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Sample records for strongly correlated model

  1. Strongly Correlated Metal Built from Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xue-Yang; Jian, Chao-Ming; Balents, Leon

    2017-11-01

    Prominent systems like the high-Tc cuprates and heavy fermions display intriguing features going beyond the quasiparticle description. The Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model describes a (0 +1 )D quantum cluster with random all-to-all four-fermion interactions among N fermion modes which becomes exactly solvable as N →∞ , exhibiting a zero-dimensional non-Fermi-liquid with emergent conformal symmetry and complete absence of quasiparticles. Here we study a lattice of complex-fermion SYK dots with random intersite quadratic hopping. Combining the imaginary time path integral with real time path integral formulation, we obtain a heavy Fermi liquid to incoherent metal crossover in full detail, including thermodynamics, low temperature Landau quasiparticle interactions, and both electrical and thermal conductivity at all scales. We find linear in temperature resistivity in the incoherent regime, and a Lorentz ratio L ≡(κ ρ /T ) varies between two universal values as a function of temperature. Our work exemplifies an analytically controlled study of a strongly correlated metal.

  2. Effect of particle statistics in strongly correlated two-dimensional Hubbard models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ehsan; Rigol, Marcos

    2012-08-01

    We study the onset of particle statistics effects as the temperature is lowered in strongly correlated two-dimensional Hubbard models. We utilize numerical linked-cluster expansions and focus on the properties of interacting lattice fermions and two-component hard-core bosons. In the weak-coupling regime, where the ground state of the bosonic system is a superfluid, the thermodynamic properties of the two systems at half filling exhibit very large differences even at high temperatures. In the strong-coupling regime, where the low-temperature behavior is governed by a Mott insulator for either particle statistics, the agreement between the thermodynamic properties of both systems extends to regions where the antiferromagnetic (iso)spin correlations are exponentially large. We analyze how particle statistics affects adiabatic cooling in those systems.

  3. Strong correlations in model of the scale-invariance (2+1) dimensional nonlinear Schroedinger equation

    CERN Document Server

    Protogenov, A P

    2001-01-01

    The brief review of events, conditioned by the nonlinear modes strong correlations in the planar systems is presented. The analysis is limited by the Schroedinger nonlinear equation model. The fields stationary distributions are determined. The dependence of the particles number on the parameter characterizing the degree of looking, of the universal oscillation lines, is obtained. It is shown that by small values of this parameter there exists on the two-dimensional lattice the universal gravitation, which may be the dynamic cause of transition to the coherent state. The connection of the chiral nonlinear boundary modes with the violations of the Galilean-invariance of the considered system is discussed

  4. Density functional theory and dynamical mean-field theory. A way to model strongly correlated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backes, Steffen

    2017-04-15

    -local fluctuations. It has been successfully used to study the whole range of weakly to strongly correlated lattice models, including the metal-insulator transition, since even in the relevant dimensions of d = 2 and d = 3 spatial fluctuations are often small. The extension of DMFT towards realistic system by the use of DFT has been termed LDA+DMFT and has since then allowed for a significant improvement of the understanding of strongly correlated materials. We dedicate this thesis to the LDA+DMFT method and the study of the recently discovered ironpnictide superconductors, which are known to show effects of strong electronic correlations. Thus, in many cases these materials cannot be adequately described by a pure DFT approach alone and provide and ideal case for an investigation of their electronic properties within LDA+DMFT. We will first review the DFT method and point out what kind of approximations have to be made in practical calculations and what deficits they entail. Then we will give an introduction into the Green's function formalism in the real and imaginary time representation and discuss the resulting consequences like analytic continuation to pave the way for the derivation of the DMFT equations. After that, we will discuss the combination of DFT and DMFT into the LDA+DMFT method and how to set up the effective lattice models for practical calculations. Then we will apply the LDA+DMFT method to the hole-doped iron-pnictide superconductor KFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, which we find to be a rather strongly correlated material that can only be reasonably described when electronic correlations are treated on a proper level beyond the the standard DFT approach. Our results show that the LDA+DMFT method is able to significantly improve the agreement of the theoretical calculation with experimental observations. Then we expand our study towards the isovalent series of KFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, RbFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and CsFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, which we propose to show even stronger

  5. Criticality and superconductivity in the two-dimensional Hubbard model of strongly correlated electronic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ehsan

    Many properties of the two-dimensional Hubbard model have been explored for the model parameters appropriate for strongly correlated electronic systems, especially cuprate superconductors. Most of the calculations are done using a well-established dynamical cluster quantum Monte Carlo method. Using this method, we investigate the effect of long-range hoppings on superconductivity with and without the presence of phonons on small clusters. The superconducting transition temperature, Tc, is found to generally decrease with a negative next nearest neighbor hopping, t'. In the presence of the Holstein phonons, a finite t' enhances Tc in the under-doped region for the hole-doped system, consistent with band structure calculations and experiment. The validity of the spin-susceptibility-mediated pairing in this model is studied and found to yield symmetries other than d-wave when a finite t' is considered. A new numerical algorithm for solving the embedded cluster problems is introduced, and used to calculate the thermodynamic properties of the model on larger clusters, especially those associated with the quantum critical behavior at finite doping. Our results suggest that the quantum critical point (QCP) which separates the Fermi liquid and pseudogap regions, is the second order terminus of the line of first order phase separation transition in the limit when a positive t' goes to zero. For small t', the superconducting dome is centered at the QCP, suggesting that charge fluctuations might have a role in the pairing mechanism in this model.

  6. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed

  7. Thermomagnetic correlation lengths of strongly interacting matter in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Hernández, L. A.; Loewe, M.; Raya, Alfredo; Rojas, J. C.; Zamora, R.

    2017-08-01

    We study the correlation length between test quarks with the same electric and color charges in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, considering thermal and magnetic effects. We extract the correlation length from the quark correlation function. The latter is constructed from the probability amplitude to bring a given quark into the plasma once a previous one with the same quantum numbers is placed at a given distance apart. For temperatures below the transition temperature, the correlation length starts growing as the field strength increases to then decrease for large magnetic fields. For temperatures above the pseudocritical temperature, the correlation length continues increasing as the field strength increases. We found that such behavior can be understood as a competition between the tightening induced by the classical magnetic force versus the random thermal motion. For large enough temperatures, the increase of the occupation number contributes to the screening of the interaction between the test particles. The growth of the correlation distance with the magnetic field can be understood as due to the closer proximity between one of the test quarks and the ones popped up from the vacuum, which in turn appear due to the increase of the occupation number with the temperature.

  8. Strongly correlated systems experimental techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    The continuous evolution and development of experimental techniques is at the basis of any fundamental achievement in modern physics. Strongly correlated systems (SCS), more than any other, need to be investigated through the greatest variety of experimental techniques in order to unveil and crosscheck the numerous and puzzling anomalous behaviors characterizing them. The study of SCS fostered the improvement of many old experimental techniques, but also the advent of many new ones just invented in order to analyze the complex behaviors of these systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and materials science, belong to this class of systems. The volume presents a representative collection of the modern experimental techniques specifically tailored for the analysis of strongly correlated systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognize...

  9. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which

  10. Effective electron-phonon coupling in the Hubbard-Holstein model in presence of strong correlations and density fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Citro, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno and CNISM, Unita di ricerca di Salerno, Via S. Allende, 84081 Baronissi (Italy)], E-mail: citro@sa.infn.it; Cojocaru, S.; Marinaro, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno and CNISM, Unita di ricerca di Salerno, Via S. Allende, 84081 Baronissi (Italy)

    2007-09-01

    We study the Hubbard-Holstein model in the strong coupling regime and discuss the role of electron-electron correlations, doping and phonon frequency (isotope substitution) on the effective electron-phonon coupling. A comparison with recent dynamical mean field (DMF) studies and connection with recent experimental findings in cuprate superconductors is also discussed.

  11. Competing ground states of strongly correlated bosons in the Harper-Hofstadter-Mott model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natu, Stefan S.; Mueller, Erich J.; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-06-01

    Using an efficient cluster approach, we study the physics of two-dimensional lattice bosons in a strong magnetic field in the regime where the tunneling is much weaker than the on-site interaction strength. We study both the dilute, hard-core bosons at filling factors much smaller than unity occupation per site and the physics in the vicinity of the superfluid-Mott lobes as the density is tuned away from unity. For hard-core bosons, we carry out extensive numerics for a fixed flux per plaquette ϕ =1 /5 and ϕ =1 /3 . At large flux, the lowest-energy state is a strongly correlated superfluid, analogous to He-4, in which the order parameter is dramatically suppressed, but nonzero. At filling factors ν =1 /2 ,1 , we find competing incompressible states which are metastable. These appear to be commensurate density wave states. For small flux, the situation is reversed and the ground state at ν =1 /2 is an incompressible density wave solid. Here, we find a metastable lattice supersolid phase, where superfluidity and density wave order coexist. We then perform careful numerical studies of the physics near the vicinity of the Mott lobes for ϕ =1 /2 and ϕ =1 /4 . At ϕ =1 /2 , the superfluid ground state has commensurate density wave order. At ϕ =1 /4 , incompressible phases appear outside the Mott lobes at densities n =1.125 and n =1.25 , corresponding to filling fractions ν =1 /2 and 1, respectively. These phases, which are absent in single-site mean-field theory, are metastable and have slightly higher energy than the superfluid, but the energy difference between them shrinks rapidly with increasing cluster size, suggestive of an incompressible ground state. We thus explore the interplay between Mott physics, magnetic Landau levels, and superfluidity, finding a rich phase diagram of competing compressible and incompressible states.

  12. Self-trapping phase diagram for the strongly correlated extended Holstein-Hubbard model in two-dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, I. V.; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2014-07-01

    The two-dimensional extended Holstein-Hubbard model is investigated in the strong correlation regime to study the nature of self-trapping transition and the polaron phase diagram in the absence of superconductivity. Using a series of canonical transformations followed by zero-phonon averaging the extended Holstein-Hubbard model is converted into an effective extended Hubbard model which is subsequently transformed into an effective t- J model in the strong correlation limit. This effective t- J model is finally solved using the mean-field Hartree-Fock approximation to show that the self-trapping transition is continuous in the anti-adiabatic limit while it is discontinuous in the adiabatic limit. The phase diagrams for the localization-delocalization transition, namely the phase line and the phase surface separating the small polaron and large polaron states are also shown.

  13. Strongly-correlated electrons on the 1/5-depleted square lattice Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ehsan; Singh, Rajiv. R. P.; Pickett, Warren E.; Scalettar, Richard T.

    2015-03-01

    We study the single-orbital Hubbard model on the 1/5-depleted square lattice geometry, which arises in the spin-gap magnetic insulator CaV4O9 and ordered-vacancy iron selenides, presenting new issues regarding the origin of both magnetic ordering and superconductivity in these materials. We find a rich phase diagram that includes a plaquette singlet phase, a dimer singlet phase, a Neel and a block-spin antiferromagnetic phase, and stripe phases. Quantum Monte Carlo simulations show that, interestingly, the dominant pairing correlations at half filling change character from d-wave in the plaquette phase to extended s-wave upon transition to the Neel phase. These results have intriguing connections to properties of iron-based superconductors.

  14. Spin-charge transformation of lattice fermion models: duality approach for diagrammatic simulation of strongly correlated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlström, Johan

    2017-09-01

    I derive a dual description of lattice fermions, specifically focusing on the t-J and Hubbard models, that allow diagrammatic techniques to be employed efficiently in the strongly correlated regime, as well as for systems with a restricted Hilbert space. These constructions are based on spin-charge transformation, where the lattice fermions of the original model are mapped onto spins and spin-less fermions. This mapping can then be combined with Popov-Fedotov fermionisation, where the spins are mapped onto lattice fermions with imaginary chemical potential. The resulting models do not contain any large expansion parameters, even for strongly correlated systems. Also, they exhibit dramatically smaller corrections to the density matrix from nonlinear terms in the Hamiltonian. The combination of these two properties means that they can be addressed with diagrammatic methods, including simulation techniques based on stochastic sampling of diagrammatic expansions.

  15. Conserving approximations for strongly correlated electron systems - Bethe-Salpeter equation and dynamics for the two-dimensional Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickers, N. E.; Scalapino, D. J.; White, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    A semianalytical approach is described for strongly correlated electronic systems which satisfies microscopic conservation laws, treats strong frequency and momentum dependences, and provides information on both static and dynamic properties. This approach may be used to treat large systems and temperatures lower than those currently accessible to finite-temperature quantum Monte Carlo techniques. Examples of such systems include heavy-electron compounds, organic Bechegaard salts, bis-(ethylenedithiolo)-TTF superconductors, and the oxide superconductors. The technique is based on the derivation and self-consistent solution of infinite-order conserving approximations. The technique is used to derive a low-temperature phase diagram and dynamic correlation functions for the two-dimensional Hubbard lattice model.

  16. Aspects of the Strongly Correlated Hubbard Model in Relation to High-Critical Temperature Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristopulos, Dionissios T.

    This thesis examines some questions arising in the context of the Hubbard model, which has been proposed by Anderson as the appropriate model for high - T_{c} superconductivity. The most recent theoretical advances and some of the important experimental results are briefly reviewed. It is argued that the large U, single-band Hubbard model can be approximated by the t-J model after a renormalization of the Hilbert space. A class of variational Gutzwiller projected wavefunctions is derived for this model and it is argued that a member of this class, the flux-phase wavefunction, is potentially useful in understanding the ground state of the superconducting oxides. The energy of this state is calculated for a half -filled band and compared to other existing variational estimates. The question of Quantum Macroscopic Coherence of the flux state is examined. A calculation of the off -diagonal two-particle density matrix with the Gutzwiller renormalized approximation shows the absence of ODLRO in the flux state for the {1over3} -filled band. The characterization of the flux state as a spin liquid with a chiral order parameter associated with the T-symmetry breaking is discussed. The value of the COP is calculated for the triangular lattice at half -filling and its uniformity is established. Finally, some questions relating to the magnetic phase diagram of the infinitely repulsive Hubbard model are addressed in the context of the Shastry, Krishnamurthy and Anderson variational wavefunction. In particular the leading FM instability diagram is derived for the one-dimensional Hubbard model with infinite on site repulsion and second nearest neighbour hopping, and the variational results for a square 4 x 4 lattice are compared with known exact diagonalization results.

  17. Breaking of SU(4) symmetry and interplay between strongly-correlated phases in the Hubbard model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Golubeva, A.; Sotnikov, A.; Cichy, A.; Kuneš, Jan; Hofstetter, W.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 12 (2017), s. 1-7, č. článku 125108. ISSN 2469-9950 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 646807 - EXMAG Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Hubbard model * SU(4) Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  18. Building a Unified Computational Model for the Resonant X-Ray Scattering of Strongly Correlated Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansil, Arun [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Basic-Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (BES/DOE) has made large investments in x-ray sources in the U.S. (NSLS-II, LCLS, NGLS, ALS, APS) as powerful enabling tools for opening up unprecedented new opportunities for exploring properties of matter at various length and time scales. The coming online of the pulsed photon source literally allows us to see and follow the dynamics of processes in materials at their natural timescales. There is an urgent need therefore to develop theoretical methodologies and computational models for understanding how x-rays interact with matter and the related spectroscopies of materials. The present project addressed aspects of this grand challenge of X-ray science. In particular, our Collaborative Research Team (CRT) focused on understanding and modeling of elastic and inelastic resonant X-ray scattering processes. We worked to unify the three different computational approaches currently used for modeling X-ray scattering—density functional theory, dynamical mean-field theory, and small-cluster exact diagonalization—to achieve a more realistic material-specific picture of the interaction between X-rays and complex matter. To achieve a convergence in the interpretation and to maximize complementary aspects of different theoretical methods, we concentrated on the cuprates, where most experiments have been performed. Our team included both US and international researchers, and it fostered new collaborations between researchers currently working with different approaches. In addition, we developed close relationships with experimental groups working in the area at various synchrotron facilities in the US. Our CRT thus helped toward enabling the US to assume a leadership role in the theoretical development of the field, and to create a global network and community of scholars dedicated to X-ray scattering research.

  19. Quantum Transport in Strongly Correlated Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Dan

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade there has been a trend towards studying ever smaller devices. Improved experimental techniques have made new experiments possible, one class of which is electron transport through molecules and artificially manufactured structures like quantum dots. In this type of systems...... screening plays a much less significant role than in bulk systems due to the reduced size of the objects, therefore making it necessary to consider the importance of correlations between electrons. The work presented in this thesis deals with quantum transport through strongly correlated systems using...... onto the contact links leads to a strong enhancement of the off-resonance transport, and further that this behavior is non-monotonic. By considering both a single level model and short interacting chains we demonstrate that the off-resonance transport enhancement is stronger than the corresponding...

  20. Machine Learning Phases of Strongly Correlated Fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Kelvin; Carrasquilla, Juan; Melko, Roger G.; Khatami, Ehsan

    2017-07-01

    Machine learning offers an unprecedented perspective for the problem of classifying phases in condensed matter physics. We employ neural-network machine learning techniques to distinguish finite-temperature phases of the strongly correlated fermions on cubic lattices. We show that a three-dimensional convolutional network trained on auxiliary field configurations produced by quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the Hubbard model can correctly predict the magnetic phase diagram of the model at the average density of one (half filling). We then use the network, trained at half filling, to explore the trend in the transition temperature as the system is doped away from half filling. This transfer learning approach predicts that the instability to the magnetic phase extends to at least 5% doping in this region. Our results pave the way for other machine learning applications in correlated quantum many-body systems.

  1. Machine Learning Phases of Strongly Correlated Fermions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin Ch’ng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Machine learning offers an unprecedented perspective for the problem of classifying phases in condensed matter physics. We employ neural-network machine learning techniques to distinguish finite-temperature phases of the strongly correlated fermions on cubic lattices. We show that a three-dimensional convolutional network trained on auxiliary field configurations produced by quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the Hubbard model can correctly predict the magnetic phase diagram of the model at the average density of one (half filling. We then use the network, trained at half filling, to explore the trend in the transition temperature as the system is doped away from half filling. This transfer learning approach predicts that the instability to the magnetic phase extends to at least 5% doping in this region. Our results pave the way for other machine learning applications in correlated quantum many-body systems.

  2. Theoretical studies of strongly correlated fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, D. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    Strongly correlated fermions are investigated. An understanding of strongly correlated fermions underpins a diverse range of phenomena such as metal-insulator transitions, high-temperature superconductivity, magnetic impurity problems and the properties of heavy-fermion systems, in all of which local moments play an important role. (author).

  3. Thermoelectric properties of a strongly correlated layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titvinidze, Irakli; Dorda, Antonius; von der Linden, Wolfgang; Arrigoni, Enrico

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we investigate the effect of strong electronic interactions on the thermoelectric properties of a simple generic system, consisting of a single correlated layer sandwiched between two metallic leads. Results will be given for the linear response regime as well as beyond, for which a full nonequilibrium many-body calculation is performed, based on nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). As impurity solver we use the auxiliary master equation approach, which addresses the impurity problem within a finite auxiliary system consisting of a correlated impurity, a small number of uncorrelated bath sites, and Markovian environments. For the linear response regime, results will be presented for the Seebeck coefficient, the electrical conductance, and the electronic contribution to the thermal conductance. Beyond linear response, i.e., for finite differences in the temperatures and/or the bias voltages in the leads, we study the dependence of the current on various model parameters, such as gate voltage and Hubbard interaction of the central layer. We will give a detailed parameter study as far as the thermoelectric efficiency is concerned. We find that strong correlations can indeed increase the thermopower of the device. In addition, some general theoretical requirements for an efficient thermoelectric device will be given.

  4. Strongly correlated quantum spin liquid in herbertsmithite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaginyan, V. R., E-mail: vrshag@thd.pnpi.spb.ru [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Popov, K. G. [Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Komi Science Center (Russian Federation); Khodel, V. A. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    Strongly correlated Fermi systems are among the most intriguing and fundamental systems in physics. We show that the herbertsmithite ZnCu{sub 3}(OH){sub 6}Cl{sub 2} can be regarded as a new type of strongly correlated electrical insulator that possesses properties of heavy-fermion metals with one exception: it resists the flow of electric charge. We demonstrate that herbertsmithite's low-temperature properties are defined by a strongly correlated quantum spin liquid made with hypothetic particles such as fermionic spinons that carry spin 1/2 and no charge. Our calculations of its thermodynamic and relaxation properties are in good agreement with recent experimental facts and allow us to reveal their scaling behavior, which strongly resembles that observed in heavy-fermion metals. Analysis of the dynamic magnetic susceptibility of strongly correlated Fermi systems suggests that there exist at least two types of its scaling.

  5. Exciton condensation in strongly correlated electron bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademaker, Louk; van den Brink, J.; Zaanen, Jan; Hilgenkamp, H.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the possibility of exciton condensation in Mott insulating bilayers. In these strongly correlated systems, an exciton is the bound state of a double occupied and empty site. In the strong coupling limit, the exciton acts as a hard-core boson. Its physics is captured by the exciton t -J

  6. The self-trapping transition in the non-half-filled strongly correlated extended Holstein-Hubbard model in two-dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, I. V.; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2014-04-01

    The two-dimensional extended Holstein-Hubbard model (EHH) has been considered at strong correlation regime in the non-half-filled band case to understand the self-trapping transition of electrons in strongly correlated electron system. We have used the method of optimized canonical transformations to transform an EHH model into an effective extended Hubbard (EEH) model. In the strong on-site correlation limit an EH model can be transformed into a t-J model which is finally solved using Hartree-Fock approximation (HFA). We found that, for non-half-filled band case, the transition is abrupt in the adiabatic region whereas it is continuous in the anti-adiabatic region.

  7. The self-trapping transition in the non-half-filled strongly correlated extended Holstein-Hubbard model in two-dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankar, I. V., E-mail: ivshankar27@gmail.com; Chatterjee, Ashok, E-mail: ivshankar27@gmail.com [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Gachibowli-500046, Hyderabad (India)

    2014-04-24

    The two-dimensional extended Holstein-Hubbard model (EHH) has been considered at strong correlation regime in the non-half-filled band case to understand the self-trapping transition of electrons in strongly correlated electron system. We have used the method of optimized canonical transformations to transform an EHH model into an effective extended Hubbard (EEH) model. In the strong on-site correlation limit an EH model can be transformed into a t-J model which is finally solved using Hartree-Fock approximation (HFA). We found that, for non-half-filled band case, the transition is abrupt in the adiabatic region whereas it is continuous in the anti-adiabatic region.

  8. Wavelet Correlation Coefficient of 'strongly correlated' financial time series

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok Razdan

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we use wavelet concepts to show that correlation coefficient between two financial data's is not constant but varies with scale from high correlation value to strongly anti-correlation value This studies is important because correlation coefficient is used to quantify degree of independence between two variables. In econophysics correlation coefficient forms important input to evolve hierarchial tree and minimum spanning tree of financial data.

  9. Boson-Jet Correlations in a Hybrid Strong/Weak Coupling Model for Jet Quenching in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Milhano, Jose Guilherme; Pablos, Daniel; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    We confront a hybrid strong/weak coupling model for jet quenching to data from LHC heavy ion collisions. The model combines the perturbative QCD physics at high momentum transfer and the strongly coupled dynamics of non- abelian gauge theories plasmas in a phenomenological way. By performing a full Monte Carlo simulation, and after fitting one single parameter, we successfully describe several jet observables at the LHC, including dijet and photon jet measurements. Within current theoretical and experimental uncertainties, we find that such observables show little sensitivity to the specifics of the microscopic energy loss mechanism. We also present a new observable, the ratio of the fragmentation function of inclusive jets to that of the associated jets in dijet pairs, which can discriminate among different medium models. Finally, we discuss the importance of plasma response to jet passage in jet shapes.

  10. Computational Studies of Strongly Correlated Quantum Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hao

    The study of strongly correlated quantum many-body systems is an outstanding challenge. Highly accurate results are needed for the understanding of practical and fundamental problems in condensed-matter physics, high energy physics, material science, quantum chemistry and so on. Our familiar mean-field or perturbative methods tend to be ineffective. Numerical simulations provide a promising approach for studying such systems. The fundamental difficulty of numerical simulation is that the dimension of the Hilbert space needed to describe interacting systems increases exponentially with the system size. Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods are one of the best approaches to tackle the problem of enormous Hilbert space. They have been highly successful for boson systems and unfrustrated spin models. For systems with fermions, the exchange symmetry in general causes the infamous sign problem, making the statistical noise in the computed results grow exponentially with the system size. This hinders our understanding of interesting physics such as high-temperature superconductivity, metal-insulator phase transition. In this thesis, we present a variety of new developments in the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) methods, including the incorporation of symmetry in both the trial wave function and the projector, developing the constraint release method, using the force-bias to drastically improve the efficiency in Metropolis framework, identifying and solving the infinite variance problem, and sampling Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov wave function. With these developments, some of the most challenging many-electron problems are now under control. We obtain an exact numerical solution of two-dimensional strongly interacting Fermi atomic gas, determine the ground state properties of the 2D Fermi gas with Rashba spin-orbit coupling, provide benchmark results for the ground state of the two-dimensional Hubbard model, and establish that the Hubbard model has a stripe order in the

  11. Electronic Structure of Strongly Correlated Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Anisimov, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Electronic structure and physical properties of strongly correlated materials containing elements with partially filled 3d, 4d, 4f and 5f electronic shells is analyzed by Dynamical Mean-Field Theory (DMFT). DMFT is the most universal and effective tool used for the theoretical investigation of electronic states with strong correlation effects. In the present book the basics of the method are given and its application to various material classes is shown. The book is aimed at a broad readership: theoretical physicists and experimentalists studying strongly correlated systems. It also serves as a handbook for students and all those who want to be acquainted with fast developing filed of condensed matter physics.

  12. Bentonite swelling pressure in strong NaCl solutions. Correlation between model calculations and experimentally determined data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, O. [Clay Technology, Lund (Sweden)

    1997-12-01

    A number of quite different quantitative models concerning swelling pressure in bentonite clay have been proposed by different researchers over the years. The present report examines some of the models which possibly may be used also for saline conditions. A discrepancy between calculated and measured values was noticed for all models at brine conditions. In general the models predicted a too low swelling pressure compared to what was experimentally found. An osmotic component in the clay/water system is proposed in order to improve the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. Calculations of this osmotic component is proposed to be made by use of the clay cation exchange capacity and Donnan equilibrium. Calculations made by this approach showed considerably better correlation to literature laboratory data, compared to calculations made by the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. A few verifying laboratory tests were made and are briefly described in the report. The improved thermodynamic model predicts substantial bentonite swelling pressures also in saturated sodium chloride solution if the density of the system is high enough. In practice, the model predicts a substantial swelling pressure for the buffer in a KBS-3 repository if the system is exposed to brines, but the positive effects of mixing bentonite into a backfill material will be lost, since the available compaction technique does not give a sufficiently high bentonite density 37 refs, 15 figs

  13. On the modeling of strong motion parameters and correlation with historical macroseismic data: an application to the 1915 Avezzano earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Longhi

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the results of a ground motion modeling study of the 1915 Avezzano earthquake. The goal was to test assuinptions regarding the rupture process of this earthquake by attempting to model the damage to historical monuments and populated habitats during the earthquake. The methodology used combines stochastic and deterministic modeling techniques to synthesize strong ground motion, starting from a simple characterization of the earthquake source on an extended fault plane. The stochastic component of the methodology is used to simulate high-frequency ground motion oscillations. The envelopes of these synthetic waveforms, however, are simulated in a deterministic way based on the isochron formulation for the calculation of radiated seismic energy. Synthetic acceleration time histories representative of ground motion experienced at the towns of Avezzano, Celano, Ortucchio, and Sora are then analyzed in terms of the damage to historical buildings at these sites. The article also discusses how the same methodology can be adapted to efficiently evaluate various strong motion parameters such as duration and amplitude of ground shaking, at several hundreds of surface sites and as a function of rupture process. The usefulness of such a technique is illustrated through the inodeling of intensity data from the Avezzano earthquake. One of the most interesting results is that it is possible to distinguish between different rupture scenarios for the 1915 earthquake based on the goodness of fit of theoretical intensities to observed values.

  14. Bentonite swelling pressure in strong NaCl solutions. Correlation of model calculations to experimentally determined data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, O. [Clay Technology, Lund (Sweden)

    1998-01-01

    A number of quite different quantitative models concerning swelling pressure in bentonite clay have been proposed. This report discusses a number of models which possibly can be used also for saline conditions. A discrepancy between calculated and measured values was noticed for all models at brine conditions. In general the models predicted a too low swelling pressure compared to what was experimentally found. An osmotic component in the clay/water system is proposed in order to improve the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. Calculations of this osmotic component is proposed to be made by use of the clay cation exchange capacity and Donnan equilibrium. Calculations made by this approach showed considerably better correlation to literature laboratory data, compared to calculations made by the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. A few verifying laboratory tests were made and are briefly described in the report. The improved model predicts a substantial bentonite swelling pressure also in a saturated sodium chloride solution if the density of the system is sufficiently high. This means in practice that the buffer in a KBS-3 repository will give rise to an acceptable swelling pressure, but that the positive effects of mixing bentonite into a backfill material will be lost if the system is exposed to brines. (orig.). 14 refs.

  15. TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF THE STRONGLY CORRELATED SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Domanski

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The transport properties of various systems are studied here in the context of three different models. These are: - the disordered Hubbard model applicable to correlated binary alloys with a general disorder, - the Anderson model used in describing the Kondo physics of a quantum dot connected to the external superconducting leads, and - the Ranninger-Robaszkiewicz model applied to the study of optical properties of the system with preformed electron pairs above the temperature of transition to the superconducting state. We calculate the density of states, specific heat, the Wilson ratio and conductivity of the correlated binary alloy with off-diagonal disorder. We investigate the conditions under which the Kondo peak appears in the density of states and in the conductance of a dot coupled to the external superconducting leads. We analyze the effect of the pseudogap on the optical spectra in the high temperature superconductors described by the boson-fermion model.

  16. Noise Spectroscopy in Strongly Correlated Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaqqa, Ali M.

    Strongly correlated materials are an interesting class of materials, thanks to the novel electronic and magnetic phenomena they exhibit as a result of the interplay of various degrees of freedom. This gives rise to an array of potential applications, from Mott-FET to magnetic storage. Many experimental probes have been used to study phase transitions in strongly correlated oxides. Among these, resistance noise spectroscopy, together with conventional transport measurements, provides a unique viewpoint to understand the microscopic dynamics near the phase transitions in these oxides. In this thesis, utilizing noise spectroscopy and transport measurements, four different strongly correlated materials were studied: (1) neodymium nickel oxide (NdNiO 3) ultrathin films, (2) vanadium dioxide (VO2) microribbons, (3) copper vanadium bronze (CuxV2O 5) microribbons and (4) niobium triselenide (NbSe3) microribbons. Ultra thin films of rare-earth nickelates exhibit several temperature-driven phase transitions. In this thesis, we studied the metal-insulator and Neel transitions in a series of NdNiO3 films with different lattice mismatches. Upon colling down, the metal-insulator phase transition is accompanied by a structural (orthorohombic to monoclinic) and magnetic (paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic) transitions as well, making the problem more interesting and complex at the same time. The noise is of the 1/f type and is Gaussian in the high temperature phase, however deviations are seen in the low temperature phases. Below the metal-insulator transition, noise magnitude increases by orders of magnitude: a sign of inhomogeneous electrical conduction as result of phase separation. This is further assured by the non-Gaussian noise signature. At very low temperatures (T noise behavior switches between Gaussian and non-Gaussian over several hours, possibly arising from dynamically competing ground states. VO2 is one of the most widely studied strongly correlated oxides and is

  17. Controlling strongly correlated dust clusters with lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Thomsen, Hauke; Bonitz, Michael; Schablinski, Jan; Block, Dietmar; Schella, André; Melzer, André

    2014-01-01

    The most attractive feature of dusty plasmas is the possibility to create strong correlations at room temperatures. At the same time, these plasmas allow for a precise diagnostics with single-particle resolution. From such measurements, the structural properties of finite two-dimensional (2D) clusters and three-dimensional (3D) spherical crystals in nearly harmonic traps-Yukawa balls-have been explored in great detail. Their structural properties-the shell compositions and the order within the shells-have been investigated and good agreement to theoretical predictions was found. Open questions on the agenda are the excitation behavior, the structural changes, and phase transitions that occur at elevated temperature. In order to increase the dust temperature in the experiment various techniques have been used. Among them, laser heating appears to have unique capabilities because it affects only the dust particles, leaving the lighter plasma components unchanged. Here we report on recent experimental results wh...

  18. Transport phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Kontani, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    In conventional metals, various transport coefficients are scaled according to the quasiparticle relaxation time, \\tau, which implies that the relaxation time approximation (RTA) holds well. However, such a simple scaling does not hold in many strongly correlated electron systems, reflecting their unique electronic states. The most famous example would be cuprate high-Tc superconductors (HTSCs), where almost all the transport coefficients exhibit a significant deviation from the RTA results. To better understand the origin of this discrepancy, we develop a method for calculating various transport coefficients beyond the RTA by employing field theoretical techniques. Near the magnetic quantum critical point, the current vertex correction (CVC), which describes the electron-electron scattering beyond the relaxation time approximation, gives rise to various anomalous transport phenomena. We explain anomalous transport phenomena in cuprate HTSCs and other metals near their magnetic or orbital quantum critical poi...

  19. Metallic ferromagnetism in the systems with strongly correlated electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.Didukh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper considers the ground state ferromagnetic ordering in narrow-band models with strongly correlated electrons, in particular, in a single-band generalized Hubbard model with correlated hopping and interatomic exchange interaction, as well as in a double orbitally degenerate Hubbard model with correlated hopping. The effective Hamiltonians of these models are treated by means of variants of generalized Hartree-Fock approximations, in which the quasi-particle energy spectra are obtained. The ground state energy, critical electron concentration and magnetization are calculated for some types of density of states. The mechanisms of ferromagnetic ordering stability in the narrow-band materials are discussed.

  20. Superconductivity, Antiferromagnetism, and Kinetic Correlation in Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yanagisawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the ground state of two-dimensional Hubbard model on the basis of the variational Monte Carlo method. We use wave functions that include kinetic correlation and doublon-holon correlation beyond the Gutzwiller ansatz. It is still not clear whether the Hubbard model accounts for high-temperature superconductivity. The antiferromagnetic correlation plays a key role in the study of pairing mechanism because the superconductive phase exists usually close to the antiferromagnetic phase. We investigate the stability of the antiferromagnetic state when holes are doped as a function of the Coulomb repulsion U. We show that the antiferromagnetic correlation is suppressed as U is increased exceeding the bandwidth. High-temperature superconductivity is possible in this region with enhanced antiferromagnetic spin fluctuation and pairing interaction.

  1. Lattice and electronic properties of strongly correlated PuCoGa5 based on first principles calculations and thermodynamic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filanovich, A. N.; Povzner, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    In the framework of density functional theory method, the ground state energy of the PuCoGa5 compound is calculated for different values of the unit cell volume. The obtained data were incorporated into the thermodynamic model, which was utilized to calculate the temperature dependencies of thermal and elastic properties of PuCoGa5. The parameters of the developed model were estimated based on data of ab initio phonon spectrum. The Gruneisen parameters, which characterize degree of anharmonicity of the acoustic and optical phonons, are obtained. Using experimental data, non-lattice contributions to the coefficient of thermal expansion and heat capacity are determined. The nature of observed anomalies of the properties of PuCoGa5 is discussed, in particular, the possibility of a valence phase transition.

  2. Cost-effective description of strong correlation: efficient implementations of the perfect quadruples and perfect hextuples models

    CERN Document Server

    Lehtola, Susi; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Novel implementations based on dense tensor storage are presented for the singlet-reference perfect quadruples (PQ) [Parkhill, Lawler, and Head-Gordon, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 084101 (2009)] and perfect hextuples (PH) [Parkhill and Head-Gordon, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 024103 (2010)] models. The methods are obtained as block decompositions of conventional coupled-cluster theory that are exact for four electrons in four orbitals (PQ) and six electrons in six orbitals (PH), but that can also be applied to much larger systems. PQ and PH have storage requirements that scale as the square, and as the cube of the number of active electrons, respectively, and exhibit quartic scaling of the computational effort for large systems. Applications of the new implementations are presented for full-valence calculations on linear polyenes (C n H n+2 ), which highlight the excellent computational scaling of the present implementations that can routinely handle active spaces of hundreds of electrons. The accuracy of the models is studi...

  3. Strongly correlated electron behavior in carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hone James

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available One dimensional systems offer a fascinating platform for investigating and understanding the collective and many-body behavior of interacting electron systems. We report low-temperature transport experiments on carbon nanotubes, which are archetypal one-dimensional systems that have either semiconducting or metallic band structure depending on their radius and chirality. Semiconducting nanotubes at low densities exhibit Wigner crystal behavior, while nominally metallic nanotubes are observed to have an energy gap at half filling, consistent with theories of a Mott insulating state in nanotubes. Our results demonstrate nanotubes’ promise for studying a variety of tunable correlated electron phenomena in one dimension.

  4. Theoretical Studies of Strong Correlations in Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistark, Peter

    This thesis presents work that has been done to describe the high temperature superconducting cuprates by going beyond first principles calculations using the Hubbard model with (pi,pi) antiferromagnetic and BCS superconducting order. The unique approach here is to fit the Hubbard model to either first principles or experimental band structure and obtain electronic structure properties by self consisting the antiferromagnetic and superconducting gaps as well as self consistently computing self energy corrections. The self energy corrections are determined through the QPGW model which correctly describes the cuprates as having intermediate coupling of electrons. These methods of modeling cuprates are used to describe the experimental results of spectroscopies such as photoemission and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. The first topic presented here studies the one, three, and four band versions of the Hubbard model. It is shown that, in the three and four band model, by fitting the tight binding parameters to first principles calculations and the antiferromagnetic gap to experimental gap measurements, cuprates should be described as charge transfer insulators instead of Mott insulators which is predicted by one band models. The one, three, and four band models with parameters fit to experiment predict a negative electronic compressibility. This phenomenon is shown to be due to a dramatic decrease in the Hubbard U with increased electron doping away from half filling. Switching focus to hole doped cuprates, the addition of superconducting order reveals a property known as Fermi surface free superconductivity. Fermi surface free superconductivity drives a topological transition from open to closed Fermi surfaces in the hole doped cuprates. STM measurements of the local density of states on hole doped cuprates show a gap filling rather than a gap closing with increased doping. A model of nanoscale phase separation in conjunction with a Coulomb gap which describes stripe

  5. Pair correlation functions of strongly coupled two-temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Nathaniel R.; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2017-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we perform the first direct tests of three proposed models for the pair correlation functions of strongly coupled plasmas with species of unequal temperature. The models are all extensions of the Ornstein-Zernike/hypernetted-chain theory used to good success for equilibrium plasmas. Each theory is evaluated at several coupling strengths, temperature ratios, and mass ratios for a model plasma in which the electrons are positively charged. We show that the model proposed by Seuferling et al. [Phys. Rev. A 40, 323 (1989)] agrees well with molecular dynamics over a wide range of mass and temperature ratios, as well as over a range of coupling strength similar to that of the equilibrium hypernetted-chain (HNC) theory. The SVT model also correctly predicts the strength of interspecies correlations and exhibits physically reasonable long-wavelength limits of the static structure factors. Comparisons of the SVT model with the Yukawa one-component plasma (YOCP) model are used to show that ion-ion pair correlations are well described by the YOCP model up to Γe≈1 , beyond which it rapidly breaks down.

  6. Supercurrent multiplet correlators at weak and strong coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argurio, Riccardo [Physique Théorique et Mathématique Université Libre de Bruxelles, C.P. 231, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); International Solvay Institutes,Brussels (Belgium); Bertolini, Matteo [SISSA and INFN - Sezione di Trieste,Via Bonomea 265, I 34136 Trieste (Italy); International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP),Strada Costiera 11, I 34014 Trieste (Italy); Pietro, Lorenzo Di [SISSA and INFN - Sezione di Trieste,Via Bonomea 265, I 34136 Trieste (Italy); Weizmann Institute of Science,Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Porri, Flavio [SISSA and INFN - Sezione di Trieste,Via Bonomea 265, I 34136 Trieste (Italy); Redigolo, Diego [Physique Théorique et Mathématique Université Libre de Bruxelles, C.P. 231, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); International Solvay Institutes,Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-04-22

    Correlators of gauge invariant operators provide useful information on the dynamics, phases and spectra of a quantum field theory. In this paper, we consider four dimensional N=1 supersymmetric theories and focus our attention on the supercurrent multiplet. We give a complete characterization of two-point functions of operators belonging to such multiplet, like the energy-momentum tensor and the supercurrent, and study the relations between them. We discuss instances of weakly coupled and strongly coupled theories, in which different symmetries, like conformal invariance and supersymmetry, may be conserved and/or spontaneously or explicitly broken. For theories at strong coupling, we exploit AdS/CFT techniques. We provide a holographic description of different properties of a strongly coupled theory, including a realization of the Goldstino mode in a simple illustrative model.

  7. Observations of strong ion-ion correlations in dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.; Fletcher, L.; Pak, A.; Chapman, D. A.; Falcone, R. W.; Fortmann, C.; Galtier, E.; Gericke, D. O.; Gregori, G.; Hastings, J.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Neumayer, P.; Turnbull, D.; Vorberger, J.; White, T. G.; Wünsch, K.; Zastrau, U.; Glenzer, S. H.; Döppner, T.

    2014-05-01

    Using simultaneous spectrally, angularly, and temporally resolved x-ray scattering, we measure the pronounced ion-ion correlation peak in a strongly coupled plasma. Laser-driven shock-compressed aluminum at ~3× solid density is probed with high-energy photons at 17.9 keV created by molybdenum He-α emission in a laser-driven plasma source. The measured elastic scattering feature shows a well-pronounced correlation peak at a wave vector of k=4k=4Å-1. The magnitude of this correlation peak cannot be described by standard plasma theories employing a linear screened Coulomb potential. Advanced models, including a strong short-range repulsion due to the inner structure of the aluminum ions are however in good agreement with the scattering data. These studies have demonstrated a new highly accurate diagnostic technique to directly measure the state of compression and the ion-ion correlations. We have since applied this new method in single-shot wave-number resolved S(k) measurements to characterize the physical properties of dense plasmas.

  8. Quantum Liquid Crystal Phases in Strongly Correlated Fermionic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of the quantum liquid crystal phases in strongly correlated electronic systems. Such phases are characterized by their partially broken spatial symmetries and are observed in various strongly correlated systems as being summarized in Chapter 1. Although quantum liquid crystal phases often involve…

  9. Simplified model of bifurcation of single-particle degrees of freedom in strongly correlated Fermi systems near point of antiferromagnetic phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Zverev, M V; Clark, J W

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of analysis of the Landau-Pitaevskii one has determined that antiferromagnetic transition follows fermion condensation and rearrangement of single-particle degrees of freedom. It results in the spectrum of single-particle excitations. The derived results are used to explain structure of slit in the spectrum at T = 0 in two-dimensional high-temperature superconductors with a square lattice. They may be, as well, used to describe superfluid states of strongly correlated systems with fermion condensation

  10. LDA+DMFT Approach to Materials with Strong Electronic Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Held, K; Nekrasov, I A; Keller, G; Eyert, V; Blumer, N; McMahan, A K; Scalettar, R T; Pruschke, T; Anisimov, V I; Volhardt, D

    2001-12-02

    LDA+DMFT is a novel computational technique for ab initio investigations of real materials with strongly correlated electrons, such as transition metals and their oxides. It combines the strength of conventional band structure theory in the local density approximation (LDA) with a modern many-body approach, the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). In the last few years LDA+DMFT has proved to be a powerful tool for the realistic modeling of strongly correlated electronic systems. In this paper the basic ideas and the set-up of the LDA+DMFT(X) approach, where X is the method used to solve the DMFT equations, are discussed. Results obtained with X=QMC (quantum Monte Carlo) and X=NCA (non-crossing approximation) are presented and compared. By means of the model system La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}TiO{sub 3} we show that the method X matters qualitatively and quantitatively. Furthermore, they discuss recent results on the Mott-Hubbard metal-insulator transition in the transition metal oxide V{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the {alpha}-{gamma} transition in the 4f-electron system Ce.

  11. Correlated Fluctuations in Strongly Coupled Binary Networks Beyond Equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Dahmen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Randomly coupled Ising spins constitute the classical model of collective phenomena in disordered systems, with applications covering glassy magnetism and frustration, combinatorial optimization, protein folding, stock market dynamics, and social dynamics. The phase diagram of these systems is obtained in the thermodynamic limit by averaging over the quenched randomness of the couplings. However, many applications require the statistics of activity for a single realization of the possibly asymmetric couplings in finite-sized networks. Examples include reconstruction of couplings from the observed dynamics, representation of probability distributions for sampling-based inference, and learning in the central nervous system based on the dynamic and correlation-dependent modification of synaptic connections. The systematic cumulant expansion for kinetic binary (Ising threshold units with strong, random, and asymmetric couplings presented here goes beyond mean-field theory and is applicable outside thermodynamic equilibrium; a system of approximate nonlinear equations predicts average activities and pairwise covariances in quantitative agreement with full simulations down to hundreds of units. The linearized theory yields an expansion of the correlation and response functions in collective eigenmodes, leads to an efficient algorithm solving the inverse problem, and shows that correlations are invariant under scaling of the interaction strengths.

  12. Correlated Fluctuations in Strongly Coupled Binary Networks Beyond Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, David; Bos, Hannah; Helias, Moritz

    2016-07-01

    Randomly coupled Ising spins constitute the classical model of collective phenomena in disordered systems, with applications covering glassy magnetism and frustration, combinatorial optimization, protein folding, stock market dynamics, and social dynamics. The phase diagram of these systems is obtained in the thermodynamic limit by averaging over the quenched randomness of the couplings. However, many applications require the statistics of activity for a single realization of the possibly asymmetric couplings in finite-sized networks. Examples include reconstruction of couplings from the observed dynamics, representation of probability distributions for sampling-based inference, and learning in the central nervous system based on the dynamic and correlation-dependent modification of synaptic connections. The systematic cumulant expansion for kinetic binary (Ising) threshold units with strong, random, and asymmetric couplings presented here goes beyond mean-field theory and is applicable outside thermodynamic equilibrium; a system of approximate nonlinear equations predicts average activities and pairwise covariances in quantitative agreement with full simulations down to hundreds of units. The linearized theory yields an expansion of the correlation and response functions in collective eigenmodes, leads to an efficient algorithm solving the inverse problem, and shows that correlations are invariant under scaling of the interaction strengths.

  13. Strong pressure-energy correlations in van der Waals liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk; Bailey, Nicholas; Schrøder, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Strong correlations between equilibrium fluctuations of the configurational parts of pressure and energy are found in computer simulations of the Lennard-Jones liquid and other simple liquids, but not for hydrogen-bonding liquids such as methanol and water. The correlations that are present also ...

  14. Discovery of a Strongly-Interrelated Gene Network in Corals under Constant Darkness by Correlation Analysis after Wavelet Transform on Complex Network Model

    OpenAIRE

    Longlong Liu; Jieqiong Qu; Xilong Zhou; Xuefeng Liu; Zhaobao Zhang; Xumin Wang; Tao Liu; Guiming Liu

    2014-01-01

    Coral reefs occupy a relatively small portion of sea area, yet serve as a crucial source of biodiversity by establishing harmonious ecosystems with marine plants and animals. Previous researches mainly focused on screening several key genes induced by stress. Here we proposed a novel method--correlation analysis after wavelet transform of complex network model, to explore the effect of light on gene expression in the coral Acropora millepora based on microarray data. In this method, wavelet t...

  15. Doubly excited helium. From strong correlation to chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yuhai

    2006-03-15

    In the present dissertation, the double excitation states of helium including the autoionization decay of these states were studied experimentally and theoretically in a broad energy region, which includes the transition from strong correlation below the low single ionization thresholds (SIT) to the region of quantum chaos at energies very close to the double-ionization threshold. Two kind of experiments were performed, namely total-ion-yield measurements with the aim to observe total cross sections (TCS) and electron time-of-flight (TOF) measurements to obtain partial cross sections (PCS) as well as angular distribution parameters (ADP). Both types of measurements were performed at the third generation synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin. The TCSs were recorded up to the SIT I{sub 15}, and they were found to be in in excellent agreement with state-of-the-art complex-rotation calculations performed recently by D. Delande. These experimental and theoretical data on the TCSs were analyzed in order to study quantum chaos in doubly excited helium, and interesting signatures of quantum chaos were found. The TOF technique allowed to measure PCSs and ADPs in the energy regions from I{sub 5} to I{sub 9} and I{sub 7}, respectively. These experimental data provide a critical assessment of theoretical models that can be used to explore the dynamics of strong correlation as well as quantum chaos in helium. In the theoretical part of this dissertation, the n- and l-specific PCSs and ADPs below I{sub 4} were calculated employing the R-matrix method. The present theoretical results agree well with a recent experimental study of l-specific PCSs below I{sub 4} by J.R. Harries et al. An analysis of patterns in the PCSs and ADPs on the basis of the present experimental and theoretical l-specific data allowed to improve the present understanding of autoionization decay dynamics in this two-electron atom. (orig.)

  16. STIR: Novel Electronic States by Gating Strongly Correlated Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    techniques and learned to apply thin hexagonal Boron Nitride to single crystals of materials expected to show some of the most exciting correlated...Equivalent: Total Number: NAME Total Number: NAME Total Number: PERCENT_SUPPORTEDNAME FTE Equivalent: Total Number: ...... ...... Inventions (DD882...understood landscape of phases . The physics of strongly-correlated materials is at the heart of some of the most important current problems in condensed

  17. Theory of L -edge spectroscopy of strongly correlated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüder, Johann; Schött, Johan; Brena, Barbara; Haverkort, Maurits W.; Thunström, Patrik; Eriksson, Olle; Sanyal, Biplab; Di Marco, Igor; Kvashnin, Yaroslav O.

    2017-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy measured at the L edge of transition metals (TMs) is a powerful element-selective tool providing direct information about the correlation effects in the 3 d states. The theoretical modeling of the 2 p →3 d excitation processes remains to be challenging for contemporary ab initio electronic structure techniques, due to strong core-hole and multiplet effects influencing the spectra. In this work, we present a realization of the method combining the density-functional theory with multiplet ligand field theory, proposed in Haverkort et al. [Phys. Rev. B 85, 165113 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevB.85.165113]. In this approach, a single-impurity Anderson model (SIAM) is constructed, with almost all parameters obtained from first principles, and then solved to obtain the spectra. In our implementation, we adopt the language of the dynamical mean-field theory and utilize the local density of states and the hybridization function, projected onto TM 3 d states, in order to construct the SIAM. The developed computational scheme is applied to calculate the L -edge spectra for several TM monoxides. A very good agreement between the theory and experiment is found for all studied systems. The effect of core-hole relaxation, hybridization discretization, possible extensions of the method as well as its limitations are discussed.

  18. Higher order correlation beams in atmosphere under strong turbulence conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetisyan, H; Monken, C H

    2016-02-08

    Higher order correlation beams, that is, two-photon beams obtained from the process of spontaneous parametric down-conversion pumped by Hermite-Gauss or Laguerre-Gauss beams of any order, can be used to encode information in many modes, opening the possibility of quantum communication with large alphabets. In this paper we calculate, analytically, the fourth-order correlation function for the Hermite-Gauss and Laguerre-Gauss coherent and partially coherent correlation beams propagating through a strong turbulent medium. We show that fourth-order correlation functions for correlation beams have, under certain conditions, expressions similar to those of intensities of classical beams and are degraded by turbulence in a similar way as the classical beams. Our results can be useful in establishing limits for the use of two-photon beams in quantum communications with larger alphabets under atmospheric turbulence.

  19. Nonlinear phononics and structural control of strongly correlated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mankowsky, Roman

    2016-01-20

    Mid-infrared light pulses can be used to resonantly excite infrared-active vibrational modes for the phase control of strongly correlated materials on subpicosecond timescales. As the energy is transferred directly into atomic motions, dissipation into the electronic system is reduced, allowing for the emergence of unusual low energy collective properties. Light-induced superconductivity, insulator-metal transitions and melting of magnetic order demonstrate the potential of this method. An understanding of the mechanism, by which these transitions are driven, is however missing. The aim of this work is to uncover this process by investigating the nonlinear lattice dynamics induced by the excitation and to elucidate their contribution to the modulation of collective properties of strongly correlated materials. The first signature of nonlinear lattice dynamics was reported in the observation of coherent phonon oscillations, resonant with the excitation of an infrared-active phonon mode in a manganite. This nonlinear phononic coupling can be described within a model, which predicts not only oscillatory coherent phonons dynamics but also directional atomic displacements along the coupled modes on average, which could cause the previously observed transitions. We verified this directional response and quantified the anharmonic coupling constant by tracing the atomic motions in a time-resolved hard X-ray diffraction experiment with sub-picometer spatial and femtosecond temporal resolution. In a subsequent study, we investigated the role of nonlinear lattice dynamics in the emergence of superconductivity far above the equilibrium transition temperature, an intriguing effect found to follow lattice excitation of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x}. By combining density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the anharmonic coupling constants with time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments, we identified a structural rearrangement, which appears and decays with the same temporal

  20. Discovery of a strongly-interrelated gene network in corals under constant darkness by correlation analysis after wavelet transform on complex network model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longlong Liu

    Full Text Available Coral reefs occupy a relatively small portion of sea area, yet serve as a crucial source of biodiversity by establishing harmonious ecosystems with marine plants and animals. Previous researches mainly focused on screening several key genes induced by stress. Here we proposed a novel method--correlation analysis after wavelet transform of complex network model, to explore the effect of light on gene expression in the coral Acropora millepora based on microarray data. In this method, wavelet transform and the conception of complex network were adopted, and 50 key genes with large differences were finally captured, including both annotated genes and novel genes without accurate annotation. These results shed light on our understanding of coral's response toward light changes and the genome-wide interaction among genes under the control of biorhythm, and hence help us to better protect the coral reef ecosystems. Further studies are needed to explore how functional connections are related to structural connections, and how connectivity arises from the interactions within and between different systems. The method introduced in this study for analyzing microarray data will allow researchers to explore genome-wide interaction network with their own dataset and understand the relevant biological processes.

  1. Discovery of a strongly-interrelated gene network in corals under constant darkness by correlation analysis after wavelet transform on complex network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longlong; Qu, Jieqiong; Zhou, Xilong; Liu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Zhaobao; Wang, Xumin; Liu, Tao; Liu, Guiming

    2014-01-01

    Coral reefs occupy a relatively small portion of sea area, yet serve as a crucial source of biodiversity by establishing harmonious ecosystems with marine plants and animals. Previous researches mainly focused on screening several key genes induced by stress. Here we proposed a novel method--correlation analysis after wavelet transform of complex network model, to explore the effect of light on gene expression in the coral Acropora millepora based on microarray data. In this method, wavelet transform and the conception of complex network were adopted, and 50 key genes with large differences were finally captured, including both annotated genes and novel genes without accurate annotation. These results shed light on our understanding of coral's response toward light changes and the genome-wide interaction among genes under the control of biorhythm, and hence help us to better protect the coral reef ecosystems. Further studies are needed to explore how functional connections are related to structural connections, and how connectivity arises from the interactions within and between different systems. The method introduced in this study for analyzing microarray data will allow researchers to explore genome-wide interaction network with their own dataset and understand the relevant biological processes.

  2. Spectroscopic and structural studies of strongly correlated oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannella, Norman

    2003-07-01

    This dissertation has involved the study of the electronic and crystal structures of strongly correlated oxides by means of a unique combination of several soft x-ray spectroscopies that are currently available at third generation synchrotron facilities. As the major topic, we present temperature-dependent data obtained from single crystals of colossal magnetoresistive manganites of composition La 1-xSrxMnO3 (LSMO, x = 0.3--0.4) using core and valence level photoemission, near edge x-ray absorption, x-ray emission, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, and x-ray extended fine structure spectroscopies. A dramatic and reversible change of the electronic structure is observed on crossing the Curie temperature, including a significant increase of the local Mn spin moment by about one Bohr magneton and corresponding charge transfer/localization to the manganese atom, while the EXAFS data show signatures typical of Jahn-Teller distortions (JTDs). The charge localization onto the Mn atom concomitant with local JTDs at high temperature provides strong evidence for a direct detection of lattice polaron formation that could possibly lead also to ferromagnetic clusters in the metallic paramagnetic state. These results thus challenge the long-standing belief of some authors that the LSMO compounds are canonical double-exchange (DE) systems, described by the DE model alone and without the need to be supplemented by other more complex mechanism such as polaron formation and phase separation. Our results suggest that the presence of polarons above the Curie temperature, as well as microscopic tendencies toward phase separation, are general defining characteristics of all of the CMR materials, thus bringing unity to their theoretical description. We also present experimental and theoretical results related to multi-atom resonant photoemission (MARPE), a newly discovered spectroscopic effect in which the photoelectron intensity from a core level on one atom is influenced by a core

  3. Phase transition transistors based on strongly-correlated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masaki

    2013-03-01

    The field-effect transistor (FET) provides electrical switching functions through linear control of the number of charges at a channel surface by external voltage. Controlling electronic phases of condensed matters in a FET geometry has long been a central issue of physical science. In particular, FET based on a strongly correlated material, namely ``Mott transistor,'' has attracted considerable interest, because it potentially provides gigantic and diverse electronic responses due to a strong interplay between charge, spin, orbital and lattice. We have investigated electric-field effects on such materials aiming at novel physical phenomena and electronic functions originating from strong correlation effects. Here we demonstrate electrical switching of bulk state of matter over the first-order metal-insulator transition. We fabricated FETs based on VO2 with use of a recently developed electric-double-layer transistor technique, and found that the electrostatically induced carriers at a channel surface drive all preexisting localized carriers of 1022 cm-3 even inside a bulk to motion, leading to bulk carrier delocalization beyond the electrostatic screening length. This non-local switching of bulk phases is achieved with just around 1 V, and moreover, a novel non-volatile memory like character emerges in a voltage-sweep measurement. These observations are apparently distinct from those of conventional FETs based on band insulators, capturing the essential feature of collective interactions in strongly correlated materials. This work was done in collaboration with K. Shibuya, D. Okuyama, T. Hatano, S. Ono, M. Kawasaki, Y. Iwasa, and Y. Tokura. This work was supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSAP) through its ``Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program).''

  4. Effect of strong correlations on transport properties of disordered cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Peter

    2007-03-01

    The theory of thermal transport in a d-wave superconductor predicts a universal T-linear term κ0 at low temperatures. Measurements on several cuprate families down to the 50 milliKelvin range indicate that the linear term decreases with underdoping, from which a substantial increase of the slope of the order parameter near the nodes is usually deduced by comparison with the standard theory. We discuss ways in which low-T universal transport can break down, and in particular focus on the importance of strong correlations, which can induce local magnetism in the presence of disorder or other spatial perturbations. Static magnetism coexisting with superconductivity has been detected in some but not all cuprate families, particularly at low temperatures and for strongly underdoped samples, We present an interpretation of this superconducting ``spin glass'' state as local antiferromagnetic order driven by dopant atoms, particularly in the LSCO and BSCCO systems. Within this framework, recent NMR experiments on Zn-doped YBCO can also be quantitatively explained, down to detailed description of the lineshapes. Both the strong correlations and the quantum interference of impurity states appear to be vital to understand these results. In either more disordered or more underdoped systems, the tendency towards static magnetism is enhanced. Numerical solutions of the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations of a disordered d-wave superconductor with Hubbard-like correlations show that in this case κ0 is in fact strongly suppressed, universality of quasiparticle transport is violated and κ0 may no longer be used to extract the size of the gap near the node directly. B.M. Andersen and P.J. Hirschfeld, cond-mat/0607682, J.W. Harter et al., cond-mat/0609721

  5. Quantum phase transition in strongly correlated many-body system

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Wenlong

    The past decade has seen a substantial rejuvenation of interest in the study of quantum phase transitions (QPTs), driven by experimental advance on the cuprate superconductors, the heavy fermion materials, organic conductors, Quantum Hall effect, Fe-As based superconductors and other related compounds. It is clear that strong electronic interactions play a crucial role in the systems of current interest, and simple paradigms for the behavior of such systems near quantum critical points remain unclear. Furthermore, the rapid progress in Feshbach resonance and optical lattice provides a flexible platform to study QPT. Quantum Phase Transition (QPT) describes the non-analytic behaviors of the ground-state properties in a many-body system by varying a physical parameter at absolute zero temperature - such as magnetic field or pressure, driven by quantum fluctuations. Such quantum phase transitions can be first-order phase transition or continuous. The phase transition is usually accompanied by a qualitative change in the nature of the correlations in the ground state, and describing this change shall clearly be one of our major interests. We address this issue from three prospects in a few strong correlated many-body systems in this thesis, i.e., identifying the ordered phases, studying the properties of different phases, characterizing the QPT points. In chapter 1, we give an introduction to QPT, and take one-dimensional XXZ model as an example to illustrate the QPT therein. Through this simple example, we would show that when the tunable parameter is varied, the system evolves into different phases, across two quantum QPT points. The distinct phases exhibit very different behaviors. Also a schematic phase diagram is appended. In chapter 2, we are engaged in research on ordered phases. Originating in the work of Landau and Ginzburg on second-order phase transition, the spontaneous symmetry breaking induces nonzero expectation of field operator, e.g., magnetization M

  6. Strongly correlated Fermi-Bose mixtures in disordered optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Palencia, L [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l' Institut d' Optique, CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud XI, Bat 503, Centre scientifique, F-91403 Orsay Cedex (France); Ahufinger, V [ICREA and Grup d' optica, Departament de FIsica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Belaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Kantian, A [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Zakrzewski, J [Instytut Fizyki imienia Mariana Smoluchowskiego i Centrum Badan Ukladow Zlozonych imienia Marka Kaca, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland); Sanpera, A [ICREA and Grup de FIsica Teorica, Departament de FIsica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Belaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Lewenstein, M [ICREA and ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Parc Mediterrani de la TecnologIa, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2006-05-28

    We investigate theoretically the low-temperature physics of a two-component ultracold mixture of bosons and fermions in disordered optical lattices. We focus on the strongly correlated regime. We show that, under specific conditions, composite fermions, made of one fermion plus one bosonic hole, form. The composite picture is used to derive an effective Hamiltonian whose parameters can be controlled via the boson-boson and the boson-fermion interactions, the tunnelling terms and the inhomogeneities. We finally investigate the quantum phase diagram of the composite fermions and show that it corresponds to the formation of Fermi glasses, spin glasses and quantum percolation regimes.

  7. Charge and spin fractionalization in strongly correlated topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Predrag

    2013-01-16

    We construct an effective topological Landau-Ginzburg theory that describes general SU(2) incompressible quantum liquids of strongly correlated particles in two spatial dimensions. This theory characterizes the fractionalization of quasiparticle quantum numbers and statistics in relation to the topological ground-state symmetries, and generalizes the Chern-Simons, BF ('background field') and hierarchical effective gauge theories to an arbitrary representation of the SU(2) symmetry group. We mainly focus on fractional topological insulators with time-reversal symmetry, which are treated as SU(2) generalizations of the quantum Hall effect.

  8. Restricted Boltzmann machine learning for solving strongly correlated quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yusuke; Darmawan, Andrew S.; Yamaji, Youhei; Imada, Masatoshi

    2017-11-01

    We develop a machine learning method to construct accurate ground-state wave functions of strongly interacting and entangled quantum spin as well as fermionic models on lattices. A restricted Boltzmann machine algorithm in the form of an artificial neural network is combined with a conventional variational Monte Carlo method with pair product (geminal) wave functions and quantum number projections. The combination allows an application of the machine learning scheme to interacting fermionic systems. The combined method substantially improves the accuracy beyond that ever achieved by each method separately, in the Heisenberg as well as Hubbard models on square lattices, thus proving its power as a highly accurate quantum many-body solver.

  9. Electron-phonon interaction in strongly correlated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalenko, V. A.

    1997-06-01

    By a canonical transformation, the Hubbard model, supplemented with the Holstein interaction of localized electrons and nondispersive optical phonons, is transformed into a model where the hoppings of polarons from one lattice site into another are possible and are accompanied by the hoppings of an unbounded number of phonons. This, together with the fact that strong one-site interactions of electrons are inherent in the Hubbard model, leads to the necessity of introducing a new diagram technique based on irreducible one-site multi-particle Green’s functions or Kubo cumulants. The presence of phonons leads to renormalization of single-particle and multi-particle Green’s functions. The Dyson equation for the renormalized electron Green’s function is obtained. However, we did not manage to obtain the Dyson equation for the phonon functions due to the multiplicity of phonons taking part in the hopping. The validity of the theorem of connected diagrams is proved.

  10. Differentially expressed genes strongly correlated with femur strength in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Imranul; Sun, Qiwei; Koller, Daniel L.; Liu, Lixiang; Liu, Yunlong; Edenberg, Howard J.; Li, Jiliang; Foroud, Tatiana; Turner, Charles H.

    2011-01-01

    The region of chromosome 1q33–q54 harbors quantitative trait loci (QTL) for femur strength in COP×DA and F344×LEW F2 rats. The purpose of this study is to identify the genes within this QTL region that contribute to the variation in femur strength. Microarray analysis was performed using RNA extracted from femurs of COP, DA, F344 and LEW rats. Genes differentially expressed in the 1q33–q54 region among these rat strains were then ranked based on the strength of correlation with femur strength in F2 animals derived from these rats. A total of 214 genes in this QTL region were differentially expressed among all rat strains, and 81 genes were found to be strongly correlated (r2>0.50) with femur strength. Of these, 12 candidate genes were prioritized for further validation, and 8 of these genes (Ifit3, Ppp2r5b, Irf7, Mpeg1, Bloc1s2, Pycard, Sec23ip, and Hps6) were confirmed by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis suggested that these genes were involved in interferon alpha, nuclear factor-kappa B (NFkB), extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4A) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) pathways. PMID:19482074

  11. PREFACE: International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, P. B.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Saxena, S. S.; Sutherland, M. L.; Sebastian, S. E.; Artacho, E.; Grosche, F. M.; Hadzibabic, Z.

    2012-11-01

    The Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 was dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covered a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The meeting welcomed to Cambridge 657 participants from 23 countries, who presented 127 talks (including 16 plenary, 57 invited, and 54 contributed) and 736 posters in 40 sessions over five full days of meetings. This proceedings volume contains papers reporting on the science presented at the meeting. This work deepens our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. Strongly correlated systems are known for their remarkable array of emergent phenomena: the traditional subjects of superconductivity, magnetism and metal-insulator transitions have been joined by non-Fermi liquid phenomena, topologically protected quantum states, atomic and photonic gases, and quantum phase transitions. These are some of the most challenging and interesting phenomena in science. As well as the science driver, there is underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which make use of 'small' electrons packed to the highest possible density. These are by definition 'strongly correlated'. For example: good photovoltaics must be efficient optical absorbers, which means that photons will generate tightly bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) that must then be ionised at a heterointerface and transported to contacts; efficient solid state refrigeration depends on substantial entropy changes in a unit cell, with large local electrical or magnetic moments; efficient lighting is in a real sense the inverse of photovoltaics; the limit of an efficient battery is a supercapacitor employing mixed valent ions; fuel cells and solar to fuel conversion

  12. Model reduction of strong-weak neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Bosen; Sorensen, Danny; Cox, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    We consider neurons with large dendritic trees that are weakly excitable in the sense that back propagating action potentials are severly attenuated as they travel from the small, strongly excitable, spike initiation zone. In previous work we have shown that the computational size of weakly excitable cell models may be reduced by two or more orders of magnitude, and that the size of strongly excitable models may be reduced by at least one order of magnitude, without sacrificing the spatio-temporal nature of its inputs (in the sense we reproduce the cell's precise mapping of inputs to outputs). We combine the best of these two strategies via a predictor-corrector decomposition scheme and achieve a drastically reduced highly accurate model of a caricature of the neuron responsible for collision detection in the locust.

  13. Electroweak and Strong Interactions Phenomenology, Concepts, Models

    CERN Document Server

    Scheck, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Electroweak and Strong Interaction: Phenomenology, Concepts, Models, begins with relativistic quantum mechanics and some quantum field theory which lay the foundation for the rest of the text. The phenomenology and the physics of the fundamental interactions are emphasized through a detailed discussion of the empirical fundamentals of unified theories of strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions. The principles of local gauge theories are described both in a heuristic and a geometric framework. The minimal standard model of the fundamental interactions is developed in detail and characteristic applications are worked out. Possible signals of physics beyond that model, notably in the physics of neutrinos are also discussed. Among the applications scattering on nucleons and on nuclei provide salient examples. Numerous exercises with solutions make the text suitable for advanced courses or individual study. This completely updated revised new edition contains an enlarged chapter on quantum chromodynamics an...

  14. Energy deposition of heavy ions in the regime of strong beam-plasma correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, D O; Schlanges, M

    2003-03-01

    The energy loss of highly charged ions in dense plasmas is investigated. The applied model includes strong beam-plasma correlation via a quantum T-matrix treatment of the cross sections. Dynamic screening effects are modeled by using a Debye-like potential with a velocity dependent screening length that guarantees the known low and high beam velocity limits. It is shown that this phenomenological model is in good agreement with simulation data up to very high beam-plasma coupling. An analysis of the stopping process shows considerably longer ranges and a less localized energy deposition if strong coupling is treated properly.

  15. Cosmogenic photons strongly constrain UHECR source models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Vliet Arjen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the newest version of our Monte Carlo code for ultra-high-energy cosmic ray (UHECR propagation, CRPropa 3, the flux of neutrinos and photons due to interactions of UHECRs with extragalactic background light can be predicted. Together with the recently updated data for the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background (IGRB by Fermi LAT, it is now possible to severely constrain UHECR source models. The evolution of the UHECR sources especially plays an important role in the determination of the expected secondary photon spectrum. Pure proton UHECR models are already strongly constrained, primarily by the highest energy bins of Fermi LAT’s IGRB, as long as their number density is not strongly peaked at recent times.

  16. Tree-level correlations in the strong field regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelis, François

    2017-09-01

    We consider the correlation function of an arbitrary number of local observables in quantum field theory, in situations where the field amplitude is large. Using a quasi-classical approximation (valid for a highly occupied initial mixed state, or for a coherent initial state if the classical dynamics has instabilities), we show that at tree level these correlations are dominated by fluctuations at the initial time. We obtain a general expression of the correlation functions in terms of the classical solution of the field equation of motion and its derivatives with respect to its initial conditions, that can be arranged graphically as the sum of labeled trees where the nodes are the individual observables, and the links are pairs of derivatives acting on them. For 3-point (and higher) correlation functions, there are additional tree-level terms beyond the quasi-classical approximation, generated by fluctuations in the bulk.

  17. Strong Country Level Correlation between Syphilis and HSV-2 Prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Richard Kenyon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Syphilis is curable but Herpes Simplex Virus-2 (HSV-2 is not. As a result, the prevalence of syphilis but not HSV-2 may be influenced by the efficacy of national STI screening and treatment capacity. If the prevalence of syphilis and HSV-2 is found to be correlated, then this makes it more likely that something other than differential STI treatment is responsible for variations in the prevalence of both HSV-2 and syphilis. Methods. Simple linear regression was used to evaluate the relationship between national antenatal syphilis prevalence and HSV-2 prevalence in women in two time periods: 1990–1999 and 2008. Adjustments were performed for the laboratory syphilis testing algorithm used and the prevalence of circumcision. Results. The prevalence of syphilis was positively correlated with that of HSV-2 for both time periods (adjusted correlations, 20–24-year-olds: 1990–99: R2=0.54, P<0.001; 2008: R2=0.41, P<0.001 and 40–44-year-olds: 1990–99: R2=0.42, P<0.001; 2008: R2=0.49, P<0.001. Conclusion. The prevalence of syphilis and HSV-2 is positively correlated. This could be due to a common set of risk factors underpinning both STIs.

  18. Can strong correlations be experimentally revealed for Ҡ -mesons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiesmayr Beatrix C.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1964 the physicists John St. Bell working at CERN took the 1935-idea of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen seriously and found that all theories based on local realism have to satisfy a certain inequality, nowadays dubbed Bell’s inequality. Experiments with ordinary matter systems or light show violations of Bell’s inequality favouring the quantum theory though a loophole free experiment has not yet been performed. This contribution presents an experimentally feasible Bell inequality for systems at higher energy scales, i.e. entangled neutral Ҡ -meson pairs that are typically produced in Φ -mesons decays or proton-antiproton annihilation processes. Strong requirements have to be overcome in order to achieve a conclusive tests, such a proposal was recently published. Surprisingly, this new Bell inequality reveals new features for weakly decaying particles, in particular, a strong sensitivity to the combined charge-conjugation-parity (CP symmetry. Here-with, a puzzling relation between a symmetry breaking for mesons and Bell’s inequality—which is a necessary and sufficient condition for the security of quantum cryptography protocols— is established. This becomes the more important since CP symmetry is related to the cosmological question why the antimatter disappeared after the Big Bang.

  19. Model Reduction of Strong-Weak Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven James Cox

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider neurons with large dendritic trees that are weakly excitable in the sense that back propagating action potentials are severly attenuated as they travelfrom the small, strongly excitable, spike initiation zone. In previous workwe have shown that the computational size of weakly excitable cell modelsmay be reduced by two or more orders of magnitude, and that the size of stronglyexcitable models may be reduced by at least one order of magnitude,without sacrificing thespatio-temporal nature of its inputs (in the sense we reproduce the cell's precise mapping of inputs to outputs. We combine the best of these twostrategies via a predictor--corrector decomposition scheme andachieve a drastically reduced highly accurate model of a caricature of the neuron responsible for collision detection in the locust.

  20. Differentially expressed genes strongly correlated with femur strength in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Imranul; Sun, Qiwei; Koller, Daniel L.; Liu, Lixiang; Liu, Yunlong; Edenberg, Howard J; Li, Jiliang; Foroud, Tatiana; Turner, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    The region of chromosome 1q33–q54 harbors quantitative trait loci (QTL) for femur strength in COP×DA and F344×LEW F2 rats. The purpose of this study is to identify the genes within this QTL region that contribute to the variation in femur strength. Microarray analysis was performed using RNA extracted from femurs of COP, DA, F344 and LEW rats. Genes differentially expressed in the 1q33–q54 region among these rat strains were then ranked based on the strength of correlation with femur strength...

  1. Thermodynamic properties and electrical conductivity of strongly correlated plasma media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filinov, V S; Levashov, P R; BoTan, A V; Fortov, V E [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13 bldg 2, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Bonitz, M [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Leibnizstrasse 15, 24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2009-05-29

    We study thermodynamic properties and the electrical conductivity of dense hydrogen and deuterium using three methods: classical reactive Monte Carlo, direct path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and a quantum dynamics method in the Wigner representation of quantum mechanics. We report the calculation of the deuterium compression quasi-isentrope in good agreement with experiments. We also solve the Wigner-Liouville equation of dense degenerate hydrogen calculating the initial equilibrium state by the PIMC method. The obtained particle trajectories determine the momentum-momentum correlation functions and the electrical conductivity and are compared with available theories and simulations.

  2. Baryon femtoscopy considering residual correlations as a tool to extract strong interaction potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymański Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the analysis of baryon-antibaryon femtoscopic correlations is presented. In particular, it is shown that taking into account residual correlations is crucial for the description of pΛ¯$\\bar \\Lambda $ and p̄Λ correlation functions measured by the STAR experiment in Au–Au collisions at the centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair √sNN = 200 GeV. This approach enables to obtain pΛ¯$\\bar \\Lambda $ (p̄Λ source size consistent with the sizes extracted from correlations in pΛ (p̄Λ¯$\\bar \\Lambda $ and lighter pair systems as well as with model predictions. Moreover, with this analysis it is possible to derive the unknown parameters of the strong interaction potential for baryon-antibaryon pairs under several assumptions.

  3. Thermodynamic prediction of glass formation tendency, cluster-in-jellium model for metallic glasses, ab initio tight-binding calculations, and new density functional theory development for systems with strong electron correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Yongxin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    also plays an important role, as it may directly track the movement of every atom. Simulation time is a major limit for molecular dynamics, not only because of “slow” computer speed, but also because of the accumulation error in the numerical treatment of the motion equations. There is also a great concern about the reliability of the emperical potentials if using classical molecular dynamics. Ab initio methods based on density functional theory(DFT) do not have this problem, however, it suffers from small simulation cells and is more demanding computationally. When crystal phase is involved, size effect of the simulation cell is more pronounced since long-range elastic energy would be established. Simulation methods which are more efficient in computation but yet have similar reliability as the ab initio methods, like tight-binding method, are highly desirable. While the complexity of metallic glasses comes from the atomistic level, there is also a large field which deals with the complexity from electronic level. The only “ab initio” method applicable to solid state systems is density functional theory with local density approximation( LDA) or generalized gradient approximation(GGA) for the exchange-correlation energy. It is very successful for simple sp element, where it reaches an high accuracy for determining the surface reconstruction. However, there is a large class of materials with strong electron correlation, where DFT based on LDA or GGA fails in a fundamental way. An “ab initio” method which can generally apply to correlated materials, as LDA for simple sp element, is still to be developed. The thesis is prepared to address some of the above problems.

  4. Methodological study of computational approaches to address the problem of strong correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juho

    The main focus of this thesis is the detailed investigation of computational methods to tackle strongly correlated materials in which a rich variety of exotic phenomena are found. A many-body problem with sizable electronic correlations can no longer be explained by independent-particle approximations such as density functional theory (DFT) or tight-binding approaches. The influence of an electron to the others is too strong for each electron to be treated as an independent quasiparticle and consequently those standard band-structure methods fail even at a qualitative level. One of the most powerful approaches for strong correlations is the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT), which has enlightened the understanding of the Mott transition based on the Hubbard model. For realistic applications, the dynamical mean-field theory is combined with various independent-particles approaches. The most widely used one is the DMFT combined with the DFT in the local density approximation (LDA), so-called LDA+DMFT. In this approach, the electrons in the weakly correlated orbitals are calculated by LDA while others in the strongly correlated orbitals are treated by DMFT. Recently, the method combining DMFT with Hedin's GW approximation was also developed, in which the momentum-dependent self-energy is also added. In this thesis, we discuss the application of those methodologies based on DMFT. First, we apply the dynamical mean-field theory to solve the 3-dimensional Hubbard model in Chap. 3. In this application, we model the interface between the thermodynamically coexisting metal and Mott insulator. We show how to model the required slab geometry and extract the electronic spectra. We construct an effective Landau free energy and compute the variation of its parameters across the phase diagram. Finally, using a linear mixture of the density and double-occupancy, we identify a natural Ising order parameter which unifies the treatment of the bandwidth and filling controlled Mott

  5. Selective Mottness as a key to iron superconductors: weak and strong correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medici, Luca

    2014-03-01

    I will discuss the strength of electronic correlations in the normal phase of Fe-superconductors and trace a comparison with cuprates. The phase diagram of the high-Tc cuprates is dominated by the Mott insulating phase of the parent compounds. Approaching it from large doping, a standard Fermi-liquid is seen to gradually turn into a bad non-Fermi liquid metal in which quasiparticles have heavily differentiated coherence depending on momentum, a process which culminates in the pseudogap regime, in which the antinodal region in momentum space acquires a gap before the material reaches a fully gapped Mott state. I will show that experiments for electron- and hole-doped BaFe2As2 support an analogous scenario. The doping evolution is dominated by the influence of a Mott insulator that would be realized for half-filled conduction bands, while the stoichiometric compound does not play a special role. Weakly and strongly correlated conduction electrons coexist in much of the phase diagram, a differentiation that increases with hole-doping. We identify the reason for this ``selective Mottness'' in a simple emergent mechanism, an ``orbital decoupling,'' triggered by the strong Hund's coupling. When this mechanism is active charge excitations in the different orbitals are decoupled and each orbital behaves as a single band Hubbard model, where the correlation degree almost only depends on how doped is each orbital from half-filling. This scenario reconciles contrasting evidences on the electronic correlation strength, implies a strong asymmetry between hole- and electron-doping and establishes a deep connection with the cuprates. L. de' Medici, G. Giovannetti and M. Capone, ArXiv:1212.3966 Work supported by CNRS - ESPCI ParisTech, France

  6. Recent progress on correlated electron systems with strong spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Robert; Kin-Ho Lee, Eric; Yang, Bohm-Jung; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of novel quantum ground states in correlated electron systems with strong spin-orbit coupling has been a recent subject of intensive studies. While it has been realized that spin-orbit coupling can provide non-trivial band topology in weakly interacting electron systems, as in topological insulators and semi-metals, the role of electron-electron interaction in strongly spin-orbit coupled systems has not been fully understood. The availability of new materials with significant electron correlation and strong spin-orbit coupling now makes such investigations possible. Many of these materials contain 5d or 4d transition metal elements; the prominent examples are iridium oxides or iridates. In this review, we succinctly discuss recent theoretical and experimental progress on this subject. After providing a brief overview, we focus on pyrochlore iridates and three-dimensional honeycomb iridates. In pyrochlore iridates, we discuss the quantum criticality of the bulk and surface states, and the relevance of the surface/boundary states in a number of topological and magnetic ground states, both in the bulk and thin film configurations. Experimental signatures of these boundary and bulk states are discussed. Domain wall formation and strongly-direction-dependent magneto-transport are also discussed. In regard to the three-dimensional honeycomb iridates, we consider possible quantum spin liquid phases and unusual magnetic orders in theoretical models with strongly bond-dependent interactions. These theoretical ideas and results are discussed in light of recent resonant x-ray scattering experiments on three-dimensional honeycomb iridates. We also contrast these results with the situation in two-dimensional honeycomb iridates. We conclude with the outlook on other related systems.

  7. Strongly interacting matter from holographic QCD model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yidian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the 5-dimension dynamical holographic QCD model, which is constructed in the graviton-dilaton-scalar framework with the dilaton background field Φ and the scalar field X responsible for the gluodynamics and chiral dynamics, respectively. We review our results on the hadron spectra including the glueball and light meson spectra, QCD phase transitions and transport properties in the framework of the dynamical holographic QCD model.

  8. Solving the 2-Dimensional Fokker-Planck Equation for Strongly Correlated Neurons

    CERN Document Server

    Deniz, Taskin

    2016-01-01

    Pairs of neurons in brain networks often share much of the input they receive from other neurons. Due to essential non-linearities of neuronal dynamics, the consequences for the correlation of the output spike trains are not well understood in the strongly correlated regime. Here we consider two leaky integrate-and-fire neurons with correlated white noise input. We analyze this scenario using a novel non-perturbative approach. Hence our treatment covers both weakly and strongly correlated dynamics, generalizing previous results based on linear response theory.

  9. High-energy photoemission spectroscopy for investigating bulk electronic structures of strongly correlated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiyama, Akira, E-mail: sekiyama@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Division of Materials Physics, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531, Osaka (Japan); SPring-8/RIKEN, Sayo 679-5148, Hyogo (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Progress of high-energy photoemission spectroscopy for investigating the bulk electronic structures of strongly correlated electron systems is reviewed. High-resolution soft X-ray photoemission has opened the door for revealing the bulk strongly correlated spectral functions overcoming the surface contributions. More bulk-sensitive hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES) enables us to study the electronic structure with negligible surface contribution. The recent development of the polarization-dependent HAXPES is also described in this short review.

  10. Model validation: Correlation for updating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, a review is presented of the various methods which are available for the purpose of performing a systematic comparison and correlation between two sets of vibration data. In the present case, the application of interest is in conducting this correlation process as a prelude to model correlation or updating activity ...

  11. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and strongly correlated electrons on honeycomb structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Thomas C.

    2010-12-16

    In this thesis we apply recently developed, as well as sophisticated quantum Monte Carlo methods to numerically investigate models of strongly correlated electron systems on honeycomb structures. The latter are of particular interest owing to their unique properties when simulating electrons on them, like the relativistic dispersion, strong quantum fluctuations and their resistance against instabilities. This work covers several projects including the advancement of the weak-coupling continuous time quantum Monte Carlo and its application to zero temperature and phonons, quantum phase transitions of valence bond solids in spin-1/2 Heisenberg systems using projector quantum Monte Carlo in the valence bond basis, and the magnetic field induced transition to a canted antiferromagnet of the Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice. The emphasis lies on two projects investigating the phase diagram of the SU(2) and the SU(N)-symmetric Hubbard model on the hexagonal lattice. At sufficiently low temperatures, condensed-matter systems tend to develop order. An exception are quantum spin-liquids, where fluctuations prevent a transition to an ordered state down to the lowest temperatures. Previously elusive in experimentally relevant microscopic two-dimensional models, we show by means of large-scale quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the SU(2) Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice, that a quantum spin-liquid emerges between the state described by massless Dirac fermions and an antiferromagnetically ordered Mott insulator. This unexpected quantum-disordered state is found to be a short-range resonating valence bond liquid, akin to the one proposed for high temperature superconductors. Inspired by the rich phase diagrams of SU(N) models we study the SU(N)-symmetric Hubbard Heisenberg quantum antiferromagnet on the honeycomb lattice to investigate the reliability of 1/N corrections to large-N results by means of numerically exact QMC simulations. We study the melting of phases

  12. Pure density functional for strong correlations and the thermodynamic limit from machine learning

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Li; White, Steven R; Burke, Kieron

    2016-01-01

    We use density-matrix renormalization group, applied to a one-dimensional model of continuum Hamiltonians, to accurately solve chains of hydrogen atoms of various separations and numbers of atoms. We train and test a machine-learned approximation to $F[n]$, the universal part of the electronic density functional, to within quantum chemical accuracy. Our calculation (a) bypasses the standard Kohn-Sham approach, avoiding the need to find orbitals, (b) includes the strong correlation of highly-stretched bonds without any specific difficulty (unlike all standard DFT approximations) and (c) is so accurate that it can be used to find the energy in the thermodynamic limit to quantum chemical accuracy.

  13. Ising models of strongly coupled biological networks with multivariate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchan, Lina; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    Biological networks consist of a large number of variables that can be coupled by complex multivariate interactions. However, several neuroscience and cell biology experiments have reported that observed statistics of network states can be approximated surprisingly well by maximum entropy models that constrain correlations only within pairs of variables. We would like to verify if this reduction in complexity results from intricacies of biological organization, or if it is a more general attribute of these networks. We generate random networks with p-spin (p > 2) interactions, with N spins and M interaction terms. The probability distribution of the network states is then calculated and approximated with a maximum entropy model based on constraining pairwise spin correlations. Depending on the M/N ratio and the strength of the interaction terms, we observe a transition where the pairwise approximation is very good to a region where it fails. This resembles the sat-unsat transition in constraint satisfaction problems. We argue that the pairwise model works when the number of highly probable states is small. We argue that many biological systems must operate in a strongly constrained regime, and hence we expect the pairwise approximation to be accurate for a wide class of problems. This research has been partially supported by the James S McDonnell Foundation grant No.220020321.

  14. Respiratory insufficiency correlated strongly with mortality of rodents infected with West Nile virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrey, John D; Siddharthan, Venkatraman; Wang, Hong; Hall, Jeffery O

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) disease can be fatal for high-risk patients. Since WNV or its antigens have been identified in multiple anatomical locations of the central nervous system of persons or rodent models, one cannot know where to investigate the actual mechanism of mortality without careful studies in animal models. In this study, depressed respiratory functions measured by plethysmography correlated strongly with mortality. This respiratory distress, as well as reduced oxygen saturation, occurred beginning as early as 4 days before mortality. Affected medullary respiratory control cells may have contributed to the animals' respiratory insufficiency, because WNV antigen staining was present in neurons located in the ventrolateral medulla. Starvation or dehydration would be irrelevant in people, but could cause death in rodents due to lethargy or loss of appetite. Animal experiments were performed to exclude this possibility. Plasma ketones were increased in moribund infected hamsters, but late-stage starvation markers were not apparent. Moreover, daily subcutaneous administration of 5% dextrose in physiological saline solution did not improve survival or other disease signs. Therefore, infected hamsters did not die from starvation or dehydration. No cerebral edema was apparent in WNV- or sham-infected hamsters as determined by comparing wet-to-total weight ratios of brains, or by evaluating blood-brain-barrier permeability using Evans blue dye penetration into brains. Limited vasculitis was present in the right atrium of the heart of infected hamsters, but abnormal electrocardiograms for several days leading up to mortality did not occur. Since respiratory insufficiency was strongly correlated with mortality more than any other pathological parameter, it is the likely cause of death in rodents. These animal data and a poor prognosis for persons with respiratory insufficiency support the hypothesis that neurological lesions affecting respiratory function may be the

  15. Computational time-resolved and resonant x-ray scattering of strongly correlated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansil, Arun [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-11-09

    Basic-Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (BES/DOE) has made large investments in x-ray sources in the U.S. (NSLS-II, LCLS, NGLS, ALS, APS) as powerful enabling tools for opening up unprecedented new opportunities for exploring properties of matter at various length and time scales. The coming online of the pulsed photon source, literally allows us to see and follow the dynamics of processes in materials at their natural timescales. There is an urgent need therefore to develop theoretical methodologies and computational models for understanding how x-rays interact with matter and the related spectroscopies of materials. The present project addressed aspects of this grand challenge of x-ray science. In particular, our Collaborative Research Team (CRT) focused on developing viable computational schemes for modeling x-ray scattering and photoemission spectra of strongly correlated materials in the time-domain. The vast arsenal of formal/numerical techniques and approaches encompassed by the members of our CRT were brought to bear through appropriate generalizations and extensions to model the pumped state and the dynamics of this non-equilibrium state, and how it can be probed via x-ray absorption (XAS), emission (XES), resonant and non-resonant x-ray scattering, and photoemission processes. We explored the conceptual connections between the time-domain problems and other second-order spectroscopies, such as resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) because RIXS may be effectively thought of as a pump-probe experiment in which the incoming photon acts as the pump, and the fluorescent decay is the probe. Alternatively, when the core-valence interactions are strong, one can view K-edge RIXS for example, as the dynamic response of the material to the transient presence of a strong core-hole potential. Unlike an actual pump-probe experiment, here there is no mechanism for adjusting the time-delay between the pump and the probe. However, the core hole

  16. Condensation to a strongly correlated dark fluid of two dimensional dipolar excitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuz-Harpaz, Yotam; Cohen, Kobi; Rapaport, Ronen

    2017-08-01

    Recently we reported on the condensation of cold, electrostatically trapped dipolar excitons in GaAs bilayer heterostructure into a new, dense and dark collective phase. Here we analyze and discuss in detail the experimental findings and the emerging evident properties of this collective liquid-like phase. We show that the phase transition is characterized by a sharp increase of the number of non-emitting dipoles, by a clear contraction of the fluid spatial extent into the bottom of the parabolic-like trap, and by spectral narrowing. We extract the total density of the condensed phase which we find to be consistent with the expected density regime of a quantum liquid. We show that there are clear critical temperature and excitation power onsets for the phase transition and that as the power further increases above the critical power, the strong darkening is reduced down until no clear darkening is observed. At this point another transition appears which we interpret as a transition to a strongly repulsive yet correlated e-h plasma. Based on the experimental findings, we suggest that the physical mechanism that may be responsible for the transition is a dynamical final-state stimulation of the dipolar excitons to their dark spin states, which have a long lifetime and thus support the observed sharp increase in density. Further experiments and modeling will hopefully be able to unambiguously identify the physical mechanism behind these recent observations.

  17. Record statistics of a strongly correlated time series: random walks and Lévy flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godrèche, Claude; Majumdar, Satya N.; Schehr, Grégory

    2017-08-01

    We review recent advances on the record statistics of strongly correlated time series, whose entries denote the positions of a random walk or a Lévy flight on a line. After a brief survey of the theory of records for independent and identically distributed random variables, we focus on random walks. During the last few years, it was indeed realized that random walks are a very useful ‘laboratory’ to test the effects of correlations on the record statistics. We start with the simple one-dimensional random walk with symmetric jumps (both continuous and discrete) and discuss in detail the statistics of the number of records, as well as of the ages of the records, i.e. the lapses of time between two successive record breaking events. Then we review the results that were obtained for a wide variety of random walk models, including random walks with a linear drift, continuous time random walks, constrained random walks (like the random walk bridge) and the case of multiple independent random walkers. Finally, we discuss further observables related to records, like the record increments, as well as some questions raised by physical applications of record statistics, like the effects of measurement error and noise.

  18. Formation of charge and spin ordering in strongly correlated electron systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Farkašovsky

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review we present results of our theoretical study of charge and spin ordering in strongly correlated electron systems obtained within various generalizations of the Falicov-Kimball model. The primary goal of this study was to identify crucial interactions that lead to the stabilization of various types of charge ordering in these systems, like the axial striped ordering, diagonal striped ordering, phase-separated ordering, phase-segregated ordering, etc. Among the major interactions that come into account, we have examined the effect of local Coulomb interaction between localized and itinerant electrons, long-range and correlated hopping of itinerant electrons, long-range Coulomb interaction between localized and itinerant electrons, local Coulomb interaction between itinerant electrons, local Coulomb interaction between localized electrons, spin-dependent interaction between localized and itinerant electrons, both for zero and nonzero temperatures, as well as for doped and undoped systems. Finally, the relevance of resultant solutions for a description of rare-earth and transition-metal compounds is discussed.

  19. Exceptionally strong correlation-driven charge migration and attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hollstein, Maximilian; Santra, Robin; Pfannkuche, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    We investigate theoretically charge migration following prompt double ionization of a polyatomic molecule (C$_2$H$_4$BrI) and find that for double ionization, correlation-driven charge migration appears to be particularly prominent, i.e., we observe exceptionally rich dynamics solely driven by the electron-electron interaction even in the situation when the electrons are emitted from outer-valence orbitals. These strongly correlated electron dynamics are witnessed in the theoretically determi...

  20. New developments in the theoretical treatment of low dimensional strongly correlated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Andrew J A; Konik, Robert M; Lecheminant, Philippe; Robinson, Neil; Tsvelik, Alexei M

    2017-10-09

    We review two important non-perturbative approaches for extracting the physics of low- dimensional strongly correlated quantum systems. Firstly, we start by providing a comprehensive review of non-Abelian bosonization. This includes an introduction to the basic elements of confor- mal field theory as applied to systems with a current algebra, and we orient the reader by presenting a number of applications of non-Abelian bosonization to models with large symmetries. We then tie this technique into recent advances in the ability of cold atomic systems to realize complex symme- tries. Secondly, we discuss truncated spectrum methods for the numerical study of systems in one and two dimensions. For one-dimensional systems we provide the reader with considerable insight into the methodology by reviewing canonical applications of the technique to the Ising model (and its variants) and the sine-Gordon model. Following this we review recent work on the development of renormalization groups, both numerical and analytical, that alleviate the effects of truncating the spectrum. Using these technologies, we consider a number of applications to one-dimensional systems: properties of carbon nanotubes, quenches in the Lieb-Liniger model, 1+1D quantum chro- modynamics, as well as Landau-Ginzburg theories. In the final part we move our attention to consider truncated spectrum methods applied to two-dimensional systems. This involves combining truncated spectrum methods with matrix product state algorithms. We describe applications of this method to two-dimensional systems of free fermions and the quantum Ising model, including their non-equilibrium dynamics. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  1. GW-based ab initio downfolding aiming at strongly correlated electron system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kazuma; Kosugi, Taichi; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Arita, Ryotaro; Imada, Masatoshi

    2008-03-01

    Aiming at ab initio description of real complex systems under effects of strong electron correlations, we develop a GW-based downfolding scheme formulated in the plane-wave basis set. Our method is successfully applied to organic conductors, the family of (BEDT-TTF)2X. At the heart of our downfolding scheme lies utilizing the energy hierarchy of the system [1]: The low-energy hierarchy near the Fermi level (ɛ f±2˜3 eV) determines physics while is affected by the remaining high-energy part of hierarchy. We renormalize the high-energy part into low energy, based on the GW scheme. The renormalization generates a low-energy model characterized by renormalized transfers and effective screened Coulomb/exchange interactions, having frequency dependence arising from retarded screening by eliminated high-energy electrons. Thus, the low-energy frequency-dependent effective model is mapped out from the whole high- plus low-energy system in an ab initio procedure. [1] F. Aryasetiawan et al., Phys. Rev. B 70, 19514 (2004); I. V. Solovyev and M. Imada, ibid. 71, 045103 (2005).

  2. Study of rare earth local moment magnetism and strongly correlated phenomena in various crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Tai [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-12-17

    Benefiting from unique properties of 4f electrons, rare earth based compounds are known for offering a versatile playground for condensed matter physics research as well as industrial applications. This thesis focuses on three specific examples that further explore the rare earth local moment magnetism and strongly correlated phenomena in various crystal structures.

  3. Communication: Thermodynamics of condensed matter with strong pressure-energy correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond; Bøhling, Lasse; Schrøder, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    in the phase diagram of invariant structure and dynamics) are described by h(ρ)/T = Const., (2) the density-scaling exponent is a function of density only, and (3) a Grüneisen-type equation of state applies for the configurational degrees of freedom. For strongly correlating atomic systems one has h(ρ) = ∑n...

  4. Photoinduced femtosecond formation of ferromagnetism in a strongly correlated antiferromagentic manganite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perakis I. E.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a pump threshold behavior in fs photoinduced magnetization in a strongly correlated manganite, which indicates the establishment of thermally-inaccessible ferromagnetic ground state and build-up of new magnetic order parameters at fs time scales

  5. Realistic many-body approaches to materials with strong nonlocal correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechermann, F.; Lichtenstein, A. I.; Potthoff, M.

    2017-07-01

    Many of the fascinating and unconventional properties of several transition-metal compounds with partially filled d-shells are due to strong electronic correlations. While local correlations are in principle treated exactly within the frame of the dynamical mean-field theory, there are two major and interlinked routes for important further methodical advances: On the one hand, there is a strong need for methods being able to describe material-specific aspects, i.e., methods combining the DMFT with modern band-structure theory, and, on the other hand, nonlocal correlations beyond the mean-field paradigm must be accounted for. Referring to several concrete example systems, we argue why these two routes are worth pursuing and how they can be combined, we describe several related methodical developments and present respective results, and we discuss possible ways to overcome remaining obstacles.

  6. Investigation of real materials with strong electronic correlations by the LDA+DMFT method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, V I; Lukoyanov, A V

    2014-02-01

    Materials with strong electronic correlations are at the cutting edge of experimental and theoretical studies, capturing the attention of researchers for a great variety of interesting phenomena: metal-insulator, phase and magnetic spin transitions, `heavy fermion' systems, interplay between magnetic order and superconductivity, appearance and disappearance of local magnetic moments, and transport property anomalies. It is clear that the richness of physical phenomena for these compounds is a result of partially filled 3d, 4f or 5f electron shells with local magnetic moments preserved in the solid state. Strong interactions of d and f electrons with each other and with itinerant electronic states of the material are responsible for its anomalous properties. Electronic structure calculations for strongly correlated materials should explicitly take into account Coulombic interactions between d or f electrons. Recent advances in this field are related to the development of the LDA+DMFT method, which combines local density approximation (LDA) with dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) to account for electronic correlation effects. In recent years, LDA+DMFT has allowed the successful treatment not only of simple systems but also of complicated real compounds. Nowadays, the LDA+DMFT method is the state-of-the-art tool for investigating correlated metals and insulators, spin and metal-insulator transitions (MIT) in transition-metal compounds in paramagnetic and magnetically ordered phases.

  7. Good thermoelectric performance in strongly correlated system SnCCo3 with antiperovskite structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shuai; Tong, Peng; Wang, Bosen; Lin, Jianchao; Huang, Yanan; Sun, Yuping

    2014-04-07

    We report the magnetic, electrical, and thermoelectric properties of SnCCo3, where good thermoelectric performance [figure of merit ZT ∼ 0.035(2), 258 K] and strong electron correlation (Kadowaki-Woods ratio RKW ∼ 4a0) are observed. The thermoelectric properties of ACCo3 (A = Al, Ga, Ge) and SnCM3 (M = Mn, Fe) were also investigated for comparison. As a result, the ZT value of SnCCo3 is the largest among all of those samples, which is mainly attributed to the large Seebeck coefficient caused by the strong electron correlation and low carrier density. Moreover, the ZT value can be effectively enhanced by proper chemical doping in SnCCo3.

  8. Peculiarities of the momentum distribution functions of strongly correlated charged fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, A. S.; Filinov, V. S.; Fortov, V. E.

    2018-01-01

    New numerical version of the Wigner approach to quantum thermodynamics of strongly coupled systems of particles has been developed for extreme conditions, when analytical approximations based on different kinds of perturbation theories cannot be applied. An explicit analytical expression of the Wigner function has been obtained in linear and harmonic approximations. Fermi statistical effects are accounted for by effective pair pseudopotential depending on coordinates, momenta and degeneracy parameter of particles and taking into account Pauli blocking of fermions. A new quantum Monte-Carlo method for calculations of average values of arbitrary quantum operators has been developed. Calculations of the momentum distribution functions and the pair correlation functions of degenerate ideal Fermi gas have been carried out for testing the developed approach. Comparison of the obtained momentum distribution functions of strongly correlated Coulomb systems with the Maxwell–Boltzmann and the Fermi distributions shows the significant influence of interparticle interaction both at small momenta and in high energy quantum ‘tails’.

  9. Model validation: Correlation for updating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, a review is presented of the various methods which are available for the purpose of performing a systematic comparison and correla- tion between two sets of vibration data. In the present case, the application of interest is in conducting this correlation process as a prelude to model correc-.

  10. Emergence of Quantum Critical Behavior in Metallic Quantum-Well States of Strongly Correlated Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Yoshimatsu, Kohei; Mitsuhashi, Taichi; Kitamura, Miho; Sakai, Enju; Yukawa, Ryu; Minohara, Makoto; Fujimori, Atsushi; Horiba, Koji; Kumigashira, Hiroshi

    2017-11-30

    Controlling quantum critical phenomena in strongly correlated electron systems, which emerge in the neighborhood of a quantum phase transition, is a major challenge in modern condensed matter physics. Quantum critical phenomena are generated from the delicate balance between long-range order and its quantum fluctuation. So far, the nature of quantum phase transitions has been investigated by changing a limited number of external parameters such as pressure and magnetic field. We propose a new approach for investigating quantum criticality by changing the strength of quantum fluctuation that is controlled by the dimensional crossover in metallic quantum well (QW) structures of strongly correlated oxides. With reducing layer thickness to the critical thickness of metal-insulator transition, crossover from a Fermi liquid to a non-Fermi liquid has clearly been observed in the metallic QW of SrVO3 by in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Non-Fermi liquid behavior with the critical exponent α = 1 is found to emerge in the two-dimensional limit of the metallic QW states, indicating that a quantum critical point exists in the neighborhood of the thickness-dependent Mott transition. These results suggest that artificial QW structures provide a unique platform for investigating novel quantum phenomena in strongly correlated oxides in a controllable fashion.

  11. Establishing a Consistent Theory of Transport in Strongly Correlated Fermi Superfluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyack, Rufus M.

    A diagrammatic method of obtaining exact gauge-invariant response functions in strongly correlated Fermi superfluids is implemented for several example condensed matter systems of current interest. These include: topological superfluids, high temperature superconductors, and superfluids with finite center-of-mass momentum pairing known as Fulde-Ferrell superfluids. Much of the literature on these systems has focused on single-particle properties or alternatively has invoked simple approximations to treat response functions. The goal is to show that, for this wide class of topical problems, one can compute exact response functions. This enables assessment of the validity of different physical scenarios and allows a very broad class of experiments to be addressed. The method developed is based on deriving the full electromagnetic vertex, which satisfies the Ward-Takahashi identity, and determining the collective modes in a manner compatible with the self-consistent gap equation. In the condensed phase of a superfluid and a superconductor, where gauge invariance is spontaneously broken, it is crucial to determine the collective modes from the gap equation in a manner which restores gauge invariance. Our diagrammatic framework provides a very general and powerful method for obtaining these collective modes in a variety of strongly correlated Fermi superfluids. We show that a full electromagnetic vertex satisfying the Ward-Takahashi identity ensures the f-sum rule is satisfied and thus charge is conserved. This diagrammatic method is implemented for both normal and superfluid phases. While there are no collective modes in the normal phase, the Ward-Takahashi identity plays a similarly important role. In particular, for the normal phase we study Rashba spin-orbit coupled Fermi gases with intrinsic pairing in the absence and presence of a magnetic field. Exact density and spin response functions are obtained, even in the absence of a spin conservation law, providing

  12. Earthquake source model using strong motion displacement as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The strong motion displacement records available during an earthquake can be treated as the response of the earth as the a structural system to unknown forces acting at unknown locations. Thus, if the part of the earth participating in ground motion is modelled as a known finite elastic medium, one can attempt to model the ...

  13. Strong CP Problem with $10^{32}$ Standard Model Copies

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2008-01-01

    We show that a recently proposed solution to the Hierarchy Problem simultaneously solves the Strong CP Problem, without requiring an axion or any further new physics. Consistency of black hole physics implies a non-trivial relation between the number of particle species and particle masses, so that with ~10^{32} copies of the standard model, the TeV scale is naturally explained. At the same time, as shown here, this setup predicts a typical expected value of the strong-CP parameter in QCD of theta ~ 10^{-9}. This strongly motivates a more sensitive measurement of the neutron electric dipole moment.

  14. Mean-field approximation for thermodynamic and spectral functions of correlated electrons: Strong coupling and arbitrary band filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiš, Václav; Pokorný, Vladislav; Kauch, Anna

    2017-04-01

    We present a construction of a mean-field theory for thermodynamic and spectral properties of correlated electrons reliable in the strong-coupling limit. We introduce an effective interaction determined self-consistently from the reduced parquet equations. It is a static local approximation of the two-particle irreducible vertex, the kernel of a potentially singular Bethe-Salpeter equation. The effective interaction enters the Ward identity from which a thermodynamic self-energy, renormalizing the one-electron propagators, is determined. The dynamical Schwinger-Dyson equation with the thermodynamic propagators is then used to calculate the spectral properties. The thermodynamic and spectral properties of correlated electrons are in this way determined on the same footing and in a consistent manner. Such a mean-field approximation is analytically controllable and free of unphysical behavior and spurious phase transitions. We apply the construction to the asymmetric Anderson impurity and the Hubbard models in the strong-coupling regime.

  15. Spin-Projected Matrix Product States: Versatile Tool for Strongly Correlated Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhendong; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2017-06-13

    to implement with MPS. To illustrate the versatility of SP-MPS, we formulate algorithms for the optimization of ground and excited states, develop perturbation theory based on SP-MPS, and describe how to evaluate spin-independent and spin-dependent properties such as the reduced density matrices. We demonstrate the numerical performance of SP-MPS with applications to several models typical of strong correlation, including the Hubbard model, and [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] model complexes.

  16. Electron correlation dynamics of strong-field double ionization of atoms below recollision threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yunquan; Gong Qihuang [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ye Difa; Liu Jie [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, 100084 Beijing (China); Rudenko, A; Tschuch, S; Duerr, M; Moshammer, R; Ullrich, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Siegel, M; Morgner, U, E-mail: yunquan.liu@pku.edu.cn [Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Welfengarten 1, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2011-02-01

    In recent combined experimental and theoretical study we have explored nonsequential double ionization of neon and argon atoms in the infrared light field (800nm) below the recollision threshold. We find that the two-electron correlation dynamics depends on atomic structure- 'side-by-side emission' (correlation) for Ne and 'back-to-back emission' (anticorrelation) for argon atoms. This can be explained theoretically within our three dimensional classical model calculation including tunnelling effect. The multiple recollisions as well as recollision-induced-excitation-tunnelling (RIET) effect dominate the anticorrelation of argon, whereas the laser-assisted instantaneous recollision dominates the correlation of neon.

  17. Generalized-active-space pair-density functional theory: an efficient method to study large, strongly correlated, conjugated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Cramer, Christopher J; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2017-04-01

    Predicting ground- and excited-state properties of open-shell organic molecules by electronic structure theory can be challenging because an accurate treatment has to correctly describe both static and dynamic electron correlation. Strongly correlated systems, i.e., systems with near-degeneracy correlation effects, are particularly troublesome. Multiconfigurational wave function methods based on an active space are adequate in principle, but it is impractical to capture most of the dynamic correlation in these methods for systems characterized by many active electrons. We recently developed a new method called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), that combines the advantages of wave function theory and density functional theory to provide a more practical treatment of strongly correlated systems. Here we present calculations of the singlet-triplet gaps in oligoacenes ranging from naphthalene to dodecacene. Calculations were performed for unprecedently large orbitally optimized active spaces of 50 electrons in 50 orbitals, and we test a range of active spaces and active space partitions, including four kinds of frontier orbital partitions. We show that MC-PDFT can predict the singlet-triplet splittings for oligoacenes consistent with the best available and much more expensive methods, and indeed MC-PDFT may constitute the benchmark against which those other models should be compared, given the absence of experimental data.

  18. Strong population substructure is correlated with morphology and ecology in a migratory bat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Butterworth, Cassandra M; Jacobs, David S; Harley, Eric H

    2003-07-10

    Examining patterns of inter-population genetic diversity can provide valuable information about both historical and current evolutionary processes affecting a species. Population genetic studies of flying and migratory species such as bats and birds have traditionally shown minimal population substructure, characterized by high levels of gene flow between populations. In general, strongly substructured mammalian populations either are separated by non-traversable barriers or belong to terrestrial species with low dispersal abilities. Species with female philopatry (the tendency to remain in or consistently return to the natal territory) might show strong substructure when examined with maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA, but this substructure generally disappears when biparentally inherited markers are used, owing to male-mediated gene flow. Male-biased dispersal is considered typical for mammals, and philopatry in both sexes is rare. Here we show strong population substructure in a migratory bat species, and philopatry in both sexes, as indicated by concordance of nuclear and mtDNA findings. Furthermore, the genetic structure correlates with local biomes and differentiation in wing morphology. There is therefore a close correlation of genetic and morphological differentiation in sympatric subspecific populations of this mammalian species.

  19. A high and low noise model for strong motion accelerometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, J. F.; Cauzzi, C.; Olivieri, M.

    2010-12-01

    We present reference noise models for high-quality strong motion accelerometer installations. We use continuous accelerometer data acquired by the Swiss Seismological Service (SED) since 2006 and other international high-quality accelerometer network data to derive very broadband (50Hz-100s) high and low noise models. The proposed noise models are compared to the Peterson (1993) low and high noise models designed for broadband seismometers; the datalogger self-noise; background noise levels at existing Swiss strong motion stations; and typical earthquake signals recorded in Switzerland and worldwide. The standard strong motion station operated by the SED consists of a Kinemetrics Episensor (2g clip level; flat acceleration response from 200 Hz to DC; insulated sensor / datalogger systems placed in vault quality sites. At all frequencies, there is at least one order of magnitude between the ALNM and the AHNM; at high frequencies (> 1Hz) this extends to 2 orders of magnitude. This study provides remarkable confirmation of the capability of modern strong motion accelerometers to record low-amplitude ground motions with seismic observation quality. In particular, an accelerometric station operating at the ALNM is capable of recording the full spectrum of near source earthquakes, out to 100 km, down to M2. Of particular interest for the SED, this study provides acceptable noise limits for candidate sites for the on-going Strong Motion Network modernisation.

  20. Strongly correlated crystal-field approach to Mott insulator LaCoO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radwanski, R.J. [Institute of Physics, Pedagogical University, 30-084 Cracow (Poland) and Center of Solid State Physics, Snt Filip 5, 31-150 Cracow (Poland)]. E-mail: sfradwan@cyf-kr.edu.pl; Ropka, Z. [Center of Solid State Physics, Snt Filip 5, 31-150 Cracow (Poland)

    2005-04-30

    Our success in description of recent electron spin resonance results on Mott insulator LaCoO{sub 3} (Phys. Rev. B 67 (2003) 172401) lies in taking into account strong electron correlations among d electrons and the relativistic spin-orbit coupling. In the developed quantum atomistic solid state theory (Quest) we assume that the atomic-like integrity of the 3d{sup 6} system is preserved in the Co{sup 3+} ion in LaCoO{sub 3} and that intra-atomic correlations are stronger than crystal-field interactions. We conclude that in LaCoO{sub 3} there is no intermediate spin state as came out from band-structure calculations. The excited states originate from the high-spin {sup 5}T{sub 2g} term, being 12meV above the ground {sup 1}A{sub 1} state. We are convinced that many-electron CEF approach with strong correlations and the atomic-scale orbital magnetism is physically adequate approach to 3d oxides.

  1. One-electron reduced density matrices of strongly correlated harmonium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioslowski, Jerzy

    2015-03-21

    Explicit asymptotic expressions are derived for the reduced one-electron density matrices (the 1-matrices) of strongly correlated two- and three-electron harmonium atoms in the ground and first excited states. These expressions, which are valid at the limit of small confinement strength ω, yield electron densities and kinetic energies in agreement with the published values. In addition, they reveal the ω(5/6) asymptotic scaling of the exchange components of the electron-electron repulsion energies that differs from the ω(2/3) scaling of their Coulomb and correlation counterparts. The natural orbitals of the totally symmetric ground state of the two-electron harmonium atom are found to possess collective occupancies that follow a mixed power/Gaussian dependence on the angular momentum in variance with the simple power-law prediction of Hill's asymptotics. Providing rigorous constraints on energies as functionals of 1-matrices, these results are expected to facilitate development of approximate implementations of the density matrix functional theory and ensure their proper description of strongly correlated systems.

  2. Theoretical development and first-principles analysis of strongly correlated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-12-17

    A variety of quantum many-body methods have been developed for studying the strongly correlated electron systems. We have also proposed a computationally efficient and accurate approach, named the correlation matrix renormalization (CMR) method, to address the challenges. The initial implementation of the CMR method is designed for molecules which have theoretical advantages, including small size of system, manifest mechanism and strongly correlation effect such as bond breaking process. The theoretic development and benchmark tests of the CMR method are included in this thesis. Meanwhile, ground state total energy is the most important property of electronic calculations. We also investigated an alternative approach to calculate the total energy, and extended this method for magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of ferromagnetic materials. In addition, another theoretical tool, dynamical mean- field theory (DMFT) on top of the DFT , has also been used in electronic structure calculations for an Iridium oxide to study the phase transition, which results from an interplay of the d electrons' internal degrees of freedom.

  3. Matrix-product states for strongly correlated systems and quantum information processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saberi, Hamed

    2008-12-12

    This thesis offers new developments in matrix-product state theory for studying the strongly correlated systems and quantum information processing through three major projects: In the first project, we perform a systematic comparison between Wilson's numerical renormalization group (NRG) and White's density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG). The NRG method for solving quantum impurity models yields a set of energy eigenstates that have the form of matrix-product states (MPS). White's DMRG for treating quantum lattice problems can likewise be reformulated in terms of MPS. Thus, the latter constitute a common algebraic structure for both approaches. We exploit this fact to compare the NRG approach for the single-impurity Anderson model to a variational matrix-product state approach (VMPS), equivalent to single-site DMRG. For the latter, we use an ''unfolded'' Wilson chain, which brings about a significant reduction in numerical costs compared to those of NRG. We show that all NRG eigenstates (kept and discarded) can be reproduced using VMPS, and compare the difference in truncation criteria, sharp vs. smooth in energy space, of the two approaches. Finally, we demonstrate that NRG results can be improved upon systematically by performing a variational optimization in the space of variational matrix-product states, using the states produced by NRG as input. In the second project we demonstrate how the matrix-product state formalism provides a flexible structure to solve the constrained optimization problem associated with the sequential generation of entangled multiqubit states under experimental restrictions. We consider a realistic scenario in which an ancillary system with a limited number of levels performs restricted sequential interactions with qubits in a row. The proposed method relies on a suitable local optimization procedure, yielding an efficient recipe for the realistic and approximate sequential generation of any

  4. On the phase-correlation and phase-fluctuation dynamics of a strongly excited Bose gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakhel, Roger R., E-mail: rogersakhel@yahoo.com [Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Information Technology, Isra University, Amman 11622 (Jordan); The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34151 (Italy); Sakhel, Asaad R. [Department of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Engineering Technology, Balqa Applied University, Amman 11134 (Jordan); The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34151 (Italy); Ghassib, Humam B. [Department of Physics, The University of Jordan, Amman 11942 (Jordan)

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of a Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) is explored in the wake of a violent excitation caused by a strong time-dependent deformation of a trapping potential under the action of an intense stirring laser. The system is a two-dimensional BEC confined to a power-law trap with hard-wall boundaries. The stirring agent is a moving red-detuned laser potential. The time-dependent Gross–Pitaevskii equation is solved numerically by the split-step Crank–Nicolson method in real time. The phase correlations and phase fluctuations are examined as functions of time to demonstrate the evolving properties of a strongly-excited BEC. Of special significance is the occurrence of spatial fluctuations while the condensate is being excited. These oscillations arise from stirrer-induced density fluctuations. While the stirrer is inside the trap, a reduction in phase coherence occurs, which is attributed to phase fluctuations.

  5. Understanding Strongly Correlated Materials thru Theory Algorithms and High Performance Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotliar, Gabriel

    A long standing challenge in condensed matter physics is the prediction of physical properties of materials starting from first principles. In the past two decades, substantial advances have taken place in this area. The combination of modern implementations of electronic structure methods in conjunction with Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT), in combination with advanced impurity solvers, modern computer codes and massively parallel computers, are giving new system specific insights into the properties of strongly correlated electron systems enable the calculations of experimentally measurable correlation functions. The predictions of this ''theoretical spectroscopy'' can be directly compared with experimental results. In this talk I will briefly outline the state of the art of the methodology, and illustrate it with an example the origin of the solid state anomalies of elemental Plutonium.

  6. Feshbach Prize: New Phenomena and New Physics from Strongly-Correlated Quantum Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Joseph A.

    2017-01-01

    Strongly correlated quantum matter is ubiquitous in physics from cold atoms to nuclei to the cold dense matter found in neutron stars. Experiments from table-top to the extremely large scale experiments including FRIB and LIGO will help determine the properties of matter across an incredible scale of distances and energies. Questions to be addressed include the existence of exotic states of matter in cold atoms and nuclei, the response of this correlated matter to external probes, and the behavior of matter in extreme astrophysical environments. A more complete understanding is required, both to understand these diverse phenomena and to employ this understanding to probe for new underlying physics in experiments including neutrinoless double beta decay and accelerator neutrino experiments. I will summarize some aspects of our present understanding and highlight several important prospects for the future.

  7. Nutritional status is strongly correlated with grip strength and depression in community-living elderly Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaburagi, Tomoko; Hirasawa, Reiko; Yoshino, Haruka; Odaka, Yukino; Satomi, Mariko; Nakano, Mana; Fujimoto, Eka; Kabasawa, Kazuyuki; Sato, Kazuto

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate the utility of the Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA) in assessing nutritional, physical and psychosocial functions in community-living elderly individuals. A cross-sectional study of elderly individuals investigated in August 2007 and August-September 2008. Nutritional status was assessed using serum biomarkers, anthropometric measurements and the MNA. Physical function was assessed by measuring grip strength and both usual and maximum walking speeds. The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) was used to measure the individual's depressive state. Elder-care facilities in Tokyo, Japan. Community-living elderly individuals aged ≥65 years (n 130). The MNA evaluation classified twenty-seven (20·8 %) individuals as being at risk for malnutrition (MNA score ≤23·5); these at-risk individuals included a high proportion of the elderly aged ≥75 years. MNA scores correlated with nutritional biomarkers (total protein, albumin, cholinesterase, Hb) and anthropometric measurements (triceps skinfold, subscapular skinfold, mid-arm muscle area) and exhibited a strong correlation with grip strength and GDS score. Multivariate analysis revealed that grip strength, GDS score, marital status and maximum walking speed are strong predictors of MNA score. The MNA is considerably useful in providing a comprehensive assessment of nutritional status in elderly, community-living Japanese. However, larger-scale epidemiological studies are needed to determine the utility and the appropriate cut-off point of the MNA as a screen for risk of malnutrition.

  8. First-principles study of strong correlation effects in pyrochlore iridates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinaoka, Hiroshi [Department of Physics, Saitama University (Japan); Hoshino, Shintaro [Department of Basic Science, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Troyer, Matthias [Theoretische Physik, ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Werner, Philipp [Department of Physics, University of Fribourg (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    The pyrochlore iridates A{sub 2}Ir{sub 2}O{sub 7} (A=Pr, Nd, Y, etc.) are an ideal system to study fascinating phenomena induced by strong electron correlations and spin-orbit coupling. In this talk, we study strong correlation effects in the prototype compound Y{sub 2}Ir{sub 2}O{sub 7} using the local density approximation and dynamical mean-field theory (LDA+DMFT). We map out the phase diagram in the space of temperature, onsite Coulomb repulsion U, and filling. Consistent with experiments, we find that an all-in/all-out ordered insulating phase is stable for realistic values of U. We reveal the importance of the hybridization between j{sub eff} = 1/2 and j{sub eff} = 3/2 states under the Coulomb interaction and trigonal crystal field. We demonstrate a substantial band narrowing in the paramagnetic metallic phase and non-Fermi liquid behavior in the electron/hole doped system originating from long-lived quasi-spin moments induced by nearly flat bands. We further compare our results with recent experimental results of Eu{sub 2}Ir{sub 2}O{sub 7} under hydrostatic pressure.

  9. Conventional and Ultrafast Pump-Probe Time-Resolved Raman Spectroscopy of Strongly Correlated Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jhih-An

    Raman scattering has become an invaluable tool for the study of strongly-correlated systems because it can directly probe phonons, magnetic excitations, and electronic excitations. The extension of Raman scattering to the time domain by using the pump-probe technique allows us to study the femtosecond dynamics under a non-equilibrium condition. Time-resolved Raman scattering thus is able to disentangle different fundamental interactions that are difficult to distinguish in the energy domain by their different temporal evolution. In this thesis we show the development of time-resolved Raman spectroscopy and its applications to investigate non-equilibrium dynamics in novel materials. The first part of this thesis is devoted to using large-shift Raman spectroscopy to study the electronic structure of Sr2IrO4, a spin-orbit-induced Mott insulator. We found two high-energy excitations of the d-shell multiplet at 690 meV and 680 meV with A1g and B1g symmetry respectively. We show that both pseudospin-flip and non-pseudosin-flip dd electronic transitions are Raman active, but only the latter are observed. The second part is devoted to the study of the time dynamics of electron-hole excitations as well as the G-phonon in graphite after an excitation by an intense laser pulse. We found that the increase of the G-phonon population occurs with a delay of ˜65 fs in contradiction with the two-temperature model. This time-delay is also evidenced by the absence of the so-called self-pumping for G phonons. It decreases with increased pump fluence. We show that these observations imply a new relaxation pathway: Instead of hot carriers transferring energy to G-phonons directly, the energy is first transferred to optical phonons near the zone boundary K-points, which then decay into G-phonons via phonon-phonon scattering. In the third part we study magnetic dynamics in insulating YBa2 Cu3O6+x using time-resolved Raman spectroscopy. We observed ultrafast melting of the magnetic order

  10. Strong correlation between D 2 density and electron temperature at the target of divertors found in SOLPS analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangeby, P. C.; Sang, Chaofeng

    2017-05-01

    A companion paper (Sang et al 2016 Nucl. Fusion (https://doi.org/10.1088/1741-4326/aa6548)) reports an assessment, using the SOLPS5.0 (B2-EIRENE) code, of the relative importance of two key aspects of divertor-baffle geometry: (i) divertor closure, and (ii) field-target angle. A wide range of the degree of divertor closure and field-target angle were modeled. An unexpectedly strong and simple correlation has been discovered in these data (and is reported here) between the electron temperature, T et, and the D 2 density, n{{D2}t}{} at the target, for T et  grid spanning two power decay widths outward from the separatrix. This may imply that achievement of low T et reduces, essentially, to identifying the divertor-baffle geometry which achieves the highest gas density near the target. To try to identify the controlling physics involved, two-point model formatting (2PMF) has been applied to the code output; it finds an equally strong and simple correlation between the 2PMF volumetric power-loss factor, {{f}\\text{vol-\\text{pwr}-\\text{loss}}} , and n{{D2}t}{} for each flux tube: {{f}\\text{vol-\\text{pwr}-\\text{loss}}}=1.2× {{10}29}n{{D2}t}-1.54~ with R 2 = 0.93. While these trends are broadly as would be expected, the simplicity, tightness and span of the correlations are not understood at present. Additionally, since more of the volumetric power loss is due to impurities than to deuterium, and as the impurities do not radiate just at the target, it is not evident why {{f}\\text{vol-\\text{pwr}-\\text{loss}}} is so strongly correlated with n{{D2}t}{} . To address these questions, in future work 2PMF analysis will be extended to compute the individual contributions to {{f}\\text{vol-\\text{pwr}-\\text{loss}}} .

  11. Correlation Models for Temperature Fields

    KAUST Repository

    North, Gerald R.

    2011-05-16

    This paper presents derivations of some analytical forms for spatial correlations of evolving random fields governed by a white-noise-driven damped diffusion equation that is the analog of autoregressive order 1 in time and autoregressive order 2 in space. The study considers the two-dimensional plane and the surface of a sphere, both of which have been studied before, but here time is introduced to the problem. Such models have a finite characteristic length (roughly the separation at which the autocorrelation falls to 1/e) and a relaxation time scale. In particular, the characteristic length of a particular temporal Fourier component of the field increases to a finite value as the frequency of the particular component decreases. Some near-analytical formulas are provided for the results. A potential application is to the correlation structure of surface temperature fields and to the estimation of large area averages, depending on how the original datastream is filtered into a distribution of Fourier frequencies (e.g., moving average, low pass, or narrow band). The form of the governing equation is just that of the simple energy balance climate models, which have a long history in climate studies. The physical motivation provided by the derivation from a climate model provides some heuristic appeal to the approach and suggests extensions of the work to nonuniform cases.

  12. Construction of Exchange-Correlation Potentials for Strongly Interacting One-Dimensional Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J. Wildon O.; Vieira, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    One-dimensional (1D) systems are useful laboratories aiming further improvement of electronic structure calculations. In order to simulate electron-electron interactions, two types of expressions are commonly considered: soft-Coulomb and exponential. For both cases, in the context of density-functional theory (DFT), 1D systems can be employed to gain insight into the ingredients accurate exchange-correlation (XC) density functionals must incorporate. A question of major interest is the treatment of strongly interacting situations, one of the main modern challenges for DFT. In this manuscript, we propose a generalization of preexisting XC potentials which can be applied to investigate the transition from weak to strong interactions. Specifically, we employ the intriguing behavior of electrons confined in one dimension: the spin-charge separation, for which spin and charge are decoupled to form two independent quasiparticles, spinons, and chargons. By means of Friedel oscillations, our results indicate it is possible to reproduce the weak-strong interaction transition by using a simple strategy we name, from previous works, spin-charge separation correction (SCSC). In addition, SCSC also yields good results in reproducing the constancy of the highest occupied Kohn-Sham eigenvalues upon fractional electron charges.

  13. Incoherent Fermi-Pasta-Ulam Recurrences and Unconstrained Thermalization Mediated by Strong Phase Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasoni, M.; Garnier, J.; Rumpf, B.; Sugny, D.; Fatome, J.; Amrani, F.; Millot, G.; Picozzi, A.

    2017-01-01

    The long-standing and controversial Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem addresses fundamental issues of statistical physics, and the attempt to resolve the mystery of the recurrences has led to many great discoveries, such as chaos, integrable systems, and soliton theory. From a general perspective, the recurrence is commonly considered as a coherent phase-sensitive effect that originates in the property of integrability of the system. In contrast to this interpretation, we show that convection among a pair of waves is responsible for a new recurrence phenomenon that takes place for strongly incoherent waves far from integrability. We explain the incoherent recurrence by developing a nonequilibrium spatiotemporal kinetic formulation that accounts for the existence of phase correlations among incoherent waves. The theory reveals that the recurrence originates in a novel form of modulational instability, which shows that strongly correlated fluctuations are spontaneously created among the random waves. Contrary to conventional incoherent modulational instabilities, we find that Landau damping can be completely suppressed, which unexpectedly removes the threshold of the instability. Consequently, the recurrence can take place for strongly incoherent waves and is thus characterized by a reduction of nonequilibrium entropy that violates the H theorem of entropy growth. In its long-term evolution, the system enters a secondary turbulent regime characterized by an irreversible process of relaxation to equilibrium. At variance with the expected thermalization described by standard Gibbsian statistical mechanics, our thermalization process is not dictated by the usual constraints of energy and momentum conservation: The inverse temperatures associated with energy and momentum are zero. This unveils a previously unrecognized scenario of unconstrained thermalization, which is relevant to a variety of weakly dispersive wave systems. Our work should stimulate the development of new

  14. Herschel-ATLAS: modelling the first strong gravitational lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, S.; Negrello, M.; Hopwood, R.; Nightingale, J. W.; Bussmann, R. S.; Amber, S.; Bourne, N.; Cooray, A.; Dariush, A.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S. A.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Maddox, S.; Valiante, E.; Smith, M.

    2014-05-01

    We have determined the mass density radial profiles of the first five strong gravitational lens systems discovered by the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey. We present an enhancement of the semilinear lens inversion method of Warren & Dye which allows simultaneous reconstruction of several different wavebands and apply this to dual-band imaging of the lenses acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope. The five systems analysed here have lens redshifts which span a range 0.22 ≤ z ≤ 0.94. Our findings are consistent with other studies by concluding that: (1) the logarithmic slope of the total mass density profile steepens with decreasing redshift; (2) the slope is positively correlated with the average total projected mass density of the lens contained within half the effective radius and negatively correlated with the effective radius; (3) the fraction of dark matter contained within half the effective radius increases with increasing effective radius and increases with redshift.

  15. Non-linear quantum-classical scheme to simulate non-equilibrium strongly correlated fermionic many-body dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreula, J. M.; Clark, S. R.; Jaksch, D.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a non-linear, hybrid quantum-classical scheme for simulating non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly correlated fermions described by the Hubbard model in a Bethe lattice in the thermodynamic limit. Our scheme implements non-equilibrium dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) and uses a digital quantum simulator to solve a quantum impurity problem whose parameters are iterated to self-consistency via a classically computed feedback loop where quantum gate errors can be partly accounted for. We analyse the performance of the scheme in an example case.

  16. The hadronic standard model for strong and electroweak interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raczka, R. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    We propose a new model for strong and electro-weak interactions. First, we review various QCD predictions for hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron processes. We indicate that the present formulation of strong interactions in the frame work of Quantum Chromodynamics encounters serious conceptual and numerical difficulties in a reliable description of hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron interactions. Next we propose to replace the strong sector of Standard Model based on unobserved quarks and gluons by the strong sector based on the set of the observed baryons and mesons determined by the spontaneously broken SU(6) gauge field theory model. We analyse various properties of this model such as asymptotic freedom, Reggeization of gauge bosons and fundamental fermions, baryon-baryon and meson-baryon high energy scattering, generation of {Lambda}-polarization in inclusive processes and others. Finally we extend this model by electro-weak sector. We demonstrate a remarkable lepton and hadron anomaly cancellation and we analyse a series of important lepton-hadron and hadron-hadron processes such as e{sup +} + e{sup -} {yields} hadrons, e{sup +} + e{sup -} {yields} W{sup +} + W{sup -}, e{sup +} + e{sup -} {yields} p + anti-p, e + p {yields} e + p and p + anti-p {yields} p + anti-p processes. We obtained a series of interesting new predictions in this model especially for processes with polarized particles. We estimated the value of the strong coupling constant {alpha}(M{sub z}) and we predicted the top baryon mass M{sub {Lambda}{sub t}} {approx_equal} 240 GeV. Since in our model the proton, neutron, {Lambda}-particles, vector mesons like {rho}, {omega}, {phi}, J/{psi} ect. and leptons are elementary most of experimentally analysed lepton-hadron and hadron-hadron processes in LEP1, LEP2, LEAR, HERA, HERMES, LHC and SSC experiments may be relatively easily analysed in our model. (author). 252 refs, 65 figs, 1 tab.

  17. Focusing cosmic telescopes: systematics of strong lens modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Traci Lin; Sharon, Keren q.

    2018-01-01

    The use of strong gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters has become a popular method for studying the high redshift universe. While diverse in computational methods, lens modeling techniques have grasped the means for determining statistical errors on cluster masses and magnifications. However, the systematic errors have yet to be quantified, arising from the number of constraints, availablity of spectroscopic redshifts, and various types of image configurations. I will be presenting my dissertation work on quantifying systematic errors in parametric strong lensing techniques. I have participated in the Hubble Frontier Fields lens model comparison project, using simulated clusters to compare the accuracy of various modeling techniques. I have extended this project to understanding how changing the quantity of constraints affects the mass and magnification. I will also present my recent work extending these studies to clusters in the Outer Rim Simulation. These clusters are typical of the clusters found in wide-field surveys, in mass and lensing cross-section. These clusters have fewer constraints than the HFF clusters and thus, are more susceptible to systematic errors. With the wealth of strong lensing clusters discovered in surveys such as SDSS, SPT, DES, and in the future, LSST, this work will be influential in guiding the lens modeling efforts and follow-up spectroscopic campaigns.

  18. Interfaces between strongly correlated oxides: controlling charge transfer and induced magnetism by hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibes, Manuel

    At interfaces between conventional materials, band bending and alignment are controlled by differences in electrochemical potential. Applying this concept to oxides in which interfaces can be polar and cations may adopt a mixed valence has led to the discovery of novel two-dimensional states between simple band insulators such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. However, many oxides have a more complex electronic structure, with charge, orbital and/or spin orders arising from correlations between transition metal and oxygen ions. Strong correlations thus offer a rich playground to engineer functional interfaces but their compatibility with the classical band alignment picture remains an open question. In this talk we will show that beyond differences in electron affinities and polar effects, a key parameter determining charge transfer at correlated oxide interfaces is the energy required to alter the covalence of the metal-oxygen bond. Using the perovskite nickelate (RNiO3) family as a template, we have probed charge reconstruction at interfaces with gadolinium titanate GdTiO3 using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We show that the charge transfer is thwarted by hybridization effects tuned by the rare-earth (R) size. Charge transfer results in an induced ferromagnetic-like state in the nickelate (observed by XMCD), exemplifying the potential of correlated interfaces to design novel phases. Further, our work clarifies strategies to engineer two-dimensional systems through the control of both doping and covalence. Work supported by ERC CoG MINT #615759.

  19. Strong electron correlation in the decomposition reaction of dioxetanone with implications for firefly bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Loren; Mazziotti, David A

    2010-10-28

    Dioxetanone, a key component of the bioluminescence of firefly luciferin, is itself a chemiluminescent molecule due to two conical intersections on its decomposition reaction surface. While recent calculations of firefly luciferin have employed four electrons in four active orbitals [(4,4)] for the dioxetanone moiety, a study of dioxetanone [F. Liu et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 6181 (2009)] indicates that a much larger active space is required. Using a variational calculation of the two-electron reduced-density-matrix (2-RDM) [D. A. Mazziotti, Acc. Chem. Res. 39, 207 (2006)], we present the ground-state potential energy surface as a function of active spaces from (4,4) to (20,17) to determine the number of molecular orbitals required for a correct treatment of the strong electron correlation near the conical intersections. Because the 2-RDM method replaces exponentially scaling diagonalizations with polynomially scaling semidefinite optimizations, we readily computed large (18,15) and (20,17) active spaces that are inaccessible to traditional wave function methods. Convergence of the electron correlation with active-space size was measured with complementary RDM-based metrics, the von Neumann entropy of the one-electron RDM as well as the Frobenius and infinity norms of the cumulant 2-RDM. Results show that the electron correlation is not correctly described until the (14,12) active space with small variations present through the (20,17) space. Specifically, for active spaces smaller than (14,12), we demonstrate that at the first conical intersection, the electron in the σ(∗) orbital of the oxygen-oxygen bond is substantially undercorrelated with the electron of the σ orbital and overcorrelated with the electron of the carbonyl oxygen's p orbital. Based on these results, we estimate that in contrast to previous treatments, an accurate calculation of the strong electron correlation in firefly luciferin requires an active space of 28 electrons in 25 orbitals

  20. The correlation between the Nernst effect and fluctuation diamagnetism in strongly fluctuating superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Kingshuk; Banerjee, Sumilan; Mukerjee, Subroto; Ramakrishnan, T. V.

    2017-07-01

    We study the Nernst effect in fluctuating superconductors by calculating the transport coefficient {α }{xy} in a phenomenological model where the relative importance of phase and amplitude fluctuations of the order parameter is tuned continuously to smoothly evolve from an effective XY model to the more conventional Ginzburg-Landau description. To connect with a concrete experimental realization we choose the model parameters appropriate for cuprate superconductors and calculate {α }{xy} and the magnetization {M} over the entire range of experimentally accessible values of field, temperature and doping. We argue that {α }{xy} and {M} are both determined by the equilibrium properties of the superconducting fluctuations (and not their dynamics) despite the former being a transport quantity. Thus, the experimentally observed correlation between the Nernst signal and the magnetization arises primarily from the correlation between {α }{xy} and {M}. Further, there exists a dimensionless ratio {M}/(T{α }{xy}) that quantifies this correlation. We calculate, for the first time, this ratio over the entire phase diagram of the cuprates and find it agrees with previous results obtained in specific parts of the phase diagram. We conclude that there appears to be no sharp distinction between the regimes dominated by phase fluctuations and Gaussian fluctuations for this ratio in contrast to {α }{xy} and {M} individually. The utility of this ratio is that it can be used to determine the extent to which superconducting fluctuations contribute to the Nernst effect in different parts of the phase diagram given the measured values of magnetization.

  1. Collective oscillations of strongly correlated one-dimensional bosons on a lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigol, M; Rousseau, V; Scalettar, R T; Singh, R R P

    2005-09-09

    We study the dipole oscillations of strongly correlated 1D bosons, in the hard-core limit, on a lattice, by an exact numerical approach. We show that far from the regime where a Mott insulator appears in the system, damping is always present and increases for larger initial displacements of the trap, causing dramatic changes in the momentum distribution, n(k). When a Mott insulator sets in the middle of the trap, the center of mass barely moves after an initial displacement, and n(k) remains very similar to the one in the ground state. We also study changes introduced by the damping in the natural orbital occupations, and the revival of the center-of-mass oscillations after long times.

  2. Adaptation of the Landau-Migdal quasiparticle pattern to strongly correlated Fermi systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodel, V. A. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Clark, J. W. [Washington University, McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences and Department of Physics (United States); Zverev, M. V., E-mail: zverev@mbslab.kiae.ru [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-15

    A quasiparticle pattern advanced in Landau's first article on Fermi-liquid theory is adapted to elucidate the properties of a class of strongly correlated Fermi systems characterized by a Lifshitz phase diagram featuring a quantum critical point (QCP) where the density of states diverges. The necessary condition for stability of the Landau Fermi-Liquid state is shown to break down in such systems, triggering a cascade of topological phase transitions that lead, without symmetry violation, to states with multi-connected Fermi surfaces. The end point of this evolution is found to be an exceptional state whose spectrum of single-particle excitations exhibits a completely flat portion at zero temperature. Analysis of the evolution of the temperature dependence of the single-particle spectrum yields results that provide a natural explanation of classical behavior of this class of Fermi systems in the QCP region.

  3. Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations of Strongly-Correlated Systems, the Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-07

    In this final report, we present preliminary results of ground state phases of interacting spinless Dirac fermions. The name "Dirac fermion" originates from the fact that low-energy excitations of electrons hopping on the honeycomb lattice are described by a relativistic Dirac equation. Dirac fermions have received much attention particularly after the seminal work of Haldale1 which shows that the quantum Hall physics can be realized on the honeycomb lattice without magnetic fields. Haldane's work later becomes the foundation of topological insulators (TIs). While the physics of TIs is based largely on spin-orbit coupled non-interacting electrons, it was conjectured that topological insulators can be induced by strong correlations alone.

  4. Quantum physics of light and matter photons, atoms, and strongly correlated systems

    CERN Document Server

    Salasnich, Luca

    2017-01-01

    This compact but exhaustive textbook, now in its significantly revised and expanded second edition, provides an essential introduction to the field quantization of light and matter with applications to atomic physics and strongly correlated systems. Following an initial review of the origins of special relativity and quantum mechanics, individual chapters are devoted to the second quantization of the electromagnetic field and the consequences of light field quantization for the description of electromagnetic transitions. The spin of the electron is then analyzed, with particular attention to its derivation from the Dirac equation. Subsequent topics include the effects of external electric and magnetic fields on the atomic spectra and the properties of systems composed of many interacting identical particles. The book also provides a detailed explanation of the second quantization of the non-relativistic matter field, i.e., the Schrödinger field, which offers a powerful tool for the investigation of many-body...

  5. Strongly correlated impurity band superconductivity in diamond: X-ray spectroscopic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Baskaran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In a recent X-ray absorption study in boron doped diamond, Nakamura et al. have seen a well isolated narrow boron impurity band in non-superconducting samples and an additional narrow band at the chemical potential in a superconducting sample. We interpret the beautiful spectra as evidence for upper Hubbard band of a Mott insulating impurity band and an additional metallic 'mid-gap band' of a conducting 'self-doped' Mott insulator. This supports the basic framework of a recent theory of the present author of strongly correlated impurity band superconductivity (impurity band resonating valence bond, IBRVB theory in a template of a wide-gap insulator, with no direct involvement of valence band states.

  6. Variation in Rural African Gut Microbiota Is Strongly Correlated with Colonization by Entamoeba and Subsistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Elise R.; Lynch, Joshua; Froment, Alain; Lafosse, Sophie; Heyer, Evelyne; Przeworski, Molly; Blekhman, Ran; Ségurel, Laure

    2015-01-01

    The human gut microbiota is impacted by host nutrition and health status and therefore represents a potentially adaptive phenotype influenced by metabolic and immune constraints. Previous studies contrasting rural populations in developing countries to urban industrialized ones have shown that industrialization is strongly correlated with patterns in human gut microbiota; however, we know little about the relative contribution of factors such as climate, diet, medicine, hygiene practices, host genetics, and parasitism. Here, we focus on fine-scale comparisons of African rural populations in order to (i) contrast the gut microbiota of populations inhabiting similar environments but having different traditional subsistence modes and either shared or distinct genetic ancestry, and (ii) examine the relationship between gut parasites and bacterial communities. Characterizing the fecal microbiota of Pygmy hunter-gatherers as well as Bantu individuals from both farming and fishing populations in Southwest Cameroon, we found that the gut parasite Entamoeba is significantly correlated with microbiome composition and diversity. We show that across populations, colonization by this protozoa can be predicted with 79% accuracy based on the composition of an individual's gut microbiota, and that several of the taxa most important for distinguishing Entamoeba absence or presence are signature taxa for autoimmune disorders. We also found gut communities to vary significantly with subsistence mode, notably with some taxa previously shown to be enriched in other hunter-gatherers groups (in Tanzania and Peru) also discriminating hunter-gatherers from neighboring farming or fishing populations in Cameroon. PMID:26619199

  7. Variation in Rural African Gut Microbiota Is Strongly Correlated with Colonization by Entamoeba and Subsistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Elise R; Lynch, Joshua; Froment, Alain; Lafosse, Sophie; Heyer, Evelyne; Przeworski, Molly; Blekhman, Ran; Ségurel, Laure

    2015-11-01

    The human gut microbiota is impacted by host nutrition and health status and therefore represents a potentially adaptive phenotype influenced by metabolic and immune constraints. Previous studies contrasting rural populations in developing countries to urban industrialized ones have shown that industrialization is strongly correlated with patterns in human gut microbiota; however, we know little about the relative contribution of factors such as climate, diet, medicine, hygiene practices, host genetics, and parasitism. Here, we focus on fine-scale comparisons of African rural populations in order to (i) contrast the gut microbiota of populations inhabiting similar environments but having different traditional subsistence modes and either shared or distinct genetic ancestry, and (ii) examine the relationship between gut parasites and bacterial communities. Characterizing the fecal microbiota of Pygmy hunter-gatherers as well as Bantu individuals from both farming and fishing populations in Southwest Cameroon, we found that the gut parasite Entamoeba is significantly correlated with microbiome composition and diversity. We show that across populations, colonization by this protozoa can be predicted with 79% accuracy based on the composition of an individual's gut microbiota, and that several of the taxa most important for distinguishing Entamoeba absence or presence are signature taxa for autoimmune disorders. We also found gut communities to vary significantly with subsistence mode, notably with some taxa previously shown to be enriched in other hunter-gatherers groups (in Tanzania and Peru) also discriminating hunter-gatherers from neighboring farming or fishing populations in Cameroon.

  8. Patient-specific Immune States before Surgery are Strong Correlates of Surgical Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragiadakis, Gabriela K.; Gaudillière, Brice; Ganio, Edward A.; Aghaeepour, Nima; Tingle, Martha; Nolan, Garry P.; Angst, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recovery after surgery is highly variable. Risk-stratifying patients based on their predicted recovery profile will afford individualized perioperative management strategies. Recently, application of mass cytometry in patients undergoing hip arthroplasty revealed strong immune correlates of surgical recovery in blood samples collected shortly after surgery. However, the ability to interrogate a patient’s immune state before surgery and predict recovery is highly desirable in perioperative medicine. Methods To evaluate a patient’s pre-surgical immune state, cell-type specific intracellular signaling responses to ex-vivo ligands (LPS, IL-6, IL-10, IL-2/GM-CSF) were quantified by mass cytometry in pre-surgical blood samples. Selected ligands modulate signaling processes perturbed by surgery. Twenty-three cell surface and 11 intracellular markers were used for the phenotypic and functional characterization of major immune cell subsets. Evoked immune responses were regressed against patient-centered outcomes contributing to protracted recovery including functional impairment, postoperative pain, and fatigue. Results Evoked signaling responses varied significantly and defined patient-specific pre-surgical immune states. Eighteen signaling responses correlated significantly with surgical recovery parameters (|R|=0.37–0.70; FDRpost-surgical samples. Conclusion Convergent findings in pre- and post-surgical analyses provide validation of reported immune correlates and suggest a critical role of the TLR4 signaling pathway in monocytes for the clinical recovery process. The comprehensive assessment of patients’ preoperative immune state is promising for predicting important recovery parameters and may lead to clinical tests using standard flow cytometry. PMID:26655308

  9. Finite-temperature properties of strongly correlated fermions in the honeycomb lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Baoming; Paiva, Thereza; Khatami, Ehsan; Rigol, Marcos

    2014-05-01

    We study finite-temperature properties of the Hubbard model in the honeycomb lattice using numerical linked-cluster expansions and determinantal quantum Monte Carlo simulations. Specifically, we calculate experimentally relevant quantities, such as the entropy, the specific heat, uniform and staggered spin susceptibilities, nearest-neighbor spin correlations, and the double occupancy at and away from half filling. We show that in homogeneous systems adiabatic cooling is more efficient at finite doping than at half filling, and that this can be used in trapped geometries to create a Mott insulating phase with exponentially long antiferromagnetic correlations at relatively high entropies. Those entropies are found to be higher in the honeycomb lattice than in the square one suggesting that the experimental realization of an antiferromagnetic Mott insulator may be easier in the former geometry.

  10. Precise finite-temperature properties of disordred strongly-correlated electronic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ehsan

    The interplay between disorder and electronic interactions in quantum many-body systems is not well understood. Experiments with ultracold atoms on optical lattices hold a great promise for exploring the different competing phases that arise in these systems by simulating disordered quantum lattice models in the presence of interactions. However, these experiments often rely on precise and approximate-free results from numerical calculations for various static and dynamic properties of these models in order to characterize the experimental systems. In this talk, I will present recently obtained data for the thermodynamic properties and magnetic correlations of the disordered three-dimensional Hubbard model using the determinant quantum Monte Carlo. I will also discuss new techniques within the numerical linked-cluster expansions that allow for fast and precise calculation of finite-temperature properties of disordered systems in the thermodynamic limit.

  11. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory: A New Way To Treat Strongly Correlated Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Laura; Truhlar, Donald G; Li Manni, Giovanni; Carlson, Rebecca K; Hoyer, Chad E; Bao, Junwei Lucas

    2017-01-17

    The electronic energy of a system provides the Born-Oppenheimer potential energy for internuclear motion and thus determines molecular structure and spectra, bond energies, conformational energies, reaction barrier heights, and vibrational frequencies. The development of more efficient and more accurate ways to calculate the electronic energy of systems with inherently multiconfigurational electronic structure is essential for many applications, including transition metal and actinide chemistry, systems with partially broken bonds, many transition states, and most electronically excited states. Inherently multiconfigurational systems are called strongly correlated systems or multireference systems, where the latter name refers to the need for using more than one ("multiple") configuration state function to provide a good zero-order reference wave function. This Account describes multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which was developed as a way to combine the advantages of wave function theory (WFT) and density functional theory (DFT) to provide a better treatment of strongly correlated systems. First we review background material: the widely used Kohn-Sham DFT (which uses only a single Slater determinant as reference wave function), multiconfiguration WFT methods that treat inherently multiconfigurational systems based on an active space, and previous attempts to combine multiconfiguration WFT with DFT. Then we review the formulation of MC-PDFT. It is a generalization of Kohn-Sham DFT in that the electron kinetic energy and classical electrostatic energy are calculated from a reference wave function, while the rest of the energy is obtained from a density functional. However, there are two main differences with respent to Kohn-Sham DFT: (i) The reference wave function is multiconfigurational rather than being a single Slater determinant. (ii) The density functional is a function of the total density and the on-top pair density rather than

  12. Entropy excess in strongly correlated Fermi systems near a quantum critical point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, J.W., E-mail: jwc@wuphys.wustl.edu [McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences and Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Zverev, M.V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Moscow, 123098 (Russian Federation); Khodel, V.A. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation); McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences and Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    A system of interacting, identical fermions described by standard Landau Fermi-liquid (FL) theory can experience a rearrangement of its Fermi surface if the correlations grow sufficiently strong, as occurs at a quantum critical point where the effective mass diverges. As yet, this phenomenon defies full understanding, but salient aspects of the non-Fermi-liquid (NFL) behavior observed beyond the quantum critical point are still accessible within the general framework of the Landau quasiparticle picture. Self-consistent solutions of the coupled Landau equations for the quasiparticle momentum distribution n(p) and quasiparticle energy spectrum {epsilon}(p) are shown to exist in two distinct classes, depending on coupling strength and on whether the quasiparticle interaction is regular or singular at zero momentum transfer. One class of solutions maintains the idempotency condition n{sup 2}(p)=n(p) of standard FL theory at zero temperature T while adding pockets to the Fermi surface. The other solutions are characterized by a swelling of the Fermi surface and a flattening of the spectrum {epsilon}(p) over a range of momenta in which the quasiparticle occupancies lie between 0 and 1 even at T=0. The latter, non-idempotent solution is revealed by analysis of a Poincare mapping associated with the fundamental Landau equation connecting n(p) and {epsilon}(p) and validated by solution of a variational condition that yields the symmetry-preserving ground state. Significantly, this extraordinary solution carries the burden of a large temperature-dependent excess entropy down to very low temperatures, threatening violation of the Nernst Theorem. It is argued that certain low-temperature phase transitions, notably those involving Cooper-pair formation, offer effective mechanisms for shedding the entropy excess. Available measurements in heavy-fermion compounds provide concrete support for such a scenario. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extension of Landau

  13. Correlations of Strong Martian Crustal Magnetic Fields With Valley Networks and Phyllosilicate Exposures: Implications for Magnetic Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, L. L.; Harrison, K. P.; Langlais, B.; Lillis, R. J.; Poulet, F.

    2009-05-01

    A broad spatial correlation between strong martian crustal magnetic fields and the valley networks, which are indicative of surface water erosion, has previously been reported. In this paper, we report initial evidence for a correlation of phyllosilicate exposures identified to date using Mars Express OMEGA data with strong crustal fields and valley networks in the Noachian southern highlands. Two separate statistical methods confirm the significance of the phyllosilicate exposure correlation. Like the valley networks and crustal fields, the phyllosilicate exposures are distributed north and east of Hellas in the southern highlands but are nearly absent within, south, and west of this basin. Similarly, they are present north and west of Argyre but are sparse within, south, and east of this basin. All three tend to occur mainly at low paleolatitudes as inferred from magnetic anomaly modeling by several groups. We interpret the correlation to imply that the strongest crustal magnetization formed primarily while liquid water was present in the martian upper crust. The source of the water could have been from above (precipitation) or from below (mantle outgassing). A likely explanation is that the production in magnetic source regions of efficient remanence carriers was enhanced in the presence of magmatic heat through hydrothermal chemical processes. For example, magnetite production could have been enhanced through serpentinization. Geologic evidence suggests that magmatic intrusions occurred commonly in the upper highland crust during the Noachian. If these intrusions occurred in the form of dikes and/or dendritic conduits over regions as large as 200 - 600 km during time periods less than the dynamo reversal time scale, then magnetic source regions with dimensions comparable to those inferred from orbital data could be accounted for.

  14. Strong correlations in hysteretic and switching behavior of resistance ramdom access memories (RRAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenberg, M. J.; Inoue, I. H.; Sanchez, M. J.

    2004-03-01

    We propose a basic model that should be relevant for some novel "two-terminal" devices under current heavy experimental investigation, such as resistance random access memory (RRAM) based on the manganites and titanates among others. Our model stands on a key assumption of the existence of charge inhomogeneity, i.e., a structure of domains, in the semiconducting medium. Carriers can hop between the domains and also hop between the external leads and the domains. Its relevance is validated by explicitly showing that solutions obtained by the Monte Carlo simulations are in great qualitative agreement with many experimentally observed features. The most salient ones are hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics, the non-volatility of memory states, and the multilevel switching between the memory states. A significant feature borne out from our results is that electron correlations in the domains holds the key of the mechanism.

  15. Signatures of pairing in the magnetic excitation spectrum of strongly correlated two-leg ladders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, A.; Patel, N. D.; Dagotto, E.; Alvarez, G.

    2017-11-01

    Magnetic interactions are widely believed to play a crucial role in the microscopic mechanism leading to high critical temperature superconductivity. It is therefore important to study the signatures of pairing in the magnetic excitation spectrum of simple models known to show unconventional superconducting tendencies. Using the density matrix renormalization group technique, we calculate the dynamical spin structure factor S (k ,ω ) of a generalized t -U -J Hubbard model away from half filling in a two-leg ladder geometry. The addition of J enhances pairing tendencies. We analyze quantitatively the signatures of pairing in the magnetic excitation spectra. We found that the superconducting pair-correlation strength, that can be estimated independently from ground state properties, is closely correlated with the integrated low-energy magnetic spectral weight in the vicinity of (π ,π ) . In this wave-vector region, robust spin incommensurate features develop with increasing doping. The branch of the spectrum with rung direction wave vector krung=0 does not change substantially with doping where pairing dominates and thus plays a minor role. We discuss the implications of our results for neutron scattering experiments, where the spin excitation dynamics of hole-doped quasi-one-dimensional magnetic materials can be measured and also address implications for recent resonant inelastic x-ray scattering experiments.

  16. Reproducible resistive switching effect for memory applications in heterocontacts based on strongly correlated electron systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tulina, N.A. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation)], E-mail: tulina@issp.ac.ru; Borisenko, I.Yu.; Sirotkin, V.V. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High Purity Materials, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation)

    2008-10-27

    The transitional processes in heterocontacts based on strongly correlated electron systems (SCES) are studied for analyzing of the effect of resistive switching (ERS). It has been shown that the process is asymmetric with respect to switching into 'on' and 'off' states, the switching time is controlled by a voltage level, this time can be less than microseconds, on the other hand, relaxation processes can reach tens seconds. The switching is controlled by two processes: a change in the resistance state of the normal metal/SCES interface under effect of electric current field and by electrodiffusion of oxygen to vacancies, at that the doping level of the contact area and resistive properties of the heterocontact change. In particular, electrodiffusion of mobile oxygen induced by the electric field makes it possible to use a device with ERS as a memristor. On the other hand, a possibility to control the switching time and ON and OFF parameters show the possibilities to use these devices as memory elements 'RAM'.

  17. Non-Equilibrium Dynamics of C-QED Arrays in Strong Correlation Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Ding; Li, Zhi-Hang; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-11-01

    Recently increasing interests are attracted in the physics of controlled arrays of nonlinear cavity resonators because of the rapid experimental progress achieved in cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). For a driven-dissipative two-dimentional planar C-QED array, standard Markov master equation is generally used to study the dynamics of this system. However, when in the case that the on-site photon-photon interaction enters strong correlation regime, standard Markov master equation may lead to incorrect results. In this paper we study the non-equilibrium dynamics of a two-dimentional C-QED array, which is homogeneously pumped by an external pulse, at the same time dissipation exits. We study the evolution of the average photon number of a single cavity by deriving a modified master equation to. In comparison with the standard master equation, the numerical result obtained by our newly derived master equation shows significant difference for the non-equilibrium dynamics of the system.

  18. PREFACE: International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems 2014 (SCES2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The 2014 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES) was held in Grenoble from the 7th to 11th of July on the campus of the University of Grenoble. It was a great privilege to have the conference in Grenoble after the series of meetings in Sendai (1992), San Diego (1993), Amsterdam (1994), Goa (1995), Zürich (1996), Paris (1998), Nagano (1999), Ann Arbor (2001), Krakow (2002), Karlsruhe (2004), Vienna (2005), Houston (2007), Buzios (2008), Santa Fe (2010), Cambridge (2011) and Tokyo (2013). Every three years, SCES joins the triennial conference on magnetism ICM. In 2015, ICM will take place in Barcelona. The meeting gathered an audience of 875 participants who actively interacted inside and outside of conference rooms. A large number of posters (530) was balanced with four parallel oral sessions which included 86 invited speakers and 141 short oral contributions. A useful arrangement was the possibility to put poster presentations on the website so participants could see them all through the conference week. Each morning two plenary sessions were held, ending on Friday with experimental and theoretical summaries delivered by Philipp Gegenwart (Augsburg) and Andrew Millis (Columbia). The plenary sessions were given by Gabriel Kotliar (Rutgers), Masashi Kawasaki (Tokyo), Jennifer Hoffman (Harvard), Mathias Vojta (Dresden), Ashvin Vishwanath (Berkeley), Andrea Cavalleri (Hamburg), Marc-Henri Julien (Grenoble), Neil Mathur (Cambridge), Giniyat Khaliullin (Stuttgart), and Toshiro Sakakibara (Tokyo). The parallel oral sessions were prepared by 40 symposium organizers selected by the chairman (Antoine Georges) and co-chairman (Kamran Behnia) of the Program Committee with the supplementary rule that speakers had not delivered an invited talk at the previous SCES conference held in 2013 in Tokyo. Special attention was given to help young researchers via grants to 40 overseas students. Perhaps due to the additional possibility of cheap

  19. Symmetries and Topological Order: Realizations and Signals in Correlated Strong Spin-Orbit Coupled Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Ping

    Spin-orbit coupling exists in materials in general. However, it entangles the spin and orbital degrees of freedom and complicates the model. Thus, theorists usually neglect the effects induced by spin-orbit coupling first and consider spin-orbit coupling as perturbation next. The non-perturbative effects brought up by spin-orbit coupling are thus often less studied or overlooked. On the other hand, the majority in the study of interacting topological order focusing on the general structure of theories and made significant advances by leaving material details behind. It is thus important to find possible microscopic models that could realize the new phases in laboratories and benefits from the progress of theories to make experimental predictions. In this thesis, we study the physical effects due to strong spin-orbit coupling from the perspective of searching new quantum orders and the non-trivial responses. (i) The first project, we propose the nontrivial dipolar-octupolar(DO) doublets on the pyrochlore lattice. By studying the most general symmetry allowed model at the localized and the itinerant limit for DO doublets, we found two 3D symmetry enriched topological orders and topological insulator correspondingly. (ii) In the second project, we analyze the 2D model descending from the localized limit of DO doublets on pyrochlore. The discrete onsite symmetry and space group symmetry could lead to a symmetry-enriched topological order with symmetry fractionalization pattern that cannot emerge from a spin model with continuous spin rotational symmetry. The non-trivial symmetry fractionalization pattern contributes to the striking numerical signal that can help identifying the topological order. (iii) In the third project, we develop a theory to understand the high-energy Raman signal in Sr2IrO4.

  20. Hirshfeld atom refinement for modelling strong hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woińska, Magdalena; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Spackman, Mark A; Edwards, Alison J; Dominiak, Paulina M; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Nishibori, Eiji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Grabowsky, Simon

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution low-temperature synchrotron X-ray diffraction data of the salt L-phenylalaninium hydrogen maleate are used to test the new automated iterative Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) procedure for the modelling of strong hydrogen bonds. The HAR models used present the first examples of Z' > 1 treatments in the framework of wavefunction-based refinement methods. L-Phenylalaninium hydrogen maleate exhibits several hydrogen bonds in its crystal structure, of which the shortest and the most challenging to model is the O-H...O intramolecular hydrogen bond present in the hydrogen maleate anion (O...O distance is about 2.41 Å). In particular, the reconstruction of the electron density in the hydrogen maleate moiety and the determination of hydrogen-atom properties [positions, bond distances and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs)] are the focus of the study. For comparison to the HAR results, different spherical (independent atom model, IAM) and aspherical (free multipole model, MM; transferable aspherical atom model, TAAM) X-ray refinement techniques as well as results from a low-temperature neutron-diffraction experiment are employed. Hydrogen-atom ADPs are furthermore compared to those derived from a TLS/rigid-body (SHADE) treatment of the X-ray structures. The reference neutron-diffraction experiment reveals a truly symmetric hydrogen bond in the hydrogen maleate anion. Only with HAR is it possible to freely refine hydrogen-atom positions and ADPs from the X-ray data, which leads to the best electron-density model and the closest agreement with the structural parameters derived from the neutron-diffraction experiment, e.g. the symmetric hydrogen position can be reproduced. The multipole-based refinement techniques (MM and TAAM) yield slightly asymmetric positions, whereas the IAM yields a significantly asymmetric position.

  1. From strong to weak coupling in holographic models of thermalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grozdanov, Sašo; Kaplis, Nikolaos [Instituut-Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Leiden University,Niels Bohrweg 2, Leiden 2333 CA (Netherlands); Starinets, Andrei O. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford,1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-29

    We investigate the analytic structure of thermal energy-momentum tensor correlators at large but finite coupling in quantum field theories with gravity duals. We compute corrections to the quasinormal spectra of black branes due to the presence of higher derivative R{sup 2} and R{sup 4} terms in the action, focusing on the dual to N=4 SYM theory and Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We observe the appearance of new poles in the complex frequency plane at finite coupling. The new poles interfere with hydrodynamic poles of the correlators leading to the breakdown of hydrodynamic description at a coupling-dependent critical value of the wave-vector. The dependence of the critical wave vector on the coupling implies that the range of validity of the hydrodynamic description increases monotonically with the coupling. The behavior of the quasinormal spectrum at large but finite coupling may be contrasted with the known properties of the hierarchy of relaxation times determined by the spectrum of a linearized kinetic operator at weak coupling. We find that the ratio of a transport coefficient such as viscosity to the relaxation time determined by the fundamental non-hydrodynamic quasinormal frequency changes rapidly in the vicinity of infinite coupling but flattens out for weaker coupling, suggesting an extrapolation from strong coupling to the kinetic theory result. We note that the behavior of the quasinormal spectrum is qualitatively different depending on whether the ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density is greater or less than the universal, infinite coupling value of ℏ/4πk{sub B}. In the former case, the density of poles increases, indicating a formation of branch cuts in the weak coupling limit, and the spectral function shows the appearance of narrow peaks. We also discuss the relation of the viscosity-entropy ratio to conjectured bounds on relaxation time in quantum systems.

  2. A multifluid model extended for strong temperature nonequilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-08

    We present a multifluid model in which the material temperature is strongly affected by the degree of segregation of each material. In order to track temperatures of segregated form and mixed form of the same material, they are defined as different materials with their own energy. This extension makes it necessary to extend multifluid models to the case in which each form is defined as a separate material. Statistical variations associated with the morphology of the mixture have to be simplified. Simplifications introduced include combining all molecularly mixed species into a single composite material, which is treated as another segregated material. Relative motion within the composite material, diffusion, is represented by material velocity of each component in the composite material. Compression work, momentum and energy exchange, virtual mass forces, and dissipation of the unresolved kinetic energy have been generalized to the heterogeneous mixture in temperature nonequilibrium. The present model can be further simplified by combining all mixed forms of materials into a composite material. Molecular diffusion in this case is modeled by the Stefan-Maxwell equations.

  3. Dynamical mean-field theory and path integral renormalisation group calculations of strongly correlated electronic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilmann, D.B.

    2007-02-15

    The two-plane HUBBARD model, which is a model for some electronic properties of undoped YBCO superconductors as well as displays a MOTT metal-to-insulator transition and a metal-to-band insulator transition, is studied within Dynamical Mean-Field Theory using HIRSCH-FYE Monte Carlo. In order to find the different transitions and distinguish the types of insulator, we calculate the single-particle spectral densities, the self-energies and the optical conductivities. We conclude that there is a continuous transition from MOTT to band insulator. In the second part, ground state properties of a diagonally disordered HUBBARD model is studied using a generalisation of Path Integral Renormalisation Group, a variational method which can also determine low-lying excitations. In particular, the distribution of antiferromagnetic properties is investigated. We conclude that antiferromagnetism breaks down in a percolation-type transition at a critical disorder, which is not changed appreciably by the inclusion of correlation effects, when compared to earlier studies. Electronic and excitation properties at the system sizes considered turn out to primarily depend on the geometry. (orig.)

  4. Phase-space perspective on the wavelength-dependent electron correlation of strong-field double ionization of Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yun; Yuan, Zongqiang; Ye, Difa; Fu, Libin; Liu, Ming-Ming; Sun, Xufei; Wu, Chengyin; Liu, Jie; Gong, Qihuang; Liu, Yunquan

    2017-12-01

    We measure the wavelength-dependent correlated-electron momentum (CEM) spectra of strong-field double ionization of Xe atoms, and observe a significant change from a roughly nonstructured (uncorrelated) pattern at 795 nm to an elongated distribution with V-shaped structure (correlated) at higher wavelengths of 1320 and 1810 nm, pointing to the transition of the ionization dynamics imprinted in the momentum distributions. These observations are well reproduced by a semiclassical model using Green–Sellin–Zachor potential to take into account the screening effect. We show that the momentum distribution of Xe2+ undergoes a bifurcation structure emerging from single-hump to double-hump structure as the laser wavelength increases, which is dramatically different from that of He2+, indicating the complex multi-electron effect. By back analyzing the double ionization trajectories in the phase space (the initial transverse momentum and the laser phase at the tunneling exit) of the first tunneled electrons, we provide deep insight into the physical origin for electron correlation dynamics. We find that a random distribution in phase-space is responsible for a less distinct structured CEM spectrum at shorter wavelength. While increasing the laser wavelength, a topology-invariant pattern in phase-space appears, leading to the clearly visible V-shaped structures.

  5. Strong Local-Nonlocal Coupling for Integrated Fracture Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littlewood, David John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Silling, Stewart A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mitchell, John A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Seleson, Pablo D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bond, Stephen D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Parks, Michael L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turner, Daniel Z. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burnett, Damon J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ostien, Jakob [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Gunzburger, Max [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Peridynamics, a nonlocal extension of continuum mechanics, is unique in its ability to capture pervasive material failure. Its use in the majority of system-level analyses carried out at Sandia, however, is severely limited, due in large part to computational expense and the challenge posed by the imposition of nonlocal boundary conditions. Combined analyses in which peridynamics is em- ployed only in regions susceptible to material failure are therefore highly desirable, yet available coupling strategies have remained severely limited. This report is a summary of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project "Strong Local-Nonlocal Coupling for Inte- grated Fracture Modeling," completed within the Computing and Information Sciences (CIS) In- vestment Area at Sandia National Laboratories. A number of challenges inherent to coupling local and nonlocal models are addressed. A primary result is the extension of peridynamics to facilitate a variable nonlocal length scale. This approach, termed the peridynamic partial stress, can greatly reduce the mathematical incompatibility between local and nonlocal equations through reduction of the peridynamic horizon in the vicinity of a model interface. A second result is the formulation of a blending-based coupling approach that may be applied either as the primary coupling strategy, or in combination with the peridynamic partial stress. This blending-based approach is distinct from general blending methods, such as the Arlequin approach, in that it is specific to the coupling of peridynamics and classical continuum mechanics. Facilitating the coupling of peridynamics and classical continuum mechanics has also required innovations aimed directly at peridynamic models. Specifically, the properties of peridynamic constitutive models near domain boundaries and shortcomings in available discretization strategies have been addressed. The results are a class of position-aware peridynamic constitutive laws for

  6. Statistical moments in superposition models and strongly intensive measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broniowski, Wojciech; Olszewski, Adam

    2017-06-01

    First, we present a concise glossary of formulas for composition of standard, cumulant, factorial, and factorial cumulant moments in superposition (compound) models, where final particles are created via independent emission from a collection of sources. Explicit mathematical formulas for the composed moments are given to all orders. We discuss the composition laws for various types of moments via the generating-function methods and list the formulas for the unfolding of the unwanted fluctuations. Second, the technique is applied to the difference of the scaled multiplicities of two particle types. This allows for a systematic derivation and a simple algebraic interpretation of the so-called strongly intensive fluctuation measures. With the help of the formalism we obtain several new strongly intensive measures involving higher-rank moments. The reviewed as well as the new results may be useful in investigations of mechanisms of particle production and event-by-event fluctuations in high-energy nuclear and hadronic collisions, and in particular in the search for signatures of the QCD phase transition at a finite baryon density.

  7. L233P mutation of the Tax protein strongly correlated with leukemogenicity of bovine leukemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Emi; Matsumura, Keiko; Soma, Norihiko; Hirasawa, Shintaro; Wakimoto, Mayuko; Arakaki, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Osawa, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Katsunori

    2013-12-27

    The bovine leukemia virus (BLV) Tax protein is believed to play a crucial role in leukemogenesis by the virus. BLV usually causes asymptomatic infections in cattle, but only one-third develop persistent lymphocytosis that rarely progress after a long incubation period to lymphoid tumors, namely enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL). In the present study, we demonstrated that the BLV tax genes could be divided into two alleles and developed multiplex PCR detecting an L233P mutation of the Tax protein. Then, in order to define the relationship between the Tax protein and leukemogenicity, we examined 360 tumor samples randomly collected from dairy or breeding cattle in Japan, of which Tax proteins were categorized, for age at the time of diagnosis of EBL. The ages of 288 animals (80.0%) associated with L233-Tax and those of 70 animals (19.4%) with P233-Tax individually followed log-normal distributions. Only the two earliest cases (0.6%) with L233-Tax disobeyed the log-normal distribution. These findings suggest that the animals affected by EBL were infected with the virus at a particular point in life, probably less than a few months after birth. Median age of those with P233-Tax was 22 months older than that with L233-Tax and geometric means exhibited a significant difference (P<0.01). It is also quite unlikely that viruses carrying the particular Tax protein infect older cattle. Here, we conclude that BLV could be divided into two categories on the basis of amino acid at position 233 of the Tax protein, which strongly correlated with leukemogenicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Origin of the photoinduced current of strongly correlated YMnO3 ferroelectric epitaxial films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Kohei; Zhang, Lejun; Kiriya, Daisuke; Ashida, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Fujimura, Norifumi

    2017-10-01

    We have studied the photoinduced carrier generation and the carrier emission resulting in a photoinduced current using strongly correlated YMnO3 ferroelectric thin films. The unipolar material YMnO3 is suitable for studying the effect of the ferroelectric polarization on the photoinduced current. A clear relationship between the direction of the polarization and the photoinduced current was recognized using (0001)YMnO3 epitaxial films. The current switching corresponding to the polarization switching is also observed under white light illumination. To study the origin of the photoinduced current that originated from the photoinduced carrier generation, the light energy dependence of the photoinduced current was investigated. A small peak at 1.75 eV and a broad peak at around 2.5 eV are observed at room temperature. The peak at 1.75 eV corresponds to the optical absorption at 1.7 eV generated by the electron transition between the Mn 3d (xy,x2 - y2) (e2g state)/O 2p hybridized band and upper Mn 3d (3z 2 - r 2) (a1g state) orbital. The broad peak of the photoinduced current corresponds to the broad photoluminescence excitation spectrum at around 2.5 eV, which is never observed in absorption measurement but reported as the hidden optical channel. The origin of the photoinduced current of YMnO3 is discussed in relation to the carrier generation and the emission processes.

  9. <strong>Driving forces behind the increasing cardiovascular treatment intensity.strong>>A dynamic epidemiologic model of trends in Danish cardiovascular drug utilization. strong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Andersen, Morten

    -state (untreated, treated, dead) semi-Markov model to analyse the dynamics of drug use. Transitions were from untreated to treated (incidence), the reverse (discontinuation), and from either untreated or treated to dead. Stratified by sex and age categories, prevalence trends of "growth driving" drug categories...

  10. Correlated two-electron momentum spectra for strong-field non-sequential double ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudenko, Artem; Ergler, Thorsten; Zrost, Karl; Feuerstein, Bernold; Kremer, Manuel; Fischer, Bettina; Schroeter, Claus Dieter; Moshammer, Robert; Ullrich, Joachim [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Jesus, Vitor de [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Quimica de Nilopolis/RJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Non-sequential double ionization (NSDI) of atoms by intense linearly polarized laser fields has remained one of the central and most controversial topics in strong-field physics for more than two decades. Though most of the experimental findings are in good overall agreement with a semiclassical ''recollision'' model, the current understanding of NSDI is far from being complete. Here we present the results of a kinematically complete experiment on NSDI of He by 800 nm 25 fs 1.5 PW/cm{sup 2} laser pulses. In contrast to earlier experimental results for Ne and Ar, we observe a pronounced v-shaped structure in the two-electron momentum distributions along the laser polarization (''longitudinal'') direction, which was predicted by several S-matrix calculations, and by the numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. This pattern, indicating that both electrons have non-equal longitudinal momenta in the final state, can be explained by the role of the Coulomb repulsion and typical (e,2e) recollision kinematics.

  11. Electrodynamic modeling of strong coupling between a metasurface and intersubband transitions in quantum wells

    CERN Document Server

    Campione, Salvatore; Klem, John F; Sinclair, Michael B; Brener, Igal; Capolino, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Strong light-matter coupling has recently been demonstrated in sub-wavelength volumes by coupling engineered optical transitions in semiconductor heterostructures (e.g., quantum wells) to metasurface resonances via near fields. It has also been shown that different resonator shapes may lead to different Rabi splittings, though this has not yet been well explained. In this paper, our aim is to understand the correlation between resonator shape and Rabi splitting, and in particular determine and quantify the physical parameters that affect strong coupling by developing an equivalent circuit network model whose elements describe energy and dissipation. Because of the subwavelength dimension of each metasurface element, we resort to the quasi-static (electrostatic) description of the near-field and hence define an equivalent capacitance associated to each dipolar element of a flat metasurface, and we show that this is also able to accurately model the phenomenology involved in strong coupling between the metasurf...

  12. Experiments on a strongly correlated material: photoresponse, phase diagram and hydrogen doping of vanadium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasirga, T. Serkan

    The metal-insulator transition (MIT) in vanadium dioxide (VO2) has attracted waves of attention after its rst observation by Morin in 1959. There are several reasons for the interest in this material. First, its metal-insulator transition is at an easily accessible temperature which allows investigators to study the eect of strong electronic correlations with little eort. Second reason is VO2 oers many applications, although most of them are mundane, a few may have signicant eects on dierent areas of technology. However, even after over half a century there is still a debate about the nature of the MIT and non of the applications proposed have been realized. The main culprit for this is the diculties in studying the bulk crystals of VO 2. In bulk crystals, defects in the crystal, impurities and domain structure causes irreproducible results. This combined with the theoretical challenges made studying VO2 and realization of applications impractical. However, recent discovery of the growth technique for growing the nano-scale crystals, revitalized the interest in VO2. In this dissertation I present the experimental studies that we performed on VO2. I discussed the ndings from three major studies we performed; photoresponse, finding the strain-temperature phase diagram and hydrogen doping of VO2. We used scanning photocurrent microscopy technique to reveal the light-matter interaction in VO2. Suspended nanobeam devices are used in the experiments and results revealed that photoresponse of VO2 is dominated by the thermal eects and there is no photovoltaic contribution. Results are published in Nature Nanotechnology in 2012 . In the second study, we determined the strain-temperature phase stability diagram of VO2. This is the first ever determination of the phase diagram of a solid state phase transition. Also our studies revealed that the triple point coincides with the critical point, which has important implications for both theoretical studies of the MIT in VO 2 and

  13. Ehrenfest's theorem and the validity of the two-step model for strong-field ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shvetsov-Shilovskiy, Nikolay; Dimitrovski, Darko; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    with situations where the ensemble average of the force deviates considerably from the force calculated at the average position of the trajectories of the ensemble. We identify the general trends for the applicability of the semiclassical model in terms of intensity, ellipticity, and wavelength of the laser pulse......By comparison with the solution of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation we explore the validity of the two-step semiclassical model for strong-field ionization in elliptically polarized laser pulses. We find that the discrepancy between the two-step model and the quantum theory correlates...

  14. Ehrenfest's theorem and the validity of the two-step model for strong-field ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shvetsov-Shilovskiy, Nikolay; Dimitrovski, Darko; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2013-01-01

    with situations where the ensemble average of the force deviates considerably from the force calculated at the average position of the trajectories of the ensemble. We identify the general trends for the applicability of the semiclassical model in terms of intensity, ellipticity, and wavelength of the laser pulse......By comparison with the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation we explore the validity of the two-step semiclassical model for strong-field ionization in elliptically polarized laser pulses. We find that the discrepancy between the two-step model and the quantum theory correlates...

  15. Strong correlation between levels of tropospheric hydroxyl radicals and solar ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, Franz; Berresheim, Harald

    2006-07-13

    The most important chemical cleaning agent of the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical, OH. It determines the oxidizing power of the atmosphere, and thereby controls the removal of nearly all gaseous atmospheric pollutants. The atmospheric supply of OH is limited, however, and could be overcome by consumption due to increasing pollution and climate change, with detrimental feedback effects. To date, the high variability of OH concentrations has prevented the use of local observations to monitor possible trends in the concentration of this species. Here we present and analyse long-term measurements of atmospheric OH concentrations, which were taken between 1999 and 2003 at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeissenberg in southern Germany. We find that the concentration of OH can be described by a surprisingly linear dependence on solar ultraviolet radiation throughout the measurement period, despite the fact that OH concentrations are influenced by thousands of reactants. A detailed numerical model of atmospheric reactions and measured trace gas concentrations indicates that the observed correlation results from compensations between individual processes affecting OH, but that a full understanding of these interactions may not be possible on the basis of our current knowledge of atmospheric chemistry. As a consequence of the stable relationship between OH concentrations and ultraviolet radiation that we observe, we infer that there is no long-term trend in the level of OH in the Hohenpeissenberg data set.

  16. Footprints of electron correlation in strong-field double ionization of Kr close to the sequential-ionization regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaokai; Wang, Chuncheng; Yuan, Zongqiang; Ye, Difa; Ma, Pan; Hu, Wenhui; Luo, Sizuo; Fu, Libin; Ding, Dajun

    2017-09-01

    By combining kinematically complete measurements and a semiclassical Monte Carlo simulation we study the correlated-electron dynamics in the strong-field double ionization of Kr. Interestingly, we find that, as we step into the sequential-ionization regime, there are still signatures of correlation in the two-electron joint momentum spectrum and, more intriguingly, the scaling law of the high-energy tail is completely different from early predictions on the low-Z atom (He). These experimental observations are well reproduced by our generalized semiclassical model adapting a Green-Sellin-Zachor potential. It is revealed that the competition between the screening effect of inner-shell electrons and the Coulomb focusing of nuclei leads to a non-inverse-square central force, which twists the returned electron trajectory at the vicinity of the parent core and thus significantly increases the probability of hard recollisions between two electrons. Our results might have promising applications ranging from accurately retrieving atomic structures to simulating celestial phenomena in the laboratory.

  17. Nonequilibrium self-energy functional theory. Accessing the real-time dynamics of strongly correlated fermionic lattice systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Felix

    2016-07-05

    The self-energy functional theory (SFT) is extended to the nonequilibrium case and applied to the real-time dynamics of strongly correlated lattice-fermions. Exploiting the basic structure of the well established equilibrium theory the entire formalism is reformulated in the language of Keldysh-Matsubara Green's functions. To this end, a functional of general nonequilibrium self-energies is constructed which is stationary at the physical point where it moreover yields the physical grand potential of the initial thermal state. Nonperturbative approximations to the full self-energy can be constructed by reducing the original lattice problem to smaller reference systems and varying the functional on the space of the respective trial self-energies, which are parametrized by the reference system's one-particle parameters. Approximations constructed in this way can be shown to respect the macroscopic conservation laws related to the underlying symmetries of the original lattice model. Assuming thermal equilibrium, the original SFT is recovered from the extended formalism. However, in the general case, the nonequilibrium variational principle comprises functional derivatives off the physical parameter space. These can be carried out analytically to derive inherently causal conditional equations for the optimal physical parameters of the reference system and a computationally realizable propagation scheme is set up. As a benchmark for the numerical implementation the variational cluster approach is applied to the dynamics of a dimerized Hubbard model after fast ramps of its hopping parameters. Finally, the time-evolution of a homogeneous Hubbard model after sudden quenches and ramps of the interaction parameter is studied by means of a dynamical impurity approximation with a single bath site. Sharply separated by a critical interaction at which fast relaxation to a thermal final state is observed, two differing response regimes can be distinguished, where the

  18. Correlated electron-ion collisions in a strong laser field; Korrelierte Elektron-Ion-Stoesse in starken Laserfeldern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristow, T.

    2007-12-17

    Electron-ion-collisions in plasmas in the presence of an ultra-short intensive laser pulse can cause high energy transfers to the electrons. During the collision the oscillation energy of the electron in the laser field is changed into drift energy. In this regime, multi-photon processes, known from the ionization of neutral atoms (Above-Threshold Ionization), and successive, so called correlated collisions, are important. The subject of the thesis is a study of binary Coulomb collisions in strong laser fields. The collisions are treated both in the context of classical Newtonian mechanics and in the quantum-mechanical framework by the Schroedinger equation. In the classical case a simplified instantaneous collision model and a complete dynamical treatment are discussed. Collisions can be treated instantaneously, if the ratio of the impact parameter to the quiver amplitude is small. The energy distributions calculated in this approximation show an elastic peak and a broad plateau due to rescattered electrons. At incident velocities smaller than the quiver velocity, correlated collisions are observed in the electron trajectories of the dynamical model. This effect leads to characteristic momentum distributions of the electrons, that are explicitly calculated and compared with the results of the instantaneous model. In addition, the time-dependence of the collisions is discussed in the framework of a singular perturbation theory. The complete description of the Coulomb scattering requires a quantum-mechanical description. A time-dependent method of wave-packet scattering is used and the corresponding time-dependent three-dimensional Schroedinger equation is solved by an implicit ADImethod on a spatial grid. The momentum and the energy distributions of the scattered electrons are calculated by the Fourier transformation of the wavefunction. A comparison of the scattering from a repulsive and an attractive potential is used to distinguish between simple collisions and

  19. Strong genetic correlation between interview-assessed internalizing disorders and a brief self-report symptom scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerde, Line C; Røysamb, Espen; Czajkowski, Nikolai; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Orstavik, Ragnhild E; Kendler, Kenneth S; Tambs, Kristian

    2011-02-01

    Self-report scales for symptoms of anxiety and depression are frequently used for screening and research purposes. A moderate phenotypic association between disorders measured by diagnostic interviews and symptoms of anxiety and depression measured by self-report scales has been shown, but little is known about the overlap in these phenotypes' genetic and environmental variance. In the present study, we used twin modeling to identify common genetic and environmental liabilities underlying the phenotypic association between the self-report Symptom Checklist-5 (SCL-5) and lifetime internalizing disorders derived from the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). The sample consisted of 7,992 young adult twins from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health Twin Panel (NIPHT), who all responded to a questionnaire. A subset of 2,793 individuals later underwent structured interviews. The best fitting model showed a strong genetic correlation of 0.82 (95% confidence interval; 0.61-1.0) between current self-report symptoms of anxiety and depression, and lifetime internalizing disorders, which suggests an almost complete overlap in genetic liability. The correlation between environmental factors was much lower: 0.16 (0.00-0.34, 95% CI). This implies that brief self-report scales capture genetic variance that is highly overlapping with the genetic variance common to internalizing disorder diagnoses. It thus follows that SCL-5 and similar instruments may be used as screening instruments for genetic risk factors that influence liability to internalizing disorders. In addition, existing data on self-report symptoms of anxiety and depression can be used with increased confidence to specify models including effects from genes coding for internalizing disorders.

  20. Two-gluon rapidity correlations of strong colour field in pp, pA and AA collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Ye-Yin, E-mail: yeyin.zhao@gmail.com; Xu, Ming-Mei; Zhang, Heng-Ying; Wu, Yuan-Fang, E-mail: wuyf@mail.ccnu.edu.cn

    2016-11-15

    Using the CGC formalism, we calculate the two-gluon rapidity correlations of strong colour fields in pp, pA and AA collisions, respectively. If one trigger gluon is fixed at central rapidity, a ridge-like correlation pattern is obtained in symmetry pp and AA collisions, and a huge bump-like correlation pattern is presented in asymmetry pA collisions. It is demonstrated that long-range ridge-like rapidity correlations are caused by the stronger correlation with the gluon of colour source. These features are independent of the azimuthal angular of two selected gluon. They are qualitatively consistent with current observed data at LHC. The transverse momentum and incident energy dependence of the ridge and bump-like correlations are also systematically studied. The ridge is more likely observed at higher incident energy and lower transverse momentum of trigger gluon.

  1. Atomic physics of strongly correlated systems. Progress report, 1 August 1980-31 July 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C.D.

    1981-03-01

    Studies of electron correlations of doubly-excited electrons in hyperspherical coordinates, and differential and total cross sections for charge transfer and ionization in fast ion-atom collisions are reported. (GHT)

  2. Strong Correlation Between Isoprene Emission and Gross Photosynthetic Capacity During Leaf Phenology of the Tropical Tree Species Hymenaea courbaril

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, U.; Rottenberger, S.; Biesenthal, T.; Wolf, A.; Schebeske, G.; Ciccioli, P.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2004-12-01

    Composition and amount of volatile organic compound (VOC) emission of the tropical tree species Hymenaea courbaril was studied under different developmental stages at a remote Amazonian rainforest site. The different stages covered young leaves (= grown full in size, but not fully turgescent) in the end of the dry season, mature leaves in the end of dry and wet season, and senescent leaves in the end of dry season. Though the diel isoprene emissions pattern could adequately be modelled by a current isoprene algorithm, the basal emission capacity of isoprene changed considerably over the course of leaf development. The inadequacy of using one single standard emission factor to represent the VOC emission capacity of tropical vegetation for an entire seasonal cycle is obvious. A strong linear correlation between the isoprene emission capacity and the gross photosynthetic capacity (GPmax) covering all developmental stages and seasons was observed. Hence, basic leaf photosynthetic activity may offer a valuable basis to model the seasonal variation of isoprene emission, especially in tropical regions where the environmental conditions vary less than in temperate regions. Of special interest was the light dependent monoterpene emission found exclusively in the period between bud break and leave maturity. The finding of this temporary emergence of monoterpene emission may be of general interest in understanding both the ecological functions of isoprenoid production and the regulatory processes involved.

  3. Strong correlations between the exponent α and the particle number for a Renyi monoatomic gas in Gibbs' statistical mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plastino, A.; Rocca, M. C.

    2017-06-01

    Appealing to the 1902 Gibbs formalism for classical statistical mechanics (SM)—the first SM axiomatic theory ever that successfully explained equilibrium thermodynamics—we show that already at the classical level there is a strong correlation between Renyi's exponent α and the number of particles for very simple systems. No reference to heat baths is needed for such a purpose.

  4. On strongly correlated N-electron systems | Enaibe | Journal of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An attempt is made in this work to extend the correlated variational approach of Chen and Mei [1], which was developed for two-electron systems, to N-electron systems (N>2). Preliminary results are reported here for four electrons interacting under a Hubbard-type potential in a one-dimensional lattice with only four sites

  5. Phase transitions of the dimerized Kane-Mele model with/without strong interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tao; Li, Yue-Xun; Li, Yan; Lu, He-Lin; Zhang, Hui

    2017-09-01

    The dimerized Kane-Mele model with/without strong interaction is studied using analytical methods. The boundary of the topological phase transition of the model without strong interaction is obtained. Our results show that the occurrence of the transition only depends on dimerized parameter α . From the one-particle spectrum, we obtain the completed phase diagram including the quantum spin Hall state and the topologically trivial insulator. Then, using different mean field methods, we investigate the Mott transition and the magnetic transition of the strongly correlated dimerized Kane-Mele model. In the region between the two transitions, the topological Mott insulator with characteristics of Mott insulators and topological phases may be the most interesting phase. In this work, the effects of hopping anisotropy and Hubbard interaction U on the boundaries of the two transitions are observed in detail. The completed phase diagram of the dimerized Kane-Mele-Hubbard model is also obtained in this work. Quantum fluctuations have extremely important influences on a quantum system. However, investigations are under the framework of mean field treatment in this work and the effects of fluctuations in this model will be discussed in the future.

  6. Correlations and Non-Linear Probability Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breen, Richard; Holm, Anders; Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    2014-01-01

    Although the parameters of logit and probit and other non-linear probability models are often explained and interpreted in relation to the regression coefficients of an underlying linear latent variable model, we argue that they may also be usefully interpreted in terms of the correlations between...... the dependent variable of the latent variable model and its predictor variables. We show how this correlation can be derived from the parameters of non-linear probability models, develop tests for the statistical significance of the derived correlation, and illustrate its usefulness in two applications. Under...... certain circumstances, which we explain, the derived correlation provides a way of overcoming the problems inherent in cross-sample comparisons of the parameters of non-linear probability models....

  7. Histologically Measured Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Correlates with Body Height as Strongly as with Body Mass Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac myocytes are presumed to enlarge with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH. This study correlates histologically measured myocytes with lean and fat body mass. Cases of LVH without coronary heart disease and normal controls came from forensic autopsies. The cross-sectional widths of myocytes in H&E-stained paraffin sections followed log normal distributions almost to perfection in all 104 specimens, with constant coefficient of variation across the full range of ventricular weight, as expected if myocytes of all sizes contribute proportionately to hypertrophy. Myocyte sizes increased with height. By regression analysis, height2.7 as a proxy for lean body mass and body mass index (BMI as a proxy for fat body mass, exerted equal effects in the multiple correlation with myocyte volume, and the equation rejected race and sex. In summary, myocyte sizes, as indexes of LVH, suggest that lean and fat body mass may contribute equally.

  8. Strong Solar Control of Infrared Aurora on Jupiter: Correlation Since the Last Solar Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiuk, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Hewagama, T.

    2009-01-01

    Polar aurorae in Jupiter's atmosphere radiate throughout the electromagnetic spectrum from X ray through mid-infrared (mid-IR, 5 - 20 micron wavelength). Voyager IRIS data and ground-based spectroscopic measurements of Jupiter's northern mid-IR aurora, acquired since 1982, reveal a correlation between auroral brightness and solar activity that has not been observed in Jovian aurora at other wavelengths. Over nearly three solar cycles, Jupiter auroral ethane emission brightness and solar 10.7 cm radio flux and sunspot number are positively correlated with high confidence. Ethane line emission intensity varies over tenfold between low and high solar activity periods. Detailed measurements have been made using the GSFC HIPWAC spectrometer at the NASA IRTF since the last solar maximum, following the mid-IR emission through the declining phase toward solar minimum. An even more convincing correlation with solar activity is evident in these data. Current analyses of these results will be described, including planned measurements on polar ethane line emission scheduled through the rise of the next solar maximum beginning in 2009, with a steep gradient to a maximum in 2012. This work is relevant to the Juno mission and to the development of the Europa Jupiter System Mission. Results of observations at the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) operated by the University of Hawaii under Cooperative Agreement no. NCC5-538 with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Science Mission Directorate, Planetary Astronomy Program. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program.

  9. Indistinguishability and correlation in model systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laguna, H G; Sagar, R P, E-mail: sagar@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-05-06

    We study the influence of wavefunction symmetry on localization measures of quantum mechanical distributions for two non-interacting particles in a box, in position and in momentum spaces. A comparison between the marginal distributions and the previously studied one-particle model is performed. The correlation coefficient and mutual information are examined as measures of correlation and the differences discussed. The influence of symmetry on the correlation measures is examined in both spaces.

  10. Strong temperature dependence of extraordinary magnetoresistance correlated to mobility in a two-contact device

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian

    2012-02-21

    A two-contact extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) device has been fabricated and characterized at various temperatures under magnetic fields applied in different directions. Large performance variations across the temperature range have been found, which are due to the strong dependence of the EMR effect on the mobility. The device shows the highest sensitivity of 562ω/T at 75 K with the field applied perpendicularly. Due to the overlap between the semiconductor and the metal shunt, the device is also sensitive to planar fields but with a lower sensitivity of about 20 to 25% of the one to perpendicular fields. © 2012 The Japan Society of Applied Physics.

  11. Many-body braiding phases in a rotating strongly correlated photon gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umucalılar, R.O., E-mail: rifatonur.umucalilar@ua.ac.be; Carusotto, I.

    2013-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of fractional quantum Hall physics in a rotating gas of strongly interacting photons in a single cavity with a large optical nonlinearity. Photons are injected into the cavity by a Laguerre–Gauss laser beam with a non-zero orbital angular momentum. The Laughlin-like few-photon eigenstates appear as sharp resonances in the transmission spectra. Using additional localized repulsive potentials, quasi-holes can be created in the photon gas and then braided around in space: an unambiguous signature of the many-body Berry phase under exchange of two quasi-holes is observed as a spectral shift of the corresponding transmission resonance.

  12. Many-body braiding phases in a rotating strongly correlated photon gas

    OpenAIRE

    Umucalilar, R. O.; Carusotto, I.

    2012-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of a rotating trapped photon gas where a Laguerre-Gauss laser pump with a non-zero orbital angular momentum is used to inject rotating photons into a cavity with strong optical nonlinearity. The Laughlin-like few-photon eigenstates appear as sharp resonances in the transmission spectra. Using additional localized repulsive potentials, quasi-holes can be created in the quantum Hall liquid of photons and then braided around in space: an unambiguous signature of th...

  13. Tunable moiré bands and strong correlations in small-twist-angle bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyounghwan; DaSilva, Ashley; Huang, Shengqiang; Fallahazad, Babak; Larentis, Stefano; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; LeRoy, Brian J.; MacDonald, Allan H.; Tutuc, Emanuel

    2017-03-01

    According to electronic structure theory, bilayer graphene is expected to have anomalous electronic properties when it has long-period moiré patterns produced by small misalignments between its individual layer honeycomb lattices. We have realized bilayer graphene moiré crystals with accurately controlled twist angles smaller than 1° and studied their properties using scanning probe microscopy and electron transport. We observe conductivity minima at charge neutrality, satellite gaps that appear at anomalous carrier densities for twist angles smaller than 1°, and tunneling densities-of-states that are strongly dependent on carrier density. These features are robust up to large transverse electric fields. In perpendicular magnetic fields, we observe the emergence of a Hofstadter butterfly in the energy spectrum, with fourfold degenerate Landau levels, and broken symmetry quantum Hall states at filling factors ±1, 2, 3. These observations demonstrate that at small twist angles, the electronic properties of bilayer graphene moiré crystals are strongly altered by electron-electron interactions.

  14. Strongly-correlated 2D Electron Systems in Si-MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiqi

    Si-MOSFETs are basic building blocks of present-day integrated circuits. Above a threshold gate voltage, a layer of two-dimensional electrons is induced near the silicon-silicon dioxide interface of a Si-MOSFET. According to theory for noninteracting and weakly interacting electrons, no metallic state can exist in two dimensions in zero magnetic field in the limit of zero temperature. However, in strongly interacting electron systems the observation of a resistivity that changes from metallic to insulating temperature dependence has fueled a debate over whether this signals a quantum phase transition to a metallic phase in two dimensions. In this thesis I will present the results of two detailed experimental studies performed on high mobility Si-MOSFET samples. In the first study, we find the thermopower of this low-disorder, strongly interacting 2D electron system in silicon diverges at a finite disorder-independent density, providing evidence that this IS a transition to a new phase at low densities. For the second study, we conducted measurements on I-V characteristics as well as the AC voltage generated by the sample in the insulating phase. Nonlinear I-V characteristics observed in the insulating phase have been attributed to the presence of an additional conduction channel due to a sliding electron solid (Wigner crystal). We seek to provide evidence for the presence of a zero-field Wigner solid by detecting the noise generated by the sliding crystallites.

  15. Correlators in tensor models from character calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, A.; Morozov, A.

    2017-11-01

    We explain how the calculations of [20], which provided the first evidence for non-trivial structures of Gaussian correlators in tensor models, are efficiently performed with the help of the (Hurwitz) character calculus. This emphasizes a close similarity between technical methods in matrix and tensor models and supports a hope to understand the emerging structures in very similar terms. We claim that the 2m-fold Gaussian correlators of rank r tensors are given by r-linear combinations of dimensions with the Young diagrams of size m. The coefficients are made from the characters of the symmetric group Sm and their exact form depends on the choice of the correlator and on the symmetries of the model. As the simplest application of this new knowledge, we provide simple expressions for correlators in the Aristotelian tensor model as tri-linear combinations of dimensions.

  16. Correlators in tensor models from character calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mironov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We explain how the calculations of [20], which provided the first evidence for non-trivial structures of Gaussian correlators in tensor models, are efficiently performed with the help of the (Hurwitz character calculus. This emphasizes a close similarity between technical methods in matrix and tensor models and supports a hope to understand the emerging structures in very similar terms. We claim that the 2m-fold Gaussian correlators of rank r tensors are given by r-linear combinations of dimensions with the Young diagrams of size m. The coefficients are made from the characters of the symmetric group Sm and their exact form depends on the choice of the correlator and on the symmetries of the model. As the simplest application of this new knowledge, we provide simple expressions for correlators in the Aristotelian tensor model as tri-linear combinations of dimensions.

  17. Macroscopic quantum phenomena in strongly correlated fermionic systems; Phenomenes quantiques macroscopiques dans les systemes d'electrons fortement correles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rech, J

    2006-06-15

    It took several years after the idea of a zero-temperature phase transition emerged to realize the impact of such a quantum critical point over a large region of the phase diagram. Observed in many experimental examples, this quantum critical regime is not yet understood in details theoretically, and one needs to develop new approaches. In the first part, we focused on the ferromagnetic quantum critical point. After constructing a controlled approach allowing us to describe the quantum critical regime, we show through the computation of the static spin susceptibility that the ferromagnetic quantum critical point is unstable, destroyed internally by an effective dynamic long-range interaction generated by the Landau damping. In the second part, we revisit the exactly screened single impurity Kondo model, using a bosonic representation of the local spin and treating it in the limit of large spin degeneracy N. We show that, in this regime, the ground-state is a non-trivial Fermi liquid, unlike what was advocated by previous similar studies. We then extend our method to encompass the physics of two coupled impurities, for which our results are qualitatively comparable to the ones obtained from various approaches carried out in the past. We also develop a Luttinger-Ward formalism, enabling us to cure some of the drawbacks of the original method used to describe the single impurity physics. Finally, we present the main ideas and the first results for an extension of the method towards the description of a Kondo lattice, relevant for the understanding of the quantum critical regime of heavy fermion materials. (authors)

  18. Strong correlation between ASPM gene expression and HCV cirrhosis progression identified by co-expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fan; Chang, Ying; Li, Jin; Wang, Hongling; Zhou, Rui; Qi, Jian; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Qiu

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) cirrhosis is at a high risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and its progression is influenced by a complex network of gene interactions. A weighted gene co-expression network was constructed to identify gene modules associated with the seven-stage disease progression from HCV cirrhosis to HCV-related HCC (n=65). In the significant module (R2=0.86), a total of 25 network hub genes were identified, half of which were also hub nodes in the protein-protein interaction network of the module genes. In validation, most hub genes showed a moderate correlation with the disease progression, and only ASPM was highly correlated (R2=0.801). In the test set (n=63), ASPM was also more highly expressed in HCV cirrhosis with concomitant HCC than in those without HCC (P=0.0054). Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) demonstrated that the gene set of "regulation of protein amino acid phosphorylation" (n=20) was enriched in HCV cirrhosis samples with ASPM highly expressed (false discovery rate (FDR)=0.049). In gene ontology (GO) analysis, genes in the enriched set were associated with liver neoplasms and other neoplastic diseases. In conclusion, through co-expression analysis, ASPM was identified and validated in association with the progression of HCV cirrhosis probably by regulating tumor-related phosphorylation. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Point-contact transport properties of strongly correlated electrons on liquid helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, D G; Kuroda, I; Marrache-Kikuchi, C A; Höfer, M; Leiderer, P; Kono, K

    2011-01-14

    We present transport measurements of a nondegenerate two-dimensional electron system on the surface of liquid helium at a point constriction. The constriction is formed in a microchannel by a split gate beneath the helium surface. The electrostatic energy of the electron system, which depends in part on the electron density, determines the split-gate voltage threshold of current flow through the constriction. Steplike increases in conductance are observed as the confinement strength is reduced. As the Coulomb interaction between electrons is strong, we attribute this effect to the increase in the number of electrons that can pass simultaneously through the constriction. Close to the threshold, single-electron transport is observed.

  20. Earthquake source model using strong motion displacement as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thus, if the part of the earth participating in ground motion is modelled as a known finite elastic medium, one can attempt to model the source location and forces generated during an earthquake as an inverse problem in structural dynamics. Based on this analogy, a simple model for the basic earthquake source is proposed ...

  1. Quantum distillation: Dynamical generation of low-entropy states of strongly correlated fermions in an optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidrich-Meisner, F. [Institut fur Physikalische Chemie der RWTH; Manmana, S. R. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland; Rigol, M. [Georgetown University; Muramatsu, A. [Universitat Stuttgart, Institute fur Plasmaforschung, Germany; Feiguin, A. E. [University of Maryland; Dagotto, Elbio R [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Correlations between particles can lead to subtle and sometimes counterintuitive phenomena. We analyze one such case, occurring during the sudden expansion of fermions in a lattice when the initial state has a strong admixture of double occupancies. We promote the notion of quantum distillation: during the expansion and in the case of strongly repulsive interactions, doublons group together, forming a nearly ideal band insulator, which is metastable with low entropy. We propose that this effect could be used for cooling purposes in experiments with two-component Fermi gases.

  2. Strong nonlinearity-induced correlations for counterpropagating photons scattering on a two-level emitter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nysteen, Anders; McCutcheon, Dara; Mørk, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    We analytically treat the scattering of two counterpropagating photons on a two-level emitter embedded in an optical waveguide. We find that the nonlinearity of the emitter can give rise to significant pulse-dependent directional correlations in the scattered photonic state, which could...... be quantified via a reduction in coincidence clicks in a Hong–Ou–Mandel measurement setup, analogous to a linear beam splitter. Changes to the spectra and phase of the scattered photons, however, would lead to reduced interference with other photons when implemented in a larger optical circuit. We introduce...... suitable fidelity measures which account for these changes and find that high values can still be achieved even when accounting for all properties of the scattered photonic state....

  3. Nonparametric correlation models for portfolio allocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslanidis, Nektarios; Casas, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    This article proposes time-varying nonparametric and semiparametric estimators of the conditional cross-correlation matrix in the context of portfolio allocation. Simulations results show that the nonparametric and semiparametric models are best in DGPs with substantial variability or structural...... breaks in correlations. Only when correlations are constant does the parametric DCC model deliver the best outcome. The methodologies are illustrated by evaluating two interesting portfolios. The first portfolio consists of the equity sector SPDRs and the S&P 500, while the second one contains major...

  4. Spin-orbit coupling and transport in strongly correlated two-dimensional systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2017-05-01

    Measuring the magnetoresistance (MR) of ultraclean GaAs two-dimensional holes for a large rs range of 20-50, two striking behaviors in relation to the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) emerge in response to strong electron-electron interaction. First, in exact correspondence to the zero-field metal-to-insulator transition (MIT), the sign of the MR switches from being positive in the metallic regime to being negative in the insulating regime when the carrier density crosses the critical density pc of MIT (rs˜39 ). Second, as the SOC-driven correction Δ ρ to the MR decreases with reducing carrier density (or the in-plane wave vector), it exhibits an upturn in the close proximity just above pc where rs is beyond 30, indicating a substantially enhanced SOC effect. This peculiar behavior echoes with a trend of delocalization long suspected for the SOC-interaction interplay. Meanwhile, for p 40 , in contrast to the common belief that a magnet field enhances Wigner crystallization, the negative MR is likely linked to enhanced interaction.

  5. Determination of the Strong Phase in D0 -> K+pi- Using Quantum-Correlated Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rosner, J L; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Libby, J; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Ecklund, K M; Love, W; Savinov, V; López, A; Méndez, H; Ramírez, J; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E

    2008-01-01

    We exploit the quantum coherence between pair-produced D0 and D0bar in psi(3770) decays to study charm mixing, which is characterized by the parameters x and y, and to make a first determination of the relative strong phase \\delta between D0 -> K+pi- and D0bar -> K+pi-. Using 281 pb^-1 of e^+e^- collision data collected with the CLEO-c detector at E_cm = 3.77 GeV, as well as branching fraction input from other experiments, we find \\cos\\delta = 1.03 +0.31-0.17 +- 0.06, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. By further including other mixing parameter measurements, we obtain an alternate measurement of \\cos\\delta = 1.10 +- 0.35 +- 0.07, as well as x\\sin\\delta = (4.4 +2.7-1.8 +- 2.9) x 10^-3 and \\delta = 22 +11-12 +9-11 degrees.

  6. Non-Fermi-liquid behavior of strongly correlated Fermi systems explained by the Fermi-liquid approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodel, V.A. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences and Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)], E-mail: vak@wuphys.wustl.edu; Clark, J.W. [McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences and Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Yakovenko, V.M. [University of Maryland, College Park, MA 20742-4111 (United States); Zverev, M.V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2008-04-01

    Non-Fermi-liquid behavior of strongly correlated Fermi systems is derived within the Landau approach. We attribute this behavior to a phase transition associated with a rearrangement of the Landau state that leads to flattening of a portion of the single-particle spectrum in the vicinity of the Fermi surface. We demonstrate that the quasiparticle subsystem responsible for the flat spectrum possesses the same thermodynamic properties as a gas of localized spins. Theoretical results compare favorably with available experimental data.

  7. Flattening of Single-Particle Spectra in Strongly Correlated Electron Systems and the Violation of the Wiedemann-Franz Law

    OpenAIRE

    Khodel, V. A.; Yakovenko, V. M.; Zverev, M. V.

    2007-01-01

    The renormalization of the Wiedemann-Franz (WF) ratio in strongly correlated electron systems is analyzed within the Landau quasiparticle picture. We demonstrate that the WF law is violated: (i) at the quantum critical point, where the effective mass diverges, and (ii) beyond a point of fermion condensation, where the single-particle spectrum $\\epsilon(p)$ becomes flat. Results of the analysis are compared with available experimental data.

  8. Microchimerism is strongly correlated with tolerance to noninherited maternal antigens in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Partha; Molitor-Dart, Melanie; Bobadilla, Joseph L; Roenneburg, Drew A; Yan, Zhen; Torrealba, Jose R; Burlingham, William J

    2009-10-22

    In mice and humans, the immunologic effects of developmental exposure to noninherited maternal antigens (NIMAs) are quite variable. This heterogeneity likely reflects differences in the relative levels of NIMA-specific T regulatory (T(R)) versus T effector (T(E)) cells. We hypothesized that maintenance of NIMA-specific T(R) cells in the adult requires continuous exposure to maternal cells and antigens (eg, maternal microchimerism [MMc]). To test this idea, we used 2 sensitive quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) tests to detect MMc in different organs of NIMA(d)-exposed H2(b) mice. MMc was detected in 100% of neonates and a majority (61%) of adults; nursing by a NIMA+ mother was essential for preserving MMc into adulthood. MMc was most prevalent in heart, lungs, liver, and blood, but was rarely detected in unfractionated lymphoid tissues. However, MMc was detectable in isolated CD4+, CD11b+, and CD11c+ cell subsets of spleen, and in lineage-positive cells in heart. Suppression of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) and in vivo lymphoproliferation correlated with MMc levels, suggesting a link between T(R) and maternal cell engraftment. In the absence of neonatal exposure to NIMA via breastfeeding, MMc was lost, which was accompanied by sensitization to NIMA in some offspring, indicating a role of oral exposure in maintaining a favorable T(R) > T(E) balance.

  9. Quantum transport simulation scheme including strong correlations and its application to organic radicals adsorbed on gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droghetti, Andrea; Rungger, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    We present a computational method to quantitatively describe the linear-response conductance of nanoscale devices in the Kondo regime. This method relies on a projection scheme to extract an Anderson impurity model from the results of density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's functions calculations. The Anderson impurity model is then solved by continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo. The developed formalism allows us to separate the different contributions to the transport, including coherent or noncoherent transport channels, and also the quantum interference between impurity and background transmission. We apply the method to a scanning tunneling microscope setup for the 1,3,5-triphenyl-6-oxoverdazyl (TOV) stable radical molecule adsorbed on gold. The TOV molecule has one unpaired electron, which when brought in contact with metal electrodes behaves like a prototypical single Anderson impurity. We evaluate the Kondo temperature, the finite-temperature spectral function, and transport properties, finding good agreement with published experimental results.

  10. Strongly Correlated Quantum Fluids: Ultracold Quantum Gases, Quantum Chromodynamic Plasmas and Holographic Duality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    gained by a light-like quark moving through the QGP. This can be reduced [367–369] to computing a light-like Wilson loop in the QGP. Holographically , the...description to a small subset of modes? Secondly, might this truncated holographic model have a more straightforward QFT representation than the full...comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggesstions for reducing this burden, to

  11. Experimental Study of Dust Acoustic Waves in the Strongly Correlated Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, P; Sen, A

    2016-01-01

    Low frequency dust acoustic waves (DAW) were excited in a laboratory argon dusty plasma by modulating the discharge voltage with a low frequency AC signal. Metallic graphite particles were used as dust grains and a digital FFT technique was used to obtain dispersion characteristics. The experimental dispersion relation shows the reduction of phase velocity and a regime where $\\partial \\omega/\\partial k < 0$. A comparison is made with existing theoretical model.

  12. Few-particle Green's functions for strongly correlated systems on infinite lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berciu, Mona

    2011-12-09

    We show how few-particle Green's functions can be calculated efficiently for models with nearest-neighbor hopping, for infinite lattices in any dimension. As an example, for one-dimensional spinless fermions with both nearest-neighbor and second-nearest-neighbor interactions, we investigate the ground states for up to 5 fermions. This allows us not only to find the stability region of various bound complexes, but also to infer the phase diagram at small but finite concentrations.

  13. RELAP5/MOD2 models and correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimenna, R.A.; Larson, J.R.; Johnson, R.W.; Larson, T.K.; Miller, C.S.; Streit, J.E.; Hanson, R.G.; Kiser, D.M.

    1988-08-01

    A review of the RELAP5/MOD2 computer code has been performed to assess the basis for the models and correlations comprising the code. The review has included verification of the original data base, including thermodynamic, thermal-hydraulic, and geothermal conditions; simplifying assumptions in implementation or application; and accuracy of implementation compared to documented descriptions of each of the models. An effort has been made to provide the reader with an understanding of what is in the code and why it is there and to provide enough information that an analyst can assess the impact of the correlation or model on the ability of the code to represent the physics of a reactor transient. Where assessment of the implemented versions of the models or correlations has been accomplished and published, the assessment results have been included.

  14. Multireference linearized Coupled Cluster theory for strongly correlated systems using Matrix Product States

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    We propose a multireference linearized coupled cluster theory using matrix product states (MPS-LCC) which provides remarkably accurate ground-state energies, at a computational cost that has the same scaling as multireference configuration interaction singles and doubles (MRCISD), for a wide variety of electronic Hamiltonians. These range from first-row dimers at equilibrium and stretched geometries, to highly multireference systems such as the chromium dimer and lattice models such as periodic two-dimensional 1-band and 3-band Hubbard models. The MPS-LCC theory shows a speed up of several orders of magnitude over the usual DMRG algorithm while delivering energies in excellent agreement with converged DMRG calculations. Also, in all the benchmark calculations presented here MPS-LCC outperformed the commonly used multi-reference quantum chemistry methods in some cases giving energies in excess of an order of magnitude more accurate. As a size-extensive method that can treat large active spaces, MPS-LCC opens u...

  15. Strong correlation of borehole optical backscattering and volcanic sulfate signatures at Siple Dome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talghader, J.; Chan, W. S.; Mah, M.; Bay, R. C.

    2016-12-01

    A borehole logging instrument measuring optical backscattering was deployed at Siple Dome (SDMA) in January 2014. The logger body was a completely passive instrument consisting of a lightweight aluminum structure supporting two optical fiber cables and associated collimating connectors. One cable guided light from an 808 nm laser on the ice surface while the second collected backscattered light and guided it to a silicon detector, also on the surface. Both laser and detector were positioned within a few cm of one another for high resolution. An image of the device is shown in Figure 1. The laser wavelength was chosen so that the scattering length for light within the ice would be comparable to the absorption length. In this way it was possible to guarantee that most of the light received had been directly backscattered from sites within the ice rather than traveling for many meters through many scattering events, which would reduce the resolution of the layer measurement. The resolution of the measurement was estimated to be on the order of a centimeter to a few centimeters, the lower limit given by the size of the collimated laser beam and the other by the geometry of the laser-detector unit and the nature of the optical backscattering at 808 nm. The ice could not be sampled directly to determine the physical source of the scattering but, based on prior work at Siple Dome and other boreholes, the background signal was assumed to be produced by bubbles with the observed layer structure primarily due to volcanic ash. Useful data was measured to a depth of approximately 175 m, with the resulting signal given in Figure 2, minus the background scattering due to bubbles. 20 of the 27 statistically significant deviations from the background average matched closely with the volcanic sulfate record published by Kurbatov, et. al. in 2006 using the chronology of Taylor, et. al. in 2004. The correlation between optical backscattering, presumably from ash, and the presence of

  16. Hydrodynamic modelling of small upland lakes under strong wind forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, L.; French, J.; Burningham, H.

    2012-04-01

    Small lakes (Area Stokes equations using a 3D unstructured mesh and a finite volume scheme. The model is forced by meteorological boundary conditions. Improvements made to the FVCOM code include a new graphical user interface to pre- and post process the model input and results respectively, and a JONSWAT wave model to include the effects of wind-wave induced bottom stresses on lake sediment dynamics. Modelled internal scale waves are validated against summer temperature measurements acquired from a thermistor chain deployed at the deepest part of the lake. Seiche motions were validated using data recorded by high-frequency level sensors around the lake margins, and the velocity field and the circulation patterns were validated using the data recorded by an ADCP and GPS drifters. The model is shown to reproduce the lake hydrodynamics and reveals well-developed seiches at different frequencies superimposed on wind-driven circulation patterns that appear to control the distribution of bottom sediments in this small upland lake.

  17. Anomalous spin disordered properties of strongly correlated honeycomb compound In3Cu2VO9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Qing Jia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We study the ground-state and finite-temperature magnetic properties of an interlayer frustrated J1 − J2 − Jc Heisenberg model on three-dimensional honeycomb lattice by employing the Schwinger boson mean-field theory, focusing on the low-energy physics in In3Cu2VO9. We find that with the increase of interlayer coupling Jc from 0 to 3.6 meV, the interlayer frustrated system transits from an antiferromagnetic (AFM phase to a state with intralayer AFM order and interlayer disorder. This spin disordered phase explains not only the intralayer phase transition at TN = 38 K, but also the qualitative behaviors of the intermediate-temperature specific heat and magnetic susceptibility of In3Cu2VO9.

  18. Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations of Strongly-Correlated Molecules and Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Morales, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-10

    We propose a method of implementing projected wave functions for second-quantized auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) techniques. The method is based on expressing the two-body projector as one-body terms coupled to binary Ising fields. To benchmark the method, we choose to study the two-dimensional (2D) one-band Hubbard model with repulsive interactions using the constrained-path MC (CPMC). The CPMC uses a trial wave function to guide the random walks so that the so-called fermion sign problem can be eliminated. The trial wave function also serves as the importance function in Monte Carlo sampling. As such, the quality of the trial wave function has a direct impact to the efficiency and accuracy of the simulations.

  19. A Recent Application of the ETAS Model and a Proposed Method for Prediction of Strong Aftershocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. B.; Ma, L.

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, 28 aftershock sequences are selected, which are distributed in different areas including north China, southwest of China, northwest of China, Taiwan area, Turkey and Greece. In order to investigate the characteristics of these sequences along with different temporal and spatial coordinates, each sequence has been divided into dozens of segments called ``sub-sequences''. The ETAS (Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequences) model is applied to each ``sub-sequence'', and therefore the vectors of parameters of ETAS could be evaluated. Another model named LR (Logistic Regression) model is used to seek the correlate relation between the parameters of ETAS applied to every earthquake ``sub-sequence'' and seismicity. All the analyses and estimations imply that the characteristic of decay of aftershock sequences in different temporal and spatial domains seems to be characterized by the parameters of the ETAS model applied to some aftershock sequences or ``sub-sequences'', and there are some proportional correlate relations between the evaluation of LR model and the occurrence probability of the succeeding strong seismic energy release.

  20. Stochastic finite-fault modelling of strong earthquakes in Narmada ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, the prevailing seismotectonic conditions specified by parameters associated with source, path and site conditions are appraised. Stochastic finite-fault models are formulated for each scenario earthquake. The simulated peak ground accelerations for the rock sites from the possible mean maximum ...

  1. Variational Boussinesq model for strongly nonlinear dispersive waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lawrence, C.; Adytia, D.; van Groesen, E.

    2018-01-01

    For wave tank, coastal and oceanic applications, a fully nonlinear Variational Boussinesq model with optimized dispersion is derived and a simple Finite Element implementation is described. Improving a previous weakly nonlinear version, high waves over flat and varying bottom are shown to be

  2. The strong correlation of the 4f electrons of erbium in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Fu Yu Rui; Wang Xun; Ye Lin

    2003-01-01

    The local spin density approximation (LSDA) with the Hubbard model correction is adopted to describe the electronic structures of O-codoped Er-Si systems. The electrons in the 4f orbitals of Er atoms are taken as localized electrons in the framework of an all-electron treatment. The total density of states (DOS) and the partial densities of states for Si(3s, 3p), Er(4f), Er(5d), Er(6s), O(2s), and O(2p) in this ErSiO system are calculated. It is found that the inclusion of the Hubbard U greatly influences the partial DOS of the Er 4f electrons. The separation between the spin-up and the spin-down states of the highly localized 4f orbitals is larger than that of the LSDA results obtained without considering the Hubbard U-parameter. The calculation results provide possible explanations of the experimentally observed erbium-induced impurity energy levels in Si detected by deep-level transient spectroscopy.

  3. Competing orders in strongly correlated systems. Dirac materials and iron-based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classen, Laura

    2016-11-04

    In this work we address the collective phenomena appearing in interacting fermion systems due to the competition of distinct orders at the example of Dirac materials and iron-based superconductors. On the one hand we determine leading ordering tendencies in an unbiased way, when Fermi liquid instabilities are expected simultaneously in the particle-particle and particle-hole channel. In this context we analyze the impact of electron-phonon interactions on the many-body instabilities of electrons on the honeycomb lattice. Furthermore we investigate the interplay between superconductivity, magnetism and orbital order in five-pocket iron-based superconductors including the full orbital composition of low-energy excitations. On the other hand we study how the close proximity of different phases affects the structure of the phase diagram and the nature of transitions, as well as the corresponding quantum multicritical behavior. To this end we consider the semimetal-insulator transitions to an antiferromagnetic and a staggered-density state of low-energy Dirac fermions. To account for the decisive role of interactions and the various degrees of freedom in these models, modern renormalization group techniques are applied.

  4. The strong interactions beyond the standard model of particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergner, Georg [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2016-11-01

    SuperMUC is one of the most convenient high performance machines for our project since it offers a high performance and flexibility regarding different applications. This is of particular importance for investigations of new theories, where on the one hand the parameters and systematic uncertainties have to be estimated in smaller simulations and on the other hand a large computational performance is needed for the estimations of the scale at zero temperature. Our project is just the first investigation of the new physics beyond the standard model of particle physics and we hope to proceed with our studies towards more involved Technicolour candidates, supersymmetric QCD, and extended supersymmetry.

  5. Fitting models to correlated data (large samples)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Féménias, Jean-Louis

    2004-03-01

    The study of the ordered series of residuals of a fit proved to be useful in evaluating separately the pure experimental error and the model bias leading to a possible improvement of the modeling [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 217 (2003) 32]. In the present work this procedure is extended to homogeneous correlated data. This new method allows a separate estimation of pure experimental error, model bias, and data correlation; furthermore, it brings a new insight into the difference between goodness of fit and model relevance. It can be considered either as a study of 'random systematic errors' or as an extended approach of the Durbin-Watson problem [Biometrika 37 (1950) 409] taking into account the model error. In the present work an empirical approach is proposed for large samples ( n⩾500) where numerical tests are done showing the accuracy and the limits of the method.

  6. Finite-temperature superconducting correlations of the Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ehsan; Scalettar, Richard T.; Singh, Rajiv R. P.

    2015-06-01

    We utilize numerical linked-cluster expansions (NLCEs) and the determinantal quantum Monte Carlo algorithm to study pairing correlations in the square-lattice Hubbard model. To benchmark the NLCE, we first locate the finite-temperature phase transition of the attractive model to a superconducting state away from half filling. We then explore the superconducting properties of the repulsive model for the d -wave and extended s -wave pairing symmetries. The pairing structure factor shows a strong tendency to d -wave pairing and peaks at an interaction strength comparable to the bandwidth. The extended s -wave structure factor and correlation length are larger at higher temperatures but clearly saturate as temperature is lowered, whereas the d -wave counterparts, which start off lower at high temperatures, continue to rise near half filling. This rise is even more dramatic in the d -wave susceptibility. The convergence of NLCEs breaks down as the susceptibilities and correlation lengths become large, so we are unable to determine the onset of long-range order. However, our results extend the conclusion, previously restricted to only magnetic and charge correlations, that NLCEs offer a unique window into pairing in the Hubbard model at strong coupling.

  7. The effects of strong correlations on the band structure of Ag_8SnSe_6 argyrodite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Syrotyuk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The electronic energy band spectra, as well as partial and total density of electronic states of the crystal argyrodite Ag_8SnSe_6 have been evaluated within the projector augmented waves (PAW approach by means of the ABINIT code. The one-electron energies have been evaluated using two functionals for exchange-correlation energy. The first one is the generalized gradient approximation (GGA approach. The second one is the hybrid functional PBE0 composed of the semilocal GGA part and Hartree-Fock exact exchange non-local energy for strongly correlated 4d electrons of Ag atom. The second approach eliminates the Coulomb self-interaction of the Ag 4d electrons. This leads to a significant restructuring of the energy bands in the filled valence part and to an improved location of the Ag 4d-states on the energy scale, and the resulting value of the band gap is well compared with experiment. The effects of strong correlation on the electronic structure of the crystal argyrodite are considered here for the first time.

  8. Weak versus strong wave turbulence in the MMT model

    CERN Document Server

    Chibbaro, Sergio; Onorato, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Within the spirit of fluid turbulence, we consider the one-dimensional Majda-McLaughlin-Tabak (MMT) model that describes the interactions of nonlinear dispersive waves. We perform a detailed numerical study of the direct energy cascade in the defocusing regime. In particular, we consider a configuration with large-scale forcing and small scale dissipation, and we introduce three non- dimensional parameters: the ratio between nonlinearity and dispersion, {\\epsilon}, and the analogues of the Reynolds number, Re, i.e. the ratio between the nonlinear and dissipative time-scales, both at large and small scales. Our numerical experiments show that (i) in the limit of small {\\epsilon} the spectral slope observed in the statistical steady regime corresponds to the one predicted by the Weak Wave Turbulence (WWT) theory. (ii) As the nonlinearity is increased, the WWT theory breaks down and deviations from its predictions are observed. (iii) It is shown that such departures from the WWT theoretical predictions are accom...

  9. Critical mingling and universal correlations in model binary active liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Nicolas; Bartolo, Denis

    2017-06-01

    Ensembles of driven or motile bodies moving along opposite directions are generically reported to self-organize into strongly anisotropic lanes. Here, building on a minimal model of self-propelled bodies targeting opposite directions, we first evidence a critical phase transition between a mingled state and a phase-separated lane state specific to active particles. We then demonstrate that the mingled state displays algebraic structural correlations also found in driven binary mixtures. Finally, constructing a hydrodynamic theory, we single out the physical mechanisms responsible for these universal long-range correlations typical of ensembles of oppositely moving bodies.

  10. Model equation for strongly focused finite-amplitude sound beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakura; Ishiwata; Matsuda

    2000-06-01

    A model equation that describes the propagation of sound beams in a fluid is developed using the oblate spheroidal coordinate system. This spheroidal beam equation (SBE) is a parabolic equation and has a specific application to a theoretical prediction on focused, high-frequency beams from a circular aperture. The aperture angle does not have to be small. The theoretical background is basically along the same analytical lines as the composite method (CM) reported previously [B. Ystad and J. Berntsen, Acustica 82, 698-706 (1996)]. Numerical examples are displayed for the amplitudes of sound pressure along and across the beam axis when sinusoidal waves are radiated from the source with uniform amplitude distribution. The primitive approach to linear field analysis is readily extended to the case where harmonic generation in finite-amplitude sound beams becomes significant due to the inherent nonlinearity of the medium. The theory provides the propagation and beam pattern profiles that differ from the CM solution for each harmonic component.

  11. Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-03

    Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Condensed Matter, Topological Phases of Matter REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S...Fractional Quantum Hall effect, but unlike it, can potentially exist in more than 2-dimensional quantum wells. By using a mix of numerical and analytical...intricate surface physics. Another direction we have explored focuses on breaking the barriers of numerical simulations for interacting topological phases

  12. The contribution of Diamond Light Source to the study of strongly correlated electron systems and complex magnetic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radaelli, P. G.; Dhesi, S. S.

    2015-01-26

    We review some of the significant contributions to the field of strongly correlated materials and complex magnets, arising from experiments performed at the Diamond Light Source (Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, UK) during the first few years of operation (2007–2014). We provide a comprehensive overview of Diamond research on topological insulators, multiferroics, complex oxides and magnetic nanostructures. Several experiments on ultrafast dynamics, magnetic imaging, photoemission electron microscopy, soft X-ray holography and resonant magnetic hard and soft X-ray scattering are described.

  13. The contribution of Diamond Light Source to the study of strongly correlated electron systems and complex magnetic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, P G; Dhesi, S S

    2015-03-06

    We review some of the significant contributions to the field of strongly correlated materials and complex magnets, arising from experiments performed at the Diamond Light Source (Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, UK) during the first few years of operation (2007-2014). We provide a comprehensive overview of Diamond research on topological insulators, multiferroics, complex oxides and magnetic nanostructures. Several experiments on ultrafast dynamics, magnetic imaging, photoemission electron microscopy, soft X-ray holography and resonant magnetic hard and soft X-ray scattering are described. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Direct observation of ultrafast many-body electron dynamics in a strongly-correlated ultracold Rydberg gas

    CERN Document Server

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Genes, Claudiu; Pupillo, Guido; Goto, Haruka; Koyasu, Kuniaki; Chiba, Hisashi; Weidemüller, Matthias; Ohmori, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Many-body interactions govern a variety of important quantum phenomena ranging from superconductivity and magnetism in condensed matter to solvent effects in chemistry. Understanding those interactions beyond mean field is a holy grail of modern sciences. AMO physics with advanced laser technologies has recently emerged as a new platform to study quantum many-body systems. One of its latest developments is the study of long-range interactions among ultracold particles to reveal the effects of many-body correlations. Rydberg atoms distinguish themselves by their large dipole moments and tunability of dipolar interactions. Most of ultracold Rydberg experiments have been performed with narrow-band lasers in the Rydberg blockade regime. Here we demonstrate an ultracold Rydberg gas in a complementary regime, where electronic coherence is created using a broadband picosecond laser pulse, thus circumventing the Rydberg blockade to induce strong many-body correlations. The effects of long-range Rydberg interactions h...

  15. Students’ delinquency and correlates with strong and weaker ties : A study of students’ networks in Dutch high schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baerveldt, Chris; Rossem, Ronan van; Vermande, Marjolein; Weerman, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate three issues in the current debate on youth delinquency: (1) Whether the level of delinquency of adolescents is negatively correlated with the quality of her/his personal networks (as stated by the social inability model) or not (as stated by the

  16. Graphical model checking with correlated response data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, W; Connett, J E; Porzio, G C; Weisberg, S

    2001-10-15

    Correlated response data arise often in biomedical studies. The generalized estimation equation (GEE) approach is widely used in regression analysis for such data. However, there are few methods available to check the adequacy of regression models in GEE. In this paper, a graphical method is proposed based on Cook and Weisberg's marginal model plot. A bootstrap method is applied to obtain the reference band to assess statistical uncertainties in comparing two marginal mean functions. We also propose using the generalized additive model (GAM) in a similar fashion. The proposed two methods are easy to implement by taking advantage of existing smoothing and GAM softwares for independent data. The usefulness of the methodology is demonstrated through application to a correlated binary data set drawn from a clinical trial, the Lung Health Study. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. A strong genetic correlation underlying a behavioural syndrome disappears during development because of genotype-age interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Class, Barbara; Brommer, Jon E

    2015-06-22

    In animal populations, as in humans, behavioural differences between individuals that are consistent over time and across contexts are considered to reflect personality, and suites of correlated behaviours expressed by individuals are known as behavioural syndromes. Lifelong stability of behavioural syndromes is often assumed, either implicitly or explicitly. Here, we use a quantitative genetic approach to study the developmental stability of a behavioural syndrome in a wild population of blue tits. We find that a behavioural syndrome formed by a strong genetic correlation of two personality traits in nestlings disappears in adults, and we demonstrate that genotype-age interaction is the likely mechanism underlying this change during development. A behavioural syndrome may hence change during organismal development, even when personality traits seem to be strongly physiologically or functionally linked in one age group. We outline how such developmental plasticity has important ramifications for understanding the mechanistic basis as well as the evolutionary consequences of behavioural syndromes. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Communication: the description of strong correlation within self-consistent Green's function second-order perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jordan J; Zgid, Dominika

    2014-06-28

    We report an implementation of self-consistent Green's function many-body theory within a second-order approximation (GF2) for application with molecular systems. This is done by iterative solution of the Dyson equation expressed in matrix form in an atomic orbital basis, where the Green's function and self-energy are built on the imaginary frequency and imaginary time domain, respectively, and fast Fourier transform is used to efficiently transform these quantities as needed. We apply this method to several archetypical examples of strong correlation, such as a H32 finite lattice that displays a highly multireference electronic ground state even at equilibrium lattice spacing. In all cases, GF2 gives a physically meaningful description of the metal to insulator transition in these systems, without resorting to spin-symmetry breaking. Our results show that self-consistent Green's function many-body theory offers a viable route to describing strong correlations while remaining within a computationally tractable single-particle formalism.

  19. Modeling correlated human dynamics with temporal preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Zhou, Tao; Han, Xiao-Pu; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2014-03-01

    We empirically study the activity pattern of individual blog-posting and observe the interevent time distributions decay as power-laws at both individual and population level. As different from previous studies, we find significant short-term memory in it. Moreover, the memory coefficient first decays in a power law and then turns to an exponential form. Our findings produce evidence for the strong short-term memory in human dynamics and challenge previous models. Accordingly, we propose a simple model based on temporal preference, which can well reproduce both the heavy-tailed nature and the strong memory effects. This work helps in understanding the temporal regularities of online human behaviors.

  20. Study of two-particle response and phase changes in strongly correlated systems using Dynamical Mean Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Bismayan

    The study of strongly correlated materials is currently perhaps one of the most active areas of research in condensed matter physics. Strongly correlated materials contain localized electronic states which are often hybridized with more itinerant electrons. This interplay between localized and delocalized degrees of freedom means that these compounds have highly complex phase diagrams which makes these compounds very challenging to understand from a theoretical standpoint. Computer simulations have proved to be an invaluable tool in this regard with state of the art ab-initio simulation techniques harnessing the ever-increasing power of modern computers to produce highly accurate descriptions of a variety of strongly correlated materials. One of the most powerful simulation techniques currently in existence is Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT). This thesis describes this powerful simulation technique and its applications to various material systems, as well as addressing some theoretical questions concerning particular implementations of DMFT. This thesis is divided into two parts. In part 1, we describe the theory behind DMFT and its amalgamation with Density Functional Theory (DFT+DMFT). In chapters 2 and 3, we provide the basic theory behind DFT and DMFT respectively. In chapter 4, we describe how these two methods are merged to give us the computational framework that is used in this thesis, namely DFT+DMFT. Finally, we round off part 1 of the thesis in chapter 5, which provides a description of the Continuous Time Quantum Monte Carlo (CTQMC) impurity solver, which is at the heart of the DFT+DMFT algorithm and is used extensively throughout this thesis. In part two of the thesis, we apply the DFT+DMFT framework to address some important problems in condensed matter physics. In chapter 6, we study the Magnetic Spectral Function of strongly correlated f-shell materials to understand two important problems in condensed matter physics, namely the volume collapse

  1. Strongly correlated electrons at high pressure: an approach by inelastic X-Ray scattering; Electrons correles sous haute pression: une approche par diffusion inelastique des rayons X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueff, J.P

    2007-06-15

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) and associated methods has turn out to be a powerful alternative for high-pressure physics. It is an all-photon technique fully compatible with high-pressure environments and applicable to a vast range of materials. Standard focalization of X-ray in the range of 100 microns is typical of the sample size in the pressure cell. Our main aim is to provide an overview of experimental results obtained by IXS under high pressure in 2 classes of materials which have been at the origin of the renewal of condensed matter physics: strongly correlated transition metal oxides and rare-earth compounds. Under pressure, d and f-electron materials show behaviors far more complex that what would be expected from a simplistic band picture of electron delocalization. These spectroscopic studies have revealed unusual phenomena in the electronic degrees of freedom, brought up by the increased density, the changes in the charge-carrier concentration, the over-lapping between orbitals, and hybridization under high pressure conditions. Particularly we discuss about pressure induced magnetic collapse and metal-insulator transitions in 3d compounds and valence fluctuations phenomena in 4f and 5f compounds. Thanks to its superior penetration depth, chemical selectivity and resonant enhancement, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering has appeared extremely well suited to high pressure physics in strongly correlated materials. (A.C.)

  2. Strong correlation between N-cadherin and CD133 in breast cancer: role of both markers in metastatic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Carolin; Kuhn, Christina; Ditsch, Nina; Krebold, Regina; Heublein, Sabine; Mayr, Doris; Doisneau-Sixou, Sophie; Jeschke, Udo

    2014-11-01

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition is a major mechanism to explain metastatic events in breast cancer. Another important aspect is that cells with stem cell properties are able to become resistant against chemotherapeutics. Our main goal was to investigate the role of the EMT marker, N-cadherin, and of the stem cell marker, CD133, in breast cancer. The expressions of N-cadherin and CD133 were assessed by immunohistochemistry in 307 primary tumors from breast cancer patients and for 30 patients, in the related recurrences and/or metastases. We studied the correlation between both markers, their associations with known clinicopathological parameters and their role as predictive markers for survival time. Different expressions of both markers in primary tumor and recurrences or metastases were examined. N-cadherin and CD133 expressions correlated positively in the 261 primary tumor samples (p = 0.000) and in the 45 primary tumor, recurrence or metastasis samples (p = 0.010). In patients without lymph node metastases, the 10-year survival time was significantly lower when the tumor was N-cadherin-positive (p = 0.042). Expression of N-cadherin was also significantly higher in metastases than in the related primary tumors (p = 0.039). N-cadherin and CD133 expressions are strongly correlated and N-cadherin appears as a potential metastases marker in a specific patient subpopulation.

  3. Fluctuation correlation models for receptor immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourcade, B.

    2017-12-01

    Nanoscale dynamics with cycles of receptor diffusion and immobilization by cell-external-or-internal factors is a key process in living cell adhesion phenomena at the origin of a plethora of signal transduction pathways. Motivated by modern correlation microscopy approaches, the receptor correlation functions in physical models based on diffusion-influenced reaction is studied. Using analytical and stochastic modeling, this paper focuses on the hybrid regime where diffusion and reaction are not truly separable. The time receptor autocorrelation functions are shown to be indexed by different time scales and their asymptotic expansions are given. Stochastic simulations show that this analysis can be extended to situations with a small number of molecules. It is also demonstrated that this analysis applies when receptor immobilization is coupled to environmental noise.

  4. Electron correlations in narrow energy bands: modified polar model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Didukh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The electron correlations in narrow energy bands are examined within the framework of the modified form of polar model. This model permits to analyze the effect of strong Coulomb correlation, inter-atomic exchange and correlated hopping of electrons and explain some peculiarities of the properties of narrow-band materials, namely the metal-insulator transition with an increase of temperature, nonlinear concentration dependence of Curie temperature and peculiarities of transport properties of electronic subsystem. Using a variant of generalized Hartree-Fock approximation, the single-electron Green's function and quasi-particle energy spectrum of the model are calculated. Metal-insulator transition with the change of temperature is investigated in a system with correlated hopping. Processes of ferromagnetic ordering stabilization in the system with various forms of electronic DOS are studied. The static conductivity and effective spin-dependent masses of current carriers are calculated as a function of electron concentration at various DOS forms. The correlated hopping is shown to cause the electron-hole asymmetry of transport and ferromagnetic properties of narrow band materials.

  5. Computational models of neurophysiological correlates of tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaette, Roland; Kempter, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of tinnitus has progressed considerably in the past decade, but the details of the mechanisms that give rise to this phantom perception of sound without a corresponding acoustic stimulus have not yet been pinpointed. It is now clear that tinnitus is generated in the brain, not in the ear, and that it is correlated with pathologically altered spontaneous activity of neurons in the central auditory system. Both increased spontaneous firing rates and increased neuronal synchrony have been identified as putative neuronal correlates of phantom sounds in animal models, and both phenomena can be triggered by damage to the cochlea. Various mechanisms could underlie the generation of such aberrant activity. At the cellular level, decreased synaptic inhibition and increased neuronal excitability, which may be related to homeostatic plasticity, could lead to an over-amplification of natural spontaneous activity. At the network level, lateral inhibition could amplify differences in spontaneous activity, and structural changes such as reorganization of tonotopic maps could lead to self-sustained activity in recurrently connected neurons. However, it is difficult to disentangle the contributions of different mechanisms in experiments, especially since not all changes observed in animal models of tinnitus are necessarily related to tinnitus. Computational modeling presents an opportunity of evaluating these mechanisms and their relation to tinnitus. Here we review the computational models for the generation of neurophysiological correlates of tinnitus that have been proposed so far, and evaluate predictions and compare them to available data. We also assess the limits of their explanatory power, thus demonstrating where an understanding is still lacking and where further research may be needed. Identifying appropriate models is important for finding therapies, and we therefore, also summarize the implications of the models for approaches to treat tinnitus.

  6. Computational models of neurophysiological correlates of tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland eSchaette

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of tinnitus has progressed considerably in the past decade, but the details of the mechanisms that give rise to this phantom perception of sound without a corresponding acoustic stimulus have not been pinpointed yet. It is now clear that tinnitus is generated in the brain, not in the ear, and that it is correlated with pathologically altered spontaneous activity of neurons in the central auditory system. Both increased spontaneous firing rates and increased neuronal synchrony have been identified as putative neuronal correlates of phantom sounds in animal models, and both phenomena can be triggered by damage to the cochlea. Various mechanisms could underlie the generation of such aberrant activity. At the cellular level, decreased synaptic inhibition and increased neuronal excitability, which may be related to homeostatic plasticity, could lead to an over-amplification of natural spontaneous activity. At the network level, lateral inhibition could amplify differences in spontaneous activity, and structural changes such as reorganization of tonotopic maps could lead to self-sustained activity in recurrently connected neurons. It is difficult to disentangle the contributions of different mechanisms in experiments, especially since not all changes observed in animal models of tinnitus are necessarily related to tinnitus. Computational modelling presents an opportunity of evaluating these mechanisms and their relation to tinnitus. Here we review the computational models for the generation of neurophysiological correlates of tinnitus that have been proposed so far, evaluate predictions and compare them to available data. We also evaluate the limits of their explanatory power, thus demonstrating where an understanding is still lacking and where further research may be needed. Identifying appropriate models is important for finding therapies and we therefore also summarize the implications of the models for approaches to treat

  7. IFCI 7.0 Models and Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, A.W.; Schmidt, R.C.; Young, M.F.

    1999-05-01

    The Integrated Fuel-Coolant Interaction Code (IFCI) is a best-estimate computer program for analysis of phenomena related to mixing of molten nuclear reactor core material with reactor coolant (water). The stand-alone version of the code, IFCI 7.0, has been designed for analysis of small- and intermediate-scale experiments in order to gain insight into the physics (including scaling effects) of molten fuel-coolant interactions. The code's methods, models, and correlations are being assessed. This report describes the flow regime, friction factor, and heat-transfer models used in the current version of IFCI (IFCI 7.0).

  8. Pump-probe reflectivity study of ultrafast dynamics of strongly correlated 5f electrons inUO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Au, Yongqiang Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Durakiewicz, Tomasz [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    5f electrons in the Mott insulator UO{sub 2} produce intriguing electronic states and dynamics, such as strong correlation and f-f excitations. We have performed femtosecond pump-probe reflectivity measurements on a single crystal UO{sub 2} at temperatures 5-300 K to study the ultrafast dynamics of photoexcited 5f electrons. The laser pulses at 400 nm pump 5 f electrons across the Mott gap, while those at 800 nm probe the pump-induced change of reflectivity. We find temperature-dependent excitation and relaxation processes and long-lived acoustic phonons, and extract picosecond risetimes and microsecond relaxation times at low temperatures. The observed slow relaxation is ascribed to the decay of Hubbard excitons formed by U{sup 3+}-U{sup 5+} pairs.

  9. Azimuthal collimation of long range rapidity correlations by strong color fields in high multiplicity hadron-hadron collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusling, Kevin; Venugopalan, Raju

    2012-06-29

    The azimuthal collimation of dihadrons with large rapidity separations in high multiplicity p+p collisions at the LHC is described in the color glass condensate (CGC) effective theory [A. Dumitru, K. Dusling, F. Gelis, J. Jalilian-Marian, T. Lappi, and R. Venugopalan, Phys. Lett. B 697, 21 (2011).] by N(c)(2) suppressed multiladder QCD diagrams that are enhanced α(S)(-8) due to gluon saturation in hadron wave functions. We show that quantitative computations in the CGC framework are in good agreement with data from the CMS experiment on per trigger dihadron yields and predict further systematics of these yields with varying trigger p(T) and charged hadron multiplicity. Radial flow generated by rescattering is strongly limited by the structure of the p+p dihadron correlations. In contrast, radial flow explains the systematics of identical measurements in heavy ion collisions.

  10. Strong asymmetry of hemispheric climates during MIS-13 inferred from correlating China loess and Antarctica ice records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. T. Guo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We correlate the China loess and Antarctica ice records to address the inter-hemispheric climate link over the past 800 ka. The results show a broad coupling between Asian and Antarctic climates at the glacial-interglacial scale. However, a number of decoupled aspects are revealed, among which marine isotope stage (MIS 13 exhibits a strong anomaly compared with the other interglacials. It is characterized by unusually positive benthic oxygen (δ18O and carbon isotope (δ13C values in the world oceans, cooler Antarctic temperature, lower summer sea surface temperature in the South Atlantic, lower CO2 and CH4 concentrations, but by extremely strong Asian, Indian and African summer monsoons, weakest Asian winter monsoon, and lowest Asian dust and iron fluxes. Pervasive warm conditions were also evidenced by the records from northern high-latitude regions. These consistently indicate a warmer Northern Hemisphere and a cooler Southern Hemisphere, and hence a strong asymmetry of hemispheric climates during MIS-13. Similar anomalies of lesser extents also occurred during MIS-11 and MIS-5e. Thus, MIS-13 provides a case that the Northern Hemisphere experienced a substantial warming under relatively low concentrations of greenhouse gases. It suggests that the global climate system possesses a natural variability that is not predictable from the simple response of northern summer insolation and atmospheric CO2 changes. During MIS-13, both hemispheres responded in different ways leading to anomalous continental, marine and atmospheric conditions at the global scale. The correlations also suggest that the marine δ18O record is not always a reliable indicator of the northern ice-volume changes, and that the asymmetry of hemispheric climates is one of the prominent factors controlling the strength of Asian, Indian and African monsoon circulations, most likely through modulating the position of

  11. Modeling CMB lensing cross correlations with CLEFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Chirag; White, Martin; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2017-08-01

    A new generation of surveys will soon map large fractions of sky to ever greater depths and their science goals can be enhanced by exploiting cross correlations between them. In this paper we study cross correlations between the lensing of the CMB and biased tracers of large-scale structure at high z. We motivate the need for more sophisticated bias models for modeling increasingly biased tracers at these redshifts and propose the use of perturbation theories, specifically Convolution Lagrangian Effective Field Theory (CLEFT). Since such signals reside at large scales and redshifts, they can be well described by perturbative approaches. We compare our model with the current approach of using scale independent bias coupled with fitting functions for non-linear matter power spectra, showing that the latter will not be sufficient for upcoming surveys. We illustrate our ideas by estimating σ8 from the auto- and cross-spectra of mock surveys, finding that CLEFT returns accurate and unbiased results at high z. We discuss uncertainties due to the redshift distribution of the tracers, and several avenues for future development.

  12. Time-resolved THz studies of carrier dynamics in semiconductors, superconductors, and strongly-correlated electron materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaindl, Robert A.; Averitt, Richard D.

    2006-11-14

    Perhaps the most important aspect of contemporary condensed matter physics involves understanding strong Coulomb interactions between the large number of electrons in a solid. Electronic correlations lead to the emergence of new system properties, such as metal-insulator transitions, superconductivity, magneto-resistance, Bose-Einstein condensation, the formation of excitonic gases, or the integer and fractional Quantum Hall effects. The discovery of high-Tc superconductivity in particular was a watershed event, leading to dramatic experimental and theoretical advances in the field of correlated-electron systems. Such materials often exhibit competition between the charge, lattice, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom, whose cause-effect relationships are difficult to ascertain. Experimental insight into the properties of solids is traditionally obtained by time-averaged probes, which measure e.g., linear optical spectra, electrical conduction properties, or the occupied band structure in thermal equilibrium. Many novel physical properties arise from excitations out of the ground state into energetically higher states by thermal, optical, or electrical means. This leads to fundamental interactions between the system's constituents, such as electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions, which occur on ultrafast timescales. While these interactions underlie the physical properties of solids, they are often only indirectly inferred from time-averaged measurements. Time-resolved spectroscopy, consequently, is playing an ever increasing role to provide insight into light-matter interaction, microscopic processes, or cause-effect relationships that determine the physics of complex materials. In the past, experiments using visible and near-infrared femtosecond pulses have been extensively employed, e.g. to follow relaxation and dephasing processes in metals and semiconductors. However, many basic excitations in strongly-correlated electron systems and nanoscale

  13. Correlation Functions in Holographic Minimal Models

    CERN Document Server

    Papadodimas, Kyriakos

    2012-01-01

    We compute exact three and four point functions in the W_N minimal models that were recently conjectured to be dual to a higher spin theory in AdS_3. The boundary theory has a large number of light operators that are not only invisible in the bulk but grow exponentially with N even at small conformal dimensions. Nevertheless, we provide evidence that this theory can be understood in a 1/N expansion since our correlators look like free-field correlators corrected by a power series in 1/N . However, on examining these corrections we find that the four point function of the two bulk scalar fields is corrected at leading order in 1/N through the contribution of one of the additional light operators in an OPE channel. This suggests that, to correctly reproduce even tree-level correlators on the boundary, the bulk theory needs to be modified by the inclusion of additional fields. As a technical by-product of our analysis, we describe two separate methods -- including a Coulomb gas type free-field formalism -- that ...

  14. Observation of spatial charge and spin correlations in the 2D Fermi-Hubbard model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuk, Lawrence W; Nichols, Matthew A; Lawrence, Katherine R; Okan, Melih; Zhang, Hao; Khatami, Ehsan; Trivedi, Nandini; Paiva, Thereza; Rigol, Marcos; Zwierlein, Martin W

    2016-09-16

    Strong electron correlations lie at the origin of high-temperature superconductivity. Its essence is believed to be captured by the Fermi-Hubbard model of repulsively interacting fermions on a lattice. Here we report on the site-resolved observation of charge and spin correlations in the two-dimensional (2D) Fermi-Hubbard model realized with ultracold atoms. Antiferromagnetic spin correlations are maximal at half-filling and weaken monotonically upon doping. At large doping, nearest-neighbor correlations between singly charged sites are negative, revealing the formation of a correlation hole, the suppressed probability of finding two fermions near each other. As the doping is reduced, the correlations become positive, signaling strong bunching of doublons and holes, in agreement with numerical calculations. The dynamics of the doublon-hole correlations should play an important role for transport in the Fermi-Hubbard model. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Testing strong factorial invariance using three-level structural equation modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jak, Suzanne

    Within structural equation modeling, the most prevalent model to investigate measurement bias is the multigroup model. Equal factor loadings and intercepts across groups in a multigroup model represent strong factorial invariance (absence of measurement bias) across groups. Although this approach is

  16. Strong correlation between the 6-minute walk test and accelerometry functional outcomes in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Zoe E; Ryan, Monique M; Kornberg, Andrew J; Walker, Karen Z; Truby, Helen

    2015-03-01

    Accelerometry provides information on habitual physical capability that may be of value in the assessment of function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This preliminary investigation describes the relationship between community ambulation measured by the StepWatch activity monitor and the current standard of functional assessment, the 6-minute walk test, in ambulatory boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (n = 16) and healthy controls (n = 13). All participants completed a 6-minute walk test and wore the StepWatch™ monitor for 5 consecutive days. Both the 6-minute walk test and StepWatch accelerometry identified a decreased capacity for ambulation in boys with Duchenne compared to healthy controls. There were strong, significant correlations between 6-minute walk distance and all StepWatch parameters in affected boys only (r = 0.701-0.804). These data proffer intriguing observations that warrant further exploration. Specifically, accelerometry outcomes may compliment the 6-minute walk test in assessment of therapeutic interventions for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Testing strong factorial invariance using three-level structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jak, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Within structural equation modeling, the most prevalent model to investigate measurement bias is the multigroup model. Equal factor loadings and intercepts across groups in a multigroup model represent strong factorial invariance (absence of measurement bias) across groups. Although this approach is possible in principle, it is hardly practical when the number of groups is large or when the group size is relatively small. Jak et al. (2013) showed how strong factorial invariance across large numbers of groups can be tested in a multilevel structural equation modeling framework, by treating group as a random instead of a fixed variable. In the present study, this model is extended for use with three-level data. The proposed method is illustrated with an investigation of strong factorial invariance across 156 school classes and 50 schools in a Dutch dyscalculia test, using three-level structural equation modeling.

  18. Testing strong factorial invariance using three-level structural equation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne eJak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Within structural equation modeling, the most prevalent model to investigate measurement bias is the multigroup model. Equal factor loadings and intercepts across groups in a multigroup model represent strong factorial invariance (absence of measurement bias across groups. Although this approach is possible in principle, it is hardly practical when the number of groups is large or when the group size is relatively small. Jak, Oort and Dolan (2013 showed how strong factorial invariance across large numbers of groups can be tested in a multilevel structural equation modeling framework, by treating group as a random instead of a fixed variable. In the present study, this model is extended for use with three-level data. The proposed method is illustrated with an investigation of strong factorial invariance across 156 school classes and 50 schools in a Dutch dyscalculia test, using three-level structural equation modeling.

  19. Strong Inference in Mathematical Modeling: A Method for Robust Science in the Twenty-First Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganusov, Vitaly V

    2016-01-01

    While there are many opinions on what mathematical modeling in biology is, in essence, modeling is a mathematical tool, like a microscope, which allows consequences to logically follow from a set of assumptions. Only when this tool is applied appropriately, as microscope is used to look at small items, it may allow to understand importance of specific mechanisms/assumptions in biological processes. Mathematical modeling can be less useful or even misleading if used inappropriately, for example, when a microscope is used to study stars. According to some philosophers (Oreskes et al., 1994), the best use of mathematical models is not when a model is used to confirm a hypothesis but rather when a model shows inconsistency of the model (defined by a specific set of assumptions) and data. Following the principle of strong inference for experimental sciences proposed by Platt (1964), I suggest "strong inference in mathematical modeling" as an effective and robust way of using mathematical modeling to understand mechanisms driving dynamics of biological systems. The major steps of strong inference in mathematical modeling are (1) to develop multiple alternative models for the phenomenon in question; (2) to compare the models with available experimental data and to determine which of the models are not consistent with the data; (3) to determine reasons why rejected models failed to explain the data, and (4) to suggest experiments which would allow to discriminate between remaining alternative models. The use of strong inference is likely to provide better robustness of predictions of mathematical models and it should be strongly encouraged in mathematical modeling-based publications in the Twenty-First century.

  20. Low productivity of Chinook salmon strongly correlates with high summer stream discharge in two Alaskan rivers in the Yukon drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuswanger, Jason R.; Wipfli, Mark S.; Evenson, Matthew J.; Hughes, Nicholas F.; Rosenberger, Amanda E.

    2015-01-01

    Yukon River Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) populations are declining for unknown reasons, creating hardship for thousands of stakeholders in subsistence and commercial fisheries. An informed response to this crisis requires understanding the major sources of variation in Chinook salmon productivity. However, simple stock–recruitment models leave much of the variation in this system’s productivity unexplained. We tested adding environmental predictors to stock–recruitment models for two Yukon drainage spawning streams in interior Alaska — the Chena and Salcha rivers. Low productivity was strongly associated with high stream discharge during the summer of freshwater residency for young-of-the-year Chinook salmon. This association was more consistent with the hypothesis that sustained high discharge negatively affects foraging conditions than with acute mortality during floods. Productivity may have also been reduced in years when incubating eggs experienced major floods or cold summers and falls. These freshwater effects — especially density dependence and high discharge — helped explain population declines in both rivers. They are plausible as contributors to the decline of Chinook salmon throughout the Yukon River drainage.

  1. Angular structure of jet quenching within a hybrid strong/weak coupling model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford,1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Departament de Física Quàntica i Astrofísica & Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICC),Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gulhan, Doga Can [CERN, EP Department,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Milhano, José Guilherme [CENTRA, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa,Av. Rovisco Pais, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (LIP),Av. Elias Garcia 14-1, P-1000-149 Lisboa (Portugal); Theoretical Physics Department, CERN,Geneva (Switzerland); Pablos, Daniel [Departament de Física Quàntica i Astrofísica & Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICC),Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Rajagopal, Krishna [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Within the context of a hybrid strong/weak coupling model of jet quenching, we study the modification of the angular distribution of the energy within jets in heavy ion collisions, as partons within jet showers lose energy and get kicked as they traverse the strongly coupled plasma produced in the collision. To describe the dynamics transverse to the jet axis, we add the effects of transverse momentum broadening into our hybrid construction, introducing a parameter K≡q̂/T{sup 3} that governs its magnitude. We show that, because of the quenching of the energy of partons within a jet, even when K≠0 the jets that survive with some specified energy in the final state are narrower than jets with that energy in proton-proton collisions. For this reason, many standard observables are rather insensitive to K. We propose a new differential jet shape ratio observable in which the effects of transverse momentum broadening are apparent. We also analyze the response of the medium to the passage of the jet through it, noting that the momentum lost by the jet appears as the momentum of a wake in the medium. After freezeout this wake becomes soft particles with a broad angular distribution but with net momentum in the jet direction, meaning that the wake contributes to what is reconstructed as a jet. This effect must therefore be included in any description of the angular structure of the soft component of a jet. We show that the particles coming from the response of the medium to the momentum and energy deposited in it leads to a correlation between the momentum of soft particles well separated from the jet in angle with the direction of the jet momentum, and find qualitative but not quantitative agreement with experimental data on observables designed to extract such a correlation. More generally, by confronting the results that we obtain upon introducing transverse momentum broadening and the response of the medium to the jet with available jet data, we highlight the

  2. Parasympathetic neurogenesis is strongly associated with tumor budding and correlates with an adverse prognosis in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingfu; Guo, Limei; Tao, Ming; Fu, Wei; Xiu, Dianrong

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the frequency of parasympathetic neurogenesis and determine its association with tumor budding and prognosis in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Parasympathetic neurogenesis was defined as the distribution of abnormal parasympathetic nerves in the stroma tissue. Staining of vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), as a marker for parasympathetic neurogenesis, was performed on a representative specimen of the tumor for 59 PDAC patients with available clinical, pathologic, and follow-up information. Three specimens containing normal pancreatic tissues were stained in parallel. The number of parasympathetic nerve fibers was counted in five high-power microscopic fields (5×0.785 mm(2)). Cut-off values were calculated by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. VAChT-positive parasympathetic nerve fibers were not seen in the stroma of 3 cases of normal pancreatic tissues. In 59 PDAC cases, the range of parasympathetic neurogenesis was 4-38 fibers/(5×0.785) mm(2), with a median of 18 fibers/(5×0.785) mm(2). Patients with parasympathetic neurogenesis >15 fibers/(5×0.785) mm(2) were defined as the high-density group (39 patients, 66.1%), and those with parasympathetic neurogenesis 15 fibers/(5×0.785) mm(2) as the low-density group (20 patients, 33.9%). The high-density group had a higher occurrence of tumor budding (P=0.001) and a higher rate of early recurrence (P=0.035). Parasympathetic neurogenesis appeared to be an independent adverse prognostic factor [hazard ratio (HR)=2.45, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.25-4.81, P=0.009], in addition to American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage (P=0.010) and tumor budding (P=0.009). Parasympathetic neurogenesis is strongly associated with tumor budding and correlates with an adverse prognosis in PDAC.

  3. Classical trajectory perspective of atomic ionization in strong laser fields semiclassical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is an active field in modern physics and has versatile applications in such as attosecond physics, X-ray generation, inertial confined fusion (ICF), medical science and so on. Classical Trajectory Perspective of Atomic Ionization in Strong Laser Fields covers the basic concepts in this field and discusses many interesting topics using the semiclassical model of classical trajectory ensemble simulation, which is one of the most successful ionization models and has the advantages of a clear picture, feasible computing and accounting for many exquisite experiments quantitatively. The book also presents many applications of the model in such topics as the single ionization, double ionization, neutral atom acceleration and other timely issues in strong field physics, and delivers useful messages to readers with presenting the classical trajectory perspective on the strong field atomic ionization. The book is intended for graduate students and researchers...

  4. POLD2 and KSP37 (FGFBP2 correlate strongly with histology, stage and outcome in ovarian carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bente Vilming Elgaaen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC constitutes more than 90% of ovarian cancers and is associated with high mortality. EOC comprises a heterogeneous group of tumours, and the causes and molecular pathology are essentially unknown. Improved insight into the molecular characteristics of the different subgroups of EOC is urgently needed, and should eventually lead to earlier diagnosis as well as more individualized and effective treatments. Previously, we reported a limited number of mRNAs strongly upregulated in human osteosarcomas and other malignancies, and six were selected to be tested for a possible association with three subgroups of ovarian carcinomas and clinical parameters. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The six selected mRNAs were quantified by RT-qPCR in biopsies from eleven poorly differentiated serous carcinomas (PDSC, stage III-IV, twelve moderately differentiated serous carcinomas (MDSC, stage III-IV and eight clear cell carcinomas (CCC, stage I-IV of the ovary. Superficial scrapings from six normal ovaries (SNO, as well as biopsies from three normal ovaries (BNO and three benign ovarian cysts (BBOC were analyzed for comparison. The gene expression level was related to the histological and clinical parameters of human ovarian carcinoma samples. One of the mRNAs, DNA polymerase delta 2 small subunit (POLD2, was increased in average 2.5- to almost 20-fold in MDSC and PDSC, respectively, paralleling the degree of dedifferentiation and concordant with a poor prognosis. Except for POLD2, the serous carcinomas showed a similar transcription profile, being clearly different from CCC. Another mRNA, Killer-specific secretory protein of 37 kDa (KSP37 showed six- to eight-fold higher levels in CCC stage I compared with the more advanced staged carcinomas, and correlated positively with an improved clinical outcome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have identified two biomarkers which are markedly upregulated in two subgroups of ovarian

  5. Strong correlation by ultrasonography of hepatomegaly and the presence of co-infection in HIV/HCV cirrhotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Cerqueira Paranaguá Vezozzo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Progression of hepatic fibrosis is accelerated in patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus compared to hepatitis C virus mono-infected patients. This study aimed to compare ultrasound features and selected clinical and biochemical variables between patients with human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus co-infection (n = 16 versus hepatitis C virus mono-infection (n = 16. METHODS: Each patient underwent abdominal ultrasound, and a specific evaluation was performed in order to detect findings consistent with chronic liver disease. Characterization of spleen size, liver structural pattern, diameter of the portal, spleen, and mesenteric veins was based on classical ultrasound parameters. Propensity score was used for control of selection bias and performed using binary logistic regression to generate a score for each patient. The Fisher and Mann-Whitney tests were used to evaluate categorical variables and continuous variables, respectively. RESULTS: On univariate analysis right hepatic lobe size was larger in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus patients (157.06 ± 17.56 mm compared to hepatitis C virus mono-infected patients (134.94 ± 16.95 mm (p = 0.0011. The left hepatic lobe was also significantly larger in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus patients Cirrhosis (115.88 ±22.69 mm versus hepatitis C virus mono-infected patients (95.06 ±24.18 mm (p= 0.0177. Also, there was a strong correlation between hepatomegaly and co-infection (p=0.005. CONCLUSION: Human immunodeficiency virus infection was the primary variable influencing liver enlargement in this population. Hepatomegaly on ultrasound was more common among cirrhotic human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus co-infected patients than among cirrhotic hepatitis C virus mono-infected patients. This aspect is very important in the management of human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus co-infected patients

  6. Strong correlation by ultrasonography of hepatomegaly and the presence of co-infection in HIV/HCV cirrhotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Cerqueira Paranaguá Vezozzo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Progression of hepatic fibrosis is accelerated in patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus compared to hepatitis C virus mono-infected patients. This study aimed to compare ultrasound features and selected clinical and biochemical variables between patients with human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus co-infection (n = 16 versus hepatitis C virus mono-infection (n = 16. METHODS: Each patient underwent abdominal ultrasound, and a specific evaluation was performed in order to detect findings consistent with chronic liver disease. Characterization of spleen size, liver structural pattern, diameter of the portal, spleen, and mesenteric veins was based on classical ultrasound parameters. Propensity score was used for control of selection bias and performed using binary logistic regression to generate a score for each patient. The Fisher and Mann-Whitney tests were used to evaluate categorical variables and continuous variables, respectively. RESULTS: On univariate analysis right hepatic lobe size was larger in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus patients (157.06 ± 17.56 mm compared to hepatitis C virus mono-infected patients (134.94 ± 16.95 mm (p = 0.0011. The left hepatic lobe was also significantly larger in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus patients Cirrhosis (115.88 ±22.69 mm versus hepatitis C virus mono-infected patients (95.06 ±24.18 mm (p= 0.0177. Also, there was a strong correlation between hepatomegaly and co-infection (p=0.005. CONCLUSION: Human immunodeficiency virus infection was the primary variable influencing liver enlargement in this population. Hepatomegaly on ultrasound was more common among cirrhotic human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus co-infected patients than among cirrhotic hepatitis C virus mono-infected patients. This aspect is very important in the management of human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus co-infected patients

  7. Simple anthropometric measures correlate with metabolic risk indicators as strongly as magnetic resonance imaging-measured adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, Rebecca; Shen, Wei; Bacchetti, Peter; Kotler, Donald; Lewis, Cora E; Shlipak, Michael G; Heymsfield, Steven B; Grunfeld, Carl

    2008-06-01

    Studies in persons without HIV infection have compared percentage body fat (%BF) and waist circumference as markers of risk for the complications of excess adiposity, but only limited study has been conducted in HIV-infected subjects. We compared anthropometric and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based adiposity measures as correlates of metabolic complications of adiposity in HIV-infected and control subjects. The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 666 HIV-positive and 242 control subjects in the Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection (FRAM) study assessing body mass index (BMI), waist (WC) and hip (HC) circumferences, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), %BF, and MRI-measured regional adipose tissue. Study outcomes were 3 metabolic risk variables [homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol]. Analyses were stratified by sex and HIV status and adjusted for demographic, lifestyle, and HIV-related factors. In HIV-infected and control subjects, univariate associations with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL were strongest for WC, MRI-measured visceral adipose tissue, and WHR; in all cases, differences in correlation between the strongest measures for each outcome were small (r models between the use of anthropometric and MRI measures, and the magnitudes of differences were small (adjusted R(2) correlate of metabolic complications, whereas, for triglycerides, the best was WHR. Relations of simple anthropometric measures with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol are approximately as strong as MRI-measured whole-body adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects.

  8. Disease quantification in dermatology: in vivo near-infrared spectroscopy measures correlate strongly with the clinical assessment of psoriasis severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Tanja Maria; Kamp, Søren; Jemec, Gregor B. E.

    2013-03-01

    Accurate documentation of disease severity is a prerequisite for clinical research and the practice of evidence-based medicine. The quantification of skin diseases such as psoriasis currently relies heavily on clinical scores. Although these clinical scoring methods are well established and very useful in quantifying disease severity, they require an extensive clinical experience and carry a risk of subjectivity. We explore the opportunity to use in vivo near-infrared (NIR) spectra as an objective and noninvasive method for local disease severity assessment in 31 psoriasis patients in whom selected plaques were scored clinically. A partial least squares (PLS) regression model was used to analyze and predict the severity scores on the NIR spectra of psoriatic and uninvolved skin. The correlation between predicted and clinically assigned scores was R=0.94 (RMSE=0.96), suggesting that in vivo NIR provides accurate clinical quantification of psoriatic plaques. Hence, NIR may be a practical solution to clinical severity assessment of psoriasis, providing a continuous, linear, numerical value of severity.

  9. Modeling conditional correlations of asset returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvennoinen, Annastiina; Teräsvirta, Timo

    2015-01-01

    -test is derived to test the constancy of correlations and LM- and Wald tests to test the hypothesis of partially constant correlations. Analytical expressions for the test statistics and the required derivatives are provided to make computations feasible. An empirical example based on daily return series of five...... frequently traded stocks in the S&P 500 stock index completes the paper....

  10. Voussoir beam model for lower strong roof strata movement in longwall mining – Case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the influence of varying immediate roof thickness on the lower strong roof strata movement and failure pattern in longwall coal mining with large mining height. The investigation is based on 58 geological drill holes and hydraulic shield pressure measurements around the longwall Panel 42105 of the Buertai Mine in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China. The longwall Panel 42105 is characterized by relatively soft immediate roof strata of varying thickness superposed by strong strata, herein defined as lower strong roof. A voussoir beam model is adopted to interpret the structural movement of the lower strong roof strata and shield pressure measurements. It is shown that when the immediate roof is relatively thick, the broken overlying lower strong roof tends to form a stable voussoir beam with previously broken layer, thus not exerting high pressure on the hydraulic shield and working face. When the immediate roof is relatively thin, the broken overlying lower strong roof tends to behave as a cantilever beam, thus exerting higher pressure on the hydraulic shield and working face. Comparison of model predictions with measured time-weighted average shield pressure (TWAP shows good agreement.

  11. Superconducting dome in doped quasi-two-dimensional organic Mott insulators: A paradigm for strongly correlated superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Charles-David; Sémon, Patrick; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2015-11-01

    Layered organic superconductors of the BEDT family are model systems for understanding the interplay of the Mott transition with superconductivity, magnetic order, and frustration, ingredients that are essential to understand superconductivity also in the cuprate high-temperature superconductors. Recent experimental studies on a hole-doped version of the organic compounds reveals an enhancement of superconductivity and a rapid crossover between two different conducting phases above the superconducting dome. One of these phases is a Fermi liquid, the other not. Using plaquette cellular dynamical mean field theory with state-of-the-art continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo calculations, we study this problem with the two-dimensional Hubbard model on the anisotropic triangular lattice. Phase diagrams as a function of temperature T and interaction strength U /t are obtained for anisotropy parameters t'=0.4 t ,t'=0.8 t and for various fillings. As in the case of the cuprates, we find, at finite doping, a first-order transition between two normal-state phases. One of theses phases has a pseudogap while the other does not. At temperatures above the critical point of the first-order transition, there is a Widom line where crossovers occur. The maximum (optimal) superconducting critical temperature Tcm at finite doping is enhanced by about 25% compared with its maximum at half filling and the range of U /t where superconductivity appears is greatly extended. These results are in broad agreement with experiment. Also, increasing frustration (larger t'/t ) significantly reduces magnetic ordering, as expected. This suggests that for compounds with intermediate to high frustration, very light doping should reveal the influence of the first-order transition and associated crossovers. These crossovers could possibly be even visible in the superconducting phase through subtle signatures. We also predict that destroying the superconducting phase by a magnetic field should reveal the

  12. An Improved Car-Following Model Accounting for Impact of Strong Wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of strong wind on dynamic characteristic of traffic flow, an improved car-following model based on the full velocity difference model is developed in this paper. Wind force is introduced as the influence factor of car-following behavior. Among three components of wind force, lift force and side force are taken into account. The linear stability analysis is carried out and the stability condition of the newly developed model is derived. Numerical analysis is made to explore the effect of strong wind on spatial-time evolution of a small perturbation. The results show that the strong wind can significantly affect the stability of traffic flow. Driving safety in strong wind is also studied by comparing the lateral force under different wind speeds with the side friction of vehicles. Finally, the fuel consumption of vehicle in strong wind condition is explored and the results show that the fuel consumption decreased with the increase of wind speed.

  13. Quantum simulation of the general semi-classical Rabi model in regimes of arbitrarily strong driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Kunzhe; Wu, Haiteng; Zhao, Peng; Li, Mengmeng; Liu, Qiang; Xue, Guangming; Tan, Xinsheng; Yu, Haifeng; Yu, Yang

    2017-12-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a scheme to simulate the interaction between a two-level system and a classical light field. Under the transversal driving of two microwave tones, the effective Hamiltonian in an appropriate rotating frame is identical to that of the general semi-classical Rabi model. We experimentally realize this Hamiltonian with a superconducting transmon qubit. By tuning the strength, phase, and frequency of the two microwave driving fields, we simulate the quantum dynamics from the weak to extremely strong driving regime. Under these conditions, we observe that, as a function of increased Rabi drive strength, the qubit evolution gradually deviates from the normal sinusoidal Rabi oscillation, in accordance with the predictions of the general semi-classical Rabi model far beyond the weak driving limit. Our scheme provides an effective approach to investigate the extremely strong interaction between a two-level system and a classical light field. Such strong interactions are usually inaccessible in experiments.

  14. Determining extreme parameter correlation in ground water models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Mary Cole; Østerby, Ole

    2003-01-01

    In ground water flow system models with hydraulic-head observations but without significant imposed or observed flows, extreme parameter correlation generally exists. As a result, hydraulic conductivity and recharge parameters cannot be uniquely estimated. In complicated problems, such correlation...

  15. Strain localization at the margins of strong lithospheric domains: insights from analogue models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calignano, Elisa; Sokoutis, Dimitrios; Willingshofer, Ernst; Gueydan, Frederic; Cloetingh, Sierd

    The lateral variation of the mechanical properties of continental lithosphere is an important factor controlling the localization of deformation and thus the deformation history and geometry of intra-plate mountain belts. A series of three-layer lithospheric-scale analog models, with a strong domain

  16. Bayesian strong gravitational-lens modelling on adaptive grids : objective detection of mass substructure in Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegetti, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a new adaptive and fully Bayesian grid-based method to model strong gravitational lenses with extended images. The primary goal of this method is to quantify the level of luminous and dark mass substructure in massive galaxies, through their effect on highly magnified arcs and Einstein

  17. Development of 3D ferromagnetic model of tokamak core with strong toroidal asymmetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovič, Tomáš; Gryaznevich, Mikhail; Ďuran, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Fully 3D model of strongly asymmetric tokamak core, based on boundary integral method approach (i.e. characterization of ferromagnet by its surface) is presented. The model is benchmarked on measurements on tokamak GOLEM, as well as compared to 2D axisymmetric core equivalent for this tokamak......, presented in previous work. Linearized model well describes quantitative characteristics of BR field, generated by poloidal field coils located close to core central column, and distorted by ferromagnet. A discrepancy is seen between linearized form of model for BR field generated by coils under...

  18. RAMAN LIGHT SCATTERING IN PSEUDOSPIN-ELECTRON MODEL AT STRONG PSEUDOSPIN-ELECTRON INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S.Mysakovych

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Anharmonic phonon contributions to Raman scattering in locally anharmonic crystal systems in the framework of the pseudospin-electron model with tunneling splitting of levels are investigated. The case of strong pseudospin-electron coupling is considered. Pseudospin and electron contributions to scattering are taken into account. Frequency dependences of Raman scattering intensity for different values of model parameters and for different polarization of scattering and incident light are investigated.

  19. Modelling conditional correlations of asset returns: A smooth transition approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvennoinen, Annastiina; Teräsvirta, Timo

    In this paper we propose a new multivariate GARCH model with time-varying conditional correlation structure. The time-varying conditional correlations change smoothly between two extreme states of constant correlations according to a predetermined or exogenous transition variable. An LM-test is d......In this paper we propose a new multivariate GARCH model with time-varying conditional correlation structure. The time-varying conditional correlations change smoothly between two extreme states of constant correlations according to a predetermined or exogenous transition variable. An LM...

  20. Two-component Gaussian core model: Strong-coupling limit, Bjerrum pairs, and gas-liquid phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydel, Derek; Levin, Yan

    2018-01-14

    In the present work, we investigate a gas-liquid transition in a two-component Gaussian core model, where particles of the same species repel and those of different species attract. Unlike a similar transition in a one-component system with particles having attractive interactions at long separations and repulsive interactions at short separations, a transition in the two-component system is not driven solely by interactions but by a specific feature of the interactions, the correlations. This leads to extremely low critical temperature, as correlations are dominant in the strong-coupling limit. By carrying out various approximations based on standard liquid-state methods, we show that a gas-liquid transition of the two-component system poses a challenging theoretical problem.

  1. Superconducting states in strongly correlated systems with nonstandard quasiparticles and real space pairing: an unconventional Fermi-liquid limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Spałek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We use the concept of generalized (almost localized Fermi Liquid composed of nonstandard quasiparticles with spin-dependence effective masses and the effective field induced by electron correlations. This Fermi liquid is obtained within the so-called statistically-consistent Gutzwiller approximation (SGA proposed recently [cf. J. Jędrak et al., arXiv: 1008.0021] and describes electronic states of the correlated quantum liquid. Particular emphasis is put on real space pairing driven by the electronic correlations, the Fulde-Ferrell state of the heavy-fermion liquid, and the d-wave superconducting state of high temperature curate superconductors in the overdoped limit. The appropriate phase diagrams are discussed showing in particular the limits of stability of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS type of state.

  2. Cosmic Constraints to wCDM Model from Strong Gravitational Lensing

    CERN Document Server

    An, Jie; Xu, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the cosmic constraint to $w$CDM model via $118$ strong gravitational lensing systems which are complied from SLACS, BELLS, LSD and SL2S surveys, where the ratio between two angular diameter distances $D^{obs} = D_A(z_l,z_s)/D_A(0,z_s)$ is taken as a cosmic observable. To obtain this ratio, we adopt two strong lensing models: one is the singular isothermal sphere model (SIS), the other one is the power-law density profile (PLP) model. Via the Markov Chain Mote Carlo method, the posterior distribution of the cosmological model parameters space is obtained. The results show that the cosmological model parameters are not sensitive to the parameterized forms of the power-law index $\\gamma$. Furthermore, the PLP model gives a relative tighter constraint to the cosmological parameters than that of the SIS model. The predicted value of $\\Omega_m=0.31^{+0.44}_{-0.24}$ by SIS model is compatible with that obtained by {\\it Planck}2015: $\\Omega_{m}=0.313\\pm0.013$. However, the value of $\\Omega_m=0...

  3. Correlation-based Transition Modeling for External Aerodynamic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medida, Shivaji

    Conventional turbulence models calibrated for fully turbulent boundary layers often over-predict drag and heat transfer on aerodynamic surfaces with partially laminar boundary layers. A robust correlation-based model is developed for use in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations to predict laminar-to-turbulent transition onset of boundary layers on external aerodynamic surfaces. The new model is derived from an existing transition model for the two-equation k-omega Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model, and is coupled with the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras (SA) turbulence model. The transition model solves two transport equations for intermittency and transition momentum thickness Reynolds number. Experimental correlations and local mean flow quantities are used in the model to account for effects of freestream turbulence level and pressure gradients on transition onset location. Transition onset is triggered by activating intermittency production using a vorticity Reynolds number criterion. In the new model, production and destruction terms of the intermittency equation are modified to improve consistency in the fully turbulent boundary layer post-transition onset, as well as ensure insensitivity to freestream eddy viscosity value specified in the SA model. In the original model, intermittency was used to control production and destruction of turbulent kinetic energy. Whereas, in the new model, only the production of eddy viscosity in SA model is controlled, and the destruction term is not altered. Unlike the original model, the new model does not use an additional correction to intermittency for separation-induced transition. Accuracy of drag predictions are improved significantly with the use of the transition model for several two-dimensional single- and multi-element airfoil cases over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The new model is able to predict the formation of stable and long laminar separation bubbles on low-Reynolds number airfoils that

  4. Angular Structure of Jet Quenching Within a Hybrid Strong/Weak Coupling Model

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Milhano, Guilherme; Pablos, Daniel; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2017-01-01

    Within the context of a hybrid strong/weak coupling model of jet quenching, we study the modification of the angular distribution of the energy within jets in heavy ion collisions, as partons within jet showers lose energy and get kicked as they traverse the strongly coupled plasma produced in the collision. To describe the dynamics transverse to the jet axis, we add the effects of transverse momentum broadening into our hybrid construction, introducing a parameter $K\\equiv \\hat q/T^3$ that governs its magnitude. We show that, because of the quenching of the energy of partons within a jet, even when $K\

  5. Analog quantum simulation of the Rabi model in the ultra-strong coupling regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braumüller, Jochen; Marthaler, Michael; Schneider, Andre; Stehli, Alexander; Rotzinger, Hannes; Weides, Martin; Ustinov, Alexey V

    2017-10-03

    The quantum Rabi model describes the fundamental mechanism of light-matter interaction. It consists of a two-level atom or qubit coupled to a quantized harmonic mode via a transversal interaction. In the weak coupling regime, it reduces to the well-known Jaynes-Cummings model by applying a rotating wave approximation. The rotating wave approximation breaks down in the ultra-strong coupling regime, where the effective coupling strength g is comparable to the energy ω of the bosonic mode, and remarkable features in the system dynamics are revealed. Here we demonstrate an analog quantum simulation of an effective quantum Rabi model in the ultra-strong coupling regime, achieving a relative coupling ratio of g/ω ~ 0.6. The quantum hardware of the simulator is a superconducting circuit embedded in a cQED setup. We observe fast and periodic quantum state collapses and revivals of the initial qubit state, being the most distinct signature of the synthesized model.An analog quantum simulation scheme has been explored with a quantum hardware based on a superconducting circuit. Here the authors investigate the time evolution of the quantum Rabi model at ultra-strong coupling conditions, which is synthesized by slowing down the system dynamics in an effective frame.

  6. Calculation of generalized spin stiffness constant of strongly correlated doped quantum antiferromagnet on two-dimensional lattice and it’s application to effective exchange constant for semi-itinerant systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Suraka, E-mail: surakabhatta@bose.res.in; Chaudhury, Ranjan, E-mail: ranjan@bose.res.in

    2016-11-01

    The generalized spin stiffness constant for a doped quantum antiferromagnet has been investigated both analytically and numerically as a function of doping concentration at zero temperature, based on the strongly correlated t-J model on two-dimensional square lattice. The nature of the theoretical dependence of the stiffness constant on doping shows a striking similarity with that of the effective exchange constant, obtained from the combination of other theoretical and experimental techniques in the low doping region. This correspondence once again establishes that spin stiffness can very well play the role of an effective exchange constant even in the strongly correlated semi-itinerant systems. Our theoretical plot of the stiffness constant against doping concentration in the whole doping region exhibits the various characteristic features like a possible crossover in the higher doping regions and persistence of short range ordering even for very high doping with the complete vanishing of spin stiffness occurring only close to 100% doping. Our results receive very good support from various other theoretical approaches and also brings out a few limitations of some of them. Our detailed analysis highlights the crucial importance of the study of spin stiffness for the proper understanding of magnetic correlations in a semi-itinerant magnetic system described by the strongly correlated t-J model. Moreover, our basic formalism can also be utilized for determination of the effective exchange constant and magnetic correlations for itinerant magnetic systems, in general in a novel way.

  7. Hand-Held Dynamometer Measurements Obtained in a Home Environment Are Reliable but Not Correlated Strongly with Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    This research report describes the reliability and validity of hand-held dynamometer measurements of knee extension force obtained from 13 patients referred for physical therapy. Results found that hand-held dynamometry can be used to obtain reliable measures of muscle strength; however, correlation between strength measures and function was not…

  8. Computation and modeling of aero-thermal fields in turbine cascades and strongly curved ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, J.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced turbulence models are crucial for accurate prediction of rocket engine flows, due to existence of very large extra strain rates, such as strong streamline curvature. Numerical simulation of the turbulent flow in a strongly curved turn-around duct (TAD) has been carried out with a Reynolds stress model (RSM), an algebraic Reynolds stress model (ARSM) and a kappa-epsilon model. the RSM model and the ARSM model are found to capture the turbulence damping due to the convex curvature, but underpredict the turbulence enhancement caused by the concave curvature. To capture the concave curvature effects, it is necessary to modify the epsilon-equation. The modification of episilon-equation suggested by Launder, et.al, provides the correct trend, but over-corrects the curvature effects. A comparative study of two modes of transition in gas turbine, the by-pass transition and the separation-induced transition, has been carried out with several low-Reynolds-number (LRN) kappa-epsilon models. Effects of blade surface pressure gradient, freestream turbulence and Reynolds number on the blade boundary layer development, and particularly the inception of transition are examined in detail. The present study indicates that the turbine blade transition, in the presence of high freestream turbulence, is predicted well with LRN kappa-epsilon models employed.

  9. Mott-Anderson Transition in Molecular Conductors: Influence of Randomness on Strongly Correlated Electrons in the κ-(BEDT-TTF2X System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Sasaki

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Mott-Anderson transition has been known as a metal-insulator (MI transition due to both strong electron-electron interaction and randomness of the electrons. For example, the MI transition in doped semiconductors and transition metal oxides has been investigated up to now as a typical example of the Mott-Anderson transition for changing electron correlations by carrier number control in concurrence with inevitable randomness. On the other hand, molecular conductors have been known as typical strongly correlated electron systems with bandwidth controlled Mott transition. In this paper, we demonstrate our recent studies on the randomness effect of the strongly correlated electrons of the BEDT-TTF molecule based organic conductors. X-ray irradiation on the crystals introduces molecular defects in the insulating anion layer, which cause random potential modulation of the correlated electrons in the conductive BEDT-TTF layer. In combination with hydrostatic pressure, we are able to control the parameters for randomness and correlations for electrons approaching the Mott-Anderson transition.

  10. The strong-weak coupling symmetry in 2D Φ4 field models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.N.Shalaev

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available It is found that the exact beta-function β(g of the continuous 2D gΦ4 model possesses two types of dual symmetries, these being the Kramers-Wannier (KW duality symmetry and the strong-weak (SW coupling symmetry f(g, or S-duality. All these transformations are explicitly constructed. The S-duality transformation f(g is shown to connect domains of weak and strong couplings, i.e. above and below g*. Basically it means that there is a tempting possibility to compute multiloop Feynman diagrams for the β-function using high-temperature lattice expansions. The regular scheme developed is found to be strongly unstable. Approximate values of the renormalized coupling constant g* found from duality symmetry equations are in an agreement with available numerical results.

  11. A strong response to selection on mass-independent maximal metabolic rate without a correlated response in basal metabolic rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wone, B W M; Madsen, Per; Donovan, E R

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic rates are correlated with many aspects of ecology, but how selection on different aspects of metabolic rates affects their mutual evolution is poorly understood. Using laboratory mice, we artificially selected for high maximal mass-independent metabolic rate (MMR) without direct selection...... on mass-independent basal metabolic rate (BMR). Then we tested for responses to selection in MMR and correlated responses to selection in BMR. In other lines, we antagonistically selected for mice with a combination of high mass-independent MMR and low mass-independent BMR. All selection protocols...... and data analyses included body mass as a covariate, so effects of selection on the metabolic rates are mass adjusted (that is, independent of effects of body mass). The selection lasted eight generations. Compared with controls, MMR was significantly higher (11.2%) in lines selected for increased MMR...

  12. Circulating fibroblast activation protein activity and antigen levels correlate strongly when measured in liver disease and coronary heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Uitte de Willige

    Full Text Available Circulating fibroblast activation protein (cFAP is a constitutively active enzyme expressed by activated fibroblasts that has both dipeptidyl peptidase and endopeptidase activities. We aimed to assess the correlation between cFAP activity and antigen levels and to compare variations in levels.In plasma of 465 control individuals, 368 patients with coronary heart disease (CHD and 102 hepatitis C virus (HCV infected patients with severe liver disease before and after liver transplant, cFAP activity levels were measured with a newly developed cFAP activity assay. In the same samples, cFAP antigen levels were measured using a commercially available cFAP ELISA. Correlation analyses between activity and antigen levels were performed by calculating Pearson's correlation coefficient (ρ. Additionally, normal ranges, determinants and differences between cohorts and between anticoagulants were investigated.cFAP activity and antigen levels significantly correlated in controls (ρ: 0.660, p<0.001 and in CHD patients (ρ: 0.709, p<0.001. cFAP activity and antigen levels in the HCV cohort were significantly lower in the samples taken after liver transplantation (p<0.001 and normalized toward levels of healthy individuals. Furthermore, cFAP activity and antigen levels were higher in men and significantly associated with body mass index. Also, cFAP activity and antigen levels were higher in EDTA plasma as compared to the levels in citrated plasma from the same healthy individuals.For analyzing cFAP levels, either activity levels or antigen levels can be measured to investigate differences between individuals. However, it is of importance that blood samples are collected in the same anticoagulant.

  13. Explicitly-correlated non-born-oppenheimer calculations of the HD molecule in a strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamowicz, Ludwik; Stanke, Monika; Tellgren, Erik; Helgaker, Trygve

    2017-08-01

    Explicitly correlated all-particle Gaussian functions with shifted centers (ECGs) are implemented within the earlier proposed effective variational non-Born-Oppenheimer method for calculating bound states of molecular systems in magnetic field (Adamowicz et al., 2015). The Hamiltonian used in the calculations is obtained by subtracting the operator representing the kinetic energy of the center-of-mass motion from the total laboratory-frame Hamiltonian. Test ECG calculations are performed for the HD molecule.

  14. A Model for Positively Correlated Count Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Rubak, Ege Holger

    2010-01-01

    An α-permanental random field is briefly speaking a model for a collection of non-negative integer valued random variables with positive associations. Though such models possess many appealing probabilistic properties, many statisticians seem unaware of α-permanental random fields and their poten......An α-permanental random field is briefly speaking a model for a collection of non-negative integer valued random variables with positive associations. Though such models possess many appealing probabilistic properties, many statisticians seem unaware of α-permanental random fields...

  15. Using Dispersed Modes During Model Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Eric; Hathcock, Megan

    2017-01-01

    Using model dispersions as a starting point allows us to quickly adjust a model to reflect new test data: a) The analyst does a lot of work before the test to save time post-test. b) Creating 1000s of model dispersions to provide "coarse tuning," then use Attune to provide the "fine tuning." ?Successful model tuning on three structures: a) TAURUS. b) Ares I-X C) Cart (in backup charts). ?Mode weighting factors, matrix norm method, and XOR vs. MAC all play key roles in determining the BME. The BME process will be used on future tests: a) ISPE modal test (ongoing work). b) SLS modal test (mid 2018).

  16. Infrared catastrophe and tunneling into strongly correlated electron systems: Exact x-ray edge limit for the one-dimensional electron gas and two-dimensional Hall fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Kelly R.; Geller, Michael R.

    2006-06-01

    In previous work [K. R. Patton and M. R. Geller, Phys. Rev. B 72, 125108 (2005)] we have proposed that the non-Fermi-liquid spectral properties in a variety of low-dimensional and strongly correlated electron systems are caused by the infrared catastrophe, and we used an exact functional integral representation for the interacting Green’s function to map the tunneling problem onto the x-ray edge problem, plus corrections. The corrections are caused by the recoil of the tunneling particle, and, in systems where the method is applicable, are not expected to change the qualitative form of the tunneling density of states (DOS). Qualitatively correct results were obtained for the DOS of the one-dimensional electron gas and two-dimensional Hall fluid when the corrections to the x-ray edge limit were neglected and when the corresponding Nozières-De Dominicis integral equations were solved by resummation of a divergent perturbation series. Here we reexamine the x-ray edge limit for these two models by solving these integral equations exactly, finding the expected modifications of the DOS exponent in the one-dimensional case but finding no changes in the DOS of the two-dimensional Hall fluid with short-range interaction. Our analysis provides an exact solution of the Nozières-De Dominicis equation for the two-dimensional electron gas in the lowest Landau level.

  17. Strong Electron Correlation in the High-Temperature Phase of (EDO-TTF)2PF6 as a Quasi-One-Dimensional Molecular Conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwano, Kaoru; Shimoi, Yukihiro

    2010-10-01

    We focus on the electronic property of the high-temperature phase of (EDO-TTF)2PF6. Applying a cluster-based density-functional theory (DFT) calculation augmented by a self-consistent environment, we recognize a strong electron-electron repulsion in a dimer-Mott-type ground state. On the basis of this ground state, we obtain an absorption spectrum that takes a form of a single peak in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) region. We next analyze a Hubbard model with alternate transfers, of which the values are determined by the DFT calculations. The obtained absorption peak energy is comparable to the mid-IR peak energy observed in the experiment. Finally, we also investigate other one-dimensional conductors, (TMTSF)2PF6 and (TMTTF)2PF6, which are known as correlated metals, and conclude that (EDO-TTF)2PF6 also falls in this category, in spite of its unique (0110)-type charge ordering observed in the low-temperature phase.

  18. Modeling of Circuits with Strongly Temperature Dependent Thermal Conductivities for Cryogenic CMOS

    OpenAIRE

    Hamlet, J.; Eng, K.; Gurrieri, T.; Levy, J; Carroll, M

    2010-01-01

    When designing and studying circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures understanding local heating within the circuits is critical due to the temperature dependence of transistor and noise behavior. We have investigated local heating effects of a CMOS ring oscillator and current comparator at T=4.2K. In two cases, the temperature near the circuit was measured with an integrated thermometer. A lumped element equivalent electrical circuit SPICE model that accounts for the strongly temperature...

  19. Modified Regression Correlation Coefficient for Poisson Regression Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaengthong, Nattacha; Domthong, Uthumporn

    2017-09-01

    This study gives attention to indicators in predictive power of the Generalized Linear Model (GLM) which are widely used; however, often having some restrictions. We are interested in regression correlation coefficient for a Poisson regression model. This is a measure of predictive power, and defined by the relationship between the dependent variable (Y) and the expected value of the dependent variable given the independent variables [E(Y|X)] for the Poisson regression model. The dependent variable is distributed as Poisson. The purpose of this research was modifying regression correlation coefficient for Poisson regression model. We also compare the proposed modified regression correlation coefficient with the traditional regression correlation coefficient in the case of two or more independent variables, and having multicollinearity in independent variables. The result shows that the proposed regression correlation coefficient is better than the traditional regression correlation coefficient based on Bias and the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE).

  20. Strong correlations between empathy, emotional intelligence, and personality traits among podiatric medical students: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Kurtis; Randazzo, John; Alabi, Nathaniel; Levenson, Jack; Doucette, John T; Barbosa, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The ability of health-care providers to demonstrate empathy toward their patients results in a number of positive outcomes improving the quality of care. In addition, a provider's level of emotional intelligence (EI) can further the doctor-patient relationship, stimulating a more personalized and comprehensive manner of treating patients. Furthermore, personality traits of a clinician may positively or negatively influence that relationship, as well as clinical outcomes. This study was designed to evaluate empathy levels in podiatric medical students in a 4-year doctoral program. Moreover, this study aimed to determine whether EI, personality traits, and demographic variables exhibit correlations with the observed empathy patterns. This cross-sectional study collected data using an anonymous web-based survey completed by 150 students registered at the New York College of Podiatric Medicine. There were four survey sections: (1) demographics, (2) empathy (measured by the Jefferson Scale of Physicians' Empathy), (3) EI (measured by the Assessing Emotions Scale), and (4) personality traits (measured by the NEO-Five-Factor Inventory-3). Empathy levels were significantly correlated with EI scores (r = 0.62, n = 150, Peducation.

  1. Updating the (supermassive black hole mass)-(spiral arm pitch angle) relation: a strong correlation for galaxies with pseudobulges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Graham, Alister W.; Seigar, Marc S.

    2017-10-01

    We have conducted an image analysis of the (current) full sample of 44 spiral galaxies with directly measured supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses, MBH, to determine each galaxy's logarithmic spiral arm pitch angle, ϕ. For predicting black hole masses, we have derived the relation: log (MBH/M⊙) = (7.01 ± 0.07) - (0.171 ± 0.017)[|ϕ| - 15°]. The total root mean square scatter associated with this relation is 0.43 dex in the log MBH direction, with an intrinsic scatter of 0.30 ± 0.08 dex. The MBH-ϕ relation is therefore at least as accurate at predicting SMBH masses in spiral galaxies as the other known relations. By definition, the existence of an MBH-ϕ relation demands that the SMBH mass must correlate with the galaxy discs in some manner. Moreover, with the majority of our sample (37 of 44) classified in the literature as having a pseudobulge morphology, we additionally reveal that the SMBH mass correlates with the large-scale spiral pattern and thus the discs of galaxies hosting pseudobulges. Furthermore, given that the MBH-ϕ relation is capable of estimating black hole masses in bulge-less spiral galaxies, it therefore has great promise for predicting which galaxies may harbour intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs, MBH < 105 M⊙). Extrapolating from the current relation, we predict that galaxies with |ϕ| ≥ 26.7° should possess IMBHs.

  2. A Note on the Correlated Random Coefficient Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolodziejczyk, Christophe

    In this note we derive the bias of the OLS estimator for a correlated random coefficient model with one random coefficient, but which is correlated with a binary variable. We provide set-identification to the parameters of interest of the model. We also show how to reduce the bias of the estimator...

  3. Modeling a nonperturbative spinor vacuum interacting with a strong gravitational wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Department of Theoretical and Nuclear Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Folomeev, Vladimir [Institute of Physicotechnical Problems and Material Science, NAS of the Kyrgyz Republic, Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan)

    2015-07-15

    We consider the propagation of strong gravitational waves interacting with a nonperturbative vacuum of spinor fields. To described the latter, we suggest an approximate model. The corresponding Einstein equation has the form of the Schroedinger equation. Its gravitational-wave solution is analogous to the solution of the Schroedinger equation for an electron moving in a periodic potential. The general solution for the periodic gravitational waves is found. The analog of the Kronig-Penney model for gravitational waves is considered. It is shown that the suggested gravitational-wave model permits the existence of weak electric charge and current densities concomitant with the gravitational wave. Based on this observation, a possible experimental verification of the model is suggested. (orig.)

  4. Formation of antibodies against infliximab and adalimumab strongly correlates with functional drug levels and clinical responses in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radstake, T R D J; Svenson, M; Eijsbouts, A M

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) neutralising antibody constructs are increasingly being used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVE: To determine potential differences in clinical responses, soluble drug levels and antibody formation between patients with RA receiving...... intravenously at 3 mg/kg at baseline and after 2, 6 and 14 weeks. Adalimumab was administered as 40 mg biweekly subcutaneously. Concomitant drug treatment was monitored and continued at constant dosage during the study. All serum samples were tested for infliximab/adalimumab levels and anti...... 16 (47%), 8 (24%) and 10 (29%). Clinical responses correlated with the levels of S-infliximab/adalimumab and the formation of anti-infliximab/anti-adalimumab antibodies. CONCLUSION: The clinical response to two anti-TNFalpha biological agents closely follows the trough drug levels and the presence...

  5. Model calculations in correlated finite nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardiola, R.; Ros, J. (Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear); Polls, A. (Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik)

    1980-10-21

    In order to study the convergence condition of the FAHT cluster expansion several model calculations are described and numerically tested. It is concluded that this cluster expansion deals properly with the central part of the two-body distribution function, but presents some difficulties for the exchange part.

  6. Atomistic model for excitons: Capturing Strongly Bound Excitons in Monolayer Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Frank; Simsek, Ergun; Gunlycke, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides form a direct bandgap predicted in the visible regime making them attractive host materials for various electronic and optoelectronic applications. Due to a weak dielectric screening in these materials, strongly bound electron-hole pairs or excitons have binding energies up to at least several hundred meV's. While the conventional wisdom is to think of excitons as hydrogen-like quasi-particles, we show that the hydrogen model breaks down for these experimentally observed strongly bound, room-temperature excitons. To capture these non-hydrogen-like photo-excitations, we introduce an atomistic model for excitons that predicts both bright excitons and dark excitons, and their broken degeneracy in these two-dimensional materials. For strongly bound exciton states, the lattice potential significantly distorts the envelope wave functions, which affects predicted exciton peak energies. The combination of large binding energies and non-degeneracy of exciton states in monolayer transition metal dichalogendies may furthermore be exploited in room temperature applications where prolonged exciton lifetimes are necessary. This work has been funded by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), directly and through the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). F.T and E.S acknowledge support from NRL through the NRC Research Associateship Program and ONR Summer Faculty Program, respectively.

  7. Interaction effects in a microscopic quantum wire model with strong spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, G. W.; Ganahl, M.; Schuricht, D.; Evertz, H. G.; Andergassen, S.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the effect of strong interactions on the spectral properties of quantum wires with strong Rashba spin-orbit (SO) interaction in a magnetic field, using a combination of matrix product state and bosonization techniques. Quantum wires with strong Rashba SO interaction and magnetic field exhibit a partial gap in one-half of the conducting modes. Such systems have attracted wide-spread experimental and theoretical attention due to their unusual physical properties, among which are spin-dependent transport, or a topological superconducting phase when under the proximity effect of an s-wave superconductor. As a microscopic model for the quantum wire we study an extended Hubbard model with SO interaction and Zeeman field. We obtain spin resolved spectral densities from the real-time evolution of excitations, and calculate the phase diagram. We find that interactions increase the pseudo gap at k = 0 and thus also enhance the Majorana-supporting phase and stabilize the helical spin order. Furthermore, we calculate the optical conductivity and compare it with the low energy spiral Luttinger liquid result, obtained from field theoretical calculations. With interactions, the optical conductivity is dominated by an excotic excitation of a bound soliton-antisoliton pair known as a breather state. We visualize the oscillating motion of the breather state, which could provide the route to their experimental detection in e.g. cold atom experiments.

  8. Sensitivity analysis of a sound absorption model with correlated inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, W.; Christen, J.-L.; Zine, A.-M.; Ichchou, M.

    2017-04-01

    Sound absorption in porous media is a complex phenomenon, which is usually addressed with homogenized models, depending on macroscopic parameters. Since these parameters emerge from the structure at microscopic scale, they may be correlated. This paper deals with sensitivity analysis methods of a sound absorption model with correlated inputs. Specifically, the Johnson-Champoux-Allard model (JCA) is chosen as the objective model with correlation effects generated by a secondary micro-macro semi-empirical model. To deal with this case, a relatively new sensitivity analysis method Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test with Correlation design (FASTC), based on Iman's transform, is taken into application. This method requires a priori information such as variables' marginal distribution functions and their correlation matrix. The results are compared to the Correlation Ratio Method (CRM) for reference and validation. The distribution of the macroscopic variables arising from the microstructure, as well as their correlation matrix are studied. Finally the results of tests shows that the correlation has a very important impact on the results of sensitivity analysis. Assessment of correlation strength among input variables on the sensitivity analysis is also achieved.

  9. Interpretation of TOVS Water Vapor Radiances Using a Random Strong Line Model

    CERN Document Server

    Soden, B J; Soden, Brian J.; Bretherton, Francis P.

    1995-01-01

    This study illustrates the application of a random strong line (RSL) model of radiative transfer to the interpretation of satellite observations of the upwelling radiation in the 6.3 micron water vapor absorption band. The model, based upon an assemblage of randomly overlapped, strongly absorbing, pressure broadened lines, is compared to detailed radiative transfer calculations of the upper (6.7 micron) tropospheric water vapor radiance and demonstrated to be accurate to within ~ 1.2 K. Similar levels of accuracy are found when the model is compared to detailed calculations of the middle (7.3 micron) and lower (8.3 micron) tropospheric water vapor radiance, provided that the emission from the underlying surface is taken into account. Based upon these results, the RSL model is used to interpret TOVS-observed water vapor radiances in terms of the relative humidity averaged over deep layers of the upper, middle, and lower troposphere. We then present near-global maps of the geographic distribution and climatolog...

  10. Note on the hydrodynamic description of thin nematic films: Strong anchoring model

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Te-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the long-wave hydrodynamic model for a thin film of nematic liquid crystal in the limit of strong anchoring at the free surface and at the substrate. We rigorously clarify how the elastic energy enters the evolution equation for the film thickness in order to provide a solid basis for further investigation: several conflicting models exist in the literature that predict qualitatively different behaviour. We consolidate the various approaches and show that the long-wave model derived through an asymptotic expansion of the full nemato-hydrodynamic equations with consistent boundary conditions agrees with the model one obtains by employing a thermodynamically motivated gradient dynamics formulation based on an underlying free energy functional. As a result, we find that in the case of strong anchoring the elastic distortion energy is always stabilising. To support the discussion in the main part of the paper, an appendix gives the full derivation of the evolution equation for the film thickness via asymptotic expansion. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  11. Field-theoretic methods in strongly-coupled models of general gauge mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortin, Jean-François, E-mail: jean-francois.fortin@cern.ch [Theory Division, Department of Physics, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stergiou, Andreas, E-mail: stergiou@physics.ucsd.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    An often-exploited feature of the operator product expansion (OPE) is that it incorporates a splitting of ultraviolet and infrared physics. In this paper we use this feature of the OPE to perform simple, approximate computations of soft masses in gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking. The approximation amounts to truncating the OPEs for hidden-sector current–current operator products. Our method yields visible-sector superpartner spectra in terms of vacuum expectation values of a few hidden-sector IR elementary fields. We manage to obtain reasonable approximations to soft masses, even when the hidden sector is strongly coupled. We demonstrate our techniques in several examples, including a new framework where supersymmetry breaking arises both from a hidden sector and dynamically. Our results suggest that strongly-coupled models of supersymmetry breaking are naturally split.

  12. Strong diamagnetic response in split-ring-resonator metamaterials: Numerical study and two-loop model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Economou, E.; Koschny, T.; Souloulis, C.

    2008-03-03

    We demonstrate that there is a strong diamagnetic response of metamaterials, consisting of open or closed split-ring resonators (SRRs). Detailed numerical work shows that for densely packed SRRs, the magnetic permeability {mu}({omega}) does not approach unity, as expected for frequencies lower and higher than the resonance frequency {omega}{sub 0}. Below {omega}{sub 0}, {mu}({omega}) gives values ranging from 0.9 to 0.6 depending of the width of the metallic ring, while above {omega}{sub 0}, {mu}({omega}) is close to 0.5. Closed rings have {mu} {approx} 0.5 over a wide frequency range independently of the width of the ring. A simple model that uses the inner and outer current loops of the SRRs can easily explain theoretically this strong diamagnetic response, which can be used in magnetic levitation.

  13. Impact of correlation of predictors on discrimination of risk models in development and external populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Suman; Mazumdar, Madhu; Ferket, Bart

    2017-04-19

    The area under the ROC curve (AUC) of risk models is known to be influenced by differences in case-mix and effect size of predictors. The impact of heterogeneity in correlation among predictors has however been under investigated. We sought to evaluate how correlation among predictors affects the AUC in development and external populations. We simulated hypothetical populations using two different methods based on means, standard deviations, and correlation of two continuous predictors. In the first approach, the distribution and correlation of predictors were assumed for the total population. In the second approach, these parameters were modeled conditional on disease status. In both approaches, multivariable logistic regression models were fitted to predict disease risk in individuals. Each risk model developed in a population was validated in the remaining populations to investigate external validity. For both approaches, we observed that the magnitude of the AUC in the development and external populations depends on the correlation among predictors. Lower AUCs were estimated in scenarios of both strong positive and negative correlation, depending on the direction of predictor effects and the simulation method. However, when adjusted effect sizes of predictors were specified in the opposite directions, increasingly negative correlation consistently improved the AUC. AUCs in external validation populations were higher or lower than in the derivation cohort, even in the presence of similar predictor effects. Discrimination of risk prediction models should be assessed in various external populations with different correlation structures to make better inferences about model generalizability.

  14. Observation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations and possible local strong parity violation in heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to non-trivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along the orbital momentum of the system created in non-central collisions. To study this effect, we investigate a three particle mixed harmonics azimuthal correlator which is a {Rho}-even observable, but directly sensitive to the charge separation effect. We report measurements of this observable using the STAR detector in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 and 62 GeV. The results are presented as a function of collision centrality, particle separation in rapidity, and particle transverse momentum. A signal consistent with several of the theoretical expectations is detected in all four data sets. We compare our results to the predictions of existing event generators, and discuss in detail possible contributions from other effects that are not related to parity violation.

  15. Short-range correlations in modified planar rotator model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žukovič, M.; Hristopulos, D. T.

    2015-09-01

    We introduce a model inspired from statistical physics that is shown to display flexible short-range spatial correlations which are potentially useful in geostatistical modeling. In particular, we consider a suitably modified planar rotator or XY model, traditionally used for modeling continuous spin systems in magnetism, and we demonstrate that it can capture spatial correlations typically present in geostatistical data. The empirical study of the spin configurations produced by Monte Carlo simulations at various temperatures and stages in the nonequilibrium regime shows that their spatial variability can be modeled by the flexible class of Matern covariance functions. The correlation range and the smoothness of these functions vary significantly in the parameter space that consists of the temperature and the simulation time. We briefly discuss the potential of the model for efficient and automatic prediction of spatial data with short-range correlations, such as commonly encountered in geophysical and environmental applications.

  16. Self-consistent random phase approximation - application to systems of strongly correlated fermions; Approximation des phases aleatoires self-consistante - applications a des systemes de fermions fortement correles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jemai, M

    2004-07-01

    In the present thesis we have applied the self consistent random phase approximation (SCRPA) to the Hubbard model with a small number of sites (a chain of 2, 4, 6,... sites). Earlier SCRPA had produced very good results in other models like the pairing model of Richardson. It was therefore interesting to see what kind of results the method is able to produce in the case of a more complex model like the Hubbard model. To our great satisfaction the case of two sites with two electrons (half-filling) is solved exactly by the SCRPA. This may seem a little trivial but the fact is that other respectable approximations like 'GW' or the approach with the Gutzwiller wave function yield results still far from exact. With this promising starting point, the case of 6 sites at half filling was considered next. For that case, evidently, SCRPA does not any longer give exact results. However, they are still excellent for a wide range of values of the coupling constant U, covering for instance the phase transition region towards a state with non zero magnetisation. We consider this as a good success of the theory. Non the less the case of 4 sites (a plaquette), as indeed all cases with 4n sites at half filling, turned out to have a problem because of degeneracies at the Hartree Fock level. A generalisation of the present method, including in addition to the pairs, quadruples of Fermions operators (called second RPA) is proposed to also include exactly the plaquette case in our approach. This is therefore a very interesting perspective of the present work. (author)

  17. A Simple Model of Fields Including the Strong or Nuclear Force and a Cosmological Speculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Spencer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Reexamining the assumptions underlying the General Theory of Relativity and calling an object's gravitational field its inertia, and acceleration simply resistance to that inertia, yields a simple field model where the potential (kinetic energy of a particle at rest is its capacity to move itself when its inertial field becomes imbalanced. The model then attributes electromagnetic and strong forces to the effects of changes in basic particle shape. Following up on the model's assumption that the relative intensity of a particle's gravitational field is always inversely related to its perceived volume and assuming that all black holes spin, may create the possibility of a cosmic rebound where a final spinning black hole ends with a new Big Bang.

  18. Sd-model with strong exchange coupling and a metal-insulator phase transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.A.Izyumov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sd-exchange model (Kondo lattice model is formulated for strong sd-coupling within the framework of the X-operators technique and the generating functional approach. The X-operators are constructed based on the exact eigen functions of a single-site sd-exchange Hamiltonian. Such representation enables us to develop a perturbation theory near the atomic level. A locator-type representation was derived for the electron Green's function. The electron self-energy includes interaction of electrons and spin fluctuations. An integral equation for the self-energy was obtained in the limit of infinite localized spins. A solution of this equation in the static approximation for spin fluctuations leads to a structure of electron Green's function showing a metal-insulator phase transition. This transition is similar to that in the Hubbard model at half filling.

  19. An assessment of turbulence models for linear hydrodynamic stability analysis of strongly swirling jets

    CERN Document Server

    Rukes, Lothar; Oberleithner, Kilian

    2016-01-01

    Linear stability analysis has proven to be a useful tool in the analysis of dominant coherent structures, such as the von K\\'{a}rm\\'{a}n vortex street and the global spiral mode associated with the vortex breakdown of swirling jets. In recent years, linear stability analysis has been applied successfully to turbulent time-mean flows, instead of laminar base-flows, \\textcolor{black}{which requires turbulent models that account for the interaction of the turbulent field with the coherent structures. To retain the stability equations of laminar flows, the Boussinesq approximation with a spatially nonuniform but isotropic eddy viscosity is typically employed. In this work we assess the applicability of this concept to turbulent strongly swirling jets, a class of flows that is particularly unsuited for isotropic eddy viscosity models. Indeed we find that unsteady RANS simulations only match with experiments with a Reynolds stress model that accounts for an anisotropic eddy viscosity. However, linear stability anal...

  20. Psychological Correlates of a Model of the Human Visual System

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model of the human visual system is investigated for psychological correlates. A priori hypotheses from the model concerned with human...identification of defocused letters as well as identification of rotated letters have been validated with the computer model. Gestalt principles of similarity...is also psychologically correlated. It is further postulated that the human perceptual space is the image domain from spatially filtered transforms of

  1. The End-Diastolic Velocity of Thyroid Arteries Is Strongly Correlated with the Peak Systolic Velocity and Gland Volume in Patients with Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Bianchini Höfling

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The end-diastolic velocity (EDV of thyroid arteries reflects peripheral blood flow resistance. Objective. The aim was to evaluate EDV correlations with other Doppler sonography parameters and with clinical and biochemical variables in a sample of patients with hypothyroidism caused by chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (CAT. Methods. A sample of 48 CAT hypothyroid patients receiving treatment with stable doses of levothyroxine was selected. The participants underwent clinical evaluation and measurement of serum thyrotropin (TSH, total triiodothyronine (T3, total thyroxine (T4, free T4, thyroid peroxidase antibodies (anti-TPO, and antithyroglobulin antibodies (anti-Tg and Doppler sonography. Results. The EDV of the inferior thyroid arteries (ITA-EDV was strongly and positively correlated with the peak systolic velocity of the inferior thyroid arteries (ITA-PSV, r=0.919, thyroid volume (r=0.711, and thyroid visual vascularization pattern (TVP, r=0.687. There was no correlation between ITA-EDV and the clinical variables, hormones, anti-TPO, or anti-Tg. Conclusion. The strong correlation of ITA-EDV with ITA-PSV, TVP, and volume suggests that increased vascularization in CAT may be associated with a reduction in thyroid blood flow resistance, possibly due to an angiogenesis-induced increase in the total vascular cross-sectional area of the parenchyma.

  2. Engineering the Dynamics of Effective Spin-Chain Models for Strongly Interacting Atomic Gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volosniev, A. G.; Petrosyan, D.; Valiente, M.

    2015-01-01

    We consider a one-dimensional gas of cold atoms with strong contact interactions and construct an effective spin-chain Hamiltonian for a two-component system. The resulting Heisenberg spin model can be engineered by manipulating the shape of the external confining potential of the atomic gas. We...... find that bosonic atoms offer more flexibility for tuning independently the parameters of the spin Hamiltonian through interatomic (intra-species) interaction which is absent for fermions due to the Pauli exclusion principle. Our formalism can have important implications for control and manipulation...

  3. Process Correlation Analysis Model for Process Improvement Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-jin Choi

    2014-01-01

    software development process. However, in the current practice, correlations of process elements are often overlooked in the development of an improvement plan, which diminishes the efficiency of the plan. This is mainly attributed to significant efforts and the lack of required expertise. In this paper, we present a process correlation analysis model that helps identify correlations of process elements from the results of process assessment. This model is defined based on CMMI and empirical data of improvement practices. We evaluate the model using industrial data.

  4. Modeling of two-particle femtoscopic correlations at top RHIC energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, N.; Nigmatkulov, G.

    2017-01-01

    The spatial and temporal characteristics of particle emitting source produced in particle and/or nuclear collisions can be measured by using two-particle femtoscopic correlations. These correlations arise due to quantum statistics, Coulomb and strong final state interactions. In this paper we report on the calculations of like-sign pion femtoscopic correlations produced in p+p, p+Au, d+Au, Au+Au at top RHIC energy using Ultra Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics Model (UrQMD). Three-dimensional correlation functions are constructed using the Bertsch-Pratt parametrization of the two-particle relative momentum. The correlation functions are studied in several transverse mass ranges. The emitting source radii of charged pions, Rout, Rside, Rlong , are obtained from Gaussian fit to the correlation functions and compared to data from the STAR and PHENIX experiments.

  5. A model for the training effects in swimming demonstrates a strong relationship between parasympathetic activity, performance and index of fatigue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Chalencon

    Full Text Available Competitive swimming as a physical activity results in changes to the activity level of the autonomic nervous system (ANS. However, the precise relationship between ANS activity, fatigue and sports performance remains contentious. To address this problem and build a model to support a consistent relationship, data were gathered from national and regional swimmers during two 30 consecutive-week training periods. Nocturnal ANS activity was measured weekly and quantified through wavelet transform analysis of the recorded heart rate variability. Performance was then measured through a subsequent morning 400 meters freestyle time-trial. A model was proposed where indices of fatigue were computed using Banister's two antagonistic component model of fatigue and adaptation applied to both the ANS activity and the performance. This demonstrated that a logarithmic relationship existed between performance and ANS activity for each subject. There was a high degree of model fit between the measured and calculated performance (R(2=0.84±0.14,p<0.01 and the measured and calculated High Frequency (HF power of the ANS activity (R(2=0.79±0.07, p<0.01. During the taper periods, improvements in measured performance and measured HF were strongly related. In the model, variations in performance were related to significant reductions in the level of 'Negative Influences' rather than increases in 'Positive Influences'. Furthermore, the delay needed to return to the initial performance level was highly correlated to the delay required to return to the initial HF power level (p<0.01. The delay required to reach peak performance was highly correlated to the delay required to reach the maximal level of HF power (p=0.02. Building the ANS/performance identity of a subject, including the time to peak HF, may help predict the maximal performance that could be obtained at a given time.

  6. On detecting and modeling periodic correlation in financial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broszkiewicz-Suwaj, E.; Makagon, A.; Weron, R.; Wyłomańska, A.

    2004-05-01

    For many economic problems standard statistical analysis, based on the notion of stationarity, is not adequate. These include modeling seasonal decisions of consumers, forecasting business cycles and-as we show in the present article-modeling wholesale power market prices. We apply standard methods and a novel spectral domain technique to conclude that electricity price returns exhibit periodic correlation with daily and weekly periods. As such they should be modeled with periodically correlated processes. We propose to apply periodic autoregression models which are closely related to the standard instruments in econometric analysis-vector autoregression models.

  7. Confidence intervals for intraclass correlation coefficients in variance components models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demetrashvili, Nino; Wit, Ernst C.; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.

    2016-01-01

    Confidence intervals for intraclass correlation coefficients in agreement studies with continuous outcomes are model-specific and no generic approach exists. This paper provides two generic approaches for intraclass correlation coefficients of the form Sigma q=1 2). The first approach uses

  8. K correlations and facet models in diffuse scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenders, B.J.; Jakeman, E.; Baltes, H.P.; Steinle, B.

    1979-01-01

    The angular intensity distribution of radiation scattered by a wide range of random media can be accounted for by assuming effective source amplitude correlations involving modified Bessel functions Kv. We investigate how such correlations can be derived from physical models of stochastic scattering

  9. Cluster decomposition of full configuration interaction wave functions: A tool for chemical interpretation of systems with strong correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtola, Susi; Tubman, Norm M.; Whaley, K. Birgitta; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2017-10-01

    Approximate full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations have recently become tractable for systems of unforeseen size, thanks to stochastic and adaptive approximations to the exponentially scaling FCI problem. The result of an FCI calculation is a weighted set of electronic configurations, which can also be expressed in terms of excitations from a reference configuration. The excitation amplitudes contain information on the complexity of the electronic wave function, but this information is contaminated by contributions from disconnected excitations, i.e., those excitations that are just products of independent lower-level excitations. The unwanted contributions can be removed via a cluster decomposition procedure, making it possible to examine the importance of connected excitations in complicated multireference molecules which are outside the reach of conventional algorithms. We present an implementation of the cluster decomposition analysis and apply it to both true FCI wave functions, as well as wave functions generated from the adaptive sampling CI algorithm. The cluster decomposition is useful for interpreting calculations in chemical studies, as a diagnostic for the convergence of various excitation manifolds, as well as as a guidepost for polynomially scaling electronic structure models. Applications are presented for (i) the double dissociation of water, (ii) the carbon dimer, (iii) the π space of polyacenes, and (iv) the chromium dimer. While the cluster amplitudes exhibit rapid decay with an increasing rank for the first three systems, even connected octuple excitations still appear important in Cr2, suggesting that spin-restricted single-reference coupled-cluster approaches may not be tractable for some problems in transition metal chemistry.

  10. A statistical model of three-dimensional anisotropy and intermittency in strong Alfv\\'enic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Mallet, A

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple statistical model of three-dimensionally anisotropic, intermittent, strong Alfv\\'enic turbulence, incorporating both critical balance and dynamic alignment. Our model is based on log-Poisson statistics for Elsasser-field increments {\\em along} the magnetic field. We predict the scalings of Elsasser-field conditional two-point structure functions with point separations in all three directions in a coordinate system locally aligned with the direction of the magnetic field and of the fluctuating fields and obtain good agreement with numerical simulations. We also derive a scaling of the parallel coherence scale of the fluctuations, $l_\\parallel \\propto \\lambda^{1/2}$, where $\\lambda$ is the perpendicular scale. This is indeed observed for the bulk of the fluctuations in numerical simulations.

  11. Thermal conductivity of local moment models with strong spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamokostas, Georgios L.; Lapas, Panteleimon E.; Fiete, Gregory A.

    2017-02-01

    We study the magnetic and lattice contributions to the thermal conductivity of electrically insulating strongly spin-orbit coupled magnetically ordered phases on a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice using the Kitaev-Heisenberg model. Depending on model parameters, such as the relative strength of the spin-orbit induced anisotropic coupling, a number of magnetically ordered phases are possible. In this work, we study two distinct regimes of thermal transport depending on whether the characteristic energy of the phonons or the magnons dominates, and focus on two different relaxation mechanisms, boundary scattering and magnon-phonon scattering. For spatially anisotropic magnetic phases, the thermal conductivity tensor can be highly anisotropic when the magnetic energy scale dominates, since the magnetic degrees of freedom dominate the thermal transport for temperatures well below the magnetic transition temperature. In the opposite limit in which the phonon energy scale dominates, the thermal conductivity will be nearly isotropic, reflecting the isotropic (at low temperatures) phonon dispersion assumed for the honeycomb lattice. We further discuss the extent to which thermal transport properties are influenced by strong spin-orbit induced anisotropic coupling in the local moment regime of insulating magnetic phases. The developed methodology can be applied to any 2D magnon-phonon system, and more importantly to systems where an analytical Bogoliubov transformation cannot be found and magnon bands are not necessarily isotropic.

  12. An assessment of turbulence models for linear hydrodynamic stability analysis of strongly swirling jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukes, Lothar; Paschereit, Christian Oliver; Oberleithner, Kilian

    2016-09-01

    Linear stability analysis has proven to be a useful tool in the analysis of dominant coherent structures, such as the von K\\'{a}rm\\'{a}n vortex street and the global spiral mode associated with the vortex breakdown of swirling jets. In recent years, linear stability analysis has been applied successfully to turbulent time-mean flows, instead of laminar base-flows, \\textcolor{black}{which requires turbulent models that account for the interaction of the turbulent field with the coherent structures. To retain the stability equations of laminar flows, the Boussinesq approximation with a spatially nonuniform but isotropic eddy viscosity is typically employed. In this work we assess the applicability of this concept to turbulent strongly swirling jets, a class of flows that is particularly unsuited for isotropic eddy viscosity models. Indeed we find that unsteady RANS simulations only match with experiments with a Reynolds stress model that accounts for an anisotropic eddy viscosity. However, linear stability analysis of the mean flow is shown to accurately predict the global mode growth rate and frequency if the employed isotropic eddy viscosity represents a least-squares approximation of the anisotropic eddy viscosity. Viscosities derived from the $k-\\epsilon$ model did not achieve a good prediction of the mean flow nor did they allow for accurate stability calculations. We conclude from this study that linear stability analysis can be accurate for flows with strongly anisotropic turbulent viscosity and the capability of the Boussinesq approximation in terms of URANS-based mean flow prediction is not a prerequisite.

  13. Diet-induced metabolic improvements in a hamster model of hypercholesterolemia are strongly linked to alterations of the gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Inés; Wallace, Grant; Zhang, Chaomei; Legge, Ryan; Benson, Andrew K; Carr, Timothy P; Moriyama, Etsuko N; Walter, Jens

    2009-06-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal microbiota exerts a strong influence on host lipid and cholesterol metabolism. In this study, we have characterized the interplay among diet, gut microbial ecology, and cholesterol metabolism in a hamster model of hypercholesterolemia. Previous work in this model had shown that grain sorghum lipid extract (GSL) included in the diet significantly improved the high-density lipoprotein (HDL)/non-HDL cholesterol equilibrium (T. P. Carr, C. L. Weller, V. L. Schlegel, S. L. Cuppett, D. M. Guderian, Jr., and K. R. Johnson, J. Nutr. 135:2236-2240, 2005). Molecular analysis of the hamsters' fecal bacterial populations by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA tags, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and Bifidobacterium-specific quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the improvements in cholesterol homeostasis induced through feeding the hamsters GSL were strongly associated with alterations of the gut microbiota. Bifidobacteria, which significantly increased in abundance in hamsters fed GSL, showed a strong positive association with HDL plasma cholesterol levels (r = 0.75; P = 0.001). The proportion of members of the family Coriobacteriaceae decreased when the hamsters were fed GSL and showed a high positive association with non-HDL plasma cholesterol levels (r = 0.84; P = 0.0002). These correlations were more significant than those between daily GSL intake and animal metabolic markers, implying that the dietary effects on host cholesterol metabolism are conferred, at least in part, through an effect on the gut microbiota. This study provides evidence that modulation of the gut microbiota-host metabolic interrelationship by dietary intervention has the potential to improve mammalian cholesterol homeostasis, which has relevance for cardiovascular health.

  14. A STRONGLY COUPLED REACTOR CORE ISOLATION COOLING SYSTEM MODEL FOR EXTENDED STATION BLACK-OUT ANALYSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Haihua [Idaho National Laboratory; Zhang, Hongbin [Idaho National Laboratory; Zou, Ling [Idaho National Laboratory; Martineau, Richard Charles [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-03-01

    The reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system in a boiling water reactor (BWR) provides makeup cooling water to the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) when the main steam lines are isolated and the normal supply of water to the reactor vessel is lost. The RCIC system operates independently of AC power, service air, or external cooling water systems. The only required external energy source is from the battery to maintain the logic circuits to control the opening and/or closure of valves in the RCIC systems in order to control the RPV water level by shutting down the RCIC pump to avoid overfilling the RPV and flooding the steam line to the RCIC turbine. It is generally considered in almost all the existing station black-out accidents (SBO) analyses that loss of the DC power would result in overfilling the steam line and allowing liquid water to flow into the RCIC turbine, where it is assumed that the turbine would then be disabled. This behavior, however, was not observed in the Fukushima Daiichi accidents, where the Unit 2 RCIC functioned without DC power for nearly three days. Therefore, more detailed mechanistic models for RCIC system components are needed to understand the extended SBO for BWRs. As part of the effort to develop the next generation reactor system safety analysis code RELAP-7, we have developed a strongly coupled RCIC system model, which consists of a turbine model, a pump model, a check valve model, a wet well model, and their coupling models. Unlike the traditional SBO simulations where mass flow rates are typically given in the input file through time dependent functions, the real mass flow rates through the turbine and the pump loops in our model are dynamically calculated according to conservation laws and turbine/pump operation curves. A simplified SBO demonstration RELAP-7 model with this RCIC model has been successfully developed. The demonstration model includes the major components for the primary system of a BWR, as well as the safety

  15. Strong correlation of high EBNA-1-IgG levels with edematous attacks involving upper airway mucosa in hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csuka, Dorottya; Varga, Lilian; Farkas, Henriette; Füst, George

    2012-01-01

    Elevated level of IgG-type antibodies against Type 1 nuclear antigen (anti-EBNA-1-IgG) of the Epstein-Barr virus is a strong risk factor for certain autoimmune diseases. We measured anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers in 107 patients with hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (HAE-C1-INH). In the sera from 33 longitudinally tested patients, we found a very strong correlation (R>0.75, p=0.0005) between anti-EBNA-1-IgG titers measured in 2004 and 2010, respectively. High (>200 U/ml) anti-EBNA-1 levels were strongly correlated with the frequency of upper airway attacks (p=0.003) and the dose requirement of C1-inhibitor concentrate (p=0.008), while no significant association with the frequency of subcutaneous and abdominal attacks was found. These novel findings indicate that the underlying/triggering mechanisms of upper airway attacks in HAE-C1-INH may differ from that of other types of attacks and measurement of the anti-EBNA-1 IgG levels may be suitable for the prediction of upper airway attacks and C1-inhibitor concentrate requirement in HAE-C1-INH patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. CoRoT light curves of Blazhko RR Lyrae stars. Evidence of a strong correlation between phase and amplitude modulations of CoRoT ID 0105288363

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadid, M.; Perini, C.; Bono, G.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Weiss, W. W.; Deboscher, J.

    2011-03-01

    Context. The CoRoT - Convection Rotation and planetary Transits - space mission provides a unique opportunity to monitor RR Lyrae stars with excellent time-sampling, unprecedented photometric precision, and a long time base of 150 days. Aims: The pulsation characteristics of RR Lyrae stars rely on robust physics, but we still lack a firm quantitative understanding of the physical mechanisms driving the Blazhko modulation and the long-term changes in their pulsation behavior. We use the high-precision space data of an unknown RR Lyrae star CoRoT ID 0105288363 observed during a second long run centered on the Galaxy - LRc02 -, to improve our understanding of the pulsation properties of RR Lyrae stars. Methods: The CoRoT data were corrected using a jump and trend filtering code. We applied different period-finding techniques including Period04, MuFrAn, PDM, and SigSpec. Amplitude and phase modulation were investigated using an analytical function method as well as traditional O-C diagrams. Results: For the first time, we detect significant cycle-to-cycle changes in the Blazhko modulation, which appear to be analogous to those predicted by Stothers - owing to the suppression of turbulent convection - to explain this phenomenon. We discuss the clear correlations between the phase and the amplitude of the bump, and the skewness and acuteness of the light curve during different Blazhko cycles. We find that these quantities are strongly anticorrelated with the fundamental pulsation period. This provides a strong support to the slow convective cycle model suggested by Stothers. We also detect a long-term modulation period in the maximum brightness spectrum. A more extended coverage of the long-term modulation is required to constrain its period. Seventh-order side peaks of the pulsation multiplet structure are also visible with the left-side peak amplitudes being higher than those of the right. This has never previously been detected. Future theoretical investigations are

  17. Strong dynamics in a classically scale invariant extension of the standard model with a flat potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Yamada, Toshifumi

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the scenario where the standard model is extended with classical scale invariance, which is broken by chiral symmetry breaking and confinement in a new strongly coupled gauge theory that resembles QCD. The standard model Higgs field emerges as a result of the mixing of a scalar meson in the new strong dynamics and a massless elementary scalar field. The mass and scalar decay constant of that scalar meson, which are generated dynamically in the new gauge theory, give rise to the Higgs field mass term, automatically possessing the correct negative sign by the bosonic seesaw mechanism. Using analogy with QCD, we evaluate the dynamical scale of the new gauge theory and further make quantitative predictions for light pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons associated with the spontaneous breaking of axial symmetry along chiral symmetry breaking in the new gauge theory. A prominent consequence of the scenario is that there should be a standard model gauge singlet pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson with mass below 220 GeV, which couples to two electroweak gauge bosons through the Wess-Zumino-Witten term, whose strength is thus determined by the dynamical scale of the new gauge theory. Other pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons, charged under the electroweak gauge groups, also appear. Concerning the theoretical aspects, it is shown that the scalar quartic coupling can vanish at the Planck scale with the top quark pole mass as large as 172.5 GeV, realizing the flatland scenario without being in tension with the current experimental data.

  18. Mathematical model to interpret localized reflectance spectra measured in the presence of a strong fluorescence marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Jaime J.; Davis, Scott C.; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Kanick, Stephen C.

    2016-06-01

    Quantification of multiple fluorescence markers during neurosurgery has the potential to provide complementary contrast mechanisms between normal and malignant tissues, and one potential combination involves fluorescein sodium (FS) and aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). We focus on the interpretation of reflectance spectra containing contributions from elastically scattered (reflected) photons as well as fluorescence emissions from a strong fluorophore (i.e., FS). A model-based approach to extract μa and μs‧ in the presence of FS emission is validated in optical phantoms constructed with Intralipid (1% to 2% lipid) and whole blood (1% to 3% volume fraction), over a wide range of FS concentrations (0 to 1000 μg/ml). The results show that modeling reflectance as a combination of elastically scattered light and attenuation-corrected FS-based emission yielded more accurate tissue parameter estimates when compared with a nonmodified reflectance model, with reduced maximum errors for blood volume (22% versus 90%), microvascular saturation (21% versus 100%), and μs‧ (13% versus 207%). Additionally, quantitative PpIX fluorescence sampled in the same phantom as FS showed significant differences depending on the reflectance model used to estimate optical properties (i.e., maximum error 29% versus 86%). These data represent a first step toward using quantitative optical spectroscopy to guide surgeries through simultaneous assessment of FS and PpIX.

  19. Weak diffusion limits of dynamic conditional correlation models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hafner, Christian M.; Laurent, Sebastien; Violante, Francesco

    The properties of dynamic conditional correlation (DCC) models are still not entirely understood. This paper fills one of the gaps by deriving weak diffusion limits of a modified version of the classical DCC model. The limiting system of stochastic differential equations is characterized...... by a diffusion matrix of reduced rank. The degeneracy is due to perfect collinearity between the innovations of the volatility and correlation dynamics. For the special case of constant conditional correlations, a non-degenerate diffusion limit can be obtained. Alternative sets of conditions are considered...

  20. Gaussian graphical modeling reveals specific lipid correlations in glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Nikola S.; Krumsiek, Jan; Theis, Fabian J.; Böhm, Christian; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2011-06-01

    Advances in high-throughput measurements of biological specimens necessitate the development of biologically driven computational techniques. To understand the molecular level of many human diseases, such as cancer, lipid quantifications have been shown to offer an excellent opportunity to reveal disease-specific regulations. The data analysis of the cell lipidome, however, remains a challenging task and cannot be accomplished solely based on intuitive reasoning. We have developed a method to identify a lipid correlation network which is entirely disease-specific. A powerful method to correlate experimentally measured lipid levels across the various samples is a Gaussian Graphical Model (GGM), which is based on partial correlation coefficients. In contrast to regular Pearson correlations, partial correlations aim to identify only direct correlations while eliminating indirect associations. Conventional GGM calculations on the entire dataset can, however, not provide information on whether a correlation is truly disease-specific with respect to the disease samples and not a correlation of control samples. Thus, we implemented a novel differential GGM approach unraveling only the disease-specific correlations, and applied it to the lipidome of immortal Glioblastoma tumor cells. A large set of lipid species were measured by mass spectrometry in order to evaluate lipid remodeling as a result to a combination of perturbation of cells inducing programmed cell death, while the other perturbations served solely as biological controls. With the differential GGM, we were able to reveal Glioblastoma-specific lipid correlations to advance biomedical research on novel gene therapies.

  1. Atmospheric CO2 observations and models suggest strong carbon uptake by forests in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkamp, Kay; Mikaloff Fletcher, Sara E.; Brailsford, Gordon; Smale, Dan; Moore, Stuart; Keller, Elizabeth D.; Baisden, W. Troy; Mukai, Hitoshi; Stephens, Britton B.

    2017-01-01

    A regional atmospheric inversion method has been developed to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of CO2 sinks and sources across New Zealand for 2011-2013. This approach infers net air-sea and air-land CO2 fluxes from measurement records, using back-trajectory simulations from the Numerical Atmospheric dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME) Lagrangian dispersion model, driven by meteorology from the New Zealand Limited Area Model (NZLAM) weather prediction model. The inversion uses in situ measurements from two fixed sites, Baring Head on the southern tip of New Zealand's North Island (41.408° S, 174.871° E) and Lauder from the central South Island (45.038° S, 169.684° E), and ship board data from monthly cruises between Japan, New Zealand, and Australia. A range of scenarios is used to assess the sensitivity of the inversion method to underlying assumptions and to ensure robustness of the results. The results indicate a strong seasonal cycle in terrestrial land fluxes from the South Island of New Zealand, especially in western regions covered by indigenous forest, suggesting higher photosynthetic and respiratory activity than is evident in the current a priori land process model. On the annual scale, the terrestrial biosphere in New Zealand is estimated to be a net CO2 sink, removing 98 (±37) Tg CO2 yr-1 from the atmosphere on average during 2011-2013. This sink is much larger than the reported 27 Tg CO2 yr-1 from the national inventory for the same time period. The difference can be partially reconciled when factors related to forest and agricultural management and exports, fossil fuel emission estimates, hydrologic fluxes, and soil carbon change are considered, but some differences are likely to remain. Baseline uncertainty, model transport uncertainty, and limited sensitivity to the northern half of the North Island are the main contributors to flux uncertainty.

  2. Nested Generalized Linear Model with Ordinal Response for Correlated Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aji H. Wigena

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the generalized linear models with ordinal response for correlated data in nested area. Some basic concepts are described, that is nested spatial, threshold model, and cumulative link function. Due to correlated data used for this modeling, Generalized Estimating Eequation (GEE is used as model parameters estimation method. Nested is shown by the model building and its application on nested spatially data. In this method, some Working Correlation Matrices (WCM are able to be specified depend on the nature and type of the data. In this study, 3 types of WCM and 2 types of parameters estimation covariance are used to see the results of parameters estimation from these combinations. As a conclusion, independent WCM is appropriate to the data.

  3. Collisional broadening of angular correlations in a multiphase transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Terrence; Li, Qingfeng; Wang, Fuqiang

    2017-10-01

    Systematic comparisons of jetlike correlation data to radiative and collisional energy loss model calculations are essential to extract transport properties of the quark-gluon medium created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. This paper presents a transport study of collisional broadening of jetlike correlations, by following parton-parton collision history in a multiphase transport (AMPT) model. The correlation shape is studied as functions of the number of parton-parton collisions suffered by a high transverse momentum probe parton (Ncoll) and the azimuth of the probe relative to the reaction plane (ϕfin.probe). Correlation is found to broaden with increasing Ncoll and ϕfin.probe from in- to out-of-plane direction. This study provides a transport model reference for future jet-medium interaction studies.

  4. A single H II region model of the strong interstellar scattering towards Sgr A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicheneder, Egid; Dexter, Jason

    2017-05-01

    Until recently, the strong interstellar scattering observed towards the Galactic centre (GC) black hole, Sgr A*, was thought to come from dense gas within the GC region. The pulse broadening towards the transient magnetar SGR J1745-2900 near Sgr A* has shown that the source of the scattering is instead located much closer to Earth, possibly in a nearby spiral arm. We show that a single H II region along the line of sight, 1.5-4.8 kpc away from Earth with density ne of a few ≃ 100 cm^{-3} and radius R ≃ 1.8-3.2 pc can explain the observed angular broadening of Sgr A*. Clouds closer to the GC overproduce the observed disperson measure, providing an independent location constraint that agrees with that from the magnetar pulse broadening. Our model predicts that sources within ≲10 pc should show the same scattering origin as the magnetar and Sgr A*, while the nearest known pulsars with separations >20 pc should not. The radio spectrum of Sgr A* should show a cut-off from free-free absorption at 0.2 ≲ ν ≲ 1 GHz. For a magnetic field strength B ≃ 15-70 μG, the H II region could produce the rotation measure of the magnetar, the largest of any known pulsar, without requiring the gas near Sgr A* to be strongly magnetized.

  5. Energy transfer in the nonequilibrium spin-boson model: From weak to strong coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junjie; Xu, Hui; Li, Baowen; Wu, Changqin

    2017-07-01

    To explore energy transfer in the nonequilibrium spin-boson model (NESB) from weak to strong system-bath coupling regimes, we propose a polaron-transformed nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. By combining the polaron transformation, we are able to treat the system-bath coupling nonperturbatively, thus in direct contrast to conventionally used NEGF methods which take the system-bath coupling as a perturbation. The Majorana-fermion representation is further utilized to evaluate terms in the Dyson series. This method not only allows us to deal with weak as well as strong coupling regimes but also enables an investigation on the role of bias in the energy transfer. As an application of the method, we study an Ohmic NESB. For an unbiased spin system, our energy current result smoothly bridges predictions of two benchmarks, namely, the quantum master equation and the nonequilibrium noninteracting blip approximation, a considerable improvement over existing theories. In case of a biased spin system, we found a bias-induced nonmonotonic behavior of the energy conductance in the intermediate coupling regime, resulting from the resonant character of the energy transfer. This finding may offer a nontrivial quantum control knob over energy transfer at the nanoscale.

  6. Delocalization effects in quasi-1D models with correlated disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessieri, L [Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Edificio C-3, Ciudad Universitaria, 58060, Morelia, Mich. (Mexico); Izrailev, F M [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Apdo Postal J-48, Puebla, Pue 72570 (Mexico)

    2006-09-22

    We introduce a new approach to analyse the global structure of electronic states in quasi-1D models in terms of the dynamics of a system of parametric oscillators with time-dependent stochastic couplings. We thus extend to quasi-1D models the method previously applied to 1D disordered models. Using this approach, we show that a 'delocalization transition' can occur in quasi-1D models with weak disorder with long-range correlations.

  7. A boundary condition to the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya equation for modeling strongly focused nonlinear ultrasound fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosnitskiy, P., E-mail: pavrosni@yandex.ru; Yuldashev, P., E-mail: petr@acs366.phys.msu.ru; Khokhlova, V., E-mail: vera@acs366.phys.msu.ru [Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    An equivalent source model was proposed as a boundary condition to the nonlinear parabolic Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya (KZ) equation to simulate high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields generated by medical ultrasound transducers with the shape of a spherical shell. The boundary condition was set in the initial plane; the aperture, the focal distance, and the initial pressure of the source were chosen based on the best match of the axial pressure amplitude and phase distributions in the Rayleigh integral analytic solution for a spherical transducer and the linear parabolic approximation solution for the equivalent source. Analytic expressions for the equivalent source parameters were derived. It was shown that the proposed approach allowed us to transfer the boundary condition from the spherical surface to the plane and to achieve a very good match between the linear field solutions of the parabolic and full diffraction models even for highly focused sources with F-number less than unity. The proposed method can be further used to expand the capabilities of the KZ nonlinear parabolic equation for efficient modeling of HIFU fields generated by strongly focused sources.

  8. Charge and spin quantum fluctuations in the doped strongly coupled Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, F. G.; Coutinho-Filho, M. D.

    2015-07-01

    Field-theoretic methods are used to investigate the large-U Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice at half-filling and in the hole-doped regime. Within the framework of a functional-integral approach, we obtain the Lagrangian density associated with the charge and spin degrees of freedom. The Hamiltonian related to the charge degrees of freedom is exactly diagonalized. In the strong-coupling regime, we derive a perturbative low-energy theory suitable to describe the quantum antiferromagnetic phase (AF) as a function of hole doping. At half-filling, we deal with the underlying spin degrees of freedom of the quantum AF Heisenberg model by employing a second-order spin-wave analysis, in which case we have calculated the ground-state energy and the staggered magnetization; the results are in very good agreement with previous studies. Further, in the continuum, we derive a nonlinear σ model with a topological Hopf term that describes the AF-VBS (valence bond solid) competition. Lastly, in the challenging doped regime, our approach allows the derivation of a t -J Hamiltonian, and the analysis of the role played by charge and spin quantum fluctuations on the ground-state energy and, particularly, on the breakdown of the AF order at a critical hole doping; the results are benchmarked against recent Grassmann tensor product state simulations.

  9. Modelling Multivariate Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity with the Double Smooth Transition Conditional Correlation GARCH Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvennoinen, Annastiina; Teräsvirta, Timo

    In this paper we propose a multivariate GARCH model with a time-varying conditional correlation structure. The new Double Smooth Transition Conditional Correlation GARCH model extends the Smooth Transition Conditional Correlation GARCH model of Silvennoinen and Ter¨asvirta (2005) by including...... another variable according to which the correlations change smoothly between states of constant correlations. A Lagrange multiplier test is derived to test the constancy of correlations against the DSTCC-GARCH model, and another one to test for another transition in the STCC-GARCH framework. In addition...

  10. Correlated Poisson models for age-period-cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyavskiy, Pavel; Little, Mark P; Rosenberg, Philip S

    2017-10-04

    Age-period-cohort (APC) models are widely used to analyze population-level rates, particularly cancer incidence and mortality. These models are used for descriptive epidemiology, comparative risk analysis, and extrapolating future disease burden. Traditional APC models have 2 major limitations: (1) they lack parsimony because they require estimation of deviations from linear trends for each level of age, period, and cohort; and (2) rates observed at similar ages, periods, and cohorts are treated as independent, ignoring any correlations between them that may lead to biased parameter estimates and inefficient standard errors. We propose a novel approach to estimation of APC models using a spatially correlated Poisson model that accounts for over-dispersion and correlations in age, period, and cohort, simultaneously. We treat the outcome of interest as event rates occurring over a grid defined by values of age, period, and cohort. Rates defined in this manner lend themselves to well-established approaches from spatial statistics in which correlation among proximate observations may be modeled using a spatial random effect. Through simulations, we show that in the presence of spatial dependence and over-dispersion: (1) the correlated Poisson model attains lower AIC; (2) the traditional APC model produces biased trend parameter estimates; and (3) the correlated Poisson model corrects most of this bias. We illustrate our approach using brain and breast cancer incidence rates from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Program of the United States. Our approach can be easily extended to accommodate comparative risk analyses and interpolation of cells in the Lexis with sparse data. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Regional probabilistic fertility forecasting by modeling between-country correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Fosdick

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The United Nations (UN Population Division constructs probabilistic projections for the total fertility rate (TFR using the Bayesian hierarchical model of Alkema et al. (2011, which produces predictive distributions of the TFR for individual countries. The UN is interested in publishing probabilistic projections for aggregates of countries, such as regions and trading blocs. This requires joint probabilistic projections of future countryspecific TFRs, taking account of the correlations between them. Objective: We propose an extension of the Bayesian hierarchical model that allows for probabilistic projection of aggregate TFR for any set of countries. Methods: We model the correlation between country forecast errors as a linear function of time invariant covariates, namely whether the countries are contiguous, whether they had a common colonizer after 1945, and whether they are in the same UN region. The resulting correlation model is incorporated into the Bayesian hierarchical model's error distribution. Results: We produce predictive distributions of TFR for 1990-2010 for each of the UN's primary regions. We find that the proportions of the observed values that fall within the prediction intervals from our method are closer to their nominal levels than those produced by the current model. Conclusions: Our results suggest that a substantial proportion of the correlation between forecast errors for TFR in different countries is due to the countries' geographic proximity to one another, and that if this correlation is accounted for, the quality of probabilistic projections of TFR for regions and other aggregates is improved.

  12. First-principles study of the honeycomb-lattice iridates Na2IrO3 in the presence of strong spin-orbit interaction and electron correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaji, Youhei; Nomura, Yusuke; Kurita, Moyuru; Arita, Ryotaro; Imada, Masatoshi

    2014-09-05

    An effective low-energy Hamiltonian of itinerant electrons for iridium oxide Na2IrO3 is derived by an ab initio downfolding scheme. The model is then reduced to an effective spin model on a honeycomb lattice by the strong coupling expansion. Here we show that the ab initio model contains spin-spin anisotropic exchange terms in addition to the extensively studied Kitaev and Heisenberg exchange interactions, and allows us to describe the experimentally observed zigzag magnetic order, interpreted as the state stabilized by the antiferromagnetic coupling of the ferromagnetic chains. We clarify possible routes to realize quantum spin liquids from existing Na2IrO3.

  13. Universality in the site-bond-correlated (SBC) Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Albuquerque, Douglas F.; Ricardo de Sousa, J.

    1992-12-01

    The site-bond-correlated (SBC) model is proposed to describe the phase diagram for KNi pMg 1- pF3. We treat the square and simple cubic lattices by employing the mean field renormalization group (MFRG) scheme. In this approach, two different exchange interactions (denoted as models A and B) are used. As a result, we find an interesting universal relation between the initial slopes Δ( μ) ( α=±1) and Δ( μ) ( α=0) (μ denoting model A or B). Therefore, it is possible to estimate the exact values of the initial slope for the case of complete correlation.

  14. Correlators in the N=2 supersymmetric SYK model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Spradlin, Marcus; Volovich, Anastasia

    2017-10-01

    We study correlation functions in the one-dimensional N=2 supersymmetric SYK model. The leading order 4-point correlation functions are computed by summing over ladder diagrams expanded in a suitable basis of conformal eigenfunctions. A novelty of the N=2 model is that both symmetric and antisymmetric eigenfunctions are required. Although we use a component formalism, we verify that the operator spectrum and 4-point functions are consistent with N=2 supersymmetry. We also confirm the maximally chaotic behavior of this model and comment briefly on its 6-point functions.

  15. Application of the Hubbard model to Cp*(2)Yb(bipy), a model system for strong exchange coupling in lanthanide systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukens, Wayne W; Magnani, Nicola; Booth, Corwin H

    2012-10-01

    Exchange coupling is quantified in lanthanide (Ln) single-molecule magnets (SMMs) containing a bridging N(2)(3-) radical ligand and between [Cp*(2)Yb](+) and bipy(•-) in Cp*(2)Yb(bipy), where Cp* is pentamethylcyclopentadienyl and bipy is 2,2'-bipyridyl. In the case of these lanthanide SMMs, the magnitude of exchange coupling between the Ln ion and the bridging N(2)(3-), 2J, is very similar to the barrier to magnetic relaxation, U(eff). A molecular version of the Hubbard model is applied to systems in which unpaired electrons on magnetic metal ions have direct overlap with unpaired electrons residing on ligands. The Hubbard model explicitly addresses electron correlation, which is essential for understanding the magnetic behavior of these complexes. This model is applied quantitatively to Cp*(2)Yb(bipy) to explain its very strong exchange coupling, 2J = -0.11 eV (-920 cm(-1)). The model is also used to explain the presence of strong exchange coupling in Ln SMMs in which the lanthanide spins are coupled via bridging N(2)(3-) radical ligands. The results suggest that increasing the magnetic coupling in lanthanide clusters could lead to an increase in the blocking temperatures of exchange-coupled lanthanide SMMs, suggesting routes to rational design of future lanthanide SMMs.

  16. Modelling strong seismic ground motion: three-dimensional loading path versus wavefield polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santisi d'Avila, Maria Paola; Lenti, Luca; Semblat, Jean-François

    2012-09-01

    Seismic waves due to strong earthquakes propagating in surficial soil layers may both reduce soil stiffness and increase the energy dissipation into the soil. To investigate seismic wave amplification in such cases, past studies have been devoted to one-directional shear wave propagation in a soil column (1D-propagation) considering one motion component only (1C-polarization). Three independent purely 1C computations may be performed ('1D-1C' approach) and directly superimposed in the case of weak motions (linear behaviour). This research aims at studying local site effects by considering seismic wave propagation in a 1-D soil profile accounting for the influence of the 3-D loading path and non-linear hysteretic behaviour of the soil. In the proposed '1D-3C' approach, the three components (3C-polarization) of the incident wave are simultaneously propagated into a horizontal multilayered soil. A 3-D non-linear constitutive relation for the soil is implemented in the framework of the Finite Element Method in the time domain. The complex rheology of soils is modelled by mean of a multisurface cyclic plasticity model of the Masing-Prandtl-Ishlinskii-Iwan type. The great advantage of this choice is that the only data needed to describe the model is the modulus reduction curve. A parametric study is carried out to characterize the changes in the seismic motion of the surficial layers due to both incident wavefield properties and soil non-linearities. The numerical simulations show a seismic response depending on several parameters such as polarization of seismic waves, material elastic and dynamic properties, as well as on the impedance contrast between layers and frequency content and oscillatory character of the input motion. The 3-D loading path due to the 3C-polarization leads to multi-axial stress interaction that reduces soil strength and increases non-linear effects. The non-linear behaviour of the soil may have beneficial or detrimental effects on the seismic

  17. Martingale property for the Scott correlated stochastic volatility model

    OpenAIRE

    Akdim, Khadija; Eddahbi, M'hamed; Haddadi, Mouna

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the martingale property for a Scott correlated stochastic volatility model, when the correlation coefficient between the Brownian motion driving the volatility and the one driving the asset price process is arbitrary. For this study we verify the martingale property by using the necessary and sufficient conditions given by Bernard \\emph{et al.} \\cite{Bernard}. Our main results are to prove that the price process is a true and uniformly integrable martingale if and only...

  18. Radiative Impact of Aerosols on the Regional Boundary Layer Features in Strong and Weak Wind Conditions using WRF Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, R. A.; Sharan, M.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles play a vital role in the Earth's radiative energy budget. They exert a net cooling influence on climate by directly reflecting the solar radiation to space and by modifying the shortwave reflective properties of clouds. Radiation is the main source that regulates the surface energy budget. Surface temperature and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height depends on accurate calculation of both shortwave and longwave radiation. The weakening of the ambient winds is known to influence the structure of PBL. This study examines the sensitivity of the performance of Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) ARW Model to the use of different radiation schemes [For Long wave Radiation: Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTM), Eta Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), Goddard, New Goddard, NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 3.0), New Goddard scheme, Fu-Liou-Gu scheme and for Short wave Radiation: Dudhia scheme, Eta Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 3.0), New Goddard scheme]. Two different simulations are conducted one for the summer (14-15 May 2009) and winter (14-15 Dec 2008) season characterized by strong and weak wind conditions over India. Comparison of surface temperatures from different schemes for different cities (New Delhi, Ahmedabad, Lucknow, Kanpur, Jaipur and Jodhpur) on 14-15 May 2009 and 14-15 Dec 2008 with those observed shows the simulation with RRTM , New Goddard, and Fu-Liou-Gu schemes are closer to the observations as compared to other schemes. The temperature simulated from all the radiation schemes have more than 0.9 correlation coefficient but the root mean square error is relatively less in summer compared to winter season. It is surmised that Fu-Liou-Gu scheme performs better in almost all the cases. The reason behind can be the greater absorption of solar and IR radiative fluxes in the atmosphere and the surface provided in Fu-Liou-Gu radiation scheme than those computed in

  19. Application of Multilevel Models to Morphometric Data. Part 2. Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Tsybrovskyy

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Multilevel organization of morphometric data (cells are “nested” within patients requires special methods for studying correlations between karyometric features. The most distinct feature of these methods is that separate correlation (covariance matrices are produced for every level in the hierarchy. In karyometric research, the cell‐level (i.e., within‐tumor correlations seem to be of major interest. Beside their biological importance, these correlation coefficients (CC are compulsory when dimensionality reduction is required. Using MLwiN, a dedicated program for multilevel modeling, we show how to use multivariate multilevel models (MMM to obtain and interpret CC in each of the levels. A comparison with two usual, “single‐level” statistics shows that MMM represent the only way to obtain correct cell‐level correlation coefficients. The summary statistics method (take average values across each patient produces patient‐level CC only, and the “pooling” method (merge all cells together and ignore patients as units of analysis yields incorrect CC at all. We conclude that multilevel modeling is an indispensable tool for studying correlations between morphometric variables.

  20. Correlation of spacecraft thermal mathematical models to reference data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torralbo, Ignacio; Perez-Grande, Isabel; Sanz-Andres, Angel; Piqueras, Javier

    2018-03-01

    Model-to-test correlation is a frequent problem in spacecraft-thermal control design. The idea is to determine the values of the parameters of the thermal mathematical model (TMM) that allows reaching a good fit between the TMM results and test data, in order to reduce the uncertainty of the mathematical model. Quite often, this task is performed manually, mainly because a good engineering knowledge and experience is needed to reach a successful compromise, but the use of a mathematical tool could facilitate this work. The correlation process can be considered as the minimization of the error of the model results with regard to the reference data. In this paper, a simple method is presented suitable to solve the TMM-to-test correlation problem, using Jacobian matrix formulation and Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse, generalized to include several load cases. Aside, in simple cases, this method also allows for analytical solutions to be obtained, which helps to analyze some problems that appear when the Jacobian matrix is singular. To show the implementation of the method, two problems have been considered, one more academic, and the other one the TMM of an electronic box of PHI instrument of ESA Solar Orbiter mission, to be flown in 2019. The use of singular value decomposition of the Jacobian matrix to analyze and reduce these models is also shown. The error in parameter space is used to assess the quality of the correlation results in both models.

  1. Modeling preferential flow and its consequences on solute transfer in a strongly heterogeneous deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Slimene, Erij; Lassabatere, Laurent; Winiarski, Thierry; Gourdon, Remy

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of the fate of pollutants in the vadose zone is a prerequisite to manage soil and groundwater quality. Water infiltrates into the soil and carries a large amount of pollutants (heavy metals, organic compounds, etc.). The quality of groundwater depends on the capability of soils to remove pollutants while water infiltrates. The capability of soils to remove pollutants depends not only on their geochemical properties and affinity with pollutants but also on the quality of the contact between the reactive particles of the soil and pollutants. In such a context, preferential flows are the worst scenario since they prevent pollutants from reaching large parts of the soil including reactive zones that could serve for pollutant removal. The negative effects of preferential flow have already been pointed out by several studies. In this paper, we investigate numerically the effect of the establishment of preferential flow in a numerical section (13.5m long and 2.5m deep) that mimics a strongly heterogeneous deposit. The modelled deposit is made of several lithofacies with contrasting hydraulic properties. The numerical study proves that this strong contrast in hydraulic properties triggers the establishment of preferential flow (capillary barriers and funneled flow). Preferential flow develops mainly for low initial water contents and low fluxes imposed at the soil surface. The impact of these flows on solute transfer is also investigated as a function of solute reactivity and affinity to soil sorption sites. Modeled results clearly show that solute transport is greatly impacted by flow heterogeneity. Funneled flows have the same impacts as water fractionation into mobile and immobile transfer with a fast transport of solutes by preferential flow and solute diffusion to zones where the flow is slower. Such a pattern greatly impacts retention and reduces the access of pollutants into large parts of the soil. Retention is thus greatly reduced at the section

  2. Using Cross Correlation for Evaluating Shape Models of Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Eric; Weirich, John; Barnouin, Olivier; Campbell, Tanner; Lambert, Diane

    2017-10-01

    The Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, and Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) sample return mission to Bennu will be using optical navigation during its proximity operations. Optical navigation is heavily dependent upon having an accurate shape model to calculate the spacecraft's position and pointing. In support of this, we have conducted extensive testing of the accuracy and precision of shape models. OSIRIS-REx will be using the shape models generated by stereophotoclinometry (Gaskell, 2008). The most typical technique to evaluate models is to subtract two shape models and produce the differences in the height of each node between the two models. During flight, absolute accuracy cannot be determined; however, our testing allowed us to characterize both systematic and non-systematic errors. We have demonstrated that SPC provides an accurate and reproducible shape model (Weirich, et al., 2017), but also that shape model subtraction only tells part of the story. Our advanced shape model evaluation uses normalized cross-correlation to show a different aspect of quality of the shape model. In this method, we generate synthetic images using the shape model and calculate their cross-correlation with images of the truth asteroid. This technique tests both the shape model's representation of the topographic features (size, shape, depth and relative position), but also estimates of the surface's albedo. This albedo can be used to determine both Bond and geometric albedo of the surface (Palmer, et al., 2014). A high correlation score between the model's synthetic images and the truth images shows that the local topography and albedo has been well represented over the length scale of the image. A global evaluation, such as global shape and size, is best shown by shape model subtraction.

  3. Correlation between centrality metrics and their application to the opinion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cong; Li, Qian; Van Mieghem, Piet; Stanley, H. Eugene; Wang, Huijuan

    2015-03-01

    In recent decades, a number of centrality metrics describing network properties of nodes have been proposed to rank the importance of nodes. In order to understand the correlations between centrality metrics and to approximate a high-complexity centrality metric by a strongly correlated low-complexity metric, we first study the correlation between centrality metrics in terms of their Pearson correlation coefficient and their similarity in ranking of nodes. In addition to considering the widely used centrality metrics, we introduce a new centrality measure, the degree mass. The mth-order degree mass of a node is the sum of the weighted degree of the node and its neighbors no further than m hops away. We find that the betweenness, the closeness, and the components of the principal eigenvector of the adjacency matrix are strongly correlated with the degree, the 1st-order degree mass and the 2nd-order degree mass, respectively, in both network models and real-world networks. We then theoretically prove that the Pearson correlation coefficient between the principal eigenvector and the 2nd-order degree mass is larger than that between the principal eigenvector and a lower order degree mass. Finally, we investigate the effect of the inflexible contrarians selected based on different centrality metrics in helping one opinion to compete with another in the inflexible contrarian opinion (ICO) model. Interestingly, we find that selecting the inflexible contrarians based on the leverage, the betweenness, or the degree is more effective in opinion-competition than using other centrality metrics in all types of networks. This observation is supported by our previous observations, i.e., that there is a strong linear correlation between the degree and the betweenness, as well as a high centrality similarity between the leverage and the degree.

  4. Correlation function of one-dimensional s = 1 Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proshkin, A. I.; Ponomareva, T. Yu.; Menshikh, I. A.; Zarubin, A. V.; Kassan-Ogly, F. A.

    2017-10-01

    The temperature behavior of the Fourier transform of the spin-correlation function has been studied in terms of the one-dimensional Ising model taking into account the interaction between the nearest neighbors in the cases of different signs of exchange interactions, magnetic field, and spin. It has been shown that, in the antiferromagnetic model, in the frustration field, the correlation function has a broad maximum and does not take on the form of a delta function as the temperature approaches zero, which indicates the absence of ordering in the system.

  5. Investigation of the source size and strong interaction with the femtoscopic correlations of baryons and antibaryons in heavy-ion collisions registered by ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00508100

    The strong interaction is one of the four fundamental forces of nature. It binds together quarks inside protons and neutrons (which are example of baryons - particles composed of three quarks) and assures the stability of the atomic nucleus. Parameters describing the strong potential are also crucial for the neutron stars models used in astrophysics. What is more, a precise study of strongly interacting particles may help to better understand the process of baryon annihilation. The current knowledge of the strong interactions between baryons other than nucle- ons is limited - there exist only a few measurements of the cross sections for pairs of (anti)baryons. The reason is that in many cases it is not possible to perform scattering experiments with beams of particles and antiparticles, as the exotic matter (such as Λ, Ξ or Σ baryons) is very shot-living. This issue can be solved thanks to the recent particle colliders like the Large Hadron Collider and experiments dedicated to study the heavy-ion collisio...

  6. Characterizing multivariate decoding models based on correlated EEG spectral features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Dennis J

    2013-07-01

    Multivariate decoding methods are popular techniques for analysis of neurophysiological data. The present study explored potential interpretative problems with these techniques when predictors are correlated. Data from sensorimotor rhythm-based cursor control experiments was analyzed offline with linear univariate and multivariate models. Features were derived from autoregressive (AR) spectral analysis of varying model order which produced predictors that varied in their degree of correlation (i.e., multicollinearity). The use of multivariate regression models resulted in much better prediction of target position as compared to univariate regression models. However, with lower order AR features interpretation of the spectral patterns of the weights was difficult. This is likely to be due to the high degree of multicollinearity present with lower order AR features. Care should be exercised when interpreting the pattern of weights of multivariate models with correlated predictors. Comparison with univariate statistics is advisable. While multivariate decoding algorithms are very useful for prediction their utility for interpretation may be limited when predictors are correlated. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Strong interactions between learned helplessness and risky decision-making in a rat gambling model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobrega, José N; Hedayatmofidi, Parisa S; Lobo, Daniela S

    2016-11-18

    Risky decision-making is characteristic of depression and of addictive disorders, including pathological gambling. However it is not clear whether a propensity to risky choices predisposes to depressive symptoms or whether the converse is the case. Here we tested the hypothesis that rats showing risky decision-making in a rat gambling task (rGT) would be more prone to depressive-like behaviour in the learned helplessness (LH) model. Results showed that baseline rGT choice behaviour did not predict escape deficits in the LH protocol. In contrast, exposure to the LH protocol resulted in a significant increase in risky rGT choices on retest. Unexpectedly, control rats subjected only to escapable stress in the LH protocol showed a subsequent decrease in riskier rGT choices. Further analyses indicated that the LH protocol affected primarily rats with high baseline levels of risky choices and that among these it had opposite effects in rats exposed to LH-inducing stress compared to rats exposed only to the escape trials. Together these findings suggest that while baseline risky decision making may not predict LH behaviour it interacts strongly with LH conditions in modulating subsequent decision-making behaviour. The suggested possibility that stress controllability may be a key factor should be further investigated.

  8. Revisiting classic water erosion models in drylands: The strong impact of biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, M.A.; Belnap, J.; Bala, Chaudhary V.; Johnson, N.C.

    2008-01-01

    Soil erosion and subsequent degradation has been a contributor to societal collapse in the past and is one of the major expressions of desertification in arid regions. The revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE) models soil lost to water erosion as a function of climate erosivity (the degree to which rainfall can result in erosion), topography, soil erodibility, and land use/management. The soil erodibility factor (K) is primarily based upon inherent soil properties (those which change slowly or not at all) such as soil texture and organic matter content, while the cover/management factor (C) is based on several parameters including biological soil crust (BSC) cover. We examined the effect of two more precise indicators of BSC development, chlorophyll a and exopolysaccharides (EPS), upon soil stability, which is closely inversely related to soil loss in an erosion event. To examine the relative influence of these elements of the C factor to the K factor, we conducted our investigation across eight strongly differing soils in the 0.8 million ha Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. We found that within every soil group, chlorophyll a was a moderate to excellent predictor of soil stability (R2 = 0.21-0.75), and consistently better than EPS. Using a simple structural equation model, we explained over half of the variance in soil stability and determined that the direct effect of chlorophyll a was 3?? more important than soil group in determining soil stability. Our results suggest that, holding the intensity of erosive forces constant, the acceleration or reduction of soil erosion in arid landscapes will primarily be an outcome of management practices. This is because the factor which is most influential to soil erosion, BSC development, is also among the most manageable, implying that water erosion in drylands has a solution. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Flexible Bayesian Dynamic Modeling of Covariance and Correlation Matrices

    KAUST Repository

    Lan, Shiwei

    2017-11-08

    Modeling covariance (and correlation) matrices is a challenging problem due to the large dimensionality and positive-definiteness constraint. In this paper, we propose a novel Bayesian framework based on decomposing the covariance matrix into variance and correlation matrices. The highlight is that the correlations are represented as products of vectors on unit spheres. We propose a variety of distributions on spheres (e.g. the squared-Dirichlet distribution) to induce flexible prior distributions for covariance matrices that go beyond the commonly used inverse-Wishart prior. To handle the intractability of the resulting posterior, we introduce the adaptive $\\\\Delta$-Spherical Hamiltonian Monte Carlo. We also extend our structured framework to dynamic cases and introduce unit-vector Gaussian process priors for modeling the evolution of correlation among multiple time series. Using an example of Normal-Inverse-Wishart problem, a simulated periodic process, and an analysis of local field potential data (collected from the hippocampus of rats performing a complex sequence memory task), we demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of our proposed framework for (dynamic) modeling covariance and correlation matrices.

  10. Double parton correlations in Light-Front constituent quark models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldi Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Double parton distribution functions (dPDF represent a tool to explore the 3D proton structure. They can be measured in high energy proton-proton and proton nucleus collisions and encode information on how partons inside a proton are correlated among each other. dPFDs are studied here in the valence quark region, by means of a constituent quark model, where two particle correlations are present without any additional prescription. This framework allows to understand the dynamical origin of the correlations and to clarify which, among the features of the results, are model independent. Use will be made of a relativistic light-front scheme, able to overcome some drawbacks of the previous calculation. Transverse momentum correlations, due to the exact treatment of the boosts, are predicted and analyzed. The role of spin correlations is also shown. Due to the covariance of the approach, some symmetries of the dPDFs are seen unambigously. For the valence sector, also the study of the QCD evolution of the model results, which can be performed safely thanks to the property of good support, has been also completed.

  11. Process correlation analysis model for process improvement identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Su-jin; Kim, Dae-Kyoo; Park, Sooyong

    2014-01-01

    Software process improvement aims at improving the development process of software systems. It is initiated by process assessment identifying strengths and weaknesses and based on the findings, improvement plans are developed. In general, a process reference model (e.g., CMMI) is used throughout the process of software process improvement as the base. CMMI defines a set of process areas involved in software development and what to be carried out in process areas in terms of goals and practices. Process areas and their elements (goals and practices) are often correlated due to the iterative nature of software development process. However, in the current practice, correlations of process elements are often overlooked in the development of an improvement plan, which diminishes the efficiency of the plan. This is mainly attributed to significant efforts and the lack of required expertise. In this paper, we present a process correlation analysis model that helps identify correlations of process elements from the results of process assessment. This model is defined based on CMMI and empirical data of improvement practices. We evaluate the model using industrial data.

  12. A comparative study of models for correlated binary data with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various methods of modeling correlated binary data are compared as applied to data from health services research. The methods include the standard logistic regression, a simple adjustment of the standard errors of logistic regression by a single inflator, the weighted logistic regression, the generalized estimating equation ...

  13. Correlation-regression model for physico-chemical quality of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abusaad

    Multiple regression models can predict EC at 5% level of significance. Nitrate, chlorides, TDS and ... Key words: Groundwater, water quality, bore well, water supply, correlation, regression. INTRODUCTION. Groundwater is the prime .... reservoir located 10 to 25 km away from the city and through more than 1850 bore wells ...

  14. a comparative study of models for correlated binary data with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Key words/phrases: Beta-binomial, bootstrap, correlated binary data, model selection, overdispersion ... In other applications, clustering typically occurs as a result of repeated measurement on the same subject. Analysis of this type of data has gained much attention in .... SAS system for this adjustment is SCALE=W in the.

  15. Estimation of 1-D velocity models beneath strong-motion observation sites in the Kathmandu Valley using strong-motion records from moderate-sized earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijukchhen, Subeg M.; Takai, Nobuo; Shigefuji, Michiko; Ichiyanagi, Masayoshi; Sasatani, Tsutomu; Sugimura, Yokito

    2017-07-01

    The Himalayan collision zone experiences many seismic activities with large earthquakes occurring at certain time intervals. The damming of the proto-Bagmati River as a result of rapid mountain-building processes created a lake in the Kathmandu Valley that eventually dried out, leaving thick unconsolidated lacustrine deposits. Previous studies have shown that the sediments are 600 m thick in the center. A location in a seismically active region, and the possible amplification of seismic waves due to thick sediments, have made Kathmandu Valley seismically vulnerable. It has suffered devastation due to earthquakes several times in the past. The development of the Kathmandu Valley into the largest urban agglomerate in Nepal has exposed a large population to seismic hazards. This vulnerability was apparent during the Gorkha Earthquake (Mw7.8) on April 25, 2015, when the main shock and ensuing aftershocks claimed more than 1700 lives and nearly 13% of buildings inside the valley were completely damaged. Preparing safe and up-to-date building codes to reduce seismic risk requires a thorough study of ground motion amplification. Characterizing subsurface velocity structure is a step toward achieving that goal. We used the records from an array of strong-motion accelerometers installed by Hokkaido University and Tribhuvan University to construct 1-D velocity models of station sites by forward modeling of low-frequency S-waves. Filtered records (0.1-0.5 Hz) from one of the accelerometers installed at a rock site during a moderate-sized (mb4.9) earthquake on August 30, 2013, and three moderate-sized (Mw5.1, Mw5.1, and Mw5.5) aftershocks of the 2015 Gorkha Earthquake were used as input motion for modeling of low-frequency S-waves. We consulted available geological maps, cross-sections, and borehole data as the basis for initial models for the sediment sites. This study shows that the basin has an undulating topography and sediment sites have deposits of varying thicknesses

  16. General parenting styles are not strongly associated with fruit and vegetable intake and social-environmental correlates among 11-year-old children in four countries in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bourdeaudhuij, I; Te Velde, S J; Maes, L; Pérez-Rodrigo, C; de Almeida, M D V; Brug, J

    2009-02-01

    To investigate whether fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake in 11-year-olds, and social-environmental correlates of F&V intake such as parental modelling and encouragement, family food rules and home availability, differ according to general parenting styles in Belgium, The Netherlands, Portugal and Spain. Cross-sectional study. Primary schools in four countries. Pupils and one of their parents completed questionnaires to measure F&V intake, related social-environmental correlates and general parenting styles. The sample size was 4555 (49.3 % boys); 1180 for Belgium, 883 for The Netherlands, 1515 for Portugal and 977 for Spain. Parenting styles were divided into authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent and neglectful. No differences were found in F&V intake across parenting styles and only very few significant differences in social-environmental correlates. The authoritarian (more parental encouragement and more demands to eat fruit) and the authoritative (more availability of fruit and vegetables) parenting styles resulted in more favourable correlates. Despite earlier studies suggesting that general parenting styles are associated with health behaviours in children, the present study suggests that this association is weak to non-existent for F&V intakes in four different European countries.

  17. Modeling and notation of DEA with strong and weak disposable outputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Ludwig; Sülz, Sandra

    2011-12-01

    Recent articles published in Health Care Management Science have described DEA applications under the assumption of strong and weak disposable outputs. As we confidently assume that these papers include some methodical deficiencies, we aim to illustrate a revised approach.

  18. Ising model with long range correlated disorder on hierarchical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Roberto F. S.; Cason, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A next-neighbor Ising model with disordered but long range correlated coupling constants is investigated. The model is built on a hierarchical lattice and the correlation strength depends on a tuning parameter α . The results are obtained within a transfer-matrix framework, which allows for the evaluation of the properties of individual samples. Collective behavior is computed by averaging over a large number of independent realizations. The dependence of the thermodynamic and magnetic functions with respect to the temperature is investigated for each value of α . Phase diagrams in the (α,T) plane are constructed for two distinct versions of the model, indicating the existence of regions of paramagnetic and ordered phases. Critical values αc , below which the system always assumes the paramagnetic phase, are found for both versions.

  19. A goodness-of-fit test for occupancy models with correlated within-season revisits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Wilson; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Rodhouse, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Occupancy modeling is important for exploring species distribution patterns and for conservation monitoring. Within this framework, explicit attention is given to species detection probabilities estimated from replicate surveys to sample units. A central assumption is that replicate surveys are independent Bernoulli trials, but this assumption becomes untenable when ecologists serially deploy remote cameras and acoustic recording devices over days and weeks to survey rare and elusive animals. Proposed solutions involve modifying the detection-level component of the model (e.g., first-order Markov covariate). Evaluating whether a model sufficiently accounts for correlation is imperative, but clear guidance for practitioners is lacking. Currently, an omnibus goodnessof- fit test using a chi-square discrepancy measure on unique detection histories is available for occupancy models (MacKenzie and Bailey, Journal of Agricultural, Biological, and Environmental Statistics, 9, 2004, 300; hereafter, MacKenzie– Bailey test). We propose a join count summary measure adapted from spatial statistics to directly assess correlation after fitting a model. We motivate our work with a dataset of multinight bat call recordings from a pilot study for the North American Bat Monitoring Program. We found in simulations that our join count test was more reliable than the MacKenzie–Bailey test for detecting inadequacy of a model that assumed independence, particularly when serial correlation was low to moderate. A model that included a Markov-structured detection-level covariate produced unbiased occupancy estimates except in the presence of strong serial correlation and a revisit design consisting only of temporal replicates. When applied to two common bat species, our approach illustrates that sophisticated models do not guarantee adequate fit to real data, underscoring the importance of model assessment. Our join count test provides a widely applicable goodness-of-fit test and

  20. Correlations in a generalized elastic model: fractional Langevin equation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taloni, Alessandro; Chechkin, Aleksei; Klafter, Joseph

    2010-12-01

    The generalized elastic model (GEM) provides the evolution equation which governs the stochastic motion of several many-body systems in nature, such as polymers, membranes, and growing interfaces. On the other hand a probe (tracer) particle in these systems performs a fractional Brownian motion due to the spatial interactions with the other system's components. The tracer's anomalous dynamics can be described by a fractional Langevin equation (FLE) with a space-time correlated noise. We demonstrate that the description given in terms of GEM coincides with that furnished by the relative FLE, by showing that the correlation functions of the stochastic field obtained within the FLE framework agree with the corresponding quantities calculated from the GEM. Furthermore we show that the Fox H -function formalism appears to be very convenient to describe the correlation properties within the FLE approach.

  1. Distributing Correlation Coefficients of Linear Structure-Activity/Property Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorana D. BOLBOACA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative structure-activity/property relationships are mathematical relationships linking chemical structure and activity/property in a quantitative manner. These in silico approaches are frequently used to reduce animal testing and risk-assessment, as well as to increase time- and cost-effectiveness in characterization and identification of active compounds. The aim of our study was to investigate the pattern of correlation coefficients distribution associated to simple linear relationships linking the compounds structure with their activities. A set of the most common ordnance compounds found at naval facilities with a limited data set with a range of toxicities on aquatic ecosystem and a set of seven properties was studied. Statistically significant models were selected and investigated. The probability density function of the correlation coefficients was investigated using a series of possible continuous distribution laws. Almost 48% of the correlation coefficients proved fit Beta distribution, 40% fit Generalized Pareto distribution, and 12% fit Pert distribution.

  2. On the complexity of statistical models admitting correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cafaro, Carlo; Mancini, Stefano, E-mail: carlo.cafaro@unicam.i, E-mail: stefano.mancini@unicam.i [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    We compute the asymptotic temporal behavior of the dynamical complexity associated with the maximum probability trajectories on Gaussian statistical manifolds in the presence of correlations between the variables labeling the macrostates of the system. The algorithmic structure of our asymptotic computations is presented and special focus is devoted to the diagonalization procedure that allows us to simplify the problem in a remarkable way. We observe a power-law decay of the information geometric complexity at a rate determined by the correlation coefficient. We conclude that macro-correlations lead to the emergence of an asymptotic information geometric compression of the statistical macrostates explored on the configuration manifold of the model in its evolution between the initial and final macrostates.

  3. Model for Thermal Relic Dark Matter of Strongly Interacting Massive Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Murayama, Hitoshi; Volansky, Tomer; Wacker, Jay G

    2015-07-10

    A recent proposal is that dark matter could be a thermal relic of 3→2 scatterings in a strongly coupled hidden sector. We present explicit classes of strongly coupled gauge theories that admit this behavior. These are QCD-like theories of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, where the pions play the role of dark matter. The number-changing 3→2 process, which sets the dark matter relic abundance, arises from the Wess-Zumino-Witten term. The theories give an explicit relationship between the 3→2 annihilation rate and the 2→2 self-scattering rate, which alters predictions for structure formation. This is a simple calculable realization of the strongly interacting massive-particle mechanism.

  4. Modeling velocity space-time correlations in wind farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukassen, Laura J.; Stevens, Richard J. A. M.; Meneveau, Charles; Wilczek, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent fluctuations of wind velocities cause power-output fluctuations in wind farms. The statistics of velocity fluctuations can be described by velocity space-time correlations in the atmospheric boundary layer. In this context, it is important to derive simple physics-based models. The so-called Tennekes-Kraichnan random sweeping hypothesis states that small-scale velocity fluctuations are passively advected by large-scale velocity perturbations in a random fashion. In the present work, this hypothesis is used with an additional mean wind velocity to derive a model for the spatial and temporal decorrelation of velocities in wind farms. It turns out that in the framework of this model, space-time correlations are a convolution of the spatial correlation function with a temporal decorrelation kernel. In this presentation, first results on the comparison to large eddy simulations will be presented and the potential of the approach to characterize power output fluctuations of wind farms will be discussed. Acknowledgements: 'Fellowships for Young Energy Scientists' (YES!) of FOM, the US National Science Foundation Grant IIA 1243482, and support by the Max Planck Society.

  5. Sample selection and taste correlation in discrete choice transport modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mabit, Stefan Lindhard

    2008-01-01

    many issues that deserve attention. This thesis investigates how sample selection can affect estimation of discrete choice models and how taste correlation should be incorporated into applied mixed logit estimation. Sampling in transport modelling is often based on an observed trip. This may cause...... explain counterintuitive results in value of travel time estimation. However, the results also point at the difficulty of finding suitable instruments for the selection mechanism. Taste heterogeneity is another important aspect of discrete choice modelling. Mixed logit models are designed to capture...... observed as well as unobserved heterogeneity in tastes. But just as there are many reasons to expect unobserved heterogeneity, there is no reason to expect these tastes for different things to be independent. This is rarely accounted for in transportation research. Here three separate investigations...

  6. Tyrosine phosphorylation on capacitated human sperm tail detected by immunofluorescence correlates strongly with sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) binding but not with the ZP-induced acrosome reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D Y; Clarke, G N; Baker, H W G

    2006-04-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation (TP) of human sperm is related to sperm capacitation and zona pellucida (ZP) binding. The aim of this study was to determine whether the TP of capacitated sperm is a useful marker for the ability of sperm to bind to the ZP and undergo the ZP-induced acrosome reaction (AR). Semen samples were obtained from 115 subfertile men with sperm count > or =20 x 10(6)/ml, motility > or =25% and variable morphology. Motile sperm (2 x 10(6)/ml) selected by swim-up were incubated with four oocytes for 2 h, and the number of sperm bound to the ZP and the ZP-induced AR was examined. TP of sperm tail was assessed by immunofluorescence (IF) with anti-phosphotyrosine monoclonal antibody. The time course and effects of dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (dbcAMP) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) on TP were also studied. TP was stimulated more by dbcAMP (P ZP binding but not with the ZP-induced AR. Sperm TP detected by IF correlates strongly with sperm-ZP binding capacity but not with the ZP-induced AR. This simple IF assay of TP may be a clinically useful test of sperm function that is predictive of normal sperm ZP-binding capacity.

  7. The strongly correlated electron systems CeNi sub 2 Ge sub 2 and Sr sub 2 RuO sub 4

    CERN Document Server

    Diver, A J

    1996-01-01

    susceptibility and magnetoresistance on a single crystal CeNi sub 2 Ge sub 2 sample are discussed. The low temperature resistivity is found to show non-Fermi liquid behaviour both at low field and at 16 T. Chapter four is concerned with the layered perovskite superconductor Sr sub 2 RuO sub 4 which has a very similar structure to the La sub 2 sub - sub x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 family of high-T sub c superconductors. De Haas-van Alphen oscillations were detected allowing a study in which all of the Fermi surface sheets were detected. These oscillations are analysed and shown to obey the form expected for a conventional Fermi liquid. The results are compared with the predictions of recent band structure calculations. Measurements of the Hall effect and upper critical field for superconductivity are explained in terms of the measured Fermi surface. Strongly correlated electron systems provide many challenges for condensed matter physics which attempts to find new ways to understand the behaviour of vast numbers of p...

  8. Global solutions of restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock theory from semidefinite programming with applications to strongly correlated quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraraghavan, Srikant; Mazziotti, David A

    2014-03-28

    We present a density matrix approach for computing global solutions of restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock theory, based on semidefinite programming (SDP), that gives upper and lower bounds on the Hartree-Fock energy of quantum systems. While wave function approaches to Hartree-Fock theory yield an upper bound to the Hartree-Fock energy, we derive a semidefinite relaxation of Hartree-Fock theory that yields a rigorous lower bound on the Hartree-Fock energy. We also develop an upper-bound algorithm in which Hartree-Fock theory is cast as a SDP with a nonconvex constraint on the rank of the matrix variable. Equality of the upper- and lower-bound energies guarantees that the computed solution is the globally optimal solution of Hartree-Fock theory. The work extends a previously presented method for closed-shell systems [S. Veeraraghavan and D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. A 89, 010502-R (2014)]. For strongly correlated systems the SDP approach provides an alternative to the locally optimized Hartree-Fock energies and densities with a certificate of global optimality. Applications are made to the potential energy curves of C2, CN, Cr2, and NO2.

  9. Accommodating negative intracluster correlation with a mixed effects logistic model for bivariate binary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Have, T R; Kunselman, A; Zharichenko, E

    1998-03-01

    We extend the random intercept logistic model to accommodate negative intracluster correlations for bivariate binary response data. This approach assumes a single random effect per cluster, but entails separate affine transformations of this random effect for the two responses of the pair. We show this approach works for two data sets and a simulation, whereas other mixed effects approaches fail. The two data sets are from a crossover trial and a developmental toxicity study of the effects of chemical exposure on malformation risk among rat pups. Comparisons are made with the conditional likelihood approach and with generalized estimating equations estimation of the population-averaged logit model. Simulations show the conditional likelihood approach does not perform well for moderate to strong negative correlations, as a positive intracluster correlation is assumed. The proposed mixed effects approach appears to be slightly more conservative than the population-averaged approach with respect to coverage of confidence intervals. Nonetheless, the statistical literature suggests that mixed effects models provide information in addition to that provided by population-averaged models under scientific contexts such as crossover trials. Extensions to trivariate and higher-dimensional responses also are addressed. However, such extensions require certain constraints on the correlation structure.

  10. Optimization and uncertainty assessment of strongly nonlinear groundwater models with high parameter dimensionality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keating, E.H.; Doherty, J.; Vrugt, J.A.; Kang, Q.

    2010-01-01

    Highly parameterized and CPU-intensive groundwater models are increasingly being used to understand and predict flow and transport through aquifers. Despite their frequent use, these models pose significant challenges for parameter estimation and predictive uncertainty analysis algorithms,

  11. Modeling binary correlated responses using SAS, SPSS and R

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Statistical tools to analyze correlated binary data are spread out in the existing literature. This book makes these tools accessible to practitioners in a single volume. Chapters cover recently developed statistical tools and statistical packages that are tailored to analyzing correlated binary data. The authors showcase both traditional and new methods for application to health-related research. Data and computer programs will be publicly available in order for readers to replicate model development, but learning a new statistical language is not necessary with this book. The inclusion of code for R, SAS, and SPSS allows for easy implementation by readers. For readers interested in learning more about the languages, though, there are short tutorials in the appendix. Accompanying data sets are available for download through the book s website. Data analysis presented in each chapter will provide step-by-step instructions so these new methods can be readily applied to projects.  Researchers and graduate stu...

  12. Other paradigms: growth rate constants and tumor burden determined using computed tomography data correlate strongly with the overall survival of patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Wilfred D; Huang, Hui; Menefee, Michael; Edgerly, Maureen; Kotz, Herb; Dwyer, Andrew; Yang, James; Bates, Susan E

    2009-01-01

    In solid tumors, where curative therapies still elude oncologists, novel paradigms are needed to assess the efficacy of new therapies and those already approved. We used radiologic measurements obtained in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma enrolled in a phase II study of the epothilone B analog, ixabepilone (Ixempra), to address this issue. Using a novel 2-phase mathematical equation, we used the radiologic measurements to estimate the concomitant rates of tumor regression and growth (regression and growth rate constants). Eighty-one patients were enrolled on the ixabepilone trial at the time of this analysis. Growth rate constants were determined using computed tomography measurements obtained exclusively while a patient was enrolled on study. The growth rate constants of renal cell carcinomas treated with ixabepilone were significantly reduced compared with those of tumors in patients who received placebo in a previous trial. Furthermore, a correlation with overall survival was found for both the growth rate constant and the initial tumor burden; and this correlation was even stronger when both the growth rate constant and the initial tumor burden were combined. The readily amenable mathematical model described herein has potential applications to many tumor types that can be assessed with imaging modalities. Because the growth rate constant seems to be a surrogate for survival, assessment could aid in the evaluation of relative efficacies of different therapies and perhaps in assessing the potential individual benefit of an experimental therapy.

  13. Electronic structure calculations of atomic transport properties in uranium dioxide: influence of strong correlations; Etude des proprietes de transport atomique dans le dioxyde d'uranium par le calcul de structure electronique: influence des fortes correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorado, B.

    2010-09-15

    Uranium dioxide UO{sub 2} is the standard nuclear fuel used in pressurized water reactors. During in-reactor operation, the fission of uranium atoms yields a wide variety of fission products (FP) which create numerous point defects while slowing down in the material. Point defects and FP govern in turn the evolution of the fuel physical properties under irradiation. In this study, we use electronic structure calculations in order to better understand the fuel behavior under irradiation. In particular, we investigate point defect behavior, as well as the stability of three volatile FP: iodine, krypton and xenon. In order to take into account the strong correlations of uranium 5f electrons in UO{sub 2}, we use the DFT+U approximation, based on the density functional theory. This approximation, however, creates numerous metastable states which trap the system and induce discrepancies in the results reported in the literature. To solve this issue and to ensure the ground state is systematically approached as much as possible, we use a method based on electronic occupancy control of the correlated orbitals. We show that the DFT+U approximation, when used with electronic occupancy control, can describe accurately point defect and fission product behavior in UO{sub 2} and provide quantitative information regarding point defect transport properties in the oxide fuel. (author)

  14. Unconventional superconductivity in cuprates, cobaltates and graphene. What is universal and what is material-dependent in strongly versus weakly correlated materials?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiesel, Maximilian Ludwig

    2013-02-08

    A general theory for all classes of unconventional superconductors is still one of the unsolved key issues in condensed-matter physics. Actually, it is not yet fully settled if there is a common underlying pairing mechanism. Instead, it might be possible that several distinct sources for unconventional (not phonon-mediated) superconductivity have to be considered, or an electron-phonon interaction is not negligible. The focus of this thesis is on the most probable mechanism for the formation of Cooper pairs in unconventional superconductors, namely a strictly electronic one where spin fluctuations are the mediators. Studying different superconductors in this thesis, the emphasis is put on material-independent features of the pairing mechanism. In addition, the investigation of the phase diagrams enables a view on the vicinity of superconductivity. Thus, it is possible to clarify which competing quantum fluctuations enhance or weaken the propensity for a superconducting state. The broad range of superconducting materials requires the use of more than one numerical technique to study an appropriate microscopic description. This is not a problem but a big advantage because this facilitates the approach-independent description of common underlying physics. For this evaluation, the strongly correlated cuprates are simulated with the variational cluster approach. Especially the question of a pairing glue is taken into consideration. Furthermore, it is possible to distinguish between retarded and non-retarded contributions to the gap function. The cuprates are confronted with the cobaltate Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} and graphene. These weakly correlated materials are investigated with the functional renormalization group (fRG) and reveal a comprehensive phase diagram, including a d+id-wave superconductivity, which breaks time-reversal symmetry. The corresponding gap function is nodeless, but for NaCoO, it features a doping-dependent anisotropy. In addition, some general

  15. Electrophysiological correlates of listening effort: neurodynamical modeling and measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Daniel J; Corona-Strauss, Farah I; Trenado, Carlos; Bernarding, Corinna; Reith, Wolfgang; Latzel, Matthias; Froehlich, Matthias

    2010-06-01

    An increased listing effort represents a major problem in humans with hearing impairment. Neurodiagnostic methods for an objective listening effort estimation might support hearing instrument fitting procedures. However the cognitive neurodynamics of listening effort is far from being understood and its neural correlates have not been identified yet. In this paper we analyze the cognitive neurodynamics of listening effort by using methods of forward neurophysical modeling and time-scale electroencephalographic neurodiagnostics. In particular, we present a forward neurophysical model for auditory late responses (ALRs) as large-scale listening effort correlates. Here endogenously driven top-down projections related to listening effort are mapped to corticothalamic feedback pathways which were analyzed for the selective attention neurodynamics before. We show that this model represents well the time-scale phase stability analysis of experimental electroencephalographic data from auditory discrimination paradigms. It is concluded that the proposed neurophysical and neuropsychological framework is appropriate for the analysis of listening effort and might help to develop objective electroencephalographic methods for its estimation in future.

  16. FASTSAT-HSV01 Thermal Math Model Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Callie

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the thermal math model correlation effort for the Fast Affordable Science and Technology SATellite (FASTSAT-HSV01), which was designed, built and tested by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and multiple partners. The satellite launched in November 2010 on a Minotaur IV rocket from the Kodiak Launch Complex in Kodiak, Alaska. It carried three Earth science experiments and two technology demonstrations into a low Earth circular orbit with an inclination of 72deg and an altitude of 650 kilometers. The mission has been successful to date with science experiment activities still taking place daily. The thermal control system on this spacecraft was a passive design relying on thermo-optical properties and six heaters placed on specific components. Flight temperature data is being recorded every minute from the 48 Resistance Temperature Devices (RTDs) onboard the satellite structure and many of its avionics boxes. An effort has been made to correlate the thermal math model to the flight temperature data using Cullimore and Ring's Thermal Desktop and by obtaining Earth and Sun vector data from the Attitude Control System (ACS) team to create an "as-flown" orbit. Several model parameters were studied during this task to understand the spacecraft's sensitivity to these changes. Many "lessons learned" have been noted from this activity that will be directly applicable to future small satellite programs.

  17. Mask roughness induced LER: geometric model at long correlation lengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClinton, Brittany M.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-02-11

    Collective understanding of how both the resist and line-edge roughness (LER) on the mask affect the final printed LER has made significant advances. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which mask surface roughness couples to image plane LER as a function of illumination conditions, NA, and defocus. Recently, progress has been made in formulating a simplified solution for mask roughness induced LER. Here, we investigate the LER behavior at long correlation lengths of surface roughness on the mask. We find that for correlation lengths greater than 3/NA in wafer dimensions and CDs greater than approximately 0.75/NA, the previously described simplified model, which remains based on physical optics, converges to a 'geometric regime' which is based on ray optics and is independent of partial coherence. In this 'geometric regime', the LER is proportional to the mask slope error as it propagates through focus, and provides a faster alternative to calculating LER in contrast to either full 2D aerial image simulation modeling or the newly proposed physical optics model. Data is presented for both an NA = 0.32 and an NA = 0.5 imaging system for CDs of 22-nm and 50-nm horizontal-line-dense structures.

  18. The Complex Action Recognition via the Correlated Topic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-bin Tu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human complex action recognition is an important research area of the action recognition. Among various obstacles to human complex action recognition, one of the most challenging is to deal with self-occlusion, where one body part occludes another one. This paper presents a new method of human complex action recognition, which is based on optical flow and correlated topic model (CTM. Firstly, the Markov random field was used to represent the occlusion relationship between human body parts in terms of an occlusion state variable. Secondly, the structure from motion (SFM is used for reconstructing the missing data of point trajectories. Then, we can extract the key frame based on motion feature from optical flow and the ratios of the width and height are extracted by the human silhouette. Finally, we use the topic model of correlated topic model (CTM to classify action. Experiments were performed on the KTH, Weizmann, and UIUC action dataset to test and evaluate the proposed method. The compared experiment results showed that the proposed method was more effective than compared methods.

  19. The strong non-reciprocity of metamaterial absorber: characteristic, interpretation and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yuanxun; Xie Yunsong; Zhang Huaiwu; Liu Yingli; Wen Qiye; Ling Weiwei, E-mail: liyuanxun@uestc.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Film and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, 610054 (China)

    2009-05-07

    We simulated the metamaterial absorbers in two propagation conditions and observed the universal phenomenon of strong non-reciprocity. It is found that this non-reciprocity cannot be well interpreted using the effective medium theory, which indicates that the designing and understanding for the metamaterial absorber based on the proposed effective medium theory could not be applicable. The reason is pointed out that the metamaterial absorber does not satisfy the homogeneous-effective limit. So we put forward a three-parameter modified effective medium theory to fully describe the metamaterial absorbers. We have also investigated the relationships of S-parameters and absorptance among the metamaterial absorbers and the two components inside. Then the power absorption distributions in these three structures are discussed in detail. It can be concluded that the absorption is derived from the ERR structure and is enhanced largely by the coupling mechanism, and the strong non-reciprocity results from the different roles which wire structure plays in both propagation conditions.

  20. Strong correlation between cross-amplification success and genetic distance across all members of 'True Salamanders' (Amphibia: Salamandridae) revealed by Salamandra salamandra-specific microsatellite loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Ralf; Susanne Hauswaldt, J; Veith, Michael; Steinfartz, Sebastian

    2010-11-01

    The unpredictable and low cross-amplification success of microsatellite loci tested for congeneric amphibian species has mainly been explained by the size and complexity of amphibian genomes, but also by taxonomy that is inconsistent with phylogenetic relationships among taxa. Here, we tested whether the cross-amplification success of nine new and 11 published microsatellite loci cloned for an amphibian source species, the fire salamander (Salamandra salamandra), correlated with the genetic distance across all members of True Salamanders (genera Chioglossa, Lyciasalamandra, Mertensiella and Salamandra that form a monophyletic clade within the family of Salamandridae) serving as target species. Cross-amplification success varied strongly among the species and showed a highly significant negative relationship with genetic distance and amplification success. Even though lineages of S. salamandra and Lyciasalamndra have separated more than 30 Ma, a within genus amplification success rate of 65% was achieved for species of Lyciasalamandra thus demonstrating that an efficient cross-species amplification of microsatellite loci in amphibians is feasible even across large evolutionary distances. A decrease in genome size, on the other hand, paralleled also a decrease in amplified loci and therefore contradicted previous results and expectations that amplification success should increase with a decrease in genome size. However, in line with other studies, our comprehensive dataset clearly shows that cross-amplification success of microsatellite loci is well explained by phylogenetic divergence between species. As taxonomic classifications on the species and genus level do not necessarily mirror phylogenetic divergence between species, the pure belonging of species to the same taxonomic units (i.e. species or genus) might be less useful to predict cross-amplification success of microsatellite loci between such species. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Fuzzy-logic modeling of Fenton's strong chemical oxidation process treating three types of landfill leachates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Hanife; Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Ilhan, Fatih; Yazici, Senem; Kurt, Ugur; Apaydin, Omer

    2013-06-01

    Three multiple input and multiple output-type fuzzy-logic-based models were developed as an artificial intelligence-based approach to model a novel integrated process (UF-IER-EDBM-FO) consisted of ultrafiltration (UF), ion exchange resins (IER), electrodialysis with bipolar membrane (EDBM), and Fenton's oxidation (FO) units treating young, middle-aged, and stabilized landfill leachates. The FO unit was considered as the key process for implementation of the proposed modeling scheme. Four input components such as H(2)O(2)/chemical oxygen demand ratio, H(2)O(2)/Fe(2+) ratio, reaction pH, and reaction time were fuzzified in a Mamdani-type fuzzy inference system to predict the removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, color, and ammonia nitrogen. A total of 200 rules in the IF-THEN format were established within the framework of a graphical user interface for each fuzzy-logic model. The product (prod) and the center of gravity (centroid) methods were performed as the inference operator and defuzzification methods, respectively, for the proposed prognostic models. Fuzzy-logic predicted results were compared to the outputs of multiple regression models by means of various descriptive statistical indicators, and the proposed methodology was tested against the experimental data. The testing results clearly revealed that the proposed prognostic models showed a superior predictive performance with very high determination coefficients (R (2)) between 0.930 and 0.991. This study indicated a simple means of modeling and potential of a knowledge-based approach for capturing complicated inter-relationships in a highly non-linear problem. Clearly, it was shown that the proposed prognostic models provided a well-suited and cost-effective method to predict removal efficiencies of wastewater parameters prior to discharge to receiving streams.

  2. CFD modeling of particle behavior in supersonic flows with strong swirls for gas separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yan; Wen, Chuang

    2017-01-01

    The supersonic separator is a novel technique to remove the condensable components from gas mixtures. But the particle behavior is not well understood in this complex supersonic flow. The Discrete Particle Method was used here to study the particle motion in supersonic flows with a strong swirl....... The results showed that the gas flow was accelerated to supersonic velocity, and created the low pressure and temperature conditions for gas removal. Most of the particles collided with the walls or entered into the liquid-collection space directly, while only a few particles escaped together with the gas...... flow from the dry gas outlet. The separation efficiency reached over 80%, when the droplet diameter was more than 1.5 μm. The optimum length of the cyclonic separation section was approximate 16–20 times of the nozzle throat diameter to obtain higher collection efficiency for the supersonic separator...

  3. A Comprehensive Analysis of Jet Quenching via a Hybrid Strong/Weak Coupling Model for Jet-Medium Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Matèria and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Gulhan, Doga Can [Laboratory for Nuclear Science and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Milhano, José Guilherme [CENTRA, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Pablos, Daniel [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Matèria and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Rajagopal, Krishna [Laboratory for Nuclear Science and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Within a hybrid strong/weak coupling model for jets in strongly coupled plasma, we explore jet modifications in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Our approach merges the perturbative dynamics of hard jet evolution with the strongly coupled dynamics which dominates the soft exchanges between the fast partons in the jet shower and the strongly coupled plasma itself. We implement this approach in a Monte Carlo, which supplements the DGLAP shower with the energy loss dynamics as dictated by holographic computations, up to a single free parameter that we fit to data. We then augment the model by incorporating the transverse momentum picked up by each parton in the shower as it propagates through the medium, at the expense of adding a second free parameter. We use this model to discuss the influence of the transverse broadening of the partons in a jet on intra-jet observables. In addition, we explore the sensitivity of such observables to the back-reaction of the plasma to the passage of the jet.

  4. Group Targets Tracking Using Multiple Models GGIW-CPHD Based on Best-Fitting Gaussian Approximation and Strong Tracking Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma Gaussian inverse Wishart cardinalized probability hypothesis density (GGIW-CPHD algorithm was always used to track group targets in the presence of cluttered measurements and missing detections. A multiple models GGIW-CPHD algorithm based on best-fitting Gaussian approximation method (BFG and strong tracking filter (STF is proposed aiming at the defect that the tracking error of GGIW-CPHD algorithm will increase when the group targets are maneuvering. The best-fitting Gaussian approximation method is proposed to implement the fusion of multiple models using the strong tracking filter to correct the predicted covariance matrix of the GGIW component. The corresponding likelihood functions are deduced to update the probability of multiple tracking models. From the simulation results we can see that the proposed tracking algorithm MM-GGIW-CPHD can effectively deal with the combination/spawning of groups and the tracking error of group targets in the maneuvering stage is decreased.

  5. Numerical modelling of shaking effects due to strong motions on the tiber alluvial deposits in Rome (Italy)

    CERN Document Server

    Bonilla, Fabian; Gelis, Céline; Giacomi, Anna Chiara; Lenti, Luca; Martino, Salvatore; d'Avila, Maria Paola Santisi; Semblat, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    A multidisciplinary approach is proposed for evaluating the effects of shaking due to strong motions on the Tiber river alluvial deposits in Rome's historical centre. At this aim, a detailed 3D geological model of the Tiber river alluvial deposit has been constructed and a numerical analysis of site response was performed along two geological sections across the historical centre of Rome. The numerical models were performed in both 1D and 2D configurations assuming linear and nonlinear conditions, by applying a three component seismic input. The results show that the maximum shear strains are strongly conditioned by the layer geometries (i.e. 2D or 1D conditions) and by the soil heterogeneity. Moreover, the reliability of the maximum strains obtained by numerical modeling is discussed comparing these values respect to both the volumetric and the degradation dynamic thresholds of the considered soils.

  6. Structure and predictive skill of strong northeasterly wind events using a limited area numerical weather prediction model at Iqaluit, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Hanesiak

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Strong northeasterly wind events are infrequent over Baffin Island, but are potentially hazardous for aviation and the local community of Iqaluit (the capital of Nunavut, Canada. Three strong northeasterly wind events in this region are examined in this study, using the Canadian Global Environmental Multiscale-Limited Area Model (GEM-LAM with a horizontal grid spacing of 2.5 km; in-situ observations; and reanalysis data. The skill of the GEM-LAM in simulating these events is examined. With the exception of one event, the GEM-LAM was successful at predicting the large-scale flow in terms of the circulation pattern, timing of the synoptic set-up and the low-level flow over the Hall Peninsula. The onset and cessation of strong winds and timing of major wind shifts was typically well handled by the model to within ~3 h, but with a tendency to underestimate the peak wind speed. The skill of the surface wind forecasts at Iqaluit is critically dependent on the predicted timing and location of the hydraulic jump and the grid point selected to represent Iqaluit. Examination of the observed and modelled data suggest that the strong northeasterly wind events have several features in common: (1 strong gradient-driven flow across the Hall Peninsula, (2 mean-state critical layer (or reverse shear over the Hall Peninsula, (3 a low-level inversion, typically above the maximum barrier height immediately upstream of the Hall Peninsula, (4 subcritical flow, typically present upstream of the Hall Peninsula and (5 a hydraulic jump in the vicinity of Frobisher Bay. The modelled atmospheric conditions upwind of the Hall Peninsula immediately prior to the formation of the hydraulic jump (and acceleration of winds over the lee slope are largely consistent with the prediction of propagating hydraulic jumps presented in the literature.

  7. A model for strong interactions at high energy based on the CGC/saturation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotsman, E.; Maor, U. [Tel Aviv University, Department of Particle Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Science, Tel Aviv (Israel); Levin, E. [Tel Aviv University, Department of Particle Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Science, Tel Aviv (Israel); Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria and Centro Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso, Departamento de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2015-01-01

    We present our first attempt to develop a model for soft interactions at high energy, based on the BFKL Pomeron and the CGC/saturation approach. We construct an eikonal-type model, whose opacity is determined by the exchange of the dressed BFKL Pomeron. The Green function of the Pomeron is calculated in the framework of the CGC/saturation approach. Using five parameters we achieve a reasonable description of the experimental data at high energies (W ≥ 0.546TeV) with overall χ{sup 2}/d.o.f. ∼ 2. The model results in different behavior for the single- and double-diffraction cross sections at high energies.The singlediffraction cross section reaches a saturated value (about 10mb) at high energies, while the double-diffraction cross section continues growing slowly. (orig.)

  8. In vitro fertilization and embryo culture strongly impact the placental transcriptome in the mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Fauque

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART are increasingly used in humans; however, their impact is now questioned. At blastocyst stage, the trophectoderm is directly in contact with an artificial medium environment, which can impact placental development. This study was designed to carry out an in-depth analysis of the placental transcriptome after ART in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Blastocysts were transferred either (1 after in vivo fertilization and development (control group or (2 after in vitro fertilization and embryo culture. Placentas were then analyzed at E10.5. Six percent of transcripts were altered at the two-fold threshold in placentas of manipulated embryos, 2/3 of transcripts being down-regulated. Strikingly, the X-chromosome harbors 11% of altered genes, 2/3 being induced. Imprinted genes were modified similarly to the X. Promoter composition analysis indicates that FOXA transcription factors may be involved in the transcriptional deregulations. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, our study shows that in vitro fertilization associated with embryo culture strongly modify the placental expression profile, long after embryo manipulations, meaning that the stress of artificial environment is memorized after implantation. Expression of X and imprinted genes is also greatly modulated probably to adapt to adverse conditions. Our results highlight the importance of studying human placentas from ART.

  9. Modelling strong seismic ground motion: three-dimensional loading path versus wavefield polarization

    CERN Document Server

    D'Avila, Maria Paola Santisi; Semblat, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Seismic waves due to strong earthquakes propagating in surficial soil layers may both reduce soil stiffness and increase the energy dissipation into the soil. To investigate seismic wave amplification in such cases, past studies have been devoted to one-directional shear wave propagation in a soil column (1D-propagation) considering one motion component only (1C-polarization). Three independent purely 1C computations may be performed ('1D-1C' approach) and directly superimposed in the case of weak motions (linear behaviour). This research aims at studying local site effects by considering seismic wave propagation in a 1-D soil profile accounting for the influence of the 3-D loading path and non-linear hysteretic behaviour of the soil. In the proposed '1D-3C' approach, the three components (3C-polarization) of the incident wave are simultaneously propagated into a horizontal multilayered soil. A 3-D non-linear constitutive relation for the soil is implemented in the framework of the Finite Element Method in th...

  10. Magnetic correlations in the two-dimensional repulsive Fermi-Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimkovic, Fedor; Deng, Youjin; Prokof'ev, N. V.; Svistunov, B. V.; Tupitsyn, I. S.; Kozik, Evgeny

    2017-08-01

    The repulsive Fermi-Hubbard model on a square lattice has a rich phase diagram near half-filling (n =1 ): at n =1 the ground state is an antiferromagnetic insulator, at 0.6 strong interactions, U ≲4 ), and the region 1 -n ≪1 is likely subject to phase separation. Much less is known about the nature of strong magnetic fluctuations at finite temperature and how they change with the doping level. Recent experiments on ultracold atoms have now reached this interesting fluctuation regime. In this work we employ the skeleton diagrammatic method to quantify the characteristic temperature scale TM(n ) for the onset of magnetic fluctuations with a large correlation length.

  11. The Combined Use of Correlative and Mechanistic Species Distribution Models Benefits Low Conservation Status Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaud Rougier

    Full Text Available Species can respond to climate change by tracking appropriate environmental conditions in space, resulting in a range shift. Species Distribution Models (SDMs can help forecast such range shift responses. For few species, both correlative and mechanistic SDMs were built, but allis shad (Alosa alosa, an endangered anadromous fish species, is one of them. The main purpose of this study was to provide a framework for joint analyses of correlative and mechanistic SDMs projections in order to strengthen conservation measures for species of conservation concern. Guidelines for joint representation and subsequent interpretation of models outputs were defined and applied. The present joint analysis was based on the novel mechanistic model GR3D (Global Repositioning Dynamics of Diadromous fish Distribution which was parameterized on allis shad and then used to predict its future distribution along the European Atlantic coast under different climate change scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5. We then used a correlative SDM for this species to forecast its distribution across the same geographic area and under the same climate change scenarios. First, projections from correlative and mechanistic models provided congruent trends in probability of habitat suitability and population dynamics. This agreement was preferentially interpreted as referring to the species vulnerability to climate change. Climate change could not be accordingly listed as a major threat for allis shad. The congruence in predicted range limits between SDMs projections was the next point of interest. The difference, when noticed, required to deepen our understanding of the niche modelled by each approach. In this respect, the relative position of the northern range limit between the two methods strongly suggested here that a key biological process related to intraspecific variability was potentially lacking in the mechanistic SDM. Based on our knowledge, we hypothesized that local

  12. Models of the Strongly Lensed Quasar DES J0408-5354

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnello, A.; et al.

    2017-02-01

    We present gravitational lens models of the multiply imaged quasar DES J0408-5354, recently discovered in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) footprint, with the aim of interpreting its remarkable quad-like configuration. We first model the DES single-epoch $grizY$ images as a superposition of a lens galaxy and four point-like objects, obtaining spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and relative positions for the objects. Three of the point sources (A,B,D) have SEDs compatible with the discovery quasar spectra, while the faintest point-like image (G2/C) shows significant reddening and a `grey' dimming of $\\approx0.8$mag. In order to understand the lens configuration, we fit different models to the relative positions of A,B,D. Models with just a single deflector predict a fourth image at the location of G2/C but considerably brighter and bluer. The addition of a small satellite galaxy ($R_{\\rm E}\\approx0.2$") in the lens plane near the position of G2/C suppresses the flux of the fourth image and can explain both the reddening and grey dimming. All models predict a main deflector with Einstein radius between $1.7"$ and $2.0",$ velocity dispersion $267-280$km/s and enclosed mass $\\approx 6\\times10^{11}M_{\\odot},$ even though higher resolution imaging data are needed to break residual degeneracies in model parameters. The longest time-delay (B-A) is estimated as $\\approx 85$ (resp. $\\approx125$) days by models with (resp. without) a perturber near G2/C. The configuration and predicted time-delays of J0408-5354 make it an excellent target for follow-up aimed at understanding the source quasar host galaxy and substructure in the lens, and measuring cosmological parameters. We also discuss some lessons learnt from J0408-5354 on lensed quasar finding strategies, due to its chromaticity and morphology.

  13. A new Expert Finding model based on Term Correlation Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Pornour

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the enormous volume of unstructured information available on the Web and inside organization, finding an answer to the knowledge need in a short time is difficult. For this reason, beside Search Engines which don’t consider users individual characteristics, Recommender systems were created which use user’s previous activities and other individual characteristics to help users find needed knowledge. Recommender systems usage is increasing every day. Expert finder systems also by introducing expert people instead of recommending information to users have provided this facility for users to ask their questions form experts. Having relation with experts not only causes information transition, but also with transferring experiences and inception causes knowledge transition. In this paper we used university professors academic resume as expert people profile and then proposed a new expert finding model that recommends experts to users query. We used Term Correlation Matrix, Vector Space Model and PageRank algorithm and proposed a new hybrid model which outperforms conventional methods. This model can be used in internet environment, organizations and universities that experts have resume dataset.

  14. Finite-temperature superconducting correlations in the square lattice Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ehsan; Scalettar, Richard; Singh, Rajiv R. P.

    2014-03-01

    We utilize numerical linked-cluster expansions (NLCE) to study superconducting properties of the repulsive Fermi-Hubbard model on the square lattice. Within NLCE, temperature-dependent properties in the thermodynamic limit can be obtained from exact diagonalization of small clusters. We calculate the pairing correlation functions, structure factor, and correlation length for d-wave and extended s-wave symmetries at, and especially away from, half filling for a wide range of interaction strengths. A relatively strong tendency to d-wave pairing away from half filling is revealed after subtracting the uncorrelated contributions. We compare our findings to improved results from the determinantal quantum Monte Carlo simulations on large finite clusters with periodic boundary condition.

  15. Short-Range Correlation Models in Electronic Structure Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldey, Matthew Bryant

    fraction of MP2/CBS computational cost. Second, attenuated MP2 is developed within the larger aug-cc-pVTZ (aTZ) basis set for inter- and intramolecular non-bonded interactions. A single attenuation parameter is optimized on the S66 database of 66 intermolecular interactions, leading to a very large RMS error reduction by a factor of greater than 5 relative to standard MP2/aTZ. Attenuation introduces an error of opposite sign to basis set superposition error (BSSE) and overestimation of dispersion interactions in finite basis MP2. A variety of tests including the S22 set, conformer energies of peptides, alkanes, sugars, sulfate-water clusters, and the coronene dimer establish the transferability of the MP2(terfc, aTZ) model to other inter and intra-molecular interactions. Direct comparisons against attenuation in the smaller aug-cc-pVDZ basis shows that MP2(terfc, aTZ) often significantly outperforms MP2(terfc, aDZ), although at higher computational cost. MP2(terfc, aDZ) and MP2(terfc, aTZ) often outperform MP2 at the complete basis set limit. Comparison of the two attenuated MP2 models against each other and against attenuation using non-augmented basis sets gives insight into the error cancellation responsible for their remarkable success. Third, I present an improved algorithm for single-node multi-threaded computation of the correlation energy using resolution of the identity second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (RI-MP2). This algorithm is based on shared memory parallelization of the rate-limiting steps and an overall reduction in the number of disk reads. The requisite fifth-order computation in RI-MP2 calculations is efficiently parallelized within this algorithm, with improvements in overall parallel efficiency as the system size increases. Fourth-order steps are also parallelized. As an application, I present energies and timings for several large, noncovalently interacting systems with this algorithm, and demonstrate that the RI-MP2 cost is still

  16. Modeling the Etiology of Individual Differences in Early Reading Development: Evidence for Strong Genetic Influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Micaela E; Hulslander, Jacqueline; Byrne, Brian; Samuelsson, Stefan; Keenan, Janice M; Pennington, Bruce; Defries, John C; Wadsworth, Sally J; Willcutt, Erik; Olson, Richard K

    2013-01-01

    We explored the etiology of individual differences in reading development from post-kindergarten to post-4th grade by analyzing data from 487 twin pairs tested in Colorado. Data from three reading measures and one spelling measure were fit to biometric latent growth curve models, allowing us to extend previous behavioral genetic studies of the etiology of early reading development at specific time points. We found primarily genetic influences on individual differences at post-1st grade for all measures. Genetic influences on variance in growth rates were also found, with evidence of small, nonsignificant, shared environmental influences for two measures. We discuss our results, including their implications for educational policy.

  17. Fully variational average atom model with ion-ion correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starrett, C E; Saumon, D

    2012-02-01

    An average atom model for dense ionized fluids that includes ion correlations is presented. The model assumes spherical symmetry and is based on density functional theory, the integral equations for uniform fluids, and a variational principle applied to the grand potential. Starting from density functional theory for a mixture of classical ions and quantum mechanical electrons, an approximate grand potential is developed, with an external field being created by a central nucleus fixed at the origin. Minimization of this grand potential with respect to electron and ion densities is carried out, resulting in equations for effective interaction potentials. A third condition resulting from minimizing the grand potential with respect to the average ion charge determines the noninteracting electron chemical potential. This system is coupled to a system of point ions and electrons with an ion fixed at the origin, and a closed set of equations is obtained. Solution of these equations results in a self-consistent electronic and ionic structure for the plasma as well as the average ionization, which is continuous as a function of temperature and density. Other average atom models are recovered by application of simplifying assumptions.

  18. A Strong Validation of the Crosswise Model Using Experimentally-Induced Cheating Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Adrian; Diedenhofen, Birk; Verschuere, Bruno; Musch, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    We constructed an online cheating paradigm that could be used to validate the Crosswise Model ( Yu, Tian, & Tang, 2008 ), a promising indirect questioning technique designed to control for socially desirable responding on sensitive questions. Participants qualified for a reward only if they could identify the target words from three anagrams, one of which was virtually unsolvable as shown on a pretest. Of the 664 participants, 15.5% overreported their performance and were categorized as cheaters. When participants were asked to report whether they had cheated, a conventional direct question resulted in a substantial underestimate (5.1%) of the known prevalence of cheaters. Using a CWM question resulted in a more accurate estimate (13.0%). This result shows that the CWM can be used to control for socially desirable responding and provides estimates that are much closer to the known prevalence of a sensitive personal attribute than those obtained using a direct question.

  19. Smooth approximation model of dispersion with strong space charge for continuous beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bernal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We apply the Venturini-Reiser (V-R envelope-dispersion equations [M. Venturini and M. Reiser, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 96 (1998PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.81.96] to a continuous beam in a uniform focusing/bending lattice to study the combined effects of linear dispersion and space charge. Within this simple model we investigate the scaling of average dispersion and the effects on beam dimensions and show that the V-R equations lead to the correct zero-current limits. We also introduce a generalization of the space charge intensity parameter and apply it to the University of Maryland Electron Ring and other machines. In addition, we present results of calculations to test the smooth approximation by solving the V-R original equations and also through simulations with the matrix code ELEGANT.

  20. <strong>Driving forces behind the increasing cardiovascular treatment intensity.A dynamic epidemiologic model of trends in Danish cardiovascular drug utilization.strong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Andersen, Morten

    -state (untreated, treated, dead) semi-Markov model to analyse the dynamics of drug use. Transitions were from untreated to treated (incidence), the reverse (discontinuation), and from either untreated or treated to dead. Stratified by sex and age categories, prevalence trends of "growth driving" drug categories...

  1. Vesicular stomatitis virus polymerase's strong affinity to its template suggests exotic transcription models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Tang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is the prototype for negative sense non segmented (NNS RNA viruses which include potent human and animal pathogens such as Rabies, Ebola and measles. The polymerases of NNS RNA viruses only initiate transcription at or near the 3' end of their genome template. We measured the dissociation constant of VSV polymerases from their whole genome template to be 20 pM. Given this low dissociation constant, initiation and sustainability of transcription becomes nontrivial. To explore possible mechanisms, we simulated the first hour of transcription using Monte Carlo methods and show that a one-time initial dissociation of all polymerases during entry is not sufficient to sustain transcription. We further show that efficient transcription requires a sliding mechanism for non-transcribing polymerases and can be realized with different polymerase-polymerase interactions and distinct template topologies. In conclusion, we highlight a model in which collisions between transcribing and sliding non-transcribing polymerases result in release of the non-transcribing polymerases allowing for redistribution of polymerases between separate templates during transcription and suggest specific experiments to further test these mechanisms.

  2. Coupled barrier island-resort model: 1. Emergent instabilities induced by strong human-landscape interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, D. E.; Werner, B. T.

    2008-03-01

    As humans increasingly occupy and modify marginal landscapes, previously unobserved long timescale, emergent behaviors related to interactions between natural processes and human agency are possible. Barrier islands, which are low-lying strips of sand separated from a coast by lagoons, cut by inlets and topped by sand dunes, have been significantly modified through the development of tourist resorts. Resorts and barrier islands are dynamically coupled through storm damage and beach erosion, and measures taken to prevent or mitigate them. In response to rising sea level, a natural barrier island migrates steadily up the continental shelf. In contrast, we show that in a novel numerical model-coupling barrier island processes with resort development, storm damage, and hazard mitigation, policy decisions driven by market dynamics destabilize barrier island response to rising sea level, giving rise to emergent, episodic boom and bust cycles, which alternate in phase alongshore, and less frequent, regionally extensive resort destruction events. Developed barrier islands are precariously maintained at lower elevations and further offshore than their natural counterparts, a situation exacerbated by insurance, which can lead to island inundation. Our results suggest that coastal areas that have recently instituted protection measures eventually will experience a widespread upsurge in damage if these practices are sustained, even in the absence of climate-change-induced increased storminess.

  3. Energy distribution and local fluctuations in strongly coupled open quantum systems: The extended resonant level model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Maicol A.; Bruch, Anton; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-07-01

    We study the energy distribution in the extended resonant level model at equilibrium. Previous investigations [Phys. Rev. B 89, 161306 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.161306; Phys. Rev. B 93, 115318 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.115318] have found, for a resonant electronic level interacting with a thermal free-electron wide-band bath, that the expectation value for the energy of the interacting subsystem can be correctly calculated by considering a symmetric splitting of the interaction Hamiltonian between the subsystem and the bath. However, the general implications of this approach were questioned [Phys. Rev. B 92, 235440 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.235440]. Here, we show that, already at equilibrium, such splitting fails to describe the energy fluctuations, as measured here by the second and third central moments (namely, width and skewness) of the energy distribution. Furthermore, we find that when the wide-band approximation does not hold, no splitting of the system-bath interaction can describe the system thermodynamics. We conclude that in general no proper division subsystem of the Hamiltonian of the composite system can account for the energy distribution of the subsystem. This also implies that the thermodynamic effects due to local changes in the subsystem cannot in general be described by such splitting.

  4. Anisotropy of stress correlation in two-dimensional liquids and a pseudospin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Iwashita, Takuya; Egami, Takeshi

    2015-11-01

    Liquids are condensed matter in which atoms are strongly correlated in position and momentum. The atomic pair density function (PDF) is used often in describing such correlation. However, elucidation of many properties requires higher degrees of correlation than the pair correlation. For instance, viscosity depends upon the stress correlations in space and time. In this paper, we examine the cross correlation between the stress correlation at the atomic level and the PDF for two-dimensional liquids. We introduce the concept of the stress-resolved pair distribution function (SRPDF) that uses the sign of atomic-level stress as a selection rule to include particles from density correlations. The connection between SRPDFs and stress correlation function is explained through an approximation in which the shear stress is replaced by a pseudospin. We further assess the possibility of interpreting the long-range stress correlation as a consequence of short-range Ising-like pseudospin interactions.

  5. Observation of antiferromagnetic correlations in the Hubbard model with ultracold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Russell A; Duarte, Pedro M; Yang, Tsung-Lin; Liu, Xinxing; Paiva, Thereza; Khatami, Ehsan; Scalettar, Richard T; Trivedi, Nandini; Huse, David A; Hulet, Randall G

    2015-03-12

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices have great potential to contribute to a better understanding of some of the most important issues in many-body physics, such as high-temperature superconductivity. The Hubbard model--a simplified representation of fermions moving on a periodic lattice--is thought to describe the essential details of copper oxide superconductivity. This model describes many of the features shared by the copper oxides, including an interaction-driven Mott insulating state and an antiferromagnetic (AFM) state. Optical lattices filled with a two-spin-component Fermi gas of ultracold atoms can faithfully realize the Hubbard model with readily tunable parameters, and thus provide a platform for the systematic exploration of its phase diagram. Realization of strongly correlated phases, however, has been hindered by the need to cool the atoms to temperatures as low as the magnetic exchange energy, and also by the lack of reliable thermometry. Here we demonstrate spin-sensitive Bragg scattering of light to measure AFM spin correlations in a realization of the three-dimensional Hubbard model at temperatures down to 1.4 times that of the AFM phase transition. This temperature regime is beyond the range of validity of a simple high-temperature series expansion, which brings our experiment close to the limit of the capabilities of current numerical techniques, particularly at metallic densities. We reach these low temperatures using a compensated optical lattice technique, in which the confinement of each lattice beam is compensated by a blue-detuned laser beam. The temperature of the atoms in the lattice is deduced by comparing the light scattering to determinant quantum Monte Carlo simulations and numerical linked-cluster expansion calculations. Further refinement of the compensated lattice may produce even lower temperatures which, along with light scattering thermometry, would open avenues for producing and characterizing other novel quantum states of

  6. Analytical solutions by squeezing to the anisotropic Rabi model in the nonperturbative deep-strong-coupling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Yu; Chen, Xiang-You

    2017-12-01

    An unexplored nonperturbative deep strong coupling (npDSC) achieved in superconducting circuits has been studied in the anisotropic Rabi model by the generalized squeezing rotating-wave approximation. Energy levels are evaluated analytically from the reformulated Hamiltonian and agree well with numerical ones in a wide range of coupling strength. Such improvement ascribes to deformation effects in the displaced-squeezed state presented by the squeezed momentum variance, which are omitted in previous displaced states. The atom population dynamics confirms the validity of our approach for the npDSC strength. Our approach offers the possibility to explore interesting phenomena analytically in the npDSC regime in qubit-oscillator experiments.

  7. Influence of strong noise on the decline and propagation of population in the delayed Malthus-Verhulst model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jian-Chun; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2010-11-01

    The effects of strong noise on the decline and propagation processes of a population in the Malthus-Verhulst model with time delay are investigated by a stochastic simulation. Time delays in two different processes are concurrent in ecosystems. The simulation results indicate that: The stability of the population is enhanced by the decreasing multiplicative noise intensity and the increasing delay time. The replacement of old individuals with young ones is accelerated by an increasing multiplicative noise intensity, an increasing additive noise intensity and a decreasing delay time. An increasing multiplicative noise intensity will drive the population of species to fluctuate more largely.

  8. Strong absorption model analysis of elastic K sup + scatterings on nuclei and a potential calculation by inversion

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y J

    1999-01-01

    We analyze the elastic scattering of 800 MeV/c positive kaons from sup 1 sup 2 C and sup 4 sup 0 Ca nuclei within the framework of the McIntyre strong absorption model. The calculated differential cross-sections are found to be in excellent agreement with the observed data. Near- and far-side decompositions of the elastic cross-section have also been performed by following Fuller's formalism. The corresponding complex potentials are predicted by using the inversion procedure of the McIntyre S-matrix.

  9. Tensor formulation of the model equations on strong conservation form for an incompressible flow in general coordinates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bo Hoffmann

    2003-01-01

    equations on a general form which accommodate curvilinear coordinates. Strong conservation form is obtained by formulating the equations so that the flow variables, velocity and pressure, are expressed in thephysical coordinate system while the location of evaluation is expressed within the transformed...... coordinate system. The tensor formulation allows both a finite difference and a pseudo-spectral description of the model equations. The intention is for thefinite difference formulation to achieve the same robustness and conservation properties as a finite volume discretization. Furthermore, an invariant...

  10. The detection and correlation modeling of Rayleigh distributed radar signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buterbaugh, Alan L.

    1992-09-01

    This thesis provides a method for determining the detection of partially correlated Rayleigh distributed radar returns by a pulsed search radar. The receiver consists of a quadrature demodulator receiver, followed by a square law envelope detector and a linear post-detection integrator. In addition, a technique for determining the pulse-to-pulse correlation of a complex target is given using inverse Fourier transforms of the target scattering centers. An AIM-9 missile is used to illustrate how the partially correlated detection techniques and the pulse-to-pulse correlation predictions can be used to determine the probability of detection.

  11. From Near-Neutral to Strongly Stratified: Adequately Modelling the Clear-Sky Nocturnal Boundary Layer at Cabauw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, P.; van de Wiel, B. J. H.; van der Linden, S. J. A.; Bosveld, F. C.

    2017-10-01

    The performance of an atmospheric single-column model (SCM) is studied systematically for stably-stratified conditions. To this end, 11 years (2005-2015) of daily SCM simulations were compared to observations from the Cabauw observatory, The Netherlands. Each individual clear-sky night was classified in terms of the ambient geostrophic wind speed with a 1 m s^{-1} bin-width. Nights with overcast conditions were filtered out by selecting only those nights with an average net radiation of less than - 30 W m^{-2} . A similar procedure was applied to the observational dataset. A comparison of observed and modelled ensemble-averaged profiles of wind speed and potential temperature and time series of turbulent fluxes showed that the model represents the dynamics of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) at Cabauw very well for a broad range of mechanical forcing conditions. No obvious difference in model performance was found between near-neutral and strongly-stratified conditions. Furthermore, observed NBL regime transitions are represented in a natural way. The reference model version performs much better than a model version that applies excessive vertical mixing as is done in several (global) operational models. Model sensitivity runs showed that for weak-wind conditions the inversion strength depends much more on details of the land-atmosphere coupling than on the turbulent mixing. The presented results indicate that in principle the physical parametrizations of large-scale atmospheric models are sufficiently equipped for modelling stably-stratified conditions for a wide range of forcing conditions.

  12. From Near-Neutral to Strongly Stratified: Adequately Modelling the Clear-Sky Nocturnal Boundary Layer at Cabauw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, P.; van de Wiel, B. J. H.; van der Linden, S. J. A.; Bosveld, F. C.

    2018-02-01

    The performance of an atmospheric single-column model (SCM) is studied systematically for stably-stratified conditions. To this end, 11 years (2005-2015) of daily SCM simulations were compared to observations from the Cabauw observatory, The Netherlands. Each individual clear-sky night was classified in terms of the ambient geostrophic wind speed with a 1 m s^{-1} bin-width. Nights with overcast conditions were filtered out by selecting only those nights with an average net radiation of less than - 30 W m^{-2}. A similar procedure was applied to the observational dataset. A comparison of observed and modelled ensemble-averaged profiles of wind speed and potential temperature and time series of turbulent fluxes showed that the model represents the dynamics of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) at Cabauw very well for a broad range of mechanical forcing conditions. No obvious difference in model performance was found between near-neutral and strongly-stratified conditions. Furthermore, observed NBL regime transitions are represented in a natural way. The reference model version performs much better than a model version that applies excessive vertical mixing as is done in several (global) operational models. Model sensitivity runs showed that for weak-wind conditions the inversion strength depends much more on details of the land-atmosphere coupling than on the turbulent mixing. The presented results indicate that in principle the physical parametrizations of large-scale atmospheric models are sufficiently equipped for modelling stably-stratified conditions for a wide range of forcing conditions.

  13. A statistical model for estimation of fish density including correlation in size, space, time and between species from research survey data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Rasmus Nielsen

    Full Text Available Trawl survey data with high spatial and seasonal coverage were analysed using a variant of the Log Gaussian Cox Process (LGCP statistical model to estimate unbiased relative fish densities. The model estimates correlations between observations according to time, space, and fish size and includes zero observations and over-dispersion. The model utilises the fact the correlation between numbers of fish caught increases when the distance in space and time between the fish decreases, and the correlation between size groups in a haul increases when the difference in size decreases. Here the model is extended in two ways. Instead of assuming a natural scale size correlation, the model is further developed to allow for a transformed length scale. Furthermore, in the present application, the spatial- and size-dependent correlation between species was included. For cod (Gadus morhua and whiting (Merlangius merlangus, a common structured size correlation was fitted, and a separable structure between the time and space-size correlation was found for each species, whereas more complex structures were required to describe the correlation between species (and space-size. The within-species time correlation is strong, whereas the correlations between the species are weaker over time but strong within the year.

  14. Inter-neuronal correlation distinguishes mechanisms of direction selectivity in cortical circuit models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Pamela M.; Bair, Wyeth

    2012-01-01

    Direction selectivity is a fundamental physiological property that arises from V1 circuitry, yet basic questions of how direction selective (DS) receptive fields are constructed remain unanswered. We built a set of simple, plausible neuronal circuits that produce DS cells via different mechanisms and tested these circuits to determine how they can be distinguished experimentally. Our models consisted of populations of spiking units representing physiological cell classes ranging from LGN cells to V1 complex DS cells. They differed in network architecture and DS mechanism: including linear summation of non-DS simple cell inputs or nonlinear pairwise combinations of non-DS inputs. The circuits also varied in the location of the DS time delay and whether the DS interaction was facilitatory or suppressive. We tested the models with visual stimuli often employed experimentally, including sinusoidal gratings and flashed bars, and computed shuffle-corrected cross-correlograms (CCGs) of spike trains from pairs of units that would be accessible to extracellular recording. We found that CCGs revealed fundamental features of the DS models, including the location of signal delays in the DS circuit and the sign (facilitatory or suppressive) of DS interactions. We also found that correlation was strongly stimulus-dependent, changing with direction and temporal frequency in a manner that generalized across model architectures. Our models make specific predictions for designing, optimizing and interpreting electrophysiology experiments aimed at resolving DS circuitry and provide new insights into mechanisms that could underlie stimulus-dependent correlation. The models are available and easy to explore at www.iModel.org. PMID:22745482

  15. Correlated parameter fit of arrhenius model for thermal denaturation of proteins and cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhenpeng; Balasubramanian, Saravana Kumar; Wolkers, Willem F; Pearce, John A; Bischof, John C

    2014-12-01

    Thermal denaturation of proteins is critical to cell injury, food science and other biomaterial processing. For example protein denaturation correlates strongly with cell death by heating, and is increasingly of interest in focal thermal therapies of cancer and other diseases at temperatures which often exceed 50 °C. The Arrhenius model is a simple yet widely used model for both protein denaturation and cell injury. To establish the utility of the Arrhenius model for protein denaturation at 50 °C and above its sensitivities to the kinetic parameters (activation energy E a and frequency factor A) were carefully examined. We propose a simplified correlated parameter fit to the Arrhenius model by treating E a, as an independent fitting parameter and allowing A to follow dependently. The utility of the correlated parameter fit is demonstrated on thermal denaturation of proteins and cells from the literature as a validation, and new experimental measurements in our lab using FTIR spectroscopy to demonstrate broad applicability of this method. Finally, we demonstrate that the end-temperature within which the denaturation is measured is important and changes the kinetics. Specifically, higher E a and A parameters were found at low end-temperature (50 °C) and reduce as end-temperatures increase to 70 °C. This trend is consistent with Arrhenius parameters for cell injury in the literature that are significantly higher for clonogenics (45-50 °C) vs. membrane dye assays (60-70 °C). Future opportunities to monitor cell injury by spectroscopic measurement of protein denaturation are discussed.

  16. Real-Time Corrected Traffic Correlation Model for Traffic Flow Forecasting

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Hua-pu; Sun, Zhi-yuan; Qu, Wen-cong; Wang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the problems of short-term traffic flow forecasting. The main goal is to put forward traffic correlation model and real-time correction algorithm for traffic flow forecasting. Traffic correlation model is established based on the temporal-spatial-historical correlation characteristic of traffic big data. In order to simplify the traffic correlation model, this paper presents correction coefficients optimization algorithm. Considering multistate characteristic of traffic ...

  17. Modeling Mental Speed: Decomposing Response Time Distributions in Elementary Cognitive Tasks and Correlations with Working Memory Capacity and Fluid Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Schmitz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown an inverse relation between response times in elementary cognitive tasks and intelligence, but findings are inconsistent as to which is the most informative score. We conducted a study (N = 200 using a battery of elementary cognitive tasks, working memory capacity (WMC paradigms, and a test of fluid intelligence (gf. Frequently used candidate scores and model parameters derived from the response time (RT distribution were tested. Results confirmed a clear correlation of mean RT with WMC and to a lesser degree with gf. Highly comparable correlations were obtained for alternative location measures with or without extreme value treatment. Moderate correlations were found as well for scores of RT variability, but they were not as strong as for mean RT. Additionally, there was a trend towards higher correlations for slow RT bands, as compared to faster RT bands. Clearer evidence was obtained in an ex-Gaussian decomposition of the response times: the exponential component was selectively related to WMC and gf in easy tasks, while mean response time was additionally predictive in the most complex tasks. The diffusion model parsimoniously accounted for these effects in terms of individual differences in drift rate. Finally, correlations of model parameters as trait-like dispositions were investigated across different tasks, by correlating parameters of the diffusion and the ex-Gaussian model with conventional RT and accuracy scores.

  18. Diet-Induced Metabolic Improvements in a Hamster Model of Hypercholesterolemia Are Strongly Linked to Alterations of the Gut Microbiota▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Inés; Wallace, Grant; Zhang, Chaomei; Legge, Ryan; Benson, Andrew K.; Carr, Timothy P.; Moriyama, Etsuko N.; Walter, Jens

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal microbiota exerts a strong influence on host lipid and cholesterol metabolism. In this study, we have characterized the interplay among diet, gut microbial ecology, and cholesterol metabolism in a hamster model of hypercholesterolemia. Previous work in this model had shown that grain sorghum lipid extract (GSL) included in the diet significantly improved the high-density lipoprotein (HDL)/non-HDL cholesterol equilibrium (T. P. Carr, C. L. Weller, V. L. Schlegel, S. L. Cuppett, D. M. Guderian, Jr., and K. R. Johnson, J. Nutr. 135:2236-2240, 2005). Molecular analysis of the hamsters' fecal bacterial populations by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA tags, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and Bifidobacterium-specific quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the improvements in cholesterol homeostasis induced through feeding the hamsters GSL were strongly associated with alterations of the gut microbiota. Bifidobacteria, which significantly increased in abundance in hamsters fed GSL, showed a strong positive association with HDL plasma cholesterol levels (r = 0.75; P = 0.001). The proportion of members of the family Coriobacteriaceae decreased when the hamsters were fed GSL and showed a high positive association with non-HDL plasma cholesterol levels (r = 0.84; P = 0.0002). These correlations were more significant than those between daily GSL intake and animal metabolic markers, implying that the dietary effects on host cholesterol metabolism are conferred, at least in part, through an effect on the gut microbiota. This study provides evidence that modulation of the gut microbiota-host metabolic interrelationship by dietary intervention has the potential to improve mammalian cholesterol homeostasis, which has relevance for cardiovascular health. PMID:19411417

  19. Validation of strong-motion stochastic model using observed ground motion records in north-east India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipok K. Bora

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We focused on validation of applicability of semi-empirical technique (spectral models and stochastic simulation for the estimation of ground-motion characteristics in the northeastern region (NER of India. In the present study, it is assumed that the point source approximation in far field is valid. The one-dimensional stochastic point source seismological model of Boore (1983 (Boore, DM. 1983. Stochastic simulation of high frequency ground motions based on seismological models of the radiated spectra. Bulletin of Seismological Society of America, 73, 1865–1894. is used for modelling the acceleration time histories. Total ground-motion records of 30 earthquakes of magnitudes lying between MW 4.2 and 6.2 in NER India from March 2008 to April 2013 are used for this study. We considered peak ground acceleration (PGA and pseudospectral acceleration (response spectrum amplitudes with 5% damping ratio at three fundamental natural periods, namely: 0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 s. The spectral models, which work well for PGA, overestimate the pseudospectral acceleration. It seems that there is a strong influence of local site amplification and crustal attenuation (kappa, which control spectral amplitudes at different frequencies. The results would allow analysing regional peculiarities of ground-motion excitation and propagation and updating seismic hazard assessment, both the probabilistic and deterministic approaches.

  20. Correlation between centrality metrics and their application to the opinion model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, C.; Li, Q.; Van Mieghem, P.F.A.; Stanley, H.E.; Wang, H.

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, a number of centrality metrics describing network properties of nodes have been proposed to rank the importance of nodes. In order to understand the correlations between centrality metrics and to approximate a high-complexity centrality metric by a strongly correlated

  1. Modeling brittle fracture, slip weakening, and variable friction in geomaterials with an embedded strong discontinuity finite element.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regueiro, Richard A. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Borja, R. I. (Stanford University, Stanford, CA); Foster, C. D. (Stanford University, Stanford, CA)

    2006-10-01

    element using a generalized trapezoidal formulation. While the focus is on the constitutive model of interest, the framework is also developed for a general surface response. This report summarizes the major research and development accomplishments for the LDRD project titled 'Cohesive Zone Modeling of Failure in Geomaterials: Formulation and Implementation of a Strong Discontinuity Model Incorporating the Effect of Slip Speed on Frictional Resistance'. This project supported a strategic partnership between Sandia National Laboratories and Stanford University by providing funding for the lead author, Craig Foster, during his doctoral research.

  2. A network model of correlated growth of tissue stiffening in pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cláudio L. N.; Bates, Jason H. T.; Suki, Béla

    2014-06-01

    During the progression of pulmonary fibrosis, initially isolated regions of high stiffness form and grow in the lung tissue due to collagen deposition by fibroblast cells. We have previously shown that ongoing collagen deposition may not lead to significant increases in the bulk modulus of the lung until these local remodeled regions have become sufficiently numerous and extensive to percolate in a continuous path across the entire tissue (Bates et al 2007 Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 176 617). This model, however, did not include the possibility of spatially correlated deposition of collagen. In the present study, we investigate whether spatial correlations influence the bulk modulus in a two-dimensional elastic network model of lung tissue. Random collagen deposition at a single site is modeled by increasing the elastic constant of the spring at that site by a factor of 100. By contrast, correlated collagen deposition is represented by stiffening the springs encountered along a random walk starting from some initial spring, the rationale being that excess collagen deposition is more likely in the vicinity of an already stiff region. A combination of random and correlated deposition is modeled by performing random walks of length N from randomly selected initial sites, the balance between the two processes being determined by N. We found that the dependence of bulk modulus, B(N,c), on both N and the fraction of stiff springs, c, can be described by a strikingly simple set of empirical equations. For c0.8, B(N,c) is linear in c and independent of N, such that B(N,c)=100\\;{{B}_{0}}-100{{a}_{III}}(1-c){{B}_{0}}, where {{a}_{III}}=2.857. For small concentrations, the physiologically most relevant regime, the forces in the network springs are distributed according to a power law. When c = 0.3, the exponent of this power law increases from -4.5, when N = 1, and saturates to about -2, as N increases above 40. These results suggest that the spatial correlation of

  3. Null distribution of multiple correlation coefficient under mixture normal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hydar Ali

    2002-01-01

    correlation coefficient, R2, when a sample is drawn from a mixture of two multivariate Gaussian populations. The moments of 1−R2 and inverse Mellin transform have been used to derive the density of R2.

  4. Growth of solid domains in model membranes: quantitative image analysis reveals a strong correlation between domain shape and spatial position

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Ipsen, John Hjort; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2009-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of solid domains in supported bilayers composed of a binary mixture of equimolar 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) have been studied using combined fluorescence microscopy and AFM. We have found that th...

  5. The apparent diffusion coefficient is strongly correlated with extracellular volume, a measure of myocardial fibrosis, and subclinical cardiomyopathy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rui; An, Dong-Aolei; Hu, Jiani; Jiang, Meng; Guo, Qiang; Xu, Jian-Rong; Wu, Lian-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Background Extracellular volume (ECV) has been histologically validated as a non-invasive quantitative index of myocardial fibrosis that does not require the use of contrast, which is contraindicated in patients with renal insufficiency. Purpose To evaluate the correlation between the contrast-free apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and ECV, an index of fibrosis. Material and Methods Twenty-four patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), who were predominantly women (mean age = 36 ± 12 years) and 12 normal participants (mean age = 38 ± 10 years) underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) via 3.0 T MR with T1 mapping. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and late gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) imaging served as the reference standards with which CMR was compared. The mean ADC, native T1, and ECV were calculated for each patient, and the correlations among these parameters were analyzed. Results Both SLE LGE-positive (LGE+) and SLE LGE-negative (LGE-) participants had higher native T1 values, ECV, and ADC than normal controls ( P ECV (0.31 ± 0.02) and ADC (2.44 ± 0.32 × 10(-3 )mm(2)/s) than SLE LGE- participants ( p  0.05). ADC values were positively correlated with increased ECV (R(2 )= 0.62) and native T1 values (R(2 )= 0.28) in all participants. Conclusion ADC measurements are a suitable alternative to ECV that may be used to assess and quantify myocardial fibrosis in patients with SLE.

  6. Null distribution of multiple correlation coefficient under mixture normal model

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Hydar; Nagar, Daya K.

    2002-01-01

    The multiple correlation coefficient is used in a large variety of statistical tests and regression problems. In this article, we derive the null distribution of the square of the sample multiple correlation coefficient, R2, when a sample is drawn from a mixture of two multivariate Gaussian populations. The moments of 1−R2 and inverse Mellin transform have been used to derive the density of R2.

  7. <strong>Mini-project>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katajainen, Jyrki

    2008-01-01

    In this project the goal is to develop the safe * family of containers for the CPH STL. The containers to be developed should be safer and more reliable than any of the existing implementations. A special focus should be put on strong exception safety since none of the existing prototypes availab...... at the CPH STL can give this guarantee for all operations. In spite of the safety requirements, the strict running-time requirements specified in the C++ standard, and additional requirements specified in the CPH STL design documents, must be fulfilled....

  8. Bayesian model comparison for one-dimensional azimuthal correlations in 200GeV AuAu collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eggers Hans C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of data modeling and comparisons between different fit models, Bayesian analysis calls that model best which has the largest evidence, the prior-weighted integral over model parameters of the likelihood function. Evidence calculations automatically take into account both the usual chi-squared measure and an Occam factor which quantifies the price for adding extra parameters. Applying Bayesian analysis to projections onto azimuth of 2D angular correlations from 200 GeV AuAu collisions, we consider typical model choices including Fourier series and a Gaussian plus combinations of individual cosine components. We find that models including a Gaussian component are consistently preferred over pure Fourier-series parametrizations, sometimes strongly so. For 0–5% central collisions the Gaussian-plus-dipole model performs better than Fourier Series models or any other combination of Gaussian-plus-multipoles.

  9. Predicting long-term recovery of a strongly acidified stream using MAGIC and climate models (Litavka, Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. Hardekopf

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Two branches forming the headwaters of a stream in the Czech Republic were studied. Both streams have similar catchment characteristics and historical deposition; however one is rain-fed and strongly affected by acid atmospheric deposition, the other spring-fed and only moderately acidified. The MAGIC model was used to reconstruct past stream water and soil chemistry of the rain-fed branch, and predict future recovery up to 2050 under current proposed emissions levels. A future increase in air temperature calculated by a regional climate model was then used to derive climate-related scenarios to test possible factors affecting chemical recovery up to 2100. Macroinvertebrates were sampled from both branches, and differences in stream chemistry were reflected in the community structures. According to modelled forecasts, recovery of the rain-fed branch will be gradual and limited, and continued high levels of sulphate release from the soils will continue to dominate stream water chemistry, while scenarios related to a predicted increase in temperature will have little impact. The likelihood of colonization of species from the spring-fed branch was evaluated considering the predicted extent of chemical recovery. The results suggest that the possibility of colonization of species from the spring-fed branch to the rain-fed will be limited to only the acid-tolerant stonefly, caddisfly and dipteran taxa in the modelled period.

  10. Modeling Travel-Time Correlations Based on Sensitivity Kernels and Correlated Velocity Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    sensitivity of 1-Hz Pn arrivals are sensitive to the entire velocity profile between the Moho and a maximum depth that reaches 200 km for an arrival at 15...the Earth’s surface, (2) de-correlation of velocity anomalies across interfaces, such as the Moho , and (3) allowing spatial dependence of σ, λ1 and λ2...the Moho down to a depth that increases with distance, with the vertical extent of significant sensitivity (τ ≤ 0.5 s) eventually exceeding our

  11. Long-periodic strong radar echoes in the summer polar D region correlated with oscillations of high-speed solar wind streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Sook; Kirkwood, Sheila; Shepherd, Gordon G.; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kim, Kyung-Chan

    2013-08-01

    We report long-periodic oscillations of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSEs) correlated with high-speed solar wind streams (HSSs) as observed between 1 June and 8 August in the solar minimum years 2006 and 2008. PMSEs (80-90 km altitudes) were observed by 52 MHz VHF radar measurements at Esrange, Sweden (67.8°N, 20.4°E). Correlations between PMSE volume reflectivity/counts, HSSs, and AE index are primarily found at 7-day, 9-day, and 13-day periodicities as well as 9-day and 13.5-day periodicities in 2006 and 2008, respectively. The observations show that the effects of HSSs appear in PMSEs. During corotating interaction region (CIR)-induced HSSs, the long-lasting enhancement of PMSEs, geomagnetic disturbances, and D-region ionization suggests that a favorable condition in generating PMSEs can be provided by the precipitating energetic electrons (>30 keV), which are frequently multiplied in the magnetosphere during HSSs.

  12. Diffusive Mixing in Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaw, Abdourahmane; Murillo, Michael

    2016-10-01

    A multispecies hydrodynamic model based on moments of the Born-Bogolyubov-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy is developed for physical conditions relevant to astrophysical plasmas. The modified transport equations incorporate strong correlations through a density functional theory closure, while fluctuations enters through a mixture BGK operator. This model extends the usual Burgers equations for a dilute gas to strongly coupled and isothermal plasmas mixtures. The diffusive currents for these strongly coupled plasmas is self-consistently derived. The settling of impurities and its impact on cooling of white dwarfs and neutron stars can be greatly affected by strong Coulomb coupling, which we show can be quantified using the direct-correlation function. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant No. FA9550-12-1-0344).

  13. Women's Endorsement of Models of Sexual Response: Correlates and Predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowosielski, Krzysztof; Wróbel, Beata; Kowalczyk, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have investigated endorsement of female sexual response models, and no single model has been accepted as a normative description of women's sexual response. The aim of the study was to establish how women from a population-based sample endorse current theoretical models of the female sexual response--the linear models and circular model (partial and composite Basson models)--as well as predictors of endorsement. Accordingly, 174 heterosexual women aged 18-55 years were included in a cross-sectional study: 74 women diagnosed with female sexual dysfunction (FSD) based on DSM-5 criteria and 100 non-dysfunctional women. The description of sexual response models was used to divide subjects into four subgroups: linear (Masters-Johnson and Kaplan models), circular (partial Basson model), mixed (linear and circular models in similar proportions, reflective of the composite Basson model), and a different model. Women were asked to choose which of the models best described their pattern of sexual response and how frequently they engaged in each model. Results showed that 28.7% of women endorsed the linear models, 19.5% the partial Basson model, 40.8% the composite Basson model, and 10.9% a different model. Women with FSD endorsed the partial Basson model and a different model more frequently than did non-dysfunctional controls. Individuals who were dissatisfied with a partner as a lover were more likely to endorse a different model. Based on the results, we concluded that the majority of women endorsed a mixed model combining the circular response with the possibility of an innate desire triggering a linear response. Further, relationship difficulties, not FSD, predicted model endorsement.

  14. Individual differences and the characterization of animal models of psychopathology: a strong challenge and a good opportunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eArmario

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the development of valuable new techniques (i.e. genetics, neuroimage for the study of the neurobiological substrate of psychiatric diseases, there are strong limitations in the information that can be gathered from human studies. It is thus critical to develop appropriate animal models of psychiatric diseases to characterize their putative biological bases and the development of new therapeutic strategies. The present review tries to offer a general perspective and several examples of how individual differences in animals can contribute to explain differential susceptibility to develop behavioural alterations, but also emphasizes methodological problems that can lead to inappropriate or over-simplistic interpretations. A critical analysis of the approaches currently used could contribute to obtain more reliable data and allow taking full advantage of new and sophisticated technologies. The discussion is mainly focused on anxiety-like and to a lower extent on depression-like behaviour in rodents.

  15. Observations and Numerical Modelling of Strong Meteotsunami of 13 June 2013 on the East Coast of the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, I.; Sepic, J.; Rabinovich, A.; Thomson, R.

    2014-12-01

    A strong "derecho" (rapidly moving lines of convectively induced intense thunderstorms) was generated over the Midwestern United States on 12-13 June 2013 and propagated across the Appalachian Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean. Three hours after the derecho crossed the Atlantic coast, a ~2-m high meteotsunami wave was reported to have hit the New Jersey coast. Significant tsunami-like oscillations, with wave heights of ~0.6 m, were also recorded by a number of tide-gauges located along the eastern seaboard from Nova Scotia to South Carolina, at Bermuda, and by open-ocean DART 44402. These observations triggered the tsunami-alert mode of the DART station. Intense air pressure disturbances (with pressure change of 3-6 hPa in 20 min) and strong winds were observed at a number of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) stations to be propagating simultaneously with the derecho system, indicating that the pressure disturbances were the primary cause for the sea level oscillations in Chesapeake and Delaware bays. The air pressure disturbance continued to propagate seaward over the continental shelf, thereby generating long waves via Proudman resonance at those areas of the shelf where the propagation speed of the air pressure disturbance matched the long wave speed. Upon reaching the shelf break, the long-waves were partly transmitted (reaching Bermuda 5 hours later) and partly reflected (returning to the east coast of the US and Canada 3 to 6 hours later). A numerical barotropic ocean model forced with idealized air pressure and wind fields was used successfully to simulate the event. The meteotsunami arrival times and maximum wave heights obtained from the model closely match the measured values and confirm initial assumptions regarding the partitioning between transmitted and reflected meteotsunami waves.

  16. Projection of Anthropometric Correlation for Virtual Population Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, John; Waagepetersen, Rasmus Plenge; Rasmussen, Kasper Pihl

    2017-01-01

    , and therefore the correlations between parameters, are not accessible. This problem is solved by projecting correlation from a data set for which raw data are provided. The method is tested and validated by generation of pseudo females from males in the ANSUR anthropometric dataset. Results show...... that the statistical congruency of the pseudo population with an actual female population is more than 90% for more than 90% of the possible parameter pairs. The method represents a new opportunity to generate virtual populations for specific geographic regions and ethnicities based on summary data only....

  17. Bone strain magnitude is correlated with bone strain rate in tetrapods: implications for models of mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, B R; Iriarte-Diaz, J; Blob, R W; Butcher, M T; Carrano, M T; Espinoza, N R; Main, R P; Ross, C F

    2015-07-07

    Hypotheses suggest that structural integrity of vertebrate bones is maintained by controlling bone strain magnitude via adaptive modelling in response to mechanical stimuli. Increased tissue-level strain magnitude and rate have both been identified as potent stimuli leading to increased bone formation. Mechanotransduction models hypothesize that osteocytes sense bone deformation by detecting fluid flow-induced drag in the bone's lacunar-canalicular porosity. This model suggests that the osteocyte's intracellular response depends on fluid-flow rate, a product of bone strain rate and gradient, but does not provide a mechanism for detection of strain magnitude. Such a mechanism is necessary for bone modelling to adapt to loads, because strain magnitude is an important determinant of skeletal fracture. Using strain gauge data from the limb bones of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, we identified strong correlations between strain rate and magnitude across clades employing diverse locomotor styles and degrees of rhythmicity. The breadth of our sample suggests that this pattern is likely to be a common feature of tetrapod bone loading. Moreover, finding that bone strain magnitude is encoded in strain rate at the tissue level is consistent with the hypothesis that it might be encoded in fluid-flow rate at the cellular level, facilitating bone adaptation via mechanotransduction. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Separate Ways: The Mass-Metallicity Relation Does Not Strongly Correlate with Star Formation Rate in SDSS-IV MaNGA Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Sánchez, S. F.; Heckman, T.; Blanc, G. A.; The MaNGA Team

    2017-07-01

    We present the integrated stellar mass-metallicity relation (MZR) for more than 1700 galaxies included in the integral field area SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. The spatially resolved data allow us to determine the metallicity at the same physical scale (effective radius, R eff) using a heterogeneous set of 10 abundance calibrators. In addition to scale factors, the shape of the MZR is similar for all calibrators, consistent with those reported previously using single-fiber and integral field spectroscopy. We compare the residuals of this relation against the star formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR). We do not find a strong secondary relation of the MZR with either SFR or sSFR for any of the calibrators, in contrast with previous single-fiber spectroscopic studies. Our results agree with a scenario in which metal enrichment happens at local scales, with global outflows playing a secondary role in shaping the chemistry of galaxies and cold-gas inflows regulating the stellar formation.

  19. Separate Ways: The Mass–Metallicity Relation Does Not Strongly Correlate with Star Formation Rate in SDSS-IV MaNGA Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Heckman, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg Center, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sánchez, S. F. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-264, 04510 México, D.F., México (Mexico); Blanc, G. A., E-mail: jbarrer3@jhu.edu [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Collaboration: MaNGA Team

    2017-07-20

    We present the integrated stellar mass–metallicity relation (MZR) for more than 1700 galaxies included in the integral field area SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. The spatially resolved data allow us to determine the metallicity at the same physical scale (effective radius, R {sub eff}) using a heterogeneous set of 10 abundance calibrators. In addition to scale factors, the shape of the MZR is similar for all calibrators, consistent with those reported previously using single-fiber and integral field spectroscopy. We compare the residuals of this relation against the star formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR). We do not find a strong secondary relation of the MZR with either SFR or sSFR for any of the calibrators, in contrast with previous single-fiber spectroscopic studies. Our results agree with a scenario in which metal enrichment happens at local scales, with global outflows playing a secondary role in shaping the chemistry of galaxies and cold-gas inflows regulating the stellar formation.

  20. Statistical planning to address strongly correlated endpoints for inferential subgroups: An innovative approach for an illustrative clinical trial with complex multiplicity issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hengrui; Binkowitz, Bruce; Koch, Gary G

    2017-01-01

    Multiplicity is an important statistical issue that arises in clinical trials when the efficacy of the test treatment is evaluated in multiple ways. The major concern for multiplicity is that uncontrolled multiple assessments lead to inflated family-wise Type I error, and they thereby undermine the integrity of the statistical inferences. Multiplicity comes from different sources, for example, making inferences either on the overall population or some pre-specified sub-populations, while multiple endpoints need to be evaluated for each population. Therefore, a sound statistical strategy that controls the family-wise Type I error rate in a strong sense, without excessive loss of power from over-control, is crucial for the success of the trial. For a recent phase III cardiovascular trial with such complex multiplicity, we illustrate the use of a closed testing strategy that begins with a global test; and subsequent testing only proceeds when the global test is rejected. Also, we discuss a simulation study based on this trial to compare the power of the illustrated closed testing strategy to some well-known alternative approaches. We found that this strategy can comprehensively meet most of the primary objectives of the trial effectively with reasonably high overall power.

  1. Comment on ``Correlated noise in a logistic growth model''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Anita; O'Rourke, S. Francesca C.

    2008-01-01

    We argue that the results published by Ai [Phys. Rev. E 67, 022903 (2003)] on “correlated noise in logistic growth” are not correct. Their conclusion that, for larger values of the correlation parameter λ , the cell population is peaked at x=0 , which denotes a high extinction rate, is also incorrect. We find the reverse behavior to their results, that increasing λ promotes the stable growth of tumor cells. In particular, their results for the steady-state probability, as a function of cell number, at different correlation strengths, presented in Figs. 1 and 2 of their paper show different behavior than one would expect from the simple mathematical expression for the steady-state probability. Additionally, their interpretation that at small values of cell number the steady-state probability increases as the correlation parameter is increased is also questionable. Another striking feature in their Figs. 1 and 3 is that, for the same values of the parameters λ and α , their simulation produces two different curves, both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  2. Modeling Concordance Correlation Coefficient for Longitudinal Study Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Tang, Wan; Yu, Qin; Tu, X. M.

    2010-01-01

    Measures of agreement are used in a wide range of behavioral, biomedical, psychosocial, and health-care related research to assess reliability of diagnostic test, psychometric properties of instrument, fidelity of psychosocial intervention, and accuracy of proxy outcome. The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) is a popular measure of…

  3. Site-specific glycoprofiling of N-linked glycopeptides using MALDI-TOF MS: strong correlation between signal strength and glycoform quantities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Mysling, Simon; Højrup, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Site-specific glycoprofiling of N-linked glycopeptides using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an emerging technique, but its quantitative accuracy lacks documentation. Thus, a systematic study of widely different glycopeptides was perf......Site-specific glycoprofiling of N-linked glycopeptides using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an emerging technique, but its quantitative accuracy lacks documentation. Thus, a systematic study of widely different glycopeptides...... was performed to determine the relationship between the relative abundances of the individual glycoforms and the MALDI-TOF MS signal strength. Glycopeptides derived from glycoproteins containing neutral glycans (ribonuclease B, IgG, and ovalbumin) were initially profiled and yielded excellent and reproducible...... fetuin were site-specifically profiled, and good correlation between peak intensities and relative abundances was found with only a minor loss of sialic acids (r = 0.9664, n = 5). For glycopeptide purification, a range of hydrophilic and graphite materials packed in microcolumn format proved capable...

  4. Strong correlations elucidate the electronic structure and phase diagram of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniv, E; Ben Shalom, M; Ron, A; Mograbi, M; Palevski, A; Goldstein, M; Dagan, Y

    2015-09-11

    The interface between the two band insulators SrTiO3 and LaAlO3 has the unexpected properties of a two-dimensional electron gas. It is even superconducting with a transition temperature, T(c), that can be tuned using gate bias V(g), which controls the number of electrons added or removed from the interface. The gate bias-temperature (V(g), T) phase diagram is characterized by a dome-shaped region where superconductivity occurs, that is, T(c) has a non-monotonic dependence on V(g), similar to many unconventional superconductors. Here, we report, the frequency of the quantum resistance-oscillations versus inverse magnetic field for various V(g). This frequency follows the same non-monotonic behaviour as T(c); a similar trend is seen in the low field limit of the Hall coefficient. We theoretically show that electronic correlations result in a non-monotonic population of the mobile band, which can account for the experimental behaviour of the normal transport properties and the superconducting dome.

  5. Strong correlation between tax and HBZ mRNA expression in HAM/TSP patients: distinct markers for the neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Rafaela Gomes; Gonçalves, Poliane de Cássia; Ribeiro, Maisa Aparecida; Romanelli, Luiz Cláudio Ferreira; Ribas, João Gabriel; Torres, Elídio Barbosa; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Bárbara de Freitas; Barbosa-Stancioli, Edel Figueiredo; Martins, Marina Lobato

    2013-02-01

    HTLV-1 proviral load is a risk marker for HAM/TSP, but it is insufficient to determine the disease outcome. HTLV-1 Tax and HBZ proteins have been implicated in HAM/TSP pathogenesis in inducing cell proliferation and cytotoxic T lymphocytes response. To quantify the expression of tax and HBZ mRNA in asymptomatic carriers (AC) and HAM patients, and to investigate their association with HAM/TSP. We quantified the expression of HTLV-1 tax and HBZ mRNA in 37 AC and 26 HAM patients classified according to proviral load as low (AC(L) and HAM(L): 1%). The AC(L) subgroup showed the lowest frequency of individuals expressing tax mRNA in comparison with AC(H), HAM(L) and HAM(H), and tax mRNA load normalized by proviral load was significantly lower in the AC(L). In turn, normalized HBZ mRNA expression was similar in all subgroups. Both tax and HBZ mRNA expression were moderately correlated with proviral load in AC (r=0.6, pTSP, whereas HBZ mRNA appears to be a surrogate marker to disease progression, indicating that they have important but distinct roles in HAM/TSP pathogenesis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Loss of Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) is strongly associated with high-grade tumor budding and correlates with an aggressive phenotype in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) has emerged as a significant metastatic suppressor in a variety of human cancers and is known to inhibit Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling. By suppressing the activation of the NFkB/SNAIL circuit, RKIP can regulate the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The aim of this study was to evaluate RKIP expression and to determine its association with clinicopathological features, including EMT in form of tumor budding in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Methods Staining for RKIP was performed on a multipunch Tissue Microarray (TMA) of 114 well-characterized PDACs with clinico-pathological, follow-up and adjuvant therapy information. RKIP-expression was assessed separately in the main tumor body and in the tumor buds. Another 3 TMAs containing normal pancreatic tissue, precursor lesions (Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia, PanINs) and matched lymph node metastases were stained in parallel. Cut-off values were calculated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results We found a significant progressive loss of RKIP expression between normal pancreatic ductal epithelia (average: 74%), precursor lesions (PanINs; average: 37%), PDAC (average 20%) and lymph node metastases (average 8%, p tumor buds (average: 6%) compared to the main tumor body (average 20%; p tumor body was marginally associated with advanced T-stage (p = 0.0599) as well as high-grade peritumoral (p = 0.0048) and intratumoral budding (p = 0.0373). RKIP loss in the buds showed a clear association with advanced T stage (p = 0.0089). Conclusions The progressive loss of RKIP seems to play a major role in the neoplastic transformation of pancreas, correlates with aggressive features in PDAC and is associated with the presence of EMT in form of tumor budding. PMID:24330423

  7. Thermodynamic assessment of the effect of strongly swelling polymer hydrogels on the water retention capacity of model porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovnikova, N. B.; Smagin, A. V.; Sidorova, M. A.

    2014-04-01

    The effect of different rates and fractions of strongly swelling polymer hydrogel (SSPH) based on radiation-grafted polyacrylamide on the water retention capacity and structural state of model porous media in the form of quartz sand fractions with different degrees of dispersion has been studied. The water retention curve (WRC) of sandy porous media obtained by the capillarimetric method has been used as a basic thermodynamic parameter. An original method has been proposed for the comparative study of the effect of SSPHs on the WRC based on the approximation of data by the nonlinear van Genuchten function followed by differential analysis. Equations are given for the calculation of capillary water capacity and structural curves of pore size distribution. SSPH concentrations in the range 0.05-0.2% of enclosing material weight reliably increase the water retention capacity of sandy fractions and the total, capillary, and field capacities (determined by the Voronin secant method) by 2-3 times; as well as the range of available water and the contents of fine macropores and mesopores. Factors limiting the swelling of SSPHs in model porous media have been revealed.

  8. Race-ethnicity is a strong correlate of circulating fat-soluble nutrient concentrations in a representative sample of the U.S. population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Rosemary L; Sternberg, Maya R; Pfeiffer, Christine M

    2013-06-01

    Sociodemographic and lifestyle factors exert important influences on nutritional status; however, information on their association with biomarkers of fat-soluble nutrients is limited, particularly in a representative sample of adults. Serum or plasma concentrations of vitamin A, vitamin E, carotenes, xanthophylls, 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], SFAs, MUFAs, PUFAs, and total fatty acids (tFAs) were measured in adults (aged ≥ 20 y) during all or part of NHANES 2003-2006. Simple and multiple linear regression models were used to assess 5 sociodemographic variables (age, sex, race-ethnicity, education, and income) and 5 lifestyle behaviors (smoking, alcohol consumption, BMI, physical activity, and supplement use) and their relation to biomarker concentrations. Adjustment for total serum cholesterol and lipid-altering drug use was added to the full regression model. Adjustment for latitude and season was added to the full model for 25(OH)D. Based on simple linear regression, race-ethnicity, BMI, and supplement use were significantly related to all fat-soluble biomarkers. Sociodemographic variables as a group explained 5-17% of biomarker variability, whereas together, sociodemographic and lifestyle variables explained 22-23% [25(OH)D, vitamin E, xanthophylls], 17% (vitamin A), 15% (MUFAs), 10-11% (SFAs, carotenes, tFAs), and 6% (PUFAs) of biomarker variability. Although lipid adjustment explained additional variability for all biomarkers except for 25(OH)D, it appeared to be largely independent of sociodemographic and lifestyle variables. After adjusting for sociodemographic, lifestyle, and lipid-related variables, major differences in biomarkers were associated with race-ethnicity (from -44 to 57%), smoking (up to -25%), supplement use (up to 21%), and BMI (up to -15%). Latitude and season attenuated some race-ethnicity differences. Of the sociodemographic and lifestyle variables examined, with or without lipid adjustment, most fat-soluble nutrient biomarkers were

  9. Correlation between vortices and wall shear stress in a curved artery model under pulsatile flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2017-11-01

    One of the most physiologically relevant factors within the cardiovascular system is the wall shear stress. The wall shear stress affects endothelial cells via mechanotransduction and atherosclerotic regions are strongly correlated with curvature and branching in the human vasculature, where the shear stress is both oscillatory and multidirectional. Also, the combined effect of curvature and pulsatility in cardiovascular flows produces unsteady vortices. In this work, our goal is to assess the correlation between multiple vortex pairs and wall shear stress. To accomplish this, we use an in-house high-order flux reconstruction Navier-Stokes solver to simulate pulsatile flow of a Newtonian blood-analog fluid through a rigid 180° curved artery model. We use a physiologically relevant flow rate and generate results using both fully developed and uniform entrance conditions, the latter motivated by the fact that flow upstream to a curved artery may not be fully developed. Under these two inflow conditions, we characterize the evolution of various vortex pairs and their subsequent effect on several wall shear stress metrics. Supported by GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  10. Magnetic quantum correlations in the one-dimensional transverse-field X X Z model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavifar, Salimeh; Mahdavifar, Saeed; Jafari, R.

    2017-11-01

    One-dimensional spin-1/2 systems are well-known candidates to study the quantum correlations between particles. In condensed matter physics, studies often are restricted to first-neighbor particles. In this work, we consider the one-dimensional X X Z model in a transverse magnetic field (TF) which is not integrable except at specific points. Analytical expressions for quantum correlations (entanglement and quantum discord) between spin pairs at any distance are obtained for both zero and finite temperature by using the analytical approach proposed by Caux et al. [Phys. Rev. B 68, 134431 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevB.68.134431]. We compare the efficiency of the quantum discord (QD) with respect to the entanglement in the detection of critical points as the neighboring spin pairs go farther than the next-nearest neighbors. In the absence of the TF and at zero temperature, we show that the QD for spin pairs farther than the second neighbors is able to capture the critical points while the pairwise entanglement is absent. In contrast with the pairwise entanglement, two-site QD is effectively long range in the critical regimes where it decays algebraically with the distance between pairs. We also show that the thermal QD between neighbor spins possesses strong distinctive behavior at the critical point that can be seen at finite temperature and, therefore, spotlights the critical point while the entanglement fails in this task.

  11. A unifying framework for marginalized random intercept models of correlated binary outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swihart, Bruce J.; Caffo, Brian S.; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that many current approaches for marginal modeling of correlated binary outcomes produce likelihoods that are equivalent to the copula-based models herein. These general copula models of underlying latent threshold random variables yield likelihood-based models for marginal fixed effects estimation and interpretation in the analysis of correlated binary data with exchangeable correlation structures. Moreover, we propose a nomenclature and set of model relationships that substantially elucidates the complex area of marginalized random intercept models for binary data. A diverse collection of didactic mathematical and numerical examples are given to illustrate concepts. PMID:25342871

  12. A unifying framework for marginalized random intercept models of correlated binary outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swihart, Bruce J; Caffo, Brian S; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate that many current approaches for marginal modeling of correlated binary outcomes produce likelihoods that are equivalent to the copula-based models herein. These general copula models of underlying latent threshold random variables yield likelihood-based models for marginal fixed effects estimation and interpretation in the analysis of correlated binary data with exchangeable correlation structures. Moreover, we propose a nomenclature and set of model relationships that substantially elucidates the complex area of marginalized random intercept models for binary data. A diverse collection of didactic mathematical and numerical examples are given to illustrate concepts.

  13. The neural correlates of problem states: testing FMRI predictions of a computational model of multitasking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelmer P Borst

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been shown that people can only maintain one problem state, or intermediate mental representation, at a time. When more than one problem state is required, for example in multitasking, performance decreases considerably. This effect has been explained in terms of a problem state bottleneck. METHODOLOGY: In the current study we use the complimentary methodologies of computational cognitive modeling and neuroimaging to investigate the neural correlates of this problem state bottleneck. In particular, an existing computational cognitive model was used to generate a priori fMRI predictions for a multitasking experiment in which the problem state bottleneck plays a major role. Hemodynamic responses were predicted for five brain regions, corresponding to five cognitive resources in the model. Most importantly, we predicted the intraparietal sulcus to show a strong effect of the problem state manipulations. CONCLUSIONS: Some of the predictions were confirmed by a subsequent fMRI experiment, while others were not matched by the data. The experiment supported the hypothesis that the problem state bottleneck is a plausible cause of the interference in the experiment and that it could be located in the intraparietal sulcus.

  14. Differentiating Interpersonal Correlates of Depressive Symptoms and Social Anxiety in Adolescence: Implications for Models of Comorbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Lisa R.; Davila, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Research on psychosocial correlates of depression and social anxiety often has not accounted for their comorbidity. Differentiating correlates of depression and social anxiety may inform the development of comorbidity models. Building on research linking both disorders to interpersonal dysfunction, this study examined interpersonal correlates of…

  15. Strong Anticipation: Complexity Matching in Interpersonal Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delignières Didier

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anticipation in sensori-motor synchronization tasks is often attributed to the presence of internal model based on situation regularities. However this interpretation seems unable to explain the synchronization of an organism with a complex environment. Instead the notion of “strong anticipation” provides a new point of view about synchronization between complex systems. It implies a global coordination on non-local time scales between an organism and its environment. The matching between the long-range correlations of the organism and the long-range correlations of the environment could attest for the presence of such a strong anticipatory process. We propose here to test the presence of strong anticipation in interpersonal coordination task. Results show a close matching of fractal exponents of participants within a dyad. Moreover this matching cannot be attributed to only short-term adaptations as revealed by the low percentage of local cross-correlations.

  16. Electron correlations observed through intensity interferometry: study of model initial state wave functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feuerstein, B.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany); Schulz, M

    2001-07-01

    Recently, a new method of analysing electron correlations based on intensity interferometry has been applied to double ionization of He and Ne by fast ion impact [1]. The data reveal sensitively correlation effects while they appear to be very insensitive to the collision dynamics. In order to analyse the role of the initial state electron correlation a statistically defined correlation function based on intensity interferometry was calculated for the ground state of He. In a comparative study of model wave functions we demonstrate that correlation can be considered from a statistical point of view which offers a new tool to study correlation effects in many-particle systems. (orig.)

  17. Electron Correlations Observed Through Intensity Interferometry: Study of Model Initial State Wave Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, B.; Schulz, M.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    Recently, a new method of analysing electron correlations based on intensity interferometry has been applied to double ionization of He and Ne by fast ion impact [1]. The data reveal sensitively correlation effects while they appear to be very insensitive to the collision dynamics. In order to analyse the role of the initial state electron correlation a statistically defined correlation function based on intensity interferometry was calculated for the ground state of He. In a comparative study of model wave functions we demonstrate that correlation can be considered from a statistical point of view which offers a new tool to study correlation effects in many-particle systems.

  18. Connecting single-stock assessment models through correlated survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Christoffer Moesgaard; Nielsen, Anders; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro

    2017-01-01

    Fisheries management is mainly conducted via single-stock assessment models assuming that fish stocks do not interact, except through assumed natural mortalities. Currently, the main alternative is complex ecosystem models which require extensive data, are difficult to calibrate, and have long ru...

  19. Application of Multilevel Logistic Model to Identify Correlates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Implementation of multilevel model is becoming a common analytic technique over a wide range of disciplines including social and economic sciences. In this paper, an attempt has been made to assess the application of multilevel logistic model for the purpose of identifying the effect of household characteristics on poverty ...

  20. High-field magnetostriction in CeNiSn{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} (0<=x<=1) strongly correlated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moral, A. del, E-mail: delmoral@unizar.e [Laboratorio de Magnetismo de Solidos, Departamento de Fisica de Materia Condensada and ICMA, Universidad de Zaragoza and CSIC, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Fuente, C. de la [Laboratorio de Magnetismo de Solidos, Departamento de Fisica de Materia Condensada and ICMA, Universidad de Zaragoza and CSIC, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Magnetization (down to 1.8 K and up to 9 T) and magnetostriction (down to 4.2 K and up to 30 T) measurements have been performed in the series of polycrystalline intermetallics CeNiSn{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} (0<=x<=1), which show a crossover from Kondo-lattice to fluctuating valence behaviors with x increase. Magnetostriction observed can be denominated as 'colossal' for a paramagnet (up to 0.68% at 150 K and 30 T), with no sign of saturation. Field, H, induced metamagnetic transitions associated to a change in Ce valence are observed. Three kinds of analysis of magnetostriction have been performed to ascertain the magnetostriction origin. At relatively low field and low temperatures these systems follow well the standard theory of magnetostriction (STM), revealing single-ion crystal field and exchange origins, and a determination of the alpha-symmetry microscopic magnetoelastic parameters have been performed. The valence transition is well explained in terms of the interconfigurational model, which needs an extension up to power H{sup 4}. Application of the scaling (thermodynamics corresponding low states) allows the obtainment of the Grueneisen constant, which increases with x. Needed elastic constants measurements are also reported.

  1. Strongly correlated material under voltage: The electrical breakdown in V{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the insulator to metal transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenon, Stefan; Wang, Siming; Ramirez, Juan Gabriel; Schuller, Ivan K. [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California, San Diego (United States); Scharinger, Sebastian; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold [Physikalisches Institut and Center for Collective Quantum Phenomena and their Applications in LISAplus, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We have investigated the electrical properties of a V{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film micro bridge. Discontinuous jumps to lower voltages in the current voltage characteristic (IV) followed by an approximately constant voltage progression for high currents indicate an electrical breakdown of the device. In addition, the IV curves show hysteresis and a training effect, i.e. the subsequent IV loops are different from the first IV loop after thermal cycling. Low temperature scanning electron microscopy (LTSEM) reveals that the electrical breakdown over the whole device is caused by the formation of electro-thermal domains (ETDs), i.e. the current and temperature redistribution. On the contrary, at the nanoscale, the electrical breakdown causes the insulator to metal transition of individual domains. In a numerical model we considered these domains as a network of resistors and we were able to reproduce the electro-thermal breakdown as well as the hysteresis and the training effect in the IVs.

  2. Total and free testosterone concentrations are strongly influenced by age and central obesity in men with type 1 and type 2 diabetes but correlate weakly with symptoms of androgen deficiency and diabetes-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Mousumi; Hampton, David; Newcombe, Robert G; Rees, D Aled

    2012-05-01

    Testosterone levels are commonly lowered in men with diabetes, but it is unclear how these relate to symptoms of hypogonadism and quality of life. We sought to investigate the relationship between testosterone levels, symptoms of androgen deficiency, erectile function and quality of life in men with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Cross-sectional study of 115 men with type 2 diabetes, 93 men with type 1 diabetes and 121 healthy controls. Total, bioavailable and free testosterone levels were measured or calculated by Vermuelen's formula. Quality of life and symptom scores were assessed by the Audit of Diabetes Dependent Quality of Life (ADDQoL), androgen deficiency in the aging male (ADAM) and International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaires. Forty-five and sixty-one per cent of men with type 2 diabetes had low total and calculated free testosterone (CFT) levels, respectively. Total testosterone (TT) levels were not lowered in men with type 1 diabetes, but 32% had low CFT. After adjustment for age and waist circumference, only CFT in men with type 2 diabetes (-0·037 nm, 95% CI -0·075 to -0·0003, P = 0.048) remained lowered compared with controls. CFT correlated weakly with ADAM (r = -0·26, 95% CI -0.42 to -0·08, P = 0·006), IIEF (r = 0.19, 95% CI 0.01-0.37, P = 0.042) and ADDQoL (r = 0.21, 95% CI 0·03 to 0·38, P = 0·022) scores in men with type 2, but not type 1 diabetes. Age exerted the predominant effect on erectile function in both groups, in a model incorporating age, testosterone level and complications. Testosterone levels are strongly affected by age and central obesity in men with type 1 and type 2 diabetes but correlate weakly with symptoms of androgen deficiency and erectile function. Testosterone levels do not appear to be a major determinant of quality of life in patients with diabetes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Site-resolved measurement of the spin-correlation function in the Fermi-Hubbard model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Maxwell F; Mazurenko, Anton; Chiu, Christie S; Ji, Geoffrey; Greif, Daniel; Greiner, Markus

    2016-09-16

    Exotic phases of matter can emerge from strong correlations in quantum many-body systems. Quantum gas microscopy affords the opportunity to study these correlations with unprecedented detail. Here, we report site-resolved observations of antiferromagnetic correlations in a two-dimensional, Hubbard-regime optical lattice and demonstrate the ability to measure the spin-correlation function over any distance. We measure the in situ distributions of the particle density and magnetic correlations, extract thermodynamic quantities from comparisons to theory, and observe statistically significant correlations over three lattice sites. The temperatures that we reach approach the limits of available numerical simulations. The direct access to many-body physics at the single-particle level demonstrated by our results will further our understanding of how the interplay of motion and magnetism gives rise to new states of matter. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Wavy liquid films in interaction with a strongly confined laminar gas flow: Modeling and direct numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Georg F.; Ruyer-Quil, Christian

    2013-11-01

    Different technological settings concern the flow of a wavy liquid film in contact with a strongly confined gas flow. Micro-gaps for instance, which are employed for the cooling of electronic equipment, involve a pressure-driven evaporating liquid film flowing co-currently to its own vapor. In packed columns used for distillation, falling liquid films sheared by a counter-current gas flow occur within narrow channels. Surface waves on the liquid-gas interface of these flows play an important role as they intensify scalar transfer and may cause flooding of the channel. However, their accurate prediction by full numerical simulation is associated with a substantial computational cost. We evaluate an alternative approach based on a low-dimensional integral boundary layer formulation applied to both fluid layers. The resulting model captures the long-wave (Yih and Kapitza) instabilities of the flow accurately and allows calculations on long domains at low computational cost. These evince a number of intricate wave-induced flow structures within the film and gas as well as a possible route to the flooding of narrow channels under counter-current gas flow conditions. Comparisons with direct numerical simulations using the VOF-CSF approach as well as experiments are convincing. GFD acknowledges support from DAAD (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst).

  5. Novel nano-sized MR contrast agent mediates strong tumor contrast enhancement in an oncogene-driven breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per-Olof Eriksson

    Full Text Available The current study was carried out to test the potential of a new nanomaterial (Spago Pix as a macromolecular magnetic MR contrast agent for tumor detection and to verify the presence of nanomaterial in tumor tissue. Spago Pix, synthesized by Spago Nanomedical AB, is a nanomaterial with a globular shape, an average hydrodynamic diameter of 5 nm, and a relaxivity (r1 of approximately 30 (mM Mn-1 s-1 (60 MHz. The material consists of an organophosphosilane hydrogel with strongly chelated manganese (II ions and a covalently attached PEG surface layer. In vivo MRI of the MMTV-PyMT breast cancer model was performed on a 3 T clinical scanner. Tissues were thereafter analyzed for manganese and silicon content using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES. The presence of nanomaterial in tumor and muscle tissue was assessed using an anti-PEG monoclonal antibody. MR imaging of tumor-bearing mice (n = 7 showed a contrast enhancement factor of 1.8 (tumor versus muscle at 30 minutes post-administration. Contrast was retained and further increased 2-4 hours after administration. ICP-AES and immunohistochemistry confirmed selective accumulation of nanomaterial in tumor tissue. A blood pharmacokinetics analysis showed that the concentration of Spago Pix gradually decreased over the first hour, which was in good agreement with the time frame in which the accumulation in tumor occurred. In summary, we demonstrate that Spago Pix selectively enhances MR tumor contrast in a clinically relevant animal model. Based on the generally higher vascular leakiness in malignant compared to benign tissue lesions, Spago Pix has the potential to significantly improve cancer diagnosis and characterization by MRI.

  6. FTS high resolution spectra of 16O3 in 3500 and 5500 cm-1 regions. First example of new theoretical modelling for a polyad of strongly coupled states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbe, A.; De Backer, M.-R.; Starikova, E.; Tashkun, S. A.; Thomas, X.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.

    2012-07-01

    The infrared spectrum of 16O3 has been revisited in the ranges 3300-3600 cm-1 and 5200-5600 cm-1, recorded by the Fourier Transform Spectrometer of Reims, with an improved signal/noise ratio. In the lower spectral range the weak 2ν1+2ν2 band is observed and assigned for the first time. This allowed for completing the triad of strongly interacting (220), (121), and (022) states. The resonance interaction parameters for this triad were derived from the molecular potential energy surface using high-order Contact Transformation method. This involves Darling-Dennison resonances between (220) and (022) vibration A-states, and Coriolis resonances between (121) B-state and A-states. Altogether 18 coupling parameters were fixed to these theoretically predicted values that allowed avoiding problems of ambiguities while fitting strongly correlated parameters. The remaining small perturbations of a few Ka=5 transitions of the ν1+2ν2+ν3 band were explained by accidental Coriolis resonance of (121) with the (050) dark state. This mixed half theoretical/half empirical model (with 39 fitted and 77 theoretically constrained parameters) developed in this work for the first time allows an excellent description of 1897 line positions with the rms deviation ∼0.001 cm-1 closed to the experimental precision. The intensities of two new hot bands ν2+4ν3-ν3 and ν1+ν2+3ν3-ν1 that fall in this range were also observed and modelled, thanks to a better signal to noise ratio. In addition, the 5200-5600 cm-1 region has also been revisited, showing for the first time the (321) state which was considered as “dark” one in the previous analysis. Effective Hamiltonian parameters were derived for strongly coupled (213)/(114)/(321) upper states including (080) as a dark one. The transition moment parameters of all newly observed and assigned bands were derived resulting to average rms deviation for intensities of ∼8% and 13% for the cold and the hot bands, respectively, in the lower

  7. On cross-currency models with stochastic volatility and correlated interest rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grzelak, L.A.; Oosterlee, C.W.

    2010-01-01

    We construct multi-currency models with stochastic volatility and correlated stochastic interest rates with a full matrix of correlations. We first deal with a foreign exchange (FX) model of Heston-type, in which the domestic and foreign interest rates are generated by the short-rate process of

  8. A Digital Simulation of Psychological Correlates of a Model of the Human Visual System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    model’s ability to exhibit Gestalt grouping principles and visual illusions. Psychological correlates were obtained by comparing human visual performance...to the computer model’s performance; the correlation factors were high. Patterns containing Gestalt grouping principles and various visual illusions

  9. Correlation between clinical and histological features in a pig model of choroidal neovascularization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassota, Nathan; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Prause, Jan Ulrik

    2006-01-01

    To analyse the histological changes in the retina and the choroid in a pig model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and to correlate these findings with fundus photographic and fluorescein angiographic features.......To analyse the histological changes in the retina and the choroid in a pig model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and to correlate these findings with fundus photographic and fluorescein angiographic features....

  10. Multivariate Receptor Models for Spatially Correlated Multipollutant Data

    KAUST Repository

    Jun, Mikyoung

    2013-08-01

    The goal of multivariate receptor modeling is to estimate the profiles of major pollution sources and quantify their impacts based on ambient measurements of pollutants. Traditionally, multivariate receptor modeling has been applied to multiple air pollutant data measured at a single monitoring site or measurements of a single pollutant collected at multiple monitoring sites. Despite the growing availability of multipollutant data collected from multiple monitoring sites, there has not yet been any attempt to incorporate spatial dependence that may exist in such data into multivariate receptor modeling. We propose a spatial statistics extension of multivariate receptor models that enables us to incorporate spatial dependence into estimation of source composition profiles and contributions given the prespecified number of sources and the model identification conditions. The proposed method yields more precise estimates of source profiles by accounting for spatial dependence in the estimation. More importantly, it enables predictions of source contributions at unmonitored sites as well as when there are missing values at monitoring sites. The method is illustrated with simulated data and real multipollutant data collected from eight monitoring sites in Harris County, Texas. Supplementary materials for this article, including data and R code for implementing the methods, are available online on the journal web site. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  11. Robustness to misspecifications of correlation models. Technical report No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheshinski, R.

    1976-07-22

    Optimal linear interpolation between discrete observations in R/sup 2/ depends on the random function model assumed to generate the two-dimensional field. Sensitivity of the optimal solution to errors in specification of the model are studied. An illustration using second-order stationary models with a misspecified autocorrelation function is examined in detail. We also explore, by examples, the sensitivity procedure when more distant data points are omitted from the calculations. We have found that the optimal linear estimator is grossly insensitive to misspecifications of the autocorrelation function. However, if the misspecified autocorrelation function is used in the calculation of the squared interpolation error--then such error calculations may be grossly misleading.

  12. Correlation lengths in hydrodynamic models of active nematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Ewan J; Mishra, Prashant; Marchetti, M Cristina; Fielding, Suzanne M

    2016-09-28

    We examine the scaling with activity of the emergent length scales that control the nonequilibrium dynamics of an active nematic liquid crystal, using two popular hydrodynamic models that have been employed in previous studies. In both models we find that the chaotic spatio-temporal dynamics in the regime of fully developed active turbulence is controlled by a single active scale determined by the balance of active and elastic stresses, regardless of whether the active stress is extensile or contractile in nature. The observed scaling of the kinetic energy and enstrophy with activity is consistent with our single-length scale argument and simple dimensional analysis. Our results provide a unified understanding of apparent discrepancies in the previous literature and demonstrate that the essential physics is robust to the choice of model.

  13. Real-Time Corrected Traffic Correlation Model for Traffic Flow Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-pu Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the problems of short-term traffic flow forecasting. The main goal is to put forward traffic correlation model and real-time correction algorithm for traffic flow forecasting. Traffic correlation model is established based on the temporal-spatial-historical correlation characteristic of traffic big data. In order to simplify the traffic correlation model, this paper presents correction coefficients optimization algorithm. Considering multistate characteristic of traffic big data, a dynamic part is added to traffic correlation model. Real-time correction algorithm based on Fuzzy Neural Network is presented to overcome the nonlinear mapping problems. A case study based on a real-world road network in Beijing, China, is implemented to test the efficiency and applicability of the proposed modeling methods.

  14. Additive N-step Markov chains as prototype model of symbolic stochastic dynamical systems with long-range correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayzelis, Z.A. [Department of Physics, Kharkov National University, 4 Svoboda Sq., Kharkov 61077 (Ukraine); Apostolov, S.S. [Department of Physics, Kharkov National University, 4 Svoboda Sq., Kharkov 61077 (Ukraine); Melnyk, S.S. [A. Ya. Usikov Institute for Radiophysics and Electronics, Ukrainian Academy of Science, 12 Proskura Street, 61085 Kharkov (Ukraine); Usatenko, O.V. [A. Ya. Usikov Institute for Radiophysics and Electronics, Ukrainian Academy of Science, 12 Proskura Street, 61085 Kharkov (Ukraine)]. E-mail: usatenko@ire.kharkov.ua; Yampol' skii, V.A. [A. Ya. Usikov Institute for Radiophysics and Electronics, Ukrainian Academy of Science, 12 Proskura Street, 61085 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2007-10-15

    A theory of symbolic dynamic systems with long-range correlations based on the consideration of the binary N-step Markov chains developed earlier in Phys Rev Lett 2003;90:110601 is generalized to the biased case (non-equal numbers of zeros and unities in the chain). In the model, the conditional probability that the ith symbol in the chain equals zero (or unity) is a linear function of the number of unities (zeros) among the preceding N symbols. The correlation and distribution functions as well as the variance of number of symbols in the words of arbitrary length L are obtained analytically and verified by numerical simulations. A self-similarity of the studied stochastic process is revealed and the similarity group transformation of the chain parameters is presented. The diffusion Fokker-Planck equation governing the distribution function of the L-words is explored. If the persistent correlations are not extremely strong, the distribution function is shown to be the Gaussian with the variance being nonlinearly dependent on L. An equation connecting the memory and correlation function of the additive Markov chain is presented. This equation allows reconstructing a memory function using a correlation function of the system. Effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method is demonstrated by simple model examples. Memory functions of concrete coarse-grained literary texts are found and their universal power-law behavior at long distances is revealed.

  15. Performances of estimators of linear model with auto-correlated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Monte Carlo Study of the small sampling properties of five estimators of a linear model with Autocorrelated error terms is discussed. The independent variable was specified as standard normal data. The estimators of the slop coefficients β with the help of Ordinary Least Squares (OLS), increased with increased ...

  16. Multidimensional Model of Trauma and Correlated Antisocial Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Willem H. J.

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have revealed an important relationship between psychosocial trauma and antisocial personality disorder. A multidimensional model is presented which describes the psychopathological route from trauma to antisocial development. A case report is also included that can illustrate the etiological process from trauma to severe antisocial…

  17. Performances of estimators of linear auto-correlated error model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The performances of five estimators of linear models with autocorrelated disturbance terms are compared when the independent variable is exponential. The results reveal that for both small and large samples, the Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) compares favourably with the Generalized least Squares (GLS) estimators in ...

  18. Correlation function of four spins in the percolation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir S. Dotsenko

    2016-10-01

    It is known that the four-point functions define the actual fusion rules of a particular model. In this respect, we find that fusion of two spins, of dimension Δσ=596, produce a new channel, in the 4-point function, which is due to the operator with dimension Δ=5/8.

  19. Extremely correlated Fermi liquid theory of the t-J model in 2 dimensions: low energy properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, B. Sriram; Mai, Peizhi

    2018-01-01

    Low energy properties of the metallic state of the two-dimensional t-J model are presented for second neighbor hopping with hole-doping (t\\prime ≤slant 0) and electron-doping (t\\prime > 0), with various superexchange energy J. We use a closed set of equations for the Greens functions obtained from the extremely correlated Fermi liquid theory. These equations reproduce the known low energies features of the large U Hubbard model in infinite dimensions. The density and temperature dependent quasiparticle weight, decay rate and the peak spectral heights over the Brillouin zone are calculated. We also calculate the resistivity, Hall conductivity, Hall number and cotangent Hall angle. The spectral features display high thermal sensitivity at modest T for density n≳ 0.8, implying a suppression of the effective Fermi-liquid temperature by two orders of magnitude relative to the bare bandwidth. The cotangent Hall angle exhibits a T 2 behavior at low T, followed by an interesting kink at higher T. The Hall number exhibits strong renormalization due to correlations. Flipping the sign of t\\prime changes the curvature of the resistivity versus T curves between convex and concave. Our results provide a natural route for understanding the observed difference in the temperature dependent resistivity of strongly correlated electron-doped and hole-doped matter.

  20. Correlational Analysis Between Social Business Model and Women Entrepreneurs Empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Martadha Mohamed

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In most developed countries, social entrepreneurship has strived to become an effective mechanism in inculcating skills ofentrepreneurship, especially among women. In these countries, social entrepreneurship has become the main policy used as part of the poverty eradication strategies. Based on this foundation, this paper work is formed with the aim to study the effect of the micro-credit financing of the AIM in creating a strong line of women-entrepreneurs. In particular, it seeks to(1 explore the current social entrepreneurship modelwhich usesAIM’s micro-credit financing scheme, (2 evaluate the effectiveness of the AIM micro-credit financing schemetowards women-entrepreneurs; and (3 manalyse the challenges and obstacles that are often faced by women entrepreneurs in relation to the current AIM micro-credit financing scheme. The study methodology involves the distribution of surveys to 1500 members of theAIM micro-credit financing schemethroughout Malaysia. As many as 1101 respondents had returned the survey forms, making the return rate 73%. The study findings were analysed using the descriptive statistics involving frequency, percentage and mean. The findings have shown that (1 AIM micro-credit financing schemehas successfully generated many womenentrepreneursespecially in rural areas; (2 the existing government policies are deemed sufficient in terms of preparing financing opportunities to these entrepreneurs; and (3 among the main issues faced by women-entrepreneurs lie in the repayment method, insufficient capital, lack of relevant trainingentrepreneurto increase skills and the lack of mentor system. The outcome of this study is anticipated to be able to improve the policy of entrepreneur development, especially increasing the number of women inthe field ofentrepreneurship. Apart from that, there are several criticial issues that need to be addressed by the government such as the need to coordinate institutions that offer micro