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Sample records for strong organizational culture

  1. Organizational culture

    OpenAIRE

    Schein, Edgar H.

    1988-01-01

    Cultural orientations of an organization can be its greatest strength, providing the basis for problem solving, cooperation, and communication. Culture, however, can also inhibit needed changes. Cultural changes typically happen slowly – but without cultural change, many other organizational changes are doomed to fail. The dominant culture of an organization is a major contributor to its success. But, of course, no organizational culture is purely one type or another. And the existence of sec...

  2. Organizational culture modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina Mihaela GHINEA; Constantin BRĂTIANU

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual analysis of organizational culture modeling in the framework of system dynamics. Tom Peters and Robert Waterman demonstrated through their seminal research that organizational culture constitutes one of the most important key success factors in any company trying to achieve excellence in its business. Organizational culture is a strong nonlinear integrator of the organizational intellectual capital acting especially on the emotional knowled...

  3. ASPECTS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cebuc Georgiana

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last twenty years world-wide companies tried to adapt their organizational culture to the external environment and to the new challenges. Recent crises put to the test organizational culture, in the sense that only companies with a strong and versa

  4. Linking transformational leadership and organizational culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, D.N.; van Meijen, J.J.; Koopman, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    Many authors assume a strong relationship between culture and leadership in organizations. Leaders create, transform and manage organizational cultures. Although this linkage between organizational culture and leadership is often referred to, hypotheses and propositions are often not specific and

  5. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND MANAGEMENT CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Tudor Hobeanu; Loredana Vacarescu Hobeanu

    2010-01-01

    Communication reveals the importance of organizational culture and management culture supported by the remarkable results in economic and social level of organization. Their functions are presented and specific ways of expression levels of organizational culture and ways of adapting to the requirements of the organization's management culture.

  6. Leadership and Organizational Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋丽娜

    2015-01-01

    This essay attempts to explore the relationship between leaders, organizational culture, and national culture. Leaders cre⁃ate“climate of the organization”with six mechanisms. Furthermore, leaders style of management is considerably influenced by their national culture based on Hofstede’s organizational culture theory. Varieties of examples and cases are analyzed to illustrate that leadership beliefs and practices have direct relationship with organizational culture and shape their individualistic communica⁃tion styles and goals that influence to a significant degree in establishing shared values, beliefs and practices among employees within an organization.

  7. Organizational culture and organizational commitment: Serbian case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić Siniša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the impact of certain dimensions of organizational culture (Future Orientation, Power Distance, Human Orientation and Performance Orientation on organizational commitment in companies in Serbia. Through a survey, responses were obtained from a total of N = 400 middle managers from 129 companies. The results show a statistically significant correlation between the observed dimensions of organizational culture and organizational commitment dimensions. Also, there is a statistically significant predictive effect of certain dimensions of organizational culture on the dimensions of organizational commitment. The biggest influences on the dimensions of organizational commitment have dimensions Future Orientation - FO and Performance Orientation - PO. On the other hand, under the most affected dimension of organizational culture is the dimension of organizational commitment Organizational identification - OCM1.

  8. Organizational climate and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Benjamin; Ehrhart, Mark G; Macey, William H

    2013-01-01

    Organizational climate and organizational culture theory and research are reviewed. The article is first framed with definitions of the constructs, and preliminary thoughts on their interrelationships are noted. Organizational climate is briefly defined as the meanings people attach to interrelated bundles of experiences they have at work. Organizational culture is briefly defined as the basic assumptions about the world and the values that guide life in organizations. A brief history of climate research is presented, followed by the major accomplishments in research on the topic with regard to levels issues, the foci of climate research, and studies of climate strength. A brief overview of the more recent study of organizational culture is then introduced, followed by samples of important thinking and research on the roles of leadership and national culture in understanding organizational culture and performance and culture as a moderator variable in research in organizational behavior. The final section of the article proposes an integration of climate and culture thinking and research and concludes with practical implications for the management of effective contemporary organizations. Throughout, recommendations are made for additional thinking and research.

  9. Organizational culture, Anthropology of

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause-Jensen, Jakob; Wright, Susan

    2015-01-01

    cultures’ into transnational corporations and organizations concerned with international governance. In such organizations, anthropology graduates are increasingly employed as ‘cultural experts.’ We track the anthropological research on organizational culture and argue that the sensibilities and analytical...... skills acquired and the concepts developed through the ethnographic encounter gives anthropology a unique voice in the study of cultural matters in organizations....

  10. Organizational culture in Qazvin hospitals (2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AM. Mosadeghrad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Organizational culture influences employees’ job satisfaction, commitment and performance. A strong corporate culture enhances organizational performance. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the type of organizational culture in Qazvin hospitals. Methods: A descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted by a survey questionnaire in Qazvin (2013 that was distributed among 800 hospital employees and managers based on stratified random sampling. Findings: The mean of hospitals’ organizational culture was 2.95 out of 5 score. Hospitals' organizational cultures were evaluated as strong in attention to details and stability dimensions and moderate in creativity, risk taking, team working and power distance dimensions. Attention to details in public hospitals was higher than private and social security hospitals. Conclusion: Organizational culture of Qazvin hospitals was evaluated as moderate. Managers for improving hospitals' performance and enhancing employees' and patients' satisfaction should create a culture of higher creativity, innovation, team working and risk taking and lower power distance.

  11. Creating organizational cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouton, Nicolaas T.O.; Just, Sine Nørholm; Gabrielsen, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to re-conceptualize the relations between rhetorical strategies and material practices in the processes whereby leaders create or change organizational cultures. Design/methodology/approach – The authors compare and contrast two broad perspectives on cultural...... insights. The authors propose an integrated perspective in which material practices and rhetorical strategies are seen as two analytical sides of the same ontological coin. This enables a fuller and more detailed explanation of how organizational cultures are created or changed. A brief illustration...

  12. Organizational Culture and Industrialization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Simon Ulrik

    Drawing on a revised version ofHofstede's theory ofindustrialization and cultural change contained in his explanation of individualism and collectivism, the paper proposes that countries which are in the earlier stages of industrialization have a common culture that governs organizational...

  13. Growing Organizational Culture: The Power of Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Organizational culture is the personality of the organization: the beliefs, values, and behavioral norms of an organization. People come and go and a strong organizational culture guides their thinking and behavior while they are there. Good centers, like all good organizations, have cultures that shape how its members think, feel, and behave.…

  14. Organizational culture in ICT companies

    OpenAIRE

    Pilík, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with problematic of organizational culture with emphasis on organizational culture in ICT companies. Main goal of this thesis is to develop own framework for influencing organizational culture in ICT companies. The introductory part sums up an overview of definitions of culture and organizational culture in chronological order. Evaluation of definitions from the author's perspective is also part of the opening chapter. The main part of thesis focuses on proposing framework f...

  15. Organizational Culture and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Catherine A.

    2003-01-01

    '..only a fool perseveres in error.' Cicero. Humans will break the most advanced technological devices and override safety and security systems if they are given the latitude. Within the workplace, the operator may be just one of several factors in causing accidents or making risky decisions. Other variables considered for their involvement in the negative and often catastrophic outcomes include the organizational context and culture. Many organizations have constructed and implemented safety programs to be assimilated into their culture to assure employee commitment and understanding of the importance of everyday safety. The purpose of this paper is to examine literature on organizational safety cultures and programs that attempt to combat vulnerability, risk taking behavior and decisions and identify the role of training in attempting to mitigate unsafe acts.

  16. A STUDY ON ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    S. Valentine Usha Kalaichelvi; Dr. Auxilia Antony; Dr. A. Nelson Vimalanathan

    2017-01-01

    Organizational Culture is defined as the values and behaviors that contribute to the unique social and psychological environment of the organization. Organizational culture includes an organizations expectations, experiences, philosophy and values that hold it together and is expressed in its self-image, inner workings, interactions with the outside world and future expectations. This article is going to study about the organizational culture.

  17. Defining and assessing organizational culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellot, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Using theories from several disciplines, the concept of organizational culture remains controversial. Conflicting definitions, lack of semantic clarity, and debate over the most appropriate methods for assessing organizational culture have led to disagreement over the value and validity of such inquiry. This paper reviews development of the concept of organizational culture and methods for assessing organizational culture, focusing on the healthcare environment. Most work on organizational culture concerns the traditional corporation. Therefore, some adaptation to the central goals and focus of a human services organization are necessary before application to healthcare settings. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Building an ethical organizational culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, William A; Taylor, Emily; Walsh, Thom

    2014-01-01

    The success of a health care institution-as defined by delivering high-quality, high-value care, positive patient outcomes, and financial solvency-is inextricably tied to the culture within that organization. The ability to achieve and sustain alignment between its mission, values, and everyday practices defines a positive organizational culture. An institution that has a diminished organizational culture, reflected in the failure to consistently align management and clinical decisions and practices with its mission and values, will struggle. The presence of misalignment or of ethics gaps affects the quality of care being delivered, the morale of the staff, and the organization's image in the community. Transforming an organizational culture will provide a foundation for success and a framework for daily ethics-grounded operations in any organization. However, building an ethics-grounded organization is a challenging process requiring strong organization leadership and planning. Using a case study, the authors provide a multiyear, continuous step-by-step strategy consisting of identifying ethics culture gaps, establishing an ethics taskforce, clarifying and prioritizing the problems, developing strategy for change, implementing the strategy, and evaluating outcomes. This process will assist organizations in aligning its actions with its mission and values, to find success on all fronts.

  19. Predicting Organizational Commitment from Organizational Culture in Turkish Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipek, Cemalettin

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to describe organizational culture and commitment and to predict organizational commitment from organizational culture in Turkish primary schools. Organizational Culture Scale (Ipek "1999") and Organizational Commitment Scale (Balay "2000") were used in the data gathering process. The data were collected from…

  20. Identifying organizational cultures that promote patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara J; Falwell, Alyson; Gaba, David M; Meterko, Mark; Rosen, Amy; Hartmann, Christine W; Baker, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    Safety climate refers to shared perceptions of what an organization is like with regard to safety, whereas safety culture refers to employees' fundamental ideology and orientation and explains why safety is pursued in the manner exhibited within a particular organization. Although research has sought to identify opportunities for improving safety outcomes by studying patterns of variation in safety climate, few empirical studies have examined the impact of organizational characteristics such as culture on hospital safety climate. This study explored how aspects of general organizational culture relate to hospital patient safety climate. In a stratified sample of 92 U.S. hospitals, we sampled 100% of senior managers and physicians and 10% of other hospital workers. The Patient Safety Climate in Healthcare Organizations and the Zammuto and Krakower organizational culture surveys measured safety climate and group, entrepreneurial, hierarchical, and production orientation of hospitals' culture, respectively. We administered safety climate surveys to 18,361 personnel and organizational culture surveys to a 5,894 random subsample between March 2004 and May 2005. Secondary data came from the 2004 American Hospital Association Annual Hospital Survey and Dun & Bradstreet. Hierarchical linear regressions assessed relationships between organizational culture and safety climate measures. Aspects of general organizational culture were strongly related to safety climate. A higher level of group culture correlated with a higher level of safety climate, but more hierarchical culture was associated with lower safety climate. Aspects of organizational culture accounted for more than threefold improvement in measures of model fit compared with models with controls alone. A mix of culture types, emphasizing group culture, seemed optimal for safety climate. Safety climate and organizational culture are positively related. Results support strategies that promote group orientation and

  1. Culture and Organizational Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cook, N.; Yanow, D.

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, theories of organizational learning have taken one of two approaches that share a common characterization of learning but differ in focus. One approach focuses on learning by individuals in organizational contexts; the other, on individual learning as a model for organizational

  2. Leadership, Culture and Organizational Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir-Codrin Ionescu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An effective leadership, an evolutionary organizational culture and permanent connection to change may ensure a company’s success within an ever more dynamic competitive environment. The scientific approach of this paper is in line with theoretical and applied research in the field by the presentation of the connections existing among leadership, organizational culture and organizational change. The paper highlights the triad “vision – motivation – momentum”, the mission and the defining coordinates of leadership, the complementarity “new – tradition” in organizational culture, the stages of the change management process and the role of managers and leaders in the preparation and implementation of change projects. Leadership is essential in building and developing an appropriate cultural model, which, in its turn, is an important vector of organizational change processes in modern companies.

  3. Organizational Identity, Culture, and Image

    OpenAIRE

    Ravasi, D.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of organizational identity is often confused with similar concepts such as organizational culture or organizational image. This confusion depends in part on the inconsistent use that scholars have made of these terms in the past. This chapter reviews the literature that has discussed how these concepts differ and how they are interrelated, and proposes an integrative framework that summarizes the most widely accepted definitions. It focuses in particular on research on dynamic int...

  4. Creating a winning organizational culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robert James

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the idea of how to create a winning organizational culture. By definition, a winning organizational culture is one that is able to make current innovations stick, while continuously changing based on the demands of the marketplace. More importantly, the article explores the notion that a winning organizational culture can have a profound impact on the conscious of the workforce, helping each individual to become a better, more productive person, who provides important services and products to the community. To form a basis toward defining the structure of what a winning organization culture looks like, 4 experts were asked 12 questions related to the development of an organizational culture. Three of the experts have worked intimately within the health care industry, while a fourth has been charged with turning around an organization that has had a losing culture for 17 years. The article provides insight into the role that values, norms, goals, leadership style, familiarity, and hiring practices play in developing a winning organizational culture. The article also emphasizes the important role that leaders perform in developing an organizational culture.

  5. Organizational Culture In Perspective Anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Safriadi, Supriadi Hamdat, Munsi Lampe, Musran Munizu

    2016-01-01

    - This article describes the anthropological perspective in the study of the organization, particularly related to the culture of the organization. Organizational culture is a reflection of the organization itself. Anthropology as a science that covers the study of culture takes an important role in the development of cultural studies organization. An ethnographic approach that looks at the phenomenon based on what the owner or the perpetrator of culture will provide a positive contributio...

  6. [Mobbing: its relationships with organizational culture and personal outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topa Cantisano, Gabriela; Morales Domínguez, José Francisco; Gallastegui Galán, José Antonio

    2006-11-01

    A study dealing with the effects of both organizational culture and mobbing on personal and organizational outcomes of a sample of Spanish emergency workers, is reported here. It was found that there is a strong impact of organizational culture dimensions on mobbing, and that mobbing affects job satisfaction, organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behaviour. Results concerning organizational commitment show that this variable is not a mere effect of mobbing in general, but rather that it is also a direct impact of culture on this outcome.

  7. Sensemaking, Organizational Culture, and Sexual Harassment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Debbie S.; Smythe, Mary Jeanette

    2004-01-01

    While EEOC guidelines for managing sexual harassment prescribe a strong sexual harassment policy and aggressive remedial action following complaints, a communication approach suggests a need for a more complex understanding of sexual harassment as diffused throughout an organizational culture. The present case study uses a sensemaking approach to…

  8. Organizational Culture in Educational Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efeoglu, I. Efe; Ulum, Ömer Gökhan

    2017-01-01

    The concept of culture closely refers to a wide scope of effects on how individuals act in a group, an institution, or a public place. Chiefly, it covers a range of universal ideas, beliefs, values, behaviors, criterion, and measures which may be both explicit and implicit. The study on organizational culture has gained much attention among…

  9. A study on relationship between organizational culture and organizational commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khalili

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to study the relationship between organizational culture and organization commitment. The study uses two questionnaires, one for measuring organizational commitment originally developed by Meyer and Allen (1991 [Meyer, J. P., & Allen, N. J. (1991. A three-component conceptualization of organizational commitment. Human resource management review, 1(1, 61-89.] and the other one for organizational culture developed by Denison and Spreitzer (1991 [Denison, D. R., & Spreitzer, G. M. (1991. Organizational culture and organizational development: A competing values approach. Research in organizational change and development, 5(1, 1-21.]. The study is accomplished among selected full time employees who work for an Iranian bank named Bank Saderat Iran. Using Pearson correlation test as well as linear regression methods, the study has determined that there were some positive and meaningful relationship between all components of organizational commitment and organizational culture.

  10. How does organizational culture influence organizational learning in a shipping company?

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez, Jorge Mario Garzon

    2016-01-01

    This project targets on organizational culture and organizational learning, aiming to reveal how organizational culture influences on organizational learning within the shipping industry. The main research question is: How does organizational culture influence organizational learning within a shipping company? The two research sub-questions are: 1) Which components of organizational culture are especially important for organizational learning? 2) How is organizational structure...

  11. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE DIMENSIONS AND VARIABLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brindusa Maria Popa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous definitions of the concept in the specialized literature and the majority present organizational culture as a system of values, norms, rules, beliefs, habits learned and internalized by the organization members and embodied in their behaviors. Such definitions highlight the fact that organizational culture is a system of values, norms, customs and beliefs shared and assimilated by the entire membership of the organization in order to transform them into inherent characteristics of their behavior. The newly acquired behavior will be promoted, defended and developed throughout their work. Even if organizational culture is built upon such a strict, rigid, formal institutional support, it evolves and develops in order to help the organization adapt and perform efficiently. In order to have an easier understanding of the concept, in this paper we shall use for our analysis the following dimensions: cognitive, normative, human and material.

  12. Cross-cultural organizational behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Michele J; Erez, Miriam; Aycan, Zeynep

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews research on cross-cultural organizational behavior (OB). After a brief review of the history of cross-cultural OB, we review research on work motivation, or the factors that energize, direct, and sustain effort across cultures. We next consider the relationship between the individual and the organization, and review research on culture and organizational commitment, psychological contracts, justice, citizenship behavior, and person-environment fit. Thereafter, we consider how individuals manage their interdependence in organizations, and review research on culture and negotiation and disputing, teams, and leadership, followed by research on managing across borders and expatriation. The review shows that developmentally, cross-cultural research in OB is coming of age. Yet we also highlight critical challenges for future research, including moving beyond values to explain cultural differences, attending to levels of analysis issues, incorporating social and organizational context factors into cross-cultural research, taking indigenous perspectives seriously, and moving beyond intracultural comparisons to understand the dynamics of cross-cultural interfaces.

  13. Impacts of organizational leadership and culture on organizational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impacts of organizational leadership and culture on organizational trust: Role of job cadre. ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... Data analysis via two separate 2X2X2 ANOVA revealed significant main influences of leadership quality ...

  14. A study on relationship between organizational culture and organizational commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Khalili

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical investigation to study the relationship between organizational culture and organization commitment. The study uses two questionnaires, one for measuring organizational commitment originally developed by Meyer and Allen (1991) [Meyer, J. P., & Allen, N. J. (1991). A three-component conceptualization of organizational commitment. Human resource management review, 1(1), 61-89.] and the other one for organizational culture developed by Denison and Spreitzer (1991)...

  15. Cultural Synergy and Organizational Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøbæk, Pernille Solveig; Vogt, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores informal codes and rhythms of social behavior at work and their relation to organizational change and wellbeing. After a merger within a public service organization we organized 8 focus groups of 2-3 clerical or academic employees within a head office and a division office (N...... = 21). Word counts of ‘I’ and ‘we’ revealed that people sharing pre-merger organizational background (homogeneous groups) used ‘we’ more often than heterogeneous groups. Head office employees were concerned with workload and social code, whereas division office employees mainly discussed meetings......, commitment, and office space. Organizational background rather than office cultures guided these differences. We found that in a merged organization cultural synergies are possible to create if practical and social values for employees are offered. Thus, interesting new ways to transform problems...

  16. Organizational Silence in Universities as the Predictor of Organizational Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan YAMAN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between the sense of organizational silence and the organizational culture the instructors perceived. In this study, the scale for determining organizational culture developed by İpek (1999 and the scale for measuring organizational silence developed by Çakıcı (2007 and adapted by Soycan (2010 are used. No remarkable difference was found in the academic staff's sense of organizational silence degree according to their genders and educational backgrounds. It was seen that the instructors' sense of organizational silence had remarkable differences according to their age group, faculty, sense of administration type in their institutions, frequency of their face-to-face communication with their administrators and their thoughts of speaking clearly with their administrators. It was observed that research assistants had a significantly higher sense of organizational silence than the lecturers in the sense of ‘Lack of Experience'. It was seen that academicians who had 1-5 years of employment period had the highest sense of organizational silence while those who had 21 years or more employment period had the lowest sense of organizational silence in the sense of ‘Lack of Experience' of organizational silence. When the points that participant academicians got from organizational silence and organizational culture scales analyzed in the correlation table, it was found out that there was a remarkable relationship between the academicians' sense of organizational silence and sense of organizational culture. This relationship was a medium-level negative relationship between subdimensions of two scales. A medium-level negative relationship between the organizational silence (total and the organizational culture was also seen. Based on the findings, university administrators were proposed to create a participant culture in their institutions as well as to encourage instructors to speak clearly and

  17. Organizational culture diagnosis - a new model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ph. D. Ionuţ Constantin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Organizational culture is a key source of competitive advantage. There is a demonstrated relation between organizational culture and organizational performance. This paper reviews previous research in the field and introduce a new model for understanding, diagnosing and changing organizational culture. The main advantage of the new model is based on regarding culture as the management and work practices that are either hindering or helping an organization's bottom line performance.

  18. Organizational culture diagnosis - a new model

    OpenAIRE

    Ph. D. Ionuţ Constantin; Ph. D. Doru Curteanu

    2010-01-01

    Organizational culture is a key source of competitive advantage. There is a demonstrated relation between organizational culture and organizational performance. This paper reviews previous research in the field and introduce a new model for understanding , diagnosing and changing organizational culture. The main advantage of the new model is based on regarding culture as the management and work practices that are either hindering or helping an organization's bottom line performance.

  19. Advancing Equity in Accountability and Organizational Cultures of Data Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon-Slater, Nora; La Londe, Priya G.; Crenshaw, Hope L.; Evans, Margaret E.; Greene, Jennifer C.; Schwandt, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Data use cultures in schools determine data use practices. Such cultures can be muted by powerful macro accountability and organizational learning cultures. Further, strong equity-oriented data use cultures are challenging to establish. The purpose of this paper is to engage these cultural tensions. Design/methodology/approach: The data…

  20. Impact of organizational culture on organizational commitment and job satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Abid Alvi, Huma; Hanif, Mehmood; Adil, Muhammad Shahnawaz; Ahmed, Rizwan Raheem; Vveinhardt, Jolita

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the researcher has tried toinvestigate the three types of organizational culture and its impact on job satisfaction and employee commitment in Chemical Sector of Karachi. The core objective of the study is toidentify the impact of organizational culture on job satisfaction and employeecommitment in Chemical Sector so as to improve the job satisfaction andcommitment of the employees in their working environment. And research questionis what is the impact of organizational cultur...

  1. THE EFFECT OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE ON ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT AND A RESEARCH

    OpenAIRE

    CENGİZ DEMİR; UMUT CAN ÖZTÜRK

    2013-01-01

    Organizational culture is the all values that shared by the whole of the organization. Organizational commitment is employees’ strength of bond for the organization which they work for. There should be shared values for mentioned about commitment. If those values are adopted by a large number of people and if they are strong, the level of commitment will increase. The main purpose of this study is to determine  the impact of organizational culture on commitment and the relationship. This stud...

  2. INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION AND ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mădălina ŞOMĂCESCU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigated the relationship between the organizational communication and organizational culture. The starting point of our analysis is that the two variables are in interdependent relation. Our study, performed in a large public organization operating in Romania and abroad, identified a positive association between the two variables. The organizational communication helps the organization to disseminate the culture among the employees. Also, the organizational culture is developed through the interactions and communications among the staff. The management of the organizations must encourage and promote an open communication in order to create a culture that sustain the performance.

  3. Conditioning Factors of an Organizational Learning Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Teresa Manuela; Gomes, Adelino Duarte

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to assess the relationship between some variables (organizational structure, organizational dimension and age, human resource characteristics, the external environment, strategy and quality) and organizational learning culture and evaluate the way they interact with this kind of culture.…

  4. Efficient Cultures: Exploring the Relationship between Culture and Organizational Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Alan L.; Ouchi, William G.

    1983-01-01

    Arguing from a transaction costs perspective, this paper contends that local organizational cultures distinct from shared background cultures exist relatively infrequently. The relationship between local organizational culture and organizational efficiency is discussed, and it is concluded that changing organizations are more adaptive than is…

  5. Managing the Organizational Culture: A Technological Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takhir U. Bazarov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Organizational culture presents an interest for research and practice of social psychology. This article is intended to discuss the problem of managing the organizational structure on two levels that contain most topical problems: general methodological level and technological level. Organizational culture is a system with its distinct features that consists of units and sub-systems with their specific features. An organizational-culture system comprises several levels: leader's personality level (as well as the personality level in general, level of executive team (as well as of a small group in general, level of organization in general (level of a large group.

  6. Culture Analysis: The Interaction of Organizational and National Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Marina Arnoldovna Makarchenko

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to the interaction between organizational culture factors. A comparative analysis of the Russian and Argentine companies culture using different methods shows the impact of the national mentality in organizational culture. The thesis is the need to introduce the term "regional culture" in relation to modern Russia.

  7. Knowledge Management from Organizational Culture Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Nhu T.B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines organizational culture perspectives to demonstrate their importance on knowledge management. Also, it is aimed to link three perspectives of organizational culture (Integration, Differentiation, and Fragmentation) to knowledge management. The conclusion suggests several implications of this paper and future research.

  8. Design and Innovation: Organizational Culture as Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul Rind; Junginger, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Designing, as an activity, is squeezed in a paradoxical agency between reproduction and innovation of meanings in society as well as in the organization. In this conceptual paper the apparent paradox is addressed in perspective of the organizational culture theory and examine the role of design...... in reproducing and innovating dominant organizational cultures....

  9. Nurses as implementers of organizational culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Lynn Perry; Crane, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Drawing from both theory and case-study data, the role of nurse leaders in implementing constructive organizational cultures is discussed. Constructive cultures create high-performance work environments, increasing both employee and patient satisfaction, and ultimately affecting economic performance. Nursing administrators aspiring to implement a constructive culture should emphasize people-centered values through a collective mission, strategic human resource management practices, and a patient service-oriented philosophy. Furthermore, constructive organizational cultures create successful high-performance work environments when nurses have positive colleague interactions and approach tasks in a manner that helps them experience self-actualization, while at the same time achieving organizational goals.

  10. RELATIONSHIP ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT IN HEALTH INSTITUTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    SEMERCİOĞLU, M.Serhat; ÇETİN, Derya; PEKSOY, Abdülaziz Ali

    2017-01-01

    Shared   and  learned   values,   norms, believes,  behaviors and  symbols  which are known  as  organization culture;  is  a holistic element   that   describes  organizational   aims and helpsorganization members to understand  organizational   objectives   within and beyond  the  organizational  environment. From this point of view, successfulfirms have to establish an organization which is powerful and  unique in  their  organizational  cultures. One     of    the     critical     factors...

  11. Organizational culture during the accident response process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1992-01-01

    A large volume of literature hypothesizes a direct relationship between organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Culture data have been collected by the authors and others at nuclear power plants (NPPs) and other organizations that demand high reliability. In this paper, the literature and data are used to explore a critical dimension of the accident response process in an NPP: the transition from an anticipatory strategy to an ad hoc strategy. In particular, the effect of organizational culture on the implementation of each of these strategies is examined

  12. THE EFFECT OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE ON ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT AND A RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CENGİZ DEMİR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Organizational culture is the all values that shared by the whole of the organization. Organizational commitment is employees’ strength of bond for the organization which they work for. There should be shared values for mentioned about commitment. If those values are adopted by a large number of people and if they are strong, the level of commitment will increase. The main purpose of this study is to determine  the impact of organizational culture on commitment and the relationship. This study composed of two main parts. The first part consists of theoretical framework which explains organizational culture and commitment’s relationship. The second part is devoted to empirical analysis. Survey study was made in this part which held on 189 employees in the province of İzmir.

  13. Assessing the Dimensions of Organizational Culture on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of dimensions of organizational culture on organizational commitment was investigated in this paper. A convenient sample made up of Two hundred (200) participants was randomly selected from private and public institutions in Uyo, Akwa Ibom State. They were 113 males and 87 females whose age range ...

  14. Validation of the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritage, Brody; Pollock, Clare; Roberts, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Organizational culture is a commonly studied area in industrial/organizational psychology due to its important role in workplace behaviour, cognitions, and outcomes. Jung et al.'s [1] review of the psychometric properties of organizational culture measurement instruments noted many instruments have limited validation data despite frequent use in both theoretical and applied situations. The Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) has had conflicting data regarding its psychometric properties, particularly regarding its factor structure. Our study examined the factor structure and criterion validity of the OCAI using robust analysis methods on data gathered from 328 (females = 226, males = 102) Australian employees. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a four factor structure of the OCAI for both ideal and current organizational culture perspectives. Current organizational culture data demonstrated expected reciprocally-opposed relationships between three of the four OCAI factors and the outcome variable of job satisfaction but ideal culture data did not, thus indicating possible weak criterion validity when the OCAI is used to assess ideal culture. Based on the mixed evidence regarding the measure's properties, further examination of the factor structure and broad validity of the measure is encouraged. PMID:24667839

  15. Validation of the organizational culture assessment instrument.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brody Heritage

    Full Text Available Organizational culture is a commonly studied area in industrial/organizational psychology due to its important role in workplace behaviour, cognitions, and outcomes. Jung et al.'s [1] review of the psychometric properties of organizational culture measurement instruments noted many instruments have limited validation data despite frequent use in both theoretical and applied situations. The Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI has had conflicting data regarding its psychometric properties, particularly regarding its factor structure. Our study examined the factor structure and criterion validity of the OCAI using robust analysis methods on data gathered from 328 (females = 226, males = 102 Australian employees. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a four factor structure of the OCAI for both ideal and current organizational culture perspectives. Current organizational culture data demonstrated expected reciprocally-opposed relationships between three of the four OCAI factors and the outcome variable of job satisfaction but ideal culture data did not, thus indicating possible weak criterion validity when the OCAI is used to assess ideal culture. Based on the mixed evidence regarding the measure's properties, further examination of the factor structure and broad validity of the measure is encouraged.

  16. Organizational Culture as a Factor Leaning Knowledge Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Walczak

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses subject of the organizational culture and understanding the strong role it plays in organizations from the point of view in regard to the human capital management. Basically, culture is comprised of the assumptions, values, norms and tangible signs (artifacts of organization members and their behaviors. It encourages employees to identify their goals with company goals, promotes knowledge sharing lead to increased competencies and teams effectiveness. The most significant thesis of the article says that organizational culture plays an important role in the process of knowledge management. Main conceptions of corporate culture as understanding, meaning, the most important aspects indicated changes which should be stimulated by transformation of organizational culture and ways of shaping, were shown.

  17. The Influence Of Organizational Culture On Management Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlis Dewi Kuraesin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to know the culture of the organization and management accounting information system based on existing theories. The management information system is a collection of sub-systems which are interconnected with each other to work together in harmony to achieve one goal of process data into information needed by management in decision making. An important factor influencing the use of information systems is Cultural Organization. Management Information system success is influenced by several factors one of which is the organizations culture. Organizational culture has a very strong influence on the overall organizational and individual behavior due to the information system is a major component of the organization are influenced substantially by organizational culture.

  18. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND JOB SATISFACTION: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIMITRIOS BELIAS

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to provide a critical review of the relation between organizational culture and the levels of job satisfaction experienced by employees. Organizational culture refers to a series of attitudes and behaviors adopted by employees of a certain organization, which affect its function and total well-being. Job satisfaction refers to the employees’ perceptions of their working environment, relations among colleagues, earnings and promotion opportunities. The review shows that contemporary job-related phenomena like job satisfaction are related to their perceptions of their working environment, relations with colleagues, institution aims and strategies and success criteria. In addition, the employees’ preference of organizational culture is likely to be affected by demographic characteristics, especially gender. It can be supported, therefore, that measuring and analyzing an institution’s organizational culture in combination with its employees’ demographic and individual characteristics may lead to valuable conclusions, so that job satisfaction is promoted.

  19. National Culture Influence over the Organizational Culture in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Carataº Maria Alina; Spãtariu Elena Cerasela

    2012-01-01

    The present paper aims highlighting the characteristics of the organisational culture concept in Romania. In the first part of the paper, we have presented the importance of organizational culture theory through a literature review; we described the factors that have an impact on it. In the second part, we developed ideas about the national culture of Romania, the national frame and how this affects the organizational culture, and we presented its peculiarities.

  20. Rebuilding organizational culture in the wake of a merger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimnell, J; Butterill, D; Skinner, W; Golyea, G; Yue-Chan, L; Macfarlane, D

    2001-01-01

    More and more, corporate culture is being recognized as an important determinant of organizational effectiveness. This article describes how the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health proactively focused on rebuilding its culture after a mandated merger. The long-term effects of this effort need to be monitored. However, commitment is strong to the ideas articulated in the Statement of Desired Culture that was developed by a staff task force and approved by the Centre's Board.

  1. A Configuration Model of Organizational Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Dauber

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes a configuration model of organizational culture, which explores dynamic relationships between organizational culture, strategy, structure, and operations of an organization (internal environment and maps interactions with the external environment (task and legitimization environment. A major feature of the configuration model constitutes its well-defined processes, which connect the elements of the model systematically to each other, such as single- and double-loop learning, operationalization of strategies, legitimization management, and so on. The model is grounded in a large review of literature in different research areas and builds on widely recognized models in the field of organization and culture theory. It constitutes a response to the call for new models, which are able to explain and facilitate the exploration of the empirical complexity that organizations face today. The configuration model of organizational culture is of particular interest to scholars who investigate into cultural phenomena and change over time.

  2. Organizational culture in nursing schools in Turkey: faculty members' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantek, F; Baykal, U

    2009-09-01

    Among the benefits of examining an organization's culture are the opportunity to understand the basic mechanisms of the institutional and structural procedures, to determine the need for change and to ensure the development and satisfaction of the faculty members. To determine the perceptions of faculty members of organizational culture at nursing schools in Turkey and to examine different perceptions in relation to demographic variables. The study was conducted with 180 faculty members from seven nursing schools in state universities located in different geographical regions of Turkey that granted permission for the study. All faculty members in these schools with at least 1 year of institutional experience were included in the research. No sampling was required. A demographic information form and an organizational culture scale were used as data collection materials. The organizational culture scale contains 30 items and resolves the organizational culture in three dimensions. The minimum score obtained was 1 and the maximum was 5. The mean score for faculty members' in total scale was 3.40 (SD = 0.68), while it was 3.26 (SD = 0.77) for the management style dimension, 3.39 (SD = 0.73) for the organizational commitment/relations dimension and 3.68 (SD = 0.73) for the student-oriented dimension. There was no statistical difference between the perception of organizational culture and work experience at the institution, marital status or educational status, but there were differences in age, number of years in the profession and academic titles. It was found that strong perceptions have been established in nursing schools in regard to student-oriented practices, and that groups consisting of senior academic personnel and experienced academicians are considered to be better at perceiving the importance of the organizational culture. The administrators are recommended to promote policies to enhance the participation in decision-making processes and regularly monitor

  3. A Conversation with Peter Senge: Transforming Organizational Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riane Eisler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Riane Eisler talks with Peter Senge, internationally renowned expert on management and organizational leadership, about transforming organizational cultures from domination to partnership.

  4. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE IN THE SUCCESSFUL GLOBAL BUSINESS

    OpenAIRE

    Eliyana, Anis

    2009-01-01

    A successful business becomes the goal of each individual who is involved in anorganizational business. The capability of business organization to enter and compete inthe global market is one of those ways often used by businessmen to both maintain andachieve a successful organization. With respect to the said issue, the writer would like toanswer the following subject matter: How to understand the organizational culture inorder to be success in global business? And does the organizational cu...

  5. Methodology and applications for organizational safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaue, Takeharu; Makino, Maomi

    2004-01-01

    The mission of our activity is making 'guidance of safety culture for understanding and evaluations' which comes in much more useful and making it substantial by clarifying positioning of safety culture within evaluation of the quality management. This is pointed out by 'Discussion on how to implement safety culture sufficiently and possible recommendation' last year by falsification issue of TEPCO (Tokyo Electric Power Company). We have been developing the safety culture evaluation structured by three elements. One is safety culture evaluation support tool (SCET), another is organizational reliability model (ORM), third is system for safety. This paper describes mainly organizational reliability model (ORM) and its applications as well as ticking the system for safety culture within quality management. (author)

  6. Organizational culture associated with provider satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scammon, Debra L; Tabler, Jennifer; Brunisholz, Kimberly; Gren, Lisa H; Kim, Jaewhan; Tomoaia-Cotisel, Andrada; Day, Julie; Farrell, Timothy W; Waitzman, Norman J; Magill, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Organizational culture is key to the successful implementation of major improvement strategies. Transformation to a patient-centered medical home (PCHM) is such an improvement strategy, requiring a shift from provider-centric care to team-based care. Because this shift may impact provider satisfaction, it is important to understand the relationship between provider satisfaction and organizational culture, specifically in the context of practices that have transformed to a PCMH model. This was a cross-sectional study of surveys conducted in 2011 among providers and staff in 10 primary care clinics implementing their version of a PCMH: Care by Design. Measures included the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument and the American Medical Group Association provider satisfaction survey. Providers were most satisfied with quality of care (mean, 4.14; scale of 1-5) and interactions with patients (mean, 4.12) and were least satisfied with time spent working (mean, 3.47), paperwork (mean, 3.45), and compensation (mean, 3.35). Culture profiles differed across clinics, with family/clan and hierarchical cultures the most common. Significant correlations (P ≤ .05) between provider satisfaction and clinic culture archetypes included family/clan culture negatively correlated with administrative work; entrepreneurial culture positively correlated with the Time Spent Working dimension; market/rational culture positively correlated with how practices were facing economic and strategic challenges; and hierarchical culture negatively correlated with the Relationships with Staff and Resource dimensions. Provider satisfaction is an important metric for assessing experiences with features of a PCMH model. Identification of clinic-specific culture archetypes and archetype associations with provider satisfaction can help inform practice redesign. Attention to effective methods for changing organizational culture is recommended.

  7. Organizational Culture as a Factor Leaning Knowledge Management

    OpenAIRE

    Waldemar Walczak

    2009-01-01

    The article discusses subject of the organizational culture and understanding the strong role it plays in organizations from the point of view in regard to the human capital management. Basically, culture is comprised of the assumptions, values, norms and tangible signs (artifacts) of organization members and their behaviors. It encourages employees to identify their goals with company goals, promotes knowledge sharing lead to increased competencies and teams effectiveness. The most significa...

  8. Leader - Member Exchange in Different Organizational Cultures and Effects to Organizational Burnout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Kırkbeşoğlu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of leader- member exchange to burnout syndrome in different organizational cultures. Sample of the study is constituted by 183 participants who work in life insurance companies which represent organic organizational culture and non-life insurance companies which represent mechanical organizational culture. As a result of regression and correlation analysis, it is determined that leader-member exchange in organic organizational culture affects organizational culture negatively and in higher level compared to mechanical organizational cultures.

  9. APPROACH TO THE ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE CONCEPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLAUDIA MARÍA GARCÍA ÁLVAREZ

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to make evident the instrumental nature of the concept of culture applied to organization, thisessay develops a comprehension of the concept of organizational culture. This effort is important becausethe concept of organization itself implies a construction of a social order from meanings becominghegemonic in the framework of a particular context. Organizational Psychology, even with its neutralitypretension, is not innocent about the instrumental role that social sciences have had in the organizationalarena; however this essay introduces alternatives from critical approaches that allow ways of comprehensionand why not, intervention from perspectives explicitly political.

  10. Lean Six Sigma implementation and organizational culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between four organizational cultural types defined by the Competing Values Framework and three Lean Six Sigma implementation components - management involvement, use of Lean Six Sigma methods and Lean Six Sigma infrastructure. The study involved surveying 446 human resource and quality managers from 223 hospitals located in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts and Rhode Island using the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument. Findings - In total, 104 completed responses were received and analyzed using multivariate analysis of variance. Follow-up analysis of variances showed management support was significant, F(3, 100)=4.89, p cultures having significant interactions with management support. The relationship between organizational culture and Lean Six Sigma in hospitals provides information on how specific cultural characteristics impact the Lean Six Sigma initiative key components. This information assists hospital staff who are considering implementing quality initiatives by providing an understanding of what cultural values correspond to effective Lean Six Sigma implementation. Managers understanding the quality initiative cultural underpinnings, are attentive to the culture-shared values and norm's influence can utilize strategies to better implement Lean Six Sigma.

  11. The Mediating Effect of Organizational Commitment on the Relationship between Job Satisfaction and Organizational Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Adel Mohamed Ali Shurbagi; Ibrahim Bin Zahari

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of organizational commitment as a mediating variable on the relationship between job satisfaction and organizational culture to answer the following questions: Is there any relationship between job satisfaction and organizational culture in oil and gas industry in Libya? Is there any relationship between job satisfaction and organizational commitment in oil and gas industry in Libya? Is there any relationship between organizational cultur...

  12. Management's role in shaping organizational culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane-Urrabazo, Christine

    2006-04-01

    The present study addresses the importance of the manager's role in the development and maintenance of organizational culture. It describes the types of cultures that exist and manager characteristics that are essential to facilitating a healthy workplace. While many managers do not deny the importance of organizational culture in employee satisfaction, few fail to realize the direct impact they have in shaping it. It is oftentimes believed that cultures are predetermined; however, this is a false assumption. It is crucial that managers at all levels are aware of their roles and responsibilities in upholding positive workplace environments that can increase employee satisfaction. Dissatisfaction is the major cause of turnover and can have detrimental cost and environmental effects on the agency. Four critical components of culture (i.e. trust and trustworthiness, empowerment and delegation, consistency and mentorship) are discussed, as is the role of managers in turning these into positive cultural traits. The viewpoints of several authors, such as Stephen Covey, Mark McCormack and Charles Handy, are explored in relation to the development of organizational culture. Additional theories--Kanter's 'Theory of Organizational Empowerment', Locke's 'Goal-setting Theory' and the 'Social Exchange Theory'- supplement these viewpoints. Managers are always under the magnifying glass, with each action carefully scrutinized by subordinates. They must exercise caution when making decisions, ensuring that fairness and equitability exists among staff, and that ethical standards are upheld on a continual basis. The four cultural components, viewed as managerial traits of trust and trustworthiness, empowerment, consistency and mentorship coexist at all times regardless of the type of culture. Managers must put support systems and other mechanisms into place that allow employees the opportunity to empower themselves and to flourish, thus increasing their own effectiveness as well as

  13. Organizational environment and operator culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morisseau, D.S.; Schoenfeld, I.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has historically reviewed corporate and plant level management and organization against the criteria of NUREG-0800, The Standard Review Plan. These criteria address the organizational structure, management control, lines of authority and communication, the range and level of experience, and the availability of manpower to effectively and safely operate the facility. Now that most nuclear power plants have received their operating licenses, the emphasis for review has shifted to the day-to-day operation of the facilities. Along with this has come greater recognition that hardware and engineering systems, through vitally important, are not the only components needed for safe operation of power plants. The people who run and operate these plants are a vitally important component and are an integral part of the entire system, i.e., machinery does not operate in isolation

  14. Organizational culture and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germann, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    GPU Nuclear has become increasingly aware of the impact of culture on performance and therefore on nuclear safety. Culture is simply described as the way things are done around here. Senior management has developed a mission and a vision and values statement to guide this culture change. The company has embarked on a number of culture-influencing initiatives, including teamwork and leadership, the subject of this paper. This paper notes the functional initiatives that were one aspect of the evolution of the overall program. These functional initiatives were requests from line managers for assistance from in-house facilitators to help their areas become even more effective. Also, the overall program implementation has evolved to include use of additional materials and concepts

  15. Organizational Culture and Corporate Innovation | Olori | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines corporate innovation with a view to determine its relationship with organizational culture. A critical review of extant literature suggests clearly that innovation matters and it is important for achieving competitive advantage in a highly competitive market. But in achieving corporate innovation, ...

  16. Including Organizational Cultural Parameters in Work Processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Handley, Holly A; Heacox, Nancy J

    2004-01-01

    ... between decision-makers of different nationalities. In addition to nationality, a decision-maker is also a member of an organization and brings this organizational culture to his role in the work process, where it may also affect his task performance...

  17. Relationship between organizational culture, leadership style and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the relationship between organizational culture, leadership style and job satisfaction in a Nigerian private manufacturing organization. The study population consisted of employees of International Brewery Plc, Ilesha and the study sample consisted of 80% of the workforce at the Brewery comprising ...

  18. Nuclear safety culture based on the organizational and individual culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jingxi; Ren Ou

    2005-01-01

    The nuclear safety culture is used increasingly and developed by countries that have nu- clear plants all over the world, since the term 'safety culture' was first introduced by IAEA in 1986. Enterprises culture reflects many terms in an enterprise, such as management level and staff quality. The safety culture is the center in a nuclear enterprises culture, and relates directly to the safety and outstanding achievement of operation. This paper discusses the nuclear safety culture from the viewpoints of the organizational and individual cultures. (authors)

  19. QUALITY ORIENTED ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TÜNDE SZABÓ

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Total Quality Management is an attractive philosophy and its implementation involves many difficulties.Implementation of total quality management requires a profound transformation of the organization so that theappearance of strong resistance is inevitable. For this reason, it is necessary to consider the huge effort that isrequired to resolve difficulties that appear in this process.Total quality management is based on knowing the stage of organization and its environment and throughcontinuous improvement for it to try to reach excellence.It is well known that the implementation of quality management systems depends on the specifics of eachorganization. Functions performed, defining features, characteristics of public administration systems, rigidity givenby the multitude of laws make it difficult to implement quality management systems, on the one hand and on the otherhand, these difficulties are given from the specific service.The introduction of total quality management in public administration cannot and should not present a radicalreform of it. Public administration, like any other public or private organization, can be improved. In essence, thepractice of recent years shows that the model Total Quality Management in public administration allowsimprovements, but it only with an appropriate organizational culture.

  20. Influence of organizational culture on human error

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedlander, M.A.; Evans, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Much has been written in contemporary business literature during the last decade describing the role that corporate culture plays in virtually every aspect of a firm's success. In 1990 Kotter and Heskett wrote, open-quotes We found that firms with cultures that emphasized all of the key managerial constituencies (customers, stockholders, and employees) and leadership from managers at all levels out-performed firms that did not have those cultural traits by a huge margin. Over an eleven year period, the former increased revenues by an average of 682 percent versus 166 percent for the latter, expanded their workforce by 282 percent versus 36 percent, grew their stock prices by 901 percent versus 74 percent, and improved their net incomes by 756 percent versus 1 percent.close quotes Since the mid-1980s, several electric utilities have documented their efforts to undertake strategic culture change. In almost every case, these efforts have yielded dramatic improvements in the open-quotes bottom-lineclose quotes operational and financial results (e.g., Western Resources, Arizona Public Service, San Diego Gas ampersand Electric, and Electricity Trust of South Australia). Given the body of evidence that indicates a relationship between high-performing organizational culture and the financial and business success of a firm, Pennsylvania Power ampersand Light Company undertook a study to identify the relationship between organizational culture and the frequency, severity, and nature of human error at the Susquehanna Steam Electric Station. The underlying proposition for this asssessment is that organizational culture is an independent variable that transforms external events into organizational performance

  1. The mutual impact of organizational culture and structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janićijević Nebojša

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the relationship between the structure and culture of an organization. The starting assumption is that organizational structure and organizational culture impact each other, and that there is a causal relationship due to which the agreement of the two components of organization leads to better performance. First, the mechanism through which organizational culture impacts the design of organizational structures and the manner in which organizational structure affects the maintenance, strengthening, or changing of organizational culture is explained at the conceptual level. Then, based on the known classifications of organizational structure and culture, they are put into a relationship of direct mutual interdependence. This is done by generating hypotheses about the agreement of particular types of organizational culture and particular types of organizational structure.

  2. SURVEYS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND SAFETY CULTURE IN NUCLEAR POWER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BROWN, B.S.

    2000-01-01

    The results of a survey of organizational culture at a nuclear power plant are summarized and compared with those of a similar survey which has been described in the literature on high-reliability organizations. A general-purpose cultural inventory showed a profile of organizational style similar to that reported in the literature; the factor structure for the styles was also similar to that of the plant previously described. A specialized scale designed to measure safety culture did not distinguish among groups within the organization that would be expected to differ

  3. Analysis of organizational culture with social network models

    OpenAIRE

    Titov, S.

    2015-01-01

    Organizational culture is nowadays an object of numerous scientific papers. However, only marginal part of existing research attempts to use the formal models of organizational cultures. The lack of organizational culture models significantly limits the further research in this area and restricts the application of the theory to practice of organizational culture change projects. The article consists of general views on potential application of network models and social network analysis to th...

  4. The Relationship Between Organizational Culture and Organizational Commitment: An Empirical Research on Employees of Service Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Altin Gulova, Asena; Demirsoy, Ozge

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between organizational culture and organizational commitment. Two different scales (Organizational Culture Scales and Organizational Commitment Scales) were used as data gathering instrument. The research was conducted on employees of service sector working in call center in the city of Kayseri and working in insurance company in İzmir (n=181). In this research correlation analysis was made to describe the link between subscales of organizational cultu...

  5. Managing organizational culture within a management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comeau, L.; Watts, G.

    2009-01-01

    The Point Lepreau Generating Station (PLGS) is currently undergoing a major refurbishment of its nuclear reactor. At the same time, a small team is designing the organization that will operate the plant after refurbishment. This paper offers a high level overview of the Post-Refurbishment Organization (PRO) project and will focus primarily on the approach used to address organizational culture and human system dynamics. We will describe how various tools, used to assess organization culture, team performance, and individual self-understanding, are used collectively to place the right person in the right position. We will explain how the career system, Pathfinder, is used to integrate these tools to support a comprehensive model for organization design and development. Finally, we demonstrate how the management of organizational cultural and human system dynamics are integrated into the PLGS Integrated Management System. (author)

  6. The Dynamics of Organizational Culture and Academic Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Planning approaches are in a dynamic relationship with organizational culture. This article uses a case study of academic planning at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona to draw a correspondence between types of organizational culture and planning approaches. The case study shows the differing conceptions of organizational culture held…

  7. The impact of organizational culture on employees’ organizational silence In Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Parcham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Organizational Culture is one of the most important factors that can change the climate of silence. The main aim of this research was to investigate the influence of organizational culture on employees’ organizational silence in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Method: This research was a descriptive-correlation one. The target population was chosen from 1900 staff of the University of Medical sciences and Health Care headquarter in Shiraz. Thus 311 employees were selected using the Krejcie and Morgan sampling table. The instrument used in this research was Denison (2006 organizational culture questionnaire and Dimitris Buratas and Maria Vacula (2007 organizational culture. Cornbrash’s alpha method was used to calculate the reliability. The Item analysis and expert consensus were applied to calculate the validity of instruments. All gathered data analyzed with PLS software. Results: The results showed that the four dimensions of organizational culture include organizational involvement, organizational adaptability, organizational concistency and organizational mission was moderate and the mean scores obtained for each factor were 2.85, 2.82, 2.94 and 2.93 respectively. Structural equation model showed Organizational culture has a significant positive impact on organizational silence (β=0.68; P<.001. Conclusion: Based on the results and impact of organizational culture on organizational silence that is positive and significant; The organization further efforts to strengthen various aspects of organizational culture, especially the employees’ involvement in decision making; Employees can better express their opinions and thus reduced their organizational silence. In other words strengthening corporate culture is combined with the reduction of organizational silence. Medical organizations can establish appropriate reward system for creative ideas and suggestions to encourage people express their ideas As a result, reduced

  8. Organizational Factors of Justice and Culture Leading to Organizational Identification in Merger and Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Maimunah; Umar Baki, Nordahlia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the influence of two organizational factors, namely, organizational justice and organizational culture, on organizational identification as perceived by employees following merger and acquisition (M&A) in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach: The study, which adopts the Social Identity Theory as its…

  9. Preindustrial Patterns in Chinese Organizational Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Simon Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    Chinese organizational culture is usually described as being influenced by Confucian social norms and unique to the country. The paper argues in contrast to this view that there are important cultural similarities between values and norms in organizations in China and other developing countries....... It is suggested that China, like other developing countries, is in a process of industrialization but retains preindustrial social norms which shape social relations and organizational structures. The paper shows first that the morals of social distance and reciprocity which anthropologists have found...... to be constitutive of a large number of preindustrial communities also govern relationships within and between organizations in present-day China. The paper then turns to organizations in Africa and Latin America and it is shown that the same social morals structure behaviours in these two developing regions...

  10. A Lexical Approach to Identifying Dimensions of Organizational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Derek S.; Reeves, Paige; Chapin, Michelle

    2018-01-01

    A comprehensive measure of organizational culture was developed using a lexical approach, a method typically employed within the study of personality. 1761 adjectives were narrowed down and factor analyzed, which resulted in the identification of a nine factor solution to organizational culture, including the dimensions of: Innovative, Dominant, Pace, Friendly, Prestigious, Trendy, Corporate Social Responsibility, Traditional, and Diverse. Comprised of 135 adjectives most frequently used in describing organizational culture by current employees of several hundred organizations, the Lexical Organizational Culture Scale (LOCS) was found to predict employee commitment, job satisfaction, job search behaviors, and subjective fit better than earlier scales of organizational culture. PMID:29922200

  11. The mutual impact of organizational culture and structure

    OpenAIRE

    Janićijević Nebojša

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between the structure and culture of an organization. The starting assumption is that organizational structure and organizational culture impact each other, and that there is a causal relationship due to which the agreement of the two components of organization leads to better performance. First, the mechanism through which organizational culture impacts the design of organizational structures and the manner in which org...

  12. Impact of Organizational Culture Values on Organizational Agility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen M. Felipe

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To remain competitive within the current, uncertain business scenario, it is vital for firms to develop capabilities that lead them to adapt and offer quick responses to market changes. Under the dynamic capabilities view of the firm, this paper proposes a model that presents an exhaustive analysis of two relevant research gaps: (i the underlying relationships that determine the impact exerted by each of the four organizational culture typologies, comprised in Cameron and Quinn’s Competing Values Framework on organizational agility and, (ii the contingency effect exerted by a key environmental factor, the industry’s technology intensity. An empirical study is performed to test the relationships proposed, using data collected from 172 Spain-based companies. To examine the contingency effect of technology intensity, the sample is divided into two subsamples, high and medium tech companies. This work uses partial least squares path-modeling, a variance-based structural equations modeling technique, in order to test and validate the research model and hypotheses posited. In addition, thorough analyses are carried out to assess the predictive performance of our model.

  13. Child welfare employee recruitment and retention: an organizational culture perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbényiga, DeBrenna LaFa

    2009-01-01

    Drawing data from an organizational culture study, this cross-sectional study investigates the effect of organizational culture on child welfare employee recruitment and retention (N=92). Findings from quantitative analyses of the organizational culture inventory suggest that constructive culture style in child welfare organizations, especially humanistic-encouraging and self-actualizing culture norms, highly predict recruitment through employees' perception of "fit" and satisfaction as a member of the organization. Limitations, future research, and relevant implications are discussed.

  14. The Relationship Between Organizational Culture and Organizational Commitment in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizollah, Arbabisarjou; Abolghasem, Farhang; Amin, Dadgar Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Organizations effort is to achieve a common goal. There are many constructs needed for organizations. Organizational culture and organizational commitment are special concepts in management. The objective of the current research is to study the relationship between organizational culture and organizational commitment among the personnel of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive- correlational study. The statistical population was whole tenured staff of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences that worked for this organization in 2012-2013. Random sampling method was used and 165 samples were chosen. Two standardized questionnaires of the organizational culture (Schein, 1984) and organizational commitment (Meyer & Allen, 2002) were applied. The face and construct validity of the questionnaires were approved by the lecturers of Management and experts. Reliability of questionnaires of the organizational culture and organizational commitment were 0.89 and 0.88 respectively, by Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient. All statistical calculations performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 21.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). The level of significance was set at Porganizational culture and organizational commitment (P value=0.027). Also, the results showed that there was a significant relation between organizational culture and affective commitment (P-value=0.009), organizational culture and continuance commitment (P-value=0.009), and organizational culture and normative commitment (P-value=0.009). PMID:26925884

  15. The Relationship Between Organizational Culture and Organizational Commitment in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizollah, Arbabisarjou; Abolghasem, Farhang; Mohammad Amin, Dadgar

    2015-12-14

    Organizations effort is to achieve a common goal. There are many constructs needed for organizations. Organizational culture and organizational commitment are special concepts in management. The objective of the current research is to study the relationship between organizational culture and organizational commitment among the personnel of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences.  This is a descriptive- correlational study. The statistical population was whole tenured staff of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences that worked for this organization in 2012-2013. Random sampling method was used and 165 samples were chosen. Two standardized questionnaires of the organizational culture (Schein, 1984) and organizational commitment (Meyer & Allen, 2002) were applied. The face and construct validity of the questionnaires were approved by the lecturers of Management and experts. Reliability of questionnaires of the organizational culture and organizational commitment were 0.89 and 0.88 respectively, by Cronbach's Alpha coefficient. All statistical calculations performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 21.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). The level of significance was set at Porganizational culture and organizational commitment (P value=0.027). Also, the results showed that there was a significant relation between organizational culture and affective commitment (P-value=0.009), organizational culture and continuance commitment (P-value=0.009), and organizational culture and normative commitment (P-value=0.009).

  16. Understanding the Influence of Organizational Culture and Group Dynamics on Organizational Change and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Colleen; Kline, Theresa

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between organizational culture, group dynamics, and organizational learning in the context of organizational change. Design/methodology/approach: A case study was used to examine cultural and group level factors that potentially influence groups' learning in the context of…

  17. Organizational Learning Culture, Transfer Climate and Perceived Innovation in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Reid; Khasawneh, Samer

    2004-01-01

    This paper examined the relationship between organizational learning culture, learning transfer climate, and organizational innovation. The objective was to test the ability of learning organization culture to account for variance in learning transfer climate and subsequent organizational innovation, and to examine the role of learning transfer…

  18. An assessment of the impact of organizational culture on employee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Understanding the dynamism of organizational culture and its relationship to employee performance is very crucial to organizational strategic objectives. The primary aim of this paper is to assessthe impact of organizational culture on employee performance. Literature review and library research are adopted to assess how ...

  19. Teaching Organizational Culture Using a Projective Technique: Collage Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colakoglu, Saba; Littlefield, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Although the topic of "organizational culture" is an integral part of syllabi across a wide range of core business classes such as Principles of Management, Organizational Behavior, and Human Resource Management, few experiential exercises exist that can enhance student understanding and learning of different layers of organizational culture. In…

  20. CHANGING ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE IN A ROMANIAN COMPANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRIVEANU Maria Magdalena

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The focus on studying the issue of change, migrated from the attention towards western countries, struggling with the growing spread of globalization, which affects all the changes in the environment, to the former socialist countries of Central and Eastern Europe, which have undergone dramatic changes since 1989. The most disturbing event was the transition from the centralized economy system to the market economy system, which led to a series of mutations at both psychological and organizational level. In this context, this article aims to identify both the dominant type of culture in the largest retail company in Romania and the dominant type of culture in other similar companies. This research project aims at studying the culture and its specificity within the company, but also its impact on society and on the organization. The issue at stake is a retail company in Romania, in which we tried to identify the dominant culture within the company and culture desired by its employees. We also conducted a parallel between the culture type identified in the Romanian company and the type of culture identified in other companies. The research results can be a starting point for the manager charged with change, as he can easily identify discrepancies between the dominant culture and culture desired by employees

  1. A study to measure the impact of organizational culture and organizational excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Nikbakht Elham Nikbakht

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Organizational culture plays an important role on increasing organization excellence and there are many evidences through different studies on this relationship. In this paper, we re-examine this relation between organizational culture and six other important factors including quality of leadership, quality of different strategies, quality of human resources, quality of participating in organizational resources, quality of organizational processes and methods of assessment. The study was held among 70 employees of one of distance learning universities located in province of Esfahan, Iran. The study uses Pearson correlation ratio as well as linear regression technique to investigate the relationships. The results confirmed that there are positive and meaningful relationship between organizational culture and quality of leadership, quality of different strategies, quality of human resources, quality of participating in organizational resources, quality of organizational processes but it does not find any meaningful relationship between organizational culture and methods of assessment.

  2. The Impact of National Culture on the Organizational Culture

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    ALICIA FLORENCIA URTEAGA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The relationships between national culture and organizational culture were analysed in 16 Argentinean companies. Sample was integrated by 429 employees (292 male, and 184 female, mean age 35 years old. Subjects completed, in their own work places, a socio-demographic questionnaire,a scale of national culture, and a scale of organizational practices. Results indicated that organizations adopt practices that, on average, reflect the cultural values of their country of origin. Multiple regression analysis showedthat Argentinean national companies are characterized by practices closely associated with collectivism, high power distance, and high uncertainty avoidance. In contrast, Argentinean privatized companies adopted practices most linked to individualism, low power distance, low uncertainty avoidance,low paternalism, and low fatalism. The results are discussed in light of its strengths and weaknesses, and a new agenda for future research is suggested.

  3. Methodology for determining influence of organizational culture to business performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Skoumalová

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Content this article is to propose the possible methodology for quantitative measuring the organizational culture using the set of statistical methods. In view of aim we elected procedure consisting of two major sections. The first is classification of organizational culture and role of quantitative measurement on organizational culture. This part includes definition and several methods used to classify organizational culture: Hofstede, Peters and Waterman, Deal and Kennedy, Edgar Schein, Kotter and Heskett, Lukášová and opinions why a measurement perspective is worthwhile. The second major section contains methodology for measuring the organizational culture and its impact on organizational performance. We suggest using structural equation modeling for quantitative assessment of organizational culture.

  4. A study to measure the impact of organizational culture and organizational excellence

    OpenAIRE

    Asghar Nikbakht Elham Nikbakht; Ali Soleimani Rad; Mohammad Reza Iravani

    2012-01-01

    Organizational culture plays an important role on increasing organization excellence and there are many evidences through different studies on this relationship. In this paper, we re-examine this relation between organizational culture and six other important factors including quality of leadership, quality of different strategies, quality of human resources, quality of participating in organizational resources, quality of organizational processes and methods of assessment. The study was held...

  5. Levels and Patterns in the Analysis of the Organizational Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Aida Cimpeanu

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge and analysis of the component elements of the organizational culture helps us greatly understand the respective culture, establish the main guidelines of the company values and understand the behaviours and attitudes of the employees. M. Thevenet indentifies two levels at which the culture manifests itself: the external level – the outside culture (which refers to local, regional or national culture), and the inner level –the internal culture (including organizational culture, profe...

  6. Organizational Culture and the Imperatives for Implementing Joint Vision 2010

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Casmus, David

    1997-01-01

    .... Second, it identifies the notion of culture as it applies to the Armed Forces. Third, it identifies the cultural imperatives of Joint Vision 2010 and applies some tools from Edgar Schein's models for influencing organizational culture changes...

  7. Sustaining organizational culture change in health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Cameron David; Saul, Jessie; Bevan, Helen; Scheirer, Mary Ann; Best, Allan; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Mannion, Russell; Cornelissen, Evelyn; Howland, David; Jenkins, Emily; Bitz, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The questions addressed by this review are: first, what are the guiding principles underlying efforts to stimulate sustained cultural change; second, what are the mechanisms by which these principles operate; and, finally, what are the contextual factors that influence the likelihood of these principles being effective? The paper aims to discuss these issues. The authors conducted a literature review informed by rapid realist review methodology that examined how interventions interact with contexts and mechanisms to influence the sustainability of cultural change. Reference and expert panelists assisted in refining the research questions, systematically searching published and grey literature, and helping to identify interactions between interventions, mechanisms and contexts. Six guiding principles were identified: align vision and action; make incremental changes within a comprehensive transformation strategy; foster distributed leadership; promote staff engagement; create collaborative relationships; and continuously assess and learn from change. These principles interact with contextual elements such as local power distributions, pre-existing values and beliefs and readiness to engage. Mechanisms influencing how these principles sustain cultural change include activation of a shared sense of urgency and fostering flexible levels of engagement. The principles identified in this review, along with the contexts and mechanisms that influence their effectiveness, are useful domains for policy and practice leaders to explore when grappling with cultural change. These principles are sufficiently broad to allow local flexibilities in adoption and application. This is the first study to adopt a realist approach for understanding how changes in organizational culture may be sustained. Through doing so, this review highlights the broad principles by which organizational action may be organized within enabling contextual settings.

  8. Healthcare organizational performance: why changing the culture really matters. Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzolini, Elena; Ricciardi, Walter; Gray, Muir

    2018-01-01

    An organization may be considered as having three components: a structure, systems and culture. Culture is the most difficult part of the organization to affect. After all, culture has the key role in impacting and improving organizational performance. The leadership of an organization and its key operations are paramount in shaping the culture. Leadership and organizational culture are inextricably intertwined. They are two sides of the same coin. Culture is a medium through which leadership travels and impacts organizational performance. If leaders are to fulfil the challenges of the 21st century, they must first understand the dynamics of culture and their role as sculptors through behavioural and cognitive ways.

  9. The relationship between organizational culture and performance in acute hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Rowena; Mannion, Russell; Davies, Huw T O; Harrison, Stephen; Konteh, Fred; Walshe, Kieran

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between senior management team culture and organizational performance in English acute hospitals (NHS Trusts) over three time periods between 2001/2002 and 2007/2008. We use a validated culture rating instrument, the Competing Values Framework, to measure senior management team culture. Organizational performance is assessed using a wide range of routinely collected indicators. We examine the associations between organizational culture and performance using ordered probit and multinomial logit models. We find that organizational culture varies across hospitals and over time, and this variation is at least in part associated in consistent and predictable ways with a variety of organizational characteristics and routine measures of performance. Moreover, hospitals are moving towards more competitive culture archetypes which mirror the current policy context, though with a stronger blend of cultures. The study provides evidence for a relationship between culture and performance in hospital settings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Understanding Organizational Culture and Communication through a Gyroscope Metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisel, Ryan S.; Messersmith, Amber S.; Keyton, Joann

    2010-01-01

    To fill a critical void in organizational culture pedagogy, the authors present an instructional system that employs the metaphor of a gyroscope to help students understand implicit assumptions in culture research. Working from Martin's nexus approach to organizational culture and Fairhurst and Putnam's tripartite theory of organizational…

  11. Organizational Change, Leadership and Learning: Culture as Cognitive Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakomski, Gabriele

    2001-01-01

    Examines the claim that it is necessary to change an organization's culture in order to bring about organizational change. Considers the purported causal relationship between the role of the leader and organizational learning and develops the notion of culture as cognitive process based on research in cultural anthropology and cognitive science.…

  12. Selected aspects of organizational culture vs. formation of Human Capital

    OpenAIRE

    Aneta Kisiel

    2014-01-01

    The awareness of employees in relation to organizational culture existing in a company and their knowledge in this subject - have a crucial meaning. In the face of intensity of transformations, constant searching for the best solutions which bring the organization closer to success seams necessary. The organizational culture can help employees among others to: engage in performance of tasks. Organizational culture helps to understand mission, strategy of the organization and assumptions carri...

  13. Relationship between Organizational Culture and Workplace Bullying among Korean Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Yuseon An, MS, RN; Jiyeon Kang, PhD, RN

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the relationship between organizational culture and experience of workplace bullying among Korean nurses. Methods: Participants were 298 hospital nurses in Busan, South Korea. We assessed nursing organizational culture and workplace bullying among nurses using structured questionnaires from July 1 through August 15, 2014. Results: Most participants considered their organizational culture as hierarchy-oriented (45.5%), followed by relation-oriented (36.0%), innovatio...

  14. Impact on Organizational Climate trough Organizational Culture factors. Case Study of Latvia and Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juris Iljins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the article: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of organizational culture on organizational climate in process of change. For solving this problem, it is necessary to identify the main factors of organizational culture in the change process. After exploring the impact of organizational culture on organizational climate through distinguished culture’s factors, article examines how changes can be processed in different cultural environments. Methodology: The research design is based on Yin (1994 methodology and consists of two main stages: data analysis and validation for case study and case study’s methodology according to Yin (1994 (four steps: design the case, conduct the case, analyse the case evidence and develop conclusions. In the first stage an expert evaluation method was used to investigate the significance of organizational culture factors’ impact on organizational climate. Different factors of organizational climate were explored in the paper. To affirm the results triangulation method was applied. To verify the results of the research mathematical calculations and case study were used. Within the research the most significant factors were stressed. During the second stage, the case study was carried out to validate the research results in specific companies. Comparison between medium-size companies was made. It is important, that in case Latvian company (A capital holders are Latvian entrepreneurs and capital holders of Lithuanian company (B are international. Scientific aim: To distinguish organizational culture’s factors that have an impact on organizational climate’s change. Findings: The results of the research confirmed that during the period of changes organizational culture has an impact on organizational climate through specific factors. Theoretical model how change organizational culture impacts organizational climate is developed. Research showed that stability, job satisfaction, team

  15. Organizational culture of a private hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegro, Thamiris Cavazzani; Rocha, Fernanda Ludmilla Rossi; Camelo, Silvia Helena Henriques; Garcia, Alessandra Bassalobre

    2016-06-01

    Objective To assess the values and practices that characterize the organizational culture of a private hospital in the state of São Paulo in the perspective of nursing professionals. Methods Quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional study. Data collection was conducted between January and March 2013 using the Brazilian Instrument for Assessing Organizational Culture. Twenty-one nurses and sixty-two nursing aides and technicians participated in the study. The responses of the participants were coded into numerical categories, generating an electronic database to be analyzed by means of the software Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. Results Scores of cooperative professionalism values (3.24); hierarchical strictness values (2.83); individual professionalism values (2.69); well-being values (2.71); external integration practices (3.73); reward and training practices (2.56); and relationship promotion practices (2.83). Conclusion In the perception of workers, despite the existence of hierarchical strictness there is cooperation at work and the institution pursues customer satisfaction and good interpersonal relationships.

  16. Influence of School Managers' Ethical Leadership Behaviors on Organizational Culture: Teachers' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toytok, Esef Hakan; Kapusuzoglu, Saduman

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Frequently researched, organizational effectiveness is influenced by leadership, organizational culture and climate, organizational commitment, and job satisfaction; additionally, for effective, sustainable management, ethical leadership, which also influences organizational culture, is emphasized. To our knowledge, no previous…

  17. Organizational identification and cultural differences : Explaining employee attitudes and behavioral intentions during postmerger integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, D.P.; Noorderhaven, N.G.; Leufkens, A.S.; Cooper, C.; Finkelstein, S.

    2009-01-01

    Postmerger integration processes have been studied from the perspectives of organizational identity and organizational culture, but these two perspectives have rarely been integrated. We argue that organizational identification and organizational culture differences give rise to two different sets

  18. Does organizational culture mediate the relationship between transformational leadership and organizational commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Hazana Abdullah

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To date, the relationships among organizational culture, transformational leadership and organizational commitment have been empirically investigated. However, majority of these studies have been focusing on direct effects of either transformational leadership or organizational culture on organizational commitment in large organizations. This approach might not only hinder our understanding on real predictors of organizational commitment but also obscure the presence of spurious relationships. Therefore, this study aims to determine the mediating effect of organizational culture on the relationship between transformational leadership and organizational commitment among small business employees. An explanatory research design was used with cross-sectional survey as data collection technique. Once the composite reliability, construct, and convergent and discriminant validity of the measurement constructs were established, a Partial Least Square Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM was run to analyze the structural model and the mediating effect of organizational culture. The results showed that organizational culture mediates the effect of transformational leadership on organizational commitment among small business. This study cautions the generalization of findings obtained from large organizations to be extended to small organizations.

  19. Military medical graduates' perceptions of organizational culture in Turkish military medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Mustafa; Bakir, Bilal; Teke, Abdulkadir; Ucar, Muharrem; Bas, Turker; Atac, Adnan

    2008-08-01

    Organizational culture is the term used to describe the shared beliefs, perceptions, and expectations of individuals in organizations. In the healthcare environment, organizational culture has been associated with several elements of organizational experience that contribute to quality, such as nursing care, job satisfaction, and patient safety. A range of tools have been designed to measure organizational culture and applied in industrial, educational, and health care settings. This study has been conducted to investigate the perceptions of military medical graduates on organizational culture at Gülhane Military Medical School. A measurement of organizational culture, which was developed by the researchers from Akdeniz University, was applied to all military medical graduates in 2004. This was a Likert type scale that included 31 items. Designers of the measurement grouped all these items into five main dimensions in their previous study. The items were scored on a five-point scale anchored by 1: strongly agree and 5: strongly disagree. Study participants included all military physicians who were in clerkship training period at Gulhane Military Medical Academy in 2004. A total of 106 graduates were accepted to response the questionnaire. The mean age of participants was 25.2 +/- 1.1. At the time of study only 8 (7.5%) graduates were married. The study results have showed that the measurement tool with 31 items had a sufficient reliability with a Cronbach's alpha value of 0.91. Factor analysis has resulted a final measurement tool of 24 items with five factors. Total score and the scores of five subdimensions have been estimated and compared between groups based on living city and marital status. The study has shown the dimension of symbol received positive perceptions while the dimension of organizational structure and efficiency received the most negative perceptions. GMMS has a unique organizational culture with its weak and strong aspects. Conducting this kind

  20. Characteristics of organizational culture at the maintenance units of two Nordic nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, Teemu; Oedewald, Pia; Rollenhagen, Carl

    2005-01-01

    This study aims to characterize and assess the organizational cultures of two Nordic nuclear power plant (NPP) maintenance units. The research consisted of NPP maintenance units of Forsmark (Sweden) and Olkiluoto (Finland). The study strives to anticipate the consequences of the current practices, conceptions and assumptions in the given organizations to their ability and willingness to fulfill the organizational core task. The methods utilized in the study were organizational culture and core task questionnaire (CULTURE02) and semi-structured interviews. Similarities and differences in the perceived organizational values, conceptions of one's own work, conceptions of the demands of the maintenance task and organizational practices at the maintenance units were explored. The maintenance units at Olkiluoto and Forsmark had quite different organizational cultures, but they also shared a set of dimensions such as strong personal emphasis placed on safety. The authors propose that different cultural features and organizational practices may be equally effective from the perspective of the core task. The results show that due to the complexity of the maintenance work, the case organizations tend to emphasize some aspects of the maintenance task more than others. The reliability consequences of these cultural solutions to the maintenance task are discussed. The authors propose that the organizational core task, in this case the maintenance task, should be clear for all the workers. The results give implications that this has been a challenge recently as the maintenance work has been changing. The concepts of organizational core task and organizational culture could be useful as management tools to anticipate the consequences of organizational changes

  1. Relationship between Organizational Culture and Workplace Bullying among Korean Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuseon An, MS, RN

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: The results suggest that the types of nursing organizational culture are related to workplace bullying in Korean nurses. Further research is needed to develop interventions that can foster relation-oriented cultures to prevent workplace bullying in nurses.

  2. Role of Organizational Culture on the Performance Primary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharningsih; Murtedjo

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to identify and examine the role of organizational culture on teacher performance. In the present study examined the role of organizational culture with teacher performance. In accordance with the study design, namely the survey, the data collected in this research is quantitative data. The data is extracted and obtained through…

  3. Organizational Culture and Internationalization: A Brief Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaumer, Alison

    2013-01-01

    This brief literature review introduces an area of emerging research about the impact of organizational culture on institutional strategies for internationalization. The review begins by introducing the concept of organizational culture, particularly within higher education. Five articles published between 2003 and 2012 are examined that introduce…

  4. A Comparison of Leadership Styles and Organizational Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Flora Ida

    Three separate studies of three different school superintendents are reported on in terms of the effect of leadership styles on organizational cultures. The analysis used nine descriptors derived from Schein's comprehensive description of leadership in the conduct of organizational culture creation. The report is based on historical and…

  5. Relationship Between Organizational Culture and Organizational Effectiveness - A Study of Nurses in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Organizational culture refers to the beliefs and values that have existed in an organization for a long time, and to the beliefs of the staff and the foreseen value of their work that will influence their attitudes and behavior. It is therefore essential to understand the relationship between organizational cultures and organizational effectiveness. A cross-sectional study was undertaken that focused on hospital nurses in Taiwan. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire; 900 questionnaires were distributed and 473 valid questionnaires were returned. Organizational cultures were significantly (positively) correlated with organizational effectiveness (p<0.001). When the interaction between the leadership and employees is good, the latter will make a greater contribution to team communication and will also be encouraged to accomplish the mission and objectives assigned by the organization, thereby enhancing organizational effectiveness.

  6. Mapping the organizational culture research in nursing: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Findlay, Shannon; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2006-12-01

    This paper reports a critical review of nursing organizational culture research studies with the objectives of: (1) reviewing theoretical and methodological characteristics of the studies and (2) drawing inferences specific to the state of knowledge in this field. Organizational culture is regarded as significant in influencing research use in clinical practice yet it is not understood how culture shapes practitioners' behaviours. Only one review of this empirical literature in nursing has been completed. Using selected computerized databases, published nursing research studies in English that examine organizational culture were accessed. Organizational culture studies were categorized using Hatch's three perspectives on organizational culture: (1) modern, (2) symbolic-interpretive and (3) postmodern. The review was conducted in 2005. Twenty-nine studies were in the final data set. Results pointed to variations in cultural definitions and incorporation of organizational sciences theory. In classifying the studies, modern perspectives dominated (n = 22), symbolic-interpretive approaches were an emerging group (n = 6) and one study was unclassifiable. Our results expand current cultural instrument reviews by pinpointing tools that have been previously overlooked and by identifying ongoing theoretical and methodological challenges for researchers. An exclusive reliance on modernistic approaches in organizational culture research cannot yield a complete understanding of the phenomenon. Rather, the field could benefit from a variety of cultural approaches. In a similar vein, researchers need to be mindful of the terminology and the unit of analysis they use in their research, as these are the two largest research challenges.

  7. Influence of organizational and project cultures on project success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berdykulova G. M.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available the article is dedicated to studying the influence of organizational and project cultures on effective project management of the company by knowledge systematization and the comparative analysis of world companies’ practice that allowed to reveal the main factors and criteria of projects success and negative influence of organizational culture on the project; key aspects of corporate culture and cultural integration under the conditions of globalization.

  8. Selected aspects of organizational culture vs. formation of Human Capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Kisiel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The awareness of employees in relation to organizational culture existing in a company and their knowledge in this subject - have a crucial meaning. In the face of intensity of transformations, constant searching for the best solutions which bring the organization closer to success seams necessary. The organizational culture can help employees among others to: engage in performance of tasks. Organizational culture helps to understand mission, strategy of the organization and assumptions carried out by it. The purpose of this paper is the description of different aspects of organizational culture with reference to actions taken in the scope of management of human resources. The nature of leadership was also stressed in shaping the organizational culture. The analysis of literature in the field of management, own experience and observation of the author in the above mentioned matter made it possible to respond to the research problem presented in this paper.

  9. Organizational factors, organizational culture, job satisfaction and entrepreneurial orientation in public administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos M. Karyotakis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper outlines the critical role and influence of organizational culture and job satisfaction on the relationship between organizational factors and entrepreneurial orientation (EO in the public sector through generating the theoretical framework. Upon examining these terms, a model that reflects their mutual relationships has been suggested. The amalgam of internal work environment, work discretion and rewards/recognition in combination with the appropriate degree of organizational boundaries, such as formalization, centralization, technology routines and connectedness, are crucial for fostering organizational culture and job satisfaction that lead to EO through innovativeness, proactiveness and risk taking.

  10. THE STUDY OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE: METHODOLOGY FOR QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION AND ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    To Thu Trang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the concept: methodof evaluation organizational culture, qualitative and quantitative assessment methodology and lists the basic methodologyfor assessing organizational culture. Fullydescribe professor Denison’s methodology for assessing organizational culture.

  11. A REVIEW OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE IN THE MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Caleb REMANDA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mergers and acquisitions (M&A are the most widespread and most reliable international operations in the strategic market. Theoretically, they can respond to a certain amount of conventional goals like creating intrinsic value and performance. Integrating an organizational culture in an M&A process can help top management from both organizations understand cultural differences as fast as possible, in order to reduce consequences. The question remains as to whether we can go from a theoretical case to a practical one and achieve results beyond expectations. In this 2015 study we took into account cultural changes, communicated them to the members going into the process, and demonstrated the fundamental role that organizational culture plays. By comparing several approaches surrounding organizational culture, we conclude that this concept should extended to further perspectives, such as the importance of acculturation, cultural tolerance and organizational identity, all present before, during, and after the M&A process.

  12. Organizational Culture and Scale Development: Methodological Challenges and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bavik Ali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Defining and measuring organizational culture (OC is of paramount importance to organizations because a strong culture could potentially increase service quality and yield sustainable competitive advantages. However, such process could be challenging to managers because the scope of OC has been defined differently across disciplines and industries, which has led to the development of various scales for measuring OC. In addition, previously developed OC scales may also not be fully applicable in the hospitality and tourism context. Therefore, by highlighting the key factors affecting the business environment and the unique characteristics of hospitality industry, this paper aims to align the scope of OC closely with the industry and to put forth the need for a new OC scale that accurately responds to the context of the hospitality industry.

  13. What child welfare staff say about organizational culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spath, Robin; Strand, Virginia C; Bosco-Ruggiero, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the factors that can affect job satisfaction, organizational culture and climate, and intent to leave at a public child welfare agency. Findings from focus group data collected from direct line, middle, and senior managers revealed a passive defensive culture. The authors discuss concrete organizational interventions to assist the agency in shifting to a constructive oriented culture through enhancements in communication, including supervision and shared decisionmaking, recognition and rewards, and improvement in other areas related to working conditions.

  14. Levels and Patterns in the Analysis of the Organizational Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Aida Cimpeanu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge and analysis of the component elements of the organizational culture helps us greatly understand the respective culture, establish the main guidelines of the company values and understand the behaviours and attitudes of the employees. M. Thevenet indentifies two levels at which the culture manifests itself: the external level – the outside culture (which refers to local, regional or national culture, and the inner level –the internal culture (including organizational culture, professional culture, the culture of a group. Starting from this assumption, one can identify the main components of the organizational culture: founders, the organization’s history, values, beliefs and symbols, the way of thinking, the standards of behaviour etc. Some of these are visible, forming a cultural foundation surface, while others create a less visible foundation of culture – the hidden level. Kotter and Heskett agree that these two levels of analysis are very connected and influence each other. Considering their importance, other authors identify three, four or more levels of culture (Denison, Hofstede, Shein, bringing forth first the values then the rituals, heroes and symbols. Different models of culture analysis help us explain the elements of culture and understand its importance by providing for the researchers a starting point in explaining specific aspects related to the organizational culture and the organizational behaviour. By understanding the organizational culture, the members of an organization are able to shape their behaviour, can recognize their rights and obligations inside the company and the style of internal communication. They can determine the style of clothing and the dominant attitude inside the company, the way in which the management defines and implements its decisions and the staff policy.

  15. The associations between organizational culture, organizational structure and quality management in European hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, C.; Mannion, R.; Hammer, A.; Groene, O.; Arah, O.A.; DerSarkissian, M.; Suñol, R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To better understand associations between organizational culture (OC), organizational management structure (OS) and quality management in hospitals. Design: A multi-method, multi-level, cross-sectional observational study. Setting and participants: As part of the DUQuE project (Deepening

  16. Influence of Organizational Culture on Service Provider Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Yılmaz, Mehmet; Yılmaz Börekçi, Dilek; Örnek, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Although Third Party Logistics Service Provider (3PL) selection literature mentions organizational culture’s role in the development as well as in the maintenance of 3PL arrangements, there is a paucity of attempts to underline the significance of organizational culture’s influence on the formation and management of 3PL relationships. In this study, the influence of different organizational cultural orientations in uncertainty avoidance, future orientation, performance orientation and paterna...

  17. Organizational Culture and the Financial Performance of Manufacturing Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Mahrooz Koochaki Golafzani; Ebrahim Chirani

    2016-01-01

    This paper intends to examine the relationship between organizational culture and the financial performance of manufacturing firms in the province of Guilan (Iran). To do so, a statistical sample with the size of 247 firms located at industrial towns/parks in Guilan was selected. The required data was collected through questionnaire. Then, the relationship between organization culture, including the clan culture, adhocracy culture, market culture and hierarchy culture, and the financial perfo...

  18. The Effect of Organizational Culture on Employee Job Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Jumana, Mariyam

    2016-01-01

    The study attempt to examines the impact of organizational cultures on employee job satisfaction. In this study four company with four different dominant cultures are explored. The sample includes, Company A a family business signifying clan culture, Company B Information Technology Company indicating adhocracy culture, Company C hardware franchise representing market culture and Company D an automobile company signifying hierarchy culture. Data was accumulated for the research through interv...

  19. Organizational culture in cardiovascular care in Chinese hospitals: a descriptive cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Emily S; Downing, Nicholas S; Li, Xi; Singer, Sara J; Curry, Leslie A; Li, Jing; Krumholz, Harlan M; Jiang, Lixin

    2015-12-21

    Organizational learning, the process by which a group changes its behavior in response to newly acquired knowledge, is critical to outstanding organizational performance. In hospitals, strong organizational learning culture is linked with improved health outcomes for patients. This study characterizes the organizational learning culture of hospitals in China from the perspective of a cardiology service. Using a modified Abbreviated Learning Organization Survey (27 questions), we characterized organizational learning culture in a nationally representative sample of 162 Chinese hospitals, selecting 2 individuals involved with cardiovascular care at each hospital. Responses were analyzed at the hospital level by calculating the average of the two responses to each question. Responses were categorized as positive if they were 5+ on a 7-point scale or 4+ on a 5-point scale. Univariate and multiple regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between selected hospital characteristics and perceptions of organizational learning culture. Of the 324 participants invited to take the survey, 316 responded (98 % response rate). Perceptions of organizational learning culture varied among items, among domains, and both among and within hospitals. Overall, the median proportion of positive responses was 82 % (interquartile range = 59 % to 93 %). "Training," "Performance Monitoring," and "Leadership that Reinforces Learning" were characterized as the most favorable domains, while "Time for Reflection" was the least favorable. Multiple regression analyses showed that region was the only factor significantly correlated with overall positive response rate. This nationally representative survey demonstrated variation in hospital organizational learning culture among hospitals in China. The variation was not substantially explained by hospital characteristics. Organizational learning culture domains with lower positive response rates reveal important areas for

  20. Organizational culture, intersectoral collaboration and mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Penelope Fay; Pattison, Philippa Eleanor

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether and how organizational culture moderates the influence of other organizational capacities on the uptake of new mental health care roles by non-medical primary health and social care services. Using a cross-sectional survey design, data were collected in 2004 from providers in 41 services in Victoria, Australia, recruited using purposeful sampling. Respondents within each service worked as a group to complete a structured interview that collected quantitative and qualitative data simultaneously. Five domains of organizational capacity were analyzed: leadership, moral support and participation; organizational culture; shared concepts, policies, processes and structures; access to resource support; and social model of health. A principal components analysis explored the structure of data about roles and capacities, and multiple regression analysis examined relationships between them. The unit of analysis was the service (n = 41). Organizational culture was directly associated with involvement in two types of mental health care roles and moderated the influence of factors in the inter-organizational environment on role involvement. Congruence between the values embodied in organizational culture, communicated in messages from the environment, and underlying particular mental health care activities may play a critical role in shaping the emergence of intersectoral working and the uptake of new roles. This study is the first to demonstrate the importance of organizational culture to intersectoral collaboration in health care, and one of very few to examine organizational culture as a predictor of performance, compared with other organizational-level factors, in a multivariate analysis. Theory is developed to explain the findings.

  1. Transforming Cultures of Care: A Case Study in Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Karyn; Cross, David; Jones, Daren; Buff, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The authors report on a small organizational case study highlighting the dimensions of trauma-informed care, the processes of organizational change, and the growth of caregiver expertise. The article is framed by the notion of caregiving cultures, which refers to the beliefs, languages, and practices of caregivers and caregiving organizations.…

  2. WORK CULTURE, WORK MOTIVATION AND ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE: THE MEDIATING ROLE OF ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Rahayu Wilujeng*, Sri Wahyu Lelly Hana Setyanti , Handriyono

    2018-01-01

    Human resources are an organization asset that becomes an important factor in the progress of an organization. The quality of human resources itself can be seen from the performance of the employees. The purpose of this research is to examine the influence of work culture and work motivation on organizational performance with organizational commitment as mediating. This research is a review from the theory and several researches that have been done on the work culture, work motivation, organi...

  3. Methodological approaches in the research of organizational culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janićijević Nebojša

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the thirty-years-long research of organizational culture, two mutually opposed methodological approaches have emerged: objectivistic quantitative and subjectivistic-qualitative. These two approaches are based on opposite ontological and epistemological assumptions: they include different types of research, and use opposite, quantitative vs. qualitative, methods of research. Each of the methodological approaches has its advantages and disadvantages. For this reason a hybrid approach emerges as a legitimate choice in organizational culture research methodology. It combines elements of both subjectivistic and objectivistic methodological approaches, according to the goals, content, and context of the research and preferences of the researcher himself/herself. Since it is possible to combine the two principal methodological approaches in various ways, there are several possible hybrid methodologies in organizational culture research. After the review of objectivistic quantitative and subjectivistic-qualitative methodological approaches, one of possible hybrid approaches in the research of organizational culture is presented in this paper.

  4. THE EFFECTS OF THE ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE ON DIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Sezerel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The success of diversity management practices relies on the combination of a series of variables properly. The relevant literature suggests that diversity management is highly depended on an adequate organizational culture. Thus, a research model that proposes that organizational culture has impact on diversity management perceptions of employees. There are two data sets in this research. The independent variable of the research is organizational culture and the dependent variable of the research is the level of diversity management perceptions. The research is adopted in quantitative method and the data collected via questionnaires. This research which is conducted in a hotel chain finds that the mission dimension of organizational culture impacts all three levels of diversity management.

  5. The Organizational Structure and Organizational Culture Interdependence Analysis with a Special Reference to Bosnian and Herzegovinian Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Alisa Delic; Senija Nuhanovic

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to point to the very nature of the relationship between the organizational structure and organizational culture as very important mechanisms by means of which enterprises set their employees' behavior on the target course, or direct their efforts at accomplishing organizational goals, respectively. Besides the examination of the phenomenon of the organizational structure and organizational culture at the general level, the paper also includes the analysis of empirical...

  6. Organizational culture in an academic health center: an exploratory study using a competing values framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovseiko, Pavel V; Buchan, Alastair M

    2012-06-01

    Implementing cultural change and aligning organizational cultures could enhance innovation, quality, safety, and job satisfaction. The authors conducted this mixed-methods study to assess academic physician-scientists' perceptions of the current and preferred future organizational culture at a university medical school and its partner health system. In October 2010, the authors surveyed academic physicians and scientists jointly employed by the University of Oxford and its local, major partner health system. The survey included the U.S. Veterans Affairs Administration's 14-item Competing Values Framework instrument and two extra items prompting respondents to identify their substantive employer and to provide any additional open-ended comments. Of 436 academic physicians and scientists, 170 (39%) responded. Of these, 69 (41%) provided open-ended comments. Dominant hierarchical culture, moderate rational and team cultures, and underdeveloped entrepreneurial culture characterized the health system culture profile. The university profile was more balanced, with strong rational and entrepreneurial cultures, and moderate-to-strong hierarchical and team cultures. The preferred future culture (within five years) would emphasize team and entrepreneurial cultures and-to a lesser degree-rational culture, and would deemphasize hierarchical culture. Whereas the university and the health system currently have distinct organizational cultures, academic physicians and scientists would prefer the same type of culture across the two organizations so that both could more successfully pursue the shared mission of academic medicine. Further research should explore strengthening the validity and reliability of the organizational culture instrument for academic medicine and building an evidence base of effective culture change strategies and interventions.

  7. Organizational culture from an internal and external stakeholders’ perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Jungnitsch; Jol Stoffers; Petra Neessen

    2016-01-01

    A culture change within an organization may be of importance in this turbulent world. An assessment of the current and desired cultural profiles can help estimate as to whether any changes are required. In this study the organizational culture of a housing association was examined from both the

  8. Dynamics of organizational culture: Individual beliefs vs. social conformity

    OpenAIRE

    Ellinas, Christos; Allan, Neil; Johansson, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The complex nature of organizational culture challenges our ability to infers its underlying dynamics from observational studies. Recent computational studies have adopted a distinct different view, where plausible mechanisms are proposed to describe a wide range of social phenomena, including the onset and evolution of organizational culture. In this spirit, this work introduces an empirically-grounded, agent-based model which relaxes a set of assumptions that describes past work - (a) omitt...

  9. Diagnosis of Organizational Culture in a chosen Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Kaňková, Veronika

    2011-01-01

    This diploma thesis deals with the Diagnosis of organizational culture in selected organization which is particularly a food company Kraft Foods CR. The aim of the diploma thesis is to describe the organizational culture in this organization through a Denison method of questionnaire survey and using my own observation. Then, based on the information gathered from the survey, I suggest to the management of the organization recommendations and actions that could lead to greater employee satisfa...

  10. ORGANIZATIONAL CLIMATE FOR A QUALITY CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsy Thamara Visbal Pérez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Employee development, on calibration and testing laboratories at university to improve quality services, has become one of the most important problems despite efforts to improve the work environment. The objective of the research is to assess the organizational climate of a calibration and testing laboratory at a public university of the Venezuelan state. The non-experimental and correlational study (organizational climate survey was applied, generated an organizational climate of 63.7%, with 55% of open questions answered. It is concluded on the need to design sustainable long-term strategies.

  11. Organizational culture during the accident response process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of an organization to effectively move from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy may well depend on the organization having the ability to balance these two apparently dichotomous cultural styles. The organization which is most capable of making the necessary transition in an optimal manner may well exhibit some aspects of both cultural styles during normal operations. Data collected at one NPP does exhibit this pattern of results, with the organization exhibiting a clear hierarchical chain of command and perceived conventional behavioral expectations as well as exhibiting a more decentralized and collegial approach to decisionmaking, a team work orientation, and informal communications. Thus, it is expected that this organization possesses the capabilities to make a successful transition from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy. Data collected at a second NPP more strongly exhibits the traditional style suggested as being important during the anticipatory strategy, with more formal communications and bureaucratically controlled decision-making. This organization may experience difficulty if faced with the need to make a transition from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy. These conclusions are further validated based on observation of Emergency Preparedness Exercise Inspections, which suggest that the more anticipatory types of behaviors actually inhibit successful performance during an ad hoc response. The final validation of these hypotheses needs to be demonstrated with cultural data collected during emergency simulations. The mechanism to obtain such data during these types of situations is an area for future research

  12. Authentic leadership, organizational culture, and healthy work environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey, Maria R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to showcase the relationship among authentic leadership, organizational culture, and healthy work environments using a stress and coping lens. A qualitative descriptive study was conducted to determine what situations contribute to nurse manager stress, what coping strategies they utilize, what health outcomes they report, and what decision-making processes they follow to address stressful situations in their roles. A purposive sample of 21 nurse managers employed at 3 US acute care hospitals completed a demographic questionnaire and 14-question interview incorporating components of the Critical Decision Method. A secondary analysis of the data was conducted to identify differences in nurse manager narratives based upon differences in the organizational cultures where the managers worked. Of the 21 nurse managers studied, differences were evident in the organizational cultures reported. Nurse managers working in the positive organizational cultures (n = 12) generally worked in healthy work environments and engaged in more authentic leadership behaviors. Conversely, nurse managers working in the negative organizational cultures (n = 9) worked in unhealthy work environments and reported less optimism and more challenges engaging in authentic leadership practices. Organizational culture and leadership matter in creating and sustaining healthy work environments. Nurse managers play a pivotal role in creating these environments, yet they need supportive structures and resources to more effectively execute their roles.

  13. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND LEADERSHIP STYLE: KEY FACTORS IN THE ORGANIZATIONAL ADAPTATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivona Vrdoljak Raguž

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to theorize about how the specific leadership style affects the organizational adaptation in terms of its external environment through fostering the desired organizational culture. Adaptation success, the dimensions of organizational culture and the executive leadership role in fostering the desired corporate culture conducive to the organizational adaptation process are discussed in this paper. The objective of this paper is to highlight the top executive managers’ crucial role and their leadership style in creating such an internal climate within an organization that, in turn, encourages and strengthens the implementation of changes and adaptation to its environment. The limitations of this paper lie in the consideration that this subject matter is discussed only at a theoretical level and that its validity should be proved through practical application.

  14. Differences of Organizational Culture between Small and Large Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu-Iliuta Dobre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research paper analyses the organizational culture of small enterprises and largeenterprises, and highlights the common elements and the main differences. The results of the studyshow significant differences in terms of organizational culture between the two types oforganizations. Employees working in small size enterprises are oriented towards innovation,whereas the ones working in large enterprises are more aware of social responsibility. In addition,small organizations are perceived to have a more supportive organizational culture than largeenterprises. Furthermore, the study reveals differences in management and leadership styles whenanalyzing the small and large enterprises. Considering the flatter organizational structure of smallenterprises, the managers have a personal relationship with the employees and they motivate thembetter and align their goals with the ones of the enterprise. In large organizations, the managersneed to have a tighter control, as more procedures have to be followed.

  15. Organizational Identity and Culture in the Context of Managed Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo; Schultz, Majken; Skov, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    their organization’s identity led middle managers and employees both to support and resist new organizational identity claims made by top management. Within these identity activation processes we found frequent references relating new identity claims to organizational culture. Further analysis of the data revealed......This article presents top and middle managers’ experiences and understandings of how organizational identity and culture were entangled with transformational change as it unfolded over a 5-year period in Carlsberg Group. Combining ethnography and grounded theory methods with engaged scholarship......, our work sits between research and practice, speaking directly to the experience of managers at the same time that it researches both the content and processes of organizational identity and culture. The study shows that engaging in processes of reflecting, questioning, and debating about...

  16. The impact of organizational culture on knowledge sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poul Sahar Khazaei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between knowledge management and organizational culture, adopting the view of knowledge. Understanding how different cultural types are associated with specific knowledge management should shed light on how the relationship between organizational culture and knowledge management is manifested in the choices of organizations. For this research, the quantitative research design will be used. A survey questionnaire will be employed in achieving the objectives of this research. Results indicate that successful KM application should go beyond the operational side into social, human and organizational aspects to create individual commitment towards KM implementation. This discussion also emphasizes the importance of the collective knowledge and knowledge network concepts on the organizational level.

  17. Safety culture management: The importance of organizational factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haber, S.B.; Shurberg, D.A.; Jacobs, R.; Hofmann, D.

    1995-01-01

    The concept of safety culture has been used extensively to explain the underlying causes of performance based events, both positive and negative, across the nuclear industry. The work described in this paper represents several years of effort to identify, define and assess the organizational factors important to safe performance in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The research discussed in this paper is primarily conducted in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) efforts in understanding the impact of organizational performance on safety. As a result of a series of research activities undertaken by numerous NRC contractors, a collection of organizational dimensions has been identified and defined. These dimensions represent what is believed to be a comprehensive taxonomy of organizational elements that relate to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Techniques were also developed by which to measure these organizational dimensions, and include structured interview protocols, behavioral checklists, and behavioral anchored rating scales (BARS). Recent efforts have focused on devising a methodology for the extraction of information related to the identified organizational dimensions from existing NRC documentation. This type of effort would assess the applicability of the organizational dimensions to existing NRC inspection and evaluation reports, refine the organizational dimensions previously developed so they are more relevant to the task of retrospective analysis, and attempt to rate plants based on the review of existing NRC documentation using the techniques previously developed for the assessment of organizational dimensions

  18. The Relationship of Employee Status to Organizational Culture and Organizational Effectiveness: A Quantitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deem, Jackie W.; DeLotell, Pam J.; Kelly, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the relationship between employment status (full time (FT)/part time (PT)), organizational culture and institutional effectiveness in higher education. The purpose of this paper is to answer the question, "Does the growing population of PT faculty preclude effective cultures from developing and, accordingly,…

  19. A survey relation of organizational culture and organizational citizenship behavior with employees’ empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Ebrahim Sadati

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to study the relationship between organizational culture and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB with employees’ empowerment. Empowering employee’s breeds success by providing a suitable framework to utilize the necessary skills in an attempt to realize organizational goals. In this paper, four dimensions of employees’ empowerment including meaningfulness, choice, competence and impact are investigated. We also identify four dimensions for organizational culture including adaptability, consistency, involvement and mission. The paper also specifies five basic dimensions of OCB, which consists of altruism, conscientiousness, sportsmanship, courtesy and civic virtue. These basic dimensions of both independent and dependent variables construct the research conceptual model and the required data is gathered from the Tehran Municipality. This proposed study considers 180 employees who participated in our survey. The investigation of the proposed model is also performed based on the Structural Equation Modeling (SEM.

  20. Organizational Commitment for Knowledge Workers: The Roles of Perceived Organizational Learning Culture, Leader-Member Exchange Quality, and Turnover Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Baek-Kyoo

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the impact of perceived organizational learning culture and leader-member exchange (LMX) quality on organizational commitment and eventually on employee turnover intention. Employees exhibited the highest organizational commitment when they perceived a higher learning culture and when they were supervised in a supportive…

  1. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND ITS WAY OF EXPRESSION WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Raluca

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The main theme of this paper is the role of organizational culture in a company and its way of expression within the organization, for its management, for its employees and for its competition. Organizational culture is undoubtedly one of the fashionable areas of management, with a relatively recent history. Its purpose is to sensitize readers to the importance of organizational culture for the success of an enterprise, and its objectives were: to define organizational culture and its influence factors, as well as to explain the role of its components in the organization as a whole and for its members. Practically, the interest in organizational culture began in the 7th decade, largely due to the performances of Japanese companies, performance explained by their specific culture. Although the concept is increasingly met in international and local literature, the process that prevents its practical implementation is the lack of scientific (theoretical research at a company´s level. The old generation of leaders lead based on knowledge acquired years ago, few are those who really consistently do research and are up to speed with the latest news in management, or in the economic field in general. This paper aims to identify key conditions that determine human activity in an organization and their relationship to the successful implementation of an organizational culture by examplifing great successes of international companies. This is relevant, not only because these companies have huge incomes and recorded notable successes, but also because they enter and develop on the local market, trying to implement their thinking. Thus, local businesses can improve their business by adopting and adapting this way of thinking. The rezults of the research results reflect the fact that despite the concept that people are the main value of an organization, companies continue to ignore their employees, instead seeking the magic formula, the immediate solution

  2. Quantitative analysis of organizational culture in occupational health research: a theory-based validation in 30 workplaces of the organizational culture profile instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background This study advances a measurement approach for the study of organizational culture in population-based occupational health research, and tests how different organizational culture types are associated with psychological distress, depression, emotional exhaustion, and well-being. Methods Data were collected over a sample of 1,164 employees nested in 30 workplaces. Employees completed the 26-item OCP instrument. Psychological distress was measured with the General Health Questionnaire (12-item); depression with the Beck Depression Inventory (21-item); and emotional exhaustion with five items from the Maslach Burnout Inventory general survey. Exploratory factor analysis evaluated the dimensionality of the OCP scale. Multilevel regression models estimated workplace-level variations, and the contribution of organizational culture factors to mental health and well-being after controlling for gender, age, and living with a partner. Results Exploratory factor analysis of OCP items revealed four factors explaining about 75% of the variance, and supported the structure of the Competing Values Framework. Factors were labeled Group, Hierarchical, Rational and Developmental. Cronbach’s alphas were high (0.82-0.89). Multilevel regression analysis suggested that the four culture types varied significantly between workplaces, and correlated with mental health and well-being outcomes. The Group culture type best distinguished between workplaces and had the strongest associations with the outcomes. Conclusions This study provides strong support for the use of the OCP scale for measuring organizational culture in population-based occupational health research in a way that is consistent with the Competing Values Framework. The Group organizational culture needs to be considered as a relevant factor in occupational health studies. PMID:23642223

  3. Quantitative analysis of organizational culture in occupational health research: a theory-based validation in 30 workplaces of the organizational culture profile instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Alain; Haines, Victor Y; Dextras-Gauthier, Julie

    2013-05-04

    This study advances a measurement approach for the study of organizational culture in population-based occupational health research, and tests how different organizational culture types are associated with psychological distress, depression, emotional exhaustion, and well-being. Data were collected over a sample of 1,164 employees nested in 30 workplaces. Employees completed the 26-item OCP instrument. Psychological distress was measured with the General Health Questionnaire (12-item); depression with the Beck Depression Inventory (21-item); and emotional exhaustion with five items from the Maslach Burnout Inventory general survey. Exploratory factor analysis evaluated the dimensionality of the OCP scale. Multilevel regression models estimated workplace-level variations, and the contribution of organizational culture factors to mental health and well-being after controlling for gender, age, and living with a partner. Exploratory factor analysis of OCP items revealed four factors explaining about 75% of the variance, and supported the structure of the Competing Values Framework. Factors were labeled Group, Hierarchical, Rational and Developmental. Cronbach's alphas were high (0.82-0.89). Multilevel regression analysis suggested that the four culture types varied significantly between workplaces, and correlated with mental health and well-being outcomes. The Group culture type best distinguished between workplaces and had the strongest associations with the outcomes. This study provides strong support for the use of the OCP scale for measuring organizational culture in population-based occupational health research in a way that is consistent with the Competing Values Framework. The Group organizational culture needs to be considered as a relevant factor in occupational health studies.

  4. Organizational culture and relationship marketing: an interorganizational perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Larentis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – This paper aimed to analyze the contribution of interorganizational relationships, specifically between suppliers and clients, to organizational cultural changes. Design/methodology/approach – A qualitative multiple case study in two marketing channels was performed, through in-depth interviews, observation and data analysis based on grounded theory. Findings – The contribution of trust, commitment, cooperation and learning processes has been identified in the organizational cultural changes and in the reduction of the role conflicts of the boundary spanners. Also, the role of employee turnover to weaken these dimensions and respective relations has been noticed. Originality/value – The development of an interorganizational culture has been evidenced, as a system of symbols and meanings shared by groups or individuals from different organizations, on a transitional basis, with the predominance of the cultural perspective of fragmentation. It is a culture originated from relationships through intersections of cultures, a culture of boundaries.

  5. Transaction Costs, Property Rights, and Organizational Culture: An Exchange Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth R.

    1983-01-01

    Applying the language of exchange theory, this paper analyses how organizational culture emerges out of the institutional arrangements developed to regulate the transactions between members. Transaction costs of social exchange, the characteristics and etiology of those institutional arrangements, and three ideal-typical cultural forms are…

  6. Do Organizational Culture and Climate Matter for Successful Client Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver Wolf, David A. Patterson; Dulmus, Catherine N.; Maguin, Eugene; Cristalli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The existing literature on the impact of workplace conditions on client care suggests that good cultures and climates provide the best outcomes for clients. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between organizational culture and climate and the proportion of children and youth successfully discharged…

  7. Organizational Climate Determinants of Resident Safety Culture in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnetz, Judith E.; Zhdanova, Ludmila S.; Elsouhag, Dalia; Lichtenberg, Peter; Luborsky, Mark R.; Arnetz, Bengt B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: In recent years, there has been an increasing focus on the role of safety culture in preventing costly adverse events, such as medication errors and falls, among nursing home residents. However, little is known regarding critical organizational determinants of a positive safety culture in nursing homes. The aim of this study…

  8. The Relationship between Organizational Culture and Employees’ Job Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V V Barabanshchikova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of research is job motivation level and organization culture type dependence analysis in the context of recruitment and employee appraisal professionals. A significant influence of the clan, adhocratic, and bureaucratic type of organizational culture on the level of work motivation of employees was found.

  9. Building a Strong Culture That Produces Sustainable Performance - 13444

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, John A. Jr

    2013-01-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) has been involved with culture improvement for a number of years which has included co-chairing the industry effort to develop the EFCOG safety culture guidance documents [1, 2], and integration of this guidance into organizational processes and behavior expectations, described in more detail below. As various organizational cultural assessments have been periodically performed, and subsequent actions implemented to address improvement opportunities, organizational performance has shown improvement. Culture improvement is evident in the company's industrial safety statistics, event rates, safety culture survey results, employee morale, productivity, leadership effectiveness, and employee engagement. There does appear to be a relationship between striving to demonstrate behaviors consistent with excellent safety culture and good organizational performance over the past couple of years at WRPS. As performance continues to be evaluated, an improvement opportunity was identified to further enhance performance through field oriented behavioral/cultural improvement activities. WRPS recently conducted a three month effort to improve consistent implementation of management expectations by increasing management field presence with a focus on interacting real-time with workers and first line supervisors, and changing behaviors as appropriate. (authors)

  10. Building a Strong Culture That Produces Sustainable Performance - 13444

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, John A. Jr [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, PO Box 850, MSIN R2-53, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) has been involved with culture improvement for a number of years which has included co-chairing the industry effort to develop the EFCOG safety culture guidance documents [1, 2], and integration of this guidance into organizational processes and behavior expectations, described in more detail below. As various organizational cultural assessments have been periodically performed, and subsequent actions implemented to address improvement opportunities, organizational performance has shown improvement. Culture improvement is evident in the company's industrial safety statistics, event rates, safety culture survey results, employee morale, productivity, leadership effectiveness, and employee engagement. There does appear to be a relationship between striving to demonstrate behaviors consistent with excellent safety culture and good organizational performance over the past couple of years at WRPS. As performance continues to be evaluated, an improvement opportunity was identified to further enhance performance through field oriented behavioral/cultural improvement activities. WRPS recently conducted a three month effort to improve consistent implementation of management expectations by increasing management field presence with a focus on interacting real-time with workers and first line supervisors, and changing behaviors as appropriate. (authors)

  11. The effects of alignments: examining group faultlines, organizational cultures, and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrukova, Katerina; Thatcher, Sherry M B; Jehn, Karen A; Spell, Chester S

    2012-01-01

    By integrating literature on group faultlines, organizational cultures, and value congruence, this research presents a framework that explains how cultural alignment across organizational levels may influence the relationship between faultlines and performance. The hypotheses were tested using representatively sampled multisource qualitative and quantitative data on 138 teams from a Fortune 500 company. The present findings demonstrate that although informational faultlines were detrimental for group performance, the negative relationship between faultlines and performance was reversed when cultures with a strong emphasis on results were aligned, was lessened when cultures with a weak emphasis on results were aligned, and remained negative when cultures were misaligned with respect to their results orientation. These findings show the importance of recognizing alignments not only within groups (group faultlines) but also outside groups (cultural alignments between the group and departments) when considering their implications for group performance.

  12. Organizational culture and work-related attitudes among staff in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska-Simmons, Elzbieta

    2006-02-01

    In this study, the author examines the relationship between staff perceptions of organizational culture and their work-related attitudes in assisted living. Data were collected from 317 staff in 61 facilities using self-administered questionnaires. Staff who had more favorable perceptions of organizational culture reported greater job satisfaction, coworker satisfaction, and organizational commitment. Among the dimensions of organizational culture, perceptions of teamwork had the strongest influence on satisfaction with coworkers, and perceptions of organizational morale had the strongest influence on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Those who want to improve staff attitudes should focus on creating organizational cultures that promote teamwork and high organizational morale.

  13. Relationship between organizational culture, leadership behavior and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yafang

    2011-05-14

    Organizational culture refers to the beliefs and values that have existed in an organization for a long time, and to the beliefs of the staff and the foreseen value of their work that will influence their attitudes and behavior. Administrators usually adjust their leadership behavior to accomplish the mission of the organization, and this could influence the employees' job satisfaction. It is therefore essential to understand the relationship between organizational culture, leadership behavior and job satisfaction of employees. A cross-sectional study was undertaken that focused on hospital nurses in Taiwan. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire; 300 questionnaires were distributed and 200 valid questionnaires were returned. To test the reliability of the data, they were analyzed by Cronbach's α and confirmatory factors. Correlation analysis was used on the relationships between organizational cultures, leadership behavior and job satisfaction. Organizational cultures were significantly (positively) correlated with leadership behavior and job satisfaction, and leadership behavior was significantly (positively) correlated with job satisfaction. The culture within an organization is very important, playing a large role in whether it is a happy and healthy environment in which to work. In communicating and promoting the organizational ethos to employees, their acknowledgement and acceptance of it can influence their work behavior and attitudes. When the interaction between the leadership and employees is good, the latter will make a greater contribution to team communication and collaboration, and will also be encouraged to accomplish the mission and objectives assigned by the organization, thereby enhancing job satisfaction.

  14. Organizational culture influences health care workers' influenza immunization behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Nicole; Roemheld-Hamm, Beatrix; Crosson, Jesse C; Dicicco-Bloom, Barbara; Winston, Carla A

    2009-03-01

    Low rates of influenza immunization among health care workers (HCWs) pose a potential health risk to patients in primary care practices. Despite previous educational efforts and programs to reduce financial barriers, HCW influenza immunization rates remain low. Variation in practice-level organizational culture may affect immunization rates. To explore this relationship, we examined organizational cultures and HCWs' influenza immunization behaviors in three family medicine practices. We used a multi-method comparative case study. A field researcher used participant observation, in-depth interviews, and key informant interviews to collect data in each practice in November-December 2003. A diverse team used grounded theory to analyze text data. Organizational culture varied among practices and differing HCW immunization rates were observed. The most structured and business-like practice achieved immunization of all HCWs, while the other two practices exhibited greater variation in HCW immunization rates. Physicians in the practices characterized as chaotic/disorganized or divided were immunized at higher rates than other members of the practices. In these practices, organizational culture was associated with varying rates of influenza immunization for HCWs, especially among nonphysicians. Addressing elements of organizational culture such as beliefs regarding influenza immunization and office policies may facilitate the immunization of all staff members.

  15. Relationship between Organizational Culture and Workplace Bullying among Korean Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yuseon; Kang, Jiyeon

    2016-09-01

    To identify the relationship between organizational culture and experience of workplace bullying among Korean nurses. Participants were 298 hospital nurses in Busan, South Korea. We assessed nursing organizational culture and workplace bullying among nurses using structured questionnaires from July 1 through August 15, 2014. Most participants considered their organizational culture as hierarchy-oriented (45.5%), followed by relation-oriented (36.0%), innovation-oriented (10.4%), and task-oriented (8.1%). According to the operational bullying criteria, the prevalence of workplace bullying was 15.8%. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds of being a victim of bullying were 2.58 times as high among nurses in a hierarchy-oriented culture as among nurses in a relation-oriented culture [95% confidence interval (1.12, 5.94)]. The results suggest that the types of nursing organizational culture are related to workplace bullying in Korean nurses. Further research is needed to develop interventions that can foster relation-oriented cultures to prevent workplace bullying in nurses. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. The Trauma Center Organizational Culture Survey: development and conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew L; Wehbe-Janek, Hania; Subacius, Haris; Pinto, Ruxandra; Nathens, Avery B

    2015-01-01

    The Trauma Center Organizational Culture Survey (TRACCS) instrument was developed to assess organizational culture of trauma centers enrolled in the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Program (ACS TQIP). The objective is to provide evidence on the psychometric properties of the factors of TRACCS and describe the current organizational culture of TQIP-enrolled trauma centers. A cross-sectional study was conducted by surveying a sampling of employees at 174 TQIP-enrolled trauma centers. Data collection was preceded by multistep survey development. Psychometric properties were assessed by an exploratory factor analysis (construct validity) and the item-total correlations and Cronbach alpha were calculated (internal reliability). Statistical outcomes of the survey responses were measured by descriptive statistics and mixed effect models. The response rate for trauma center participation in the study was 78.7% (n = 137). The factor analysis resulted in 16 items clustered into three factors as described: opportunity, pride, and diversity, trauma center leadership, and employee respect and recognition. TRACCS was found to be highly reliable with a Cronbach alpha of 0.90 in addition to the three factors (0.91, 0.90, and 0.85). Considerable variability of TRACCS overall and factor score among hospitals was measured, with the largest interhospital deviations among trauma center leadership. More than 80% of the variability in the responses occurred within rather than between hospitals. TRACCS was developed as a reliable tool for measuring trauma center organizational culture. Relationships between TQIP outcomes and measured organizational culture are under investigation. Trauma centers could apply TRACCS to better understand current organizational culture and how change tools can impact culture and subsequent patient and process outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Moving Towards Culturally Competent Health Systems: Organizational and Market Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Elliott, Marc; Pradhan, Rohit; Schiller, Cameron; Dreachslin, Janice; Hays, Ron D.

    2012-01-01

    Cultural competency has been proposed as an organizational strategy to address racial/ethnic disparities in the health care system; disparities are a long-standing policy challenge whose relevance is only increasing with the increasing population diversity of the US and across the world. Using an integrative conceptual framework based on the resource dependency and institutional theories, we examine the relationship between organizational and market factors and hospitals’ degree of cultural competency. Our sample consists of 119 hospitals located in the state of California (US) and is constructed using the following datasets for the year 2006: Cultural Competency Assessment Tool of Hospitals (CCATH) Survey, California’s Office of Statewide Health Planning & Development’s Hospital Inpatient Discharges and Annual Hospital Financial Data, American Hospital Association’s Annual Survey, and the Area Resource File. The dependent variable consists of the degree of hospital cultural competency, as assessed by the CCATH overall score. Organizational variables include ownership status, teaching hospital, payer mix, size, system membership, financial performance, and the proportion of inpatient racial/ethnic minorities. Market characteristics included hospital competition, the proportion of racial/ethnic minorities in the area, metropolitan area, and per capita income. Regression analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between the CCATH overall score and organizational and market variables. Our results show that hospitals which are not-for-profit, serve a more diverse inpatient population, and are located in more competitive and affluent markets exhibit a higher degree of cultural competency. Our results underscore the importance of both institutional and competitive market pressures in guiding hospital behavior. For instance, while not-for-profit may adopt innovative/progressive policies like cultural competency simply as a function of their organizational

  18. Moving towards culturally competent health systems: organizational and market factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Elliott, Marc N; Pradhan, Rohit; Schiller, Cameron; Dreachslin, Janice; Hays, Ron D

    2012-09-01

    Cultural competency has been proposed as an organizational strategy to address racial/ethnic disparities in the healthcare system; disparities are a long-standing policy challenge whose relevance is only increasing with the increasing population diversity of the US and across the world. Using an integrative conceptual framework based on the resource dependency and institutional theories, we examine the relationship between organizational and market factors and hospitals' degree of cultural competency. Our sample consists of 119 hospitals located in the state of California (US) and is constructed using the following datasets for the year 2006: Cultural Competency Assessment Tool of Hospitals (CCATH) Survey, California's Office of Statewide Health Planning & Development's Hospital Inpatient Discharges and Annual Hospital Financial Data, American Hospital Association's Annual Survey, and the Area Resource File. The dependent variable consists of the degree of hospital cultural competency, as assessed by the CCATH overall score. Organizational variables include ownership status, teaching hospital, payer mix, size, system membership, financial performance, and the proportion of inpatient racial/ethnic minorities. Market characteristics included hospital competition, the proportion of racial/ethnic minorities in the area, metropolitan area, and per capita income. Regression analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between the CCATH overall score and organizational and market variables. Our results show that hospitals which are not-for-profit, serve a more diverse inpatient population, and are located in more competitive and affluent markets exhibit a higher degree of cultural competency. Our results underscore the importance of both institutional and competitive market pressures in guiding hospital behavior. For instance, while not-for-profit may adopt innovative/progressive policies like cultural competency simply as a function of their organizational goals

  19. Demystifying and improving organizational culture in health-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrin, Karen L; Currey, Hal S

    2011-01-01

    Organizational culture is defined as the shared values and beliefs that guide behavior within each organization, and it matters because it is related to performance. While culture is generally considered important, it is mysterious and intangible to most leaders. The first step toward understanding organizational culture is to measure it properly. This chapter describes methods for measuring culture in health-care organizations and how these methods were implemented in a large academic medical center. Because of the consistent empirical link between the dimension of communication, other culture dimensions, and employee satisfaction, special attention is focused in this area. Specifically, a case study of successful communication behaviors during a major "change management" initiative at a large academic medical center is described. In summary, the purpose of this chapter is to demystify the concept of culture and demonstrate how to improve it.

  20. Organizational culture and climate for promoting innovativeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, M Lindell

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the experiences of nurse leaders and nurses in a hospital whose patient care mission was stated as innovation. Nurses are critically positioned to provide creative and innovative solutions that make a difference in the lives of patients, organizations, communities, and the profession. This 2-phase qualitative study used a content analysis and thematic analysis approach to describe experiences and to generate a beginning conceptual framework of the experience. Results from phase 1 and phase 2 of this study demonstrate that innovativeness in nursing is a multifaceted phenomenon consisting of workplace antecedents followed by a social process. Nursing innovation requires organizational commitment to allow employees to inquire and question organizational practices and issues on behalf of the mission, patient care, and nursing practice.

  1. Dynamics of organizational culture: Individual beliefs vs. social conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinas, Christos; Allan, Neil; Johansson, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The complex nature of organizational culture challenges our ability to infer its underlying dynamics from observational studies. Recent computational studies have adopted a distinctly different view, where plausible mechanisms are proposed to describe a wide range of social phenomena, including the onset and evolution of organizational culture. In this spirit, this work introduces an empirically-grounded, agent-based model which relaxes a set of assumptions that describes past work-(a) omittance of an individual's strive for achieving cognitive coherence; (b) limited integration of important contextual factors-by utilizing networks of beliefs and incorporating social rank into the dynamics. As a result, we illustrate that: (i) an organization may appear to be increasingly coherent in terms of its organizational culture, yet be composed of individuals with reduced levels of coherence; (ii) the components of social conformity-peer-pressure and social rank-are influential at different aggregation levels.

  2. Organizational Culture and ISD Practices: Comparative Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovaska, Päivi; Juvonen, Pasi

    This chapter reports results from a study that aims to analyze and compare the literature related to custom IS, packaged, and open source software organizational cultures, and their systems development practices. The comparative analysis is performed using a framework for organizational culture as lenses to the literature. Our study suggests that the beliefs and values of these three communities of practice differ remarkably and make their organizational culture and systems development practices different. The most important differences were found in business milieu, ISD team efforts, ISD approaches, and products and quality. Based on the study we can question the widely held wisdom of methods, techniques, and tools in systems development and managing its efforts. Our study has several implications for research and practice, which are discussed in this chapter.

  3. Analysis of the effect of leadership and organizational culture on the organizational effectiveness of radiological technologist's working environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.H.; Kim, C.S.; Kim, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to present ideas to upgrade job performance and improve organizational management by analyzing leadership aspects and organizational cultures of radiological technologist organizations. Method: A questionnaire was used to collect data from 261 radiological technologists working in the city of Busan. Then, SPSS/PC + Win 13 was used to statistically analyze the collected data. One-way ANOVA was adopted to test differences among groups, and multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the effect of organizational culture and leadership upon organizational effectiveness. Results: First, it was found that radiological technologists stressed consensus most among the 4 types of organizational culture and regarded core transformational leadership as the right type of leadership. Second, regarding the relationship between leadership and organizational effectiveness, transformational leadership had the highest influence upon organizational effectiveness. Third, as for the relationship between organizational culture and organizational effectiveness, it was found that a developmental culture has the highest influence upon organizational effectiveness, followed by a culture of consensus. Conclusion: If transformational leadership and consensual culture are used properly for upgrading job performance in the organization, conflicts among radiological technologists might be reduced, thereby enhancing organizational effectiveness.

  4. Culture Matters in Successful Curriculum Change: An International Study of the Influence of National and Organizational Culture Tested With Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jippes, Mariëlle; Driessen, Erik W; Broers, Nick J; Majoor, Gerard D; Gijselaers, Wim H; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2015-07-01

    National culture has been shown to play a role in curriculum change in medical schools, and business literature has described a similar influence of organizational culture on change processes in organizations. This study investigated the impact of both national and organizational culture on successful curriculum change in medical schools internationally. The authors tested a literature-based conceptual model using multilevel structural equation modeling. For the operationalization of national and organizational culture, the authors used Hofstede's dimensions of culture and Quinn and Spreitzer's competing values framework, respectively. To operationalize successful curriculum change, the authors used two derivates: medical schools' organizational readiness for curriculum change developed by Jippes and colleagues, and change-related behavior developed by Herscovitch and Meyer. The authors administered a questionnaire in 2012 measuring the described operationalizations to medical schools in the process of changing their curriculum. Nine hundred ninety-one of 1,073 invited staff members from 131 of 345 medical schools in 56 of 80 countries completed the questionnaire. An initial poor fit of the model improved to a reasonable fit by two suggested modifications which seemed theoretically plausible. In sum, characteristics of national culture and organizational culture, such as a certain level of risk taking, flexible policies and procedures, and strong leadership, affected successful curriculum change. National and organizational culture influence readiness for change in medical schools. Therefore, medical schools considering curriculum reform should anticipate the potential impact of national and organizational culture.

  5. EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE IN GALATI COUNTY BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela GHEORGHE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on data collected as part of the COMOR Project, developed by The Scientific Society of Management from Romania, for the analysis of organizational culture in the Romanian business environment, we have initiated an exploration using Business Intelligence tools. The purpose of this analysis is to find relevant information about the organizational culture for Galati County, starting from the results obtained in this project, and, using data mining techniques, to investigate relationships and links between responses to different survey questions, in this "mine" data, gathered by the project team effort.

  6. The relationship between information, organizational culture and decision making in an organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Danelon Lopes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Includes a documentary research on the relationship between information, organizational culture and decision making in an organization. Objective: The goal is to check the influence of information, considering the organizational culture, decision making in an organization. Methodology: The literature review include authors specialized in the areas of information (Belkin; Borko; Capurro; Choo; Tarapanoff; among others; culture (Fleury et al.; Moraes and Fadel; Nassar and Schein, decision making (Angeloni; Hoppen; Leitão and Nassif; Lousada and Valentim and Oliveira and organization (Bernardes and Marcondes and Maximiano. Results: That there may be a strong interdependency between information, culture and decision making in an organization. Conclusions: The information can facilitate understanding of the culture of an organization, how the processes of change occur and what alternatives can be raised so that she can achieve success in their decision-making process in order to ensure its perpetuation over time.

  7. Disability management and organizational culture in Australia and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buys, Nicholas; Wagner, Shannon; Randall, Christine; Harder, Henry; Geisen, Thomas; Yu, Ignatius; Hassler, Benedikt; Howe, Caroline; Fraess-Phillips, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Organizational culture has received increasing attention in terms of its influence on workplace health and productivity, yet there has been little research on its relationship with employer-based disability programs. This study explored the relationship between disability management and organizational culture in Australian and Canadian organizations. Thematic analysis was conducted on data from semi-structured interviews with 16 employees, including injured workers, human resource managers and disability managers in two Australian and two Canadian large organizations. Seven themes were identified: 1. Consistency between espoused beliefs and artifacts in organization; 2. Genuineness of interest in well-being of injured worker; 3. Level of ongoing support of worker following injury; 4. Communication with injured workers; 5. Level of support from supervisors and co-workers; 6. Promptness in claims processing and covering medical costs and; 7. Focus on wellness and injury prevention. It was found that organizational culture may impact the delivery and perceived value of employer-based disability management programs. Given the potential relationship between organizational culture and disability management, employers should facilitate a positive workplace culture by ensuring consistency among underlying values, espoused values and actual treatment of employees, including injured workers.

  8. A Model to align the organizational culture to Lean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrsa Taherimashhadi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Since the emergence of Lean Manufacturing many organizations strived to implement it. Nonetheless, sustainable Lean transformation is not as easy as to be simply achieved. Several aspects need to be taken into account before Lean implementation which national and organizational culture are important. By considering influences of national culture on the organizational culture, this paper aims at proposing an evaluation model to determine the cultural weaknesses of an organization and give some recommendations to manage people before implementing Lean. Design/methodology/approach: This research has been conducted based on literature review survey and semi-structured interviews. Research papers, conference proceedings, books, and official websites regarding Lean philosophy were reviewed to find the influence of national culture in Lean implementation. Different databases were scrutinized, from 2015 to 2017, containing Scopus and Web of Science with the time period of 1996-2016. A set of key terms and their combinations were used including: Toyota Production system, Lean production, Lean manufacturing, Lean management, Transformation, Implementation, Barriers/ Impediments/Challenges/Difficulties, Human resources, Success factors, Organizational culture, and National culture. Findings: The proposed evaluation model is a guide for organizations to determine cultural misalignments between the corporate culture and the Lean culture before its implementation and gives some managerial recommendations to correct them. Originality/value: This study is the first attempt to integrate the national models   with Lean culture to provide an evaluation model and some recommendations to help the organization to align its culture to Lean culture before its implementation.

  9. The influence of organizational culture on intellectual capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Amalia Trillo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper tries to analyse the connection between organizational culture and intellectual capital. Nowadays, the possibility of incorporating cultural capital as a factor that distinguishes the strategic–social concept of intellectual capital in the actual knowledge society is being studied. In order to this, the elements that form organizational culture in each one of the five capitals of the “Intellectus Model” have been selected. They constitute an independent capital called cultural capital. A suggestion for the future is the possibility of creating a new model. Its peculiarity is the cultural capital incorporation as a distinguishing component. This would allow relating the intangible assets elements and variables depending on the organizational culture context. It is necessary to consider than this proposal must take into account the culture as a key element, in which is based the internal logic of the model. It also provides it with the necessary dynamic structure in a competitive and changing society as ours is.

  10. The mediating effect of organizational culture on the relationship between transformational leadership and organizational citizenship behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keramat Esmi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contemporary studies of organizational citizenship behavior (OCB are recognized as essential for modern organizations. These studies indicate that organizations with more emphasis on the OCB are healthier and more successful. The results also show that employees, who act beyond their job duties and exert OCB, belong to high productivity workgroup and enterprise with excellent quality in comparison to employees with low level of OCB. Therefore, the investigation of antecedents of organizational citizenship behavior can help the organizations to improve and reinforce it. Thus, the present study aimed at investigating the mediating effect of organizational culture on the relationship between transformational leadership and OCB. Method: A descriptive correlation research method was employed in this study. A total of 160 experts at Shiraz University were selected as the research sample through simple random sampling method using Cochran’s formula. Moreover, the study employed three instruments, namely Bass and Avolio’s transformational leadership questionnaire, Podsakoff’s et al.’s (1990 organizational citizenship behavior scale, and Denison organizational culture survey (2006. It is noted that the reliability of all the scales was obtained through Cronbach’s alpha coefficient. To analyze the research data, Pearson coefficient and structural equation modeling were used through SPSS 22 and Lisrel 8.8 software. Results: The results indicated that of dimensions of transformational leadership, inspirational motivation (β=0.33, and individualized consideration (β=-0.23 directly influenced OCB. Moreover, these two dimensions indirectly influenced OCB through organizational culture (dimension of involvement. The direct and indirect (β=0.16 effect of inspirational motivation on OCB was positive whereas individualized consideration directly had a negative and indirectly (β=0.14 a positive effect on OCB. Two other dimensions of

  11. Improving Teaching Effectiveness: Merit Pay vs. Organizational Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushardt, Stephen C.; Fowler, Aubrey R.

    1987-01-01

    Identifies four conditions which cause merit pay systems to fail to increase teacher performance: lack of skills, the poor timing of rewards, an inability to measure performance; and competing reinforcers. Explains why organizational culture is a more effective mediator of rewards. (SD)

  12. Contrasting Perspectives on Organizational Culture Change in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Michael; James, Chris; Beales, Bill

    2011-01-01

    The concept of organizational culture continues to be widely used for descriptive and explanatory purposes in academic, policy, and managerial debates in education and other contexts. The range of perspectives on its meaning, which are readily apparent in both educational and non-educational literature, is directly relevant to the analysis of…

  13. Measuring School Foodservice Workers’ Perceptions of Organizational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    School foodservice workers (SFW) are a direct link to children eating school meals. SFW who perceive positive and supportive organizational culture at their school nutrition departments also may perceive that such environments foster their own promotion of healthful food choices by students. To date...

  14. Digital work in a pre-digital organizational culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davison, R.M.; Ou, C.X.J.; Te'eni, D.; Avgerou, C.

    2014-01-01

    Digital natives constitute the majority of new employees entering the marketplace. However, they face an organizational corporate culture that enshrines the vested interests of a very different generation of people, whom they would characterize as digital immigrants or even dinosaurs. This

  15. The Impact of New Information Technology on Bureaucratic Organizational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Virtual work environments (VWEs) have been used in the private sector for more than a decade, but the United States Marine Corps (USMC), as a whole, has not yet taken advantage of associated benefits. The USMC construct parallels the bureaucratic organizational culture and uses an antiquated information technology (IT) infrastructure. During an…

  16. The relationship between organizational culture and moralism of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between organizational culture and principals' moralism in junior schools of high School, which was conducted by descriptive correlation method. The sample size of this study consisted of all principals in junior schools of high Schools in district 3 of Karaj city that according to ...

  17. Impact of staff organizational culture on the implementation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study surveyed the Impact of Library Staff Organizational Culture on the Implementation of Automation in Libraries of Federal Universities in the North- East Zone of Nigeria. The objectives of the Study were to determine: the level of implementation of automation of libraries in Federal Universities of the North- East Zone ...

  18. Organizational Culture and Performance of Paith-Based Universities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines the impact of organizational culture on the performances of faith-based Universities in Ogun State, Nigeria. The study adopted a survey research design. The population of the study is the entire employees of the selected faith-based Universities in Ogun State. Primary data were used for the study.

  19. Relationship between power resources and organizational culture in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study intended to survey the relationship between power resource and organizational culture in Aras Free Zone. Statistical population consisted of all employees of Aras Free Zone (N=950). Samples population is selected using simple randomly method and Morghan table (n= 275). Methodology of this study is allied ...

  20. Legitimating Clinical Research in the Study of Organizational Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Edgar H.

    1993-01-01

    Argues that traditional research model used in industrial-organizational psychology is not useful in understanding deeper dynamics of organizations, especially those phenomena labeled as "cultural." Contends that use of data obtained during clinical and consulting work should be legitimated as valid research data. Spells out clinical model and…

  1. Organizational culture in the primary healthcare setting of Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariadou, Theodora; Zannetos, Savvas; Pavlakis, Andreas

    2013-03-24

    The concept of organizational culture is important in understanding the behaviour of individuals in organizations as they manage external demands and internal social changes. Cyprus healthcare system is under restructuring and soon a new healthcare scheme will be implemented starting at the Primary Healthcare (PHC) level. The aim of the study was to investigate the underlying culture encountered in the PHC setting of Cyprus and to identify possible differences in desired and prevailing cultures among healthcare professionals. The population of the study included all general practitioners (GPs) and nursing staff working at the 42 PHC centres throughout the island. The shortened version of the Organizational Culture Profile questionnaire comprising 28 statements on organizational values was used in the study. The instrument was already translated and validated in Greek and cross-cultural adaptation was performed. Participants were required to indicate the organization's characteristic cultural values orientation along a five-point Likert scale ranging from "Very Much = 1" to "Not at all= 5". Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 16.0. Student t-test was used to compare means between two groups of variables whereas for more than two groups analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied. From the total of 306 healthcare professionals, 223 participated in the study (72.9%). The majority of participants were women (75.3%) and mean age was 42.6 ± 10.7 years. Culture dimension "performance orientation" was the desired culture among healthcare professionals (mean: 1.39 ± 0.45). "Supportiveness" and "social responsibility" were the main cultures encountered in PHC (means: 2.37 ± 0.80, 2.38 ± 0.83). Statistical significant differences were identified between desired and prevailing cultures for all culture dimensions (p= 0.000). This was the first study performed in Cyprus assessing organizational culture in the PHC setting. In the forthcoming health system reform

  2. ANALYSING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE TYPE AND RISKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silviu CÂRSTINA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern studies regarding the employees’ degree of satisfaction in what the work environment is concerned reveal a strong connection between the leadership style practiced by the manager and the achievements and the enthusiasm shown by the employees. Therefore, specialists have noticed that the motivational factors don’t imply only material motivational factors, such as the salary, the work environment, but also a series of moral factors like the acknowledgement of one’s merits, the appreciation of the effort invested (for example, being promoted in the company can validate the employees’ competences or the possibility that the employee has of organizing his/ her own activity. By this it is meant that the rigid and authoritarian figure of the leader should fade off, which on various occasions inhibits creativity or the employee’s power of making a decision, by having damaging aftermaths concerning the level of performance or the quality of the products. In this respect, the study aims at an evaluation within a private company, in order to establish the kind of relationship between the two cultural dimensions concerning the human resources, i. e. the organizational leadership and the management of employees.

  3. The associations between organizational culture, organizational structure and quality management in European hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, C; Mannion, R; Hammer, A; Groene, O; Arah, O A; Dersarkissian, M; Suñol, R

    2014-04-01

    To better understand associations between organizational culture (OC), organizational management structure (OS) and quality management in hospitals. A multi-method, multi-level, cross-sectional observational study. As part of the DUQuE project (Deepening our Understanding of Quality improvement in Europe), a random sample of 188 hospitals in 7 countries (France, Poland, Turkey, Portugal, Spain, Germany and Czech Republic) participated in a comprehensive questionnaire survey and a one-day on-site surveyor audit. Respondents for this study (n = 158) included professional quality managers and hospital trustees. Extent of implementation of quality management systems, extent of compliance with existing management procedures and implementation of clinical quality activities. Among participating hospitals, 33% had a clan culture as their dominant culture type, 26% an open and developmental culture type, 16% a hierarchical culture type and 25% a rational culture type. The culture type had no statistically significant association with the outcome measures. Some structural characteristics were associated with the development of quality management systems. The type of OC was not associated with the development of quality management in hospitals. Other factors (not culture type) are associated with the development of quality management. An OS that uses fewer protocols is associated with a less developed quality management system, whereas an OS which supports innovation in care is associated with a more developed quality management system.

  4. Organizational Culture, 3S, and Safeguards by Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mladineo, Stephen V.; Frazar, Sarah L.

    2012-01-31

    While Safety and Security Culture are well socialized among nuclear facility designers, the concept of safeguards culture is less well defined. One area where safeguards culture may play a helpful role is in the area of Safeguards by Design. This paper will include a theoretical discussion of organizational culture, leading with safety culture and security culture that are well known, and positing that there may be room to think about safeguards culture along with the others. It will also examine the utility of the 3S concept and how this concept has been used in training for newcomer states. These will lead into a discussion of how the addition of safeguards to the mix of safety by design and security by design can be valuable, particularly as it is socialized to newcomer states.

  5. Predicting and preventing organizational failure: learning, stability and safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    The physical definition of 'safety culture' is the creation of an organizational and operational structure that places unending emphasis on safety at every level. We propose and prefer the use of the term and the objective of sustaining a 'Learning Environment', where mistakes, outcomes and errors are used as learning vehicles to improve, and we can now define why that is true. Therefore we can manage and quantify safety effectively tracking and analyzing outcomes, using the trends to guide our needed organizational behaviors. (author)

  6. Interpretation of Leadership and Organizational Culture in PostNord

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Viktor Satterup Morell; Nissen, Peter Ravnborg; Pak, Kyeong Hwoa

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, there will be an interpretivist analysis of the organizational structure and leadership in PostNord, for the period of 2009 to 2016. The research attempts to disclose the espoused values and underlying assumption in the internal structure of the organization, and also the leadership of Lars G. Nordström, Lars Idermark and Håkan Ericsson. The theory will utilize Edgar H. Schein’s definition of organizational culture and leadership by Partington 3 schools of thought from project ...

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF TOURISM ENTERPRISE PERFORMANCE IN TERMS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae PLATON

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In a society where the emphasis is placed on innovation and creativity, and where tourism companies need to be flexible to deal with the competitive environment, the management approach from the perspective of integrating a performing organizational culture is essential. The modern enterprise operates in a dynamic, environmentally-friendly environment that brings about constant changes and considerable investment efforts to take advantage of the opportunities it is offered. Of course, connecting to environmental opportunities is not an option but a necessity, especially in the current globalization process. In this article, the author describes the typology of organizational cultures, simultaneously characterizing the premises, components and cultural values specific to tourism enterprises.

  8. Organizational Culture as a Function of Institutional Type in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Jason A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether organizational culture varies as a function of institutional type in higher education, and to identify whether there exists congruence between organizational culture type and leader behavior. Utilizing the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) developed by Cameron and Quinn…

  9. A Case Study on the Influence of Organizational Culture on Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihui

    2009-01-01

    This paper tries to probe the influence of the organizational culture on language classroom at a newly-established local college. It firstly reviews the knowledge of the organizational culture and finds out its features, and then discusses how the organizational culture was greatly influenced by the host educational environment. On the basis of…

  10. Synergistic effect of the integration of the organizational culture and social capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Лариса Анатоліївна Янковська

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the organizational culture as part of the management system of control subject aimed at the formation and development of social capital organization, helping improve the management system. It is determined an interaction of organizational culture and social capital in the synergistic approach to management. Views of scientists on organizational culture and its relationship to social capital are systemized

  11. Are National and Organizational Cultures Isomorphic? Evidence from a Four Country Comparative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Rune Ellemose Gulev

    2009-01-01

    This pilot study investigates whether organizational practices as observed through differing organizational cultures systematically replicate or reject national values. It is among the first to project delineated, narrow national cultural portrayals of Germany, Austria, Slovenia and Denmark against pattern-specific organizational cultures. Through country cluster analysis and correlation tests, the results achieve significance along all three dimensions. Trust allocations, authority perceptio...

  12. Organizational safety culture and medical error reporting by Israeli nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Ilya; Barnoy, Sivia

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the association between patient safety culture (PSC) and the incidence and reporting rate of medical errors by Israeli nurses. Self-administered structured questionnaires were distributed to a convenience sample of 247 registered nurses enrolled in training programs at Tel Aviv University (response rate = 91%). The questionnaire's three sections examined the incidence of medication mistakes in clinical practice, the reporting rate for these errors, and the participants' views and perceptions of the safety culture in their workplace at three levels (organizational, departmental, and individual performance). Pearson correlation coefficients, t tests, and multiple regression analysis were used to analyze the data. Most nurses encountered medical errors from a daily to a weekly basis. Six percent of the sample never reported their own errors, while half reported their own errors "rarely or sometimes." The level of PSC was positively and significantly correlated with the error reporting rate. PSC, place of birth, error incidence, and not having an academic nursing degree were significant predictors of error reporting, together explaining 28% of variance. This study confirms the influence of an organizational safety climate on readiness to report errors. Senior healthcare executives and managers can make a major impact on safety culture development by creating and promoting a vision and strategy for quality and safety and fostering their employees' motivation to implement improvement programs at the departmental and individual level. A positive, carefully designed organizational safety culture can encourage error reporting by staff and so improve patient safety. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. The Risk of Hyper-Culture: How to Avoid It and Work With Real Organizational Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvesson, M.

    2016-01-01

    The talk addresses the issue of work with organizational culture often circling around nicely formulated, vague and idealistic words — hyper culture. These look good on power point presentations and in policy documents. They seldom work well in practical use. But senior managers, consultants, staff people and educators like the nice-sounding. It is good for status and self-esteem. And we all like what is pedagogical, astetic and reassuring. The talk addresses the phenomenon of hyper culture. And points at ways to avoid these and work with organizational practices in relation to culture. The talk draws on the presenter’s book THE TRIUMPH OF EMPTINESS. Oxford University Press. (author)

  14. Employee commitment in MNCs: impacts of organizational culture, HRM and top management orientations

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Sully; Levy, Orly; Beechler, Schon; Boyacıgiller, Nakiye Avdan; Boyacigiller, Nakiye Avdan

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of organizational culture and HRM system on employee commitment of core employees in multinational companies (MNCs). In addition, it identifies two top management team orientations global orientation and geocentric orientation that are seen as contributing uniquely to employee commitment in international firms. We found strong overall support for the model. The results also suggest that High Performance Work Practices have a positive impact on commitment r...

  15. The role of organizational culture in retaining nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Castle, Nicholas G; Lin, Michael K; Shrivastwa, Nijika; Spreitzer, Gretchen

    2015-06-01

    We examined how organizational culture in nursing homes affects staff turnover, because culture is a first step to creating satisfactory work environments. Nursing home administrators were asked in 2009 to report on facility culture and staff turnover. We received responses from 419 of 1,056 administrators contacted. Respondents reported the strength of cultural values using scales from a Competing Values Framework and percent of staff leaving annually for Registered Nurse (RN), Licensed Practice Nurse (LPN), and nursing aide (NA) staff. We estimated negative binomial models predicting turnover.  Turnover rates are lower than found in past but remain significantly higher among NAs than among RNs or LPNs. Facilities with stronger market values had increased turnover among RNs and LPNs, and among NAs when turnover was adjusted for facilities with few staff. Facilities emphasizing hierarchical internal processes had lower RN turnover. Group and developmental values focusing on staff and innovation only lowered LPN turnover. Finally, effects on NA turnover become insignificant when turnover was adjusted if voluntary turnover was reported. Organizational culture had differential effects on the turnover of RN, LPN, and NA staff that should be addressed in developing culture-change strategies. More flexible organizational culture values were important for LPN staff only, whereas unexpectedly, greater emphasis on rigid internal rules helped facilities retain RNs. Facilities with a stronger focus on customer needs had higher turnover among all staff. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Organizational and safety culture in Canadian intensive care units: relationship to size of intensive care unit and physician management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodek, Peter M; Wong, Hubert; Jaswal, Danny; Heyland, Daren K; Cook, Deborah J; Rocker, Graeme M; Kutsogiannis, Demetrios J; Dale, Craig; Fowler, Robert; Ayas, Najib T

    2012-02-01

    The objectives of this study are to describe organizational and safety culture in Canadian intensive care units (ICUs), to correlate culture with the number of beds and physician management model in each ICU, and to correlate organizational culture and safety culture. In this cross-sectional study, surveys of organizational and safety culture were administered to 2374 clinical staff in 23 Canadian tertiary care and community ICUs. For the 1285 completed surveys, scores were calculated for each of 34 domains. Average domain scores for each ICU were correlated with number of ICU beds and with intensivist vs nonintensivist management model. Domain scores for organizational culture were correlated with domain scores for safety culture. Culture domain scores were generally favorable in all ICUs. There were moderately strong positive correlations between number of ICU beds and perceived effectiveness at recruiting/retaining physicians (r = 0.58; P organizational and safety culture. Differences in perceptions between staff in larger and smaller ICUs highlight the importance of teamwork across units in larger ICUs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An Investigation of Organizational Culture Changes and Effectiveness at Jefferson College: 1963-Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Dena M.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental factor in the internal dynamics of a college is its culture. Central to understanding organizational culture is to minimize the occurrence and consequences of cultural conflict and help foster the development of shared goals. Modifying organizational culture is important. Without culture change, there is little hope of enduring…

  18. Elements of organizational culture leading to business excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Bertoncelj

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this research was to define the development of a conceptual frame to understand the impact of organizational culture on business excellence in medium-sized and large Slovenian enterprises. In our research the focus was on the importance of the role of communication structure, interpersonal relationships, motivation, and stimulation as part of knowledge management among 825 managers working in medium-sized and large Slovenian enterprises. The aim was to find out if these elements lead or contribute to business excellence. To analyse our data we applied analysis of variance as research methods. Our proposed thesis was supported since significant differences in business excellence between enterprises, different in the above mentioned elements. We can conclude that an appropriate communication structure, interpersonal relationships, motivation, stimulation and values as part of organizational culture positively affect business excellence in enterprises

  19. Organizational culture and its implications on infection prevention and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Baral

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The hospital acquired infections are becoming common in our hospitals lately. These infections are difficult to treat and maybe life threatening. Hospital acquired infection  can be minimized or eradicated by good Infection Prevention and Control guidelines and good hand hygiene practices. The success of Infection Prevention and Control guidelines program in any hospital is largely impacted by the organizational culture.  In any health care setting the management is challenged by the organizational culture to change of any kind. Where implementation of Infection Prevention and Control guidelines program is easily implemented in some hospitals it is very difficult in others. Moreover, hand hygiene is not only biomedical practice but also has more behavioral factors. 

  20. [Job satisfaction and organizational culture as predictors of absenteeism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza Llanos, Rodolfo

    2015-08-01

    Absenteeism caused by sick leaves generates an important economic burden. To determine if job satisfaction, psychological climate, hierarchic level and age are predictors of absenteeism caused by sick leaves. FOCUS-93 survey that measures organizational culture and the satisfaction scale of Warr, Cook and Wall were distributed to 1387 workers of a hospital and answered by 874. Absenteeism data was obtained from the justified absenteeism registry of the Chilean Health Services. Absenteeism is influenced by job satisfaction and organizational culture. Age has no influence. Hierarchic level has a negative influence on absenteeism among men and a negligible effect among women. Those workers that are not satisfied with their work have higher rates of absenteeism.

  1. The impact of leadership styles on organizational culture in Mapsa company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariush Gholamzadeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effect of leadership styles on organizational culture by testing a hypothesized model. A quantitative survey using questionnaire was conducted among 93 employees from diverse work units of Mapsa Company in October 2012. They filled out multifactor leadership questionnaire and the Denison organizational culture survey. Results of structural equation modeling (SEM showed that Transformational and Transactional leadership styles could positively influence on organizational culture. Laissez-fair leadership has a negative effect on organizational culture. In conclusion, transformational leadership style was recommended to balance all four traits of Denison’s organizational culture.

  2. Management potential of organizational culture in resolving business conflicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Kopytova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to determine peculiarities, essence, content, dialectic nature of correlation of business conflicts and organizational culture in developing countries (in the case of Ukraine. A special attention draws to preconditioned application of management potential of organization culture for maintaining management potential of organization culture for ensuring conflict management in business companies. The research showed that the internal reason for any business conflict cores in frameworks of interpersonal relations in the staff, which are conditioned under the impact of organization culture. This justifies its management significance in preventing and constructively resolving business conflicts in companies. The analysis of practice of management certifies that ignoring high management potential of organization culture and its inactivity in enterprises of Ukraine is a source of conflict-relatedness of social relations. The author suggests the principles to be followed in the formation of organizational culture. It will help to reduce the level of conflict in Ukrainian business organizations and will increase their efficiency and competitiveness.

  3. Methodological Approaches in the Research of Organizational Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Nebojša Janićijević

    2011-01-01

    In the thirty-years-long research of organizational culture, two mutually opposed methodological approaches have emerged: objectivistic quantitative and subjectivistic-qualitative. These two approaches are based on opposite ontological and epistemological assumptions: they include different types of research, and use opposite, quantitative vs. qualitative, methods of research. Each of the methodological approaches has its advantages and disadvantages. For this reason a hybrid approach e...

  4. Agent-based organizational modelling for analysis of safety culture at an air navigation service provider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroeve, Sybert H.; Sharpanskykh, Alexei; Kirwan, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of safety culture is done predominantly by questionnaire-based studies, which tend to reveal attitudes on immaterial characteristics (values, beliefs, norms). There is a need for a better understanding of the implications of the material aspects of an organization (structures, processes, etc.) for safety culture and their interactions with the immaterial characteristics. This paper presents a new agent-based organizational modelling approach for integrated and systematic evaluation of material and immaterial characteristics of socio-technical organizations in safety culture analysis. It uniquely considers both the formal organization and the value- and belief-driven behaviour of individuals in the organization. Results are presented of a model for safety occurrence reporting at an air navigation service provider. Model predictions consistent with questionnaire-based results are achieved. A sensitivity analysis provides insight in organizational factors that strongly influence safety culture indicators. The modelling approach can be used in combination with attitude-focused safety culture research, towards an integrated evaluation of material and immaterial characteristics of socio-technical organizations. By using this approach an organization is able to gain a deeper understanding of causes of diverse problems and inefficiencies both in the formal organization and in the behaviour of organizational agents, and to systematically identify and evaluate improvement options.

  5. Organizational Cultural Assessment of the Solar Energy Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-06-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture;'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OCS, a broad simple of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OCS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. All data from the OCS is presented in group summaries, by division, supervisory level, and staff classification. Statistically significant differences between groups are identified and discussed. The most notable finding which emerges from the OCA conducted at SERI is that it is a very homogeneous organization as indicated by the few statistically significant differences found between divisions/offices, staff classifications, and supervisory levels. The results also indicate SERI to be an organization which places a large amount of emphasis on those behaviors which are considered constructive'' (i.e., Humanistic-Encouraging, Affiliative, Achievement, Self-Actualizing) and, although to a lesser extent, on those behaviors which could be regarded as passive/defensive'' (i.e., Approval, Conventional, Dependent, Avoidance). 9 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Organizational architecture, ethical culture, and perceived unethical behavior towards customers : Evidence from wholesale banking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaal, Raymond O.S.; Jeurissen, Ronald J.M.; Groenland, Edward A.G.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we propose and test a model of the effects of organizational ethical culture and organizational architecture on the perceived unethical behavior of employees towards customers. This study also examines the relationship between organizational ethical culture and moral acceptability

  7. A Common Methodology: Using Cluster Analysis to Identify Organizational Culture across Two Workforce Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Sunny L.

    2016-01-01

    Organizational structures are comprised of an organizational culture created by the beliefs, values, traditions, policies and processes carried out by the organization. The work-life system in which individuals use work-life initiatives to achieve a work-life balance can be influenced by the type of organizational culture within one's workplace,…

  8. Organizational Learning Culture, Learning Transfer Climate and Perceived Innovation in Jordanian Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Reid; Khasawneh, Samer

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between organizational learning culture, learning transfer climate, and organizational innovation. The objective was to test the ability of learning organization culture to account for variance in learning transfer climate and subsequent organizational innovation, and to examine the role of learning transfer…

  9. Management Culture as Part of Organizational Culture in the Context of Corporate Social Responsibility Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolita Vveinhardt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is theoretically based on management culture as part of the formal organizational culture, separately reviewing some of its elements. Expert evaluation organization, process and results of the instrument shaped by the authors and meant for qualitative research are briefly presented. The structure of the instrument is detailed by presenting its component parts and explanations. The research was carried out by interviewing the top managers of two big manufacturing company groups consisting of six enterprises. The article presents passages of an interview with the top managers of the six companies, revealing management culture as part of the formal organizational culture expression aiming to implement corporate social responsibility. It should be emphasized that the companies of both groups are preparing to become socially responsible and this results in the timeliness and importance of the research. Structured interviewing method was applied for the research, and the substantive content of the interview included strategy, organizational structure, rules and regulations, technologies, processes, information systems, control and incentive issues. The results of the research show that in both groups of the manufacturing companies management culture and corporate social responsibility, analysing them in terms of formal organizational culture, are perceived in very narrow aspects and their development is not part of the organizations’ strategic goals. The results of the study suggest that the ideas of corporate social responsibility cannot be implemented in a consistent way unless they are integrated into the formal part of organisational culture which plays an instrumental role.

  10. Analyzing the Relationship of Organizational Trust and Organizational Culture with Knowledge Sharing Behavior in Teachers of Second Intermediate Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahhosseini, Sakineh; Nadi, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    The present paper aims to study the relationship of organizational trust, organizational culture with knowledge sharing behavior among teachers of Second Intermediate Period in the City of Isfahan. Research method was correlation and statistical population included all teachers of Second Intermediate Period of Isfahan in academic year 2013-2014 (N…

  11. The Study of Relationship between Organizational Culture and Organizational Belonging in Employees of Varamin County Office of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaee, Seyed Mahmoud; Koohi, Amirhasan; Ghandali, Abbas; Tajik, Tayebeh

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present research is to study the relationship between organizational culture and organizational belonging among employees of Varamin County ministry of education. This is a descriptive-survey study. The statistical population is consisted of all 274 official and contract employees of ministry of education in Varamin County of…

  12. The Role of Transformational Leadership, Organizational Culture and Organizational Learning in Improving the Performance of Iranian Agricultural Faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Enayat; Zamani-Miandashti, Naser

    2013-01-01

    This empirical research was conducted to investigate the role of transformational leadership, organizational culture and organizational learning in improving the performance of Iranian agricultural faculties and leading them to become learning organizations. The research population consisted of all faculty members of public agricultural faculties…

  13. ANALYSIS OF THE CORRELATION BETWEEN ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicu MARCU

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Romanian economic environment is often subjected to dramatic and rapid changes, so the private environment is experiencing these turbulences. In this context, private companies need to adapt to these changes, to be flexible and to migrate from external integration, i.e. customer or supplier focus, to internal integration, that is to pay attention to the increased human resources of the company. A first aspect would be detachment from the stellar concepts that extrinsic motivation is the most important motivation and channel its attention to intrinsic motivation. In this respect, modern companies are looking for ways to define themselves as flexible organizations, capable of taking over the information from the outside environment and transforming them into forecasts, as well as embracing both structural and mental changes as opportune. For this reason, the studies attach importance to the phenomenon of organizational culture, as well as to the relationship established between it and the organizational.

  14. Influence of organizational culture on quality healthcare delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Marie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify if aspects of organizational culture may indicate a new terrain in the cultural influences-quality healthcare relationship. This research stems from the author's belief that viewing the role of head of department or directorate as pivotal to health care management is critical to health care planning and quality healthcare delivery. Interviews were undertaken among 50 professional clinician and non-clinician managers working in the role of head of department, in acute care hospitals in Ireland. The sample was drawn from the total population of 850 managers, utilized in a previous survey study. Organizational culture is more complex than was previously thought. Several cultural influences such as excellence in care delivery, ethical values, involvement, professionalism, value-for-money, cost of care, commitment to quality and strategic thinking were found to be key cultural determinants in quality care delivery. Health care managers perceive that in order to deliver quality focused care they need to act in a professional, committed manner and to place excellence at the forefront of care delivery, whilst at the same time being capable of managing the tensions that exist between cost effectiveness and quality of care. These tensions require further research in order to determine if quality of care is affected in a negative manner by those tensions. Originality relates to the new cultural terrain presented in this paper that recognizes the potential of health service managers to influence the organizations' culture and through this influence to take a greater part in ensuring that quality health care is delivered to their patients. It also seems to be important that value-for-money is viewed as an ethical means of delivering healthcare, and not as a conflict between quality and cost.

  15. Developing a strong safety culture - a safety management challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, M.; Gipson, G. P.; Williams, M.

    1995-01-01

    The approach is presented adapted by Nuclear Electric to build a strong safety culture through the development of its safety management system. Two features regarded as critical to a strong safety culture are: provision of effective communications to promote an awareness and ownership of safety among craft, and commitment to continuous improvement with a genuine willingness to learn from own experiences and those from others. (N.T.) 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. Organizational Communication Based on Organizational Justice Theory for Motivating Workers with Different Cultural Values

    OpenAIRE

    山口,生史

    2002-01-01

    This study is based on organizational justice theory. Although organizational justice theory is useful for explaining organizational behavior, it has not focused on motivation, per se. ln this study, the linkage between organizational justice and motivation is explored with the mediating effect of interpersonal communication in an organization (i.e.,organizational communication).

  17. Organizational culture, team climate and diabetes care in small office-based practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Marije; Dijkstra, Rob; Wensing, Michel; van der Weijden, Trudy; Grol, Richard

    2008-08-21

    Redesigning care has been proposed as a lever for improving chronic illness care. Within primary care, diabetes care is the most widespread example of restructured integrated care. Our goal was to assess to what extent important aspects of restructured care such as multidisciplinary teamwork and different types of organizational culture are associated with high quality diabetes care in small office-based general practices. We conducted cross-sectional analyses of data from 83 health care professionals involved in diabetes care from 30 primary care practices in the Netherlands, with a total of 752 diabetes mellitus type II patients participating in an improvement study. We used self-reported measures of team climate (Team Climate Inventory) and organizational culture (Competing Values Framework), and measures of quality of diabetes care and clinical patient characteristics from medical records and self-report. We conducted multivariate analyses of the relationship between culture, climate and HbA1c, total cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and a sum score on process indicators for the quality of diabetes care, adjusting for potential patient- and practice level confounders and practice-level clustering. A strong group culture was negatively associated to the quality of diabetes care provided to patients (beta = -0.04; p = 0.04), whereas a more 'balanced culture' was positively associated to diabetes care quality (beta = 5.97; p = 0.03). No associations were found between organizational culture, team climate and clinical patient outcomes. Although some significant associations were found between high quality diabetes care in general practice and different organizational cultures, relations were rather marginal. Variation in clinical patient outcomes could not be attributed to organizational culture or teamwork. This study therefore contributes to the discussion about the legitimacy of the widespread idea that aspects of redesigning care such as teamwork and culture

  18. Organizational culture, team climate and diabetes care in small office-based practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Weijden Trudy

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Redesigning care has been proposed as a lever for improving chronic illness care. Within primary care, diabetes care is the most widespread example of restructured integrated care. Our goal was to assess to what extent important aspects of restructured care such as multidisciplinary teamwork and different types of organizational culture are associated with high quality diabetes care in small office-based general practices. Methods We conducted cross-sectional analyses of data from 83 health care professionals involved in diabetes care from 30 primary care practices in the Netherlands, with a total of 752 diabetes mellitus type II patients participating in an improvement study. We used self-reported measures of team climate (Team Climate Inventory and organizational culture (Competing Values Framework, and measures of quality of diabetes care and clinical patient characteristics from medical records and self-report. We conducted multivariate analyses of the relationship between culture, climate and HbA1c, total cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and a sum score on process indicators for the quality of diabetes care, adjusting for potential patient- and practice level confounders and practice-level clustering. Results A strong group culture was negatively associated to the quality of diabetes care provided to patients (β = -0.04; p = 0.04, whereas a more 'balanced culture' was positively associated to diabetes care quality (β = 5.97; p = 0.03. No associations were found between organizational culture, team climate and clinical patient outcomes. Conclusion Although some significant associations were found between high quality diabetes care in general practice and different organizational cultures, relations were rather marginal. Variation in clinical patient outcomes could not be attributed to organizational culture or teamwork. This study therefore contributes to the discussion about the legitimacy of the widespread idea

  19. THE MEANING IN THE CULTURE: BASIC CONCEPT TO ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ÁLVARO ENRÍQUEZ MARTÍNEZ

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on three key psychological concepts: learning, culture and meaning, the present essay proposes a conceptualbase frame, oriented toward the understanding of development in organizations into current milieu ofcompetitiveness and temporality, of the relationships among people working into them. The organizations whichare typically embedded in a context of values, needs and symbols that made up their cultures, must evolve in orderto face the demands for new developments and change, to which they are forced to. The concept of “meaning of theculture”, is presented as the base over which is build and rooted the organizational learning - in a technical and socialsense. The different types of learning are the ways in which the organizations satisfy the requirements coming fromtheir environments, in front of which must generate knowledge and consequently, new products and services,based on the people that form such organizations. The people that belong and constitutes the organization, incircumstances of temporal cohesion and within temporary working networks, must achieve results and to beadjusted to these new working and organizational facts, developing self-management and autonomy, in order tosignify and get adapted into the cultural tissue.

  20. Multilevel Analysis of Employee Satisfaction on Commitment to Organizational Culture: Case Study of Chinese State-Owned Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangtao Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the effects of employee satisfaction and demographic indicators on employee commitment to organizational culture at the enterprise level. With data from a survey of 3029 employees from 27 state-owned enterprises (SOEs, a hierarchical linear model (HLM is used to identify the influencing factors of employee commitment to organizational culture at the enterprise level. An empirical study indicates that apart from the factors of employee satisfaction and demographic background, four contextual variables of enterprises, namely, comprehensive management, energy intensity, cost-income ratio, and capacity-load ratio, also influence commitment to organizational culture levels. Results show that applying HLM can substantially improve the explanatory power of employee satisfaction factors on commitment to organizational culture using nested enterprise contextual variables. Although measurement scales and satisfaction models have been proposed over the years, only a few studies have addressed the particular nature inherent in Chinese SOEs. HLM, which accounts for the nested data structure and determines the effects of employee satisfaction factors on commitment to organizational culture without bias, is developed in this study. Through an insider view based on empirical work, this research can improve the ability of senior managers to understand the culture and dynamics of organizations, to deliver strong leadership, and to enhance corporate internal management.

  1. PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF OSAI METHODOLOGY IN ASSESSING THE ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE OF AN ENGINEERING COMPANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Biletskaya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is intended to generalize and highlight the practical application of certain science-based approaches to assessment of an engineering company’s organizational culture. The OSAI method application has enabled determining the type of the organizational culture existing within a company and the desirable type thereof, i.e. the one which would produce a positive effect on the competitive status of a company, as well as on the utilization of its human resources. This is important because an appropriate level of the organizational culture within a company would enhance the psychological climate within a company and would provide an opportunity for improving its performance. Methodology. In order to attain the goal of our research, it is necessary to diagnose the type of the organizational culture of some selected companies and draw a conclusion as to amendment of their organizational culture. In order to ensure the successful outcome of the corporate organizational culture diagnosing procedure, let us use the OSAI tool to determine the foundation of such culture. This organizational culture assessment tool helps to define the organizational culture which members of a company are to achieve in order to meet the demands and to respond to the dynamic changes in the business environment. The results showed that the assessment of organizational culture using the method made it possible to determine the OSAI required type of organizational culture on the test plants. Practical implications. Definition of recommendation type of organizational culture has enabled the leadership to change the style of his behavior and better motivate the labor collective. Pay attention to the existing problems and improve the psychological atmosphere in the team, as well as improve the efficiency of plant personnel. Value/originality. The data obtained for the four businesses lead to the conclusion that it is the method of evaluation the optimum procedure for

  2. DIAGNOSING NATIONAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE DIFFERENCES: A RESEARCH IN HOTEL ENTERPRISES

    OpenAIRE

    AKDENİZ, Defne; AYTEMİZ SEYMEN, Oya

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to test whether national culture and organizational cultures were isomorphic in accommodation establishments, through Hofstede’s cultural dimensions. Based on data from a survey of 142 employees from multinational hotels in Istanbul, the existence and degree of difference between national and organizational culture were tested. The new culture scores were calculated by calculation formulas derived from the mean scores of each culture dimension. The most important result of th...

  3. THE LINK BETWEEN ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND CORPORATE PERFORMANCE – AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Ilies

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The object of this paper is to examine organizational culture and organizational performance through an analysis of the existent culture models and the empirical studies conducted to examine the corporate culture and organizational performance link. Even though a wide literature has focused on this relationship, the link between these two variables remains unclear because of the mixing results of the empirical studies.

  4. The importance of organizational culture for the performance of service organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Vrčon-Tratar, Nataša; Snoj, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Organizational culture as an internal consciousness of organizations as well as crucial determinant of their employee behaviour serves undoubtedly as an important phenomenon of scientific research especially from the perspective of its contribution to the performance of organizations as potential factor of their comperatitive advantage. In the paper authors discuss some aspects of organizational culture and try to find out if the right orientation and the strenght of organizational culture co...

  5. Effects of Business Model Development Projects on Organizational Culture: A Multiple Case Study of SMEs

    OpenAIRE

    Ulla Santti; Tuomo Eskelinen; Mervi Rajahonka; Kaija Villman; Ari Happonen

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has shown that links between organizational culture and innovativeness/performance may act as a “social glue” that helps a company develop organizational culture as a competitive advantage. In this study of three case companies, the organizational culture change due business model development projects is studied using the Competing Values Framework (CVF) tool and interviews with respondents about discovered changes. To reveal intervention and implied effects between business...

  6. Organizational Culture and Entrepreneurial Performance in Business Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Narcisa POSTEUCĂ

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the market economy an overview is visible, according to which organizational culture is correlated with the entrepreneurial performance. Therefore, the economic actors’ behaviour is an essential component in the formation and development of entrepreneurial performance, and also is evident the correlation between the theoretic field and practices, regarding the relationship between an organizational culture and the entrepreneurial performance Moreover, methodological openings towards the new paradigms reflect different ways of approaching the knowable contents. It is about the objective analysis of the contextual situations, analysis which reflects the transmission and reception of entrepreneurial typologies that are effective on the social level. Furthermore, adopting a consensual methodology to the level of entrepreneurial dimensions legitimize precisely those social responsibilities designed to support efficiency and educational performance. For this purpose, we consider that it should be granted an important role to the connection between entrepreneurship methodology and knowledge system, depending on which the strategies initiated are operationalized. Therefore, such connections depend on the strategies assumed in the process of materialize the business performance.

  7. The role of organizational culture in improvement of professional ethics in research organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Baqi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Culture is the soul of an organization, which can cause advance or retrogress of the organization. This paper investigates the role of organizational culture on improvement and effectiveness of organizations. We identify and recognize the role of important components of organizational culture in effectiveness of professional ethics within organizations. The results show that there was a meaningful relationship between organizational interest and commitment, enhancement of stability and compatibility, teamwork moral, giving identity to the staff and the quality of professional ethics. The results obtained from the data analysis also indicate that organizational culture deeply affects the employees' behavior of an organization.

  8. Goal Translation: How To Create a Results-Focused Organizational Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourier, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    Presents a model for changing human and organizational behavior. Highlights include behavioral dynamics; expectations; alignment; organizational structure; organizational culture; individual skills and training; leadership; management systems; developing corporate-level goals; communicating goals to the organization; and developing employee goals.…

  9. Organizational Resilience and Culture a Model for Information Technology Service Management (ITSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Organizational change and organizational culture have been studied and written about by many authors, most notably by Edgar Schein (1990, 1992), and are named as critical components of organizational maturity through such industry standards as The Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI), Control Objectives for Information and Related…

  10. Organizational Communication and Culture: A Study of 10 Italian High-Technology Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Donald Dean; Shockley-Zalabak, Pamela; Cesaria, Ruggero

    1997-01-01

    Tests in international environments models previously developed within United States high-technology organizations. Demonstrates that relationships among organizational culture themes, employee values, organizational communication activities, and perceptions of a variety of organizational outcomes are similar but not identical for United States…

  11. Small Business Leadership and Organizational Culture, Job Satisfaction and Performance: Correlational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship among organizational leadership styles (criterion variables), organizational culture, and employee job satisfaction, and organizational performance (predictor variables). The study research method was the quantitative method using a correlational research design that investigated the relationship among the…

  12. Effects of Business Model Development Projects on Organizational Culture: A Multiple Case Study of SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Santti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that links between organizational culture and innovativeness/performance may act as a “social glue” that helps a company develop organizational culture as a competitive advantage. In this study of three case companies, the organizational culture change due business model development projects is studied using the Competing Values Framework (CVF tool and interviews with respondents about discovered changes. To reveal intervention and implied effects between business model development project and organizational culture changes, we used CIMO logic (context, intervention, mechanism, and outcome to bridge practice and theory by explanatory, backward-looking research. Our case studies of companies in relatively short-duration business model development projects indicate that organizational culture may have some dynamic characteristics, for example, an increase of the adhocracy organizational type in all case companies or an increase in the hierarchical leadership type in one case company. Thus, the development of an organizational culture type can be partly controlled. Our results also indicated business model development projects do have a minor effect on organizational culture, even when development activities have not been put fully into practice. However, the more comprehensively business model development project activities have been put into practice, the larger the effect on organizational culture.

  13. Perceptions of organizational culture and organizational citizenship by faculty in U.S. colleges and schools of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desselle, Shane P; Raja, Leela; Andrews, Brienna; Lui, Julia

    2018-04-01

    (1) Describe perceptions of organizational culture and prevalence of organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) among faculty at United States (U.S.) colleges/schools of pharmacy; (2) determine which aspects of those phenomena are strongest and which are most problematic; (3) evaluate the psychometric properties of measures for organizational culture and OCBs in academic pharmacy; and (4) identify any relationships between organizational culture and organizational citizenship among academic pharmacy faculty. A random sample of 600 U.S. academic pharmacists acquired from the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy were distributed an email survey through the use of Qualtrics technology. The procedures closely resembled the Total Design Method advocated to maximize survey response, including use of a pre-notification letter, reminders, and a nominal financial inducement. In addition to demographic questions, the survey employed multiple-item measures of organizational culture and OCBs described previously in the literature and derived from Delphi consensus-building procedures. The analysis plan incorporated use of factor and item analyses to evaluate psychometric properties of the measure and elicit the inherent domains comprising these phenomena, along with descriptive statistics to describe facets of organizational culture and OCBs that were most prevalent. A total of 177 responses were delivered. Factor analysis of organizational culture revealed a five-factor solution emphasizing achievement orientation, professionalism, stability, supportiveness, and reflectiveness. OCB domains were along the possibility of faculty being virtuous, disrespectful, sportsmanlike, and benevolent/malevolent. Even while multi-faceted and avoiding a simple typological descriptor, academic pharmacy cultures were reportedly healthy. Sportsmanship, while still somewhat commonly observed, was seen less frequently than other behaviors. The measures demonstrated logical, cogent factor

  14. Cross-cultural industrial organizational psychology and organizational behavior: A hundred-year journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Michele J; Aycan, Zeynep; Erez, Miriam; Leung, Kwok

    2017-03-01

    In celebration of the anniversary of the Journal of Applied Psychology ( JAP ), we take a hundred-year journey to examine how the science of cross-cultural industrial/organizational psychology and organizational behavior (CCIO/OB) has evolved, both in JAP and in the larger field. We review broad trends and provide illustrative examples in the theoretical, methodological, and analytic advances in CCIO/OB during 4 main periods: the early years (1917-1949), the middle 20th century (1950-1979), the later 20th century (1980-2000), and the 21st century (2000 to the present). Within each period, we discuss key historical and societal events that influenced the development of the science of CCIO/OB, major trends in research on CCIO/OB in the field in general and JAP in particular, and important milestones and breakthroughs achieved. We highlight pitfalls in research on CCIO/OB and opportunities for growth. We conclude with recommendations for the next 100 years of CC IO/OB research in JAP and beyond. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. The employee satisfaction in metalworking manufacturing: How do organizational culture and organizational learning capacity jointly affect it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulent Aydin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available It is a known fact that the organizations, which give more attention to the satisfaction of their employees, produce more successful outcomes than others do. In this sense, we have constructed an original model and carried out a research analysis in metalworking manufacturing, which the main subject is about to investigate the employee satisfaction depending on the factors of organizational culture and organizational learning capacity. The aim of the research is to contribute to academic researchers as well as managerial level and human resource department employees of metalworking organizations, in maximizing the employee satisfaction. The research was applied on 578 employees of the related industry. By the results, we have determined that the constructed model is significant and there is positive significant correlation both between -organizational culture and employee satisfaction- and -organizational learning capacity and employee satisfaction. Additionally, the total explained variance of employee satisfaction depending on these two variables has come out as the value of 0.56.

  16. The Impact of Organizational Commitment and Nursing Organizational Culture on Job Satisfaction in Korean American Registered Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Im; Geun, Hyo Geun; Choi, SookJa; Lee, Young Sil

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to describe the perceived level of organizational commitment and organizational culture of Korean American Registered Nurses (KARNs) and to investigate predictors of job satisfaction. A total of 163 KARNs working in U.S. hospitals responded to a Web survey. Descriptive analysis, t test, analysis of variance, and stepwise regressions were used for data analysis. KARNs reported moderate levels of job satisfaction (3.5 ± 0.58). Job satisfaction was positively correlated with both organizational commitment (r = .85, p Organizational commitment, culture, marital status, and workplace were significant predictors of and explained 76.8% of the variance in job satisfaction. This study provides evidence to help nursing managers and health policy makers develop educational programs aimed at enhancing job satisfaction and retention of KARNs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Organizational Culture and Its Implementation in the Choice of Strategic Option - Case Study Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana NIKČEVIĆ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The topic of this paper is to examine the influence of organizational culture on determination and implementation of the appropriate strategy within the company. Specifically, the author has tested the hypothesis about the influence of organizational culture on determination of strategy in Montenegrin companies. Firstly, in the theoretical part of the paper, the author defined organizational culture and business strategy and then analyzed the nature and manner of influence of organizational culture on formulation and implementation of strategy, as well as influence of implemented strategy on organizational culture. Organizational culture affects formulation of strategy determining information gathering, perception and interpretation of the environment. Namely, culture can facilitate or prevent implementation of the strategy through legitimization process. In the same way, the application of chosen strategy may, through its institutionalization process, reinforce or change the existing organizational culture. The empirical part of the paper refers to research results and testing of hypotheses about the influence of organizational culture on strategy of companies in Montenegro carried out on sample of 16 companies (324 respondents in Montenegro.

  18. Conversation at the Border Between Organizational Culture Theory and Institutional Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo; Zilber, Tammar

    2012-01-01

    This paper reflects our conversation at the border - a dividing line but also a potential meeting place - of organizational culture theory and institutional theory. First, we discuss the border between institutional theory and organizational culture theory by exploring two notions central to both...... - taken for grantedness and meanings. We ask what is taken for granted about institutions and organizational culture and how institutions and organizational cultures materialize? Our conversation reveals that although the notion of the taken for granted is important to institutional theory...... and organizational culture theory, what this means and implies is quite different for each. We also found that even though institutions and cultures involve meaning and evolve through meaning making, the two are understood and hence explored methodologically in quite different ways. So what seemed to be similar...

  19. A framework for the organizational assumptions underlying safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, Charles

    2002-01-01

    The safety culture of the nuclear organization can be addressed at the three levels of culture proposed by Edgar Schein. The industry literature provides a great deal of insight at the artefact and espoused value levels, although as yet it remains somewhat disorganized. There is, however, an overall lack of understanding of the assumption level of safety culture. This paper describes a possible framework for conceptualizing the assumption level, suggesting that safety culture is grounded in unconscious beliefs about the nature of the safety problem, its solution and how to organize to achieve the solution. Using this framework, the organization can begin to uncover the assumptions at play in its normal operation, decisions and events and, if necessary, engage in a process to shift them towards assumptions more supportive of a strong safety culture. (author)

  20. Do sexist organizational cultures create the Queen Bee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derks, Belle; Ellemers, Naomi; van Laar, Colette; de Groot, Kim

    2011-09-01

    'Queen Bees' are senior women in masculine organizational cultures who have fulfilled their career aspirations by dissociating themselves from their gender while simultaneously contributing to the gender stereotyping of other women. It is often assumed that this phenomenon contributes to gender discrimination in organizations, and is inherent to the personalities of successful career women. We argue for a social identity explanation and examine organizational conditions that foster the Queen Bee phenomenon. Participants were 94 women holding senior positions in diverse companies in The Netherlands who participated in an on-line survey. In line with predictions, indicators of the Queen Bee phenomenon (increased gender stereotyping and masculine self-descriptions) were found mostly among women who indicated they had started their career with low gender identification and who had subsequently experienced a high degree of gender discrimination on their way up. By contrast, the experience of gender discrimination was unrelated to signs of the Queen Bee phenomenon among women who indicated to be highly identified when they started their career. Results are discussed in light of social identity theory, interpreting the Queen Bee phenomenon as an individual mobility response of low gender identified women to the gender discrimination they encounter in their work. ©2010 The British Psychological Society.

  1. Burnout, Engagement, and Organizational Culture: Differences between Physicians and Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijakoski, Dragan; Karadzinska-Bislimovska, Jovanka; Basarovska, Vera; Montgomery, Anthony; Panagopoulou, Efharis; Stoleski, Sasho; Minov, Jordan

    2015-09-15

    Burnout results from a prolonged response to chronic emotional and interpersonal workplace stressors. The focus of research has been widened to job engagement. Purpose of the study was to examine associations between burnout, job engagement, work demands, and organisational culture (OC) and to demonstrate differences between physicians and nurses working in general hospital in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia. Maslach Burnout Inventory and Utrecht Work Engagement Scale were used for assessment of burnout and job engagement. Work demands and OC were measured with Hospital Experience Scale and Competing Values Framework, respectively. Higher scores of dedication, hierarchy OC, and organizational work demands were found in physicians. Nurses demonstrated higher scores of clan OC. Burnout negatively correlated with clan and market OC in physicians and nurses. Job engagement positively correlated with clan and market OC in nurses. Different work demands were related to different dimensions of burnout and/or job engagement. Our findings support job demands-resources (JD-R) model (Demerouti and Bakker). Data obtained can be used in implementation of specific organizational interventions in the hospital setting. Providing adequate JD-R interaction can lead to prevention of burnout in health professionals (HPs) and contribute positively to better job engagement in HPs and higher quality of patient care.

  2. Organizational culture: essence and basic characteristics in the conditions of the globalizatio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Bannikova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an analysis of the concept of «organizational culture» through the prism of a phenomenon of culture and different approaches to organizational culture are crystallizes. Culture is defined as historically certain level of society development and man, that expressed in the types and forms of human life organization, and material and spiritual values, which created by them. It is shown that one of the classifications of culture divided it into three types: monoactive (or linearly arranged, poliactive and reactive. Each of these types is characterized by a particular style of the information collection that defines the possibility of decisions making management when using this classification in organizations. The features of the interpretation of the concept of «organizational culture» are defined. The essence of the organizational culture is a set of values, which are the guidelines of behavior of employees, management decision-making guidelines, as well as a system of symbols and rituals that serve as a set of rules approved behavior of employees in an organization. Marked constituent elements of organizational culture: system of values, leadership style, the characters of organization, ceremonies and rituals, cultural organization’s network. The main characteristics of organizational culture are: universality, informality, stability. It is shown that the components of organizational culture changing in the conditions of globalization, which calls for new forms and methods of work with personnel in modern organizations.

  3. The relationship between organizational culture and work engagement: A multilevel investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Krog, Anja Karolin

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of the broader factors that impact on work engagement is required in order to understand how the organizational context influences work engagement. However, knowledge of broader contextual predictors of work engagement is scarce. Using a multilevel framework, this study examined the role of four organizational culture types in facilitating work engagement of employees. Based on the organizational culture literature and work engagement research, it was assumed that the r...

  4. The Relationship of Organizational Culture and Entrepreneurship with Effectiveness in Sport Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Masoumeh Kalateh seifari; Zahra Amoozadeh

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important factors affecting organizational effectiveness is organizational culture and entrepreneurship. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship of organizational culture and corporate entrepreneurship with effectiveness in offices of sport and youth in Golestan Province. Research method was correlation and the statistical population included all directors and experts of general directorates of sport and youth in Golestan province (N=280). 164 persons we...

  5. Organizational Culture and Climate and Mental Health Provider Attitudes Toward Evidence-Based Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Sawitzky, Angelina C.

    2006-01-01

    Mental health provider attitudes toward adopting evidence-based practice (EBP) are associated with organizational context and provider individual differences. Organizational culture and climate are contextual factors that can affect staff acceptance of innovation. This study examined the association of organizational culture and climate with attitudes toward adopting EBP. Participants were 301 public sector mental health service providers from 49 programs providing mental health services for ...

  6. A multilevel model of organizational health culture and the effectiveness of health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yea-Wen; Lin, Yueh-Ysen

    2014-01-01

    Organizational health culture is a health-oriented core characteristic of the organization that is shared by all members. It is effective in regulating health-related behavior for employees and could therefore influence the effectiveness of health promotion efforts among organizations and employees. This study applied a multilevel analysis to verify the effects of organizational health culture on the organizational and individual effectiveness of health promotion. At the organizational level, we investigated the effect of organizational health culture on the organizational effectiveness of health promotion. At the individual level, we adopted a cross-level analysis to determine if organizational health culture affects employee effectiveness through the mediating effect of employee health behavior. The study setting consisted of the workplaces of various enterprises. We selected 54 enterprises in Taiwan and surveyed 20 full-time employees from each organization, for a total sample of 1011 employees. We developed the Organizational Health Culture Scale to measure employee perceptions and aggregated the individual data to formulate organization-level data. Organizational effectiveness of health promotion included four dimensions: planning effectiveness, production, outcome, and quality, which were measured by scale or objective indicators. The Health Promotion Lifestyle Scale was adopted for the measurement of health behavior. Employee effectiveness was measured subjectively in three dimensions: self-evaluated performance, altruism, and happiness. Following the calculation of descriptive statistics, hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was used to test the multilevel hypotheses. Organizational health culture had a significant effect on the planning effectiveness (β = .356, p production (β = .359, p promotion. In addition, results of cross-level moderating effect analysis by HLM demonstrated that the effects of organizational health culture on three dimensions of

  7. School Organizational Culture in Improving to the Teachers’ Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulus Mikku Ate

    2015-02-01

    Key Words: organizational culture, teacher performance   Abstrak: Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengetahui proses terbentuknya budaya organisasi dalam meningkatkan kinerja guru. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode kualitatif dengan rancangan studi multi kasus. Lokasi penelitian di dua sekolah swasta di Kabupaten Sumba Barat Daya, Nusa Tenggara Timur, pengumpulan data dilakukan dengan wawancara, pengamatan dan dokumentasi. Analisis data menggunakan model interaktif Milles dan Huberman, dan analisis lintas kasus secara induktif konseptual. Hasil penelitian adalah budaya organisasi sekolah dipengaruhi nilai-nilai pokok yang dianut, dihidupi, dan ditanamkan para pendiri, pengganti, dan pemimpin; budaya organisasi mempengaruhi kinerja guru; dan upaya melanggengkan budaya organisasi melalui penentuan pemimpin oleh yayasan, penggunaan seragam, penegakan disiplin, dan melaksanakan perayaan.  Kata kunci: budaya organisasi, kinerja guru

  8. The Association of Organizational Culture and Quality Improvement Implementation With Neonatal Outcomes in the NICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahl, Sukhy; Lee, Shoo K; Baker, G Ross; Cronin, Catherine M G; Stevens, Bonnie; Ye, Xiang Y

    2015-01-01

    Studies of adult patient populations suggest that organizational culture is associated with quality improvement (QI) implementation, as well as patient outcomes. However, very little research on organizational culture has been performed in neonatal patient populations. This combined cross-sectional survey and retrospective cohort study assessed employee perceptions of organizational culture and QI implementation within 18 Canadian neonatal intensive care units. The associations between these data and neonatal outcomes in extremely preterm infants (born at culture and QI implementation varied according to occupation and age. Higher hierarchical culture was associated with increased survival without major morbidities (odds ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.06), as were higher QI implementation scores (odds ratio range, 1.20-1.36 by culture type). Our data suggest that organizational culture, particularly hierarchical culture, and level of QI implementation may play a role in neonatal outcomes. Copyright © 2015 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Redefining Organizational Cultures: An Interpretative Anthropological Approach to Corporate Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Mahadevan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hardly any management theory nowadays fails to take culture's influence on today's organizations into account. At the very foundation lies the belief that the intercultural boundary can be determined externally—by etic view. In my paper I show how much emic organizational reality differs from etic view. Hereby, I refer to two years of fieldwork that I conducted in a global high-tech company at sites in Germany, Austria and India. I choose this approach to trace culture as an open process of sense-making in practice. Through interpretative anthropological means, I identified several discourses of collective identity that were constructed narratively—often regardless of the presumed etic border of "Germans" vs. "Indians." In summary, this paper makes the following contributions: Firstly, it shows how emic and etic categorizations of the cultural other can differ in a complex environment. Secondly, it looks in depth into the emic categorizations of "the Other" and how they are constructed narratively. Thirdly, it draws conclusions for the field of intercultural communication. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0901440

  10. Resilient leadership and the organizational culture of resilience: construct validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everly, George S; Smith, Kenneth J; Lobo, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Political, economic, and social unrest and uncertainty seem replete throughout the world. Within the United States, political vitriol and economic volatility have led to severe economic restrictions. Both government and private sector organizations are being asked to do more with less. The specter of dramatic changes in healthcare creates a condition of uncertainty affecting budget allocations and hiring practices. If ever there was a time when a "resilient culture" was needed, it is now. In this paper we shall discuss the application of "tipping point" theory (Gladwell, 2000) operationalized through a special form of leadership: "resilient leadership" (Everly, Strouse, Everly, 2010). Resilient leadership is consistent with Gladwells "Law of the Few" and strives to create an organizational culture of resilience by implementing an initial change within no more than 20% of an organization's workforce. It is expected that such a minority, if chosen correctly, will "tip" the rest of the organization toward enhanced resilience, ideally creating a self-sustaining culture of resilience. This paper reports on the empirical foundations and construct validation of "resilient leadership".

  11. The role of engineering judgement, safety culture, and organizational factors in risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzumdar, Ajit; Professor, Visiting

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of engineering judgement, safety culture, and organizational factors in risk assessment by examining the reasons for human-based error. The need for more emphasis on producing engineers with good engineering judgement is described. The progress in quantifying the role of safety culture and organizational factors in risk assessment studies is summarized

  12. The Influence of Organizational Culture on Affinity for Knowledge Management Practices of Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the problems of hospitals' duplicated effort and ad hoc knowledge management (KM) practices. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the focus and type of organizational culture in order to describe and predict the relationship between organizational culture and the affinity for KM of nurses working in health…

  13. Connection between Organizational Culture and Development of Achievement Motive of Students of the Faculty of Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubulj, Milan; Arsenijevi, Olja; Simic, Jelena

    2011-01-01

    The authors of this paper are engaged in studying the organizational culture and achievement motive, by carrying out their studies among the students of the Faculty of Management in Novi Sad, AP Vojvodina, Serbia. The problem of this paper's research was set by the question: is there a connection of a dominantly present organizational culture and…

  14. Faculty Perceptions of Organizational Culture and Collegiality at Protestant Christian Universities in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jamie R.

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on faculty perceptions of organizational culture and collegiality at denominationally affiliated Christian colleges and universities in the Pacific Northwest. It was found that while faculty members perceive tension around their experience of organizational culture, the extent of their relationships as cultivated through formal…

  15. The Relationship between an Effective Organizational Culture and Student Discipline in a Boarding School

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Westhuizen, Philip C.; Oosthuizen, Izak; Wolhuter, C. C.

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the relationship between effective organizational culture and student discipline in a boys' boarding house at an urban South African school. Ethnographical methods (observation and interviews) were employed. The study reports on the results pertaining to organizational culture, namely, tangible manifestations of the…

  16. The Mediating Roles of Generative Cognition and Organizational Culture between Personality Traits and Student Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Lin; Liang, Chaoyun

    2014-01-01

    Using science majors as an example, we analyzed how generative cognition, organizational culture, and personality traits affect student imagination, and examined the mediating effects of generative cognition and organizational culture. A total of 473 undergraduates enrolled in physical, chemical, mathematical, and biological science programs…

  17. Organizational Culture and the Deployment of Agile Methods: The Competing Values Model View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iivari, Juhani; Iivari, Netta

    A number of researchers have identified organizational culture as a factor that potentially affects the deployment of agile systems development methods. Inspired by the study of Iivari and Huisman (2007), which focused on the deployment of traditional systems development methods, the present paper proposes a number of hypotheses about the influence of organizational culture on the deployment of agile methods.

  18. Perceptions of Organizational Culture of a Multi-Campus Community College District: Mixed Methods in Concert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster Dale, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    This concurrent, mixed-methods case study analyzed perceptions of current and preferred organizational culture within a rural, multi-campus community college district. This phenomenon was examined by analyzing and comparing data collected by surveying all full-time employees utilizing the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) and…

  19. Organizational culture: an important context for addressing and improving hospital to community patient discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, G.J.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Pijnenborg, L.; Barach, P.; Gademan, P.; Dudzik-Urbaniak, E.; Flink, M.; Orrego, C.; Toccafondi, G.; Johnson, J.K.; Schoonhoven, L.; Wollersheim, H.C.H.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organizational culture is seen as having a growing impact on quality and safety of health care, but its impact on hospital to community patient discharge is relatively unknown. OBJECTIVES: To explore aspects of organizational culture to develop a deeper understanding of the discharge

  20. Positive and negative spillover from work to home : The role of organizational culture and supportive arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sok, J.; Blomme, R.J.; Tromp, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    For today's managers, striking a sound work-home balance is an important matter. In this paper we investigate the relationship between organizational culture and work-to-home spillover. Two types of organizational culture, supportive and innovative, were compared with regard to work-to-home

  1. Organizational Culture, Absorptive Capacity, Innovation Performace and Competitive Advantage: An Integrated Assessment in Indonesian Banking Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Adriansyah; Adi Zakaria Afiff

    2015-01-01

    The positive impact of absorptive capacity (ACAP) on innovation and the positive impact of innovation on competitive advantage have been proven in different research contexts. However, current knowledge on organizational culture that affects ACAP, innovation and competitive advantage as a whole, remains unclear. This article proposes a model to examine how organizational culture (developmental culture and rational culture) affects ACAP, innovation and competitive advantage, directly and indir...

  2. The influence of organizational and national culture on new product performance

    OpenAIRE

    Eisend, Martin; Evanschitzky, Heiner; Gilliland, David I.

    2016-01-01

    The authors conduct a meta-analysis on the combined influence of organizational and national culture on new product performance. For this purpose, they refer to the effectiveness of value congruency and develop a conceptual model describing the fit between organizational culture types as suggested by the competing values framework and national culture, as described by Hofstede's cultural dimensions. The meta-analysis is based on 489 effect sizes taken from 123 manuscripts. The findings show t...

  3. On the Effects of Organizational Culture on E-Learning Readiness: An Iranian Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Yaghoub Hosseini; Khodakaram Salimifard; Shahrbanoo Yadollahi

    2012-01-01

    An organization’s success in implementing e-learning depends on the supports provided by the organizational culture. This paper is aimed to evaluate the impacts of organizational culture on e-learning readiness. To test the research hypothesis, Beta coefficient test was used. Research results indicated a significant positive impact of Clan and Adhocracy cultures on e-learning readiness. It was found that Market culture has a negative impact on e-learning readiness. Research findings cannot ...

  4. A survey of the effect of organizational culture on organizational commitment based on Allen and Meyer model (Case study: High school teachers of Bandpey region)

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Asghar Firuzjaeyan; Mojtaba Firuzjaeyan; Behdad Sadeghi

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of organizational culture on organizational commitment of teachers. in this study Organizational commitment is based on Allen and Meyer: affective, continuance and normative commitment. The studied organizational culture is based on Denison four-dimension theory. Adaptability, Mission, Involvement and Consistency. Due to a few empirical studies in this region, the data were collected among 156 teachers of Bandpay region. The data were collecte...

  5. THE ANALYSIS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE VALUES IN PUBLIC SECTORS IN LATVIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maija Ivanova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Organizational culture is an important issue because of its` big influence on enterprises’ productivity and consequently on realization of their objectives and goals. The validation and harmonization of organizational values and employees’ values has an important role in increasing operational efficiency. It has long been established that enterprises and organizations, where creative and interested employees who support and understand the organizational values of the company work, operate more effectively. In this article elements of organizational culture are studied with a particular focus on the meaning of organizational culture values. This article also reveals an evaluation of the organizational culture in public sectors in Latvia (based on publicly available data and sources of information. In the research there is an indepth analysis of official public organizational culture values included. The analysis has been done in the context of rating different leaders’ organizational values. In this article we analyze the conclusions of various writers on the subject of organizational culture framework characterization. The research of values guidance as well as a view of cultural meaning and influence on both individual and organizational development is described here. The authors analyze the results of empirical research about official public values of companies and the results of a public leaders’ survey (as well as the personal values of employees which provide an opportunity to compare organizational employees’ values with the common results of organizations. Conclusions shows public characterization of values and values distribution in potentially limitative and positive values. The in-depth research of organizational values is based on A. Maslow’s (Maslow 2000 hierarchy of needs approach and developed on R. Barrett`s (Barrett 2006 sample of seven levels of consciousness.

  6. The Leadership Style Model That Builds Work Behavior Through Organizational Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arasy Alimudin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The changes in organizational culture and work behavior is an important process for companies to survive in competition. And a change of leadership that is part of the change will pose challenges and reactions to the interests of its human resources. The research approach used quantitative research and included explanatory research to explain the causal relationship among variables through hypothesis testing with partial least squares path modeling (PLS-SEM analysis technique. The results showed the influence of leadership style on positive work behavior but not significant. Reward and punishment no significant effect on work behavior. The organizational culture had a positive and significant effect on work behavior. The leadership style had a positive and significant effect on organizational culture. The reward and punishment had positive and significant effect on organizational culture. The findings of this study showed that participative leadership style model using reward and punishment mechanism could improve work behavior and organizational culture.

  7. Network embeddedness and organizational performance. The strength of strong ties in Dutch higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk, J.; Torenvlied, R.; Allen, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    With only few exceptions, current research in public management on the effects of inter-organizational networks on organizational performance focuses either on network activity or on the inter-organizational network structure. The present paper theoretically links both approaches and tests two

  8. The organizational work-family culture. The organizational time as an element of the work-family balance, in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana-Aida Cimpeanu

    2012-01-01

    Juggling work and family has become a challenge or any management system considering that the time to achieve is growing at the expanse of the necessary time to complete the tasks related to private life. The achievement of this balance is done on one hand by legislative means, and on the other hand at an organizational level, through an organizational culture that supports the achievement of a balance between the employee’s work and his family life – the work-family type of culture. The most...

  9. Analysis of the effect of leadership and organizational culture on the organizational effectiveness of radiological technologist's working environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.H.; Kim, C.S. [Department of Radiological Science, College of Health sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Bugok 3-Dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 607-757 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.M., E-mail: donald@cup.ac.kr [Department of Computer Education, Graduate School, Korea University, Anam-dong Seongbuk - gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to present ideas to upgrade job performance and improve organizational management by analyzing leadership aspects and organizational cultures of radiological technologist organizations. Method: A questionnaire was used to collect data from 261 radiological technologists working in the city of Busan. Then, SPSS/PC + Win 13 was used to statistically analyze the collected data. One-way ANOVA was adopted to test differences among groups, and multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the effect of organizational culture and leadership upon organizational effectiveness. Results: First, it was found that radiological technologists stressed consensus most among the 4 types of organizational culture and regarded core transformational leadership as the right type of leadership. Second, regarding the relationship between leadership and organizational effectiveness, transformational leadership had the highest influence upon organizational effectiveness. Third, as for the relationship between organizational culture and organizational effectiveness, it was found that a developmental culture has the highest influence upon organizational effectiveness, followed by a culture of consensus. Conclusion: If transformational leadership and consensual culture are used properly for upgrading job performance in the organization, conflicts among radiological technologists might be reduced, thereby enhancing organizational effectiveness.

  10. Endangerment of cultural heritage sites by strong rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauß, Thomas; Fischer, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Due to climate change extreme weather conditions become more and more frequent in the last years. Especially in Germany nearly every year a large flood event happens. Most of these events are caused by strong rain. There are at most two causes for these floodings: The first is locally strong rain in the area of damage, the second happens at damage sites located near confluxes and strong rain in the upper stream areas of the joining rivers. The amount of damage is often strongly correlated with unreasonable designation of new construction in such endangered regions. Our presented study is based on an earlier project together with a German insurance company. In this project we analyzed correlations of geographical settings with the insurance data of flood damages over ten years. The result of this study was a strong relation of the terrain with the amount and the probability of damages. Further investigations allow us to derive a system for estimating potential endangerment due to strong rain just from suitable digital terrain models (DTMs). In the presented study we apply this method to different types of cultural heritage (CH) sites in Germany and other parts of the world to detect which type of CH sites were build with potential endangerment of strong rain events in mind and which ones are prone to such events.

  11. Mechanisms of Change in the ARC Organizational Strategy: Increasing Mental Health Clinicians' EBP Adoption Through Improved Organizational Culture and Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Nathaniel J; Glisson, Charles; Hemmelgarn, Anthony; Green, Philip

    2017-03-01

    The development of efficient and scalable implementation strategies in mental health is restricted by poor understanding of the change mechanisms that increase clinicians' evidence-based practice (EBP) adoption. This study tests the cross-level change mechanisms that link an empirically-supported organizational strategy for supporting implementation (labeled ARC for Availability, Responsiveness, and Continuity) to mental health clinicians' EBP adoption and use. Four hundred seventy-five mental health clinicians in 14 children's mental health agencies were randomly assigned to the ARC intervention or a control condition. Measures of organizational culture, clinicians' intentions to adopt EBPs, and job-related EBP barriers were collected before, during, and upon completion of the three-year ARC intervention. EBP adoption and use were assessed at 12-month follow-up. Multilevel mediation analyses tested changes in organizational culture, clinicians' intentions to adopt EBPs, and job-related EBP barriers as linking mechanisms explaining the effects of ARC on clinicians' EBP adoption and use. ARC increased clinicians' EBP adoption (OR = 3.19, p = .003) and use (81 vs. 56 %, d = .79, p = .003) at 12-month follow-up. These effects were mediated by improvement in organizational proficiency culture leading to increased clinician intentions to adopt EBPs and by reduced job-related EBP barriers. A combined mediation analysis indicated the organizational culture-EBP intentions mechanism was the primary carrier of ARC's effects on clinicians' EBP adoption and use. ARC increases clinicians' EBP adoption and use by creating proficient organizational cultures that increase clinicians' intentions to adopt EBPs.

  12. Mechanisms of change in the ARC organizational strategy: Increasing mental health clinicians’ EBP adoption through improved organizational culture and capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Nathaniel J.; Glisson, Charles; Hemmelgarn, Anthony; Green, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background The development of efficient and scalable implementation strategies in mental health is restricted by poor understanding of the change mechanisms that increase clinicians’ evidence-based practice (EBP) adoption. This study tests the cross-level change mechanisms that link an empirically-supported organizational strategy for supporting implementation (labeled ARC for Availability, Responsiveness, and Continuity) to mental health clinicians’ EBP adoption and use. Method Four hundred seventy five mental health clinicians in 14 children’s mental health agencies were randomly assigned to the ARC intervention or a control condition. Measures of organizational culture, clinicians’ intentions to adopt EBPs, and job-related EBP barriers were collected before, during, and upon completion of the three-year ARC intervention. EBP adoption and use were assessed at 12-month follow-up. Multilevel mediation analyses tested changes in organizational culture, clinicians’ intentions to adopt EBPs, and job-related EBP barriers as linking mechanisms explaining the effects of ARC on clinicians’ EBP adoption and use. Results ARC increased clinicians’ EBP adoption (OR = 3.19, p = .003) and use (81% vs. 56%, d = .79, p = .003) at 12-month follow-up. These effects were mediated by improvement in organizational proficiency culture leading to increased clinician intentions to adopt EBPs and by reduced job-related EBP barriers. A combined mediation analysis indicated the organizational culture-EBP intentions mechanism was the primary carrier of ARC’s effects on clinicians’ EBP adoption and use. Conclusions ARC increases clinicians’ EBP adoption and use by creating proficient organizational cultures that increase clinicians’ intentions to adopt EBPs. PMID:27236457

  13. Organizational culture affecting quality of care: guideline adherence in perioperative antibiotic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukawa, Naoto; Tanaka, Masayuki; Morishima, Toshitaka; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this work was to elucidate aspects of organizational culture associated with hospital performance in perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis using quantitative data in a multicenter and multidimensional study. Cross-sectional retrospective study using a survey data and administrative data. Eighty-three acute hospitals in Japan. A total of 4856 respondents in the organizational culture study, and 23 172 patients for the quality indicator analysis. Multilevel models of various cultural dimensions were used to analyze the association between hospital organizational culture and guideline adherence. The dependent variable was adherence or non-adherence to Japanese and CDC guidelines at the patient level and main independent variable was hospital groups categorized according to organizational culture score. Other control variables included hospital characteristics such as ownership, bed capacity, region and urbanization level of location. The multilevel analysis showed that hospitals with a high score in organizational culture were more likely to adhere to the Japanese and CDC guidelines when compared with lower scoring hospitals. In particular, the hospital group with high scores in the 'collaboration' and 'professional growth' dimensions had three times the odds for Japanese guideline adherence in comparison with low-scoring hospitals. Our study revealed that various aspects of organizational culture were associated with adherence to guidelines for perioperative antibiotic use. Hospital managers aiming to improve quality of care may benefit from improving hospital organizational culture. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  14. The Relationship of Leadership Styles and Organizational Culture Case Study of an Oil and Gas Company in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Darwis, Tommy K; Djajadiningrat, Surna Tjahja

    2010-01-01

    This study explores relationship between leadership styles and organizational culture in an oil and Gas Company in Indonesia. The respondents are employees of an oil and Gas Company in Indonesia. This study use Multifactor leadership questionnaires to define leadership styles and Denison's Organizational Culture Model to measure Organizational Culture. These questionnaires were used to measure leadership styles of immediate or direct supervisor and organizational culture ...

  15. HIV health-care providers' burnout: can organizational culture make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginossar, Tamar; Oetzel, John; Hill, Ricky; Avila, Magdalena; Archiopoli, Ashley; Wilcox, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges facing those working with people living with HIV (PLWH) is the increased potential for burnout, which results in increased turnover and reduces quality of care provided for PLWH. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship among HIV health-care providers' burnout (emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) and organizational culture including teamwork, involvement in decision-making, and critical appraisal. Health-care providers for PLWH (N = 47) in federally funded clinics in a southwestern state completed a cross-sectional survey questionnaire about their perceptions of organizational culture and burnout. The results of multiple regression analysis indicated that positive organizational culture (i.e., teamwork) was negatively related to emotional burnout (p organizational culture (i.e., critical appraisal) was positively related to depersonalization (p organizational communication interventions might protect HIV health-care providers from burnout.

  16. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND TECHNOLOGY-INFUSED MANAGEMENT IN HIGHER EDUCATION: THEORETICAL AND EMPIRICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petro M. Boichuk

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides an overview of the research sources, methodology and main findings of the research of a higher educational institution organizational culture and technology-infused management correlation. Based on the recent research, the authors provided the definition of the organizational culture concept. The research revealed that the current organizational culture of the Lutsk Pedagogical College is more like market culture. The respondents in the present study defined the adhocracy culture as the desirable organizational culture in the College. Notably, the results of the in-depth interview based on expert assessment method indicated that teachers were moderately satisfied with the level of competence of the administrative staff to meet challenges of technology-infused management at their higher educational institution.

  17. The Impact of Social Media and Crowdsourcing on Organizational Innovation Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada; Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh

    innovation culture using theory on organizational culture and crowdsourcing. The analysis shows that the organizational crowdsourcing event has supported an innovation culture change in the case company towards a more open approach to innovation; creating a new and different awareness of innovation, allowing...... for internal process innovations, empowering the employees, supporting knowledge work and collaboration across the organization to a new extent and overcoming the traditional hierarchy in the organization....

  18. The relationship between leadership and organizational culture: a study carried out in an HEI

    OpenAIRE

    Andressa Gonçalves; Nicole Pasini Trevisol; Mauricio Capobianco Lopes; Joseane da Silva Soethe

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to identify leadership styles and the type of organizational culture present in the institution of higher education studied, as well as the relationship between these two artefacts in the educational context studied. To this end, theoretical frameworks were sought as the concept of organizational culture, transformational and transactional leadership and also the relationship between culture and leadership. Data were collected through a “in situ” questionnaire ...

  19. Types of analysis of trompenaar's (1994 organizational culture prevailing in the area of controllership in family businesses in textile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderlei dos Santos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to identify the types of analysis of Trompenaar's (1994 organizational culture prevailing in the area of controllership in family businesses in textile industry. Descriptive research was performed, with quantitative and qualitative approach, using a multiple case study. Data were collected through interviews with the controller of the companies. In the four basic culture types suggested by Trompenaars (1994, it is concluded that there isn´t a pure kind, but there is a strong presence of family culture among the companies surveyed in dimensions relationship between employees, attitude in relation to the ways of change, forms of motivation and reward

  20. Organizational Culture and Organizational Effectiveness: A Meta-Analytic Investigation of the Competing Values Framework's Theoretical Suppositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnell, Chad A.; Ou, Amy Yi; Kinicki, Angelo

    2011-01-01

    We apply Quinn and Rohrbaugh's (1983) competing values framework (CVF) as an organizing taxonomy to meta-analytically test hypotheses about the relationship between 3 culture types and 3 major indices of organizational effectiveness (employee attitudes, operational performance [i.e., innovation and product and service quality], and financial…

  1. THE MECHANISM OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE TRANSFORMATION ININNOVATION COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE FOR INTERNATIONAL BUSINESSSTRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia S. Leontieva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents mechanisms of organizational culture formation and development in the conditions of cross-cultural interaction on the example of the international enterprise structures - Hyundai Motor Corporation group of companies and its affiliated structures are considered: «Hyundai Glovis» and Russian company «Hyundai Glovis Russia». The Russian and Korean cultural aspects of business and daily communication feature of mentality of two cultures, the priority directions of development of organizational culture based on cross-cultural interaction are analyzed for this purpose.

  2. Organizational Culture, Absorptive Capacity, Innovation Performace and Competitive Advantage: An Integrated Assessment in Indonesian Banking Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Adriansyah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The positive impact of absorptive capacity (ACAP on innovation and the positive impact of innovation on competitive advantage have been proven in different research contexts. However, current knowledge on organizational culture that affects ACAP, innovation and competitive advantage as a whole, remains unclear. This article proposes a model to examine how organizational culture (developmental culture and rational culture affects ACAP, innovation and competitive advantage, directly and indirectly as well.  Surveyed data (in Indonesian Banking Industry shows that both of organizational culture have a direct impact on ACAP. Only developmental culture has a direct impact on innovation. There is no culture type affects competitive advantage directly. In this research, culture affects competitive advantage through ACAP and innovation.    

  3. Investigating organizational culture adaptability of broadcasting firm in response to environmental changes

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Mohammad Reza Salehi; Naser Mirsepasi; Ali Akbar Farhangi

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to study the present status of organizational adaptability in Iranian broadcasting system against environmental changes and present possible suggestions to empower the organization to cope with future changes. The study uses the method developed by Denison (1990) [Denison, D. R. (1990). Corporate culture and organizational effectiveness. John Wiley & Sons.] to study the organizational changes. Using a sample of 354 randomly selected employees who worked ...

  4. THE ANALYSIS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE VALUES IN PUBLIC SECTORS IN LATVIA

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanova, Maija; Kokina, Irēna

    2016-01-01

    Organizational culture is an important issue because of its` big influence on enterprises’ productivity and consequently on realization of their objectives and goals. The validation and harmonization of organizational values and employees’ values has an important role in increasing operational efficiency. It has long been established that enterprises and organizations, where creative and interested employees who support and understand the organizational values of the company wo...

  5. Relationship between organizational culture and commitment of employees in health care centers in west of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Yadollah; Mohammadibakhsh, Roghayeh; Soltanian, Alireza; Behzadifar, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Presence of committed personnel in each organization not only reduces their absenteeism, delays, and displacements but also leads to a dramatic increase in performance and efficiency of an organization, mental freshness of employees, better manifestation of noble objectives, and organizational mission as well as fulfillment of personal goals. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between organizational culture and organizational commitment of employees in administrative units of health care centers in the cities of Hamedan Province based on the Denison model in 2015. In this cross-sectional study, 177 employees in administrative units of health care centers in the cities of Hamedan Province were selected by a multistage stratified sampling method. The data collection instruments included the standardized Denison organizational culture survey and organizational commitment questionnaire by Meyer and Allen. Data were analyzed by IBM-SPSS version 21 using descriptive statistics and Pearson product-moment coefficient. Among the 12 indicators of organizational culture, the highest mean scores were assigned to empowerment (16.74), organizational learning (16.41), vision (16.4), and strategic direction (16.35); respectively. Furthermore, the indicators of capability development (14.2), core values (15.31), team orientation (15.45), and goals (15.46) received the lowest mean scores in this respect. Among the four dimensions of organizational culture, the highest mean score was related to "mission" in organizational culture and the lowest score was associated with "involvement." Meyer and Allen's organizational commitment model also had three components in which affective commitment in this study obtained the highest score (26.63) and continuance commitment received the lowest score (24.73). In this study, there was a significant correlation between all the components of organizational culture and organizational commitment of employees in

  6. The Cultural Analysis of Soft Systems Methodology and the Configuration Model of Organizational Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Staadt

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Organizations that find themselves within a problematic situation connected with cultural issues such as politics and power require adaptable research and corresponding modeling approaches so as to grasp the arrangements of that situation and their impact on the organizational development. This article originates from an insider-ethnographic intervention into the problematic situation of the leading public housing provider in Luxembourg. Its aim is to describe how the more action-oriented cultural analysis of soft systems methodology and the theory-driven configuration model of organizational culture are mutually beneficial rather than contradictory. The data collected between 2007 and 2013 were analyzed manually as well as by means of ATLAS.ti. Results demonstrate that the cultural analysis enables an in-depth understanding of the power-laden environment within the organization bringing about the so-called “socio-political system” and that the configuration model makes it possible to depict the influence of that system on the whole organization. The overall research approach thus contributes toward a better understanding of the influence and the impact of oppressive social environments and evolving power relations on the development of an organization.

  7. Organizational culture - a factor of potential positive influence on the collectivities of any organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona-Andreea MIHALACHE

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Organizational culture is a relatively new and rapidly expanding concept, but partly invisible and therefore very difficult analyze, offering in the same time the possibility to carry out complex studies. This paper was drawn up into two different organizations - Pentalog Romania, an IT service provider, and House of Dracula Hotel, a tourist unit - and it is based on a research carried out in order to highlight the importance of organizational culture within any entity. Considered a powerful strategic tool, the organizational culture can be used for focusing companies and their staff on joint goals, for mobilizing the initiatives, ensuring loyalty and facilitating intercommunication.

  8. Organizational transformation: a model for joint optimization of culture change and evidence-based design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D Kirk; Orr, Robin Diane; Raboin, W Ellen

    2008-01-01

    Healthcare organizations face continuous and accelerating external change and thus must be prepared to manage their own change initiatives proactively. Given that many believe that the U.S. healthcare system is broken and most healthcare organizations are dealing with pervasive problems, some organizations may choose to seek transformational change to achieve the six aims identified by the Institute of Medicine: healthcare that is safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient, and equitable. Transformational change will almost certainly involve organizational culture. Culture change may be most effective when linked to other organizational change initiatives such as organizational strategy, structure, policies, procedures, and recruiting. Significant organizational change often requires accompanying facility change. There is an interdependent relationship between facility design and organizational culture. They affect each other and both impact organizational performance. Sociotechnical theory promotes joint optimization of the social (culture) and technical (facilities) aspects of an organization to achieve sustained positive change. To achieve organizational transformation and to sustain positive change, organizations must be prepared to adopt collaborative efforts in culture change and facility design. The authors propose a model for accomplishing joint optimization of culture change and evidence-based facility design.

  9. The effect of transformational leadership style and organizational culture on the formation of organizational cynicism in the Agricultural Bank of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Rabie

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of transformational leadership style and organizational culture on the formation of organizational cynicism in the Agricultural Bank in city of Tehran. The population of this study consisted of 1022 employees of the Agricultural Bank of Tehran. A total of 304 questionnaires were distributed, of which 264 valid questionnaires were collected. These questionnaires were distributed randomly among the male and female employees in Tehran branches of Agricultural Bank. Standard questionnaire of transformational leadership model, standard questionnaire of organizational culture model and organizational cynicism were applied in this study. In this study SPSS19 and Smart PLS software were used to analyze the collected data. Hypothesis testing showed that at first, Transformational leadership style had no significant effect on the formation of organizational cynicism in the Agricultural Bank in Tehran, and organizational culture had a significant negative impact on the formation of organizational cynicism in the Agricultural Bank in the second hypothesis.

  10. STRUCTURAL MODEL OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE DIMENSION AND CONTINGENCY LEADERSHIP STYLE IN SHAPING ORGANIZATIONAL TRUST AND COMMITMENT OF PRIVATE UNIVERSITY LECTURERS IN MALANG CITY

    OpenAIRE

    Alifiulahtin Utaminingsih

    2017-01-01

    This research was based on fenomenon of decreasing lecturer ‘s organizational commitment is a crucial matter for the management of human resources. Leadeaship style will affect the level of employee trust and commitment of the organization and induce certain outcome in work with theory and empiric reviewed from outcome prior studies. This research was aimed analyze the effect of leadership style and organizational culture on organizational trust and organizational commitment. This studies use...

  11. How Do People Make Continence Care Happen? An Analysis of Organizational Culture in Two Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Stacie Salsbury

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Although nursing homes (NHs) are criticized for offering poor quality continence care, little is known about the organizational processes that underlie this care. This study investigated the influence of organizational culture on continence care practices in two NHs. Design and Methods: This ethnographic study explored continence care…

  12. The interactive role of organizational strategy and culture : a strategic management approach

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    M.Com. This study has been undertaken with the specific objective of acquiring an insight into the concept "organizational culture" within a strategic management context, as well as the role played by the concept in the formulation and implementation of organizational strategy. Researchers from within various disciplines, such as anthropology, industrial psychology and strategic management, have analysed various aspects of the concept ...

  13. Improving performance of high risk organizations Spanish nuclear sector from the analysis of organizational culture factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Salabarnada, E.; German, S.; Silla, I.; Navajas, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the research project funded by UNESA and conducted by the CISOT-CIEMAT that aims to contribute to improving the operating performance of the Spanish nuclear power plants. This paper aims to identify the factors and key organizational processes to improve efficiency, in order to advance knowledge about the influence of organizational culture on the safety of high reliability organizations.

  14. The impact of organizational culture on perceptions and experiences of sexual harassment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, M.C.; Bajema, C.W.

    2000-01-01

    In sexual harassment research, the importance of organizational variables has become increasingly clear. Utilizing the results of a survey conducted at a telecommunications company in 1997 (N = 458), this study elaborates on the impact of organizational culture on the incidence of unwanted sexual

  15. Organizational culture, team climate, and quality management in an important patient safety issue: nosocomial pressure ulcers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, M.; Halfens, R.J.; Weijden, T.T. van der; Wensing, M.J.P.; Akkermans, R.P.; Grol, R.P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasingly, policy reform in health care is discussed in terms of changing organizational culture, creating practice teams, and organizational quality management. Yet, the evidence for these suggested determinants of high-quality care is inconsistent. AIMS: To determine if the type of

  16. Defined by Outcomes or Culture? Constructing an Organizational Identity for Hispanic-Serving Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Gina A.

    2017-01-01

    While Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) enroll at least 25% Latinx students, the perennial question facing HSIs is, "What does it mean for postsecondary institutions to be Latinx-serving"--essentially an organizational identity question. Guided by the extant literature on organizational identity, culture, and institutionalism and…

  17. The Ideal Worker or the Ideal Father: Organizational Structures and Culture in the Gendered University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Margaret W.

    2012-01-01

    While literature has focused on the ways in which organizational structures exclude women from the workplace, this article suggests that the inverse is also true: organizational structures and culture prevent men from being involved in the home. Using theories of gendered organizations as a guide, this article draws on interviews with 70 faculty…

  18. Person-Organization (Culture) Fit and Employee Commitment under Conditions of Organizational Change: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, John P.; Hecht, Tracy D.; Gill, Harjinder; Toplonytsky, Laryssa

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines how person-organization fit, operationalized as congruence between perceived and preferred organizational culture, relates to employees' affective commitment and intention to stay with an organization during the early stages of a strategic organizational change. Employees in a large energy company completed surveys…

  19. The Relationship between Multiple Commitments and Organizational Citizenship Behavior in Arab and Jewish Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the relation between multiple commitments (organizational commitment, occupational commitment, job involvement, and group commitment), ethnicity, and cultural values (individualism/collectivism, power distance, uncertainty avoidance, and masculinity/femininity) with organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB) and in-role…

  20. Organizational Culture and Socio-Cultural Values: Perceptions of Managers and Employees in Five Economies in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cseh, Maria; Ardichvili, Alexandre; Gasparishvili, Alexander; Krisztian, Bela; Nemeskeri, Zsolt

    2004-01-01

    This survey-based study compared socio-cultural values and perceptions of organizational culture characteristics held by more than 3,300 managers and employees in twelve business organizations in Hungary, Russia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, and the Kyrgyz Republic. Significant differences were found between the five countries on all socio-cultural and…

  1. Measurement of organizational culture and climate in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, Robyn R M; Stone, Patricia W; Bakken, Suzanne; Larson, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    Although there is increasing interest in the relationship between organizational constructs and health services outcomes, information on the reliability and validity of the instruments measuring these constructs is sparse. Twelve instruments were identified that may have applicability in measuring organizational constructs in the healthcare setting. The authors describe and characterize these instruments and discuss the implications for nurse administrators.

  2. A PORTRAIT OF CHINESE ENTERPRISE THROUGH THE LENS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew-Huat Kong

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available By adopting a cultural perspective of organizations, and more specifically, using the structural model of culture as a framework, this investigation attempts to discover the underlying structure of reality in mainland Chinese organizations.This study proposes that at the heart of Chinese organizational culture lie three dominant assumptions, namely "the ever hostile environment", "social reality in hierarchical order", and the "self-seeking human being", which relate to the environment, group, and individual respectively. This triad of assumptions not only animates Chinese organizational culture but also constitutes a unifying thread connecting the different components of this culture. The outward manifestations of this mix of organizational assumptions can best be depicted as a clash of two cultural elitist forces – power and role culture. While power culture is characterized by bonds of personal patronage, personal connections, and displays of personal authority and subservience, role culture emphasizes institutional authority, the rule of law, and meritocracy. The former is presently in command of organizational leadership while the latter has emerged principally as a response to the excesses of the former. Interestingly, although the two cultures are supported by two different sets of values, they rest on a common set of organizational assumptions.

  3. The influence of national culture on organizational change and competitiveness in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostojić Đorđe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Globalization of business has created a worldwide market where companies from around the world make interactions. National cultures have a significant influence on the way companies do business, as well as on company's market position. National culture influences the way managers interpret their environment, the types of organizational changes and employee motivation. Companies must perform more rigorous selection of workers, so as to employ a worker whose individual cultural values (that are formed under the influence of national culture correspond to organizational culture of a company, improving the competitiveness of companies in the process.

  4. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AS CUSTOMER-ORIENTED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE THE COMPETITIVENESS OF THE UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Demenenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the features of formation and development of organizational culture of the University as customer-centric technology. The phenomenon of organizational culture is an essential resource for improving the competitiveness of the University, innovative development, indicators of international and research activities of the University. Stream organizational culture external (students, parents, employers and internal (students, faculty, University administration, staff/employees customers of the University determines the integration of elements of organizational culture of University in business environment of enterprises, through the involvement of graduates in professional environment. Organizational culture plays a very active role in the governance of higher education institution. At the present level of development of the market of educational services with the introduction of the national project of modernization of the education system organizational culture becomes a significant part of the formation of the University as an economic entity. It is a powerful factor in increasing the attractiveness of higher education institutions for potential consumers of educational and other services, as well as his staff. Organizational culture affects each student during his adaptation and socialization, psychological growth and learning at the University. Organizational culture and, after graduation, is in a symbiotic relationship with the employee as the object of professional activity. Potential employee during the period of study at the University “consumes” the historically established values of the University, participates in the established and developing its traditions, abides by the norms and rules of behavior, adapts to the society through various kinds of symbolism of the University, etc. In turn, the organizational culture of the University, as a basis for the development and socialization of a young man, becoming an

  5. The Relationship between Organizational Culture Types and Innovation in Aerospace Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Adaora N.

    Innovation in the aerospace industry has proven to be an effective strategy for competitiveness and sustainability. The organizational culture of the firm must be conducive to innovation. The problem was that although innovation is needed for aerospace companies to be competitive and sustainable, certain organizational culture issues might hinder leaders from successfully innovating (Emery, 2010; Ramanigopal, 2012). The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of hierarchical, clan, adhocracy and market organizational types and innovation in aerospace companies within the U.S while controlling for company size and length of time in business. The non-experimental quantitative study included a random sample of 136 aerospace leaders in the U.S. There was a significant relationship between market organizational culture and innovation, F(1,132) = 4.559, p = .035. No significant relationships were found between hierarchical organizational culture and innovation and between clan culture and innovation. The relationship between adhocracy culture and innovation was not significant, possible due to inadequate sample size. Company size was shown to be a justifiable covariate in the study, due to a significant relationship with innovative (F(1, 130) = 4.66, p business had no relationship with innovation. The findings imply that market organizational cultures are more likely to result in innovative outcomes in the aerospace industry. Organizational leaders are encouraged to adopt a market culture and adopt smaller organizational structures. Recommendations for further research include investigating the relationship between adhocracy culture and innovation using an adequate sample size. Research is needed to determine other variables that predict innovation. This study should be repeated at periodic intervals and across other industrial sectors and countries.

  6. A Cultural Competence Organizational Review for Community Health Services: Insights From a Participatory Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Mandy; Gibbs, Lisa; Pradel, Veronika; Morris, Michal; Gwatirisa, Pauline; Tadic, Maryanne; de Silva, Andrea; Hall, Martin; Young, Dana; Riggs, Elisha; Calache, Hanny; Gussy, Mark; Watt, Richard; Gondal, Iqbal; Waters, Elizabeth

    2017-05-01

    Cultural competence is an important aspect of health service access and delivery in health promotion and community health. Although a number of frameworks and tools are available to assist health service organizations improve their services to diverse communities, there are few published studies describing organizational cultural competence assessments and the extent to which these tools facilitate cultural competence. This article addresses this gap by describing the development of a cultural competence assessment, intervention, and evaluation tool called the Cultural Competence Organizational Review (CORe) and its implementation in three community sector organizations. Baseline and follow-up staff surveys and document audits were conducted at each participating organization. Process data and organizational documentation were used to evaluate and monitor the experience of CORe within the organizations. Results at follow-up indicated an overall positive trend in organizational cultural competence at each organization in terms of both policy and practice. Organizations that are able to embed actions to improve organizational cultural competence within broader organizational plans increase the likelihood of sustainable changes to policies, procedures, and practice within the organization. The benefits and lessons learned from the implementation of CORe are discussed.

  7. Discrepancies in Leader and Follower Ratings of Transformational Leadership: Relationship with Organizational Culture in Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Ehrhart, Mark G; Farahnak, Lauren R; Sklar, Marisa; Horowitz, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    The role of leadership in the management and delivery of health and allied health services is often discussed but lacks empirical research. Discrepancies are often found between leaders' self-ratings and followers' ratings of the leader. To our knowledge no research has examined leader-follower discrepancies and their association with organizational culture in mental health clinics. The current study examines congruence, discrepancy, and directionality of discrepancy in relation to organizational culture in 38 mental health teams (N = 276). Supervisors and providers completed surveys including ratings of the supervisor transformational leadership and organizational culture. Polynomial regression and response surface analysis models were computed examining the associations of leadership discrepancy and defensive organizational culture and its subscales. Discrepancies between supervisor and provider reports of transformational leadership were associated with a more negative organizational culture. Culture suffered more where supervisors rated themselves more positively than providers, in contrast to supervisors rating themselves lower than the provider ratings of the supervisor. Leadership and leader discrepancy should be a consideration in improving organizational culture and for strategic initiatives such as quality of care and the implementation and sustainment of evidence-based practice.

  8. The role of transformational leadership and organizational culture in service delivery within a public service organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ophillia Ledimo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Continuous changes in the external environment deriving from legislative, economic and technological factors, puts pressure not only to corporate organizations, but also to public service organizations. These changes have increased pressure on service delivery and calls for accountability in public service organizations. With this increased pressure comes the need for public service organizations to discover how to most effectively enhance their organizational performance. Two of the most effective ways to improve performance are through the organizational leadership and culture. Although many studies were conducted on transformational leadership and organizational culture, there is still a need to investigate the link between these constructs in public service organizations. Hence the objective of this study was to explore the relationship between transformational leadership and organizational culture for service delivery practices. The Leadership Practice Inventory (LPI and Organizational Culture Inventory (OCI were administered to a random sample size of N=238, from a population of 4350 employees working within the public service organization. Descriptive statistics and Pearson’s correlation were conducted to analyse the data. The results of this study indicated a significant positive relationship between transformational leadership and the constructive dimension of organizational culture within a public service organization. In terms of contributions and practical implications, insight gained from the findings may be used in proposing leadership and organizational development interventions and future research

  9. Concordance Between Administrator and Clinician Ratings of Organizational Culture and Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidas, Rinad S; Williams, Nathaniel J; Green, Philip D; Aarons, Gregory A; Becker-Haimes, Emily M; Evans, Arthur C; Rubin, Ronnie; Adams, Danielle R; Marcus, Steven C

    2018-01-01

    Organizational culture and climate are important determinants of behavioral health service delivery for youth. The Organizational Social Context measure is a well validated assessment of organizational culture and climate that has been developed and extensively used in public sector behavioral health service settings. The degree of concordance between administrators and clinicians in their reports of organizational culture and climate may have implications for research design, inferences, and organizational intervention. However, the extent to which administrators' and clinicians' reports demonstrate concordance is just beginning to garner attention in public behavioral health settings in the United States. We investigated the concordance between 73 administrators (i.e., supervisors, clinical directors, and executive directors) and 247 clinicians in 28 child-serving programs in a public behavioral health system. Findings suggest that administrators, compared to clinicians, reported more positive cultures and climates. Organizational size moderated this relationship such that administrators in small programs (climate in contrast to administrators in large programs (≥466 youth clients served annually) who reported more positive cultures and climates than clinicians. We propose a research agenda that examines the effect of concordance between administrators and clinicians on organizational outcomes in public behavioral health service settings.

  10. Components of a Measure to Describe Organizational Culture in Academic Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desselle, Shane; Rosenthal, Meagen; Holmes, Erin R; Andrews, Brienna; Lui, Julia; Raja, Leela

    2017-12-01

    Objective. To develop a measure of organizational culture in academic pharmacy and identify characteristics of an academic pharmacy program that would be impactful for internal (eg, students, employees) and external (eg, preceptors, practitioners) clients of the program. Methods. A three-round Delphi procedure of 24 panelists from pharmacy schools in the U.S. and Canada generated items based on the Organizational Culture Profile (OCP), which were then evaluated and refined for inclusion in subsequent rounds. Items were assessed for appropriateness and impact. Results. The panel produced 35 items across six domains that measured organizational culture in academic pharmacy: competitiveness, performance orientation, social responsibility, innovation, emphasis on collegial support, and stability. Conclusion. The items generated require testing for validation and reliability in a large sample to finalize this measure of organizational culture.

  11. Organizational Culture and Climate and Mental Health Provider Attitudes Toward Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Sawitzky, Angelina C

    2006-02-01

    Mental health provider attitudes toward adopting evidence-based practice (EBP) are associated with organizational context and provider individual differences. Organizational culture and climate are contextual factors that can affect staff acceptance of innovation. This study examined the association of organizational culture and climate with attitudes toward adopting EBP. Participants were 301 public sector mental health service providers from 49 programs providing mental health services for youths and families. Correlation analyses and multilevel hierarchical regressions, controlling for effects of provider characteristics, showed that constructive culture was associated with more positive attitudes toward adoption of EBP and poor organizational climates with perceived divergence of usual practice and EBP. Behavioral health organizations may benefit from consideration of how culture and climate affect staff attitudes toward change in practice.

  12. Shaping the Organizational Culture in Conditions of Increasing the Competitiveness of Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Rębisz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The organizational culture is one of key factors which can influence the organizational success in building the long-lasting domination of an enterprise. The article is an attempt to introduce and at the same time to present the understanding of the culture in terms of expected bearings which can explain why organizational individuals (or entire organizations promote only the behaviors which are in accordance with the value and the mission of the enterprises. The author draws attention to the level of expectations and behavior, which is usually the result of team work. A lot of attention has also been paid to the phenomenon of crossing of two relations: organizational culture with the function of leadership. The author has also discussed the role of a manager as a means of shaping and supporting an organization culture in conditions of increasing competition.

  13. Organizational Citizenship Behavior and Counterproductive Work Behavior: Cross-cultural comparisons between Turkey and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Cem-Ersoy (Nevra)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis research project explores cultural determinants that facilitate positive employee behavior. In the literature, this behavior is identified as organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). The dissertation also focuses on factors related to counterproductive work behavior (CWB). CWB is

  14. THE EFFECT OF COMPENSATION, LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE THROUGH WORK MOTIVATION ON EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djoko Setyo Widodo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the effect of compensation, leadership and organizational culture through work motivation on employee performance. This study uses a quantitative method by distributing questionnaires to employees in the conventional banking environment in Bekasi. The research sample is determined by simple random sampling and the technique analysis is SEM analysis with AMOS ver. 21. This study shows positive and significant results partially from the effect of variable compensation, leadership, organizational culture and motivation on employee performance. On the other hand, the study also find that organizational culture has no effect on work motivation. Based on the results of this study conclude that all hypothesis are supported but one hypotheses that examine the influence of organizational culture has no effect on work motivation.

  15. [Role of self-leadership in the relationship between organizational culture and informatics competency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung Soo

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the moderating and mediating effects of self-leadership in the relationship between organizational culture and nurses' informatics competency. Participants in this study were 297 nurses from the cities of Busan and Ulsan. The scales of organizational culture, self-leadership and informatics competency for nurses were used in this study. Descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation coefficient, stepwise multiple regression were used for data analysis. Nursing informatics competency of the participants was relatively low with a mean score 3.02. There were significant positive correlations between subcategories of perceived organizational culture, self-leadership and nursing informatics competency. Self-leadership was a moderator and a mediator between organizational culture and informatics competency. Based on the results of this study, self-leadership promotion strategies to improve nursing informatics competency are needed.

  16. The Effects of Organizational Culture on Mental Health Service Engagement of Transition Age Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, HyunSoo; Tracy, Elizabeth M; Biegel, David E; Min, Meeyoung O; Munson, Michelle R

    2015-10-01

    Nationwide, there is a growing concern in understanding mental health service engagement among transition age youth. The ecological perspective suggests that there are multiple barriers to service engagement which exist on varying levels of the ecosystem. Based on the socio-technical theory and organizational culture theory, this study examined the impact of organization-level characteristics on perceived service engagement and the moderating role of organizational culture on practitioner-level characteristics affecting youth service engagement. A cross-sectional survey research design was used to address the research questions. The data were collected from 279 practitioners from 27 mental health service organizations representing three major metropolitan areas in Ohio. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to address a nested structure. Findings revealed that location of organization, service setting, and organizational culture had significant effects on the continuation of services. In addition, the relationship between service coordination and resource knowledge and service engagement was moderated by organizational culture.

  17. Urban FFA Members' Sense of the Organizational Culture of the FFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael J.; Kitchel, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Organizational culture shapes how members of a group act. The culture has the power to exclude potential new members who do not fit into the culture of the organization. Research on urban school-based agriculture programs has indicated that urban agriculture students face barriers to their participation in the National FFA Organization (FFA).…

  18. Organizational structure and continuous improvement and learning: Moderating effects of cultural endorsement of participative leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaowen Huang; Joseph C Rode; Roger G Schroeder

    2011-01-01

    Building upon the culturally endorsed implicit theory of leadership, we investigated the moderating effects of national culture on the relationship between organizational structure and continuous improvement and learning. We propose that the relationship between organic organizations (characterized by flat, decentralized structures with a wide use of multifunctional employees) and continuous improvement and learning will be stronger when national cultural endorsement for participative leaders...

  19. Impact of Individual Perception of Organizational Culture on the Learning Transfer Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Aindrila; Pereira, Arun; Bates, Reid

    2018-01-01

    This research is an empirical study of the relationship between organization culture, as perceived by employees, and the work-environment-related learning transfer factors in organizations, which we call learning transfer environment (LTE). To measure perceptions of organization culture, we use the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument and…

  20. Mediation effect of organizational culture on the relationship between perceived ethics and SMEs performance

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullahi Hassan Gorondutse; Haim Hilman

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to examine the association between perceived ethics and SMEs performance; also determine the mediation effect of organizational culture on the relationship. Design/methodology/approach: Based on the literature review, this research developed a conceptual model of Perceived ethics, organizational culture and performance. This research applied purposive sampling to gather data from owners/managers of SMEs in Kano State North- West of Nigeria. Apart fro...

  1. An empirical study on relationship between organizational culture and administrative corruption

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed Sehhat; Mehdi Jafarzadeh kenari; Mohsen Mijani

    2012-01-01

    Bureaucratic corruption is an organizational phenomenon, which faces the trend of countries’ development with serious problems. In spite of all planning and respects of countries to fight against this phenomenon, we are still observing its growth in various aspects of the community. The basic approach emphasized by present study is that it is necessary to establish a corruption prevention system whose central element is social culture and organizational culture rather than relying upon the tr...

  2. The Effect of Transformational Leadership Behavior on Organizational Culture: An Application in Pharmaceutical Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Aydogdu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, conducted on 96 employees from production sector in a pharmaceutical company, the effect of transformational leadership behavior on organizational culture is investigated to determine statistically significant relations. The results of the study support the hypotheses. Transformational leadership behavior has a positive and significant correlation between the components of organizational culture such as long / short term orientation, masculinity / feminity, power distance, individualism / collectivisim and uncertainity avoidance.

  3. Impact of Organizational Culture on the Pakistani Hotels Workforce's Job Satisfaction: Qualitative Report

    OpenAIRE

    Zahid, Marium; Shaikh, Taha; Zehra, Syeda Zufiesha

    2017-01-01

    The influence of organizational culture on the level of job satisfaction depends on the ability to cope up with the stress and working environment. This investigation tackle the purpose of Denison’s prototypical for searching the organizational culture and Spector JGS assessment to inspect workforce job gratification in the course of 5 points Likert Scale. The investigation studied 220 hotel employees from middle range 3 star hotels in Pakistan. For interpretation, researchers chiefly used MS...

  4. Organizational Culture and Safety Performance in the Manufacturing Companies in Malaysia: A Conceptual Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ong Choon Hee; Lim Lee Ping

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual analysis of organizational culture and safety performance in the manufacturing companies in Malaysia. Our conceptual analysis suggests that manufacturing companies that adopt group culture or hierarchical culture are more likely to demonstrate safety compliance and safety participation. Manufacturing companies that adopt rational culture or developmental culture are less likely to demonstrate safety compliance and safety participation. Give...

  5. The role of organizational culture and leadership in water safety plan implementation for improved risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summerill, Corinna; Pollard, Simon J.T.; Smith, Jennifer A.

    2010-01-01

    Appropriate implementation of WSPs offers an important opportunity to engage in and promote preventative risk management within water utilities. To ensure success, the whole organization, especially executive management, need to be advocates. Illustrated by two case studies, we discuss the influence of organizational culture on buy-in and commitment to public health protection and WSPs. Despite an internal desire to undertake risk management, some aspects of organizational culture prevented these from reaching full potential. Enabling cultural features included: camaraderie; competition; proactive, involved leaders; community focus; customer service mentality; transparency; accountability; competent workforce; empowerment; appreciation of successes, and a continual improvement culture. Blocking features included: poor communication; inflexibility; complacency; lack of awareness, interest or reward and coercion. We urge water utilities to consider the influence of organizational culture on the success and sustainability of WSP adoption, and better understand how effective leadership can mould culture to support implementation.

  6. The role of organizational culture and leadership in water safety plan implementation for improved risk management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summerill, Corinna, E-mail: c.summerill@cranfield.ac.uk [Cranfield University, Centre for Water Science, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Pollard, Simon J.T., E-mail: s.pollard@cranfield.ac.uk [Collaborative Centre of Excellence in Understanding and Managing Natural and Environmental Risks, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Smith, Jennifer A., E-mail: j.a.smith@cranfield.ac.uk [Cranfield University, Centre for Water Science, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-15

    Appropriate implementation of WSPs offers an important opportunity to engage in and promote preventative risk management within water utilities. To ensure success, the whole organization, especially executive management, need to be advocates. Illustrated by two case studies, we discuss the influence of organizational culture on buy-in and commitment to public health protection and WSPs. Despite an internal desire to undertake risk management, some aspects of organizational culture prevented these from reaching full potential. Enabling cultural features included: camaraderie; competition; proactive, involved leaders; community focus; customer service mentality; transparency; accountability; competent workforce; empowerment; appreciation of successes, and a continual improvement culture. Blocking features included: poor communication; inflexibility; complacency; lack of awareness, interest or reward and coercion. We urge water utilities to consider the influence of organizational culture on the success and sustainability of WSP adoption, and better understand how effective leadership can mould culture to support implementation.

  7. Organizational culture, climate and person-environment fit: Relationships with employment outcomes for mental health consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsh, Bonnie

    2000-01-01

    Although the effects of organizational culture, climate and person-environment fit have been widely studied in the general population, little research exists in this area regarding consumers of mental health services. This research focuses on organizational culture, climate and person-environment fit and their relationship to employment outcomes for mental health consumers. It also examines specific components of organizational culture which are both desired and perceived by mental health consumers. Thirty-six (N=36) consumers were recruited into one of two groups: individuals who were employed at the time of the study and those who had recently left their jobs. Instruments used were the Workplace Climate Questionnaire (WCQ) and the Organizational Culture Profile (OCP). Significant differences were found between groups along the dimensions of organizational culture/climate and person-environment fit. Although few differences were found between groups with regards to desired workplace characteristics, many differences in perceived characteristics were found. The findings point to the importance of assessing the organizational culture/climate and its congruence with individuals' value systems as part of the work integration process.

  8. Effect of Organizational Culture Factors on Knowledge Management Processes Implementation in Technology & Deputy Tax Planning Agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Rahimian

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This research was a case study to evaluate the effect of organizational culture on knowledge management processes implementation in Technology & Deputy Tax Planning Agency was done by Survey Method. Population of the study was experts in Technology & Deputy Tax planning of the organization. Research tools included two questionnaires: the organizational culture profile and the processes of knowledge management. The first questionnaire has surveyed the seven components of organizational culture (competitiveness, social responsibility, supportiveness, innovation, emphasis on rewards, performance orientation, and stability. The second has explored six processes such as creation, capture, organization, storage, dissemination and application of knowledge. The results of this research showed that according to the experts the components of organizational culture and knowledge management were in the intermediate level. Between each of the seven components of organizational culture was 70% positive and significant relationship with knowledge management processes. Also, among each of the seven components of organizational culture was positive and significant relationship with knowledge management processes. Regression analysis gave the same result that only two components of social responsibility and performance orientation in predicting the changing role of knowledge management processes have been effective.

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF SPIRITUAL INTELLIGENCE,LEADERSHIP, AND ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE ON ORGANIZATIONAL CITIZENSHIP BEHAVIOR: A STUDY TO ISLAMIC BANK IN MAKASSAR CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhdar. HM

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study are to find out and to analys: (1 the influence of spiritual intelligence on organizational citizenship behavior; (2 the influence of leadership on organizational citizenship behavior; (3 the influence of organizationan culture on organizational citizenship behaviorThe population included all employees of Islamic Bank in Makassar City. There were 178 samples determined by using Slovin formula. The samples were selected in two stages: proportional and purposive sampling. The data were analyzed by using path analysis with the AMOS 21 program. The results show that: spiritual intelligence has a positive and significant influence on organizational citizenship behavior; leadership has a positive and significant influence on organizational citizenship behavior; organizational culture has a positive and significant influence on organizational citizenship behavior.

  10. Cultural revelations: shining a light on organizational dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noumair, Debra A

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a model for how elements of group relations and organization development perspectives can be combined in a successful organizational consultancy and to demonstrate through a case analysis what blending the two can look like in practice. The further aim of this paper is to provide readers-group therapists in particular-with an increased understanding of how to use therapeutic skills and theories in organizational consultation. The case study is provided to illustrate actual interventions and depict the use of self-as-instrument as one tool available to organizational change consultants. Throughout the paper, ideas are offered on how to engage organizational clients to work with what is irrational and unconscious as well as what is rational and conscious.

  11. An exploration study to find important factors influencing on multi-dimensional organizational culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Azad

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to find important factors influencing multi-dimensional organizational culture. The proposed study designs a questionnaire in Likert scale consists of 21 questions, distributes it among 300 people who worked for different business units and collects 283 filled ones. Cronbach alpha is calculated as 0.799. In addition, Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy and Approx. Chi-Square are 0.821 and 1395.74, respectively. The study has implemented principal component analysis and the results have indicated that there were four factors influencing organizational culture including, diversity in culture, connection based culture, integrated culture and structure of culture. In terms of diversity in culture, sensitivity to quality data and cultural flexibility are the most influential sub-factors while connection based marketing and relational satisfaction are two important sub-factors associated with diversity in culture. The study discusses other issues.

  12. Innovative culture in long-term care settings: the influence of organizational characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieboer, Anna P; Strating, Mathilde M H

    2012-01-01

    Innovative cultures have been reported to enhance the creation and implementation of new ideas and working methods in organizations. Although there is considerable research on the impact of organizational context on the innovativeness of organizations, the same is not the case for research on the organizational characteristics responsible for an innovative culture in (long-term) care settings. The aim of this study was to identify organizational characteristics that explain innovative culture in the (long-term) care sector. A large cross-sectional study in Dutch long-term care-nursing homes and/or elderly homes, care organizations for the handicapped, and long-term mental health care organizations-was conducted. A total of 432 managers and care professionals in 37 organizations participated. The Group Innovation Inventory was used to measure innovative culture in long-term care organizations. Structural characteristics of the organization were centralization and formalization, environmental dynamism and competitiveness, internal and external exchange of information, leadership style, commitment to quality improvement, and the organization's innovative strategy. The determinants of an innovative culture were estimated with a two-level random-intercepts and fixed-slopes model. Multilevel regression models were used to account for the organizational clustering of individuals within the 37 care organizations. Environmental dynamism, job codification, formal external exchange of information, transformational leadership, commitment to quality, and an exploratory and exploitative innovation strategy were all significantly correlated with an innovative culture in the multivariate multilevel analysis; the other characteristics were not. The explained organizational- and individual-level variance was 52.5% and 49.2%, respectively. The results point to substantial differences in innovative cultures between and within care organizations that can, in part, be explained by

  13. The Effect of Organizational Culture, Leadership Style, and Functional Position on Organizational Commitment and Their Impact on the Performance of Internal Auditors in Aceh, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shabri Abd. Majid

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at empirically examining the influence of the organizational culture, leadership style, and functional position of an auditor on organizational commitment and their impact on the performance of government internal auditors in Aceh, Indonesia. All 183 of the governmental internal auditors at the district level within the Province of Aceh, Indonesia, were investigated. Data, which are gathered by distributing questionnaires to the entire population, are then analysed by the Structural Equation Modelling (SEM technique.The study found that organizational culture, leadership style, and functional auditor have affected the performance of the governmental internal auditor either directly or indirectly through organizational commitment.Keywords: Organizational Culture, Leadership Style, Functional Auditor, Organizational Commitment, Internal Auditor Performance.

  14. Multidimensional Structure for Definingthe Effect of Organizational Culture and Supply Chain Culture on Knowledge Sharing in Supply Chain of Automotive Industry: With Emphasis on Improving Supply Chain Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Shafiei Nikabadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available : One of the key aspects of knowledge management is organizational culture. Finding an appropriate culture and key indicators for culture in implementation and execution of knowledge management are one the most important matter in knowledge management implementation in any organization. So, the main purpose of this article was presenting a multidimensional structure for organizational culture and supply chain culture with the aim of effective knowledge sharing in supply chain of automotive industry of Iran. First, according to the literature review, key indicators for any dimension of multidimensional structure of the research were defined. Then, key indicators were revised, adjusted and modified by three industry experts and three college professors, so 4 questions and 5 hypotheses were offered. Next, that multidimensional structure has been assessed as a survey and cause-effect study in supply chains of Iran Khodro Company and Saipa Company.115 industry professionals have participated in this study. In the research, after testing co-linearity between variables, relations between different dimensions of the multidimensional structure have been assessed with the help of path analysis. Research findings showed that the multidimensional structure introduced in the study had an appropriate fitness in automotive industry. The results of path analysis also showed that the culture of the supply chain has had the greatest impact of Business culture. On the other hand, business culture had a strong but indirect effect on supply chain performance. And finally, the greatest effect of knowledge sharing and transferring was on non-financial performance of supply chain.

  15. THE EFFECT OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND WORKING ENVIRONMENT ON EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE: STUDY ON THE EXAMPLE OF PRINTING COMPANY

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    Zainul M.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research is to examine and analyze how the organizational culture influences on the performance of the employees of Banjarmasin Post Group, and find out how the work environment has influence on the performance of its employees. Involved sample in this studies are 100 employees across all departments. The proposed model indicates that it can deliver the dependent variable by 71% by the quite strong relation at 0.846. The finding indicates that significant effect is occurred on working environment while the organizational culture doesn’t contribute any significant effect on employee performance. However, the simultaneous effect indicates that both variables were affecting employee performance.

  16. Conflict cultures in organizations: how leaders shape conflict cultures and their organizational-level consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Michele J; Leslie, Lisa M; Keller, Kirsten; de Dreu, Carsten

    2012-11-01

    Anecdotal evidence abounds that organizations have distinct conflict cultures, or socially shared norms for how conflict should be managed. However, research to date has largely focused on conflict management styles at the individual and small group level, and has yet to examine whether organizations create socially shared and normative ways to manage conflict. In a sample of leaders and members from 92 branches of a large bank, factor analysis and aggregation analyses show that 3 conflict cultures-collaborative, dominating, and avoidant-operate at the unit level of analysis. Building on Lewin, Lippitt, and White's (1939) classic work, we find that leaders' own conflict management behaviors are associated with distinct unit conflict cultures. The results also demonstrate that conflict cultures have implications for macro branch-level outcomes, including branch viability (i.e., cohesion, potency, and burnout) and branch performance (i.e., creativity and customer service). A conflict culture perspective moves beyond the individual level and provides new insight into the dynamics of conflict management in organizational contexts. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Pengaruh Transformational Leadership Terhadap Organizational Performance Melalui Organizational Culture Dan Entrepreneurial Intensity Sebagai Intervening Variable Pada Perusahaan Publik Di Surabaya

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The aimed of this study was to examine the relationship of transformational leadership to the firm performance. This research was conducted in order to find the affect of transformational leadership through organizational culture and entrepreneurial intensity as the intervening variables. This study used primary data obtained from questionnaires distributed to go-public companies' employees in Surabaya. The samples were companies that used transformational leadership. Based on the multiplicat...

  18. The Affordable Care Act: the ethical call to transform the organizational culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2014-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will require health care leaders and managers to develop strategies and implement organizational tactics for their organization to survive and thrive under the federal mandates of this new health care law. Successful health care organizations and health care systems will be defined by their adaptability in the new value-based marketplace created by the Affordable Care Act. The most critical underlining challenge for this success will be the effective transformation of the organizational culture. Transformational value-based leadership is now needed to answer the ethical call for transforming the organizational culture. This article provides a model and recommendations to influence change in the most difficult leadership duty-transforming the organizational culture.

  19. ETHICS AND ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE – KEY ELEMENTS REGARDING THE DEVELOPMENT OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana TEREC-VLAD

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyse the organizational culture within the business environment. The paper analyzes the ethical criteria of the entrepreneurs and the way they relate to the consumer, as well as the reinforcement of the moral values so that the final result of the economic activity is represented by sustainability and economic profit. We thought it would be important to point out that promoting an ethical firm can ensure the well-needed trust capital in a constantly changing society. In this context, corporate responsibility is a key element that ensures both the sustainability of the company as well as the sustainability of the relations with the business partners. In our view, a strong corporate culture must integrate ethics and responsibility in all its activities, since the focus is often laid on obtaining profit, not on the values ​​that should lead the organization towards success over a long period of time. Since our society provides both positive and negative information regarding any company or organization, the focus should be laid increasingly more on the ethics and responsibility of the human resources in regard to the external environment of the company. We thought it would be appropriate to bring up these issues since the issue of building an organizational culture is at a very early stage in our country, and most entrepreneurs only aim at obtaining short-term profit. The fees and taxes are high and the thick legislation often does not provide alternatives; therefore, one must take into account the fact that the real profit is not represented by the short-term benefits, but rather by the benefits obtained in a constant manner over medium-long periods of time.

  20. Understanding childbirth practices as an organizational cultural phenomenon: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behruzi, Roxana; Hatem, Marie; Goulet, Lise; Fraser, William; Misago, Chizuru

    2013-11-11

    Understanding the main values and beliefs that might promote humanized birth practices in the specialized hospitals requires articulating the theoretical knowledge of the social and cultural characteristics of the childbirth field and the relations between these and the institution. This paper aims to provide a conceptual framework allowing examination of childbirth practices through the lens of an organizational culture theory. A literature review performed to extrapolate the social and cultural factors contribute to birth practices and the factors likely overlap and mutually reinforce one another, instead of complying with the organizational culture of the birth place. The proposed conceptual framework in this paper examined childbirth patterns as an organizational cultural phenomenon in a highly specialized hospital, in Montreal, Canada. Allaire and Firsirotu's organizational culture theory served as a guide in the development of the framework. We discussed the application of our conceptual model in understanding the influences of organizational culture components in the humanization of birth practices in the highly specialized hospitals and explained how these components configure both the birth practice and women's choice in highly specialized hospitals. The proposed framework can be used as a tool for understanding the barriers and facilitating factors encountered birth practices in specialized hospitals.

  1. To Understand the “Brazilian Way” of School Management: How National Culture Influences the Organizational Culture and School Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria de Albuquerque Moreira

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify characteristics of national culture in the culture of Brazilian school management and leadership. Considering the broad literature that deals with the peculiarities of Brazilian culture and its influence on Brazilian management, it is assumed that as an institution belonging to a particular society, the school offers internal dynamics that are organized under influences of historical and cultural determinants of this society. This work is an exploratory study that uses secondary data found in studies on the profiles of principals, leadership, climate, and organizational culture in schools and primary data from research applied in public secondary schools located in the Federal District, Brazil. The results demonstrate that the initial premise—national culture influences the organizational culture and school leadership—has been confirmed and aspects that merit further analysis are identified.

  2. The influence of organizational culture on the use of quality techniques and its impact on performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gambi, Lillian; Jørgensen, Frances; Boer, Harry

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study about the influence of organizational culture on quality techniques and the impact of matching culture and technique to enhance performance. Data were drawn from 250 manufacturing companies in Brazil and Denmark. Profiles were identified according....... 2- Quality techniques contribute to improve performance, provided they are supported by appropriate cultural characteristics. For instance, the use of goal setting, continuous improvement, and failure prevention and control techniques supported by group and developmental cultures contribute...

  3. Characteristics of organizational culture and climate in knowledge-intensive organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Leovaridis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on organizational culture and climate in knowledge-intensive organizations, aiming to identify the specific values and features of climate for each sector.The sample of organizations included organizations from five sectors: higher education, banking and financial, research and development, IT and marketing-advertising. The qualitative design of research included near 80 in-depth interviews with employees and managers. The results showed that climate was based on various characteristics: human relations and friendship in small marketing-advertising agencies and IT companies, competition in large advertising companies. In the research development sector, the climate was based on achieving goals in the private area of the sector ( in higher education as well, while in the public areat of the sector it was based on freedom and creativity. The climate in the banking sector was very different, being based on discipline and obeying rules. From the point of view of the organizational culture, all the interviewed employees of the advertising, IT and banking sector experienced, inside the company, the presence of certain forms of organizational culture. Only half of the interviewees from the higher education sector admit to the presence of an organizational culture in their institution while in the public funded research-development sector, employees reportedly did not experience visible manifestations of any type of organizational culture.S

  4. An empirical study on relationship between organizational culture and administrative corruption

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    Saeed Sehhat

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bureaucratic corruption is an organizational phenomenon, which faces the trend of countries’ development with serious problems. In spite of all planning and respects of countries to fight against this phenomenon, we are still observing its growth in various aspects of the community. The basic approach emphasized by present study is that it is necessary to establish a corruption prevention system whose central element is social culture and organizational culture rather than relying upon the trends based on punishment after corruption. To perceive the relationship between organizational culture and bureaucratic health of organizations, we used a field approach and selected four governmental organizations namely “governorship”, “municipality”, “traffic police” and “customs to gather the data. We used two questionnaires A and B to gather the data on organizational culture and the relationship between culture and corruption, respectively. Initially, by distributing questionnaire A, we evaluated all four organizations in a manner that two organizations have bureaucratic culture and two organizations with organic culture. Then, questionnaire B was distributed among employees and clients of studied organizations (to acquire realer information on bureaucratic health rate to study the relationship between the type of organizational culture and bureaucratic health. Research statistical population consists of all employees and clients of bureaucratic organizations in Chabahar province located in south east of Iran. Statistical sample consists of 146 clients and 146 employees of all four studied organizations. The results from data analysis show that there is no significant relationship between organic or mechanic organizational culture and employees’ bureaucratic health.

  5. Assessing an organizational culture instrument based on the Competing Values Framework: Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Christian D; Li, Yu-Fang; Mohr, David C; Meterko, Mark; Sales, Anne E

    2007-01-01

    Background The Competing Values Framework (CVF) has been widely used in health services research to assess organizational culture as a predictor of quality improvement implementation, employee and patient satisfaction, and team functioning, among other outcomes. CVF instruments generally are presented as well-validated with reliable aggregated subscales. However, only one study in the health sector has been conducted for the express purpose of validation, and that study population was limited to hospital managers from a single geographic locale. Methods We used exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to examine the underlying structure of data from a CVF instrument. We analyzed cross-sectional data from a work environment survey conducted in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). The study population comprised all staff in non-supervisory positions. The survey included 14 items adapted from a popular CVF instrument, which measures organizational culture according to four subscales: hierarchical, entrepreneurial, team, and rational. Results Data from 71,776 non-supervisory employees (approximate response rate 51%) from 168 VHA facilities were used in this analysis. Internal consistency of the subscales was moderate to strong (α = 0.68 to 0.85). However, the entrepreneurial, team, and rational subscales had higher correlations across subscales than within, indicating poor divergent properties. Exploratory factor analysis revealed two factors, comprising the ten items from the entrepreneurial, team, and rational subscales loading on the first factor, and two items from the hierarchical subscale loading on the second factor, along with one item from the rational subscale that cross-loaded on both factors. Results from confirmatory factor analysis suggested that the two-subscale solution provides a more parsimonious fit to the data as compared to the original four-subscale model. Conclusion This study suggests that there may be problems applying conventional

  6. A Dynamic Simulation Model of Organizational Culture and Business Strategy Effects on Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivellas, Panagiotis; Reklitis, Panagiotis; Konstantopoulos, Nikolaos

    2007-12-01

    In the past two decades, organizational culture literature has gained tremendous interest for both academic and practitioners. This is based not only on the suggestion that culture is related to performance, but also on the view that it is subject of direct managerial control and manipulation to the desired direction. In the present paper, we adopt Competing Values Framework (CVF) to operationalise organizational culture and Porter's typology to conceptualize business strategy (cost leadership, innovative and marketing differentiation, and focus). Although simulation of social events is a quite difficult task, since there are so many considerations (not all well understood) involved, in the present study we developed a dynamic model to simulate the organizational culture and strategy effects on financial performance. Data obtained from a six-year survey in the banking sector of a European developing economy was used for the proposed dynamic model development.

  7. The natural selection of organizational and safety culture within a small to medium sized enterprise (SME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    Small to Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) form the majority of Australian businesses. This study uses ethnographic research methods to describe the organizational culture of a small furniture-manufacturing business in southern Australia. Results show a range of cultural assumptions variously 'embedded' within the enterprise. In line with memetics - Richard Dawkin's cultural application of Charles Darwin's theory of Evolution by Natural Selection, the author suggests that these assumptions compete to be replicated and retained within the organization. The author suggests that dominant assumptions are naturally selected, and that the selection can be better understood by considering the cultural assumptions in reference to Darwin's original principles and Frederik Barth's anthropological framework of knowledge. The results are discussed with reference to safety systems, negative cultural elements called Cultural Safety Viruses, and how our understanding of this particular organizational culture might be used to build resistance to these viruses.

  8. Using transformational change to improve organizational culture and climate in a school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Pamela J; Clark, Cynthia M; Strohfus, Pamela; Belcheir, Marcia

    2012-02-01

    A positive organizational culture and climate is closely associated with an affirming workplace and job satisfaction. Especially during a time of faculty shortages, academic leaders need to be cognizant of the culture and climate in schools of nursing. The culture of an organization affects employees, systems, and processes, and if the culture becomes problematic, transformational leadership is essential to create change. The purpose of this article is to describe an 8-year journey to change the culture and climate of a school of nursing from one of dissatisfaction and distrust to one of high employee satisfaction and trust. Kotter's model for transformational change was used to frame a longitudinal study using the Cultural and Climate Assessment Scale to transform the organizational culture and climate of a school of nursing. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Impact of Confucian Concepts of Feelings on Organizational Culture in Korean Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Kyu

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of Confucian concepts of feelings, especially paternalism and favoritism, on the organizational culture of current higher education in South Korea. A descriptive analysis approach is taken through the lens of a cross cultural perspective. The influence of paternalism and favoritism on Korean institutional…

  10. Implementing CRM System in a Global Organization National vs. Organizational Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frygell, Linda; Hedman, Jonas; Carlsson, Sven

    2017-01-01

    global subsidiaries, and has planned the implementation well, the implementation was not a complete success. The study has identified that the cultural factor are important, but not stressed enough in the current CRM literature. Understanding the difference between the organizational culture in which...

  11. University Organizational Culture through Insider Eyes: A Case Study of a Writing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Haley; Conley, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Using a case study approach, the authors examined university administrator and instructor perspectives about a writing program's organizational culture. In so doing, members of the writing program were invited to participate in interviews over a three-year period. This qualitative case study suggests that examples of culture through a three-lens…

  12. Organizational Cultures and Employees' Propensity to File Claims and/or Engage in Litigious Conduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abracosa, Gerilynn P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to (a) investigate the connections between aspects of organizational cultures and employees' propensity to file claims and/or engage in litigious conduct against their organization, (b) ascertain behaviors of managers and supervisors implicitly sanctioned by the organization's culture that trigger employees…

  13. Relationships among Organizational Commitment, Job Satisfaction, and Learning Organization Culture in One Korean Private Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Taejo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify dynamic relationships among organizational commitment, job satisfaction, and learning organization culture in a Korean private company. Using a sample of 669 employees from five subsidiaries of a Korean conglomerate, this research found that learning organization culture is moderately and positively related…

  14. Burnout, Engagement, and Organizational Culture: Differences between Physicians and Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Mijakoski

    2015-08-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Data obtained can be used in implementation of specific organizational interventions in the hospital setting. Providing adequate JD-R interaction can lead to prevention of burnout in health professionals (HPs and contribute positively to better job engagement in HPs and higher quality of patient care.

  15. Establishing the Unitary Classroom: Organizational Change and School Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Elizabeth M.; True, Joan H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper examines the organizational changes introduced in two elementary schools to create unitary (desegregated) classrooms. The different models adopted by the two schools--departmentalization and team teaching--are considered as expressions of their patterns of interaction, behavior, and values. (Part of a theme issue on educational…

  16. Personal Sustainability: Listening to Extension Staff and Observing Organizational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstadt, Leslie; Fortune, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    Extension staff are increasingly challenged to do excellent work and balance their lives. University of Maine Cooperative Extension committed to a 2-year participatory action research project to support staff and to an organizational climate that encourages personal sustainability. With tools from ethnography and appreciative inquiry, staff…

  17. Shaping the Culture: Organizational Development through Team Building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, James F.

    This practicum developed and implemented an organization development plan to improve agency and team effectiveness and staff satisfaction at a private agency that provides educational and treatment services to children with emotional, mental, or behavioral disorders. An extensive literature review on organizational development was conducted and…

  18. Creating a climate and culture for sustainable organizational change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Zolghadr

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to investigate the balance between employees’ organizational behavior and the method of managers’ decision making in creating a good organizational climate in Gas Company of Zanjan province, Iran. The statistical population of this research includes 180 professions, staffs, and managers of the company and the study selects 120 people according to random sampling and by the use of Cochran formula. The descriptive-survey research method is cross sectional type. The questionnaire made by researcher was used for data gathering and its reliability and validity was approved. SPSS software was used for data analysis, correlation test was used for the effectiveness, and the effectiveness was specified. Also, LISREL software has been used for performing structural equations of model. The results of the research state that the variables of the balance between organizational behavior of staffs such as the balance of management commitment, balance of leadership, balance of communications, balance of learning, and balance of motivation were effective on its effectiveness in creating good organizational climate in the Gas Company of Zanjan province by managers’ decision making methods.

  19. The Impact of Educational Interventions on Organizational Culture at an Urban Federal Agency. Ph.D. Thesis - Old Dominion Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, Janet Myrick

    1994-01-01

    This study on the impact of educational interventions on organizational culture is an evaluation of a major educational initiative undertaken by an urban federal agency, namely the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC). The design of this educational evaluation captures the essence of NASA-LaRC's efforts to continue its distinguished and international stature in the aeronautical research community following the Challenger tragedy. More specifically, this study is an evaluation of the educational initiative designed to ameliorate organizational culture via educational interventions, with emphasis on communications, rewards and recognition, and career development. After completing a review of the related literature, chronicling the educational initiative, interviewing senior managers and employees, and critically examining thousands of free responses on employee perceptions of organizational culture, it is found that previous definitions of organizational culture are more accurately classified as manifestations of organizational culture. This research has endeared to redefine 'organizational culture' by offering a more accurate and diagnostic perspective.

  20. Developing Expert Teams with a Strong Safety Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Would you like to lead a world renowned team that draws out all the talents and expertise of its members and consistently out performs all others in the industry? Ever wonder why so many organizations fail to truly learn from past mistakes only to repeat the same ones at a later date? Are you a program/project manager or team member in a high-risk organization where the decisions made often carry the highest of consequences? Leadership, communication, team building, critical decision-making and continuous team improvement skills and behaviors are mere talking points without the attitudes, commitment and strategies necessary to make them the very fabric of a team. Developing Expert Teams with a Strong Safety Culture, will provide you with proven knowledge and strategies to take your team soaring to heights you may have not thought possible. A myriad of teams have applied these strategies and techniques within their organization team environments: military and commercial aviation, astronaut flight crews, Shuttle flight controllers, members of the Space Shuttle Program Mission Management Team, air traffic controllers, nuclear power control teams, surgical teams, and the fire service report having spectacular success. Many industry leaders are beginning to realize that although the circumstances and environments of these teams may differ greatly to their own, the core elements, governing principles and dynamics involved in managing and building a stellar safety conscious team remain identical.

  1. The relationship between organizational culture and family satisfaction in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodek, Peter M; Wong, Hubert; Heyland, Daren K; Cook, Deborah J; Rocker, Graeme M; Kutsogiannis, Demetrios J; Dale, Craig; Fowler, Robert; Robinson, Sandra; Ayas, Najib T

    2012-05-01

    Family satisfaction with critical care is influenced by a variety of factors. We investigated the relationship between measures of organizational and safety culture, and family satisfaction in critical care. We further explored differences in this relationship depending on intensive care unit survival status and length of intensive care unit stay of the patient. Cross-sectional surveys. Twenty-three tertiary and community intensive care units within three provinces in Canada. One thousand two-hundred eighty-five respondents from 2374 intensive care unit clinical staff, and 880 respondents from 1381 family members of intensive care unit patients. None. Intensive care unit staff completed the Organization and Management of Intensive Care Units survey and the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Family members completed the Family Satisfaction in the Intensive Care Unit 24, a validated survey of family satisfaction. A priori, we analyzed adjusted relationships between each domain score from the culture surveys and either satisfaction with care or satisfaction with decision-making for each of four subgroups of family members according to patient descriptors: intensive care unit survivors who had length of intensive care unit stay 14 days, and intensive care unit nonsurvivors who had length of stay relationships between most domains of organizational and safety culture, and satisfaction with care or decision-making for family members of intensive care unit nonsurvivors who spent at least 14 days in the intensive care unit. For the other three groups, there were only a few weak relationships between domains of organizational and safety culture and family satisfaction. Our findings suggest that the effect of organizational culture on care delivery is most easily detectable by family members of the most seriously ill patients who interact frequently with intensive care unit staff, who are intensive care unit nonsurvivors, and who spend a longer time in the intensive

  2. The Influence of Spiritual Intelligence,Leadership, and Organizational Culture on Organizational Citizenship Behavior: a Study to Islamic Bank in Makassar City

    OpenAIRE

    HM, Muhdar; Rahma, St

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study are to find out and to analys: (1) the influence of spiritual intelligence on organizational  citizenship  behavior; (2) the influence of leadership on organizational  citizenship  behavior; (3) the influence of organizationan culture on organizational  citizenship  behaviorThe population included all employees of Islamic Bank in Makassar City. There were 178 samples determined by using Slovin formula.  The samples were selected in two...

  3. Promotion and Support of Strong Safety Culture at the Hungarian Regulatory Body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bódis, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority (HAEA) in 2014 carried out a self-assessment in order to preparation for IAEA IRRS mission. As a result of the SWOT analysis it was concluded that for the promotion, development and improvement of safety culture at the HAEA is displayed only on the policy level. In order to obtain a greater emphasis on safety culture within the organization a working group was created. The task of the working group was to define the proposed actions to develop the organizational safety culture. The working group reviewed the current situation, the international experiences and proposed on this basis the elaboration of a guideline regarding to organizational safety culture, to integrate this guideline into the organizational training program so as to apply to all levels of the organization and presentation of the safety culture as part of the training of new comers. Results so far: The working group has defined the main tasks and the connecting milestones in order to develop and improve the organizational safety culture at the HAEA. HAEA has elaborated a guideline for performing safety culture self-assessment based on IAEA and other relevant documents.

  4. A Study of the Organizational Culture at a Higher Education Institution [Case Study: Plekhanov Russian University of Economics (PRUE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasyakin, Bogdan S.; Ivleva, Marina I.; Pozharskaya, Yelena L.; Shcherbakova, Olga I.

    2016-01-01

    The article offers an analysis of the organizational culture at a higher education institution as in the case of the Plekhanov Russian University of Economics, conducted in order to study the students' involvement in this culture and to draw conclusions as to what organizational culture principles are internalized by the students. The study used…

  5. MEASURING ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE: A QUANTITATIVE-COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS [doi: 10.5329/RECADM.20100902007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valderí de Castro Alcântara

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at the analysis of the organizational culture at enterprises located in two towns with distinct quantitative traits, Rio Paranaíba and Araxá. While the surveyed enterprises in Rio Paranaíba are mostly micro and small enterprises (86%, in Araxá there are mostly medium and large companies (53%. The overall objective is to verify if there are significant differences in organizational culture among these enterprises and if they can be explained by the organization size. The research was quantitative and instruments for data collection were a questionnaire and a scale for measuring organizational culture containing four dimensions: Hierarchical Distance Index (IDH, Individualism Index (INDI, Masculinity Index (MASC and the Uncertainty Control Index (CINC. Tabulation and analysis of data were performed using the PASW Statistics 18, doing descriptive and inferential statistical procedures. Using a Reduction Factor (-21 the achieved indexes were classified into 5 intensity categories (from "very low" to "very high". The Student t test for two means was performed, revealing significant differences in Hierarchical Distance and Individualism between Araxá and Rio Paranaíba enterprises (p <0.05.   Keywords Organizational Culture; Dimensions of Organizational Culture; Araxá; Rio Paranaíba.

  6. Organizational models as configurations of structure, culture, leadership, control, and change strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janićijević Nebojša

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the axioms of consistency, stability, contingency, and configuration, research on organizational structure, culture, control, leadership, and change management strategy has shown that their typical configurations, or models, can be differentiated according to the same two criteria: distribution of power and dominant organizational dimension. On the one hand there are models of structure, culture, control, leadership, and change management strategy that are based on an unequal, or authoritarian, distribution of power within organizations, while on the other hand there are models that are based on democratic, or equal, distribution of power. Also, on the one hand there are models of structure, culture, control, leadership, and change strategy that are based on work structure and tasks, while on the other hand there are models of these organizational components that are based on social structure, people, and their relationships. Harmonization of typical configurations of organizational structure, culture, control, leadership, and change strategy occurs due to the harmonization of the differentiation criteria. Based on this harmonization, four organizational models have been identified as typical configurations of structure, culture, control, leadership, and change strategy: the autocratic, bureaucratic, innovative, and task models. Each of these models is effective in a different environmental contingency.

  7. The Relationship between Organizational Culture and Innovative Work Behavior for Sports Services in Tourism Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eskiler Ersin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The innovative behavior of individuals in the workplace is the foundation of any high-performance organization, and thus a study on the factors that motivate or enable individuals’ innovative behavior is critical (Scott, & Bruce, 1994. Therefore, the aim of this research was to find the relationship between organizational culture and innovative work behavior (IWB in tourism enterprises that market sports services. Considering the fact that IWB is crucial for tourism enterprises, exploring the factors that influence IWB could be beneficial. Correlation analysis revealed that IWB was found to be significantly correlating with cooperativeness (r=0.442, p<0.05, innovativeness (r=0.510, p<0.05, consistency (r=0.522, p<0.05, and effectiveness (r=0.554, p<0.05. Additionally, stepwise regression analysis, which was conducted to discover whether organizational culture predicts IWB, showed a significant model: F(2-131=33.775, p<0.05. The model explained 33% of the variance in IWB (Adjusted R2=0.33. In general, our findings suggest that there is a relationship between organizational culture and IWB and that organizational culture significantly predicts IWB. As IWB is crucial for the enhanced performance and success of any organization, organizational culture should be organized in order to encourage employees in terms of IWB.

  8. Improvements of the Regulatory Framework for Nuclear Installations in the Areas of Human and Organizational Factors and Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronea, M.; Ciurea, C.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the development of regulatory requirements in the area of human and organizational factors taking account of the lessons learned from major accidents in the nuclear industry and in particular of the factors that contributed to the Fukushima Daiichi accident and the improvement of the regulatory oversight of nuclear safety culture. New requirements have been elaborated by the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN) on the nuclear safety policy of licencees for nuclear installations, on independent nuclear safety oversight, on safety conscious work environment and on the assessment of nuclear safety culture. The regulatory process for the oversight of nuclear safety culture within licencees’ organizations operating nuclear installations and the associated procedure and guidelines, based on the IAEA Safety Standards, have been developed in 2010-2011. CNCAN has used the 37 IAEA attributes for a strong safety culture, grouped into five areas corresponding to safety culture characteristics, as the basis for its regulatory guidelines providing support to the reviewers and inspectors, in their routine activities, for recognising and gathering information relevant to safety culture. The safety culture oversight process, procedure and guidelines are in process of being reviewed and revised to improve their effectiveness and to align with the current international practices, using lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident. Starting with July 2014, Romania has a National Strategy for Nuclear Safety and Security, which includes strategic objectives, associated directions for action and concrete actions for promoting nuclear safety culture in all the organizations in the nuclear sector. The progress with the implementation of this strategy with regard to nuclear safety culture is described in the paper. CNCAN started to define its own organizational culture model and identifying the elements that promote and support safety

  9. The Relationship of Organizational Corruption with Organizational Culture, Attitude towards Work and Work Ethics: A Search on Turkish High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Ali; Ozdemir, Murat; Apaydin, Cigdem; Ozen, Fatmanur

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse organizational corruption and to determine its level of relation to attitude towards work, work ethics and organizational culture. The data in study have been collected from 441 public high school teachers employed in the central districts of Ankara in the school year of 2008-2009. Data have been collected…

  10. Organizational culture and organizational effectiveness: a meta-analytic investigation of the competing values framework's theoretical suppositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnell, Chad A; Ou, Amy Yi; Kinicki, Angelo

    2011-07-01

    We apply Quinn and Rohrbaugh's (1983) competing values framework (CVF) as an organizing taxonomy to meta-analytically test hypotheses about the relationship between 3 culture types and 3 major indices of organizational effectiveness (employee attitudes, operational performance [i.e., innovation and product and service quality], and financial performance). The paper also tests theoretical suppositions undergirding the CVF by investigating the framework's nomological validity and proposed internal structure (i.e., interrelationships among culture types). Results based on data from 84 empirical studies with 94 independent samples indicate that clan, adhocracy, and market cultures are differentially and positively associated with the effectiveness criteria, though not always as hypothesized. The findings provide mixed support for the CVF's nomological validity and fail to support aspects of the CVF's proposed internal structure. We propose an alternative theoretical approach to the CVF and delineate directions for future research.

  11. Evaluation of the organizational cultural competence of a community health center: a multimethod approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherner, Rebecca; Olavarria, Marcela; Young, Marta; Aubry, Tim; Marchant, Christina

    2014-09-01

    Cultural competence is an important component of client-centered care in health promotion and community health services, especially considering the changing demographics of North America. Although a number of tools for evaluating cultural competence have been developed, few studies have reported on the results of organizational cultural competence evaluations in health care or social services settings. This article aims to fill this gap by providing a description of a cultural competence evaluation of a community health center serving a diverse population. Data collection included reviewing documents, and surveying staff, management, and the Board of Directors. The organization fully met 28 of 53 standards of cultural competence, partially met 21 standards, and did not meet 2 standards, and 2 standards could not be assessed due to missing information. The advantages and lessons learned from this organizational cultural competence evaluation are discussed. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  12. Culture Matters in Successful Curriculum Change: An International Study of the Influence of National and Organizational Culture Tested With Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jippes, M.; Driessen, E.W.; Broers, N.J.; Majoor, G.D.; Gijselaers, W.H.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: National culture has been shown to play a role in curriculum change in medical schools, and business literature has described a similar influence of organizational culture on change processes in organizations. This study investigated the impact of both national and organizational culture on

  13. Development and Psychometric Properties of a Scale to Measure Hospital Organizational Culture for Cardiovascular Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Elizabeth H; Brewster, Amanda L; Fosburgh, Heather; Cherlin, Emily J; Curry, Leslie A

    2017-03-01

    Because organizational culture is increasingly understood as fundamental to achieving high performance in hospital and other healthcare settings, the ability to measure this nuanced concept empirically has gained importance. Aside from measures of patient safety culture, no measure of organizational culture has been widely endorsed in the medical literature, limiting replication of previous findings and broader use in interventional studies. We sought to develop and assess the validity and reliability of a scale for assessing organizational culture in the context of hospitals' efforts to reducing 30-day risk-standardized mortality after acute myocardial infarction. The 31-item scale was completed by 147 individuals representing 10 hospitals during August and September 2014. The resulting organizational culture scale demonstrated high level of construct validity and internal consistency. Factor analyses indicated that the 31 items loaded well (loading values 0.48-0.90), supporting distinguishable domains of (1) learning environment, (2) psychological safety, (3) commitment to the organization, (4) senior management support, and (5) time for improvement efforts. Cronbach α coefficients were 0.94 for the scale and ranged from 0.77 to 0.88 for the subscales. The scale displayed reasonable convergent validity and statistically significant variability across hospitals, with hospital identity accounting for 11.3% of variance in culture scores across respondents. We developed and validated a relatively easy-to-administer survey that was able to detect substantial variability in organizational culture across different hospitals and may be useful in measuring hospital culture and evaluating changes in culture over time as part performance improvement efforts. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. International Conference on Human and Organizational Aspects of Assuring Nuclear Safety. Exploring 30 years of Safety Culture. Programme and Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Thirty years ago, the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group concluded, in its investigation of the Chernobyl accident, that one of the key lessons to be learned from that accident was the importance of a strong safety culture to maintain safe operations. Almost five years have now passed since the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, and the need to implement a systemic approach to safety that takes into account the complex and dynamic sociotechnical systems comprising nuclear infrastructure is one of the main lessons emerging from investigations. This conference will allow an international audience to take a step back and reflect upon the knowledge accumulated in the areas of human and organizational factors (HOF), safety culture and leadership for safety over the past 30 years. The objectives of the conference are to: • Review the experience gained with regard to HOF, safety culture and leadership for safety; • Share and gather experiences related to current developments, approaches, methods and research in the areas of HOF, safety culture and leadership for safety; and • Identify the future needs for building organizational resilience capabilities in order to further strengthen defence in depth for nuclear facilities and activities. The special focus of the conference will be on safety culture and the past 30 years of developments in this area.

  15. The impact of organizational culture on the ultimate performance of a company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrić Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tendency towards the realization of profits, efficiency and growth of companies, emphasized in capitalism, has encouraged organizations to think about what is common for successful companies and what differentiates them from those considered unsuccessful. Thus, the organizational culture has become one of the most common themes in management theory and practice. As a means of regulating the conduct of an organization's members, organizational culture permeates all of its factors, manifesting itself as a cause and as a consequence of their behavior. Naturally, its impact can be felt in all aspects of the business, reflecting itself on the final results. Organizational culture should be cultivated, set in the function of company's success, but its negative impacts should be avoided.

  16. PARTICULARITIES OF ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT IN THE SPECIFIC CULTURE OF THE ROMANIAN COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oprea-Valentin BUȘU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Organizational culture and organizational commitment represent two of the most important concepts to be considered în an well-functioning organization, having a direct influence over employees` lives in that company. Organizational culture, a scientific concept appeared in the field literature at the end of 1980`, in an increasingly unstable business environment, could be defined as a defined series of collective attitudes, ideas, beliefs, symbols and meanings, values and ideologies, rules and norms, feelings or behaviors, as a model and structure of stable practices shared by all the members of that organization and which, by being implemented, come to merge with the structure of organization and its control systems, with the purpose of producing behavioral norms, this way keeping  the unit of organization. In the same time, organizational commitment represents the feeling of membership, of belonging felt by the employee toward the company he/she works in, reflecting the degree to which those characteristics and organizational perspectives are internalized and adopted in his behavior by the subject. Commitment could be also seen as a model of thinking of an employee taking into consideration the level to which personal values and goals are congruent with those of the company. On the other hand, behavioral commitment refers to the process of one employee becoming committed or even stacked into the organization and the way he manage the situation. Our motivation for choosing the theme of this research lays on one hand in the desire to understand the construct of organizational culture and the organizational development, field which I`m interested in,  and on the other hand because the lack of similar research regarding the Romanian companies. The research We have made revealed that there are many studies linking the two concepts with the organizational development in companies from other countries, but only two studies realized in our country

  17. Reforming the Norwegian Police - Cultural Change as a Restoration of Organizational Ideologies, Myths and Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stig O. Johannessen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper lays out the origins of the organizational culture myth and how ideas from populist movements of cultural change together with organizational control ideologies have come to be adopted as the panacea for the ills of the Norwegian Police. The paper then draws attention to how the above trends can be explored from a process theoretical perspective with a view towards organizational culture as practices emerging from patterns of communication, power, identity and moral ethics. The discussion further deconstructs changes in the mythology of official statements to demonstrate how the changes in the official values are solidifying a fantasy of sectarian unity, which at the same time threatens to collapse the functionality of the police organization. A recent example of whistleblowing demonstrates the antithesis of this development: the importance of breaking the unity in order to avoid organizational collapse and regain constructive functionality by a different understanding of leadership and moral ethics. The paper is a contribution to a broader discussion and a call for deeper knowledge of what organizational and cultural change and reform means both in the Norwegian police and other police organizations undergoing similar processes.

  18. "Does organizational culture influence the ethical behavior in the pharmaceutical industry?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashekhara, Molugulu; Agil, Syed Omar Syed

    2011-12-01

    Study of ethical behavior among medical representatives in the profession is an under-portrayed component that deserves further perusal in the pharmaceutical industry. The purpose of this study is to find out the influence of organizational culture on ethical behavior of medical representatives. Medical representatives working for both domestic and multinational companies constitutes the sample (n=300). Data is collected using a simple random and cluster sampling through a structured questionnaire. The research design is hypothesis testing. It is a cross-sectional and correlational study, conducted under non-contrived settings. Chi-square tests were shows that there is an association between the organizational culture and ethical behavior of medical representatives. In addition, the strength of the association is measured which report to Cramer's V of 63.1% and Phi Value of 2.749. Results indicate that multinational company medical reps are more ethical compared to domestic company medical representatives vast difference in both variance and in t test results. Through better organizational culture, pharmaceutical companies can create the most desirable behavior among their employees. Authors conclude that apart from organizational culture, the study of additional organizational, individual and external factors are imperative for better understanding of ethical behavior of medical representatives in the pharmaceutical industry in India.

  19. <strong>Neuroscientific Explanations of Religious Experience are Not free from Cultural Aspectsstrong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runehov, Anne Leona Cesarine

    2008-01-01

    We cannot disregard that the neuroscientific research on religious phenomena such as religious experiences and rituals for example, has increased significantly the last years. Neuroscientists claim that neuroscience contributes considerably in the process of understanding religious experiences, b...... neuroscientific issues, also cultural-religious assumptions that underlie this conclusion. Key Words Culture, Neuroscience, Religious Experience, Meditation. Udgivelsesdato: January...

  20. A multilevel model of patient safety culture: cross-level relationship between organizational culture and patient safety behavior in Taiwan's hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Chi; Ng, Hui-Fuang; Li, Hung-Hui

    2012-01-01

    As health-care organizations endeavor to improve their quality of care, there is a growing recognition of the importance of establishing a culture of patient safety. The main objective of this study was to investigate the cross-level influences of organizational culture on patient safety behavior in Taiwan's hospitals. The authors measured organizational culture (bureaucratic, supportive and innovative culture), patient safety culture and behavior from 788 hospital workers among 42 hospitals in Taiwan. Multilevel analysis was applied to explore the relationship between organizational culture (group level) and patient safety behavior (individual level). Patient safety culture had positive impact on patient safety behavior in Taiwan's hospitals. The results also indicated that bureaucratic, innovative and supportive organizational cultures all had direct influence on patient safety behavior. However, only supportive culture demonstrated significant moderation effect on the relationship between patient safety culture and patient safety behavior. Furthermore, organizational culture strength was shown correlated negatively with patient safety culture variability. Overall, organizational culture plays an important role in patient safety activities. Safety behaviors of hospital staff are partly influenced by the prevailing cultural norms in their organizations and work groups. For management implications, constructed patient priority from management commitment to leadership is necessary. For academic implications, research on patient safety should consider leadership, group dynamics and organizational learning. These factors are important for understanding the barriers and the possibilities embedded in patient safety. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Organizational culture and its relationship with hospital performance in public hospitals in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Bundorf, Kate; Le Chang, Ji; Huang, Jin Xin; Xue, Di

    2011-12-01

    To measure perceptions of organizational culture among employees of public hospitals in China and to determine whether perceptions are associated with hospital performance. Hospital, employee, and patient surveys from 87 Chinese public hospitals conducted during 2009. Developed and administered a tool to assess organizational culture in Chinese public hospitals. Used factor analysis to create measures of organizational culture. Analyzed the relationships between employee type and perceptions of culture and between perceptions of culture and hospital performance using multivariate models. Employees perceived the culture of Chinese public hospitals as stronger in internal rules and regulations, and weaker in empowerment. Hospitals in which employees perceived that the culture emphasized cost control were more profitable and had higher rates of outpatient visits and bed days per physician per day but also had lower levels of patient satisfaction. Hospitals with cultures perceived as customer-focused had longer length of stay but lower patient satisfaction. Managers in Chinese public hospitals should consider whether the culture of their organization will enable them to respond effectively to their changing environment. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  2. Organizational culture in general hospitals and its relationship with job satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Skinder Savić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Organizational culture is formed via communication, resolving conflicts, team work and interconnection. The aim of the study was to present the connections between organizational culture and job satisfaction indicators. Methods: A quantitative descriptive approach was used. The study included nursing employees and medical practitioners in six Slovenian hospitals. A 30 per cent quota sample was used, with a response rate of 35.2 % (n = 310. The Organization Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI (α = 0,818 and Index of Work Satisfaction (α = 0,921 questionnaires were used. The data was processed with SPSS 20.0 statistical software by using the t-test, single variance analysis, correlation, factor and regression analysis. Results: The greatest total average value among employees of both job groups with regard to organizational culture was the market (x = 28.21 and hierarchy (x = 27.57. Job satisfaction indicators (collaboration, leadership, decision-making, autonomy can be explained in 20 % of cases with adhocracy organizational culture (β = 0.318, p < 0.001, market (β = 0.219, p < 0.001 and clan (β = 0.161, p = 0.006. Discussion and conclusion: In Slovenian hospitals, control over work, abiding by the rules and attaining, goals prevails. An overview of the literature reveals the influence of culture on satisfaction. Other factors affecting satisfaction, including stress and abuse of hierarchical power, should be studied.

  3. Relationship of organizational culture, teamwork and job satisfaction in interprofessional teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Mirjam; Wirtz, Markus A; Bengel, Jürgen; Göritz, Anja S

    2015-06-23

    Team effectiveness is often explained on the basis of input-process-output (IPO) models. According to these models a relationship between organizational culture (input = I), interprofessional teamwork (process = P) and job satisfaction (output = O) is postulated. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between these three aspects using structural analysis. A multi-center cross-sectional study with a survey of 272 employees was conducted in fifteen rehabilitation clinics with different indication fields in Germany. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was carried out using AMOS software version 20.0 (maximum-likelihood method). Of 661 questionnaires sent out to members of the health care teams in the medical rehabilitation clinics, 275 were returned (41.6%). Three questionnaires were excluded (missing data greater than 30%), yielding a total of 272 employees that could be analyzed. The confirmatory models were supported by the data. The results showed that 35% of job satisfaction is predicted by a structural equation model that includes both organizational culture and teamwork. The comparison of this predictive IPO model (organizational culture (I), interprofessional teamwork (P), job satisfaction (O)) and the predictive IO model (organizational culture (I), job satisfaction (O)) showed that the effect of organizational culture is completely mediated by interprofessional teamwork. The global fit indices are a little better for the IO model (TLI: .967, CFI: .972, RMSEA .052) than for the IPO model (TLI: .934, CFI: .943, RMSEA: .61), but the prediction of job satisfaction is better in the IPO model (R(2) = 35%) than in the IO model (R(2) = 24%). Our study results underpin the importance of interprofessional teamwork in health care organizations. To enhance interprofessional teamwork, team interventions can be recommended and should be supported. Further studies investigating the organizational culture and its impact on interprofessional

  4. An organizational culture gap analysis in 6 New Zealand community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scahill, Shane L; Carswell, Peter; Harrison, Jeff

    2011-09-01

    The barriers to moving forward and meeting the expectations of policy makers and professional pharmacy bodies appear to relate to the organizational culture of community pharmacy. Despite the importance of cultural change for business transformation, organizational culture has largely gone unnoticed in community pharmacy practice research. To perform an organizational culture gap analysis in 6 New Zealand community pharmacies. Mean scores from a cultural rating survey (n=47) were calculated for 8 cultural clusters and mapped onto a typical and a beneficial pattern match (ladder diagram) for each case site. These ladder diagrams provide an understanding of the gap between the 2 ratings based on the gradient of the lines joining cultural clusters-the rungs of the ladder. Software can be used to generate a Pearson correlation describing the strength of the relationship between the typical and beneficial ratings. Eight cultural clusters were mapped: "leadership and staff management"; "valuing each other and the team"; "free-thinking, fun and, open to challenge"; "trusted behavior"; "customer relations"; "focus on external integration"; "provision of systematic advice"; and the "embracing of innovation." Analysis suggested a high level of correlation between the means of the typical and beneficial ratings. Although the variance between average ratings might be quite small, the relative difference can still be meaningful to participants in the cultural setting. The diagrams suggest a requirement for external integration, the provision of systematic advice, and the embracing of innovation to become more typical in most pharmacies. Trusted behavior is the most typical and most beneficial cultural dimension in most pharmacies, whereas valuing each other and the team is the least beneficial. Gaps in organizational culture have been identified through the use of a rating survey. The dimensions of focus on external integration, providing systematic advice, and embracing

  5. From efficacy research to large-scale impact on undernutrition: the role of organizational cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, David; Pelto, Gretel

    2013-11-01

    Undernutrition in low-income countries is receiving unprecedented attention at global and national levels due to the convergence of many forces, including strong evidence concerning its magnitude, consequences, and potential solutions and effective advocacy by many organizations. The translation of this attention into large-scale reductions in undernutrition at the country level requires the alignment and support of many organizations in the development and implementation of a coherent policy agenda for nutrition, including the strengthening of operational and strategic capacities and a supportive research agenda. However, many countries experience difficulties achieving such alignment. This article uses the concept of organizational culture to better understand some of the reasons for these difficulties. This concept is applied to the constellation of organizations that make up the "National Nutrition Network" in a given country and some of the individual organizations within that network, including academic institutions that conduct research on undernutrition. We illustrate this concept through a case study involving a middle-income country. We conclude that efforts to align organizations in support of coherent nutrition agendas should do the following: 1) make intentional and sustained efforts to foster common understanding, shared learning, and socialization of new members and other elements of a shared culture among partners; 2) seek a way to frame problems and solutions in a fashion that enables individual organizations to secure some of their particular interests by joining the effort; and 3) not only advocate on the importance of nutrition but also insist that high-level officials hold organizations accountable for aligning in support of common-interest solutions (through some elements of a common culture) that can be effective and appropriate in the national context. We further conclude that a culture change is needed within academic departments if the

  6. The mediation of the Relationship between Organizations and Institutions. The Role of Organizational Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Şimandan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the relations between organizations and institutions and their mediation by the factors of organizational culture. After discussing the elements that distinguish organizations from institutions, we will discuss W. R. Scott’s conception regarding the constitutive and functioning structures of the institutions. The following section focuses upon D. C. North’s theory regarding the institutional stability and change, as well as the costs involved by these processes. The last section systematizes a few perspectives regarding the mediation of the relations between organizations and institutions and the role of the organizational culture in this context.

  7. Relationship between Organizational Culture and Performance Management Practices: A Case of University in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ul Mujeeb Ehtesham

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to expand the base of knowledge and empirically test the relationship between the components of organizational culture and performance management practices. The study adopted the exploratory research approach to explore the impact. In this study, primary data was collected through questionnaires from 140 employees at the COMSATS Institute of Information Technology. The sample consists of both male and female faculty members. The regression and correlation statistical analysis were used. The results from the statistical analysis show that, involvement is highly correlated with consistency and adaptability. Similarly, the other dimensions of organizational culture have a positive significant relationship with the performance management practices.

  8. Exploring the effect of organizational culture on consumer perceptions of agency support for mental health recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clossey, Laurene; Rheinheimer, David

    2014-05-01

    This research explores the impact of mental health agency culture on consumers' perceptions of agency support for their recovery. This study hypothesized that a constructive organizational culture must be present for consumers to perceive agency support for recovery. A sample of 12 mental health agencies in rural Pennsylvania participated in the research. Agency administrators completed an instrument called the recovery oriented service environment, which measured the number of recovery model program components offered by the agency. Consumers completed the recovery oriented services indicators, which taps into their perception of agency support for recovery. Direct service staff completed the organizational social context, which measured their agency's culture. Results showed that in this sample stronger consumer perceptions of agency support for recovery were correlated with higher ratings of agency constructive culture. The results suggest that agency culture is an important variable to target when implementing recovery model programming.

  9. Organizational and Managerial Outcomes of a Cultural Diversity Training Program

    OpenAIRE

    Romanski-Livingston, Linda G.

    1998-01-01

    Workforce parity among cultural groups in America has been an unobtainable goal for years. The present diversity in our society dictates a new mandate for majority managers in their approach toward working beside and supervising these cultural groups. In order to achieve full inclusion and reach their fullest potential many employees, minorities and women, in these cultural groups, along with managers, are attending or participating in diversity training classes. Although diversity has sev...

  10. Organizational Culture in a chosen Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Mandík, Jaroslav

    2009-01-01

    The target of the thesis with the title "Corporate culture in selected organization" is to describe the corporate culture of the Engineering Center based in the company TRW Automotive Czech s.r.o. in Jablonec nad Nisou. The theoretical resources of the thesis are a compilation of facts and opinions originating from authors and scientists who are engaged in the area of management, organizations and corporate culture. The thesis endeavours to provide a brief but comprehensive view on the topic....

  11. Using test of Colour Semantic Differential for research into organizational culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Rešlová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to show the possibility of using a combination of the Values Survey Module 1994 (VSM 94 and the Test of Colour Semantic Differential (TCSD for research into organizational culture. The results of the VSM 94 enable the researcher to determine which poles of Hofstede’s cultural dimensions a particular working group is in fact approaching while the data obtained through TCSD make it possible to define how employees consciously rate and unconsciously perceive expressions related to Hofstede’s cultural dimensions, or how they identify themselves with the researched values, respectively. The final values from the VSM 94 are compared with Hofstede’s national values and it is investigated whether it is possible to speak about the impact of national culture on corporate culture. This article also describes advantages and disadvantages of TCSD as well as the possibilities of its more focused use for research into organizational culture. TCSD has not been widely used for research into organizational culture although it has many practical uses thanks to the ability to work with respondents’ unconsciousness in connection with culture.

  12. THE LINK BETWEEN ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES: A CASE OF IT COMPANIES FROM ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobre Ovidiu Iliuta

    2014-07-01

    Taking into account the relation between these variables and organizational performance, it is important to retain key employees that are aware of the organizational goals and values. Therefore, the organization should implement practices that increase job security and career development. In this manner, the organization will not only decrease turnover rates, but it would also form a stronger organizational culture by keeping the employees that are already accustomed with the values, beliefs and norms of the corporation. In order to analyze the data collected from the employees working in IT field, regression and correlation statistical analysis have been used. The results show that adaptability is highly correlated to the mission. The implications of my research for the field of organizational behavior is that the models that were developed for developed economies also applies to developing economies, such as the one from Romania.

  13. The relationship between organizational culture and personnel HSE performance in a production company: A case study in Saipa Car Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-12-01

    Result: Among the organizational culture indicators of Siapa car manufacturing company, control indicator (with the average score of 0.55 and among the personnel HSE performance indicators of Saipa company, performance indicator (with the average score of 0.66 had better situation, compared to other variebles. The results showed that there is a significant relationship between personnel HSE performance and organizational culture indicators except for Bonus System indicator (with the significant level of 0.112. .Conclusion: Considering the significant relationship between personnel HSE performance and organizational culture in the studied company, paying more attention to the organizational culture will accordingly improve the personnel HSE performance. Moreover, by improveing and optimizing the cultural indicators, which have the greatest impact on personnel HSE performance a better organizational culture and personnel HSE performance mey be achived in the Saipa company in the future.

  14. The effects of organizational commitment and structural empowerment on patient safety culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Sujin K; Horwitz, Irwin B

    2017-03-20

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between patient safety culture and two attitudinal constructs: affective organizational commitment and structural empowerment. In doing so, the main and interaction effects of the two constructs on the perception of patient safety culture were assessed using a cohort of physicians. Design/methodology/approach Affective commitment was measured with the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire, whereas structural empowerment was assessed with the Conditions of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire-II. The abbreviated versions of these surveys were administered to a cohort of 71 post-doctoral medical residents. For the data analysis, hierarchical regression analyses were performed for the main and interaction effects of affective commitment and structural empowerment on the perception of patient safety culture. Findings A total of 63 surveys were analyzed. The results revealed that both affective commitment and structural empowerment were positively related to patient safety culture. A potential interaction effect of the two attitudinal constructs on patient safety culture was tested but no such effect was detected. Research limitations/implications This study suggests that there are potential benefits of promoting affective commitment and structural empowerment for patient safety culture in health care organizations. By identifying the positive associations between the two constructs and patient safety culture, this study provides additional empirical support for Kanter's theoretical tenet that structural and organizational support together helps to shape the perceptions of patient safety culture. Originality/value Despite the wide recognition of employee empowerment and commitment in organizational research, there has still been a paucity of empirical studies specifically assessing their effects on patient safety culture in health care organizations. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first

  15. Organizational culture, team climate, and quality management in an important patient safety issue: nosocomial pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Marije; Halfens, Ruud J G; van der Weijden, Trudy; Wensing, Michel; Akkermans, Reinier; Grol, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Increasingly, policy reform in health care is discussed in terms of changing organizational culture, creating practice teams, and organizational quality management. Yet, the evidence for these suggested determinants of high-quality care is inconsistent. To determine if the type of organizational culture (Competing Values Framework), team climate (Team Climate Inventory), and preventive pressure ulcer quality management at ward level were related to the prevalence of pressure ulcers. Also, we wanted to determine if the type of organizational culture, team climate, or the institutional quality management related to preventive quality management at the ward level. In this cross-sectional observational study multivariate (logistic) regression analyses were performed, adjusting for potential confounders and institution-level clustering. Data from 1274 patients and 460 health care professionals in 37 general hospital wards and 67 nursing home wards in the Netherlands were analyzed. The main outcome measures were nosocomial pressure ulcers in patients at risk for pressure ulcers (Braden score ≤ 18) and preventive quality management at ward level. No associations were found between organizational culture, team climate, or preventive quality management at the ward level and the prevalence of nosocomial pressure ulcers. Institutional quality management was positively correlated with preventive quality management at ward level (adj. β 0.32; p organizational culture, team climate, or preventive quality management at the ward level. These results would therefore not subscribe the widely suggested importance of these factors in improving health care. However, different designs and research methods (that go beyond the cross-sectional design) may be more informative in studying relations between such complex factors and outcomes in a more meaningful way. Copyright ©2010 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  16. Leadership behaviours, organizational culture and intention to stay amongst Jordanian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbuAlRub, R F; Nasrallah, M A

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the impact of leadership behaviours of nurse managers and organizational culture on Jordanian nurses' intention to stay at work in public, private and university hospitals. Leadership behaviours of nurses and organizational culture are considered important factors in enhancing retention of nurses. A correlational design was used in the study. A sample of 285 Jordanian nurses was conveniently selected to complete a self-administered questionnaire that consisted of three measures; Kouzes and Posner's Leadership Practise Inventory, Professional Organizational Culture questionnaire and McCain's Intent to Stay Scale. Nurse managers' leadership behaviours and organizational culture were positively associated with the level of intention to stay at work. The study variables explained almost 43% of the variance in nurses' intention to stay at work. The limitation of the study was the use of convenience sampling method. The results asserted that transformational leadership styles of nurse managers enhance positive hospitals' culture as well as the intention of nurses to stay at work. Nurse executives should promote leadership behaviours of nurse managers through training. The regulatory bodies of nursing profession in collaboration with nurse educators and administrators should help in developing competencies for nurse managers that are based on transformational leadership and incorporate such competencies in nursing education programs as well as continuous education programs. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  17. The Cultural Cover-Up of College Athletics: How Organizational Culture Perpetuates an Unrealistic and Idealized Balancing Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Uma M.; Comeaux, Eddie

    2016-01-01

    Using a combined grounded theory and case study methodology, Jayakumar and Comeaux examined the role of organizational culture in shaping the lives of college athletes, particularly related to negotiating dual roles as both student and athlete. Data collection involved 20 interviews with athletes and stakeholders in the affairs of intercollegiate…

  18. Organizational structure, leadership and readiness for change and the implementation of organizational cultural competence in addiction health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Erick G; Kim, Ahraemi

    2013-10-01

    Increasing representation of racial and ethnic minorities in the health care system and on-going concerns about existing health disparities have pressured addiction health services programs to enhance their cultural competence. This study examines the extent to which organizational factors, such as structure, leadership and readiness for change contribute to the implementation of community, policy and staffing domains representing organizational cultural competence. Analysis of a randomly selected sample of 122 organizations located in primarily Latino and African American communities showed that programs with public funding and Medicaid reimbursement were positively associated with implementing policies and procedures, while leadership was associated with staff having greater knowledge of minority communities and developing a diverse workforce. Moreover, program climate was positively associated with staff knowledge of communities and having supportive policies and procedures, while programs with graduate staff and parent organizations were negatively associated with knowledge of and involvement in these communities. By investing in funding, leadership skills and a strategic climate, addiction health services programs may develop greater understanding and responsiveness of the service needs of minority communities. Implications for future research and program planning in an era of health care reform in the United States are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Personality, Organizational Culture, and Cooperation: Evidence from a Business Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatman, Jennifer A.; Barsade, Sigal G.

    1995-01-01

    Explored personal and situational sources of cooperation. Assessed MBA students' disposition to cooperate and randomly assigned them to simulated organizations emphasizing either collectivistic or individualistic cultural values. Coworkers rated cooperative subjects in collectivistic cultures as most cooperative. Cooperative people were most…

  20. Healthcare at the Crossroads: The Need to Shape an Organizational Culture of Humanistic Teaching and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Elizabeth A; Gilligan, MaryAnn C; Osterberg, Lars G; Litzelman, Debra K; Plews-Ogan, Margaret; Weil, Amy B; Dunne, Dana W; Hafler, Janet P; May, Natalie B; Derse, Arthur R; Frankel, Richard M; Branch, William T

    2018-05-08

    Changes in the organization of medical practice have impeded humanistic practice and resulted in widespread physician burnout and dissatisfaction. To identify organizational factors that promote or inhibit humanistic practice of medicine by faculty physicians. From January 1, 2015, through December 31, 2016, faculty from eight US medical schools were asked to write reflectively on two open-ended questions regarding institutional-level motivators and impediments to humanistic practice and teaching within their organizations. Sixty eight of the 92 (74%) study participants who received the survey provided written responses. All subjects who were sent the survey had participated in a year-long small-group faculty development program to enhance humanistic practice and teaching. As humanistic leaders, subjects should have insights into motivating and inhibiting factors. Participants' responses were analyzed using the constant comparative method. Motivators included an organizational culture that enhances humanism, which we judged to be the overarching theme. Related themes included leadership supportive of humanistic practice, responsibility to role model humanism, organized activities that promote humanism, and practice structures that facilitate humanism. Impediments included top down organizational culture that inhibits humanism, along with related themes of non-supportive leadership, time and bureaucratic pressures, and non-facilitative practice structures. While healthcare has evolved rapidly, efforts to counteract the negative effects of changes in organizational and practice environments have largely focused on cultivating humanistic attributes in individuals. Our findings suggest that change at the organizational level is at least equally important. Physicians in our study described the characteristics of an organizational culture that supports and embraces humanism. We offer suggestions for organizational change that keep humanistic and compassionate patient

  1. The role of leadership for shaping organizational culture and building employee engagement in the Bulgarian gaming industry

    OpenAIRE

    Stanislavov, Ivaylo; Ivanov, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the impact of leadership styles on organizational culture and employee engagement, and gain understanding of how these conceptual variables influence organizational performance. Through in-depth interviews, the participants from three Bulgarian gaming enterprises revealed their perceptions of how their previous and current casino managers were able to form organizational culture and build employee engagement. The study revealed that th...

  2. Vox Organizationis – theoretical basis and methodological considerations in the development of an instrument for organizational culture

    OpenAIRE

    Tomovska-Misoska, Ana; Bojadziev, Marjan; Stefanovska, Miodraga; Nikolovska, Zdenka

    2011-01-01

    Management scientists have been trying to identify the impact of various external and internal aspects on organizational effectiveness and efficiency. Some of them focused on cultural, psychological and “internal sociological issues, others on environmental issues, market trends, and strategic positioning. Many of them focused on researching and conceptualizing the organizational culture as an important concept for organizational functioning. However, it has proved difficult to define and...

  3. The Impact of Organizational Culture and Job Related Affective Well Being on Employees’ Conflict Resolution Styles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdan Özarallı

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the impact of cooperative or competitive organizational culture and employees’ job related affective well being on their preferred conflict resolution styles. A total of 236 white collar employees in the private sector completed questionnaires on “Organizational Culture“, “Job Related Affective Well Being“and “Conflict Resolution Styles“. Results indicated that employees working in a cooperative organizational culture would choose problem solving, compromising and accomodating conflict resolution styles while those working in a competitive work environment would choose forcing and avoiding strategies. Results also showed that while positive job related affective well being is a major predictor o problem solving, compromising, accomodating and avoiding conflict resolution styles, negative job related affective well being significantly predicts forcing and avoiding strategies. Overall, the results draw attention to the preferred conflict resolution strategies assumed by Turkish employees, the role of the conflict environment as well as actors’ affective well being

  4. Organizational culture of a psychiatric hospital and resilience of nursing workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Fernanda Ludmilla Rossi; Gaioli, Cheila Cristina Leonardo de Oliveira; Camelo, Silvia Helena Henriques; Mininel, Vivian Aline; Vegro, Thamiris Cavazzani

    2016-01-01

    to analyze the organizational culture of a psychiatric hospital and identify the capacity of resilience of nursing workers. quantitative research. For data collection, were used the Brazilian Instrument for Evaluation of Organizational Culture (IBACO - Instrumento Brasileiro para Avaliação da Cultura Organizacional) and the Resilience Scale (RS). participants reported the existence of centralization of power and devaluation of workers, despite recognizing the existence of collaboration at work and practices for improving interpersonal relations. In relation to the capacity of resilience, 50% of workers showed high level, and 42.9% a medium level of resilience. The correlation tests revealed negative values between the IBACO and RS domains, indicating that the lower the appreciation of individuals in the institution, the greater their capacity of resilience. the organizational values reflect the work organization model in the institution that devalues the workers' needs and requires greater capacity of resilience.

  5. The quantitative measurement of organizational culture in health care: a review of the available instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Tim; Mannion, Russell; Davies, Huw; Marshall, Martin

    2003-06-01

    To review the quantitative instruments available to health service researchers who want to measure culture and cultural change. A literature search was conducted using Medline, Cinahl, Helmis, Psychlit, Dhdata, and the database of the King's Fund in London for articles published up to June 2001, using the phrase "organizational culture." In addition, all citations and the gray literature were reviewed and advice was sought from experts in the field to identify instruments not found on the electronic databases. The search focused on instruments used to quantify culture with a track record, or potential for use, in health care settings. For each instrument we examined the cultural dimensions addressed, the number of items for each questionnaire, the measurement scale adopted, examples of studies that had used the tool, the scientific properties of the instrument, and its strengths and limitations. Thirteen instruments were found that satisfied our inclusion criteria, of which nine have a track record in studies involving health care organizations. The instruments varied considerably in terms of their grounding in theory, format, length, scope, and scientific properties. A range of instruments with differing characteristics are available to researchers interested in organizational culture, all of which have limitations in terms of their scope, ease of use, or scientific properties. The choice of instrument should be determined by how organizational culture is conceptualized by the research team, the purpose of the investigation, intended use of the results, and availability of resources.

  6. Studying the Relationship between Individual and Organizational Factors and Nurses' Perception of Patient Safety Culture

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    Farahnaz Abdolahzadeh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Safety culture is considered as an important factor in improving patient safety. Therefore, identifying individual and organizational factors affecting safety culture is crucial. This study was carried out to determine individual and organizational factors associated with nurses' perception of patient safety culture. Methods: The present descriptive study included 940 nurses working in four training hospitals affiliated with Urmia University of Medical Sciences (Iran. Data was collected through the self-report questionnaire of patient safety culture. Descriptive (number, percent, mean, and standard deviation and inferential (t-test and analysis of variance statistics were used to analyze the data in SPSS. Results: Nurses' perception of patient safety culture was significantly correlated with marital status, workplace, and overtime hours. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that some individual and organizational factors can impact on nurses' perception of patient safety culture. Nursing authorities should thus pay more attention to factors which promote patient safety culture and ultimately the safety of provided services.

  7. Joint-Service Integration: An Organizational Culture Study of the United States Department of Defense Voluntary Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Martin K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the descriptive case study with a multiple case framework was to (a) describe the organizational cultures of education programs and leaders in the United States (U.S.) Department of Defense (DoD) voluntary education system on Oahu, Hawaii; (b) determine if an overlapping common organizational culture exists; and (c) assess the…

  8. Error Management Practices Interacting with National and Organizational Culture: The Case of Two State University Departments in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göktürk, Söheyda; Bozoglu, Oguzhan; Günçavdi, Gizem

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Elements of national and organizational cultures can contribute much to the success of error management in organizations. Accordingly, this study aims to consider how errors were approached in two state university departments in Turkey in relation to their specific organizational and national cultures. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  9. A longitudinal study of the effects of charismatic leadership and organizational culture on objective and perceived corporate performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilderom, C.P.M.; van den Berg, P.T.; Wiersma, U.J.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the combined effects of charismatic leadership and organizational culture on perceived and objective company performance using a longitudinal design. Employees (N = 1214) in 46 branches of a large Dutch bank rated branch management on charismatic leadership, organizational culture in

  10. A longitudinal study of the effects of charismatic leadership and organizational culture on objective and perceived corporate performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilderom, Celeste P.M.; van den Berg, P.T.; Wiersma, U.J.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the combined effects of charismatic leadership and organizational culture on perceived and objective company performance using a longitudinal design. Employees (N = 1214) in 46 branches of a large Dutch bank rated branch management on charismatic leadership, organizational culture in

  11. Teacher Perceptions of School Culture and Their Organizational Commitment and Well-Being in a Chinese School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang; Devos, Geert; Li, Yifei

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to analyze and validate the dimensions and specific features of a school culture in a Chinese context. A sample of 181 teachers from a Chinese primary and secondary school in Beijing participated in a survey that measures school organizational cultural characteristics and teacher organizational commitment and well-being as outcomes…

  12. An Organizational Culture Study of Missouri State University Faculty/Staff in Relation to the University's Public Affair Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Marissa LeClaire

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to address a problem of practice of the public affairs mission through the perceptions of faculty and staff members at Missouri State University of the University's organizational culture. The design included a phenomenological study with a set of organizational culture procedural questions related to the perceptions…

  13. Organizational Culture Influence On Total Productive Maintenance (TPM and Operational Performance Using RASCH Model Analysis

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    Mohd Norhasni Mohd Asaad

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Market globalization, competitive product and services, high economic crises are the most critical factors that influence the success of the manufacturing companies in global market. Therefore it is critical to the manufacturing companies to be efficient in production and lean tool may used to achieve that.  The most frequently used is the Total Preventive Maintenance (TPM, even though there are many studies have been conducted in relation to the TPM but there is limited research in investigating the effects of the TPM on operational performance. However, the result of the studies was not consistent, where TPM practice may have positive and negative impact on operational performance. Among the reason is the culture of the organization that influenced the implementation of TPM and operational performance. Due to that this study attempts to investigate the influence of organizational culture on the TPM implementation and operational performance.  Rasch model is used in this study due to its ability in interpreting and analyzing the ability of respondents in performing the difficult items. The online questionnaires were distributed to 63 randomly selected automotive companies located at Northern Region of Malaysia.  Results of the study revealed that the organizational culture has influenced on the successful implementation of TPM and operational performance. Therefore by the implementation of TPM in outstanding organizational culture can improve operational performance.   Keyword: Total Preventive Maintenance (TPM, Lean manufacturing, Operational performance, Organizational culture, Rasch modeldoi:10.12695/ajtm.2013.6.2.2How to cite this article:Mohd Asaad, M.N and Yusoff, R.Z. (2013. Organizational Culture Influence On Total Productive Maintenance (TPM and Operational Performance Using RASCH Model Analysis . The Asian Journal of Technology Management 6 (2: 72-81. Print ISSN: 1978-6956; Online ISSN: 2089-791X.  doi:10.12695/ajtm

  14. Relationship of hospital organizational culture to patient safety climate in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Christine W; Meterko, Mark; Rosen, Amy K; Shibei Zhao; Shokeen, Priti; Singer, Sara; Gaba, David M

    2009-06-01

    Improving safety climate could enhance patient safety, yet little evidence exists regarding the relationship between hospital characteristics and safety climate. This study assessed the relationship between hospitals' organizational culture and safety climate in Veterans Health Administration (VA) hospitals nationally. Data were collected from a sample of employees in a stratified random sample of 30 VA hospitals over a 6-month period (response rate = 50%; n = 4,625). The Patient Safety Climate in Healthcare Organizations (PSCHO) and the Zammuto and Krakower surveys were used to measure safety climate and organizational culture, respectively. Higher levels of safety climate were significantly associated with higher levels of group and entrepreneurial cultures, while lower levels of safety climate were associated with higher levels of hierarchical culture. Hospitals could use these results to design specific interventions aimed at improving safety climate.

  15. Embedding the organizational culture profile into Schwartz’s theory of universals in values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Borg (Ingwer); P.J.F. Groenen (Patrick); K.A. Jehn (Karen); W. Bilsky (Wolfgang); S.H. Schwartz (Shalom)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Person-organization fit (P-O fit) is often measured by the congruence of a person’s values and the values that he or she ascribes to the organization. A popular instrument used in this context is the Organizational Culture Profile (O’Reilly, Chatman, & Caldwell, 1991). The OCP

  16. The Moderating Role of Self-Efficacy in the Organizational Culture-Training Transfer Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simosi, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to examine the combined effects of self-efficacy and organizational culture on employees' transfer of knowledge/skills acquired through training. The questionnaires were distributed to 252 newly hired employees working in a service organization in Greece. Each of the independent variables examined added incrementally to the…

  17. Organizational Culture and Instructional Innovations in Higher Education: Perceptions and Reactions of Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang; Engels, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    This study examines teachers' and students' perceptions of the organizational culture of their universities and their views about and reactions to instructional innovations with regard to student-centred learning, collaborative learning and use of innovative educational technologies. Six Chinese universities were involved and in total 1051…

  18. Job Satisfaction and the Perceived Organizational Culture of U.S. Military and Military Affiliated Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffenauer, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between demographic characteristics, level of job satisfaction, and current/preferred organizational culture in a sample of 139 off-campus military degree program participants. Responses were received from undergraduate students in the fields of engineering, applied sciences and arts, and education. "The Job…

  19. [Factors associated with the strength of organizational culture in a Beninese hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopoh, Ghislain Emmanuel; Kouckodila Nzingoula, Michael Florian; Sossa Jérôme, Charles; Hessou Ahahanzo-Glèlè, Yolaine; Damienne Agueh, Victoire; Tinoaga Ouédraogo, Laurent; Makoutodé, Michel

    Organizational culture, a frequently ignored concept, affects job satisfaction and productivity in organizations. To determine the factors associated with the strength of organizational culture (OC) in Mono / Couffo regional hospital in Lokossa in Benin. This cross-sectional and analytical study involved 121 workers of Mono/Couffo hospital in March 2015. Data on the strength of OC was collected using a questionnaire based on the validated tool proposed by Cameron and Quinn (2006). Logistic regression was performed to explore the nature of the relationship between the independent variables and OC using Odds ratios. 62% of the surveyed subjects had a positive perception of organizational culture. This perception was statistically associated with managerial factors (moral support of workers and type of relationship with the executive staff). The risk of perceiving a low strength of OC was sixfold higher OR = 3.78, 95% CI (1.08 - 13.22) among subjects who felt they did not have moral support from executive staff than in those who perceived this moral support. The risk of perceiving a weak OC was higher among subjects who considered relations with the staff to be uncordial [OR = 14.32, 95% CI (4.35 - 47.11)] compared to those who considered these relations to be cordial. Human resource management factors were more closely associated with the strength of organizational culture. Hospital managers should pay more attention to these factors in their hospitals to promote better institutional performance.

  20. Organizational Culture's Role in the Relationship between Power Bases and Job Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkutlu, Hakan; Chafra, Jamel; Bumin, Birol

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the moderating role of organizational culture in the relationship between leader's power bases and subordinate's job stress. Totally 622 lecturers and their superiors (deans) from 13 state universities chosen by random method in Ankara, Istanbul, Izmir, Antalya, Samsun, Erzurum and Gaziantep in 2008-2009…

  1. Assessing the Effects of Organizational Culture, Rewards, and Individual Creativity on Technical Workgroup Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaresse, Daniel O.; Yauch, Charlene A.; Goff, Kathy; Fonseca, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    This study used an experimental approach to investigate the conditions under which creative outcomes should be expected from the interplay of individual creativity, the innovation orientation of the organizational culture, and the rewards distribution rules. The results of this study suggest that the individual creativity of technically educated…

  2. Primary care units in Emilia-Romagna, Italy: an assessment of organizational culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pracilio, Valerie P; Keith, Scott W; McAna, John; Rossi, Giuseppina; Brianti, Ettore; Fabi, Massimo; Maio, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the organizational culture and associated characteristics of the newly established primary care units (PCUs)-collaborative teams of general practitioners (GPs) who provide patients with integrated health care services-in the Emilia-Romagna Region (RER), Italy. A survey instrument covering 6 cultural dimensions was administered to all 301 GPs in 21 PCUs in the Local Health Authority (LHA) of Parma, RER; the response rate was 79.1%. Management style, organizational trust, and collegiality proved to be more important aspects of PCU organizational culture than information sharing, quality, and cohesiveness. Cultural dimension scores were positively associated with certain characteristics of the PCUs including larger PCU size and greater proportion of older GPs. The presence of female GPs in the PCUs had a negative impact on collegiality, organizational trust, and quality. Feedback collected through this assessment will be useful to the RER and LHAs for evaluating and guiding improvements in the PCUs. © 2013 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  3. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND CHANGE MANAGEMENT OF MUNICIPAL COLLEGE PALHOÇA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joici Lilian Rodrigues

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This dissertation  analyzes the perceptions of managers of the Faculdade Municipal de Palhoça, which represent an outline of what can be understood as aspects of the organizational culture of this educational institution. Its specific objectives are: a to indicate aspects of the organizational culture of the institution; b to identify values among the group managers; c to link the different perceptions of managers to the public policies of the Municipality, and to the possibilities, in the managers’ perception, of interpreting the culture of the Faculdade Municipal de Palhoça. The study was conducted using the exploratory method, in which the researcher agent interprets the data collection using a qualitative approach, with discourse analysis. The survey is an interpretative case study of a municipal institution, in which a semi-structured interview was applied as the data collection technique, which provided primary data, based on the interpretive paradigm. The interviews were conducted in October 2013, with the directors, and undergraduate and postgraduate coordinators. Following a theoretical and empirical discussion on the theme of organizational culture and change, the objective of analysis of the study was to understand the organizational phenomena and behavior of actors within the context of a public higher education institution in Greater Florianópolis.

  4. Multi-Structural Relationships among Organizational Culture, Job Autonomy, and CTE Teacher Turnover Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji Hoon; Martens, Jon; McCharen, Belinda; Ausburn, Lynna J.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated structural relationships among the constructs of supportive learning culture, school innovative climate, task-related job autonomy, and teacher turnover intention in career and technical education. The study applied organizational concepts to a problem typically approached from the perspective of teacher characteristics and…

  5. The Link between Organizational Learning Culture and Customer Satisfaction: Confirming Relationship and Exploring Moderating Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantouvakis, Angelos; Bouranta, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to develop a theoretical framework and conduct an empirical study across different service sectors to investigate the inter-relationships between organizational learning culture, employee job satisfaction and their impact on customer satisfaction. It also aims to examine an individual-level variable (educational…

  6. Blended Families: The Influence of Organizational and Managerial Culture in Mergers of Career-Oriented Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambach, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative case study is constructed to offer insight on the infrequently investigated influence of organizational culture before and after a merger between higher education institutions. Respondents were selected from volunteers to form three strata of employees; staff, mid-level management which included some faculty members, and upper…

  7. Influence of Demographic Factors and Ownership Type upon Organizational Learning Culture in Chinese Enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohui; Yang, Baiyin; McLean, Gary N.

    2007-01-01

    This empirical study, using Western concepts incorporated into the Dimension of Learning Organization Questionnaire (DLOQ) instrument and data collected from 919 employees in nine companies located in Guangdong Province, China, explored organizational learning culture in Chinese business settings. Findings suggest that the DLOQ is applicable to…

  8. Gender and Leadership. The Impact of Organizational Culture of Public Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Cornelia MACARIE

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study approaches the public organizations and their organizational culture by taking into account the gender factor. More specifically, it will approach women’s presence in the leadership of public organizations, the influence of the public organizational culture in the promotion of women in middle and top management positions, and it will finally identify the defining characteristics of the organizational culture of the institutions led by women in comparison to those led by men. Our study is based on a research conducted in Bistriţa-Năsăud County, Romania, by applying a survey in 12 public organizations. The survey comprises 16 questions, seven of which are open questions; 25 women with different positions in the medium and the top management of public institutions were surveyed. The conclusions of the research confirm the existence of some clear differences in the organizational culture of womenled and respectively, men-led public institutions. At the same time, the study identifies possible causes for the low presence of women in the public top management in contrast to their high presence in the execution positions.

  9. An Investigation of the Impact of International Branch Campuses on Organizational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, William G.; Lanford, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The authors first survey the factors related to globalization that have stimulated the creation of international branch campuses. They then contend that the viability of an international branch campus should not be solely evaluated from a rational choice perspective oriented toward economic self-interest. Rather, the organizational culture of the…

  10. The Effect of Leadership, Organizational Culture, Emotional Intellegence, and Job Satisfaction on Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, Muhammad; Abdullah, Tamrin

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to study the influence of Leadership, Organizational Culture, Emotional Quotation, and Job Satisfaction to Teacher Performance of Senior High School at Palopo Municipality South Sulawesi. There were 78 teachers participated in this research. The results were: (1) Leadership directly affects teacher performance; (2) Emotional…

  11. Analysis of University Organizational Culture Perceptions and Demographic Variables as Predictors of Perceived Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa KESEN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been seen that it is inevitable for individuals to be exposed to stress in their student lives as in their work lives. The aim of this study is to measure perceived stress levels of university students in the university organizational culture setting. To this end, it is investigated the relationship between perceived stress levels of university students and university organizational culture perceptions. By using questionnaire method it is measured that the perceptions of organizational culture in different stress levels and it is analyzed that the differences in students' perceived stress levels according to socio-demographic variables. The population of the study is comprised of randomly chosen 286 students who receive training at Bayburt University Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences. According to the results, it has been found that there is a significant difference between students' perceived stress and gender. While the students stating that they experience low level of stress give maximum points to the variable of adaptation to change, other students expressing that they are exposed high level of stress give minimum score to the variable of cooperation. Besides, it has been found that different demographic variables by various combinations have different effects on perceived stress and university organizational culture.

  12. Organizational Culture at High Schools in TRNC: A Comparative Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silman, Fatos; Ozmatyatli, Icim Ozenli; Birol, Cem; Caglar, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the organizational culture in two TRNC schools by using influencing factors of metaphors, physical environment, values, norms, rituals, language, legends and reward systems. To obtain data, a triangulation of participant interviews, observations and written sources were used. Results appear to display that the…

  13. Sense-making’s role in creating alliance supportive organizational cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Man, A.P.; Luvison, D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to analyze the way in which organizational culture affects alliance performance. The literature has begun to focus on intra-firm antecedents of alliance success, but so far has mainly focused on structural aspects like the presence of an alliance department. This

  14. Organizational Cynicism, School Culture, and Academic Achievement: The Study of Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadag, Engin; Kilicoglu, Gökhan; Yilmaz, Derya

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explain constructed theoretical models that organizational cynicism perceptions of primary school teachers affect school culture and academic achievement, by using structural equation modeling. With the assumption that there is a cause-effect relationship between three main variables, the study was constructed with…

  15. Organizational climate partially mediates the effect of culture on work attitudes and staff turnover in mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Sawitzky, Angelina C

    2006-05-01

    Staff turnover in mental health service organizations is an ongoing problem with implications for staff morale, productivity, organizational effectiveness, and implementation of innovation. Recent studies in public sector services have examined the impact of organizational culture and climate on work attitudes (i.e., job satisfaction and organizational commitment) and, ultimately, staff turnover. However, mediational models of the impact of culture and climate on work attitudes have not been examined. The present study examined full and partial mediation models of the effects of culture and climate on work attitudes and the subsequent impact of work attitudes on staff turnover. Multilevel structural equation models supported a partial mediation model in which organizational culture had both direct influence on work attitudes and indirect influence through organizational climate. Work attitudes significantly predicted one-year staff turnover rates. These findings support the contention that both culture and climate impact work attitudes and subsequent staff turnover.

  16. THE MECHANISM OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE TRANSFORMATION IN INNOVATION COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE FOR INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia S. Leontieva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout article authors give algorithm of organizational culture diagnostic testing of the Hyundai Glovis Russia company, features and difficulties of her cross-cultural environment. Within research the corporate culture and history of the Hyundai Glovis Russia company is analysed. Besides, systems of norms, values and behavior models of the Korean and Russian personnel, and also set of forms of interaction between them are compared. The structural model of transformation of cultural distinctions in competitive advantages of the international enterprise structures is developed.

  17. Budaya Organisasi (Organizational Culture), Salah Satu Sumber Keunggulan Bersaing Perusahaan di Tengah Lingkungan yang Selalu Berubah

    OpenAIRE

    Son Wandrial

    2012-01-01

    As the world has grown more turbulent, the concept of culture has become increasingly important to organizational leaders because the new environment often calls for new values and fresh approach to doing business. Most leaders now understand that when a company’s culture fits the needs of its external environment and company strategy, employee can create an organization that is tough to beat. The method used in this writing is literature study, through literature materials from several sourc...

  18. Designing Knowledge Applying & Creating Organizational Culture Model (Case study: Automobile Industry)

    OpenAIRE

    Saeid Abdolmanafi; Mehdi Nassaji Kamrani

    2014-01-01

    acceleration of changes, competitive environment and uncertainty in today world make knowledge as the most strategic resource for maintain and reinforcement of competitive advantage and Knowledge management is important to achieve competitive advantage, as well as organizational culture in implementing and protecting knowledge management. This thesis in the first phase seeks to explore indicators that formed culture in Iranian organizations. and with use of this factors design Knowledge Ap...

  19. Organizational Culture and Firms’ Internationalization, Innovativeness and Networking Behaviour: Hofstede Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Maja Szymura-Tyc; Michał Kucia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this paper is to describe the features of firms’ organizational culture within four of Hofstede’s national culture dimensions and their potential relationships with internationalization, innovativeness and networking behaviour of firms. Research Design & Methods: This explorative quantitative research refers to results of an earlier study on internationalization, innovativeness and networking of firms in Poland. Descriptive statistics are used to depict the...

  20. Design and validation of a questionnaire to assess organizational culture in French hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saillour-Glénisson, F; Domecq, S; Kret, M; Sibe, M; Dumond, J P; Michel, P

    2016-09-17

    Although many organizational culture questionnaires have been developed, there is a lack of any validated multidimensional questionnaire assessing organizational culture at hospital ward level and adapted to health care context. Facing the lack of an appropriate tool, a multidisciplinary team designed and validated a dimensional organizational culture questionnaire for healthcare settings to be administered at ward level. A database of organizational culture items and themes was created after extensive literature review. Items were regrouped into dimensions and subdimensions (classification validated by experts). Pre-test and face validation was conducted with 15 health care professionals. In a stratified cluster random sample of hospitals, the psychometric validation was conducted in three phases on a sample of 859 healthcare professionals from 36 multidisciplinary medicine services: 1) the exploratory phase included a description of responses' saturation levels, factor and correlations analyses and an internal consistency analysis (Cronbach's alpha coefficient); 2) confirmatory phase used the Structural Equation Modeling (SEM); 3) reproducibility was studied by a test-retest. The overall response rate was 80 %; the completion average was 97 %. The metrological results were: a global Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.93, higher than 0.70 for 12 sub-dimensions; all Dillon-Goldstein's rho coefficients higher than 0.70; an excellent quality of external model with a Goodness of Fitness (GoF) criterion of 0.99. Seventy percent of the items had a reproducibility ranging from moderate (Intra-Class Coefficient between 50 and 70 % for 25 items) to good (ICC higher than 70 % for 33 items). COMEt (Contexte Organisationnel et Managérial en Etablissement de Santé) questionnaire is a validated multidimensional organizational culture questionnaire made of 6 dimensions, 21 sub-dimensions and 83 items. It is the first dimensional organizational culture questionnaire

  1. The Impact of Management and Organizational Culture on Creativity in the Hotel Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia State

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In today`s business environment, characterized by instability and unpredictability, organizations` success depends on their ability to adapt and manage the changes required. Therefore, in order to achieve long-term corporate success, companies need to have a culture that encourages creativity and innovation. The aim of the article is to investigate the link between corporate culture and creativity and the impact of the management form on organizational culture. The research highlights the Romanian hotel industry culture, using Hofstede`s model. Considering their impact on innovation, there were taken into consideration three factors: individualism, power distance and long term orientation. The article investigates how these factors are influenced by the hotel`s exploitation form and their impact on organizational creativity. The research was conducted on two hotels in Bucharest, affiliated to an international hotel chain. In order to identify the impact of the exploitation form on the hotel`s organizational culture, one of the accommodation units is operated under a management contract, while the other operates under a franchise agreement. The study is based on a survey conducted among the employees of the two hotels. Results indicate differences regarding the corporate culture between the hotel operated under a management contract and the unit operated under a franchise agreement. Recommendations on how to foster employees` creativity are suggested. The implications of the findings are discussed, considering the limitations and future research directions.

  2. Responsiveness of culture-based segmentation of organizational buyers

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    Veronika Jadczaková

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Much published work over the four decades has acknowledged market segmentation in business-to-business settings yet primarily focusing on observable segmentation bases such as firmographics or geographics. However, such bases were proved to have a weak predictive validity with respect to industrial buying behavior. Therefore, this paper attempts to add a debate to this topic by introducing new (unobservable segmentation base incorporating several facets of business culture, denoted as psychographics. The justification for this approach is that the business culture captures the collective mindset of an organization and thus enables marketers to target the organization as a whole. Given the hypothesis that culture has a merit for micro-segmentation a sample of 278 manufacturing firms was first subjected to principal component analysis and Varimax to reveal underlying cultural traits. In next step, cluster analysis was performed on retained factors to construct business profiles. Finally, non-parametric one-way analysis of variance confirmed discriminative power between profiles based on psychographics in terms of industrial buying behavior. Owing to this, business culture may assist marketers when targeting more effectively than some traditional approaches.

  3. Importing a Culture of Success Via a Strong Principal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavis, Charles A.; Vinson, David; Fox, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Examines how a new principal at a historically low-performing high school brought about changes in the school culture and in student achievement. Describes how the principal emphasized achievement at the highest levels through heroes and heroines, rites and rituals, stories, governance and leadership, symbols, enforcing expectations, and serving…

  4. Cross Cultural Logistics and Supply Chain Management Towards Organizational Effectiveness within the Asean/Thai Automotive Industries: A Sem Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dansomboon Suwaj

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available As a manufacturing, logistics and supply chain hub within ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations, Thailand holds the 12th spot in global vehicle production for an estimated 2,355 Thai and multinational automotive industry enterprises. Within the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, Thailand ranks number one in automotive production contributing $US11.4 billion to the Thai economy and 12 percent to Thailand’s GDP (Gross Domestic Product, with the automotive industry being Thailand’s leading export sector. However, the automotive companies envisage the difficulty of cultural diversity to manage and coordinate. Therefore, cultural values from the milieu are inducted into the workplace and have a strong impact on both individual behavior and organizational effectiveness and must be direction at all levels for cross-cultural, organizational effectiveness to be achieved. It also became evident that natural disasters are frequent and highly disruptive to the global automotive supply chain and paces must be taken to countervailing the notable and continuing loss to economic growth and organizational effectiveness to both sector units and the global industry. The implementation of strategically placed, environmentally ‘habituated’, automotive parts logistics cache might be one solution to the problem. Given the crucial importance of this sector to the economy of the region and the global supply chain, the researchers surveyed 220 managers using a 7-point Likert scale questionnaire within the multinational industrial clusters of Thailand’s ‘Detroit of Asia’ Eastern Seaboard region. Using Structural Equation Modelling to test the 11 variables on Logistics Management, Supply Chain Management and Organizational Effectiveness in a cross-cultural context, it was determined that collaboration within the supply chain and the exchange of information can reduce uncertainty, with trust being a key ingredient to a JV’s success

  5. Language and organizational culture in the Oswaldo Cruz institute 1900-1930

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Franklin Hanes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7968.2017v37n1p230 The medical literature consumed and produced by the Oswaldo Cruz Institute and the circulation of its personnel in foreign institutions from its beginnings in 1900 through the Vargas coup d’état in Brazil in 1930 testify to the complex, multilingual and international nature of scientific networking in and beyond the belle époque and challenge notions of behavior associated with colonial economic models. To explore the parameters of the Institute’s early organizational culture with respect to language, three of its publications from this period will be examined: a 1911 promotional booklet in German, which details the Institute’s journal holdings and the publications of its researchers; a 1929 English-language travelogue of leprosy treatment centers worldwide; and the journal Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz (1909-, which published articles in five languages during this period. The results indicate that the Institute’s flexible, avidly multilingual language policy, partially the result of Brazil’s peripheral, neutral political situation, led to a very strong multilateral position in the scientific community that provided both visibility and recognition as a full peer in the then-internationally emerging field of Tropical Medicine.

  6. Leading Organizational Culture: Issues of Power and Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumby, Jacky

    2012-01-01

    The literature on educational leadership and management has referred to culture since at least the 1970s. Despite the concept's mention in over one-third of articles written in this journal, there has been little in-depth engagement with how leaders might influence it and the ethical issues involved. The article argues that leadership must engage…

  7. Organizational Culture, Values, and Routines in Iranian Medical Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Brommels, Mats; Shoghli, Alireza; Zavareh, Davoud Khorasani; Masiello, Italo

    2009-01-01

    In Iran, restructuring of medical education and the health care delivery system in 1985 resulted in a rapid shift from elite to mass education, ultimately leading to an increase in the number of medical schools, faculties, and programs and as well as some complications. This study aimed to investigate views on academic culture, values, and…

  8. Vitality at work and its associations with lifestyle, self-determination, organizational culture, and with employees' performance and sustainable employability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Scheppingen, Arjella R; de Vroome, Ernest M M; Ten Have, Kristin C J M; Zwetsloot, Gerard I J M; Wiezer, Noortje; van Mechelen, Willem

    2015-01-01

    Vitality at work is an important factor for optimal functioning and sustainable employability. To date, knowledge on how to promote vitality at work is fragmented. Contribute to knowledge on how to promote vitality at work. Determinants of vitality at work are identified from three scientific fields, and used in a comprehensive model. Regression analyses on cross-sectional data from a Dutch dairy company (N= 629) are performed to examine the associations between these factors, vitality at work, and employees' perceived effective personal functioning and sustainable employability. Vitality at work is most strongly associated with basic psychological needs of self-determination, but also with healthy lifestyle behavior, having a balanced workstyle, and social capital. Vitality at work is also associated with effective personal functioning and with sustainable employability. The study confirms the multifactorial nature of vitality at work. Since organizational culture may support self-determination, and cultural aspects themselves are positively associated with vitality, organizational culture seems particular important in promoting vitality at work. Additionally, a healthy lifestyle appears important. The associations between vitality at work and effective personal functioning and sustainable employability endorse the combined health-based, business-related and societal importance of vitality at work.

  9. Oil sands and organizational cultures: strategy and stakeholder dynamics in an environmental public consultation process (Alberta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouse, M.J.

    2000-07-01

    The demand for corporate responsiveness to environmental and social concerns, more specifically the requirement for public participation/consultation with stakeholders is, according to industry insiders, one of the most pressing changes for the oil industry. For this study, data on a public consultation process involving Syncrude Canada Limited, Alberta Environmental Protection, and the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board was collected through a combination of public hearing transcripts, participant observation, interview methodologies and reports. >From the perspective of organizational strategy, stakeholder relations, institutional theory and organizational cultures, the author investigated the public consultation process. Strategic action was the central theme to emerge through the findings. Positioning strategies influenced by stakeholder status from the organization's viewpoint and stakeholder relationships informed by the network of stakeholder relationships are included in stakeholder dynamics. The management of organizational culture and the creation of an institutional field to generate and maintain values across the relational field of focal organizations, and reduce costs and conflicts, are included in strategic outcomes. The elaboration and extension of components of stakeholder and institutional theories are part of further results, as well as an integrated understanding of the dynamic interconnectedness of organizational cultures, strategies and stakeholders in an environmental public consultation process.

  10. THE EFFECTS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE ON WORKER’S JOB SATISFACTION: A CASE STUDY OF A FIRM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ETHEM DUYGULU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the characteristics of organizational culture and the relationship between organizational culture and its impacts on employees’ job satisfaction. The study begins with general information about organizational culture, importance of the concept; its characteristics and theoretical information about job satisfaction. In the second section, depending on the pervious researches in the literature, a model has been constructed for this study and the relationship between the dimensions of organizational culture and job satisfaction of employees is investigated. The application part of the study consists of information about the sample, analysis methods used in the study and findings. The results show that there is a significant relationship between job satisfaction and organizational culture’s Support, Communication and, Identity sub constructs of Model 1 and Support, Rewards, Competition, Enterprise and, Control sub constructs of Model 2.

  11. Organizational culture based on the example of an Estonian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saame, Iisi; Reino, Anne; Vadi, Maaja

    2011-01-01

    The concept of organisational culture (also referred to later as OC) is one of the approaches in modern organisational analysis exploring the values, attitudes and beliefs behind human behaviour in the workplace. OC as a social phenomenon is considered to be important for the sustainability of every organisation. In the service sector, OC may affect the nature and quality of the services provided. The aim of this paper is twofold: on the one hand, to highlight the patterns of OC in a hospital; and, on the other hand, to outline relationships between OC and patient satisfaction. The study was conducted in Tartu University Hospital, one of the most influential health care organisations in Estonia. This paper has original value by presenting an insight into organisational culture in the Estonian health care sector, and the findings of the study will expand knowledge of OC in the health care sector in general. The OC instrument applied in a quantitative cross-sectional study was earlier developed according to the Competing Values Framework (CVF). Data from 456 medical and non-medical professionals were analysed using non-parametric tests of descriptive statistics. A factor analysis was performed to assess the instrument's compatibility for analysing the OC pattern in the health care sector. The dominant culture type in all the groups investigated was the Internal Processes type, mainly followed by the Rational Goal type, while different cultural patterns were observed in professional groups. The factor analysis yielded a three-subscale solution. Clinics with high patient satisfaction did not score more than clinics with low patient satisfaction in terms of the Human Relations type. In future studies a random sample design and a multidisciplinary approach to OC research should be followed in order to further explore OC patterns in hospitals and their consequences for different aspects of hospital performance.

  12. The role of leadership in determining of the organizational culture

    OpenAIRE

    Miceski, Trajko

    2010-01-01

    In paper are present some aspects to new approaches to the leadership as one of the basic factor for determining the organization culture in organizations. Also some results of empirical researches on cca. 400 tested persons in 34 organizations in Republic of Macedonia are presented. The real leadership means that the ability of an individual to infl uence, motivate and enable others to contribute toward the effectiveness and success of the organization of which they are membres. Special a...

  13. Linking culture, organizational, learning orientation and product innovation performance: the case of Ethiopian manufacturing firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyene, K. T.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Using formal survey data from textile and leather product manufacturing firms in Ethiopia, we investigate how the current national cultural setup (power distance, collectivism, masculinity and uncertainty avoidance is affecting organizational learning, orientation and product innovation performance. Further, we assess the moderating role of sector and ownership structure on the interrelationship. The result demonstrates that the current national culture setup is negatively affecting the learning and innovation activities of the firms in the country. It also shows that while sector type is neutral, ownership type significantly affects the interrelationship among culture, learning orientation and product innovation performance.

  14. Organizational Culture in the Financial Sector: Evidence from a Cross-Industry Analysis of Employee Personal Values and Career

    OpenAIRE

    van Hoorn, Andre

    2015-01-01

    We assess the organizational culture in the finance industry in relation to the global financial crisis (GFC) and consider the potential of cultural change to improve the financial sector. To avoid (response) biases, we build on the person-organization (P-O) fit literature and develop a novel, indirect method for assessing organizational culture that revolves around relationships between employees’ personal traits and their career success in the industry or organization under study. We analyz...

  15. Transformational Leadership, Transactional Contingent Reward, and Organizational Identification: The Mediating Effect of Perceived Innovation and Goal Culture Orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenikou, Athena

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of transformational leadership and transactional contingent reward as complementary, but distinct, forms of leadership on facets of organizational identification via the perception of innovation and goal organizational values. Design/Methodology/Approach: Three studies were carried out implementing either a measurement of mediation or experimental-causal-chain design to test for the hypothesized effects. Findings: The measurement of mediation study showed that transformational leadership had a positive direct and indirect effect, via innovation value orientation, on cognitive identification, whereas transactional contingent reward was more strongly related to affective, rather than cognitive, identification, and goal orientation was a mediator of their link. The findings of the two experimental-causal-chain studies further supported the hypothesized effects. Transformational leadership was found to lead subordinates to perceive the culture as more innovative compared to transactional contingent reward, whereas transactional contingent reward led employees to perceive the culture as more goal, than innovation, oriented. Finally, innovation, compared to goal, value orientation increased cognitive identification, while goal orientation facilitated affective, rather than cognitive, identification. Implications: The practical implications involve the development of strategies organizations can apply, such as leadership training programs, to strengthen their ties with their employees, which, in turn, may have a positive impact on in-role, as well as extra-role, behaviors. Originality/Value: The originality of this research concerns the identification of distinct mechanisms explaining the effect of transformational leadership and transactional contingent reward on cognitive and affective identification applying an organizational culture perspective and a combination of measurement and causal mediation designs.

  16. Transformational Leadership, Transactional Contingent Reward, and Organizational Identification: The Mediating Effect of Perceived Innovation and Goal Culture Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenikou, Athena

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of transformational leadership and transactional contingent reward as complementary, but distinct, forms of leadership on facets of organizational identification via the perception of innovation and goal organizational values. Design/Methodology/Approach: Three studies were carried out implementing either a measurement of mediation or experimental-causal-chain design to test for the hypothesized effects. Findings: The measurement of mediation study showed that transformational leadership had a positive direct and indirect effect, via innovation value orientation, on cognitive identification, whereas transactional contingent reward was more strongly related to affective, rather than cognitive, identification, and goal orientation was a mediator of their link. The findings of the two experimental-causal-chain studies further supported the hypothesized effects. Transformational leadership was found to lead subordinates to perceive the culture as more innovative compared to transactional contingent reward, whereas transactional contingent reward led employees to perceive the culture as more goal, than innovation, oriented. Finally, innovation, compared to goal, value orientation increased cognitive identification, while goal orientation facilitated affective, rather than cognitive, identification. Implications: The practical implications involve the development of strategies organizations can apply, such as leadership training programs, to strengthen their ties with their employees, which, in turn, may have a positive impact on in-role, as well as extra-role, behaviors. Originality/Value: The originality of this research concerns the identification of distinct mechanisms explaining the effect of transformational leadership and transactional contingent reward on cognitive and affective identification applying an organizational culture perspective and a combination of measurement and causal mediation designs

  17. [The process of organizational culture formation in a philanthropic hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Valéria Bertonha; Kurcgant, Paulina

    2004-09-01

    This study was carried out in a philanthropic medium-size hospital institution in Sao Paulo - Brazil, aiming to disclose the cultural features of the institution. The adopted methodology was the qualitative study, following the steps proposed by Thévenet: document analysis, interview and observation. The analysis showed that when a new professional group starts working in an institution, it considers that some values must be changed. This change means to restructure the management of the organization and the people involved in it, facing the conflict posed by changing or preserving the old system.

  18. The Influence of Organizational Culture on School-Based Obesity Prevention Interventions: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Kayla N; Solari Williams, Kayce D; Warren, Judith; McKyer, E Lisako Jones; Ory, Marcia G

    2018-06-01

    Although the influence of organizational culture has been examined on a variety of student outcomes, few studies consider the influence that culture may have on school-based obesity prevention interventions. We present a systematic review of the literature to examine how elements of organizational culture may affect the adoption, implementation, and sustainability of school-based obesity prevention interventions. Fourteen studies examining the impact of organizational-level characteristics on school-based obesity prevention interventions were identified through the online databases EBSCO (CINAHL, ERIC, Agricola), Web of Science, Medline (PubMed), and Scopus. Five themes were identified as elements of organizational culture that influence the adoption, implementation, and sustainability of school-based obesity prevention interventions: organizational response to limited resources, value placed on staff training and professional development, internal support, organizational values, and school climate. Organizational culture can greatly influence the success of school-based obesity interventions. The collection of data related to organizational-level factors may be used to identify strategies for creating and sustaining a supportive environment for obesity prevention interventions in the school setting. © 2018, American School Health Association.

  19. Organizational culture shapes the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taplay, Karyn; Jack, Susan M; Baxter, Pamela; Eva, Kevin; Martin, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To create a substantive mid-range theory explaining how the organizational cultures of undergraduate nursing programs shape the adoption and incorporation of mid-to high-level technical fidelity simulators as a teaching strategy within curricula. Method. A constructivist grounded theory was used to guide this study which was conducted in Ontario, Canada, during 2011-12. Semistructured interviews (n = 43) with participants that included nursing administrators, nursing faculty, and simulation leaders across multiple programs (n = 13) informed this study. Additionally, key documents (n = 67) were reviewed. Purposeful and theoretical sampling was used and data were collected and analyzed simultaneously. Data were compared among and between sites. Findings. The organizational elements that shape simulation in nursing (OESSN) model depicts five key organizational factors at the nursing program level that shaped the adoption and incorporation of simulation: (1) leaders working in tandem, (2) information exchange, (3) physical locale, (4) shared motivators, and (5) scaffolding to manage change. Conclusions. The OESSN model provides an explanation of the organizational factors that contributed to the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula. Nursing programs that use the OESSN model may experience a more rapid or broad uptake of simulation when organizational factors that impact adoption and incorporation are considered and planned for.

  20. Organizational culture: the critical link between strategy and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestal, K W; Fralicx, R D; Spreier, S W

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is undertaking a massive reorganization to transform itself into a more efficient, patient-focused healthcare system. It has developed a new strategy and structure. But if it is to achieve the rapid, sustainable transformation needed to succeed in today's environment, it must also change its culture. The rigid, functionally focused, command-and-control culture that has long been a hallmark of VA must be replaced by one that values speed, flexibility, and the processes for delivering high-quality, cost-effective patient care. Such a change will not come easily. In addition to the normal hurdles, several barriers are unique to VA. They include ingrained bureaucratic traditions and behaviors, constraints imposed by the federal government, close scrutiny by powerful service organizations, and a Civil Service employee base that makes the hiring, promoting, and removing of employees a slow, unwieldy, and procedurally complex exercise. In a climate that does not encourage change, successful transformation must be well orchestrated. To drive the change, the leadership must be mobilized as a team, new work processes must be developed, and a full range of human resource processes must be established.

  1. THE INFLUENCE OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE ON THE PERFORMANCE OF PHILIPPINE BANKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliza D. Racelis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship between organizational culture and organizational performance in the Philippine banking sector. Based on a sample of 60 banks operating in the Philippines, this study sought to verify the notion that organizational culture — especially when it is “strong” and “adaptive” — can influence an organization’s financial performance. The results show that there is a significant and positive correlation between corporate profitability and the banks’ Culture Strength. This observation is especially relevant in environments characterized by rapid, unpredictable change, given that being too focused on clearly defined visions and goals may cause organizations to lose sight of emerging threats and opportunities and thus make them less adaptive. Moreover, more detailed analysis reveals the critical importance of bank size (represented chiefly by number of employees for both deposits performance and profitability. The study further finds that it is the Profitability measure, not the Deposits measure, that relates to Culture Strength. This is an important result, as Net Profits are an after-cost measure of bank profitability, i.e., a key corporate effectiveness measure.

  2. Visualizing variations in organizational safety culture across an inter-hospital multifaceted workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobuse, Hiroe; Morishima, Toshitaka; Tanaka, Masayuki; Murakami, Genki; Hirose, Masahiro; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2014-06-01

    To develop a reliable and valid questionnaire that can distinguish features of organizational culture for patient safety across subgroups such as hospitals, professions, management/non-management positions and units/wards. We developed a Hospital Organizational Culture Questionnaire based on a conceptual framework incorporating items from a review of existing literature. The questionnaire was administered to hospital staff including doctors, nurses, allied health personnel, and administrative staff at six public hospitals in Japan. Reliability and validity were assessed through exploratory factor analysis, multitrait scaling analysis, Cronbach's alpha coefficient and multiple regression analysis using staff-perceived achievement of safety as the response variable. Discriminative power across subgroups was assessed with radar chart profiling. Of the 3304 hospital staff surveyed, 2924 (88.5%) responded. After exploratory factor analysis and multitrait analysis, the finalized questionnaire was composed of 24 items in the following eight dimensions: improvement orientation, passion for mission, professional growth, resource allocation prioritization, inter-sectional collaboration, responsibility and authority, teamwork, and information sharing. Construct validity and internal consistency of dimensions were confirmed with multitrait analysis and Cronbach's alpha coefficients, respectively. Multiple regression analysis showed that improvement orientation, passion for mission, resource allocation prioritization and information sharing were significantly associated with higher achievement in safety practices. Our questionnaire tool was able to distinguish features of safety culture among different subgroups. Our questionnaire demonstrated excellent validity and reliability, and revealed distinct cultural patterns among different subgroups. Quantitative assessment of organizational safety culture with this tool may further the understanding of associated characteristics of

  3. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE OF THE INSTITUTO TECNOLÓGICO DE LOS MOCHIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Guadalupe Naranjo-Cantabrana

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Analyze the organizational culture in the Instituto Tecnológico de Los Mochis Methodology: This is a descriptive research based on a deductive-inductive and dialectical methodology, with survey and interview techniques and as instruments the questionnaire applied to the institute’s staff, with support from all Heads of Department and the interview guide applied to the diverse Heads of Departments in the Institute. Contribution. This document addresses the development of the concept of organizational culture, one of the most important analysis dimensions. For that purpose, an organizational diagnostic with gender perspective (2015 was elaborated with the purpose of knowing the labor situation of women and men who work in the Institution, with respect to the type of contract and position, to obtain indicators of level of horizontal segregation or occupational segregation and level of vertical segregation, wage difference between men and women. Qualitative data was obtained, through which the perception of the personnel on discrimination, quality of organizational life and equality of opportunity, gender equity came to be known, and also quantitative data was obtained which allowed to know indicators of the level of horizontal and vertical segregation and the gender pay gap.

  4. Relationships between Total Quality Management Practices, Organizational Culture and Teacher’s Performance: Study from Seventh Day Adventist High Schools in West Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Buha Sihotang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Teacher’s performance is the main key of school organization’s success. As the key, teachers’ genuineness is highlighted to be the most demanding of the school operations. They are actors, patrons, front liner workers, and models for the future. It shows that the role of teachers is the center of school operations. In the same situations, school operations are affected by school culture and quality management practices that enhance the teachers to do their duties properly. Teachers’ performances are tied to the culture and total quality management practices of the schools. The purpose of this research is to elaborate the relationships between implementation of total quality management practices, organizational culture and teacher’s performance. The research results indicate that there is a strong relationship between total quality management practices and teacher’s performance. Also there is a moderate relationship between organizational culture and teacher’s performance. While the relationship between total quality management and oganizationa culture is moderate relationship. Both total quality management practices and organizational culture positively and significantly affect teacher’s performance.

  5. The mediating role of integration of safety by activity versus operator between organizational culture and safety climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzoult, Laurent; Gangloff, Bernard

    2018-04-20

    In this study, we analyse the impact of the organizational culture and introduce a new variable, the integration of safety, which relates to the modalities for the implementation and adoption of safety in the work process, either through the activity or by the operator. One hundred and eighty employees replied to a questionnaire measuring the organizational climate, the safety climate and the integration of safety. We expected that implementation centred on the activity or on the operator would mediate the relationship between the organizational culture and the safety climate. The results support our assumptions. A regression analysis highlights the positive impact on the safety climate of organizational values of the 'rule' and 'support' type, as well as of integration by the operator and activity. Moreover, integration mediates the relation between these variables. The results suggest to take into account organizational culture and to introduce different implementation modalities to improve the safety climate.

  6. Aligning career development with organizational goals: working towards the development of a strong and sustainable workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxe-Braithwaite, Marcy; Carlton, Sandra; Bass, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    The rapidly changing world of healthcare is faced with many challenges, not the least of which is a diminishing workforce. Healthcare organizations must develop multiple strategies, not only to attract and retain employees, but also to ensure that workers are prepared for continuous change in the workplace, are working at their full scope of practice and are committed to, and accountable for, the provision of high-quality care. There is evidence that by creating a healthier workplace, improved patient care will follow. Aligning Healthy Workplace Initiatives with an organization's strategic goals, corporate culture and vision reinforces their importance within the organization. In this paper, we describe an innovative pilot to assess a career development program, one of multiple Healthy Workplace Initiatives taking place at Providence Care in Kingston, Ontario in support of our three strategic goals. The results of the pilot were very encouraging; subsequent success in obtaining funding from HealthForceOntario has allowed the implementation of a sustainable program of career development within the organization. More work is required to evaluate its long-term effectiveness.

  7. Managing the Organizational and Cultural Precursors to Major Events — Recognising and Addressing Complexity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R. H.; Carhart, N.; May, J.; Wijk, L. G. A. van

    2016-01-01

    illustration will be given of the use of Hierarchical Process Modelling (HPM) to develop a vulnerability tool using the question sets. However, to understand the issues involved more fully, requires the development of models and associated tools which recognise the complexity and interactive nature of the organizational and cultural issues involved. Various repeating patterns of system failure appear in most of the events studied. Techniques such as System Dynamics (SD) can be used to ‘map’ these processes and capture the complexity involved. This highlights interdependencies, incubating vulnerabilities and the impact of time lags within systems. Two examples will be given. In almost all of the events studied, there has been a strong disconnect between the knowledge and aspirations of senior management and those planning and carrying out operations. There has, for example, frequently been a failure to ensure that information flows up and down the management chain are effective. It has often led to conflicts between the need to maintain safety standards through exercising a cautious and questioning attitude in the light of uncertainty and the need to meet production and cost targets. Business pressures have led to shortcuts, failure to provide sufficient oversight so that leaders are aware of the true picture of process and nuclear safety at operational level (often leading to organizational ‘drift’), normalisation of risks, and the establishment of a ‘good news culture’. The development of this disconnect and its consequences have been shown to be interdependent, dynamic and complex. A second example is that of gaining a better appreciation of the deeper factors involved in managing the supply chain and, in particular, of the interface with contractors. Initiating projects with unclear accountabilities and to unrealistic timescales, together with a lack of clarity about the cost implications when safety-related concerns are reported and need to be addressed, have

  8. Responsibility and Social Solidarity as Values of Organizational Culture in Venezuelan Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Pasek De Pinto

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The controversial and even hostile climate of coexistence of many schools formed a culture where prevailing values contrary to the stated vision and mission. Therefore, the objective of the study was to describe the responsibility and social solidarity as values of organizational culture in Venezuelan schools. Methodologically, it was a descriptive research with field design. The population was 200 subjects and sample of 74 members of staff managerial, teaching, administrative and environmental support of three schools. To gather information about the variables responsibility and social solidarity a valid and reliable questionnaire was applied (79.7%, alpha of Cronbach. As result it was found empirical evidence that 69% of the staff is responsible and 40% is solidarity. In conclusion, the practice of organizational values is not ideal or generalized because only some of its aspects are practiced in addition that not all the staff practice them. Low solidarity makes it difficult the coexistence, for the success and excellence of institutions.

  9. Cultural models of self and social class disparities at organizational gateways and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Sarah Sm; Truong, Mindy

    2017-12-01

    Attaining a college degree has traditionally been assumed to be key to upward social and professional mobility. However, college graduates from working-class backgrounds achieve less career success in professional, white-collar workplaces compared to those from middle-class backgrounds. Using a cultural models approach, we examine how the independent cultural beliefs and practices promoted by professional organizations disadvantage people from working-class backgrounds, who espouse interdependent beliefs and practices. Our review illustrates how this disadvantage can manifest in two ways. First, despite relative equality in objective qualifications, it can occur at organizational gateways (e.g., interview and hiring decisions). Second, even after people from working-class backgrounds gain access to an organization, it can occur along organizational pathways (e.g., performance evaluations and assignment to high-profile tasks). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. The Relationship of Workplace Culture With Nursing-Sensitive Organizational Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahtela, Nina; McCormack, Brendan; Paavilainen, Eija; Slater, Paul; Helminen, Mika; Suominen, Tarja

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the relations of workplace culture on nursing-sensitive organizational factors. The need for standardized and valid measures for nursing-sensitive organizational outcomes has already been recognized in the literature. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of 21 inpatient acute care units in 9 organizations at the municipal primary healthcare level was conducted. Participants included licensed practical nurses, registered nurses, and nurse managers. Workplace culture, especially the overarching factor of stress, correlated with the use of supplemental nursing staff and patients' length of stay. It is essential to find and test workplace-sensitive indicators so that managers will have a wider range of methods to plan and evaluate nursing outcomes.

  11. Effect of Spiritual Leadership to Organizational Culture and Employee’s Loyalty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arasy Alimudin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the leader of the Society’s Eye Hospital, East Java has the characteristics of spiritual leadership as in the dimensions of spiritual leadership developed by Fry (2003 including vision, hope / faith, and altruistic love, however the level of employee turn over is still high. To address this problem, the research is using a quantitative causality approach and SEM PLS model as the data analysis technique used. The result of the research shows that there is a significant positive influence on spiritual leadership towards the organizational culture. A significant positive influence of organizational culture also seen on employee’s loyalty, and there is a positive but insignificant influence of spiritual leadership on employee’s loyalty.

  12. Family supportive supervisor behaviors and organizational culture: Effects on work engagement and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofcanin, Yasin; Las Heras, Mireia; Bakker, Arnold B

    2017-04-01

    Informed by social information processing (SIP) theory, in this study, we assessed the associations among family supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSBs) as perceived by subordinates, subordinate work engagement, and supervisor-rated work performance. Moreover, we explored the role of family supportive organizational culture as a contextual variable influencing our proposed associations. Our findings using matched supervisor-subordinate data collected from a financial credit company in Mexico (654 subordinates; 134 supervisors) showed that FSSBs influenced work performance through subordinate work engagement. Moreover, the positive association between subordinates' perceptions of FSSBs and work engagement was moderated by family supportive organizational culture. Our results contribute to emerging theories on flexible work arrangements, particularly on family supportive work policies. Moreover, our findings carry practical implications for improving employee work engagement and work performance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Organizational Culture, Performance and Career Choices of Ph.D.s: A Case Study of Dutch Medical Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weijden, Inge; de Gilder, Dick; Groenewegen, Peter; Geerling, Maaike

    2008-01-01

    Increasing demands for accountability and applicability raise the question of how organizational factors affect researchers' performance and career choices. In a study of Dutch medical Ph.D. student's experiences, organizational culture and climate and attitudes towards research quality are related to performance and career choices. Ph.D.s who…

  14. The Role of Organizational Learning Culture and Psychological Empowerment in Reducing Turnover Intention and Enhancing Citizenship Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Talat; Khan, Mubbsher Munawar; Bukhari, Fida Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the association among organizational learning culture (OLC), psychological empowerment (PE), affective commitment (AC), organizational citizenship behavior and turnover intention. Design/Methodology/Approach: This study was undertaken via a questionnaire conducted among Malay-Chinese working in…

  15. Multilevel Leadership and Organizational Effectiveness in Indian Technical Education: The Mediating Role of Communication, Power and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochhayat, Jyotiranjan; Giri, Vijai N.; Suar, Damodar

    2017-01-01

    This study provides a new conceptualization of educational leadership with a multilevel and integrative approach. It examines the impact of multilevel leadership (MLL) on the effectiveness of technical educational institutes through the mediating effects of organizational communication, bases of power and organizational culture. Data were…

  16. Organizational Culture and Open Innovation Performance in Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazur Jolanta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the links between organizational culture, the use of open innovation sources and the performance of SMEs. The main hypothesis of the study is that a special type of organizational culture (termed innovative culture, which fosters creativity, learning and inter-employee cooperation – will correspond with a greater scope of open innovation sources and higher levels of innovative, operational and financial performance. The study was based on a representative CATI survey of 473 SMEs operating in manufacturing and services industries in Poland. Our statistical analysis relied on building and testing structural equation model with the AMOS software. The findings confirmed a positive association between innovative culture and the scope of open sources of innovation. However, innovative culture had no direct effect on the percentage of sales from new and modified products, which is often used as a metric of innovativeness, but did show a positive influence on an index of operational performance and ROI. Such statistical patterns suggest that fostering innovative culture is beneficial to a company, though probably not through an increased number of product innovations, but rather via process, administrative and marketing innovations, as well as other gains in efficiency attained due to more streamlined employee cooperation and knowledge exchange. The study adds to the existing body of knowledge in management science by providing a better understanding of mechanisms underlying innovative culture’s impacts on open innovation practices and metrics of operational and financial performance in the context of small and medium enterprises.

  17. The Influence of Organizational Reconciliation Policies and Culture on Workers Stress Perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, Rosa; Pereira, Marta; Daniel, Fernanda; Silva, Alexandre Gomes da; Matos, Fátima Regina Ney

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Work-family reconciliation plays a crucial role in the well-being of employees, having impacts at the individual, social and organizational level. Studies concluded that poor work-life balance as one of the ten predictors of psychosocial risks at work. A family-friendly culture relates to how an organization values and allows the articulation of the various spheres of its workers’ life. We intended to determine the effect of different variables like the existence of services, the org...

  18. The mediation of the Relationship between Organizations and Institutions. The Role of Organizational Culture

    OpenAIRE

    M.Şimandan

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes the relations between organizations and institutions and their mediation by the factors of organizational culture. After discussing the elements that distinguish organizations from institutions, we will discuss W. R. Scott’s conception regarding the constitutive and functioning structures of the institutions. The following section focuses upon D. C. North’s theory regarding the institutional stability and change, as well as the costs involved by these processes. The last...

  19. “Does Organizational Culture Influence the Ethical Behavior in the Pharmaceutical Industry?”

    OpenAIRE

    Nagashekhara, Molugulu; Agil, Syed Omar Syed

    2012-01-01

    Study of ethical behavior among medical representatives in the profession is an under-portrayed component that deserves further perusal in the pharmaceutical industry. The purpose of this study is to find out the influence of organizational culture on ethical behavior of medical representatives. Medical representatives working for both domestic and multinational companies constitutes the sample (n=300). Data is collected using a simple random and cluster sampling through a structured question...

  20. The Influence of Size on Corporate Culture and Organizational Effectiveness in the Nigerian Banking Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Edwinah Amah; C. A. Nwuche

    2013-01-01

    The paper examined the effect of size on corporate culture and organizational effectiveness in the Nigerian banking industry. A total of 388 managers were randomly drawn from a population of 13,339 managers of all the 24 banks in Nigeria. The instruments used for data collection were questionnaire and oral interview. A total of 320 copies of the questionnaire were retrieved and analyzed. Spearman¡¯s Rank Correlation Statistical tool was used to test the hypotheses. The findings revealed that ...