WorldWideScience

Sample records for strong iron ligands

  1. Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P.; Guan, Hairong

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

  2. The autoxidation activity of new mixed-ligand manganese and iron complexes with tripodal ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gorkum, R.; Berding, J.; Tooke, D.M.; Spek, A.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/156517566; Reedijk, J.; Bouwman, E.

    2007-01-01

    The activity of new manganese and iron complexes of dianionic tripodal ligands in the autoxidation of ethyl linoleate (EL) is reported. EL consumption rates were monitored using time-resolved FTIR and the degree of oligomerisation was determined by SEC. Almost all complexes showed the same trend in

  3. XANES spectroscopy of carp hemoglobin-iron in correlation with the affinity changes of the protein for ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, S.; Cortes, R.; Alpert, B.

    1986-01-01

    In an attempt to understand how to switch off the quarternary structure of the protein modulates the response of the iron-binding site, the iron K-edge spectrum (measured by XANES spectroscopy) was used to investigate the iron structure of hemoglobin. The strong variation of ligand-binding properties with pH for carp hemoglobin is not reflected in the electronic distribution of the heme-iron. It can be supposed that hemoglobin affinity is directly controlled by the protein and not by some particular changes of the iron atom. (Auth.)

  4. The Effects of Iron Complexing Ligands on the Long Term Ecosystem Response to Iron Enrichment of HNLC waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark L. Wells; Mary Jane Perry; William P. Cochlan; Charles G. Trick

    2006-11-18

    The central hypothesis of this project is that natural iron-complexing organic ligands in seawater differentially regulate iron availability to large (microplankton) and small (nano and picoplankton) class of phytoplankton and thereby strongly influence the potential carbon sequestration in High Nitrate Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) regions of the ocean. The primary project goals are to: 1) determine how different natural and synthetic Fe chelators affect Fe availability to phytoplankton species that are representative of offshore HNLC waters, 2) elucidate how the changes in absolute concentrations of these chelators affect the longer-term ecosystem response to alleviation of Fe limitation, and 3) ascertain how changes in the ligand composition affect rates of cell sinking and aggregation - representative measures of the efficiency of carbon sequestration to the deep.

  5. Heterobifunctional PEG Ligands for Bioconjugation Reactions on Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemen, Maarten; Van Stappen, Thomas; Willot, Pieter; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Koeckelberghs, Guy; Geukens, Nick; Gils, Ann; Verbiest, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Ever since iron oxide nanoparticles have been recognized as promising scaffolds for biomedical applications, their surface functionalization has become even more important. We report the synthesis of a novel polyethylene glycol-based ligand that combines multiple advantageous properties for these applications. The ligand is covalently bound to the surface via a siloxane group, while its polyethylene glycol backbone significantly improves the colloidal stability of the particle in complex environments. End-capping the molecule with a carboxylic acid introduces a variety of coupling chemistry possibilities. In this study an antibody targeting plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 was coupled to the surface and its presence and binding activity was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance experiments. The results indicate that the ligand has high potential towards biomedical applications where colloidal stability and advanced functionality is crucial. PMID:25275378

  6. Linking phytoplankton and bacterioplankton community dynamics to iron-binding ligand production in a microcosm experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogle, S. L.; Bundy, R.; Barbeau, K.

    2016-02-01

    Several significant lines of evidence implicate heterotrophic bacterioplankton as agents of iron cycling and sources of iron-binding ligands in seawater, but direct and mechanistic linkages have mostly remained elusive. Currently, it is unknown how microbial community composition varies during the course of biogenic particle remineralization and how shifts in community structure are related to sources and sinks of Fe-binding ligands. In order to simulate the rise, decline, and ultimate remineralization of a phytoplankton bloom, we followed the production of different classes of Fe-binding ligands as measured by electrochemical techniques, Fe concentrations, and macronutrient concentrations in a series of iron-amended whole seawater incubations over a period of six days during a California Current Ecosystem Long Term Ecological Research (CCE-LTER) process cruise. At the termination of the experiment phytoplankton communities were similar across iron treatments, but high iron conditions generated greater phytoplankton biomass and increased nutrient drawdown suggesting that phytoplankton communities were in different phases of bloom development. Strikingly, L1 ligands akin to siderophores in binding strength were only observed in high iron treatments implicating phytoplankton bloom phase as an important control. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene surveys, we observed that the abundance of transiently dominant copiotroph bacteria were strongly correlated with L1 concentrations. However, incubations with similar L1 concentrations and binding strengths produced distinct copiotroph community profiles dominated by a few strains. We suggest that phytoplankton bloom maturity influences algal-associated heterotrophic community succession, and that L1 production is either directly or indirectly tied to the appearance and eventual dominance of rarely abundant copiotroph bacterial strains.

  7. The autoxidation activity of new mixed-ligand manganese and iron complexes with tripodal ligands

    OpenAIRE

    van Gorkum, R.; Berding, J.; Tooke, D.M.; Spek, A.L.; Reedijk, J.; Bouwman, E.

    2007-01-01

    The activity of new manganese and iron complexes of dianionic tripodal ligands in the autoxidation of ethyl linoleate (EL) is reported. EL consumption rates were monitored using time-resolved FTIR and the degree of oligomerisation was determined by SEC. Almost all complexes showed the same trend in the autoxidation of EL. After a short induction time, the reaction started at a relatively high constant rate; later, this rate changes to a lower rate, which was again constant and on average was ...

  8. Boosting Vis/NIR Charge-Transfer Absorptions of Iron(II) Complexes by N-Alkylation and N-Deprotonation in the Ligand Backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengel, Andreas K C; Bissinger, Christian; Dorn, Matthias; Back, Oliver; Förster, Christoph; Heinze, Katja

    2017-06-12

    Reversing the metal-to-ligand charge transfer ( 3 MLCT)/metal-centered ( 3 MC) excited state order in iron(II) complexes is a challenging objective, yet would finally result in long-sought luminescent transition-metal complexes with an earth-abundant central ion. One approach to achieve this goal is based on low-energy charge-transfer absorptions in combination with a strong ligand field. Coordinating electron-rich and electron-poor tridentate oligopyridine ligands with large bite angles at iron(II) enables both low-energy MLCT absorption bands around 590 nm and a strong ligand field. Variations of the electron-rich ligand by introducing longer alkyl substituents destabilizes the iron(II) complex towards ligand substitution reactions while hardly affecting the optical properties. On the other hand, N-deprotonation of the ligand backbone is feasible and reversible, yielding deep-green complexes with charge-transfer bands extending into the near-IR region. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations assign these absorption bands to transitions with dipole-allowed ligand-to-ligand charge transfer character. This unique geometric and electronic situation establishes a further regulating screw to increase the energy gap between potentially emitting charge-transfer states and the non-radiative ligand field states of iron(II) dyes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Thermo-Kinetic Investigation of Comparative Ligand Effect on Cysteine Iron Redox Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Ahmad Rizvi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal ions in their free state bring unwanted biological oxidations generating oxidative stress. The ligand modulated redox potential can be indispensable in prevention of such oxidative stress by blocking the redundant bio-redox reactions. In this study we investigated the comparative ligand effect on the thermo-kinetic aspects of biologically important cysteine iron (III redox reaction using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The results were corroborated with the complexation effect on redox potential of iron(III-iron(II redox couple. The selected ligands were found to increase the rate of cysteine iron (III redox reaction in proportion to their stability of iron (II complex (EDTA < terpy < bipy < phen. A kinetic profile and the catalytic role of copper (II ions by means of redox shuttle mechanism for the cysteine iron (III redox reaction in presence of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen ligand is also reported.

  10. The synthesis, structures and characterisation of new mixed-ligand manganese and iron complexes with tripodal, tetradentate ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gorkum, R.; Berding, J.; Mills, A.M.; Kooijman, H.; Tooke, D.M.; Spek, A.L.; Mutikainen, I.; Turpeinen, U.; Reedijk, J.; Bouwman, E.

    2008-01-01

    The preparation of new manganese and iron complexes with the general formula [M(tripod)(anion)] is described, where M = FeIII or MnIII, “tripod” is a dianionic tetradentate tripodal ligand and the anion is a chelating β-diketonate, 8-oxyquinoline or acetate. The synthesis of this type of complexes

  11. Weak-coupling superconductivity in a strongly correlated iron pnictide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnukha, A; Post, K W; Thirupathaiah, S; Pröpper, D; Wurmehl, S; Roslova, M; Morozov, I; Büchner, B; Yaresko, A N; Boris, A V; Borisenko, S V; Basov, D N

    2016-01-05

    Iron-based superconductors have been found to exhibit an intimate interplay of orbital, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom, dramatically affecting their low-energy electronic properties, including superconductivity. Albeit the precise pairing mechanism remains unidentified, several candidate interactions have been suggested to mediate the superconducting pairing, both in the orbital and in the spin channel. Here, we employ optical spectroscopy (OS), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), ab initio band-structure, and Eliashberg calculations to show that nearly optimally doped NaFe0.978Co0.022As exhibits some of the strongest orbitally selective electronic correlations in the family of iron pnictides. Unexpectedly, we find that the mass enhancement of itinerant charge carriers in the strongly correlated band is dramatically reduced near the Γ point and attribute this effect to orbital mixing induced by pronounced spin-orbit coupling. Embracing the true band structure allows us to describe all low-energy electronic properties obtained in our experiments with remarkable consistency and demonstrate that superconductivity in this material is rather weak and mediated by spin fluctuations.

  12. Final Activity Report: The Effects of Iron Complexing Ligands on the Long Term Ecosystem Response to Iron Enrichment of HNLC waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trick, Charles Gordon [Western University

    2013-07-30

    Substantial increases in the concentrations of the stronger of two Fe(III) complexing organic ligand classes measured during the mesoscale Fe enrichment studies IronEx II and SOIREE appeared to sharply curtailed Fe availability to diatoms and thus limited the efficiency of carbon sequestration to the deep. Detailed observations during IronEx II (equatorial Pacific Ocean) and SOIREE (Southern Ocean –Pacific sector) indicate that the diatoms began re-experiencing Fe stress even though dissolved Fe concentrations remained elevated in the patch. This surprising outcome likely is related to the observed increased concentrations of strong Fe(III)-complexing ligands in seawater. Preliminary findings from other studies indicate that diatoms may not readily obtain Fe from these chemical species whereas Fe bound by strong ligands appears to support growth of cyanobacteria and nanoflagellates. The difficulty in assessing the likelihood of these changes with in-situ mesoscale experiments is the extended monitoring period needed to capture the long-term trajectory of the carbon cycle. A more detailed understanding of Fe complexing ligand effects on long-term ecosystem structure and carbon cycling is essential to ascertain not only the effect of Fe enrichment on short-term carbon sequestration in the oceans, but also the potential effect of Fe enrichment in modifying ecosystem structure and trajectory.

  13. Final Technical Report: The Effects of Iron Complexing Ligands on the Long Term Ecosystem Response to Iron Enrichment of HNLC waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochlan, William P.

    2008-06-13

    Substantial increases in the concentrations of the stronger of two Fe(III) complexing organic ligand classes measured during the mesoscale Fe enrichment studies IronEx II and SOIREE appeared to sharply curtailed Fe availability to diatoms and thus limited the efficiency of carbon sequestration to the deep. Detailed observations during IronEx II (equatorial Pacific Ocean) and SOIREE (Southern Ocean –Pacific sector) indicate that the diatoms began re-experiencing Fe stress even though dissolved Fe concentrations remained elevated in the patch. This surprising outcome likely is related to the observed increased concentrations of strong Fe(III)-complexing ligands in seawater. Preliminary findings from other studies indicate that diatoms may not readily obtain Fe from these chemical species whereas Fe bound by strong ligands appears to support growth of cyanobacteria and nanoflagellates. The difficulty in assessing the likelihood of these changes with in-situ mesoscale experiments is the extended monitoring period needed to capture the long-term trajectory of the carbon cycle. A more detailed understanding of Fe complexing ligand effects on long-term ecosystem structure and carbon cycling is essential to ascertain not only the effect of Fe enrichment on short-term carbon sequestration in the oceans, but also the potential effect of Fe enrichment in modifying ecosystem structure and trajectory.

  14. Higher Prevalence of Iron Deficiency as Strong Predictor of Attention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research | Sep-Oct 2014 | Vol 4 | Special Issue 3 |. 291. Address ... to determine the association between iron deficiency and ADHD and the impact and role of iron deficiency ... Keywords: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Case‑control, Epidemiology, Iron deficiency,. Risk factors ...

  15. Investigation of the complexation of metal-ions by strong ligands in fresh and marine water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Maria; Biesuz, Raffaela; Profumo, Antonella; Soldi, Teresa

    2003-01-01

    The detection and investigation of metal ions bound in strong complexes in natural waters is a difficult task, due to low concentration of the metal ions themselves, and also of the strong ligands, which, moreover, are often not of a well-defined composition. Here, a method is proposed for the investigation of the speciation of metal ions in natural waters. It is based on the sorption of metal ions on strongly sorbing ion exchange resins, i.e. complexing resins. For this reason the method is called Resin Titration. It has been shown in previous investigations that the concentration of metal ion totally sorbed by a particular resin, and its reaction coefficient in the solution phase in the presence of the resin, can be determined from the sorption data using a simple relationship. Here, a data treatment (the Ruzic linearization method) is proposed for also determining the concentration of the ligands responsible for the complex in equilibrium with the resin. The method was applied to data obtained by Resin Titration of a freshwater and a seawater. Copper(II) and aluminium(III) were considered, using Chelex 100 as a titrant, due to its strong sorbing properties towards these metal ions. The results were: the total metal concentration in equilibrium with the resin, the side reaction coefficients, and the concentration of ligands. In all these cases the ligands forming very strong complexes were found to be at concentration lower than that of the metals. The Ruzic linearization method allows the determination of the concentration of the ligands forming very strong complexes in equilibrium with Chelex 100. The reaction coefficient was better determined by the calculation method previously proposed for RT. The ligands responsible for the strong complexes were found to be at low concentration, often lower than that of the metal ions considered. The metal in the original sample is partly bound to these ligands, since the complexes are very strong. Only a part of the metal

  16. Iron (III) complexes of certain tetradentate phenolate ligands as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (CTD) and protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase (PCD) are bacterial non-heme iron enzymes, which catalyse the oxidative cleavage of catechols to cis, cis-muconic acids with the incorporation of molecular oxygen via a mechanism involving a high-spin ferric centre. The iron(III) complexes of tripodal ...

  17. Ethylene oligomerization using iron complexes: beyond the discovery of bis(imino)pyridine ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudier, Adrien; Breuil, Pierre-Alain R; Magna, Lionel; Olivier-Bourbigou, Hélène; Braunstein, Pierre

    2014-02-11

    Since the discovery that bis(imino)pyridine ligands are able to confer high activities in ethylene oligomerization and polymerization to their iron complexes, considerable attention has been focused on catalyst design for these reactions and this research constitutes an ever-growing area in molecular catalysis. The tuning of the ligand structures and properties, and thus of catalysts, generally represents the basis for subsequent work contributing to process development and industrialization. Significant effort is therefore devoted to generate structural diversity in order to access the required catalyst stability and selectivity. This feature article outlines nitrogen-containing ligands that have been developed for the iron-catalyzed oligomerization of ethylene since the seminal discovery of the properties of bis(imino)pyridine ligands.

  18. Augmentation of antioxidant and iron(III) chelation properties of tertiary mixture of bioactive ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K N, Lokesh; Channarayappa; Venkataranganna, Marikunte; Gowtham Raj, Gunti; Patil, Hansraj; Dave, Hardik

    2018-01-01

    The excess of iron in plasma and cellular compartment pose direct and indirect toxic effects. In the present investigation, we proposed additive function of nutritional bioactive ligands in combination which has shown enhanced antioxidant and iron(III) chelation property. The optimal interaction and in vitro antioxidant activity of tertiary mixture comprising of curcumin+quercetin+gallic acid was validated by central composite design (CCD) based on ferric reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP). The additive denticity of nutritional bioactive ligands was investigated by UV-vis, FTIR & MALDI-TOF-MS analysis, which has given substantial evidence for the formation of tris-bidentate [curcumin-quercetin-gallic acid-Fe(III)] co-ordination complex. The in vivo proof of concept of the hypothesis was tested in iron intoxicated male wistar rats intoxicated with iron dextran. Co-administration curcumin+quercetin+gallic acid (CQG) exhibit dose dependent response & found effective in subsiding acute iron intoxication both at plasma and cellular level, evaluated by studies including serum ferritin, ICP-OES, lipid peroxidation and histopathology studies among others. Thus, we conclude that in vitro and in vivo studies supported our hypothesis to deduce additive function nutritional ligands to counteract direct and indirect effects of iron(III). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Hydrogenation and dehydrogenation iron pincer catalysts capable of metal-ligand cooperation by aromatization/dearomatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zell, Thomas; Milstein, David

    2015-07-21

    The substitution of expensive and potentially toxic noble-metal catalysts by cheap, abundant, environmentally benign, and less toxic metals is highly desirable and in line with green chemistry guidelines. We have recently discovered a new type of metal-ligand cooperation, which is based on the reversible dearomatization/aromatization of different heteroaromatic ligand cores caused by deprotonation/protonation of the ligand. More specifically, we have studied complexes of various transition metals (Ru, Fe, Co, Rh, Ir, Ni, Pd, Pt, and Re) bearing pyridine- and bipyridine-based PNP and PNN pincer ligands, which have slightly acidic methylene protons. In addition, we have discovered long-range metal-ligand cooperation in acridine-based pincer ligands, where the cooperation takes place at the electrophilic C-9 position of the acridine moiety leading to dearomatization of its middle ring. This type of metal-ligand cooperation was used for the activation of chemical bonds, including H-H, C-H (sp(2) and sp(3)), O-H, N-H, and B-H bonds. This unusual reactivity likely takes place in various catalytic hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, and related reactions. In this Account, we summarize our studies on novel bifunctional iron PNP and PNN pincer complexes, which were designed on the basis of their ruthenium congeners. Iron PNP pincer complexes serve as efficient (pre)catalysts for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions under remarkably mild conditions. Their catalytic applications include atom-efficient and industrially important hydrogenation reactions of ketones, aldehydes, and esters to the corresponding alcohols. Moreover, they catalyze the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide to sodium formate in the presence of sodium hydroxide, the selective decomposition of formic acid to carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and the E-selective semihydrogenation of alkynes to give E-alkenes. These catalysts feature, compared to other iron-based catalysts, very high catalytic activities which in

  20. Synthesis and characterization of an iron complex bearing a cyclic tetra-N-heterocyclic carbene ligand: An artifical heme analogue?

    KAUST Repository

    Anneser, Markus R.

    2015-04-20

    An iron(II) complex with a cyclic tetradentate ligand containing four N-heterocyclic carbenes was synthesized and characterized by means of NMR and IR spectroscopies, as well as by single-crystal X-ray structure analysis. The iron center exhibits an octahedral coordination geometry with two acetonitrile ligands in axial positions, showing structural analogies with porphyrine-ligated iron complexes. The acetonitrile ligands can readily be substituted by other ligands, for instance, dimethyl sulfoxide, carbon monoxide, and nitric oxide. Cyclic voltammetry was used to examine the electronic properties of the synthesized compounds. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  1. Iron(III) complexes of certain tetradentate phenolate ligands as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The single crystal X-ray crystal structures of four of the complexes have been deter- mined. One of the bis-phenolato complexes ... by soil bacteria of naturally occurring aromatic mole- cules and many aromatic environmental ... As the interaction of iron(III) with phenolate moie- ties of tyrosine residues plays an important role ...

  2. Higher prevalence of iron deficiency as strong predictor of attention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 630 children with ADHD aged 5-18 and 630 controls aged 5-18 years old. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected, including physician diagnosis. The health status of the subjects was assessed by ascertaining clinical presentations and symptoms, family history, body mass index (BMI), iron deficiency, ...

  3. Effect of capping ligands on the optical properties and electronic energies of iron pyrite FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals and solid thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Guangmei, E-mail: zhaiguangmei@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Research Centre of Advanced Materials Science and Technology of Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Solar Cell Materials and Technology, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); Xie, Rongwei; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Jitao; Yang, Yongzhen; Wang, Hua; Li, Xuemin [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Research Centre of Advanced Materials Science and Technology of Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); Liu, Xuguang [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Research Centre of Advanced Materials Science and Technology of Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); Xu, Bingshe [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Research Centre of Advanced Materials Science and Technology of Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China)

    2016-07-25

    In this work, the optical and electronic properties of iron pyrite FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals and solid thin films with various capping ligands were systematically investigated by UV–Vis–NIR absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and current density–voltage characteristic measurements. The iron pyrite nanocrystals with various ligands have an indirect band gap of around 1.05 eV and broad absorption spanning into the near-infrared region, exhibiting favorable optical properties for their photovoltaic applications. The electron affinities and ionization potentials of FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals determined through cyclic voltammetry measurements show strong ligand dependence. An energy level shift of up to 190 meV was obtained among the pyrite nanocrystals capped with the ligands employed in this work. The iron pyrite nanocrystal films capped with iodide and 1,2-ethanedithiol exhibit the largest band edge energy shift and conductivity, respectively. Our results not only provide several useful optical and electronic parameters of pyrite nanocrystals for their further use in optoelectronic devices as active layers and/or infrared optical absorption materials, but also highlight the relationship between their surface chemistry and electronic energies. - Highlights: • The energy levels of FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals with various ligands were determined via electrochemical measurements. • The energy levels of FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals showed strong ligand-dependence. • An energy level shift of up to 190 meV was obtained for the pyrite nanocrystals studied in the work. • The conductivities of FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals with different ligands were obtained by current density–voltage measurements.

  4. Manipulating charge transfer excited state relaxation and spin crossover in iron coordination complexes with ligand substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenkai; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Alonso-Mori, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    iron complexes with four cyanide (CN-;) ligands and one 2,2′-bipyridine (bpy) ligand. This enables MLCT excited state and metal-centered excited state energies to be manipulated with partial independence and provides a path to suppressing spin crossover. We have combined X-ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL......) Kβ hard X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy with femtosecond time-resolved UV-visible absorption spectroscopy to characterize the electronic excited state dynamics initiated by MLCT excitation of [Fe(CN)4(bpy)]2-. The two experimental techniques are highly complementary; the time-resolved UV...

  5. Ultrasensitivity of Cell Adhesion to the Presence of Mechanically Strong Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Roein-Peikar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrins, a class of membrane proteins involved in cell adhesion, participate in the cell’s sensing of the mechanical environments. We previously showed that, for the initial cell adhesion to occur, single integrins need to experience a threshold force of 40 pico-Newton (pN through their bond with surface-bound ligands. This force requirement was determined using a series of double-stranded DNA tethers called tension gauge tethers (TGTs, each with a different rupture force, linked to the ligand. Here, we performed cell-adhesion experiments using surfaces coated with two different TGTs, one of a strong rupture force (around 54 pN and the other of a weak rupture force (around 12 pN. When presented with one type of TGT only, cells adhered to the strong TGT-coated surface but not to the weak TGT-coated surface. However, when presented with both, the presence of the strong TGTs transforms the way cells respond to the weak TGTs such that cells treat both TGTs the same, as if the weak TGTs were strong. Furthermore, a subpopulation of cells can adhere to and spread on a surface displaying just a few molecules of the strong TGTs per cell if, and only if, they are presented along with many weak TGTs. This ultrasensitivity to just a few tethers that can withstand strong forces raises a question of how the cells can achieve such remarkable sensitivity to their mechanical environment without amplifying noise.

  6. Cooperative Metal–Ligand Catalyzed Intramolecular Hydroamination and Hydroalkoxylation of Allenes Using a Stable Iron Catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    El-Sepelgy, Osama

    2018-01-18

    A new iron-catalyzed chemoselective intramolecular hydroamination and hydroalkoxylation of the readily available α-allenic amines and alcohols to valuable unsaturated 5-membered heterocycles, 2,3-dihydropyrrole and 2,3-dihydrofuran, is reported. Effective selectivity control is achieved by a metal–ligand cooperative activation of the substrates. The mild reaction conditions and the use of low amounts of an air and moisture stable iron catalyst allow for the hydrofunctionalization of a wide range of allenes bearing different functional groups in good yields in the absence of base or any sensitive additives.

  7. Promoted Iron Nanocrystals Obtained via Ligand Exchange as Active and Selective Catalysts for Synthesis Gas Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casavola, Marianna; Xie, Jingxiu; Meeldijk, Johannes D; Krans, Nynke A; Goryachev, Andrey; Hofmann, Jan P; Dugulan, A Iulian; de Jong, Krijn P

    2017-08-04

    Colloidal synthesis routes have been recently used to fabricate heterogeneous catalysts with more controllable and homogeneous properties. Herein a method was developed to modify the surface composition of colloidal nanocrystal catalysts and to purposely introduce specific atoms via ligands and change the catalyst reactivity. Organic ligands adsorbed on the surface of iron oxide catalysts were exchanged with inorganic species such as Na 2 S, not only to provide an active surface but also to introduce controlled amounts of Na and S acting as promoters for the catalytic process. The catalyst composition was optimized for the Fischer-Tropsch direct conversion of synthesis gas into lower olefins. At industrially relevant conditions, these nanocrystal-based catalysts with controlled composition were more active, selective, and stable than catalysts with similar composition but synthesized using conventional methods, possibly due to their homogeneity of properties and synergic interaction of iron and promoters.

  8. Effect of selected ligands on the U(VI) immobilization by zerovalent iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noubactep, C.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of Cl - , CO 3 2- , EDTA, NO 2 - , NO 3 - , PO 4 3- , SO 4 2- , and humic substances (HS) on the U(VI) co-precipitation from aqueous solutions by zerovalent iron (ZVI) was investigated in the neutral pH range.Batch experiments without shaking were conducted for 14 days mostly with five different ZVI materials (15 g/l), selected ligands (10mM) and an U(VI) solution (20 mg/l, 0.084mM). Apart from Cl - , all tested ligands induced a decrease of U(VI) coprecipitation. This decrease is attributed to the surface adsorption and complexation of the ligands at the reactive sites on the surface of ZVI and their corrosion products. The decrease of U(VI) removal was not uniform with the five ZVI materials. Generally, groundwater with elevated EDTA concentration could not be remediated with the ZVI barrier technology. The response of the system on the pre-treating by two ZVI materials in 250mM HCl indicated that in situ generated corrosion products favor an irreversible U(VI) uptake. Thus for the long term performance of ZVI barrier, the iron dissolution should continue in such a way that fresh iron oxide be always available for U(VI) coprecipitation. (author)

  9. Fabricating Water Dispersible Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications through Ligand Exchange and Direct Conjugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Lam

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stable superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs, which can be easily dispersed in an aqueous medium and exhibit high magnetic relaxivities, are ideal candidates for biomedical applications including contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. We describe a versatile methodology to render water dispersibility to SPIONs using tetraethylene glycol (TEG-based phosphonate ligands, which are easily introduced onto SPIONs by either a ligand exchange process of surface-anchored oleic-acid (OA molecules or via direct conjugation. Both protocols confer good colloidal stability to SPIONs at different NaCl concentrations. A detailed characterization of functionalized SPIONs suggests that the ligand exchange method leads to nanoparticles with better magnetic properties but higher toxicity and cell death, than the direct conjugation methodology.

  10. Gas-phase complexes formed between amidoxime ligands and vanadium or iron investigated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Adetayo M; Pasilis, Sofie P

    2016-08-15

    Amidoxime-functionalized sorbents can be used to extract uranium from seawater. Iron(III) and vanadium(V) may compete with uranium for adsorption sites. We use 2,6-dihydroxyiminopiperidine (DHIP) and N(1) ,N(5) -dihydroxypentanediimidamide (DHPD) to model amidoxime functional groups and characterize the vanadium(V) and iron(III) complexes with these ligands. We also examine the effect of iron(III) and vanadium(V) on uranyl(VI) complexation by DHIP and DHPD. The experiments were carried out in positive ion mode using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization source. The effect on the mass spectra of changes in ligand, metal:ligand mole ratio, and pH was examined. Iron(III) formed a 1:2 metal:ligand complex with DHIP at all metal:ligand mole ratios and pH values investigated; it formed both 1:2 and 1:3 metal:ligand complexes with DHPD. Vanadium(V) formed 1:1 and 1:2 metal:ligand complexes with DHIP. A 1:2 metal:ligand complex was formed with DHPD at all vanadium(V):DHPD mole ratios investigated. Changes in solution pH did not affect the ions observed. The relative binding affinities of the metal ions towards DHIP followed the order iron(III) > vanadium(V) > uranyl(VI). This study presents a first look at the gas-phase vanadium(V)- and iron(III)-DHIP and -DHPD complexes using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. These metals form stronger complexes with amidoxime ligands than uranyl(VI), and will affect uranyl(VI) adsorption to amidoxime-based sorbents. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Particle-Hole Transformation in Strongly-Doped Iron-Based Superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    An exact particle-hole transformation is discovered in a local-moment description of a single layer in an iron-based superconductor. Application of the transformation to a surface layer of heavily electron-doped FeSe predicts a surface-layer high-temperature superconductor at strong hole doping. Comparison with existing low-T_c iron superconductors suggests that the critical temperature at heavy hole doping can be increased by increasing direct ferromagnetic exchange in between nearest neighb...

  12. Reversible dissociation and ligand-glutathione exchange reaction in binuclear cationic tetranitrosyl iron complex with penicillamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrtsova, Lidia; Sanina, Natalia; Lyssenko, Konstantin; Kabachkov, Evgeniy; Psikha, Boris; Shkondina, Natal'ja; Pokidova, Olesia; Kotelnikov, Alexander; Aldoshin, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a comparative study of the decomposition of two nitrosyl iron complexes (NICs) with penicillamine thiolic ligands [Fe2(SC5H11NO2)2(NO)4]SO4 ·5H2O (I) and glutathione- (GSH-) ligands [Fe2(SC10H17N3O6)2(NO)4]SO4 ·2H2O (II), which spontaneously evolve to NO in aqueous medium. NO formation was measured by a sensor electrode and by spectrophotometric methods by measuring the formation of a hemoglobin- (Hb-) NO complex. The NO evolution reaction rate from (I)  k 1 = (4.6 ± 0.1)·10(-3) s(-1) and the elimination rate constant of the penicillamine ligand k 2 = (1.8 ± 0.2)·10(-3) s(-1) at 25°C in 0.05 M phosphate buffer,  pH 7.0, was calculated using kinetic modeling based on the experimental data. Both reactions are reversible. Spectrophotometry and mass-spectrometry methods have firmly shown that the penicillamine ligand is exchanged for GS(-) during decomposition of 1.5·10(-4) M (I) in the presence of 10(-3) M GSH, with 76% yield in 24 h. As has been established, such behaviour is caused by the resistance of (II) to decomposition due to the higher affinity of iron to GSH in the complex. The discovered reaction may impede S-glutathionylation of the essential enzyme systems in the presence of (I) and is important for metabolism of NIC, connected with its antitumor activity.

  13. Mössbauer effect study of iron(III) inidazolidine nitroxyl-free radical ligand complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulaba, A.; Kiremire, E.; Pollak, H.; Boeyens, J.

    1999-09-01

    A new complex, [Fe(acac)L2], bearing inidazolidine nitroxyl-free radical ligand (L-) was recently synthesised for biological studies. It proved to be biologically active against African sleeping sickness, plasmodium falciparum (malaria), leishmaniasis and chaga disease causative agents. Three ESR well resolved peaks indicated the presence of a free (unpaired) and chemically active electron in the complex. The structural complex ferric iron was found at the centre of two electric gradient whose the biggest is suggested to be initiated by the unpaired charge. No distinction between different cis isomers could be made.

  14. Moessbauer effect study of iron(III)-inidazolidine nitroxyl-free radical ligand complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulaba, A. [Technikon Witwatersrand, Metallurgy Department (South Africa); Kiremire, E. [University of the Witwatersrand, Chemistry Department (South Africa); Pollak, H. [University of the Witwatersrand, Physics Department (South Africa); Boeyens, J. [University of the Witwatersrand, Chemistry Department (South Africa)

    1999-09-15

    A new complex, [Fe(acac)L{sub 2}], bearing inidazolidine nitroxyl-free radical ligand (L{sup -}) was recently synthesised for biological studies. It proved to be biologically active against African sleeping sickness, plasmodium falciparum (malaria), leishmaniasis and chaga disease causative agents. Three ESR well resolved peaks indicated the presence of a free (unpaired) and chemically active electron in the complex. The structural complex ferric iron was found at the centre of two electric gradient whose the biggest is suggested to be initiated by the unpaired charge. No distinction between different cis isomers could be made.

  15. Unsaturated Long-Chain Fatty Acids Are Preferred Ferritin Ligands That Enhance Iron Biomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanzoni, Serena; Pagano, Katiuscia; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Assfalg, Michael; Ciambellotti, Silvia; Bernacchioni, Caterina; Turano, Paola; Aime, Silvio; Ragona, Laura; Molinari, Henriette

    2017-07-21

    Ferritin is a ubiquitous nanocage protein, which can accommodate up to thousands of iron atoms inside its cavity. Aside from its iron storage function, a new role as a fatty acid binder has been proposed for this protein. The interaction of apo horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) with a variety of lipids has been here investigated through NMR spectroscopic ligand-based experiments, to provide new insights into the mechanism of ferritin-lipid interactions, and the link with iron mineralization. 1D 1 H, diffusion (DOSY) and saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR experiments provided evidence for a stronger interaction of ferritin with unsaturated fatty acids compared to saturated fatty acids, detergents, and bile acids. Mineralization assays showed that oleate c aused the most efficient increase in the initial rate of iron oxidation, and the highest formation of ferric species in HoSF. The comprehension of the factors inducing a faster biomineralization is an issue of the utmost importance, given the association of ferritin levels with metabolic syndromes, such as insulin resistance and diabetes, characterized by fatty acid concentration dysregulation. The human ferritin H-chain homopolymer (HuHF), featuring ferroxidase activity, was also tested for its fatty acid binding capabilities. Assays show that oleate can bind with high affinity to HuHF, without altering the reaction rates at the ferroxidase site. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Consequence of total lepton number violation in strongly magnetized iron white dwarfs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, V.B. [Bogolyubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Ricci, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Šimkovic, F. [Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina F1, SK-842 15, Bratislava (Slovakia); Bogolyubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Adam, J.; Tater, M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics ASCR, CZ-250 68 Řež (Czech Republic); Truhlík, E., E-mail: truhlik@ujf.cas.cz [Institute of Nuclear Physics ASCR, CZ-250 68 Řež (Czech Republic)

    2015-05-15

    The influence of a neutrinoless electron to positron conversion on a cooling of strongly magnetized iron white dwarfs is studied. It is shown that they can be good candidates for soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars.

  17. Synthesis, structures, and dearomatization by deprotonation of iron complexes featuring bipyridine-based PNN pincer ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zell, Thomas; Langer, Robert; Iron, Mark A; Konstantinovski, Leonid; Shimon, Linda J W; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Leitus, Gregory; Balaraman, Ekambaram; Ben-David, Yehoshoa; Milstein, David

    2013-08-19

    The synthesis and characterization of new iron pincer complexes bearing bipyridine-based PNN ligands is reported. Three phosphine-substituted pincer ligands, namely, the known (t)Bu-PNN (6-((di-tert-butylphosphino)methyl)-2,2'-bipyridine) and the two new (i)Pr-PNN (6-((di-iso-propylphosphino)methyl)-2,2'-bipyridine) and Ph-PNN (6-((diphenylphosphino)methyl)-2,2'-bipyridine) ligands were synthesized and studied in ligation reactions with iron(II) chloride and bromide. These reactions lead to the formation of two types of complexes: mono-chelated neutral complexes of the type [(R-PNN)Fe(X)2] and bis-chelated dicationic complexes of the type [(R-PNN)2Fe](2+). The complexes [(R-PNN)Fe(X)2] (1: R = (t)Bu, X = Cl, 2: R = (t)Bu, X = Br, 3: R = (i)Pr, X = Cl, and 4: R = (i)Pr, X = Br) are readily prepared from reactions of FeX2 with the free R-PNN ligand in a 1:1 ratio. Magnetic susceptibility measurements show that these complexes have a high-spin ground state (S = 2) at room temperature. Employing a 2-fold or higher excess of (i)Pr-PNN, diamagnetic hexacoordinated dicationic complexes of the type [((i)Pr-PNN)2Fe](X)2 (5: X = Cl, and 6: X = Br) are formed. The reactions of Ph-PNN with FeX2 in a 1:1 ratio lead to similar complexes of the type [(Ph-PNN)2Fe](FeX4) (7: X = Cl, and 8: X = Br). Single crystal X-ray studies of 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 do not indicate electron transfer from the Fe(II) centers to the neutral bipyridine unit based on the determined bond lengths. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to compare the relative energies of the mono- and bis-chelated complexes. The doubly deprotonated complexes [(R-PNN*)2Fe] (9: R = (i)Pr, and 10: R = Ph) were synthesized by reactions of the dicationic complexes 6 and 8 with KO(t)Bu. The dearomatized nature of the central pyridine of the pincer ligand was established by X-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals of 10. Reactivity studies show that 9 and 10 have a slightly different behavior in

  18. Polynuclear Iron-Oxo/Hydroxy Complexes of Ketoacidoximate Ligands: Synthesis, Structures and Conversion to Ferric Oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Davaasuren, Bambar

    2017-06-13

    The polynuclear iron-oxo/hydroxy complexes containing ketoacidoximate ligands described in this report are [Fe3(μ3-O){O2C-C(C6H5)=NOCH3}6(py)3] (1) (py=pyridine), [Fe2(μ3-O){O2C-C(CH2-C6H5)=NO}2(H2O)(CH3OH)]2 (2) and [{Fe(μ2-OH)(O2C-C(CH3)=NO)}(dmso)]6 (3) (dmso=dimethyl sulfoxide). 1–3 are isolated from the reaction of Fe(NO3)3⋅9H2O and in situ generated anions of ketoacidoximate ligand [(HO2C-C(R1)=NOR2), where R1=CH3, C6H5 and CH2-C6H5; R2=H or CH3] in H2O, followed by crystallization in donor solvents. 1–3 undergo thermal decomposition above 200 °C and form crystalline α-Fe2O3 at 600 °C.

  19. Investigations of ultrafast ligand rebinding to heme and heme proteins using temperature and strong magnetic field perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyu

    This thesis is written to summarize investigations of the mechanisms that underlie the kinetics of diatomic ligand rebinding to the iron atom of the heme group, which is chelated inside heme proteins. The family of heme proteins is a major object of studies for several branches of scientific research activity. Understanding the ligand binding mechanisms and pathways is one of the major goals for biophysics. My interests mainly focus on the physics of this ligand binding process. Therefore, to investigate the problem, isolated from the influence of the protein matrix, Fe-protophorphyrin IX is chosen as the prototype system in my studies. Myoglobin, the most extensively and intensively studied protein, is another ideal system that allows coupling the protein polypeptide matrix into the investigation. A technique to synchro-lock two laser pulse trains electronically is applied to our pump-probe spectroscopic studies. Based on this technique, a two color, fs/ps pump-probe system is developed which extends the temporal window for our investigation to 13ns and fills a gap existing in previous pump-probe investigations. In order to apply this newly-developed pump-probe laser system to implement systematic studies on the kinetics of diatomic ligand (NO, CO, O2) rebinding to heme and heme proteins, several experimental setups are utilized. In Chapter 1, the essential background knowledge, which helps to understand the iron-ligand interaction, is briefly described. In Chapter 2, in addition to a description of the preparation protocols of protein samples and details of the method for data analysis, three home-made setups are described, which include: a picosecond laser regenerative amplifier, a pump-probe application along the bore (2-inch in diameter) of a superconducting magnet and a temperature-controllable cryostat for spinning sample cell. Chapter 3 presents high magnetic field studies of several heme-ligand or protein-ligand systems. Pump-probe spectroscopy is used to

  20. Iron complexes of tetramine ligands catalyse allylic hydroxyamination via a nitroso–ene mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Porter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron(II complexes of the tetradentate amines tris(2-pyridylmethylamine (TPA and N,N′-bis(2-pyridylmethyl-N,N′-dimethylethane-1,2-diamine (BPMEN are established catalysts of C–O bond formation, oxidising hydrocarbon substrates via hydroxylation, epoxidation and dihydroxylation pathways. Herein we report the capacity of these catalysts to promote C–N bond formation, via allylic amination of alkenes. The combination of N-Boc-hydroxylamine with either FeTPA (1 mol % or FeBPMEN (10 mol % converts cyclohexene to the allylic hydroxylamine (tert-butyl cyclohex-2-en-1-yl(hydroxycarbamate in moderate yields. Spectroscopic studies and trapping experiments suggest the reaction proceeds via a nitroso–ene mechanism, with involvement of a free N-Boc-nitroso intermediate. Asymmetric induction is not observed using the chiral tetramine ligand (+-(2R,2′R-1,1′-bis(2-pyridylmethyl-2,2′-bipyrrolidine ((R,R′-PDP.

  1. Novel ruthenium methylcyclopentadienyl complex bearing a bipyridine perfluorinated ligand shows strong activity towards colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Ricardo G; Brás, Ana Rita; Côrte-Real, Leonor; Tatikonda, Rajendhraprasad; Sanches, Anabela; Robalo, M Paula; Avecilla, Fernando; Moreira, Tiago; Garcia, M Helena; Haukka, Matti; Preto, Ana; Valente, Andreia

    2018-01-01

    Three new compounds have been synthesized and completely characterized by analytical and spectroscopic techniques. The new bipyridine-perfluorinated ligand L1 and the new organometallic complex [Ru(η 5 -MeCp)(PPh 3 ) 2 Cl] (Ru1) crystalize in the centrosymmetric triclinic space group P1¯. Analysis of the phenotypic effects induced by both organometallic complexes Ru1 and [Ru(η 5 -MeCp)(PPh 3 )(L1)][CF 3 SO 3 ] (Ru2), on human colorectal cancer cells (SW480 and RKO) survival, showed that Ru2 has a potent anti-proliferative activity, 4-6 times higher than cisplatin, and induce apoptosis in these cells. Data obtained in a noncancerous cell line derived from normal colon epithelial cells (NCM460) revealed an intrinsic selectivity of Ru2 for malignant cells at low concentrations, showing the high potential of this compound as a selective anticancer agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. A critical look at the calculation of the binding characteristics and concentration of iron complexing ligands in seawater with suggested improvements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerringa, L.J.A.; Rijkenberg, M.J.A.; Thuróczy, C.-E.; Maas, L.R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental context
    The low concentration of iron in the oceans limits growth of phytoplankton. Dissolved organic molecules, called ligands, naturally present in seawater, bind iron thereby increasing its solubility and, consequently, its availability for biological uptake by phytoplankton. The

  3. Resonance Raman detection of iron-ligand vibrations in cyano(pyridine)(octaethylporphinato)iron(III): Effects of pyridine basicity on the Fe-CN bond strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Tadayuki; Hatano, Keiichiro; Nishimura, Yoshifumi; Arata, Yoji

    1988-01-01

    The influence of axial ligand basicity on the bonding of iron(III) in cyano adducts of octaethylporphyrin has been studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy. In a six-coordinate ferric low-spin complex, cyano(pyridine)(octaethylporphinato)iron(III), Fe(OEP)(CN)(py), Raman lines at 449 and 191 cm -1 were assigned to the ν(Fe-CN) and ν(Fe-py) stretching modes, respectively. When pyridine was displaced with its derivatives, py-X, where X = 4-cyano, 3-acetyl, 3-methyl, 4-methyl, 3,4-dimethyl, and 4-dimethylamino, the ν(Fe-CN) stretching frequency was found to decrease in the complex with a high pyridine basicity. It was concluded that the stronger the trans pyridine basicity, the weaker the iron-carbon (cyanide) bond. A clear frequency shift was observed in the ν 4 model, though most of the porphyrin vibrations were insensitive to the ligand substitution. The frequency of the ν 4 mode, which is the C a -N(pyrrole) breathing vibration of the porphyrin skeleton, was found to increase with an increase in pyridine basicity. This is contrary to what was found in ferrous low-spin hemes as CO complexes. The ν 4 shift in the CN complexes was explained in terms of forward π donation; donation of electrons from the porphyrin π orbital to the d π vacancy of the low-spin iron(III) weakened the C a -N(pyrrole) bonds and hence decreased the ν 4 frequency. 32 references, 8 figures

  4. Iron and nickel complexes with heterocyclic ligands: stability, synthesis, spectral characterization, antimicrobial activity, acute and subacute toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchoucha, Afaf; Terbouche, Achour; Zaouani, Mohamed; Derridj, Fazia; Djebbar, Safia

    2013-07-01

    The synthesis and characterization by elemental analysis, emission atomic spectroscopy, TG measurements, magnetic measurements, FTIR, (1)H NMR, UV-visible spectra and conductivity of a series of iron (II) and nickel (II) complexes with two heterocyclic ligands (L(1)(SMX): sulfamethoxazole and L(2)(MIZ): metronidazole) used in pharmaceutical field and with a new ligand derived benzoxazole (L(3)(MPBO): 2-(5-methylpyridine-2-yl)benzoxazole), were reported. The formulae obtained for the complexes are: [M(L(1))2 Cl2]·nH2O, [M(L(2))2Cl2(H2O)2]·H2O and [M(L(3))2(OH)2]·nH2O. Stability constants of these complexes have been determined by potentiometric methods in water-ethanol (90:10, v/v) mixture at a 0.2 mol L(-1) ionic strength (NaCl) and at 25.0±0.1 °C. Sirko program was used to determine the protonation constants as well as the binding constants of three species [ML2H2](2+), [ML2] and [ML](2+). The antimicrobial activity of the ligands and complexes was evaluated in vitro against different human bacteria and fungi using agar diffusion method. Iron sulfamethoxazole complex showed a remarkable inhibition of bacteria growth especially on Staphylococcus aureus and P. aeruginosa. The iron metronidazole complex is active against yeasts especially on Candida tropicalis strain. Nickel complexes presented different antibacterial and antifungal behavior's against bacteria and fungal. The acute toxicity study revealed that the iron complexes are not toxic at 2000 mg/kg dose orally administrated. LD50 for nickel complexes was determined using graphical method. No significant differences in the body weights between the control and the treated groups of both rat sexes in subacute toxicity study using for iron complexes. Hematological and clinical blood chemistry analysis revealed no toxicity effects of the iron complexes. Pathologically, neither gross abnormalities nor histopathological changes were observed for these complexes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights

  5. AFM and electron microscopy study of the unusual aggregation behavior of metallosurfactants based on iron(II) complexes with bipyridine ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Paula; Eaton, Peter; Geurts, Huub P M; Sousa, Miguel; Gameiro, Paula; Feiters, Martin C; Nolte, Roeland J M; Pereira, Eulalia; de Castro, Baltazar

    2007-07-17

    The aggregation behavior in water-rich solutions of five iron(II) complexes with alkylated derivatives of 2,2'-bipyridine was studied by electron microscopy (cryo-SEM, SEM, and TEM) and AFM. The results obtained by cryo-SEM on frozen colloidal solutions show that the morphology of the aggregates strongly depends on the length of the alkyl chains in the bipyridine ligands, with shorter alkyl chains forming rod-like structures, whereas for compounds with longer alkyl chains, only spherical structures were detected. The self-aggregates were further characterized by SEM and TEM. The results show that their overall morphology depends only on the length of the alkyl chain of the bipyridine ligands and that the samples show a broad size distribution. In addition, TEM and SEM were used to study the stability of the self-aggregates in solution, the effect of addition of methanol, and the temperature used in the preparation of the colloidal solutions. AFM studies of the aggregates either dried in ambient conditions or dehydrated by long drying under vacuum showed partially collapsed self-aggregates in the latter case, showing that the aggregates contain water in their core, indicating that the self-aggregation leads to vesicle-type structures.

  6. Characterisation of powerful antioxidants and synthetic iron ligands, as protective agents against oxidative damages, using new high throughput screening assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meunier, St.

    2002-12-01

    This work was devoted to the development of pertinent high throughput screening assays in the aim of studying oxidative stress. Three screening assays have been developed for the evaluation of protective agents toward ROS generated by gamma irradiation, UV or by a Fenton-like system. 24 natural extracts and a library of 120 pure compounds, containing among the most powerful antioxidants known to date, have been readily studied using, these new techniques. We found that two pulvinic acid derivatives possess excellent protective properties, and especially a pigment of fungus named norbadione A. Beyond its in vitro activity, this molecule displays remarkable biological properties. In the aim of studying an alternative pathway of protection against oxidation induced by iron, ligands able to modify the redox properties of this metal, have been synthesised. We have developed a parallel synthesis allowing the variation of the architecture, denticity, chelating moieties and hydrophobicity of iron chelates. Using this strategy, 47 potential Fe(III) ligands were obtained. Their protective capacities have been studied using a fourth screening assay, demonstrating the effectiveness of some ligands. Finally, the immunoassay technique called SPI-RAD has been used in order to study a particular consequence of drastic oxidative stress, namely covalent crosslinks between proteins. Our results demonstrate that these linkages occur in the presence of metals (FeII or CuII) and hydrogen peroxide, as well as in the presence of NO . radical. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that tyrosines residues and disulfide bridges play an important role in these phenomena. (author)

  7. Synthesis, structure and magnetism of manganese and iron dipicolinates with N,N '-donor ligands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhrecký, Róbert; Svoboda, I.; Růžičková, Z.; Koman, M.; Dlháň, L.; Pavlík, J.; Moncol, J.; Boca, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 425, JAN (2015), s. 134-144 ISSN 0020-1693 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Manganese * Iron * Dipicolinate complexes * Crystal structure * Magnetism Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.918, year: 2015

  8. Comparison of regeneration efficiency of strong base anion exchangers fouled by iron and humic acids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kus, P.; Kunesova, K.; Šlouf, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 15 (2014), s. 2352-2357 ISSN 0149-6395 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : regeneration * iron * fouling Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.171, year: 2014

  9. Experimental and Computational Study of an Unexpected Iron-Catalyzed Carboetherification by Cooperative Metal and Ligand Substrate Interaction and Proton Shuttling

    KAUST Repository

    El-Sepelgy, Osama

    2017-09-26

    An iron-catalyzed cycloisomerization of allenols to deoxygenated pyranose glycals has been developed. Combined experimental and computational studies show that the iron complex exhibits a dual catalytic role in that the non-innocent cyclopentadienone ligand acts as proton shuttle by initial hydrogen abstraction from the alcohol and by facilitating protonation and deprotonation events in the isomerization and demetalation steps. Molecular orbital analysis provides insight into the unexpected and selective formation of the 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyran.

  10. Enhancement and inhibition of iron photoreduction by individual ligands in open ocean seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkenberg, MJA; Gerringa, LJA; Carolus, VE; Velzeboer, [No Value; de Baar, HJW; Gerringa, Loes J.A.; Carolus, Vicky E.; Velzeboer, Ilona; Baar, Hein J.W. de; Byrne, Robert H.

    2006-01-01

    In laboratory experiments, we investigated the effect of five individual Fe-binding ligands: phaeophytin, ferrichrome, desferrioxamine B (DFOB), inositol hexaphosphate (phytic acid), and protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) on the Fe(II) photoproduction using seawater of the open Southern Ocean. Addition of

  11. Activation of Small Molecules at Iron Complexes in Varying Trigonal Ligand Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Hohenberger, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Iron nitrido and nitrosyl/nitroxyl model complexes have been of great interest owing to their role as reactive intermediates and transfer reagents and their role in biochemical reactions involving nitrogen and NO. The stable iron(IV) nitrido complex [(TIMENMes)FeIV(N)]BPh4 (TIMENMes = tris-[2 (3-mesitylimidazol-2 ylidene)¬ethyl]¬amine), synthesized by Meyer and co-workers in 2008, proved to be uncreative towards electrophiles or nucleophiles and thus, the increase of its reactivity was tested...

  12. Cyclopentadienyl-ruthenium(II) and iron(II) organometallic compounds with carbohydrate derivative ligands as good colorectal anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florindo, Pedro R; Pereira, Diane M; Borralho, Pedro M; Rodrigues, Cecília M P; Piedade, M F M; Fernandes, Ana C

    2015-05-28

    New ruthenium(II) and iron(II) organometallic compounds of general formula [(η(5)-C5H5)M(PP)Lc][PF6], bearing carbohydrate derivative ligands (Lc), were prepared and fully characterized and the crystal structures of five of those compounds were determined by X-ray diffraction studies. Cell viability of colon cancer HCT116 cell line was determined for a total of 23 organometallic compounds and SAR's data analysis within this library showed an interesting dependency of the cytotoxic activity on the carbohydrate moiety, linker, phosphane coligands, and metal center. More importantly, two compounds, 14Ru and 18Ru, matched oxaliplatin IC50 (0.45 μM), the standard metallodrug used in CC chemotherapeutics, and our leading compound 14Ru was shown to be significantly more cytotoxic than oxaliplatin to HCT116 cells, triggering higher levels of caspase-3 and -7 activity and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner.

  13. Electrochemical Polymerization of Iron(III) Polypyridyl Complexes through C-C Coupling of Redox Non-innocent Phenolato Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unjaroen, Duenpen; Swart, Marcel; Browne, Wesley R

    2017-01-03

    Phenolato moieties impart redox flexibility to metal complexes due their accessible (oxidative) redox chemistry and have been proposed as functional ligand moieties in redox non-innocent ligand based transition metal catalysis. Here, the electro- and spectroelectrochemistry of phenolato based μ-oxo-diiron(III) complexes [(L 1 )Fe(μ-O)Fe(L 1 )] 2+ (1) and [(L 2 )Fe(μ-O)Fe(L 2 )] 2+ (2), where L 1 = 2-(((di(pyridin-2-yl)methyl)(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino)methyl)phenol and L 2 = 3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-(((di(pyridin-2-yl)methyl)(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino)methyl)phenol, is described. The electrochemical oxidation of 1 in dichloromethane results in aryl C-C coupling of phenoxyl radical ligand moieties to form tetra nuclear complexes, which undergo subsequent oxidation to form iron(III) phenolato based polymers (poly-1). The coupling is blocked by placing tert-butyl groups at para and ortho positions of phenol units (i.e., 2). Poly-1 shows two fully reversible redox processes in monomer free solution. Assignment of species observed during the electrochemical and chemical {(NH 4 ) 2 [Ce IV (NO 3 ) 6 ]} oxidation of 1 in acetonitrile is made by comparison with the UV-vis-NIR absorption and resonance micro-Raman spectroelectrochemistry of poly-1, and by DFT calculations, which confirms that oxidative coupling occurs in acetonitrile also. However, in contrast to that observed in dichloromethane, in acetonitrile, the oligomers formed are degraded in terms of a loss of the Fe(III)-O-Fe(III) bridge by protonation. The oxidative redox behavior of 1 and 2 is, therefore, dominated by the formation and reactivity of Fe(III) bound phenoxyl radicals, which considerably holds implications in regard to the design of phenolato based complexes for oxidation catalysis.

  14. A Heteroleptic Ferrous Complex with Mesoionic Bis(1,2,3-triazol-5-ylidene) Ligands: Taming the MLCT Excited State of Iron(II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yizhu; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Fredin, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    based on sequentially furnishing the Fe-II center with the benchmark 2,2-bipyridine (bpy) ligand and the more strongly sigma-donating mesoionic ligand, 4,4-bis(1,2,3-triazol-5-ylidene) (btz). Complex1 was comprehensively characterized by electrochemistry, static and ultrafast spectroscopy, and quantum...

  15. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  16. Competing orders in strongly correlated systems. Dirac materials and iron-based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classen, Laura

    2016-11-04

    In this work we address the collective phenomena appearing in interacting fermion systems due to the competition of distinct orders at the example of Dirac materials and iron-based superconductors. On the one hand we determine leading ordering tendencies in an unbiased way, when Fermi liquid instabilities are expected simultaneously in the particle-particle and particle-hole channel. In this context we analyze the impact of electron-phonon interactions on the many-body instabilities of electrons on the honeycomb lattice. Furthermore we investigate the interplay between superconductivity, magnetism and orbital order in five-pocket iron-based superconductors including the full orbital composition of low-energy excitations. On the other hand we study how the close proximity of different phases affects the structure of the phase diagram and the nature of transitions, as well as the corresponding quantum multicritical behavior. To this end we consider the semimetal-insulator transitions to an antiferromagnetic and a staggered-density state of low-energy Dirac fermions. To account for the decisive role of interactions and the various degrees of freedom in these models, modern renormalization group techniques are applied.

  17. Surface anisotropy of iron oxide nanoparticles and slabs from first principles: Influence of coatings and ligands as a test of the Heisenberg model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brymora, Katarzyna; Calvayrac, Florent

    2017-07-01

    We performed ab initio computations of the magnetic properties of simple iron oxide clusters and slabs. We considered an iron oxide cluster functionalized by a molecule or glued to a gold cluster of the same size. We also considered a magnetite slab coated by cobalt oxide or a mixture of iron oxide and cobalt oxide. The changes in magnetic behavior were explored using constrained magnetic calculations. A possible value for the surface anisotropy was estimated from the fit of a classical Heisenberg model on ab initio results. The value was found to be compatible with estimations obtained by other means, or inferred from experimental results. The addition of a ligand, coating, or of a metallic nanoparticle to the systems degraded the quality of the description by the Heisenberg Hamiltonian. Proposing a change in the anisotropies allowing for the proportion of each transition atom we could get a much better description of the magnetism of series of hybrid cobalt and iron oxide systems.

  18. Strong and selective glomerular localization of CD134 ligand and TNF receptor-1 in proliferative lupus nephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aten, J.; Roos, A.; Claessen, N.; Schilder-Tol, E. J.; ten Berge, I. J.; Weening, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    CD134 (OX40) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor (TNFR) family that can be expressed on activated T lymphocytes. Interaction between CD134 and its ligand (CD134L) is involved in costimulation of T and B lymphocyte activation, and in T cell adhesion to endothelium. To examine the

  19. Accelerated dissolution of iron oxides in ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jeong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron dissolution from mineral dusts and soil particles is vital as a source of bioavailable iron in various environmental media. In this work, the dissolution of iron oxide particles trapped in ice was investigated as a new pathway of iron supply. The dissolution experiments were carried out in the absence and presence of various organic complexing ligands under dark condition. In acidic pH conditions (pH 2, 3, and 4, the dissolution of iron oxides was greatly enhanced in the ice phase compared to that in water. The dissolved iron was mainly in the ferric form, which indicates that the dissolution is not a reductive process. The extent of dissolved iron was greatly affected by the kind of organic complexing ligands and the surface area of iron oxides. The iron dissolution was most pronounced with high surface area iron oxides and in the presence of strong iron binding ligands. The enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice is mainly ascribed to the "freeze concentration effect", which concentrates iron oxide particles, organic ligands, and protons in the liquid like ice grain boundary region and accelerates the dissolution of iron oxides. The ice-enhanced dissolution effect gradually decreased when decreasing the freezing temperature from −10 to −196 °C, which implies that the presence and formation of the liquid-like ice grain boundary region play a critical role. The proposed phenomenon of enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice may provide a new pathway of bioavailable iron production. The frozen atmospheric ice with iron-containing dust particles in the upper atmosphere thaws upon descending and may provide bioavailable iron upon deposition onto the ocean surface.

  20. Synthesis, crystal structure and reactivity studies of iron complexes with pybox ligands

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2014-11-01

    Iron(II) complexes, [Fe(2,6-bis(4,4-dimethyl-1,3-oxazolin-2-yl)pyridine)Cl2] ((Fe(Me2-pybox)Cl2), 3) and [Fe(2,6-bis(4,4-diphenyl-1,3-oxazolin-2-yl)pyridine)Cl2] ((Fe(Ph2-pybox)Cl2), 4), have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallographic analysis. Upon treatment of complex 3 with silver triflate and 4 with acetonitrile, [Fe(Me2-pybox)(CH3CN)OTf2] (5) and [Fe(Ph2-pybox)(CH3CN)2Cl][FeCl3] (6) were obtained, respectively. The bulkier phenyl substitutes were found not only to cause the elongation of the N-Fe bonds but also influence the reactivity of the Fe center.

  1. Strong Impact of an Axial Ligand on the Absorption by Chlorophyll a and b Pigments Determined by Gas-Phase Ion Spectroscopy Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Christina; Stockett, Mark H.; Pedersen, Bjarke Møller

    2016-01-01

    The microenvironments in photosynthetic proteins affect the absorption by chlorophyll (Chl) pigments. It is, however, a challenge to disentangle the impact on the transition energies of different perturbations, for example, the global electrostatics of the protein (nonbonded environmental effects......), exciton coupling between Chl's, conformational variations, and binding of an axial ligand to the magnesium center. This is needed to distinguish between the two most commonly proposed mechanisms for energy transport in photosynthetic proteins, relying on either weakly or strongly coupled pigments. Here...

  2. X-ray Structure and Magnetic Properties of two new iron(II) 1D Coordination Polymers with Bis(imidazolyle)methane as bridging ligand

    OpenAIRE

    Weber , Birgit

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The reaction of iron(II) acetate with the tetradentate Schiff base like ligands H2L1 ((E,E)-[{diethyl 2,2'-[1,2-phenylenebis-(iminomethyl-idyne)]bis[3-oxobutanato]}]) and H2L2 ([([3,3']-[1,2-phenylene-bis(iminomethylidyne)]bis(2,4-pentane-dionato)(2-)-N,N',O2,O2']) leads to the formation of the octahedral N2O4 coordinated iron complexes [FeL1(MeOH)2] and [FeL2(MeOH)2], respectively. Conversion of both with bimm (bis(1-imidazolyle)methane) leads to the 1D coordination polym...

  3. Nickel and iron complexes with N,P,N-type ligands: synthesis, structure and catalytic oligomerization of ethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermagoret, Anthony; Tomicki, Falk; Braunstein, Pierre

    2008-06-14

    The N,P,N-type ligands bis(2-picolyl)phenylphosphine (), bis(4,5-dihydro-2-oxazolylmethyl)phenylphosphine (), bis(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolylmethyl)phenylphosphine () and bis(2-picolyloxy)phenylphosphine () were used to synthesize the corresponding pentacoordinated Ni(ii) complexes [Ni{bis(2-picolyl)phenylphosphine}Cl(2)] (), [Ni{bis(4,5-dihydro-2-oxazolylmethyl)phenylphosphine}Cl(2)] (), [Ni{bis(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolylmethyl)phenylphosphine}Cl(2)] () and [Ni{bis(2-picolyloxy)phenylphosphine}Cl(2)] (), respectively. The hexacoordinated iron complexes [Fe{bis(2-picolyl)phenylphosphine}(2)][Cl(3)FeOFeCl(3)] (), [Fe{bis(4,5-dihydro-2-oxazolylmethyl)phenylphosphine}(2)][Cl(3)FeOFeCl(3)] () and the tetracoordinated complex [Fe{bis(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolylmethyl)phenylphosphine}Cl(2)] (abbreviated [FeCl(2)(NPN(Me2)-N,N)]) were prepared by reaction of FeCl(2).4H(2)O with ligands , respectively. The crystal structures of the octahedral complexes and , determined by X-ray diffraction, showed that two tridentate ligands are facially coordinated to the metal centre with a cis-arrangement of the P atoms and the dianion (mu-oxo)bis[trichloroferrate(iii)] compensates the doubly positive charge of the complex. The cyclic voltammograms of and showed two reversible redox couples attributed to the reduction of the dianion (Fe(2)OCl(6))(2-) (-0.24 V for and -0.20 V for vs. SCE) and to the oxidation of the Fe(ii) ion of the complex (0.67 V for and 0.52 V for vs. SCE). The cyclic voltammogram of [FeCl(2)(NPN(Me2)-N,N)] showed a reversible redox couple at -0.17 V vs. SCE assigned to the oxidation of the Fe(ii) atom and an irreversible process at 0.65 V. The complexes , and [FeCl(2)(NPN(Me2)-N,N)] have been evaluated in the catalytic oligomerization of ethylene with AlEtCl(2) or MAO as cocatalyst. The nickel complex proved to be the most active precatalyst in the series, with a turnover frequency (TOF) of 61 800 mol(C(2)H(4)) mol(Ni)(-1) h(-1) with 10 equiv. of AlEtCl(2) and 12 200 mol(C(2)H

  4. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to present...... and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...

  5. Photoemission mechanism of water-soluble silver nanoclusters: ligand-to-metal-metal charge transfer vs strong coupling between surface plasmon and emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuting; Yang, Taiqun; Pan, Haifeng; Yuan, Yufeng; Chen, Li; Liu, Mengwei; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Sanjun; Wu, Peng; Xu, Jianhua

    2014-02-05

    Using carboxylate-protected silver nanoclusters (Ag-carboxylate NCs) as a model, we separately investigated the contribution of the ligand shell and the metal core to understand the nature of photoluminescence of Ag NCs. A new Ag(0)NCs@Ag(I)-carboxylate complex core-shell structural model has been proposed. The emission from the Ag-carboxylate NCs could be attributed to ligand-to-metal-metal charge transfer from Ag(I)-carboxylate complexes (the oxygen atom in the carboxylate ligands to the Ag(I) ions) to the Ag atoms and subsequent radiative relaxation. Additionally, we found that the emission wavelength of the Ag NCs depends on the excitation wavelength implying a strong coupling between surface plasmon and emitter in Ag NCs. The strong coupling between the surface plasmon and the emitter determines the quantum yield and lifetime. The emission mechanism of Ag NCs and its relation to the organic templates and metal cores were clearly clarified. The results should stimulate additional experimental and theoretical research on the molecular-level design of luminescent metal probes for optoelectronics and other applications.

  6. Selective Mottness as a key to iron superconductors: weak and strong correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medici, Luca

    2014-03-01

    I will discuss the strength of electronic correlations in the normal phase of Fe-superconductors and trace a comparison with cuprates. The phase diagram of the high-Tc cuprates is dominated by the Mott insulating phase of the parent compounds. Approaching it from large doping, a standard Fermi-liquid is seen to gradually turn into a bad non-Fermi liquid metal in which quasiparticles have heavily differentiated coherence depending on momentum, a process which culminates in the pseudogap regime, in which the antinodal region in momentum space acquires a gap before the material reaches a fully gapped Mott state. I will show that experiments for electron- and hole-doped BaFe2As2 support an analogous scenario. The doping evolution is dominated by the influence of a Mott insulator that would be realized for half-filled conduction bands, while the stoichiometric compound does not play a special role. Weakly and strongly correlated conduction electrons coexist in much of the phase diagram, a differentiation that increases with hole-doping. We identify the reason for this ``selective Mottness'' in a simple emergent mechanism, an ``orbital decoupling,'' triggered by the strong Hund's coupling. When this mechanism is active charge excitations in the different orbitals are decoupled and each orbital behaves as a single band Hubbard model, where the correlation degree almost only depends on how doped is each orbital from half-filling. This scenario reconciles contrasting evidences on the electronic correlation strength, implies a strong asymmetry between hole- and electron-doping and establishes a deep connection with the cuprates. L. de' Medici, G. Giovannetti and M. Capone, ArXiv:1212.3966 Work supported by CNRS - ESPCI ParisTech, France

  7. Surface anisotropy of iron oxide nanoparticles and slabs from first principles: Influence of coatings and ligands as a test of the Heisenberg model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brymora, Katarzyna; Calvayrac, Florent, E-mail: Florent.Calvayrac@univ-lemans.fr

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • A new method is given to extract surface anisotropies from ab initio calculations. • Heisenberg model for magnetic clusters and surfaces is validated in simple cases. • Ligands, metallic clusters, or coatings degrade the validity of the Heisenberg model. • Values for surface anisotropies, volume anisotropies, exchange constants are computed. • Results are in agreement with experimental data, previous theoretical findings. - Abstract: We performed ab initio computations of the magnetic properties of simple iron oxide clusters and slabs. We considered an iron oxide cluster functionalized by a molecule or glued to a gold cluster of the same size. We also considered a magnetite slab coated by cobalt oxide or a mixture of iron oxide and cobalt oxide. The changes in magnetic behavior were explored using constrained magnetic calculations. A possible value for the surface anisotropy was estimated from the fit of a classical Heisenberg model on ab initio results. The value was found to be compatible with estimations obtained by other means, or inferred from experimental results. The addition of a ligand, coating, or of a metallic nanoparticle to the systems degraded the quality of the description by the Heisenberg Hamiltonian. Proposing a change in the anisotropies allowing for the proportion of each transition atom we could get a much better description of the magnetism of series of hybrid cobalt and iron oxide systems.

  8. INTERACTION OF IRON(II MIXED-LIGAND COMPLEXES WITH DNA: BASE-PAIR SPECIFICITY AND THERMAL DENATURATION STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudasir Mudasir

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A research about base-pair specificity of the DNA binding of [Fe(phen3]2+, [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ and [Fe(phen(dip2]2+ complexes and the effect of calf-thymus DNA (ct-DNA binding of these metal complexes on thermal denaturation of ct-DNA has been carried out. This research is intended to evaluate the preferential binding of the complexes to the sequence of DNA (A-T or G-C sequence and to investigate the binding strength and mode upon their interaction with DNA. Base-pair specificity of the DNA binding of the complexes was determined by comparing the equilibrium binding constant (Kb of each complex to polysynthetic DNA that contain only A-T or G-C sequence. The Kb value of the interaction was determined by spectrophotometric titration and thermal denaturation temperature (Tm was determined by monitoring the absorbance of the mixture solution of each complex and ct-DNA at λ =260 nm as temperature was elevated in the range of 25 - 100 oC. Results of the study show that in general all iron(II complexes studied exhibit a base-pair specificity in their DNA binding to prefer the relatively facile A-T sequence as compared to the G-C one. The thermal denaturation experiments have demonstrated that Fe(phen3]2+ and [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ interact weakly with double helical DNA via electrostatic interaction as indicated by insignificant changes in melting temperature, whereas [Fe(phen2(dip]2+  most probably binds to DNA in mixed modes of interaction, i.e.: intercalation and electrostatic interaction. This conclusion is based on the fact that the binding of [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ to ct-DNA moderately increase the Tm value of ct- DNA   Keywords: DNA Binding, mixed-ligand complexes

  9. One-pot synthesis of water soluble iron nanoparticles using rationally-designed peptides and ligand release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papst, Stefanie; Cheong, Soshan; Banholzer, Moritz J; Brimble, Margaret A; Williams, David E; Tilley, Richard D

    2013-05-18

    Herein we report the rational design of new phosphopeptides for control of nucleation, growth and aggregation of water-soluble, superparamagnetic iron-iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles. The use of the designed peptides enables a one-pot synthesis that avoids utilizing unstable or toxic iron precursors, organic solvents, and the need for exchange of capping agent after synthesis of the NPs.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Divalent Manganese, Iron, and Cobalt Complexes in Tripodal Phenolate/N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligand Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Käß, Martina; Hohenberger, Johannes; Adelhardt, Mario

    2014-01-01

    of the ligands is evident. Particularly, the molecular structure of 1in which a pyridine molecule is situated next to the Mn–Cl bondand those of azide complexes 2, 4, and 6 demonstrate the flexibility of these mixed-ligand derivatives, which, in contrast to the corresponding symmetrical TIMENR ligands, allow......Two novel tripodal ligands, (BIMPNMes,Ad,Me)− and (MIMPNMes,Ad,Me)2–, combining two types of donor atoms, namely, NHC and phenolate donors, were synthesized to complete the series of N-anchored ligands, ranging from chelating species with tris(carbene) to tris(phenolate) chelating arms....... The complete ligand series offers a convenient way of tuning the electronic and steric environment around the metal center, thus, allowing for control of the complex’s reactivity. This series of divalent complexes of Mn, Fe, and Co was synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, IR, and UV/vis spectroscopy...

  11. Theoretical studies on the reaction mechanism of alcohol oxidation by high-valent iron-oxo complex of non-heme ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lin; Wang, Jinping; Wang, Meiyan; Wu, Zhijian

    2010-04-28

    The catalytic mechanism for the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde and water catalyzed by the biomimetic non-heme iron complex, [(tpa)Fe(IV)O](2+) (tpa = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine), is presented by the density functional method B3LYP. Experimentally, acetate and CH(3)CN could be coordinated to the Fe center as the sixth ligand to form the catalyst [(tpa)Fe(IV)=O](2+). To investigate the detailed reaction mechanisms for the two possible ligands, two models (acetate-bound ferryl model A and CH(3)CN-bound ferryl model B) are chosen. In total, six routes have been presented for two models. Our calculations show that both acetate and CH(3)CN could provide reasonable pathways. The calculated energy barriers for these routes are between 19.0 and 23.7 kcal mol(-1) in solution, within the error limits of B3LYP. It is also found that the CH(3)CN molecule acts only as a ligand throughout the reaction cycle. By contrast, the acetate ligand acts as a proton sink to assist the product formation. In addition, the less polarized solvent is more suitable for the alcohol oxidation catalyzed by non-heme model complexes.

  12. Electrochemical Polymerization of Iron(III) Polypyridyl Complexes through C-C Coupling of Redox Non-innocent Phenolato Ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unjaroen, Duenpen; Swart, Marcel; Browne, Wesley R

    2017-01-01

    Phenolato moieties impart redox flexibility to metal complexes due their accessible (oxidative) redox chemistry and have been proposed as functional ligand moieties in redox non-innocent ligand based transition metal catalysis. Here, the electro-and spectroelectrochemistry of phenolato based

  13. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Search the ODS website Submit Search NIH Office of Dietary Supplements Consumer Datos en español Health ... eating a variety of foods, including the following: Lean meat, seafood, and poultry. Iron-fortified breakfast cereals ...

  14. Charge and Spin States in Schiff Base Metal Complexes with a Disiloxane Unit Exhibiting a Strong Noninnocent Ligand Character: Synthesis, Structure, Spectroelectrochemistry, and Theoretical Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazacu, Maria; Shova, Sergiu; Soroceanu, Alina; Machata, Peter; Bucinsky, Lukas; Breza, Martin; Rapta, Peter; Telser, Joshua; Krzystek, J; Arion, Vladimir B

    2015-06-15

    Mononuclear nickel(II), copper(II), and manganese(III) complexes with a noninnocent tetradentate Schiff base ligand containing a disiloxane unit were prepared in situ by reaction of 3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde with 1,3-bis(3-aminopropyl)tetramethyldisiloxane followed by addition of the appropriate metal(II) salt. The ligand H2L resulting from these reactions is a 2:1 condensation product of 3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde with 1,3-bis(3-aminopropyl)tetramethyldisiloxane. The resulting metal complexes, NiL·0.5CH2Cl2, CuL·1.5H2O, and MnL(OAc)·0.15H2O, were characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopic methods (IR, UV-vis, X-band EPR, HFEPR, (1)H NMR), ESI mass spectrometry, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Taking into account the well-known strong stabilizing effects of tert-butyl groups in positions 3 and 5 of the aromatic ring on phenoxyl radicals, we studied the one-electron and two-electron oxidation of the compounds using both experimental (chiefly spectroelectrochemistry) and computational (DFT) techniques. The calculated spin-density distribution and localized orbitals analysis revealed the oxidation locus and the effect of the electrochemical electron transfer on the molecular structure of the complexes, while time-dependent DFT calculations helped to explain the absorption spectra of the electrochemically generated species. Hyperfine coupling constants, g-tensors, and zero-field splitting parameters have been calculated at the DFT level of theory. Finally, the CASSCF approach has been employed to theoretically explore the zero-field splitting of the S = 2 MnL(OAc) complex for comparison purposes with the DFT and experimental HFEPR results. It is found that the D parameter sign strongly depends on the metal coordination geometry.

  15. Siderophore-based microbial adaptations to iron scarcity across the eastern Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteau, Rene M.; Mende, Daniel R.; Hawco, Nicholas J.; McIlvin, Matthew R.; Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; Saito, Mak A.; Sedwick, Peter N.; DeLong, Edward F.; Repeta, Daniel J.

    2016-12-01

    Nearly all iron dissolved in the ocean is complexed by strong organic ligands of unknown composition. The effect of ligand composition on microbial iron acquisition is poorly understood, but amendment experiments using model ligands show they can facilitate or impede iron uptake depending on their identity. Here we show that siderophores, organic compounds synthesized by microbes to facilitate iron uptake, are a dynamic component of the marine ligand pool in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Siderophore concentrations in iron-deficient waters averaged 9 pM, up to fivefold higher than in iron-rich coastal and nutrient-depleted oligotrophic waters, and were dominated by amphibactins, amphiphilic siderophores with cell membrane affinity. Phylogenetic analysis of amphibactin biosynthetic genes suggests that the ability to produce amphibactins has transferred horizontally across multiple Gammaproteobacteria, potentially driven by pressures to compete for iron. In coastal and oligotrophic regions of the eastern Pacific Ocean, amphibactins were replaced with lower concentrations (1-2 pM) of hydrophilic ferrioxamine siderophores. Our results suggest that organic ligand composition changes across the surface ocean in response to environmental pressures. Hydrophilic siderophores are predominantly found across regions of the ocean where iron is not expected to be the limiting nutrient for the microbial community at large. However, in regions with intense competition for iron, some microbes optimize iron acquisition by producing siderophores that minimize diffusive losses to the environment. These siderophores affect iron bioavailability and thus may be an important component of the marine iron cycle.

  16. Characterization of Mononuclear Non-heme Iron(III)-Superoxo Complex with a Five-Azole Ligand Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddon, Frédéric; Chiba, Yosuke; Nakazawa, Jun; Ohta, Takehiro; Ogura, Takashi; Hikichi, Shiro

    2015-06-15

    Reaction of O2 with a high-spin mononuclear iron(II) complex supported by a five-azole donor set yields the corresponding mononuclear non-heme iron(III)-superoxo species, which was characterized by UV/Vis spectroscopy and resonance Raman spectroscopy. (1)H NMR analysis reveals diamagnetic nature of the superoxo complex arising from antiferromagnetic coupling between the spins on the low-spin iron(III) and superoxide. This superoxo species reacts with H-atom donating reagents to give a low-spin iron(III)-hydroperoxo species showing characteristic UV/Vis, resonance Raman, and EPR spectra. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Unusually strong H-bonding to the heme ligand and fast geminate recombination dynamics of the carbon monoxide complex of Bacillus subtilis truncated hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feis, Alessandro; Lapini, Andrea; Catacchio, Bruno; Brogioni, Silvia; Foggi, Paolo; Chiancone, Emilia; Boffi, Alberto; Smulevich, Giulietta

    2008-01-22

    The active site of the oxygen-avid truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis has been characterized by infrared absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopies, and the dynamics of CO rebinding after photolysis has been investigated by picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Resonance Raman experiments on the CO bound adduct revealed the presence of two Fe-CO stretching bands at 545 and 520 cm-1, respectively. Accordingly, two C-O stretching bands at 1924 and 1888 cm-1 were observed in infrared absorption and resonance Raman measurements. The very low C-O stretching frequency at 1888 cm-1 (corresponding to the extremely high RR stretching frequency at 545 cm-1) indicates unusually strong hydrogen bonding between CO and distal residues. On the basis of a comparison with other truncated hemoglobin it is envisaged that the two CO conformers are determined by specific interactions with the TrpG8 and TyrB10 residues. Mutation of TrpG8 to Leu deeply alters the hydrogen-bonding network giving rise mainly to a CO conformer characterized by a Fe-CO stretching band at 489 cm-1 and a CO stretching band at 1958 cm-1. Picosecond laser photolysis experiments carried out on the CO bound adduct revealed dynamical processes that take place within a few nanoseconds after photolysis. Picosecond dynamics is largely dominated by CO geminate rebinding and is consistent with strong H-bonding contributions of TyrB10 and TrpG8 to ligand stabilization.

  18. Iron and Prochlorococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    facilitate iron transport, store iron, regulate iron homeostasis , and enable acclimation to low iron availability (Andrews et al, 2003). In...Bacterial iron homeostasis . FEMS Microbiology Reviews 27: 215-237. Barbeau K (2006) Photochemistry of Organic Iron(III) Complexing Ligands in Oceanic...Microbiology 145: 1473-1484. Moore JK, Doney SC, Lindsay K (2004) Upper ocean ecosystem dynamics and iron cycling in a global three-dimensional

  19. Steric and electronic effects of 1,3-disubstituted cyclopentadienyl ligands on metallocene derivatives of Cerium, Titanium, Manganese, and Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofield, Chadwick Dean [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Sterically demanding 1,3-disubstituted cyclopentadienyl ligands were used to modify the physical properties of the corresponding metallocenes. Sterically demanding ligands provided kinetic stabilization for trivalent cerium compounds. Tris(di-t-butylcyclopentadienyl)cerium was prepared and anion competition between halides and cyclopentadienyl groups which had complicated synthesis of the tris(cyclopentadienyl)compound was qualitatively examined. Bis(di-t-butylcyclopentadienyl)cerium methyl was prepared and its rate of decomposition, by ligand redistribution, to tris(di-t-butylcyclopentadienyl)cerium was shown to be slower than the corresponding rate for less sterically demanding ligands. Asymmetrically substituted ligands provided a symmetry label for examination of chemical exchange processes. Tris[trimethylsilyl(t-butyl)cyclopentadienyl]cerium was prepared and the rate of interconversion between the C1 and C3 isomers was examined. The enthalpy difference between the two distereomers is 7.0 kJ/mol. The sterically demanding cyclopentadienyl ligands ansa-di-t-butylcyclopentadiene (Me2Si[(Me3C)2C5H3]2), ansa-bis(trimethylsilyl)cyclopentadiene (Me2Si[(Me3Si)2C5H3]2) and tetra-t-butylfulvalene and metallocene derivatives of the ligands were prepared and their structures were examined by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The effect that substituents on the cyclopentadienyl ring have on the pi-electron system of the ligand was examined through interaction between ligand and metal orbitals. A series of 1,3-disubstituted manganocenes was prepared and their electronic states were determined by solid-state magnetic susceptibility, electron paramagnetic resonance, X-ray crystallography, and variable temperature UV-vis spectroscopy. Spin-equilibria in [(Me3C)2C5H3]2Mn and [(Me3

  20. A new PC(sp(3))P ligand and its coordination chemistry with low-valent iron, cobalt and nickel complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Gengyu; Li, Xiaoyan; Xu, Guoqiang; Wang, Lin; Sun, Hongjian

    2014-06-21

    A new PC(sp(3))P ligand N,N'-bis(diphenylphosphino)dipyrromethane [PCH2P] (1) was prepared and its iron, cobalt and nickel chemistry was explored. Two pincer-type complexes [PCHP]Fe(H)(PMe3)2 (2) and [PCHP]Co(PMe3)2 (4) were synthesized in the reaction of with Fe(PMe3)4 and Co(Me)(PMe3)4. 1 reacted with Co(PMe3)4 and Ni(PMe3)4 to afford Co(0) and Ni(0) complexes [PCH2P]Co(PMe3)2 (3) and [PCH2P]Ni(PMe3)2 (5). The structures of complexes 2-5 were determined by X-ray diffraction.

  1. Effect of amino acid ligands on the structure of iron porphyrins and their ability to bind oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Victoria E J; Baker, Matthew G; Boyd, Russell J

    2014-06-26

    Density functional theory is used to study a series of model iron porphyrins in the gas phase. In the first part of this study, three range-separated hybrid density functionals developed by Chai and Head-Gordon were assessed; ωB97, ωB97X, and ωB97XD. The effects of including full Hartree-Fock exchange at long-range and dispersion corrections are reported with respect to the geometries and binding energies of oxygen to the iron porphyrin systems. The functionals all correctly predict the quintet ground state for the deoxy-iron porphyrins, where typically hybrid functionals fail and predict a triplet ground state. Including dispersion in ωB97XD is shown to give the best results for the O2 binding energy and geometrical parameters. The second part of the study employs ωB97XD to study iron porphine systems with different amino acids in the axial position. Geometrical parameters are reported and compared to experimental data, where available. Binding energies of the systems with oxygen are also reported and discussed.

  2. Influence of Ligand Architecture in Tuning Reaction Bifurcation Pathways for Chlorite Oxidation by Non-Heme Iron Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barman, Prasenjit; Faponle, Abayomi S; Vardhaman, Anil Kumar; Angelone, Davide; Löhr, Anna-Maria; Browne, Wesley R; Comba, Peter; Sastri, Chivukula V; de Visser, Sam P

    2016-01-01

    Reaction bifurcation processes are often encountered in the oxidation of substrates by enzymes and generally lead to a mixture of products. One particular bifurcation process that is common in biology relates to electron transfer versus oxygen atom transfer by high-valent iron(IV)-oxo complexes,

  3. Bio-inspired iron and manganese complexes derived from mixed N,O ligands for the oxidation of olefins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moelands, M.A.H.

    2014-01-01

    This Thesis describes the synthesis and structural analysis of bio-inspired iron and manganese complexes used for the catalytic oxidation of olefin substrates. The development of catalytic systems for oxidation chemistry that are based on first row transition metals and that apply a green oxidant

  4. Synthesis and reactivity of iron complexes with a new pyrazine-based pincer ligand, and application in catalytic low-pressure hydrogenation of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivada-Wheelaghan, Orestes; Dauth, Alexander; Leitus, Gregory; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Milstein, David

    2015-05-04

    A novel pincer ligand based on the pyrazine backbone (PNzP) has been synthesized, (2,6-bis(di(tert-butyl)phosphinomethyl)pyrazine), tBu-PNzP. It reacts with FeBr2 to yield [Fe(Br)2(tBu-PNzP)], 1. Treatment of 1 with NaBH4 in MeCN/MeOH gives the hydride complex [Fe(H)(MeCN)2(tBu-PNzP)][X] (X = Br, BH4), 2·X. Counterion exchange and exposure to CO atmosphere yields the complex cis-[Fe(H)(CO)(MeCN)(tBu-PNzP)][BPh4] 4·BPh4, which upon addition of Bu4NCl forms [Fe(H)(Cl)(CO)(tBu-PNzP)] 5. Complex 5, under basic conditions, catalyzes the hydrogenation of CO2 to formate salts at low H2 pressure. Treatment of complex 5 with a base leads to aggregates, presumably of dearomatized species B, stabilized by bridging to another metal center by coordination of the nitrogen at the backbone of the pyrazine pincer ligand. Upon dissolution of compound B in EtOH the crystallographically characterized complex 7 is formed, comprised of six iron units forming a 6-membered ring. The dearomatized species can activate CO2 and H2 by metal-ligand cooperation (MLC), leading to complex 8, trans-[Fe(PNzPtBu-COO)(H)(CO)], and complex 9, trans-[Fe(H)2(CO)(tBu-PNzP)], respectively. Our results point at a very likely mechanism for CO2 hydrogenation involving MLC.

  5. Protein-ligand interfaces are polarized: discovery of a strong trend for intermolecular hydrogen bonds to favor donors on the protein side with implications for predicting and designing ligand complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschka, Sebastian; Wolf, Alex J.; Bemister-Buffington, Joseph; Kuhn, Leslie A.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding how proteins encode ligand specificity is fascinating and similar in importance to deciphering the genetic code. For protein-ligand recognition, the combination of an almost infinite variety of interfacial shapes and patterns of chemical groups makes the problem especially challenging. Here we analyze data across non-homologous proteins in complex with small biological ligands to address observations made in our inhibitor discovery projects: that proteins favor donating H-bonds to ligands and avoid using groups with both H-bond donor and acceptor capacity. The resulting clear and significant chemical group matching preferences elucidate the code for protein-native ligand binding, similar to the dominant patterns found in nucleic acid base-pairing. On average, 90% of the keto and carboxylate oxygens occurring in the biological ligands formed direct H-bonds to the protein. A two-fold preference was found for protein atoms to act as H-bond donors and ligand atoms to act as acceptors, and 76% of all intermolecular H-bonds involved an amine donor. Together, the tight chemical and geometric constraints associated with satisfying donor groups generate a hydrogen-bonding lock that can be matched only by ligands bearing the right acceptor-rich key. Measuring an index of H-bond preference based on the observed chemical trends proved sufficient to predict other protein-ligand complexes and can be used to guide molecular design. The resulting Hbind and Protein Recognition Index software packages are being made available for rigorously defining intermolecular H-bonds and measuring the extent to which H-bonding patterns in a given complex match the preference key.

  6. Directional Carrier Transfer in Strongly Coupled Binary Nanocrystal Superlattice Films Formed by Assembly and in Situ Ligand Exchange at a Liquid–Air Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yaoting; Li, Siming; Gogotsi, Natalie; Zhao, Tianshuo; Fleury, Blaise; Kagan, Cherie R.; Murray, Christopher B.; Baxter, Jason B.

    2017-02-16

    Two species of monodisperse nanocrystals (NCs) can self-assemble into a variety of complex 2D and 3D periodic structures, or binary NC superlattice (BNSL) films, based on the relative number and size of the NCs. BNSL films offer great promise for both fundamental scientific studies and optoelectronic applications; however, the utility of as-assembled structures has been limited by the insulating ligands that originate from the synthesis of NCs. Here we report the application of an in situ ligand exchange strategy at a liquid–air interface to replace the long synthesis ligands with short ligands while preserving the long-range order of BNSL films. This approach is demonstrated for BNSL structures consisting of PbSe NCs of different size combinations and ligands of interest for photovoltaic devices, infrared detectors, and light-emitting diodes. To confirm enhanced coupling introduced by ligand exchange, we show ultrafast (~1 ps) directional carrier transfer across the type-I heterojunction formed by NCs of different sizes within ligand-exchanged BNSL films. In conclusion, this approach shows the potential promise of functional BNSL films, where the local and long-range energy landscape and electronic coupling can be adjusted by tuning NC composition, size, and interparticle spacing.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of two novel trinuclear oxo-centered, of chromium and iron complexes containing unsaturated carboxylate bridging ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yazdanbakhsh

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Two novel oxo-centered trinuclear compounds, [M2M′O(C3H3O26(H¬2O 3]+ (M = Cr, M′ = Cr, Fe have been synthesized. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared and electronic spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. These complexes contain unsaturated carboxylate bridging ligands that cause them to have potential scopes for polymerization in the solid state by cross-linking of substituents. Bridging coordination modes for carboxylates were indicated by presence of asym (M2M'O vibrations in the infrared spectra.

  8. Antimicrobial and mutagenic activity of some carbono- and thiocarbonohydrazone ligands and their copper(II), iron(II) and zinc(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, A; Carcelli, M; Pelagatti, P; Pelizzi, C; Pelizzi, G; Zani, F

    1999-06-15

    Several mono- and bis- carbono- and thiocarbonohydrazone ligands have been synthesised and characterised; the X-ray diffraction analysis of bis(phenyl 2-pyridyl ketone) thiocarbonohydrazone is reported. The coordinating properties of the ligands have been studied towards Cu(II), Fe(II), and Zn(II) salts. The ligands and the metal complexes were tested in vitro against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, yeasts and moulds. In general, the bisthiocarbonohydrazones possess the best antimicrobial properties and Gram positive bacteria are the most sensitive microorganisms. Bis(ethyl 2-pyridyl ketone) thiocarbonohydrazone, bis(butyl 2-pyridyl ketone)thiocarbonohydrazone and Cu(H2nft)Cl2 (H2nft, bis(5-nitrofuraldehyde)thiocarbonohydrazone) reveal a strong activity with minimum inhibitory concentrations of 0.7 microgram ml-1 against Bacillus subtilis and of 3 micrograms ml-1 against Staphylococcus aureus. Cu(II) complexes are more effective than Fe(II) and Zn(II) ones. All bisthiocarbono- and carbonohydrazones are devoid of mutagenic properties, with the exception of the compounds derived from 5-nitrofuraldehyde. On the contrary a weak mutagenicity, that disappears in the copper complexes, is exhibited by monosubstituted thiocarbonohydrazones.

  9. Nonanuclear Spin-Crossover Complex Containing Iron(II) and Iron(III) Based on a 2,6-Bis(pyrazol-1-yl)pyridine Ligand Functionalized with a Carboxylate Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhervé, Alexandre; Recio-Carretero, María José; López-Jordà, Maurici; Clemente-Juan, Juan Modesto; Canet-Ferrer, Josep; Cantarero, Andrés; Clemente-León, Miguel; Coronado, Eugenio

    2016-09-19

    The synthesis and magnetostructural characterization of [Fe(III)3(μ3-O)(H2O)3[Fe(II)(bppCOOH)(bppCOO)]6](ClO4)13·(CH3)2CO)6·(solvate) (2) are reported. This compound is obtained as a secondary product during synthesis of the mononuclear complex [Fe(II)(bppCOOH)2](ClO4)2 (1). The single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure of 2 shows that it contains the nonanuclear cluster of the formula [Fe(III)3(μ3-O)(H2O)3[Fe(II)(bppCOOH)(bppCOO)]6](13+), which is formed by a central Fe(III)3O core coordinated to six partially deprotonated [Fe(II)(bppCOOH)(bppCOO)](+) complexes. Raman spectroscopy studies on single crystals of 1 and 2 have been performed to elucidate the spin and oxidation states of iron in 2. These studies and magnetic characterization indicate that most of the iron(II) complexes of 2 remain in the low-spin (LS) state and present a gradual and incomplete spin crossover above 300 K. On the other hand, the Fe(III) trimer shows the expected antiferromagnetic behavior. From the structural point of view, 2 represents the first example in which bppCOO(-) acts as a bridging ligand, thus forming a polynuclear magnetic complex.

  10. An Iron Complex with a Bent, O-Coordinated CO2Ligand Discovered by Femtosecond Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Steffen; Brünker, Paul; Lindner, Jörg; Vöhringer, Peter

    2018-03-06

    The activation of carbon dioxide by transition metals is widely recognized as a key step for utilizing this greenhouse gas as a renewable feedstock for the sustainable production of fine chemicals. However, the dynamics of CO 2 binding and unbinding to and from the ligand sphere of a metal have never been observed in the time domain. The ferrioxalate anion is used in aqueous solution as a unique model system for these dynamics and apply femtosecond UV-pump mid-infrared-probe spectroscopy to explore its photoinduced primary processes in a time-resolved fashion. Following optical excitation, a neutral CO 2 molecule is expelled from the complex within about 500 fs to generate a highly intriguing pentacoordinate ferrous dioxalate that carries a bent carbon dioxide radical anion ligand, that is, a reductively activated form of CO 2 , which is end-on-coordinated to the metal center by one of its two oxygen atoms. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Coordination studies of copper(II), cobalt(II) and iron(II) with isomeric pyridyl-tetrazole ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bond, A. D.; Fleming, A.; Gaire, J.

    2012-01-01

    (II) compounds. X-ray crystal structures were obtained for complexes 1-5. In each complex, ligands L2 and L3 coordinate to the metal centre through the pyridyl N atom and the 1-N site of the tetrazole ring, and the pyridyl-tetrazole ligand remains planar in all cases except 3. Complexes 1 and 2 comprise......The reaction of 2-(2H-tetrazol-5-yl)pyridine (L1) with 1,6-dibromohexane results in formation of the isomers 2-(6 ''-bromohexyl)-(1-tetrazol-5-yl)pyridine (12) and 2-(6 ''-bromohexyl)-(2-tetrazol-5-yl)pyridine (L3). Coordination reactions of 12 and 13 with CuCl2 center dot 2H(2)O, Co(SCN)(2) and Fe...... a central Cu2Cl2 dimeric core with Cu(II) in an essentially square-pyramidal coordination environment. Complexes 3 and 4 contain co(II) in a distorted octahedral coordination environment. In 3, the pyridyl and tetrazole rings of L2 are twisted with respect to each other and the complex adopts a puckered...

  12. Impact of ligand spacer and counter-anion in selected 1D iron(II) spin crossover coordination polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirtu, Marinela M.; Schmit, France; Naik, Anil D. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences (Belgium); Rotaru, Aurelian [' Stefan cel Mare' University, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Romania); Marchand-Brynaert, Jacqueline; Garcia, Yann, E-mail: yann.garcia@uclouvain.be [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences (Belgium)

    2012-03-15

    A new 1D coordination polymer [Fe({beta}Alatrz){sub 3}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} Bullet-Operator H{sub 2}O (1) with a neutral bidentate ligand, {beta}Alatrz = 4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl-propionate, was prepared and its magnetic behavior was investigated by temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements and {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of the high-spin molar fraction derived from {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy recorded on cooling below room temperature reveals a gradual single step transition with T{sub 1/2} = 173 K between high-spin and low-spin states in agreement with magnetic susceptibility measurements. 1 presents striking reversible thermochromism from white, at room temperature, to pink on quench cooling to liquid nitrogen. The phase transition is of first order as deduced from differential scanning calorimetry, with T{sub 1/2} matching the one determined by both SQUID and {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. A brief assessment has been made among closely related 1D coordination polymers to perceive the effect of ligand spacer length and anion effect on the spin crossover behavior of these new materials.

  13. Hydrogen bonding of sulfur ligands in blue copper and iron-sulfur proteins: detection by resonance raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mino, Y.; Loehr, T.M.; Wada, K.; Matsubara, H.; Sanders-Loehr, J.

    1987-12-15

    The resonance Raman spectrum of the blue copper protein azurin from Alcaligenes denitrificans exhibits nine vibrational modes between 330 and 460 cm/sup -1/, seven of which shift 0.4-3.0 cm/sup -1/ to lower energy after incubation of the protein in D/sub 2/O. These deuterium-dependent shifts have been previously ascribed to exchangeable protons on imidazole ligands or to exchangeable protons on amide groups which are hydrogen bonded to the cysteine thiolate ligands (a feature common to all blue copper proteins of known structure). In order to distinguish between these two possibilities, a systematic investigation of Fe/sub 2/S/sub 2/(Cys)/sub 4/-containing proteins was undertaken. Extensive hydrogen bonding between sulfur ligands and the polypeptide backbone had been observed in the crystal structure of ferredoxin from Spirulina platensis. The resonance Raman spectrum of this protein is typical of a chloroplast-type ferredoxin and exhibits deuterium-dependent shifts of -0.3 to -0.5 cm/sup -1/ in the Fe-S modes at 283, 367, and 394 cm/sup -1/ and -0.6 to -0.8 cm/sup -1/ in the Fe-S modes at 328 and 341 cm/sup -1/. Considerably greater deuterium sensitivity is observed in the Raman spectra of spinach ferredoxin and bovine adrenodoxin, particularly for the symmetric stretching vibration of the Fe/sub 2/S/sub 2/ moiety at approx. 390 cm/sup -1/. This feature decreases of 9.8 and 1.1 cm/sup -1/, respectively, for the two oxidized proteins in D/sub 2/O and by 1.8 cm/sup -1/ for reduced adrenodoxin in D/sub 2/O. These results suggest that the bridging sulfido groups may be more extensively hydrogen bonded in spinach ferredoxin and adrenodoxin than in S. platensis ferredoxin, with a further increase in hydrogen-bond strength in the reduced form of adrenodoxin.

  14. Method for Transformation of Weakly Magnetic Minerals (Hematite, Goethite into Strongly Magnetic Mineral (Magnetite to Improve the Efficiency of Technologies for Oxidized Iron Ores Benefication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponomarenko, O.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A new method for relatively simple transformation of weakly magnetic minerals (goethite (α-FeOOH and hematite (α-Fe2O3 into strongly magnetic mineral (magnetite (Fe3O4 was developed. It was shown, that transformation of structure and magnetic characteristics of go ethite and hematite are realized in the presence of starch at relatively low temperatures (in the range of 300—600 °С. Obtained results open up new possibilities for development of effective technologies for oxidized iron ore beneficiation.

  15. Unsymmetrical Chelation of N-Thioether-Functionalized Bis(diphenylphosphino)amine-Type Ligands and Substituent Effects on the Nuclearity of Iron(II) Complexes: Structures, Magnetism, and Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliedel, Christophe; Rosa, Vitor; Falceto, Andrés; Rosa, Patrick; Alvarez, Santiago; Braunstein, Pierre

    2015-07-06

    Starting from the short-bite ligands N-thioether-functionalized bis(diphenylphosphino)amine-type (Ph2P)2N(CH2)3SMe (1) and (Ph2P)2N(p-C6H4)SMe (2), the Fe(II) complexes [FeCl2(1)]n (3), [FeCl2(2)]2 (4), [Fe(OAc)(1)2]PF6 (5), and [Fe(OAc)(2)2]PF6 (6) were synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform IR, mass spectrometry, elemental analysis, and also by X-ray diffraction for 3, 4, and 6. Complex 3 is a coordination polymer in which 1 acts as a P,P-pseudochelate and a (P,P),S-bridge, whereas 4 has a chlorido-bridged dinuclear structure in which 2 acts only as a P,P-pseudochelate. Since these complexes were obtained under strictly similar synthetic and crystallization conditions, these unexpected differences were ascribed to the different spacer between the nitrogen atom and the −SMe group. In both compounds, one Fe–P bond was found to be unusually long, and a theoretical analysis was performed to unravel the electronic or steric reasons for this difference. Density functional theory calculations were performed for a set of complexes of general formula [FeCl2(SR2){R21PN(R2)P′R23}] (R = H, Me; R1, R2, and R3 = H, Me, Ph), to understand the reasons for the significant deviation of the iron coordination sphere away from tetrahedral as well as from trigonal bipyramidal and the varying degree of unsymmetry of the two Fe–P bonds involving pseudochelating PN(R)P ligands. Electronic factors nicely explain the observed structures, and steric reasons were further ruled out by the structural analysis in the solid-state of the bis-chelated complex 6, which displays usual and equivalent Fe–P bond lengths. Magnetic susceptibility studies were performed to examine how the structural differences between 3 and 4 would affect the interactions between the iron centers, and it was concluded that 3 behaves as an isolated high-spin Fe(II) mononuclear complex, while significant intra- and intermolecular ferromagnetic interactions were evidenced for 4 at low temperatures

  16. Insertion of Argos sequences into the B-loop of epidermal growth factor results in a low-affinity ligand with strong agonistic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Poll, M L; van Vugt, M J; Lenferink, A E; van Zoelen, E J

    1997-06-17

    Recently, it has been shown that the activation of the Drosophila EGF receptor (DER) by its natural ligand Spitz is inhibited by Argos [Schweitzer, R., et al. (1995) Nature 376, 699-702]. Argos and Spitz both have an EGF-like domain which in the case of Argos differs from that of Spitz and other EGF receptor agonists in that it has an extended B-loop of 20 amino acids instead of 10 amino acids which in addition contains an unusual cluster of charged residues. To investigate whether B-loop sequences are an important determinant for receptor activation and play a causal role in the antagonistic activity of Argos, three human (h)EGF mutants were constructed in which amino acids derived from the Argos B-loop were introduced. In one mutant (E3A4E/B10), replacement of four amino acids in the B-loop of hEGF (123, E24, D27, and K28) by the corresponding Argos residues neither altered the binding affinity of the growth factor for the hEGF receptor nor did it change its ability to induce a mitogenic response. Insertion of 2 additional Argos residues (E3A4E/B12) or extension of the B-loop by 10 amino acids (E3A4E/B20) resulted, however, in a significant loss of binding affinity. In spite of this, both E3A4E/B12 and E3A4E/B20 appeared to be strong agonists for the hEGF receptor with similar dose-response curves for mitogenic activity and MAPK activation as wild-type hEGF. These data show that several nonconservative substitutions in the hEGF B-loop are tolerated without affecting receptor binding or activation. Furthermore, they show that receptor binding and receptor signaling efficiency can be uncoupled which is a prerequisite for the development of receptor antagonists.

  17. Tunable and noncytotoxic PET/SPECT-MRI multimodality imaging probes using colloidally stable ligand-free superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, TH Nguyen; Lengkeek, Nigel A; Greguric, Ivan; Kim, Byung J; Pellegrini, Paul A; Bickley, Stephanie A; Tanudji, Marcel R; Jones, Stephen K; Hawkett, Brian S; Pham, Binh TT

    2017-01-01

    Physiologically stable multimodality imaging probes for positron emission tomography/single-photon emission computed tomography (PET/SPECT)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were synthesized using the superparamagnetic maghemite iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles (SPIONs). The SPIONs were sterically stabilized with a finely tuned mixture of diblock copolymers with either methoxypolyethylene glycol (MPEG) or primary amine NH2 end groups. The radioisotope for PET or SPECT imaging was incorporated with the SPIONs at high temperature. 57Co2+ ions with a long half-life of 270.9 days were used as a model for the radiotracer to study the kinetics of radiolabeling, characterization, and the stability of the radiolabeled SPIONs. Radioactive 67Ga3+ and Cu2+-labeled SPIONs were also produced successfully using the optimized conditions from the 57Co2+-labeling process. No free radioisotopes were detected in the aqueous phase for the radiolabeled SPIONs 1 week after dispersion in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). All labeled SPIONs were not only well dispersed and stable under physiological conditions but also noncytotoxic in vitro. The ability to design and produce physiologically stable radiolabeled magnetic nanoparticles with a finely controlled number of functionalizable end groups on the SPIONs enables the generation of a desirable and biologically compatible multimodality PET/SPECT-MRI agent on a single T2 contrast MRI probe. PMID:28184160

  18. Strong excitation of surface and bulk spin waves in yttrium iron garnet placed in a split ring resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Z. J.; Soh, W. T.; Ong, C. K.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) in a bilayer consisting of a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and platinum (Pt) loaded on a metamaterial split ring resonator (SRR). The system is excited by a microstrip feed line which generates both surface and bulk spin waves in the YIG. The spin waves subsequently undergo spin pumping from the YIG film to an adjacent Pt layer, and is converted into a charge current via the ISHE. It is found that the presence of the SRR causes a significant enhancement of the mangetic field near the resonance frequency of the SRR, resulting in a significant increase in the ISHE signal. Furthermore, the type of spin wave generated in the system can be controlled by changing the external applied magnetic field angle (θH ). When the external applied magnetic field is near parallel to the microstrip line (θH = 0 ), magnetostatic surface spin waves are predominantly excited. On the other hand, when the external applied magnetic field is perpendicular to the microstrip line (θH = π/2 ), backward volume magnetostatic spin waves are predominantly excited. Hence, it can be seen that the SRR structure is a promising method of achieving spin-charge conversion, which has many advantages over a coaxial probe.

  19. Thermal Conductivity of the Iron-Based Superconductor FeSe: Nodeless Gap with a Strong Two-Band Character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois-Hope, P; Chi, S; Bonn, D A; Liang, R; Hardy, W N; Wolf, T; Meingast, C; Doiron-Leyraud, N; Taillefer, Louis

    2016-08-26

    The thermal conductivity κ of the iron-based superconductor FeSe was measured at temperatures down to 75 mK in magnetic fields up to 17 T. In a zero magnetic field, the electronic residual linear term in the T=0  K limit, κ_{0}/T, is vanishingly small. The application of a magnetic field B causes an exponential increase in κ_{0}/T initially. Those two observations show that there are no zero-energy quasiparticles that carry heat and therefore no nodes in the superconducting gap of FeSe. The full field dependence of κ_{0}/T has the classic two-step shape of a two-band superconductor: a first rise at very low field, with a characteristic field B^{⋆}≪B_{c2}, and then a second rise up to the upper critical field B_{c2}. This shows that the superconducting gap is very small (but finite) on one of the pockets in the Fermi surface of FeSe. We estimate that the minimum value of the gap, Δ_{min}, is an order of magnitude smaller than the maximum value, Δ_{max}.

  20. Guest Induced Strong Cooperative One- and Two-Step Spin Transitions in Highly Porous Iron(II) Hofmann-Type Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro-López, Lucı A; Valverde-Muñoz, Francisco Javier; Seredyuk, Maksym; Muñoz, M Carmen; Haukka, Matti; Real, José Antonio

    2017-06-19

    The synthesis, crystal structure, magnetic, calorimetric, and Mössbauer studies of a series of new Hofmann-type spin crossover (SCO) metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is reported. The new SCO-MOFs arise from self-assembly of Fe II , bis(4-pyridyl)butadiyne (bpb), and [Ag(CN) 2 ] - or [M II (CN) 4 ] 2- (M II = Ni, Pd). Interpenetration of four identical 3D networks with α-Po topology are obtained for {Fe(bpb)[Ag I (CN) 2 ] 2 } due to the length of the rod-like bismonodentate bpb and [Ag(CN) 2 ] - ligands. The four networks are tightly packed and organized in two subsets orthogonally interpenetrated, while the networks in each subset display parallel interpenetration. This nonporous material undergoes a very incomplete SCO, which is rationalized from its intricate structure. In contrast, the single network Hofmann-type MOFs {Fe(bpb)[M II (CN) 4 ]}·nGuest (M II = Ni, Pd) feature enhanced porosity and display complete one-step or two-step cooperative SCO behaviors when the pores are filled with two molecules of nitrobenzene or naphthalene that interact strongly with the pyridyl and cyano moieties of the bpb ligands via π-π stacking. The lack of these guest molecules favors stabilization of the high-spin state in the whole range of temperatures. However, application of hydrostatic pressure induces one- and two-step SCO.

  1. Tunable and noncytotoxic PET/SPECT-MRI multimodality imaging probes using colloidally stable ligand-free superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham THN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available TH Nguyen Pham,1 Nigel A Lengkeek,2 Ivan Greguric,2 Byung J Kim,1 Paul A Pellegrini,2 Stephanie A Bickley,3 Marcel R Tanudji,3 Stephen K Jones,3 Brian S Hawkett,1 Binh TT Pham1 1Key Centre for Polymers and Colloids, School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, 2Radioisotopes and Radiotracers, NSTLI, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney, 3Sirtex Medical Limited, North Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Physiologically stable multimodality imaging probes for positron emission tomography/single-photon emission computed tomography (PET/SPECT-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were synthesized using the superparamagnetic maghemite iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (SPIONs. The SPIONs were sterically stabilized with a finely tuned mixture of diblock copolymers with either methoxypolyethylene glycol (MPEG or primary amine NH2 end groups. The radioisotope for PET or SPECT imaging was incorporated with the SPIONs at high temperature. 57Co2+ ions with a long half-life of 270.9 days were used as a model for the radiotracer to study the kinetics of radiolabeling, characterization, and the stability of the radiolabeled SPIONs. Radioactive 67Ga3+ and Cu2+-labeled SPIONs were also produced successfully using the optimized conditions from the 57Co2+-labeling process. No free radioisotopes were detected in the aqueous phase for the radiolabeled SPIONs 1 week after dispersion in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS. All labeled SPIONs were not only well dispersed and stable under physiological conditions but also noncytotoxic in vitro. The ability to design and produce physiologically stable radiolabeled magnetic nanoparticles with a finely controlled number of functionalizable end groups on the SPIONs enables the generation of a desirable and biologically compatible multimodality PET/SPECT-MRI agent on a single T2 contrast MRI probe. Keywords: magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography

  2. Synthesis and characterisation of iron, cobalt and gallium complexes wit the redox-active amide ligand systems pyridinocarboxiamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide; Synthese und Charakterisierung von Eisen-, Cobalt- und Galliumkomplexen mit den redoxaktiven Amidligandsystemen Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, U.

    2001-07-01

    The interactions of the redox-active ligand systems piridinocarboxamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide with the metals iron, cobalt and gallium were investigated. It was found that metal complexes with ligands of the pyridinocarboxamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide type can be redox-active in the sense of a ligand-centered reaction. This may provide a better understanding of natural catalysis mechanisms and redox processes. [German] In dieser Arbeit wurde die Wechselwirkung der redoxaktiven Ligandsysteme Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid mit den Metallen Eisen, Cobalt und Gallium untersucht. Es konnte gezeigt werden, dass Metallkomplexe mit Liganden vom Typ Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid auch im Sinne einer ligandzentrierten Reaktion redoxaktiv sein koennen. Dies kann dazu beitragen, Katalysemechanismen und Redoxprozesse in der Natur besser zu verstehen. (orig.)

  3. SUZAKU OBSERVATION OF STRONG FLUORESCENT IRON LINE EMISSION FROM THE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT V1647 ORI DURING ITS NEW X-RAY OUTBURST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Grosso, Nicolas; Kastner, Joel H.; Richmond, Michael; Weintraub, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The Suzaku X-ray satellite observed the young stellar object (YSO) V1647 Ori on 2008 October 8 during the new mass accretion outburst reported in 2008 August. During the 87 ks observation with a net exposure of 40 ks, V1647 Ori showed a high level of X-ray emission with a gradual decrease in flux by a factor of 5 and then displayed an abrupt flux increase by an order of magnitude. Such enhanced X-ray variability was also seen in XMM-Newton observations in 2004 and 2005 during the 2003-2005 outburst, but has rarely been observed for other YSOs. The spectrum clearly displays emission from Helium-like iron, which is a signature of hot plasma (kT ∼ 5 keV). It also shows a fluorescent iron Kα line with a remarkably large equivalent width (EW) of ∼600 eV. Such a large EW suggests that a part of the incident X-ray emission that irradiates the circumstellar material and/or the stellar surface is hidden from our line of sight. XMM-Newton spectra during the 2003-2005 outburst did not show a strong fluorescent iron Kα line, so that the structure of the circumstellar gas very close to the stellar core that absorbs and re-emits X-ray emission from the central object may have changed in between 2005 and 2008. This phenomenon may be related to changes in the infrared morphology of McNeil's nebula between 2004 and 2008.

  4. Hund Interaction, Spin-Orbit Coupling, and the Mechanism of Superconductivity in Strongly Hole-Doped Iron Pnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafek, Oskar; Chubukov, Andrey V.

    2017-02-01

    We present a novel mechanism of s -wave pairing in Fe-based superconductors. The mechanism involves holes near dx z/dy z pockets only and is applicable primarily to strongly hole doped materials. We argue that as long as the renormalized Hund's coupling J exceeds the renormalized interorbital Hubbard repulsion U', any finite spin-orbit coupling gives rise to s -wave superconductivity. This holds even at weak coupling and regardless of the strength of the intraorbital Hubbard repulsion U . The transition temperature grows as the hole density decreases. The pairing gaps are fourfold symmetric, but anisotropic, with the possibility of eight accidental nodes along the larger pocket. The resulting state is consistent with the experiments on KFe2 As2 .

  5. Synthesis and Ligand Non-Innocence of Thiolate-Ligated (N4S) Iron(II) and Nickel(II) Bis(imino)pyridine Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widger, Leland R.; Jiang, Yunbo; Siegler, Maxime; Kumar, Devesh; Latifi, Reza; de Visser, Sam P.; Jameson, Guy N.L.; Goldberg, David P.

    2013-01-01

    The known iron(II) complex [FeII(LN3S)(OTf)] (1) was used as starting material to prepare the new biomimetic (N4S(thiolate)) iron(II) complexes [FeII(LN3S)(py)](OTf) (2) and [FeII(LN3S)(DMAP)](OTf) (3), where LN3S is a tetradentate bis(imino)pyridine (BIP) derivative with a covalently tethered phenylthiolate donor. These complexes were characterized by X-ray crystallography, UV-vis, 1H NMR, and Mössbauer spectroscopy, as well as electrochemistry. A nickel(II) analogue, [NiII(LN3S)](BF4) (5), was also synthesized and characterized by structural and spectroscopic methods. Cyclic voltammetric studies showed 1 – 3 and 5 undergo a single reduction process with E1/2 between −0.9 to −1.2 V versus Fc+/Fc. Treatment of 3 with 0.5% Na/Hg amalgam gave the mono-reduced complex [Fe(LN3S)(DMAP)]0 (4), which was characterized by X-ray crystallography, UV-vis, EPR (g = [2.155, 2.057, 2.038]) and Mössbauer (δ = 0.33 mm s−1; ΔEQ = 2.04 mm s−1) spectroscopies. Computational methods (DFT) were employed to model complexes 3 – 5. The combined experimental and computational studies show that 1 – 3 are 5-coordinate, high-spin (S = 2) FeII complexes, whereas 4 is best described as a 5-coordinate, intermediate-spin (S = 1) FeII complex antiferromagnetically coupled to a ligand radical. This unique electronic configuration leads to an overall doublet spin (Stotal = ½) ground state. Complexes 2 and 3 are shown to react with O2 to give S-oxygenated products, as previously reported for 1. In contrast, the mono-reduced 4 appears to react with O2 to give a mixture of S- and Fe-oxygenates. The nickel(II) complex 5 does not react with O2, and even when the mono-reduced nickel complex is produced, it appears to undergo only outer-sphere oxidation with O2. PMID:23992096

  6. Heteroleptic and Homoleptic Iron(III Spin-Crossover Complexes; Effects of Ligand Substituents and Intermolecular Interactions between Co-Cation/Anion and the Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasinee Phonsri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The structural and magnetic properties of a range of new iron(III bis-tridentate Schiff base complexes are described with emphasis on how intermolecular structural interactions influence spin states and spin crossover (SCO in these d5 materials. Three pairs of complexes were investigated. The first pair are the neutral, heteroleptic complexes [Fe(3-OMe-SalEen(thsa] 1 and [Fe(3-MeOSalEen(3-EtOthsa] 2, where 3-R-HSalEen = (E-2-(((2-(ethylaminoethyliminomethyl-6-R-phenol and 3-R-H2thsa = thiosemicarbazone-3-R-salicylaldimine. They display spin transitions above room temperature. However, 2 shows incomplete and gradual change, while SCO in 1 is complete and more abrupt. Lower cooperativity in 2 is ascribed to the lack of π–π interactions, compared to 1. The second pair, cationic species [Fe(3-EtOSalEen2]NO3 3 and [Fe(3-EtOSalEen2]Cl 4 differ only in the counter-anion. They show partial SCO above room temperature with 3 displaying a sharp transition at 343 K. Weak hydrogen bonds from cation to Cl− probably lead to weaker cooperativity in 4. The last pair, CsH2O[Fe(3-MeO-thsa2] 5 and Cs(H2O2[Fe(5-NO2-thsa2] 6, are anionic homoleptic chelates that have different substituents on the salicylaldiminate rings of thsa2−. The Cs cations bond to O atoms of water and the ligands, in unusual ways thus forming attractive 1D and 3D networks in 5 and 6, respectively, and 5 remains HS (high spin at all temperatures while 6 remains LS (low spin. Comparisons are made to other literature examples of Cs salts of [Fe(5-R-thsa2]− (R = H and Br.

  7. Formation of carbonate pipes in the northern Okinawa Trough linked to strong sulfate exhaustion and iron supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaotong; Guo, Zixiao; Chen, Shun; Sun, Zhilei; Xu, Hengchao; Ta, Kaiwen; Zhang, Jianchao; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Jiwei; Du, Mengran

    2017-05-01

    The microbial anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), a key biogeochemical process that consumes substantial amounts of methane produced in seafloor sediments, can lead to the formation of carbonate deposits at or beneath the sea floor. Although Fe oxide-driven AOM has been identified in cold seep sediments, the exact mode by which it may influence the formation of carbonate deposits remains poorly understood. Here, we characterize the morphology, petrology and geochemistry of a methane-derived Fe-rich carbonate pipe in the northern Okinawa Trough (OT). We detect abundant authigenic pyrites, as well as widespread trace Fe, within microbial mat-like carbonate veins in the pipe. The in situ δ34S values of these pyrites range from -3.9 to 31.6‰ (VCDT), suggesting a strong consumption of seawater sulfate by sulfate-driven AOM at the bottom of sulfate reduction zone. The positive δ56Fe values of pyrite and notable enrichment of Fe in the OT pipe concurrently indicate that the pyrites are primarily derived from Fe oxides in deep sediments. We propose that the Fe-rich carbonate pipe formed at the bottom of sulfate reduction zone, below which Fe-driven AOM, rather than Fe-oxide reduction coupled to organic matter degradation, might be responsible for the abundantly available Fe2+ in the fluids from which pyrites precipitated. The Fe-rich carbonate pipe described in this study probably represents the first fossil example of carbonate deposits linked to Fe-driven AOM. Because Fe-rich carbonate deposits have also been found at other cold seeps worldwide, we infer that similar processes may play an essential role in biogeochemical cycling of sub-seafloor methane and Fe at continental margins.

  8. Oxidative degradation of the organometallic iron(II) complex [Fe{bis[3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-imidazol-1-yl]methane}(MeCN)(PMe3)](PF6)2: structure of the ligand decomposition product trapped via coordination to iron(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslinger, Stefan; Pöthig, Alexander; Cokoja, Mirza; Kühn, Fritz E

    2015-12-01

    Iron is of interest as a catalyst because of its established use in the Haber-Bosch process and because of its high abundance and low toxicity. Nitrogen-heterocyclic carbenes (NHC) are important ligands in homogeneous catalysis and iron-NHC complexes have attracted increasing attention in recent years but still face problems in terms of stability under oxidative conditions. The structure of the iron(II) complex [1,1'-bis(pyridin-2-yl)-2,2-bi(1H-imidazole)-κN(3)][3,3'-bis(pyridin-2-yl-κN)-1,1'-methanediylbi(1H-imidazol-2-yl-κC(2))](trimethylphosphane-κP)iron(II) bis(hexafluoridophosphate), [Fe(C17H14N6)(C16H12N6)(C3H9P)](PF6)2, features coordination by an organic decomposition product of a tetradentate NHC ligand in an axial position. The decomposition product, a C-C-coupled biimidazole, is trapped by coordination to still-intact iron(II) complexes. Insights into the structural features of the organic decomposition products might help to improve the stability of oxidation catalysts under harsh conditions.

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hemolysis, in this case, is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ...

  10. Overexpression of KIR inhibitory ligands (HLA-I) determines that immunosurveillance of myeloma depends on diverse and strong NK cell licensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, María V; Periago, Adela; Legaz, Isabel; Gimeno, Lourdes; Mrowiec, Anna; Montes-Barqueros, Natividad R; Campillo, José A; Bolarin, José M; Bernardo, María V; López-Álvarez, María R; González, Consuelo; García-Garay, María C; Muro, Manuel; Cabañas-Perianes, Valentin; Fuster, Jose L; García-Alonso, Ana M; Moraleda, José M; Álvarez-Lopez, María R; Minguela, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    Missing self recognition makes cancer sensitive to natural killer cell (NKc) reactivity. However, this model disregards the NKc licensing effect, which highly increases NKc reactivity through interactions of inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (iKIR) with their cognate HLA-I ligands. The influence of iKIR/HLA-ligand (HLA-C1/C2) licensing interactions on the susceptibility to and progression of plasma cell (PC) dyscrasias was evaluated in 164 Caucasian patients and 286 controls. Compared to controls, myeloma accumulates KIR2DL1 - L2 + L3 - genotypes (2.8% vs. 13.2%, p  < 0.01, OR = 5.29) and less diverse peripheral repertoires of NKc clones. Less diverse and weaker-affinity repertoires of iKIR2D/HLA-C licensing interactions increased myeloma susceptibility. Thus, the complete absence of conventional iKIR2D/HLA-C licensing interactions (KIR2DL1 - L2 + L3 - /C2C2, 2.56% vs. 0.35%; p < 0.05; OR = 15.014), single-KIR2DL3 + /C1 + (20.51% vs. 10.84%; p < 0.05; OR = 2.795) and single-KIR2DL2 + /C1 + (12.82% vs. 4.9%; p < 0.01; OR = 5.18) interactions were over-represented in myeloma, compared to controls. Additionally, KIR2DL1 - L2 + L3 - (20% vs. 83%, p < 0.00001) as well as KIR3DL1 - (23% vs. 82%, p < 0.00001) genotypes had a dramatic negative impact on the 3-y progression-free survival (PFS), particularly in patients with low-tumor burden. Remarkably, myeloma-PCs, compared to K562 and other hematological cancers, showed substantial over-expression of HLA-I ("increasing-self" instead of missing-self), including HLA-C, and mild expression of ligands for NKc activating receptors (aRec) CD112, CD155, ULBP-1 and MICA/B, which apparently renders myeloma-PCs susceptible to lysis mainly by licensed NKc. KIR2DL1 - L2 + L3 - /C2C2 patients (with no conventional iKIR2D/HLA-C licensing interactions) lyse K562 but barely lyse myeloma-PCs (4% vs. 15%; p < 0.05, compared to controls). These results support a model where immunosurveillance of no

  11. KIR-HLA profiling shows presence of higher frequencies of strong inhibitory KIR-ligands among prognostically poor risk AML patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Meixin; Linn, Yeh-Ching; Ren, Ee-Chee

    2016-02-01

    The expression and interaction between killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and HLA are known to be associated with pathogenesis of diseases, including hematological malignancies. Presence of B haplotype KIR in donors is associated with a lower relapse risk for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT). However, the association of KIR and HLA repertoire with disease development and other clinical features is not well studied for AML. In this study, 206 Chinese patients with AML were analyzed for their FAB subtypes, risk groups, and chemo-responsiveness to assess possible association with their KIR and HLA profile. The results revealed that a B-content score of 2 was significantly more prevalent in AML patients when compared to normal controls. Notably, there is also a differential frequency in the distribution of B haplotype KIR across distinct FAB subtypes, where the M3 subtype had significantly lower frequencies of B haplotype KIR compared to the M5 subtype (p KIR ligands HLA-C2 and HLA-Bw4-80I were present in significantly higher frequencies in the prognostically "poor" risk group compared to those with "favourable" risk (p KIR-HLA repertoire in the development and biological behavior of AML.

  12. Strong electron correlations in the normal state of the iron-based FeSe0.42Te0.58 superconductor observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, A; Ganin, A Y; Rozbicki, E; Bacsa, J; Meevasana, W; King, P D C; Caffio, M; Schaub, R; Margadonna, S; Prassides, K; Rosseinsky, M J; Baumberger, F

    2010-03-05

    We investigate the normal state of the "11" iron-based superconductor FeSe0.42Te0.58 by angle-resolved photoemission. Our data reveal a highly renormalized quasiparticle dispersion characteristic of a strongly correlated metal. We find sheet dependent effective carrier masses between approximately 3 and 16m{e} corresponding to a mass enhancement over band structure values of m{*}/m{band} approximately 6-20. This is nearly an order of magnitude higher than the renormalization reported previously for iron-arsenide superconductors of the "1111" and "122" families but fully consistent with the bulk specific heat.

  13. Tracking the picosecond deactivation dynamics of a photoexcited iron carbene complex by time-resolved X-ray scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leshchev, Denis; Harlang, Tobias C. B.; Fredin, Lisa A.

    2018-01-01

    Recent years have seen the development of new iron-centered N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes for solar energy applications. Compared to typical ligand systems, the NHC ligands provide Fe complexes with longer-lived metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) states. This increased lifetime......)pyridine) is a unique complex as it exhibits a short-lived MC state with a lifetime on the scale of a few hundreds of picoseconds. Hence, this complex allows for a detailed investigation, using 100 ps X-ray pulses from a synchrotron, of strong ligand field effects on the intermediate MC state in an NHC complex. Here...

  14. Characterization of Toll-like receptors in primary lung epithelial cells: strong impact of the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C on the regulation of Toll-like receptors, adaptor proteins and inflammatory response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weith Andreas

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial and viral exacerbations play a crucial role in a variety of lung diseases including COPD or asthma. Since the lung epithelium is a major source of various inflammatory mediators that affect the immune response, we analyzed the inflammatory reaction of primary lung epithelial cells to different microbial molecules that are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLR. Methods The effects of TLR ligands on primary small airway epithelial cells were analyzed in detail with respect to cytokine, chemokine and matrix metalloproteinase secretion. In addition, the regulation of the expression of TLRs and their adaptor proteins in small airway epithelial cells was investigated. Results Our data demonstrate that poly(I:C, a synthetic analog of viral dsRNA, mediated the strongest proinflammatory effects among the tested ligands, including an increased secretion of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, GM-CSF, GRO-α, TARC, MCP-1, MIP-3α, RANTES, IFN-β, IP-10 and ITAC as well as an increased release of MMP-1, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-13. Furthermore, our data show that poly(I:C as well as type-1 and type-2 cytokines have a pronounced effect on the expression of TLRs and molecules involved in TLR signaling in small airway epithelial cells. Poly(I:C induced an elevated expression of TLR1, TLR2 and TLR3 and increased the gene expression of the general TLR adaptor MyD88 and IRAK-2. Simultaneously, poly(I:C decreased the expression of TLR5, TLR6 and TOLLIP. Conclusion Poly(I:C, an analog of viral dsRNA and a TLR3 ligand, triggers a strong inflammatory response in small airway epithelial cells that is likely to contribute to viral exacerbations of pulmonary diseases like asthma or COPD. The pronounced effects of poly(I:C on the expression of Toll-like receptors and molecules involved in TLR signaling is assumed to influence the immune response of the lung epithelium to viral and bacterial infections. Likewise, the regulation of TLR expression by type

  15. Iron metabolism in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Drygalski, Annette; Adamson, John W

    2013-09-01

    Iron metabolism in man is a highly regulated process designed to provide iron for erythropoiesis, mitochondrial energy production, electron transport, and cell proliferation. The mechanisms of iron handling also protect cells from the deleterious effects of free iron, which can produce oxidative damage of membranes, proteins, and lipids. Over the past decade, several important molecules involved in iron homeostasis have been discovered, and their function has expanded our understanding of iron trafficking under normal and pathological conditions. Physiologic iron metabolism is strongly influenced by inflammation, which clinically leads to anemia. Although hepcidin, a small circulating peptide produced by the liver, has been found to be the key regulator of iron trafficking, molecular pathways of iron sensing that control iron metabolism and hepcidin production are still incompletely understood. With this review, we provide an overview of the current understanding of iron metabolism, the recently discovered regulators of iron trafficking, and a focus on the effects of inflammation on the process.

  16. Prospective Preliminary In Vitro Investigation of a Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Conjugated with Ligand CD80 and VEGF Antibody As a Targeted Drug Delivery System for the Induction of Cell Death in Rodent Osteosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marie Kay Kovach

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Target drug deliveries using nanotechnology are a novel consideration in the treatment of cancer. We present herein an in vitro mouse model for the preliminary investigation of the efficacy of an iron oxide nanoparticle complex conjugated to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF antibody and ligand cluster of differentiation 80 (CD80 for the purpose of eventual translational applications in the treatment of human osteosarcoma (OSA. The 35 nm diameter iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles are functionalized with an n-hydroxysuccinimide biocompatible coating and are conjugated on the surface to proteins VEGF antibody and ligand CD80. Combined, these proteins have the ability to target OSA cells and induce apoptosis. The proposed system was tested on a cancerous rodent osteoblast cell line (ATCCTMNPO CRL-2836 at four different concentrations (0.1, 1.0, 10.0, and 100.0 μg/mL of ligand CD80 alone, VEGF antibody alone, and a combination thereof (CD80+VEGF. Systems were implemented every 24 h over different sequential treatment timelines: 24, 48, and 72 h, to find the optimal protein concentration required for a reduction in cell proliferation. Results demonstrated that a combination of ligand CD80 and VEGF antibody was consistently most effective at reducing aberrant osteoblastic proliferation for both the 24- and 72-h timelines. At 48 h, however, an increase in cell proliferation was documented for the 0.1 and 1 μg/mL groups. For the 24- and 72-h tests, concentrations of 1.0 μg/mL of CD80+VEGF and 0.1 μg/mL of VEGF antibody were most effective. Concentrations of 10.0 and 100.0 μg/mL of CD80+VEGF reduced cell proliferation, but not as remarkably as the 1.0 μg/mL concentration. In addition, cell proliferation data showed that multiple treatments (72-h test induced cell death in the osteoblasts better than a single treatment. Future targeted drug delivery system research includes trials in OSA cell lines from greater phylum

  17. Spectroscopic approach in characterization of chromium(III), manganese(II), iron(III) and copper(II) complexes with a nitrogen donor tetradentate, 14-membered azamacrocyclic ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Gupta, Lokesh Kumar

    2005-07-01

    The complexes of Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II) were synthesized with the macrocyclic ligand i.e. 2,3,9,10-tetraketo-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane. The ligand was prepared by the [2 + 2] condensation reaction of diethyloxalate and 1,3-diamino propane. These complexes were found to have the general composition M(L)X 3 and M'(L)X 2 [where M = Mn(II) and Cu(II), M' = Cr(III) and Fe(III), L = ligand (N 4) and X = Cl -, NO 3-, 1/2SO 42- and [CH 3COO -]. The ligand and its transition metal complexes were characterized by the elemental analyses, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility, mass, IR, electronic, and EPR spectral studies. On the basis of IR, electronic and EPR spectral studies an octahedral geometry has been assigned for Cr(III), Mn(II) and Fe(III) and a tetragonal geometry for Cu(II) complexes.

  18. SU-8-Induced Strong Bonding of Polymer Ligands to Flexible Substrates via in Situ Cross-Linked Reaction for Improved Surface Metallization and Fast Fabrication of High-Quality Flexible Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mingjun; Guo, Qiuquan; Zhang, Tengyuan; Zhou, Shaolin; Yang, Jun

    2016-02-01

    On account of in situ cross-linked reaction of epoxy SU-8 with poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) and its strong reactive bonding ability with different pretreated substrates, we developed a simple universal one-step solution-based coating method for fast surface modification of various objects. Through this method, a layer of P4VP molecules with controllable thickness can be tethered tightly onto substrates with the assistance of SU-8. P4VP molecules possess a lot of pyridine ligands to immobilize transitional metal ions that can behave as the catalyst of electroless copper plating for surface metallization while functioning as the adhesion-promoting layer between the substrate and deposited metal. Attributed to interpenetrated entanglement of P4VP molecules and as-deposited metal, ultrathick (>7 μm) strongly adhesive high-quality copper layer can be formed on flexible substrates without any delamination. Then through laser printer to print toner mask, a variety of designed circuits can be easily fabricated on modified flexible PET substrate.

  19. Dinuclear bis-beta-diketonato ligand derivatives of iron(III) and copper(II) and use of the latter as components for the assembly of extended metallo-supramolecular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Jack K; Lindoy, Leonard F; McMurtrie, John C; Schilter, David

    2005-03-07

    A range of 1,3-aryl linked, bis-beta-diketone derivatives (LH2) has been employed to synthesise neutral bis(ligand), dinuclear complexes incorporating square-planar copper(II) and tris(ligand) dinuclear helical derivatives containing octahedral iron(III). The 1H NMR spectra of the free ligands contain singlet peaks at ca. 16.2 ppm, indicative of enolic protons, confirming that the (bis) enol tautomer is present in solution. An X-ray structure of a ligand from the series incorporating tert-butyl terminal substituents confirms that the same tautomer persists in the solid and that the relative orientation of the bis-beta-diketone fragments is such that the coordination vectors lie at approximately 120 degrees to each other. The planar, dinuclear copper complexes form 1 : 2 adducts with pyridine and 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine, confirmed by X-ray structures, that incorporate five-coordinate metal centres. Based on this behaviour, the prospect of linking copper centres in the dinuclear complexes using the difunctional heterocyclic bases, 4,4'-bipyridine, 4,4'-trans-azopyridine and pyrazine as co-ligands has been probed. However, 4,4'-bipyridine was observed to coordinate through only one of its heterocyclic nitrogen atoms in the solid state to form a 1 : 2 ([Cu2(L)2]: 4,4'-bipyridine) adduct, analogous to the structures obtained with the above mono-functional nitrogen bases. Nevertheless, an X-ray structure determination shows that the related difunctional base, 4,4'-trans-azopyridine, coordinates in a bridging fashion via both its heterocyclic nitrogen atoms on alternate sides of each planar [Cu2(L)2] unit to produce an infinite one dimensional metallo chain. In contrast, with pyrazine, a new neutral, discrete assembly of type [Cu4(L)4(pyrazine)2] is formed. The X-ray structure shows that two planar dinuclear complexes are linked by two pyrazine molecules in a sandwich arrangement such that the coordination environment of each copper ion is approximately square pyramidal

  20. Iron status and systemic inflammation, but not gut inflammation, strongly predict gender-specific concentrations of serum hepcidin in infants in rural kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeggi, T.; Moretti, D.; Kvalsvig, J.; Holding, P.A.; Tjalsma, H.; Kortman, G.A.M.; Joosten, I.; Mwangi, A.; Zimmermann, M.B.

    2013-01-01

    Hepcidin regulation by competing stimuli such as infection and iron deficiency has not been studied in infants and it's yet unknown whether hepcidin regulatory pathways are fully functional in infants. In this cross-sectional study including 339 Kenyan infants aged 6.0+/-1.1 months (mean+/-SD), we

  1. Effect of Chelate Ring Size in Iron(II) Isothiocyanato Complexes with Tetradentate Tripyridyl-alkylamine Ligands on Spin Crossover Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leibold, Michael; Kisslinger, Sandra; Heinemann, Frank W.

    2016-01-01

    -pyridylmethyl)amine, also abbreviated as tpa in the literature] we modified the ligand by increasing systematically the chelate ring sizes from 5 to 6 thus obtaining complexes [Fe(pmea)(NCS)2], [Fe(pmap)(NCS)2], and [Fe(tepa)(NCS)2] [pmea = N,N-bis[(2-pyridyl)methyl]-2-(2-pyridyl)ethylamine, pmap = N,N-bis[2...

  2. Analogies and surprising differences between recombinant nitric oxide synthase-like proteins from Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus anthracis in their interactions with l-arginine analogs and iron ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salard, Isabelle; Mercey, Emilie; Rekka, Eleni; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Nioche, Pierre; Mikula, Ivan; Martasek, Pavel; Raman, C S; Mansuy, Daniel

    2006-12-01

    Genome sequencing has recently shown the presence of genes coding for NO-synthase (NOS)-like proteins in bacteria. The roles of these proteins remain unclear. The interactions of a series of l-arginine (l-arg) analogs and iron ligands with two recombinant NOS-like proteins from Staphylococcus aureus (saNOS) and Bacillus anthracis (baNOS) have been studied by UV-visible spectroscopy. SaNOS and baNOS in their ferric native state, as well as their complexes with l-arg analogs and with various ligands, exhibit spectral characteristics highly similar to the corresponding complexes of heme-thiolate proteins such as cytochromes P450 and NOSs. However, saNOS greatly differs from baNOS at the level of three main properties: (i) native saNOS mainly exists under an hexacoordinated low-spin ferric state whereas native baNOS is mainly high-spin, (ii) the addition of tetrahydrobiopterin (H4B) or H4B analogs leads to an increase of the affinity of l-arg for saNOS but not for baNOS, and (iii) saNOS Fe(II), contrary to baNOS, binds relatively bulky ligands such as nitrosoalkanes and tert-butylisocyanide. Thus, saNOS exhibits properties very similar to those of the oxygenase domain of inducible NOS (iNOS(oxy)) not containing H4B, as expected for a NOSoxy-like protein that does not contain H4B. By contrast, the properties of baNOS which look like those of H4B-containing iNOS(oxy) are unexpected for a NOS-like protein not containing H4B. The origin of these surprising properties of baNOS remains to be determined.

  3. Molecular Structures, Vibrational Spectroscopy, and Normal-Mode Analysis of M(2)(C&tbd1;CR)(4)(PMe(3))(4) Dimetallatetraynes. Observation of Strongly Mixed Metal-Metal and Metal-Ligand Vibrational Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Kevin D.; Miskowski, Vincent M.; Vance, Michael A.; Dallinger, Richard F.; Wang, Louis C.; Geib, Steven J.; Hopkins, Michael D.

    1998-12-28

    on Mo(2)Cl(4)P(4), show that nu(a), nu(b), and nu(c) arise from modes of strongly mixed nu(Mo(2)), nu(MoC), and lambda(MoCC) character. The relative intensities of the resonance-Raman bands due to nu(a), nu(b), and nu(c) reflect, at least in part, their nu(M(2)) character. In contrast, the force field shows that mixing of nu(M(2)) and nu(C&tbd1;C) is negligible. The three-mode mixing is expected to be a general feature for quadruply bonded complexes with unsaturated ligands.

  4. Chemistry of Marine Ligands and Siderophores

    OpenAIRE

    Vraspir, Julia M.; Butler, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Marine microorganisms are presented with unique challenges to obtain essential metal ions required to survive and thrive in the ocean. The production of organic ligands to complex transition metal ions is one strategy to both facilitate uptake of specific metals, such as iron, and to mitigate the potential toxic effects of other metal ions, such as copper. A number of important trace metal ions are complexed by organic ligands in seawater, including iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, and cad...

  5. Chemistry of marine ligands and siderophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vraspir, Julia M; Butler, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Marine microorganisms are presented with unique challenges to obtain essential metal ions required to survive and thrive in the ocean. The production of organic ligands to complex transition metal ions is one strategy to both facilitate uptake of specific metals, such as iron, and to mitigate the potential toxic effects of other metal ions, such as copper. A number of important trace metal ions are complexed by organic ligands in seawater, including iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, and cadmium, thus defining the speciation of these metal ions in the ocean. In the case of iron, siderophores have been identified and structurally characterized. Siderophores are low molecular weight iron-binding ligands produced by marine bacteria. Although progress has been made toward the identity of in situ iron-binding ligands, few compounds have been identified that coordinate the other trace metals. Deciphering the chemical structures and production stimuli of naturally produced organic ligands and the organisms they come from is fundamental to understanding metal speciation and bioavailability. The current evidence for marine ligands, with an emphasis on siderophores, and discussion of the importance and implications of metal-binding ligands in controlling metal speciation and cycling within the world's oceans are presented.

  6. cis-Thioindigo (TI) - a new ligand with accessible radical anion and dianion states. Strong magnetic coupling in the {[TI-(μ2-O),(μ-O)]Cp*Cr}2 dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konarev, Dmitri V; Khasanov, Salavat S; Shestakov, Alexander F; Fatalov, Alexey M; Batov, Mikhail S; Otsuka, Akihiro; Yamochi, Hideki; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Lyubovskaya, Rimma N

    2017-10-24

    Reaction of decamethylchromocene (Cp* 2 Cr) with thioindigo (TI) yields a coordination complex {[TI-(μ 2 -O), (μ-O)]Cp*Cr} 2 ·C 6 H 14 (1) in which one Cp* ligand in Cp* 2 Cr is substituted by TI. TI adopts cis-conformation in 1 allowing the coordination of both carbonyl groups to chromium. Additionally, one oxygen atom of TI becomes a μ 2 -bridge for two chromium atoms to form {[TI-(μ 2 -O), (μ-O)]Cp*Cr} 2 dimers with a CrCr distance of 3.12 Å. According to magnetic data, diamagnetic TI 2- dianions and two Cr 3+ atoms with a high S = 3/2 spin state are present in a dimer allowing strong antiferromagnetic coupling between two Cr 3+ spins with an exchange interaction of -35.4 K and the decrease of molar magnetic susceptibility below 140 K. Paramagnetic TI˙ - radical anions with the S = 1/2 spin state have also been obtained and studied in crystalline {cryptand[2,2,2](Na + )}(TI˙ - ) (2) salt showing that both radical anion and dianion states are accessible for TI.

  7. Strong metal-metal coupling in mixed-valent intermediates [Cl(L)Ru(mu-tppz)Ru(L)Cl](+), L = beta-diketonato ligands, tppz=2,3,5,6-tetrakis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kundu, T.; Schweinfurth, D.; Sarkar, B.; Mondal, T. K.; Fiedler, Jan; Mobin, S. M.; Puranik, V. G.; Kaim, W.; Lahiri, G. K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 43 (2012), s. 13429-13440 ISSN 1477-9226 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400802 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : TRIDENTATE BRIDGING LIGAND * DENSITY-FUNCTIONAL THEORY * HYDRAZONE-BASED LIGAND S Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.806, year: 2012

  8. Simultaneous preconcentration and removal of iron, chromium, nickel with N,N'-etylenebis-(ethane sulfonamide) ligand on activated carbon in aqueous solution and determination by ICP-OES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacan, Mehmet Sayim; Aslantaş, Neslihan

    2008-07-15

    In this study, Fe, Cr and Ni have been preconcentrated and removed by using N,N'-ethylenebis (ethane sulfonamide), (ESEN) ligand on activated carbon (AC) in aqueous solution. For this purpose, complexes between these metals and ligands have been investigated and used in preconcentration and removal studies. Factors which have affected adsorption of metals on activated carbon have been optimized. Adsorbed metals have been preconcentrated 10-fold and determined by ICP-OES. Interferences of Ca, Mg and K to this process have been investigated. The proposed method has been applied to the tap water and Ankara Creek water in order to Fe, Cr, and Ni remediation and preconcentration. Determination of metals by ICP-OES has been checked with standard reference material (NIST 1643e). The proposed method provides the recoveries of 87%, 108% and 106% for Fe, Cr and Ni, respectively, in preconcentration. It also provides the removal of Fe, Cr and Ni by 93%, 100% and 100% removal from waters, respectively.

  9. Iron Coordination and Halogen-Bonding Assisted Iodosylbenzene Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegeberg, Christina; Poulsen de Sousa, David; McKenzie, Christine

    The iron complex of the hexadentate ligand N,N,N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylendiamine-N'-acetate (tpena) efficiently catalyzes selective oxidations of electron-rich olefins and sulfides by insoluble iodosylbenzene (PhIO). Surprisingly, these reactions are faster and more selective than homogenous...... catalytic mixtures using soluble terminal oxygen transfer agents. Isolation of a reactive iron-terminal oxidant adduct, an unique Fe(III)-OIPh complex, is facilitated by strong stabilizing supramolecular halogen-bonding. L3-edge XANES suggests +1.6 for the average oxidation state for the iodine atom3...... in the iron(III)-coordinated PhIO. This represents a reduction of iodine relative to the original “hypervalent” (+3) PhIO. The equivalent of electron density must be removed from the {(tpena)Fe(III)O} moiety, however Mössbauer spectroscopy shows that the iron atom is not high valent....

  10. Construction of iron-polymer-graphene nanocomposites with low nonspecific adsorption and strong quenching ability for competitive immunofluorescent detection of biomarkers in GM crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kaifei; Liu, Anran; Shangguan, Li; Mi, Li; Liu, Xu; Liu, Yuanjian; Zhao, Yuewu; Li, Ying; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin

    2017-04-15

    We developed a new immunofluorescent biosensor by utilizing a novel nanobody (Nb) and iron-polymer-graphene nanocomposites for sensitive detection of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Agrobacdterium tumefaciens strain CP4 (CP4-EPSPS), which considered as biomarkers of genetically modified (GM) crops. Specifically, we prepared iron doped polyacrylic hydrazide modified reduced graphene nanocomposites (Fe@RGO/PAH) by in-situ polymerization approach and subsequent a one-pot reaction with hydrazine. The resulting Fe@RGO/PAH nanocomposites displayed low nonspecific adsorption to analytes (11% quenching caused by nonspecific adsorption) due to electrostatic, energetic and steric effect of the nanocomposites. After Nb immobilizing, the as-prepared Fe@RGO/PAH/Nbs showed good selectivity and high quenching ability (92% quenching) in the presence of antigen (Ag) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) modified CdTe QDs (Ag/QDs@PEG), which is a nearly 4 fold than that of the unmodified GO in same condition. The high quenching ability of Fe@RGO/PAH/Nbs can be used for detection of CP4-EPSPS based on competitive immunoassay with a linearly proportional concentration range of 5-100ng/mL and a detection limit of 0.34ng/mL. The good stability, reproducibility and specificity of the resulting immunofluorescent biosensor are demonstrated and might open a new window for investigation of fluorescent sensing with numerous multifunctional graphene based materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Transition metal complexes with thiosemicarbazide-based ligands. Part 45. Synthesis, crystal and molecular structure of [2,6-diacetylpyridine bis(S-methylisothiosemicarbazonato]diazide-iron(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    REFIK FAZLIC

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available The template reaction of a warm methanolic solution of FeCl3.6H2O, S-methylisothiosemicarbazidehydroiodide and 2,6-diacetylpyridine in the presence of LiOAc and NaN3 yielded the high-spin complex [Fe(HL(N32], were HL is the monoanion of the ligand 2,6-diacetylpyridine bis(S-methylisothiosemicarbazone. X-Ray analysis of the complex showed its pentagonal-bipyramidal configuration, with pentadenate (N5 HL in the equatorial plane and two monodentate azide groups in the axial positions. Crystal data are: monoclinic, P21/c, a = 1.0263(2, b = 1.2525(2, c = 1.6660(3 nm, b = 98.94°, V = 2.1154 nm3, Z = 4, rx = 1.499 g cm-3, r0 = 1.48 g cm-3, F(000 = 984, m = 9.40 cm-3.

  12. Iron coordination chemistry with new ligands containing triazole and pyridine moieties. Comparison of the coordination ability of the N-donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ségaud, Nathalie; Rebilly, Jean-Noël; Sénéchal-David, Katell; Guillot, Régis; Billon, Laurianne; Baltaze, Jean-Pierre; Farjon, Jonathan; Reinaud, Olivia; Banse, Frédéric

    2013-01-18

    We report the synthesis, characterization, and solution chemistry of a series of new Fe(II) complexes based on the tetradentate ligand N-methyl-N,N'-bis(2-pyridyl-methyl)-1,2-diaminoethane or the pentadentate ones N,N',N'-tris(2-pyridyl-methyl)-1,2-diaminoethane and N,N',N'-tris(2-pyridyl-methyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, modified by propynyl or methoxyphenyltriazolyl groups on the amino functions. Six of these complexes are characterized by X-ray crystallography. In particular, two of them exhibit an hexadentate coordination environment around Fe(II) with two amino, three pyridyl, and one triazolyl groups. UV-visible and cyclic voltammetry experiments of acetonitrile solutions of the complexes allow to deduce accurately the structure of all Fe(II) species in equilibrium. The stability of the complexes could be ranked as follows: [L(5)Fe(II)-py](2+) > [L(5)Fe(II)-Cl](+) > [L(5)Fe(II)-triazolyl](2+) > [L(5)Fe(II)-(NCMe)](2+), where L(5) designates a pentadentate coordination sphere composed of the two amines of ethanediamine and three pyridines. For complexes based on propanediamine, the hierarchy determined is [L(5)Fe(II)-Cl](+) > [L(5)Fe(II)(OTf)](+) > [L(5)Fe(II)-(NCMe)](2+), and no ligand exchange could be evidenced for [L(5)Fe(II)-triazolyl](2+). Reactivity of the [L(5)Fe(II)-triazolyl](2+) complexes with hydrogen peroxide and PhIO is similar to the one of the parent complexes that lack this peculiar group, that is, generation of Fe(III)(OOH) and Fe(IV)(O), respectively. Accordingly, the ability of these complexes at catalyzing the oxidation of small organic molecules by these oxidants follows the tendencies of their previously reported counterparts. Noteworthy is the remarkable cyclooctene epoxidation activity by these complexes in the presence of PhIO.

  13. Nickel and iron pincer complexes as catalysts for the reduction of carbonyl compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sumit; Bhattacharya, Papri; Dai, Huiguang; Guan, Hairong

    2015-07-21

    The reductions of aldehydes, ketones, and esters to alcohols are important processes for the synthesis of chemicals that are vital to our daily life, and the reduction of CO2 to methanol is expected to provide key technology for carbon management and energy storage in our future. Catalysts that affect the reduction of carbonyl compounds often contain ruthenium, osmium, or other precious metals. The high and fluctuating price, and the limited availability of these metals, calls for efforts to develop catalysts based on more abundant and less expensive first-row transition metals, such as nickel and iron. The challenge, however, is to identify ligand systems that can increase the thermal stability of the catalysts, enhance their reactivity, and bypass the one-electron pathways that are commonly observed for first-row transition metal complexes. Although many other strategies exist, this Account describes how we have utilized pincer ligands along with other ancillary ligands to accomplish these goals. The bis(phosphinite)-based pincer ligands (also known as POCOP-pincer ligands) create well-defined nickel hydride complexes as efficient catalysts for the hydrosilylation of aldehydes and ketones and the hydroboration of CO2 to methanol derivatives. The hydride ligands in these complexes are substantially nucleophilic, largely due to the enhancement by the strongly trans-influencing aryl groups. Under the same principle, the pincer-ligated nickel cyanomethyl complexes exhibit remarkably high activity (turnover numbers up to 82,000) for catalytically activating acetonitrile and the addition of H-CH2CN across the C═O bonds of aldehydes without requiring a base additive. Cyclometalation of bis(phosphinite)-based pincer ligands with low-valent iron species "Fe(PR3)4" results in diamagnetic Fe(II) hydride complexes, which are active catalysts for the hydrosilylation of aldehydes and ketones. Mechanistic investigation suggests that the hydride ligand is not delivered to the

  14. Mixed ligand complexes of cobalt(III) and iron(III) containing N2O2-chelating Schiff base: Synthesis, characterisation, antimicrobial activity, antioxidant and DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Harun A. R.; Paul, Pradip C.; Mondal, Paritosh; Bhattacharjee, Chira R.

    2015-11-01

    Six mixed ligand complexes, namely, [Co(acac)L1] (1), [Fe(acac)L1] (2), [Co(acac)L2] (3), [Fe(acac)L2] (4), [Co(acac)L3] (5), and [Fe(acac)L3] (6) (H2L1 = NN/-bis(salicylidene)-trans 1,2 diaminocyclohexane, H2L2 = NN/-bis(salicylidene)-1,2 phenylenediamine, H2L3 = NN/-bis(salicylidene)-4-methyl-1,2-phenylenediamine) were synthesised and characterized using elemental analysis, IR spectra, UV-Vis spectra, mass spectra, magnetic susceptibility measurements, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis. The molar conductance measurement confirmed the non-electrolytic nature of the complexes in DMF solution. Antioxidant activity of the complexes was studied using the 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging method. Biological studies of the complexes have been carried out in vitro for antimicrobial activity against some selected gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. DFT calculations were performed using GAUSSIAN 09 program to ascertain the stable electronic structure, HOMO-LUMO energy gap, chemical hardness and dipole moment of the complexes.

  15. One-electron oxidation of iron(II)-imidazole and iron-(II)-bis[imidazol-2-yl]methane complexes: a pulse radiolysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, B.J.; Navaratnam, S.; Zhao, Z.; Chen, L.

    1994-01-01

    The radical anion, Br 2 .- , a strong one-electron oxidant, has been used to oxidise iron(II)-imidazole, Fe 11 -ImH, and iron(II)-bis(imidazol-2-yl)methane, Fe 11 -2-BIM, complexes in aqueous solution, the latter being regarded as good models of the iron(II) site in non-haem iron-containing enzymes such as lipoxygenase. The rates of oxidation of Fe 11 -ImH, Fe 11 (ImH) 2 , Fe-2-BIM and Fe 11 (2-BIM) 2 were measured as 1.0 x 10 7 , 2.0 x 10 7 , 1.8 x 10 8 and 3.6 x 10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . From measurements of the rates of oxidation of the ligand, it is clear that Br 2 .- oxidises the ligand in the metal complexes in the first instance. The same studies also show that the 2-BIM ligand is easier to oxidise than the closely related imidazole ligand by a factor of 10. Measurements of the rate of oxidation of 2-methylimidazole indicate that the difference is attributable to the inductive effect of the -CH 2 -group. (author)

  16. Electronic, Magnetic, and Redox Properties and O2Reactivity of Iron(II) and Nickel(II) o-Semiquinonate Complexes of a Tris(thioether) Ligand: Uncovering the Intradiol Cleaving Reactivity of an Iron(II) o-Semiquinonate Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Killian, Michelle M; Saber, Mohamed R; Qiu, Tian; Yap, Glenn P A; Popescu, Codrina V; Rosenthal, Joel; Dunbar, Kim R; Brunold, Thomas C; Riordan, Charles G

    2017-09-05

    The iron(II) semiquinonate character within the iron(III) catecholate species has been proposed by numerous studies to account for the O 2 reactivity of intradiol catechol dioxygenases, but a well-characterized iron(II) semiquinonate species that exhibits intradiol cleaving reactivity has not yet been reported. In this study, a detailed electronic structure description of the first iron(II) o-semiquinonate complex, [PhTt tBu ]Fe(phenSQ) [PhTt tBu = phenyltris(tert-butylthiomethyl)borate; phenSQ = 9,10-phenanthrenesemiquinonate; Wang et al. Chem. Commun. 2014, 50, 5871-5873], was generated through a combination of electronic and Mössbauer spectroscopies, SQUID magnetometry, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. [PhTt tBu ]Fe(phenSQ) reacts with O 2 to generate an intradiol cleavage product, diphenic anhydride, in 16% yield. To assess the dependence of the intradiol reactivity on the identity of the metal ion, the nickel analogue, [PhTt tBu ]Ni(phenSQ), and its derivative, [PhTt tBu ]Ni(3,5-DBSQ) (3,5-DBSQ = 3,5-di-tert-butyl-1,2-semiquinonate), were prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography, mass spectrometry, 1 H NMR and electronic spectroscopies, and SQUID magnetometry. DFT calculations, evaluated on the basis of the experimental data, support the electronic structure descriptions of [PhTt tBu ]Ni(phenSQ) and [PhTt tBu ]Ni(3,5-DBSQ) as high-spin nickel(II) complexes with antiferromagnetically coupled semiquinonate ligands. Unlike its iron counterpart, [PhTt tBu ]Ni(phenSQ) decomposes slowly in an O 2 atmosphere to generate 14% phenanthrenequinone with a negligible amount of diphenic anhydride. [PhTt tBu ]Ni(3,5-DBSQ) does not react with O 2 . This dramatic effect of the metal-ion identity supports the hypothesis that a metal(III) alkylperoxo species serves as an intermediate in the intradiol cleaving reactions. The redox properties of all three complexes were probed using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry, which indicate

  17. Sedimentary and mineral dust sources of dissolved iron to the world ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Moore

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of a global compilation of dissolved-iron observations provides insights into the processes controlling iron distributions and some constraints for ocean biogeochemical models. The distribution of dissolved iron appears consistent with the conceptual model developed for Th isotopes, whereby particle scavenging is a two-step process of scavenging mainly by colloidal and small particulates, followed by aggregation and removal on larger sinking particles. Much of the dissolved iron (<0.4 μm is present as small colloids (>~0.02 μm and, thus, is subject to aggregation and scavenging removal. This implies distinct scavenging regimes for dissolved iron consistent with the observations: 1 a high scavenging regime – where dissolved-iron concentrations exceed the concentrations of strongly binding organic ligands; and 2 a moderate scavenging regime – where dissolved iron is bound to both colloidal and soluble ligands. Within the moderate scavenging regime, biological uptake and particle scavenging decrease surface iron concentrations to low levels (<0.2 nM over a wide range of low to moderate iron input levels. Removal rates are also highly nonlinear in areas with higher iron inputs. Thus, observed surface-iron concentrations exhibit a bi-modal distribution and are a poor proxy for iron input rates. Our results suggest that there is substantial removal of dissolved iron from subsurface waters (where iron concentrations are often well below 0.6 nM, most likely due to aggregation and removal on sinking particles of Fe bound to organic colloids.

    We use the observational database to improve simulation of the iron cycle within a global-scale, Biogeochemical Elemental Cycling (BEC ocean model. Modifications to the model include: 1 an improved particle scavenging parameterization, based on the sinking mass flux of particulate organic material, biogenic silica, calcium carbonate, and mineral dust particles; 2 desorption of dissolved iron

  18. Mechanistic Study of Monodisperse Iron Oxide Nanocrystals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To gain better insight into the formation of iron oxide nanocrystals from the solution phase thermal decomposition of iron (III) oleate complex, different reaction conditions including time, heating ramp, as well as concentrations of iron oleate precursor and oleic acid ligand were systematically varied and the resulting ...

  19. Iron Chelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Menu Donate Treatments Therapies Iron Chelation Iron chelation therapy is the main treatment ... have iron overload and need treatment. What is iron overload? Iron chelation therapy is used when you ...

  20. Voltammetric Investigation Of Hydrothermal Iron Speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte eKleint

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal vent fluids are highly enriched in iron (Fe compared to ambient seawater, and organic ligands may play a role in facilitating the transport of some hydrothermal Fe into the open ocean. This is important since Fe is a limiting micronutrient for primary production in large parts of the world`s surface ocean. We have investigated the concentration and speciation of Fe in several vent fluid and plume samples from the Nifonea vent field, Coriolis Troughs, New Hebrides Island Arc, South Pacific Ocean using competitive ligand exchange - adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE - AdCSV with salicylaldoxime (SA as the artificial ligand. Our results for total dissolved Fe (dFe in the buoyant hydrothermal plume samples showed concentrations up to 3.86 µM dFe with only a small fraction between 1.1% and 11.8% being chemically labile. Iron binding ligand concentrations ([L] were found in µM level with strong conditional stability constants up to log K[L],Fe3+ of 22.9. Within the non-buoyant hydrothermal plume above the Nifonea vent field, up to 84.7% of the available Fe is chemically labile and [L] concentrations up to 97 nM were measured. [L] was consistently in excess of Felab, indicating that all available Fe is being complexed, which in combination with high Felab values in the non-buoyant plume, signifies that a high fraction of hydrothermal dFe is potentially being transported away from the plume into the surrounding waters, contributing to the global oceanic Fe budget.

  1. Evaluation of immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry for recovery and identification of copper(II-binding ligands in seawater using the model ligand 8-hydroxyquinoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L Nixon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Complexation by organic ligands dominates the speciation of iron (Fe, copper (Cu, and other bioactive trace metals in seawater, controlling their bioavailability and distribution in the marine environment. Several classes of high-affinity Fe-binding ligands (siderophores have been identified in seawater but the chemical structures of marine Cu-complexing ligands remain unknown. Immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC allows Cu ligands to be isolated from bulk dissolved organic matter (DOM in seawater and separated into fractions which can be characterized independently using electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques. Attempts have been made to combine IMAC with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS to characterize marine Cu ligands, but results have proven inconclusive due to the lack of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS data to confirm ligand recovery. We used 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ, a well-characterized model ligand that forms strong 1:2 metal:ligand complexes with Cu2+ at pH 8 (log β2 = 18.3, to evaluate Cu(II-IMAC and ESI-MS/MS for recovery and identification of copper(II-complexing ligands in seawater. One-litre samples of 0.45µm-filtered surface seawater were spiked with 8-HQ at low concentrations (up to 100 nM and fractionated by IMAC. Fractions eluted with acidified artificial seawater were desalted and re-suspended in methanol via solid-phase extraction (SPE to obtain extracts suitable for ESI-MS analysis. Recovery of 8-HQ by Cu(II-IMAC was confirmed unambiguously by MS/MS and found to average 81% based upon accurate quantitation via multiple reaction monitoring (MRM. Cu(II-IMAC fractionation of unspiked seawater using multiple UV detection wavelengths suggests an optimal fraction size of 2 mL for isolating and analyzing Cu ligands with similar properties.

  2. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Iron Preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Burckhardt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard approaches are not appropriate when assessing pharmacokinetics of iron supplements due to the ubiquity of endogenous iron, its compartmentalized sites of action, and the complexity of the iron metabolism. The primary site of action of iron is the erythrocyte, and, in contrast to conventional drugs, no drug-receptor interaction takes place. Notably, the process of erythropoiesis, i.e., formation of new erythrocytes, takes 3−4 weeks. Accordingly, serum iron concentration and area under the curve (AUC are clinically irrelevant for assessing iron utilization. Iron can be administered intravenously in the form of polynuclear iron(III-hydroxide complexes with carbohydrate ligands or orally as iron(II (ferrous salts or iron(III (ferric complexes. Several approaches have been employed to study the pharmacodynamics of iron after oral administration. Quantification of iron uptake from radiolabeled preparations by the whole body or the erythrocytes is optimal, but alternatively total iron transfer can be calculated based on known elimination rates and the intrinsic reactivity of individual preparations. Degradation kinetics, and thus the safety, of parenteral iron preparations are directly related to the molecular weight and the stability of the complex. High oral iron doses or rapid release of iron from intravenous iron preparations can saturate the iron transport system, resulting in oxidative stress with adverse clinical and subclinical consequences. Appropriate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics analyses will greatly assist our understanding of the likely contribution of novel preparations to the management of anemia.

  3. Iron and cobalt complexes with thiacarborane ligands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perelakin, D.S.; Glukhov, I.V.; Holub, Josef; Císařová, I.; Štíbr, Bohumil; Kudinov, AR.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 20 (2008), s. 5273-5278 ISSN 0276-7333 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC523; GA ČR GA203/05/2646 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : metallathiaborane cluster * structural characterizations * molecular structure Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.815, year: 2008

  4. Toxicological studies and antimicrobial properties of some Iron(III ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two iron(III) complexes of Ciprofloxacin were synthesized by reaction of the ligand with iron(III) chloride hexahydrate in different solutions. The nature of bonding of the ligands and the structure of the isolated metal complexes were elucidated on the basis of their physical and spectroscopic studies. The infrared spectra ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... Treatment will explain treatment-related complications or side effects. Diagnosis Iron-deficiency anemia may be detected during ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... people who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a strong urge to move the legs. This urge to move often occurs with strange ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) ...

  8. A versatile dinucleating ligand containing sulfonamide groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundberg, Jonas; Witt, Hannes; Cameron, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Copper, iron, and gallium coordination chemistries of the new pentadentate bis-sulfonamide ligand 2,6-bis(N-2-pyridylmethylsulfonamido)-4-methylphenol (psmpH3) were investigated. PsmpH3 is capable of varying degrees of deprotonation, and notably, complexes containing the fully trideprotonated...

  9. Ligand photo-isomerization triggers conformational changes in iGluR2 ligand binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tino Wolter

    Full Text Available Neurological glutamate receptors bind a variety of artificial ligands, both agonistic and antagonistic, in addition to glutamate. Studying their small molecule binding properties increases our understanding of the central nervous system and a variety of associated pathologies. The large, oligomeric multidomain membrane protein contains a large and flexible ligand binding domains which undergoes large conformational changes upon binding different ligands. A recent application of glutamate receptors is their activation or inhibition via photo-switchable ligands, making them key systems in the emerging field of optochemical genetics. In this work, we present a theoretical study on the binding mode and complex stability of a novel photo-switchable ligand, ATA-3, which reversibly binds to glutamate receptors ligand binding domains (LBDs. We propose two possible binding modes for this ligand based on flexible ligand docking calculations and show one of them to be analogues to the binding mode of a similar ligand, 2-BnTetAMPA. In long MD simulations, it was observed that transitions between both binding poses involve breaking and reforming the T686-E402 protein hydrogen bond. Simulating the ligand photo-isomerization process shows that the two possible configurations of the ligand azo-group have markedly different complex stabilities and equilibrium binding modes. A strong but slow protein response is observed after ligand configuration changes. This provides a microscopic foundation for the observed difference in ligand activity upon light-switching.

  10. Spin-crossover behavior of polymeric iron(III) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Yonezo; Miyamoto, Makoto; Takashima, Yoshimasa; Oshio, Hiroaki

    1989-01-01

    Polymeric spin-crossover iron(III) complexes possessing poly(4-vinylpyridine), poly(N-vinylimidazole) or poly(octylmethacrylate-co-4-vinylpyridine) as ligand are prepared. In this experience enriched 57 Fe was used to get strong Moessbauer absorption. The enriched behavior of the complexes were examined by magnetic susceptibilities measurement, and Moessbauer and esr spectroscopies. Some of them show spin-state behavior over a wide range of temperature. Some of them show rapid spin-state interexchange compared to the Moessbauer time scale and others not. Spin-crossover behavior of polymeric complexes is characterized of wide spin-state transition temperature range

  11. copper(I) and copper(II) complexes with tridentate ligands

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Tridendate ligands with nitrogen centers, generally well-known as the tripod ligands, have been of considerable interest to inorganic chemists dealing with the preparation of model compounds for hemocyanin, tyrosinase etc. We have found that such ligands when complexed with iron(II) and copper(II) and copper(I) ions ...

  12. Metal ion binding to iron oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.; Benedetti, M.F.; Ponthieu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to

  13. Accelerated dissolution of iron oxides in ice

    OpenAIRE

    D. Jeong; K. Kim; W. Choi

    2012-01-01

    Iron dissolution from mineral dusts and soil particles is vital as a source of bioavailable iron in various environmental media. In this work, the dissolution of iron oxide particles trapped in ice was investigated as a~new pathway of iron supply. The dissolution experiments were carried out in the absence and presence of various organic complexing ligands under dark condition. In acidic pH conditions (pH 2, 3, and 4), the dissolution of iron oxides was greatly enhanced in the ice phas...

  14. Iron Sulfur Proteins and their Synthetic Analogues: Structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    group of non-heme iron-sulfur (Fe-S) compounds are involved in ... The sulfur ligands are arranged tetrahedrally about the iron atoms. The presence of inorganic sulfur is indicated through the release of. H. 2. S gas when these proteins are treated with a ... analysis of this structure and the tri-iron cluster was corrected as.

  15. Soluble and colloidal iron in the oligotrophic North Atlantic and North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J; Boyle, E; Sunda, W; Wen, L S

    2001-08-03

    In the oligotrophic North Atlantic and North Pacific, ultrafiltration studies show that concentrations of soluble iron and soluble iron-binding organic ligands are much lower than previously presumed "dissolved" concentrations, which were operationally defined as that passing through a 0.4-micrometer pore filter. Our studies indicate that substantial portions of the previously presumed "dissolved" iron (and probably also iron-binding ligands) are present in colloidal size range. The soluble iron and iron-binding organic ligands are depleted at the surface and enriched at depth, similar to distributions of major nutrients. By contrast, colloidal iron shows a maximum at the surface and a minimum in the upper nutricline. Our results suggest that "dissolved" iron may be less bioavailable to phytoplankton than previously thought and that iron removal through colloid aggregation and settling should be considered in models of the oceanic iron cycle.

  16. Absorption mechanisms for cationic and anionic mineral species on ferric iron polymer hydroxides and oxidation products of ferrous iron in aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandon, Remi

    1982-01-01

    Adsorbents obtained by hydrolysing the Fe 3+ , 6H 2 O ion are made of polymers with aquo (H 2 O), hydroxo (-OH...) and oxo (...O...) ligands. Radioactive tracers reveal the importance of chemical mechanisms in adsorption phenomena on ferric oxide in aqueous media. Zn 2+ , Co 2+ and Mn 2+ cations are exchanged with hydrogen from hydroxo groups. CrO 4 2- , SeO 3 2- and Sb(OH) 6 - anions form covalent associations in place of iron ligands. The adsorption of hydrolyzed ions results in strong oxygen bridge bonds. In fresh water, Co and Mn participate alone in physical electrostatic adsorption. Iron II oxidation products generate chemical adsorptions. Zn 2+ and Sb(OH) 6 - associate with ferric hydroxides from oxidized Fe 2+ . 60 Co, 54 Mn and 51 Cr form covalent associations between unpaired 3d iron electrons and the adsorbed element. This process is not predominant with selenium IV or VI reduced to the metallic state or fixed on ferric hydroxide in the selenite form. These conclusions can be applied to pollutant analysis and to water purification and contribute to our understanding of the role of iron in the distribution of oligo-elements in aqueous media. (author) [fr

  17. Carbon monoxide and cyanide as intrinsic ligands to iron in the active site of [NiFe]-hydrogenases. NiFe(CN)2CO, biology's way to activate H2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, A.J.; Roseboom, W.; Happe, R.P.; Bagley, K.A.; Albracht, S.P.J.

    1999-01-01

    Infrared-spectroscopic studies on the [NiFe]-hydrogenase of Chromatium vinosum-enriched in 15N or 13C, as well as chemical analyses, show that this enzyme contains three non-exchangeable, intrinsic, diatomic molecules as ligands to the active site, one carbon monoxide molecule and two cyanide

  18. Exploiting ligand-protein conjugates to monitor ligand-receptor interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohito Haruki

    Full Text Available We introduce three assays for analyzing ligand-receptor interactions based on the specific conjugation of ligands to SNAP-tag fusion proteins. Conjugation of ligands to different SNAP-tag fusions permits the validation of suspected interactions in cell extracts and fixed cells as well as the establishment of high-throughput assays. The different assays allow the analysis of strong and weak interactions. Conversion of ligands into SNAP-tag substrates thus provides access to a powerful toolbox for the analysis of their interactions with proteins.

  19. Li+-ligand binding energies and the effect of ligand fluorination on the binding energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2018-02-01

    The Li+-ligand binding energies are computed for seven ligands and their perfluoro analogs using Density Functional Theory. The bonding is mostly electrostatic in origin. Thus the size of the binding energy tends to correlate with the ligand dipole moment, however, the charge-induced dipole contribution can be sufficiently large to affect the dipole-binding energy correlation. The perfluoro species are significantly less strongly bound than their parents, because the electron withdrawing power of the fluorine reduces the ligand dipole moment.

  20. Major deviations of iron complexation during 22 days of a mesoscale iron enrichment in the open Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boye, Marie; Nishioka, Jun; Croot, Peter L.; Laan, Patrick; Timmermans, Klaas R.; Baar, Hein J.W. de

    2005-01-01

    The speciation of strongly chelated iron during the 22-day course of an iron enrichment experiment in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean deviates strongly from ambient natural waters. Three iron additions (ferrous sulfate solution) were conducted, resulting in elevated dissolved iron

  1. Water oxidation catalyzed by molecular di- and nonanuclear Fe complexes: importance of a proper ligand framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Biswanath; Lee, Bao-Lin; Karlsson, Erik A; Åkermark, Torbjörn; Shatskiy, Andrey; Demeshko, Serhiy; Liao, Rong-Zhen; Laine, Tanja M; Haukka, Matti; Zeglio, Erica; Abdel-Magied, Ahmed F; Siegbahn, Per E M; Meyer, Franc; Kärkäs, Markus D; Johnston, Eric V; Nordlander, Ebbe; Åkermark, Björn

    2016-09-14

    The synthesis of two molecular iron complexes, a dinuclear iron(iii,iii) complex and a nonanuclear iron complex, based on the dinucleating ligand 2,2'-(2-hydroxy-5-methyl-1,3-phenylene)bis(1H-benzo[d]imidazole-4-carboxylic acid) is described. The two iron complexes were found to drive the oxidation of water by the one-electron oxidant [Ru(bpy)3](3+).

  2. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    , a situation unique in the Solar System. In such a world, iron metal is unstable and, as we all know, oxidizes to the ferric iron compounds we call 'rust'. If we require iron metal it must be produced at high temperatures by reacting iron ore, usually a mixture of ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) oxides (Fe2O3......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost...... unique examples of iron metal, otherwise called 'native iron' or 'telluric iron', occur naturally....

  3. Ligand Exchange Kinetics of Environmentally Relevant Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panasci, Adele Frances [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    The interactions of ground water with minerals and contaminants are of broad interest for geochemists but are not well understood. Experiments on the molecular scale can determine reaction parameters (i.e. rates of ligand exchange, activation entropy, activation entropy, and activation volume) that can be used in computations to gain insight into reactions that occur in natural groundwaters. Experiments to determine the rate of isotopic ligand exchange for three environmentally relevant metals, rhodium (Rh), iron (Fe), and neptunium (Np), are described. Many environmental transformations of metals (e.g. reduction) in soil occur at trivalent centers, Fe(III) in particular. Contaminant ions absorb to mineral surfaces via ligand exchange, and the reversal of this reaction can be dangerous, releasing contaminants into the environment. Ferric iron is difficult to study spectroscopically because most of its complexes are paramagnetic and are generally reactive toward ligand exchange; therefore, Rh(III), which is diamagnetic and less reactive, was used to study substitution reactions that are analogous to those that occur on mineral oxide surfaces. Studies on both Np(V) and Np(VI) are important in their own right, as 237Np is a radioactive transuranic element with a half-life of 2 million years.

  4. Saccharides enhance iron bioavailability to Southern Ocean phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Christel S.; Nichols, Carol Mancuso; Butler, Edward C. V.; Boyd, Philip W.

    2011-01-01

    Iron limits primary productivity in vast regions of the ocean. Given that marine phytoplankton contribute up to 40% of global biological carbon fixation, it is important to understand what parameters control the availability of iron (iron bioavailability) to these organisms. Most studies on iron bioavailability have focused on the role of siderophores; however, eukaryotic phytoplankton do not produce or release siderophores. Here, we report on the pivotal role of saccharides—which may act like an organic ligand—in enhancing iron bioavailability to a Southern Ocean cultured diatom, a prymnesiophyte, as well as to natural populations of eukaryotic phytoplankton. Addition of a monosaccharide (>2 nM of glucuronic acid, GLU) to natural planktonic assemblages from both the polar front and subantarctic zones resulted in an increase in iron bioavailability for eukaryotic phytoplankton, relative to bacterioplankton. The enhanced iron bioavailability observed for several groups of eukaryotic phytoplankton (i.e., cultured and natural populations) using three saccharides, suggests it is a common phenomenon. Increased iron bioavailability resulted from the combination of saccharides forming highly bioavailable organic associations with iron and increasing iron solubility, mainly as colloidal iron. As saccharides are ubiquitous, present at nanomolar to micromolar concentrations, and produced by biota in surface waters, they also satisfy the prerequisites to be important constituents of the poorly defined “ligand soup,” known to weakly bind iron. Our findings point to an additional type of organic ligand, controlling iron bioavailability to eukaryotic phytoplankton—a key unknown in iron biogeochemistry. PMID:21169217

  5. Ligands in PSI structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Abhinav; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Morse, Andrew; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Deacon, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    A survey of the types and frequency of ligands that are bound to PSI structures is analyzed as well as their utility in functional annotation of previously uncharacterized proteins. Approximately 65% of PSI structures report some type of ligand(s) that is bound in the crystal structure. Here, a description is given of how such ligands are handled and analyzed at the JCSG and a survey of the types, variety and frequency of ligands that are observed in the PSI structures is also compiled and analyzed, including illustrations of how these bound ligands have provided functional clues for annotation of proteins with little or no previous experimental characterization. Furthermore, a web server was developed as a tool to mine and analyze the PSI structures for bound ligands and other identifying features

  6. Access to highly active and thermally stable iron procatalysts using bulky 2-[1-(2,6-dibenzhydryl-4-methylphenylimino)ethyl]-6-[1-(arylimino)ethyl]pyridine ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiangang; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Wenjuan; Hao, Xiang; Sun, Wen-Hua

    2011-03-21

    Ethylene polymerization was performed using a series of 2-[1-(2,6-dibenzhydrylphenylimino)ethyl]-6-[1-(arylimino)ethyl]pyridyliron(II) chlorides with the activity in the range of 10(7) g PE mol(-1) (Fe) h(-1), which is the highest observed in iron procatalysts at elevated reaction temperatures such as 80 °C in the presence of MMAO and 60 °C in the presence of MAO, without any trace of ethylene oligomerization.

  7. MULTIDENTATE TEREPHTHALAMIDATE AND HYDROXYPYRIDONATE LIGANDS: TOWARDS NEW ORALLY ACTIVE CHELATORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abergel, Rebecca J.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2011-07-13

    The limitations of current therapies for the treatment of iron overload or radioisotope contamination have stimulated efforts to develop new orally bioavailable iron and actinide chelators. Siderophore-inspired tetradentate, hexadentate and octadentate terephthalamidate and hydroxypyridonate ligands were evaluated in vivo as selective and efficacious iron or actinide chelating agents, with several metal loading and ligand assessment procedures, using {sup 59}Fe, {sup 238}Pu, and {sup 241}Am as radioactive tracers. The compounds presented in this study were compared to commercially available therapeutic sequestering agents [deferoxamine (DFO) for iron and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DPTA) for actinides] and are unrivaled in terms of affinity, selectivity and decorporation efficacy, which attests to the fact that high metal affinity may overcome the low bioavailability properties commonly associated to multidenticity.

  8. 2 : 2 Fe(III): ligand and "adamantane core" 4 : 2 Fe(III): ligand (hydr)oxo complexes of an acyclic ditopic ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghiladi, Morten; Larsen, Frank B.; McKenzie, Christine J.

    2005-01-01

    bond lengths of the two different octahedral iron sites: Fe -mu-OH, 1.953( 5), 2.013( 5) angstrom and Fe-mu-O, 1.803( 5), 1.802( 5) angstrom. The difference in ligand environment is too small for allowing Mossbauer spectroscopy to distinguish between the two crystallographically independent Fe sites...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a strong urge to move the legs. This ... may be a sign of infection, a blood disorder, or another ... may be a clue as to the cause of your anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, for ...

  10. BESITY AND IRON DEFICIENCY. ONE MORE COMORBIDITY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. L.I. Dvoretsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron defi ciency is one of comorbidity in patients with obesity, which allows you to select a particular phenotype (“iron defi ciency” obesity. There is strong evidence of the pathogenetic link between iron defi ciency and the presence of systemic infl ammation associated with obesity. Data on the frequency and pathogenic form of anemia ( iron defi ciency or anemia of chronic disease , obesity are not unique. Further research of iron status in obese patients is needed to decide on the feasibility and methods of correction of disorders of iron metabolism , in particular in the preparation of patients for bariatric surgery.

  11. Ligand effects on single-electron transfer of isolated iron atoms in the gaseous complexes [(OC)(m)Fe(OH2)(n)](+) (m, n=0-2, m plus n=1, 2)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karlický, F.; Otyepka, M.; Schröder, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 330, 15 Dec (2012), s. 95-99 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GPP208/11/P463; European Regional Development Fund(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0058; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0017 Program:EE Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : electron transfer * iron carbonyl * microhydration * neutralization-reionization mass * spectrometry * redox transitions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.142, year: 2012

  12. Evaluation of Immobilized Metal-Ion Affinity Chromatography and Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Recovery and Identification of Copper(II)-Binding Ligands in Seawater Using the Model Ligand 8-Hydroxyquinoline

    OpenAIRE

    Nixon, Richard L.; Ross, Andrew R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Complexation by organic ligands dominates the speciation of iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and other bioactive trace metals in seawater, controlling their bioavailability and distribution in the marine environment. Several classes of high-affinity Fe-binding ligands (siderophores) have been identified in seawater but the chemical structures of marine Cu-complexing ligands remain unknown. Immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) allows Cu ligands to be isolated from bulk dissolved organic...

  13. Interesting properties of some iron(II), copper(I) and copper(II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Tridendate ligands with nitrogen centers, generally well-known as the tripod ligands, have been of considerable interest to inorganic chemists dealing with the preparation of model compounds for hemocyanin, tyrosinase etc. We have found that such ligands when complexed with iron(II) and copper(II) and copper(I) ions ...

  14. Probing heme protein-ligand interactions by UV/visible absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet/visible (UV/vis) absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool for steady-state and time-resolved studies of protein-ligand interactions. Prosthetic groups in proteins frequently have strong electronic absorbance bands that depend on the oxidation, ligation, and conformation states of the chromophores. They are also sensitive to conformational changes of the polypeptide chain into which they are embedded. Steady-state absorption spectroscopy provides information on ligand binding equilibria, from which the Gibbs free energy differences between the ligated and unligated states can be computed. Time-resolved absorption spectroscopy allows one to detect short-lived intermediate states that may not get populated significantly under equilibrium conditions, but may nevertheless be of crucial importance for biological function. Moreover, the energy barriers that have to be surmounted in the reaction can be determined. In this chapter, we present a number of typical applications of steady-state and ns time-resolved UV/vis absorption spectroscopy in the study of ligand binding to the central iron in heme proteins.

  15. Catalysis and molecular magnetism of dinuclear iron(III) complexes with N-(2-pyridylmethyl)-iminodiethanol/-ate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jong Won; Bae, Jeong Mi; Kim, Cheal; Min, Kil Sik

    2014-03-14

    The reaction of N-(2-pyridylmethyl)iminodiethanol (H2pmide) and Fe(NO3)3·9H2O in MeOH led to the formation of a dimeric iron(III) complex, [(Hpmide)Fe(NO3)]2(NO3)2·2CH3OH (1). Its anion-exchanged form, [(pmide)Fe(N3)]2 (2), was prepared by the reaction of 1and NaN3 in MeOH, during which the Hpmide ligand of 1 was also deprotonated. These compounds were investigated by single crystal X-ray diffraction and magnetochemistry. In complex 1, one iron(III) ion was bonded with a mono-deprotonated Hpmide ligand and a nitrate ion. The two iron(III) ions within the dinuclear unit were connected by two ethoxy groups with an inversion center. In 2, one iron(III) ion was coordinated with a deprotonated pmide ligand and an azide ion. The Fe(pmide)(N3) unit was related by symmetry through an inversion center. Both 1 and 2 efficiently catalyzed the oxidation of a variety of alcohols under mild conditions. The oxidation mechanism was proposed to involve an Fe(IV)=O intermediate as the major reactive species and an Fe(V)=O intermediate as a minor oxidant. Evidence for this proposal was derived from reactivity and Hammett studies, KIE (kH/kD) values, and the use of MPPH (2-methyl-1-phenylprop-2-yl hydroperoxide) as a mechanistic probe. Both compounds had significant antiferromagnetic interactions between the iron(III) ions via the oxygen atoms. 1 showed a strong antiferromagnetic interaction within the Fe(III) dimer, while 2 had a weak antiferromagnetic coupling within the Fe(III) dimer.

  16. Pro-Oxidant Activity of Amine-Pyridine-Based Iron Complexes Efficiently Kills Cancer and Cancer Stem-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Bártulos, Marta; Aceves-Luquero, Clara; Qualai, Jamal; Cussó, Olaf; Martínez, M Angeles; Fernández de Mattos, Silvia; Menéndez, Javier A; Villalonga, Priam; Costas, Miquel; Ribas, Xavi; Massaguer, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Differential redox homeostasis in normal and malignant cells suggests that pro-oxidant-induced upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) should selectively target cancer cells without compromising the viability of untransformed cells. Consequently, a pro-oxidant deviation well-tolerated by nonmalignant cells might rapidly reach a cell-death threshold in malignant cells already at a high setpoint of constitutive oxidative stress. To test this hypothesis, we took advantage of a selected number of amine-pyridine-based Fe(II) complexes that operate as efficient and robust oxidation catalysts of organic substrates upon reaction with peroxides. Five of these Fe(II)-complexes and the corresponding aminopyridine ligands were selected to evaluate their anticancer properties. We found that the iron complexes failed to display any relevant activity, while the corresponding ligands exhibited significant antiproliferative activity. Among the ligands, none of which were hemolytic, compounds 1, 2 and 5 were cytotoxic in the low micromolar range against a panel of molecularly diverse human cancer cell lines. Importantly, the cytotoxic activity profile of some compounds remained unaltered in epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT)-induced stable populations of cancer stem-like cells, which acquired resistance to the well-known ROS inducer doxorubicin. Compounds 1, 2 and 5 inhibited the clonogenicity of cancer cells and induced apoptotic cell death accompanied by caspase 3/7 activation. Flow cytometry analyses indicated that ligands were strong inducers of oxidative stress, leading to a 7-fold increase in intracellular ROS levels. ROS induction was associated with their ability to bind intracellular iron and generate active coordination complexes inside of cells. In contrast, extracellular complexation of iron inhibited the activity of the ligands. Iron complexes showed a high proficiency to cleave DNA through oxidative-dependent mechanisms, suggesting a likely mechanism of

  17. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  18. Iron-Catalyzed Olefin Metathesis with Low-Valent Iron Alkylidenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauksch, Michael; Tsogoeva, Svetlana B

    2017-08-01

    Inspired by recent reports of low-valent iron-complex-catalyzed formal [2+2] cycloaddition of olefins, we demonstrate computationally that with such low-valent iron complexes and with "strong" ligands, the olefin metathesis is also preferred over the undesired cyclopropanation side-reaction, competition already studied by Hoffmann and co-workers almost 40 years ago (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1981, 103, 5582). The [2+2] cycloaddition step in metathesis propagation, which gives a Chauvin-type metallacyclobutane intermediate, is proposed to proceed either via a planar four-electron Craig-Möbius aromatic [π2 s +π2 s ] transition-state structure with a low barrier of 4.7 kcal mol -1 or, alternatively, via a twisted Zimmerman-Möbius aromatic [π2 s +π2 a ] transition state with a 5.5 kcal mol -1 activation-energy barrier, with respect to an "encounter" π-complex minimum obtained from an Fe II alkylidene and the entering olefin, while the corresponding triplet pathways are all disfavored. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Disilicate-Assisted Iron Electrolysis for Sequential Fenton-Oxidation and Coagulation of Aqueous Contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiaxin; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Jing; Qiu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Dihua; Zhao, Ying; Xi, Beidou; Alshawabkeh, Akram N; Mao, Xuhui

    2017-07-18

    Sodium disilicate (SD), an inorganic and environmentally friendly ligand, is introduced into the conventional iron electrolysis system to achieve an oxidizing Fenton process to degrade organic pollutants. Electrolytic ferrous ions, which are complexed by the disilicate ions, can chemically reduce dioxygen molecules via consecutive reduction steps, producing H 2 O 2 for the Fenton-oxidation of organics. At the near-neutral pH (from 6 to 8), the disilicate-Fe(II) complexes possess strong reducing capabilities; therefore, a near-neutral pH rather than an acid condition is preferable for the disilicate-assisted iron electrolysis (DAIE) process. Following the DAIE process, the different complexing capacities of disilicate for ferrous/ferric ions and calcium ions can be used to break the disilicate-iron complexes. The addition of CaO or CaCl 2 can precipitate ferrous/ferric ions, disilicates and possibly heavy metals in the wastewater. Compared to previously reported organic and phosphorus ligands, SD is a low-cost inorganic agent that does not lead to secondary pollution, and would not compete with the target organic pollutants for •OH; therefore, it would greatly expand the application fields of the O 2 activation process. The combination of DAIE and CaO treatments is envisioned to be a versatile and affordable method for treating wastewater with complicated pollutants (e.g., mixtures of biorefractory organics and heavy metals).

  20. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  1. Structural characterization of a non-heme iron active site in zeolites that hydroxylates methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Benjamin E R; Böttger, Lars H; Bols, Max L; Yan, James J; Rhoda, Hannah M; Jacobs, Ariel B; Hu, Michael Y; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, E Ercan; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O; Schoonheydt, Robert A; Sels, Bert F; Solomon, Edward I

    2018-04-02

    Iron-containing zeolites exhibit unprecedented reactivity in the low-temperature hydroxylation of methane to form methanol. Reactivity occurs at a mononuclear ferrous active site, α-Fe(II), that is activated by N 2 O to form the reactive intermediate α-O. This has been defined as an Fe(IV)=O species. Using nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy coupled to X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we probe the bonding interaction between the iron center, its zeolite lattice-derived ligands, and the reactive oxygen. α-O is found to contain an unusually strong Fe(IV)=O bond resulting from a constrained coordination geometry enforced by the zeolite lattice. Density functional theory calculations clarify how the experimentally determined geometric structure of the active site leads to an electronic structure that is highly activated to perform H-atom abstraction.

  2. Periodic Trends in the Binding of a Phosphine-Tethered Ketone Ligand to Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Dide G A; van Wiggen, Maxime A C; Kwakernaak, Joost; Lutz, Martin; Klein Gebbink, Robertus J M; Moret, Marc-Etienne

    2018-04-06

    π-Coordinating ligands are commonly found in intermediate structures in homogeneous catalysis, and are gaining interest as supporting ligands for the development of cooperative catalysts. Herein, we systematically investigate the binding of the ketone group, a strongly accepting π ligand, to mid-to-late metals of the first transition series. To this end, the coordination of 2,2'-bis(diphenylphosphino)benzophenone ( Ph dpbp), which features a ketone moiety flanked by two strongly binding P-donor groups, to Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu was explored. The ketone moiety does not bind to the metal in M II complexes, whereas M I complexes (Fe, Co, Ni) adopt an η 2 (C,O) coordination. A structural and computational investigation of periodic trends in this series was performed. These data suggest that the coordination of the ketone to M I can mostly be described by the resonance extremes of the Dewar-Chatt-Duncanson model, that is, the π complex and the metallaoxacycle extreme, with a possible minor contribution from a ketyl radical resonance structure in the case of the iron complex. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. A contribution to the study of the structure, reactivity and bioinorganic chemistry of iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toma, H.E.

    1984-01-01

    The research work on inorganic and biological chemistry of iron developed at the University of Sao Paulo (SP, Brazil) is reviewed. Considerations are made about: π interactions, electronic structure and spectroscopy of cyanoferrates; solvation studies and kinetics of substitution reactions involving iron complexes; reactivity of coordinating ligands and iron interactions with biomolecules. (C.L.B.) [pt

  4. Transient ligand docking sites in Cerebratulus lacteus mini-hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Pengchi; Nienhaus, Karin; Palladino, Pasquale; Olson, John S; Blouin, George; Moens, Luc; Dewilde, Sylvia; Geuens, Eva; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2007-08-15

    The monomeric hemoglobin of the nemertean worm Cerebratulus lacteus functions as an oxygen storage protein to maintain neural activity under hypoxic conditions. It shares a large, apolar matrix tunnel with other small hemoglobins, which has been implicated as a potential ligand migration pathway. Here we explore ligand migration and binding within the distal heme pocket, to which the tunnel provides access to ligands from the outside. FTIR/TDS experiments performed at cryogenic temperatures reveal the presence of three transient ligand docking sites within the distal pocket, the primary docking site B on top of pyrrole C and secondary sites C and D. Site C is assigned to a cavity adjacent to the distal portion of the heme pocket, surrounded by the B and E helices. It has an opening to the apolar tunnel and is expected to be on the pathway for ligand entry and exit, whereas site D, circumscribed by TyrB10, GlnE7, and the CD corner, most likely is located on a side pathway of ligand migration. Flash photolysis experiments at ambient temperatures indicate that the rate-limiting step for ligand binding to CerHb is migration through the apolar channel to site C. Movement from C to B and iron-ligand bond formation involve low energy barriers and thus are very rapid processes in the wt protein.

  5. Effects of heme iron enriched peptide on iron deficiency anemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Chen, Le-qun; Zhuang, Hong

    2014-02-01

    The present study aims to investigate whether a daily intake of heme iron enriched peptide obtained from bovine hemoglobin is effective in alleviating iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups: a control group, an anemic group not treated, and anemic groups treated with FeSO4 or with the heme iron enriched peptide at low, moderate or high doses. The rats in the anemic groups were fed on a low-iron diet to establish the iron deficiency anemia model. After the model had been established, different doses of heme iron enriched peptide were given to the rats once a day via intragastric administration. After the iron supplement administration, it was observed that heme iron enriched peptide had effective restorative action returning the hemoglobin, red blood cells, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and serum iron in IDA animals to normal values or better. In addition, compared with FeSO4, higher Fe bioavailability and fewer side effects were observed. The rats in the moderate dose group had the highest apparent Fe absorption. Moreover, in vivo antioxidant activity was also observed, enhancing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and reduced malondialdehyde levels in IDA rats. Furthermore, the heme iron enriched peptide also exhibited strong in vitro antioxidant activities. In conclusion, heme iron enriched peptide significantly alleviated iron deficiency anemia, and exhibited strong in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities. This suggests that heme iron enriched peptide might be exploited as a safe, efficient new iron supplement.

  6. Designer TGFβ superfamily ligands with diversified functionality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P Allendorph

    Full Text Available Transforming Growth Factor--beta (TGFβ superfamily ligands, including Activins, Growth and Differentiation Factors (GDFs, and Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs, are excellent targets for protein-based therapeutics because of their pervasiveness in numerous developmental and cellular processes. We developed a strategy termed RASCH (Random Assembly of Segmental Chimera and Heteromer, to engineer chemically-refoldable TGFβ superfamily ligands with unique signaling properties. One of these engineered ligands, AB208, created from Activin-βA and BMP-2 sequences, exhibits the refolding characteristics of BMP-2 while possessing Activin-like signaling attributes. Further, we find several additional ligands, AB204, AB211, and AB215, which initiate the intracellular Smad1-mediated signaling pathways more strongly than BMP-2 but show no sensitivity to the natural BMP antagonist Noggin unlike natural BMP-2. In another design, incorporation of a short N-terminal segment from BMP-2 was sufficient to enable chemical refolding of BMP-9, without which was never produced nor refolded. Our studies show that the RASCH strategy enables us to expand the functional repertoire of TGFβ superfamily ligands through development of novel chimeric TGFβ ligands with diverse biological and clinical values.

  7. Mononuclear non-heme iron(III)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 2. Mononuclear non-heme iron(III) complexes of linear and tripodal tridentate ligands as functional models for catechol dioxygenases: Effect of -alkyl substitution on regioselectivity and reaction rate. Mallayan Palaniandavar Kusalendiran Visvaganesan.

  8. Reconstruction of Gene Networks of Iron Response in Shewanella oneidensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yunfeng [ORNL; Harris, Daniel P [ORNL; Luo, Feng [Clemson University; Joachimiak, Marcin [Clemson University; Wu, Liyou [University of Oklahoma; Dehal, Paramvir [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Jacobsen, Janet [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL; Gao, Haichun [University of Oklahoma; Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma

    2009-01-01

    It is of great interest to study the iron response of the -proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis since it possesses a high content of iron and is capable of utilizing iron for anaerobic respiration. We report here that the iron response in S. oneidensis is a rapid process. To gain more insights into the bacterial response to iron, temporal gene expression profiles were examined for iron depletion and repletion, resulting in identification of iron-responsive biological pathways in a gene co-expression network. Iron acquisition systems, including genes unique to S. oneidensis, were rapidly and strongly induced by iron depletion, and repressed by iron repletion. Some were required for iron depletion, as exemplified by the mutational analysis of the putative siderophore biosynthesis protein SO3032. Unexpectedly, a number of genes related to anaerobic energy metabolism were repressed by iron depletion and induced by repletion, which might be due to the iron storage potential of their protein products. Other iron-responsive biological pathways include protein degradation, aerobic energy metabolism and protein synthesis. Furthermore, sequence motifs enriched in gene clusters as well as their corresponding DNA-binding proteins (Fur, CRP and RpoH) were identified, resulting in a regulatory network of iron response in S. oneidensis. Together, this work provides an overview of iron response and reveals novel features in S. oneidensis, including Shewanella-specific iron acquisition systems, and suggests the intimate relationship between anaerobic energy metabolism and iron response.

  9. Immunity to plant pathogens and iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Thomine, Sebastien; Dellagi, Alia

    2015-11-01

    Iron is essential for metabolic processes in most living organisms. Pathogens and their hosts often compete for the acquisition of this nutrient. However, iron can catalyze the formation of deleterious reactive oxygen species. Hosts may use iron to increase local oxidative stress in defense responses against pathogens. Due to this duality, iron plays a complex role in plant-pathogen interactions. Plant defenses against pathogens and plant response to iron deficiency share several features, such as secretion of phenolic compounds, and use common hormone signaling pathways. Moreover, fine tuning of iron localization during infection involves genes coding iron transport and iron storage proteins, which have been shown to contribute to immunity. The influence of the plant iron status on the outcome of a given pathogen attack is strongly dependent on the nature of the pathogen infection strategy and on the host species. Microbial siderophores emerged as important factors as they have the ability to trigger plant defense responses. Depending on the plant species, siderophore perception can be mediated by their strong iron scavenging capacity or possibly via specific recognition as pathogen associated molecular patterns. This review highlights that iron has a key role in several plant-pathogen interactions by modulating immunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Ferrojan Horse Hypothesis: Iron-Virus Interactions in the Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnain, Chelsea; Breitbart, Mya; Buck, Kristen N.

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient and the sub-nanomolar concentrations of iron in open ocean surface waters are often insufficient to support optimal biological activity. More than 99.9% of dissolved iron in these waters is bound to organic ligands, yet determining the identity of these ligands in seawater remains a major challenge. Among the potential dissolved organic ligands in the colloidal fraction captured between a 0.02 and a 0.2 μm filter persists an extremely abundant biological candidat...

  11. Strong and Reversible Monovalent Supramolecular Protein Immobilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, Jacqui F.; Nguyen, Hoang D.; Yang, Lanti; Huskens, Jurriaan; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Brunsveld, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Proteins with an iron clasp: Site-selective incorporation of a ferrocene molecule into a protein allows for easy, strong, and reversible supramolecular protein immobilization through a selective monovalent interaction of the ferrocene with a cucurbit[7]uril immobilized on a gold surface. The

  12. Toward understanding macrocycle specificity of iron on the dioxygen-binding ability: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong; Chen, Kexian; Jia, Lu; Li, Haoran

    2011-08-14

    In an effort to examine the interaction between dioxygen and iron-macrocyclic complexes, and to understand how this interaction was affected by those different macrocyclic ligands, dioxygen binding with iron-porphyrin, iron-phthalocyanine, iron-dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene, and iron-salen complexes is investigated by means of quantum chemical calculations utilizing Density Functional Theory (DFT). Based on the analysis of factors influencing the corresponding dioxygen binding process, it showed that different macrocyclic ligands possess different O-O bond distances, and different electronic configurations for the bound O(2) and non-aromatic macrocyclic ligands favor dioxygen activation. Furthermore, the smaller the energy gap between the HOMO of iron-macrocyclic complexes and the LUMO of dioxygen, the more active the bound O(2) becomes, with a longer O-O bond distance and a shorter Fe-O bond length.

  13. Kinetic, spectroscopic and chemical modification study of iron release from transferrin; iron(III) complexation to adenosine triphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.P.

    1985-01-01

    Amino acids other than those that serve as ligands have been found to influence the chemical properties of transferrin iron. The catalytic ability of pyrophosphate to mediate transferrin iron release to a terminal acceptor is largely quenched by modification non-liganded histine groups on the protein. The first order rate constants of iron release for several partially histidine modified protein samples were measured. A statistical method was employed to establish that one non-liganded histidine per metal binding domain was responsible for the reduction in rate constant. These results imply that the iron mediated chelator, pyrophosphate, binds directly to a histidine residue on the protein during the iron release process. EPR spectroscopic results are consistent with this interpretation. Kinetic and amino acid sequence studies of ovotransferrin and lactoferrin, in addition to human serum transferrin, have allowed the tentative assignment of His-207 in the N-terminal domain and His-535 in the C-terminal domain as the groups responsible for the reduction in rate of iron release. The above concepts have been extended to lysine modified transferrin. Complexation of iron(II) to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was also studied to gain insight into the nature of iron-ATP species present at physiological pH. 31 P NMR spectra are observed when ATP is presented in large excess

  14. Chelating ligands for nanocrystals' surface functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querner, Claudia; Reiss, Peter; Bleuse, Joël; Pron, Adam

    2004-09-22

    A new family of ligands for the surface functionalization of CdSe nanocrystals is proposed, namely alkyl or aryl derivatives of carbodithioic acids (R-C(S)SH). The main advantages of these new ligands are as follows: they nearly quantitatively exchange the initial surface ligands (TOPO) in very mild conditions; they significantly improve the resistance of nanocrystals against photooxidation because of their ability of strong chelate-type binding to metal atoms; their relatively simple preparation via Grignard intermediates facilitates the development of new bifunctional ligands containing, in addition to the anchoring carbodithioate group, a second function, which enables the grafting of molecules or macromolecules of interest on the nanocrystal surface. To give an example of this approach, we report, for the first time, the grafting of an electroactive oligomer from the polyaniline family-aniline tetramer-on CdSe nanocrystals after their functionalization with 4-formyldithiobenzoic acid. The grafting proceeds via a condensation reaction between the aldehyde group of the ligand and the terminal primary amine group of the tetramer. The resulting organic/inorganic hybrid exhibits complete extinction of the fluorescence of its constituents, indicating efficient charge or energy transfer between the organic and the inorganic semiconductors.

  15. Coordination chemistry of poly(thioether)borate ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Charles G.

    2010-01-01

    This review traces the development and application of the tris(thioether)borate ligands, tripodal ligands with highly polarizable thioether donors. Areas of emphasis include the basic coordination chemistry of the mid-to-late first row transition metals (Fe, Ni, Co, Cu), and the role of the thioether substituent in directing complex formation, the modeling of zinc thiolate protein active sites, high-spin organo-iron and organo-cobalt chemistry, the preparation of monovalent complexes of Fe, Co and Ni, and dioxygen and sulfur activation by monovalent nickel complexes. PMID:20607091

  16. Iron monoxide photodissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestakov, D. A.; Parker, D. H.; Baklanov, A. V.

    2005-02-01

    The photodissociation of Fe56O was studied by means of the velocity map imaging technique. A molecular beam of iron atoms and iron monoxide molecules was created using an electrical discharge with an iron electrode in a supersonic expansion of molecular oxygen. The ground state iron atom Fe(D45) and FeO concentrations in the molecular beam have been estimated. The dissociation energy of the FeO XΔ5 ground electronic state was found to be D00(FeO )=4.18±0.01eV. The effective absorption cross section of FeO at 252.39nm (vac), leading to the Fe(D45)+O(P3) dissociation channel, is ˜1.2×10-18cm2. A (1+1) resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization spectrum of Fe56O in the region 39550-39580 cm-1 with rotational structure has been observed, but not assigned. Angular distributions of Fe(D45) and Fe(D35) products for the channel FeO →Fe(D4,35)+O(P3) have been measured at several points in the 210-260nm laser light wavelength region. The anisotropy parameter varies strongly with wavelength for both channels.

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron in your body causes iron-deficiency anemia. Lack of iron usually is due to blood loss, ... can help prevent overdosing in children. Because recent research supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you lose iron. ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of iron include iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark ... of iron include iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawings also can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Poor Diet The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, ... more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat the ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods (foods that have iron ... you: Follow a diet that excludes meat and fish, which are the best sources of iron. However, ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... good nonmeat sources of iron include iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach ... good nonmeat sources of iron include iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... re more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ... which are the best sources of iron. However, vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ... which are the best sources of iron. However, vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can provide enough iron if you eat the right foods. For example, good nonmeat sources of iron ... can provide enough iron if you eat the right foods. For example, good nonmeat sources of iron ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ... Treatment may need to be done in a hospital. The goals of treating iron-deficiency anemia are ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron in the body and lead to ... Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron- ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat sources ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sources of iron include iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other ... sources of iron include iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the ... pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron added. ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for your body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, ... iron deficiency. Endurance athletes lose iron through their gastrointestinal tracts. They also lose iron through the breakdown of ...

  18. Application of strong phosphoric acid to radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Kikuo

    1977-01-01

    Not only inorganic and organic compounds but also natural substrances, such as accumulations in soil, are completely decomposed and distilled by heating with strong phosphoric acid for 30 to 50 minutes. As applications of strong phosphoric acid to radiochemistry, determination of uranium and boron by use of solubilization effect of this substance, titration of uranyl ion by use of sulfuric iron (II) contained in this substance, application to tracer experiment, and determination of radioactive ruthenium in environmental samples are reviewed. Strong phosphoric acid is also applied to activation analysis, for example, determination of N in pyrographite with iodate potassium-strong phosphoric acid method, separation of Os and Ru with sulfuric cerium (IV) - strong phosphoric acid method or potassium dechromate-strong phosphoric acid method, analysis of Se, As and Sb rocks and accumulations with ammonium bromide, sodium chloride and sodium bromide-strong phosphoric acid method. (Kanao, N.)

  19. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  20. The effect of heterocyclic S,S’-ligands on the electrochemical properties of some cobalt(III complexes in acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. JOVANOVIC

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Eight mixed-ligand cobalt(III complexes with the macrocyclic amine 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (cyclam and a heterocyclic dithiocarbamate (Rdtc- i.e., morpholine- (Morphdtc, thiomorpholine- (Timdtc, piperazine- (Pzdtc, N-methylpiperazine-(Mepzdtc, piperidine- (Pipdtc, 2-, 3- or 4-methylpiperidine- (2-, 3- and 4-Mepipdtc carbodithionato-S,S ions, of the general formula [Co(cyclamRdtc](ClO42, were investigated in deoxygenated 0.1MHClO4 solutions. Cyclic voltammetry data at a glassy carbon (GC electrode demonstrate a redox reaction of cobalt(III from the complexes at potentials strongly influenced by the presence of different heterocyclic Rdtc- ligands. In this respect, the complexes were separated into two groups: the first, with a heteroatom O, S or N in the heterocyclic ring, and the second, with a methyl group on the piperidine ring of the Rdtc- ligand. Anodic polarization of an Fe electrode in the presence of the complexes shows their influence not only on the dissolution of iron but also on the hydrogen evolution reactions and on this basis complexes the complexes could be divided into the same two groups. It was found that the weaker the inhibiting effect of the free heterocyclic amines is, the significantly higher is the efficiency of the corresponding complexes.

  1. Correlation between surface physicochemical properties and the release of iron from stainless steel AISI 304 in biological media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Yolanda; Karlsson, Maria-Elisa; Blomberg, Eva; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Hedberg, Jonas

    2014-10-01

    Stainless steel is widely used in biological environments, for example as implant material or in food applications, where adsorption-controlled ligand-induced metal release is of importance from a corrosion, health, and food safety perspective. The objective of this study was to elucidate potential correlations between surface energy and wettability of stainless steel surfaces and the release of iron in complexing biological media. This was accomplished by studying changes in surface energies calculated from contact angle measurements, surface oxide composition (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), and released iron (graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy) for stainless steel grade AISI 304 immersed in fluids containing bovine serum albumin or citric acid, and non-complexing fluids such as NaCl, NaOH, and HNO3. It was shown that the surface wettability and polar surface energy components were all influenced by adventitious atmospheric carbon (surface contamination of low molecular weight), rather than differences in surface oxide composition in non-complexing solutions. Adsorption of both BSA and citrate, which resulted in ligand-induced metal release, strongly influenced the wettability and the surface energy, and correlated well with the measured released amount of iron. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of atmospheric organic complexation on iron-bearing dust solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Paris

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies reported that the effect of organic complexation may be a potentially important process to be considered by models estimating atmospheric iron flux to the ocean. In this study, we investigated this process effect by a series of dissolution experiments on iron-bearing dust in the presence or the absence of various organic compounds (acetate, formate, oxalate, malonate, succinate, glutarate, glycolate, lactate, tartrate and humic acid as an analogue of humic like substances, HULIS typically found in atmospheric waters. Only 4 of tested organic ligands (oxalate, malonate, tartrate and humic acid caused an enhancement of iron solubility which was associated with an increase of dissolved Fe(II concentrations. For all of these organic ligands, a positive linear dependence of iron solubility to organic concentrations was observed and showed that the extent of organic complexation on iron solubility decreased in the following order: oxalate >malonate = tartrate > humic acid. This was attributed to the ability of electron donors of organic ligands and implies a reductive ligand-promoted dissolution. This study confirms that among the known atmospheric organic binding ligands of Fe, oxalate is the most effective ligand promoting dust iron solubility and showed, for the first time, the potential effect of HULIS on iron dissolution under atmospheric conditions.

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  4. IRON DOME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Automated precise guided missile defence has been around for some years, and is a modern-day mechanism used frequently since 2011 to defend against rocket attacks penetrating national airspace. Israel's automated Iron Dome. Missile Defence System has intercepted over 1 000 rockets during two recent.

  5. Sterically demanding iminopyridine ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irrgang, Torsten; Keller, Sandra; Maisel, Heidi; Kretschmer, Winfried; Kempe, Rhett

    Two sterically demanding iminopyridine ligands, (2,6-diisopropylphenyl)[6-(2,4,6-triisopropylphenyl)pyridin-2-ylmeth- ylene]amine and (2,6-diisopropylphenyl)]6-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)pyridin-2-ylmethylene]amine, were prepared by a two-step process: first, condensation of 6-bromopyridine-2-carbaldehyde

  6. Iron and iron derived radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fast! Think small! In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  7. Iron bioavailability from commercially available iron supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christides, Tatiana; Wray, David; McBride, Richard; Fairweather, Rose; Sharp, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a global public health problem. Treatment with the standard of care ferrous iron salts may be poorly tolerated, leading to non-compliance and ineffective correction of IDA. Employing supplements with higher bioavailability might permit lower doses of iron to be used with fewer side effects, thus improving treatment efficacy. Here, we compared the iron bioavailability of ferrous sulphate tablets with alternative commercial iron products, including three liquid-based supplements. Iron bioavailability was measured using Caco-2 cells with ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA followed by either Dunnett's or Tukey's multiple comparisons tests. Spatone Apple(®) (a naturally iron-rich mineral water with added ascorbate) and Iron Vital F(®) (a synthetic liquid iron supplement) had the highest iron bioavailability. There was no statistical difference between iron uptake from ferrous sulphate tablets, Spatone(®) (naturally iron-rich mineral water alone) and Pregnacare Original(®) (a multimineral/multivitamin tablet). In our in vitro model, naturally iron-rich mineral waters and synthetic liquid iron formulations have equivalent or better bioavailability compared with ferrous iron sulphate tablets. If these results are confirmed in vivo, this would mean that at-risk groups of IDA could be offered a greater choice of more bioavailable and potentially better tolerated iron preparations.

  8. Coordination Chemistry of Microbial Iron Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Allred, Benjamin E; Sia, Allyson K

    2015-09-15

    This Account focuses on the coordination chemistry of the microbial iron chelators called siderophores. The initial research (early 1970s) focused on simple analogs of siderophores, which included hydroxamate, catecholate, or hydroxycarboxylate ligands. The subsequent work increasingly focused on the transport of siderophores and their microbial iron transport. Since these are pseudo-octahedral complexes often composed of bidentate ligands, there is chirality at the metal center that in principle is independent of the ligand chirality. It has been shown in many cases that chiral recognition of the complex occurs. Many techniques have been used to elucidate the iron uptake processes in both Gram-positive (single membrane) and Gram-negative (double membrane) bacteria. These have included the use of radioactive labels (of ligand, metal, or both), kinetically inert metal complexes, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. In general, siderophore recognition and transport involves receptors that recognize the metal chelate portion of the iron-siderophore complex. A second, to date less commonly found, mechanism called the siderophore shuttle involves the receptor binding an apo-siderophore. Since one of the primary ways that microbes compete with each other for iron stores is the strength of their competing siderophore complexes, it became important early on to characterize the solution thermodynamics of these species. Since the acidity of siderophores varies significantly, just the stability constant does not give a direct measure of the relative competitive strength of binding. For this reason, the pM value is compared. The pM, like pH, is a measure of the negative log of the free metal ion concentration, typically calculated at pH 7.4, and standard total concentrations of metal and ligand. The characterization of the electronic structure of ferric siderophores has done much to help explain the high stability of these complexes. A new chapter in siderophore science has emerged

  9. Targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor imaging and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Hong Peng

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Xiang-Hong Peng1,4, Ximei Qian2,4, Hui Mao3,4, Andrew Y Wang5, Zhuo (Georgia Chen1,4, Shuming Nie2,4, Dong M Shin1,4*1Department of Medical Oncology/Hematology; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering; 3Department of Radiology; 4Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 5Ocean Nanotech, LLC, Fayetteville, AR, USAAbstract: Magnetic iron oxide (IO nanoparticles with a long blood retention time, biodegradability and low toxicity have emerged as one of the primary nanomaterials for biomedical applications in vitro and in vivo. IO nanoparticles have a large surface area and can be engineered to provide a large number of functional groups for cross-linking to tumor-targeting ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, peptides, or small molecules for diagnostic imaging or delivery of therapeutic agents. IO nanoparticles possess unique paramagnetic properties, which generate significant susceptibility effects resulting in strong T2 and T*2 contrast, as well as T1 effects at very low concentrations for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which is widely used for clinical oncology imaging. We review recent advances in the development of targeted IO nanoparticles for tumor imaging and therapy.Keywords: iron oxide nanoparticles, tumor imaging, MRI, therapy

  10. Reduced risk for placental malaria in iron deficient women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senga, Edward L.; Harper, Gregory; Koshy, Gibby; Kazembe, Peter N.; Brabin, Bernard J.

    2011-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency may limit iron availability to the malaria parasite reducing infection risk, and/or impair host immunity thereby increasing this risk. In pregnant women, there is evidence of an adverse effect with iron supplementation, but the few reported studies are strongly

  11. Analysis of macromolecules, ligands and macromolecule-ligand complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Dreele, Robert B [Los Alamos, NM

    2008-12-23

    A method for determining atomic level structures of macromolecule-ligand complexes through high-resolution powder diffraction analysis and a method for providing suitable microcrystalline powder for diffraction analysis are provided. In one embodiment, powder diffraction data is collected from samples of polycrystalline macromolecule and macromolecule-ligand complex and the refined structure of the macromolecule is used as an approximate model for a combined Rietveld and stereochemical restraint refinement of the macromolecule-ligand complex. A difference Fourier map is calculated and the ligand position and points of interaction between the atoms of the macromolecule and the atoms of the ligand can be deduced and visualized. A suitable polycrystalline sample of macromolecule-ligand complex can be produced by physically agitating a mixture of lyophilized macromolecule, ligand and a solvent.

  12. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzicka, Alex M.; Haack, Henning; Chabot, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    By far most of the melted and differentiated planetesimals that have been sampled as meteorites are metal-rich iron meteorites or stony iron meteorites. The parent asteroids of these meteorites accreted early and differentiated shortly after the solar system formed, producing some of the oldest...... and interpretations for iron and stony iron meteorites (Plate 13.1). Such meteorites provide important constraints on the nature of metal-silicate separation and mixing in planetesimals undergoing partial to complete differentiation. They include iron meteorites that formed by the solidification of cores...... (fractionally crystallized irons), irons in which partly molten metal and silicates of diverse types were mixed together (silicate-bearing irons), stony irons in which partly molten metal and olivine from cores and mantles were mixed together (pallasites), and stony irons in which partly molten metal...

  13. Iron bioavailability from commercially available iron supplements

    OpenAIRE

    Christides, Tatiana; Wray, David; McBride, Richard; Fairweather, Rose; Sharp, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a global public health problem. Treatment with the standard of care ferrous iron salts may be poorly tolerated, leading to non-compliance and ineffective correction of IDA. Employing supplements with higher bioavailability might permit lower doses of iron to be used with fewer side effects, thus improving treatment efficacy. Here, we compared the iron bioavailability of ferrous sulphate tablets with alternative commercial iron products, including thre...

  14. Iron supplementation in suckling piglets: how to correct iron deficiency anemia without affecting plasma hepcidin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzyński, Rafał R; Laarakkers, Coby M M; Tjalsma, Harold; Swinkels, Dorine W; Pieszka, Marek; Styś, Agnieszka; Mickiewicz, Michał; Lipiński, Paweł

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish an optimized protocol of iron dextran administration to pig neonates, which better meets the iron demand for erythropoiesis. Here, we monitored development of red blood cell indices, plasma iron parameters during a 28-day period after birth (till the weaning), following intramuscular administration of different concentrations of iron dextran to suckling piglets. To better assess the iron status we developed a novel mass spectrometry assay to quantify pig plasma levels of the iron-regulatory peptide hormone hepcidin-25. This hormone is predominantly secreted by the liver and acts as a negative regulator of iron absorption and reutilization. The routinely used protocol with high amount of iron resulted in the recovery of piglets from iron deficiency but also in strongly elevated plasma hepcidin-25 levels. A similar protocol with reduced amounts of iron improved hematological status of piglets to the same level while plasma hepcidin-25 levels remained low. These data show that plasma hepcidin-25 levels can guide optimal dosing of iron treatment and pave the way for mixed supplementation of piglets starting with intramuscular injection of iron dextran followed by dietary supplementation, which could be efficient under condition of very low plasma hepcidin-25 level.

  15. Iron supplementation in suckling piglets: how to correct iron deficiency anemia without affecting plasma hepcidin levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał R Starzyński

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to establish an optimized protocol of iron dextran administration to pig neonates, which better meets the iron demand for erythropoiesis. Here, we monitored development of red blood cell indices, plasma iron parameters during a 28-day period after birth (till the weaning, following intramuscular administration of different concentrations of iron dextran to suckling piglets. To better assess the iron status we developed a novel mass spectrometry assay to quantify pig plasma levels of the iron-regulatory peptide hormone hepcidin-25. This hormone is predominantly secreted by the liver and acts as a negative regulator of iron absorption and reutilization. The routinely used protocol with high amount of iron resulted in the recovery of piglets from iron deficiency but also in strongly elevated plasma hepcidin-25 levels. A similar protocol with reduced amounts of iron improved hematological status of piglets to the same level while plasma hepcidin-25 levels remained low. These data show that plasma hepcidin-25 levels can guide optimal dosing of iron treatment and pave the way for mixed supplementation of piglets starting with intramuscular injection of iron dextran followed by dietary supplementation, which could be efficient under condition of very low plasma hepcidin-25 level.

  16. Iron oxyhydroxide mineralization on microbial extracellular polysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Clara S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Edwards, David C.; Emerson, David; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2010-06-22

    Iron biominerals can form in neutral pH microaerophilic environments where microbes both catalyze iron oxidation and create polymers that localize mineral precipitation. In order to classify the microbial polymers that influence FeOOH mineralogy, we studied the organic and mineral components of biominerals using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF) microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We focused on iron microbial mat samples from a creek and abandoned mine; these samples are dominated by iron oxyhydroxide-coated structures with sheath, stalk, and filament morphologies. In addition, we characterized the mineralized products of an iron-oxidizing, stalk-forming bacterial culture isolated from the mine. In both natural and cultured samples, microbial polymers were found to be acidic polysaccharides with carboxyl functional groups, strongly spatially correlated with iron oxyhydroxide distribution patterns. Organic fibrils collect FeOOH and control its recrystallization, in some cases resulting in oriented crystals with high aspect ratios. The impact of polymers is particularly pronounced as the materials age. Synthesis experiments designed to mimic the biomineralization processes show that the polysaccharide carboxyl groups bind dissolved iron strongly but release it as mineralization proceeds. Our results suggest that carboxyl groups of acidic polysaccharides are produced by different microorganisms to create a wide range of iron oxyhydroxide biomineral structures. The intimate and potentially long-term association controls the crystal growth, phase, and reactivity of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in natural systems.

  17. Radiobiology with DNA ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinreich, R.; Argentini, M.; Guenther, I.; Koziorowski, J.; Larsson, B.; Nievergelt-Egido, M.C.; Salt, C.; Wyer, L.; Dos Santos, D.F.; Hansen, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with the following topics: labelling of DNA ligands and other tumour-affinic compounds with 4.15-d 124 I, radiotoxicity of Hoechst 33258 and 33342 and of iodinated Hoechst 33258 in cell cultures, preparation of 76 Br-, 123 I-, and 221 At-labelled 5-halo-2'-deoxyuridine, chemical syntheses of boron derivatives of Hoechst 33258.III., Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

  18. Therapeutic androgen receptor ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, George F.; Sui, Zhihua

    2003-01-01

    In the past several years, the concept of tissue-selective nuclear receptor ligands has emerged. This concept has come to fruition with estrogens, with the successful marketing of drugs such as raloxifene. The discovery of raloxifene and other selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) has raised the possibility of generating selective compounds for other pathways, including androgens (that is, selective androgen receptor modulators, or SARMs). PMID:16604181

  19. Arrested α-hydride migration activates a phosphido ligand for C–H insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, Anne K. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Muñoz, Salvador B. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Lutz, Sean A. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Pink, Maren [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Chen, Chun-Hsing [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Smith, Jeremy M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2016-12-05

    Bulky tris(carbene)borate ligands provide access to high spin iron(II) phosphido complexes. The complex PhB(MesIm)3FeP(H)Ph is thermally unstable, and we observed [PPh] group insertion into a C–H bond of the supporting ligand. An arrested α-hydride migration mechanism suggests increased nucleophilicity of the phosphorus atom facilitates [PPh] group transfer reactivity.

  20. [Iron dysregulation and anemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Katsuya

    2015-10-01

    Most iron in the body is utilized as a component of hemoglobin that delivers oxygen to the entire body. Under normal conditions, the iron balance is tightly regulated. However, iron dysregulation does occasionally occur; total iron content reductions cause iron deficiency anemia and overexpression of the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin disturbs iron utilization resulting in anemia of chronic disease. Conversely, the presence of anemia may ultimately lead to iron overload; for example, thalassemia, a common hereditary anemia worldwide, often requires transfusion, but long-term transfusions cause iron accumulation that leads to organ damage and other poor outcomes. On the other hand, there is a possibility that iron overload itself can cause anemia; iron chelation therapy for the post-transfusion iron overload observed in myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia improves dependency on transfusions in some cases. These observations reflect the extremely close relationship between anemias and iron metabolism.

  1. Nitrogen Atom Transfer From High Valent Iron Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michael D. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Smith, Jeremy M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2015-10-14

    This report describes the synthesis and reactions of high valent iron nitrides. Organonitrogen compounds such as aziridines are useful species for organic synthesis, but there are few efficient methods for their synthesis. Using iron nitrides to catalytically access these species may allow for their synthesis in an energy-and atom-efficient manner. We have developed a new ligand framework to achieve these goals as well as providing a method for inducing previously unknown reactivity.

  2. Iron-Catalyzed Asymmetric Nitro-Mannich Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Agata; Mlynarski, Jacek

    2017-10-20

    The first enantioselective addition of nitroalkanes to imines (nitro-Mannich reaction), mediated by an iron(II) catalyst assembled by a hindered hydroxyethyl-pybox ligand, is described. This valuable carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction proceeds smoothly at room temperature to afford enantioenriched β-nitro amines in good yields and high enantioselectivity, up to 98% with unprecedentedly low iron catalyst loading (5 mol %).

  3. Higher prevalence of iron deficiency as strong predictor of attention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 3 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  4. Iron and iron derived radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  7. Iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Altay, Hakan; Çetiner, Mustafa; Güvenç, Tolga Sinan; Temizhan, Ahmet; Ural, Dilek; Yeşilbursa, Dilek; Yıldırım, Nesligül; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure is an important community health problem. Prevalence and incidence of heart failure have continued to rise over the years. Despite recent advances in heart failure therapy, prognosis is still poor, rehospitalization rate is very high, and quality of life is worse. Co-morbidities in heart failure have negative impact on clinical course of the disease, further impair prognosis, and add difficulties to treatment of clinical picture. Therefore, successful management of co-morbidities is strongly recommended in addition to conventional therapy for heart failure. One of the most common co-morbidities in heart failure is presence of iron deficiency and anemia. Current evidence suggests that iron deficiency and anemia are more prevalent in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, as well as those with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction. Moreover, iron deficiency and anemia are referred to as independent predictors for poor prognosis in heart failure. There is strong relationship between iron deficiency or anemia and severity of clinical status of heart failure. Over the last two decades, many clinical investigations have been conducted on clinical effectiveness of treatment of iron deficiency or anemia with oral iron, intravenous iron, and erythropoietin therapies. Studies with oral iron and erythropoietin therapies did not provide any clinical benefit and, in fact, these therapies have been shown to be associated with increase in adverse clinical outcomes. However, clinical trials in patients with iron deficiency in the presence or absence of anemia have demonstrated considerable clinical benefits of intravenous iron therapy, and based on these positive outcomes, iron deficiency has become target of therapy in management of heart failure. The present report assesses current approaches to iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure in light of recent evidence.

  8. Testing strong interaction theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses possible tests of the current theories of the strong interaction, in particular, quantum chromodynamics. High energy e + e - interactions should provide an excellent means of studying the strong force. (W.D.L.)

  9. Regulation mechanisms of the FLT3-ligand after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prat-Lepesant, M.

    2005-06-01

    The hematopoietic compartment is one of the most severely damaged after chemotherapy, radiotherapy or accidental irradiations. Whatever its origin, the resulting damage to the bone marrow remains difficult to evaluate. Thus, it would be of great interest to get a biological indicator of residual hematopoiesis in order to adapt the treatment to each clinical situation. Recent results indicated that the plasma Flt3 ligand concentration was increased in patients suffering from either acquired or induced aplasia, suggesting that Flt3 ligand might be useful as a biological indicator of bone marrow status. We thus followed in a mouse model as well as in several clinical situations the variations in plasma Flt3 ligand concentration, after either homogeneous or heterogeneous irradiations. These variations were correlated to the number of hematopoietic progenitors and to other parameters such as duration and depth of pancytopenia. The results indicated that the concentration of Flt3 ligand in the blood reflects the bone marrow status, and that the follow-up of plasma Flt3 ligand concentration could give predictive information about the bone marrow function and the duration and severity of pancytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Nevertheless, the clinical use of Flt3 ligand as a biological indicator of bone marrow damage require the knowledge of the mechanisms regulating the variations in plasma Flt3 ligand concentration. We thus developed a study in the mouse model. The results indicated that the variations in plasma Flt3 ligand variations were not solely due to a balance between its production by lymphoid cells and its consumption by hematopoietic cells. Moreover, we showed that T lymphocytes are not the main regulator of plasma Flt3 ligand concentration as previously suggested, and that other cell types, possibly including bone marrow stromal cells, might be strongly implicated. These results also suggest that the Flt3 ligand is a main systemic regulator of hematopoiesis

  10. Bexarotene ligand pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, R E

    2000-12-01

    Bexarotene (LGD-1069), from Ligand, was the first retinoid X receptor (RXR)-selective, antitumor retinoid to enter clinical trials. The company launched the drug for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), as Targretin capsules, in the US in January 2000 [359023]. The company filed an NDA for Targretin capsules in June 1999, and for topical gel in December 1999 [329011], [349982] specifically for once-daily oral administration for the treatment of patients with early-stage CTCL who have not tolerated other therapies, patients with refractory or persistent early stage CTCL and patients with refractory advanced stage CTCL. The FDA approved Targretin capsules at the end of December 1999 for once-daily oral treatment of all stages of CTCL in patients refractory to at least one prior systemic therapy, at an initial dose of 300 mg/m2/day. After an NDA was submitted in December 1999 for Targretin gel, the drug received Priority Review status for use as a treatment of cutaneous lesions in patients with stage IA, IB or IIA CTCL [354836]. The FDA issued an approvable letter in June 2000, and granted marketing clearance for CTCL in the same month [370687], [372768], [372769], [373279]. Ligand had received Orphan Drug designation for this indication [329011]. At the request of the FDA, Ligand agreed to carry out certain post-approval phase IV and pharmacokinetic studies [351604]. The company filed an MAA with the EMEA for Targretin Capsules to treat lymphoma in November 1999 [348944]. The NDA for Targretin gel is based on a multicenter phase III trial that was conducted in the US, Canada, Europe and Australia involving 50 patients and a multicenter phase I/II clinical program involving 67 patients. Targretin gel was evaluated for the treatment of patients with early stage CTCL (IA-IIA) who were refractory to, intolerant to, or reached a response plateau for at least 6 months on at least two prior therapies. Efficacy results exceeded the protocol-defined response

  11. Bio-inspired computational design of iron catalysts for the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinzheng

    2015-08-25

    Inspired by the active site structure of monoiron hydrogenase, a series of iron complexes are built using experimentally ready-made acylmethylpyridinol and aliphatic PNP pincer ligands. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the newly designed iron complexes are very promising to catalyze the formation of formic acid from H2 and CO2.

  12. Measuring marine iron(III) complexes by CLE-AdSV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Town, R.M.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2005-01-01

    Iron(iii) speciation data, as determined by competitive ligand exchange?adsorptive stripping voltammetry (CLE-AdSV), is reconsidered in the light of the kinetic features of the measurement. The very large stability constants reported for iron(iii) in marine ecosystems are shown to be possibly due to

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Blood Loss When you lose blood, you lose ...

  14. Taking iron supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007478.htm Taking iron supplements To use the sharing features on this page, ... levels. You may also need to take iron supplements as well to rebuild iron stores in your ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... life when more iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark ... choose nonmeat sources of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ... because your need for iron increases during these times of growth and development. Inability To Absorb Enough ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause ... as complete blood count and iron studies. Prevent complications over your lifetime To prevent complications from iron- ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... iron-deficiency anemia may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... taking an overdose of iron. Iron supplements can cause side effects, such as dark stools, stomach irritation, and heartburn. Iron also can cause constipation, so your doctor may suggest that you ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron in your body causes iron-deficiency anemia. Lack of iron usually is due to blood loss, ... preventing, diagnosing, and treating heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders. Learn more about participating in a clinical ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have iron-deficiency anemia, you'll have a high level of transferrin that has no iron. Other ... may include dietary changes and supplements, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require a blood ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and paler than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency ... if you have iron-deficiency anemia or another type of anemia. You may be diagnosed with iron- ...

  7. Iron metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanikolaou, G.; Pantopoulos, K.

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability. When present in excess, iron poses a threat to cells and tissues, and therefore iron homeostasis has to be tightly controlled. Iron's toxicity is largely based on its ability to catalyze the generation of radicals, which attack and damage cellular macromolecules and promote cell death and tissue injury. This is lucidly illustrated in diseases of iron overload, such as hereditary hemochromatosis or transfusional siderosis, where excessive iron accumulation results in tissue damage and organ failure. Pathological iron accumulation in the liver has also been linked to the development of hepatocellular cancer. Here we provide a background on the biology and toxicity of iron and the basic concepts of iron homeostasis at the cellular and systemic level. In addition, we provide an overview of the various disorders of iron overload, which are directly linked to iron's toxicity. Finally, we discuss the potential role of iron in malignant transformation and cancer

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs and ... much of the transferrin in your blood isn't carrying iron. If you have iron-deficiency anemia, ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding. Recommended daily iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts of iron, ... increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age 65. Unhealthy environments Children ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... foods that are high in iron. It is important to know that increasing your intake of iron may not be enough to replace the iron your body normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ESAs are usually used with iron therapy or IV iron, or when iron therapy alone is not enough. Look for Living With will discuss what your doctor may recommend, including lifelong lifestyle changes ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may experience vomiting, headache, or other side effects right after the IV iron, but these usually go ... iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron- ... and lifestyle changes to avoid complications. Follow your treatment plan Do not stop taking your prescribed iron ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is low in iron. For this and other reasons, cow's milk isn't recommended for babies in ... iron in your body is low. For this reason, other iron tests also are done. Serum ferritin. ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of red blood cells, hemoglobin, and iron. Dietary Changes and Supplements Iron You may need iron supplements ... are improving. At your checkups, your doctor may change your medicines or supplements. He or she also ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  19. Regulation mechanisms of the FLT3-ligand after irradiation; Mecanismes de regulation du FLT3-ligand apres irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prat-Lepesant, M

    2005-06-15

    The hematopoietic compartment is one of the most severely damaged after chemotherapy, radiotherapy or accidental irradiations. Whatever its origin, the resulting damage to the bone marrow remains difficult to evaluate. Thus, it would be of great interest to get a biological indicator of residual hematopoiesis in order to adapt the treatment to each clinical situation. Recent results indicated that the plasma Flt3 ligand concentration was increased in patients suffering from either acquired or induced aplasia, suggesting that Flt3 ligand might be useful as a biological indicator of bone marrow status. We thus followed in a mouse model as well as in several clinical situations the variations in plasma Flt3 ligand concentration, after either homogeneous or heterogeneous irradiations. These variations were correlated to the number of hematopoietic progenitors and to other parameters such as duration and depth of pancytopenia. The results indicated that the concentration of Flt3 ligand in the blood reflects the bone marrow status, and that the follow-up of plasma Flt3 ligand concentration could give predictive information about the bone marrow function and the duration and severity of pancytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Nevertheless, the clinical use of Flt3 ligand as a biological indicator of bone marrow damage require the knowledge of the mechanisms regulating the variations in plasma Flt3 ligand concentration. We thus developed a study in the mouse model. The results indicated that the variations in plasma Flt3 ligand variations were not solely due to a balance between its production by lymphoid cells and its consumption by hematopoietic cells. Moreover, we showed that T lymphocytes are not the main regulator of plasma Flt3 ligand concentration as previously suggested, and that other cell types, possibly including bone marrow stromal cells, might be strongly implicated. These results also suggest that the Flt3 ligand is a main systemic regulator of hematopoiesis

  20. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...... to that continuing on Earth – although on much smaller length- and timescales – with melting of the metal and silicates; differentiation into core, mantle, and crust; and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth...

  1. Iron deficiency anemia refractory to iron preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with iron deficiency anemia are treated effectively with oral iron preparations. However, a small number of these patients are refractory to such treatments, even when the pathologic condition underlying the anemia is concurrently treated. The pathological basis for this refractoriness can be explained by several factors, including malabsorption of iron, e.g. atrophic gastritis, deficiency of other hematopoietic vitamins or minerals, e.g. vitamin B12 or zinc, other undiagnosed anemic disorders, e.g. renal anemia or hematopoietic diseases, as well as certain hereditary disorders of iron metabolism, e.g. iron refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) caused by genetic mutation of the TMPRSS6 gene. This review focuses on the diagnosis and pathoetiology of iron deficiency anemia that is refractory to conventional oral iron preparations.

  2. Characterizing the production and retention of dissolved iron as Fe(II) across a natural gradient in chlorophyll concentrations in the Southern Drake Passage - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katherine Barbeau

    2007-04-10

    . As a co-PI in the NSF/OPP-funded project, I was responsible for iron addition incubation and radiotracer experiments, and analysis of iron chemistry, including iron-organic speciation. This final technical report describes the results of my DOE funded project to analyse reduced iron species using an FeLume flow injection analysis chemiluminescence system as an extension of my work on the NSF/OPP project. On the cruise in 2004, spatial and temporal gradients in Fe(II) were determined, and on-board incubations were conducted to study Fe(II) lifetime and production. Following the cruise a further series of experiments was conducted in my laboratory to study Fe(II) lifetimes and photoproduction under conditions typical of high latitude waters. The findings of this study suggest that, in contrast to results observed during mesoscale iron addition experiments, steady-state levels of Fe(II) are likely to remain low (below detection) even within a significant gradient in dissolved Fe concentrations produced as a result of natural iron enrichment processes. Fe(II) is likely to be produced, however, as a reactive intermediate associated with photochemical reactions in surface waters. While Fe(II) lifetimes measured in the field in this study were commensurate with those determined in previously published Southern Ocean work, Fe(II) lifetimes reflective of realistic Southern Ocean environmental conditions have proven difficult to determine in a laboratory setting, due to contamination by trace levels of H2O2. Laboratory experiments demonstrated that direct ligand-to-metal charge transfer reactions of strong Fe(III)-organic complexes do appear to be a viable source of available Fe(II) in Antarctic waters, and further studies are needed to characterize the temperature dependence of this phenomenon.

  3. Ligand-controlled Fe mobilization catalyzed by adsorbed Fe(II) on Fe(hydr)oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyounglim; Biswakarma, Jagannath; Borowski, Susan C.; Hug, Stephan J.; Hering, Janet G.; Schenkeveld, Walter D. C.; Kraemer, Stephan M.

    2017-04-01

    Dissolution of Fe(hydr)oxides is a key process in biological iron acquisition. Due to the low solubility of iron oxides in environments with a circumneutral pH, organisms may exude organic compounds catalyzing iron mobilization by reductive and ligand controlled dissolution mechanisms. Recently, we have shown synergistic effects between reductive dissolution and ligand-controlled dissolution that may operate in biological iron acquisition. The synergistic effects were observed in Fe mobilization from single goethite suspensions as well as in suspensions containing calcareous soil[1],[2]. However, how the redox reaction accelerates Fe(hydr)oxide dissolution by ligands is not studied intensively. In our study, we hypothesized that electron transfer to structural Fe(III) labilizes the Fe(hydr)oxide structure, and that this can accelerate ligand controlled dissolution. Systematical batch dissolution experiments were carried out under anoxic conditions at environmentally relevant pH values in which various Fe(hydr)oxides (goethite, hematite, lepidocrocite) interacted with two different types of ligand (desferrioxamine B (DFOB) and N,N'-Di(2-hydroxybenzyl)ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid monohydrochloride (HBED)). Electron transfer to the structure was induced by adsorbing Fe(II) to the mineral surface at various Fe(II) concentrations. Our results show a distinct catalytic effect of adsorbed Fe(II) on ligand controlled dissolution, even at submicromolar Fe(II) concentrations. We observed the effect for a range of iron oxides, but it was strongest in lepidocrocite, most likely due to anisotropy in conductivity leading to higher near-surface concentration of reduced iron. Our results demonstrate that the catalytic effect of reductive processes on ligand controlled dissolution require a very low degree of reduction making this an efficient process for biological iron acquisition and a potentially important effect in natural iron cycling. References 1. Wang, Z. M

  4. Structural Characterization of Natural Nickel and Copper Binding Ligands along the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect

    OpenAIRE

    Boiteau, Rene M.; Till, Claire P.; Ruacho, Angel; Bundy, Randelle M.; Hawco, Nicholas J.; McKenna, Amy M.; Barbeau, Katherine A.; Bruland, Kenneth W.; Saito, Mak A.; Repeta, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Organic ligands form strong complexes with many trace elements in seawater. Various metals can compete for the same ligand chelation sites, and the final speciation of bound metals is determined by relative binding affinities, concentrations of binding sites, uncomplexed metal concentrations, and association/dissociation kinetics. Different ligands have a wide range of metal affinities and specificities. However, the chemical composition of these ligands in the marine environment remains poor...

  5. Structural characterization of natural nickel and copper binding ligands along the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal transect

    OpenAIRE

    Rene M Boiteau; Rene M Boiteau; Claire P Till; Angel Ruacho; Randelle M Bundy; Nicholas J Hawco; Nicholas J Hawco; Amy M. McKenna; Katherine Barbeau; Kenneth Bruland; Mak Saito; Daniel James Repeta

    2016-01-01

    Organic ligands form strong complexes with many trace elements in seawater. Various metals can compete for the same ligand chelation sites, and the final speciation of bound metals is determined by relative binding affinities, concentrations of binding sites, uncomplexed metal concentrations, and association/dissociation kinetics. Different ligands have a wide range of metal affinities and specificities. However, the chemical composition of these ligands in the marine environment remains poor...

  6. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  7. Iron(III) Chloride mediated reduction of Bis(1-isoquinolylcarbonyl ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    atoms of the ligand and two chloride ions, imparting a rare distorted trigonal bipyramidal N3Cl2 coordination environment. Keywords. Reduction; Ferric chloride; Isoquinoline; Bis(carbonyl)amide. 1. Introduction. Iron(III) chloride has been known to catalyze or assist several kinds of organic reactions.1–3 This includes.

  8. Iron complexes as electrocatalysts for the water oxidation reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kottrup, K.G.

    2018-01-01

    In this dissertation, the synthesis and characterization of a series of iron complexes based on different ligand platforms are described. The complexes are subsequently studied for their activity in catalytic water oxidation with the help of a variety of electroanalytical techniques. The

  9. Phytic acid concentration influences iron bioavailability from biofortified beans in Rwandese women with low iron status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nicolai; Egli, Ines; Gahutu, Jean B; Tugirimana, Pierrot L; Boy, Erick; Hurrell, Richard

    2014-11-01

    The common bean is a staple crop in many African and Latin American countries and is the focus of biofortification initiatives. Bean iron concentration has been doubled by selective plant breeding, but the additional iron is reported to be of low bioavailability, most likely due to high phytic acid (PA) concentrations. The present study evaluated the impact of PA on iron bioavailability from iron-biofortified beans. Iron absorption, based on erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes, was measured in 22 Rwandese women who consumed multiple, composite bean meals with potatoes or rice in a crossover design. Iron absorption from meals containing biofortified beans (8.8 mg Fe, 1320 mg PA/100 g) and control beans (5.4 mg Fe, 980 mg PA/100 g) was measured with beans containing either their native PA concentration or with beans that were ∼50% dephytinized or >95% dephytinized. The iron concentration of the cooked composite meals with biofortified beans was 54% higher than in the same meals with control beans. With native PA concentrations, fractional iron absorption from the control bean meals was 9.2%, 30% higher than that from the biofortified bean meals (P bean meals (406 μg) was 19% higher (P bean meals. With ∼50% and >95% dephytinization, the quantity of iron absorbed from the biofortified bean meals increased to 599 and 746 μg, respectively, which was 37% (P bean meals. PA strongly decreases iron bioavailability from iron-biofortified beans, and a high PA concentration is an important impediment to the optimal effectiveness of bean iron biofortification. Plant breeders should focus on lowering the PA concentration of high-iron beans. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01521273. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Ligand Depot: a data warehouse for ligands bound to macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zukang; Chen, Li; Maddula, Himabindu; Akcan, Ozgur; Oughtred, Rose; Berman, Helen M; Westbrook, John

    2004-09-01

    Ligand Depot is an integrated data resource for finding information about small molecules bound to proteins and nucleic acids. The initial release (version 1.0, November, 2003) focuses on providing chemical and structural information for small molecules found as part of the structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. Ligand Depot accepts keyword-based queries and also provides a graphical interface for performing chemical substructure searches. A wide variety of web resources that contain information on small molecules may also be accessed through Ligand Depot. Ligand Depot is available at http://ligand-depot.rutgers.edu/. Version 1.0 supports multiple operating systems including Windows, Unix, Linux and the Macintosh operating system. The current drawing tool works in Internet Explorer, Netscape and Mozilla on Windows, Unix and Linux.

  11. Metallo-supramolecular Architectures based on Multifunctional N-Donor Ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Tanh Jeazet, Harold Brice

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembly processes were used to construct supramolecular architectures based on metal-ligand interactions. The structures formed strongly depend on the used metal ion, the ligand type, the chosen counter ion and solvent as well as on the experimental conditions. The focus of the studies was the design of multifunctional N-donor ligands and the characterization of their complexing and structural properties. This work was divided into three distinct main parts: The bis(2-pyridylimine), the...

  12. Melatonin: functions and ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mahaveer; Jadhav, Hemant R

    2014-09-01

    Melatonin is a chronobiotic substance that acts as synchronizer by stabilizing bodily rhythms. Its synthesis occurs in various locations throughout the body, including the pineal gland, skin, lymphocytes and gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Its synthesis and secretion is controlled by light and dark conditions, whereby light decreases and darkness increases its production. Thus, melatonin is also known as the 'hormone of darkness'. Melatonin and analogs that bind to the melatonin receptors are important because of their role in the management of depression, insomnia, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease (AD), diabetes, obesity, alopecia, migraine, cancer, and immune and cardiac disorders. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action of melatonin in these disorders, which could aid in the design of novel melatonin receptor ligands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Unravelling the genetics of iron status in African populations : candidate gene association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gichohi-Wainaina, W.N.

    2015-01-01

    <strong>Abstract>

    <strong>Background:> Investigating the manner in which genetic and environmental factors interact to increase susceptibility to iron deficiency, has the potential to impact on strategies to overcome iron deficiency as well as the development of

  14. Unravelling the genetics of iron status in African populations : candidate gene association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gichohi-Wainaina, W.N.

    2015-01-01

    <strong>Abstract> <strong>Background:> Investigating the manner in which genetic and environmental factors interact to increase susceptibility to iron deficiency, has the potential to impact on strategies to overcome iron deficiency as well as the development of biomarkers to monitor

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... term but can't take iron supplements by mouth. This therapy also is given to people who need immediate treatment for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With If you have iron-deficiency anemia, get ongoing care to make sure your iron levels are improving. ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  17. Serum iron test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fe+2; Ferric ion; Fe++; Ferrous ion; Iron - serum; Anemia - serum iron; Hemochromatosis - serum iron ... A blood sample is needed. Iron levels are highest in the morning. Your health care provider will likely have you do this test in the morning.

  18. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  19. Special thermite cast irons

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. Zhiguts; I. Kurytnik

    2008-01-01

    The given paper deals with the problems of the synthesis of cast iron by metallothermy synthesis. On the basis of investigated method of calculations structures of charges have been arranged and cast iron has been synthesized further. Peculiarities metallothermic smelting were found, mechanical properties and structure of received cast iron were investigated and different technologies for cast iron receiving were worked out.

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... of growth and development. Inability To Absorb Enough Iron Even if you have enough iron in your ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other conditions to prevent you from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried ... patterns. Increase your daily intake of iron-rich foods to help treat your iron-deficiency anemia. See Prevention strategies to learn about foods ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron added). If you don't eat these foods regularly, or if you don't take an iron supplement, you're more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... levels of red blood cells, hemoglobin, and iron. Dietary Changes and Supplements Iron You may need iron supplements to build ... Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources Anemia (MedlinePlus) "Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Iron" (Office of Dietary Supplements, National ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  5. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 15 milligrams. (Adolescence is a time of rapid growth and teen girls need additional iron to replace what they ... make up the difference. Iron deficiency can affect growth and may lead to ... Enough Iron? Kids and teens should know that iron is an important part ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prescribes. Keep iron supplements out of reach from children. This will prevent them from taking an overdose of iron. Iron supplements can cause side effects, such as dark stools, stomach irritation, and heartburn. Iron also can cause constipation, so your doctor may suggest that you use ...

  7. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  8. Proteomic analysis of iron acquisition, metabolic and regulatory responses of Yersinia pestis to iron starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleischmann Robert D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of the bubonic plague. Efficient iron acquisition systems are critical to the ability of Y. pestis to infect, spread and grow in mammalian hosts, because iron is sequestered and is considered part of the innate host immune defence against invading pathogens. We used a proteomic approach to determine expression changes of iron uptake systems and intracellular consequences of iron deficiency in the Y. pestis strain KIM6+ at two physiologically relevant temperatures (26°C and 37°C. Results Differential protein display was performed for three Y. pestis subcellular fractions. Five characterized Y. pestis iron/siderophore acquisition systems (Ybt, Yfe, Yfu, Yiu and Hmu and a putative iron/chelate outer membrane receptor (Y0850 were increased in abundance in iron-starved cells. The iron-sulfur (Fe-S cluster assembly system Suf, adapted to oxidative stress and iron starvation in E. coli, was also more abundant, suggesting functional activity of Suf in Y. pestis under iron-limiting conditions. Metabolic and reactive oxygen-deactivating enzymes dependent on Fe-S clusters or other iron cofactors were decreased in abundance in iron-depleted cells. This data was consistent with lower activities of aconitase and catalase in iron-starved vs. iron-rich cells. In contrast, pyruvate oxidase B which metabolizes pyruvate via electron transfer to ubiquinone-8 for direct utilization in the respiratory chain was strongly increased in abundance and activity in iron-depleted cells. Conclusions Many protein abundance differences were indicative of the important regulatory role of the ferric uptake regulator Fur. Iron deficiency seems to result in a coordinated shift from iron-utilizing to iron-independent biochemical pathways in the cytoplasm of Y. pestis. With growth temperature as an additional variable in proteomic comparisons of the Y. pestis fractions (26°C and 37°C, there was

  9. Interconnection of nitrogen fixers and iron in the Pacific Ocean: Theory and numerical simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Dutkiewicz, S.; Ward, B. A.; Monteiro, F.; Follows, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the interplay between iron supply, iron concentrations and phytoplankton communities in the Pacific Ocean. We present a theoretical framework which considers the competition for iron and nitrogen resources between phytoplankton to explain where nitrogen fixing autotrophs (diazotrophs, which require higher iron quotas, and have slower maximum growth) can co-exist with other phytoplankton. The framework also indicates that iron and fixed nitrogen concentrations can be strongly contro...

  10. Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-03

    Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators In the past year, the grant was used for work in the field of topological phases, with emphasis on finding...surface of topological insulators. In the past 3 years, we have started a new direction, that of fractional topological insulators. These are materials...in which a topologically nontrivial quasi-flat band is fractionally filled and then subject to strong interactions. The views, opinions and/or

  11. Strong Cosmic Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, James

    2017-01-01

    The Hawking-Penrose theorems tell us that solutions of Einstein's equations are generally singular, in the sense of the incompleteness of causal geodesics (the paths of physical observers). These singularities might be marked by the blowup of curvature and therefore crushing tidal forces, or by the breakdown of physical determinism. Penrose has conjectured (in his `Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture`) that it is generically unbounded curvature that causes singularities, rather than causal breakdown. The verification that ``AVTD behavior'' (marked by the domination of time derivatives over space derivatives) is generically present in a family of solutions has proven to be a useful tool for studying model versions of Strong Cosmic Censorship in that family. I discuss some of the history of Strong Cosmic Censorship, and then discuss what is known about AVTD behavior and Strong Cosmic Censorship in families of solutions defined by varying degrees of isometry, and discuss recent results which we believe will extend this knowledge and provide new support for Strong Cosmic Censorship. I also comment on some of the recent work on ``Weak Null Singularities'', and how this relates to Strong Cosmic Censorship.

  12. Iron absorption in relation to iron status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, B.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.; Hallberg, L.; Rossander, L.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption from a 3 mg dose of ferrous iron was measured in 250 male subjects. The absorption was related to the log concentration of serum ferritin in 186 subjects of whom 99 were regular blood donors (r= -0.76), and to bone marrow haemosiderin grading in 52 subjects with varying iron status. The purpose was to try and establish a percentage absorption from such a dose that is representative of subjects who are borderline iron deficient. This information is necessary for food iron absorption studies in order (1) to calculate the absorption of iron from the diet at a given iron status and (2) compare the absorption of iron from different meals studied in different groups of subjects by different investigarors. The results suggest that an absorption of about 40% of a 3 mg reference dose of ferrous iron is given in a fasting state, roughly corresponds to the absorption in borderline-iron-deficient subjects. The results indicate that this 40% absorption value corresponds to a serum ferritin level of 30 μg/l and that food iron absorption in a group of subjects should be expressed preferably as the absorption corresponding to a reference-dose absorption of 45%, or possibly a serum ferritin level of 30 μg/l. (author)

  13. Dinitrogen binding and cleavage by multinuclear iron complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Sean F; Holland, Patrick L

    2015-07-21

    The iron-molybdenum cofactor of nitrogenase has unprecedented coordination chemistry, including a high-spin iron cluster called the iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMoco). Thus, understanding the mechanism of nitrogenase challenges coordination chemists to understand the fundamental N2 chemistry of high-spin iron sites. This Account summarizes a series of studies in which we have synthesized a number of new compounds with multiple iron atoms, characterized them using crystallography and spectroscopy, and studied their reactions in detail. These studies show that formally iron(I) and iron(0) complexes with three- and four-coordinate metal atoms have the ability to weaken and break the triple bond of N2. These reactions occur at or below room temperature, indicating that they are kinetically facile. This in turn implies that iron sites in the FeMoco are chemically reasonable locations for N2 binding and reduction. The careful evaluation of these compounds and their reaction pathways has taught important lessons about what characteristics make iron more effective for N2 activation. Cooperation of two iron atoms can lengthen and weaken the N-N bond, while three working together enables iron atoms to completely cleave the N-N bond to nitrides. Alkali metals (typically introduced into the reaction as part of the reducing agent) are thermodynamically useful because the alkali metal cations stabilize highly reduced complexes, pull electron density into the N2 unit, and make reduced nitride products more stable. Alkali metals can also play a kinetic role, because cation-π interactions with the supporting ligands can hold iron atoms near enough to one another to facilitate the cooperation of multiple iron atoms. Many of these principles may also be relevant to the iron-catalyzed Haber-Bosch process, at which collections of iron atoms (often promoted by the addition of alkali metals) break the N-N bond of N2. The results of these studies teach more general lessons as well. They

  14. LABILE IRON IN CELLS AND BODY FLUIDS . Physiology, Pathology and Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvi Ioav Cabantchik

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In living systems iron appears predominantly associated with proteins, but can also be detected in forms referred as labile iron, which denotes the combined redox properties of iron and its amenability to exchange between ligands, including chelators. The labile cell iron (LCI composition varies with metal concentration and substances with chelating groups but also with pH and the redox potential. Although physiologically in the lower µM range, LCI plays a key role in cell iron economy as cross-roads of metabolic pathways. LCI levels are continually regulated by an iron-responsive machinery that balances iron uptake versus deposition into ferritin. However, LCI rises aberrantly in some cell types due to faulty cell utilization pathways or infiltration by pathological iron forms that are found in hemosiderotic plasma. As LCI attains pathological levels, it can catalyze reactive O species (ROS formation that, at particular threshold, can surpass cellular anti-oxidant capacities and seriously damage its constituents. While in normal plasma and interstitial fluids, virtually all iron is securely carried by circulating transferrin (that renders iron essentially non-labile, in systemic iron overload (IO, the total plasma iron binding capacity is often surpassed by a massive iron influx from hyperabsorptive gut or from erythrocyte overburdened spleen and/or liver. As plasma transferrin approaches iron saturation, labile plasma iron (LPI emerges in forms that can infiltrate cells by unregulated routes and raise LCI to toxic levels. Despite the limited knowledge available on LPI speciation in different types and degrees of iron overload, LPI measurements can be and are in fact used for identifying systemic IO and for initiating/adjusting chelation regimens to attain full-day LPI protection. A recent application of labile iron assay is the detection of labile components in iv iron formulations per se as well as in plasma (LPI following parenteral iron

  15. Copper binding ligands: production by marine plankton and characterization by ESI-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orians, K.; Ross, A.; Lawrence, M.; Ikonomou, M.

    2003-04-01

    Organic complexation affects the bioavailability and distribution of copper in the surface ocean. The cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 was cultured in the lab and subjected to near-toxic Cu concentrations. Strong Cu-binding ligands were produced under these conditions, as found for other species of Synechococcus. The copper-binding ligand produced had a log K'cond. (log conditional stability constant) of 12.2, similar to the natural ligands found in the surface ocean. The amount of ligand produced was proportional to the amount of copper present. Isolation and concentration of these compounds for characterization by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) provides information about the structure of the organic ligands and their metal-ion complexes. Using model ligands, we'll show that ligands can be characterized by ESI-MS and that the location of the copper binding site can be determined in complex molecules. We'll also present results of copper-complexing ligands extracted from the coastal waters of British Columbia. Ligand concentrations are higher at low salinity and in surface waters, indicating that these ligands are produced in surface waters and/or delivered to the region via the Fraser River. Analysis of the extracts with highest UV absorbance identified two Cu2+ ligands of molecular weight 259 and 264. The mass and isotopic distributions are consistent with dipeptides and tripeptides containing two metal-binding amino groups. This result is consistent with the findings of other studies attempting to characterize Cu2+ ligands in seawater. The structure of the identified ligand is similar to that of rhodotorulic acid (a microbial siderophore), glutathione, and phytochelatins, indicating that small peptides and related compounds can act as strong, specific metal chelators in natural waters

  16. Electron Spectroscopy Studies of Iron, Iron Sulfides and Supported Iron Surfaces: Chemisorption of Simple Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yiu Chung

    EELS was used to investigate the chemisorption of oxygen and carbon on iron. The EELS spectra of oxidized iron show characteristic features with strong enhancement of the interband transitions involving the Fe 3d band (4.6 and 7.5 eV) and moderate enhancement of the M(,2,3) transition doublet (54.4 and 58.2 eV). The changes in the electron energy loss structures with an overlayer of graphitic or carbidic carbon were investigated. The adsorption and growth of iron on Ni(100) has been studied using the combined techniques of LEED and EELS. Initially iron grows by a layer-by-layer mechanism for the first few layers. High iron coverages result in the observation of complex LEED patterns with satellites around the main (1 x 1) diffraction sports. This is due to the formation of b.c.c. Fe(110) crystallites arranged in domains with different orientations. EELS studies show the presence of three stages in the growth of iron on Ni(100): low-coverage, film-like and bulk-like. Auger and EELS were used to study the iron sulfide (FeS(,2), Fe(,7)S(,8) and FeS) surfaces. A characteristic M(,2,3) VV Auger doublet with a separation of 5.0 eV was observed on the sulfides. An assignment of the electron energy loss peaks was made based on the energy dependence of the loss peaks and previous photoemission results. The effect of argon ion bombardment was studied. Peaks with strong iron and sulfur character were observed. Heating the damaged sulfides results in reconstruction of the sulfide surfaces. The reactions of the sulfides with simple gases, such as H(,2), CO, CH(,4), C(,2)H(,4), NH(,3) and O(,2) were also studied. Using XPS, the chemisorption of SO(,2) on CaO(100) has been studied. The chemical state of sulfur has been identified as that of sulfate. The kinetics of SO(,2) chemisorption on CaO are discussed. The binding states of Fe and Na on CaO were determined to be Fe('2+) and Na('+) respectively. At low Fe or Na coverages (< 0.5 ML), there is a large increase in the rate of

  17. Glutamate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandt, Mette; Johansen, Tommy N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Homologation and substitution on the carbon backbone of (S)-glutamic acid [(S)-Glu, 1], as well as absolute stereochemistry, are structural parameters of key importance for the pharmacological profile of (S)-Glu receptor ligands. We describe a series of methyl-substituted 2-aminoadipic acid (AA...... or slightly lower potencies than (S)-AA [e.g., EC(50) = 76 microM for (2S,4S)-4-methyl-AA (5a) as compared to EC(50) = 35 microM for (S)-AA]. The position of the methyl substituent had a profound effect on the observed pharmacology, whereas the absolute stereochemistry at the methylated carbon atom had a very......) analogs, and the synthesis, stereochemistry, and enantiopharmacology of 3-methyl-AA (4a-d), 4-methyl-AA (5a-d), 5-methyl-AA (6a-d), and (E)-Delta(4)-5-methyl-AA (7a and 7b) are reported. The compounds were resolved using chiral HPLC and the configurational assignments of the enantiomers were based on X...

  18. [Iron and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufrère, B; Bresson, J L; Briend, A; Farriaux, J P; Ghisolfi, J; Navarro, J; Rey, J; Ricour, C; Rieu, D; Vidailhet, M

    1995-12-01

    Infants, young children, and childbearing aged women are particularly exposed to iron deficiency. Pregnancy further increases iron requirements. Nevertheless the consequences of anemia and/or iron deficiency on pregnancy outcome, development of the foetus and postnatal iron status of the infant, remain to be determined. There is a 3-fold increase of premature deliveries in iron deficient anemic pregnant women whose anemia is discovered in early pregnancy: however this increased risk of premature delivery is not observed when iron deficiency anemia is discovered in late pregnancy. Iron supplementation during pregnancy improves the maternal hematological parameters but it is still unclear whether it also improves the maternal health and the pre and postnatal development of the child. Based on our actual knowledge, iron supplementation during pregnancy is to be recommended in risk groups only (ie mainly adolescents, low income women, women with multiple pregnancies), using ferrous iron at a dosage of 30 mg per day.

  19. The mechanism of stereospecific C-H oxidation by Fe(Pytacn) complexes: bioinspired non-heme iron catalysts containing cis-labile exchangeable sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Irene; Company, Anna; Postils, Verònica; Ribas, Xavi; Que, Lawrence; Luis, Josep M; Costas, Miquel

    2013-05-17

    A detailed mechanistic study of the hydroxylation of alkane C-H bonds using H2O2 by a family of mononuclear non heme iron catalysts with the formula [Fe(II)(CF3SO3)2(L)] is described, in which L is a tetradentate ligand containing a triazacyclononane tripod and a pyridine ring bearing different substituents at the α and γ positions, which tune the electronic or steric properties of the corresponding iron complexes. Two inequivalent cis-labile exchangeable sites, occupied by triflate ions, complete the octahedral iron coordination sphere. The C-H hydroxylation mediated by this family of complexes takes place with retention of configuration. Oxygen atoms from water are incorporated into hydroxylated products and the extent of this incorporation depends in a systematic manner on the nature of the catalyst, and the substrate. Mechanistic probes and isotopic analyses, in combination with detailed density functional theory (DFT) calculations, provide strong evidence that C-H hydroxylation is performed by highly electrophilic [Fe(V)(O)(OH)L] species through a concerted asynchronous mechanism, involving homolytic breakage of the C-H bond, followed by rebound of the hydroxyl ligand. The [Fe(V)(O)(OH)L] species can exist in two tautomeric forms, differing in the position of oxo and hydroxide ligands. Isotopic-labeling analysis shows that the relative reactivities of the two tautomeric forms are sensitively affected by the α substituent of the pyridine, and this reactivity behavior is rationalized by computational methods. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Strong Arcwise Connectedness

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza, Benjamin; Gartside, Paul; Kovan-Bakan, Merve; Mamatelashvili, Ana

    2012-01-01

    A space is `n-strong arc connected' (n-sac) if for any n points in the space there is an arc in the space visiting them in order. A space is omega-strong arc connected (omega-sac) if it is n-sac for all n. We study these properties in finite graphs, regular continua, and rational continua. There are no 4-sac graphs, but there are 3-sac graphs and graphs which are 2-sac but not 3-sac. For every n there is an n-sac regular continuum, but no regular continuum is omega-sac. There is an omega-sac ...

  1. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally......'s scenarios have some valuable future or admitted that killing them is not seriously morally wrong. Finally, if "valuable future" is interpreted as referring to objective standards, one ends up with implausible and unpalatable moral claims....

  2. Cast iron - a predictable material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorg C. Sturm

    2011-02-01

    stresses in castings are also gaining increasing attention. State-of-the-art tools allow the prediction of residual stresses and iron casting distortion quantitatively. Cracks in castings can be assessed, as well as the reduction of casting stresses during heat treatment. As the property requirements for cast iron as a material in design strongly increase, new alloys and materials such as ADI might become more attractive, where latest software developments allow the modeling of the required heat treatment. Phases can be predicted and parametric studies can be performed to optimize the alloy dependent heat treatment conditions during austenitization, quenching and ausferritization. All this quantitative information about the material's performance is most valuable if it can be used during casting design. The transfer of local properties into the designer抯 world, to predict fatigue and durability as a function of the entire manufacturing route, will increase the trust in this old but highly innovative material and will open new opportunities for cast iron in the future. The paper will give an overview on current capabilities to quantitatively predict cast iron specific defects and casting performance and will highlight latest developments in modeling the manufacture of cast iron and ADI as well as the prediction of iron casting stresses.

  3. Iron(III) citrate speciation in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Andre M N; Kong, XiaoLe; Parkin, Mark C; Cammack, Richard; Hider, Robert C

    2009-10-28

    Citrate is an iron chelator and it has been shown to be the major iron ligand in the xylem sap of plants. Furthermore, citrate has been demonstrated to be an important ligand for the non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI) pool occurring in the plasma of individuals suffering from iron-overload. However, ferric citrate chemistry is complicated and a definitive description of its aqueous speciation at neutral pH remains elusive. X-Ray crystallography data indicates that the alcohol function of citrate (Cit4-) is involved in Fe(III) coordination and that deprotonation of this functional group occurs upon complex formation. The inability to include this deprotonation in the affinity constant calculations has been a major source of divergence between various reports of iron(III)-citrate affinity constants. However the recent determination of the alcoholic pKa of citric acid (H4Cit) renders the reassessment of the ferric citrate system possible. The aqueous speciation of ferric citrate has been investigated by mass spectrometry and EPR spectroscopy. It was observed that the most relevant species are a monoiron dicitrate species and dinuclear and trinuclear oligomeric complexes, the relative concentration of which depends on the solution pH value and the iron : citric acid molar ratio. Spectrophotometric titration was utilized for affinity constant determination and the formation constant for the biologically relevant [Fe(Cit)2]5- is reported for the first time.

  4. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and a Polydiacetylene Coating to Create a Biocompatible and Stable Molecule for Use in Cancer Diagnostics and Early Detection in Molecular Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Shweta

    Earlier cancer detection and diagnosis is essential to prevent cancer mortality in nanomedicine and nanotechnology. Fluorescence and magnetic signals provide a way for earlier detection through imaging systems. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have a superparamagnetism feature that allows them to act as contrast agents that can be detected through a magnetic resonance imaging system. These iron oxide cores have a polymer coating around them to provide stability, prevent aggregation, and allow for biocompatibility within the body. In addition, these functional coatings can have ligands and peptides for detection and therapy purposes. One functional coating is a polydiacetylene coating due to its chromatic and optical properties. When polymerized, it has the ability to change color in the visible spectrum to blue (not a fluorescent signal) and when heated, it changes to a red color (fluorescent signal). This way a strong and stable layer is formed around the iron oxide cores. These coatings are placed on the iron cores using a modified dual solvent exchange method, in which DMSO is slowly replaced by water without the use of organic solvents previous used. In addition, these nanoparticles can then be PEGylated, which provides a more stable and water soluble compound in aqueous solutions. Measurements can be taken through dynamic light scattering for size distributions and zeta potential and the Nanodrop for absorbance. Ideal sizes are about 30 nm for MNPs. Moreover, for future directions, there can be more molecules attached to the coated layers to use for molecular detection and analysis.

  5. Development of iron homeostasis in infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2017-12-01

    Healthy, term, breastfed infants usually have adequate iron stores that, together with the small amount of iron that is contributed by breast milk, make them iron sufficient until ≥6 mo of age. The appropriate concentration of iron in infant formula to achieve iron sufficiency is more controversial. Infants who are fed formula with varying concentrations of iron generally achieve sufficiency with iron concentrations of 2 mg/L (i.e., with iron status that is similar to that of breastfed infants at 6 mo of age). Regardless of the feeding choice, infants' capacity to regulate iron homeostasis is important but less well understood than the regulation of iron absorption in adults, which is inverse to iron status and strongly upregulated or downregulated. Infants who were given daily iron drops compared with a placebo from 4 to 6 mo of age had similar increases in hemoglobin concentrations. In addition, isotope studies have shown no difference in iron absorption between infants with high or low hemoglobin concentrations at 6 mo of age. Together, these findings suggest a lack of homeostatic regulation of iron homeostasis in young infants. However, at 9 mo of age, homeostatic regulatory capacity has developed although, to our knowledge, its extent is not known. Studies in suckling rat pups showed similar results with no capacity to regulate iron homeostasis at 10 d of age when fully nursing, but such capacity occurred at 20 d of age when pups were partially weaned. The major iron transporters in the small intestine divalent metal-ion transporter 1 (DMT1) and ferroportin were not affected by pup iron status at 10 d of age but were strongly affected by iron status at 20 d of age. Thus, mechanisms that regulate iron homeostasis are developed at the time of weaning. Overall, studies in human infants and experimental animals suggest that iron homeostasis is absent or limited early in infancy largely because of a lack of regulation of the iron transporters DMT1 and ferroportin

  6. A strong comeback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marier, D.

    1992-01-01

    This article presents the results of a financial rankings survey which show a strong economic activity in the independent energy industry. The topics of the article include advisor turnover, overseas banks, and the increase in public offerings. The article identifies the top project finance investors for new projects and restructurings and rankings for lenders

  7. Variability in the organic ligands released by Emiliania huxleyi under simulated ocean acidification conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Samperio-Ramos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The variability in the extracellular release of organic ligands by Emiliania huxleyi under four different pCO2 scenarios (225, 350, 600 and 900 μatm, was determined. Growth in the batch cultures was promoted by enriching them only with major nutrients and low iron concentrations. No chelating agents were added to control metal speciation. During the initial (IP, exponential (EP and steady (SP phases, extracellular release rates, normalized per cell and day, of dissolved organic carbon (DOCER, phenolic compounds (PhCER, dissolved combined carbohydrates (DCCHOER and dissolved uronic acids (DUAER in the exudates were determined. The growth rate decreased in the highest CO2 treatment during the IP (<48 h, but later increased when the exposure was longer (more than 6 days. DOCER did not increase significantly with high pCO2. Although no relationship was observed between DCCHOER and the CO2 conditions, DCCHO was a substantial fraction of the freshly released organic material, accounting for 18% to 37%, in EP, and 14% to 23%, in SP, of the DOC produced. Growth of E. huxleyi induced a strong response in the PhCER and DUAER. While in EP, PhCER were no detected, the DUAER remained almost constant for all CO2 treatments. Increases in the extracellular release of these organic ligands during SP were most pronounced under high pCO2 conditions. Our results imply that, during the final growth stage of E. huxleyi, elevated CO2 conditions will increase its excretion of acid polysaccharides and phenolic compounds, which may affect the biogeochemical behavior of metals in seawater.

  8. Development of a strong electromagnet wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, M.J.; Deis, G.A.; Holmes, R.H.; Van Maren, R.D.; Halbach, K.

    1987-01-01

    The Strong Electromagnet (SEM) wiggler is a permanent magnet-assisted electromagnet under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Induction Linac Free-Electron-Laser (IFEL) program. This concept uses permanent magnets within the wiggler to provide a reverse bias flux in the iron and thus delay the onset of magnetic saturation. The electromagnet coils determine the wiggler field and operate at low current densities by virtue of their placement away from the midplane. We describe here the design approach used and test data from a 7-period wiggler prototype that includes curved pole tips to provide wiggle-plane focusing. 7 refs

  9. Ligand-guided receptor optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katritch, Vsevolod; Rueda, Manuel; Abagyan, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    Receptor models generated by homology or even obtained by crystallography often have their binding pockets suboptimal for ligand docking and virtual screening applications due to insufficient accuracy or induced fit bias. Knowledge of previously discovered receptor ligands provides key information that can be used for improving docking and screening performance of the receptor. Here, we present a comprehensive ligand-guided receptor optimization (LiBERO) algorithm that exploits ligand information for selecting the best performing protein models from an ensemble. The energetically feasible protein conformers are generated through normal mode analysis and Monte Carlo conformational sampling. The algorithm allows iteration of the conformer generation and selection steps until convergence of a specially developed fitness function which quantifies the conformer's ability to select known ligands from decoys in a small-scale virtual screening test. Because of the requirement for a large number of computationally intensive docking calculations, the automated algorithm has been implemented to use Linux clusters allowing easy parallel scaling. Here, we will discuss the setup of LiBERO calculations, selection of parameters, and a range of possible uses of the algorithm which has already proven itself in several practical applications to binding pocket optimization and prospective virtual ligand screening.

  10. Quantitative Prediction of Multivalent Ligand-Receptor Binding Affinities for Influenza, Cholera, and Anthrax Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Susanne; Netz, Roland R

    2018-03-05

    Multivalency achieves strong, yet reversible binding by the simultaneous formation of multiple weak bonds. It is a key interaction principle in biology and promising for the synthesis of high-affinity inhibitors of pathogens. We present a molecular model for the binding affinity of synthetic multivalent ligands onto multivalent receptors consisting of n receptor units arranged on a regular polygon. Ligands consist of a geometrically matching rigid polygonal core to which monovalent ligand units are attached via flexible linker polymers, closely mimicking existing experimental designs. The calculated binding affinities quantitatively agree with experimental studies for cholera toxin ( n = 5) and anthrax receptor ( n = 7) and allow to predict optimal core size and optimal linker length. Maximal binding affinity is achieved for a core that matches the receptor size and for linkers that have an equilibrium end-to-end distance that is slightly longer than the geometric separation between ligand core and receptor sites. Linkers that are longer than optimal are greatly preferable compared to shorter linkers. The angular steric restriction between ligand unit and linker polymer is shown to be a key parameter. We construct an enhancement diagram that quantifies the multivalent binding affinity compared to monovalent ligands. We conclude that multivalent ligands against influenza viral hemagglutinin ( n = 3), cholera toxin ( n = 5), and anthrax receptor ( n = 7) can outperform monovalent ligands only for a monovalent ligand affinity that exceeds a core-size dependent threshold value. Thus, multivalent drug design needs to balance core size, linker length, as well as monovalent ligand unit affinity.

  11. Studies on effect of Microbial Iron Chelators on Candida Albican

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehmani, Fouzia S.; Milicent, S.; Zaheer-Uddin

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential for the life of all microbe cells. It generally exists in the oxidized form Fe(III). Even under anaerobic reducing condition the metal appear to be taken up as Fe(III). Thus free-living microorganisms require specific and effective ferric ion transport system to cope with low availability of the metal. In iron deficient environment they produce a low molecular weight specific chelators called siderphores or microbial iron chelators. Siderphores compete for limited supplied of iron. These compounds came out of the cell but can not re-enter without iron due to high affinity of these siderphores often have more than one catechol/hydroxamate functions and are multidentate (usually hexadentate ligands). The aim of the present research is to check the effect of iron chelators, namely gallic acid and salisyl hydroxamate on the growth of Candida albican in vitro. C. albican is the opportunistic paltogen present as the normal flora inside human body. In vivo the growth of C. albican is distributed by the use of antibiotics and immuno suppressers. In cases of iron over-dosage in human being, the patients are treated with certain a-iron chelators. Hence an attempt is made to notice the effect that might be inhibition or enhancement of the organism in vitro. (author)

  12. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Models of spontaneous breaking of electroweak symmetry by a strong interaction do not have fine tuning/hierarchy problem. They are conceptually elegant and use the only mechanism of spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry that is known to occur in nature. The simplest model, minimal technicolor with extended technicolor interactions, is appealing because one can calculate by scaling up from QCD. But it is ruled out on many counts: inappropriately low quark and lepton masses (or excessive FCNC), bad electroweak data fits, light scalar and vector states, etc. However, nature may not choose the minimal model and then we are stuck: except possibly through lattice simulations, we are unable to compute and test the models. In the LHC era it therefore makes sense to abandon specific models (of strong EW breaking) and concentrate on generic features that may indicate discovery. The Technicolor Straw Man is not a model but a parametrized search strategy inspired by a remarkable generic feature of walking technicolor,...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for iron-deficiency anemia, especially if they have: A history of iron-deficiency anemia Heavy blood loss during ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of blood ... iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition because they need twice ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... of iron include: Iron-fortified breads and cereals Peas; lentils; white, red, and baked beans; soybeans; and ... and juices usually have more vitamin C than canned ones. If you're taking medicines, ask your ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... and is recruiting by invitation only. View more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor may recommend that you ... Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia ...

  19. Iron in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - iron; Ferric acid; Ferrous acid; Ferritin ... The human body needs iron to make the oxygen-carrying proteins hemoglobin and myoglobin. Hemoglobin is found in red blood cells and myoglobin is found ...

  20. Iron supplements (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  1. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... be hard to get the recommended amount from food alone. Pregnant women need more iron to support ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... infancy and childhood can have long-lasting, negative effects on brain health, the American Academy of Pediatrics ... overdose of iron. Iron supplements can cause side effects, such as dark stools, stomach irritation, and heartburn. ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... carry oxygen throughout your body. A reticulocyte count shows whether your bone marrow is making red blood ... Tests to measure iron levels. These tests can show how much iron has been used from your ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and young children and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment ... ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... you don't have enough iron in your body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood ... remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur if your red blood ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to improve health through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... apply to all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all ... growth and development, and behavioral problems. Signs and Symptoms of Iron Deficiency Signs and symptoms of iron ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... For this treatment, iron is injected into a muscle or an IV line in one of your ... body can damage your organs. You may have fatigue (tiredness) and other symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... from absorbing enough iron. Certain eating patterns or habits may put you at higher risk for iron- ... preventing, diagnosing, and treating heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders. Are you a frequent blood donor living ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... chronic conditions such as kidney disease or celiac disease may be more likely to receive IV iron. You may experience vomiting, headache, or other side effects right after the IV iron, but these usually ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... risk for the condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia ... periods. About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... need for iron increases during these periods of growth and development, and it may be hard to get the ... iron-deficiency anemia, red blood cells will be small in size with an MCV of less than ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and ... of the mouth, an enlarged spleen, and frequent infections. People who have iron-deficiency anemia may have ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lead in their blood from their environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make ... drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron- ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less ... include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... muh-glow-bin). Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the ... hemoglobin than normal. Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein in red blood cells. It helps red blood ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting less than the recommended daily ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. Living With will discuss what your doctor may recommend to prevent your iron- ... colon under sedation to view the colon directly. What if my doctor thinks something else is causing ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... of the condition. Your doctor may recommend healthy eating changes, iron supplements, intravenous iron therapy for mild ... less Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and ... Internal bleeding (bleeding inside the body) also may lead to iron-deficiency anemia. This type of blood ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... inability to absorb enough iron from food. Blood Loss When you lose blood, you lose iron. If ... produce hemoglobin. Tests and Procedures for Gastrointestinal Blood Loss To check whether internal bleeding is causing your ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... striking the ground, such as with marathon runners. Sex Girls and women between the ages of 14 ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase the likelihood of bleeding ... oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption of iron. If you are pregnant, talk to ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... recommended amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen ... mean corpuscular volume (MCV) that would suggest anemia. Different tests help your doctor screen for iron-deficiency ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... can slow the absorption of iron. Screening and Prevention Eating a well-balanced diet that includes iron- ... deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for who should be ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up to 11 mg for children ages 7 to ... called hepcidin. Hepcidin blocks the intestine from taking up iron. Other medical conditions Other medical conditions that ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... total amount of iron you need every day. Vitamin C Vitamin C helps the body absorb iron. Good sources of vitamin C are vegetables and fruits, especially citrus fruits. Citrus ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... specialists also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs ... information, go to the Health Topics Blood Transfusion article. Iron Therapy If you have severe anemia, your ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... were born prematurely may be at an even higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores ... men of the same age. Women are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia under some circumstances, ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the cause and severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... from absorbing enough iron. Certain eating patterns or habits may put you at higher risk for iron- ... preventing, diagnosing, and treating heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders. Learn more about participating in a clinical ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... to iron-deficiency anemia. We are interested in studying in more detail how iron levels are regulated ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... eating lead in paint or soil, or drinking water that contains lead. Teens Teens are at risk ... out of reach from children. This will prevent them from taking an overdose of iron. Iron supplements ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... more information about diet and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young ... who should be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... some stages of life, such as pregnancy and childhood, it may be hard to get enough iron ... supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and childhood can have long-lasting, negative effects on brain ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... disease also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables. ... iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables. ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ... iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the condition. Treatments may include ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women of childbearing age ... For this treatment, iron is injected into a muscle or an IV line in one of your ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... stomach also can interfere with iron absorption. Risk Factors Infants and Young Children Infants and young children ... blood loss during their monthly periods Other risk factors for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Blood Loss When you lose blood, you lose iron. ... find out how severe the condition is. Complete Blood Count Often, the first test used to diagnose ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is severe, you may get a transfusion of red blood cells. A blood transfusion is ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep ... diets can provide enough iron if you eat the right foods. For example, good nonmeat sources of iron ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... hemoglobin than normal. Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein in red blood cells. It helps red blood ... oh-crit) levels. Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells that carries oxygen from ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your body. Reticulocyte ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to prevent you from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried ... tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... lose blood, you lose iron. Certain conditions or medicines can cause blood loss and lead to iron- ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ...

  20. Novel olfactory ligands via terpene synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchet, Sabrina; Chamberlain, Keith; Woodcock, Christine M; Miller, David J; Birkett, Michael A; Pickett, John A; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2015-05-01

    A synthetic biology approach to the rational design of analogues of olfactory ligands by providing unnatural substrates for the enzyme synthesising (S)-germacrene D, an olfactory ligand acting as a plant derived insect repellent, to produce novel ligands is described as a viable alternative to largely unsuccessful ligand docking studies. (S)-14,15-Dimethylgermacrene D shows an unexpected reversal in behavioural activity.

  1. 2 : 2 Fe(III): ligand and "adamantane core" 4 : 2 Fe(III): ligand (hydr)oxo complexes of an acyclic ditopic ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghiladi, Morten; Larsen, Frank B.; McKenzie, Christine J.

    2005-01-01

    crystalline platelets. The Fe4O6 core of 2 shows an adamantane-like structure: The six bridging oxygen atoms are provided by the two phenolato groups of the two bpbp(-) ligands, two bridging oxo groups and two bridging hydroxo groups. The hydroxo and oxo ligands could be distinguished on the basis of Fe - O......-ray structure of the dinuclear complex [{( Hbpbp) Fe(mu-OH)}(2)](ClO4)(4) center dot 2C(3)H(6)O ( 1 center dot 2C(3)H(6)O) shows that only one of the metal-binding cavities of each ligand is occupied by an iron( III) atom and two [Fe(Hbpbp)](3+) units are linked together by two hydroxo bridging groups to form...... a [ Fe(III) -(mu-OH)](2) rhomb structure with Fe center dot center dot center dot Fe = 3.109(1) angstrom. The non-coordinated tertiary amine of Hbpbp is protonated. Magnetic susceptibility measurements show a well-behaved weak antiferromagnetic coupling between the two Fe( III) atoms, J =- 8 cm(-1...

  2. Plasmons in strong superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldo, M.; Ducoin, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the possible plasmon excitations that can occur in systems where strong superconductivity is present. In these systems the plasmon energy is comparable to or smaller than the pairing gap. As a prototype of these systems we consider the proton component of Neutron Star matter just below the crust when electron screening is not taken into account. For the realistic case we consider in detail the different aspects of the elementary excitations when the proton, electron components are considered within the Random-Phase Approximation generalized to the superfluid case, while the influence of the neutron component is considered only at qualitative level. Electron screening plays a major role in modifying the proton spectrum and spectral function. At the same time the electron plasmon is strongly modified and damped by the indirect coupling with the superfluid proton component, even at moderately low values of the gap. The excitation spectrum shows the interplay of the different components and their relevance for each excitation modes. The results are relevant for neutrino physics and thermodynamical processes in neutron stars. If electron screening is neglected, the spectral properties of the proton component show some resemblance with the physical situation in high-T c superconductors, and we briefly discuss similarities and differences in this connection. In a general prospect, the results of the study emphasize the role of Coulomb interaction in strong superconductors.

  3. Iron absorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekenved, G.

    1976-01-01

    The main objective of the present work was to study iron absorption from different iron preparations in different types of subjects and under varying therapeutic conditions. The studies were performed with different radioiron isotope techniques and with a serum iron technique. The preparations used were solutions of ferrous sulphate and rapidly-disintegrating tablets containing ferrous sulphate, ferrous fumarate and ferrous carbonate and a slow-release ferrous sulphate tablet of an insoluble matrix type (Duroferon Durules). The serum iron method was evaluated and good correlation was found between the serum iron response and the total amount of iron absorbed after an oral dose of iron given in solution or in tablet form. New technique for studying the in-vivo release properties of tablets was presented. Iron tablets labelled with a radio-isotope were given to healthy subjects. The decline of the radioactivity in the tablets was followed by a profile scanning technique applied to different types of iron tablets. The release of iron from the two types of tablets was shown to be slower in vivo than in vitro. It was found that co-administration of antacids and iron tablets led to a marked reduction in the iron absorption and that these drugs should not be administered sumultaneously. A standardized meal markedly decreased the absorbability of iron from iron tablets. The influence of the meal was more marked with rapidly-disintegrating than with slow-release ferrous sulphate tablets. The absorption from rapidly-disintegrating and slow-release ferrous sulphate tablets was compared under practical clinical conditions during an extended treatment period. The studies were performed in healthy subjects, blood donors and patients with iron deficiency anaemia and it was found that the absorption of iron from the slow-release tablets was significantly better than from the rapidly-disintegrating tablets in all three groups of subjects. (author)

  4. Determining Iron Distribution in the Regolith of 433 Eros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. E.; Evans, L. F.; Murphy, M. E.

    1998-09-01

    We have produced maps of iron abundance in bulk and iron-bearing mineral (pyroxene and olivine) soil components by combining Apollo Gamma-ray (AGR) and Clementine spectral reflectance (CSR) with lunar soil data to produce a more detailed model of crustal iron distribution than the separate datasets would provide. CSR measurements are most directly correlated to pyroxene iron in lunar soils. We subtracted pyroxene-recalibrated CSR data from AGR bulk iron abundance measurements: the residual iron is clearly correlated with olivine abundance in lunar soils. This work has implications for determining iron distribution for 433 Eros, a Class S asteroid, during the upcoming NEAR mission. We have modeled X-ray and Gamma-ray spectral line ratios for the best meteorite class candidates and can clearly distinguish between them, on the basis of abundance ratios. We have considered the equivalent spectral reflectance measurements, from which mineral abundances would be derived, as well, summarized in the qualitative Meteorite Classification matrix below. With these measurements, we should be able to determine Eros' nearest meteorite analogue, and iron abundance in each component. \\begin{tabular}{llll} Si/Fe, Mg/Fe for XGRS & Fe Band Depth, Position & Albedo & Meteorite Class Medium, MediumHigh & Medium, shorter & Medium & Ordinary Chondrite, Type H Medium, High & Medium, longer & Medium & Ordinary Chondrite, Type LL High, Medium & Strong, shorter & High & Achondrite-Eucrite High, High & Strong, longer & High & Achondrite-Diogenite Low, Low & Weak & Medium & Stony Iron-Mesosiderite Low, MediumLow & Weak & Medium & Stony Iron-Pallasite

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, ... iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron supplement. Follow ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Follow a high-fiber diet. Large amounts of fiber can slow the absorption of iron. Screening and Prevention Eating a well-balanced diet that includes iron-rich foods may help you prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Taking ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially harmful donations and protect individuals from needing iron supplementation. Advancing research for improved health In support of our mission , we are committed ...

  8. Iron and Immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbon, E.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413534049; Trapet, P.L.; Stringlis, I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41185206X; Kruijs, Sophie; Bakker, P.A.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074744623; Pieterse, C.M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113115113

    2017-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for most life on Earth because it functions as a crucial redox catalyst in many cellular processes. However, when present in excess iron can lead to the formation of harmful hydroxyl radicals. Hence, the cellular iron balance must be tightly controlled. Perturbation of

  9. Glutathione, Glutaredoxins, and Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Carsten; Lillig, Christopher Horst

    2017-11-20

    Glutathione (GSH) is the most abundant cellular low-molecular-weight thiol in the majority of organisms in all kingdoms of life. Therefore, functions of GSH and disturbed regulation of its concentration are associated with numerous physiological and pathological situations. Recent Advances: The function of GSH as redox buffer or antioxidant is increasingly being questioned. New functions, especially functions connected to the cellular iron homeostasis, were elucidated. Via the formation of iron complexes, GSH is an important player in all aspects of iron metabolism: sensing and regulation of iron levels, iron trafficking, and biosynthesis of iron cofactors. The variety of GSH coordinated iron complexes and their functions with a special focus on FeS-glutaredoxins are summarized in this review. Interestingly, GSH analogues that function as major low-molecular-weight thiols in organisms lacking GSH resemble the functions in iron homeostasis. Since these iron-related functions are most likely also connected to thiol redox chemistry, it is difficult to distinguish between mechanisms related to either redox or iron metabolisms. The ability of GSH to coordinate iron in different complexes with or without proteins needs further investigation. The discovery of new Fe-GSH complexes and their physiological functions will significantly advance our understanding of cellular iron homeostasis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1235-1251.

  10. Iron Stain on Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Iron stain, an unsightly blue–black or gray discoloration, can occur on nearly all woods. Oak, redwood, cypress, and cedar are particularly prone to iron stain because these woods contain large amounts of tannin-like extractives. The discoloration is caused by a chemical reaction between extractives in the wood and iron in steel products, such as nails, screws, and...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ages of 14 and 50 years need more iron than boys and men of the same age. Women are at higher ... anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the ... cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Frequent blood tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia ... iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts ...

  18. Iron homeostasis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Allison L; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2017-12-01

    During pregnancy, iron needs to increase substantially to support fetoplacental development and maternal adaptation to pregnancy. To meet these iron requirements, both dietary iron absorption and the mobilization of iron from stores increase, a mechanism that is in large part dependent on the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. In healthy human pregnancies, maternal hepcidin concentrations are suppressed in the second and third trimesters, thereby facilitating an increased supply of iron into the circulation. The mechanism of maternal hepcidin suppression in pregnancy is unknown, but hepcidin regulation by the known stimuli (i.e., iron, erythropoietic activity, and inflammation) appears to be preserved during pregnancy. Inappropriately increased maternal hepcidin during pregnancy can compromise the iron availability for placental transfer and impair the efficacy of iron supplementation. The role of fetal hepcidin in the regulation of placental iron transfer still remains to be characterized. This review summarizes the current understanding and addresses the gaps in knowledge about gestational changes in hematologic and iron variables and regulatory aspects of maternal, fetal, and placental iron homeostasis. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other dark green leafy vegetables Prune juice The Nutrition Facts labels on packaged foods will show how much iron the items contain. The amount is given as a percentage of the total amount of iron you need every day. Vitamin C Vitamin C helps the body absorb iron. ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research ... Is Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you don't have enough iron in your body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of ... and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... 2, especially if they drink a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased ... more detail how iron levels are regulated by hormones and other pathways. ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron- ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the best sources of iron. Follow a high-fiber diet. Large amounts of fiber can slow the absorption of iron. Screening and Prevention Eating a well-balanced diet that includes iron-rich foods may help you ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  8. A Protein Data Bank survey reveals shortening of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in ligand-protein complexes when a halogenated ligand is an H-bond donor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Poznański

    Full Text Available Halogen bonding in ligand-protein complexes is currently widely exploited, e.g. in drug design or supramolecular chemistry. But little attention has been directed to other effects that may result from replacement of a hydrogen by a strongly electronegative halogen. Analysis of almost 30000 hydrogen bonds between protein and ligand demonstrates that the length of a hydrogen bond depends on the type of donor-acceptor pair. Interestingly, lengths of hydrogen bonds between a protein and a halogenated ligand are visibly shorter than those estimated for the same family of proteins in complexes with non-halogenated ligands. Taking into account the effect of halogenation on hydrogen bonding is thus important when evaluating structural and/or energetic parameters of ligand-protein complexes. All these observations are consistent with the concept that halogenation increases the acidity of the proximal amino/imino/hydroxyl groups and thus makes them better, i.e. stronger, H-bond donors.

  9. A Protein Data Bank survey reveals shortening of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in ligand-protein complexes when a halogenated ligand is an H-bond donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznański, Jarosław; Poznańska, Anna; Shugar, David

    2014-01-01

    Halogen bonding in ligand-protein complexes is currently widely exploited, e.g. in drug design or supramolecular chemistry. But little attention has been directed to other effects that may result from replacement of a hydrogen by a strongly electronegative halogen. Analysis of almost 30000 hydrogen bonds between protein and ligand demonstrates that the length of a hydrogen bond depends on the type of donor-acceptor pair. Interestingly, lengths of hydrogen bonds between a protein and a halogenated ligand are visibly shorter than those estimated for the same family of proteins in complexes with non-halogenated ligands. Taking into account the effect of halogenation on hydrogen bonding is thus important when evaluating structural and/or energetic parameters of ligand-protein complexes. All these observations are consistent with the concept that halogenation increases the acidity of the proximal amino/imino/hydroxyl groups and thus makes them better, i.e. stronger, H-bond donors.

  10. Kinetics of hydrogen release from alloyed iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomozov, P.A.; Mogutnov, B.M.; Shvartsman, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    The kinetics of evolution of hydrogen from Armco-iron and alloys of iron with small amounts of carbon, phosphorus, sulfur, titanium, silicon and nickel was studied in the temperature range from 24 to 110 deg C. This process is described in terms of a kinetic equation which follows from the solution of the equation of diffusion with boundary conditions allowing for the rate of the chemical reaction on the surface of the specimen. A strong dependence is noted of the surface reaction on the presence of small amounts of alloying elements in the iron. The reaction of evolution of hydrogen from iron and its alloys in the temperature range from 24 to 110 deg C takes place in a combined diffusion-kinetic range

  11. Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of furan- and thiophene-functionalized bis(n-heterocyclic carbene) complexes of iron(II)

    KAUST Repository

    Rieb, Julia

    2014-09-15

    The synthesis of iron(II) complexes bearing new heteroatom-functionalized methylene-bridged bis(N-heterocyclic carbene) ligands is reported. All complexes are characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SC-XRD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. Tetrakis(acetonitrile)-cis-[bis(o-imidazol-2-ylidenefuran)methane]iron(II) hexafluorophosphate (2a) and tetrakis(acetonitrile)-cis-[bis(o-imidazol-2-ylidenethiophene)methane]iron(II) hexafluorophosphate (2b) were obtained by aminolysis of [Fe{N(SiMe3)2}2(THF)] with furan- and thiophene-functionalized bis(imidazolium) salts 1a and 1b in acetonitrile. The SC-XRD structures of 2a and 2b show coordination of the bis(carbene) ligand in a bidentate fashion instead of a possible tetradentate coordination. The four other coordination sites of these distorted octahedral complexes are occupied by acetonitrile ligands. Crystallization of 2a in an acetone solution by the slow diffusion of Et2O led to the formation of cisdiacetonitriledi[ bis(o-imidazol-2-ylidenefuran)methane]iron(II) hexafluorophosphate (3a) with two bis(carbene) ligands coordinated in a bidentate manner and two cis-positioned acetonitrile molecules. Compounds 2a and 2b are the first reported iron(II) carbene complexes with four coordination sites occupied by solvent molecules, and it was demonstrated that those solvent ligands can undergo ligand-exchange reactions.

  12. mobilization of iron from soil recalcitrant fractions by using mango

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Abstract. This study has been carried out to investigate the speciation of iron in the various, plant available and non-available, soil fractions and the efficiency of the Mango. (Mangifera indica) plant leaf extract in mobilizing iron from the strongly-bound soil fractions of cultivated, forest and water logged soil samples which ...

  13. CO2 hydrogenation to hydrocarbons over iron nanoparticles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    active nanoparticles.17 Oxygen functionalization of the exposed graphitic CNT surfaces is required to provide strong anchoring sites for the deposited nanoparticles.21. Here, we report CO2 hydrogenation to hydrocar- bons over iron nanoparticles supported on oxygen- functionalized CNTs (OCNTs). The iron catalyst was.

  14. Ecology of neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria in wetland soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.

    2011-01-01

    Wetland ecosystems are important as sites of rapid biogeochemical cycling of bioactive elements, among which iron features prominently. The redox cycling of iron exerts a strong influence on soil chemistry and the metabolism of plants and microorganisms. Studies have shown that bacteria play an

  15. Combined Effects of Atmospheric and Seafloor Iron Fluxes to the Glacial Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muglia, Juan; Somes, Christopher J.; Nickelsen, Levin; Schmittner, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    Changes in the ocean iron cycle could help explain the low atmospheric CO2 during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Previous modeling studies have mostly considered changes in aeolian iron fluxes, although it is known that sedimentary and hydrothermal fluxes are important iron sources for today's ocean. Here we explore effects of preindustrial-to-LGM changes in atmospheric dust, sedimentary, and hydrothermal fluxes on the ocean's iron and carbon cycles in a global coupled biogeochemical-circulation model. Considering variable atmospheric iron solubility decreases LGM surface soluble iron fluxes compared with assuming constant solubility. This limits potential increases in productivity and export production due to surface iron fertilization, lowering atmospheric CO2 by only 4 ppm. The effect is countered by a decrease in sedimentary flux due to lower sea level, which increases CO2 by 15 ppm. Assuming a 10 times higher iron dust solubility in the Southern Ocean, combined with changes in sedimentary flux, we obtain an atmospheric CO2 reduction of 13 ppm. The high uncertainty in the iron fluxes does not allow us to determine the net direction and magnitude of variations in atmospheric CO2 due to changes in the iron cycle. Our model does not account for changes to iron-binding ligand concentrations that could modify the results. We conclude that when evaluating glacial-interglacial changes in the ocean iron cycle, not only surface but also seafloor fluxes must be taken into account.

  16. Strong-coupling approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, R.B.

    1984-03-01

    Standard path-integral techniques such as instanton calculations give good answers for weak-coupling problems, but become unreliable for strong-coupling. Here we consider a method of replacing the original potential by a suitably chosen harmonic oscillator potential. Physically this is motivated by the fact that potential barriers below the level of the ground-state energy of a quantum-mechanical system have little effect. Numerically, results are good, both for quantum-mechanical problems and for massive phi 4 field theory in 1 + 1 dimensions. 9 references, 6 figures

  17. Strong interaction and QFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, T.

    1981-01-01

    With an assumed weak multiplet structure for bosonic hadrons, which is consistent with the ΔI = 1/2 rule, it is shown that the strong interaction effective hamiltonian is compatible with the weak SU(2) x U(1) gauge transformation. Especially the rho-meson transforms as a triplet under SU(2)sub(w), and this is the origin of the rho-photon analogy. It is also shown that the existence of the non-vanishing Cabibbo angle is a necessary condition for the absence of the exotic hadrons. (orig.)

  18. An Iron-Based Molecular Redox Switch as a Model for Iron Release from Enterobactin via the Salicylate Binding Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Thomas R.; Lutz, Andreas; Parel, Serge P.; Ensling, Jürgen; Gütlich, Philipp; Buglyó, Péter; Orvig, Chris

    1999-11-01

    The iron release mechanism from protonated ferric enterobactin [Fe(III)(enterobactinH(3))] via the salicylate binding mode was probed. For this purpose, a tripodal dodecadentate ligand incorporating three salicylamide (OO) and three bipyridine (NN) binding sites was synthesized as well as iron complexes thereof. It was shown that a ferric ion coordinates selectively to the hard salicylamides and a ferrous ion binds to the softer bipyridines. Upon reduction or oxidation, the iron translocates reversibly and intramolecularly from one site to the other, thus displaying switchlike properties. Both states were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and visible and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The Mössbauer spectrum for the ferric complex is fully consistent with that obtained by Pecoraro et al. upon lowering the pH of [Fe(III)(enterobactin)](3)(-) solutions (Pecoraro, V. L., et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1983, 105, 4617), thus supporting the alternative iron release mechanism from enterobactin via the salicylate binding mode.

  19. NHC Versus Pyridine: How “Teeth” Change the Redox Behavior of Iron(II) Complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Weiss, Daniel T.

    2015-10-06

    A series of octahedral iron(II) complexes with tetradentate NHC/pyridine hybrid ligands containing up to three pyridyl units was designed to study the influence of NHC and pyridine donors on the electronic structure of the metal center. Structural analysis of the iron complexes by NMR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction reveals different coordination modes of the ligand depending on the linkage of the different donor moieties. The oxidation potentials of all complexes correlate linearly with the number of NHC moieties coordinated to iron, as shown by cyclic voltammetry. The influence, although minor, of structural properties on the oxidation potential and (in one case) the influence of the oxidation state of the coordination geometry of the hybrid ligand are also demonstrated.

  20. Strong Coupling Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2009-01-01

    We show that whenever a 4-dimensional theory with N particle species emerges as a consistent low energy description of a 3-brane embedded in an asymptotically-flat (4+d)-dimensional space, the holographic scale of high-dimensional gravity sets the strong coupling scale of the 4D theory. This connection persists in the limit in which gravity can be consistently decoupled. We demonstrate this effect for orbifold planes, as well as for the solitonic branes and string theoretic D-branes. In all cases the emergence of a 4D strong coupling scale from bulk holography is a persistent phenomenon. The effect turns out to be insensitive even to such extreme deformations of the brane action that seemingly shield 4D theory from the bulk gravity effects. A well understood example of such deformation is given by large 4D Einstein term in the 3-brane action, which is known to suppress the strength of 5D gravity at short distances and change the 5D Newton's law into the four-dimensional one. Nevertheless, we observe that the ...

  1. GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT AND IRON ABSORPTION: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys O. LATUNDE-DADA

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Iron is an important element in many metabolic processes. The bioavailability of iron is a function of solubilization and reduction of Fe3+ in the stomach, hydrolysis, neutralization, ligand complexes and transport through the mucus layer of the intestine. The bioavailibility of non-heme Fe is determined by enhancers of iron absorption such as meat, amino acids, organic acids, antagonized by the inhibitors as bran, phytate and fibre. Haem Fe is absorbed directly as an intact metalloprotein porphyrin complex. The pathways of inorganic Fe into the mucosa cell Include endocytosis, electrogenic fatty acid mediated transcellular pathway, nonspecific paracellular permeation ar probably facilitated transcellular diffusion. The redox model proposes the reduction of Fe3+ by a transplasma membrane ferric reductase in lhe duodenal mucosa and the translocation of the Fe2+ across the cell probably by the nonesterified fatty acid. The mucin-mobilferrin-integrin pathway on the other hand involves the delivery of Fe-mucin complex in the lumen to the integrins of mucosa surface for translocation lo mobllferrin in the cytosol. The transfer of absorbed Fe iron from the mucosa into the blood is dependent on a number of regulatory intracellular and systemic factors

  2. Dietary hemoglobin rescues young piglets from severe iron deficiency anemia: Duodenal expression profile of genes involved in heme iron absorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Staroń

    Full Text Available Heme is an efficient source of iron in the diet, and heme preparations are used to prevent and cure iron deficiency anemia in humans and animals. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for heme absorption remain only partially characterized. Here, we employed young iron-deficient piglets as a convenient animal model to determine the efficacy of oral heme iron supplementation and investigate the pathways of heme iron absorption. The use of bovine hemoglobin as a dietary source of heme iron was found to efficiently counteract the development of iron deficiency anemia in piglets, although it did not fully rebalance their iron status. Our results revealed a concerted increase in the expression of genes responsible for apical and basolateral heme transport in the duodenum of piglets fed a heme-enriched diet. In these animals the catalytic activity of heme oxygenase 1 contributed to the release of elemental iron from the protoporphyrin ring of heme within enterocytes, which may then be transported by the strongly expressed ferroportin across the basolateral membrane to the circulation. We hypothesize that the well-recognized high bioavailability of heme iron may depend on a split pathway mediating the transport of heme-derived elemental iron and intact heme from the interior of duodenal enterocytes to the bloodstream.

  3. LIGO: The strong belief

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years of designing, building and testing a number of innovative technologies, with the strong belief that the endeavour would lead to a historic breakthrough. The Bulletin publishes an abstract of the Courier’s interview with Barry Barish, one of the founding fathers of LIGO.   The plots show the signals of gravitational waves detected by the twin LIGO observatories at Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington. (Image: Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab) On 11 February, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo collaborations published a historic paper in which they showed a gravitational signal emitted by the merger of two black holes. These results come after 20 years of hard work by a large collaboration of scientists operating the two LIGO observatories in the US. Barry Barish, Linde Professor of Physics, Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology and former Director of the Global Design Effort for the Internat...

  4. Functionalization of new PN ligands with steroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, H.; Volkert, W.A.; Singh, P.R.; Ketring, A.R.; Katti, K.V.

    1993-01-01

    Efforts are currently underway to radiolabel steroids for possible imaging and treatment of breast cancer. The authors are exploring the ligating properties of phosphorus hydrazides to anchor radionuclides of diagnostic and therapeutic use (e.g. 99m Tc or 186 Re/ 188 Re) to estrogen and progesterone steroids which abound around breast tumor cells. The phenolic ring of estrone undergoes nucleophilic reaction with the pentavalent trichloro phosphorus sulfide (or oxide) in the presence of a weak base such as Et 3 N or pyridine. The chlorines were then substituted with hydrazine to produce the phosphorus attached steroid ligands in excellent yields. These ligands formed stable complexes with the metals at the open-quotes non-tracerclose quotes (Pd(II) and Re) and open-quotes tracerclose quotes ( 99m Tc and 109 Pd) levels. The alcohol functionalities as in 11-hydroxy progesterone and protected estradiol were also utilized with the use of a strong base LiN(SiMe 3 ) 2 and KH. Carbonyl containing steroid such as pregnenolone was directly added to a bishydrazido phosphine chelate by Schiff base coupling in a dean stark set-up. For estrone, which contains a hindered ketone, one hydrazone unit was first formed before the phosphorus chloride was introduced. C-O-P bond formation was also achieved from enolates of these ketones. By applying 2 eq of LDA or BuLi, α C-P bonding was accomplished. Structures and reactivities of these phosphorus hydrazide bound steroids are discussed

  5. Effect of surfactant for magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haracz, S. [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89B, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Hilgendorff, M. [Freie Universität Berlin, Fachbereich Physik, Arnimalle 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Rybka, J.D. [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89B, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Giersig, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89B, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Freie Universität Berlin, Fachbereich Physik, Arnimalle 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic behavior of magnetic nanoparticles. • Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles. • Effect of surfactant for magnetic properties. - Abstract: For different medical applications nanoparticles (NPs) with well-defined magnetic properties have to be used. Coating ligand can change the magnetic moment on the surface of nanostructures and therefore the magnetic behavior of the system. Here we investigated magnetic NPs in a size of 13 nm conjugated with four different kinds of surfactants. The surface anisotropy and the magnetic moment of the system were changed due to the presence of the surfactant on the surface of iron oxide NPs.

  6. Effect of surfactant for magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haracz, S.; Hilgendorff, M.; Rybka, J.D.; Giersig, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic behavior of magnetic nanoparticles. • Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles. • Effect of surfactant for magnetic properties. - Abstract: For different medical applications nanoparticles (NPs) with well-defined magnetic properties have to be used. Coating ligand can change the magnetic moment on the surface of nanostructures and therefore the magnetic behavior of the system. Here we investigated magnetic NPs in a size of 13 nm conjugated with four different kinds of surfactants. The surface anisotropy and the magnetic moment of the system were changed due to the presence of the surfactant on the surface of iron oxide NPs.

  7. Effect of Siderophore on Iron Availability in a Diatom and a Dinoflagellate Species: Contrasting Response in Associated Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Sanchez

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Organic ligands play a key role controlling trace metal bioavailability in the world's oceans, yet the species-specific requirements determining whether certain iron forms can be metabolized largely remain unclear. Siderophores are considered relevant within the pool of ligands keeping iron soluble. We used desferrioxamine B (DFB to study the siderophore's effect on cultures of Skeletonema costatum and Alexandrium catenella. The experimental approach used semi-continuous additions of iron(II and DFB over time, reaching final concentrations of 1 and 10 nM Fe and 10–10,000 nM DFB. The negative effect of DFB on growth in S. costatum was evident and sharp until day 9 for treatments above 500 nM. Delayed growth occurred at 10,000 nM, reaching ~80% of cell density in Controls under both iron conditions. Alexandrium catenella exhibited a less severe negative effect of DFB on growth, only significant at 10,000 nM, while growth was enhanced at lowest DFB. Total bacterial abundance in diatom and dinoflagellate cultures presented inverse trends. While negatively correlated to DFB in diatom cultures, bacteria showed highest abundances in high DFB treatments in dinoflagellate cultures. Delayed growth exhibited in S. costatum at the highest DFB, indicates that favorable changes for Fe uptake occurred over time, suggesting the involvement of other mechanisms facilitating the diatom cell membrane reduction. Overall, unaffected growth in A. catenella suggests that this species can use FeDFB and therefore has the capacity to access strongly complexed Fe sources. Contrasting responses in the bacterial community associated with each species highlight the complexity of these interactions, while suggesting that for A. catenella it may represent an advantage for acquiring Fe. These results demonstrated the capacity for different uptake strategies among phytoplankton species of different functional groups and underlines the necessity to broaden the study of iron

  8. Distinct Siderophores Contribute to Iron Cycling in the Mesopelagic at Station ALOHA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundy, Randelle M.; Boiteau, Rene M.; McLean, Craig; Turk-Kubo, Kendra A.; McIlvin, Matt R.; Saito, Mak A.; Van Mooy, Benjamin A. S.; Repeta, Daniel J.

    2018-03-01

    The distribution of dissolved iron (Fe), total organic Fe-binding ligands, and siderophores were measured between the surface and 400 m at Station ALOHA, a long term ecological study site in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. Dissolved Fe concentrations were low throughout the water column and strong organic Fe-binding ligands exceeded dissolved Fe at all depths; varying from 0.9 nmol L-1 in the surface to 1.6 nmol L-1 below 150 m. Although Fe does not appear to limit microbial production, we nevertheless found siderophores at nearly all depths, indicating some populations of microbes were responding to Fe stress. Ferrioxamine siderophores were most abundant in the upper water column, with concentrations between 0.1-2 pmol L-1, while a suite of amphibactins were found below 200 m with concentrations between 0.8-11 pmol L-1. The distinct vertical distribution of ferrioxamines and amphibactins may indicate disparate strategies for acquiring Fe from dust in the upper water column and recycled organic matter in the lower water column. Amphibactins were found to have conditional stability constants (log ) ranging from 12.0-12.5, while ferrioxamines had much stronger conditional stability constants ranging from 14.0-14.4, within the range of observed L1 ligands by voltammetry. We used our data to calculate equilibrium Fe speciation at Station ALOHA to compare the relative concentration of inorganic and siderophore complexed Fe. The results indicate that the concentration of Fe bound to siderophores was up to two orders of magnitude higher than inorganic Fe, suggesting that even if less bioavailable, siderophores were nevertheless a viable pathway for Fe acquisition by microbes at our study site. Finally, we observed rapid production of ferrioxamine E by particle-associated bacteria during incubation of freshly collected sinking organic matter. Fe-limitation may therefore be a factor in regulating carbon metabolism and nutrient regeneration in the mesopelagic.

  9. Rosetta Ligand docking with flexible XML protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmon, Gordon; Meiler, Jens

    2012-01-01

    RosettaLigand is premiere software for predicting how a protein and a small molecule interact. Benchmark studies demonstrate that 70% of the top scoring RosettaLigand predicted interfaces are within 2Å RMSD from the crystal structure [1]. The latest release of Rosetta ligand software includes many new features, such as (1) docking of multiple ligands simultaneously, (2) representing ligands as fragments for greater flexibility, (3) redesign of the interface during docking, and (4) an XML script based interface that gives the user full control of the ligand docking protocol.

  10. Hematologic iron analyte values as an indicator of hepatic hemosiderosis in Callitrichidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kristine M; McAloose, Denise; Torregrossa, Ann-Marie; Raphael, Bonnie L; Calle, Paul P; Moore, Robert P; James, Stephanie B

    2008-07-01

    Hepatic hemosiderosis is one of the most common postmortem findings in captive callitrichid species. Noninvasive evaluation of hematologic iron analytes has been used to diagnose hepatic iron storage disease in humans, lemurs, and bats. This study evaluated the relationship between hematologic iron analyte values (iron, ferritin, total iron binding capacity, and percent transferrin saturation) and hepatic hemosiderosis in callitrichids at the Wildlife Conservation Society's Central Park and Bronx Zoos. Results revealed that both ferritin and percent transferrin saturation levels had strong positive correlations with hepatic iron concentration (Phemosiderosis in callitrichids.

  11. The ubiquity of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Perry A; Reed, George H

    2012-09-21

    The importance of iron in living systems can be traced to the many complexes within which it is found, to its chemical mobility in undergoing oxidation-reduction reactions, and to the abundance of iron in Earth's crust. Iron is the most abundant element, by mass, in the Earth, constituting about 80% of the inner and outer cores of Earth. The molten outer core is about 8000 km in diameter, and the solid inner core is about 2400 km in diameter. Iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust. It is the chemically functional component of mononuclear iron complexes, dinuclear iron complexes, [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters, [Fe-Ni-S] clusters, iron protophorphyrin IX, and many other complexes in protein biochemistry. Metals such as nickel, cobalt, copper, and manganese are present in the crust and could in principle function chemically in place of iron, but they are scarce in Earth's crust. Iron is plentiful because of its nuclear stability in stellar nuclear fusion reactions. It seems likely that other solid planets, formed by the same processes as Earth, would also foster the evolution of life and that iron would be similarly important to life on those planets as it is on Earth.

  12. Uptake and incorporation of iron in sugar beet chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solti, Adám; Kovács, Krisztina; Basa, Brigitta; Vértes, Attila; Sárvári, Eva; Fodor, Ferenc

    2012-03-01

    Chloroplasts contain 80-90% of iron taken up by plant cells. Though some iron transport-related envelope proteins were identified recently, the mechanism of iron uptake into chloroplasts remained unresolved. To shed more light on the process of chloroplast iron uptake, trials were performed with isolated intact chloroplasts of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris). Iron uptake was followed by measuring the iron content of chloroplasts in the form of ferrous-bathophenantroline-disulphonate complex after solubilising the chloroplasts in reducing environment. Ferric citrate was preferred to ferrous citrate as substrate for chloroplasts. Strong dependency of ferric citrate uptake on photosynthetic electron transport activity suggests that ferric chelate reductase uses NADPH, and is localised in the inner envelope membrane. The K(m) for iron uptake from ferric-citrate pool was 14.65 ± 3.13 μM Fe((III))-citrate. The relatively fast incorporation of (57)Fe isotope into Fe-S clusters/heme, detected by Mössbauer spectroscopy, showed the efficiency of the biosynthetic machinery of these cofactors in isolated chloroplasts. The negative correlation between the chloroplast iron concentration and the rate of iron uptake refers to a strong feedback regulation of the uptake. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Chemistry of Iron N -heterocyclic carbene complexes: Syntheses, structures, reactivities, and catalytic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Riener, Korbinian

    2014-05-28

    Iron is the most abundant transition metal in Earth\\'s crust. It is relatively inexpensive, not very toxic, and environmentally benign. Undoubtedly, due to the involvement in a multitude of biological processes, which heavily rely on the rich functionalities of iron-containing enzymes, iron is one of the most important elements in nature. Additionally, three-coordinate iron complexes have been reported during the past several years. In this review, the mentioned iron NHC complexes are categorized by their main structure and reactivity attributes. Thus, monocarbene and bis-monocarbene complexes are presented first. This class is subdivided into carbonyl, nitrosyl, and halide compounds followed by a brief section on other, more unconventional iron NHC motifs. Subsequently, donor-substituted complexes bearing bi-, tri-, tetra-, or even pentadentate ligands and further pincer as well as scorpionato motifs are described.

  14. Mineralogy and geochemistry of banded iron formation and iron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The geological complexities of banded iron formation (BIF) and associated iron ores of Jilling–. Langalata iron ore deposits, Singhbhum–North Orissa Craton, belonging to Iron Ore Group (IOG) eastern India have been studied in detail along with the geochemical evaluation of different iron ores. The geochemical and ...

  15. Mineralogy and geochemistry of banded iron formation and iron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The geological complexities of banded iron formation (BIF) and associated iron ores of Jilling–Langalata iron ore deposits, Singhbhum–North Orissa Craton, belonging to Iron Ore Group (IOG) eastern India have been studied in detail along with the geochemical evaluation of different iron ores. The geochemical and ...

  16. John Strong (1941 - 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    Wickens, F

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on Monday 31st July, a few days before his 65th birthday John started his career working with a group from Westfield College, under the leadership of Ted Bellamy. He obtained his PhD and spent the early part of his career on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), but after the early 1970s his research was focussed on experiments in CERN. Over the years he made a number of notable contributions to experiments in CERN: The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras to record the sparks in the spark chambers; He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems; He was responsible for the second level trigger system for the ALEPH detector and spent five years leading a team that designed and built the system, which ran for twelve years with only minor interventions. Following ALEPH he tur...

  17. Stirring Strongly Coupled Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir; Rajagopal, Krishna; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2009-01-01

    We determine the energy it takes to move a test quark along a circle of radius L with angular frequency w through the strongly coupled plasma of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory. We find that for most values of L and w the energy deposited by stirring the plasma in this way is governed either by the drag force acting on a test quark moving through the plasma in a straight line with speed v=Lw or by the energy radiated by a quark in circular motion in the absence of any plasma, whichever is larger. There is a continuous crossover from the drag-dominated regime to the radiation-dominated regime. In the crossover regime we find evidence for significant destructive interference between energy loss due to drag and that due to radiation as if in vacuum. The rotating quark thus serves as a model system in which the relative strength of, and interplay between, two different mechanisms of parton energy loss is accessible via a controlled classical gravity calculation. We close by speculating on the implicati...

  18. Strong-interaction nonuniversality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkas, R.R.; Foot, R.; He, X.; Joshi, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    The universal QCD color theory is extended to an SU(3) 1 direct product SU(3) 2 direct product SU(3) 3 gauge theory, where quarks of the ith generation transform as triplets under SU(3)/sub i/ and singlets under the other two factors. The usual color group is then identified with the diagonal subgroup, which remains exact after symmetry breaking. The gauge bosons associated with the 16 broken generators then form two massive octets under ordinary color. The interactions between quarks and these heavy gluonlike particles are explicitly nonuniversal and thus an exploration of their physical implications allows us to shed light on the fundamental issue of strong-interaction universality. Nonuniversality and weak flavor mixing are shown to generate heavy-gluon-induced flavor-changing neutral currents. The phenomenology of these processes is studied, as they provide the major experimental constraint on the extended theory. Three symmetry-breaking scenarios are presented. The first has color breaking occurring at the weak scale, while the second and third divorce the two scales. The third model has the interesting feature of radiatively induced off-diagonal Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements

  19. Marine phytoplankton and the changing ocean iron cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, D. A.; Boyd, P. W.

    2016-12-01

    The availability of the micronutrient iron governs phytoplankton growth across much of the ocean, but the global iron cycle is changing rapidly due to accelerating acidification, stratification, warming and deoxygenation. These mechanisms of global change will cumulatively affect the aqueous chemistry, sources and sinks, recycling, particle dynamics and bioavailability of iron. Biological iron demand will vary as acclimation to environmental change modifies cellular requirements for photosynthesis and nitrogen acquisition and as adaptive evolution or community shifts occur. Warming, acidification and nutrient co-limitation interactions with iron biogeochemistry will all strongly influence phytoplankton dynamics. Predicting the shape of the future iron cycle will require understanding the responses of each component of the unique biogeochemistry of this trace element to many concurrent and interacting environmental changes.

  20. Sulfuric acid leaching of high iron-bearing zinc calcine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-lin; Liu, Ji-guang; Xiao, Han-xin; Ma, Shao-jian

    2017-11-01

    Sulfuric acid leaching of high iron-bearing zinc calcine was investigated to assess the effects of sulfuric acid concentration, liquid- to-solid ratio, leaching time, leaching temperature, and the stirring speed on the leaching rates of zinc and iron. The results showed that the sulfuric acid concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, leaching time, and leaching temperature strongly influenced the leaching of zinc and iron, whereas stirring speed had little influence. Zinc was mainly leached and the leaching rate of iron was low when the sulfuric acid concentration was less than 100 g/L. At sulfuric acid concentrations higher than 100 g/L, the leaching rate of iron increased quickly with increasing sulfuric acid concentration. This behavior is attributed to iron-bearing minerals such as zinc ferrite in zinc calcine dissolving at high temperatures and high sulfuric acid concentrations but not at low temperatures and low sulfuric acid concentrations.

  1. Long-Term Effect of a Leonardite Iron Humate Improving Fe Nutrition As Revealed in Silico, in Vivo, and in Field Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieschi, María T; Caballero-Molada, Marcos; Menéndez, Nieves; Naranjo, Miguel A; Lucena, Juan J

    2017-08-09

    Novel, cheap and ecofriendly fertilizers that solve the usual iron deficiency problem in calcareous soil are needed. The aim of this work is to study the long-term effect of an iron leonardite fertilizer on citrus nutrition taking into account a properly characterization, kinetic response with a ligand competition experiment, efficiency assessment using Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain and finally, in field conditions with citrus as test plants. Its efficiency was compared with the synthetic iron chelate FeEDDHA. Leonardite iron humate (LIH) is mainly humic acid with a high-condensed structure where iron is present as ferrihydrite and Fe 3+ polynuclear compounds stabilized by organic matter. Iron and humic acids form aggregates that decrease the iron release from these kinds of fertilizers. Furthermore, LIH repressed almost 50% of the expression of FET3, FTR1, SIT1, and TIS11 genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, indicating increasing iron provided in cells and improved iron nutrition in citrus.

  2. THERMODYNAMIC ASSESSMENT OF ANIONIC LIGANDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    2010-06-30

    Jun 30, 2010 ... The presence of the ligands (ethylenediaminettraacetic acid, EDTA, enthylenediamine, en,and chloride ion, Cl-) generally improved the sorption capacity for the adsorbent, the best being. Cl- at optimum pH of 2.0 (for Co2+) and 5.0 (for Ni2+ and Cd2+). The thermodynamic studies reveal that the adsorption.

  3. Multinuclear non-heme iron complexes for double-strand DNA cleavage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megens, Rik P.; van den Berg, Tieme A.; de Bruijn, A. Dowine; Feringa, Ben L.; Roelfes, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of the antitumor drug BLM is believed to be related to the ability of the corresponding iron complex (Fe-BLM) to engage in oxidative double-strand DNA cleavage. The iron complex of the ligand N4Py (Fe-N4Py; N4Py - N,N-bis(2-pyridyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine has proven to be a

  4. Coupling Graphene Sheets with Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Energy Storage and Microelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-18

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0002 Coupling Graphene Sheets with Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Energy Storage and Microelectronics Kwang-Sup Lee HANNAM...SUBTITLE Coupling Graphene Sheets with Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Energy Storage and Microelectronics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA2386-12-1-4010...superparamagnetic γ-Fe2O3 magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) to grapheme-based materials. The distance of the ligands to the graphene derivative surface can be

  5. Non-Heme Iron Catalysts with a Rigid Bis-Isoindoline Backbone and Their Use in Selective Aliphatic C−H Oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Jianming; Lutz, Martin; Milan, Michela; Costas, Miquel; Otte, Matthias; Klein Gebbink, Bert

    2017-01-01

    Iron complexes derived from a bis-isoindoline-bis-pyridine ligand platform based on the BPBP ligand (BPBP=N,N′-bis(2-picolyl)-2,2′-bis-pyrrolidine) have been synthesized and applied in selective aliphatic C−H oxidation with hydrogen peroxide under mild conditions. The introduction of benzene

  6. State of the iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinisch, Walter; Staun, Michael; Bhandari, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) frequently occurs in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and negatively impacts their quality of life. Nevertheless, the condition appears to be both under-diagnosed and undertreated. Regular biochemical screening of patients with IBD for anemia...... by the gastroenterology community has to be advocated. Oral iron is a low cost treatment however its effectiveness is limited by low bioavailability and poor tolerability. Intravenous (IV) iron rapidly replenishes iron stores and has demonstrated its safe use in a number of studies in various therapeutic areas. A broad...... spectrum of new IV iron formulations is now becoming available offering improved tolerability and patient convenience by rapidly restoring the depleted iron status of patients with IBD. The following article aims to review the magnitude of the problem of IDA in IBD, suggest screening standards...

  7. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed

  8. Iron deficiency anaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Barragán-Ibañez, G.; Santoyo-Sánchez, A.; Ramos-Peñafiel, C.O.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is a public health problem that affects all age groups. In Mexico, it is a common cause of morbidity, and accounts for 50% of cases of anaemia worldwide. It is more prevalent during the first 2 years of life, during adolescence and pregnancy. It is characterised by fatigue, weakness, pallor and koilonychia. Treatment is based on dietary recommendations and oral and intravenous iron supplements. In this review article, we summarise the characteristics of iron efficiency...

  9. Crystallization of protein–ligand complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassell, Anne M.; An, Gang; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Bynum, Jane M.; Carter, H. Luke III; Deng, Su-Jun J.; Gampe, Robert T.; Grisard, Tamara E.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Nolte, Robert T.; Rocque, Warren J.; Wang, Liping; Weaver, Kurt L.; Williams, Shawn P.; Wisely, G. Bruce; Xu, Robert; Shewchuk, Lisa M.

    2007-01-01

    Methods presented for growing protein–ligand complexes fall into the categories of co-expression of the protein with the ligands of interest, use of the ligands during protein purification, cocrystallization and soaking the ligands into existing crystals. Obtaining diffraction-quality crystals has long been a bottleneck in solving the three-dimensional structures of proteins. Often proteins may be stabilized when they are complexed with a substrate, nucleic acid, cofactor or small molecule. These ligands, on the other hand, have the potential to induce significant conformational changes to the protein and ab initio screening may be required to find a new crystal form. This paper presents an overview of strategies in the following areas for obtaining crystals of protein–ligand complexes: (i) co-expression of the protein with the ligands of interest, (ii) use of the ligands during protein purification, (iii) cocrystallization and (iv) soaks

  10. Usefulness of Iron Deficiency Correction in Management of Patients With Heart Failure [from the Registry Analysis of Iron Deficiency-Heart Failure (RAID-HF) Registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienbergen, Harm; Pfister, Otmar; Hochadel, Matthias; Michel, Stephan; Bruder, Oliver; Remppis, Björn Andrew; Maeder, Micha Tobias; Strasser, Ruth; von Scheidt, Wolfgang; Pauschinger, Matthias; Senges, Jochen; Hambrecht, Rainer

    2016-12-15

    Iron deficiency (ID) has been identified as an important co-morbidity in patients with heart failure (HF). Intravenous iron therapy reduced symptoms and rehospitalizations of iron-deficient patients with HF in randomized trials. The present multicenter study investigated the "real-world" management of iron status in patients with HF. Consecutive patients with HF and ejection fraction ≤40% were recruited and analyzed from December 2010 to October 2015 by 11 centers in Germany and Switzerland. Of 1,484 patients with HF, iron status was determined in only 923 patients (62.2%), despite participation of the centers in a registry focusing on ID and despite guideline recommendation to determine iron status. In patients with determined iron status, a prevalence of 54.7% (505 patients) for ID was observed. Iron therapy was performed in only 8.5% of the iron-deficient patients with HF; 2.6% were treated with intravenous iron therapy. The patients with iron therapy were characterized by a high rate of symptomatic HF and anemia. In conclusion, despite strong evidence of beneficial effects of iron therapy on symptoms and rehospitalizations, diagnostic and therapeutic efforts on ID in HF are low in the actual clinical practice, and the awareness to diagnose and treat ID in HF should be strongly enforced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may ...

  12. Iron and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    In this case presentation, a man with a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease was treated with Chelation Therapy against iron without iron serum level correlation. The patient, who suffered from motor and non-motor symptoms of the disease, showed an improved condition after the Therapy. This clinical test was evaluated with UPDRS III score. The rationale and the limits of the Therapy are discussed. This case suggests that iron-dependent oxidative stress could represent a promising therapy for this dramatic disease; the necessity to deeply study the iron metabolism in neuro-degeneration appears really significant.

  13. Physics of iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, O.

    1993-10-01

    This volume comprises papers presented at the AIRAPT Conference, June 28 to July 1993. The iron sessions at the meeting were identified as the Second Ironworkers Convention. The renewal of interest stems from advances in technologies in both diamond-anvil cell (DAC) and shock wave studies as well as from controversies arising from a lack of consensus among both experimentalists and theoreticians. These advances have produced new data on iron in the pressure-temperature regime of interest for phase diagrams and for temperatures of the core/mantle and inner-core/outer-core boundaries. Particularly interesting is the iron phase diagram inferred from DAC studies. A new phase, {beta}, with a {gamma}-{beta}-{epsilon} triple point at about 30 GPa and 1190 K, and possible sixth phase, {omega}, with an {epsilon}-{Theta}-melt triple point at about 190 GPa and 4000 K are deemed possible. The importance of the equation of state of iron in consideration of Earth`s heat budget and the origin of its magnetic field invoke the interest of theoreticians who argue on the basis of molecular dynamics and other first principles methods. While the major thrust of both meetings was on the physics of pure iron, there was notable contributions on iron alloys. Hydrogen-iron alloys, iron-sulfur liquids, and the comparability to rhenium in phase diagram studies are discussed. The knowledge of the physical properties of iron were increased by several contributions.

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Our ... more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  15. Acid monolayer functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenberry, Myles

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle functionalization is an area of intensely active research, with applications across disciplines such as biomedical science and heterogeneous catalysis. This work demonstrates the functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles with a quasi-monolayer of 11-sulfoundecanoic acid, 10-phosphono-1-decanesulfonic acid, and 11-aminoundecanoic acid. The carboxylic and phosphonic moieties form bonds to the iron oxide particle core, while the sulfonic acid groups face outward where they are available for catalysis. The particles were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), potentiometric titration, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The sulfonic acid functionalized particles were used to catalyze the hydrolysis of sucrose at 80° and starch at 130°, showing a higher activity per acid site than the traditional solid acid catalyst Amberlyst-15, and comparing well against results reported in the literature for sulfonic acid functionalized mesoporous silicas. In sucrose catalysis reactions, the phosphonic-sulfonic nanoparticles (PSNPs) were seen to be incompletely recovered by an external magnetic field, while the carboxylic-sulfonic nanoparticles (CSNPs) showed a trend of increasing activity over the first four recycle runs. Between the two sulfonic ligands, the phosphonates produced a more tightly packed monolayer, which corresponded to a higher sulfonic acid loading, lower agglomeration, lower recoverability through application of an external magnetic field, and higher activity per acid site for the hydrolysis of starch. Functionalizations with 11-aminoundecanoic acid resulted in some amine groups binding to the surfaces of iron oxide nanoparticles. This amine binding is commonly ignored in iron oxide

  16. Selection of ligands for affinity chromatography using quartz crystal biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Tang, Xiaoling; Liu, Feng; Li, Ke'an

    2005-07-01

    This paper described a new strategy for rapid selecting ligands for application in affinity chromatography using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor. An aminoglycoside antibiotic drug, kanamycin (KM), was immobilized on the gold electrodes of the QCM sensor chip. The binding interactions of the immobilized KM with various proteins in solution were monitored as the variations of the resonant frequency of the modified sensor. Such a rapid screen analysis of interactions indicated clearly that KM-immobilized sensor showed strong specific interaction only with lysozyme (LZM). The resultant sensorgrams were rapidly analyzed by using a kinetic analysis software based on a genetic algorithm to derive both the kinetic rate constants (k(ass) and k(diss)) and equilibrium dissociation constants (K(D)) for LZM-KM interactions. The immobilized KM showed higher affinity to LZM with a dissociation constant on the order of 10(-5) M, which is within the range of 10(-4)-10(-8) M and suitable for an affinity ligand. Therefore, KM was demonstrated for the first time as a novel affinity ligand for purification of LZM and immobilized onto the epoxy-activated silica in the presence of a high potassium phosphate concentration. The KM immobilized affinity column has proved useful for a very convenient purification of LZM from chicken egg white. The purity of LZM obtained was higher than 90%, as determined by densitometric scanning of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified fraction. These results confirmed that the selected KM ligand is indeed a valuable affinity ligand for purification of LZM. The new screening strategy based on a QCM biosensor is expected to be a promising way for rapid selecting specific ligands for purifying other valuable proteins.

  17. -Pincer Ligand Family through Ligand Post-Modification

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Mei-Hui

    2017-10-02

    A series of air-stable nickel complexes containing triazine-based PN3P-pincer ligands were synthesized and fully characterized. Complex 3 contains a de-aromatized central triazine ring from the deprotonation of one of the N–H arms. With a post-modification strategy, the Me-PN3P*NiCl complex (3) could be converted into a new class of diimine–traizine PN3P-pincer nickel complexes.

  18. Iron Refractory Iron Deficiency Anaemia: A Rare Cause of Iron Deficiency Anaemia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGrath, T

    2018-01-01

    We describe the case of a 17-month-old boy with a hypochromic microcytic anaemia, refractory to oral iron treatment. After exclusion of dietary and gastrointestinal causes of iron deficiency, a genetic cause for iron deficiency was confirmed by finding two mutations in the TMPRSS6 gene, consistent with a diagnosis of iron-refractory iron deficiency anaemia (IRIDA).

  19. Chelating ligands for nanocrystals' surface functionalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Querner, Claudia; Reiss, Peter; Bleuse, Joël; Pron, Adam

    2004-01-01

    A new family of ligands for the surface functionalization of CdSe nanocrystals is proposed, namely alkyl or aryl derivatives of carbodithioic acids (R-C(S)SH). The main advantages of these new ligands are as follows: they nearly quantitatively exchange the initial surface ligands (TOPO) in very mild

  20. Spin state switching in iron coordination compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Gütlich

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with coordination compounds of iron(II that may exhibit thermally induced spin transition, known as spin crossover, depending on the nature of the coordinating ligand sphere. Spin transition in such compounds also occurs under pressure and irradiation with light. The spin states involved have different magnetic and optical properties suitable for their detection and characterization. Spin crossover compounds, though known for more than eight decades, have become most attractive in recent years and are extensively studied by chemists and physicists. The switching properties make such materials potential candidates for practical applications in thermal and pressure sensors as well as optical devices.The article begins with a brief description of the principle of molecular spin state switching using simple concepts of ligand field theory. Conditions to be fulfilled in order to observe spin crossover will be explained and general remarks regarding the chemical nature that is important for the occurrence of spin crossover will be made. A subsequent section describes the molecular consequences of spin crossover and the variety of physical techniques usually applied for their characterization. The effects of light irradiation (LIESST and application of pressure are subjects of two separate sections. The major part of this account concentrates on selected spin crossover compounds of iron(II, with particular emphasis on the chemical and physical influences on the spin crossover behavior. The vast variety of compounds exhibiting this fascinating switching phenomenon encompasses mono-, oligo- and polynuclear iron(II complexes and cages, polymeric 1D, 2D and 3D systems, nanomaterials, and polyfunctional materials that combine spin crossover with another physical or chemical property.

  1. Searching for new aluminium chelating agents: a family of hydroxypyrone ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toso, Leonardo; Crisponi, Guido; Nurchi, Valeria M; Crespo-Alonso, Miriam; Lachowicz, Joanna I; Mansoori, Delara; Arca, Massimiliano; Santos, M Amélia; Marques, Sérgio M; Gano, Lurdes; Niclós-Gutíerrez, Juan; González-Pérez, Josefa M; Domínguez-Martín, Alicia; Choquesillo-Lazarte, Duane; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Attention is devoted to the role of chelating agents in the treatment of aluminium related diseases. In fact, in spite of the efforts that have drastically reduced the occurrence of aluminium dialysis diseases, they so far constitute a cause of great medical concern. The use of chelating agents for iron and aluminium in different clinical applications has found increasing attention in the last thirty years. With the aim of designing new chelators, we synthesized a series of kojic acid derivatives containing two kojic units joined by different linkers. A huge advantage of these molecules is that they are cheap and easy to produce. Previous works on complex formation equilibria of a first group of these ligands with iron and aluminium highlighted extremely good pMe values and gave evidence of the ability to scavenge iron from inside cells. On these bases a second set of bis-kojic ligands, whose linkers between the kojic chelating moieties are differentiated both in terms of type and size, has been designed, synthesized and characterized. The aluminium(III) complex formation equilibria studied by potentiometry, electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS), quantum-mechanical calculations and (1)H NMR spectroscopy are here described and discussed, and the structural characterization of one of these new ligands is presented. The in vivo studies show that these new bis-kojic derivatives induce faster clearance from main organs as compared with the monomeric analog. © 2013.

  2. Current understanding of iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gregory J; Frazer, David M

    2017-12-01

    Iron is an essential trace element, but it is also toxic in excess, and thus mammals have developed elegant mechanisms for keeping both cellular and whole-body iron concentrations within the optimal physiologic range. In the diet, iron is either sequestered within heme or in various nonheme forms. Although the absorption of heme iron is poorly understood, nonheme iron is transported across the apical membrane of the intestinal enterocyte by divalent metal-ion transporter 1 (DMT1) and is exported into the circulation via ferroportin 1 (FPN1). Newly absorbed iron binds to plasma transferrin and is distributed around the body to sites of utilization with the erythroid marrow having particularly high iron requirements. Iron-loaded transferrin binds to transferrin receptor 1 on the surface of most body cells, and after endocytosis of the complex, iron enters the cytoplasm via DMT1 in the endosomal membrane. This iron can be used for metabolic functions, stored within cytosolic ferritin, or exported from the cell via FPN1. Cellular iron concentrations are modulated by the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) IRP1 and IRP2. At the whole-body level, dietary iron absorption and iron export from the tissues into the plasma are regulated by the liver-derived peptide hepcidin. When tissue iron demands are high, hepcidin concentrations are low and vice versa. Too little or too much iron can have important clinical consequences. Most iron deficiency reflects an inadequate supply of iron in the diet, whereas iron excess is usually associated with hereditary disorders. These disorders include various forms of hemochromatosis, which are characterized by inadequate hepcidin production and, thus, increased dietary iron intake, and iron-loading anemias whereby both increased iron absorption and transfusion therapy contribute to the iron overload. Despite major recent advances, much remains to be learned about iron physiology and pathophysiology. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Luminescent solutions and films of new europium complexes with chelating ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharcheva, Anastasia V.; Ivanov, Alexey V.; Borisova, Nataliya E.; Kaminskaya, Tatiana P.; Patsaeva, Svetlana V.; Popov, Vladimir V.; Yuzhakov, Viktor I.

    2015-03-01

    The development of new complexes of rare earth elements (REE) with chelating organic ligands opens up the possibility of purposeful alteration in the composition and structure of the complexes, and therefore tuning their optical properties. New ligands possessing two pyridine rings in their structure were synthesized to improve coordination properties and photophysical characteristics of REE compounds. Complexes of trivalent europium with novel chelating ligands were investigated using luminescence and absorption spectroscopy, as well as atomic force microscopy. Luminescence properties of new compounds were studied both for solutions and films deposited on the solid support. All complexes exhibit the characteristic red luminescence of Eu (III) ion with the absolute lumenescence quantum yield in polar acetonitrile solution varying from 0.21 to 1.45 % and emission lifetime ranged from 0.1 to 1 ms. Excitation spectra of Eu coordination complexes correspond with absorption bands of chelating ligand. The energy levels of the triplet state of the new ligands were determined from the phosphorescence at 77 K of the corresponding Gd (III) complexes. The morphology of films of europium complexes with different substituents in the organic ligands was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). It strongly depends both on the type of substituent in the organic ligand, and the rotation speed of the spin-coater. New europium complexes with chelating ligands containing additional pyridine fragments represent outstanding candidates for phosphors with improved luminescence properties.

  5. Copper-complexing ligands produced by an intact estuarine microbial community in response to copper stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, J.; Dryden, C.; Gordon, A.

    2002-12-01

    Copper is both an important nutrient and a pollutant in the marine environment. By studying the interactions between microorganisms and copper in the Elizabeth River (VA), home to a major Naval Base, we field tested the hypothesis that picoplankton and/or bacterioplankton produce strong, copper-complexing ligands in response to elevated copper concentrations. A simple light/ dark test was used to distinguish between heterotrophic and phototrophic ligand production. Samples were bottled and moored, submerged one meter, for a week. Direct counts using DAPI stain and epiflourescence were conducted to find concentrations of picoplankton and bacterioplankton. Using cathodic stripping voltammetry, we found the total copper concentrations, and then from a titration of the ligands by copper, the ligand concentrations and conditional stability constants were obtained. The Elizabeth River naturally had between 10-20 nM total dissolved copper concentrations. However when copper complexation was considered we found that the levels of bio-available Cu(II) ions were much lower. In fact in the natural samples the levels were not high enough to affect the relative reproductive rates of several microorganisms. Naturally there was a 50 nM "buffer zone" of ligand to total dissolved copper concentration. Furthermore, when stressed with excess copper, healthy picoplankton produced enough ligand to alleviate toxicity, and rebuild the buffer zone. However bacterioplankton only produced enough ligand so that they were no longer affected. Therefore, intact estuarine communities regulate copper bioavailability and toxicity with ligand production.

  6. Oxidation of ligand-protected aluminum clusters: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alnemrat, Sufian; Hooper, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    We report Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations of the oxidation of ligand-protected aluminum clusters that form a prototypical cluster-assembled material. These clusters contain a small aluminum core surrounded by a monolayer of organic ligand. The aromatic cyclopentadienyl ligands form a strong bond with surface Al atoms, giving rise to an organometallic cluster that crystallizes into a low-symmetry solid and is briefly stable in air before oxidizing. Our calculations of isolated aluminum/cyclopentadienyl clusters reacting with oxygen show minimal reaction between the ligand and O 2 molecules at simulation temperatures of 500 and 1000 K. In all cases, the reaction pathway involves O 2 diffusing through the ligand barrier, splitting into atomic oxygen upon contact with the aluminum, and forming an oxide cluster with aluminum/ligand bonds still largely intact. Loss of individual aluminum-ligand units, as expected from unimolecular decomposition calculations, is not observed except following significant oxidation. These calculations highlight the role of the ligand in providing a steric barrier against oxidizers and in maintaining the large aluminum surface area of the solid-state cluster material

  7. Alternative Affinity Ligands for Immunoglobulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruljec, Nika; Bratkovič, Tomaž

    2017-08-16

    The demand for recombinant therapeutic antibodies and Fc-fusion proteins is expected to increase in the years to come. Hence, extensive efforts are concentrated on improving the downstream processing. In particular, the development of better-affinity chromatography matrices, supporting robust time- and cost-effective antibody purification, is warranted. With the advances in molecular design and high-throughput screening approaches from chemical and biological combinatorial libraries, novel affinity ligands representing alternatives to bacterial immunoglobulin (Ig)-binding proteins have entered the scene. Here, we review the design, development, and properties of diverse classes of alternative antibody-binding ligands, ranging from engineered versions of Ig-binding proteins, to artificial binding proteins, peptides, aptamers, and synthetic small-molecular-weight compounds. We also provide examples of applications for the novel affinity matrices in chromatography and beyond.

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ages 1 and 2, especially if they drink a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... babies need more iron as they grow and begin to eat solid foods. Talk with your child's ... C Vitamin C helps the body absorb iron. Good sources of vitamin C are ... or other severe health issues. For more information, go to the Health ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if you eat the right foods. For example, good nonmeat sources of iron include iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables. Eat poorly because of money, social, health, or other problems. Follow a very low-fat ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... when used properly, can help prevent iron-deficiency anemia in infants and young children. Talk with your child's doctor ... and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young children and women are the two ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... proof packages for supplements can help prevent overdosing in children. Because recent research supports concerns that iron deficiency ... within months. Supplements come in pill form or in drops for children. Large amounts of iron can be harmful, so ...

  13. Banded Iron Formations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole R; Konhauser, Kurt O; Kappler, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Sedimentary deposits of alternating iron-rich (20–40% Fe) and iron-poor, siliceous (40–50% SiO2) mineral layers that primarily precipitated throughout much of the late Archean (2.7–2.5 Ga) and Paleoproterozoic (2.5– 1.8 Ga), but then remerged in the Neoproterozoic (0.8 Ga)....

  14. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... infancy and childhood can have long-lasting, negative effects on brain health, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends testing all ... overdose of iron. Iron supplements can cause side effects, such as dark ... or other severe health issues. For more information, go to the Health ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z ... usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español What Is ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or advise you to eat more iron-rich foods. This not only will help you avoid iron-deficiency anemia, but also may lower your risk of having a low-birth-weight baby. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications The signs and ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...