WorldWideScience

Sample records for strong intraspecific competition

  1. The conditions for speciation through intraspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürger, Reinhard; Schneider, Kristan A; Willensdorfer, Martin

    2006-11-01

    It has been shown theoretically that sympatric speciation can occur if intraspecific competition is strong enough to induce disruptive selection. However, the plausibility of the involved processes is under debate, and many questions on the conditions for speciation remain unresolved. For instance, is strong disruptive selection sufficient for speciation? Which roles do genetic architecture and initial composition of the population play? How strong must assortative mating be before a population can split in two? These are some of the issues we address here. We investigate a diploid multilocus model of a quantitative trait that is under frequency-dependent selection caused by a balance of intraspecific competition and frequency-independent stabilizing selection. This trait also acts as mating character for assortment. It has been established previously that speciation can occur only if competition is strong enough to induce disruptive selection. We find that speciation becomes more difficult for very strong competition, because then extremely strong assortment is required. Thus, speciation is most likely for intermediate strengths of competition, where it requires strong, but not extremely strong, assortment. For this range of parameters, however, it is not obvious how assortment can evolve from low to high levels, because with moderately strong assortment less genetic variation is maintained than under weak or strong assortment-sometimes none at all. In addition to the strength of frequency-dependent competition and assortative mating, the roles of the number of loci, the distribution of allelic effects, the initial conditions, costs to being choosy, the strength of stabilizing selection, and the particular choice of the fitness function are explored. A multitude of possible evolutionary outcomes is observed, including loss of all genetic variation, splitting in two to five species, as well as very short and extremely long stable limit cycles. On the methodological

  2. Intraspecific competition delays recovery of population structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liess, Matthias; Foit, Kaarina

    2010-04-01

    Ecotoxicological field studies have shown that total abundance and biomass often recover shortly after pulsed toxicant stress. In contrast, population structure showed comparatively long-term alterations before reaching pre-treatment conditions. We investigated two mechanisms that may explain the prolonged recovery of population structure: latent toxicant effects on life-history traits on the individual level and competition on the population level. To test these hypotheses we exposed populations of Daphnia magna to a pulse of the pyrethroid Fenvalerate. For several generations the populations were kept at two different degrees of competition: strong competition at carrying capacity and reduced competition maintained by simulated predation. After disturbance due to Fenvalerate exposure, biomass recovered after 14-17 days. In contrast, size structure characterised by a lack of large and dominance of small organisms recovered after 43 days in populations with strong competition. Size structure recovered twice faster in populations with reduced competition. We explain this as follows: due to toxicant induced mortality, food availability and consequently birth rate increased and populations were dominated by small individuals. In populations without predation, these cohorts grew and eventually exerted high intraspecific competition that (i) stopped further growth of juveniles and (ii) increased mortality of adults. These demographic processes were mainly responsible for the prolonged recovery of size structure. In contrast, for populations with predation, the regular harvest of individuals reduced competition. Juveniles developed continuously, allowing a fast recovery of size structure in these dynamic populations. In risk assessment the duration for populations to recover from (toxicant) stress, is crucial for the determination of ecological acceptable effects. We conclude that competition needs to be considered in order to understand and predict recovery of size

  3. Intraspecific competition increases toxicant effects in outdoor pond microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knillmann, Saskia; Stampfli, Nathalie C; Beketov, Mikhail A; Liess, Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Competition is a ubiquitous factor in natural populations and has been reported to alter the ecological impact of xenobiotics. We investigated conditions that mirror the natural variation of environmental factors. For this, different treatments were applied to 96 outdoor pond microcosms by shading the ponds and harvesting the communities. Then, the effect of esfenvalerate (0.03, 0.3, and 3 μg/L) on populations of Daphnia spp. was investigated. The pesticide effect and the sensitivity of Daphnia spp. in the context of a zooplankton community was increased by intraspecific competition 11 days after contamination. This relationship was most pronounced at 0.03 and 0.3 μg/L esfenvalerate, which were the concentrations that led to partial mortality. In contrast, interspecific interaction did not significantly alter the effect of the toxicant on Daphnia spp. Modelled concentration-response curves showed that the negative effects of the pesticide differed by a factor of up to 100 depending on the strength of intraspecific competition. In addition, a wider range of concentrations led to negative effects at high levels of intraspecific competition than at low levels. We argue that increased intraspecific competition reduces the availability of resources at the individual level and thereby increases the effect of contaminants. This knowledge about the interaction between competition and the response to toxicants is important in assessing the effects of these factors under field conditions.

  4. Effects of temperature on intraspecific competition in ectotherms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekare, Priyanga; Coutinho, Renato M

    2014-09-01

    Understanding how temperature influences population regulation through its effects on intraspecific competition is an important question for which there is currently little theory or data. Here we develop a theoretical framework for elucidating temperature effects on competition that integrates mechanistic descriptions of life-history trait responses to temperature with population models that realistically capture the variable developmental delays that characterize ectotherm life cycles. This framework yields testable comparative predictions about how intraspecific competition affects reproduction, development, and mortality under alternative hypotheses about the temperature dependence of competition. The key finding is that ectotherm population regulation in seasonal environments depends crucially on the mechanisms by which temperature affects competition. When competition is strongest at temperatures optimal for reproduction, effects of temperature and competition act antagonistically, leading to more complex dynamics than when competition is temperature independent. When the strength of competition increases with temperature past the optimal temperature for reproduction, effects of temperature and competition act synergistically, leading to dynamics qualitatively similar to those when competition is temperature independent. Paradoxically, antagonistic effects yield a higher population floor despite greater fluctuations. These findings have important implications for predicting effects of climate warming on population regulation. Synergistic effects of temperature and competition can predispose populations to stochastic extinction by lowering minimum population sizes, while antagonistic effects can increase the potential for population outbreaks through greater fluctuations in abundance.

  5. The reciprocal relationship between competition and intraspecific trait variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A Bennett, Jonathan; Riibak, Kersti; Tamme, Riin

    2016-01-01

    with larger leaves and lower specific leaf area than their neighbours. Switching to more stress tolerant strategies by increasing root diameter and leaf tissue density also reduced competition. However, dissimilarity in root tissue density also minimized competition, consistent with limiting similarity...... outcomes, we grew 15 species alone, in monoculture, and in mixture. We measured traits relating to leaf and root tissue morphology as well as biomass allocation and related competition induced changes in these traits to intra- and interspecific competition using multi-model inference. Additionally, we...... to both intra- and interspecific competition, frequently affecting competitive hierarchies. Intraspecific competition was lower for species that limited competition-induced increases in root allocation and had less variability in this trait overall. Interspecific competition was lower for species...

  6. Hierarchical analysis of taxonomic variation in intraspecific competition across fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss-Grant, Andrew P; Zipkin, Elise F; Thorson, James T; Jensen, Olaf P; Fagan, William F

    2016-07-01

    The nature and intensity of intraspecific competition can vary greatly among taxa, yet similarities in these interactions can lead to similar population dynamics among related organisms. Variation along the spectrum of intraspecific competition, with contest and scramble competition as endpoints, leads to vastly different responses to population density. Here we investigated the diversity of intraspecific competition among fish species, predicting that functional forms of density-dependent reproduction would be conserved in related taxa. Using a hierarchical model that links stock-recruitment parameters among populations, species, and orders, we found that the strength of overcompensation, and therefore the type of intraspecific competition, is tightly clustered within taxonomic groupings, as species within an order share similar degrees of compensation. Specifically, species within the orders Salmoniformes and Pleuronectiformes exhibited density dependence indicative of scramble competition (overcompensation) while the orders Clupeiformes, Gadiformes, Perciformes, and Scorpaeniformes exhibited dynamics consistent with contest competition (compensation). Maximum potential recruitment also varied among orders, but with less clustering across species. We also tested whether stock-recruitment parameters correlated with maximum body length among species, but found no strong relationship. Our results suggest that much of the variation in the form of density-dependent reproduction among fish species may be predicted taxonomically due to evolved life history traits and reproductive behaviors. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  7. Intraspecific competition in Tridacna crocea, a burrowing bivalve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamner, W M

    1978-01-01

    Intraspecific competition for space and light occurred when Tridacna crocea burrowed into coralline substratum of boulders on leeward coral reefs in the central Great Barrier Reef near Townsville, Australia. Intensity of competition was linearly related to clam density. Above about 200 clams/m 2 , all clams physically contacted one another and all shells sustained damage. Mortality in isolated populations due to intraspecific competition was estimated at 40%. Principles of intraspecific competition in plants were tested for applicability to T. crocea populations. Juvenile mortality due to competitive stress was density dependent. Aggregated distributions of one year old clams changed to random or regular distribution of adults. Normal size-frequency distribution for juveniles became skewed for older groups. A bimodal size-frequency distribution of the population was related to selective mortality in 1-3 year old clams. Adult mortality due to crowding was less severe but significant. Growth rates were inhibited by competition. Deformations in morphology resulted from crowding. Intraspecific competition for space and light by adults inhibited recruitment of young. Animal adaptations to reduce mortality under crowded conditions were also important. Larvae aggregated on settling and oriented with posterior ends pointed away from nearest neighbors. Positional alignment within the substratum was selectively advantageous. Burrowing posteriorly was preferential, but anterior and sideways burrowing as well as twisting within the burrow were also observed. Movement within substratum served to reduce local damage to the shell. Proteinaceous deposits secreted through perforations in the shell reduced subsequent damage. T. crocea populations exhibited many animal adaptations that reduced mortality during the first years of life, but as cohorts matured, plant-like patterns of competitive interaction became more significant.

  8. Species coexistence under resource competition with intraspecific and interspecific direct competition in a chemostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yasuhisa; Miki, Takeshi

    2010-11-01

    Competition theory has developed separately for direct competition and for exploitative competition. However, the combined effects of the two types of competition on species coexistence remain unclear. To examine how intraspecific and interspecific direct competition contributes to the coexistence of species competing for a single resource, we constructed a chemostat-type resource competition model. With general functions for intraspecific and interspecific direct competition, we derived necessary and sufficient conditions (except for a critical case that rarely occurs in a biological sense) that determine the number of stably coexisting species. From these conditions, we found that the number of coexisting species is determined just by the invasibility of each species into subcommunities with a smaller number of species. In addition, using a combination of rigorous mathematical theory and a simple graphical method, we can demonstrate how the stronger intraspecific direct competition facilitates species invasion, leading to a larger number of coexisting species. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Intraspecific Competition and Population Dynamics of Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, C. A.; Charret, I. C.; Lima, R. R.

    2012-04-01

    We report computational simulations for the evolution of the population of the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The results suggest that controlling the mosquito population, on the basis of intraspecific competition at the larval stage, can be an efficient mechanism for controlling the spread of the epidemic. The results also show the presence of a kind of genetic evolution in vector population, which results mainly in increasing the average lifespan of individuals in adulthood.

  10. Intraspecific genetic variation and competition interact to influence niche expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agashe, Deepa; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2010-10-07

    Theory and empirical evidence show that intraspecific competition can drive selection favouring the use of novel resources (i.e. niche expansion). The evolutionary response to such selection depends on genetic variation for resource use. However, while genetic variation might facilitate niche expansion, genetically diverse groups may also experience weaker competition, reducing density-dependent selection on resource use. Therefore, genetic variation for fitness on different resources could directly facilitate, or indirectly retard, niche expansion. To test these alternatives, we factorially manipulated both the degree of genetic variation and population density in flour beetles (Tribolium castaneum) exposed to both novel and familiar food resources. Using stable carbon isotope analysis, we measured temporal change and individual variation in beetle diet across eight generations. Intraspecific competition and genetic variation acted on different components of niche evolution: competition facilitated niche expansion, while genetic variation increased individual variation in niche use. In addition, genetic variation and competition together facilitated niche expansion, but all these impacts were temporally variable. Thus, we show that the interaction between genetic variation and competition can also determine niche evolution at different time scales.

  11. Does intraspecific competition promote variation? A test via synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew W; Post, David M

    2016-03-01

    Competitive diversification, that is, when increasing intraspecific competition promotes population niche expansion, is commonly invoked in evolutionary studies and currently plays a central role in how we conceptualize the process of adaptive diversification. Despite the frequency with which this idea is cited, the empirical evidence for the process is somewhat limited, and the findings of these studies have yet to be weighed objectively through synthesis. Here, we sought to fill this gap by reviewing the existing literature and collecting the data necessary to assess the evidence for competition as a diversifying force. Additionally, we sought to test a more recent hypothesis, which suggests that competition can act to both promote and inhibit dietary diversification depending on the degree to which a consumer depletes its resources. The surprising result of this synthesis was that increasing competition did not have a mean positive effect on population-level diet breadth or the degree of individual specialization. Instead, we found that increasing intraspecific competition had a restricting effect on population-level diet breadth in as many cases as it had a diversifying effect. This wide disparity in the effect of competition on consumer diet variation was negatively related to a metric for consumer resource depletion. Altogether, these findings call into question a long-standing assumption of basic evolutionary models and lend some support to recent theoretical predictions. Specifically, these findings support the idea that competition is primarily diversifying for species with a small effect (per unit biomass) on their resources and that resource depletion limits the diversifying effect of competition for consumers with larger ecological effects.

  12. Experimental test of intraspecific competition mechanisms among tadpoles of Leptodactylus ocellatus (Anura: Leptodactylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Maneyro, Raúl

    2008-03-01

    Intraspecific competition is predicted to strongly influence species abundance and dynamics through two main mechanisms: consumption and interference of resources. Tadpoles were used in experiments in which we tried to elucidate the relative importance of each mechanism. Our goal was to apply this experimental procedure to Leptodactylus ocellatus, a common South American anuran, a species whose larvae exhibit aggregative behavior and receive parental care. Previous work suggests that tadpole schools should present lower levels of intraspecific competition. Tadpoles from a single nest were reared in the laboratory in three densities (1, 2, and 4 individuals/container) and three food levels (1, 2, and 4 ration multiples) in a randomized three-block design for a factorial analysis of variance, up to day eight. Contrary to previous work with other species, our results show both the absence of interference competition effects, and that larval growth depends only on per capita food availability. The differences between species in intraspecific competition mechanisms are probably related to strong differences in ecology and life history. Leptodactylus ocellatus tadpoles could be directing interference competition away from their kin, reducing schooling costs. Further studies (including kinship as a factor) would give more information about these larvae, allowing a better understanding of the evolutionary and ecological mechanisms behind the biological patterns observed in Leptodactylus species.

  13. Intraspecific competition reduces niche width in experimental populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Christine E; Agashe, Deepa; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2014-10-01

    Intraspecific competition is believed to drive niche expansion, because otherwise suboptimal resources can provide a refuge from competition for preferred resources. Competitive niche expansion is well supported by empirical observations, experiments, and theory, and is often invoked to explain phenotypic diversification within populations, some forms of speciation, and adaptive radiation. However, some foraging models predict the opposite outcome, and it therefore remains unclear whether competition will promote or inhibit niche expansion. We conducted experiments to test whether competition changes the fitness landscape to favor niche expansion, and if competition indeed drives niche expansion as expected. Using Tribolium castaneum flour beetles fed either wheat (their ancestral resource), corn (a novel resource) or mixtures of both resources, we show that fitness is maximized on a mixed diet. Next, we show that at higher population density, the optimal diet shifts toward greater use of corn, favoring niche expansion. In stark contrast, when beetles were given a choice of resources, we found that competition caused niche contraction onto the ancestral resource. This presents a puzzling mismatch between how competition alters the fitness landscape, versus competition's effects on resource use. We discuss several explanations for this mismatch, highlighting potential reasons why optimality models might be misleading.

  14. Intraspecific larval competition in the olive fruit fly (Diptera: tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrack, Hannah Joy; Fornell, Angela M; Connell, Joseph H; O'Connell, Neil V; Phillips, Phil A; Vossen, Paul M; Zalom, Frank G

    2009-10-01

    Olive fruit flies [Bactrocera oleae (Gmelin)] occur at densities in California that can result in intraspecific larval competition within infested fruit. Larval B. oleae densities tracked in the field at six location were found to be highly variable and related to the proportion of fruit infested and adult densities. Egg and larval distribution within the field was generally aggregated early in the season and trended toward random and uniform as the season progressed. To determine whether B. oleae experienced fitness consequences at a range of larval densities observed in the field, olive fruits were infested with one, two, four, and six eggs, and larval and pupal developmental time, pupal weight, and pupal yield were compared. At the highest egg density, all measures of performance were negatively impacted, resulting in fewer and lighter pupae that took longer to pupate and emerge as adults, and even when only two larvae was present per olive, resulting pupae were significantly smaller. Density did not impact the sex ratio of the resulting flies or survive to adults. As field surveys showed, larval densities ranged from 1 to 11 B. oleae per fruit at some sites, and our results suggest that, at high densities, B. oleae do experience competition for larval resources. The impact of intraspecific larval competition North American in field populations of B. oleae is unknown, but the potential for competition is present.

  15. Intraspecific competition, not predation, drives lizard tail loss on islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itescu, Yuval; Schwarz, Rachel; Meiri, Shai; Pafilis, Panayiotis

    2017-01-01

    Tail autotomy is mainly considered an antipredator mechanism. Theory suggests that predation pressure relaxes on islands, subsequently reducing autotomy rates. Intraspecific aggression, which may also cause tail loss, probably intensifies on islands due to the higher abundance. We studied whether tail autotomy is mostly affected by predation pressure or by intraspecific competition. We further studied whether predator abundance or predator richness is more important in this context. To test our predictions, we examined multiple populations of two gecko species: Kotschy's gecko (Mediodactylus kotschyi; mainland and 41 islands) and the Mediterranean house gecko (Hemidactylus turcicus; mainland and 17 islands), and estimated their abundance together with five indices of predation. In both species, autotomy rates are higher on islands and decline with most predation indices, in contrast with common wisdom, and increase with gecko abundance. In M. kotschyi, tail-loss rates are higher on predator and viper-free islands, but increase with viper abundance. We suggest that autotomy is not simply, or maybe even mainly, an antipredatory mechanism. Rather, such defence mechanisms are a response to complex direct and indirect biotic interactions and perhaps, in the case of tail autotomy in insular populations, chiefly to intraspecific aggression. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2016 British Ecological Society.

  16. Role of intraspecific competition in the coexistence of mobile populations in spatially extended ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2010-06-01

    Evolutionary-game based models of nonhierarchical, cyclically competing populations have become paradigmatic for addressing the fundamental problem of species coexistence in spatially extended ecosystems. We study the role of intraspecific competition in the coexistence and find that the competition can strongly promote the coexistence for high individual mobility in the sense that stable coexistence can arise in parameter regime where extinction would occur without the competition. The critical value of the competition rate beyond which the coexistence is induced is found to be independent of the mobility. We derive a theoretical model based on nonlinear partial differential equations to predict the critical competition rate and the boundaries between the coexistence and extinction regions in a relevant parameter space. We also investigate pattern formation and well-mixed spatiotemporal population dynamics to gain further insights into our findings.

  17. Intraspecific Competition and Inbreeding Depression: Increased Competitive Effort by Inbred Males Is Costly to Outbred Opponents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jon; Smiseth, Per T

    2017-05-01

    A recent theoretical model suggests that intraspecific competition is an important determinant of the severity of inbreeding depression. The reason for this is that intraspecific competition is density dependent, leading to a stronger negative effect on inbred individuals if they are weaker competitors than outbred ones. In support of this prediction, previous empirical work shows that inbred individuals are weaker competitors than outbred ones and that intraspecific competition often exacerbates inbreeding depression. Here, we report an experiment on the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides, in which we recorded the outcome of competition over a small vertebrate carcass between an inbred or outbred male resident caring for a brood and a size-matched inbred or outbred male intruder. We found that inbred males were more successful as intruders in taking over a carcass from a male resident and were injured more frequently as either residents or intruders. Furthermore, inbred males gained less mass during the breeding attempt and had a shorter adult life span than outbred males. Finally, successful resident males reared a substantially smaller brood comprised of lighter larvae when the intruder was inbred than when it was outbred. Our results shows that inbred males increased their competitive effort, thus contradicting previous work suggesting that inbred males are weaker competitors. Furthermore, our results shows that inbred intruders impose a greater cost to resident males, suggesting that outbred individuals can suffer fitness costs as a result of competition with inbred ones.

  18. Intraspecific competition between co-infecting parasite strains enhances host survival in African trypanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Oliver; Stearns, Stephen Curtis; Schötzau, Andreas; Brun, Reto

    2009-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that under natural conditions parasitic infections commonly consist of co-infections with multiple conspecific strains. Multiple-strain infections lead to intraspecific interactions and may have important ecological and evolutionary effects on both hosts and parasites. However, experimental evidence on intraspecific competition or facilitation in infections has been scarce because of the technical challenges of distinguishing and tracking individual co-infecting strains. To overcome this limitation, we engineered transgenic strains of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, the causal agent of human African sleeping sickness. Different strains were transfected with fluorescence genes of different colors to make them visually distinguishable in order to investigate the effects of multiple-strain infections on parasite population dynamics and host fitness. We infected mice either with each strain alone or with mixes of two strains. Our results show a strong mutual competitive suppression of co-infecting T. brucei strains very early in infection. This mutual suppression changes within-host parasite dynamics and alleviates the effects of infection on the host. The strength of suppression depends on the density of the co-infecting strain, and differences in life-history traits between the strains determine the consequences of strain-strain competition for the host. Unexpectedly, co-infection with a less virulent strain significantly enhances host survival (+15%). Analysis of the strain dynamics reveals that this is due to the suppression of the density of the more virulent strain (-33%), whose degree of impact ultimately determines the physical condition of the host. The competitive suppression is likely caused by allelopathic interference or by apparent competition mediated by strain-specific immune responses. These findings highlight the importance of intraspecific variation for parasite-parasite and parasite-host interactions. To

  19. Intraspecific maternal competition induces summer diapause in insect parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougeron, Kévin; Hraoui, George; Le Lann, Cécile; van Baaren, Joan; Brodeur, Jacques

    2017-06-15

    , by considering intraspecific competition. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  20. Spatial Heterogeneity in Light Supply Affects Intraspecific Competition of a Stoloniferous Clonal Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Pu; Lei, Jing-Pin; Li, Mai-He; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in light supply is common in nature. Many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous light supply on growth, morphology, physiology and biomass allocation of clonal plants, but few have tested those effects on intraspecific competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (no competition) or nine ramets (with intraspecific competition) of a stoloniferous clonal plant, Duchesnea indica, in three homogeneous light conditions (high, medium and low light intensit...

  1. Spatial heterogeneity in light supply affects intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous clonal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu; Lei, Jing-Pin; Li, Mai-He; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in light supply is common in nature. Many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous light supply on growth, morphology, physiology and biomass allocation of clonal plants, but few have tested those effects on intraspecific competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (no competition) or nine ramets (with intraspecific competition) of a stoloniferous clonal plant, Duchesnea indica, in three homogeneous light conditions (high, medium and low light intensity) and two heterogeneous ones differing in patch size (large and small patch treatments). The total light in the two heterogeneous treatments was the same as that in the homogeneous medium light treatment. Both decreasing light intensity and intraspecific competition significantly decreased the growth (biomass, number of ramets and total stolon length) of D. indica. As compared with the homogeneous medium light treatment, the large patch treatment significantly increased the growth of D. indica without intraspecific competition. However, the growth of D. indica with competition did not differ among the homogeneous medium light, the large and the small patch treatments. Consequently, light heterogeneity significantly increased intraspecific competition intensity, as measured by the decreased log response ratio. These results suggest that spatial heterogeneity in light supply can alter intraspecific interactions of clonal plants.

  2. Spatial heterogeneity in light supply affects intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous clonal plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Wang

    Full Text Available Spatial heterogeneity in light supply is common in nature. Many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous light supply on growth, morphology, physiology and biomass allocation of clonal plants, but few have tested those effects on intraspecific competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (no competition or nine ramets (with intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous clonal plant, Duchesnea indica, in three homogeneous light conditions (high, medium and low light intensity and two heterogeneous ones differing in patch size (large and small patch treatments. The total light in the two heterogeneous treatments was the same as that in the homogeneous medium light treatment. Both decreasing light intensity and intraspecific competition significantly decreased the growth (biomass, number of ramets and total stolon length of D. indica. As compared with the homogeneous medium light treatment, the large patch treatment significantly increased the growth of D. indica without intraspecific competition. However, the growth of D. indica with competition did not differ among the homogeneous medium light, the large and the small patch treatments. Consequently, light heterogeneity significantly increased intraspecific competition intensity, as measured by the decreased log response ratio. These results suggest that spatial heterogeneity in light supply can alter intraspecific interactions of clonal plants.

  3. Larval intraspecific competition for food in the European grapevine moth Lobesia botrana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiéry, D; Monceau, K; Moreau, J

    2014-08-01

    Effective pest management with lower amounts of pesticides relies on accurate prediction of insect pest growth rates. Knowledge of the factors governing this trait and the resulting fitness of individuals is thus necessary to refine predictions and make suitable decisions in crop protection. The European grapevine moth, Lobesia botrana, the major pest of grapes in Europe, is responsible for huge economic losses. Larvae very rarely leave the grape bunch on which they were oviposited and thus cannot avoid intraspecific competition. In this study, we determined the impact of intraspecific competition during the larval stage on development and adult fitness in this species. This was tested by rearing different numbers of larvae on an artificial diet and measuring developmental and reproductive life history traits. We found that intraspecific competition during larval development has a slight impact on the fitness of L. botrana. The principal finding of this work is that larval density has little effect on the life history traits of survivors. Thus, the timing of eclosion, duration of subsequent oviposition, fecundity appears to be more uniform in L. botrana than in other species. The main effect of larval crowding was a strong increase of larval mortality at high densities whereas the probability of emergence, sex ratio, pupal mass, fecundity and longevity of mated females were not affected by larval crowding. Owing to increased larval mortality at high larval densities, we hypothesized that mortality of larvae at high densities provided better access to food for the survivors with the result that more food was available per capita and there were no effect on fitness of survivors. From our results, larval crowding alters the reproductive capacity of this pest less than expected but this single factor should now be tested in interaction with limited resources in the wild.

  4. Everybody loses: intraspecific competition induces tragedy of the commons in Allenby's gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger-Tal, Oded; Embar, Keren; Kotler, Burt P; Saltz, David

    2015-01-01

    Interference competition may lead to a tragedy of the commons in which individuals driven by self-interest reduce the fitness of the entire group. We investigated this hypothesis in Allenby's gerbils, Gerbillus andersoni allenbyi, by comparing foraging behaviors of single vs. pairs of gerbils. We recorded strong interference competition within the foraging pairs. Competition reduced the amount of time the gerbils spent foraging, as well as foraging efficiency since part of the foragers' attention was directed toward detecting competitors (apparent predation risk). Single gerbils harvested significantly more food than the combined efforts of two gerbils foraging together. Competition reduced the success of both individuals within a pair by more than 50%, making this a case of the tragedy of the commons where each individual's investment in competition reduces the success of all individuals within the group, including its own. Despite their great costs, competitive behaviors will be selected for as long as one individual achieves higher fitness than the other. In nature, interspecific interactions, such as predation risk, may act to reduce and regulate the deleterious effects of intraspecific competition.

  5. Effects of intraspecific larval competition on adult longevity in the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiskind, M H; Lounibos, L P

    2009-03-01

    Larval competition is common in container-breeding mosquitoes. The impact of competition on larval growth has been thoroughly examined and findings that larval competition can lead to density-dependent effects on adult body size have been documented. The effects of larval competition on adult longevity have been less well explored. The effects of intraspecific larval densities on the longevity of adults maintained under relatively harsh environmental conditions were tested in the laboratory by measuring the longevity of adult Aedes aegypti (L.) and Aedes albopictus (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae) that had been reared under a range of larval densities and subsequently maintained in high- or low-humidity regimes (85% or 35% relative humidity [RH], respectively) as adults. We found significant negative effects of competition on adult longevity in Ae. aegypti, but not in Ae. albopictus. Multivariate analysis of variance suggested that the negative effect of the larval environment on the longevity of Ae. aegypti adults was most strongly associated with increased development time and decreased wing length as adults. Understanding how larval competition affects adult longevity under a range of environmental conditions is important in establishing the relationship between models of mosquito population regulation and epidemiological models of vector-borne disease transmission.

  6. Natural variation in dauer pheromone production and sensing supports intraspecific competition in nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Neelanjan; Meyer, Jan M; Yim, Joshua J; Mayer, Melanie G; Markov, Gabriel V; Ogawa, Akira; Schroeder, Frank C; Sommer, Ralf J

    2014-07-07

    Dauer formation, a major nematode survival strategy, represents a model for small-molecule regulation of metazoan development [1-10]. Free-living nematodes excrete dauer-inducing pheromones that have been assumed to target conspecifics of the same genotype [9, 11]. However, recent studies in Pristionchus pacificus revealed that the dauer pheromone of some strains affects conspecifics of other genotypes more strongly than individuals of the same genotype [12]. To elucidate the mechanistic basis for this intriguing cross-preference, we compared six P. pacificus wild isolates to determine the chemical composition of their dauer-inducing metabolomes and responses to individual pheromone components. We found that these isolates produce dauer pheromone blends of different composition and respond differently to individual pheromone components. Strikingly, there is no correlation between production of and dauer response to a specific compound in individual strains. Specifically, pheromone components that are abundantly produced by one genotype induce dauer formation in other genotypes, but not necessarily in the abundant producer. Furthermore, some genotypes respond to pheromone components they do not produce themselves. These results support a model of intraspecific competition in nematode dauer formation. Indeed, we observed intraspecific competition among sympatric strains in a novel experimental assay, suggesting a new role of small molecules in nematode ecology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Larval size in acanthocephalan parasites: Influence of intraspecific competition and effects on intermediate host behavioural changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne Lucile

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasites often face a trade-off between exploitation of host resources and transmission probabilities to the next host. In helminths, larval growth, a major component of adult parasite fitness, is linked to exploitation of intermediate host resources and is influenced by the presence of co-infecting conspecifics. In manipulative parasites, larval growth strategy could also interact with their ability to alter intermediate host phenotype and influence parasite transmission. Methods We used experimental infections of Gammarus pulex by Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala, to investigate larval size effects on host behavioural manipulation among different parasite sibships and various degrees of intra-host competition. Results Intra-host competition reduced mean P. laevis cystacanth size, but the largest cystacanth within a host always reached the same size. Therefore, all co-infecting parasites did not equally suffer from intraspecific competition. Under no intra-host competition (1 parasite per host, larval size was positively correlated with host phototaxis. At higher infection intensities, this relationship disappeared, possibly because of strong competition for host resources, and thus larval growth, and limited manipulative abilities of co-infecting larval acanthocephalans. Conclusions Our study indicates that behavioural manipulation is a condition-dependant phenomenon that needs the integration of parasite-related variables to be fully understood.

  8. Larval size in acanthocephalan parasites: influence of intraspecific competition and effects on intermediate host behavioural changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianne, Lucile; Bollache, Loïc; Lagrue, Clément; Franceschi, Nathalie; Rigaud, Thierry

    2012-08-09

    Parasites often face a trade-off between exploitation of host resources and transmission probabilities to the next host. In helminths, larval growth, a major component of adult parasite fitness, is linked to exploitation of intermediate host resources and is influenced by the presence of co-infecting conspecifics. In manipulative parasites, larval growth strategy could also interact with their ability to alter intermediate host phenotype and influence parasite transmission. We used experimental infections of Gammarus pulex by Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala), to investigate larval size effects on host behavioural manipulation among different parasite sibships and various degrees of intra-host competition. Intra-host competition reduced mean P. laevis cystacanth size, but the largest cystacanth within a host always reached the same size. Therefore, all co-infecting parasites did not equally suffer from intraspecific competition. Under no intra-host competition (1 parasite per host), larval size was positively correlated with host phototaxis. At higher infection intensities, this relationship disappeared, possibly because of strong competition for host resources, and thus larval growth, and limited manipulative abilities of co-infecting larval acanthocephalans. Our study indicates that behavioural manipulation is a condition-dependant phenomenon that needs the integration of parasite-related variables to be fully understood.

  9. Application of high resolution melting assay (HRM) to study temperature-dependent intraspecific competition in a pathogenic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Roghaieh; Bruneaux, Matthieu; Sundberg, Lotta-Riina; Pulkkinen, Katja; Ketola, Tarmo

    2017-04-20

    Studies on species' responses to climate change have focused largely on the direct effect of abiotic factors and in particular temperature, neglecting the effects of biotic interactions in determining the outcome of climate change projections. Many microbes rely on strong interference competition; hence the fitness of many pathogenic bacteria could be a function of both their growth properties and intraspecific competition. However, due to technical challenges in distinguishing and tracking individual strains, experimental evidence on intraspecific competition has been limited so far. Here, we developed a robust application of the high-resolution melting (HRM) assay to study head-to-head competition between mixed genotype co-cultures of a waterborne bacterial pathogen of fish, Flavobacterium columnare, at two different temperatures. We found that competition outcome in liquid cultures seemed to be well predicted by growth yield of isolated strains, but was mostly inconsistent with interference competition results measured in inhibition tests on solid agar, especially as no growth inhibition between strain pairs was detected at the higher temperature. These results suggest that, for a given temperature, the factors driving competition outcome differ between liquid and solid environments.

  10. Consumer interaction strength may limit the diversifying effect of intraspecific competition: a test in alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew W; Post, David M

    2013-06-01

    Intraspecific competition is considered a principal driver of dietary variation, but empirical studies provide mixed support for this mechanism. Here we link comparative and experimental work testing the effects of competition and resource availability on the dietary variation of the alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus). The alewife, a consumer with extreme effects on its resources, was specifically utilized to additionally test the idea that strong interactions between a consumer and its resources can diminish the diversifying effect of competition. First, we compared the short- and long-term diet measures of wild populations across a wide range of densities. Second, in a pair of large-scale field mesocosm experiments, we explored the influence of competition and interaction strength on alewife dietary variation. Results from a whole-lake comparison and field experiments indicated that increasing competition was negatively correlated with population dietary variation. Further, altering the strength of the interaction between the alewife and its prey via prey supplementation eliminated this negative relationship. Collectively, our results suggest that competitive interactions may not drive dietary diversification in the alewife and, potentially, in other highly effective consumers. Our results also indicate that further consideration of the strength of species interactions (and the consumer traits that underlie them) would improve our understanding of the link between intraspecific competition and variation.

  11. Time-lagged intraspecific competition in temporally separated cohorts of a generalist insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Elizabeth E; Murphy, Shannon M

    2018-03-01

    Competition can have far-reaching consequences for insect fitness and dispersion. Time-lagged interspecific competition is known to negatively affect fitness, yet time-lagged intraspecific competition is rarely studied outside of outbreak conditions. We tested the impact of competition between larval cohorts of the western tent caterpillar (Malacosoma californicum) feeding on chokecherry (Prunus virginiana). We reared larvae on host plants that either had or did not have feeding damage from tent caterpillars the previous season to test the bottom-up fitness effects of intraspecific competition. We measured host-plant quality to test potential mechanisms for bottom-up effects and conducted field oviposition surveys to determine if female adult tent caterpillars avoided host plants with evidence of prior tent caterpillar presence. We found that time-lagged intraspecific competition impacted tent caterpillar fitness by reducing female pupal mass, which is a predictor of lifetime fitness. We found that plants that had been fed upon by tent caterpillars the previous season had leaves that were significantly tougher than plants that had not been fed upon by tent caterpillars, which may explain why female tent caterpillars suffered reduced fitness on these plants. Finally, we found that there were fewer tent caterpillar egg masses on plants that had tent caterpillars earlier in the season than plants without tent caterpillars, which suggests that adult females avoid these plants for oviposition. Our results confirm that intraspecific competition occurs among tent caterpillars and suggests that time-lagged intraspecific competition has been overlooked as an important component of insect fitness.

  12. Environmental stochasticity and intraspecific competition influence the population dynamics of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, William T; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M

    2018-02-27

    Members of the Culex pipiens complex (Cx. pipiens quinquefasciatus in Southern USA) play a critical role in the spillover of urban arboviruses such as West Nile virus or St. Louis encephalitis virus. Field studies have shown strong correlation between the periodicity of rainfall events and larval proliferation. However, mechanistic determinants driving this relationship are poorly understood. We hypothesize that rainfall events decrease strain from intraspecific competition through the associated reduction of immature density and the introduction of detritus. To address our hypothesis, we used laboratory competition experiments to inform a deterministic matrix projection model consisting of an age-structured larval matrix coupled with a stage-structured adult mosquito matrix. Rain events were simulated in a competition-based metabolic age model and compared to a null model including environmental variability. Variable rain delays in two-event simulations showed optimal proliferation occurring with rain delays between 16 and 21 days when including density-dependent effects. These results are comparable to the pattern observed in natural populations, indicating that Cx. quinquefasciatus proliferation rates can be modeled mechanistically as a density-dependent system. The empirical understanding of density-dependence as it relates to environmental stochasticity provides a theoretical platform for the study of larval dynamics and the impact of larval control in this medically relevant disease vector.

  13. The Orphan Gene dauerless Regulates Dauer Development and Intraspecific Competition in Nematodes by Copy Number Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melanie G; Rödelsperger, Christian; Witte, Hanh; Riebesell, Metta; Sommer, Ralf J

    2015-06-01

    Many nematodes form dauer larvae when exposed to unfavorable conditions, representing an example of phenotypic plasticity and a major survival and dispersal strategy. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the regulation of dauer induction is a model for pheromone, insulin, and steroid-hormone signaling. Recent studies in Pristionchus pacificus revealed substantial natural variation in various aspects of dauer development, i.e. pheromone production and sensing and dauer longevity and fitness. One intriguing example is a strain from Ohio, having extremely long-lived dauers associated with very high fitness and often forming the most dauers in response to other strains' pheromones, including the reference strain from California. While such examples have been suggested to represent intraspecific competition among strains, the molecular mechanisms underlying these dauer-associated patterns are currently unknown. We generated recombinant-inbred-lines between the Californian and Ohioan strains and used quantitative-trait-loci analysis to investigate the molecular mechanism determining natural variation in dauer development. Surprisingly, we discovered that the orphan gene dauerless controls dauer formation by copy number variation. The Ohioan strain has one dauerless copy causing high dauer formation, whereas the Californian strain has two copies, resulting in strongly reduced dauer formation. Transgenic animals expressing multiple copies do not form dauers. dauerless is exclusively expressed in CAN neurons, and both CAN ablation and dauerless mutations increase dauer formation. Strikingly, dauerless underwent several duplications and acts in parallel or downstream of steroid-hormone signaling but upstream of the nuclear-hormone-receptor daf-12. We identified the novel or fast-evolving gene dauerless as inhibitor of dauer development. Our findings reveal the importance of gene duplications and copy number variations for orphan gene function and suggest daf-12 as major target for

  14. Growth and intraspecific competitive abilities of the dioecious Lindera melissifolia (Lauraceae) in varied flooding regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy S. Hawkins; Nathan M. Schiff; Theodor D. Leininger; Emile S Gardiner; Margaret S. Devall; Paul B. Hamel; A. Dan Wilson; Kristina F. Connor

    2009-01-01

    Forest Service, Southern Research Station, Stoneville, MS 38776). Growth and intraspecific competitive abilities of the dioecious Lindera melissifolia (Lauraceae) in varied flooding regimes. J. Torrey Bot. Soc. 136: 91–101. 2009.—The contribution of sexual dimorphism to malebiased colony ratios observed in field populations of the federally...

  15. Behavioral signature of intraspecific competition and density dependence in colony-breeding marine predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breed, Greg A; Don Bowen, W; Leonard, Marty L

    2013-10-01

    In populations of colony-breeding marine animals, foraging around colonies can lead to intraspecific competition. This competition affects individual foraging behavior and can cause density-dependent population growth. Where behavioral data are available, it may be possible to infer the mechanism of intraspecific competition. If these mechanics are understood, they can be used to predict the population-level functional response resulting from the competition. Using satellite relocation and dive data, we studied the use of space and foraging behavior of juvenile and adult gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) from a large (over 200,000) and growing population breeding at Sable Island, Nova Scotia (44.0 (o)N 60.0 (o)W). These data were first analyzed using a behaviorally switching state-space model to infer foraging areas followed by randomization analysis of foraging region overlap of competing age classes. Patterns of habitat use and behavioral time budgets indicate that young-of-year juveniles (YOY) were likely displaced from foraging areas near (intraspecific competition between adults and juveniles, resulting in the currently observed decelerating logistic population growth. Competition theory predicts that intraspecific competition resulting in a clear losing competitor should cause compensatory population regulation. This functional response produces a smooth logistic growth curve as carrying capacity is approached, and is consistent with census data collected from this population over the past 50 years. The competitive mechanism causing compensatory regulation likely stems from the capital-breeding life-history strategy employed by gray seals. This strategy decouples reproductive success from resources available around breeding colonies and prevents females from competing with each other while young are dependent.

  16. Effects of intraspecific competition on the life cycle of the stonefly, Nemurella pictetii (Plecoptera: Nemouridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieske, Reimo; Zwick, Peter

    2008-04-16

    Considerable variation of life cycle duration in given insect species has been frequently recorded. Splitting of populations into cohorts with different life cycle lengths may occur, sometimes even between siblings from the same batch. Larval populations of the stonefly Nemurella pictetii in central Europe regularly split into a very fast developing and a normal univoltine cohort, leading to partial multivoltinism. The causes for such variation remain unknown but presumably act on the larval stage in which most of the life cycle is spent. We therefore studied possible effects of intraspecific competition on growth and development of larvae in the laboratory. Intraspecific competition had important influence on growth and development of the larvae. High larval densities led to reduced growth and retarded development through interference, not through exploitative competition. All specimens were negatively affected by frequent encounters and the resulting disturbance. There were no dominant individuals able to grow and develop faster than the rest, at the expense of the others. Differences in life cycle length of Nemurella pictetii may result from different larval densities in different microhabitats and resultant different degrees of interference competition. Although competition alone probably does not cause splitting of populations into cohorts with different life cycle duration differences in size and development caused by other factors are certainly enhanced by intraspecific competition.

  17. Intrinsic inter- and intraspecific competition in parasitoid wasps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Jeffrey A; Poelman, Erik H; Tanaka, Toshiharu

    2013-01-01

    Immature development of parasitoid wasps is restricted to resources found in a single host that is often similar in size to the adult parasitoid. When two or more parasitoids of the same or different species attack the same host, there is competition for monopolization of host resources. The success of intrinsic competition differs between parasitoids attacking growing hosts and parasitoids attacking paralyzed hosts. Furthermore, the evolution of gregarious development in parasitoids reflects differences in various developmental and behavioral traits, as these influence antagonistic encounters among immature parasitoids. Fitness-related costs (or benefits) of competition for the winning parasitoid reveal that time lags between successive attacks influence the outcome of competition. Physiological mechanisms used to exclude competitors include physical and biochemical factors that originate with the ovipositing female wasp or her progeny. In a broader multitrophic framework, indirect factors, such as plant quality, may affect parasitoids through effects on immunity and nutrition.

  18. Field manipulations of resources mediate the transition from intraspecific competition to facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanfeldt, Karin; Monro, Keyne; Marshall, Dustin J

    2017-05-01

    Population density affects individual performance, though its effects are often mixed. For sessile species, increases in population density typically reduce performance. Still, cases of positive density-dependence do occur in sessile systems and demand explanation. The stress gradient hypothesis (SGH) predicts that under stressful conditions, positive effects of facilitation may outweigh the negative effects of competition. While some elements of the SGH are well studied, its potential to explain intraspecific facilitation has received little attention. Further, there have been questions regarding whether the SGH holds if the stressor is a resource. Most studies of interactions between the environment and intraspecific facilitation have relied on natural environmental gradients; manipulative studies are much rarer. To test the effects of intraspecific density and resources, we manipulated resource availability over natural population densities for the marine bryozoan Watersipora subtorquata. We found negative effects of density on colony performance in low resource environments, but mainly positive density-dependence in high resource environments. By adding resources, competition effects were reduced and the positive effects of facilitation were revealed. Our results suggest that resource availability mediates the relative strength of competition and facilitation in our system. We also suggest that intraspecific facilitation is more common than may be appreciated and that environmental variation may mediate the balance between negative and positive density-dependence. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2017 British Ecological Society.

  19. Intraspecific competition and high food availability are associated with insular gigantism in a lizard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafilis, Panayiotis; Meiri, Shai; Foufopoulos, Johannes; Valakos, Efstratios

    2009-09-01

    Resource availability, competition, and predation commonly drive body size evolution. We assess the impact of high food availability and the consequent increased intraspecific competition, as expressed by tail injuries and cannibalism, on body size in Skyros wall lizards ( Podarcis gaigeae). Lizard populations on islets surrounding Skyros (Aegean Sea) all have fewer predators and competitors than on Skyros but differ in the numbers of nesting seabirds. We predicted the following: (1) the presence of breeding seabirds (providing nutrients) will increase lizard population densities; (2) dense lizard populations will experience stronger intraspecific competition; and (3) such aggression, will be associated with larger average body size. We found a positive correlation between seabird and lizard densities. Cannibalism and tail injuries were considerably higher in dense populations. Increases in cannibalism and tail loss were associated with large body sizes. Adult cannibalism on juveniles may select for rapid growth, fuelled by high food abundance, setting thus the stage for the evolution of gigantism.

  20. Effects of clonal fragmentation on intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous floating plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P; Xu, Y-S; Dong, B-C; Xue, W; Yu, F-H

    2014-11-01

    Disturbance is common and can fragment clones of plants. Clonal fragmentation may affect the density and growth of ramets so that it could alter intraspecific competition. To test this hypothesis, we grew one (low density), five (medium density) or nine (high density) parent ramets of the floating invasive plant Pistia stratiotes in buckets, and newly produced offspring ramets were either severed (with fragmentation) or remained connected to parent ramets (no fragmentation). Increasing density reduced biomass of the whole clone (i.e. parent ramet plus its offspring ramets), showing intense intraspecific competition. Fragmentation decreased biomass of offspring ramets, but increased biomass of parent ramets and the whole clone, suggesting significant resource translocation from parent to offspring ramets when clones were not fragmented. There was no interaction effect of density x fragmentation on biomass of the whole clone, and fragmentation did not affect competition intensity index. We conclude that clonal fragmentation does not alter intraspecific competition between clones of P. stratiotes, but increases biomass production of the whole clone. Thus, fragmentation may contribute to its interspecific competitive ability and invasiveness, and intentional fragmentation should not be recommended as a measure to stop the rapid growth of this invasive species. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  1. Transcriptome analysis of intraspecific competition in Arabidopsis thaliana reveals organ-specific signatures related to nutrient acquisition and general stress response pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masclaux, Frédéric G; Bruessow, Friederike; Schweizer, Fabian; Gouhier-Darimont, Caroline; Keller, Laurent; Reymond, Philippe

    2012-11-29

    Plants are sessile and therefore have to perceive and adjust to changes in their environment. The presence of neighbours leads to a competitive situation where resources and space will be limited. Complex adaptive responses to such situation are poorly understood at the molecular level. Using microarrays, we analysed whole-genome expression changes in Arabidopsis thaliana plants subjected to intraspecific competition. The leaf and root transcriptome was strongly altered by competition. Differentially expressed genes were enriched in genes involved in nutrient deficiency (mainly N, P, K), perception of light quality, and responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Interestingly, performance of the generalist insect Spodoptera littoralis on densely grown plants was significantly reduced, suggesting that plants under competition display enhanced resistance to herbivory. This study provides a comprehensive list of genes whose expression is affected by intraspecific competition in Arabidopsis. The outcome is a unique response that involves genes related to light, nutrient deficiency, abiotic stress, and defence responses.

  2. Intrinsic inter- and intraspecific competition in parasitoid wasps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harvey, J.A.; Poelman, E.H.; Tanaka, T.

    2013-01-01

    Immature development of parasitoid wasps is restricted to resources found in a single host that is often similar in size to the adult parasitoid. When two or more parasitoids of the same or different species attack the same host, there is competition for monopolization of host resources. The success

  3. Intrinsic inter and intra-specific competition in parasitoid wasps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harvey, J.A.; Poelman, E.H.; Tanaka, T.

    2013-01-01

    Immature development of parasitoid wasps is restricted to resources found in a single host that is often similar in size to the adult parasitoid. When two or more parasitoids of the same or different species attack the same host, there is competition for monopolization of host resources. The success

  4. A nutrient mediates intraspecific competition between rodent malaria parasitesin vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wale, Nina; Sim, Derek G; Read, Andrew F

    2017-07-26

    Hosts are often infected with multiple strains of a single parasite species. Within-host competition between parasite strains can be intense and has implications for the evolution of traits that impact patient health, such as drug resistance and virulence. Yet the mechanistic basis of within-host competition is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that a parasite nutrient, para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA), mediates competition between a drug resistant and drug susceptible strain of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi We further show that increasing pABA supply to hosts infected with the resistant strain worsens disease and changes the relationship between parasite burden and pathology. Our experiments demonstrate that, even when there is profound top-down regulation (immunity), bottom-up regulation of pathogen populations can occur and that its importance may vary during an infection. The identification of resources that can be experimentally controlled opens up the opportunity to manipulate competitive interactions between parasites and hence their evolution. © 2017 The Authors.

  5. Habitat preferences and intraspecific competition in black-footed ferrets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggins, Dean E.; Godbey, Jerry L.; Matchett, Marc R.; Livieri, Travis M.

    2006-01-01

    We used radio-telemetry data (28,560 positional fixes) collected on 153 black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) to (1) reexamine the assumed obligate relationship of these ferrets to prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), (2) investigate habitat preferences of ferrets at a small scale (1 year (P = 0.048). Also, preference was stronger for wild-born young ferrets than for young captive-born ferrets released to augment the wild population (P = 0.040). This additional evidence for competition among ferrets, and for an advantage of prior residency, raises conservation concerns. The energetics-based model commonly used to predict ferret densities at reintroduction sites does not consider competition, which likely leads to overestimation of the densities of ferrets attainable in high-quality habitat. During sequential releases of ferrets, prior residency may handicap success of newcomers, even though the latter may have higher potential fitness. Although the manner of initial colonization of available habitat by blackfooted ferrets, and their subsequent competition for it, was suggestive of an ideal despotic distribution, we did not assess effects of prey density or burrow density on fitness.

  6. Intraspecific competition effects on Aethina tumida (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meikle, William G; Patt, Joseph M; Sammataro, Diana

    2012-02-01

    Two kinds of experiments were conducted with Aethina tumida Murray larvae over four temperatures: "consumption" experiments, in which larvae and diet were weighed to determine food consumption rates under conditions of unlimited food and few conspecifics; and "competition" experiments, in which varying numbers of larvae were presented with the same amount of honey and pollen diet, and larval weight at final instar was used to determine competition effects. In consumption experiments temperature, diet and their interaction all had significant effects on the ratio of larval weight to the weight of food consumed, which was higher at 24 degrees C than at any other temperature. In competition experiments, three relationships were examined and modeled: that between the number of larvae per experimental unit and the average weight of those larvae; that between average larval and adult weights; and that between average adult weight and survivorship to adult (emergence rate). An exponential decay function was fit to the relationship between number of larvae per experimental unit and their average weight. Average adult weight was linearly correlated with larval weight. Likewise, emergence rates for adults < 11.6 mg in weight were linearly correlated with adult weights, but no significant relationship was observed for heavier adults. Using these relationships, the reproductive potential for A. tumida were estimated for a frame of honey and pollen. Information on resource acquisition by A. tumida will be useful in evaluating the impact of different factors on beetle population dynamics, such as bee hygienic behavior or control strategies used by the beekeeper.

  7. Intraspecific variation in sperm length is negatively related to sperm competition in passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleven, Oddmund; Laskemoen, Terje; Fossøy, Frode; Robertson, Raleigh J; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2008-02-01

    Spermatozoa are among the most diversified cells in the animal kingdom, but the underlying evolutionary forces affecting intraspecific variation in sperm morphology are poorly understood. It has been hypothesized that sperm competition is a potent selection pressure on sperm variation within species. Here, we examine intraspecific variation in total sperm length of 22 wild passerine bird species (21 genera, 11 families) in relation to the risk of sperm competition, as expressed by the frequency of extrapair paternity and relative testis size. We demonstrate, by using phylogenetic comparative methods, that between-male variation in sperm length within species is closely and negatively linked to the risk of sperm competition. This relationship was even stronger when only considering species in which data on sperm length and extrapair paternity originated from the same populations. Intramale variation in sperm length within species was also negatively, although nonsignificantly, related to sperm competition risk. Our findings suggest that postcopulatory sexual selection is a powerful evolutionary force reducing the intraspecific phenotypic variation in sperm-size traits, potentially driving the diversification of sperm morphology across populations and species.

  8. Intraspecific competition facilitates the evolution of tolerance to insect damage in the perennial plant Solanum carolinense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, David W; Halpern, Stacey L; Barrows, Kahaili; Underwood, Nora

    2012-12-01

    Tolerance to herbivory (the degree to which plants maintain fitness after damage) is a key component of plant defense, so understanding how natural selection and evolutionary constraints act on tolerance traits is important to general theories of plant-herbivore interactions. These factors may be affected by plant competition, which often interacts with damage to influence trait expression and fitness. However, few studies have manipulated competitor density to examine the evolutionary effects of competition on tolerance. In this study, we tested whether intraspecific competition affects four aspects of the evolution of tolerance to herbivory in the perennial plant Solanum carolinense: phenotypic expression, expression of genetic variation, the adaptive value of tolerance, and costs of tolerance. We manipulated insect damage and intraspecific competition for clonal lines of S. carolinense in a greenhouse experiment, and measured tolerance in terms of sexual and asexual fitness components. Compared to plants growing at low density, plants growing at high density had greater expression of and genetic variation in tolerance, and experienced greater fitness benefits from tolerance when damaged. Tolerance was not costly for plants growing at either density, and only plants growing at low density benefited from tolerance when undamaged, perhaps due to greater intrinsic growth rates of more tolerant genotypes. These results suggest that competition is likely to facilitate the evolution of tolerance in S. carolinense, and perhaps in other plants that regularly experience competition, while spatio-temporal variation in density may maintain genetic variation in tolerance.

  9. The diverse effects of intraspecific competition on the selective advantage to resistance: A model and its predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weis, A.E.; Hochberg, M.E.

    2000-01-01

    We constructed a model to investigate conditions under which intraspecific competition amplifies or diminishes the selective advantage to resistance. The growth trajectories of competing individual plants were depicted by logistic difference equations that incorporated basic costs (lowered growth

  10. Warming effects on consumption and intraspecific interference competition depend on predator metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Birgit; Rall, Björn C; Brose, Ulrich

    2012-05-01

    1. Model analyses show that the stability of population dynamics and food web persistence increase with the strength of interference competition. Despite this critical importance for community stability, little is known about how external factors such as the environmental temperature affect intraspecific interference competition. 2. We aimed to fill this void by studying the functional responses of two ground beetle species of different body size, Pterostichus melanarius and Poecilus versicolor. These functional response experiments were replicated across four predator densities and two temperatures to address the impact of temperature on intraspecific interference competition. 3. We generally expected that warming should increase the speed of movement, encounter rates and in consequence interference among predator individuals. In our experiment, this expectation was supported by the results obtained for the larger predator, P. melanarius, whereas the opposite pattern characterized the interference behaviour of the smaller predator P. versicolor. 4. These results suggest potentially nontrivial implications for the effects of environmental temperature on intraspecific interference competition, for which we propose an explanation based on the different sensitivity to warming of metabolic rates of both species. As expected, increasing temperature led to stronger interference competition of the larger species, P. melanarius, which exhibited a weaker increase in metabolic rate with increasing temperature. The stronger increase in the metabolic rate of the smaller predator, P. versicolor, had to be compensated by increasing searching activity for prey, which did not leave time for increasing interference. 5. Together, these results suggest that any generalization how interference competition responds to warming should also take the species' metabolic response to temperature increases into account. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2011

  11. Effects of Intraspecific Competition and Host-Parasitoid Developmental Timing on Foraging Behaviour of a Parasitoid Wasp

    OpenAIRE

    Couchoux, Christelle; van Nouhuys, Saskya

    2014-01-01

    In a context where hosts are distributed in patches and susceptible to parasitism for a limited time, female parasitoids foraging for hosts might experience intraspecific competition. We investigated the effects of host and parasitoid developmental stage and intraspecific competition among foraging females on host-searching behaviour in the parasitoid wasp Hyposoter horticola. We found that H. horticola females have a pre-reproductive adult stage during which their eggs are not mature yet and...

  12. T6SS intraspecific competition orchestrates Vibrio cholerae genotypic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiuk, Benjamin; Unterweger, Daniel; Provenzano, Daniele; Pukatzki, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a diverse species that inhabits a wide range of environments from copepods in brackish water to the intestines of humans. In order to remain competitive, V. cholerae uses the versatile type-VI secretion system (T6SS) to secrete anti-prokaryotic and anti-eukaryotic effectors. In addition to competing with other bacterial species, V. cholerae strains also compete with one another. Some strains are able to coexist, and are referred to as belonging to the same compatibility group. Challenged by diverse competitors in various environments, different V. choleare strains secrete different combination of effectors - presumably to best suit their niche. Interestingly, all pandemic V. cholerae strains encode the same three effectors. In addition to the diversity displayed in the encoded effectors, the regulation of V. cholerae also differs between strains. Two main layers of regulation appear to exist. One strategy connects T6SS activity with behavior that is suited to fighting eukaryotic cells, while the other is linked with natural competence - the ability of the bacterium to acquire and incorporate extracellular DNA. This relationship between bacterial killing and natural competence is potentially a source of diversification for V. cholerae as it has been shown to incorporate the DNA of cells recently killed through T6SS activity. It is through this process that we hypothesize the transfer of virulence factors, including T6SS effector modules, to happen. Switching of T6SS effectors has the potential to change the range of competitors V. cholerae can kill and to newly define which strains V. cholerae can co-exist with, two important parameters for survival in diverse environments. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  13. Experimental Evidence for an Eco-Evolutionary Coupling between Local Adaptation and Intraspecific Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepielski, Adam M; Nemirov, Alex; Cattivera, Matthew; Nickerson, Avery

    2016-04-01

    Determining how adaptive evolution can be coupled to ecological processes is key for developing a more integrative understanding of the demographic factors that regulate populations. Intraspecific competition is an especially important ecological process because it generates negative density dependence in demographic rates. Although ecological factors are most often investigated to determine the strength of density dependence, evolutionary processes such as local adaptation could also feed back to shape variation in the strength of density dependence among populations. Using an experimental approach with damselflies, a predaceous aquatic insect, we find evidence that both density-dependent intraspecific competition and local adaptation can reduce per capita growth rates. In some cases, the effects of local adaptation on reducing per capita growth rates exceeded the ecological competitive effects of a doubling of density. However, we also found that these ecological and evolutionary properties of populations are coupled, and we offer two interpretations of the causes underlying this pattern: (1) the strength of density-dependent competition depends on the extent of local adaptation, or (2) the extent of local adaptation is shaped by the strength of density-dependent competition. Regardless of the underlying causal pathway, these results show how eco-evolutionary dynamics can affect a key demographic process regulating populations.

  14. Inter- and intra-specific competition of duckweed under multiple heavy metal contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao; Shi, Huijuan; Kang, Xianjiang; Liu, Cunqi; Chen, Lingci; Liang, Xiaofei; Jin, Lei

    2017-11-01

    The influences of intra- and inter-species competition on ecosystems are poorly understood. Lemna aequinoctialis and Spirodela polyrhiza were used to assess the effects of exposure to different concentrations of multiple heavy metals (copper-cadmium-zinc), when the plants were grown in mixed- or mono-culture. Parameters assessed included relative growth rate (RGR), content of chlorophyll, glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), as well as the activity of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD). Inter-specific competition was affected by metal concentration, with results indicating that inter-specific competition significantly affected duckweed growth and metal uptake in different heavy metal exposure conditions. Inter-specific competition increased growth rate of duckweed under high metal concentrations, although when compared with intra-specific competition, it caused no obvious differences under low metal concentrations. The growth of L. aequinoctialis was further increased in mixed culture when exposed to high metal concentrations, with inter-specific competition increasing the content of cadmium and zinc, while decreasing copper content of L. aequinoctialis compared with under intra-specific conditions. Conversely, inter-specific competition increased the content of copper and cadmium of S. polyrhiza, without causing obvious differences in zinc accumulation under high ambient concentrations. Under high metal conditions, inter-specific competition increased antioxidant enzyme activities in duckweed species, increasing resistance to heavy metals. Results show that inter-specific competition makes duckweed develop mechanisms to increase fitness and survival, such as enhancement of antioxidant enzyme activities, rather than limiting metal uptake when exposed to high concentrations of multiple metals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Density-dependent intraspecific competition in the larval stage of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae): revisiting the current paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legros, Mathieu; Lloyd, Alun L; Huang, Yunxin; Gould, Fred

    2009-05-01

    Density-dependent intraspecific competition has been considered an important determinant of the dynamics of larval stages of Aedes aegypti. A model was published in 1984 providing a mathematical description of this density dependence, based on field data, that has since been widely used. This description, however, is based on the strong assumption that all mortality is density-dependent. We re-examine the data without this premise and find a reduced importance of density dependence, as well as a different functional form. Based on these discrepancies, we emphasize that the characterization of density dependence in the larval stages of Ae. aegypti should be based on a more complete dataset, and we use artificially generated data to explore how such additional information could help developing a better description of this density dependence. We review other empirical studies on larval competition, discuss the need for further dedicated studies, and provide a few simple guidelines for the design of such studies.

  16. Effect of intraspecific competition and substrate type on terpene emissions from some Mediterranean plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormeño, Elena; Bousquet-Mélou, Anne; Mévy, Jean-Philippe; Greff, Stéphane; Robles, Christine; Bonin, Gilles; Fernandez, Catherine

    2007-02-01

    Competition is an important factor that has been extensively reported in the Mediterranean area. There is evidence that leaf terpene accumulation may vary between plants growing on calcareous and siliceous soils. In the present study, leaf terpene emissions from potted seedlings of Pinus halepensis, Cistus albidus, and Quercus coccifera, growing under natural environmental conditions on calcareous and siliceous substrates, were studied by using a bag enclosure method. In both substrates, seedlings were potted alone and in intraspecific competition, to examine the effect of substrate type and that of intraspecific competition on terpene emissions. The results showed that competition favored: (i) overall monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions from Q. coccifera; (ii) overall monoterpene emissions from P. halepensis; (iii) overall sesquiterpene emissions from C. albidus. Substrate type affected terpene emissions to a limited extent and in a species-specific way. Whereas for Q. coccifera, the overall monoterpene emissions and that of Allo-aromadendrene were favored on siliceous substrate, no significant changes were found in emissions from P. halepensis. Only the release of AR-curcumene from C. albidus was higher on siliceous substrate. We also found high variability in terpene emission composition from the study species, particularly for P. halepensis and Q. coccifera. These two species released both monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, instead of monoterpenes only, as shown in previous studies.

  17. Multiple infestation by seed predators: the effect of loculate fruits on intraspecific insect larval competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, José M.; Delgado, Juan A.; López, Francisco; Acosta, Francisco J.; Fungairiño, Sara G.

    2001-06-01

    Many morphological features of fruits are important factors affecting predispersal seed predation by insects. This paper analyses the predispersal seed predation process of a major predator (a Noctuidae lepidopteran larvae) in loculate fruits of a bushy perennial plant, Cistus ladanifer. The main aim of the study is to assess the potential effect of internal valvae (which partition groups of seeds) in the intraspecific competition between larvae in multiple-infested fruits. Our results show that larvae do not reject already infested fruits, but they avoid the proximity of other larvae within the fruit, keeping an average minimum distance of one locule. In multiple-infested fruits, larval mortality increases and the proportion of seeds consumed by each larvae decreases. In those situations in which valvae keep apart larvae within a fruit, these only suffer the cost of exploitation competition with a low acquisition of resources. However, when all valvae between them are pierced by the larvae, competition switches to an interference component and larval mortality increases markedly. The existence of valvae within a fruit allows larvae to diminish the cost of intraspecific competition, obtaining high life expectancies (70%), even in triple-infested fruits.

  18. Multi-clone infections and the impact of intraspecific competition on trematode colonies with a division of labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Melanie M; Poulin, Robert

    2014-02-01

    A division of labour occurs in colonies of the trematode Philophthalmus sp. within their first intermediate hosts. Two castes exist: one which reproduces and one which does not reproduce. It has been hypothesized that the benefit of the non-reproductive caste is in competitive interactions. Evidence for this from past experiments with Philophthalmus sp. colonies has been contradictory: the non-reproductive caste appears to benefit the colony in some way but not necessarily by combating interspecific competitors. The aims of this study were to consider intraspecific competition as a possible cause of the division of labour in Philophthalmus sp. colonies. Results show that mixed genotype infections occur in Philophthalmus sp. infected hosts and thus intraspecific competition is likely. Furthermore, the total number of individuals per colony is reduced in mixed genotype infections, indicating that intraspecific competition reduces colony fitness. However, the results do not indicate that the division of labour in Philophthalmus sp. plays a role in competitive interactions as the ratio of small, non-reproductive to large, reproductive individuals is unaffected by the presence of intraspecific competition. This is the first study to identify and quantify intraspecific competition in Philophthalmus sp., and to assess its selective role in this species' division of labour.

  19. Intraspecific competition drives increased resource use diversity within a natural population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanbäck, Richard; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2007-03-22

    Resource competition is thought to play a major role in driving evolutionary diversification. For instance, in ecological character displacement, coexisting species evolve to use different resources, reducing the effects of interspecific competition. It is thought that a similar diversifying effect might occur in response to competition among members of a single species. Individuals may mitigate the effects of intraspecific competition by switching to use alternative resources not used by conspecific competitors. This diversification is the driving force in some models of sympatric speciation, but has not been demonstrated in natural populations. Here, we present experimental evidence confirming that competition drives ecological diversification within natural populations. We manipulated population density of three-spine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) in enclosures in a natural lake. Increased population density led to reduced prey availability, causing individuals to add alternative prey types to their diet. Since phenotypically different individuals added different alternative prey, diet variation among individuals increased relative to low-density control enclosures. Competition also increased the diet-morphology correlations, so that the frequency-dependent interactions were stronger in high competition. These results not only confirm that resource competition promotes niche variation within populations, but also show that this increased diversity can arise via behavioural plasticity alone, without the evolutionary changes commonly assumed by theory.

  20. Strain specific differences in intraspecific competition in Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesavaraju, Banugopan; Afify, Ali; Gaugler, Randy

    2012-09-01

    Malathion is an organophosphate insecticide that is used for the control of adult mosquitoes and agricultural pests. Recent studies have shown that malathion affects competition among mosquitoes in the larval stage. Individuals from laboratory colonies are often used in experiments but it is not known whether there is a difference between laboratory and field strains in their response to competition and malathion. Intraspecific larval competition in the presence of malathion (0.11 mg/liter) was compared between laboratory and field strains of Aedes albopictus (Skuse), a native of Asia that has established in the United States. There was no difference in the responses of the two strains to the presence of malathion. The fitness (finite growth rate) of the field strain decreased at the highest larval density tested but there was no difference in fitness across densities for the laboratory strain. This finding suggests that laboratory rearing could reduce sensitivity to crowding.

  1. Rhizosphere priming effects on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics among tree species with and without intraspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liming; Dijkstra, Feike A; Wang, Peng; Zhu, Biao; Cheng, Weixin

    2018-03-07

    Rhizosphere priming effects (RPEs) play a central role in modifying soil organic matter mineralization. However, effects of tree species and intraspecific competition on RPEs are poorly understood. We investigated RPEs of three tree species (larch, ash and Chinese fir) and the impact of intraspecific competition of these species on the RPE by growing them at two planting densities for 140 d. We determined the RPE on soil organic carbon (C) decomposition, gross and net nitrogen (N) mineralization and net plant N acquisition. Differences in the RPE among species were associated with differences in plant biomass. Gross N mineralization and net plant N acquisition increased, but net N mineralization decreased, as the RPE on soil organic C decomposition increased. Intraspecific competition reduced the RPE on soil organic C decomposition, gross and net N mineralization, and net plant N acquisition, especially for ash and Chinese fir. Microbial N mining may explain the overall positive RPEs across species, whereas intensified plant-microbe competition for N may have reduced the RPE with intraspecific competition. Overall, the species-specific effects of tree species play an important role in modulating the magnitude and mechanisms of RPEs and the intraspecific competition on soil C and N dynamics. © 2018 The Authors New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Long-term evolution of polygenic traits under frequency-dependent intraspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kristan A

    2007-05-01

    We analytically investigate the long-term evolution of a continuously varying quantitative character in a diploid population that is determined additively by a finite number of loci. The trait is under a mixture of frequency-dependent disruptive selection induced by intraspecific competition and frequency-independent stabilizing selection. Moreover, the trait is restricted to a finite range by constraints on the particular loci. Our investigations are based on explicit analytical results (provided by Bürger [2005. A multilocus analysis of intraspecific competition and stabilizing selection on a quantitative trait. J. Math. Biol. 50, 355-396]; Schneider [2006. A multilocus-multiallele analysis of frequency-dependent selection induced by intraspecific competition. J. Math. Biol. 52, 483-523]) on the short-term dynamics under the assumption of linkage equilibrium. We show that the population always reaches a long-term equilibrium (LTE), i.e., an equilibrium that is resistant against perturbations of mutations of sufficiently small effect. In general, several LTEs can coexist. They can be calculated explicitly, and we provide necessary and sufficient conditions for their existence. In the case that more than one LTE exists, we exemplify numerically that the evolutionary outcome depends crucially on the initial genetic architecture, on the joint distribution of mutational effects across loci, and on the particular realization of the mutation process. Therefore, long-term evolution cannot be predicted from the ecology alone. We further show that a partial order exists for the LTEs. The set of LTEs has a 'largest' element, an LTE which is reached during long-term evolution if the effects of the occurring mutant alleles are sufficiently large.

  3. Intraspecific adaptive radiation: Competition, ecological opportunity, and phenotypic diversification within species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levis, Nicholas A; Martin, Ryan A; O'Donnell, Kerry A; Pfennig, David W

    2017-10-01

    Intraspecific variation in resource-use traits can have profound ecological and evolutionary implications. Among the most striking examples are resource polymorphisms, where alternative morphs that utilize different resources evolve within a population. An underappreciated aspect of their evolution is that the same conditions that favor resource polymorphism-competition and ecological opportunity-might foster additional rounds of diversification within already existing morphs. We examined these issues in spadefoot toad tadpoles that develop into either a generalist "omnivore" or a specialist "carnivore" morph. Specifically, we assessed the morphological diversity of tadpoles from natural ponds and experimentally induced carnivores reared on alternative diets. We also surveyed natural ponds to determine if the strength of intramorph competition and the diversity and abundance of dietary resources (measures of ecological opportunity) influenced the diversity of within-morph variation. We found that five omnivore and four carnivore types were present in natural ponds; alternative diets led to shape differences, some of which mirrored variation in the wild; and both competition and ecological opportunity were associated with enhanced morphological diversity in natural ponds. Such fine-scale intraspecific variation might represent an underappreciated form of biodiversity and might constitute a crucible of evolutionary innovation and diversification. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  4. Which species will successfully track climate change? The influence of intraspecific competition and density dependent dispersal on range shifting dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, A.S.; Johst, K.; Muenkemueller, T.; Travis, J.M.J.

    2007-09-15

    Understanding the ability of species to shift their geographic range is of considerable importance given the current period of rapid climate change. Furthermore, a greater understanding of the spatial population dynamics underlying range shifting is required to complement the advances made in climate niche modelling. A simulation model is developed which incorporates three key features that have been largely overlooked in studies of range shifting dynamics: the form of intraspecific competition, density dependent dispersal and the transient dynamics of habitat patches. The results show that the exact shape of the response depends critically on both local and patch dynamics. Species whose intraspecific competition is contest based are more vulnerable than those whose competition is scramble based. Contesters are especially sensitive when combined with density dependent dispersal. Species living in patches whose carrying capacity grows slowly are also susceptible to rapid shifts of environmental conditions. A complementary analytic approach further highlights the importance of intraspecific competition. (au)

  5. Effects of soil nutrient heterogeneity on intraspecific competition in the invasive, clonal plant Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Dong, Bi-Cheng; Alpert, Peter; Li, Hong-Li; Zhang, Ming-Xiang; Lei, Guang-Chun; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2012-03-01

    Fine-scale, spatial heterogeneity in soil nutrient availability can increase the growth of individual plants, the productivity of plant communities and interspecific competition. If this is due to the ability of plants to concentrate their roots where nutrient levels are high, then nutrient heterogeneity should have little effect on intraspecific competition, especially when there are no genotypic differences between individuals in root plasticity. We tested this hypothesis in a widespread, clonal species in which individual plants are known to respond to nutrient heterogeneity. Plants derived from a single clone of Alternanthera philoxeroides were grown in the greenhouse at low or high density (four or 16 plants per 27·5 × 27·5-cm container) with homogeneous or heterogeneous availability of soil nutrients, keeping total nutrient availability per container constant. After 9 weeks, measurements of size, dry mass and morphology were taken. Plants grew more in the heterogeneous than in the homogeneous treatment, showing that heterogeneity promoted performance; they grew less in the high- than in the low-density treatment, showing that plants competed. There was no interactive effect of nutrient heterogeneity and plant density, supporting the hypothesis that heterogeneity does not affect intraspecific competition in the absence of genotypic differences in plasticity. Treatments did not affect morphological characteristics such as specific leaf area or root/shoot ratio. Results indicate that fine-scale, spatial heterogeneity in the availability of soil nutrients does not increase competition when plants are genetically identical, consistent with the suggestion that effects of heterogeneity on competition depend upon differences in plasticity between individuals. Heterogeneity is only likely to increase the spread of monoclonal, invasive populations such as that of A. philoxeroides in China.

  6. Ecological opportunities and intraspecific competition alter trophic niche specialization in an opportunistic stream predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Charlotte; Boiche, Anatole; Lecerf, Antoine; Cucherousset, Julien

    2014-09-01

    Many generalist populations are composed of specialized individuals that use a narrow part of the population's niche. Ecological theories predict that individual specialization and population trophic niche are determined by biotic interactions and resource diversity emerging from environmental variations (i.e. ecological opportunities). However, due to the paucity of empirical and experimental demonstrations, the genuine importance of each of these drivers in determining trophic niche attributes is not fully appreciated. The present study aimed at determining the population level and individual responses of brown trout (Salmo trutta) to variations in ecological opportunities (terrestrial prey inputs) and autochthonous prey communities among 10 stream reaches along a riparian condition gradient using individual longitudinal monitoring and stable isotope analyses. Our results suggested that trophic niche diversity varied along the environmental gradient, while individual trophic specialization was indirectly driven by ecological opportunities through strengthened intraspecific competition. Individual diet was repeatable over the study period, and the growth rate of juvenile brown trout increased with their specialization for aquatic predatory invertebrates. Our findings highlight the dual influences of intraspecific competition and ecological opportunities on individual trophic specialization and population trophic niche. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2014 British Ecological Society.

  7. Evolution of dominance under frequency-dependent intraspecific competition in an assortatively mating population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peischl, Stephan; Schneider, Kristan A

    2010-02-01

    We study the evolution of higher levels of dominance as a response to negative frequency-dependent selection. In contrast to previous studies, we focus on the effect of assortative mating on the evolution of dominance under frequency-dependent intraspecific competition. We analyze a two-locus two-allele model, in which the primary locus has a major effect on a quantitative trait that is under a mixture of frequency-independent stabilizing selection, density-dependent selection, and frequency-dependent selection caused by intraspecific competition for a continuum of resources. The second (modifier) locus determines the degree of dominance at the trait level. Additionally, the population mates assortatively with respect to similarities in the ecological trait. Our analysis shows that the parameter region in which dominance can be established decreases if small levels of assortment are introduced. In addition, the degree of dominance that can be established also decreases. In contrast, if assortment is intermediate, sexual selection for extreme types can be established, which leads to evolution of higher levels of dominance than under random mating. For modifiers with large effects, intermediate levels of assortative mating are most favorable for the evolution of dominance. For large modifiers, the speed of fixation can even be higher for intermediate levels of assortative mating than for random mating.

  8. Conflicting selection in the course of adaptive diversification: the interplay between mutualism and intraspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimundo, Rafael L G; Gibert, Jean P; Hembry, David H; Guimarães, Paulo R

    2014-03-01

    Adaptive speciation can occur when a population undergoes assortative mating and disruptive selection caused by frequency-dependent intraspecific competition. However, other interactions, such as mutualisms based on trait matching, may generate conflicting selective pressures that constrain species diversification. We used individual-based simulations to explore how different types of mutualism affect adaptive diversification. A magic trait was assumed to simultaneously mediate mate choice, intraspecific competition, and mutualisms. In scenarios of intimate, specialized mutualisms, individuals interact with one or few individual mutualistic partners, and diversification is constrained only if the mutualism is obligate. In other scenarios, increasing numbers of different partners per individual limit diversification by generating stabilizing selection. Stabilizing selection emerges from the greater likelihood of trait mismatches for rare, extreme phenotypes than for common intermediate phenotypes. Constraints on diversification imposed by increased numbers of partners decrease if the trait matching degree has smaller positive effects on fitness. These results hold after the relaxation of various assumptions. When trait matching matters, mutualism-generated stabilizing selection would thus often constrain diversification in obligate mutualisms, such as ant-myrmecophyte associations, and in low-intimacy mutualisms, including plant-seed disperser systems. Hence, different processes, such as trait convergence favoring the incorporation of nonrelated species, are needed to explain the higher richness of low-intimacy assemblages--shown here to be up to 1 order of magnitude richer than high-intimacy systems.

  9. Intraspecific sperm competition genes enforce post-mating species barriers in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Dean M; Moyle, Leonie C

    2014-12-22

    Sexual selection and sexual conflict are considered important drivers of speciation, based on both theoretical models and empirical correlations between sexually selected traits and diversification. However, whether reproductive isolation between species evolves directly as a consequence of intrapopulation sexual dynamics remains empirically unresolved, in part because knowledge of the genetic mechanisms (if any) connecting these processes is limited. Here, we provide evidence of a direct mechanistic link between intraspecies sexual selection and reproductive isolation. We examined genes with known roles in intraspecific sperm competition (ISC) in D. melanogaster and assayed their impact on conspecific sperm precedence (CSP). We found that two such genes (Acp36DE and CG9997) contribute to both offensive sperm competition and CSP; null/knockdown lines both had lower competitive ability against D. melanogaster conspecifics and were no longer able to displace heterospecific D. simulans sperm in competitive matings. In comparison, Sex Peptide (Acp70A)-another locus essential for ISC-does not contribute to CSP. These data indicate that two loci important for sperm competitive interactions have an additional role in similar interactions that enforce post-mating reproductive isolation between species, and show that sexual selection and sexual isolation can act on the same molecular targets in a gene-specific manner. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Consequences of the Allee effect and intraspecific competition on population persistence under adverse environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovskii, Sergei; Blackshaw, Rod; Li, Bai-Lian

    2008-02-01

    The impact of intraspecific interactions on ecological stability and population persistence in terms of steady state(s) existence is considered theoretically based on a general competition model. We compare persistence of a structured population consisting of a few interacting (competitive) subpopulations, or groups, to persistence of the corresponding unstructured population. For a general case, we show that if the intra-group competition is stronger than the inter-group competition, then the structured population is less prone to extinction, i.e. it can persist in a parameter range where the unstructured population goes extinct. For a more specific case of a population with hierarchical competition, we show that relative viability of structured and unstructured populations depend on the type of density dependence in the population growth. Namely, while in the case of logistic growth, structured and unstructured populations exhibit equivalent persistence; in the case of Allee dynamics, the persistence of a hierarchically structured population is shown to be higher. We then apply these results to the case of behaviourally structured populations and demonstrate that an extreme form of individual aggression can be beneficial at the population level and enhance population persistence.

  11. Variation in Streptococcus pneumoniae susceptibility to human antimicrobial peptides may mediate intraspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habets, Michelle G J L; Rozen, Daniel E; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2012-09-22

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a facultative pathogen inhabiting the nasopharynx of humans where it is exposed to a range of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the innate immune response. It is possible therefore that the susceptibility of strains to AMPs plays a role in determining their ability to colonize, and furthermore, that AMPs could mediate competitive interactions between co-colonizing genotypes. However, little is known about patterns of natural variation in AMP susceptibility of S. pneumoniae, and it is unclear whether the susceptibilities of an isolate to multiple human AMPs are correlated. We tested this by characterizing the susceptibility of 31 S. pneumoniae natural isolates to human neutrophil peptide (HNP-1) (α-defensin) and LL-37 (cathelicidin). We observed significant variation in susceptibility between isolates to both AMPs, and in the majority of isolates, susceptibilities to HNP-1 and LL-37 were uncorrelated. Clinical isolates were more susceptible to AMPs than were carriage isolates. The polysaccharide capsule of S. pneumoniae is thought to protect cells against AMPs. However, serotype alone could not explain the observed variation in susceptibility suggesting that genetic background plays an equally important role. We tested directly whether AMPs could mediate competition between isolates using competition experiments in the presence and absence of AMPs. These experiments demonstrated that AMPs could indeed reverse the outcome of competition between selected isolates. AMP-mediated competition could therefore contribute to the maintenance of intraspecific genetic diversity in S. pneumoniae.

  12. Does intraspecific competition facilitate age separation in timing of southward migration in waders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minias, Piotr; Kaczmarek, Krzysztof; Włodarczyk, Radosław; Janiszewski, Tomasz

    2014-07-01

    In many Palaearctic wader species there is a clear separation in the timing of adult and juvenile southward migration. This phenomenon is traditionally explained by the selection on adults to depart early from breeding grounds and necessity of juveniles to prepare longer for migration. In this study we hypothesize that late departure from natal grounds may also be adaptive for juveniles, as it allows them to avoid intensified interference competition at stopover sites with adult, usually more dominant conspecifics. To test this hypothesis we analysed long-term data on stopover behaviour of juvenile wood sandpipers (Tringa glareola) staying at a central Polish stopover site under varying levels of competition from adult birds. The results clearly indicated that juveniles were highly disadvantaged by the simultaneous presence of adults at the same staging site, as under intense competition from older conspecifics they refuelled more slowly and attained lower fat reserves. It was also found that juveniles which were forced to compete with adults left the site quickly and possibly searched for more favourable staging places. All these imply that delayed departure from natal grounds may be adaptive for juvenile waders, allowing them to mismatch the timing of their first migration with the peak of adult passage and, thus, reduce the negative consequences of intraspecific competition during migration.

  13. Intraspecific competition affects population size and resource allocation in an ant dispersing by colony fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulay, Raphaël; Galarza, Juan A; Chéron, Blandine; Hefetz, Abraham; Lenoir, Alain; van Oudenhove, Louise; Cerdá, Xim

    2010-11-01

    Intraspecific competition is a pervasive phenomenon with important ecological and evolutionary consequences, yet its effect in natural populations remains controversial. Although numerous studies suggest that in many cases populations across all organisms are limited by density-dependent processes, this conclusion often relies on correlative data. Here, using an experimental approach, we examined the effect of intraspecific competition on population regulation of the ant Aphaenogaster senilis. In this species females are philopatric while males disperse by flying over relatively long distances. All colonies were removed from 15 experimental plots, except for one focal colony in each plot, while 15 other plots remained unmanipulated. After the first reproductive season, nest density in the experimental plots returned to a level nonsignificantly different from that in the control plots, which was not expected if the populations were indeed regulated by density-independent phenomena. In both the control plots and the experimental plots colonies remained overdispersed throughout the experiment, suggesting colony mutual exclusion. Nests outside the plots rapidly extended their foraging span, but we did not detect any significant inward migration into the experimental plots. Experimental reduction in density did not significantly affect the focal colonies' biomass, measured just before the first reproductive season. However, the ratio of males to workers-pupae biomasses was smaller in experimental plots, suggesting that colonies there had redirected part of the resources normally allocated to male production to the production instead of new workers. Microsatellite analysis indicated that, after the reproductive season, many colonies in the experimental plots were headed by a young queen that was the mother of the brood but not of the old workers, indicating that reduction in colony density stimulated fission of the remaining colonies. Finally, at the end of the

  14. Network analysis reveals contrasting effects of intraspecific competition on individual vs. population diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Márcio S; Guimarães, Paulo R; Svanbäck, Richard; Pinheiro, Aluisio; Guimarães, Paulo; Dos Reis, Sérgio F; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2008-07-01

    Optimal foraging theory predicts that individuals should become more opportunistic when intraspecific competition is high and preferred resources are scarce. This density-dependent diet shift should result in increased diet breadth for individuals as they add previously unused prey to their repertoire. As a result, the niche breadth of the population as a whole should increase. In a recent study, R. Svanbäck and D. I. Bolnick confirmed that intraspecific competition led to increased population diet breadth in threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). However, individual diet breadth did not expand as resource levels declined. Here, we present a new method based on complex network theory that moves beyond a simple measure of diet breadth, and we use the method to reexamine the stickleback experiment. This method reveals that the population as a whole added new types of prey as stickleback density was increased. However, whereas foraging theory predicts that niche expansion is achieved by individuals accepting new prey in addition to previously preferred prey, we found that a subset of individuals ceased to use their previously preferred prey, even though other members of their population continued to specialize on the original prey types. As a result, populations were subdivided into groups of ecologically similar individuals, with diet variation among groups reflecting phenotype-dependent changes in foraging behavior as prey density declined. These results are consistent with foraging theory if we assume that quantitative trait variation among consumers affects prey preferences, and if cognitive constraints prevent individuals from continuing to use their formerly preferred prey while adding new prey.

  15. Molecular assessment of trematode co-infection and intraspecific competition in molluscan intermediate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Elizabeth A; Minchella, Dennis J

    2013-01-01

    In natural populations of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni, parasite distribution among snail intermediate hosts is generally overdispersed, such that a small proportion of hosts harbor the majority of parasite genotypes. Within these few infected snails, researchers have found that it can be common for hosts to harbor multiple parasite genotypes, creating circumstances in which co-infecting parasites are faced with potential competition over limited host resources. Much theoretical modeling has focused on parasite competition, especially regarding the influence of co-infection on parasite exploitation strategy evolution. However, particularly in the case of intra-molluscan intermediate stages, empirical investigations of parasite-parasite competition have often hinged on the untested assumption that co-exposure produces co-infection. That is, infected hosts exposed to multiple strains have been assumed to harbor multiple strains, regardless of the true nature of the infection outcome. Here we describe a real-time quantitative PCR method to distinguish the conditions of multiple- versus single-strain infection, as well as quantify the relative larval output of co-infecting strains. We applied the method to an empirical investigation of intraspecific parasite competition between S. mansoni strains within the intermediate snail host Biomphalaria glabrata, assessing co-exposure's effects on parasite infectivity and productivity and the concomitant effects on host fitness. Overall, there was no effect of parasite co-infection on snail life history traits relative to single-strain infection. Parasite infectivity significantly increased as a result of increasing overall miracidial dose, rather than co-exposure, though strain-specific productivity was significantly reduced in co-infections in manner consistent with resource competition. Moreover, we show that less than half of infected, co-exposed hosts had patent co-infections and demonstrate the utility of this

  16. Transcriptome analysis of intraspecific competition in Arabidopsis thaliana reveals organ-specific signatures related to nutrient acquisition and general stress response pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masclaux Frédéric G

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants are sessile and therefore have to perceive and adjust to changes in their environment. The presence of neighbours leads to a competitive situation where resources and space will be limited. Complex adaptive responses to such situation are poorly understood at the molecular level. Results Using microarrays, we analysed whole-genome expression changes in Arabidopsis thaliana plants subjected to intraspecific competition. The leaf and root transcriptome was strongly altered by competition. Differentially expressed genes were enriched in genes involved in nutrient deficiency (mainly N, P, K, perception of light quality, and responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Interestingly, performance of the generalist insect Spodoptera littoralis on densely grown plants was significantly reduced, suggesting that plants under competition display enhanced resistance to herbivory. Conclusions This study provides a comprehensive list of genes whose expression is affected by intraspecific competition in Arabidopsis. The outcome is a unique response that involves genes related to light, nutrient deficiency, abiotic stress, and defence responses.

  17. Effects of Spatial Patch Arrangement and Scale of Covarying Resources on Growth and Intraspecific Competition of a Clonal Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Jian; Shi, Xue-Ping; Meng, Xue-Feng; Wu, Xiao-Jing; Luo, Fang-Li; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in two co-variable resources such as light and water availability is common and can affect the growth of clonal plants. Several studies have tested effects of spatial heterogeneity in the supply of a single resource on competitive interactions of plants, but none has examined those of heterogeneous distribution of two co-variable resources. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (without intraspecific competition) or nine isolated ramets (with competition) of a rhizomatous herb Iris japonica under a homogeneous environment and four heterogeneous environments differing in patch arrangement (reciprocal and parallel patchiness of light and soil water) and patch scale (large and small patches of light and water). Intraspecific competition significantly decreased the growth of I. japonica, but at the whole container level there were no significant interaction effects of competition by spatial heterogeneity or significant effect of heterogeneity on competitive intensity. Irrespective of competition, the growth of I. japonica in the high and the low water patches did not differ significantly in the homogeneous treatments, but it was significantly larger in the high than in the low water patches in the heterogeneous treatments with large patches. For the heterogeneous treatments with small patches, the growth of I. japonica was significantly larger in the high than in the low water patches in the presence of competition, but such an effect was not significant in the absence of competition. Furthermore, patch arrangement and patch scale significantly affected competitive intensity at the patch level. Therefore, spatial heterogeneity in light and water supply can alter intraspecific competition at the patch level and such effects depend on patch arrangement and patch scale.

  18. Can we control the invasive cane toad using chemicals that have evolved under intraspecific competition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Gregory S; Crossland, Michael R; Shine, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Many invasive species experience intense intraspecific competition, because they are abundant in anthropogenically disturbed habitats where few native species persist. Species-specific competitive mechanisms that evolve in this context may offer novel, highly targeted means to control invasive taxa. We conducted laboratory experiments to evaluate the feasibility of this method of control, based on waterborne cues that are produced by tadpoles of the cane toad (Rhinella marina) to suppress the development of conspecific embryos. Our trials examined the nature and species-specificity of the effect, the robustness of the cue to freezing and storage, and the amounts required to suppress toad embryos. Our results were encouraging. The cue appears to be chemical rather than a biological organism, and may well be species-specific; the four species of native anurans that we tested were not influenced by toad larval cues. The cue retains its effectiveness after being frozen, but not after being dried, or after 7 d in water. It is effective at very low concentrations (the amount produced by three tadpoles within 750 L of water). Overall, the cane toad's suppressor pheromone may offer an effective new way to control invasive toads.

  19. Effects of Intraspecific Competition and Host-Parasitoid Developmental Timing on Foraging Behaviour of a Parasitoid Wasp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couchoux, Christelle; van Nouhuys, Saskya

    2014-01-01

    In a context where hosts are distributed in patches and susceptible to parasitism for a limited time, female parasitoids foraging for hosts might experience intraspecific competition. We investigated the effects of host and parasitoid developmental stage and intraspecific competition among foraging females on host-searching behaviour in the parasitoid wasp Hyposoter horticola. We found that H. horticola females have a pre-reproductive adult stage during which their eggs are not mature yet and they forage very little for hosts. The wasps foraged for hosts more once they were mature. Behavioural experiments showed that wasps' foraging activity also increased as host eggs aged and became susceptible to parasitism, and as competition among foraging wasps increased.

  20. Intraspecific competition reveals conditional fitness effects of single gene polymorphism at the Arabidopsis root growth regulator BRX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, Chikako; Bernasconi, Giorgina; Hardtke, Christian S

    2008-01-01

    Intraspecific genetic variation for morphological traits is observed in many organisms. In Arabidopsis thaliana, alleles responsible for intraspecific morphological variation are increasingly being identified. However, the fitness consequences remain unclear in most cases. Here, the fitness effects of alleles of the BRX gene are investigated. A brx loss-of-function allele, which was found in a natural accession, results in a highly branched but poorly elongated root system. Comparison between the control accession Sav-0 and an introgression of brx into this background (brxS) indicated that, surprisingly, brx loss of function did not negatively affect fitness in pure stands. However, in mixed, well-watered stands brxS performance and reproductive output decreased significantly, as the proportion of Sav-0 neighbors increased. Additional comparisons between brxS and a brxS line that was complemented by a BRX transgene confirmed a direct effect of the loss-of-function allele on plant performance, as indicated by restored competitive ability of the transgenic genotype. Further, because plant height was very similar across genotypes and because the experimental setup largely excluded shading effects, the impaired competitiveness of the brx loss-of-function genotype likely reflects below-ground competition. In summary, these data reveal conditional fitness effects of a single gene polymorphism in response to intraspecific competition in Arabidopsis.

  1. Intraspecific competition between ectomycorrhizal Pisolithus microcarpus isolates impacts plant and fungal performance under elevated CO2 and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortal, S; Powell, J R; Plett, J M; Simonin, A; Anderson, I C

    2016-08-01

    Root systems are simultaneously colonized by multiple individuals of mycorrhizal fungi. Intraspecific competitive interactions between fungal isolates are likely to affect both fungal and plant performance and be influenced by abiotic factors. Here, we assessed the impact of intraspecific competition between three Pisolithus microcarpus isolates on the establishment of, and benefit derived from, symbioses with Eucalyptus grandis seedlings. We investigated the outcomes of competition under ambient and elevated temperature and CO2 concentration ([CO2]) in a factorial design. We observed a reduction in mycelium growth, mycorrhiza formation and seedling mass when two P. microcarpus isolates were co-inoculated on a single E. grandis seedling. Isolates invested more in mycelium than in mycorrhizas in the presence of a competitor. All isolates responded negatively to elevated [CO2] and positively to elevated temperature, which led to no changes on the outcomes of the interactions with changing conditions. However, the presence of a competitor hindered the positive response of P. microcarpus isolates to warming, which resulted in larger negative effects of competition under elevated temperature than under ambient conditions. Our study highlights the need to consider how competition affects individual fungal responses as well as plant performance when trying to predict the impacts of climate change. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Effects of host plant and larval density on intraspecific competition in larvae of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J; Larson, Kristi; Watt, Tim; Gould, Juli; Lelito, Jonathan P

    2013-12-01

    Competition for food, mates, and space among different individuals of the same insect species can affect density-dependent regulation of insect abundance or population dynamics. The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a serious invasive pest of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees, with its larvae feeding in serpentine galleries between the interface of sapwood and phloem tissues of ash trees. Using artificial infestation of freshly cut logs of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall) and tropical ash (Fraxinus uhdei [Wenzig] Lingelsh) with a series of egg densities, we evaluated the mechanism and outcome of intraspecific competition in larvae of A. planipennis in relation to larval density and host plant species. Results from our study showed that as the egg densities on each log (1.5-6.5 cm in diameter and 22-25 cm in length) increased from 200 to 1,600 eggs per square meter of surface area, larval survivorship declined from ≍68 to 10% for the green ash logs, and 86 to 55% for tropical ash logs. Accordingly, larval mortality resulting from cannibalism, starvation, or both, significantly increased as egg density increased, and the biomass of surviving larvae significantly decreased on both ash species. When larval density was adjusted to the same level, however, larval mortality from intraspecific competition was significantly higher and mean biomasses of surviving larvae was significantly lower in green ash than in tropical ash. The role of intraspecific competition of A. planipennis larvae in density-dependent regulation of its natural population dynamics is discussed.

  3. The effect of competition on the neutral intraspecific diversity of invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roques, L; Hosono, Y; Bonnefon, O; Boivin, T

    2015-08-01

    This paper deals with the effect of interspecific competition on the dynamics of neutral genetic diversity in a range-expanding population. The spread of an invasive species in an environment already hosting a resident competitor is described by a traveling wave solution with minimal speed, u(t,x) = U(x - c ∗ t), of a diffusive Lotka-Volterra competition model. The description of the dynamics of neutral genetic fractions in this wave is based on a decomposition of the wave into several components, as proposed by Roques et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109(23):8828-8833, 2012). Our analytical results reveal that the wave can be either the pulled type, corresponding to strong erosion of the diversity, or the pushed type, corresponding to maintenance of the initial diversity. The pulled/pushed nature of the wave depends on the linear or nonlinear nature of the speed c *. Our results show that, for sufficiently strong competition, the speed is nonlinear, and therefore all of the genetic diversity in the invasive population is maintained. Conversely, in the absence of competition, or when competition is mild, the speed is linear, which means that only the furthest forward fraction in the initial invasive population eventually remains in the colonization front. Our numerical results also show that the sufficient conditions of Lewis et al. (J Math Biol 45(3):219-233, 2002) and Huang (J Dyn Differ Equ 22(2):285-297, 2010) for the linearity of the speed c * can still be improved, and they show that nonlinear speeds occur across a wide region of the parameter space, providing a counterpoint to recent analytical results suggesting that nonlinear speeds only occur in certain limiting cases.

  4. Intraspecific competition and mating between fungal strains of the anther smut Microbotryum violaceum from the host plants Silene latifolia and S-dioica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Putten, WF; Biere, A; Van Damme, JMM

    We studied intraspecific competition and assortative mating between strains of the anther smut fungus Microbotryum violaceum from two of its host species, Silene latifolia and S. dioica. Specifically. we investigated whether strains from allopatric host populations have higher competitive ability on

  5. Intraspecific competition and mating between fungal strains of the anther smut Microbotryum violaceum from the host plants Silene latifolia and S-dioica.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Putten, W.F.; Biere, A.; Van Damme, J.M.M.

    2003-01-01

    We studied intraspecific competition and assortative mating between strains of the anther smut fungus Microbotryum violaceum from two of its host species, Silene latifolia and S. dioica. Specifically, we investigated whether strains from allopatric host populations have higher competitive ability on

  6. Bulk leaf delta(18)O and delta(13)C reflect the intensity of intraspecific competition for water in a semi-arid tussock grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, David A; Querejeta, José I; Bellot, Juan

    2009-10-01

    We investigated the extent to which plant water and nutrient status are affected by intraspecific competition intensity and microsite quality in a monodominant tussock grassland. Leaf gas exchange and stable isotope measurements were used to assess the water relations of Stipa tenacissima tussocks growing along a gradient of plant cover and soil depth in a semi-arid catchment of Southeast Spain. Stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rate decreased with increasing intensity of competition during the wet growing season, leading to foliar delta(18)O and delta(13)C enrichment. A high potential for runoff interception by upslope neighbours exerted strong detrimental effects on the water and phosphorus status of downslope S. tenacissima tussocks. Foliar delta(15)N values became more enriched with increasing soil depth. Multiple stepwise regression showed that competition potential and/or rhizosphere soil depth accounted for large proportions of variance in foliar delta(13)C, delta(18)O and delta(15)N among target tussocks (57, 37 and 64%, respectively). The results presented here highlight the key role that spatial redistribution of resources (water and nutrients) by runoff plays in semi-arid ecosystems. It is concluded that combined measurement of delta(13)C, delta(18)O and nutrient concentrations in bulk leaf tissue can provide insight into the intensity of competitive interactions occurring in natural plant communities.

  7. Intraspecific variation among clones of a naïve rare grass affects competition with a nonnative, invasive forb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, David J; Dewey, Justin; Goossens, Hélène; Dodd, Misty M

    2014-01-01

    Intraspecific variation can have a major impact on plant community composition yet there is little information available on the extent that such variation by an already established species affects interspecific interactions of an invading species. The current research examined the competitiveness of clones of a globally rare but locally common native grass, Calamagrostis porteri ssp. insperata to invasion by Alliaria petiolata, a non-native invasive species. A greenhouse experiment was conducted twice over consecutive years in which 15 clones from three populations of Calamagrostis were paired with rosettes of Alliaria in pots containing native forest soil previously uninvaded by Alliaria. Both species showed a negative response to the presence of the other species, although Alliaria more so than Calamagrostis. Moreover, the effect of Calamagrostis depended upon population, and, to a lesser extent, the individual clone paired with Alliaria. Competitive effects were stronger in the first experiment compared with when the experiment was repeated in the second year. The influence of Calamagrostis clones on the outcome of the experiment varied among populations and among clones, but also between years. Clones from one of the three populations were more influential than clones from the other two populations. Only one of 15 clones, both from the same population, was influential in both experiments. This research supports a growing literature indicating that intraspecific variability among clones of a dominant species can affect interspecific interactions and that such variability in a native species can affect performance of an invading species.

  8. Competition increases in the face of strong regional ties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoetgen, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    The current fuel market exhibits a large surplus production capacity and is strongly influenced by regional ties, with imports of fabricated fuel serving to supplement domestic production or to keep domestic vendors competitive. In the future, the market is set to become increasingly competitive, especially in Europe and the United States. (author)

  9. Experimental examination of intraspecific density-dependent competition during the breeding period in monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D T Tyler Flockhart

    Full Text Available A central goal of population ecology is to identify the factors that regulate population growth. Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus in eastern North America re-colonize the breeding range over several generations that result in population densities that vary across space and time during the breeding season. We used laboratory experiments to measure the strength of density-dependent intraspecific competition on egg laying rate and larval survival and then applied our results to density estimates of wild monarch populations to model the strength of density dependence during the breeding season. Egg laying rates did not change with density but larvae at high densities were smaller, had lower survival, and weighed less as adults compared to lower densities. Using mean larval densities from field surveys resulted in conservative estimates of density-dependent population reduction that varied between breeding regions and different phases of the breeding season. Our results suggest the highest levels of population reduction due to density-dependent intraspecific competition occur early in the breeding season in the southern portion of the breeding range. However, we also found that the strength of density dependence could be almost five times higher depending on how many life-stages were used as part of field estimates. Our study is the first to link experimental results of a density-dependent reduction in vital rates to observed monarch densities in the wild and show that the effects of density dependent competition in monarchs varies across space and time, providing valuable information for developing robust, year-round population models in this migratory organism.

  10. Experimental examination of intraspecific density-dependent competition during the breeding period in monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flockhart, D T Tyler; Martin, Tara G; Norris, D Ryan

    2012-01-01

    A central goal of population ecology is to identify the factors that regulate population growth. Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) in eastern North America re-colonize the breeding range over several generations that result in population densities that vary across space and time during the breeding season. We used laboratory experiments to measure the strength of density-dependent intraspecific competition on egg laying rate and larval survival and then applied our results to density estimates of wild monarch populations to model the strength of density dependence during the breeding season. Egg laying rates did not change with density but larvae at high densities were smaller, had lower survival, and weighed less as adults compared to lower densities. Using mean larval densities from field surveys resulted in conservative estimates of density-dependent population reduction that varied between breeding regions and different phases of the breeding season. Our results suggest the highest levels of population reduction due to density-dependent intraspecific competition occur early in the breeding season in the southern portion of the breeding range. However, we also found that the strength of density dependence could be almost five times higher depending on how many life-stages were used as part of field estimates. Our study is the first to link experimental results of a density-dependent reduction in vital rates to observed monarch densities in the wild and show that the effects of density dependent competition in monarchs varies across space and time, providing valuable information for developing robust, year-round population models in this migratory organism.

  11. Consequences of Intraspecific Competition and Environmental Variation for Selection in the Mustard Sinapsis arvensis: Contrasting Ecological and Evolutionary Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, M L; Thiede, D A; Roy, B A

    2004-12-01

    Alternative models of plant life-history evolution differ in their views of how abiotic stress and competition interact to shape the evolution of plant life-history traits. To address this debate, which crosses traditional boundaries between community ecology and population biology, we grew wild turnip families from three selection histories in a field experiment in which we manipulated conspecific density and sun exposure. Hot spring conditions caused neutral shading to reduce drought stress, resulting in a greater mean and variance for lifetime fertility at low density and greater intensity of competition at high density. The variance in relative fitness among individuals or families was least in partial shade at low density. Prior selection under shade stress in the greenhouse reduced lifetime fitness in the less stressful partial-shade treatment under field conditions. Patterns of selection and predicted trait evolution were more similar between high and low densities than between the two light environments. Partial shade favored the proliferation of large leaves early in development, especially at high density. Selection in the stressful full-sun treatment favored reduced pathogen susceptibility at both densities and early flowering at low density. Because direct selection on traits changed principally in magnitude rather than in direction, genetic correlations for fitness were generally positive between light and density treatments. Greater intraspecific competition led to more rapid predicted trait evolution in the partial-shade environment but not in the stressful full-sun treatment.

  12. Stabilizing selection on genome size in a population of Festuca pallens under conditions of intensive intraspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarda, Petr; Horová, Lucie; Bures, Petr; Hralová, Ivana; Marková, Michaela

    2010-09-01

    *Stabilizing selection is a key evolutionary mechanism for which there is relatively little experimental evidence. To date, stabilizing selection has never been observed at the whole-genome level. *We tested the effect of selection on genome size in a field experiment using seeds collected in a population of Festuca pallens with a highly variable genome size. Using flow cytometry, we measured the genome size in germinating seedlings and juvenile plants grown with or without high intraspecific competition (908 individuals). Above-ground biomass and leaf number were used as measurements of individual vegetative performance. The possible confounding effect of seed weight was controlled for in a separate experiment. *Growth under high competition had a significant stabilizing effect on genome size. Because no relationship was observed between genome size and vegetative performance, we assume that the elimination of plants with extreme genome sizes was the result of decreased survival as a consequence of some unrecognized stress. *Our results indicate that genome size may be under direct selection. The equal disadvantaging of either large or small genomes indicates that the selection for optimum genome size in species may be fully context dependent. This study demonstrates the power of competition experiments for the detection of weak selection processes.

  13. Intraspecific and interspecific competition in Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) and Callosobruchus subinnotatus (Pic) on stored bambara groundnut, Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdcourt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lale, N E.S.; Vidal, S

    2001-10-01

    Intraspecific competition was studied in Callosobruchus maculatus and Callosobruchus subinnotatus. Interspecific competition between the two bruchids was also studied to determine which of these species is likely to cause more damage to stored bambara groundnuts, Vigna subterranea in cases of joint infestation. Results showed that increasing the adult density up to 8 females per 10g of bambara groundnut seeds did not significantly reduce the mean number of eggs laid per female, the number of eggs developing to the adult stage, or the weight of emerged adults of either species. The developmental period of the two species was also not significantly affected. The adult emergence curve of C. maculatus was similar to that of C. subinnotatus and was of the scramble type. C. maculatus performed better than C. subinnotatus in interspecific competition and it achieved this through a higher egg-laying ability and a higher rate of progeny production coupled with a shorter life-cycle. The implications of these findings with respect to damage and possible loss of stored bambara groundnut are discussed.

  14. Intraspecific competition during infection by Aspergillus flavus is influenced by plant host species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Communities of Aspergillus flavus are composed of diverse genotypes that collectively influence incidence and severity of crop aflatoxin contamination. Isolates vary in competitive ability on maize, but empirical data on the extent to which host-specific influences determine outcomes of competition ...

  15. Intraspecific and interspecific competition induces density-dependent habitat niche shifts in an endangered steppe bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarjuelo, Rocío; Morales, Manuel B; Arroyo, Beatriz; Mañosa, Santiago; Bota, Gerard; Casas, Fabián; Traba, Juan

    2017-11-01

    Interspecific competition is a dominant force in animal communities that induces niche shifts in ecological and evolutionary time. If competition occurs, niche expansion can be expected when the competitor disappears because resources previously inaccessible due to competitive constraints can then be exploited (i.e., ecological release). Here, we aimed to determine the potential effects of interspecific competition between the little bustard ( Tetrax tetrax ) and the great bustard ( Otis tarda ) using a multidimensional niche approach with habitat distribution data. We explored whether the degree of niche overlap between the species was a density-dependent function of interspecific competition. We then looked for evidences of ecological release by comparing measures of niche breadth and position of the little bustard between allopatric and sympatric situations. Furthermore, we evaluated whether niche shifts could depend not only on the presence of great bustard but also on the density of little and great bustards. The habitat niches of these bustard species partially overlapped when co-occurring, but we found no relationship between degree of overlap and great bustard density. In the presence of the competitor, little bustard's niche was displaced toward increased use of the species' primary habitat. Little bustard's niche breadth decreased proportionally with great bustard density in sympatric sites, in consistence with theory. Overall, our results suggest that density-dependent variation in little bustard's niche is the outcome of interspecific competition with the great bustard. The use of computational tools like kernel density estimators to obtain multidimensional niches should bring novel insights on how species' ecological niches behave under the effects of interspecific competition in ecological communities.

  16. Insect herbivores change the outcome of plant competition through both inter- and intraspecific processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tania N; Underwood, Nora; Inouye, Brian D

    2013-08-01

    Insect herbivores can affect plant abundance and community composition, and theory suggests that herbivores influence plant communities by altering interspecific interactions among plants. Because the outcome of interspecific interactions is influenced by the per capita competitive ability of plants, density dependence, and intrinsic rates of increase, measuring herbivore effects on all these processes is necessary to understand the mechanisms by which herbivores influence plant communities. We fit alternative competition models to data from a response surface experiment conducted over four years to examine how herbivores affected the outcome of competition between two perennial plants, Solidago altissima and Solanum carolinense. Within a growing season, herbivores reduced S. carolinense plant size but did not affect the size of S. altissima, which exhibited compensatory growth. Across seasons, herbivores did not affect S. carolinense density or biomass but reduced both the density and population growth of S. altissima. The best-fit models indicated that the effects of herbivores varied with year. In some years, herbivores increased the per capita competitive effect of S. altissima on S. carolinense; in other years, herbivores influenced the intrinsic rate of increase of S. altissima. We examined possible herbivore effects on the longer-term outcome of competition (over the time scale of a typical old-field habitat), using simulations based on the best-fit models. In the absence of herbivores, plant coexistence was observed. In the presence of herbivores, S. carolinense was excluded by S. altissima in 72.3% of the simulations. We demonstrate that herbivores can influence the outcome of competition through changes in both per capita competitive effects and intrinsic rates of increase. We discuss the implications of these results for ecological succession and biocontrol.

  17. Invasional interference due to similar inter- and intraspecific competition between invaders may affect management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschert, Emily Sofia Jalics; Shea, Katriona

    2012-07-01

    As the number of biological invasions increases, the potential for invader-invader interactions also rises. The effect of multiple invaders can be superadditive (invasional meltdown), additive, or subadditive (invasional interference); which of these situations occurs has critical implications for prioritization of management efforts. Carduus nutans and C. acanthoides, two congeneric invasive weeds, have a striking, segregated distribution in central Pennsylvania, U.S.A. Possible hypotheses for this pattern include invasion history and chance, direct competition, or negative interactions mediated by other species, such as shared pollinators. To explore the role of resource competition in generating this pattern, we conducted three related experiments using a response-surface design throughout the life cycles of two cohorts. Although these species have similar niche requirements, we found no differential response to competition between conspecifics vs. congeners. The response to combined density was relatively weak for both species. While direct competitive interactions do not explain the segregated distributional patterns of these two species, we predict that invasions of either species singly, or both species together, would have similar impacts. When prioritizing which areas to target to prevent the spread of one of the species, it is better to focus on areas as yet unaffected by its congener; where the congener is already present, invasional interference makes it unlikely that the net effect will change.

  18. Biological control of indianmeal moth and rice weevil by parasitoids with reference to the intraspecific competition pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Youngwoo; Ji, Jeongyeon; Na, Ja Hyun; Chun, Yong Shik; Ryoo, Mun Il

    2011-04-01

    Biological control of rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.), and Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner), by their parasitoids Anisopteromalus calandrae (Howard) and Bracon hebetor Say was examined while considering the intraspecific competition pattern of the pests. In both experimental and simulation studies, A. calandrae was shown to suppress the rice weevil population, a contest type competitor, regardless of the parasitoid/weevil ratios tested. In contrast, B. hebetor only significantly suppressed the Indianmeal moth, a scramble type competitor, when the parasitoid/moth ratio was >0.05. At ratios lower than 0.05, the role of B. hebetor was negligible, and the correlation coefficients between the number of moths that had emerged and the parasitoid/moth ratio was estimated to be 0.07. The control efficiency of the two parasitoids with respect to the parasitoid/host ratio was estimated using a ratio-response model. To suppress the weevil density to a level that was only 10% of the current density, the ratio was estimated to be 0.02, whereas this value was 0.14 for the Indianmeal moth. However, for the continuous suppression of the Indianmeal moth, periodic and iterative introduction of B. hebetor was required.

  19. Sexual segregation in juvenile New Zealand sea lion foraging ranges: implications for intraspecific competition, population dynamics and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Elaine S; Chilvers, B Louise; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Moore, Antoni B; Robertson, Bruce C

    2012-01-01

    Sexual segregation (sex differences in spatial organisation and resource use) is observed in a large range of taxa. Investigating causes for sexual segregation is vital for understanding population dynamics and has important conservation implications, as sex differences in foraging ecology may affect vulnerability to area-specific human activities. Although behavioural ecologists have proposed numerous hypotheses for this phenomenon, the underlying causes of sexual segregation are poorly understood. We examined the size-dimorphism and niche divergence hypotheses as potential explanations for sexual segregation in the New Zealand (NZ) sea lion (Phocarctos hookeri), a nationally critical, declining species impacted by trawl fisheries. We used satellite telemetry and linear mixed effects models to investigate sex differences in the foraging ranges of juvenile NZ sea lions. Male trip distances and durations were almost twice as long as female trips, with males foraging over the Auckland Island shelf and in further locations than females. Sex was the most important variable in trip distance, maximum distance travelled from study site, foraging cycle duration and percent time at sea whereas mass and age had small effects on these characteristics. Our findings support the predictions of the niche divergence hypothesis, which suggests that sexual segregation acts to decrease intraspecific resource competition. As a consequence of sexual segregation in foraging ranges, female foraging grounds had proportionally double the overlap with fisheries operations than males. This distribution exposes female juvenile NZ sea lions to a greater risk of resource competition and bycatch from fisheries than males, which can result in higher female mortality. Such sex-biased mortality could impact population dynamics, because female population decline can lead to decreased population fecundity. Thus, effective conservation and management strategies must take into account sex differences

  20. Sexual segregation in juvenile New Zealand sea lion foraging ranges: implications for intraspecific competition, population dynamics and conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine S Leung

    Full Text Available Sexual segregation (sex differences in spatial organisation and resource use is observed in a large range of taxa. Investigating causes for sexual segregation is vital for understanding population dynamics and has important conservation implications, as sex differences in foraging ecology may affect vulnerability to area-specific human activities. Although behavioural ecologists have proposed numerous hypotheses for this phenomenon, the underlying causes of sexual segregation are poorly understood. We examined the size-dimorphism and niche divergence hypotheses as potential explanations for sexual segregation in the New Zealand (NZ sea lion (Phocarctos hookeri, a nationally critical, declining species impacted by trawl fisheries. We used satellite telemetry and linear mixed effects models to investigate sex differences in the foraging ranges of juvenile NZ sea lions. Male trip distances and durations were almost twice as long as female trips, with males foraging over the Auckland Island shelf and in further locations than females. Sex was the most important variable in trip distance, maximum distance travelled from study site, foraging cycle duration and percent time at sea whereas mass and age had small effects on these characteristics. Our findings support the predictions of the niche divergence hypothesis, which suggests that sexual segregation acts to decrease intraspecific resource competition. As a consequence of sexual segregation in foraging ranges, female foraging grounds had proportionally double the overlap with fisheries operations than males. This distribution exposes female juvenile NZ sea lions to a greater risk of resource competition and bycatch from fisheries than males, which can result in higher female mortality. Such sex-biased mortality could impact population dynamics, because female population decline can lead to decreased population fecundity. Thus, effective conservation and management strategies must take into account

  1. Intraspecific competition and light effect on reproduction of Ligularia virgaurea, an invasive native alpine grassland clonal herb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tian-Peng; Zhang, Ge-Fei; Zhao, Zhi-Gang; Du, Guo-Zhen; He, Gui-Yong

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between sexual reproduction and clonal growth in clonal plants often shows up at the ramet level. However, only a few studies focus on the relationship at the genet level, which could finally account for evolution. The sexual reproduction and clonal growth of Ligularia virgaurea, a perennial herb widely distributed in the alpine grasslands of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau of China, were studied under different competition intensities and light conditions at the genet level through a potted experiment. The results showed that: (1) sexual reproduction did not depend on density or light, and increasing clonal growth with decreasing density and increasing light intensity indicated that intraspecific competition and light intensity may affect the clonal life history of L. virgaurea; (2) both sexual reproduction and clonal growth show a positive linear relationship with genet size under different densities and light conditions; (3) a threshold size is required for sexual reproduction and no evidence of a threshold size for clonal growth under different densities and light conditions; (4) light level affected the allocation of total biomass to clonal and sexual structures, with less allocation to clonal structures and more allocation to sexual structures in full sunlight than in shade; (5) light determined the onset of sexual reproduction, and the genets in the shade required a smaller threshold size for sexual reproduction to occur than the plants in full sunlight; and (6) no evidence was found of trade-offs between clonal growth and sexual reproduction under different densities and light conditions at the genet level, and the positive correlation between two reproductive modes indicated that these are two integrated processes. Clonal growth in this species may be viewed as a growth strategy that tends to maximize genet fitness.

  2. Intraspecific Competition Impacts Vibrio fischeri Strain Diversity during Initial Colonization of the Squid Light Organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; LaSota, Elijah D; Cecere, Andrew G; LaPenna, Kyle B; Larios-Valencia, Jessie; Wollenberg, Michael S; Miyashiro, Tim

    2016-05-15

    Animal development and physiology depend on beneficial interactions with microbial symbionts. In many cases, the microbial symbionts are horizontally transmitted among hosts, thereby making the acquisition of these microbes from the environment an important event within the life history of each host. The light organ symbiosis established between the Hawaiian squid Euprymna scolopes and the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri is a model system for examining how hosts acquire horizontally transmitted microbial symbionts. Recent studies have revealed that the light organ of wild-caught E. scolopes squid contains polyclonal populations of V. fischeri bacteria; however, the function and development of such strain diversity in the symbiosis are unknown. Here, we report our phenotypic and phylogenetic characterizations of FQ-A001, which is a V. fischeri strain isolated directly from the light organ of an E. scolopes individual. Relative to the type strain ES114, FQ-A001 exhibits similar growth in rich medium but displays increased bioluminescence and decreased motility in soft agar. FQ-A001 outcompetes ES114 in colonizing the crypt spaces of the light organs. Remarkably, we find that animals cocolonized with FQ-A001 and ES114 harbor singly colonized crypts, in contrast to the cocolonized crypts observed from competition experiments involving single genotypes. The results with our two-strain system suggest that strain diversity within the squid light organ is a consequence of diversity in the single-strain colonization of individual crypt spaces. The developmental programs and overall physiologies of most animals depend on diverse microbial symbionts that are acquired from the environment. However, the basic principles underlying how microbes colonize their hosts remain poorly understood. Here, we report our findings of bacterial strain competition within the coevolved animal-microbe symbiosis composed of the Hawaiian squid and bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri

  3. The Vibrio cholerae type VI secretion system employs diverse effector modules for intraspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterweger, Daniel; Miyata, Sarah T; Bachmann, Verena; Brooks, Teresa M; Mullins, Travis; Kostiuk, Benjamin; Provenzano, Daniele; Pukatzki, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that consists of over 200 serogroups with differing pathogenic potential. Only strains that express the virulence factors cholera toxin (CT) and toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) are capable of pandemic spread of cholera diarrhoea. Regardless, all V. cholerae strains sequenced to date harbour genes for the type VI secretion system (T6SS) that translocates effectors into neighbouring eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Here we report that the effectors encoded within these conserved gene clusters differ widely among V. cholerae strains, and that immunity proteins encoded immediately downstream from the effector genes protect their host from neighbouring bacteria producing corresponding effectors. As a consequence, strains with matching effector-immunity gene sets can coexist, while strains with different sets compete against each other. Thus, the V. cholerae T6SS contributes to the competitive behaviour of this species.

  4. The eye fluke Tylodelphys clavata affects prey detection and intraspecific competition of European perch (Perca fluviatilis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas Muñoz, Jenny Carolina; Staaks, Georg; Knopf, Klaus

    2017-07-27

    Parasites that occupy the eyes of fish have the potential to affect visual perception and consequently alter the host's behaviour, as these organs provide information about their surroundings. In an experimental study, the feeding behaviour of European perch (Perca fluviatilis) infested with the eye fluke Tylodelphys clavata was examined. The results showed that an individual's ability to identify and approach food items was negatively affected by the infestation intensity of T. clavata. Additionally, the foraging success of an individual was reduced in competition with another, less heavily infested conspecific, when the same food resource was exploited. These alterations in the ability to locate food may have important consequences on the feeding strategy of the fish. Furthermore, the impaired feeding capability caused by T. clavata may also increase the predation risk as heavily infested fish need to spend more time foraging to attain a rate of food intake equivalent to less infested conspecifics.

  5. Horizontal mergers and weak and strong competition commissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Bojan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse the horizontal merger of companies in an already concentrated industry. The participants in mergers are obliged to submit notification to the Competition Commission but they also have the option of rejecting the merger. At the time of the notification submission the participants do not know whether the Commission is strong or weak, and they can complain to the Court if the Commission prohibits the merger. We model the strategic interaction between Participants and Commission in a dynamic game of incomplete information and determine weak perfect Bayesian equilibria. The main finding of our paper is that Participants will base their decision to submit notification on their belief in a weak Commission decision and will almost completely ignore the possibility of a strong Commission decision. We also provide a detailed examination of one case from Serbian regulatory practice, which coincides with the results of our game theoretical model.

  6. Competição intraespecífica em Boophilus microplus Intra-specific competition in Boophilus microplus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Passos dos Santos

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho foi desenvolvido no Campo Experimental da Embrapa Gado de Leite, Coronel Pacheco, Minas Gerais, Brasil, tendo como objetivo a verificação da ocorrência de competição intra-específica durante a fase parasitária do carrapato bovino Boophilus microplus e a confirmação da correlação positiva entre o peso da fêmea ingurgitada e o peso da massa de ovos. Foram feitas observações em bovinos infestados naturalmente e experimentalmente, com cargas parasitárias e intervalos diferenciados. Os animais infestados permaneceram em baias individuais durante todo o período de queda das fêmeas ingurgitadas, para que estas pudessem ser coletadas diariamente. As diferenças observadas entre as médias de peso das fêmeas ingurgitadas, no decorrer dos dias de queda, sugeriram a ocorrência de competição durante a fase de alimentação. Observou-se também que o potencial de oviposição está diretamente relacionado a sua capacidade de alimentação.This study was developed in the Experimental Station of Embrapa Dairy Cattle, Coronel Pacheco, Minas Gerais, Brazil, and had the aim of verifying the occurrence of intra-specific competition in the cattle tick Boophilus microplus during its parasite life and to confirm the relation between the weight of engorged females and the egg mass laid. Observations were done with cattle naturally and experimentally infested with different quantities of larvae during different intervals of time. The infested animals remained in individual stalls for the whole period of engorged females drop-off, in order to collect them daily. The observed differences among weight of engorged females during drop-off days suggested the competition occurrence during the feeding phase. It was also seen that the oviposition potential of an engorged female is directly related to its feeding capacity.

  7. Survival of transplanted nests of the red wood ant Formica aquilonia (Hymenoptera: Formicidae): the effects of intraspecific competition and forest clear-cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorvari, Jouni; Huhta, Esa; Hakkarainen, Harri

    2014-08-01

    The fitness and survival of ant colonies depend on the resources near their nests. These resources may be limited due to poor habitat quality or by intra- and interspecific competitions, which in extreme cases may cause the ant colony to perish. We tested the effect of intraspecific competition and habitat degradation (forest clear-cutting) on colony survival by transplanting 26 nests of the red wood ant (Formica aquilonia Yarrow, 1955) in 26 different forest areas that contained 0-11 conspecific alien nests per hectare. F. aquilonia is highly dependent on canopy-dwelling aphids, thus the removal of trees should cause food limitation. During the course of the 4-year experiment, 9 of the forests were partially clear-cut. We found that while forest clear-cutting significantly decreased the colonies' survival, intraspecific competition did not. As a highly polygynous and polydomous species, F. aquilonia seems to tolerate the presence of alien conspecific colonies to a certain extent. © 2013 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  8. Going deeper into phosphorus adsorbents for lake restoration: Combined effects of magnetic particles, intraspecific competition and habitat heterogeneity pressure on Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Arco, Ana; Parra, Gema; de Vicente, Inmaculada

    2018-02-01

    Aquatic population responses to chemical exposure may be exacerbated by intraspecific competition pressures, being also shaped by habitat heterogeneity. Magnetic particles (MPs) have been recently proposed as promising phosphorus (P) adsorbents for lake restoration. This study focuses on assessing the effects of MPs on the abundance of the crustacean Daphnia magna under different levels of both intraspecific competition pressure and habitat heterogeneity. The experimental design consisted of two experiments (in homogeneous and heterogeneous habitats) done in glass jars with four concentrations of MPs: controls of 0g MPsL -1 , and treatments of 1, 1.5 and 2g MPsL -1 . In addition, competition treatments were established by using different population densities, and hence, no competition (C), low (L) and high (H) competition pressures were simulated. The experiments lasted for 7 days, with a 4-day pre-exposure period, in which competition was all allowed to take place, and a 3-day post-exposure period. Twenty-four hours after adding MPs, the MPs were removed by applying a magnetic separation technique. The results showed that competition pressures occurred and significantly reduced population abundances during the pre-exposure period. During the post-exposure period, the combined effects of competition and MPs were detected in both homogeneous (Ho-) and heterogeneous (He-) habitat experiments, showing a significantly drastic reduction in abundances. In fact, the lethal concentration for 50% of the population (LC 50 - 24h) was 0 and 0.16g MPsL -1 in the Ho- and He-experiments respectively, indicating that the addition and especially the removal of MPs cause extreme mortality. These results indicated that even though competition plays a role in shaping populations, its influence was down-weighted by the stronger pressures of MPs. In addition, as no significant differences between homogeneous and heterogeneous habitats were found, we may state that the refuge offered was

  9. OnlineMin: A Fast Strongly Competitive Randomized Paging Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Moruz, Gabriel; Negoescu, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    approach that both has optimal competitiveness and selects victim pages in subquadratic time. In fact, if k pages fit in internal memory the best previous solution required O(k 2) time per request and O(k) space, whereas our approach takes also O(k) space, but only O(logk) time in the worst case per page...

  10. Strategic Mergers of Strong Institutions to Enhance Competitive Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Grant; Harman, Kay

    2008-01-01

    Strategic mergers are formal combinations or amalgamations of higher education institutions with the aim of enhancing competitive advantage, or merging for "mutual growth". Recently, in a number of countries, there has been a decided shift from mergers initiated by governments, and dealing mainly with "problem" cases, towards…

  11. Effects of ultraviolet-B irradiance on intraspecific competition and facilitation of plants: self-thinning, size inequality, and phenotypic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-Chang; Lin, Yue; Yue, Ming; Li, Qian; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Xiao; Chi, Hong; Chai, Yong-Fu; Wang, Mao

    2012-01-01

    (1) The effects of facilitation on the structure and dynamics of plant populations have not been studied so widely as competition. The UV-B radiation, as a typical environmental factor causing stress, may result in direct stress and facilitation. (2) The effects of UV-B radiation on intraspecific competition and facilitation were investigated based on the following three predictions on self-thinning, size inequality, and phenotypic plasticity: i) Self-thinning is the reduction in density that results from the increase in the mean biomass of individuals in crowded populations, and is driven by competition. In this study, the mortality rate of the population is predicted to decrease from UV-B irradiance. ii) The size inequality of a population increases with competition intensity because larger individuals receive a disproportionate share of resources, thereby leaving limited resources for smaller individuals. The second hypothesis assumes that direct stress decreases the size inequality of the population. iii) Phenotypic plasticity is the ability to alter one's morphology in response to environmental changes. The third hypothesis assumes that certain morphological indices can change among the trade-offs between competition, facilitation, and stress. These predictions were tested by conducting a field pot experiment using mung beans, and were supported by the following results: (3) UV-B radiation increased the survival rate of the population at the end of self-thinning. However, this result was mainly due to direct stress rather than facilitation. (4) Just as competitor, facilitation was also asymmetric. It increased the size inequality of populations during self-thinning, whereas stress decreased the size inequality. (5) Direct stress and facilitation influence plants differently on various scales. Stress inhibited plant growth, whereas facilitation showed the opposite on an individual scale. Stress increased survival rate, whereas facilitation increased individual

  12. Effects of ultraviolet-B irradiance on intraspecific competition and facilitation of plants: self-thinning, size inequality, and phenotypic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Chang Zhang

    Full Text Available (1 The effects of facilitation on the structure and dynamics of plant populations have not been studied so widely as competition. The UV-B radiation, as a typical environmental factor causing stress, may result in direct stress and facilitation. (2 The effects of UV-B radiation on intraspecific competition and facilitation were investigated based on the following three predictions on self-thinning, size inequality, and phenotypic plasticity: i Self-thinning is the reduction in density that results from the increase in the mean biomass of individuals in crowded populations, and is driven by competition. In this study, the mortality rate of the population is predicted to decrease from UV-B irradiance. ii The size inequality of a population increases with competition intensity because larger individuals receive a disproportionate share of resources, thereby leaving limited resources for smaller individuals. The second hypothesis assumes that direct stress decreases the size inequality of the population. iii Phenotypic plasticity is the ability to alter one's morphology in response to environmental changes. The third hypothesis assumes that certain morphological indices can change among the trade-offs between competition, facilitation, and stress. These predictions were tested by conducting a field pot experiment using mung beans, and were supported by the following results: (3 UV-B radiation increased the survival rate of the population at the end of self-thinning. However, this result was mainly due to direct stress rather than facilitation. (4 Just as competitor, facilitation was also asymmetric. It increased the size inequality of populations during self-thinning, whereas stress decreased the size inequality. (5 Direct stress and facilitation influence plants differently on various scales. Stress inhibited plant growth, whereas facilitation showed the opposite on an individual scale. Stress increased survival rate, whereas facilitation increased

  13. Uso da eletroforese de isoenzimas para avaliação da competitividade de biotipos de tiririca Isoenzyme evaluation of intra-specific competitivity of purple nutsedge biotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. R. Silva

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve o objetivo de avaliar, por meio de eletroforese de isoenzimas, em casa de vegetação, a competitividade dos biotipos de tiririca (Cyperus rotundus L. mais freqüentes que ocorrem no estado de São Paulo. Dos quatorze sistemas enzimáticos testados, seis apresentaram polimorfismo (a e b-EST, ACP, IDH, MDH e SKDH e foram utilizados para a identificação das 66 amostras coletadas, classificando-as em 10 biotipos de Cyperus rotundus. Durante a amostragem, foram identificadas as espécies C. flavus, C. iria e C. esculentus. Foram identificados diferentes biotipos de C. rotundus, com diferentes freqüências de ocorrência no estado de São Paulo. Houve predominância de dois biotipos, que estiveram presentes em 48,5% e 21,2% dos pontos de amostragem. Os diferentes biotipos de C. rotundus mostraram-se distintos em termos de competitividade intra-específica. Os biotipos mais competitivos foram os mais freqüentes nas avaliações de campo.The objective of this research was to evaluate intra-specific competition ability of purple nutsedge Cyperus rotundus biotypes, using isoenzymes. We sampled weed populations in 66 sites all around São Paulo State - Brazil. Polymorphism was observed in six out of fourteen enzymatic systems studied (aand b-EST, ACP, IDH, MDH, and SKDH. Polymorphism was not observed for ADH, CAT, GDH, AAT, LAP, MADH, PER, and SDH. Using the information of the six polymorphic isoenzymes, it was possible to identify 10 biotypes of Cyperus rotundus and C. flavus, C. iria e C. esculentus species. The two major biotypes were predominant in 48.5% and 21.2% of the sampling sites. The competition ability assay was carried out showing that the most widely spread biotypes were the most competitive ones.

  14. The Evolution of Phenotypic Plasticity in Spatially Structured Environments: Implications of Intraspecific Competition, Plasticity Costs, and Environmental Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Ernande, B.; Dieckmann, U.

    2004-01-01

    We model the evolution of reaction norms focusing on three aspects: frequency dependent selection arising from resource competition, maintenance and production costs of phenotypic plasticity, and three characteristics of environmental heterogeneity (frequency of environments, their intrinsic carrying capacity, and the sensitivity to phenotypic maladaptation in these environments). We show that (i) reaction norms evolve so as to trade adaptation for acquiring resources against cost avoidance; ...

  15. Spatial pattern formation and intraspecific competition of anabasis aphylla l. population in the diluvial fan of junggar basin, nw china

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, M.; Li, Y.Y.; Niu, P.X.

    2015-01-01

    Using conventional nearest neighbour analysis and Ripley's L-function, the goal of this study was to analyze spatial patterns of Anabasis aphylla plants in order to investigate underlying competitive processes that shape the population spatial structure from diluvial fan in Junggar Basin, NW China. We found that the spatial patterns of all growth stages were aggregated in the three study plots, and seedling and juvenile plants were more aggregated than expected by chance. Positive associations among growth stages of A. aphylla population were found at a small scale while negative associations of seedling and juvenile relative to adult plants were shown at a larger scale. The processes such as dispersal, seedling establishment, environmental heterogeneity, plant interactions and disturbance may have acted individually or in concert with other processes to produce the aggregated patterns and competitive relationship. Moreover, these findings suggested that the aggregated distribution and the competitive interaction between A. aphylla plants in the diluvial fan reflected not only in mortality, but also in decreased performance (smaller canopy) that was an important characteristic of drought-enduring plant, thus preventing a regular distribution pattern. (author)

  16. Simulating the Interacting Effects of Intraspecific Variation, Disturbance, and Competition on Climate-Driven Range Shifts in Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Emily V; Ormond, Rhys A

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to favor shifts in plant distributions; some such shifts are already being observed along elevation gradients. However, the rate of such shifts may be limited by their ability to reach newly suitable areas and by competition from resident species. The degree of local adaptation and genetic variation may also play a role in the interaction between migrants and residents by affecting relative fitness. We used a simulation model to explore the interacting effects of dispersal, fecundity, disturbance, and genetic variation on range-edge dynamics between a pair of demographically similar tree species. Ideal climate for an individual is determined by genotype. The simulated landscape undergoes an 80-year period of climate change in which climate bands shift upslope; subsequently, climate is held constant for 300 years. The presence of a high-elevation competitor caused a significant lag in the range shift of the low-elevation species relative to competition-free scenarios. Increases in fecundity and dispersal distance both helped to speed up the replacement of the high-elevation species by the low-elevation species at their range boundary. While some disturbance scenarios facilitated this transition, frequent canopy disturbance inhibited colonization by removing reproductive adults and led to range contractions in both species. Differences between dispersal scenarios were more pronounced when disturbance was frequent (15 vs. 25 year return interval) and dispersal was limited. When the high-elevation species lacked genetic variation, its range was more-easily invaded by the low-elevation species, while a similar lack of variation in the low-elevation species inhibited colonization-but only when this lack of variation decreased the fitness of the affected species near the range boundary. Our model results support the importance of measuring and including dispersal/fecundity, disturbance type and frequency, and genetic variation when assessing the

  17. Feeding activity and influence of intraspecific competition on zooplankton communities by jundiá (Rhamdia quelen Quoy and Gaimard, 1824 in laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Brandão-Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Experiments were designed to determine if the juvenile forms of jundia (Rhamdia quelen exhibit selectivity feeding on zooplanktonic organisms and the influence of intraspecific competition on the diet. The fish were maintained in 5000-L containers, and after seven days from birth, they were acclimated in experimental units with different densities and supplied with water containing plankton (natural, where they remained for 24 h in the environment with food. In the first seven days at densities of 5 and 10 fish.L–1, the fish selected the Rotifera more intensely, and at densities of 20 and 40 fish.L–1, the Cladocera were more selected. At 14 days of age, the Cladocera were the most selected for all densities of fish. At 21 days of age, the juvenile forms of jundia maintained a preference for Cladocera, and there was an increase in the capture of Copepoda at a density of 40 fish.L–1. At 28 days of age, the Cladocera were the most captured at densities of 5 to 20 fish.L–1, and the consumption of copepods increased at a density of 40 fish.L–1. The juvenile forms of Rhamdia quelen showed a high feeding preference for Cladocera at all the ages tested (7, 14, 21 and 28 days, but the density of fish per litre influenced the capture of the preferential food. This study showed that the juvenile forms of jundia had a more rapid response to the presence of food at densities of more than 10 fish.L–1, and that at higher densities the fish decreased interactions of territorial defense and formed schools, which allowed the foraging of zooplanktonic organisms, larger in size, more agile and of greater energy gain, such as the Cladocera and copepods.

  18. Feeding activity and influence of intraspecific competition on zooplankton communities by jundiá (Rhamdia quelen Quoy and Gaimard, 1824) in laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão-Gonçalves, L; Sebastien, N Y

    2013-11-01

    Experiments were designed to determine if the juvenile forms of jundia (Rhamdia quelen) exhibit selectivity feeding on zooplanktonic organisms and the influence of intraspecific competition on the diet. The fish were maintained in 5000-L containers, and after seven days from birth, they were acclimated in experimental units with different densities and supplied with water containing plankton (natural), where they remained for 24 h in the environment with food. In the first seven days at densities of 5 and 10 fish.L-1, the fish selected the Rotifera more intensely, and at densities of 20 and 40 fish.L-1, the Cladocera were more selected. At 14 days of age, the Cladocera were the most selected for all densities of fish. At 21 days of age, the juvenile forms of jundia maintained a preference for Cladocera, and there was an increase in the capture of Copepoda at a density of 40 fish.L-1. At 28 days of age, the Cladocera were the most captured at densities of 5 to 20 fish.L-1, and the consumption of copepods increased at a density of 40 fish.L-1. The juvenile forms of Rhamdia quelen showed a high feeding preference for Cladocera at all the ages tested (7, 14, 21 and 28 days), but the density of fish per litre influenced the capture of the preferential food. This study showed that the juvenile forms of jundia had a more rapid response to the presence of food at densities of more than 10 fish.L-1, and that at higher densities the fish decreased interactions of territorial defense and formed schools, which allowed the foraging of zooplanktonic organisms, larger in size, more agile and of greater energy gain, such as the Cladocera and copepods.

  19. Variation in the relative magnitude of intraspecific and interspecific ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While there was considerable variation in the relative magnitude of intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects over generations, among both populations and environments, there was no clear evidence supporting the genetic feedback hypothesis. Intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects on population growth ...

  20. Punishment as a Means of Competition: Implications for Strong Reciprocity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paál, Tünde; Bereczkei, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Strong negative reciprocity, that is, sanctions imposed on norm violators at the punisher’s own expense, has powerful cooperation-enhancing effects in both real-life and experimental game situations. However, it is plausible that punishment may obtain alternative roles depending on social context and the personality characteristics of participants. We examined the occurrence of punishing behavior among 80 subjects in a strongly competitive Public Goods game setting. Despite the punishment condition, the amount of the contributions decreased steadily during the game. The amount of contributions had no significant effect on received and imposed punishments. The results indicate that certain social contexts (in this case, intensive competition) exert modifying effects on the role that punishment takes on. Subjects punished each other in order to achieve a higher rank and a financially better outcome. Punishment primarily functioned as a means of rivalry, instead of as a way of second-order cooperation, as strong reciprocity suggests. These results indicate the need for the possible modification of the social conditions of punishment mechanisms described by the strong reciprocity theory as an evolutionary explanation of human cooperation. PMID:25811464

  1. Strong Neutron-γ Competition above the Neutron Threshold in the Decay of ^{70}Co.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyrou, A; Liddick, S N; Naqvi, F; Crider, B P; Dombos, A C; Bleuel, D L; Brown, B A; Couture, A; Crespo Campo, L; Guttormsen, M; Larsen, A C; Lewis, R; Möller, P; Mosby, S; Mumpower, M R; Perdikakis, G; Prokop, C J; Renstrøm, T; Siem, S; Quinn, S J; Valenta, S

    2016-09-30

    The β-decay intensity of ^{70}Co was measured for the first time using the technique of total absorption spectroscopy. The large β-decay Q value [12.3(3) MeV] offers a rare opportunity to study β-decay properties in a broad energy range. Two surprising features were observed in the experimental results, namely, the large fragmentation of the β intensity at high energies, as well as the strong competition between γ rays and neutrons, up to more than 2 MeV above the neutron-separation energy. The data are compared to two theoretical calculations: the shell model and the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). Both models seem to be missing a significant strength at high excitation energies. Possible interpretations of this discrepancy are discussed. The shell model is used for a detailed nuclear structure interpretation and helps to explain the observed γ-neutron competition. The comparison to the QRPA calculations is done as a means to test a model that provides global β-decay properties for astrophysical calculations. Our work demonstrates the importance of performing detailed comparisons to experimental results, beyond the simple half-life comparisons. A realistic and robust description of the β-decay intensity is crucial for our understanding of nuclear structure as well as of r-process nucleosynthesis.

  2. The ecological importance of intraspecific variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Roches, Simone; Post, David M; Turley, Nash E; Bailey, Joseph K; Hendry, Andrew P; Kinnison, Michael T; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Palkovacs, Eric P

    2018-01-01

    Human activity is causing wild populations to experience rapid trait change and local extirpation. The resulting effects on intraspecific variation could have substantial consequences for ecological processes and ecosystem services. Although researchers have long acknowledged that variation among species influences the surrounding environment, only recently has evidence accumulated for the ecological importance of variation within species. We conducted a meta-analysis comparing the ecological effects of variation within a species (intraspecific effects) with the effects of replacement or removal of that species (species effects). We evaluated direct and indirect ecological responses, including changes in abundance (or biomass), rates of ecological processes and changes in community composition. Our results show that intraspecific effects are often comparable to, and sometimes stronger than, species effects. Species effects tend to be larger for direct ecological responses (for example, through consumption), whereas intraspecific effects and species effects tend to be similar for indirect responses (for example, through trophic cascades). Intraspecific effects are especially strong when indirect interactions alter community composition. Our results summarize data from the first generation of studies examining the relative ecological effects of intraspecific variation. Our conclusions can help inform the design of future experiments and the formulation of strategies to quantify and conserve biodiversity.

  3. Intraspecific diversity regulates fungal productivity and respiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wilkinson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals and not just species are key components of biodiversity, yet the relationship between intraspecific diversity and ecosystem functioning in microbial systems remains largely untested. This limits our ability to understand and predict the effects of altered genetic diversity in regulating key ecosystem processes and functions. Here, we use a model fungal system to test the hypothesis that intraspecific genotypic richness of Paxillus obscurosporus stimulates biomass and CO(2 efflux, but that this is dependent on nitrogen supply. Using controlled experimental microcosms, we show that populations containing several genotypes (maximum 8 of the fungus had greater productivity and produced significantly more CO(2 than those with fewer genotypes. Moreover, intraspecific diversity had a much stronger effect than a four-fold manipulation of the carbon:nitrogen ratio of the growth medium. The effects of intraspecific diversity were underpinned by strong roles of individuals, but overall intraspecific diversity increased the propensity of populations to over-yield, indicating that both complementarity and selection effects can operate within species. Our data demonstrate the importance of intraspecific diversity over a range of nitrogen concentrations, and the need to consider fine scale phylogenetic information of microbial communities in understanding their contribution to ecosystem processes.

  4. Nutrient environment influences competition among Aspergillus flavus genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Structures of Aspergillus flavus populations, shaped by intraspecific competition, influence the incidences and severities of crop aflatoxin contamination. Competition for nutrients may be one factor modulating intraspecific interactions, but influences of specific types and concentrations of nutrie...

  5. Variation in the relative magnitude of intraspecific and interspecific ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Models of competitor coevolution, especially the genetic feedback hypothesis, suggest that a negative correlation be- tween intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects may be important in sustaining competitor coexistence, and can give rise to oscillatory dynamics with repeated reversals of competitive superiority.

  6. Competition between Free-Floating Plants Is Strongly Driven by Previously Experienced Phosphorus Concentrations in the Water Column.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin T H M Peeters

    Full Text Available Nutrients can determine the outcome of the competition between different floating plant species. The response of floating plants to current phosphorus levels may be affected by previously experienced phosphorus concentrations because some species have the ability to store excess phosphorus for later use. This might have an impact on their competition. Here, we investigate the effect of previous and actual phosphorus concentrations on the growth rate of free-floating plant species (Azolla filiculoides, Lemna minor/gibba and Ricciocarpus natansand the effect of phosphorus history on the competition between L. minor/gibba and A. filiculoides and between L. minor/gibba and R. natans. As expected, plant growth was lower when previously kept at low instead of high phosphorus concentrations. Growth of L. minor/gibba and A. filiculoides with a phosphorus rich history was comparable for low and high actual phosphorus concentrations, however, internal phosphorus concentrations were significantly lower with low actual phosphorus concentration. This indicates that both species perform luxury phosphorus uptake. Furthermore, internal P concentration in Azolla and Lemna increased within two weeks after a period of P deficit without a strong increase in growth. A. filiculoides in a mixture with L. minor/gibba grew faster than its monoculture. Morphological differences may explain why A. filiculoides outcompeted L. minor/gibba and these differences may be induced by phosphorus concentrations in the past. Growth of L. minor/gibba was only reduced by the presence of A. filiculoides with a high phosphorus history. Growth of L. minor/gibba and R. natans in mixtures was positively affected only when they had a high phosphorus history themselves and their competitor a low phosphorus history. These observations clearly indicate that phosphorus history of competing plants is important for understanding the outcome of the competition. Therefore, actual and previously

  7. Intraspecific plant-soil feedback and intraspecific overyielding in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Alexandra R; Petermann, Jana S

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of community coexistence and ecosystem functioning may help to counteract the current biodiversity loss and its potentially harmful consequences. In recent years, plant-soil feedback that can, for example, be caused by below-ground microorganisms has been suggested to play a role in maintaining plant coexistence and to be a potential driver of the positive relationship between plant diversity and ecosystem functioning. Most of the studies addressing these topics have focused on the species level. However, in addition to interspecific interactions, intraspecific interactions might be important for the structure of natural communities. Here, we examine intraspecific coexistence and intraspecific diversity effects using 10 natural accessions of the model species Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. We assessed morphological intraspecific diversity by measuring several above- and below-ground traits. We performed a plant-soil feedback experiment that was based on these trait differences between the accessions in order to determine whether A. thaliana experiences feedback at intraspecific level as a result of trait differences. We also experimentally tested the diversity-productivity relationship at intraspecific level. We found strong differences in above- and below-ground traits between the A. thaliana accessions. Overall, plant-soil feedback occurred at intraspecific level. However, accessions differed in the direction and strength of this feedback: Some accessions grew better on their own soils, some on soils from other accessions. Furthermore, we found positive diversity effects within A. thaliana: Accession mixtures produced a higher total above-ground biomass than accession monocultures. Differences between accessions in their feedback response could not be explained by morphological traits. Therefore, we suggest that they might have been caused by accession-specific accumulated soil communities, by root exudates, or by accession

  8. Coalitions and Competition in Malaysia – Incremental Transformation of a Strong-party System

    OpenAIRE

    Meredith L. WEISS

    2013-01-01

    "The seeming entrenchment of a two-coalition system in Malaysia solidifies the centrality of strongly institutionalised parties in the polity. The primary parties in Malaysia reach deeply into society and nest within dense networks of both intra-party and external organisations. Given this order - which differentiates Malaysia from its neighbours in the region - political liberalisation, if it happens, should be expected largely via electoral politics, and, specifically, through inter-party c...

  9. Competition

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

      The Staff Association is organising a competition from 13 to 21 December 2016. There are several Go Sport vouchers to win with a value of 50 € each. Try your luck! To participate, you just have to be a member of the Staff Association and take the online quiz: https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/content/jeu-concours-de-noel. The winners will be drawn among the correct answers.

  10. Competition

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

      The Staff Association is organising a competition from April 11 to 20. There are several Go Sport gift vouchers with a value of 50 € each to win. Try your luck! To participate, you just have to be a member of the Staff Association and take the online quiz: https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/content/jeu-concours. The winners will be drawn among the correct answers.

  11. Competition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Get ready for the Easter Egg Hunt! The Staff Association is organising a competition from 10 to 21 April 2017. There are several Go Sport gift vouchers to win, with a value of 50 € each. Try your luck! Count the number of different eggs that we have hidden on our website. Then indicate your answer in the online form. To participate, you just need to be a member of the Staff Association. Winners will be randomly drawn among the correct answers.

  12. Characteristics of competitive uptake between Microcystin-LR and natural organic matter (NOM) fractions using strongly basic anion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Fuhar; Barbeau, Benoit; Mohseni, Madjid

    2018-03-29

    Microcystins are the most commonly occurring cyanotoxins, and have been extensively studied across the globe. In the present study, a strongly basic anion exchange resin was employed to investigate the removal of Microcystin-LR (MCLR), one of the most toxic microcystin variants. Factors influencing the uptake behavior included the MCLR and resin concentrations, resin dosage, and natural organic matter (NOM) characteristics, specifically, the charge density and molecular weight distribution of source water NOM. Equivalent background concentration (EBC) was employed to evaluate the competitive uptake between NOM and MCLR. The experimental data were compared with different mathematical and physical models and pore diffusion was determined as the rate-limiting step. The resin dose/solute concentration ratio played a key role in the MCLR uptake process and MCLR removal was attributed primarily to electrostatic attractions. Charge density and molecular weight distribution of the background NOM fractions played a major role in MCLR removal at lower resin dosages (200 mg/L ∼ 1 mL/L and below), where a competitive uptake was observed due to the limited exchange sites. Further, evidences of pore blockage and site reduction were also observed in the presence of humics and larger molecular weight organic fractions, where a four-fold reduction in the MCLR uptake was observed. Comparable results were obtained for laboratory studies on synthetic laboratory water and surface water under similar conditions. Given their excellent performance and low cost, anion exchange resins are expected to present promising potentials for applications involving the removal of removal of algal toxins and NOM from surface waters. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Intraspecific chemical communication in microalgae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Venuleo, M.; Raven, J. A.; Giordano, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 215, č. 2 (2017), s. 516-530 ISSN 1469-8137 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : evolution * infochemicals * intraspecific communication Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology

  14. A comprehensive test of evolutionarily increased competitive ability in a highly invasive plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Srijana; Gruntman, Michal; Bilton, Mark; Seifan, Merav; Tielbörger, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims A common hypothesis to explain plants' invasive success is that release from natural enemies in the introduced range selects for reduced allocation to resistance traits and a subsequent increase in resources available for growth and competitive ability (evolution of increased competitive ability, EICA). However, studies that have investigated this hypothesis have been incomplete as they either did not test for all aspects of competitive ability or did not select appropriate competitors. Methods Here, the prediction of increased competitive ability was examined with the invasive plant Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife) in a set of common-garden experiments that addressed these aspects by carefully distinguishing between competitive effect and response of invasive and native plants, and by using both intraspecific and interspecific competition settings with a highly vigorous neighbour, Urtica dioica (stinging nettle), which occurs in both ranges. Key Results While the intraspecific competition results showed no differences in competitive effect or response between native and invasive plants, the interspecific competition experiment revealed greater competitive response and effect of invasive plants in both biomass and seed production. Conclusions The use of both intra- and interspecific competition experiments in this study revealed opposing results. While the first experiment refutes the EICA hypothesis, the second shows strong support for it, suggesting evolutionarily increased competitive ability in invasive populations of L. salicaria. It is suggested that the use of naturally co-occurring heterospecifics, rather than conspecifics, may provide a better evaluation of the possible evolutionary shift towards greater competitive ability. PMID:25301818

  15. Evolution of competitive ability within Lonicera japonica's invaded range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory A. Evans; Francis F. Kilkenny; Laura F. Galloway

    2013-01-01

    Factors influencing invasive taxa may change during the course of an invasion. For example, intraspecific competition is predicted to be more important in areas with older stands of dense monospecific invaders than at the margins of an invaded range. We evaluated evolution in response to predicted changes in competition by comparing the intraspecific competitive...

  16. Interspecific Resource Competition in Antelopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Herbert H.T.

    2016-01-01

    Intraspecific or interspecific competition is then fundamentally the same: scramble competition is a good example of this type of competition. Modern ecology increasingly is faced with the question whether the data or a paper provide evidence for the statement that is made or for testing the

  17. Competition between free-floating plants is strongly driven by previously experienced phosphorus concentrations in the water column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Neefjes, Rozemarijn; Zuidam, van B.G.

    2016-01-01

    Nutrients can determine the outcome of the competition between different floating plant species. The response of floating plants to current phosphorus levels may be affected by previously experienced phosphorus concentrations because some species have the ability to store excess phosphorus for later

  18. Intraspecific genetic variation and species coexistence in plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Bodil K; Damgaard, Christian F; Laroche, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Many studies report that intraspecific genetic variation in plants can affect community composition and coexistence. However, less is known about which traits are responsible and the mechanisms by which variation in these traits affect the associated community. Focusing on plant-plant interactions, we review empirical studies exemplifying how intraspecific genetic variation in functional traits impacts plant coexistence. Intraspecific variation in chemical and architectural traits promotes species coexistence, by both increasing habitat heterogeneity and altering competitive hierarchies. Decomposing species interactions into interactions between genotypes shows that genotype × genotype interactions are often intransitive. The outcome of plant-plant interactions varies with local adaptation to the environment and with dominant neighbour genotypes, and some plants can recognize the genetic identity of neighbour plants if they have a common history of coexistence. Taken together, this reveals a very dynamic nature of coexistence. We outline how more traits mediating plant-plant interactions may be identified, and how future studies could use population genetic surveys of genotype distribution in nature and methods from trait-based ecology to better quantify the impact of intraspecific genetic variation on plant coexistence. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Finding all multiple stable fixpoints of n-species Lotka-Volterra competition models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischke, Heike; Löffler, Thomas J

    2017-06-01

    One way to explore assembly of extant and novel communities from species pools, and by that biodiversity and species ranges, is to study the equilibrium behavior of dynamic competition models such as the Lotka-Volterra competition (LVC) model. We present a novel method (COMMUSTIX) to determine all stable fixpoints of the general LVC model with abundances x from a given pool of n species. To that purpose, we split the species in potentially surviving species (x i >0) and in others going extinct (x i =0). We derived criteria for the stability of x i =0 and for the equilibrium of x i >0 to determine possible combinations of extinct and surviving species by iteratively applying a mixed binary linear optimization algorithm. We tested this new method against (a) the numerical solution at equilibrium of the LVC ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and (b) the fixpoints of all combinations of surviving and extinct species (possible only for small n), tested for stability and non-negativity. The tests revealed that COMMUSTIX is reliable, it detects all multiple stable fixpoints (SFPs), which is not guaranteed by solving the ODEs, and more efficient than the combinations method. With COMMUSTIX, we studied the dependence of the fixpoint behavior on the competition strengths relative to the intra-specific competition. If inter-specific competition was considerably lower than intra-specific competition, only globally SFPs occurred. In contrast, if all inter-specific was higher than intra-specific competition, multiple SFPs consisting of only one species occurred. If competition strengths in the species pool ranged from below to above the intra-specific competition, either global or multiple SFPs strongly differing in species composition occurred. The species richness over all SFPs was high for pools of species with similar, either weak or strong competition, and lower for species with dissimilar or close to intra-specific competition strengths. The new approach is a reliable

  20. Coalitions and Competition in Malaysia – Incremental Transformation of a Strong-party System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith L. Weiss

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The seeming entrenchment of a two-coalition system in Malaysia solidifies the centrality of strongly institutionalised parties in the polity. The primary parties in Malaysia reach deeply into society and nest within dense networks of both intra-party and external organisations. Given this order – which differentiates Malaysia from its neighbours in the region – political liberalisation, if it happens, should be expected largely via electoral politics, and, specifically, through inter-party challenges. Indeed, the ideological and material premises of the emergent Pakatan Rakyat (People’s Alliance differ substantially from those of the long-standing Barisan Nasional (National Front, even as both pursue the same broad swathe of voters. This distinction reflects and furthers transformation in Malaysian politics, including not just a shift in the salience of communal identities and in policy proposals and issues, but also in patterns of political engagement both within and outside of parties, regardless of which coalition controls parliament.

  1. Competition Between Radial Loss and EMIC Wave Scattering of MeV Electrons During Strong CME-shock Driven Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, M. K.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, Z.; Malaspina, D.; Millan, R. M.; Patel, M.; Qin, M.; Shen, X.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    The two strongest storms of Solar Cycle 24, 17 March and 22 June 2015, provide a contrast between magnetospheric response to CME-shocks at equinox and solstice. The 17 March CME-shock initiated storm produced a stronger ring current response with Dst = - 223 nT, while the 22 June CME-shock initiated storm reached a minimum Dst = - 204 nT. The Van Allen Probes ECT instrument measured a dropout in flux for both events which can be characterized by magnetopause loss at higher L values prior to strong recovery1. However, rapid loss is seen at L 3 for the June storm at high energies with maximum drop in the 5.2 MeV channel of the REPT instrument coincident with the observation of EMIC waves in the H+ band by the EMFISIS wave instrument. The rapid time scale of loss can be determined from the 65 minute delay in passage of the Probe A relative to the Probe B spacecraft. The distinct behavior of lower energy electrons at higher L values has been modeled with MHD-test particle simulations, while the rapid loss of higher energy electrons is examined in terms of the minimum resonant energy criterion for EMIC wave scattering, and compared with the timescale for loss due to EMIC wave scattering which has been modeled for other storm events.2 1Baker, D. N., et al. (2016), Highly relativistic radiation belt electron acceleration, transport, and loss: Large solar storm events of March and June 2015, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 121, 6647-6660, doi:10.1002/2016JA022502. 2Li, Z., et al. (2014), Investigation of EMIC wave scattering as the cause for the BARREL 17 January 2013 relativistic electron precipitation event: A quantitative comparison of simulation with observations, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, 8722-8729, doi:10.1002/2014GL062273.

  2. A comprehensive test of evolutionarily increased competitive ability in a highly invasive plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Srijana; Gruntman, Michal; Bilton, Mark; Seifan, Merav; Tielbörger, Katja

    2014-12-01

    A common hypothesis to explain plants' invasive success is that release from natural enemies in the introduced range selects for reduced allocation to resistance traits and a subsequent increase in resources available for growth and competitive ability (evolution of increased competitive ability, EICA). However, studies that have investigated this hypothesis have been incomplete as they either did not test for all aspects of competitive ability or did not select appropriate competitors. Here, the prediction of increased competitive ability was examined with the invasive plant Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife) in a set of common-garden experiments that addressed these aspects by carefully distinguishing between competitive effect and response of invasive and native plants, and by using both intraspecific and interspecific competition settings with a highly vigorous neighbour, Urtica dioica (stinging nettle), which occurs in both ranges. While the intraspecific competition results showed no differences in competitive effect or response between native and invasive plants, the interspecific competition experiment revealed greater competitive response and effect of invasive plants in both biomass and seed production. The use of both intra- and interspecific competition experiments in this study revealed opposing results. While the first experiment refutes the EICA hypothesis, the second shows strong support for it, suggesting evolutionarily increased competitive ability in invasive populations of L. salicaria. It is suggested that the use of naturally co-occurring heterospecifics, rather than conspecifics, may provide a better evaluation of the possible evolutionary shift towards greater competitive ability. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Intraspecific variation in feeding strategies of Galapagos sea lions: A case of trophic specialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas-Amtmann, Stella; Costa, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The trophic behavior of marine predators varies according to the level of competition to which they are exposed. In general, populations that inhabit lower productivity systems face a strong intraspecific competition, which contributes to the development of different foraging strategies to maximize nutritional efficiency. Given the high trophic flexibility of Zalophus wollebaeki, this species is considered appropriate for the analysis of such behavior. Furthermore, this trophic flexibility has allowed them to persist in a seemingly marginal ecosystem. In this study, we used a comparative analysis of variables (diet and dive behavior) related to Z. wollebaeki trophic niche plasticity to better understand their foraging ecology, using techniques such scat analysis, satellite telemetry and complementarily an isotopic analysis. Scat analysis revealed intra-population variation in their diet, represented by prey from different environments (epipelagic and benthic). These results are supported by the animals’ locations at sea and diving profiles. Global Positioning System (GPS) and time-depth recorder (TDR) records showed the existence of two groups, with differing feeding areas and diving behavior. Also the δ15N values showed differences in the trophic level at which the species fed. These results constitute a relevant finding in the evolutionary behavior of the species, showing that Z. wollebaeki has developed a high degree of foraging flexibility, thus increasing its survival rate in an ecosystem that is highly demanding in terms of resource availability. PMID:29059188

  4. Intraspecific variation in feeding strategies of Galapagos sea lions: A case of trophic specialization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Páez-Rosas

    Full Text Available The trophic behavior of marine predators varies according to the level of competition to which they are exposed. In general, populations that inhabit lower productivity systems face a strong intraspecific competition, which contributes to the development of different foraging strategies to maximize nutritional efficiency. Given the high trophic flexibility of Zalophus wollebaeki, this species is considered appropriate for the analysis of such behavior. Furthermore, this trophic flexibility has allowed them to persist in a seemingly marginal ecosystem. In this study, we used a comparative analysis of variables (diet and dive behavior related to Z. wollebaeki trophic niche plasticity to better understand their foraging ecology, using techniques such scat analysis, satellite telemetry and complementarily an isotopic analysis. Scat analysis revealed intra-population variation in their diet, represented by prey from different environments (epipelagic and benthic. These results are supported by the animals' locations at sea and diving profiles. Global Positioning System (GPS and time-depth recorder (TDR records showed the existence of two groups, with differing feeding areas and diving behavior. Also the δ15N values showed differences in the trophic level at which the species fed. These results constitute a relevant finding in the evolutionary behavior of the species, showing that Z. wollebaeki has developed a high degree of foraging flexibility, thus increasing its survival rate in an ecosystem that is highly demanding in terms of resource availability.

  5. Intraspecific variation in feeding strategies of Galapagos sea lions: A case of trophic specialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez-Rosas, Diego; Villegas-Amtmann, Stella; Costa, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The trophic behavior of marine predators varies according to the level of competition to which they are exposed. In general, populations that inhabit lower productivity systems face a strong intraspecific competition, which contributes to the development of different foraging strategies to maximize nutritional efficiency. Given the high trophic flexibility of Zalophus wollebaeki, this species is considered appropriate for the analysis of such behavior. Furthermore, this trophic flexibility has allowed them to persist in a seemingly marginal ecosystem. In this study, we used a comparative analysis of variables (diet and dive behavior) related to Z. wollebaeki trophic niche plasticity to better understand their foraging ecology, using techniques such scat analysis, satellite telemetry and complementarily an isotopic analysis. Scat analysis revealed intra-population variation in their diet, represented by prey from different environments (epipelagic and benthic). These results are supported by the animals' locations at sea and diving profiles. Global Positioning System (GPS) and time-depth recorder (TDR) records showed the existence of two groups, with differing feeding areas and diving behavior. Also the δ15N values showed differences in the trophic level at which the species fed. These results constitute a relevant finding in the evolutionary behavior of the species, showing that Z. wollebaeki has developed a high degree of foraging flexibility, thus increasing its survival rate in an ecosystem that is highly demanding in terms of resource availability.

  6. Phylogenetic patterns of tragedy of commons in intraspecific root competition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smyčka, J.; Herben, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 417, 1-2 (2017), s. 87-97 ISSN 0032-079X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-19245S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : evolutionary game theory * self/non-self-recognition * phenotypic plasticity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 3.052, year: 2016

  7. Application of electrical capacitance measurement for in situ monitoring of competitive interactions between maize and weed plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imre Cseresnyés

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Applicability of root electrical capacitance (EC measurement for monitoring of crop–weed competition was studied in a pot experiment. Maize (Zea mays L. was grown both alone and with Echinochloa crus-galli or Abutilon theophrasti in different densities with regular measurement of root EC. Plants were harvested 42 days after planting to determine above- and belowground biomass. Depending on weed density, E. crus-galli-A. theophrasti interaction reduced the root EC of maize by 22–66% and 3–57%, respectively. Competitive effect of crop on weeds and intraspecific competition among weeds could also be detected by EC values: E. crus-galli was less sensitive both to the presence of maize and to intraspecific competition than A. theophrasti. Strong linear correlations between root dry mass and root EC for crop and weeds (with R2 from 0.901 to 0.956 were obtained by regression analyses at the end of the experiment. EC monitoring informed us on the emergence time of competition: E. crus-galli interfered with maize root growth a week earlier then A. theophrasti, and increasing weed densities accelerated the emergence of competition. In conclusion, the simple, non-destructive EC method should be considered a potential in situ technique for pot studies on crop–weed competition, which may partially substitute the intrusive techniques commonly used in agricultural researches.

  8. Application of electrical capacitance measurement for in situ monitoring of competitive interactions between maize and weed plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cseresnyés, I.; Takács, T.; Füzy, A.; Végh, K.R.; Lehoczky, E.

    2016-11-01

    Applicability of root electrical capacitance (EC) measurement for monitoring of crop–weed competition was studied in a pot experiment. Maize (Zea mays L.) was grown both alone and with Echinochloa crus-galli or Abutilon theophrasti in different densities with regular measurement of root EC. Plants were harvested 42 days after planting to determine above- and belowground biomass. Depending on weed density, E. crus-galli-A. theophrasti interaction reduced the root EC of maize by 22–66% and 3–57%, respectively. Competitive effect of crop on weeds and intraspecific competition among weeds could also be detected by EC values: E. crus-galli was less sensitive both to the presence of maize and to intraspecific competition than A. theophrasti. Strong linear correlations between root dry mass and root EC for crop and weeds (with R2 from 0.901 to 0.956) were obtained by regression analyses at the end of the experiment. EC monitoring informed us on the emergence time of competition: E. crus-galli interfered with maize root growth a week earlier then A. theophrasti, and increasing weed densities accelerated the emergence of competition. In conclusion, the simple, non-destructive EC method should be considered a potential in situ technique for pot studies on crop–weed competition, which may partially substitute the intrusive techniques commonly used in agricultural researches. (Author)

  9. Effects of intrapopulation competition on morphological and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of intrapopulation competition on morphological and agronomic characters of Jute plant ( Corchorus olitorius L.) ... There was a gradual decline in all attributes except height/plant as population density increased. These observations confirmed the occurrence of intraspecific competition in population of jute plant.

  10. Dynamical role of the degree of intraspecific cooperation: A simple model for prebiotic replicators and ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontich, Ernest; Sardanyés, Josep

    2009-05-01

    We present a simple mean field model to analyze the dynamics of competition between two populations of replicators in terms of the degree of intraspecific cooperation (i.e., autocatalysis) in one of these populations. The first population can only replicate with Malthusian kinetics while the second one can reproduce with Malthusian or autocatalytic replication or with a combination of both reproducing strategies. The model consists of two coupled, nonlinear, autonomous ordinary differential equations. We investigate analytically and numerically the phase plane dynamics and the bifurcation scenarios of this ecologically coupled system, focusing on the outcome of competition for several degrees of intraspecific cooperation, σ, in the second population of replicators. We demonstrate that the dynamics of both populations can not be governed by a limit cycle, and also that once cooperation is considered, the topology of phase space does not allow for coexistence. Even for low values of the degree of intraspecific cooperation, for large enough autocatalytic replication rates, the second population of replicators is able to outcompete the first one, having a wide basin of attraction in state space. We characterize the same power law dependence between the outcompetition extinction times, τ, and the degree of intraspecific cooperation for both populations, given by τ˜ciσ-1. Our results suggest that, under some kinetic conditions, the appearance of autocatalysis might be favorable in a population of replicators growing with Malthusian kinetics competing with another population also reproducing exponentially.

  11. Intra- and Interspecific Competition Between Western Flower Thrips and Sweetpotato Whitefly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing-Jun; Hou, Wen-Jie; Li, Fei; Xu, Bao-Yun; Xie, Wen; Wang, Shao-Li; Zhang, You-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), and the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), are both invasive insect pests and are present in most of the same agricultural crops without a clear dominance of either species. Here, intra- and interspecific competition in B. tabaci and F. occidentalis was determined under controlled experiments. The results showed that intraspecific competition was distinct in F. occidentalis and that the co-occurrence of B. tabaci had a strong effect on F. occidentalis , resulting in a decrease in oviposition. Significant intraspecific competition was found in B. tabaci , and the coexistence of F. occidentalis had limited effect on the oviposition of B. tabaci . In a selective host plant preference experiment, both F. occidentalis and B. tabaci preferred eggplants most, followed by cucumbers and tomatoes. On cucumber plants, B. tabaci was predominant, whereas on eggplant and tomato plants, F. occidentalis and B. tabaci exhibited comparative competitive abilities during the initial stage. However, over time, higher numbers of B. tabaci than that of F. occidentalis were found on the two host plants. Our in vitro and potted plant experiments indicate that B. tabaci is competitively superior to F. occidentalis , which might help to explain their differential distribution patterns in China. PMID:25480973

  12. Are negative intra-specific interactions important for recruitment dynamics? A case study of Atlantic fish stocks.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ricard, Daniel; Zimmermann, F.; Heino, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 547, April (2016), s. 211-217 ISSN 0171-8630 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : cannibalism * intra-specific competition * recruitment * population dynamics * Atlantic Ocean Subject RIV: EH - Ecology , Behaviour Impact factor: 2.292, year: 2016

  13. Intraspecific chromosomal and genetic polymorphism in Brassica ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-16

    Apr 16, 2014 ... A. V., Lemesh V. A. and Muravenko O. V. 2014 Intraspecific chromosomal and genetic polymorphism in Brassica napus L. detected by cytogenetic and molecular markers. J. Genet. ...... Howell E. C., Kearsey M. J., Jones G. H., King G. J. and Armstrong. S. J. 2008 A and C genome distinction and ...

  14. Characterization and intraspecific variation of Fusarium semitectum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 79 isolates of Fusarium semitectum were characterized by morphological and IGS-RFLP analysis to assess its intraspecific variation. Based on morphological characteristics, the isolates of F. semitectum were classified into 2 distinct groups, morphotypes I and II. Morphotype I was characterized by longer ...

  15. Molecular markers unravel intraspecific and interspecific genetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular markers unravel intraspecific and interspecific genetic variability in Plantago ovata and some of its wild allies. Shivanjali Kotwal, Manoj K. Dhar, Balbir Kour, Kuldeep Raj and Sanjana Kaul. J. Genet. 92, 293–298. Table 1. Jaccard's similarity matrix of AFLP analysis of Plantago species. P. coronopus P. lanceolata ...

  16. Neighbour tolerance, not suppression, provides competitive advantage to non-native plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golivets, Marina; Wallin, Kimberly F

    2018-05-01

    High competitive ability has often been invoked as a key determinant of invasion success and ecological impacts of non-native plants. Yet our understanding of the strategies that non-natives use to gain competitive dominance remains limited. Particularly, it remains unknown whether the two non-mutually exclusive competitive strategies, neighbour suppression and neighbour tolerance, are equally important for the competitive advantage of non-native plants. Here, we analyse data from 192 peer-reviewed studies on pairwise plant competition within a Bayesian multilevel meta-analytic framework and show that non-native plants outperform their native counterparts due to high tolerance of competition, as opposed to strong suppressive ability. Competitive tolerance ability of non-native plants was driven by neighbour's origin and was expressed in response to a heterospecific native but not heterospecific non-native neighbour. In contrast to natives, non-native species were not more suppressed by hetero- vs. conspecific neighbours, which was partially due to higher intensity of intraspecific competition among non-natives. Heterogeneity in the data was primarily associated with methodological differences among studies and not with phylogenetic relatedness among species. Altogether, our synthesis demonstrates that non-native plants are competitively distinct from native plants and challenges the common notion that neighbour suppression is the primary strategy for plant invasion success. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  17. Intraspecific Trait Variation and Coordination: Root and Leaf Economics Spectra in Coffee across Environmental Gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Marney E; Martin, Adam R; de Melo Virginio Filho, Elias; Rapidel, Bruno; Roupsard, Olivier; Van den Meersche, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Hypotheses on the existence of a universal "Root Economics Spectrum" (RES) have received arguably the least attention of all trait spectra, despite the key role root trait variation plays in resource acquisition potential. There is growing interest in quantifying intraspecific trait variation (ITV) in plants, but there are few studies evaluating (i) the existence of an intraspecific RES within a plant species, or (ii) how a RES may be coordinated with other trait spectra within species, such as a leaf economics spectrum (LES). Using Coffea arabica (Rubiaceae) as a model species, we measured seven morphological and chemical traits of intact lateral roots, which were paired with information on four key LES traits. Field collections were completed across four nested levels of biological organization. The intraspecific trait coefficient of variation (cv) ranged from 25 to 87% with root diameter and specific root tip density showing the lowest and highest cv, respectively. Between 27 and 68% of root ITV was explained by site identity alone for five of the seven traits measured. A single principal component explained 56.2% of root trait covariation, with plants falling along a RES from resource acquiring to conserving traits. Multiple factor analysis revealed significant orthogonal relationships between root and leaf spectra. RES traits were strongly orthogonal with respect to LES traits, suggesting these traits vary independently from one another in response to environmental cues. This study provides among the first evidence that plants from the same species differentiate from one another along an intraspecific RES. We find that in one of the world's most widely cultivated crops, an intraspecific RES is orthogonal to an intraspecific LES, indicating that above and belowground responses of plants to managed (or natural) environmental gradients are likely to occur independently from one another.

  18. Sizing ocean giants: patterns of intraspecific size variation in marine megafauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Craig R; Balk, Meghan A; Benfield, Mark C; Branch, Trevor A; Chen, Catherine; Cosgrove, James; Dove, Alistair D M; Gaskins, Lindsay C; Helm, Rebecca R; Hochberg, Frederick G; Lee, Frank B; Marshall, Andrea; McMurray, Steven E; Schanche, Caroline; Stone, Shane N; Thaler, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    What are the greatest sizes that the largest marine megafauna obtain? This is a simple question with a difficult and complex answer. Many of the largest-sized species occur in the world's oceans. For many of these, rarity, remoteness, and quite simply the logistics of measuring these giants has made obtaining accurate size measurements difficult. Inaccurate reports of maximum sizes run rampant through the scientific literature and popular media. Moreover, how intraspecific variation in the body sizes of these animals relates to sex, population structure, the environment, and interactions with humans remains underappreciated. Here, we review and analyze body size for 25 ocean giants ranging across the animal kingdom. For each taxon we document body size for the largest known marine species of several clades. We also analyze intraspecific variation and identify the largest known individuals for each species. Where data allows, we analyze spatial and temporal intraspecific size variation. We also provide allometric scaling equations between different size measurements as resources to other researchers. In some cases, the lack of data prevents us from fully examining these topics and instead we specifically highlight these deficiencies and the barriers that exist for data collection. Overall, we found considerable variability in intraspecific size distributions from strongly left- to strongly right-skewed. We provide several allometric equations that allow for estimation of total lengths and weights from more easily obtained measurements. In several cases, we also quantify considerable geographic variation and decreases in size likely attributed to humans.

  19. Inter- and intraspecific variation in leaf economic traits in wheat and maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adam R; Hale, Christine E; Cerabolini, Bruno E L; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Craine, Joseph; Gough, William A; Kattge, Jens; Tirona, Cairan K F

    2018-02-01

    Leaf Economics Spectrum (LES) trait variation underpins multiple agroecological processes and many prominent crop yield models. While there are numerous independent studies assessing trait variation in crops, to date there have been no comprehensive assessments of intraspecific trait variation (ITV) in LES traits for wheat and maize: the world's most widespread crops. Using trait databases and peer-reviewed literature, we compiled over 700 records of specific leaf area (SLA), maximum photosynthetic rates ( A max ) and leaf nitrogen (N) concentrations, for wheat and maize. We evaluated intraspecific LES trait variation, and intraspecific trait-environment relationships. While wheat and maize occupy the upper 90th percentile of LES trait values observed across a global species pool, ITV ranged widely across the LES in wheat and maize. Fertilization treatments had strong impacts on leaf N, while plant developmental stage (here standardized as the number of days since planting) had strong impacts on A max ; days since planting, N fertilization and irrigation all influenced SLA. When controlling for these factors, intraspecific responses to temperature and precipitation explained 39.4 and 43.7 % of the variation in A max and SLA, respectively, but only 5.4 % of the variation in leaf N. Despite a long history of domestication in these species, ITV in wheat and maize among and within cultivars remains large. Intraspecific trait variation is a critical consideration to refine regional to global models of agroecosystem structure, function and food security. Considerable opportunities and benefits exist for consolidating a crop trait database for a wider range of domesticated plant species.

  20. Competition between endoparasitic nematodes and effect on biomass of Ammophila arenaria (marram grass) as affected by timing of inoculation and plant age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, E.P.; Duyts, H.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the effects of intra- and interspecific competition on the abundance of endoparasitic nematodes and assessed the consequences for biomass production of the natural dune grass Ammophila arenaria. Pratylenchus penetrans was limited by intraspecific competition and it suppressed the

  1. Intraspecific trait variation and the leaf economics spectrum across resource gradients and levels of organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Alex; Siefert, Andrew

    2018-03-30

    Understanding patterns of functional trait variation across environmental gradients offers an opportunity to increase inference in the mechanistic causes of plant community assembly. The leaf economics spectrum (LES) predicts global tradeoffs in leaf traits and trait-environment relationships, but few studies have examined whether these predictions hold across different levels of organization, particularly within species. Here, we asked (1) whether the main assumptions of the LES (expected trait relationships and shifts in trait values across resource gradients) hold at the intraspecific level, and (2) how within-species trait correlations scale up to interspecific or among-community levels. We worked with leaf traits of saplings of woody species growing across light and soil N and P availability gradients in temperate rainforests of southern Chile. We found that ITV accounted for a large proportion of community-level variation in leaf traits (e.g., LMA and leaf P) and played an important role in driving community-level shifts in leaf traits across environmental gradients. Additionally, intraspecific leaf trait relationships were generally consistent with interspecific and community-level trait relationships and with LES predictions-e.g., a strong negative intraspecific LMA-leaf N correlation-although, most trait relationships varied significantly among species, suggesting idiosyncrasies in the LES at the intraspecific level. © 2018 by the Ecological Society of America.

  2. How competition affects evolutionary rescue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmond, Matthew Miles; de Mazancourt, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Populations facing novel environments can persist by adapting. In nature, the ability to adapt and persist will depend on interactions between coexisting individuals. Here we use an adaptive dynamic model to assess how the potential for evolutionary rescue is affected by intra- and interspecific competition. Intraspecific competition (negative density-dependence) lowers abundance, which decreases the supply rate of beneficial mutations, hindering evolutionary rescue. On the other hand, interspecific competition can aid evolutionary rescue when it speeds adaptation by increasing the strength of selection. Our results clarify this point and give an additional requirement: competition must increase selection pressure enough to overcome the negative effect of reduced abundance. We therefore expect evolutionary rescue to be most likely in communities which facilitate rapid niche displacement. Our model, which aligns to previous quantitative and population genetic models in the absence of competition, provides a first analysis of when competitors should help or hinder evolutionary rescue. PMID:23209167

  3. Target gene expression levels and competition between transfected and endogenous microRNAs are strong confounding factors in microRNA high-throughput experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNA (miRNA) target genes tend to have relatively long and conserved 3' untranslated regions (UTRs), but to what degree these characteristics contribute to miRNA targeting is poorly understood. Different high-throughput experiments have, for example, shown that miRNAs preferentially regulate genes with both short and long 3' UTRs and that target site conservation is both important and irrelevant for miRNA targeting. Results We have analyzed several gene context-dependent features, including 3' UTR length, 3' UTR conservation, and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels, reported to have conflicting influence on miRNA regulation. By taking into account confounding factors such as technology-dependent experimental bias and competition between transfected and endogenous miRNAs, we show that two factors - target gene expression and competition - could explain most of the previously reported experimental differences. Moreover, we find that these and other target site-independent features explain about the same amount of variation in target gene expression as the target site-dependent features included in the TargetScan model. Conclusions Our results show that it is important to consider confounding factors when interpreting miRNA high throughput experiments and urge special caution when using microarray data to compare average regulatory effects between groups of genes that have different average gene expression levels. PMID:22325809

  4. Parasitoid competition and the dynamics of host-parasitoid models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew D. Taylor

    1988-01-01

    Both parasitoids and predators compete intraspecifically for prey or hosts. The nature of this competition, however, is potentially much more complex and varied for parasitoids than for predators. With predators, prey are generally consumed upon capture and thus cease to be bones of contention: competition is simply for discovery (or capture) of prey. In contrast,...

  5. Intraspecific variation in aerobic and anaerobic locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jon Christian; Tirsgård, Bjørn; Cordero, Gerardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Intraspecific variation and trade-off in aerobic and anaerobic traits remain poorly understood in aquatic locomotion. Using gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), both axial swimmers, this study tested four hypotheses: (1) gait transition from steady...... to unsteady (i.e., burst-assisted) swimming is associated with anaerobic metabolism evidenced as excess post exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC); (2) variation in swimming performance (critical swimming speed; U crit) correlates with metabolic scope (MS) or anaerobic capacity (i.e., maximum EPOC); (3...

  6. Interference competition in a sexually dimorphic shorebird: prey behaviour explains intraspecific competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijns, S.; Piersma, T.

    2014-01-01

    When males and females come in distinct sizes and shapes they often forage at different sites, selecting different prey. In the sexually dimorphic bar-tailed godwit, Limosa lapponica, females generally forage along the tideline, whereas the smaller (and subordinate) males generally forage across dry

  7. Interference competition in a sexually dimorphic shorebird : Prey behaviour explains intraspecific competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijns, Sjoerd; Piersma, Theunis

    When males and females come in distinct sizes and shapes they often forage at different sites, selecting different prey. In the sexually dimorphic bar-tailed godwit, Limosa lapponica, females generally forage along the tideline, whereas the smaller (and subordinate) males generally forage across dry

  8. The role of intraspecific variation in the ecological and evolutionary success of diatoms in changing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godhe, Anna; Rynearson, Tatiana

    2017-09-05

    Intraspecific variation in diatoms has been shown to play a key role in species' responses to several important environmental factors such as light, salinity, temperature and nutrients. Furthermore, modelling efforts indicate that this variation within species extends bloom periods, and likely provides sufficient variability in competitive interactions between species under hydrographically variable conditions. The intraspecific variation most likely corresponds to optimal fitness in temporary microhabitats and may help to explain the paradox of the plankton. Here, we examine the implications of intraspecific variation for the ecology and success of diatoms in general and emphasize the potential implications for our understanding of carbon metabolism in these important organisms. Additionally, data from palaeoecological studies have the potential for evaluating genetic variation through past climate changes, going thousands of years back in time. We suggest pathways for future research including the adoption of multiple strains of individual species into studies of diatom carbon metabolism, to refine our understanding of the variation within and between species, and the inclusion of experimental evolution as a tool for understanding potential evolutionary responses of diatom carbon metabolism to climate change.This article is part of the themed issue 'The peculiar carbon metabolism in diatoms'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  9. Construction of iron-polymer-graphene nanocomposites with low nonspecific adsorption and strong quenching ability for competitive immunofluorescent detection of biomarkers in GM crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kaifei; Liu, Anran; Shangguan, Li; Mi, Li; Liu, Xu; Liu, Yuanjian; Zhao, Yuewu; Li, Ying; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin

    2017-04-15

    We developed a new immunofluorescent biosensor by utilizing a novel nanobody (Nb) and iron-polymer-graphene nanocomposites for sensitive detection of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Agrobacdterium tumefaciens strain CP4 (CP4-EPSPS), which considered as biomarkers of genetically modified (GM) crops. Specifically, we prepared iron doped polyacrylic hydrazide modified reduced graphene nanocomposites (Fe@RGO/PAH) by in-situ polymerization approach and subsequent a one-pot reaction with hydrazine. The resulting Fe@RGO/PAH nanocomposites displayed low nonspecific adsorption to analytes (11% quenching caused by nonspecific adsorption) due to electrostatic, energetic and steric effect of the nanocomposites. After Nb immobilizing, the as-prepared Fe@RGO/PAH/Nbs showed good selectivity and high quenching ability (92% quenching) in the presence of antigen (Ag) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) modified CdTe QDs (Ag/QDs@PEG), which is a nearly 4 fold than that of the unmodified GO in same condition. The high quenching ability of Fe@RGO/PAH/Nbs can be used for detection of CP4-EPSPS based on competitive immunoassay with a linearly proportional concentration range of 5-100ng/mL and a detection limit of 0.34ng/mL. The good stability, reproducibility and specificity of the resulting immunofluorescent biosensor are demonstrated and might open a new window for investigation of fluorescent sensing with numerous multifunctional graphene based materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Species interactions and chemical stress: combined effects of intraspecific and interspecific interactions and pyrene on Daphnia magna population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viaene, Karel P J; De Laender, Frederik; Rico, Andreu; Van den Brink, Paul J; Di Guardo, Antonio; Morselli, Melissa; Janssen, Colin R

    2015-08-01

    Species interactions are often suggested as an important factor when assessing the effects of chemicals on higher levels of biological organization. Nevertheless, the contribution of intraspecific and interspecific interactions to chemical effects on populations is often overlooked. In the present study, Daphnia magna populations were initiated with different levels of intraspecific competition, interspecific competition, and predation and exposed to pyrene pulses. Generalized linear models were used to test which of these factors significantly explained population size and structure at different time points. Pyrene had a negative effect on total population densities, with effects being more pronounced on smaller D. magna individuals. Among all species interactions tested, predation had the largest negative effect on population densities. Predation and high initial intraspecific competition were shown to interact antagonistically with pyrene exposure. This was attributed to differences in population structure before pyrene exposure and pyrene-induced reductions in predation pressure by Chaoborus sp. larvae. The present study provides empirical evidence that species interactions within and between populations can alter the response of aquatic populations to chemical exposure. Therefore, such interactions are important factors to be considered in ecological risk assessments. © 2015 SETAC.

  11. Economic Competition and Evolution: Are there Lessons from Ecology?

    OpenAIRE

    Tisdell, Clement A.

    2003-01-01

    After discussing generally models in ecology and economics that combine competition, optimization and evolution, this article concentrates on models of intraspecific competition. It demonstrates the importance of diversity/inequalities within populations of species and other environments for the sustainability of their populations, given the occurrence of environmental change. This is demonstrated both for scramble (open-access) and contest competition. Implications are drawn for human popula...

  12. Y-Chromosome variation in hominids: intraspecific variation is limited to the polygamous chimpanzee.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Greve

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated that the Y-specific ampliconic fertility genes DAZ (deleted in azoospermia and CDY (chromodomain protein Y varied with respect to copy number and position among chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes. In comparison, seven Y-chromosomal lineages of the bonobo (Pan paniscus, the chimpanzee's closest living relative, showed no variation. We extend our earlier comparative investigation to include an analysis of the intraspecific variation of these genes in gorillas (Gorilla gorilla and orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus, and examine the resulting patterns in the light of the species' markedly different social and mating behaviors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH of DAZ and CDY in 12 Y-chromosomal lineages of western lowland gorilla (G. gorilla gorilla and a single lineage of the eastern lowland gorilla (G. beringei graueri showed no variation among lineages. Similar findings were noted for the 10 Y-chromosomal lineages examined in the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus, and 11 Y-chromosomal lineages of the Sumatran orangutan (P. abelii. We validated the contrasting DAZ and CDY patterns using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR in chimpanzee and bonobo. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: High intraspecific variation in copy number and position of the DAZ and CDY genes is seen only in the chimpanzee. We hypothesize that this is best explained by sperm competition that results in the variant DAZ and CDY haplotypes detected in this species. In contrast, bonobos, gorillas and orangutans-species that are not subject to sperm competition-showed no intraspecific variation in DAZ and CDY suggesting that monoandry in gorillas, and preferential female mate choice in bonobos and orangutans, probably permitted the fixation of a single Y variant in each taxon. These data support the notion that the evolutionary history of a primate Y chromosome is not simply encrypted in its DNA

  13. Anti- versus Pro-Competitive Mergers

    OpenAIRE

    Fridolfsson, Sven-Olof

    2007-01-01

    In a framework where mergers are mutually excluding, I show that firms pursue anti- rather than (alternative) pro-competitive mergers. Potential outsiders to anti-competitive mergers refrain from pursuing pro-competitive mergers if the positive externalities from anti-competitive mergers are strong enough. Potential outsiders to pro-competitive mergers pursue anti-competitive mergers if the negative externalities from the pro-competitive mergers are strong enough. Potential participants in an...

  14. Intraspecific functional diversity of common species enhances community stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Connor M; McKinney, Shawn T; Loftin, Cynthia S

    2017-03-01

    Common species are fundamental to the structure and function of their communities and may enhance community stability through intraspecific functional diversity (iFD). We measured among-habitat and within-habitat iFD (i.e., among- and within-plant community types) of two common small mammal species using stable isotopes and functional trait dendrograms, determined whether iFD was related to short-term population stability and small mammal community stability, and tested whether spatially explicit trait filters helped explain observed patterns of iFD. Southern red-backed voles ( Myodes gapperi ) had greater iFD than deer mice ( Peromyscus maniculatus ), both among habitats, and within the plant community in which they were most abundant (their "primary habitat"). Peromyscus maniculatus populations across habitats differed significantly between years and declined 78% in deciduous forests, their primary habitat, as did the overall deciduous forest small mammal community. Myodes gapperi populations were stable across habitats and within coniferous forest, their primary habitat, as was the coniferous forest small mammal community. Generalized linear models representing internal trait filters (e.g., competition), which increase within-habitat type iFD, best explained variation in M. gapperi diet, while models representing internal filters and external filters (e.g., climate), which suppress within-habitat iFD, best explained P. maniculatus diet. This supports the finding that M. gapperi had higher iFD than P. maniculatus and is consistent with the theory that internal trait filters are associated with higher iFD than external filters. Common species with high iFD can impart a stabilizing influence on their communities, information that can be important for conserving biodiversity under environmental change.

  15. Intraspecific functional diversity of common species enhances community stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Connor M.; McKinney, Shawn T.; Loftin, Cynthia S.

    2017-01-01

    Common species are fundamental to the structure and function of their communities and may enhance community stability through intraspecific functional diversity (iFD). We measured among-habitat and within-habitat iFD (i.e., among- and within-plant community types) of two common small mammal species using stable isotopes and functional trait dendrograms, determined whether iFD was related to short-term population stability and small mammal community stability, and tested whether spatially explicit trait filters helped explain observed patterns of iFD. Southern red-backed voles (Myodes gapperi) had greater iFD than deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), both among habitats, and within the plant community in which they were most abundant (their “primary habitat”). Peromyscus maniculatus populations across habitats differed significantly between years and declined 78% in deciduous forests, their primary habitat, as did the overall deciduous forest small mammal community. Myodes gapperi populations were stable across habitats and within coniferous forest, their primary habitat, as was the coniferous forest small mammal community. Generalized linear models representing internal trait filters (e.g., competition), which increase within-habitat type iFD, best explained variation in M. gapperidiet, while models representing internal filters and external filters (e.g., climate), which suppress within-habitat iFD, best explained P. maniculatus diet. This supports the finding that M. gapperi had higher iFD than P. maniculatus and is consistent with the theory that internal trait filters are associated with higher iFD than external filters. Common species with high iFD can impart a stabilizing influence on their communities, information that can be important for conserving biodiversity under environmental change.

  16. Egg size matching by an intraspecific brood parasite

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick R. Lemons; James S. Sedinger

    2011-01-01

    Avian brood parasitism provides an ideal system with which to understand animal recognition and its affect on fitness. This phenomenon of laying eggs in the nests of other individuals has classically been framed from the perspective of interspecific brood parasitism and host recognition of parasitic eggs. Few examples exist of strategies adopted by intraspecific brood parasites to maximize success of parasitic eggs. Intraspecific brood parasitism within precocial birds can be a risky strategy...

  17. "A strong competition" | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Each scholar has been guided by at least one Chinese and one international mentor, who work closely with them as they produce a paper of original scholarship, written in English for international audiences. In all cases, the young scholars either address new research questions or take a fresh approach to familiar topics ...

  18. Influência da competição intra-específica entre fêmeas e da ausência de hospedeiro no parasitismo de Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera, Scelionidae sobre ovos de Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae Influence of females intraspecific competition and lack of host on Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera, Scelionidae parasitism on Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana R. Carneiro

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A competição intraespecífica e a ausência de hospedeiros podem comprometer o sucesso de programas de controle biológico. Assim, este trabalho objetivou avaliar o efeito de diferentes densidades de fêmeas (1, 3, 6 e 9 fêmeas/ 100 ovos e da ausência de hospedeiro no parasitismo de Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera, Scelionidae em ovos de Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae. Observou-se aumento no parasitismo de ovos de S. frugiperda por T. remus a partir da densidade 3 fêmeas/ 100 ovos tanto em condições de laboratório (18% quanto em campo (32%, embora o parasitismo causado por densidades maiores que 1 fêmea/100 ovos não foi significativamente diferente. Todavia, isso não causou superparasitismo. Por outro lado, o número de fêmeas produzidas na progênie diminuiu (39% com a maior densidade de fêmeas sob condições de laboratório. Contudo, não verificou-se diferença significativa sob condições de campo. Mesmo após 9 dias de ausência de hospedeiro não houve redução nos índices de parasitismo, permanecendo em torno de 95 ovos parasitados/fêmea/dia. Todavia, no décimo dia pode-se observar redução (40% no número médio de ovos parasitados. Desse modo, a liberação de três fêmeas por 100 ovos é adequada para se obter elevados níveis de parasitismo.Intraspecific competition and lack of host can affect the success of biological control programs. Thus, this work aimed at evaluating the effect of different densities of females (1, 3, 6, and 9 females/100 eggs and the absence of host in the parasitism of Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera, Scelionidae on Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae eggs. It was observed an increase in egg parasitism of S. frugiperda by T. remus beyond a density of 3 females/ 100 eggs under laboratory (18% and field (32% conditions, although the parasitism caused by densities greater than 1 female/100 eggs was not significantly different. However

  19. Do hair-crested drongos reduce prospective territory competition by dismantling their nest after breeding?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lv, Lei; Li, Jianqiang; Kingma, Sjouke A.; Gao, Chang; Wang, Yong; Komdeur, Jan; Zhang, Zhengwang

    Animals that breed seasonally often use the same territory where they successfully produced young previously. Intra-specific competition may be intense for these high-quality territories, and therefore, natural selection should favour behaviour of territory owners to reduce such competition.

  20. Niche construction within riparian corridors. Part II: The unexplored role of positive intraspecific interactions in Salicaceae species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corenblit, Dov; Garófano-Gómez, Virginia; González, Eduardo; Hortobágyi, Borbála; Julien, Frédéric; Lambs, Luc; Otto, Thierry; Roussel, Erwan; Steiger, Johannes; Tabacchi, Eric; Till-Bottraud, Irène

    2018-03-01

    -establishment, roots form functional grafts between neighbouring trees to increase biomechanical and physiological anchorage as well as nutrient acquisition and exchange; and (v) these stands remain dense on alluvial bars until a threshold of landform construction and hydrogeomorphic disconnection is reached. At this last stage, intraspecific competition for resources (light and nutrients) increases, inducing a density reduction in the aerial stand (i.e., self-thinning), but root systems of altruistic individuals could remain functional via root grafting. Finally, we suggest new methodological perspectives for testing our hypotheses related to the occurrence of positive intraspecific interactions among Salicaceae trees in fluvial landform and niche construction through in situ and ex situ experiments.

  1. Global dynamics of delay equations for populations with competition among immature individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liz, Eduardo; Ruiz-Herrera, Alfonso

    2016-04-01

    We analyze a population model for two age-structured species allowing for inter- and intra-specific competition at immature life stages. The dynamics is governed by a system of Delay Differential Equations (DDEs) recently introduced by Gourley and Liu. The analysis of this model presents serious difficulties because the right-hand sides of the DDEs depend on the solutions of a system of nonlinear ODEs, and generally cannot be solved explicitly. Using the notion of strong attractor, we reduce the study of the attracting properties of the equilibria of the DDEs to the analysis of a related two-dimensional discrete system. Then, we combine some tools for monotone planar maps and planar competing Lotka-Volterra systems to describe the dynamics of the model with three different birth rate functions. We give easily verifiable conditions for global extinction of one or the two species, and for global convergence of the positive solutions to a coexistence state.

  2. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2011-07-01

    and Astrophysics. Those in charge of the competition give an overview of this relatively young tournament. They give a few examples of theoretical and experimental tasks, and one can see the strong connection between astronomy and physics, between the large scales in the universe and the small scales in particle physics. The third paper introduces a special competition called 'First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics'. It was conceived as a national event in Poland and has gained international reputation and acceptance since 1992. Papers are submitted from young students prior to university and are refereed in the same manner as real research papers. This means that the most important criterion is the originality and novelty of the activity performed in theoretical or experimental physics. The aims of this competition are set out below and can be seen as a credo for all competitions: promotion of scientific interest among young pupils selection and promotion of outstanding pupils enhancing motivation stimulation of school work establishing friendly relations between young physicists.

  3. Intraspecific and interspecific pre-adult competition on the neotropical region colonizer Zaprionus indianus (Diptera: Drosophilidae under laboratory conditions Competição pré-adulta intra e interespecífica, em Zaprionus indianus (Diptera: Drosophilidae, espécie colonizadora da região neotropical, sob condições laboratoriais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Gustavo da Conceição Galego

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the pre-adult interactions of Zaprionus indianus, a recently-introduced species in Brazil, with two others Drosophilidae under laboratory conditions. The effects of larval residues on the viability and on the developmental time of Z. indianus, Drosophila simulans and D. sturtevanti were used to evaluate pre-adult competitive interactions, conditioning the culture medium with larval residues. Pre-adult interactions between Z. indianus, D. sturtevanti and D. simulans may affect their relative abundance over time, since the viability of Z. indianus was negatively affected by residues of D. sturtevanti, and its residues reduced the viability of D. simulans and the developmental time of both D. simulans and D. sturtevanti.Este estudo é uma análise das interações pré-adultas, sob condições laboratoriais, da mosca-do-figo Zaprionus indianus, espécie recentemente introduzida no Brasil, com dois outros drosofilídeos. A interferência de meio de cultura, acrescido de resíduos larvais, sobre a viabilidade e o tempo de desenvolvimento de Z. indianus, Drosophila simulans e D. sturtevanti foi utilizada para avaliar as interações competitivas pré-adultas. As interações pré-adultas entre Z. indianus, D. sturtevanti e D. simulans podem afetar sua abundância relativa ao longo do tempo, pois a viabilidade de Z. indianus foi negativamente afetada por resíduos de D. sturtevanti; os resíduos da mosca-do-figo reduziram a viabilidade de D. simulans e o tempo de desenvolvimento tanto de D. simulans como de D. sturtevanti.

  4. Sampling intraspecific variability in leaf functional traits: Practical suggestions to maximize collected information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzellis, Francesco; Palandrani, Chiara; Savi, Tadeja; Alberti, Roberto; Nardini, Andrea; Bacaro, Giovanni

    2017-12-01

    The choice of the best sampling strategy to capture mean values of functional traits for a species/population, while maintaining information about traits' variability and minimizing the sampling size and effort, is an open issue in functional trait ecology. Intraspecific variability (ITV) of functional traits strongly influences sampling size and effort. However, while adequate information is available about intraspecific variability between individuals (ITV BI ) and among populations (ITV POP ), relatively few studies have analyzed intraspecific variability within individuals (ITV WI ). Here, we provide an analysis of ITV WI of two foliar traits, namely specific leaf area (SLA) and osmotic potential (π), in a population of Quercus ilex L. We assessed the baseline ITV WI level of variation between the two traits and provided the minimum and optimal sampling size in order to take into account ITV WI , comparing sampling optimization outputs with those previously proposed in the literature. Different factors accounted for different amount of variance of the two traits. SLA variance was mostly spread within individuals (43.4% of the total variance), while π variance was mainly spread between individuals (43.2%). Strategies that did not account for all the canopy strata produced mean values not representative of the sampled population. The minimum size to adequately capture the studied functional traits corresponded to 5 leaves taken randomly from 5 individuals, while the most accurate and feasible sampling size was 4 leaves taken randomly from 10 individuals. We demonstrate that the spatial structure of the canopy could significantly affect traits variability. Moreover, different strategies for different traits could be implemented during sampling surveys. We partially confirm sampling sizes previously proposed in the recent literature and encourage future analysis involving different traits.

  5. Intraspecific hybridization studies in three wild strains of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were no significant (P > 0.05) differences in the weight of the three parental strains and the six intraspecific hybrids at hatching and six weeks of rearing indoor aquaria and outdoor concrete tanks. The best survival value of 96% was recorded for the Jos strain followed by that of the hybrid cross involving female Jos ...

  6. Hypothalamically Induced Intraspecific Aggressive Behaviour in the Rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolhaas, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of electrical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) of rats on intraspecific aggressive behaviour were studied. In order to investigate the specificity of the stimulation effects, each experimental animal was stimulated in a number of different social situations. Stimulation of

  7. Intraspecific prey choice of bushmeat hunters outside the Serengeti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study we investigated intraspecific prey choice of illegal bushmeat hunters outside the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. During the study 151 animals belonging to 12 species were reported killed. The majority, 76%, of prey species were migratory herbivores. Night hunting with dogs was the most common hunting ...

  8. Intraspecific aflatoxin inhibition in Aspergillus flavus is thigmoregulated, independent of vegetative compatibility group and is strain dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changwei Huang

    Full Text Available Biological control of preharvest aflatoxin contamination by atoxigenic stains of Aspergillus flavus has been demonstrated in several crops. The assumption is that some form of competition suppresses the fungus's ability to infect or produce aflatoxin when challenged. Intraspecific aflatoxin inhibition was demonstrated by others. This work investigates the mechanistic basis of that phenomenon. A toxigenic and atoxigenic isolate of A. flavus which exhibited intraspecific aflatoxin inhibition when grown together in suspended disc culture were not inhibited when grown in a filter insert-plate well system separated by a .4 or 3 µm membrane. Toxigenic and atoxigenic conidial mixtures (50∶50 placed on both sides of these filters restored inhibition. There was ∼50% inhibition when a 12 µm pore size filter was used. Conidial and mycelial diameters were in the 3.5-7.0 µm range and could pass through the 12 µm filter. Larger pore sizes in the initially separated system restored aflatoxin inhibition. This suggests isolates must come into physical contact with one another. This negates a role for nutrient competition or for soluble diffusible signals or antibiotics in aflatoxin inhibition. The toxigenic isolate was maximally sensitive to inhibition during the first 24 hrs of growth while the atoxigenic isolate was always inhibition competent. The atoxigenic isolate when grown with a green fluorescent protein (GFP toxigenic isolate failed to inhibit aflatoxin indicating that there is specificity in the touch inhibiton. Several atoxigenic isolates were found which inhibited the GFP isolate. These results suggest that an unknown signaling pathway is initiated in the toxigenic isolate by physical interaction with an appropriate atoxigenic isolate in the first 24 hrs which prevents or down-regulates normal expression of aflatoxin after 3-5 days growth. We suspect thigmo-downregulation of aflatoxin synthesis is the mechanistic basis of intraspecific

  9. Interspecific Larval Competition Differentially Impacts Adult Survival in Dengue Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alto, Barry W; Bettinardi, David J; Ortiz, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Mosquitoes often experience intraspecific and interspecific competition among larvae attributable to high densities and nutrient limitation, especially container mosquitoes including Aedes aegypti (L.) and Aedes albopictus (Skuse). Density-dependent effects on larvae impact adult production and adult traits that influence transmission of arboviruses. To improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which density-dependence influences transmission and identify species-specific traits, we tested the hypotheses: 1) Competitive asymmetry in favor of Ae. albopictus over Ae. aegypti translates to altered adult female survival, and 2) Ae. aegypti adult females are more resistant to life-shortening effects of low-humidity conditions than Ae. albopictus. We gauged the relative impact of inter- and intraspecific larval competition on adult survival in high- and low-humidity regimes (77 and 44% relative humidity, respectively). For Ae. albopictus, intraspecific but not interspecific competition usually reduced adult survival under both humidity regimes. For Ae. aegypti, both intraspecific and interspecific competition reduced adult survival. Ae. albopictus adult survival was minimally influenced by interspecific competition with Ae. aegypti, consistent with observations that Ae. albopictus is the superior competitor. A species comparison indicated that Ae. aegypti exhibited a survival advantage relative to Ae. albopictus under both low- and high-humidity conditions. However, similar survival of these Aedes species was observed in some cases depending on conditions experienced in both the aquatic and terrestrial environments. These results demonstrate plasticity in survival rates of dengue and chikungunya vectors and the significance of considering the influence of biological interactions during the immature stages and abiotic conditions during the adult stage. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights

  10. Conditions Promoting Mycorrhizal Parasitism Are of Minor Importance for Competitive Interactions in Two Differentially Mycotrophic Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friede, Martina; Unger, Stephan; Hellmann, Christine; Beyschlag, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Interactions of plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) may range along a broad continuum from strong mutualism to parasitism, with mycorrhizal benefits received by the plant being determined by climatic and edaphic conditions affecting the balance between carbon costs vs. nutritional benefits. Thus, environmental conditions promoting either parasitism or mutualism can influence the mycorrhizal growth dependency (MGD) of a plant and in consequence may play an important role in plant-plant interactions. In a multifactorial field experiment we aimed at disentangling the effects of environmental and edaphic conditions, namely the availability of light, phosphorus and nitrogen, and the implications for competitive interactions between Hieracium pilosella and Corynephorus canescens for the outcome of the AMF symbiosis. Both species were planted in single, intraspecific and interspecific combinations using a target-neighbor approach with six treatments distributed along a gradient simulating conditions for the interaction between plants and AMF ranking from mutualistic to parasitic. Across all treatments we found mycorrhizal association of H. pilosella being consistently mutualistic, while pronounced parasitism was observed in C. canescens , indicating that environmental and edaphic conditions did not markedly affect the cost:benefit ratio of the mycorrhizal symbiosis in both species. Competitive interactions between both species were strongly affected by AMF, with the impact of AMF on competition being modulated by colonization. Biomass in both species was lowest when grown in interspecific competition, with colonization being increased in the less mycotrophic C. canescens , while decreased in the obligate mycotrophic H. pilosella . Although parasitism-promoting conditions negatively affected MGD in C. canescens , these effects were small as compared to growth decreases related to increased colonization levels in this species. Thus, the lack of plant control over

  11. Conditions Promoting Mycorrhizal Parasitism Are of Minor Importance for Competitive Interactions in Two Differentially Mycotrophic Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friede, Martina; Unger, Stephan; Hellmann, Christine; Beyschlag, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Interactions of plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) may range along a broad continuum from strong mutualism to parasitism, with mycorrhizal benefits received by the plant being determined by climatic and edaphic conditions affecting the balance between carbon costs vs. nutritional benefits. Thus, environmental conditions promoting either parasitism or mutualism can influence the mycorrhizal growth dependency (MGD) of a plant and in consequence may play an important role in plant-plant interactions. In a multifactorial field experiment we aimed at disentangling the effects of environmental and edaphic conditions, namely the availability of light, phosphorus and nitrogen, and the implications for competitive interactions between Hieracium pilosella and Corynephorus canescens for the outcome of the AMF symbiosis. Both species were planted in single, intraspecific and interspecific combinations using a target-neighbor approach with six treatments distributed along a gradient simulating conditions for the interaction between plants and AMF ranking from mutualistic to parasitic. Across all treatments we found mycorrhizal association of H. pilosella being consistently mutualistic, while pronounced parasitism was observed in C. canescens, indicating that environmental and edaphic conditions did not markedly affect the cost:benefit ratio of the mycorrhizal symbiosis in both species. Competitive interactions between both species were strongly affected by AMF, with the impact of AMF on competition being modulated by colonization. Biomass in both species was lowest when grown in interspecific competition, with colonization being increased in the less mycotrophic C. canescens, while decreased in the obligate mycotrophic H. pilosella. Although parasitism-promoting conditions negatively affected MGD in C. canescens, these effects were small as compared to growth decreases related to increased colonization levels in this species. Thus, the lack of plant control over

  12. Conditions Promoting Mycorrhizal Parasitism are of Minor Importance for Competitive Interactions in Two Differentially Mycotrophic Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Friede

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Interactions of plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF may range along a broad continuum from strong mutualism to parasitism, with mycorrhizal benefits received by the plant being determined by climatic and edaphic conditions affecting the balance between carbon costs vs. nutritional benefits. Thus, environmental conditions promoting either parasitism or mutualism can influence the mycorrhizal growth dependency (MGD of a plant and in consequence may play an important role in plant-plant interactions.In a multifactorial field experiment we aimed at disentangling the effects of environmental and edaphic conditions, namely the availability of light, phosphorus and nitrogen, and the implications for competitive interactions between Hieracium pilosella and Corynephorus canescens for the outcome of the AMF symbiosis. Both species were planted in single, intraspecific and interspecific combinations using a target-neighbor approach with six treatments distributed along a gradient simulating conditions for the interaction between plants and AMF ranking from mutualistic to parasitic.Across all treatments we found mycorrhizal association of H. pilosella being consistently mutualistic, while pronounced parasitism was observed in C. canescens, indicating that environmental and edaphic conditions did not markedly affect the cost:benefit ratio of the mycorrhizal symbiosis in both species. Competitive interactions between both species were strongly affected by AMF, with the impact of AMF on competition being modulated by colonization. Biomass in both species was lowest when grown in interspecific competition, with colonization being increased in the less mycotrophic C. canescens, while decreased in the obligate mycotrophic H. pilosella. Although parasitism-promoting conditions negatively affected MGD in C. canescens, these effects were small as compared to growth decreases related to increased colonization levels in this species. Thus, the lack of plant

  13. Retail competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Retail competition as the cornerstone of a competitive electricity marketplace was the subject of the seventh in the series of policy discussion papers developed at the Market Design Conference. Concern was expressed that because of the complexities involved in market design and technical implementation, the retail competition may lag behind other elements of the implementation of the new market design. A variety of key issues were debated, including the role of physical versus financial contracts, the form of retail competition and financial settlement systems in the short term, the requirement to separate 'competitive' (metering, billing, maintenance, consumer education) from non-competitive' (the transmission wires) services and the role of municipal electric utilities. It was agreed that the IMO should play an important role in defining and enforcing the separation of services, and that as a general rule, the development of policy in this area should be guided by the principle of maximizing the potential for competition

  14. Effects of intra- and interspecific competition on the sensitivity of Daphnia magna populations to the fungicide carbendazim

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arco, Del Ana Isabel; Rico Artero, Andreu; Brink, van den P.J.

    2015-01-01

    The ecological risk assessment of pesticides is generally based on toxicity data obtained from single-species laboratory experiments and does not take into account ecological interactions such as competition or predation. Intraspecific and interspecific competition are expected to result in

  15. Intraspecific hybridization, developmental stability and fitness in Drosophila mercatorum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, DH; Pertoldi, C; Scali, V

    2002-01-01

    One of the possible effects of intraspecific hybridization is outbreeding depression, due to a breakdown of coadapted gene complexes, which can lead to reduced fitness and decreased developmental stability in hybrids. Alternatively, increased fitness and increased developmental stability in hybrids...... (hybrid vigour) may be a result of hybridization, probably due to increased heterozygosity. Developmental stability is assumed to be correlated with fitness and is commonly measured as fluctuating asymmetry or phenotypic variance. Drosophila mercatorum is capable of reproducing sexually, but also...

  16. Egg size matching by an intraspecific brood parasite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Patrick R.; Sedinger, James S.

    2011-01-01

    Avian brood parasitism provides an ideal system with which to understand animal recognition and its affect on fitness. This phenomenon of laying eggs in the nests of other individuals has classically been framed from the perspective of interspecific brood parasitism and host recognition of parasitic eggs. Few examples exist of strategies adopted by intraspecific brood parasites to maximize success of parasitic eggs. Intraspecific brood parasitism within precocial birds can be a risky strategy in that hatch synchrony is essential to reproductive success. Given that egg size is positively correlated with incubation time, parasitic birds would benefit by recognizing and selecting hosts with a similar egg size. Intraspecific brood parasitism is an alternative reproductive strategy in black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans), a colonial nesting goose with precocial young. Based on a randomization test, parasitic eggs in this study differed less in size from eggs in their host's nests than did random eggs placed in random nests. Parasitic eggs were remarkably similar in size to hosts’ eggs, differing by parasitic brant match the egg size of hosts in our study supports our hypothesis that brant match egg size of hosts, thereby maximizing hatching success of their parasitic eggs.

  17. Political Competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Casey B. Mulligan; Kevin K. Tsui

    2006-01-01

    Political competitiveness - which many interpret as the degree of democracy - can be modeled as a monopolistic competition. All regimes are constrained by the threat of "entry," and thereby seek some combination of popular support and political entry barriers. This simple model predicts that many public policies are unrelated to political competitiveness, and that even unchallenged nondemocratic regimes should tax far short of their Laffer curve maximum. Economic sanctions, odious debt repudi...

  18. Estimating intraspecific genetic diversity from community DNA metabarcoding data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Elbrecht

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background DNA metabarcoding is used to generate species composition data for entire communities. However, sequencing errors in high-throughput sequencing instruments are fairly common, usually requiring reads to be clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs, losing information on intraspecific diversity in the process. While Cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI haplotype information is limited in resolving intraspecific diversity it is nevertheless often useful e.g. in a phylogeographic context, helping to formulate hypotheses on taxon distribution and dispersal. Methods This study combines sequence denoising strategies, normally applied in microbial research, with additional abundance-based filtering to extract haplotype information from freshwater macroinvertebrate metabarcoding datasets. This novel approach was added to the R package “JAMP” and can be applied to COI amplicon datasets. We tested our haplotyping method by sequencing (i a single-species mock community composed of 31 individuals with 15 different haplotypes spanning three orders of magnitude in biomass and (ii 18 monitoring samples each amplified with four different primer sets and two PCR replicates. Results We detected all 15 haplotypes of the single specimens in the mock community with relaxed filtering and denoising settings. However, up to 480 additional unexpected haplotypes remained in both replicates. Rigorous filtering removes most unexpected haplotypes, but also can discard expected haplotypes mainly from the small specimens. In the monitoring samples, the different primer sets detected 177–200 OTUs, each containing an average of 2.40–3.30 haplotypes per OTU. The derived intraspecific diversity data showed population structures that were consistent between replicates and similar between primer pairs but resolution depended on the primer length. A closer look at abundant taxa in the dataset revealed various population genetic patterns, e.g. the stonefly

  19. Pop competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Cellino; Anna Soci

    2002-01-01

    Very few economic terms are used as much as competitiveness in economics. This article deals with the different meanings of competitiveness, at the level of a firm, at the level of the local area, and at the level of the country. It analyzes the problems of consistency among the available definitions and among the indicators used to measurecompetitiveness.

  20. Competitiveness factors

    OpenAIRE

    Popa Liliana-Viorica

    2012-01-01

    Porter's theory supports the idea that, despite the globalization of production and trade, the competitive advantage is created in a national framework, nations, through their institutional, natural, cultural, economic characteristics ultimately determining the development of certain economic activities. The factors considered by Porter as determinants for the competitive advantage are grouped in four categories, the linkages between them being important as well

  1. Intraspecific competition of .i.Glyptotendipes paripes./i. (Diptera: Chironomidae) larvae under laboratory conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frouz, Jan; Lobinske, R.J.; Ali, A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 2 (2009), s. 487-500 ISSN 1386-2588 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521; CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : food availability * Glyptotendipes paripes * larval density Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.549, year: 2009

  2. The effect of intraspecific competition on the development and quality of Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita (Rhabditida: Rhabditidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nermuť, Jiří; Půža, Vladimír; Mráček, Zdeněk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 12 (2012), s. 1389-1397 ISSN 0958-3157 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : slug parasitic nematodes * lipid reserves * progeny production Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.712, year: 2012

  3. The Ecohydrologic Role of Coexistence and Competition in Semiarid Hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanjalili, M. J.; Saco, P. M.; Willgoose, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Through its influence on runoff and erosion-deposition processes, vegetation remarkably regulates different aspects of landscape dynamics. Here, the influence of different plant functional traits on the coexistence of different species in arid and semi-arid regions with patchy vegetation is investigated using an ecohydrology model. The model simulates coevolving changes in biomass patterns for two species, as well as overland flow and soil moisture dynamics. Vegetation patterns emerge as a result of facilitation (shading and infiltration) and competition mechanisms as well as varying seed dispersal strategies. The results show that the survival of only one species or the coexistence of both species not only strongly depends on environmental stresses, but also on differences in hillslope micro and macro topography. These vegetation patterns have very different hydrologic signatures and the potential to trigger remarkably different geomorphic responses. Based on these results we establish new hypothesis that will be used to further investigate the role of plant interspecific and intraspecific feedbacks on landscape coevolution processes.

  4. Intraspecific brood parasitism can increase the number of eggs that an individual lays in its own nest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruxton, Graeme D; Broom, Mark

    2002-10-07

    Intraspecific brood parasitism involves laying eggs in the nest of another individual of the same species without subsequently caring for the eggs or hatchlings. Where individuals lay in their own nest as well as parasitically, previous works predicted that parasitism leads to fewer eggs being laid in an individual's own nest, compared with the equivalent situation without parasitism. This is predicted to occur both to reduce the effects of competition from parasitically laid individuals and because parasitism can be used to reduce competition between siblings. Here, we present a quantitative model of this situation. This model indicates that the brood-reduction prediction does not hold universally. For some plausible parameter combinations, parasitism causes an increase rather than a decrease in the number of eggs laid by an individual in its own nest. This occurs because parasitism becomes a less profitable tactic as more eggs are laid by nest owners due to increasing within-nest competition. Increasing clutch size will also increase competition between the host's own offspring, but can still be advantageous if the induced reduction in parasitism is sufficient.

  5. Interaction between stress induced by competition, predation, and an insecticide on the response of aquatic invertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, Van den Paul J.; Klein, Sylvan L.; Rico, Andreu

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of species interactions like competition and (intraguild) predation on the sensitivity of aquatic organisms to the insecticide chlorpyrifos. In the first experiment, combined effects of chlorpyrifos and different levels of intraspecific and interspecific

  6. Costly neighbours: Heterospecific competitive interactions increase metabolic rates in dominant species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janča, M.; Gvoždík, Lumír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 5177 (2017), č. článku 5177. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-07140S Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : interference competition * intraspecific variation * terrestrial salamander * energy metabolism * natural selection * newts Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  7. Tall swards and small grazers : competition, facilitation and coexistence of different-sized grazers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuermann, N.

    2007-01-01

    Differences in body mass are assumed to be a major factor leading to resource partitioning and the reduction of competition between species within a guild. To study the effects of body mass on foraging behaviour of grazers  independently of morphological adaptations we used intra-specific size

  8. Intraspecific hybridization, developmental stability and fitness in Drosophila mercatorum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, DH; Pertoldi, C; Scali, V

    2002-01-01

    (hybrid vigour) may be a result of hybridization, probably due to increased heterozygosity. Developmental stability is assumed to be correlated with fitness and is commonly measured as fluctuating asymmetry or phenotypic variance. Drosophila mercatorum is capable of reproducing sexually, but also....... Intraspecific hybridization between a parthenogenetic and a sexually reproducing strain of Drosophila mercatorum resulted in significant changes in fecundity as well as fluctuating asymmetry and phenotypic variance for the number of sternopleural bristles and in the length of two wing traits over three...

  9. Evaluating the Intraspecific Interactions of Indian Rosewood (Dalbergia sissoo Roxb. Trees in Indian Rosewood Reserveof Khuzestan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Erfanifard

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Positive and negative (facilitative and competitive interactions of plants are important issues in autecology and can be evaluated by the spatial pattern analysis in plant ecosystems. This study investigates the intraspecific interactions of Indian rosewood (Dalbergia sissoo Roxb. trees in Indian rosewood Reserve of Khuzestan province. Three 150 m × 200 m plots were selected and the spatial locations of all Indian rosewoods (239 trees were specified. Structurally different summary statistics (nearest neighbour distribution function D(r, K2-index K2(r, pair correlation function g(r, and O-ring O(r were also implemented to analyze the spatial pattern of the trees. The distribution of Indian rosewood trees significantly followed inhomogeneous Poisson process (α=0.05. The results of D(r and K2(r showed that the maximum distance to nearest tree was 12 m and density was decreased to this scale. The results of g(r and O(r also revealed the significant aggregation of Indian rosewood trees at scales of 1.5 to 4 m (α=0.05. In general, it was concluded that Indian rosewood trees had positive intraspecific interactions in Indian rosewood Reserve of Khuzestan province and their aggregation showed their facilitative effects on one another.

  10. Coal competitiveness?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogeaux, B.

    2006-01-01

    Will coal electrical plants be more competitive in the coming years? Answering this one cannot be limited to merely comparing estimates based on reference electricity production costs. The competitiveness of coal will indeed depend on the final product marketed, as the MWhs are not equal: is the purpose to produce base, half-base MWh? Does the electrical equipment structure require flexible MWh (for instance in the event of significant intermittent renewable energy amounts), and therefore plants able to adjust their power rapidly? But the competitiveness of coal will also depend on many factors that will correct reference cost estimates: uncertainties, risks, externalities. These factors will need to be appreciated on a case by case basis. We introduce some of the reasoning used to better appreciate the future competitiveness of coal, and the main factors conditioning it in three contrasting regions of the world: Europe, USA, china. (author)

  11. Understanding competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    CRESPO, Aranzazu; SEGURA-CAYUELA, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    Using firm level data, we analyze the factors that drive the evolution of the aggregate Unit Labor Costs – the main European competitiveness indicator – in France, Germany, Italy and Spain. The evolution of the aggregate Unit Labor Cost is not driven by the evolution of the firm level Unit Labor Costs, but rather by an important factor for the competitiveness of a country: the reallocation of resources among the firms of the economy. Using the methodology of Hsieh and Klenow (...

  12. REGIONAL COMPETITIVENESS

    OpenAIRE

    Krželj-Čolović, Zorica

    2015-01-01

    Individual city and regional authorities in many countries have themselves taken up the issue of “competitiveness” as part of their own economic development agendas: competitiveness has come to be regarded as critical for understanding and promoting local economic performance. Like their national counterparts, regional and city policy-makers have become preoccupied with knowing the relative competitive standing of their local economies compared with others, not just other regions and cities w...

  13. Intraspecific Variation in and Environment-Dependent Resource Allocation to Embryonic Development Time in Common Terns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedder, Oscar; Kürten, Nathalie; Bouwhuis, Sandra

    Embryonic development time is thought to impact life histories through trade-offs against life-history traits later in life, yet the inference is based on interspecific comparative analyses only. It is largely unclear whether intraspecific variation in embryonic development time that is not caused by environmental differences occurs, which would be required to detect life-history trade-offs. Here we performed a classical common-garden experiment by incubating fresh eggs of free-living common terns (Sterna hirundo) in a controlled incubation environment at two different temperatures. Hatching success was high but was slightly lower at the lower temperature. While correcting for effects of year, incubation temperature, and laying order, we found significant variation in the incubation time embryos required until hatching and in their heart rate. Embryonic heart rate was significantly positively correlated within clutches, and a similar tendency was found for incubation time, suggesting that intrinsic differences in embryonic development rate between offspring of different parents exist. Incubation time and embryonic heart rate were strongly correlated: embryos with faster heart rates required shorter incubation time. However, after correction for heart rate, embryos still required more time for development at the lower incubation temperature. This suggests that processes other than development require a greater share of resources in a suboptimal environment and that relative resource allocation to development is, therefore, environment dependent. We conclude that there is opportunity to detect intraspecific life-history trade-offs with embryonic development time and that the resolution of trade-offs may differ between embryonic environments.

  14. Competition for Space between the Epiphytes of ’Fucus serratus’ L,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatial competition between the epiphytes of Fucus serratus L. has been studied. The frequency of overgrowth and the cessation of growth when...others, but there is little other interspecific overgrowth and no intraspecific overgrowth. Spirorbis spirorbis is frequently overgrown by bryozoans...while Dynamena pumila seems almost immune from interspecific competition for space in this community because of its erect habit of growth. (Author)

  15. Intraspecific variation in the diet of the Mexican garter snake Thamnophis eques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Manjarrez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Mexican Garter Snake (Thamnophis eques is a terrestrial-aquatic generalist that feeds on both aquatic and terrestrial prey. We describe size-related variation and sexual variation in the diet of T. eques through analysis of 262 samples of identifiable stomach contents in snakes from 23 locations on the Mexican Plateau. The snake T. eques we studied consumed mostly fish, followed in lesser amounts by leeches, earthworms, frogs, and tadpoles. Correspondence analysis suggested that the frequency of consumption of various prey items differed between the categories of age but not between sex of snakes, and the general pattern was a reduction of prey item diversity with size of snake. Snake length was correlated positively with mass of ingested prey. Large snakes consumed large prey and continued to consume smaller prey. In general, no differences were found between the prey taxa of male and female snakes, although males ate two times more tadpoles than females. Males and females did not differ in the mass of leeches, earthworms, fishes, frogs and tadpoles that they ate, and males and females that ate each prey taxon were similar in length. We discuss proximate and functional determinants of diet and suggest that the observed intraspecific variation in T. eques could be explored by temporal variation in prey availability, proportions of snake size classes and possible sexual dimorphism in head traits and prey dimensions to assess the role of intersexual resource competition.

  16. CONCEPTUAL APPROACH OF COMPETITIVENESS AND INTERDEPENDENCE BETWEEN COMPETITION AND COMPETITIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana GUTIUM

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to analysis of interdependence and correlation between competition and competitiveness, and competition’s consequences. The author analysed some authors’ visions on competitiveness, and common features between theories of competition and competitiveness. Using the synthetic indicator elaborated by author has been evaluated the competitiveness of domestic goods on the internal and external market. At the end of this article, the author has developed proposals to increase competitiveness.

  17. Effects of intraspecific variation in white cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. Capitata) on soil ogranisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabouw, P.; Putten, van der W.H.; Dam, van N.M.; Biere, A.

    2010-01-01

    Intraspecific variation in plants can affect soil organisms. However, little is known about whether the magnitude of the effect depends on the degree of interaction with the roots. We analyzed effects of plant intraspecific variation on root herbivores and other soil organisms that interact directly

  18. Growth rates of rhizosphere microorganisms depend on competitive abilities of plants for nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Littschwager, Johanna; Lauerer, Marianna; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2010-05-01

    Rhizosphere - one of the most important ‘hot spots' in soil - is characterized not only by accelerated turnover of microbial biomass and nutrients but also by strong intra- and inter-specific competition. Intra-specific competition occurs between individual plants of the same species, while inter-specific competition can occur both at population level (plant species-specific, microbial species-specific interactions) and at community level (plant - microbial interactions). Such plant - microbial interactions are mainly governed by competition for available N sources, since N is one of the main growth limiting nutrients in natural ecosystems. Functional structure and activity of microbial community in rhizosphere is not uniform and is dependent on quantity and quality of root exudates which are plant specific. It is still unclear how microbial growth and turnover in the rhizosphere are dependent on the features and competitive abilities of plants for N. Depending on C and N availability, acceleration and even retardation of microbial activity and carbon mineralization can be expected in the rhizosphere of plants with high competitive abilities for N. We hypothesized slower microbial growth rates in the rhizosphere of plants with smaller roots, as they usually produce less exudates compared to plants with small shoot-to-root ratio. As the first hypothesis is based solely on C availability, we also expected the greater effect of N availability on microbial growth in rhizosphere of plants with smaller root mass. These hypothesis were tested for two plant species of strawberry: Fragaria vesca L. (native species), and Duchesnea indica (Andrews) Focke (an invasive plant in central Europe) growing in intraspecific and interspecific competition. Microbial biomass and the kinetic parameters of microbial growth in the rhizosphere were estimated by dynamics of CO2 emission from the soil amended with glucose and nutrients. Specific growth rate (µ) of soil microorganisms was

  19. Subcontract Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    DRCPM- ROL USA Missile Command, ATTN: DRCPM-VI Armor Training Devices, ATTN: DRCPM-AR 3 APRO 82-11 FINAL SUBCONTRACT COMPETITION by Wayne V. Zabel Charles...A. Correia "I S The pronouns "he," "his," and "him," when used in this publication, represent both the masculine and feminine genders unless... advertising or by negotiation, shall be made on a competitive basis to the maximum practicable extent." Armed Services Procurement Regul-tion Manual

  20. Intraspecific relationships among wood density, leaf structural traits and environment in four co-occurring species of Nothofagus in New Zealand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Richardson

    Full Text Available Plant functional traits capture important variation in plant strategy and function. Recent literature has revealed that within-species variation in traits is greater than previously supposed. However, we still have a poor understanding of how intraspecific variation is coordinated among different traits, and how it is driven by environment. We quantified intraspecific variation in wood density and five leaf traits underpinning the leaf economics spectrum (leaf dry matter content, leaf mass per unit area, size, thickness and density within and among four widespread Nothofagus tree species in southern New Zealand. We tested whether intraspecific relationships between wood density and leaf traits followed widely reported interspecific relationships, and whether variation in these traits was coordinated through shared responses to environmental factors. Sample sites varied widely in environmental variables, including soil fertility (25-900 mg kg(-1 total P, precipitation (668-4875 mm yr(-1, temperature (5.2-12.4 °C mean annual temperature and latitude (41-46 °S. Leaf traits were strongly correlated with one another within species, but not with wood density. There was some evidence for a positive relationship between wood density and leaf tissue density and dry matter content, but no evidence that leaf mass or leaf size were correlated with wood density; this highlights that leaf mass per unit area cannot be used as a surrogate for component leaf traits such as tissue density. Trait variation was predicted by environmental factors, but not consistently among different traits; e.g., only leaf thickness and leaf density responded to the same environmental cues as wood density. We conclude that although intraspecific variation in wood density and leaf traits is strongly driven by environmental factors, these responses are not strongly coordinated among functional traits even across co-occurring, closely-related plant species.

  1. Executive Gender, Competitive Pressures, and Corporate Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amore, Mario Daniele; Garofalo, Orsola

    2016-01-01

    significantly higher financial performance under low competition, they tend to underperform when competition increases. At the same time, we find that the presence of female leaders improves the capital stability of banks subject to greater competition. Overall, our study highlights strong interactions between...

  2. Widespread disruptive selection in the wild is associated with intense resource competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Disruptive selection has been documented in a growing number of natural populations. Yet, its prevalence within individual systems remains unclear. Furthermore, few studies have sought to identify the ecological factors that promote disruptive selection in the wild. To address these issues, we surveyed 15 populations of Mexican spadefoot toad tadpoles, Spea multiplicata, and measured the prevalence of disruptive selection acting on resource-use phenotypes. We also evaluated the relationship between the strength of disruptive selection and the intensity of intraspecific competition—an ecological agent hypothesized to be an important driver of disruptive selection. Results Disruptive selection was the predominant mode of quadratic selection across all populations. However, a directional component of selection favoring an extreme ecomorph—a distinctive carnivore morph—was also common. Disruptive selection was strongest in populations experiencing the most intense intraspecific competition, whereas stabilizing selection was only found in populations experiencing relatively weak intraspecific competition. Conclusions Disruptive selection can be common in natural populations. Intraspecific competition for resources may be a key driver of such selection. PMID:22857143

  3. Case competitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne Gram

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents and discusses a teaching project with case competitions for MA students of specialised translation at the Aarhus School of Business, Aarhus University. Drawing on a series of online questionnaires, the paper ascertains how the project was evaluated by the participating students...

  4. Assessing intraspecific variation in effective dispersal along an altitudinal gradient: a test in two Mediterranean high-mountain plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Lara-Romero

    Full Text Available Plant recruitment depends among other factors on environmental conditions and their variation at different spatial scales. Characterizing dispersal in contrasting environments may thus be necessary to understand natural intraspecific variation in the processes underlying recruitment. Silene ciliata and Armeria caespitosa are two representative species of cryophilic pastures above the tree line in Mediterranean high mountains. No explicit estimations of dispersal kernels have been made so far for these or other high-mountain plants. Such data could help to predict their dispersal and recruitment patterns in a context of changing environments under ongoing global warming.We used an inverse modelling approach to analyse effective seed dispersal patterns in five populations of both Silene ciliata and Armeria caespitosa along an altitudinal gradient in Sierra de Guadarrama (Madrid, Spain. We considered four commonly employed two-dimensional seedling dispersal kernels exponential-power, 2Dt, WALD and log-normal.No single kernel function provided the best fit across all populations, although estimated mean dispersal distances were short (<1 m in all cases. S. ciliata did not exhibit significant among-population variation in mean dispersal distance, whereas significant differences in mean dispersal distance were found in A. caespitosa. Both S. ciliata and A. caespitosa exhibited among-population variation in the fecundity parameter and lacked significant variation in kernel shape.This study illustrates the complexity of intraspecific variation in the processes underlying recruitment, showing that effective dispersal kernels can remain relatively invariant across populations within particular species, even if there are strong variations in demographic structure and/or physical environment among populations, while the invariant dispersal assumption may not hold for other species in the same environment. Our results call for a case-by-case analysis in a

  5. Demographic History and Reproductive Output Correlates with Intraspecific Genetic Variation in Seven Species of Indo-Pacific Mangrove Crabs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Fratini

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution and the amount of intraspecific genetic variation of marine organisms are strongly influenced by many biotic and abiotic factors. Comparing biological and genetic data characterizing species living in the same habitat can help to elucidate the processes driving these variation patterns. Here, we present a comparative multispecies population genetic study on seven mangrove crabs co-occurring in the West Indian Ocean characterized by planktotrophic larvae with similar pelagic larval duration. Our main aim was to investigate whether a suite of biological, behavioural and ecological traits could affect genetic diversities of the study species in combination with historical demographic parameters. As possible current explanatory factors, we used the intertidal micro-habitat colonised by adult populations, various parameters of individual and population fecundity, and the timing of larval release. As the genetic marker, we used partial sequences of cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene. Genetic and ecological data were collected by the authors and/or gathered from primary literature. Permutational multiple regression models and ANOVA tests showed that species density and their reproductive output in combination with historical demographic parameters could explain the intraspecific genetic variation indexes across the seven species. In particular, species producing consistently less eggs per spawning event showed higher values of haplotype diversity. Moreover, Tajima's D parameters well explained the recorded values for haplotype diversity and average γst. We concluded that current intraspecific gene diversities in crabs inhabiting mangrove forests were affected by population fecundity as well as past demographic history. The results were also discussed in terms of management and conservation of fauna in the Western Indian Ocean mangroves.

  6. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2009-11-01

    1. Physics competitions: aims and realizations One aim of physics competitions is to increase the interest of young students, primarily at upper secondary level, to physics and natural sciences in general. A competition has motivational aspects known usually from sports events or games—comparing one's own ability with others, of course with the desire to be better and to win. If competitions reach nationwide and even international levels, additional stimulation is created. Competitions provide greatest attraction to possible winners, to the group of gifted people in a particular field. This implies that science contests are excellent tools for the promotion of talented students. Traditional teaching has been shown to have problems in supporting this group of students. Very often teachers are overstretched with the demands of teaching both low- and high-level students. Extracurricular activities are therefore a good chance to relieve the teacher, and to give talented students the opportunity for appropriate training and challenge. The competitions, however, have a broader impact and address more young people than one might guess from the statements above. Training courses and selection at school level give a larger group of students extra and, to some extent, complimentary education in physics. The degree of complexity of the tasks corresponds very often to the standards of the next level of education in the school system. Interestingly, many physics competitions have their origin in countries beyond the former Iron Curtain. They started as regional and national tournaments, were joined by neighbouring countries and have grown, in some cases, to events with participants from more than 80 countries. Although the features mentioned above are common to the different competitions, there are distinct differences between them [1]. The International Physics Olympiad (IPhO) is the oldest international physics competition for students at upper secondary level [2]. It dates

  7. Intraspecific functional and genetic diversity ofPetriella setifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertile, Giorgia; Panek, Jacek; Oszust, Karolina; Siczek, Anna; Frąc, Magdalena

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was an analysis of the intraspecific genetic and functional diversity of the new isolated fungal strains of P. setifera . This is the first report concerning the genetic and metabolic diversity of Petriella setifera strains isolated from industrial compost and the first description of a protocol for AFLP fingerprinting analysis optimised for these fungal species. The results showed a significant degree of variability among the isolates, which was demonstrated by the clearly subdivision of all the isolates into two clusters with 51% and 62% similarity, respectively. For the metabolic diversity, the BIOLOG system was used and this analysis revealed clearly different patterns of carbon substrates utilization between the isolates resulting in a clear separation of the five isolates into three clusters with 0%, 42% and 54% of similarity, respectively. These results suggest that genetic diversity does not always match the level of functional diversity, which may be useful in discovering the importance of this fungus to ecosystem functioning. The results indicated that P. setifera strains were able to degrade substrates produced in the degradation of hemicellulose (D-Arabinose, L-Arabinose, D-Glucuronic Acid, Xylitol, γ-Amino-Butyric Acid, D-Mannose, D-Xylose and L-Rhamnose), cellulose (α-D-Glucose and D-Cellobiose) and the synthesis of lignin (Quinic Acid) at a high level, showing their importance in ecosystem services as a decomposer of carbon compounds and as organisms, which make a significant contribution to carbon cycling in the ecosystem.The results showed for the first time that the use of molecular biology techniques (such as AFLP and BIOLOG analyses) may allow for the identification of intraspecific diversity of as yet poorly investigated fungal species with favourable consequences for our understanding their ecosystem function.

  8. Competitive Cross-Subsidization

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhijun; Rey, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Cross-subsidization arises naturally when firms with different comparative ad- vantages compete for consumers with diverse shopping patterns. Firms then face a form of co-opetition, being substitutes for one-stop shoppers and complements for multi-stop shoppers. Competition for one-stop shoppers then drives total prices down to cost, but firms subsidize weak products with the profit made on strong products. While firms and consumers would benefit from cooperation limiting cross- subsidization...

  9. Multi-species coexistence in Lotka-Volterra competitive systems with crowding effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavina, Maica Krizna A; Tahara, Takeru; Tainaka, Kei-Ichi; Ito, Hiromu; Morita, Satoru; Ichinose, Genki; Okabe, Takuya; Togashi, Tatsuya; Nagatani, Takashi; Yoshimura, Jin

    2018-01-19

    Classical Lotka-Volterra (LV) competition equation has shown that coexistence of competitive species is only possible when intraspecific competition is stronger than interspecific competition, i.e., the species inhibit their own growth more than the growth of the other species. Note that density effect is assumed to be linear in a classical LV equation. In contrast, in wild populations we can observed that mortality rate often increases when population density is very high, known as crowding effects. Under this perspective, the aggregation models of competitive species have been developed, adding the additional reduction in growth rates at high population densities. This study shows that the coexistence of a few species is promoted. However, an unsolved question is the coexistence of many competitive species often observed in natural communities. Here, we build an LV competition equation with a nonlinear crowding effect. Our results show that under a weak crowding effect, stable coexistence of many species becomes plausible, unlike the previous aggregation model. An analysis indicates that increased mortality rate under high density works as elevated intraspecific competition leading to the coexistence. This may be another mechanism for the coexistence of many competitive species leading high species diversity in nature.

  10. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2010-07-01

    This editorial opens the second special section on physics competitions in European Journal of Physics. In the first section last year, we asked for feedback on the idea of such a section and on the content of the articles. We received no answer whatsoever, which can be interpreted in two ways: the section is not interesting enough to raise motivation for feedback, or the reader is satisfied. Having no indication which scenario is the correct one, we are optimistic and favour the second. The section at hand contains three articles. Again, as last year, the organizer of the annual Olympiad reports on tasks and outcomes of this competition. The Olympiad took place in Merida, Mexico, and was by far the largest event with 316 contestants from 68 countries. Again, the predominance of Asian/Chinese students was manifest, showing how serious the training is taken by both their authorities and students. Unfortunately, the winners of the last International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT), the team from Korea, did not accept the offer to report on their prize-winning contribution. We are thankful that two students from Austria, who achieved second place with their team, took over and reported on the task which they presented in the finals of the competition. It connects the fields of sport and physics and explains a special move in skateboarding. The third contribution introduces a different competition, 'International Conference of Young Scientists'. On one hand, as in the Olympiad, it addresses individuals, not teams. On the other, as in the IYPT, students have several months to prepare and also the quality of the presentation is an important element of the judgment. In fact, this competition comes closer to real scientific research compared to the other events. Finally and again, we hope that this section will serve several purposes: To show the competitions as a very important tool in the support of gifted students. To raise awareness amongst university teachers, and

  11. Competition magnifies the impact of a pesticide in a warming world by reducing heat tolerance and increasing autotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Op de Beeck, Lin; Verheyen, Julie; Stoks, Robby

    2018-02-01

    There is increasing concern that standard laboratory toxicity tests may be misleading when assessing the impact of toxicants, because they lack ecological realism. Both warming and biotic interactions have been identified to magnify the effects of toxicants. Moreover, while biotic interactions may change the impact of toxicants, toxicants may also change the impact of biotic interactions. However, studies looking at the impact of biotic interactions on the toxicity of pesticides and vice versa under warming are very scarce. Therefore, we tested how warming (+4 °C), intraspecific competition (density treatment) and exposure to the pesticide chlorpyrifos, both in isolation and in combination, affected mortality, cannibalism, growth and heat tolerance of low- and high-latitude populations of the damselfly Ischnura elegans. Moreover, we addressed whether toxicant exposure, potentially in interaction with competition and warming, increased the frequency of autotomy, a widespread antipredator mechanism. Competition increased the toxicity of chlorpyrifos and made it become lethal. Cannibalism was not affected by chlorpyrifos but increased at high density and under warming. Chlorpyrifos reduced heat tolerance but only when competition was high. This is the first demonstration that a biotic interaction can be a major determinant of 'toxicant-induced climate change sensitivity'. Competition enhanced the impact of chlorpyrifos under warming for high-latitude larvae, leading to an increase in autotomy which reduces fitness in the long term. This points to a novel pathway how transient pesticide pulses may cause delayed effects on populations in a warming world. Our results highlight that the interplay between biotic interactions and toxicants have a strong relevance for ecological risk assessment in a warming polluted world. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Logo competition

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Award of the prizes The price ceremony for the Staff Association’s new logo competition which took place on Friday 1st March at 5 p.m. was a big success. The first prize, an Ezee Suisse electric bike, was won by Paulo Rios, from Portugal. In his absence, the bike was handed to his brother Vitor. The other five winners of the competition also received their prize: Go Sport vouchers. A peize draw was then organized to award 22 other participants with prizes offered by our commercial partners (Aquaparc, BCGE, L’Occitane, Passeport Gourmand, Sephora, Theater La Comédie de Genève), whom we would like to warmly thank. After all prices were distributed the evening continued with discussions around a friendly drink.

  13. Measuring competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    J. Peter Neary

    2005-01-01

    An earlier version was presented at the Conference on Macroeconomic Perspectives in Honour of Brendan M. Walsh, held at University College Dublin on 7 October, 2005 This paper reviews alternative approaches to measuring an economy?s cost competitiveness and proposes some new measures inspired by the economic theory of index numbers. The indices provide a theoretical benchmark for estimated real effective exchange rates, but differ from standard measures in that they are based on marginal r...

  14. Optimal Competition : A Benchmark for Competition Policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces optimal competition: the best form of competition in an industry that a competition authority can achieve under the information constraint that it cannot observe firms' effciency levels.We show that the optimal competition outcome in an industry becomes more competitive as more

  15. Interspecific competition of early successional plant species in ex-arable fields as influenced by plant–soil feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jing, Y.; Bezemer, T.M.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2015-01-01

    Plant–soil feedback can affect plants that belong to the same (intraspecific feedback) or different species (interspecific feedback). However, little is known about how intra- and interspecific plant–soil feedbacks influence interspecific plant competition. Here, we used plants and soil from

  16. International Competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Fagerberg

    1988-01-01

    This paper develops and tests a model of differing trends in international competitiveness and economic growth across countries. The model relates the development of market shares at home and abroad to three sets of factors: the ability to compete in technology, the ability to compete in delivery(capacity) and the ability to compete in price. The test, using data for 15 OECD countries for the period 1961-1983, shows that in the medium and long run, factors related to technology and capacity a...

  17. Sediment Type Affects Competition between a Native and an Exotic Species in Coastal China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Li; Wang, Yong-Yang; An, Shu-Qing; Zhi, Ying-Biao; Lei, Guang-Chun; Zhang, Ming-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Different types of sediments in salt marsh have different physical and chemical characters. Thus sediment type plays a role in plant competition and growth in salt marsh ecosystems. Spartina anglica populations have been increasingly confined to upper elevation gradients of clay, and the niche sediment has changed. Because the niches of S. anglica and the native species Scirpus triqueter overlap, we conducted a greenhouse experiment to test the hypothesis that plant competition has changed under different types of sediments. Biomass and asexual reproduction were analyzed, and inter- and intraspecific competition was measured by log response ratio for the two species in both monoculture and combination under three sediment types (sand, clay and mixture of sand and clay). For S. anglica, biomass, ramet number and rhizome length in combination declined significantly compared with those in monoculture, and the intensity of interspecific competition was significantly higher than that of intraspecific competition under all sediments. For S. triqueter, the intensities of intra- and interspecific competition were not significantly different. This indicates that S. triqueter exerts an asymmetric competitive advantage over S. anglica across all sediments, but especially clay. Thus the sediment type changes competition between S. anglica and S. triqueter. PMID:25339574

  18. Intraspecific variation of the interparietal suture closure in Siberian roe deer Capreolus pygargus from Jeju Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jinwoo; Oh, Hong-Shik; Kimura, Junpei; Koyabu, Daisuke

    2017-12-22

    The sequence of cranial suture closure among cervids is reported to be generally species-specific and highly conservative within species. On the other hand, it is known that intraspecific variation often exists to some extent in other mammalian taxa. Here we studied the cranial suture closures of Capreolus pygargus from Jeju Island and compared it with other cervid species. We found that the timing of the interparietal suture closure is highly variable within C. pygargus. Capreolus capreolus similarly shows intraspecific variation of the interparietal suture closure, whereas other cervid species studied to date do not show any intraspecific variation in the sequence of cranial suture closure. Such high intraspecific variation of the interparietal suture may be a derived character for Capreolus.

  19. Plant movements and climate warming: intraspecific variation in growth responses to nonlocal soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Frenne, P.; Coomes, D. A.; De Schrijver, A.; Staelens, J.; Alexander, J. M.; Bernhardt-Römermann, M.; Brunet, J.; Chabrerie, O.; Chiarucci, A.; den Ouden, J.; Eckstein, R. L.; Graae, B. J.; Gruwez, R.; Hédl, Radim; Hermy, M.; Kolb, A.; Marell, A.; Mullender, S. M.; Olsen, S. L.; Orczewska, A.; Peterken, G.; Petřík, Petr; Plue, J.; Simonson, W. D.; Tomescu, C. V.; Vangansbeke, P.; Verstraeten, G.; Vesterdal, L.; Wulf, M.; Verheyen, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 202, č. 2 (2014), s. 431-441 ISSN 0028-646X Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : climate change * intraspecific variability * soil chemism Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 7.672, year: 2014

  20. Using coloured roots to study root interaction and competition in intercropped legumes and non-legumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosti, Giacomo; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    Root interactions between neighbour plants represent a fundamental aspect of the competitive dynamics in pure stand and mixed cropping systems. The comprehension of such phenomena places big methodological challenges, and still needs clarification. The objectives of this work were (i) to test if ...... for deep root growth and (iv) to compare the effect of intraspecific and interspecific competition on root development and biomass growth.......Root interactions between neighbour plants represent a fundamental aspect of the competitive dynamics in pure stand and mixed cropping systems. The comprehension of such phenomena places big methodological challenges, and still needs clarification. The objectives of this work were (i) to test...

  1. Intra-specific pelage color variation in a South American small rodent species

    OpenAIRE

    Sandoval Salinas,M. L.; Barquez,R. M.; Colombo,E. M.; Sandoval,J. D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Intra-specific color variation is often underestimated by researchers, and among mammals, intra-specific differences in coloration are poorly documented for most species. The main goal of this study was to apply an objective color measurement methodology to the study of a specific problem: the detection, if any, of patterns of changes in the fur color of specimens of Akodon budini in relation to biological (i.e., sex) and environmental (i.e., season) variables. We hypothesize that co...

  2. Intra-specific pelage color variation in a South American small rodent species

    OpenAIRE

    Sandoval Salinas, M. L.; Barquez, R. M.; Colombo, E. M.; Sandoval, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intra-specific color variation is often underestimated by researchers, and among mammals, intra-specific differences in coloration are poorly documented for most species. The main goal of this study was to apply an objective color measurement methodology to the study of a specific problem: the detection, if any, of patterns of changes in the fur color of specimens of Akodon budini in relation to biological (i.e., sex) and environmental (i.e., season) variables. We hypothesize that co...

  3. RECONSIDERING COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Zaharia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of the competitive advantage involves a considerable effort from any organization. In particular, those organizations involved in a strong competitive market require the development of strategies to allocate long-term strategic marketing resources, efficiently and with easily quantifiable results. Faced with a multitude of phenomena and processes sometimes contradictory on different markets of consumption, contemporarily marketing has the mission to develop as creative as possible the business strategy of the organizations, their capacity of interacting with customers and other categories of audience. Such concepts as strategic positioning, relational marketing, management of the relationship with the consumer, marketing integrated research, a.s.o. are only a few of the tools with the help of which the marketing managers will implement successful operational strategies. All these developments are creating a real new paradigm of Marketing aimed to better explain the new types of complex market relationship in which the 21st Century organization is .

  4. Intraspecific diet shift in Talitrus saltator inhabiting exposed sandy beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabarria, Celia; Incera, Mónica; Garrido, Josefina; Rodil, Iván F.; Rossi, Francesca

    2009-09-01

    Talitrid amphipods are the most abundant herbivores on exposed sandy beaches. Despite their important role as trophic intermediates between macrophytes and higher levels (i.e. insect and bird) of beach food webs, very little information is available on their feeding patterns. The main aim of this study was to investigate intraspecific differences in the feeding behaviour of Talitrus saltator. We tested the hypotheses that: (1) adult females and males showed different isotope signatures and therefore relied on different sources of food; and (2) patterns of variation of isotope signatures of juveniles differed from those of adult specimens, evidencing a diet shift during the development. We used stable isotope signatures and tested for differences upon the level on the shore, times of the year and beaches experiencing similar morpho-dynamic and environmental conditions. Finally, we investigated the trophic significance of macrophyte detritus in the diet of males, females and juveniles. Results showed that adult males had a more variable diet than females and juveniles (inferred from δ 13C and δ 15N values). Dual-isotope graphs suggested that Sargassum muticum and Cystoseira baccata wrack could be among the main food sources for both juvenile and adult stage.

  5. Competitive interactions are mediated in a sex-specific manner by arbuscular mycorrhiza in Antennaria dioica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, S; Vega-Frutis, R; Kytöviita, M-M

    2017-03-01

    Plants usually interact with other plants, and the outcome of such interaction ranges from facilitation to competition depending on the identity of the plants, including their sexual expression. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have been shown to modify competitive interactions in plants. However, few studies have evaluated how AM fungi influence plant intraspecific and interspecific interactions in dioecious species. The competitive abilities of female and male plants of Antennaria dioica were examined in a greenhouse experiment. Females and males were grown in the following competitive settings: (i) without competition, (ii) with intrasexual competition, (iii) with intersexual competition, and (iv) with interspecific competition by Hieracium pilosella - a plant with similar characteristics to A. dioica. Half of the pots were grown with Claroideoglomus claroideum, an AM fungus isolated from the same habitat as the plant material. We evaluated plant survival, growth, flowering phenology, and production of AM fungal structures. Plant survival was unaffected by competition or AM fungi. Competition and the presence of AM fungi reduced plant biomass. However, the sexes responded differently to the interaction between fungal and competition treatments. Both intra- and interspecific competition results were sex-specific, and in general, female performance was reduced by AM colonization. Plant competition or sex did not affect the intraradical structures, extraradical hyphae, or spore production of the AM fungus. These findings suggest that plant sexual differences affect fundamental processes such as competitive ability and symbiotic relationships with AM fungi. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  6. The future of competitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bates, Gary; Jensen, Boris Brorman; Miessen, Markus

    2010-01-01

    We wanted to explore the potential of the competition. The question we asked ourselves was if the competition can generate new, relevant and critical ideas within architecture? We organized an idea competition about the architectural competition.......We wanted to explore the potential of the competition. The question we asked ourselves was if the competition can generate new, relevant and critical ideas within architecture? We organized an idea competition about the architectural competition....

  7. The Impact of Beat Competition on City Hall Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Stephen; Coulson, David C.; St. Cyr, Charles

    1999-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship on newspaper competition and news coverage. Finds that newspaper competition was much more likely to affect content than TV news competition, but that TV can have an impact on some reporters. Shows a strong relationship between competition and reporter/editor interaction, and the impact of this interaction on reporters'…

  8. Does polyembryony confer a competitive advantage to the invasive perennial vine Vincetoxicum rossicum (Apocynaceae)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Megan L; Barney, Jacob N; Averill, Kristine M; Mohler, Charles L; Ditommaso, Antonio

    2010-02-01

    Determining which traits may allow some introduced plant species to become invasive in their new environment continues to be a key question in invasion biology. Vincetoxicum rossicum is an invasive, perennial vine colonizing natural and seminatural habitats primarily in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada. More than half its seeds exhibit polyembryony, a relatively uncommon condition in which a single seed produces multiple seedlings. For evaluating the potential consequences of polyembryony on invasiveness, V. rossicum plants derived from seeds of three embryonic classes-singlets, doublets, and triplets (one, two, and three seedlings per seed, respectively)-were paired in all combinations intraspecifically and with the co-occurring native herbs Solidago canadensis and Asclepias syriaca in a greenhouse study. Vincetoxicum rossicum biomass was 25-55% greater and follicle production 55-100% greater under intraspecific competition compared with interspecific competition. However, within a competitive environment, follicle production varied little. Regardless of competitive environment, V. rossicum originating from seeds with a greater number of embryos typically performed no better than plants arising from seed with fewer embryos (singlets = doublets = triplets)-except intraspecifically where doublets outperformed singlets, and with S. canadensis where triplets outperformed singlets. Our findings suggest that overall performance and fitness of V. rossicum is higher in monocultures than in mixed stands and that its ability to invade new habitats may not be attributable to the production of polyembryonic seeds.

  9. Competitive Interactions of Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) and Damesrocket (Hesperis matronalis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht-Young, Stacey A.; Pavlovic, Noel B.; Adams, Jean V.

    2012-01-01

    Competitive interactions between native plants and nonnative, invasive plant species have been extensively studied; however, within degraded landscapes, the effect of interspecific interactions among invasive plants is less explored. We investigated a competitive interaction between two sympatric, invasive mustard species that have similar life history strategies and growth forms: garlic mustard and damesrocket. Greenhouse experiments using a full range of reciprocal density ratios were conducted to investigate interspecific competition. Garlic mustard had a negative effect on the final biomass, number of leaves, and relative growth rate in height of damesrocket. Survival of damesrocket was not negatively affected by interspecific competition with garlic mustard; however, garlic mustard showed higher mortality because of intraspecific competition. These results indicated that although garlic mustard has been observed to be the dominant species in this landscape, it may not completely outcompete damesrocket in all situations. Studies of invasive species in competition are important in degraded landscapes because this is the common situation in many natural areas.

  10. Metabolites and hormones are involved in the intraspecific variability of drought hardening in radiata pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Diego, N; Saiz-Fernández, I; Rodríguez, J L; Pérez-Alfocea, P; Sampedro, M C; Barrio, R J; Lacuesta, M; Moncaleán, P

    2015-09-01

    Studies of metabolic and physiological bases of plant tolerance and hardening against drought are essential to improve genetic breeding programs, especially in productive species such as Pinus radiata. The exposure to different drought cycles is a highly effective tool that improves plant conditioning, but limited information is available about the mechanisms that modulate this process. To clarify this issue, six P. radiata breeds with well-known differences in drought tolerance were analyzed after two consecutive drought cycles. Survival rate, concentration of several metabolites such as free soluble amino acids and polyamines, and main plant hormones varied between them after drought hardening, while relative growth ratio and water potential at both predawn and dawn did not. Hardening induced a strong increase in total soluble amino acids in all breeds, accumulating mainly those implicated in the glutamate metabolism (GM), especially L-proline, in the most tolerant breeds. Other amino acids from GM such as γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-arginine (Arg) were also strongly increased. GABA pathway could improve the response against drought, whereas Arg acts as precursor for the synthesis of spermidine. This polyamine showed a positive relationship with the survival capacity, probably due to its role as antioxidant under stress conditions. Finally, drought hardening also induced changes in phytohormone content, showing each breed a different profile. Although all of them accumulated indole-3-acetic acid and jasmonic acid and reduced zeatin content in needles, significant differences were observed regarding abscisic acid, salicylic acid and mainly zeatin riboside. These results confirm that hardening is not only species-dependent but also an intraspecific processes controlled through metabolite changes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of intra- and interspecific competition on the sensitivity of Daphnia magna populations to the fungicide carbendazim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Arco, Ana Isabel; Rico, Andreu; van den Brink, Paul J

    2015-08-01

    The ecological risk assessment of pesticides is generally based on toxicity data obtained from single-species laboratory experiments and does not take into account ecological interactions such as competition or predation. Intraspecific and interspecific competition are expected to result in additional stress and might increase the sensitivity of aquatic populations to pesticide contamination. To test this hypothesis, the effects of the fungicide carbendazim were assessed on the population dynamics of the micro-crustacean Daphnia magna under different levels of intraspecific and interspecific competition for an algal food resource, using the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus as competing species. The experiments were performed in glass jars with three different carbendazim concentrations (i.e., 50, 100 and 150 µg/L), and had a duration of 25 days, with a 4-day pre-treatment period in which competition was allowed to take place and a 21-day exposure period. The endpoints evaluated were D. magna total population abundance and population structure. Results of these experiments show that competition stress on its own had a significant influence on shaping D. magna population's structure, however, a different response was observed in the intraspecific and interspecific competition experiments. The use of a 4-day pre-treatment period in the intraspecific experiment already led to an absence of interactive effects due to the quick abundance confluence between the different intraspecific treatments, thus not allowing the observation of interactive effects between competition and carbendazim stress. Results of the interspecific competition experiment showed that rotifers were quickly outcompeted by D. magna and that D. magna even profited from the rotifer presence through exploitative competition, which alleviated the original stress caused by the algal resource limitation. These experiments suggest that competition interactions play an important role in defining population

  12. Functional genetics of intraspecific ecological interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jason B; Mutic, Joshua J; Kover, Paula X

    2011-05-12

    Studying the genetic basis of traits involved in ecological interactions is a fundamental part of elucidating the connections between evolutionary and ecological processes. Such knowledge allows one to link genetic models of trait evolution with ecological models describing interactions within and between species. Previous work has shown that connections between genetic and ecological processes in Arabidopsis thaliana may be mediated by the fact that quantitative trait loci (QTL) with 'direct' effects on traits of individuals also have pleiotropic 'indirect' effects on traits expressed in neighbouring plants. Here, we further explore these connections by examining functional relationships between traits affected directly and indirectly by the same QTL. We develop a novel approach using structural equation models (SEMs) to determine whether observed pleiotropic effects result from traits directly affected by the QTL in focal individuals causing the changes in the neighbours' phenotypes. This hypothesis was assessed using SEMs to test whether focal plant phenotypes appear to mediate the connection between the focal plants' genotypes and the phenotypes of their neighbours, or alternatively, whether the connection between the focal plants' genotypes and the neighbours' phenotypes is mediated by unmeasured traits. We implement this analysis using a QTL of major effect that maps to the well-characterized flowering locus, FRIGIDA. The SEMs support the hypothesis that the pleiotropic indirect effects of this locus arise from size and developmental timing-related traits in focal plants affecting the expression of developmental traits in their neighbours. Our findings provide empirical insights into the genetics and nature of intraspecific ecological interactions. Our technique holds promise in directing future work into the genetic basis and functional relationship of traits mediating and responding to ecological interactions.

  13. Intraspecific variability and systematics in South American Syrotrigoniinae (Trigoniida, Bivalvia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarría, Javier; Damborenea, Susana E.; Manceñido, Miguel O.

    2015-04-01

    The systematics of the genus Syrotrigonia is revised in the light of the intraspecific variability of a large sample of Syrotrigonia sigeli from the Valanginian from Neuquén Basin, Argentina. The genus can be recognized by the presence of concentric or subconcentric costae surrounding the umbo, later on developing an inflection and finally resulting in a set of anterior horizontal to commarginal costae and another set of posterior sub-vertical costae. The anterior part of the area bears transverse, usually anteriorly concave, costae which direct towards the umbo on the escutcheon; initially they are continuous with those on the flank, but later on they usually alternate. General shell shape, the presence of an antecarinal sulcus, the junction pattern between both sets of costae and the number of horizontal costae relative to vertical costae are variable among species, while costae width or density and the development of horizontal vs. commarginal costae may vary highly within species. The presence of commarginal rugae developed on the whole surface of the shell is interpreted as a result of environmental perturbations. A brief biogeographical interpretation of the family Buchotrigoniidae is also outlined. Syrotrigonia probably originated in North America in the Tithonian, being widespread in the Pacific coast of South America by Early Cretaceous times; at least six (probably seven) South American species could be recognized. By Aptian times the taxon reached the Tethyan realm, its last record being Aptian or Albian in age. The frequent presence of different species in marginal marine deposits suggests a euryhaline lineage adapted to salinity variations, this may also be the cause of the frequent presence of commarginal rugae. Considering the high variability displayed in the analyzed material, large samples are needed to characterize new species within the group.

  14. Privatization, Competition and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mete Gundogan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Privatization not only results in the transfer of state assets, but it also reduces economic role of the government. Developing and developed countries have experienced privatization in different ways for years. This article focuses upon the issue of privatization in Turkey. Turkey launched its comprehensive economic liberalization program named ‘structural adjustment reform' in 1980 by the stimulation of the World Bank and IMF. Later on, privatization has been an official state ideology with two institutions, the Privatization Higher Council and the Privatization Administration. Some of their implementations have been given. Privatization policies have multiple, often together with often inter-related and conflicting political, economic and financial objectives. They must be evaluated according to political, social and economical structures and conditions of the country concerned. Together with privatization, competition and its institutional framework with implementations have also been analyzed in the paper. The paper maintains that there seemed no direct and strong relationship between the privatization endeavours and institutional competition. Finally, the study points out that Turkey seems to be a bare-foot runner in its privatization venture unless there is a proper competitive market, together with a sound social security system and a profound capital market.

  15. Competitive analysis of soybean and sudangrass using replacement series design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Antônio Rizzardi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Competition is the best known form of direct interference of weeds on agricultural crops. However, there is relatively little information on the competition of the weed sudangrass on soybean, which has been common in agricultural areas in the southern of Rio Grande do Sul. The objective of this study was to evaluate the competition between sudangrass and soybeans using replacement series experiments. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse in a completely randomized design with four replications. The treatments consisted of soybean and sudangrass associations. The experimental units were 8-L plastic pots, in the proportions 0: 8, 2: 6, 4: 4, 6: 2, 8: 0, corresponding to 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% of the crop and weed respectively. Shoot, root and total dry matter and plant height were analyzed through diagrams applied to replacement series and competitive indices. Soybean showed competitive superiority in coexistence with sudangrass in relation to shoot, root and total dry matter. The intraspecific competition was more significant for the crop and inter-specific competition was more important for the weed.

  16. Power market competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.

    1998-01-01

    In the Unites States the prospect of greater competition in wholesale power market was immediately eclipsed by talk of retail competition. Attempts to move to retail competition have been costly and complex. Prudent public policy and economic analyses suggest that retail competition not be implemented until it can first be demonstrated that effective competition exists in wholesale power markets [it

  17. Lunabotics Mining Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Rob; Murphy, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation describes a competition to design a lunar robot (lunabot) that can be controlled either remotely or autonomously, isolated from the operator, and is designed to mine a lunar aggregate simulant. The competition is part of a systems engineering curriculum. The 2010 competition winners in five areas of the competition were acknowledged, and the 2011 competition was announced.

  18. Increased stem density and competition may diminish the positive effects of warming at alpine treeline

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yafeng; Pederson, Neil; Ellison, Aaron M.; Buckley, Hannah L.; Case, Bradley; Liang, Eryuan; Camarero, J Julio

    2016-01-01

    The most widespread response to global warming among alpine treeline ecotones is not an upward shift, but an increase in tree density. However, the impact of increasing density on interactions among trees at treeline is not well understood. Here, we test if treeline densification induced by climatic warming leads to increasing intraspecific competition. We mapped and measured the size and age of Smith fir trees growing in two treelines located in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau. We used spat...

  19. Competitive spirit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Leicester University will host the 65 international teams of students who will assemble in July for this year's International Physics Olympiad . The last time the Olympiad came to the UK was in 1986 in London, and it was the notable enthusiasm of the Leicester Physics and Astronomy department which persuaded the Olympiad Committee to give them the chance of organizing the prestigious event. The students taking part from all over the world are studying physics at A-level or an equivalent standard and they will take part in an intellectual marathon of theoretical and practical examinations. Each national team comprises five students selected from three rounds of competition and the teams will receive an official welcome from the city, as well as opportunities to visit some of the important educational and cultural centres of the surrounding region. The finalists will also be able to test their skills and initiative at the Challenger Learning Centre, which forms part of Leicester's new National Space Science Centre. Specific information on the event can be found on the Olympiad-2000 website at www.star.le.ac.uk/IphO-2000 . The Rudolf Ortvay problem solving contest in physics, which takes place in November, is a tradition of Eötvös University in Budapest, Hungary. The competition was first opened to international participants in 1998, enabling students from universities around the world to show their knowledge, ingenuity, problem-solving skills and physical insight into problems that are far beyond routine level. The problems (30 - 35 each year) are chosen from different branches of theoretical as well as applied physics. They have varying levels of difficulty, and every contestant can send solutions for ten problems. The focus is not on school-level problem-solving routines but rather on the `physical' way of thinking, recognition of the heart of the problem and an appropriate choice of mathematics. The majority of the assigned problems are original, few having

  20. Revisiting Darwin's hypothesis: Does greater intraspecific variability increase species' ecological breadth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sides, Colby B; Enquist, Brian J; Ebersole, James J; Smith, Marielle N; Henderson, Amanda N; Sloat, Lindsey L

    2014-01-01

    Darwin first proposed that species with larger ecological breadth have greater phenotypic variation. We tested this hypothesis by comparing intraspecific variation in specific leaf area (SLA) to species' local elevational range and by assessing how external (abiotic) filters may influence observed differences in ecological breadth among species. Understanding the patterns of individual variation within and between populations will help evaluate differing hypotheses for structuring of communities and distribution of species. We selected 21 species with varying elevational ranges and compared the coefficient of variation of SLA for each species against its local elevational range. We examined the influence of external filters on local trait composition by determining if intraspecific changes in SLA with elevation have the same direction and similar rates of change as the change in community mean SLA value. In support of Darwin's hypothesis, we found a positive relationship between species' coefficient of variation for SLA with species' local elevational range. Intraspecific changes in SLA had the same sign, but generally lower magnitude than the community mean SLA. The results indicate that wide-ranging species are indeed characterized by greater intraspecific variation and that species' phenotypes shift along environmental gradients in the same direction as the community phenotypes. However, across species, the rate of intraspecific trait change, reflecting plastic and/or adaptive changes across populations, is limited and prevents species from adjusting to environmental gradients as quickly as interspecific changes resulting from community assembly.

  1. Inter- and intraspecific variations of cadmium accumulation of 13 leafy vegetable species in a greenhouse experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junli; Fang, Wei; Yang, Zhongyi; Yuan, Jiangang; Zhu, Yun; Yu, Hui

    2007-10-31

    Leafy vegetables are among the crop species that are most vulnerable to heavy metal pollution. This study investigated inter- and intraspecific variations of cadmium accumulation in 13 species with a total of 39 cultivars of leafy vegetables under two levels of soil Cd stress (1.5 and 7.7 mg kg (-1)). Intraspecific variations of shoot biomass and Cd concentration of the tested leafy vegetables were significantly larger than interspecific variations under both Cd treatments and were also more significantly correlated between two Cd stress levels when grouped by cultivar than grouped by species. These results indicate that cultivar is a more reliable taxa level for screening pollutant-safe leafy vegetables than species. Any screening for pollutant hypoaccumulator species, or other similar species-based concepts, without considering intraspecific variation should be avoided.

  2. Intra-specific variation in social organization of gorillas: implications for their social evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagiwa, Juichi; Kahekwa, John; Basabose, Augustin Kanyunyi

    2003-10-01

    We analysed intra-specific variation in the social organization of gorillas and ecological and social factors influencing them, based on recent data on diet, day journey length, home range size, group size and proportion of multi-male groups in three subspecies [western lowland gorillas (WLG); eastern lowland gorillas (ELG); mountain gorillas (MG)]. Median group size was similar across subspecies and across habitats, but the extraordinarily large group including >30 gorillas was only found in habitat with dense terrestrial herbaceous vegetation. Within-group competition may determine the upper limit of group size in frugivorous WLGs and ELGs in lowland habitats with scarce undergrowth. A frugivorous diet may be a causal factor of subgrouping in multi-male groups of WLGs and ELGs, while a folivorous diet may prevent subgrouping in multi-male groups of MGs. Social factors, rather than ecological factors, may play an important role in the formation of multi-male groups and their cohesiveness in MGs. High gregariousness of female gorillas and their prolonged association with a protector male are explained by their vulnerability to both infanticide (MGs) and predators (ELGs). Comparison of long-term changes in group composition and individual movements between ELGs in Kahuzi and MGs in the Virungas suggest that the occurrence of infanticide may promote kin-male association within a group. Threat of infanticide may stimulate MG females to transfer into multi-male groups to seek reliable protection and maturing MG males to stay in their natal groups after maturity. By contrast, the absence of infanticide may facilitate ELG females to associate with infants and other females at transfer and ELG males to establish large groups in a short period by taking females from their natal groups, by luring females from neighbouring groups, or by takeover of a widow group after the death of its leading male. These conditions may prevent ELG and WLG maturing males from remaining to

  3. Inter- and intraspecific sexual discrimination in the flour beetles Tribolium castaneum and Tribolium confusum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, J M; Castro, L; Toro, M A; López-Fanjul, C

    2000-08-01

    In Tribolium castaneum (CS) and T. confusum (CF), intra- and interspecific rates of homosexual mounting have been measured. The intraspecific results are compatible with the hypothesis of both species being sexually indiscriminate. However, the CF intraspecific rates were very high (35%-53% of mountings were homosexual), suggesting a lower sexual attractiveness, or a stronger rejection to being mounted, of CF females relative to conspecific males. CS males discriminate between species but, in interspecific contacts, preferentially mounted CF males rather than CF females. CF males do not discriminate between species, but the loss of sexual attractiveness of CF females, or their rejection to being mounted, may act as a precopulatory isolation mechanism.

  4. All competition is not alike: Neural mechanisms for resolving underdetermined and prepotent competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Hannah R.; Banich, Marie T.; Munakata, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    People must constantly select among potential thoughts and actions in the face of competition from (a) multiple task-relevant options (underdetermined competition) and (b) strongly dominant options that are not appropriate in the current context (prepotent competition). These types of competition are ubiquitous during language production. In this work, we investigate the neural mechanisms that allow individuals to effectively manage these cognitive control demands and to quickly choose words with few errors. Using fMRI, we directly contrast underdetermined and prepotent competition within the same task (verb generation) for the first time, allowing localization of the neural substrates supporting the resolution of these two types of competition. Using a neural network model, we investigate the possible mechanisms by which these brain regions support selection. Together, our findings demonstrate that all competition is not alike: resolving prepotent competition and resolving underdetermined competition rely on partly dissociable neural substrates and mechanisms. Specifically, activation of left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex is specific to resolving underdetermined competition between multiple appropriate responses, most likely via competitive lateral inhibition. In contrast, activation of left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is sensitive to both underdetermined competition and prepotent competition from response options that are inappropriate in the current context. This region likely provides top-down support for task-relevant responses, which enables them to out-compete prepotent responses in the selection process that occurs in left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. PMID:24742155

  5. Competitive Interactions between Immature Stages of Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett) and Bactrocera tau (Walker) (Diptera: Tephritidae) under Laboratory Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, K; Hu, J; Wu, B; An, K; Zhang, J; Liu, J; Zhang, R

    2014-08-01

    The melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett), and the pumpkin fly, Bactrocera tau (Walker), are economically important pests that attack mainly cucurbitacean fruits. The two fruit fly species have similar natural distributions, host ranges, and population growth capacities. This study was designed to assess the asymmetrical competitions through resource exploitation between the larvae of B. cucurbitae and B. tau at different density levels and temperatures, and on different hosts by comparing the relative effects of interspecific and intraspecific interactions on four life history parameters: survival rate, puparial mass, puparial duration, and developmental duration. Our results showed that intraspecific and interspecific competitions occurred under some laboratory conditions, and B. cucurbitae took advantage over B. tau at the high-density level and at low and high temperatures on pumpkin, bitter gourd, and bottle gourd when interspecific competition took place. Intraspecific and interspecific competitions mainly affected the puparial mass and the survival rate of the two fruit fly species but had no marked effect on the puparial duration or development duration.

  6. 77 FR 16131 - Establishing a White House Council on Strong Cities, Strong Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... Order 13602 of March 15, 2012 Establishing a White House Council on Strong Cities, Strong Communities By... enable them to develop and implement economic strategies to become more competitive, sustainable, and inclusive, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. Policy. Cities, towns, and regions across our Nation...

  7. Finite land resources and competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haberl, Helmut; Mbow, Cheikh; Deng, Xiangzheng

    2014-01-01

    strongly between the different types of land-use competition. They are associated with important trade-offs and high uncertainty. Institutional aspects related to land-use competition are discussed using a conceptual model that distinguishes types of institutions (government, private, community) as well...... as their functions (objectives, distribution/ equity, effectiveness/efficiency). Analysis of long-term trajectories suggests that land-use competition is likely to intensify in the medium- to long-term future, mainly in the face of expected scarcities in resource supply (e.g., in terms of limited resources...... and energy systems, “ land architecture” (i.e., the significance of spatial confi gurations), and multiscale models to assess local-global connections and impacts....

  8. Isolation and identification of 4-a-rhamnosyloxy benzyl glucosinolate in Noccaea caerulescens showing intraspecific variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, de R.M.; Krosse, S.; Swolfs, A.E.M.; Brinke, te E.; Prill, N.; Leimu, R.; Galen, van P.M.; Wang, Y.; Aarts, M.G.M.; Dam, van N.M.

    2015-01-01

    Glucosinolates are secondary plant compounds typically found in members of the Brassicaceae and a few other plant families. Usually each plant species contains a specific subset of the ~130 different glucosinolates identified to date. However, intraspecific variation in glucosinolate profiles is

  9. Consequences of intraspecific seed-size variation in Sparganium emersum for dispersal by fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollux, B.J.A.; Ouborg, J.; Van Groenendael, J.M.; Klaassen, M.R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The potential for seed dispersal by fish (ichthyochory) is likely to vary within aquatic plant species, depending on intraspecific variation in phenotypic seed traits. 2. We studied the effect of seed size variation within the unbranched burreed (Sparganium emersum) on the potential for internal

  10. Can we predict diatoms herbicide sensitivities with phylogeny? Influence of intraspecific and interspecific variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Sara M; Keck, François; Almeida, Salomé F P; Figueira, Etelvina; Bouchez, Agnès; Rimet, Frédéric

    2017-10-01

    Diatoms are used as indicators of freshwater ecosystems integrity. Developing diatom-based tools to assess impact of herbicide pollution is expected by water managers. But, defining sensitivities of all species to multiple herbicides would be unattainable. The existence of a phylogenetic signal of herbicide sensitivity was shown among diatoms and should enable prediction of new species sensitivity. However, diatoms present a cryptic diversity that may lead to variation in their sensitivity to herbicides that would need to be taken into account. Using bioassays, the sensitivity to four herbicides (Atrazine, Terbutryn, Diuron, Isoproturon) was evaluated for 11 freshwater diatom taxa and intraspecific variability was assessed for two of them (Nitzschia palea and Achnanthidium spp.). Intraspecific variability of herbicide sensitivity was always smaller than interspecific variability, but intraspecific variability was more important in N. palea than in Achnanthidium spp. Indeed, one species showed no intraspecific phylogenetic signal (N. palea) whereas the other did (Achnanthidium spp.). On one hand, species boundaries are not set properly for Achnanthidium spp. which encompass several taxa. On the other hand, there is a higher phenotypic plasticity for N. palea. Finally, a phylogenetic signal of herbicide sensitivity was measured at the interspecific level, opening up prospects for setting up reliable biomonitoring tools based on sensitivity prediction, insofar as species boundaries are correctly defined.

  11. Intraspecific variation of seed floating ability in Sparganium emersum suggests a bimodal dispersal strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollux, B.J.A.; Verbruggen, E.; Van Groenendael, J.M.; Ouborg, N.J.

    2009-01-01

    Water-mediated spread of seeds (hydrochory) plays an important role in the dispersal of aquatic plants. In this study we investigate intraspecific variation in floating ability and germination capacity of Sparganium emersum seeds in relation to seed mass, within three natural populations along the

  12. Utilizing intraspecific variation in phenotypic plasticity to bolster agricultural and forest productivity under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspinwall, Michael J; Loik, Michael E; Resco de Dios, Victor; Tjoelker, Mark G; Payton, Paxton R; Tissue, David T

    2015-09-01

    Climate change threatens the ability of agriculture and forestry to meet growing global demands for food, fibre and wood products. Information gathered from genotype-by-environment interactions (G × E), which demonstrate intraspecific variation in phenotypic plasticity (the ability of a genotype to alter its phenotype in response to environmental change), may prove important for bolstering agricultural and forest productivity under climate change. Nonetheless, very few studies have explicitly quantified genotype plasticity-productivity relationships in agriculture or forestry. Here, we conceptualize the importance of intraspecific variation in agricultural and forest species plasticity, and discuss the physiological and genetic factors contributing to intraspecific variation in phenotypic plasticity. Our discussion highlights the need for an integrated understanding of the mechanisms of G × E, more extensive assessments of genotypic responses to climate change under field conditions, and explicit testing of genotype plasticity-productivity relationships. Ultimately, further investigation of intraspecific variation in phenotypic plasticity in agriculture and forestry may prove important for identifying genotypes capable of increasing or sustaining productivity under more extreme climatic conditions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. <strong>Neuroeconomics and behavioral health economicsstrong>/>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    2009-01-01

    dissemination of relaxation procedures is evident in industrialized countries since about 1970 both inside the medical healthcare system and as NGO-settings in a market-alike competition. However, a serious barrier to the dissemination of meditative de-stressing is the lack of general knowledge of the action...... for explanation of the neural dynamics of normal decision making. Secondly, the literature is reviewed for evidence on hypothesized applications of NeM in behavioral health. Results I. The present bias as documented by neuroeconomic game-trials is explained by NeM as rooted in the basal activation of Amygdala...... - a key center in our emotional arousal (limbic system) - as shaped in the elder stone-age with many acute threats. II. In general, the Hawthorne-effect of human-relations management is explained as the result of supportive job-relations relaxing Amygdala for better emotional integration...

  14. Mixing, entropy and competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimenko, A Y

    2012-01-01

    Non-traditional thermodynamics, applied to random behaviour associated with turbulence, mixing and competition, is reviewed and analysed. Competitive mixing represents a general framework for the study of generic properties of competitive systems and can be used to model a wide class of non-equilibrium phenomena ranging from turbulent premixed flames and invasion waves to complex competitive systems. We demonstrate consistency of the general principles of competition with thermodynamic description, review and analyse the related entropy concepts and introduce the corresponding competitive H-theorem. A competitive system can be characterized by a thermodynamic quantity—competitive potential—which determines the likely direction of evolution of the system. Contested resources tend to move between systems from lower to higher values of the competitive potential. There is, however, an important difference between conventional thermodynamics and competitive thermodynamics. While conventional thermodynamics is constrained by its zeroth law and is fundamentally transitive, the transitivity of competitive thermodynamics depends on the transitivity of the competition rules. Intransitivities are common in the real world and are responsible for complex behaviour in competitive systems. This work follows ideas and methods that have originated from the analysis of turbulent combustion, but reviews a much broader scope of issues linked to mixing and competition, including thermodynamic characterization of complex competitive systems with self-organization. The approach presented here is interdisciplinary and is addressed to the general educated readers, whereas the mathematical details can be found in the appendices. (comment)

  15. COMPETITION ADVOCACY: CHALLENGE FOR COMPETITION POLICY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatolie CARAGANCIU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A large variety of different countries conditions requires a modernization of criteria, norms and standards of competition regulation and methods of enforcement. Competition advocacy is a type of complementary activity exercised by antimonopoly authorities additional to enforcement measures, through active cooperation with market, government and civil society actors and increasing the understanding of the benefits of competition. Relevance of article is determined by summarizing the theoretical studies and the present practice of advocacy in the USA and the EU. Originality and practical applications of research are based on empirical studies completed by Moldovan Competition Board.

  16. Evaluation of intraspecific competition (Aspergillus flavus Link) and aflatoxin formation in suspended disc culture and preharvest maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    The abilities of non-aflatoxin producing strains of Aspergillus flavus NRRL 32354; 18543; 21882; 21368 as well as domesticated koji strains Aspergillus oryzae (syn. A. flavus var. oryzae) NRRL 451; 1911; 5592; 6271; 30038 to interfere with aflatoxin formation by A. flavus NRRL 3357; 32355 were exami...

  17. Intraspecific competition between adult females of the hyperparasitoid Trichomalopsis apanteloctena (Hymenoptera: Chelonidae), for domination of Cotesia kariyai (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) cocoons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakamatsu, Y.; Harvey, J.A.; Tanaka, T.

    2009-01-01

    The development of parasitoid wasps is dependent on the finite resources contained in a single item of resource (=host) that is frequently not much larger than the adult parasitoid. When the costs of egg production are high, and host distribution is highly aggregated, parasitoid females may spend

  18. Latitudinal variation in ecological opportunity and intraspecific competition indicates differences in niche variability and diet specialization of Arctic marine predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkowski, David J; Ferguson, Steve; Choy, Emily S; Loseto, Lisa L; Brown, Tanya M; Muir, Derek C G; Semeniuk, Christina A D; Fisk, Aaron T

    2016-03-01

    Individual specialization (IS), where individuals within populations irrespective of age, sex, and body size are either specialized or generalized in terms of resource use, has implications on ecological niches and food web structure. Niche size and degree of IS of near-top trophic-level marine predators have been little studied in polar regions or with latitude. We quantified the large-scale latitudinal variation of population- and individual-level niche size and IS in ringed seals (Pusa hispida) and beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis on 379 paired ringed seal liver and muscle samples and 124 paired beluga skin and muscle samples from eight locations ranging from the low to high Arctic. We characterized both within- and between-individual variation in predator niche size at each location as well as accounting for spatial differences in the isotopic ranges of potential prey. Total isotopic niche width (TINW) for populations of ringed seals and beluga decreased with increasing latitude. Higher TINW values were associated with greater ecological opportunity (i.e., prey diversity) in the prey fish community which mainly consists of Capelin (Mallotus villosus) and Sand lance (Ammodytes sp.) at lower latitudes and Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) at high latitudes. In beluga, their dietary consistency between tissues also known as the within-individual component (WIC) increased in a near 1:1 ratio with TINW (slope = 0.84), suggesting dietary generalization, whereas the slope (0.18) of WIC relative to TINW in ringed seals indicated a high degree of individual specialization in ringed seal populations with higher TINWs. Our findings highlight the differences in TINW and level of IS for ringed seals and beluga relative to latitude as a likely response to large-scale spatial variation in ecological opportunity, suggesting species-specific variation in dietary plasticity to spatial differences in prey resources and environmental conditions in a rapidly changing ecosystem.

  19. Intraspecific competition, stealing and placement of the symbiotic sea anemone Calliactis tricolor by the hermit crab Dardanus pedunculatus

    OpenAIRE

    Giraud, Camille

    2011-01-01

    The hermit crab Dardanus pedunculatus and the sea anemone Calliactis tricolor engage in a mutualistic relationship in the tropical reef ecosystem of Mo’orea, French Polynesia. This mutualism is shaped by the pressures on D. pedunculatus individuals to acquire actively and compete for C. tricolor in the wild. D. pedunculatus exhibits a consistent trend in behavior when competing for and placing C. tricolor on its gastropod shell. Since C. tricolor seems to be a valuable resource to D. peduncul...

  20. Juvenile competitive bottleneck in the production of brown trout in hydroelectric reservoirs due to intraspecific habitat segregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegge, O.; Hesthagen, T.; Skurdal, J.

    1993-01-01

    Resource utilization and growth of brown trout were studied in four deep (mean depths 16.2 - 37.5 m) Norwegian hydroelectric reservoirs by benthic and pelagic gillnet sampling. In all the reservoirs supplementary stockings are carried out. The brown trout were spatially segregated according to size as the habitat use of small individuals (< 180-220 mm) was completely restricted to benthic habitats, whereas larger individuals mainly utilized the upper strata of pelagic waters. It is argued that the pelagic habitat is the more rewarding, and that small-sized brown trout are forced into the less favourable benthic habitat through social interactions with larger specimens. This is supported by an increase in growth of brown trout from their third to fifth year of life, which seems to be related to the shift from benthic to pelagic behaviour. It is also argued that the conditions for small-sized brown trout may be a bottleneck in the capacity to produce brown trout in hydroelectric reservoirs with limited benthic feeding conditions, despite ample access to food in pelagic habitats. When evaluating the possibility of increasing the yield of brown trout through supplementary stockings, it is therefore important to consider food and growth conditions for all age and size groups of brown trout. In reservoirs with poor benthic feeding conditions it may be necessary to stock with brown trout of sizes that are large enough to utilize pelagic habitat, to avoid the limiting benthic living stage. (Author)

  1. Building strong brands – does it matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Aure, Kristin Gaaseide; Nervik, Kristine Dybvik

    2014-01-01

    Brand equity has proven, through several decades of research, to be a primary source of competitive advantage and future earnings (Yoo & Donthu, 2001). Building strong brands has therefore become a priority for many organizations, with the presumption that building strong brands yields these advantages (Yasin et al., 2007). A quantitative survey was conducted at Sunnmøre in Norway in order to answer the two developed research questions. - Does the brand equity dimensions; brand...

  2. COMPETITIVENESS AND COMPETITIVE ORIENTATIONS: EVALUATION OF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Z. Efimova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Education of a competitive student is a strategically significant problem of the system of higher education in modern social and economic conditions. Personal competitiveness and competitive orientations – priority quality of future expert for successful future professional experience.The aim of the present research is to study factors of competitive orientations formation and criteria for evaluation of competitiveness of student’s youth in the Russian society.Methodology and research methods. Results of theoretical researches of Russian and foreign researchers are generalized; secondary analysis of data based on results of sociological researches and analysis of official statistical data are carried out. The results of the sociological survey undertaken in 2017 on the basis of statistical methods were processed and studied by the instrumentality of IBM SPSS Statistics 23 program; 1196 students of institutions of higher and secondary vocational education of the Tyumen region took part.Results and scientific novelty. It is stated that senior students feel themselves more competitive. It is revealed that a quarter of students who took part in the survey, generally men, count themselves competitive. A continuous distance of goal-setting is recorded among these respondents; in every third case they have plans of professional growth for five and more years that allows them to build attractive competitive strategy.The level of the competitiveness is directly connected with such indicators as “social stratum”, “overall life satisfaction”, “self-esteem of health”, “tendency to lead a healthy lifestyle” and “the level of trust in the surrounding people”. Mostly the students oriented on competition look into the future with confidence and optimism.Respondents focused on the competitiveness were more tend to demonstrate their abilities and cause admiration, have a creative approach towards work, be ready for surprises

  3. Intraspecific niche models for ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) suggest potential variability in population-level response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Kaitlin C.; Shinneman, Douglas; Potter, Kevin M.; Hipkins, Valerie D.

    2018-01-01

    Unique responses to climate change can occur across intraspecific levels, resulting in individualistic adaptation or movement patterns among populations within a given species. Thus, the need to model potential responses among genetically distinct populations within a species is increasingly recognized. However, predictive models of future distributions are regularly fit at the species level, often because intraspecific variation is unknown or is identified only within limited sample locations. In this study, we considered the role of intraspecific variation to shape the geographic distribution of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), an ecologically and economically important tree species in North America. Morphological and genetic variation across the distribution of ponderosa pine suggest the need to model intraspecific populations: the two varieties (var. ponderosa and var. scopulorum) and several haplotype groups within each variety have been shown to occupy unique climatic niches, suggesting populations have distinct evolutionary lineages adapted to different environmental conditions. We utilized a recently-available, geographically-widespread dataset of intraspecific variation (haplotypes) for ponderosa pine and a recently-devised lineage distance modeling approach to derive additional, likely intraspecific occurrence locations. We confirmed the relative uniqueness of each haplotype-climate relationship using a niche-overlap analysis, and developed ecological niche models (ENMs) to project the distribution for two varieties and eight haplotypes under future climate forecasts. Future projections of haplotype niche distributions generally revealed greater potential range loss than predicted for the varieties. This difference may reflect intraspecific responses of distinct evolutionary lineages. However, directional trends are generally consistent across intraspecific levels, and include a loss of distributional area and an upward shift in elevation. Our results

  4. GLOBAL COMPETITION AND ROMANIA’S NATIONAL COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop Nicolae Alexandru

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing products and services around us it is clear that most of them are the result of production factors, labor and capital becoming more international and increasingly less and less national. We are witnessing the globalization of markets and production, to a large global integration and interdependence, increase personalization of production and services as a result of new communication systems interaction and flexible production processes. Markets will continue to homogenize and diversify at the same time, so it is important that as a global marketer one addresses a market segment defined by income, age, and consumption habits and not by membership of a nation. The most visible and polarized is the premium segment fighting for high income clients where brand value plays an important role. Instead identification of large segments of customers offers the advantages of scale economy in production and marketing for global enterprises. Consumer profile is the dominant global consumer requesting and accepting global products and services easily. In fact, what can force an economic alignment to achieve the best performance, rather than the global consumer. The research methodology used includes literature review, comparative analysis, synthesis of data based on bibliographic resources and official documents.The aim of the paper is to highlight current models that underlie the competitive advantage of nations and assess the competitive advantage of Romania in the context of the global market. A case study is used to offer an overview of competitive advantage of Antibiotice Iasi SA, a competitive player, in a global pharmaceutical market with strong global competition. Countries moderate companies’ achievements of global efficiency objectives due to the countries’ rivalry. Romania has to understand that it is in competition with other countries in order to fulfill economic, political and social objectives. The scope in the end is the well

  5. Intraspecific variation in the metabolic scaling exponent in ectotherms: testing the effect of latitudinal cline, ontogeny and transgenerational change in the land snail Cornu aspersum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitán-Espitia, Juan Diego; Bruning, Andrea; Mondaca, Fredy; Nespolo, Roberto F

    2013-06-01

    The strong dependence of metabolic rates on body mass has attracted the interest of ecological physiologists, as it has important implications to many aspects of biology including species variations in body size, the evolution of life history, and the structure and function of biological communities. The great diversity of observed scaling exponents has led some authors to conclude that there is no single universal scaling exponent, but instead it ranges from 2/3 to 1. Most of the telling evidence against the universality of power scaling exponents comes from ontogenetic changes. Nevertheless, there could be other sources of phenotypic variation that influence this allometric relationship at least at the intraspecific level. In order to explore the general concept of the metabolic scaling in terrestrial molluscs we tested the role of several biological and methodological sources of variation on the empirically estimated scaling exponent. Specifically, we measured a proxy of metabolic rate (CO(2) production) in 421 individuals, during three generations, in three different populations. Additionally, we measured this scaling relationship in 208 individuals at five developmental stages. Our results suggest that the metabolic scaling exponent at the intraspecific level does not have a single stationary value, but instead it shows some degree of variation across geographic distribution, transgenerational change and ontogenetic stages. The major differences in the metabolic scaling exponent that we found were at different developmental stages of snails, because ontogeny involves increases in size at different rates, which in turn, generate differential energy demands. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Diversifying evolution of competitiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldauf, Sebastian A; Engqvist, Leif; Weissing, Franz J

    2014-10-29

    In many species, individuals express phenotypic characteristics that enhance their competitiveness, that is, the ability to acquire resources in competition with others. Moreover, the degree of competitiveness varies considerably across individuals and in time. By means of an evolutionary model, we provide an explanation for this finding. We make the assumption that investment into competitiveness enhances the probability to acquire a high-quality resource, but at the same time reduces the ability of exploiting acquired resources with maximal efficiency. The model reveals that under a broad range of conditions competitiveness either converges to a polymorphic state, where individuals differing in competitive ability stably coexist, or is subject to perpetual transitions between periods of high and low competitiveness. The dynamics becomes even more complex if females can evolve preferences for (or against) competitive males. In extreme cases, such preferences can even drive the population to extinction.

  7. Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liles, Cassandra

    2009-01-01

    The Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition is a new competition that needs graphics, logos, rules, as well as an arena. Although this is the first year of the competition, the competition is modeled after an existing competition, the Centennial Lunar Excavator Challenge. This competition however is aimed at college students. This makes the challenge identifying key aspects of the original competition and modeling them to fit into an easier task, and creating exciting advertisement that helps encourage participation. By using a youth focus group, young insight, as well as guiding advice from experts in the field, hopefully an arena can be designed and built, rules can be molded and created to fit, and alluring graphics can be printed to bring about a successful first year of the Lunar Regolith Excavation Competition.

  8. Are invasive plants more competitive than native conspecifics? Patterns vary with competitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yulong; Feng, Yulong; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso; Li, Yangping; Liao, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jiaolin; Chen, Yajun

    2015-10-22

    Invasive plants are sometimes considered to be more competitive than their native conspecifics, according to the prediction that the invader reallocates resources from defense to growth due to liberation of natural enemies ['Evolution of Increased Competitive Ability' (EICA) hypothesis]. However, the differences in competitive ability may depend on the identity of competitors. In order to test the effects of competitors, Ageratina adenophora plants from both native and invasive ranges competed directly, and competed with native residents from both invasive (China) and native (Mexico) ranges respectively. Invasive A. adenophora plants were more competitive than their conspecifics from native populations when competing with natives from China (interspecific competition), but not when competing with natives from Mexico. Invasive A. adenophora plants also showed higher competitive ability when grown in high-density monoculture communities of plants from the same population (intrapopulation competition). In contrast, invasive A. adenophora plants showed lower competitive ability when competing with plants from native populations (intraspecific competition). Our results indicated that in the invasive range A. adenophora has evolved to effectively cope with co-occurring natives and high density environments, contributing to invasion success. Here, we showed the significant effects of competitors, which should be considered carefully when testing the EICA hypothesis.

  9. Are invasive plants more competitive than native conspecifics? Patterns vary with competitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yulong; Feng, Yulong; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso; Li, Yangping; Liao, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jiaolin; Chen, Yajun

    2015-10-01

    Invasive plants are sometimes considered to be more competitive than their native conspecifics, according to the prediction that the invader reallocates resources from defense to growth due to liberation of natural enemies [‘Evolution of Increased Competitive Ability’ (EICA) hypothesis]. However, the differences in competitive ability may depend on the identity of competitors. In order to test the effects of competitors, Ageratina adenophora plants from both native and invasive ranges competed directly, and competed with native residents from both invasive (China) and native (Mexico) ranges respectively. Invasive A. adenophora plants were more competitive than their conspecifics from native populations when competing with natives from China (interspecific competition), but not when competing with natives from Mexico. Invasive A. adenophora plants also showed higher competitive ability when grown in high-density monoculture communities of plants from the same population (intrapopulation competition). In contrast, invasive A. adenophora plants showed lower competitive ability when competing with plants from native populations (intraspecific competition). Our results indicated that in the invasive range A. adenophora has evolved to effectively cope with co-occurring natives and high density environments, contributing to invasion success. Here, we showed the significant effects of competitors, which should be considered carefully when testing the EICA hypothesis.

  10. Diversifying evolution of competitiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldauf, Sebastian A.; Engqvist, Leif; Weissing, Franz J.

    2014-01-01

    In many species, individuals express phenotypic characteristics that enhance their competitiveness, that is, the ability to acquire resources in competition with others. Moreover, the degree of competitiveness varies considerably across individuals and in time. By means of an evolutionary model, we

  11. Competition in EU banking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jonghe, Olivier; Diepstraten, Maaike; Schepens, Glenn; Beck, Thorsten; Casu, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses recent EU-wide movements in bank competition and concentration. We start with a concise overview of the most frequently used competition and concentration measures. Given that different measures may capture different aspects of bank competition, we focus on the differences and

  12. Productive and Unproductive Competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Alice; Luppi, Barbara; Parisi, Francesco

    Conventional theories of competition classify contests as being either “productive,” when the competitive efforts generate a surplus for society, or “unproductive,” when competition generates no social surplus and merely distributes already existing resources. These two discrete categories of com...

  13. Competition and Innovation Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Lowe

    2008-01-01

    Innovation and competition go hand in hand. Innovative markets are competitive markets and innovative companies succeed in them. In the European Commission, as in competition authorities across the world, our focus is on ensuring that this happens in the most efficient and fair manner.

  14. Competition for Assistance Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is EPA policy to promote competition in the award of assistance agreements to the maximum extent practicable.When assistance agreements are awarded competitively, it is EPA policy that the competitive process be fair and open & that no applicant receive

  15. Increasing the competitiveness of banks

    OpenAIRE

    Badaeva V.; Makukhina Y.

    2017-01-01

    The article examines about the essence of competitiveness of banks, the ways of improving it, competitive advantages and factors which influence the effectiveness and competitiveness of banking institutions.

  16. Testing strong interaction theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses possible tests of the current theories of the strong interaction, in particular, quantum chromodynamics. High energy e + e - interactions should provide an excellent means of studying the strong force. (W.D.L.)

  17. Intra-specific Differences in Root and Shoot Glucosinolate Profiles among White Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var capitata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabouw, P.; Biere, A.; Putten, van der W.H.; Dam, van N.M.

    2010-01-01

    Shoot glucosinolate profiles of Brassicaceae are known to vary within species, across environmental conditions, and between developmental stages. Here we study whether root profiles follow the intra-specific, environmental, and developmental variation observed for aerial parts in white cabbage

  18. Species interactions and chemical stress combined effects of intraspecific and interspecific interactions and pyrene n Daphnia magna populations dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viaene, K.P.J.; Laender, de F.; Rico, A.; Brink, van den P.J.; Guardo, Di A.; Morselli, M.; Janssen, C.R.

    2015-01-01

    Species interactions are often suggested as an important factor when assessing the effects of chemicals on higher levels of biological organization. Nevertheless, the contribution of intraspecific and interspecific interactions to chemical effects on populations is often overlooked. In the present

  19. Intraspecific Variation in Maximum Ingested Food Size and Body Mass in Varecia rubra and Propithecus coquereli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartstone-Rose, Adam; Perry, Jonathan M G

    2011-01-01

    In a recent study, we quantified the scaling of ingested food size (V(b))-the maximum size at which an animal consistently ingests food whole-and found that V(b) scaled isometrically between species of captive strepsirrhines. The current study examines the relationship between V(b) and body size within species with a focus on the frugivorous Varecia rubra and the folivorous Propithecus coquereli. We found no overlap in V(b) between the species (all V. rubra ingested larger pieces of food relative to those eaten by P. coquereli), and least-squares regression of V(b) and three different measures of body mass showed no scaling relationship within each species. We believe that this lack of relationship results from the relatively narrow intraspecific body size variation and seemingly patternless individual variation in V(b) within species and take this study as further evidence that general scaling questions are best examined interspecifically rather than intraspecifically.

  20. Intraspecific variation of body size in a gamasid mite Laelaps clethrionomydis: environment, geography and host dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korallo-Vinarskaya, Natalia P; Vinarski, Maxim V; Khokhlova, Irina S; Shenbrot, Georgy I; Krasnov, Boris R

    2015-10-01

    We investigated intraspecific variation in body size of an ectoparasitic gamasid mite, Laelaps clethrionomydis, across 12 localities in the Palearctic. We asked whether mites collected from the same host species in different localities or from different host species in the same locality vary in body size. Within host species, mites collected in different localities differed significantly in body size, tending to be larger in northern than in southern localities. In addition, mite body size correlated negatively with mean annual temperature in a locality. Mites collected from different hosts in the same locality differed significantly in body size when hosts belonged to different genera but did not differ when collected from congeneric hosts. We conclude that intraspecific variation in mite body size is caused by interplay of environmental and host-related factors.

  1. Intraspecific Variation in Maximum Ingested Food Size and Body Mass in Varecia rubra and Propithecus coquereli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Hartstone-Rose

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In a recent study, we quantified the scaling of ingested food size (Vb—the maximum size at which an animal consistently ingests food whole—and found that Vb scaled isometrically between species of captive strepsirrhines. The current study examines the relationship between Vb and body size within species with a focus on the frugivorous Varecia rubra and the folivorous Propithecus coquereli. We found no overlap in Vb between the species (all V. rubra ingested larger pieces of food relative to those eaten by P. coquereli, and least-squares regression of Vb and three different measures of body mass showed no scaling relationship within each species. We believe that this lack of relationship results from the relatively narrow intraspecific body size variation and seemingly patternless individual variation in Vb within species and take this study as further evidence that general scaling questions are best examined interspecifically rather than intraspecifically.

  2. Parallel evolution in an invasive plant: effect of herbivores on competitive ability and regrowth of Jacobaea vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tiantian; Klinkhamer, Peter G L; Vrieling, Klaas

    2015-07-01

    A shift in the composition of the herbivore guild in the invasive range is expected to select for plants with a higher competitive ability, a lower regrowth capacity and a lower investment in defence. We show here that parallel evolution took place in three geographically distinct invasive regions that differed significantly in climatic conditions. This makes it most likely that indeed the shifts in herbivore guilds were causal to the evolutionary changes. We studied competitive ability and regrowth of invasive and native Jacobaea vulgaris using an intraspecific competition set-up with and without herbivory. Without herbivores invasive genotypes have a higher competitive ability than native genotypes. The invasive genotypes were less preferred by the generalist Mamestra brassicae but more preferred by the specialist Tyria jacobaeae, consequently their competitive ability was significantly increased by the first and reduced by the latter. Invasive genotypes showed a lower regrowth ability in both herbivore treatments. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  3. COMPETITIVENESS THROUGH INFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Daniela RIZEA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Intelligence competitiveness has already started to build its road in the company’s long term strategies. Nonetheless, business executives continue to look for ways to apply information technology strategically to their businesses. Using information managers manage to communicate, to convey their knowledge about markets, competitors, products, services and operations. Even if data and information are all over there are few amounts of managers that realize the importance of them to the success of the business. This article will review competitive forces and competitive information systems strategies for gaining competitive advantages, explain concepts of value chain, value co-opetition (competition and cooperation, and discuss innovation strategy. Co-opetition is a strategy whereby companies cooperate and compete at the same time with their competitors, complementors (i.e. hardware and software businesses, customers, suppliers. The article discuss an important dimension of information system, identifies competitive advantages and enhancing competitive strategies thought information systems.

  4. Rare insights into intraspecific brood parasitism and apparent quasi–parasitism in black–capped chickadees

    OpenAIRE

    Otter, K. A.; Murray, B. W.; Holschuh, C. I.; Fort, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic analysis of passerine birds often finds evidence of extra–pair copulations within species, but genetic evidence of intraspecific brood parasitism (IBP) and quasi–parasitism (Q–P) are relatively rare. Further, it is even rarer for genetic patterns that might indicate quasi–parasitism (resident male sires offspring through extra–pair copulations, and allows the female to lay these within the male’s nest) to be coupled with observational evidence of this behavior. In this paper, we repor...

  5. Repeated intraspecific divergence in life span and aging of African annual fishes along an aridity gradient

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blažek, Radim; Polačik, Matej; Kačer, P.; Cellerino, A.; Řežucha, Radomil; Methling, Caroline; Tomášek, Oldřich; Syslová, K.; Terzibasi Tozzini, E.; Albrecht, Tomáš; Vrtílek, Milan; Reichard, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 2 (2017), s. 386-402 ISSN 0014-3820 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-05872S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-00291S Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Intraspecific variation * life span * neoplasia * pace-of-life syndrome * parallel evolution * reproductive senescence Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 4.201, year: 2016

  6. Intraspecific variation in fruit-frugivore interactions: effects of fruiting neighborhood and consequences for seed dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Tadeu J; Dayrell, Roberta L C; Arruda, André J; Dáttilo, Wesley; Teixido, Alberto L; Messeder, João V S; Silveira, Fernando A O

    2017-10-01

    The extent of specialization/generalization continuum in fruit-frugivore interactions at the individual level remains poorly explored. Here, we investigated the interactions between the Neotropical treelet Miconia irwinii (Melastomataceae) and its avian seed dispersers in Brazilian campo rupestre. We built an individual-based network to derive plant degree of interaction specialization regarding disperser species. Then, we explored how intraspecific variation in interaction niche breadth relates to fruit availability on individual plants in varying densities of fruiting conspecific neighbors, and how these factors affect the quantity of viable seeds dispersed. We predicted broader interaction niche breadths for individuals with larger fruit crops in denser fruiting neighborhoods. The downscaled network included nine bird species and 15 plants, which varied nearly five-fold in their degree of interaction specialization. We found positive effects of crop size on visitation and fruit removal rates, but not on degree of interaction specialization. Conversely, we found that an increase in the density of conspecific fruiting neighbors both increased visitation rate and reduced plant degree of interaction specialization. We suggest that tracking fruit-rich patches by avian frugivore species is the main driver of density-dependent intraspecific variation in plants' interaction niche breadth. Our study shed some light on the overlooked fitness consequences of intraspecific variation in interaction niches by showing that individuals along the specialization/generalization continuum may have their seed dispersed with similar effectiveness. Our study exemplifies how individual-based networks linking plants to frugivore species that differ in their seed dispersal effectiveness can advance our understanding of intraspecific variation in the outcomes of fruit-frugivore interactions.

  7. Intraspecific differentiation of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides sensu lato based on in silico multilocus PCR-RFLP fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdeen, Stephen; Rampersad, Sephra N

    2013-02-01

    Colletotrichum gloeosporioides sensu lato is one of the most common and widely distributed plant pathogens in the world. Understanding fungal biodiversity is hinged on accurate identification and delimitation at the inter- and intraspecific levels. Sequences of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region (ITS), β-tubulin (TUB), actin (ACT), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) genes of 30 C. gloeosporioides sensu lato isolates, collected from anthracnose infected papaya fruits grown in the main production areas in Trinidad, were analyzed by in silico PCR-RFLP analysis with the aim of identifying which gene region(s) had the highest level of intraspecific polymorphism. Restriction site polymorphisms generated from 13 restriction enzymes enabled the identification of specific enzymes that were successful at intraspecific discrimination of the C. gloeosporioides isolates. Genetic distance values were reflective of the level of polymorphisms obtained for the four different gene regions. In both cases (calculated genetic distance and percentage of polymorphic loci from RFLP profiles), ACT and ITS gene regions had the highest level of restriction site polymorphisms and genetic diversity, GPDH and TUB had the lowest. Cluster analysis based on PCR-RFLP genetic distance data revealed sub-specific placement of the isolates which appeared to be gene-dependent. The implications of these findings are discussed relative to biodiversity monitoring and the need for multilocus, polyphasic investigations which must take into account the possibility of exaggerated estimates of genetic diversity.

  8. Intraspecific Variation in Armillaria Species from Shrubs and Trees in Northwestern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Aguín

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the identification of Armillaria species relied upon morphological characteristics and mating tests, but now molecular techniques based on polymorphisms in the IGS region of the fungal rDNA are more commonly used, since these are more rapid and reliable. Differences found in RFLP patterns identifying Armillaria species have suggested the existence of intraspecific variation. In this work, 185 Armillaria isolates from different plant species (including fruit trees, broadleaf and coniferous trees, ornamental shrubs, kiwifruit and grapevine affected by white root rot were analyzed by RFLP-PCR, in order to study intraspecific variation in Armillaria and the relationship with the plant host. Armillaria mellea was found in the majority of samples (71%, and was the most frequent Armillaria species in symptomatic ornamental shrubs, kiwifruit, grapevine, fruit trees and broadleaf trees. In conifers however white root rot was generally caused by Armillaria ostoyae. Armillaria gallica was identified, although with low incidence, in ornamental, coniferous, broadleaf and fruit hosts. Intraspecies variation was recorded only in A. mellea, for which RFLP patterns mel 1 and mel 2 were found. Most plants infected with A. mellea showed the mel 2 pattern. Further research is needed to study whether Armillaria RFLP patterns are specific to certain plant hosts, and whether intraspecific variation is related to differences in pathogenicity.

  9. Gender and Competition in Adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreber, Anna; Essen, Emma von; Ranehill, Eva

    2013-01-01

    We look at gender differences among adolescents in Sweden in preferences for competition, altruism and risk. For competitiveness, we explore two different tasks that differ in associated stereotypes. We find no gender difference in competitiveness when comparing performance under competition...

  10. Determinants of intra-specific variation in basal metabolic rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konarzewski, Marek; Książek, Aneta

    2013-01-01

    Basal metabolic rate (BMR) provides a widely accepted benchmark of metabolic expenditure for endotherms under laboratory and natural conditions. While most studies examining BMR have concentrated on inter-specific variation, relatively less attention has been paid to the determinants of within-species variation. Even fewer studies have analysed the determinants of within-species BMR variation corrected for the strong influence of body mass by appropriate means (e.g. ANCOVA). Here, we review recent advancements in studies on the quantitative genetics of BMR and organ mass variation, along with their molecular genetics. Next, we decompose BMR variation at the organ, tissue and molecular level. We conclude that within-species variation in BMR and its components have a clear genetic signature, and are functionally linked to key metabolic process at all levels of biological organization. We highlight the need to integrate molecular genetics with conventional metabolic field studies to reveal the adaptive significance of metabolic variation. Since comparing gene expressions inter-specifically is problematic, within-species studies are more likely to inform us about the genetic underpinnings of BMR. We also urge for better integration of animal and medical research on BMR; the latter is quickly advancing thanks to the application of imaging technologies and 'omics' studies. We also suggest that much insight on the biochemical and molecular underpinnings of BMR variation can be gained from integrating studies on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which appears to be the major regulatory pathway influencing the key molecular components of BMR.

  11. PRICES IN COMPETITIVE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VADUVA MARIA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Regularities of competitive market determine rules for determining prices and their dynamics. Orientation prices to competition (competitive pricing is the strategy most frequently used in countries with market economies and especially for exports. Moreover, in an economy dominated by market competition it cannot be ignored without certain risks the prices resulting from competition between products bidders. Companies that use this type of strategy seek to maintain a level of prices linked to that charged by other competitors (or exporting producers generally no longer covering production costs or demand, relying on the assumption that the average market price is a reasonable basis of costs. But the way how practical guidance and reporting to the competition in every price strategy, will be determined by the company's market position, by the available power and enjoyed prestige, objectives and prospects of its market share etc. according to these elements, there may be several versions of pricing strategies oriented to competitors.

  12. Architectural Competition and BIM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nils Lykke; Frandsen, Anne Kathrine; Øien, Turid Borgestrand

    2015-01-01

    on architecturalcompetitions, a series of interviews was conducted with building clients as well as architects, focusing on the impact of the above-mentioned changes within the building sector on architectural competitions as an institution. In the interviews, ICT and notleast BIM was a recurring theme that both parties saw...... as having a positive impact on competitions. But when looking closely into the answers, these revealed diverse understandings of how and why the impact of BIM on competitions could be said to be positive. The paper sheds light on the interaction between the actors (building clients, architects and client...... consultants) and the applied technologies (competition forms, ICT tools, directives) in architectural competitions in a theoretical actor-network perspective. The diverging understandings of the role of BIM are demonstrating one of many negotiations in progress in the network of architectural competitions...

  13. Competition in electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.

    1996-01-01

    This article examines expanded wholesale and retail competition and the effect that they are likely to have on the electric power industry. The author believes that expanded wholesale competition is good and will bring immediate benefit to all electric consumers; however, based on the experience of the natural gas industry and the electric power industry in California and other parts of the world, the author counsels caution in moving toward expanded retail competition

  14. Quality and Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Rajiv D. Banker; Inder Khosla; Kingshuk K. Sinha

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, the practitioner literature in operations management has seen a dramatic surge in articles on quality management. It reflects the increased emphasis on quality by U.S. firms, which has been attributed largely to increased competition faced by them. The question of how quality is influenced by competitive intensity, however, has not received much attention, either in the practitioner or the academic research literatures. The notion of competitive intensity itself has not been ...

  15. Retail Electricity Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Joskow, Paul L.; Tirole, Jean

    2004-01-01

    We analyze a number of unstudied aspects of retail electricity competition. We first explore the implications of load profiling of consumers whose traditional meters do not allow for measurement of their real time consumption, when consumers are homogeneous up to a scaling factor. In general, the combination of retail competition and load profiling does not yield the second best prices given the non price responsiveness of consumers. Specifically, the competitive equilibrium does not support ...

  16. Gender differences in competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Lackner, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Differences in labor market outcomes for women and men are highly persistent. Apart from discrimination, one frequently mentioned explanation could be differences in the attitude towards competition for both genders. Abundant empirical evidence indicates that multiple influences shape attitudes towards competition during different periods of the life cycle. Gender differences in competitiveness will not only influence outcomes during working age, but also during early childhood education. In ...

  17. Coal and the competition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morey, M. [RDI Consulting, Arlington, VA (United States). FT Energy

    2000-07-01

    24 overheads/viewgraphs outline a presentation on competition in the US coal industry. It discussed four main subjects: key factors driving coal demand (environmental regulations, electric utility deregulation; competition with natural gas, inter-regional coal competition, supply availability and pricing; and the export market and competition from off-shore coal sources); coal's ability to boost market share; shifts in coal distribution and the risk of more branded coal; and attempts to keep more regional sources of coal in business. State tax incentives for coal use in Arizona, Ohio, Oklahoma, Virginia and Alabama were discussed.

  18. Struggle for Space: Viral Extinction through Competition for Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, José A.; Aguirre, Jacobo; Capitán, José A.; Manrubia, Susanna C.

    2011-01-01

    The design of protocols to suppress the propagation of viral infections is an enduring enterprise, especially hindered by limited knowledge of the mechanisms leading to viral extinction. Here we report on infection extinction due to intraspecific competition to infect susceptible hosts. Beneficial mutations increase the production of viral progeny, while the host cell may develop defenses against infection. For an unlimited number of host cells, a feedback runaway coevolution between host resistance and progeny production occurs. However, physical space limits the advantage that the virus obtains from increasing offspring numbers; thus, infection clearance may result from an increase in host defenses beyond a finite threshold. Our results might be relevant to devise improved control strategies in environments with mobility constraints or different geometrical properties.

  19. Effects of Plant Density and Water Stress on Competitive Ability and Yield of Medicago Sativa L. and Bromus tomentellus Boiss.in Mono and Mixed Cropping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Barati

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of plant density and water stress on yield of Medicago sativa and Bromus tomentellus was studied. A greenhouse experiment was conducted at Isfahan University of Technology in 2013. The experiment included 18 treatments, three crop compositions (M.sativa, B. tomentellus or mixture of the two, two plant density levels, three watering regimes and four replicates, arranged in a completely randomized block design. Results showed that total yield of M. sativa mono-cropping was higher than mixed cropping and it was higher than B. tomentellus mono-cropping. Land Equivalent Ratio (LER values were less than 1 for all mixed cropping treatments, indicated the interspecific competition in mixed cropping. The biomass production per plant decreased with increasing density, competition for resource utilization and water stress. Compare of above-ground and below-ground dry matter showed that M. sativa appeared to be more constrained by intraspecific than by interspecific competition, Conversely, B. tomentellus was more suppressed by interspecific competition exerted by M. sativa than by intraspecific competition. Relative competition intensity (RCI values were positive for B. tomentellus and negative for M.sativa, implying that competitive ability of M.sativa was higher than B. tomentellus in mixed cropping .

  20. African Competition Forum: Promoting Open and Competitive ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Markets in developing countries are often marked by anti-competitive behaviour, concentrated market power, and low access for newcomers. This limits local enterprise development and innovation. This project supports African countries in their bid to promote markets that work better for all producers and consumers.

  1. Exhibitionist eating: Who wins eating competitions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Wansink

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: How and why does competition and spectator involvement influence eating behaviors? The primary objective of this article is to explore the nature of eating competitions with the goal of identifying implications for other social situations.Design: Study 1 investigated how many chicken wings were eaten by men and women in a 30-minute eating competition when cheering spectators either were or were not present (compared to a control condition. A second study sought to explain Study 1’s findings through a survey of 93 students who rated male or female competitive eaters (in randomized order based on intelligence, attractiveness, health, strength, and how romantic they expected the eaters to be.Results: Exploratory findings show competitive eaters ate approximately four times as many chicken wings as a similar control group, and the presence of a cheering audience further increased wing consumption for males (but decreased consumption for females. Study 2 suggests part of the over-performance of males may be related to a shared positive perception that competitive male eaters are strong and virile. Conclusions: Even in relatively low-stakes environments, competitive visibility may dramatically increase how much males eat. These preliminary results help illuminate recent discoveries that males overeat in various social situations where there are opportunities for men to show off. This may have relevance for dining behavior – especially among younger males – at parties, banquets, group dinners, and similar social situations.

  2. Competition research improves services

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    5. Case study. THE POWER OF COMPETITIVE MARKETS. Competition and Development. One issue that all migrant workers face is how to send some of ... send some of their hard-earned wages home — quickly, safely, and at the lowest possible cost. Few have bank accounts. This might seem like a minor issue to people ...

  3. Competition: Was Kohn Right?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, David Light; Bredemeier, Brenda Light

    2010-01-01

    Alfie Kohn made the case for competition being destructive to education. The truth may be that there are two separate ways to contest: true competition, which is a healthy desire to excel, and decompetition, which is the unhealthy desire merely to beat the opponent. Decompetition leads to the ills that Kohn enumerated. Educators should teach their…

  4. Competition, Ownership and Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baghdasaryan, Delia; la Cour, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical results support two concurrent views regarding the mediating role that ownership structure might play on the effect of competition on firm performance. According to one stream of literature, competition has a high, positive impact in companies that have an effective ownership structur...

  5. Multinationals and Institutional Competitiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hull Kristensen, Peer; Morgan, Glenn

    by forming firms capable of expanding internationally. At the level of subsidiaries as providing institutional back up for these firms' abilities to fight for survival and growth within the frame of rivalling subsidiaries of the MNC. The article discusses at these two levels the comparative institutional...... competitiveness of Liberal Market Economies and Coordinated Markets Economies under the current competitive regime....

  6. The competitive challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, M.T.

    1992-01-01

    This article examines the strategies necessary to succeed in the increasingly competitive independent power industry. The topics of the article include the factors encouraging mergers, acquisitions, and joint ventures, the availability of financing, changes in the market, regulatory climate changes, competition and power planning, Not In My Back Yard and project siting, and the road ahead

  7. Crop–weed competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallandt, Eric R.; Weiner, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    importantly, weed density and time of emergence relative to the crop. Practices that (1) reduce the density of weeds, (2) maximise occupation of space or uptake of resources by the crop or (3) establish an early-season size advantage of the crop over the weeds will minimise the competitive effects of weeds...... an early-season competitive advantage to the crop and (3) maximising resource capture by the crop using competitive species, competitive cultivars, high sowing densities, optimal spatial arrangement, intercropping complimentary species or transplanting.......Competition from weeds is the most important of all biological factors that reduce agricultural crop yield. This occurs primarily because weeds use resources that would otherwise be available to the crop. The magnitude of yield loss is affected by numerous agronomic and environmental factors, most...

  8. Competition in investment banking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Ellis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We construct a comprehensive measure of overall investment banking competitiveness for follow-on offerings that aggregates the various dimensions of competition such as fees, pricing accuracy, analyst recommendations, distributional abilities, market making prowess, debt offering capabilities, and overall reputation. The measure allows us to incorporate trade-offs that investment banks may use in competing for new or established clients. We find that firms who switch to similar-quality underwriters enjoy more intense competition among investment banks which manifests in lower fees and more optimistic recommendations. Investment banks do compete vigorously for some clients, with the level of competition related to the likelihood of gaining or losing clients. Finally, investment banks not performing up to market norms are more likely to be dropped in the follow-on offering. In contrast, firms who seek a higher reputation underwriter face relatively non-competitive markets.

  9. Competitiveness through strategic orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Monferrer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to further the study of the factors that influence the international competitive position of international new ventures and, consequently, their international performance. Specifically, we analyze the role of entrepreneurial and market orientations in the international competitive position of such firms. Data were collected at Spanish and Belgian international new ventures. The structural equations model approach was used to test our hypotheses. Both the Spanish and the Belgian sample revealed a positive and significant relationship between entrepreneurial orientation and market orientation. Furthermore, both orientations have a positive and significant effect on the international competitive position of such firms. Finally, any firm’s international competitive position is positively and significantly related to its international performance. The study therefore appears to indicate that, when it comes to international new ventures, the conjunction of these two orientations is a key factor to attaining a superior competitive position and a positive performance in international markets.

  10. The role of drought- and disturbance-mediated competition in shaping community responses to varied environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Joseph D; Mordecai, Erin A; Heckman, Robert W

    2016-06-01

    By altering the strength of intra- and interspecific competition, droughts may reshape plant communities. Furthermore, species may respond differently to drought when other influences, such as herbivory, are considered. To explore this relationship, we conducted a greenhouse experiment measuring responses to inter- and intraspecific competition for two grasses, Schedonorus arundinaceus and Paspalum dilatatum, while varying water availability and simulating herbivory via clipping. We then parameterized population growth models to examine the long-term outcome of competition under these conditions. Under drought, S. arundinaceus was less water stressed than P. dilatatum, which exhibited severe water stress; clipping alleviated this stress, increasing the competitive ability of P. dilatatum relative to S. arundinaceus. Although P. dilatatum competed weakly under drought, clipping reduced water stress in P. dilatatum, thereby enhancing its ability to compete with S. arundinaceus under drought. Supporting these observations, population growth models predicted that P. dilatatum would exclude S. arundinaceus when clipped under drought, while S. arundinaceus would exclude P. dilatatum when unclipped under drought. When the modeled environment varied temporally, environmental variation promoted niche differences that, though insufficient to maintain stable coexistence, prevented unconditional competitive exclusion by promoting priority effects. Our results suggest that it is important to consider how species respond not just to stable, but also to variable, environments. When species differ in their responses to drought, competition, and simulated herbivory, stable environments may promote competitive exclusion, while fluctuating environments may promote coexistence. These interactions are critical to understanding how species will respond to global change.

  11. Effects of intra- and interspecific competition on the sensitivity of aquatic macroinvertebrates to carbendazim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Arco, Ana Isabel; Parra, Gema; Rico, Andreu; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    The Ecological Risk Assessment of pesticides and other potentially toxic chemicals is generally based on toxicity data obtained from single-species laboratory experiments. In the field, however, contaminant effects are ubiquitously co-occurring with ecological interactions such as species competition and predation, which might influence the sensitivity of the individuals exposed to toxicants. The present experimental study investigated how intra- and interspecific competition influence the response of sensitive aquatic organisms to a pesticide. For this, the effects of the fungicide carbendazim were assessed on the mortality and growth of the snail Bithynia tentaculata and the crustacean Gammarus pulex under different levels of intraspecific and interspecific competition for a food resource. Interspecific competition was created by adding individuals of Radix peregra and Asellus aquaticus, respectively. The interaction of competition and carbendazim exposure significantly influenced B. tentaculata growth, however, combined effects on survival and immobility were considered transient and were less easily demonstrated. Positive influence of competition on G. pulex survival was observed under low-medium carbendazim concentrations and under medium-high density pressures, being partly related to cannibalistic and predation compensatory mechanisms, enhanced under food limiting conditions. This study shows that intra- and interspecific competition pressure may influence the response of sensitive aquatic organisms in a more complex way (positive, non-significant and negative effects were observed) than just increasing the sensitivity of the studied species, as has generally been hypothesized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessing the Importance of Intraspecific Variability in Dung Beetle Functional Traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah M Griffiths

    Full Text Available Functional diversity indices are used to facilitate a mechanistic understanding of many theoretical and applied questions in current ecological research. The use of mean trait values in functional indices assumes that traits are robust, in that greater variability exists between than within species. While the assertion of robust traits has been explored in plants, there exists little information on the source and extent of variability in the functional traits of higher trophic level organisms. Here we investigated variability in two functionally relevant dung beetle traits, measured from individuals collected from three primary forest sites containing distinct beetle communities: body mass and back leg length. In doing so we too addressed the following questions: (i what is the contribution of intra vs. interspecific differences in trait values; (ii what sample size is needed to provide representative species mean trait values; and (iii what impact does omission of intraspecific trait information have on the calculation of functional diversity (FD indices from naturally assembled communities? At the population level, interspecific differences explained the majority of variability in measured traits (between 94% and 96%. In accordance with this, the error associated with calculating FD without inclusion of intraspecific variability was low, less than 20% in all cases. This suggests that complete sampling to capture intraspecific variance in traits is not necessary even when investigating the FD of small and/or naturally formed communities. To gain an accurate estimation of species mean trait values we encourage the measurement of 30-60 individuals and, where possible, these should be taken from specimens collected from the site of study.

  13. Assessing the Importance of Intraspecific Variability in Dung Beetle Functional Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Hannah M; Louzada, Julio; Bardgett, Richard D; Barlow, Jos

    2016-01-01

    Functional diversity indices are used to facilitate a mechanistic understanding of many theoretical and applied questions in current ecological research. The use of mean trait values in functional indices assumes that traits are robust, in that greater variability exists between than within species. While the assertion of robust traits has been explored in plants, there exists little information on the source and extent of variability in the functional traits of higher trophic level organisms. Here we investigated variability in two functionally relevant dung beetle traits, measured from individuals collected from three primary forest sites containing distinct beetle communities: body mass and back leg length. In doing so we too addressed the following questions: (i) what is the contribution of intra vs. interspecific differences in trait values; (ii) what sample size is needed to provide representative species mean trait values; and (iii) what impact does omission of intraspecific trait information have on the calculation of functional diversity (FD) indices from naturally assembled communities? At the population level, interspecific differences explained the majority of variability in measured traits (between 94% and 96%). In accordance with this, the error associated with calculating FD without inclusion of intraspecific variability was low, less than 20% in all cases. This suggests that complete sampling to capture intraspecific variance in traits is not necessary even when investigating the FD of small and/or naturally formed communities. To gain an accurate estimation of species mean trait values we encourage the measurement of 30-60 individuals and, where possible, these should be taken from specimens collected from the site of study.

  14. Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-03

    Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators In the past year, the grant was used for work in the field of topological phases, with emphasis on finding...surface of topological insulators. In the past 3 years, we have started a new direction, that of fractional topological insulators. These are materials...in which a topologically nontrivial quasi-flat band is fractionally filled and then subject to strong interactions. The views, opinions and/or

  15. Strong spatial segregation between wildcats and domestic cats may explain low hybridization rates on the Iberian Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Sánchez, J M; Jaramillo, J; Barea-Azcón, J M

    2015-12-01

    The European wildcat (Felis silvestris silvestris) is an endangered felid impacted by genetic introgression with the domestic cat (Felis silvestris catus). The problem of hybridization has had different effects in different areas. In non-Mediterranean regions pure forms of wildcats became almost extinct, while in Mediterranean regions genetic introgression is a rare phenomenon. The study of the potential factors that prevent the gene flow in areas of lower hybridization may be key to wildcat conservation. We studied the population size and spatial segregation of wildcats and domestic cats in a typical Mediterranean area of ancient sympatry, where no evidence of hybridization had been detected by genetic studies. Camera trapping of wild-living cats and walking surveys of stray cats in villages were used for capture-recapture estimations of abundance and spatial segregation. Results showed (i) a low density of wildcats and no apparent presence of putative hybrids; (ii) a very low abundance of feral cats in spite of the widespread and large population sources of domestic cats inhabiting villages; (iii) strong spatial segregation between wildcats and domestic/feral cats; and (iv) no relationship between the size of the potential population sources and the abundance of feral cats. Hence, domestic cats were limited in their ability to become integrated into the local habitat of wildcats. Ecological barriers (habitat preferences, food limitations, intra-specific and intra-guild competition, predation) may explain the severe divergences of hybridization impact observed at a biogeographic level. This has a direct effect on key conservation strategies for wildcats (i.e., control of domestic cats). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Strong Cosmic Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, James

    2017-01-01

    The Hawking-Penrose theorems tell us that solutions of Einstein's equations are generally singular, in the sense of the incompleteness of causal geodesics (the paths of physical observers). These singularities might be marked by the blowup of curvature and therefore crushing tidal forces, or by the breakdown of physical determinism. Penrose has conjectured (in his `Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture`) that it is generically unbounded curvature that causes singularities, rather than causal breakdown. The verification that ``AVTD behavior'' (marked by the domination of time derivatives over space derivatives) is generically present in a family of solutions has proven to be a useful tool for studying model versions of Strong Cosmic Censorship in that family. I discuss some of the history of Strong Cosmic Censorship, and then discuss what is known about AVTD behavior and Strong Cosmic Censorship in families of solutions defined by varying degrees of isometry, and discuss recent results which we believe will extend this knowledge and provide new support for Strong Cosmic Censorship. I also comment on some of the recent work on ``Weak Null Singularities'', and how this relates to Strong Cosmic Censorship.

  17. Fuel modelling and its economical competitiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, A.C.; Savino, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Due to reasons of economical competitiveness, there is at present a strong need in the nuclear industry to improve fuel performance under more demanding operating conditions, such as those resulting from an extended burnup. This requires a good understanding of the properties of fuel rod materials and their in-service performance. As it can be easily foreseen, thermal, mechanical and microstructural irradiation effects are strongly interrelated while the fuel is at reactor operating conditions. (author). 7 refs., 16 figs

  18. Buffer zones of territories of gray wolves as regions of intraspecific strife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L.D.

    1994-01-01

    The locations of 22 territorial gray wolves (Canis lupus) killed by conspecifics in northeastern Minnesota were analyzed in a study involving radio-telemetry from 1968 through 1992. Twenty-three percent of the wolves were killed precisely on the borders of their estimated territories; 41%, within 1.0 km (16% of the radius of their mean-estimated territory) inside or outside the estimated edge; 91%, within 3.2 km inside or outside (50% of the radius of their mean-estimated territory) of the estimated edge. This appears to be the first report of intraspecific mortality of mammals along territorial boundaries.

  19. Competitiveness in tourism: A comparison between Brazil and Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Gabriela Montanari; Janaina de Moura Engracia Giraldi

    2013-01-01

    Despite the unstable global situation and the crisis in the euro area, world tourism has remained strong and with a positive growth in the last years. Besides, this activity has a great economic and social importance which is reflected in its ability to generate jobs and income. Thus, this article aims to analyze the competitiveness of the tourism sector in Brazil and Switzerland, comparing the two countries through competitive factors identified by the World Competitiveness Index in Tourism ...

  20. Response- Surface Analysis for Evaluation of Competition in Different Densities of Sesame (Sesamum indicum and Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris Intercropping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Koocheki

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Response surface models predict crop yield based on crop density and this is an important tool for evaluation competition at different density and hence selection of optimum density based on yield. In order to study intra and inter specific competition in intercropping bean (Phaseolus vulgaris and sesame (Sesamum indicum, an experiment was conducted at the Agricultural Research Station, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad during the growing season of 2010. For this purpose a complete randomized block design with 3 replications and 16 treatments based on different densities of sesame and bean intercropping was used. The model predicted the maximum yield of an isolated plant of bean and sesame approximately 33 and 17g per plant respectively. The area associated with the maximum yield per plant in bean and sesame were 0.6 and 0.1 m2, respectively. Bean was the dominant competitor with respect to both grain and biomass, and competition coefficient was 0.35 and 0.3 for bean grain yield and bean biomass respectively. Intra-specific competition was more important than inter-specific competition for bean. Competition coefficient was 2.6 and 2.9 for sesame grain yield and biomass respectively. Intra-specific competition was much less important than Interspecific competition in sesame. The highest grain yield in bean (300 g m-2 was obtained of sole crop with density of 20 plants, and the highest sesame grain yield (195 g m-2 was obtained of sole crop with density of 40 plants, the highest land equivalent ratio (1.14 was obtained in intercropping of 20 plants of bean and 10 plants of sesame.

  1. Heterogeneous logics of competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossin, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to demonstrate that in order to understand competition as a socially organizing phenomenon, we should not examine competition in isolation, but as constellations of heterogeneous logics. More precisely, the article is based on two main theoretical points: (1) Logics...... of a presumed logic of competition within EU law, whereas the second part focuses on particular legal logics. In this respect, the so-called ‘real link criterion’ (determining the access to transnational social rights for certain groups of unemployed people) is given special attention. What is particularly...

  2. Gaining Relational Competitive Advantages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yimei; Zhang, Si; Li, Jizhen

    2015-01-01

    Establishing strategic technological partnerships (STPs) with foreign partners is an increasingly studied topic within the innovation management literature. Partnering firms can jointly create sources of relational competitive advantage. Chinese firms often lack research and development (R......&D) capabilities but are increasingly becoming preferred technological partners for transnational corporations. We investigate an STP between a Scandinavian and a Chinese firm and try to explore how to gain relational competitive advantage by focusing on its two essential stages: relational rent generation...... and appropriation. Based on an explorative case study, we develop a conceptual framework that consists of process, organizational alliance factors, and coordination modes that we propose lead to relational competitive advantage....

  3. Competitiveness: new economic paradigm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Peñaloza

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays competitiveness is made up of “the new” paradigm that allows to prevail in the global World. Thus, it is inevitable to ask, was it required to be competitive to be successful in the international trade arena? Recognizing the discussion about it and its theoretical-conceptual density, the present paper studies this old notion whose meaning, in essence, is always the same one. This applies even though new realities in the present world-wide atmosphere confer to it a distinguishing character and new and old players are forced to organize actions and bring efforts together to obtain the competitive supremacy.

  4. Competition in education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hanne; Christensen, Søren

    Competition in education has two functions: selection and motivation. How do these two functions correlate, contradict or co-exist? How has the educational system reflected on the relation between competition as motivational technology and as a technology for selection? The aim of this paper...... is to formulate the problem of competition in education as a relation between selection and motivation and provide an analytical strategy to grasp this problem. Our ambition is to theorize the problem and give empirical illustrations of how the connection between selection and motivation has been articulated...... in various educational institutions and programs....

  5. The use and limits of ITS data in the analysis of intraspecific variation in Passiflora L. (Passifloraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Mäder

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and characterization of informative intraspecific genetic markers is fundamental for evolutionary and conservation genetics studies. Here, we used nuclear ribosomal ITS sequences to access intraspecific genetic diversity in 23 species of the genus Passiflora L. Some degree of variation was detected in 21 of these. The Passiflora and Decaloba (DC. Rchb. subgenera showed significant differences in the sizes of the two ITS regions and in GC content, which can be related to reproductive characteristics of species in these subgenera. Furthermore, clear geographical patterns in the spatial distribution of sequence types were identified in six species. The results indicate that ITS may be a useful tool for the evaluation of intraspecific genetic variation in Passiflora.

  6. The use and limits of ITS data in the analysis of intraspecific variation in Passiflora L. (Passifloraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäder, Geraldo; Zamberlan, Priscilla M; Fagundes, Nelson J R; Magnus, Tielli; Salzano, Francisco M; Bonatto, Sandro L; Freitas, Loreta B

    2010-01-01

    The discovery and characterization of informative intraspecific genetic markers is fundamental for evolutionary and conservation genetics studies. Here, we used nuclear ribosomal ITS sequences to access intraspecific genetic diversity in 23 species of the genus Passiflora L. Some degree of variation was detected in 21 of these. The Passiflora and Decaloba (DC.) Rchb. subgenera showed significant differences in the sizes of the two ITS regions and in GC content, which can be related to reproductive characteristics of species in these subgenera. Furthermore, clear geographical patterns in the spatial distribution of sequence types were identified in six species. The results indicate that ITS may be a useful tool for the evaluation of intraspecific genetic variation in Passiflora.

  7. Strong Arcwise Connectedness

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza, Benjamin; Gartside, Paul; Kovan-Bakan, Merve; Mamatelashvili, Ana

    2012-01-01

    A space is `n-strong arc connected' (n-sac) if for any n points in the space there is an arc in the space visiting them in order. A space is omega-strong arc connected (omega-sac) if it is n-sac for all n. We study these properties in finite graphs, regular continua, and rational continua. There are no 4-sac graphs, but there are 3-sac graphs and graphs which are 2-sac but not 3-sac. For every n there is an n-sac regular continuum, but no regular continuum is omega-sac. There is an omega-sac ...

  8. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally......'s scenarios have some valuable future or admitted that killing them is not seriously morally wrong. Finally, if "valuable future" is interpreted as referring to objective standards, one ends up with implausible and unpalatable moral claims....

  9. Enforcing Competition Rules in South Africa: Thieves at the Dinner ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Describing and analyzing competition law in South Africa, this book promotes a deeper understanding of the development of this foundational economic law within its specific national, social and economic context. Enforcing Competition Rules in South Africa draws strongly on case law and enforcement ...

  10. Comparative local advantages and technological competitiveness for Italian industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palma, Daniela; Zini, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of the Italian manufacturing sector's competitiveness over the past ten years and the role played bu the local technology-based comparative advantages in shaping national competitiveness. Data obtained with local-based econometric techniques point to a gradual weakening of core know-how in high-tech industries strongly rooted in the Northwest [it

  11. Intraspecific morphological and genetic variation of common species predicts ranges of threatened ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Trevon L.; Thomassen, Henri A.; Peralvo, Manuel; Buermann, Wolfgang; Milá, Borja; Kieswetter, Charles M.; Jarrín-V, Pablo; Devitt, Susan E. Cameron; Mason, Eliza; Schweizer, Rena M.; Schlunegger, Jasmin; Chan, Janice; Wang, Ophelia; Schneider, Christopher J.; Pollinger, John P.; Saatchi, Sassan; Graham, Catherine H.; Wayne, Robert K.; Smith, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Predicting where threatened species occur is useful for making informed conservation decisions. However, because they are usually rare, surveying threatened species is often expensive and time intensive. Here, we show how regions where common species exhibit high genetic and morphological divergence among populations can be used to predict the occurrence of species of conservation concern. Intraspecific variation of common species of birds, bats and frogs from Ecuador were found to be a significantly better predictor for the occurrence of threatened species than suites of environmental variables or the occurrence of amphibians and birds. Fully 93 per cent of the threatened species analysed had their range adequately represented by the geographical distribution of the morphological and genetic variation found in seven common species. Both higher numbers of threatened species and greater genetic and morphological variation of common species occurred along elevation gradients. Higher levels of intraspecific divergence may be the result of disruptive selection and/or introgression along gradients. We suggest that collecting data on genetic and morphological variation in common species can be a cost effective tool for conservation planning, and that future biodiversity inventories include surveying genetic and morphological data of common species whenever feasible. PMID:23595273

  12. Intraspecific variation in Trichogramma bruni Nagaraja, 1983 (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) associated with different hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querino, R B; Zucchi, R A

    2002-11-01

    Trichogramma bruni is an insufficiently studied South American species whose limits are still not well defined. Thus, the objective of the present study was to characterize T. bruni taxonomically and to determine the association between morphological variations as well as host and habitat, based on morphological and biological studies. Specimens from the Escola Superior de Agricultura "Luiz de Queiroz" (ESALQ) collection, and from the University of California Riverside (UCR) and specimens collected from the vegetation of forest parks with native areas planted with eucalyptus in Piracicaba and Itatinga, State of São Paulo, were also analyzed. The holotype deposited at Univeridade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG) collection was also examined. The variability in the genital capsule of T. bruni observed both among individuals of the same progeny and among specimens from different hosts is remarkable and is mainly related to the dorsal lamina. Therefore, an association of diagnostic characters rather than the dorsal lamina alone should be used for the identification of T. bruni and intraspecific variations should be considered. The intraspecific variation observed for T. bruni is a factor that should be considered for its identification, since the influence of the environment (habitat + host) and the variation among individuals itself is responsible for the plasticity observed in the genital capsule. Heliconius erato phyllis, Hamadryas feronia, Erosina hyberniata and Mechanitis lysiminia are new hosts of T. bruni.

  13. Recent observations of intraspecific predation and cannibalism among polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Stirling, I.; Smith, T.S.; Perham, C.; Thiemann, G.W.

    2006-01-01

    Intraspecific killing has been reported among polar bears (Ursus maritimus), brown bears (U. arctos), and black bears (U. americanus). Although cannibalism is one motivation for such killings, the ecological factors mediating such events are poorly understood. Between 24 January and 10 April 2004, we confirmed three instances of intraspecific predation and cannibalism in the Beaufort Sea. One of these, the first of this type ever reported for polar bears, was a parturient female killed at her maternal den. The predating bear was hunting in a known maternal denning area and apparently discovered the den by scent. A second predation event involved an adult female and cub recently emerged from their den, and the third involved a yearling male. During 24 years of research on polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea region of northern Alaska and 34 years in northwestern Canada, we have not seen other incidents of polar bears stalking, killing, and eating other polar bears. We hypothesize that nutritional stresses related to the longer ice-free seasons that have occurred in the Beaufort Sea in recent years may have led to the cannibalism incidents we observed in 2004. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  14. Rare insights into intraspecific brood parasitism and apparent quasi–parasitism in black–capped chickadees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otter, K. A.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic analysis of passerine birds often finds evidence of extra–pair copulations within species, but genetic evidence of intraspecific brood parasitism (IBP and quasi–parasitism (Q–P are relatively rare. Further, it is even rarer for genetic patterns that might indicate quasi–parasitism (resident male sires offspring through extra–pair copulations, and allows the female to lay these within the male’s nest to be coupled with observational evidence of this behavior. In this paper, we report behavioral observations surrounding the nest of black–capped chickadee, one of the few species in which both IBP and Q–P have been detected through a genetic analysis. These were later confirmed to have young genetically mismatched with both attending parents, as well as mismatched with the attending female but sired by the attending male. The behavioral patterns associated with this nest are contrasted with the two previously reported cases of IPB/Q–P in this species, and suggest that rare ‘detection’ of quasi–parasitism may be explained by converging patterns of extra–pair behavior and the rarer strategy of intraspecific brood parasitism.

  15. Cultivar mixtures: a meta-analysis of the effect of intraspecific diversity on crop yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Emily R; Drinkwater, Laurie E

    2018-01-01

    Extensive research has shown that greater plant community diversity leads to higher levels of productivity and other ecosystem services, and such increased diversity has been suggested as a way to improve yield and agricultural sustainability. Increasing intraspecific diversity with cultivar mixtures is one way to increase diversity in agricultural systems. We examined the relationship between intraspecific diversity and yield in cultivar mixtures using a meta-analysis of 91 studies and >3,600 observations. Additionally, we investigated how environmental and management factors might influence this relationship, and if the yield stability of cultivar mixtures differed from that of monocultures. We found that the yield increased by 2.2% overall in cultivar mixtures relative to their monoculture components. Mixtures with more cultivars and those with more functional trait diversity showed higher relative yields. Under biotic stressors, such as disease pressure, and abiotic stressors, such as low levels of soil organic matter and nutrient availability, this diversity effect was stronger, resulting in higher relative yields. Finally, cultivar mixtures generally showed higher yield stability compared to monocultures, especially in response to annual weather variability at a site over time. This practice of mixing cultivars can be integrated into intensified cropping systems where species monocultures dominate, as well as in smallholder cropping systems where low-cost improvements are in demand. Overall, these results suggest that cultivar mixtures are a viable strategy to increase diversity in agroecosystems, promoting increased yield and yield stability, with minimal environmental impact. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  16. Concordance between stabilizing sexual selection, intraspecific variation, and interspecific divergence inPhymata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punzalan, David; Rowe, Locke

    2016-11-01

    Empirical studies show that lineages typically exhibit long periods of evolutionary stasis and that relative levels of within-species trait covariance often correlate with the extent of between-species trait divergence. These observations have been interpreted by some as evidence of genetic constraints persisting for long periods of time. However, an alternative explanation is that both intra- and interspecific variation are shaped by the features of the adaptive landscape (e.g., stabilizing selection). Employing a genus of insects that are diverse with respect to a suite of secondary sex traits, we related data describing nonlinear phenotypic (sexual) selection to intraspecific trait covariances and macroevolutionary divergence. We found support for two key predictions (1) that intraspecific trait covariation would be aligned with stabilizing selection and (2) that there would be restricted macroevolutionary divergence in the direction of stabilizing selection. The observed alignment of all three matrices offers a point of caution in interpreting standing variability as metrics of evolutionary constraint. Our results also illustrate the power of sexual selection for determining variation observed at both short and long timescales and account for the apparently slow evolution of some secondary sex characters in this lineage.

  17. Intraspecific reproductive character displacement in a polymorphic poison dart frog, Dendrobates pumilio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards-Zawacki, Corinne L; Cummings, Molly E

    2011-01-01

    Divergence in male mating signals and associated female preferences is often an important step in the process of speciation. Reproductive character displacement, the pattern of greater divergence of male signals and/or female preference in sympatry than in allopatry, has been observed in a variety of taxa with different degrees of postzygotic isolation. A number of selective processes, including reinforcement, have been proposed to cause such a pattern. Cases in which reproductive character displacement occurs among intraspecific variants are especially informative for understanding how selection acting within a species can lead to the evolution of reproductive barriers and speciation. This study tested the hypothesis that female strawberry poison dart frogs (Dendrobates pumilio) in polymorphic populations of the Bocas del Toro archipelago of Panama show stronger mating discrimination than do females from monomorphic populations, exhibiting an intraspecific pattern of reproductive character displacement. Our results contribute important insights into understanding selection's role in generating the striking diversity of Bocas del Toro's D. pumilio and provide a snapshot of what could be the early stages of reproductive isolation and speciation. © 2010 The Author(s). Evolution© 2010 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  18. Intraspecific relationship within the genus convolvulus l. inferred by rbcl gene using different phylogenetic approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kausar, S.; Qamarunnisa, S.

    2016-01-01

    A molecular systematics analysis was conducted using sequence data of chloroplast rbcL gene for the genus Convolvulus L., by distance and character based phylogenetic methods. Fifteen representative members from genus Convolvulus L., were included as in group whereas two members from a sister family Solanaceae were taken as out group to root the tree. Intraspecific relationships within Convolvulus were inferred by distance matrix, maximum parsimony and bayesian analysis. Transition/transversion ratio was also calculated and it was revealed that in the investigated Convolvulus species, transitional changes were more prevalent in rbcL gene. The nature of rbcL gene in the present study was observed to be conserved, as it does not show major variations between examined species. Distance matrix represented the minimal genetic variations between some species (C. glomeratus and C. pyrrhotrichus), thus exhibiting them as close relatives. The result of parsimonious and bayesian analysis revealed almost similar clades however maximum parsimony based tree was unable to establish relationship between some Convolvulus species. The bayesian inference method was found to be the method of choice for establishing intraspecific associations between Convolvulus species using rbcL data as it clearly defined the connections supported by posterior probability values. (author)

  19. Intraspecific Variation in Female Sex Pheromone of the Codling Moth Cydia pomonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duménil, Claire; Judd, Gary J R; Bosch, Dolors; Baldessari, Mario; Gemeno, César; Groot, Astrid T

    2014-09-26

    The codling moth, Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae), is a major pest of apple, pear and walnut orchards worldwide. This pest is often controlled using the biologically friendly control method known as pheromone-based mating disruption. Mating disruption likely exerts selection on the sexual communication system of codling moth, as male and female moths will persist in their attempt to meet and mate. Surprisingly little is known on the intraspecific variation of sexual communication in this species. We started an investigation to determine the level of individual variation in the female sex pheromone composition of this moth and whether variation among different populations might be correlated with use of mating disruption against those populations. By extracting pheromone glands of individual females from a laboratory population in Canada and from populations from apple orchards in Spain and Italy, we found significant between- and within-population variation. Comparing females that had been exposed to mating disruption, or not, revealed a significant difference in sex pheromone composition for two of the minor components. Overall, the intraspecific variation observed shows the potential for a shift in female sexual signal when selection pressure is high, as is the case with continuous use of mating disruption.

  20. Intraspecific Variation in Female Sex Pheromone of the Codling Moth Cydia pomonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Duménil

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The codling moth, Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae, is a major pest of apple, pear and walnut orchards worldwide. This pest is often controlled using the biologically friendly control method known as pheromone-based mating disruption. Mating disruption likely exerts selection on the sexual communication system of codling moth, as male and female moths will persist in their attempt to meet and mate. Surprisingly little is known on the intraspecific variation of sexual communication in this species. We started an investigation to determine the level of individual variation in the female sex pheromone composition of this moth and whether variation among different populations might be correlated with use of mating disruption against those populations. By extracting pheromone glands of individual females from a laboratory population in Canada and from populations from apple orchards in Spain and Italy, we found significant between- and within-population variation. Comparing females that had been exposed to mating disruption, or not, revealed a significant difference in sex pheromone composition for two of the minor components. Overall, the intraspecific variation observed shows the potential for a shift in female sexual signal when selection pressure is high, as is the case with continuous use of mating disruption.

  1. Intra-specific pelage color variation in a South American small rodent species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Sandoval Salinas

    Full Text Available Abstract Intra-specific color variation is often underestimated by researchers, and among mammals, intra-specific differences in coloration are poorly documented for most species. The main goal of this study was to apply an objective color measurement methodology to the study of a specific problem: the detection, if any, of patterns of changes in the fur color of specimens of Akodon budini in relation to biological (i.e., sex and environmental (i.e., season variables. We hypothesize that coat color will be more homogeneous in males than in females and that coat color will be darker in winter than in summer, the latter being orange. We measured the pelage color on five points over the dorsal surface of 26 A. budini museum specimens using a spectroradiometer and a diffuse illumination cabin. We used Principal Component Analysis to describe the association between the color variables, sex and season, and each of the observations. We then used general linear models of Analysis of Variance to examine relationships between color data, season, and sex. The results clearly confirm the hypothesis related to seasonal coat color change but do not directly confirm the hypothesis related to changes in coat color in relation to sex, and we show the complexity of the studied pattern. In conclusion, undoubtedly, the studied variables should accordingly be considered when studying the coloration of specimens for characterization, identification and discrimination of different taxonomic units based on color.

  2. Intra-specific pelage color variation in a South American small rodent species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval Salinas, M L; Barquez, R M; Colombo, E M; Sandoval, J D

    2017-03-01

    Intra-specific color variation is often underestimated by researchers, and among mammals, intra-specific differences in coloration are poorly documented for most species. The main goal of this study was to apply an objective color measurement methodology to the study of a specific problem: the detection, if any, of patterns of changes in the fur color of specimens of Akodon budini in relation to biological (i.e., sex) and environmental (i.e., season) variables. We hypothesize that coat color will be more homogeneous in males than in females and that coat color will be darker in winter than in summer, the latter being orange. We measured the pelage color on five points over the dorsal surface of 26 A. budini museum specimens using a spectroradiometer and a diffuse illumination cabin. We used Principal Component Analysis to describe the association between the color variables, sex and season, and each of the observations. We then used general linear models of Analysis of Variance to examine relationships between color data, season, and sex. The results clearly confirm the hypothesis related to seasonal coat color change but do not directly confirm the hypothesis related to changes in coat color in relation to sex, and we show the complexity of the studied pattern. In conclusion, undoubtedly, the studied variables should accordingly be considered when studying the coloration of specimens for characterization, identification and discrimination of different taxonomic units based on color.

  3. Intraspecific variation in alkaline phosphatase activity in Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Bacillariophyceae, Bohlin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domênica Teixeira de Lima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT To describe potential intraspecific variation in phosphorus incorporation in two strains of Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Bohlin, Ub3 and Ub7, alkaline phosphatase (AP activity was evaluated via enzyme-labeled fluorescence assay. Analysis using the probe ELF-97(r provides individual evaluation, and therefore can determine the nutritional status of inorganic phosphorus in phytoplanktonic cells. Bioassays compared the control treatment to both phosphate-enriched and phosphate-depleted treatments by varying only the phosphate concentration in the media. The P. tricornutum strains exhibited differences in their development when incubated in the phosphate-enriched media. The development of the Ub7 strain differed by exhibiting "luxury uptake" and utilization of organic phosphorus, and the alkaline phosphatase analysis indicated limitations of this clone under such conditions. The Ub7 strain showed higher AP activity, when compared to Ub3, in the P-enriched condition. P. tricornutum presented increases in AP activity and low variation in Surface/Volume ratio, by increasing biovolume and its maximum linear dimension, as strategies for phosphate incorporation. Our results highlight intraspecific differences in alkaline phosphatase activity, and hence differences in the incorporation of organic phosphorus, as the tested species regulated enzymatic activity under different external phosphate concentrations.

  4. Light induced intraspecific variability in response to thermal stress in the hard coral Stylophora pistillata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen Tilstra

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent research suggests that prior exposure of several months to elevated irradiance induces enhanced thermal tolerance in scleractinian corals. While this tolerance has been reported at the species level, individual coral colonies may react differently due to individual variability in thermal tolerance. As thermal anomalies are predicted to become common in the upcoming future, intraspecific variation may be key to the survival of coral populations. In order to study light-history based thermal stress responses on individual colonies, we developed a preliminary microcosm experiment where three randomly chosen, aquacultured colonies of the model coral Stylophora pistillata were exposed to two irradiance treatments (200 and 400 μmol photons m−2 s−1 for 31 days, followed by artificially induced heat stress (∼33.4 °C. We found different responses to occur at both the intraspecific and the intracolonial levels, as indicated by either equal, less severe, delayed, and/or even non-necrotic responses of corals previously exposed to the irradiance of 400 compared to 200 μmol photons m−2 s−1. In addition, all individual colonies revealed light-enhanced calcification. Finally, elevated irradiance resulted in a lower chlorophyll a concentration in one colony compared to the control treatment, and the same colony displayed more rapid bleaching compared to the other ones. Taken together, this study highlights the potential importance of intra-individual variability in physiological responses of scleractinian corals and provides recommendations for improving methodological designs for future studies.

  5. Intraspecific Crossability in Andrographis paniculata Nees: A Barrier against Breeding of the Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Valdiani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ambiguity of crossability in Andrographis paniculata (AP was pointed out in the present research. Accordingly, the effects of different style length and crossing time on intraspecific crossability of seven AP accessions in 21 possible combinations were investigated. The best results came out between 08:00 to 11:00 h for manual out-crossing of AP, while the time from 12:00 to 18:00 h showed a decreasing trend. Moreover, 12 mm style length was found as the most proper phenological stage in terms of stigmatic receptivity to perform out-crossing in this plant. All in all, AP behaved unlikely in each combination, and a significant difference was observed in crossability of AP accessions (<0.01. The lowest and highest crossability rate was found in hybrids 21 (11261NS × 11344K and 27 (11322PA × 11350T with 0.25% and 13.33%, respectively. Furthermore, a significant negative relationship between style length and crossibility (2=0.762∗∗ was recorded in this research. As a final conclusion, crossing time and proper style length can improve the intraspecific crossability in the species, considerably. Despite all the mentioned contrivances, we still believe that a genetic incongruity should be involved as an additional obstacle in crossability of those combinations that failed or responded deficiently to outcrossing.

  6. Specialist-generalist model of body temperature regulation can be applied at the intraspecific level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylska, Anna S; Boratyński, Jan S; Wojciechowski, Michał S; Jefimow, Małgorzata

    2017-07-01

    According to theoretical predictions, endothermic homeotherms can be classified as either thermal specialists or thermal generalists. In high cost environments, thermal specialists are supposed to be more prone to using facultative heterothermy than generalists. We tested this hypothesis at the intraspecific level using male laboratory mice (C57BL/cmdb) fasted under different thermal conditions (20 and 10°C) and for different time periods (12-48 h). We predicted that variability of body temperature ( T b ) and time spent with T b below normothermy would increase with the increase of environmental demands (duration of fasting and cold). To verify the above prediction, we measured T b and energy expenditure of fasted mice. We did not record torpor bouts but we found that variations in T b and time spent in hypothermia increased with environmental demands. In response to fasting, mice also decreased their energy expenditure. Moreover, animals that showed more precise thermoregulation when fed had more variable T b when fasted. We postulate that the prediction of the thermoregulatory generalist-specialist trade-off can be applied at the intraspecific level, offering a valid tool for identifying mechanistic explanations of the differences in animal responses to variations in energy supply. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. How recruitment, intraspecific interactions, and predation control species borders in a tidal estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, George H; Ewanchuk, Patrick J; Bertness, Mark D

    1999-03-01

    We examined the relative contribution of recruitment, intraspecific species interactions, and predation in controlling the upper intertidal border of the northern acorn barnacle, Semibalanusbalanoides, in a tidal estuary in Maine. We hypothesized that the contracted border at sites that experienced low tidal currents was due to flow-mediated recruitment that resulted in reduced survival due to the absence of neighbor buffering of thermal stress (i.e., positive intraspecific interactions). We tested this hypothesis by manipulating the density of recently settled barnacles and their thermal environment in a field experiment. Counter to our original hypothesis, barnacles with neighbors suffered severe mortality at low-flow sites. When density-dependent predation by the green crab (Carcinusmaenus) was experimentally eliminated, however, we did detect evidence for positive interactions at the low-flow sites but not at the high-flow sites. In spite of the close proximity of the sites, maximum daily rock temperatures at the low-flow sites were slightly, but consistently, greater than those at high-flow sites. Our findings suggest that the upper intertidal border of S. balanoides in the Damariscotta River is limited at low-flow sites by a combination of reduced recruitment, elevated mortality from thermal stress and enhanced predation by green crabs. More generally, our findings highlight how physical stress and predation interact to alter the nature of density-dependent species interactions in natural assemblages.

  8. Solid-phase microextraction-based cuticular hydrocarbon profiling for intraspecific delimitation in Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Chen

    Full Text Available Insect cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs play critical roles in reducing water loss and chemical communication. Species-specific CHC profiles have been used increasingly as an excellent character for species classification. However, considerably less is known about their potential for population delimitation within species. The aims of this study were to develop a solid-phase microextraction (SPME-based CHC collection method and to investigate whether CHC profiles could serve as potential chemotaxonomic tools for intraspecific delimitation in Acyrthosiphon pisum. Optimization of fibers for SPME sampling revealed that 7 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS demonstrated the most efficient adsorption of CHCs among five different tested fibers. SPME sampling showed good reproducibility with repeated collections of CHCs from a single aphid. Validation of SPME was performed by comparing CHC profiles with those from conventional hexane extractions. The two methods showed no qualitative differences in CHCs, although SPME appeared to extract relatively fewer short-chained CHCs. While CHC profiles of a given population differed among developmental stages, wing dimorphism types, and host plants, wingless adult aphids showed very low variance in relative proportions of individual CHC components. Reproducibility of CHC profiles was explored further to classify wingless adult morphs of A. pisum from five different geographic regions that showed no variation in mitochondrial COI gene sequences. Our results demonstrate that CHC profiles are useful in intraspecific delimitation in the field of insect chemotaxonomy.

  9. Solid-phase microextraction-based cuticular hydrocarbon profiling for intraspecific delimitation in Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Bai, Yu; Fan, Yong-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Insect cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) play critical roles in reducing water loss and chemical communication. Species-specific CHC profiles have been used increasingly as an excellent character for species classification. However, considerably less is known about their potential for population delimitation within species. The aims of this study were to develop a solid-phase microextraction (SPME)-based CHC collection method and to investigate whether CHC profiles could serve as potential chemotaxonomic tools for intraspecific delimitation in Acyrthosiphon pisum. Optimization of fibers for SPME sampling revealed that 7 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) demonstrated the most efficient adsorption of CHCs among five different tested fibers. SPME sampling showed good reproducibility with repeated collections of CHCs from a single aphid. Validation of SPME was performed by comparing CHC profiles with those from conventional hexane extractions. The two methods showed no qualitative differences in CHCs, although SPME appeared to extract relatively fewer short-chained CHCs. While CHC profiles of a given population differed among developmental stages, wing dimorphism types, and host plants, wingless adult aphids showed very low variance in relative proportions of individual CHC components. Reproducibility of CHC profiles was explored further to classify wingless adult morphs of A. pisum from five different geographic regions that showed no variation in mitochondrial COI gene sequences. Our results demonstrate that CHC profiles are useful in intraspecific delimitation in the field of insect chemotaxonomy. PMID:28859151

  10. DMEPOS Competitive Bidding

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The DMEPOS Competitive Bidding Program was mandated by Congress through the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA). The statute...

  11. Competition Policy and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllgaard, Peter; Lorentzen, Jo

    2005-01-01

    We briefly review the rationale behind technological alliances and provide a snapshot oftheir role in global competition, especially insofar as it is based around intellectual capital.They nicely illustrate the increased importance of horizontal agreements and thusestablish the relevance of the t......We briefly review the rationale behind technological alliances and provide a snapshot oftheir role in global competition, especially insofar as it is based around intellectual capital.They nicely illustrate the increased importance of horizontal agreements and thusestablish the relevance...... of the topic. We move on to discuss the organisation of industriesin a dynamic context and draw out consequences for competition policy. We concludewith an outlook on the underlying tensions between technology alliances, competitionpolicy, and industrial policy.JEL codes: L4, L5, O31Keywords: Competition...... policy, innovation, alliances, industrial policy...

  12. COMPETITIVENESS FOR SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelu Eugen POPESCU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The current economic environment puts pressure on all national economies which struggle to improve their competitiveness and innovativeness in a sustainable way. This article aims to present the current state of the competitiveness by reviewing the main literature and worldwide researches, in order to provide a brief overview of the determinants that drive productivity and economic success at global and national level, taking into consideration the entrepreneurial activity for a country’s competitiveness and economic growth. The paper identifies the ways in which efficiency driven countries can improve their policies and get a better return on their investments, underlining a set of competitiveness enhancing policies (measures that can be implemented by public and private institutions in order to strengthen the economic fundamentals of the economies.

  13. Innovation and strategic competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Mile B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper discussed relationships of innovation to achieving strategic competitiveness in today globalized economic environment. Special attention is devoted to the nature of competitive advantages on global industries as well national level. Competitive advantage is a firm's ability to transform inputs into goods and services at a profit on a sustained basis, better than competitors. Comparative advantage resides in the factor endowments and created endowments of particular regions. Beside the traditional endowment approach (land, natural resources, labor and the size of the local population it is emphasized the importance of created one such as skilled labor, the technology and knowledge base, government support and culture. Creating corporate or country competitiveness roadmap there are no substantial difference - innovative as well strategic approach is essential.

  14. A strong comeback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marier, D.

    1992-01-01

    This article presents the results of a financial rankings survey which show a strong economic activity in the independent energy industry. The topics of the article include advisor turnover, overseas banks, and the increase in public offerings. The article identifies the top project finance investors for new projects and restructurings and rankings for lenders

  15. FameLab competition

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Are you 18 to 35 years old and studying or working in science in Switzerland? Are you passionate about your job and keen on exciting public imagination with a vision of the 21st century of science? Then this competition is for you!   For more information, check out http://www.famelab.ch/ or http://famelab.org/ or write to info@famelab.ch. Read more about the Famelab competition in this Bulletin article.  

  16. Technology and Competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Fagerberg

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on technology and competitiveness. First, the concept of the international competitiveness of a country, and various theoretical approaches on the relationship between trade and growth, are discussed. Then a number of empirical studies of the impact of technology (as evidenced by R&D, patents, etc.) on exports are examined. The final section summarizes the evidence and considers the lessons for policy.

  17. Managing Dynamic Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Tracy R. Lewis; Huseyin Yildirim

    2002-01-01

    In many important high-technology markets, including software development, data processing, communications, aeronautics, and defense, suppliers learn through experience how to provide better service at lower cost. This paper examines how a buyer designs dynamic competition among rival suppliers to exploit learning economies while minimizing the costs of becoming locked in to one producer. Strategies for controlling dynamic competition include the handicapping of more efficient suppliers in pr...

  18. Context Construction Through Competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between the evolution of statehood and competition in the European context. To begin with, a particular take on the evolution of modern political power in the state form in Europe is developed. Against this background, the article reconstructs how the instit...... and to expand the use of competition as a tool for organizing social processes, and the implications of these attempts for the state of statehood....

  19. Context Construction through Competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.

    This paper examines the relation between the evolution of statehood and institutionalised competition in the European context. The first half of the paper develops a historical-sociological view on the evolution of modern political power in the state form in Europe while the second half the paper...... and expand the use of competition as a tool for organising social processes and the implications of the se attempts for the state of statehood....

  20. World competitiveness and agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. van Zyl

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Against the background of a changing environment in which market factors and greater world trade and competitiveness are increasingly becoming the only criteria for success, a framework for the analysis of world competitiveness is initially developed. This is followed by a discussion on the growth of productivity in agriculture, as well as an exposition of the role of agricultural research. Thirdly, price factors and the terms of trade are discussed, followed by a summary of policy implications.

  1. COMPETITION AS MARKET MECHANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ya. Kazhuro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The essence of a competition as an objective law for development of the commodities production based on private ownership of the means of production and commodity exchange has been revealed in the paper. The paper presents an economic basis of market economy (private ownership which generates a corresponding production objective. Such purpose is a maximization of profit and a minimization of market subject expenses. Therefore, a struggle for the most favourable conditions on commodity production and sales is inevitable in such situation. The struggle is considered in the community with developed market economy as a competition.The competition is regarded not as an exogenic factor exerting its influence on market economic system from the outside, but as an objective phenomenon which is inherent to management market system in itself. Such treatment is substantiated by economic disintegration of individual commodity producers. Being an important engine of market economy, the competition does not establish its laws, and its role is to be an executive of data which are internally inherent in commodity production laws and firstly it concerns a profit maximization law which defines a purpose and guiding motif of economic entities in the given economy.The competition plays a contradictory role under conditions of market economy. On the one hand, it makes manufacturers constantly to aspire to expense reduction for the sake of profit increase. This has resulted in labour productivity increase, production cost decrease and a company receives an opportunity to reduce retail price for its products. Consequently, the competition acts as a potential factor for lowering of prices while increasing production efficiency. On the other hand, sellers have more freedom in price fixing under conditions of imperfect competition as they sell their products under the conditions of a monopolistic competition or an oligopoly. This is the main weakest point of the market

  2. Global competitiveness research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelić Slavica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wealth in all economies is being created at the microeconomic level through the activities of economic entities. Due to the disappearance of many barriers in international trade, i.e. reducing costs in transportation and communications, all countries and their economic subjects are now competing in the global market. In today's global economy, characterized by openness and integration, competitiveness plays a key role both in developed countries, as well as in developing ones. Competitiveness presents sustainable productivity growth driven by the quality of the strategy and operations of the company, affected by macroeconomic and microeconomic environment altogether. The level of competitiveness is determined by productivity - ability to produce goods and services using existing human, financial, natural and other resources. Productivity determines the standard of living of the country or a region, capital income, preservation of national wealth. Productivity also depends on the value of goods and services (e.g. of their uniqueness, quality and the efficiency of their production. In order to identify as many indicators (variables that are essential to the concept of competition, and get more reliable results when measuring the international competitiveness of countries, most commonly used and most accurate ones are three models: IMD model, the World Economic Forum model and the World Bank model. Those models have been successfully used by the CEER magazine, in order to conduct an analysis of competitiveness between Poland, the Czech Republic, Hungary, as well as of all developing countries (Serbia being among them.

  3. Competition in energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, Warren

    1995-01-01

    With changes occurring within both the gas and electricity industries and both sectors undergoing simultaneous reforms at the State and national levels it is timely to look at some major aspects of the energy-reform processes in Australia and to attempt to offer some perspectives from the viewpoint of an industry user of energy. From an industry user's viewpoint there is quantifiable evidence that competition in the energy sector will deliver major economic benefits to industry and the nation. The reform process currently in train will increase Australia's international competitiveness. Commonwealth-State collaboration is useful on economic issues which require a national consistent approach. Many significant and complex arrangement apply to the gas and electricity sectors which add to the complexity of the respective reform processes. More competitive arrangements are therefore required more quickly at several stages of the gas-sector reform process, such as in the commercialization of government utilities, resolving the issue of third-party transmission pricing, and the removal of State governments' impediments to competitive trading. The Hilmer Report on National Competition Policy will help deal with some difficult structural and transitional issues, e.g. third-party access, competitive structures, regulatory regimes, and a consistent national approach.(author). 1 fig., 1 photo

  4. EU POLICY REGARDING THE COMPETITIVENESS ISSUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bârsan

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with one of the most important, but also challenging economic issues nowadays, which is economic competitiveness. The literature is not unanimous in recognizing the importance of competitiveness, especially where it concerns the state level. However, the relevance of international competitiveness is increasingly brought into light by theory, specific policy measures and by periodical evaluations made by international organizations. Against this background, the EU is one of the main players whose position is still lagging behind the USA, and, according to recent evaluations, behind the other OECD countries. The European Council in March 2000, held in Lisbon, had launched a very inciting challenge – that of transforming the EU economy into the most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy in the world, by 2010. Such an ambitious target requires an evaluation of the competitiveness level and also new measures to be taken in order to accomplish this objective.The article presents opinions on the EU competitiveness issue, and on the main weak and strong points, concluding that even the target and especially the schedule seem to be unrealistic, the new direction of action, i.e. towards better business conditions for enterprises being correct.

  5. The Role of Within-Host Competition for Coexistence in Multiparasitoid-Host Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, Ellen; Pérez-Vila, Saleta; Etienne, Rampal S

    2016-01-01

    Multiparasitism (females of multiple species parasitizing the same host) is a ubiquitous phenomenon in parasitoids, yet the role of within-host competition has been mostly ignored in multiparasitoid-host models. Here we study the effect of varying the degree of competition at different life stages: competition over oviposition sites (between-adult competition) and larval competition over resources within the host (within-host competition). We adapt a Nicholson-Bailey model to allow for varying levels of between-adult competition (varying the overlap in species distributions) and within-host competition (varying the number of offspring that can successfully emerge from a host). Surprisingly, while stronger between-adult competition reduces coexistence, stronger within-host competition promotes it. Asymmetric between-adult competition (a fecundity difference between the two species) reduces coexistence when compared to symmetric competition; this can be counteracted by asymmetric within-host competition (within-host competitive advantage of the lower-fecundity species), but only when within-host competition is strong and the correlation between the parasitoids' distributions is intermediate. We discuss our results in the context of the interaction between two parasitoid species, Nasonia vitripennis and Nasonia giraulti, which have strongly correlated distributions and high levels of multiparasitism in the field. We conclude that either low or asymmetric within-host competition is unlikely to explain their coexistence.

  6. Consequences of intra-specific metabolic diversity in plants for soil organisms : a baseline approach for evaluating ecological effects of genetic modifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabouw, P.

    2012-01-01

    Plant intra-specific variation, i.e. variation within a plant species, is known to affect organisms that are directly associated to plants. These effects may be due to for example differences in nutritional quality or defensive metabolites. Plant intra-specific variation can also affect

  7. MACROECONOMIC ASPECTS OF COMPETITIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Hooke

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the process of globalization of world economic processes, the role of individual national economies increases, comparative advantages of the development of a country are formed, and their competitiveness is ensured. That is why it is worth emphasizing the importance of increasing the competitiveness of each individual country, based on its internal capacity. In a broad aspect, the competitiveness of the national economy is perceived as the ability of the country to ensure the balance of its external proportions and to avoid those constraints imposed by the foreign economic sphere, to self-organizing the improvement of their world economic ties. The competitiveness of the economy at the macro level is associated with the duration of the cycle of reproduction of the main productive assets and, accordingly, the jobs, productive forces of society and determined by the overall economic efficiency of investment. The criteria of competitiveness of the national economy are the growth of social productivity of labor, increase of social and economic efficiency of production and standard of living of the population. The competitiveness of the national economy determines sustainable socio-economic development of the country, as well as sustainable development predetermines the competitiveness of not only the country, but also all its levels. Scientific results are obtained using special methods of research of economic objects and phenomena, that is, based on the correlation and regressive, comparative analysis (establishing the relationship between the indicator factor, as well as economic modeling. Findings. Generalizing analysis and the importance of the macroeconomic aspect of competitiveness were used in the research paper, which will allow to better respond to the economic situation, in accordance with the trends of the “green” transformation of the economy; which in turn will solve important problems of the development and implementation of its

  8. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Models of spontaneous breaking of electroweak symmetry by a strong interaction do not have fine tuning/hierarchy problem. They are conceptually elegant and use the only mechanism of spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry that is known to occur in nature. The simplest model, minimal technicolor with extended technicolor interactions, is appealing because one can calculate by scaling up from QCD. But it is ruled out on many counts: inappropriately low quark and lepton masses (or excessive FCNC), bad electroweak data fits, light scalar and vector states, etc. However, nature may not choose the minimal model and then we are stuck: except possibly through lattice simulations, we are unable to compute and test the models. In the LHC era it therefore makes sense to abandon specific models (of strong EW breaking) and concentrate on generic features that may indicate discovery. The Technicolor Straw Man is not a model but a parametrized search strategy inspired by a remarkable generic feature of walking technicolor,...

  9. Healthy Competition and Unsound Comparison: Reforming Educational Competition in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    It is frequently claimed that the "competition state" responds to external competition by making competition increasingly central to its internal processes as well. This article discusses education reform in Singapore as departing from the opposite position. In Singapore "excessive" competition in education is now targeted by…

  10. Plasmons in strong superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldo, M.; Ducoin, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the possible plasmon excitations that can occur in systems where strong superconductivity is present. In these systems the plasmon energy is comparable to or smaller than the pairing gap. As a prototype of these systems we consider the proton component of Neutron Star matter just below the crust when electron screening is not taken into account. For the realistic case we consider in detail the different aspects of the elementary excitations when the proton, electron components are considered within the Random-Phase Approximation generalized to the superfluid case, while the influence of the neutron component is considered only at qualitative level. Electron screening plays a major role in modifying the proton spectrum and spectral function. At the same time the electron plasmon is strongly modified and damped by the indirect coupling with the superfluid proton component, even at moderately low values of the gap. The excitation spectrum shows the interplay of the different components and their relevance for each excitation modes. The results are relevant for neutrino physics and thermodynamical processes in neutron stars. If electron screening is neglected, the spectral properties of the proton component show some resemblance with the physical situation in high-T c superconductors, and we briefly discuss similarities and differences in this connection. In a general prospect, the results of the study emphasize the role of Coulomb interaction in strong superconductors.

  11. Competitive intelligence: An instrument to enhance South Africa’s competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma Viviers

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The case for Competitive Intelligence (CI as an instrument that can enhance the competitiveness of South African companies and South Africa as a country is strong. Various global competitive rankings measurements have indicated over a number of years the areas in which competitiveness is lacking. Moreover, these rankings have indicated that South Africa has failed to improve its position year on year. The fact that the world is becoming increasingly competitive for South African entities is undisputed. Coupled with a fluctuating exchange rate and the country’s geographical proximity, this poses unique challenges facing South African managers who have to deal with various regulations and legislative matters. In order to create and sustain an effective knowledge economy and to enhance global competitiveness, South Africa however has to put appropriate strategies/measures in place to stimulate, encourage and grow knowledge practices. Competitive Intelligence (CI as a means of making more sense of the competitive business environment and to identify opportunities and risks in time to act upon can be effectively used as a means to enhance competitiveness. Valuable lessons from successful CI practices in the business sector and government can be learnt from elsewhere in the world. CI should be investigated and adapted for South Africa’s business environment. It is therefore the aim of this article to first attempt to describe the role of CI in enhancing competitiveness, specifically in South Africa and secondly, to stimulate thought on how to secure momentum in enhancing CI as an academic field by developing relevant CI courses as well as demonstrating the value of CI to companies in South Africa through research and collaboration between academics and the private and public sectors.

  12. Multiple Openings and Competitiveness of Forward Markets: Experimental Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, José Luis; Kujal, Praveen; Rassenti, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    We test the competition enhancing effect of selling forward in experimental Cournot duopoly and quadropoly with multiple forward markets. We find that two forward periods yields competitive outcomes and that the results are very close to the predicted theoretical results for quantity setting duopolies and quadropolies. Our experiments lend strong support to the hypothesis that forward markets are competition enhancing. We then test a new market that allows for endogenously determined indefinitely many forward periods that only close when sellers coordinate on selling a zero amount in a forward market. We find that the outcomes under an endogenous close rule are also very competitive. These results hold for both duopolies and quadropolies.

  13. The Impact of Product Market Competition on Training Provision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Tat-kei; Ng, Travis

    2014-01-01

    While standard models of training focus on how input market affects firms' training decisions, this paper investigates the impact of product market competition on training provision. Using the longitudinal data from Statistics Canada's Workplace and Employee Survey, we find that increased...... competition is strongly associated with more training provision. This association is unlikely to be driven by unobserved heterogeneity, specific measures used and other relevant factors. To the extent that training is a significant source of human capital and industry competitiveness, our results suggest...... that increasing training is an important channel through which competition raises productivity....

  14. SOCIAL ASPECTS OF COMPETITIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimova A. V.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important conditions of the existence of every organization, every enterprise is to insure the long-term sustainable development, one of the conditions of which is the increase of an organizational competitiveness. In modern economic conditions, social aspects of competitiveness are now in the foreground of interest, because just the strategy of social responsibility (SSR of modern enterprises can assure some commercial benefits, in responding, at the same time, to the social demands and in creating its well-being. Such an approach is in the basis of the notion of competitiveness. Along with «rigid parameters», such as price characteristics, the capability to deal with competitors, effective financial and production policies, «flexible factors» of competitiveness are of a big importance: a personnel potential, individual and collective competencies, organizational and managerial capabilities. As a result, we have formulated a research hypothesis: the organizational competitiveness is defined by individual and collective competencies of an organization, is based on socially responsible actions, confirms the demand for the object and insures its sustainable long-term development. Any organization should base all its actions aimed to increase its competitiveness on its intellectual potential, or on the management of individual and collective competencies that assure the sustainable development and the goal achievement. For every organizational strategic action, an effective combination of these competencies exists. So, we suggest a new definition of competitiveness: it is a social and economic category of understanding of the social responsibility, having as a central element individual and collective competencies, based on socially responsible actions of an enterprise, insuring its long-term sustainable development.

  15. Niche separation in Varecia variegata rubra and Eulemur fulvus albifrons: II. Intraspecific patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasey, Natalie

    2002-06-01

    Based on a year-long field study in northeastern Madagascar, I summarize annual patterns of niche use (food patch size, diet, forest height, and forest site) in two sympatric lemurs, Varecia variegata rubra and Eulemur fulvus albifrons. Furthermore, I examine intraspecific patterns of niche use according to sex, season, and reproductive stage in these two lemurs that differ in terms of energetic investment in reproduction. Lemurs as a group provide a special opportunity to test hypotheses concerning sex differences in niche use. Due to their body size monomorphism and seasonal, synchronous pattern of breeding, it is possible to directly evaluate whether sex differences in diet reflect high energetic investment in reproduction by females. Results confirm the hypothesis that intraspecific variation in niche use (e.g., sex differences, seasonal differences) would be more pronounced in V. v. rubra than in E. f. albifrons, due in large measure to the former's relatively high energetic investment in reproduction: 1a) Dietary sex differences in V. v. rubra are most pronounced during costly reproductive stages and involve acquisition of low-fiber, high-protein plant foods. Females of both species consume more seasonally available low-fiber protein (young leaves, flowers) relative to conspecific males during the hot dry season, but only in V. v. rubra females is this pattern also evident during gestation and lactation. 1b) The diets of female V. v. rubra and female E. f. albifrons are more similar to each other than are the diets of conspecific males and females in the case of V. v. rubra. This is not uniformly the case for female E. f. albifrons. This finding confirms a hypothesis put forward in Vasey ([2000] Am J Phys Anthropol 112:411-431) that energetic requirements of reproductive females drive niche separation more than do the energetic requirements of males. 1c) Both species synchronize most or all of lactation with seasonal food abundance and diversity. E. f

  16. Intraspecific non-sexual interactions of Grammostola schulzei (Araneae: Theraphosidae under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson E Ferretti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Intraspecific interactions of araneomorph spiders have received considerable attention, but there are few detailed studies on intraspecific interactions of mygalomorph spiders. Moreover, a thorough understanding of theraphosid biology and ecology is necessary from a conservation standpoint because natural populations may be threatened by habitat disturbances and captures for pet commerce. We described the behavior of conspecific individuals of Grammostola schulzei during non-sexual interactions, under laboratory conditions. Pairs of individuals involving adult males, adult females and juveniles were confronted and observed in resident and intruder conditions, totalizing 115 trials. When confronted two adult females, they retreated or grappled, and performed gaping display with bite attempts, usually resulted in severe injury of the intruder spiders. When confronted females with large juveniles, we frequently observed cannibalism on juveniles. Juveniles exposed to females or to other juveniles retreated or made leg tapping with forelegs and palpal drumming, which are common displays of courting adult males. Adult males courted and clasped some juveniles, but juveniles avoided or reject clasping. The behaviors observed during intraspecific interactions could play an important role determining spatial distribution and could lead to behavioral adaptations of territoriality. Rev. Biol. Trop. 59 (3: 1173-1182. Epub 2011 September 01.Hay pocos estudios detallados sobre las interacciones intraespecíficas de arañas migalomorfas. Por lo tanto, se describe el comportamiento de individuos conspecíficos de Grammostola schulzei durante interacciones nosexuales en condiciones de laboratorio. Se confrontaron y observaron pares de individuos involucrando machos adultos, hembras adultas y juveniles en condiciones de locatarios y visitantes, totalizando 115 encuentros. Cuando dos hembras adultas se enfrentaron, retrocedieron o lucharon adoptando elevaciones

  17. Causes and Consequences of Intraspecific Variation in Nesting Behaviors: Insights from Blue Tits and Great Tits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C. Mainwaring

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nest building is an important and yet under-studied stage of the reproductive cycle in many taxa, including birds, and whilst we have a decent understanding of interspecific variation in avian nesting behaviors, our understanding of intraspecific variation in nesting behaviors is much less developed. This is largely because an insufficient number of studies have been performed on any one species to draw robust conclusions. Fortunately, though, the amount of research on the nesting behaviors of nestbox-breeding blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus and great tits (Parus major has increased dramatically in recent years and their nesting behaviors are now sufficiently well-studied to offer useful insights into intraspecific variation in avian nesting behaviors. Studies show that individuals of both species select nest sites based on the presence and/or absence of conspecifics and heterospecifics and whilst neighbors were assumed to adversely affect focal individuals by competing for resources, they are now considered beneficial as they provide information about habitat quality and contribute to anti-predator defenses. Nest-building females accurately gauge local weather conditions and respond to predictable variation in environmental conditions by building nests with variable amounts of cup lining material to create suitable nest microclimates for nestlings. Meanwhile, both species vary the amount of aromatic plant materials in their nests in relation to the abundance of nest-dwelling parasites and pathogens and as aromatic plant materials also play a role in sexual selection then nest materials can have multiple functions. The height of nests is negatively correlated with the local risk of predation but whilst predator avoidance favors lower nests, sexual selection favors taller nests. In fact, higher quality females build taller nests that contain more green plant material which in turn influences the amount of care provided by males. This suggests

  18. Density-dependent intraspecific aggression regulates survival in northern Yellowstone wolves (Canis lupus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubaynes, Sarah; MacNulty, Daniel R; Stahler, Daniel R; Quimby, Kira A; Smith, Douglas W; Coulson, Tim

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the population dynamics of top-predators is essential to assess their impact on ecosystems and to guide their management. Key to this understanding is identifying the mechanisms regulating vital rates. Determining the influence of density on survival is necessary to understand the extent to which human-caused mortality is compensatory or additive. In wolves (Canis lupus), empirical evidence for density-dependent survival is lacking. Dispersal is considered the principal way in which wolves adjust their numbers to prey supply or compensate for human exploitation. However, studies to date have primarily focused on exploited wolf populations, in which density-dependent mechanisms are likely weak due to artificially low wolf densities. Using 13 years of data on 280 collared wolves in Yellowstone National Park, we assessed the effect of wolf density, prey abundance and population structure, as well as winter severity, on age-specific survival in two areas (prey-rich vs. prey-poor) of the national park. We further analysed cause-specific mortality and explored the factors driving intraspecific aggression in the prey-rich northern area of the park. Overall, survival rates decreased during the study. In northern Yellowstone, density dependence regulated adult survival through an increase in intraspecific aggression, independent of prey availability. In the interior of the park, adult survival was less variable and density-independent, despite reduced prey availability. There was no effect of prey population structure in northern Yellowstone, or of winter severity in either area. Survival was similar among yearlings and adults, but lower for adults older than 6 years. Our results indicate that density-dependent intraspecific aggression is a major driver of adult wolf survival in northern Yellowstone, suggesting intrinsic density-dependent mechanisms have the potential to regulate wolf populations at high ungulate densities. When low prey availability or high

  19. COMPETITIVE ABILITY OF WHEAT IN ASSOCIATION WITH BIOTYPES OF Raphanus raphanistrum L. RESISTANT AND SUSCEPTIBLE TO ALS-INHIBITOR HERBICIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Oliveira da Costa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of Raphanus raphanistrum ALS herbicide-resistant in wheat crops causes crop yield losses, which makes it necessary to understand the factors that influence the interference of this weed to develop safer management strategies. This study aimed to evaluate the competitive ability of wheat in coexistence with biotypes of R. raphanistrum that are resistant (R biotype and susceptible (S biotypes to ALS herbicides and to determine whether there are differences in the competitiveness of these biotypes. The experiments were conducted in a greenhouse using a completely randomized design with four replications. The treatments were placed in pots and arranged in replacement series for three experiments (1 - wheat with the R biotype; 2 - wheat with the S biotype; and 3 - the R biotype with the S biotype at the following ratios: 100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, and 0:100. The competitiveness was analyzed through diagrams applied to replacement experiments and competitiveness indices, including the evaluation of the shoot dry matter of the plants (experiments 1, 2, and 3 and the leaf area (experiment 3. The R and S biotypes significantly decreased the shoot dry matter of the wheat cultivar and demonstrated superior competitive ability compared with the culture. The interspecific competition was more important for the wheat and for the S biotype. The competitiveness of the R biotype compared to the S biotype was similar, with synergism in the leaf area production, which indicates the predominant intraspecific competition exhibited by the R biotype.

  20. Political Failures and Intergovernmental Competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Hindriks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In normative public economics, intergovernmental competition is usually viewed as harmful. Although empirical support for this position does not abound, market integration has intensified competition among developed countries. In this paper we argue that when assessing welfare effects of intergovernmental competition for various forms of political failures (the public choice critique, the outcome is ambiguous and competition can be welfare improving.

  1. Strong-coupling approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, R.B.

    1984-03-01

    Standard path-integral techniques such as instanton calculations give good answers for weak-coupling problems, but become unreliable for strong-coupling. Here we consider a method of replacing the original potential by a suitably chosen harmonic oscillator potential. Physically this is motivated by the fact that potential barriers below the level of the ground-state energy of a quantum-mechanical system have little effect. Numerically, results are good, both for quantum-mechanical problems and for massive phi 4 field theory in 1 + 1 dimensions. 9 references, 6 figures

  2. Strong interaction and QFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, T.

    1981-01-01

    With an assumed weak multiplet structure for bosonic hadrons, which is consistent with the ΔI = 1/2 rule, it is shown that the strong interaction effective hamiltonian is compatible with the weak SU(2) x U(1) gauge transformation. Especially the rho-meson transforms as a triplet under SU(2)sub(w), and this is the origin of the rho-photon analogy. It is also shown that the existence of the non-vanishing Cabibbo angle is a necessary condition for the absence of the exotic hadrons. (orig.)

  3. The effect of medium composition on ovary-slice culture and ovule culture in intraspecific Tulipa gesneriana crosses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creij, van M.G.M.; Kerckhoffs, D.M.F.J.; Bruijn, de S.M.; Tuyl, van J.M.; Vreugdenhil, D.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of several media components on the germination percentage of ovules in intraspecific T. gesneriana L. crosses was studied by using two embryo rescue techniques, viz. ovary-slice culture followed by ovule culture and direct ovule culture. The addition of 9% sucrose to medium for

  4. Molecular evidence for extra-pair paternity and intraspecific brood parasitism in the Black-headed Gull

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ležalová-Piálková, Radka

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 152, č. 2 (2011), s. 291-295 ISSN 0021-8375 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : Black-headed Gull * genetic mating system * extra-pair paternity * intraspecific brood parasitism Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.636, year: 2011

  5. The importance of intraspecific variation in tree responses to elevated [CO2]: breeding and management of future forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    One strategy for managing forests to sustain or increase productivity under global climate change is to initiate breeding programs which maximize responses to elevated [CO2] within species. The basis for any breeding program is intraspecific variation in the traits of interest, and for forests, grow...

  6. Intraspecific morphological and genetic variability in the European freshwater snail Radix labiata (Rossmaessler, 1835) (Gastropoda: Basommatophora: Lymnaeidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schniebs, K.; Glöer, P.; Vinarski, M.V.; Hundsdoerfer, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Radix labiata is a widely distributed Palaearctic freshwater snail. This work aims to improve the knowledge of the intraspecific variability in the most important characters used for its determination. To find out which characters are really suitable to distinguish this species from other similar

  7. Marketing mix and competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Slobodan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Competitiveness cannot simply be viewed as a country's ability to export or generate trade surpluses, since these can be brought about at least temporarily by means of artificially lowering the exchange rate and/or compressing domestic expenditures, as has been done in recent years by many DC that have tried to adjust to diminished resource availability. Authors standpoint is that international competitiveness requires creating comparative advantage where it does not exist, and requires action on several levels including an emerging consensus on the importance of macroeconomic policy, role and accountability of the government as well as the imperative of developing and internalizing technology body of knowledge for achieving competitiveness. Particular attention is given to the role and impact of marketing instruments marketing mix.

  8. Price competition in procurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keisler, J.M.; Buehring, W.A.

    1996-07-01

    When creating a private market to provide a public good, government agencies can influence the market's competitive characteristics. Markets have predictable, but often counterintuitive, behaviors. To succeed in applying available controls, and thereby reduce future costs, agencies must understand the behavior of the market. A model has been constructed to examine some issues in establishing competition for a structure in which there are economies of scale and government is obligated to purchase a fixed total quantity of a good. This model is used to demonstrate a way to estimate the cost savings from several alternative plans for a buyer exploring competitive procurement. The results are not and cannot be accurate for budgeting purposes; rather, they indicate the approximate magnitude of changes in cost that would be associated with changes in the market structure within which procurement occurs

  9. Context Construction through Competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.

    This paper examines the relation between the evolution of statehood and institutionalised competition in the European context. The first half of the paper develops a historical-sociological view on the evolution of modern political power in the state form in Europe while the second half the paper...... reconstructs how the institutionalisation of competition as a specific type of policy tool which has been used by emerging modern states to establish its authority vis-à-vis competing claims to authority. It furthermore engages in an examination of corporatist and governance based attempts to respectively curb...... and expand the use of competition as a tool for organising social processes and the implications of the se attempts for the state of statehood....

  10. Business plan competition

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Venture – Companies for tomorrow" is a business plan competition, which supports students and other junior entrepreneurs in developing their business plans. The sixth edition of the competition is now taking place. Venture 2008 highlights: - prize money totalling CHF 150’000; - possibility to optimize business ideas and business plans with the help of experienced coaches: around 200 coaches are available, with a wide range of backgrounds, entrepreneurs as well as venture capitalists; -\tpossibility to present business ideas and business plans to potential investors ("Investor Days" - 17 January and 7 May); - active involvement in the start-up community; -\tcontribution to potential independence. The competition consists of two phases: Phase I, Business idea, Deadline for submission of business idea: 5 December 2007 (online at http://www.venture.ch). Award Ceremony: 17 January 2008 Phase II, Business plan Deadline for submission of business plan: 2 April 2008 (online at...

  11. The competitive advantage of sanctioning institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürerk, Ozgür; Irlenbusch, Bernd; Rockenbach, Bettina

    2006-04-07

    Understanding the fundamental patterns and determinants of human cooperation and the maintenance of social order in human societies is a challenge across disciplines. The existing empirical evidence for the higher levels of cooperation when altruistic punishment is present versus when it is absent systematically ignores the institutional competition inherent in human societies. Whether punishment would be deliberately adopted and would similarly enhance cooperation when directly competing with nonpunishment institutions is highly controversial in light of recent findings on the detrimental effects of punishment. We show experimentally that a sanctioning institution is the undisputed winner in a competition with a sanction-free institution. Despite initial aversion, the entire population migrates successively to the sanctioning institution and strongly cooperates, whereas the sanction-free society becomes fully depopulated. The findings demonstrate the competitive advantage of sanctioning institutions and exemplify the emergence and manifestation of social order driven by institutional selection.

  12. Effects of habitat patchiness on American lobster movement across a gradient of predation risk and shelter competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovel, Kevin A; Wahle, Richard A

    2010-07-01

    The influence of landscape structure on marine ecological processes is receiving increasing attention. However, few studies conducted in coastal marine habitats have evaluated whether the effects of landscape structure on species interactions and organismal behavior are consistent across the range of an organism, over which landscape context and the strength of species interactions typically vary. American lobster (Homarus americanus) juveniles seek refuge from predators within shallow rocky habitat but make short-distance movements to forage outside of shelter. We evaluated how the patchiness of cobble habitat influences juvenile lobster movement by conducting mark-recapture experiments on lobsters placed within patchy and contiguous cobble plots in three regions of New England among which risk of predation and intraspecific shelter competition vary (Rhode Island, mid-coast Maine, and eastern Maine, USA). We also evaluated whether habitat patchiness influenced lobster colonization of plots and whether lobster fidelity to individual shelters corresponds to variability in predator abundance and conspecific density among regions. Cobble patchiness reduced rates of lobster movement in all three regions in 2004 and in two of three regions in 2005, despite large differences in landscape context among regions. Region had much larger effects on lobster colonization than did patchiness, but patchy plots were colonized at higher rates than were contiguous plots where lobster densities were highest. Fidelity to shelter was higher in regions with low conspecific density (Rhode Island and eastern Maine) than in mid-coast Maine where conspecific density is high and where unmarked lobsters often occupied shelters vacated by marked lobsters. Our results indicate that cobble patchiness influences juvenile lobster movement at small scales, but that the effects of patchiness on movement were consistent across much of the range of the American lobster despite strong regional

  13. Strong Coupling Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2009-01-01

    We show that whenever a 4-dimensional theory with N particle species emerges as a consistent low energy description of a 3-brane embedded in an asymptotically-flat (4+d)-dimensional space, the holographic scale of high-dimensional gravity sets the strong coupling scale of the 4D theory. This connection persists in the limit in which gravity can be consistently decoupled. We demonstrate this effect for orbifold planes, as well as for the solitonic branes and string theoretic D-branes. In all cases the emergence of a 4D strong coupling scale from bulk holography is a persistent phenomenon. The effect turns out to be insensitive even to such extreme deformations of the brane action that seemingly shield 4D theory from the bulk gravity effects. A well understood example of such deformation is given by large 4D Einstein term in the 3-brane action, which is known to suppress the strength of 5D gravity at short distances and change the 5D Newton's law into the four-dimensional one. Nevertheless, we observe that the ...

  14. Intra-specific diversity of Serratia marcescens in Anopheles mosquito midgut defines Plasmodium transmission capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bando, Hironori; Okado, Kiyoshi; Guelbeogo, Wamdaogo M.; Badolo, Athanase; Aonuma, Hiroka; Nelson, Bryce; Fukumoto, Shinya; Xuan, Xuenan; Sagnon, N'Fale; Kanuka, Hirotaka

    2013-01-01

    A critical stage in malaria transmission occurs in the Anopheles mosquito midgut, when the malaria parasite, Plasmodium, ingested with blood, first makes contact with the gut epithelial surface. To understand the response mechanisms within the midgut environment, including those influenced by resident microbiota against Plasmodium, we focus on a midgut bacteria species' intra-specific variation that confers diversity to the mosquito's competency for malaria transmission. Serratia marcescens isolated from either laboratory-reared mosquitoes or wild populations in Burkina Faso shows great phenotypic variation in its cellular and structural features. Importantly, this variation is directly correlated with its ability to inhibit Plasmodium development within the mosquito midgut. Furthermore, this anti-Plasmodium function conferred by Serratia marcescens requires increased expression of the flagellum biosynthetic pathway that is modulated by the motility master regulatory operon, flhDC. These findings point to new strategies for controlling malaria through genetic manipulation of midgut bacteria within the mosquito. PMID:23571408

  15. Intraspecific genetic diversity of Drechslera tritici-repentis as detected by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Pujol Vieira dos Santos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The phytopathogenic fungus Drechslera tritici-repentis causes tan spot, an important disease of wheat in the southern Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul. Twelve D. tritici-repentis isolates were obtained from wheat seeds from different locations in the state. Their colony morphology on potato dextrose agar and polymorphisms in genomic DNA by the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD method were investigated. For the RAPD method, 23 primers were tested of which nine were selected for use in the study of D. tritici-repentis polymorphisms. The degree of similarity between isolates was calculated using a simple matching coefficient and dendrograms constructed by the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetical averages (UPGMA. The morphological and RAPD analyses showed intraspecific polymorphisms within the isolates, but it was not possible to establish a relationship between these polymorphisms and the geographical regions from where the host seeds were collected.

  16. Intraspecific genetic diversity of Oenococcus oeni as derived from DNA fingerprinting and sequence analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavaleta, A I; Martínez-Murcia, A J; Rodríguez-Valera, F

    1997-04-01

    The intraspecific genetic diversity of Oenococcus oeni, the key organism in the malolactic fermentation of wine, has been evaluated by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), ribotyping, small-plasmid content, and sequencing of RAPD markers with widespread distribution among the strains. Collection strains representing the diversity of this species have been studied together with some new isolates, many of which were obtained from wines produced by spontaneous malolactic fermentation. The RAPD profiles were strain specific and discerned two main groups of strains coincident with clusters obtained by macrorestriction typing in a previous work. Ribotyping and the conservation of RAPD markers indicates that O. oeni is a relatively homogeneous species. Furthermore, identical DNA sequences of some RAPD markers among strains representative of the most divergent RAPD clusters indicates that O. oeni is indeed a phylogenetically tight group, probably corresponding to a single clone, or clonal line of descent, specialized to grow in the wine environment and universally spread.

  17. Competition and social cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Libertini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available "Competition" and "social cohesion" are both protected by E.U. and Italian laws. The author moves from the analysis of the meaning of these two concepts, in order to reflect on their compatibility and the way to conciliate them. The central problem - in the opinion of the Author - is to abandon the myth of spontaneous markets' order and to rebuild a political order able to maintain and support, as far as possible, the competitive market economy, but also to govern economic processes in critical moments and situations.

  18. Competition in Soccer Leagues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bodil Olai; Tvede, Mich

    In the present paper a model of competition between sports clubs in a sports league is presented. Clubs are endowed with initial players but at a cost clubs are able to sell their initial players and buy new players. The results are that: if the quality of players is one-dimensional, then equilib......In the present paper a model of competition between sports clubs in a sports league is presented. Clubs are endowed with initial players but at a cost clubs are able to sell their initial players and buy new players. The results are that: if the quality of players is one...

  19. Competitiveness in Road Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgström, Benedikte; Gammelgaard, Britta; Bruun, Poul

    Road transport is an important sector, connecting time and space of production and consumption. Its market conditions has changed. The EU single market implementation has increased price pressure due to supply of low cost road freight transport from counties with lower cost structures. Changes...... a competitive value proposition? We will illustrate the strategy-as-practice with two projects, and discuss implications in terms of capabilities needed to create an effective value proposition and hence competitiveness. The theoretical contribution is in theorizing haulier strategic development in which we...

  20. Intraspecific variation in vertical habitat use by tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) in the western North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudo, Jeremy J; Wetherbee, Bradley M; Harvey, Guy; Nemeth, Richard S; Aming, Choy; Burnie, Neil; Howey-Jordan, Lucy A; Shivji, Mahmood S

    2014-01-01

    Tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) are a wide ranging, potentially keystone predator species that display a variety of horizontal movement patterns, making use of coastal and pelagic waters. Far less, however, is known about their vertical movements and use of the water column. We used pop-up satellite archival tags with two data sampling rates (high rate and standard rate tags) to investigate the vertical habitat use and diving behavior of tiger sharks tagged on the Puerto Rico–Virgin Islands platform and off Bermuda between 2008 and 2009. Useable data were received from nine of 14 sharks tagged, tracked over a total of 529 days. Sharks spent the majority of their time making yo-yo dives within the upper 50 m of the water column and considerable time within the upper 5 m of the water column. As a result, sharks typically occupied a narrow daily temperature range (∼2°C). Dives to greater than 200 m were common, and all sharks made dives to at least 250 m, with one shark reaching a depth of 828 m. Despite some similarities among individuals, a great deal of intraspecific variability in vertical habit use was observed. Four distinct depth distributions that were not related to tagging location, horizontal movements, sex, or size were detected. In addition, similar depth distributions did not necessitate similar dive patterns among sharks. Recognition of intraspecific variability in habitat use of top predators can be crucial for effective management of these species and for understanding their influence on ecosystem dynamics. PMID:24963376

  1. Phylogeny and intraspecific variability of holoparasitic Orobanche (Orobanchaceae) inferred from plastid rbcL sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manen, Jean-François; Habashi, Christine; Jeanmonod, Daniel; Park, Jeong-Mi; Schneeweiss, Gerald M

    2004-11-01

    The rbcL sequences of 106 specimens representing 28 species of the four recognized sections of Orobanche were analyzed and compared. Most sequences represent pseudogenes with premature stop codons. This study confirms that the American lineage (sects. Gymnocaulis and Myzorrhiza) contains potentially functional rbcL-copies with intact open reading frames and low rates of non-synonymous substitutions. For the first time, this is also shown for a member of the Eurasian lineage, O. coerulescens of sect. Orobanche, while all other investigated species of sects. Orobanche and Trionychon contain pseudogenes with distorted reading frames and significantly higher rates of non-synonymous substitutions. Phylogenetic analyses of the rbcL sequences give equivocal results concerning the monophyly of Orobanche, and the American lineage might be more closely related to Boschniakia and Cistanche than to the other sections of Orobanche. Additionally, species of sect. Trionychon phylogenetically nest in sect. Orobanche. This is in concordance with results from other plastid markers (rps2 and matK), but in disagreement with other molecular (nuclear ITS), morphological, and karyological data. This might indicate that the ancestor of sect. Trionychon has captured the plastid genome, or parts of it, of a member of sect. Orobanche. Apart from the phylogenetically problematic position of sect. Trionychon, the phylogenetic relationships within sect. Orobanche are similar to those inferred from nuclear ITS data and are close to the traditional groupings traditionally recognized based on morphology. The intraspecific variation of rbcL is low and is neither correlated with intraspecific morphological variability nor with host range. Ancestral character reconstruction using parsimony suggests that the ancestor of O. sect. Orobanche had a narrow host range.

  2. Epigenetic variation predicts regional and local intraspecific functional diversity in a perennial herb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Mónica; Herrera, Carlos M; Bazaga, Pilar

    2014-10-01

    The ecological significance of epigenetic variation has been generally inferred from studies on model plants under artificial conditions, but the importance of epigenetic differences between individuals as a source of intraspecific diversity in natural plant populations remains essentially unknown. This study investigates the relationship between epigenetic variation and functional plant diversity by conducting epigenetic (methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphisms, MSAP) and genetic (amplified fragment length polymorphisms, AFLP) marker-trait association analyses for 20 whole-plant, leaf and regenerative functional traits in a large sample of wild-growing plants of the perennial herb Helleborus foetidus from ten sampling sites in south-eastern Spain. Plants differed widely in functional characteristics, and exhibited greater epigenetic than genetic diversity, as shown by per cent polymorphism of MSAP fragments (92%) or markers (69%) greatly exceeding that for AFLP ones (41%). After controlling for genetic structuring and possible cryptic relatedness, every functional trait considered exhibited a significant association with at least one AFLP or MSAP marker. A total of 27 MSAP (13.0% of total) and 12 AFLP (4.4%) markers were involved in significant associations, which explained on average 8.2% and 8.0% of trait variance, respectively. Individual MSAP markers were more likely to be associated with functional traits than AFLP markers. Between-site differences in multivariate functional diversity were directly related to variation in multilocus epigenetic diversity after multilocus genetic diversity was statistically accounted for. Results suggest that epigenetic variation can be an important source of intraspecific functional diversity in H. foetidus, possibly endowing this species with the capacity to exploit a broad range of ecological conditions despite its modest genetic diversity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Competitive intelligence as an enabler for firm competitiveness: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Maune

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to provide an overview, from literature, about how competitive intelligence can be an enabler towards a firm’s competitiveness. This overview is done under the background of intense global competition that firms are currently experiencing. This paper used a qualitative content analysis as a data collection methodology on all identified journal articles on competitive intelligence and firm competitiveness. To identify relevant literature, academic databases and search engines were used. Moreover, a review of references in related studies led to more relevant sources, the references of which were further reviewed and analysed. To ensure reliability and trustworthiness, peer-reviewed journal articles and triangulation were used. The paper found that competitive intelligence is an important enabler of firm competitiveness. The findings from this paper will assist business managers to understand and improve their outlook of competitive intelligence as an enabler of firm competitiveness and will be of great academic value.

  4. Vertical and seasonal patterns in competition for microalgae between intertidal gastropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, A J

    1984-10-01

    Grazing by the snail Nerita atramentosa and the limpet Cellana tramoserica caused similarly great reductions in abundance of microalgae - measured by direct counts and by estimation of chlorophyll analyses. A smaller snail, Bembicium nanum, caused smaller reductions of microalgal resources, compared with ungrazed areas. These results were consistent with the competitive abilities of these three species. Chlorophyll concentrations in samples of grazed rocks were reliable estimates of the nature and abundance of food available to the grazers.Inter- and intra-specific competition amongst Nerita and Cellana were investigated at various densities in experimental cages. To examine the effects of different availability of food resources, the experiments were repeated at three heights on the shore (abundance of food decreases with height) and during autumn/winter and spring/summer periods of the year (less food is available during summer).Density-dependent mortality of Cellana was caused by the presence of other limpets, or of Nerita. Mortality was greatest at higher levels and during the spring/summer and was significantly, negatively correlated with mean chlorophyll concentration in the experimental cages. The only exception was that all limpets suddenly died in cages at the highest level during the summer period, which cannot be explained solely by competitive interactions. Nerita showed no density-dependent mortality during the short periods of these experiments. Tissue-weights of Nerita declined with increased density, but the effect of Cellana was not as great as the intraspecific effect of Nerita. Snails retained weight better at lower than at higher levels, and during the autumn/winter which is consistent with the availability of food. Tissue weights of both Nerita and Cellana were positively correlated with chlorophyll concentrations inside the cages in both seasons investigated.These experimental results demonstrate that intensity of competition will vary from

  5. LIGO: The strong belief

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years of designing, building and testing a number of innovative technologies, with the strong belief that the endeavour would lead to a historic breakthrough. The Bulletin publishes an abstract of the Courier’s interview with Barry Barish, one of the founding fathers of LIGO.   The plots show the signals of gravitational waves detected by the twin LIGO observatories at Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington. (Image: Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab) On 11 February, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo collaborations published a historic paper in which they showed a gravitational signal emitted by the merger of two black holes. These results come after 20 years of hard work by a large collaboration of scientists operating the two LIGO observatories in the US. Barry Barish, Linde Professor of Physics, Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology and former Director of the Global Design Effort for the Internat...

  6. Potential for nest site competition between native and exotic tree squirrels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew J. Edelman; John L. Koprowski; Sadie R. Bertelsen

    2009-01-01

    In communities where strong interspecific competition between native species is lacking, exotic and native species often exhibit intense resource competition resulting in decline of native populations. We examined the potential for interspecific competition for nest sites between co-occurring native Mt. Graham red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis...

  7. Strategic Alliance: Competitiveness of Sino-Foreign Cooperative School Running Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lihui; Hou, Tao; Li, Ze

    2011-01-01

    Lying in a transformation period of economic development, economic prosperity, social progress and development in science and technology have to rely on strong competitiveness of a nation's universities to a large degree. Actually, universities' competitiveness is closely related to the improvement of a nation's competitiveness in human resources,…

  8. Competitiveness and Campaign '88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernan-Schloss, Adam, Ed.; And Others

    This report profiles the positions of the six Democratic and six Republican 1988 presidential candidates on policy issues affecting U.S. competitiveness in the global economy. Candidate profiles are provided for: Bruce Babbitt, Michael Dukakis, Richard Gephardt, Albert Gore, Jr., Jesse Jackson, and Paul Simon (Democrats); and George Bush, Robert…

  9. Competition Fosters Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Steffen; Ruchala, Gabriele K.; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    We study the effects of reputation and competition in a stylized market for experience goods. If interaction is anonymous, such markets perform poorly: sellers are not trustworthy, and buyers do not trust sellers. If sellers are identifiable and can, hence, build a reputation, efficiency quadruples...

  10. Business Ideas Competition

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Business Ideas Competition "The Rainbow Seed Fund is a UK fund, which provides finance to support the commercialization of good ideas founded on scientific research; it is for the benefit of the UK industry in particular. To encourage ideas from CERN the Rainbow Seed Fund is running a business ideas competition.The winner of this competition will receive an immediate cash prize of GBP £1,000. In addition the Rainbow Seed Fund may well provide finance for market research, for protection of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) and for prototyping to take the idea forward. Further awards of GBP £750 will be made for ideas which gain investment from the Fund.Candidates will only be required to prepare a 2-4-page summary of their business idea, and not a full business plan. Full details and an entry form are available at www.rainbowseedfund.com ." ALL Members of the Personnel seeking participation in the business ideas competition are asked to submit their ideas via the CERN TT Unit (Jean-Marie.Le Goff@cern.ch) th...

  11. Conflict exposure and competitiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cecchi, Francesco; Leuveld, Koen; Voors, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    We use data from a street football tournament and a series of lab-in-field experiments in postconflict Sierra Leone to examine the impact of exposure to conflict violence on competitive behavior. We find that football players who experienced more intense exposure to violence are more likely to get a

  12. Industrial location and competitiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Brakman (Steven); J.H. Garretsen (Harry); J.G.M. van Marrewijk (Charles)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe interaction between the extent of location advantages and the intensity of firm competition relative to the size of the market jointly determines the location of industrial activity. Technology, factor endowments, geography, and scale economies are influential for determining

  13. Explaining competitive reaction effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeflang, P.S.H.; Wittink, D.R.

    Changes in promotional expenditure decisions for a brand, as in other marketing decisions, should be based on the expected impact on purchase and consumption behavior as well as on the likely reactions by competitors. Purchase behavior may be predicted from estimated demand functions. Competitive

  14. Mediterranean Way of Competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Art Kovacic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean area have a special concept of competitiveness topic. Normally is that region not so industrial and knowledge based oriented as a North Europe.That countries can't reach the same development level as the north one. Lisbon's and Goethenburg's strategies create the main framework of development programme. Mediterranean programme is such a case. European internal market has forced the EU countries to increase competitiveness. The economic prosperity of countries is associated with their ability to generate or attract economic activities which are able to increase income by performing well on themarket. Financial crisis in the EU has changed the look on the competitiveness research. Economy in the main countries has to find way of recovery. Former giants of the financial world have found themselves suddenly facing bankruptcy.Inevitably, the crisis is also having an effect on households and businesses - economic growth has slowed sharply and in some EU countries unemployment has begun to increase for the first time in several years. Form that perspective we have to find the right solution of European competitiveness.

  15. Competition Fosters Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Steffen; Lünser, Gabriele; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of reputation and competition in a trust game. If trustees are anonymous, outcomes are poor: trustees are not trustworthy, and trustors do not trust. If trustees are identifiable and can, hence, build a reputation, efficiency quadruples but is still at only a third of the fir...

  16. City and suburban competition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Austin, D. Andrew

    -, č. 251 (2005), s. 1-38 ISSN 1211-3298 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : government competition * duopoly * local public finance Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp251.pdf

  17. Heterogeneous logics of competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossin, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    still experience competition as an expression of spontaneous human activities. On the basis of these perspectives, a study of fundamental rights of EU law, springing from the principle of ‘free movement of people’, is conducted. The first part of the empirical analysis seeks to detect the presence...

  18. Catalogers and Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, Norman

    1987-01-01

    Reports the results of a literature review and a survey of catalogers which were conducted to study the problem of the decline in quantity and quality of applications for entry-level cataloging jobs. Factors studied included: competition between types of library professionals, automation, library education, the women's movement, and library…

  19. Competitive Moves over Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antero, Michelle; Hedman, Jonas; Henningsson, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This paper applies the Red Queen theory to explain how organizations utilize various sourcing arrangements in order to compete in an evolutionary arms race where only the strongest competitors will survive. This case study incorporates competition and views sourcing strategies as a means to impro...

  20. Growing Competition for Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Questia subscription-based online academic digital books library. Highlights include weaknesses of the collection; what college students want from a library; importance of marketing; competition for traditional academic libraries that may help improve library services; and the ability of Questia to overcome barriers and…

  1. Competition and Development

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Investigation of specific firm behaviour is the bread and butter of competition law enforcement, but studies of the structure and dynamics of relevant markets are ..... point to the text of the European Union–Egypt and European Union–Estonia RTAs, which allow for the exemption of various state aids and state monopolies.

  2. The interaction between predator strategy and prey competition in a pair of multi-predator multi-prey lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, Gavin M.; McCartney, Mark; Glass, David H.

    2018-03-01

    A computational study of a system of ten prey phenotypes and either one or ten predator phenotypes with a range of foraging behaviours, arranged on two separate one-dimensional lattices, is presented. Mutation between nearest neighbours along the prey lattice occurs at a constant rate, and mutation may or may not be enabled for the predators. The significance of competition amongst the prey is investigated by testing a variety of distributions of the relative intraspecific and interspecific competition. We also study the influence this has on the survival and population size of predator phenotypes with a variety of foraging strategies. Our results indicate that the distribution of competition amongst prey is of little significance, provided that intraspecific is stronger than the interspecific, and that it is typically preferable for a predator to adopt a foraging strategy that scales linearly with prey population sizes if it is alone. In an environment of multiple predator phenotypes, the least or most-focused predators are most likely to persist, dependent on the feeding parameter.

  3. John Strong (1941 - 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    Wickens, F

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on Monday 31st July, a few days before his 65th birthday John started his career working with a group from Westfield College, under the leadership of Ted Bellamy. He obtained his PhD and spent the early part of his career on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), but after the early 1970s his research was focussed on experiments in CERN. Over the years he made a number of notable contributions to experiments in CERN: The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras to record the sparks in the spark chambers; He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems; He was responsible for the second level trigger system for the ALEPH detector and spent five years leading a team that designed and built the system, which ran for twelve years with only minor interventions. Following ALEPH he tur...

  4. Stirring Strongly Coupled Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir; Rajagopal, Krishna; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2009-01-01

    We determine the energy it takes to move a test quark along a circle of radius L with angular frequency w through the strongly coupled plasma of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory. We find that for most values of L and w the energy deposited by stirring the plasma in this way is governed either by the drag force acting on a test quark moving through the plasma in a straight line with speed v=Lw or by the energy radiated by a quark in circular motion in the absence of any plasma, whichever is larger. There is a continuous crossover from the drag-dominated regime to the radiation-dominated regime. In the crossover regime we find evidence for significant destructive interference between energy loss due to drag and that due to radiation as if in vacuum. The rotating quark thus serves as a model system in which the relative strength of, and interplay between, two different mechanisms of parton energy loss is accessible via a controlled classical gravity calculation. We close by speculating on the implicati...

  5. Strong-interaction nonuniversality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkas, R.R.; Foot, R.; He, X.; Joshi, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    The universal QCD color theory is extended to an SU(3) 1 direct product SU(3) 2 direct product SU(3) 3 gauge theory, where quarks of the ith generation transform as triplets under SU(3)/sub i/ and singlets under the other two factors. The usual color group is then identified with the diagonal subgroup, which remains exact after symmetry breaking. The gauge bosons associated with the 16 broken generators then form two massive octets under ordinary color. The interactions between quarks and these heavy gluonlike particles are explicitly nonuniversal and thus an exploration of their physical implications allows us to shed light on the fundamental issue of strong-interaction universality. Nonuniversality and weak flavor mixing are shown to generate heavy-gluon-induced flavor-changing neutral currents. The phenomenology of these processes is studied, as they provide the major experimental constraint on the extended theory. Three symmetry-breaking scenarios are presented. The first has color breaking occurring at the weak scale, while the second and third divorce the two scales. The third model has the interesting feature of radiatively induced off-diagonal Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements

  6. Competitive Pressures and Transition to Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Failla, Virgilio; Melillo, Francesca; Reichstein, Toke

    a comprehensive matched employer-employee longitudinal data set from Denmark. To mitigate endogeneity concerns, we exploit variation in the gender composition of established firms as women are systematically found to be less competitive than man. We find that workers are more likely to become entrepreneurs...... to entrepreneurship has a positive non-linear effect. Our results have strong implications for managers, prospect entrepreneurs and policy makers....

  7. Hiding effort to gain a competitive advantage: Evidence from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Heyman, Gail D

    2016-06-06

    Previous studies with Western populations have shown that adolescents' tendency to downplay their academic effort is affected by two kinds of motives: ability-related motives (e.g., to appear competent) and social approval motives (e.g., to be popular). In this research, we test for the presence of additional competition-related motives in China, a culture placing strong emphasis on academic competition. Study 1 (N = 150) showed that, in response to a scenario in which a hard-working high-school junior hid effort from classmates, the most highly endorsed explanation was "to influence others to work less hard to maintain a competitive advantage." Study 2 (N = 174) revealed that competition-related explanations were endorsed relatively more often when the speaker and audience had similar academic rankings. This tendency was most evident when both speaker and audience were top performers, and when this was the case, participants' desire to demonstrate superiority over others was a positive predictor of endorsement of competition-related motives. Study 3 (N = 137) verified that competition-related motives were more strongly endorsed among Chinese participants than U.S. These results suggest that at least in cultures that emphasize academic competition and in contexts where competition is salient, hiding effort is often about attempting to gain strategic advantage. © 2016 International Union of Psychological Science.

  8. Integrated Approach to Competitive Advantage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edita Ragelskaja

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Environmental changes and globalization of markets make an impact on intense competition in almost all business sectors. Evolutionary changes influence companies to learn, adequately react, adapt to environmental changes and to change themselves. Such a situation has revealed the problems of competitive advan­tage of industry companies. Therefore the focus to the factors impacting competitive advantage is seen as timely and relevant. The authors of the paper analyze approaches to competitive advantage and the factors impacting competitive advantage. The integrated model of competitive advantage is proposed in the paper.Article in Lithuanian

  9. Chloride and sulphate toxicity to Hydropsyche exocellata (Trichoptera, Hydropsychidae): Exploring intraspecific variation and sub-lethal endpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sala, Miquel [Centre Tecnològic Forestal de Catalunya - CTFC, Solsona, Catalunya (Spain); Faria, Melissa [CESAM, Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Sarasúa, Ignacio [Technische Universität München, Munich, Bayern (Germany); Barata, Carlos [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Bonada, Núria [Grup de Recerca Freshwater Ecology and Management (FEM), Departament d' Ecologia, Facultat de Biologia, Universitat de Barcelona (UB), Diagonal 643, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Grup de Recerca Freshwater Ecology and Management (FEM), Departament d' Ecologia, Facultat de Biologia, Institut de Recerca de la Biodiversitat (IRBio), Universitat de Barcelona - UB, Diagonal 643, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Brucet, Sandra [Aquatic Ecology Group, BETA Tecnio Centre, University of Vic - Central University of Catalonia, Vic, Catalonia (Spain); Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies, ICREA, Barcelona 08010 (Spain); Llenas, Laia; Ponsá, Sergio [Aquatic Ecology Group, BETA Tecnio Centre, University of Vic - Central University of Catalonia, Vic, Catalonia (Spain); Prat, Narcís [Grup de Recerca Freshwater Ecology and Management (FEM), Departament d' Ecologia, Facultat de Biologia, Universitat de Barcelona (UB), Diagonal 643, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Soares, Amadeu M.V.M. [CESAM, Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); and others

    2016-10-01

    The rivers and streams of the world are becoming saltier due to human activities. In spite of the potential damage that salt pollution can cause on freshwater ecosystems, this is an issue that is currently poorly managed. Here we explored intraspecific differences in the sensitivity of freshwater fauna to two major ions (Cl{sup −} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}) using the net-spinning caddisfly Hydropsyche exocellata Dufour 1841 (Trichoptera, Hydropsychidae) as a model organism. We exposed H. exocellata to saline solutions (reaching a conductivity of 2.5 mS cm{sup −1}) with Cl{sup −}:SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ratios similar to those occurring in effluents coming from the meat, mining and paper industries, which release dissolved salts to rivers and streams in Spain. We used two different populations, coming from low and high conductivity streams. To assess toxicity, we measured sub-lethal endpoints: locomotion, symmetry of the food-capturing nets and oxidative stress biomarkers. According to biomarkers and net building, the population historically exposed to lower conductivities (B10) showed higher levels of stress than the population historically exposed to higher conductivities (L102). However, the differences between populations were not strong. For example, net symmetry was lower in the B10 than in the L102 only 48 h after treatment was applied, and biomarkers showed a variety of responses, with no discernable pattern. Also, treatment effects were rather weak, i.e. only some endpoints, and in most cases only in the B10 population, showed a significant response to treatment. The lack of consistent differences between populations and treatments could be related to the high salt tolerance of H. exocellata, since both populations were collected from streams with relatively high conductivities. The sub-lethal effects tested in this study can offer an interesting and promising tool to monitor freshwater salinization by combining physiological and behavioural bioindicators

  10. Environmental structure and competitive scoring advantages in team competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Sears; Clauset, Aaron

    2013-10-01

    In most professional sports, playing field structure is kept neutral so that scoring imbalances may be attributed to differences in team skill. It thus remains unknown what impact environmental heterogeneities can have on scoring dynamics or competitive advantages. Applying a novel generative model of scoring dynamics to roughly 10 million team competitions drawn from an online game, we quantify the relationship between the structure within a competition and its scoring dynamics, while controlling the impact of chance. Despite wide structural variations, we observe a common three-phase pattern in the tempo of events. Tempo and balance are highly predictable from a competition's structural features alone and teams exploit environmental heterogeneities for sustained competitive advantage. Surprisingly, the most balanced competitions are associated with specific environmental heterogeneities, not from equally skilled teams. These results shed new light on the design principles of balanced competition, and illustrate the potential of online game data for investigating social dynamics and competition.

  11. Company competitiveness and competitive advantages in tourism and hospitality

    OpenAIRE

    Cetinski, Vinka; Milohnic, Ines

    2008-01-01

    Connection between competitive strategies and competitive advantages is described in details in this paper. Model of the research is located on the company level in tourism and hospitality. Applicative basis of the paper is founded on the Diamond of Competitiveness (Case Study) usage and is based on the qualitative research of small entrepreneurship in tourism and hospitality. The fact that every strategy is based on creating and sustaining competitive advantages implies that the principal...

  12. in_focus - Competition and Development: The Power of Competitive ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2008-01-01

    Jan 1, 2008 ... This book demonstrates the importance of true and fair competition to sustainable development and an effective marketplace, touching on issues of globalization, consumer welfare, cartels and monopolies, and trade liberalization. It provides an introduction to competition, and competition law and policy in ...

  13. Crop–weed competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallandt, Eric R.; Weiner, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    on crops. Longer term management of crop–weed competition can be achieved through crop rotations, specifically crop sequences that reduce the weed seed bank, and therefore seedling density, and prevent proliferation of perennial weeds. Key ConceptsKey Concepts * Plant growth requires sunlight, water......Competition from weeds is the most important of all biological factors that reduce agricultural crop yield. This occurs primarily because weeds use resources that would otherwise be available to the crop. The magnitude of yield loss is affected by numerous agronomic and environmental factors, most...... and nutrients, which in turn are converted into biomass that captures additional resources. * In crop or weed monocultures, increasing density increases total production to a maximum that is determined by the resource status of the site, generally with a corresponding decrease in per plant mass. * In crop...

  14. Political Competition and Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Christian

    This paper considers political competition and the consequences of political polarization when parties are better informed about how the economy functions than voters are. Specifically, parties know the cost producing a public good, voters do not. An incumbent's choice of policy acts like a signa...... for costs before an upcoming election. It is shown that the more polarized the political parties the more distorted the incumbent's policy choice.......This paper considers political competition and the consequences of political polarization when parties are better informed about how the economy functions than voters are. Specifically, parties know the cost producing a public good, voters do not. An incumbent's choice of policy acts like a signal...

  15. Power industry and competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recknagel, H.

    1988-01-01

    A task group on antritrust law has been set in by the Federal Ministry of Economics in order to again investigate the position of the utilities within the framework of the law against restraints on competition, (GWB). The task group's report states that from the power industry's perspective, there is no reason to modify the existing system created by sections 103, 103a of the GWB. The EC internal market to come, and enhanced use of coal for power generation to be continued beyond the year 1995 are topics that will keep politicians, utilities, and lawmakers in this field busy enough. In such a situation, the legislator cannot afford a discovery trip into unexplored, theoretical impacts of enhanced competition on the power industry. (orig./DG) [de

  16. Competitive Advantage through Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Maier, Maximilian; Wimschneider, Christine

    2016-01-01

    to failure several times. Before the current situation of the company, it remains challenging in the future as well. Hence, the Nespresso story provides interesting space for discussion and learning about what innovation is, how innovation emerges, and under which circumstances innovation can serve...... as a source for competitive advantage. Research limitations/implications Especially given the current market situation, the case offers different starting points for discussion about innovation and long-term company success. Practical implications Especially before the current market situation, the case...... offers different starting points for discussion about innovation and the success of a company on the long term. The case is designed to give practitioners a better understanding on what an innovation as, and how competitive advantages can be linked to innovation. Originality/value This case of Nespresso...

  17. Canadian competitive advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, J.

    1997-01-01

    The evolution of the Canadian petrochemical industry was outlined, emphasizing the proximity to feedstocks as the principal advantage enjoyed by the industry over its international competitors. Annual sales statistics for 1995 were provided. Key players in the Canadian petrochemical industry (Nova, Dow, DuPont, Methanex, Esso, Union Carbide, Shell and Celanese), their share of the market and key products were noted. Manufacturing facilities are located primarily in Alberta, southern Ontario and Quebec. The feedstock supply infrastructure, historical and alternative ethane pricing in Canada and the US, the North American market for petrochemicals, the competitiveness of the industry, tax competitiveness among Canadian provinces and the US, the Canada - US unit labour cost ratio, ethylene facility construction costs in Canada relative to the US Gulf Coast, and projected 1997 financial requirements were reviewed. 19 figs

  18. Driving Competitiveness Through Servitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlonitis, Viktor; Frandsen, Thomas; Hsuan, Juliana

    Servitization, or adding services to the manufactured product, has become a strategy for increasing financial margins, getting closer to the customer and prolonging product lives. This is especially applicable to Western hemisphere companies in their efforts to compete with companies from low cos...... for the company. This booklet is produced to serve as a documentation of a research project together with industry on how servitization can be a strategy to enhance the competitiveness of manufacturing firms....

  19. Competitive quantity discounts

    OpenAIRE

    Calzolari, Giacomo; Denicolò, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the effects of competition with quantity discounts in a duopoly model with asymmetric firms. Consumers are privately informed about demand, so firms use quantity discounts as a price discrimination device. However, a dominant firm may also use quantity discounts to weaken or eliminate its competitor. We analyze the effects of quantity discounts on firms' profits and consumer surplus. Our main finding is that quantity discounts can decrease social welfare (i.e., the sum of producers...

  20. Competitiveness - higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labas Istvan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Involvement of European Union plays an important role in the areas of education and training equally. The member states are responsible for organizing and operating their education and training systems themselves. And, EU policy is aimed at supporting the efforts of member states and trying to find solutions for the common challenges which appear. In order to make our future sustainable maximally; the key to it lies in education. The highly qualified workforce is the key to development, advancement and innovation of the world. Nowadays, the competitiveness of higher education institutions has become more and more appreciated in the national economy. In recent years, the frameworks of operation of higher education systems have gone through a total transformation. The number of applying students is continuously decreasing in some European countries therefore only those institutions can “survive” this shortfall, which are able to minimize the loss of the number of students. In this process, the factors forming the competitiveness of these budgetary institutions play an important role from the point of view of survival. The more competitive a higher education institution is, the greater the chance is that the students would like to continue their studies there and thus this institution will have a greater chance for the survival in the future, compared to ones lagging behind in the competition. Aim of our treatise prepared is to present the current situation and main data of the EU higher education and we examine the performance of higher education: to what extent it fulfils the strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth which is worded in the framework of Europe 2020 programme. The treatise is based on analysis of statistical data.

  1. Strategic Accessibility Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Bacchiega, Emanuele; Randon, Emanuela; Zirulia, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the effect of competition in market-accessibility enhancement among quality-differentiated firms. Firms are located in regions with different ex-ante transport costs to reach the final market. We characterize the equilibrium of the two-stage game in which firms first invest to improve market accessibility and then compete in prices. Efforts in accessibility improvement crucially depend on the interplay between the willingness to pay for the quality premium of the median consumer an...

  2. Competition: the answers

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    The correct answers to the Staff Association Competition are: How many women delegates are there currently in the Staff Council? -14 Who is the current President of the Staff Association? - Alessandro Raimondo Which year was the Nursery School established by the Staff Association at CERN?  -1965 How many CERN clubs are supported by the Staff Association? -44 What is the supreme representative body of the Staff Association ? -The Staff Council   The winners will be informed by email.

  3. Corporate competitiveness and sustainability risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udo Braendle

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at providing a theoretical analysis of the existing research on corporate competition and sustainability risks that occur when companies aspire to reach maximum competitive advantages and gain competitive benefits compared to their rivals. Competitiveness has been described as a multidimensional, theoretical and relative concept linked with the market mechanism. The concept of competitiveness may refer to different levels of aggregation: national, regional, industrial and individual companies. This paper contributes to the theoretical research on corporate competitiveness by the analysis of old and new definitions of this category. It also notes that the sustainability risks connected to competition can be divided into several groups where the authors highlight environmental, legal, financial risks, behaviour risks and state-related risks as the most crucial ones. For companies to be fit for the competitive challenge, the paper identifies main characteristics of such risks and gives policy guidance for their avoidance

  4. Reduced larval feeding rate is a strong evolutionary correlate of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 85; Issue 3. Reduced larval feeding rate is a strong evolutionary correlate of rapid development in Drosophila melanogaster. M. Rajamani N. Raghavendra ... Keywords. life-history evolution; development time; larval feeding rate; competition; tradeoffs; Drosophila melanogaster.

  5. Social structure affects mating competition in a damselfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Sebastian; Ness, Miriam Horstad; Östlund-Nilsson, Sara; Amundsen, Trond

    2017-12-01

    The strength of mating competition and sexual selection varies over space and time in many animals. Such variation is typically driven by ecological and demographic factors, including adult sex ratio and consequent availability of mates. The spatial scale at which demographic factors affect mating competition and sexual selection may vary but is not often investigated. Here, we analyse variation in size and sex ratio of social groups, and how group structure affects mating competition, in the site-attached damselfish Chrysiptera cyanea. Site-attached reef fishes are known to show extensive intraspecific variation in social structure. Previous work has focused on species for which the size and dynamics of social groups are constrained by habitat, whereas species with group structure unconstrained by habitat have received little attention. Chrysiptera cyanea is such a species, with individuals occurring in spatial clusters that varied widely in size and sex ratio. Typically, only one male defended a nest in multi-male groups. Nest-holding males were frequently visited by mate-searching females, with more visits in groups with more females, suggesting that courtship and mating mostly occur within groups and that male mating success depends on the number of females in the group. Male-male aggression was frequent in multi-male groups but absent in single-male groups. These findings demonstrate that groups are distinct social units. In consequence, the dynamics of mating and reproduction are mainly a result of group structure, largely unaffected short term by overall population demography which would be important in open social systems. Future studies of the C. cyanea model system should analyse longer-term dynamics, including how groups are formed, how they vary in relation to density and time of season and how social structure affects sexual selection.

  6. Political Competition in Economic Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Bardhan, Pranab; Yang, Tsung-Tao

    2004-01-01

    It is sometimes argued that political competition yields benefits to the citizens just as competition in economic markets yields benefits to consumers. We consider the economic costs and benefits of political competition and find that the story is somewhat more complicated. We first review the limited existing literature on this topic, and in the process, identify a number of distinct interpretations of what constitutes political competition. We then turn our attention to two forms of poli...

  7. APPROACHES ON THE COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Ioan PETRIªOR; Natalia Ana STRÃIN (SILAS)

    2013-01-01

    Within this study, we approached the concept of "competitive intelligence" (CI), which we consider a key element for the success of a business, especially in the current period, characterized by numerous economic and financial turbulence. According to Society of Competitive Intelligence (SCIP), competitive intelligence is defined as a method of ethical and moral collection, analysis and dissemination of information regarding the competitive environment, opportunities, vulnerabilities, and int...

  8. Intraspecific variation in thermal acclimation of photosynthesis across a range of temperatures in a perennial crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaka, Serge; Frak, Ela; Julier, Bernadette; Gastal, François; Louarn, Gaëtan

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the thermal acclimation of photosynthesis has been stimulated by the increasing relevance of climate change. However, little is known about intra-specific variations in thermal acclimation and its potential for breeding. In this article, we examined the difference in thermal acclimation between alfalfa (Medicago sativa) cultivars originating from contrasting origins, and sought to analyze the mechanisms in play. A series of experiments was carried out at seven growth temperatures between 5 and 35 °C using four cultivars from temperate and Mediterranean origin. Leaf traits, the photosynthetic rate at 25 °C (A400 (25)), the photosynthetic rate at optimal temperature (A400 (opt)), the thermal optimum of photosynthesis (Topt), and the photosynthetic parameters from the Farqhuar model were determined. Irrespective of cultivar origin, a clear shift in the temperature responses of photosynthesis was observed as a function of growth temperature, affecting thermal optimum of photosynthesis, photosynthetic rate at optimal temperature and photosynthetic rate at 25 °C. For both cultivars, Topt values increased linearly in leaves grown between 5 and 35 °C. Relative homeostasis of A400 (25) and A400 (opt) was found between 10 °C and 30 °C growth temperatures, but sharp declines were recorded at 5 and 35 °C. This homeostasis was achieved in part through modifications to leaf nitrogen content, which increased at extreme temperatures. Significant changes were also recorded regarding nitrogen partitioning in the photosynthetic apparatus and in the temperature dependence of photosynthetic parameters. The cultivars differed only in terms of the temperature response of photosynthetic parameters, with Mediterranean genotypes displaying a greater sensitivity of the maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylation to elevated temperatures. It was concluded that intra-specific variations in the temperature acclimation of photosynthesis exist among alfalfa cultivars

  9. The generalized sports competition problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kern, Walter; Paulusma, Daniël

    2002-01-01

    Consider a sports competition among various teams playing against each other in pairs (matches) according to a previously determined schedule. At some stage of the competition one may ask whether a particular team still has a (theoretical) chance to win the competition. The computational complexity

  10. Competition in a Business Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Chris; Medlin, Christopher J

    Competition and cooperation stabilize and structure business networks. In business research there is little focus on network based competition between firms and on how firms compete to gain network position. We review a range of conceptualizations of competition and cooperation and work towards...... research and also managerial thinking about network strategy and implementation....

  11. Competition policy and cartel size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, A.M.; Harrington Jr., J.E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines endogenous cartel formation in the presence of a competition authority. Competition policy makes the most inclusive stable cartels less inclusive. In particular, small firms that might have been cartel members in the absence of a competition authority are no longer members.

  12. Large intraspecific genetic variation within the Saffron-Crocus group (Crocus L., Series Crocus; Iridaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarne; Orabi, Jihad; Pedersen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    generally were grouped with C. sativus samples. Pollination and maintenance of genetic variation are discussed. The large intraspecific variation found within the three specifically studied species reflects dynamic population structures with potential to meet future ecological fluctuations. It emphasises...

  13. Effects of Competition and Predation by Native Mosquitoes on the North American Invasion of Aedes japonicus japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, T Z; Kesavaraju, B; Leisnham, P T

    2014-11-01

    The success and effects of a biological invasion can be dependent on species interactions with resident competitors and predators. Indirect interactions between competition and predation, such as keystone predation, can influence both invasion success and the impact of an invasive species on resident competitors. The invasive mosquito Aedes japonicus japonicus (Theobald) has been established within the North American range of the indigenous competitor Aedes triseriatus (Say) and indigenous mosquito predator Toxorhynchites rutilus (Coquillett). The effects of Tx. rutilus predation on competition between Ae. j. japonicus and Ae. triseriatus were tested in laboratory microcosms. Consistent with a prior study, there was minimal evidence of competitive asymmetry between Ae. j. japonicus and Ae. triseriatus, with similar effects of intraspecific versus interspecific interactions on both species. Tx. rutilus predation caused high mortality of both Ae. j. japonicus and Ae. triseriatus, and minimized the effects of density-dependent competition. Ae. japonicus females that survived predation had larger adult body sizes than those in treatments without predators. Ae. triseriatus females that survived Tx. rutilus predation were larger and developed quicker than individuals in treatments without predators. Intraspecific competition and predation negatively affected the finite rate of population increase for Ae. j. japonicus, but only affected individual fitness correlates for Ae. triseriatus, indicating that the overall population performance of the invader is more sensitive to these interactions than the native species. Based on these results, we predict that predation is likely to be an important barrier to the establishment and spread of Ae. j. japonicus in tree holes in North America. © 2014 Entomological Society of America.

  14. Food choice effects on herbivory: Intra-specific seagrass palatability and inter-specific macrophyte palatability in seagrass communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ramos, Rocío; Brun, Fernando G.; Egea, Luis G.; Vergara, Juan J.

    2018-05-01

    Interactions between the palatability and abundance of different food sources may influence herbivory patterns in seagrass-dominated communities. In addition, intra-specific differences in nutrient and structural quality of leaves may also alter seagrass palatability and generate different rates of consumption within these communities. We offered two temperate seagrasses species, (Cymodocea nodosa and Zostera noltei) from two different locations to look at intraspecific differences, and two other macrophytes, both of which occur at the same location as seagrasses but represent the extremes of palatability, to a generalist herbivore Paracentrotus lividus (purple sea urchin). Using feeding assays, we compared the consumption rates in individual (single plant species) and combined diets at different food availabilities. Intra-specific differences between seagrass species growing at different locations (inner and outer bay) were indeed found to significantly modify the consumption rate for one species. Structural traits such as carbon content were linked to the low consumption found in Cymodocea nodosa from the inner bay location. In addition, we found that the co-occurrence of different macrophyte species can result in preferential consumption of the more palatable macrophyte with high nutritional content and low structural defence over seagrasses, especially when P. lividus has an abundant food supply. Overall, our findings suggest that intra- and inter-specific differences in seagrass traits and the relative abundance of other macrophytes may explain the variability in patterns of herbivory found within seagrass communities.

  15. Biomechanical implications of intraspecific shape variation in chimpanzee crania: moving towards an integration of geometric morphometrics and finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amanda L.; Benazzi, Stefano; Ledogar, Justin A.; Tamvada, Kelli; Smith, Leslie C. Pryor; Weber, Gerhard W.; Spencer, Mark A.; Dechow, Paul C.; Grosse, Ian R.; Ross, Callum F.; Richmond, Brian G.; Wright, Barth W.; Wang, Qian; Byron, Craig; Slice, Dennis E.; Strait, David S.

    2014-01-01

    In a broad range of evolutionary studies, an understanding of intraspecific variation is needed in order to contextualize and interpret the meaning of variation between species. However, mechanical analyses of primate crania using experimental or modeling methods typically encounter logistical constraints that force them to rely on data gathered from only one or a few individuals. This results in a lack of knowledge concerning the mechanical significance of intraspecific shape variation that limits our ability to infer the significance of interspecific differences. This study uses geometric morphometric methods (GM) and finite element analysis (FEA) to examine the biomechanical implications of shape variation in chimpanzee crania, thereby providing a comparative context in which to interpret shape-related mechanical variation between hominin species. Six finite element models (FEMs) of chimpanzee crania were constructed from CT scans following shape-space Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of a matrix of 709 Procrustes coordinates (digitized onto 21 specimens) to identify the individuals at the extremes of the first three principal components. The FEMs were assigned the material properties of bone and were loaded and constrained to simulate maximal bites on the P3 and M2. Resulting strains indicate that intraspecific cranial variation in morphology is associated with quantitatively high levels of variation in strain magnitudes, but qualitatively little variation in the distribution of strain concentrations. Thus, interspecific comparisons should include considerations of the spatial patterning of strains rather than focus only their magnitude. PMID:25529239

  16. Does intraspecific behavioural variation of pollinator species influence pollination? A quantitative study with hummingbirds and a Neotropical shrub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, P K; Justino, D G; Oliveira, P E

    2016-11-01

    Floral visitors differ in their efficacy as pollinators, and the impact of different pollinator species on pollen flow and plant reproduction has been frequently evaluated. In contrast, the impact of intraspecific behavioural changes on their efficacy as pollinators has seldom been quantified. We studied a self-incompatible shrub Palicourea rigida (Rubiaceae) and its hummingbird pollinators, which adjust their behaviour according to floral resource availability. Fluorescence microscopy was used to access pollen tube growth and incompatibility reaction in pistils after a single visit of territorial or intruder hummingbirds in two populations. To characterise the plant populations and possible differences in resource availability between areas we used a three-term quadrat variance method to detect clusters of floral resources. Within-species variation in foraging behaviour, but not species identity, affected pollinator efficacy. Effectively, hummingbirds intruding into territories deposited more compatible pollen grains on P. rigida stigmas than territory holders in both study areas. Additionally, territory holders deposited more incompatible than compatible pollen grains. Our results imply that intraspecific foraging behaviour variation has consequences for pollination success. Quantifying such variation and addressing the implications of intraspecific variability contribute to a better understanding of the dynamics and consequences of plant-pollinator interactions. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  17. Competition Advocacy: the Italian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Rebecchini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Competition advocacy is considered, together with enforcement, the core business of an antitrust authority. Broadly speaking there are at least three main tasks regularly performed by most, if not all, antitrust agencies that are amenable to the advocacy function: addressing laws and regulations in order to remove unnecessary impediments to competition; engaging in sector enquiries to understand markets behavior and identify critical issues; explaining the benefits of open competitive markets to the public opinion. This article examines these three main tasks and outlines the challenges for competition agencies, with references to the experience of the Italian Competition Authority (ICA and the initiatives undertaken at international level.

  18. The composition of cell walls from grape skin in Vitis vinifera intraspecific hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolinar-Valiente, Rafael; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna; Terrier, Nancy; Doco, Thierry; Ros-García, José María

    2017-09-01

    Monastrell is a red grape cultivar adapted to the dry environmental conditions of Murcia, SE Spain. Its berries seem to be characterized by a rigid cell wall structure, which could make difficult the winemaking process. Cabernet Sauvignon cultivar is used to complement Monastrell wines in this region owing to its high phenolic content with high extractability. This study explores the skin cell wall composition of grapes from plants resulting from intraspecific crosses of Vitis vinifera cultivars Monastrell × Cabernet Sauvignon. Moreover, the morphology of the cell wall material (CWM) from some representative samples was visualized by transmission optical microscopy. The total sugar content of CWM from nine out of ten genotypes of the progeny was lower than that from Monastrell. Seven out of ten genotypes showed lower phenolic content than Cabernet Sauvignon. The CWM from nine out of ten hybrids presented lower protein content than that from Monastrell. This study confirms that skin cell walls from Monastrell × Cabernet Sauvignon hybrid grapes presented major differences in composition compared with their parents. These data could help in the development of new cultivars adapted to the dry conditions of SE Spain and with a cell wall composition favouring extractability. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Foliar Substrate Affects Cuticular Hydrocarbon Profiles and Intraspecific Aggression in the Leafcutter Ant Atta sexdens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohan Valadares

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs are traditionally considered to be one of the most important chemical cues used in the nestmate recognition process of social hymenopterans. However, it has been suggested that in the leafcutter ant genus Atta, it is not the CHCs, but the alarm pheromone that is involved in the nestmate recognition process. In this study we used a laboratory population of Atta sexdens to explore the association between their CHC profile variation and intraspecific aggression. In the first part of the experiment, four colonies were divided into two groups with distinct diets to stimulate differentiation of their CHC profiles. In the second part of the experiment, all colonies received the same diet to examine resemblance of chemical profiles. At the end of each part of the experiment we extracted the CHCs from workers. The results demonstrated that colonies that shared the same food resource had similar cuticular hydrocarbon profiles. Furthermore, colonies were significantly more aggressive towards conspecifics that used a different foliar substrate and consequently had greater differences in their cuticular chemical composition. This study suggests that the CHC profiles of A. sexdens can be affected by the foliar substrates used, and that the CHCs are used in the nestmate recognition process of this species.

  20. Intraspecific allometry of standard metabolic rate in green iguanas, Iguana iguana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Lara K; Jacobson, Elliott R; McNab, Brian K

    2003-10-01

    To study the allometric relationship between standard metabolic rate and body mass (mass range 16-3627 g) in green iguanas, Iguana iguana (n=32), we measured rates of oxygen consumption (V(O(2))) at 30 degrees C during scotophase. The relationship could be described as: V(O(2))(ml h(-1))=0.478W(0.734). The resulting mass exponent was similar to the 3/4 power commonly used in interspecific curves (P>0.05), but differed from a proposed intraspecific value of 2/3 (Piguanas did not differ (P>0.05). The mass adjusted V(O(2)) was higher than predicted from generalized squamate curves. The mean mass exponent of intra-individual allometric equations of iguanas (n=7) at varying masses during ontogeny did not differ from that of the pooled equation, indicating that scaling of V(O(2)) is similar for both between and within individuals. Thermal acclimation, compensatory changes in V(O(2)) with prolonged exposure to a constant temperature, was not observed in juvenile iguanas (n=11) between 1 and 5 weeks of acclimation at 30 degrees C.

  1. Size does matter - Intraspecific variation of feeding mechanics in the crested newt Triturus dobrogicus (Kiritzescu, 1903)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Florian; Beisser, Christian J.; Lemell, Patrick

    2018-03-01

    Many studies have yet been conducted on suction feeding in aquatic salamander species. Within the Salamandridae, the crested newt Triturus dobrogicus (Kiritzescu, 1903), occurring from the Austrian Danube floodplains to the Danube Delta, was not subject of investigations so far. The present study examines the kinematics of aquatic suction feeding in this species by means of high-speed videography. Recordings of five individuals of different size and sex while feeding on bloodworms were conducted, in order to identify potential discrepancies among individuals and sizes. Five coordinate points were digitized from recordings of prey capture and twelve time- and velocity-determined variables were evaluated. All specimens follow a typical inertial suction feeding process, where rapid hyoid depression expands the buccal cavity. Generated negative pressure within the buccal cavity causes influx of water along with the prey item into the mouth. Results demonstrate higher distance values and angles for gape in individuals with smaller size. In addition, hyoid depression is maximized in smaller individuals. While Triturus dobrogicus resembles a typical inertial suction feeder in its functional morphology, intraspecific differences could be found regarding the correlation of different feeding patterns and body size.

  2. Intraspecific variation in 137Cs activity concentration in sporocarps of Suillus variegatus in seven Swedish populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlberg, Anders; Nikolova, Ivanka; Johanson, K.-J.

    1997-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident in 1986, sporocarps of Suillus variegatus in Sweden showed a large amount of individual variation in concentration of 137 Cs activity. Our aim was to determine the degrees to which this variability in sporocarp 137 Cs levels could be explained by differences between (i) local populations, (ii) fungal genets and (iii) locations within genets. Five populations in a 100-yr-old Scots pine forest, located within a 1 km 2 area, and two populations in Scots pine/Norway spruce forest, located 40 km north-west of Uppsala, were investigated. In total, 154 sporocarps were analysed to determine their 137 Cs content. Of these, the genetic affiliations of 86 were successfully characterized using somatic incompatibility reactions. Twenty-six genets were found which, on average, consisted of 6.5 sporocarps. The genets averaged 7.5 m in size, measured as the length between the most distant sporocarps. The mean sporocarp 137 Cs level was 67.1 ± 2.8 kBq kgsup(-1) D.W. (range between 13.6 and 182). According to analyses of variance, within-population variation accounted for 60% of the total variation in 137 Cs levels, while 40% was ascribed to variation among populations. Within a population, 137 Cs levels did not generally differ significantly between genets. Plausible reasons for intraspecific variation in radiocaesium content in sporocarps are discussed. (author)

  3. Intraspecific variations in responses to ocean acidification in two branching coral species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekizawa, Ayami; Uechi, Hikaru; Iguchi, Akira; Nakamura, Takashi; Kumagai, Naoki H; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sakai, Kazuhiko; Nojiri, Yukihiro

    2017-09-15

    Ocean acidification is widely recognised to have a negative impact on marine calcifying organisms by reducing calcifications, but controversy remains over whether such organisms could cope with ocean acidification within a range of phenotypic plasticity and/or adapt to future acidifying ocean. We performed a laboratory rearing experiment using clonal fragments of the common branching corals Montipora digitata and Porites cylindrica under control and acidified seawater (lower pH) conditions (approximately 400 and 900μatm pCO 2 , respectively) and evaluated the intraspecific variations in their responses to ocean acidification. Intra- and interspecific variations in calcification and photosynthetic efficiency were evident according to both pCO 2 conditions and colony, indicating that responses to acidification may be individually variable at the colony level. Our results suggest that some corals may cope with ocean acidification within their present genotypic composition by adaptation through phenotypic plasticity, while others may be placed under selective pressures resulting in population alteration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. PERFORMANCE AND HETEROTIC ESTIMATION OF GROWTH IN INTRASPECIFIC CROSSING OF GIANT GOURAMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didik Ariyanto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Intraspecific crossing of giant gouramy was done to get better hybrid population. This study was conducted to evaluate the hybrid vigour or heterotic value of the hybrids line, especially for growth rate character. Besides that, we want to know the effect of hybridization on performance of phenotypic variability. Two days post hatching age larvae of four populations i.e. Bastar and Blue-saphire strain, F-1 hybrid and F-1 hybrid reciprocal, were used in this experiment. All fish were reared in aquaria for 30 days period in indoor hatchery. The fish were fed with live food such as Moina and Daphnia for the first ten days, followed by Tubifex for the second ten days and finally, commercial feed were given until the end of the study. The collected data were total length, standard length, and body weight of each population. The results showed that the phenotypic variability of the hybrid population was higher than that of inbred population. Hybrid population from female of Bastar and male of Blue-saphire has better growth than both of its parents. Heterotic values of total length, standard length, and body weight of the hybrid population was 9.5%, 2.9%, and 15.6% respectively. Maternal effect was detected in hybrid population.

  5. Antagonistic properties of two recombinant strains of Streptomyces melanosporofaciens obtained by intraspecific protoplast fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbessi, S; Beauséjour, J; Déry, C; Beaulieu, C

    2003-08-01

    Intraspecific protoplast fusion was used to produce stable prototrophic recombinants of Streptomyces melanosporofaciens EF-76, a biocontrol agent of plant disease producing geldanamycin. Two recombinant strains (FP-54 and FP-60) that differed with regard to their antagonistic properties against Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579, Streptomyces scabies EF-35 and Phytophthora fragariae var. rubi 390 were characterized. FP-60 lost the ability to inhibit the in vitro growth of these microbial strains while FP-54 exhibited higher antagonistic activities against them. FP-60 was deficient in geldanamycin biosynthesis whereas FP-54 was shown to produce, in addition to geldanamycin, at least two other antimicrobial compounds that were absent in the culture supernatants of strain EF-76. Like the wild-type strain EF-76, strain FP-54 reduced common scab symptoms on potato tuber but no significant difference was observed between the disease index attributed to tubers treated with strain EF-76 or with strain FP-54. Strain FP-60 showed no protective effect against common scab. The disease index of tubers treated with this recombinant was worse than the index associated with potato tubers from control treatments.

  6. Host and symbiont intraspecific variability: The case of Paramecium calkinsi and "Candidatus Trichorickettsia mobilis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaneyeva, E; Castelli, M; Szokoli, F; Benken, K; Lebedeva, N; Salvetti, A; Schweikert, M; Fokin, S; Petroni, G

    2018-02-01

    Newly isolated strains of the ciliate Paramecium calkinsi and their cytoplasmic bacterial endosymbionts were characterized by a multidisciplinary approach, including live observation, ultrastructural investigation, and molecular analysis. Despite morphological resemblance, the characterized P. calkinsi strains showed a significant molecular divergence compared to conspecifics, possibly hinting for a cryptic speciation. The endosymbionts were clearly found to be affiliated to the species "Candidatus Trichorickettsia mobilis" (Rickettsiales, Rickettsiaceae), currently encompassing only bacteria retrieved in an obligate intracellular association with other ciliates. However, a relatively high degree of intraspecific divergence was observed as well, thus it was possible to split "Candidatus Trichorickettsia" into three subspecies, one of which represented so far only by the newly characterized endosymbionts of P. calkinsi. Other features distinguished the members of each different subspecies. In particular, the endosymbionts of P. calkinsi resided in the cytoplasm and possessed numerous peritrichous flagella, although no motility was evidenced, whereas their conspecifics in other hosts were either cytoplasmic and devoid of flagella, or macronuclear, displaying flagellar-driven motility. Moreover, contrarily to previously analyzed "Candidatus Trichorickettsia" hosts, infected P. calkinsi cells frequently became amicronucleate and demonstrated abnormal cell division, eventually leading to decline of the laboratory culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Inter- and intra-specific responses to elevated ozone and chamber climate in northern birches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manninen, S.; Huttunen, S.; Vanhatalo, M.; Pakonen, T.; Haemaelaeinen, A.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the responses of micropropagated, northern provenances of downy, mountain and silver birches to elevated ozone (O 3 ) and changing climate using open-top chambers (OTCs). Contrary to our hypothesis, northern birches were sensitive to O 3 , i.e. O 3 levels of 31-36 ppb reduced the leaf and root biomasses by -10%, whereas wood biomass was affected to a lesser extent. The warmer and drier OTC climate enhanced growth in general, though there were differences among the species and clones, e.g. in bud burst and biomass production. Inter- and intra-specific responses to O 3 and changing climate relate to traits such as allocation patterns between the above- and belowground parts (i.e. root/shoot ratio), which further relate to nutrient and water economy. Our experiments may have mimicked future conditions quite well, but only long-term field studies can yield the information needed to forecast responses at both tree and ecosystem levels. - Northern birches are responsive to ambient ozone levels.

  8. Inter- and intra-specific responses to elevated ozone and chamber climate in northern birches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, S; Huttunen, S; Vanhatalo, M; Pakonen, T; Hämäläinen, A

    2009-05-01

    We studied the responses of micropropagated, northern provenances of downy, mountain and silver birches to elevated ozone (O(3)) and changing climate using open-top chambers (OTCs). Contrary to our hypothesis, northern birches were sensitive to O(3), i.e. O(3) levels of 31-36 ppb reduced the leaf and root biomasses by -10%, whereas wood biomass was affected to a lesser extent. The warmer and drier OTC climate enhanced growth in general, though there were differences among the species and clones, e.g. in bud burst and biomass production. Inter- and intra-specific responses to O(3) and changing climate relate to traits such as allocation patterns between the above- and belowground parts (i.e. root/shoot ratio), which further relate to nutrient and water economy. Our experiments may have mimicked future conditions quite well, but only long-term field studies can yield the information needed to forecast responses at both tree and ecosystem levels.

  9. Intraspecific variation in erythrocyte sizes among populations of Hypsiboas cordobas (Anura: Hylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Baraquet

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the morphology and size of erythrocytes of H. cordobae, and analysed the geographic variation of this character along the distribution of the species, in relation to the latitudinal and altitudinal distances. Erythrocyte shape of the H. cordobae is ellipsoidal and the nuclei are also ellipsoidal and centrally oriented. Erythrocyte and nuclear size showed significant differences among populations, with the highest mean size corresponding to the population of Achiras (low altitude site and the lowest mean size to Los Linderos (high altitude site. There was no significant relationship between the latitude of each population and the both erythrocyte and nuclear size. The altitudinal variation in erythrocyte cell size may be attributable to the surface available for gas exchange; a small erythrocyte offers a possibility of greater rate of exchange than a larger one. Our results are consistent with studies of other amphibians, where intraspecific comparisons of populations at different altitudes show that individuals at higher altitudes are characterized by smaller erythrocytes.

  10. Intra-specific downsizing of frugivores affects seed germination of fleshy-fruited plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Méndez, Néstor; Rodríguez, Airam; Nogales, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    The loss of largest-bodied individuals within species of frugivorous animals is one of the major consequences of defaunation. The gradual disappearance of large-bodied frugivores is expected to entail a parallel deterioration in seed dispersal functionality if the remaining smaller-sized individuals are not so effective as seed dispersers. While the multiple impacts of the extinction of large bodied species have been relatively well studied, the impact of intraspecific downsizing (i.e. the extinction of large individuals within species) on seed dispersal has rarely been evaluated. Here we experimentally assessed the impact of body-size reduction in the frugivorous lizard Gallotia galloti (Lacertidae), an endemic species of the Canary Islands, on the seed germination patterns of two fleshy-fruited plant species (Rubia fruticosa and Withania aristata). Seed germination curves and the proportions of germinated seeds were compared for both plant species after being defecated by large-sized individuals and small-sized individuals. The data show that seeds of W. aristata defecated by larger-sized lizards germinated faster and in a higher percentage than those defecated by small-sized lizards, while no differences were found for R. fruticosa seeds. Our results suggest that disappearance of the largest individuals of frugivorous species may impair recruitment of some plant species by worsening seed germination. They also warn us of a potential cryptic loss of seed dispersal functionality on defaunated ecosystems, even when frugivorous species remain abundant.

  11. On the distribution and intraspecific taxonomy of Scrophularia olympica Boiss. (Scrophulariaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Sheludyakova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the distribution and intraspecific systematics of Scrophularia olympica Boiss., one of taxonomically problematic species of figworts. The special attention is given to the record of thisspecies from the Crimea from where it had been reported based on the single herbarium specimen collected “infra Baidara” by F. J. Ruprecht in 1861. This collection was previously regarded as made near the village of Orlinoye (former Baydary in the vicinity of Sevastopol. Actually, the locality “infra Baidara” should be referred to the river Baydara in Georgia, and S. olympica should be excludedboth from the floras of the Crimea and Europe as a whole. Six varieties are recognized within the species; a key to their identification is proposed. Lectotypes of S. olympica var. integrifolia Freyn et Sint., S. olympica var. macrophylla Freyn et Sint., S. olympica var. pinnatifida Trautv. ex Grossh. and S. olympica var. platyloma Grossh. are designated. A new name, S. olympica var. bordzilowskii Sheludyakova, nom. nov. ≡ S. olympica var. integrifoliaBordz., non Freyn et Sint., is proposed.

  12. Competition and Innovation : Pushing Productivity Up or Down?

    OpenAIRE

    Brouwer, E.; van der Wiel, H.P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between competition, innovation and productivity for the Netherlands. We use industry level data aggregated from micro data as well as moments from firm level data for the period 1996-2006. We match innovation data from Community Innovation Survey with accounting data to link innovative activities with performance at the industry level. We find strong evidence for a positive impact of competition on Total Factor Productivity (TFP) at the industry level. Co...

  13. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND ORGANIZATIONAL COMPETITIVENESS: MANAGEMENT MODEL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N. N. Ugoani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern organization theory considers emotional intelligence as the index of competencies that help organizations to develop a vision for competitiveness. It also allows organizational leaders to enthusiastically commit to the vision, and energize organizational members to achieve the vision. To maximize competiveness organizations use models to simplify and clarify thinking, to identify important aspects, to suggest explanations and to predict consequences, and explore other performance areas that would otherwise be hidden in an excess of words. The survey research design was used to explore the relationship between emotional intelligence and organizational competitiveness. The study found that emotional intelligence has strong positive relationship with organizational competitiveness

  14. Energy and competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The members of the Enquete Commission ''Future Energy Policy'' of the German Bundestag are introduced as well as the list of participants from industry and other organizations in the public heaving on 18 th December 1981. Then the catalogue of questions of the Enquete Commission is presented. The written answers of the 11 representatives of industry form the main part of the report. In the following the minutes of the public hearing of the Enquete Commission 'Future Energy Policy' of the German Bundestag on Friday, 18 th December 1981 on the topic of 'The Competitiveness of German economy in various energy supply structures' is presented. (UA) [de

  15. Competitive Manufacturing Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rymaszewska, Anna; Christensen, Irene; Karlsson, Christer

    to constantly improve this process in terms of time to volume, according to predefined cost and quality measures. The importance of the success of this process can lead to a significant creation of competitive advantage. This paper addresses the challenges of the manufacturing ramp-up process in the context......The increasing complexity of business environments and the pressure for organizations on delivering new products faster while maintaining the superior quality of their products, has forced manufacturing organizations to rethink their operations. Managers responsible for manufacturing ramp-up need...

  16. Offshoring and International Competitiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.; Pedersen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    issues on the boundaries of the firm. More or less advanced tasks can be found within all activities, e.g., in sales and marketing where telesales is on the less advanced end of the scale while branding and identity building are on the advanced end of the scale. This article focuses on the antecedents...... to achieve international competitiveness through access to cross-border knowledge flows and foreign knowledge resources. Furthermore, offshoring of advanced manufacturing tasks seems to be more widespread and experience-based than the offshoring of advanced service tasks....

  17. Attention competition with advertisement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Uzay; Bingol, Haluk O.

    2014-09-01

    In the new digital age, information is available in large quantities. Since information consumes primarily the attention of its recipients, the scarcity of attention is becoming the main limiting factor. In this study, we investigate the impact of advertisement pressure on a cultural market where consumers have a limited attention capacity. A model of competition for attention is developed and investigated analytically and by simulation. Advertisement is found to be much more effective when the attention capacity of agents is extremely scarce. We have observed that the market share of the advertised item improves if dummy items are introduced to the market while the strength of the advertisement is kept constant.

  18. Entrepreneurship and corporate competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailović Božo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Macroeconomics reforms are not enough for long-range stability. Transition enterprises in domestic economy hasn't prepare itself for the market economy. It has some specific characteristics which are analyzed in this paper. Entrepreneurship is the corner stone for enterprise development in the sense of achieving sustainable competitiveness in the contemporary globalized world economy. There are two possibilities to introduce it in transition enterprises: (a self-development (development by itself or evolution and (b create partnerships or alliance with some reputable competitor. In current situation, author proposal is for the second solution.

  19. Periodicity and blowup in a two-species cooperating model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Zhigui; Liu, Jiahong; Pedersen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    for the same system are then given. It is shown that periodic solutions exist if the intra-specific competitions are strong whereas blowup solutions exist under certain conditions if the intra-specific competitions are weak. Numerical simulations and a brief discussion are also presented in the last section....

  20. Advancing the STMS genomic resources for defining new locations on the intraspecific genetic linkage map of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokeen Bhumika

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. is an economically important cool season grain legume crop that is valued for its nutritive seeds having high protein content. However, several biotic and abiotic stresses and the low genetic variability in the chickpea genome have continuously hindered the chickpea molecular breeding programs. STMS (Sequence Tagged Microsatellite Sites markers which are preferred for the construction of saturated linkage maps in several crop species, have also emerged as the most efficient and reliable source for detecting allelic diversity in chickpea. However, the number of STMS markers reported in chickpea is still limited and moreover exhibit low rates of both inter and intraspecific polymorphism, thereby limiting the positions of the SSR markers especially on the intraspecific linkage maps of chickpea. Hence, this study was undertaken with the aim of developing additional STMS markers and utilizing them for advancing the genetic linkage map of chickpea which would have applications in QTL identification, MAS and for de novo assembly of high throughput whole genome sequence data. Results A microsatellite enriched library of chickpea (enriched for (GT/CAn and (GA/CTn repeats was constructed from which 387 putative microsatellite containing clones were identified. From these, 254 STMS primers were designed of which 181 were developed as functional markers. An intraspecific mapping population of chickpea, [ICCV-2 (single podded × JG-62 (double podded] and comprising of 126 RILs, was genotyped for mapping. Of the 522 chickpea STMS markers (including the double-podding trait, screened for parental polymorphism, 226 (43.3% were polymorphic in the parents and were used to genotype the RILs. At a LOD score of 3.5, eight linkage groups defining the position of 138 markers were obtained that spanned 630.9 cM with an average marker density of 4.57 cM. Further, based on the common loci present between the current map