WorldWideScience

Sample records for strong interaction dynamics

  1. Spin, Isospin and Strong Interaction Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comay E.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The structure of spin and isospin is analyzed. Although both spin and isospin are related to the same SU(2 group, they represent different dynamical effects. The Wigner-Racah algebra is used for providing a description of bound states of several Dirac particles in general and of the proton state in particular. Isospin states of the four ∆ (1232 baryons are discussed. The work explains the small contribution of quarks spin to the overall proton spin (the proton spin crisis. It is also proved that the addition of QCD’s color is not required for a construction of an antisymmetric state for the ∆ ++ (1232 baryon.

  2. Emergence of junction dynamics in a strongly interacting Bose mixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfknecht, Rafael Emilio; Foerster, Angela; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas

    We study the dynamics of a one-dimensional system composed of a bosonic background and one impurity in single- and double-well trapping geometries. In the limit of strong interactions, this system can be modeled by a spin chain where the exchange coefficients are determined by the geometry of the...

  3. Nonperturbative Dynamics of Strong Interactions from Gauge/Gravity Duality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoryan, Hovhannes [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2008-08-01

    This thesis studies important dynamical observables of strong interactions such as form factors. It is known that Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is a theory which describes strong interactions. For large energies, one can apply perturbative techniques to solve some of the QCD problems. However, for low energies QCD enters into the nonperturbative regime, where di erent analytical or numerical tools have to be applied to solve problems of strong interactions. The holographic dual model of QCD is such an analytical tool that allows one to solve some nonperturbative QCD problems by translating them into a dual ve-dimensional theory de ned on some warped Anti de Sitter (AdS) background. Working within the framework of the holographic dual model of QCD, we develop a formalism to calculate form factors and wave functions of vector mesons and pions. As a result, we provide predictions of the electric radius, the magnetic and quadrupole moments which can be directly veri ed in lattice calculations or even experimentally. To nd the anomalous pion form factor, we propose an extension of the holographic model by including the Chern-Simons term required to reproduce the chiral anomaly of QCD. This allows us to nd the slope of the form factor with one real and one slightly o -shell photon which appeared to be close to the experimental ndings. We also analyze the limit of large virtualities (when the photon is far o -shell) and establish that predictions of the holographic model analytically coincide with those of perturbative QCD with asymptotic pion distribution amplitude. We also study the e ects of higher dimensional terms in the AdS/QCD model and show that these terms improve the holographic description towards a more realistic scenario. We show this by calculating corrections to the vector meson form factors and corrections to the observables such as electric radii, magnetic and quadrupole moments.

  4. Magnetic dynamics of weakly and strongly interacting hematite nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Bender Koch, Christian; Mørup, Steen

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic dynamics of two differently treated samples of hematite nanoparticles from the same batch with a particle size of about 20 nm have been studied by Mossbauer spectroscopy. The dynamics of the first sample, in which the particles are coated and dispersed in water, is in accordance...

  5. Computational strong-field quantum dynamics. Intense light-matter interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Dieter (ed.) [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2017-09-01

    This graduate textbook introduces the computational techniques to study ultra-fast quantum dynamics of matter exposed to strong laser fields. Coverage includes methods to propagate wavefunctions according to the time dependent Schroedinger, Klein-Gordon or Dirac equation, the calculation of typical observables, time-dependent density functional theory, multi configurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock, time-dependent configuration interaction singles, the strong-field approximation, and the microscopic particle-in-cell approach.

  6. Computational strong-field quantum dynamics intense light-matter interactions

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This graduate textbook introduces the computational techniques to study ultra-fast quantum dynamics of matter exposed to strong laser fields. Coverage includes methods to propagate wavefunctions according to the time-dependent Schrödinger, Klein-Gordon or Dirac equation, the calculation of typical observables, time-dependent density functional theory, multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock, time-dependent configuration interaction singles, the strong-field approximation, and the microscopic particle-in-cell approach.

  7. Equilibration Dynamics of Strongly Interacting Bosons in 2D Lattices with Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mi; Hui, Hoi-Yin; Rigol, Marcos; Scarola, V W

    2017-08-18

    Motivated by recent optical lattice experiments [J.-y. Choi et al., Science 352, 1547 (2016)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.aaf8834], we study the dynamics of strongly interacting bosons in the presence of disorder in two dimensions. We show that Gutzwiller mean-field theory (GMFT) captures the main experimental observations, which are a result of the competition between disorder and interactions. Our findings highlight the difficulty in distinguishing glassy dynamics, which can be captured by GMFT, and many-body localization, which cannot be captured by GMFT, and indicate the need for further experimental studies of this system.

  8. Simulation of Quantum Many-Body Dynamics for Generic Strongly-Interacting Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Gregory; Machado, Francisco; Yao, Norman

    2017-04-01

    Recent experimental advances have enabled the bottom-up assembly of complex, strongly interacting quantum many-body systems from individual atoms, ions, molecules and photons. These advances open the door to studying dynamics in isolated quantum systems as well as the possibility of realizing novel out-of-equilibrium phases of matter. Numerical studies provide insight into these systems; however, computational time and memory usage limit common numerical methods such as exact diagonalization to relatively small Hilbert spaces of dimension 215 . Here we present progress toward a new software package for dynamical time evolution of large generic quantum systems on massively parallel computing architectures. By projecting large sparse Hamiltonians into a much smaller Krylov subspace, we are able to compute the evolution of strongly interacting systems with Hilbert space dimension nearing 230. We discuss and benchmark different design implementations, such as matrix-free methods and GPU based calculations, using both pre-thermal time crystals and the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model as examples. We also include a simple symbolic language to describe generic Hamiltonians, allowing simulation of diverse quantum systems without any modification of the underlying C and Fortran code.

  9. Uncovering new strong dynamics via topological interactions at the 100 TeV collider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molinaro, Emiliano; Sannino, Francesco; Thomsen, Anders Eller

    2017-01-01

    In models of composite Higgs dynamics, new composite pseudoscalars can interact with the Higgs and electroweak gauge bosons via anomalous interactions, stemming from the topological sector of the underlying theory. We show that a future 100 TeV proton-proton collider (FCC-pp) will be able to test...

  10. Strongly interacting Fermi gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakr W.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Strongly interacting gases of ultracold fermions have become an amazingly rich test-bed for many-body theories of fermionic matter. Here we present our recent experiments on these systems. Firstly, we discuss high-precision measurements on the thermodynamics of a strongly interacting Fermi gas across the superfluid transition. The onset of superfluidity is directly observed in the compressibility, the chemical potential, the entropy, and the heat capacity. Our measurements provide benchmarks for current many-body theories on strongly interacting fermions. Secondly, we have studied the evolution of fermion pairing from three to two dimensions in these gases, relating to the physics of layered superconductors. In the presence of p-wave interactions, Fermi gases are predicted to display toplogical superfluidity carrying Majorana edge states. Two possible avenues in this direction are discussed, our creation and direct observation of spin-orbit coupling in Fermi gases and the creation of fermionic molecules of 23Na 40K that will feature strong dipolar interactions in their absolute ground state.

  11. Engineering the Dynamics of Effective Spin-Chain Models for Strongly Interacting Atomic Gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volosniev, A. G.; Petrosyan, D.; Valiente, M.

    2015-01-01

    We consider a one-dimensional gas of cold atoms with strong contact interactions and construct an effective spin-chain Hamiltonian for a two-component system. The resulting Heisenberg spin model can be engineered by manipulating the shape of the external confining potential of the atomic gas. We...... find that bosonic atoms offer more flexibility for tuning independently the parameters of the spin Hamiltonian through interatomic (intra-species) interaction which is absent for fermions due to the Pauli exclusion principle. Our formalism can have important implications for control and manipulation...

  12. Out-of-equilibrium dynamics in superspin glass state of strongly interacting magnetic nanoparticle assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamae, Sawako, E-mail: Sawako.nakamae@cea.fr

    2014-04-15

    Interacting magnetic nanoparticles display a wide variety of magnetic behaviors ranging from modified superparamagnetism, superspin glass to possibly, superferromagnetism. The superspin glass state is described by its slow and out-of-equilibrium magnetic behaviors akin to those found in atomic spin glasses. In this article, recent experimental findings on superspin correlation length growth and the violation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem obtained in concentrated frozen ferrofluids are presented to illustrate certain out-of-equilibrium dynamics behavior in superspin glasses. - Highlights: • Recent experimental findings on superspin glass dynamics in magnetic nanoparticle systems. • Advantages of magnetic nanoparticles for the study of spin glass physics. • Open questions and future directions in superspin glass research.

  13. arXiv Uncovering new strong dynamics via topological interactions at the 100 TeV collider

    CERN Document Server

    Molinaro, Emiliano; Thomsen, Anders Eller; Vignaroli, Natascia

    2017-10-27

    In models of composite Higgs dynamics new composite pseudoscalars can interact with the Higgs and electroweak gauge bosons via anomalous interactions, stemming from the topological sector of the underlying theory. We show that a future 100 TeV proton-proton collider (FCC-pp) will be able to test this important sector and thus shed light on the strong dynamics which generates the Higgs and other composite states. To elucidate our results we focus on the topological interactions of a minimal composite Higgs model with a fermionic ultraviolet completion, based on the coset $\\text{SU}(4)/\\text{Sp}(4)$. We suggest the strategy to test these interactions at the FCC-pp and analyse the expected reach.

  14. Exploring effects of strong interactions in enhancing masses of dynamical origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabo Montes de Oca, Alejandro [International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica, Grupo de Fisica Teorica, Vedado, La Habana (Cuba)

    2011-04-15

    A previous study of the dynamical generation of masses in massless QCD is considered from another viewpoint. The quark mass is assumed to have a dynamical origin and is substituted for by a scalar field without self-interaction. The potential for the new field background is evaluated up to two loops. Expressing the running coupling in terms of the scale parameter {mu}, the potential minimum is chosen to fix m{sub top}=175 GeV when {mu}{sub 0}=498 MeV. The second derivative of the potential predicts a scalar field mass of 126.76 GeV. This number is close to the value 114 GeV, which preliminary data taken at CERN suggested to be associated with the Higgs particle. However, the simplifying assumptions limit the validity of the calculations done, as indicated by the large value of {alpha}=(g{sup 2})/(4{pi})=1.077 obtained. However, supporting statements about the possibility of improving the scheme come from the necessary inclusion of weak and scalar field couplings and mass counterterms in the renormalization procedure, in common with the seemingly needed consideration of the massive W and Z fields, if the real conditions of the SM model are intended to be approached. (orig.)

  15. Dynamical evidence for a strong tidal interaction between the Milky Way and its satellite, Leo V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Tollerud, Erik J.; Sand, David J.; Bonaca, Ana; Willman, Beth; Strader, Jay

    2017-05-01

    We present a chemodynamical analysis of the Leo V dwarf galaxy, based on the Keck II DEIMOS spectra of eight member stars. We find a systemic velocity for the system of enrich its stellar population through extended star formation. Owing to the tentative photometric evidence for the tidal substructure around Leo V, we also investigate whether there is any evidence for tidal stripping or shocking of the system within its dynamics. We measure a significant velocity gradient across the system, of dv/dχ = -4.1^{+2.8}_{-2.6} km s^{-1} arcmin-1 (or dv/dχ = -71.9^{+50.8}_{-45.6} km s^{-1} kpc-1), which points almost directly towards the Galactic Centre. We argue that Leo V is likely a dwarf on the brink of dissolution, having just barely survived a past encounter with the centre of the Milky Way.

  16. Resolution-of-identity stochastic time-dependent configuration interaction for dissipative electron dynamics in strong fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinkusch, Stefan; Tremblay, Jean Christophe [Institute for Chemistry and Biochemistry, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustr. 3, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-05-14

    In this contribution, we introduce a method for simulating dissipative, ultrafast many-electron dynamics in intense laser fields. The method is based on the norm-conserving stochastic unraveling of the dissipative Liouville-von Neumann equation in its Lindblad form. The N-electron wave functions sampling the density matrix are represented in the basis of singly excited configuration state functions. The interaction with an external laser field is treated variationally and the response of the electronic density is included to all orders in this basis. The coupling to an external environment is included via relaxation operators inducing transition between the configuration state functions. Single electron ionization is represented by irreversible transition operators from the ionizing states to an auxiliary continuum state. The method finds its efficiency in the representation of the operators in the interaction picture, where the resolution-of-identity is used to reduce the size of the Hamiltonian eigenstate basis. The zeroth-order eigenstates can be obtained either at the configuration interaction singles level or from a time-dependent density functional theory reference calculation. The latter offers an alternative to explicitly time-dependent density functional theory which has the advantage of remaining strictly valid for strong field excitations while improving the description of the correlation as compared to configuration interaction singles. The method is tested on a well-characterized toy system, the excitation of the low-lying charge transfer state in LiCN.

  17. Resolution-of-identity stochastic time-dependent configuration interaction for dissipative electron dynamics in strong fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkusch, Stefan; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2016-05-01

    In this contribution, we introduce a method for simulating dissipative, ultrafast many-electron dynamics in intense laser fields. The method is based on the norm-conserving stochastic unraveling of the dissipative Liouville-von Neumann equation in its Lindblad form. The N-electron wave functions sampling the density matrix are represented in the basis of singly excited configuration state functions. The interaction with an external laser field is treated variationally and the response of the electronic density is included to all orders in this basis. The coupling to an external environment is included via relaxation operators inducing transition between the configuration state functions. Single electron ionization is represented by irreversible transition operators from the ionizing states to an auxiliary continuum state. The method finds its efficiency in the representation of the operators in the interaction picture, where the resolution-of-identity is used to reduce the size of the Hamiltonian eigenstate basis. The zeroth-order eigenstates can be obtained either at the configuration interaction singles level or from a time-dependent density functional theory reference calculation. The latter offers an alternative to explicitly time-dependent density functional theory which has the advantage of remaining strictly valid for strong field excitations while improving the description of the correlation as compared to configuration interaction singles. The method is tested on a well-characterized toy system, the excitation of the low-lying charge transfer state in LiCN.

  18. Strong WW Interaction at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelaez, Jose R

    1998-12-14

    We present a brief pedagogical introduction to the Effective Electroweak Chiral Lagrangians, which provide a model independent description of the WW interactions in the strong regime. When it is complemented with some unitarization or a dispersive approach, this formalism allows the study of the general strong scenario expected at the LHC, including resonances.

  19. Strong interaction at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review two methods discussed in the literature to determine the effective parameters of strongly interacting ... representation for the two-point functions, anticipating the QCD sum rules. The latter are obtained ... resentation of SU(2)V. In particular, if they belong to the adjoint (triplet) representation, such as the vector and ...

  20. Strong interaction at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review two methods discussed in the literature to determine the effective parameters of strongly interacting particles as they move through a heat bath. The first one is the general method of chiral perturbation theory, which may be readily applied to this problem. The other is the method of thermal QCD sum rules.

  1. Strongly Interacting Light Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bruggisser, Sebastian; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of approximate global symmetries that forbid relevant interactions, strongly coupled light Dark Matter (DM) can appear weakly coupled at small energy and generate a sizable relic abundance. Fundamental principles like unitarity restrict these symmetries to a small class, where the leading interactions are captured by effective operators up to dimension-8. Chiral symmetry, spontaneously broken global symmetries and non-linearly realized supersymmetry are examples of this. Their DM candidates (composite fermions, pseudo Nambu-Goldstone Bosons and Goldstini) are interesting targets for LHC missing-energy searches.

  2. Scalar strong interaction hadron theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hoh, Fang Chao

    2015-01-01

    The scalar strong interaction hadron theory, SSI, is a first principles' and nonlocal theory at quantum mechanical level that provides an alternative to low energy QCD and Higgs related part of the standard model. The quark-quark interaction is scalar rather than color-vectorial. A set of equations of motion for mesons and another set for baryons have been constructed. This book provides an account of the present state of a theory supposedly still at its early stage of development. This work will facilitate researchers interested in entering into this field and serve as a basis for possible future development of this theory.

  3. Reprint of: Out-of-equilibrium dynamics in superspin glass state of strongly interacting magnetic nanoparticle assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamae, Sawako, E-mail: Sawako.nakamae@cea.fr

    2014-11-15

    Interacting magnetic nanoparticles display a wide variety of magnetic behaviors ranging from modified superparamagnetism, superspin glass to possibly, superferromagnetism. The superspin glass state is described by its slow and out-of-equilibrium magnetic behaviors akin to those found in atomic spin glasses. In this article, recent experimental findings on superspin correlation length growth and the violation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem obtained in concentrated frozen ferrofluids are presented to illustrate certain out-of-equilibrium dynamics behavior in superspin glasses. - Highlights: • Recent experimental findings on superspin glass dynamics in magnetic nanoparticle systems. • Advantages of magnetic nanoparticles for the study of spin glass physics. • Open questions and future directions in superspin glass research.

  4. Perturbative gadgets without strong interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Yudong; Nagaj, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Perturbative gadgets are used to construct a quantum Hamiltonian whose low-energy subspace approximates a given quantum $k$-body Hamiltonian up to an absolute error $\\epsilon$. Typically, gadget constructions involve terms with large interaction strengths of order $\\text{poly}(\\epsilon^{-1})$. Here we present a 2-body gadget construction and prove that it approximates a target many-body Hamiltonian of interaction strength $\\gamma = O(1)$ up to absolute error $\\epsilon\\ll\\gamma$ using interact...

  5. Particle Ratios from Strongly Interacting Hadronic Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waseem Bashir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the particle ratios K+/π+, K-/π-, and Λ/π- for a strongly interacting hadronic matter using nonlinear Walecka model (NLWM in relativistic mean field (RMF approximation. It is found that interactions among hadrons modify K+/π+ and Λ/π- particle ratios, while K-/π- is found to be insensitive to these interactions.

  6. Strong interactions between stoichiometric constraints and algal defenses: evidence from population dynamics of Daphnia and algae in phosphorus-limited microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMott, William R; Van Donk, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic interactions among nutrients, algae and grazers were tested in a 2 × 3 factorial microcosm experiment that manipulated grazers (Daphnia present or absent) and algal composition (single species cultures and mixtures of an undefended and a digestion-resistant green alga). The experiment was run for 25 days in 10-L carboys under mesotrophic conditions that quickly led to strong phosphorus limitation of algal growth (TP is approximately equal to 0.5 μM, N:P 40:1). Four-day Daphnia juvenile growth assays tested for Daphnia P-limitation and nutrient-dependent or grazer-induced algal defenses. The maximal algal growth rate of undefended Ankistrodesmus (mean ± SE for three replicate microcosms; 0.92 ± 0.02 day(-1)) was higher than for defended Oocystis (0.62 ± 0.03 day(-1)), but by day 6, algal growth was strongly P-limited in all six treatments (molar C:P ratio >900). The P-deficient algae were poor quality resources in all three algal treatments. However, Daphnia population growth, reproduction, and survival were much lower in the digestion-resistant treatment even though growth assays provided evidence for Daphnia P-limitation in only the undefended and mixed treatments. Growth assays provided little or no support for simple threshold element ratio (TER) models that fail to consider algae defenses that result in viable gut passage. Our results show that strong P-limitation of algal growth enhances the defenses of a digestion-resistant alga, favoring high abundance of well-defended algae and energy limitation of zooplankton growth.

  7. Electroweak and Strong Interactions Phenomenology, Concepts, Models

    CERN Document Server

    Scheck, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Electroweak and Strong Interaction: Phenomenology, Concepts, Models, begins with relativistic quantum mechanics and some quantum field theory which lay the foundation for the rest of the text. The phenomenology and the physics of the fundamental interactions are emphasized through a detailed discussion of the empirical fundamentals of unified theories of strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions. The principles of local gauge theories are described both in a heuristic and a geometric framework. The minimal standard model of the fundamental interactions is developed in detail and characteristic applications are worked out. Possible signals of physics beyond that model, notably in the physics of neutrinos are also discussed. Among the applications scattering on nucleons and on nuclei provide salient examples. Numerous exercises with solutions make the text suitable for advanced courses or individual study. This completely updated revised new edition contains an enlarged chapter on quantum chromodynamics an...

  8. Substructure and strong interactions at the TeV scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, M.E.

    1985-12-01

    A review is given of the current status of the three main theoretical ideas relevant to strong-interaction 1 TeV physics. These are composite vector bosons, Higgs bosons (''Technicolor''), and matter fermions. All involve the assumption that some object which is assumed to be fundamental in the standard model actually has dynamical internal structure. Complex, mechanistic models of the new physics are discussed. A brief digression is then made on how the weak interaction allows probing for this new structure. Direct manifestations of new 1 TeV strong interactions are discussed. 125 refs., 18 figs. (LEW)

  9. Controlling Josephson dynamics by strong microwave fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chesca, B.; Savel'ev, E.; Rakhmanov, A.L.; Smilde, H.J.H.; Hilgenkamp, Johannes W.M.

    2008-01-01

    We observe several sharp changes in the slope of the current-voltage characteristics (CVCs) of thin-film ramp-edge Josephson junctions between YBa2Cu3O7−delta and Nb when applying strong microwave fields. Such behavior indicates an intriguing Josephson dynamics associated with the switching from a

  10. Strongly interacting matter in magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Landsteiner, Karl; Schmitt, Andreas; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2013-01-01

    The physics of strongly interacting matter in an external magnetic field is presently emerging as a topic of great cross-disciplinary interest for particle, nuclear, astro- and condensed matter physicists. It is known that strong magnetic fields are created in heavy ion collisions, an insight that has made it possible to study a variety of surprising and intriguing phenomena that emerge from the interplay of quantum anomalies, the topology of non-Abelian gauge fields, and the magnetic field. In particular, the non-trivial topological configurations of the gluon field induce a non-dissipative electric current in the presence of a magnetic field. These phenomena have led to an extended formulation of relativistic hydrodynamics, called chiral magnetohydrodynamics. Hitherto unexpected applications in condensed matter physics include graphene and topological insulators. Other fields of application include astrophysics, where strong magnetic fields exist in magnetars and pulsars. Last but not least, an important ne...

  11. Spatial Imaging of Strongly Interacting Rydberg Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaicharoen, Nithiwadee

    The strong interactions between Rydberg excitations can result in spatial correlations between the excitations. The ability to control the interaction strength and the correlations between Rydberg atoms is applicable in future technological implementations of quantum computation. In this thesis, I investigates how both the character of the Rydberg-Rydberg interactions and the details of the excitation process affect the nature of the spatial correlations and the evolution of those correlations in time. I first describes the experimental apparatus and methods used to perform high-magnification Rydberg-atom imaging, as well as three experiments in which these methods play an important role. The obtained Rydberg-atom positions reveal the correlations in the many-body Rydberg-atom system and their time dependence with sub-micron spatial resolution. In the first experiment, atoms are excited to a Rydberg state that experiences a repulsive van der Waals interaction. The Rydberg excitations are prepared with a well-defined initial separation, and the effect of van der Waals forces is observed by tracking the interatomic distance between the Rydberg atoms. The atom trajectories and thereby the interaction coefficient C6 are extracted from the pair correlation functions of the Rydberg atom positions. In the second experiment, the Rydberg atoms are prepared in a highly dipolar state by using adiabatic state transformation. The atom-pair kinetics that follow from the strong dipole-dipole interactions are observed. The pair correlation results provide the first direct visualization of the electric-dipole interaction and clearly exhibit its anisotropic nature. In both the first and the second experiment, results of semi-classical simulations of the atom-pair trajectories agree well with the experimental data. In the analysis, I use energy conservation and measurements of the initial positions and the terminal velocities of the atom pairs to extract the C6 and C 3 interaction

  12. Strong-field short-pulse nondipole dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrovski, Darko; Førre, Morten; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2009-01-01

    We present a quantitative investigation of strong-field short-pulse nondipole dynamics in laser-matter interactions. We find excellent agreement between ab initio numerical and analytic results obtained using the Magnus expansion. We show that in the short-pulse limit, ultrafast transfer...

  13. Strong Interaction Studies with PANDA at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönning, Karin

    2016-10-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany, provides unique possibilities for a new generation of nuclear-, hadron- and atomic physics experiments. The future PANDA experiment at FAIR will offer a broad physics programme with emphasis on different aspects of hadron physics. Understanding the strong interaction in the perturbative regime remains one of the greatest challenges in contemporary physics and hadrons provide several important keys. In these proceedings, PANDA will be presented along with some high-lights of the planned physics programme.

  14. Fundamental Structure of Matter and Strong Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2011-11-01

    More than 99% of the visible matter in the universe are the protons and neutrons. Their internal structure is mostly governed by the strong interaction. Understanding their internal structure in terms of fundamental degrees-of-freedom is one of the most important subjects in modern physics. Worldwide efforts in the last few decades have lead to numerous surprises and discoveries, but major challenges still remain. An overview of the progress will be presented with a focus on the recent studies of the proton and neutron's electromagnetic and spin structure. Future perspectives will be discussed.

  15. Strong Interactions Physics at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pioppi, M.

    2005-03-14

    Recent results obtained by BABAR experiment and related to strong interactions physics are presented, with particular attention to the extraction of the first four hadronic-mass moments and the first three lepton-energy moments in semileptonic decays. From a simultaneous fit to the moments, the CKM element |V{sub cb}|, the inclusive B {yields} X{sub c}lv and other heavy quark parameters are derived. The second topic is the ambiguity-free measurement of cos(2{beta}) in B {yields} J/{Psi}K* decays. With approximately 88 million of B{bar B} pairs, negative solutions for cos(2{beta}) are excluded at 89%.

  16. Efimov States of Strongly Interacting Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullans, M. J.; Diehl, S.; Rittenhouse, S. T.; Ruzic, B. P.; D'Incao, J. P.; Julienne, P.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Taylor, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate the emergence of universal Efimov physics for interacting photons in cold gases of Rydberg atoms. We consider the behavior of three photons injected into the gas in their propagating frame, where a paraxial approximation allows us to consider them as massive particles. In contrast to atoms and nuclei, the photons have a large anisotropy between their longitudinal mass, arising from dispersion, and their transverse mass, arising from diffraction. Nevertheless, we show that, in suitably rescaled coordinates, the effective interactions become dominated by s -wave scattering near threshold and, as a result, give rise to an Efimov effect near unitarity. We show that the three-body loss of these Efimov trimers can be strongly suppressed and determine conditions under which these states are observable in current experiments. These effects can be naturally extended to probe few-body universality beyond three bodies, as well as the role of Efimov physics in the nonequilibrium, many-body regime.

  17. Strong Influence of Coadsorbate Interaction on CO Desorption Dynamics on Ru(0001) Probed by Ultrafast X-Ray Spectroscopy and Ab Initio Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, H; LaRue, J; Öberg, H; Beye, M; Dell'Angela, M; Turner, J J; Gladh, J; Ng, M L; Sellberg, J A; Kaya, S; Mercurio, G; Hieke, F; Nordlund, D; Schlotter, W F; Dakovski, G L; Minitti, M P; Föhlisch, A; Wolf, M; Wurth, W; Ogasawara, H; Nørskov, J K; Öström, H; Pettersson, L G M; Nilsson, A; Abild-Pedersen, F

    2015-04-17

    We show that coadsorbed oxygen atoms have a dramatic influence on the CO desorption dynamics from Ru(0001). In contrast to the precursor-mediated desorption mechanism on Ru(0001), the presence of surface oxygen modifies the electronic structure of Ru atoms such that CO desorption occurs predominantly via the direct pathway. This phenomenon is directly observed in an ultrafast pump-probe experiment using a soft x-ray free-electron laser to monitor the dynamic evolution of the valence electronic structure of the surface species. This is supported with the potential of mean force along the CO desorption path obtained from density-functional theory calculations. Charge density distribution and frozen-orbital analysis suggest that the oxygen-induced reduction of the Pauli repulsion, and consequent increase of the dative interaction between the CO 5σ and the charged Ru atom, is the electronic origin of the distinct desorption dynamics. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of CO desorption from Ru(0001) and oxygen-coadsorbed Ru(0001) provide further insights into the surface bond-breaking process.

  18. Strong influence of coadsorbate interaction on CO desorption dynamics on Ru(0001) probed by ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and ab initio simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); LaRue, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Oberg, H. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Beye, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Dell' Angela, M. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Turner, J. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gladh, J. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Ng, M. L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sellberg, J. A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Kaya, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Mercurio, G. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Hieke, F. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Nordlund, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Schlotter, W. F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Dakovski, G. L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Minitti, M. P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fohlisch, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Univ. Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany); Wolf, M. [Fritz-Haber Institute of the Max-Planck-Society, Berlin (Germany); Wurth, W. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY Photon Science, Hamburg (Germany); Ogasawara, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Norskov, J. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Ostrom, H. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Pettersson, L. G. M. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Nilsson, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Ablid-Pedersen, F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-04-16

    We show that coadsorbed oxygen atoms have a dramatic influence on the CO desorption dynamics from Ru(0001). In contrast to the precursor-mediated desorption mechanism on Ru(0001), the presence of surface oxygen modifies the electronic structure of Ru atoms such that CO desorption occurs predominantly via the direct pathway. This phenomenon is directly observed in an ultrafast pump-probe experiment using a soft x-ray free-electron laser to monitor the dynamic evolution of the valence electronic structure of the surface species. This is supported with the potential of mean force along the CO desorption path obtained from density-functional theory calculations. Charge density distribution and frozen-orbital analysis suggest that the oxygen-induced reduction of the Pauli repulsion, and consequent increase of the dative interaction between the CO 5σ and the charged Ru atom, is the electronic origin of the distinct desorption dynamics. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of CO desorption from Ru(0001) and oxygen-coadsorbed Ru(0001) provide further insights into the surface bond-breaking process.

  19. Dynamic Kerr effect in a strong uniform AC electric field for interacting polar and polarizable molecules in the mean field approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Snehal D.; Déjardin, Pierre-Michel; Kalmykov, Yuri P.

    2017-09-01

    Analytical formulas for the electric birefringence response of interacting polar and anisotropically polarizable molecules due to a uniform alternating electric field are derived using Berne's forced rotational diffusion model [B. J. Berne, J. Chem. Phys. 62, 1154 (1975)] in the nonlinear version described by Warchol and Vaughan [J. Chem. Phys. 71, 502 (1979)]. It is found for noninteracting molecules that the signal consists of a frequency-dependent DC component superimposed on an oscillatory part with a frequency twice that of the AC driving field. However, unlike noninteracting molecules, the AC part strongly deviates from its dilute counterpart. This suggests a possible way of motivating new experimental studies of intermolecular interactions involving electro-optical methods and complementary nonlinear dielectric relaxation experiments.

  20. Strongly Interacting Matter at High Energy Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLerran,L.

    2008-09-07

    This lecture concerns the properties of strongly interacting matter (which is described by Quantum Chromodynamics) at very high energy density. I review the properties of matter at high temperature, discussing the deconfinement phase transition. At high baryon density and low temperature, large N{sub c} arguments are developed which suggest that high baryonic density matter is a third form of matter, Quarkyonic Matter, that is distinct from confined hadronic matter and deconfined matter. I finally discuss the Color Glass Condensate which controls the high energy limit of QCD, and forms the low x part of a hadron wavefunction. The Glasma is introduced as matter formed by the Color Glass Condensate which eventually thermalizes into a Quark Gluon Plasma.

  1. Interactive molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, Daniel V

    2015-01-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in HTML5 and JavaScript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  2. Efficient simulation of strong system-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Javier; Chin, Alex W; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B

    2010-07-30

    Multicomponent quantum systems in strong interaction with their environment are receiving increasing attention due to their importance in a variety of contexts, ranging from solid state quantum information processing to the quantum dynamics of biomolecular aggregates. Unfortunately, these systems are difficult to simulate as the system-bath interactions cannot be treated perturbatively and standard approaches are invalid or inefficient. Here we combine the time-dependent density matrix renormalization group with techniques from the theory of orthogonal polynomials to provide an efficient method for simulating open quantum systems, including spin-boson models and their generalizations to multicomponent systems.

  3. Simply split strongly interacting massive particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Nicolás; Chu, Xiaoyong; Pradler, Josef

    2017-06-01

    Dark matter which interacts strongly with itself, but only feebly with the Standard Model, is a possibility that has been entertained to solve apparent small-scale structure problems that are pertinent to the noninteracting cold dark matter paradigm. In this paper, we study the simple case in which the self-scattering rate today is regulated by kinematics and/or the abundance ratio, through the mass splitting of nearly degenerate pseudo-Dirac fermions χ1 and χ2 or real scalars ϕ1 and ϕ2. We calculate the relic density of these states in a scenario where self-scattering proceeds through off-diagonal couplings with a vector particle V (dark photon) and where the abundance is set through number-depleting 4-to-2 reactions in the hidden sector, or, alternatively, via freeze-in. We study the implications of the considered models and their prospect of solving astrophysical small-scale structure problems. We also show how the introduction of the (meta)stable heavier state may be probed in future dark matter searches.

  4. Internal bremsstrahlung of strongly interacting charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurgalin, S. D. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation); Tchuvil’sky, Yu. M., E-mail: tchuvl@nucl-th.sinp.msu.ru [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Churakova, T. A. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    A universal theoretical model intended for calculating internal-bremsstrahlung spectra is proposed. In this model, which can be applied to describing nuclear decays of various type (such as alpha decay, cluster decay, and proton emission), use is made of realistic nucleus–nucleus potentials. Theoretical internal-bremsstrahlung spectra were obtained for the alpha decay of the {sup 214}Po nucleus, as well as for the decay of the {sup 222}Ra nucleus via the emission of a {sup 14}C cluster and for the decay of the {sup 113}Cs nucleus via proton emission, and the properties of these spectra were studied. The contributions of various regions (internal, subbarrier, and external) to the internal-bremsstrahlung amplitude were analyzed in detail. It is shown that the contribution of the internal region to the amplitude for internal bremsstrahlung generated in nuclear decay via proton emission is quite large, but that this is not so for alpha decay and decay via cluster emission. Thus, a process in which strong interaction of nuclear particles affects the internal-bremsstrahlung spectrum if found.

  5. Strongly interacting matter from holographic QCD model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yidian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the 5-dimension dynamical holographic QCD model, which is constructed in the graviton-dilaton-scalar framework with the dilaton background field Φ and the scalar field X responsible for the gluodynamics and chiral dynamics, respectively. We review our results on the hadron spectra including the glueball and light meson spectra, QCD phase transitions and transport properties in the framework of the dynamical holographic QCD model.

  6. Strongly interacting atom lasers in three-dimensional optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, Itay; Rigol, Marcos

    2010-10-29

    We show that the dynamical melting of a Mott insulator in a three-dimensional lattice leads to condensation at nonzero momenta, a phenomenon that can be used to generate strongly interacting atom lasers in optical lattices. For infinite on-site repulsion, the case considered here, the momenta at which bosons condense are determined analytically and found to have a simple dependence on the hopping amplitudes. The occupation of the condensates is shown to scale linearly with the total number of atoms in the initial Mott insulator. Our results are obtained by using a Gutzwiller-type mean-field approach, gauged against exact-diagonalization solutions of small systems.

  7. Actinide Topological Insulator Materials with Strong Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, X.; Zhang, H.; Wang, J.; Felser, C.; Zhang, S.-C.

    2011-01-01

    Topological band insulators have recently been discovered in spin-orbit coupled two and three dimensional systems. In this work, we theoretically predict a class of topological Mott insulators where interaction effects play a dominant role. In actinide elements, simple rocksalt compounds formed by Pu and Am lie on the boundary of metal to insulator transition. We show that interaction drives a quantum phase transition to a topological Mott insulator phase with a single Dirac cone on the surface.

  8. Strongly Deterministic Population Dynamics in Closed Microbial Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zak Frentz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Biological systems are influenced by random processes at all scales, including molecular, demographic, and behavioral fluctuations, as well as by their interactions with a fluctuating environment. We previously established microbial closed ecosystems (CES as model systems for studying the role of random events and the emergent statistical laws governing population dynamics. Here, we present long-term measurements of population dynamics using replicate digital holographic microscopes that maintain CES under precisely controlled external conditions while automatically measuring abundances of three microbial species via single-cell imaging. With this system, we measure spatiotemporal population dynamics in more than 60 replicate CES over periods of months. In contrast to previous studies, we observe strongly deterministic population dynamics in replicate systems. Furthermore, we show that previously discovered statistical structure in abundance fluctuations across replicate CES is driven by variation in external conditions, such as illumination. In particular, we confirm the existence of stable ecomodes governing the correlations in population abundances of three species. The observation of strongly deterministic dynamics, together with stable structure of correlations in response to external perturbations, points towards a possibility of simple macroscopic laws governing microbial systems despite numerous stochastic events present on microscopic levels.

  9. Strongly Interacting Fermi Gases in Two Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-17

    provide a benchmark for many-body theories on strongly Figure 1 Figure 1 Evolution of Fermion Pairing from Three to Two Dimensions. Radio -Frequency...form: H = ~ 2k2 2m − gµB ~ S · (B(D) + B(R) + B(Z)), (1) where g is the electron g-factor, µB is the Bohr magneton and S is the electron spin. The...in spin distributions between AXMSPs and radio MSPs, because radio MSPs, which have weak surface magnetic field strengths, could not spin down by the

  10. Strong Interactions, (De)coherence and Quarkonia

    CERN Document Server

    Bellucci, Stefano; Tiwari, Bhupendra Nath

    2011-01-01

    Quarkonia are the central objects to explore the non-perturbative nature of non-abelian gauge theories. We describe the confinement-deconfinement phases for heavy quarkonia in a hot QCD medium and thereby the statistical nature of the inter-quark forces. In the sense of one-loop quantum effects, we propose that the "quantum" nature of quark matters follows directly from the thermodynamic consideration of Richardson potential. Thereby we gain an understanding of the formation of hot and dense states of quark gluon plasma matter in heavy ion collisions and the early universe. In the case of the non-abelian theory, the consideration of the Sudhakov form factor turns out to be an efficient tool for soft gluons. In the limit of the Block-Nordsieck resummation, the strong coupling obtained from the Sudhakov form factor yields the statistical nature of hadronic bound states, e.g. kaons and Ds particles.

  11. "Strong interaction" for particle physics laboratories

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A new Web site pooling the communications resources of particle physics centres all over the world has just been launched. The official launching of the new particle physics website Interactions.org during the Lepton-Proton 2003 Conference at the American laboratory Fermilab was accompanied by music and a flurry of balloons. On the initiative of Fermilab, the site was created by a collaboration of communication teams from over fifteen of the world's particle physics laboratories, including KEK, SLAC, INFN, JINR and, of course, CERN, who pooled their efforts to develop the new tool. The spectacular launching of the new particle physics website Interactions.org at Fermilab on 12 August 2003. A real gateway to particle physics, the site not only contains all the latest news from the laboratories but also offers images, graphics and a video/animation link. In addition, it provides information about scientific policies, links to the universities, a very useful detailed glossary of particle physics and astrophysic...

  12. QCD : the theory of strong interactions Conference MT17

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The theory of strong interactions,Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), predicts that the strong interaction is transmitted by the exchange of particles called gluons. Unlike the messengers of electromagnetism photons, which are electrically neutral - gluons carry a strong charge associated with the interaction they mediate. QCD predicts that the strength of the interaction between quarks and gluons becomes weaker at higher energies. LEP has measured the evolution of the strong coupling constant up to energies of 200 GeV and has confirmed this prediction.

  13. Can strong-field ionization prepare attosecond dynamics?

    CERN Document Server

    Pabst, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Strong-field ionization (SFI) has been shown to prepare wave packets with few-femtosecond periods. Here, we explore whether this technique can be extended to the attosecond time scale. We introduce an intuitive model for predicting the bandwidth of ionic states that can be coherently prepared by SFI. This bandwidth is given by the Fourier-transformed sub-cycle SFI rate and decreases considerably with increasing central wavelength of the ionizing pulse. Many-body calculations based on time-dependent configuration-interaction singles (TDCIS) quantitatively support this result and reveal an additional decrease of the bandwidth as a consequence of channel interactions and non-adiabatic dynamics. Our results further predict that multi-cycle femtosecond pulses can coherently prepare attosecond wave packets with higher selectivity and versatility compared to single-cycle pulses.

  14. Universal spin transport in a strongly interacting Fermi gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Ariel; Ku, Mark; Roati, Giacomo; Zwierlein, Martin W

    2011-04-14

    Transport of fermions, particles with half-integer spin, is central to many fields of physics. Electron transport runs modern technology, defining states of matter such as superconductors and insulators, and electron spin is being explored as a new carrier of information. Neutrino transport energizes supernova explosions following the collapse of a dying star, and hydrodynamic transport of the quark-gluon plasma governed the expansion of the early Universe. However, our understanding of non-equilibrium dynamics in such strongly interacting fermionic matter is still limited. Ultracold gases of fermionic atoms realize a pristine model for such systems and can be studied in real time with the precision of atomic physics. Even above the superfluid transition, such gases flow as an almost perfect fluid with very low viscosity when interactions are tuned to a scattering resonance. In this hydrodynamic regime, collective density excitations are weakly damped. Here we experimentally investigate spin excitations in a Fermi gas of (6)Li atoms, finding that, in contrast, they are maximally damped. A spin current is induced by spatially separating two spin components and observing their evolution in an external trapping potential. We demonstrate that interactions can be strong enough to reverse spin currents, with components of opposite spin reflecting off each other. Near equilibrium, we obtain the spin drag coefficient, the spin diffusivity and the spin susceptibility as a function of temperature on resonance and show that they obey universal laws at high temperatures. In the degenerate regime, the spin diffusivity approaches a value set by [planck]/m, the quantum limit of diffusion, where [planck]/m is Planck's constant divided by 2π and m the atomic mass. For repulsive interactions, our measurements seem to exclude a metastable ferromagnetic state.

  15. QCD : the theory of strong interactions Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The theory of strong interactions,Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD),predicts that the strong interac- tion is transmitted by the exchange of particles called glu- ons.Unlike the messengers of electromagnetism -pho- tons,which are electrically neutral -gluons carry a strong charge associated with the interaction they mediate. QCD predicts that the strength of the interaction between quarks and gluons becomes weaker at higher energies.LEP has measured the evolution of the strong coupling constant up to energies of 200 GeV and has confirmed this prediction.

  16. Prospects for strong interaction physics at ISABELLE. [Seven papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, D P; Trueman, T L

    1977-01-01

    Seven papers are presented resulting from a conference intended to stimulate thinking about how ISABELLE could be used for studying strong interactions. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for inclusion in DOE Energy Research Abstracts (ERA). (PMA)

  17. Strongly-Interacting Fermi Gases in Reduced Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-16

    superconductivity), nuclear physics (nuclear matter), high - energy physics (effective theories of the strong interactions ), astrophysics (compact stellar objects...strongly- interacting Fermi gases confined in a standing- wave CO2 laser trap. This trap produces a periodic quasi-two-dimensional pancake geometry...predictions of the phase diagram and high temperature superfluidity. Our recent measurements reveal that pairing energy and cloud profiles can be

  18. Air-sea interactions during strong winter extratropical storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jill; He, Ruoying; Warner, John C.; Bane, John

    2014-01-01

    A high-resolution, regional coupled atmosphere–ocean model is used to investigate strong air–sea interactions during a rapidly developing extratropical cyclone (ETC) off the east coast of the USA. In this two-way coupled system, surface momentum and heat fluxes derived from the Weather Research and Forecasting model and sea surface temperature (SST) from the Regional Ocean Modeling System are exchanged via the Model Coupling Toolkit. Comparisons are made between the modeled and observed wind velocity, sea level pressure, 10 m air temperature, and sea surface temperature time series, as well as a comparison between the model and one glider transect. Vertical profiles of modeled air temperature and winds in the marine atmospheric boundary layer and temperature variations in the upper ocean during a 3-day storm period are examined at various cross-shelf transects along the eastern seaboard. It is found that the air–sea interactions near the Gulf Stream are important for generating and sustaining the ETC. In particular, locally enhanced winds over a warm sea (relative to the land temperature) induce large surface heat fluxes which cool the upper ocean by up to 2 °C, mainly during the cold air outbreak period after the storm passage. Detailed heat budget analyses show the ocean-to-atmosphere heat flux dominates the upper ocean heat content variations. Results clearly show that dynamic air–sea interactions affecting momentum and buoyancy flux exchanges in ETCs need to be resolved accurately in a coupled atmosphere–ocean modeling framework.

  19. A strongly complete proof system for propositional dynamic logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renardel de Lavalette, Gerard; Kooi, Barteld; Verbrugge, Rineke

    2002-01-01

    Propositional dynamic logic (PDL) is complete but not compact. As a consequence, strong completeness (the property Γ |= φ ⇒ Γ |- φ) does not hold for the standard finitary axiomatisation. In this paper, we present an infinitary proof system of PDL and prove strong completeness. The result is

  20. Effects of interaction imbalance in a strongly repulsive one-dimensional Bose gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfknecht, Rafael Emilio; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas; Foerster, Angela

    2018-01-01

    We calculate the spatial distributions and the dynamics of a few-body two-component strongly interacting Bose gas confined to an effectively one-dimensional trapping potential. We describe the densities for each component in the trap for different interaction and population imbalances. We calcula...

  1. System dynamics with interaction discontinuity

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert C J

    2015-01-01

    This book describes system dynamics with discontinuity caused by system interactions and presents the theory of flow singularity and switchability at the boundary in discontinuous dynamical systems. Based on such a theory, the authors address dynamics and motion mechanism of engineering discontinuous systems due to interaction. Stability and bifurcations of fixed points in nonlinear discrete dynamical systems are presented, and mapping dynamics are developed for analytical predictions of periodic motions in engineering discontinuous dynamical systems. Ultimately, the book provides an alternative way to discuss the periodic and chaotic behaviors in discontinuous dynamical systems.

  2. Membrane-mediated interaction between strongly anisotropic protein scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonatan Schweitzer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Specialized proteins serve as scaffolds sculpting strongly curved membranes of intracellular organelles. Effective membrane shaping requires segregation of these proteins into domains and is, therefore, critically dependent on the protein-protein interaction. Interactions mediated by membrane elastic deformations have been extensively analyzed within approximations of large inter-protein distances, small extents of the protein-mediated membrane bending and small deviations of the protein shapes from isotropic spherical segments. At the same time, important classes of the realistic membrane-shaping proteins have strongly elongated shapes with large and highly anisotropic curvature. Here we investigated, computationally, the membrane mediated interaction between proteins or protein oligomers representing membrane scaffolds with strongly anisotropic curvature, and addressed, quantitatively, a specific case of the scaffold geometrical parameters characterizing BAR domains, which are crucial for membrane shaping in endocytosis. In addition to the previously analyzed contributions to the interaction, we considered a repulsive force stemming from the entropy of the scaffold orientation. We computed this interaction to be of the same order of magnitude as the well-known attractive force related to the entropy of membrane undulations. We demonstrated the scaffold shape anisotropy to cause a mutual aligning of the scaffolds and to generate a strong attractive interaction bringing the scaffolds close to each other to equilibrium distances much smaller than the scaffold size. We computed the energy of interaction between scaffolds of a realistic geometry to constitute tens of kBT, which guarantees a robust segregation of the scaffolds into domains.

  3. Interactive Dynamic-System Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Korn, Granino A

    2010-01-01

    Showing you how to use personal computers for modeling and simulation, Interactive Dynamic-System Simulation, Second Edition provides a practical tutorial on interactive dynamic-system modeling and simulation. It discusses how to effectively simulate dynamical systems, such as aerospace vehicles, power plants, chemical processes, control systems, and physiological systems. Written by a pioneer in simulation, the book introduces dynamic-system models and explains how software for solving differential equations works. After demonstrating real simulation programs with simple examples, the author

  4. Electron Dynamics in Nanostructures in Strong Laser Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kling, Matthias

    2014-09-11

    The goal of our research was to gain deeper insight into the collective electron dynamics in nanosystems in strong, ultrashort laser fields. The laser field strengths will be strong enough to extract and accelerate electrons from the nanoparticles and to transiently modify the materials electronic properties. We aimed to observe, with sub-cycle resolution reaching the attosecond time domain, how collective electronic excitations in nanoparticles are formed, how the strong field influences the optical and electrical properties of the nanomaterial, and how the excitations in the presence of strong fields decay.

  5. Strong interactions in spacelike and timelike domains dispersive approach

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterenko, Alexander V

    2017-01-01

    Strong Interactions in Spacelike and Timelike Domains: Dispersive Approach provides the theoretical basis for the description of the strong interactions in the spacelike and timelike domains. The book primarily focuses on the hadronic vacuum polarization function, R-ratio of electron-positron annihilation into hadrons, and the Adler function, which govern a variety of the strong interaction processes at various energy scales. Specifically, the book presents the essentials of the dispersion relations for these functions, recaps their perturbative calculation, and delineates the dispersively improved perturbation theory. The book also elucidates the peculiarities of the continuation of the spacelike perturbative results into the timelike domain, which is indispensable for the studies of electron-positron annihilation into hadrons and the related processes.

  6. New results on strong-interaction effects in antiprotonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Gotta, D; Augsburger, M A; Borchert, G L; Castelli, C M; Chatellard, D; El-Khoury, P; Egger, J P; Gorke, H; Hauser, P R; Indelicato, P J; Kirch, K; Lenz, S; Nelms, N; Rashid, K; Schult, O W B; Siems, T; Simons, L M

    1999-01-01

    Lyman and Balmer transitions of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at the low-energy antiproton ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. The X-rays were detected using charge-coupled devices (CCDs) and a reflection type crystal spectrometer. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction. (33 refs).

  7. Strong light-matter interaction in graphene - Invited talk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui

    of graphene with noble-metal nanostructures is currently being explored for strong light-graphene interaction. We introduce a novel hybrid graphene-metal system for studying light-matter interactions with gold-void nanostructures exhibiting resonances in the visible range[1]. The hybrid system is further......Graphene has attracted lots of attention due to its remarkable electronic and optical properties, thus providing great promise in photonics and optoelectronics. However, the performance of these devices is generally limited by the weak light-matter interaction in graphene. The combination...

  8. Measurement of strong interaction parameters in antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Augsburger, M A; Borchert, G L; Chatellard, D; Egger, J P; El-Khoury, P; Gorke, H; Gotta, D; Hauser, P R; Indelicato, P J; Kirch, K; Lenz, S; Siems, T; Simons, L M

    1999-01-01

    In the PS207 experiment at CERN, X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressure. The strong interaction shift and the broadening of the K/sub alpha / transition in antiprotonic hydrogen were $9 determined. Evidence was found for the individual hyperfine components of the protonium ground state. (7 refs).

  9. Chiral effective field theories of the strong interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, M.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Scherer, S. [Institut fur Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitat, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Effective field theories of the strong interactions based on the approximate chiral symmetry of QCD provide a model-independent approach to low-energy hadron physics. We give a brief introduction to mesonic and baryonic chiral perturbation theory and discuss a number of applications. We also consider the effective field theory including vector and axial-vector mesons. (authors)

  10. Interplay of Anderson localization and strong interaction in disordered systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henseler, Peter

    2010-01-15

    We study the interplay of disorder localization and strong local interactions within the Anderson-Hubbard model. Taking into account local Mott-Hubbard physics and static screening of the disorder potential, the system is mapped onto an effective single-particle Anderson model, which is studied within the self-consistent theory of electron localization. For fermions, we find rich nonmonotonic behavior of the localization length {xi}, particularly in two-dimensional systems, including an interaction-induced exponential enhancement of {xi} for small and intermediate disorders and a strong reduction of {xi} due to hopping suppression by strong interactions. In three dimensions, we identify for half filling a Mott-Hubbard-assisted Anderson localized phase existing between the metallic and the Mott-Hubbard-gapped phases. For small U there is re-entrant behavior from the Anderson localized phase to the metallic phase. For bosons, the unrestricted particle occupation number per lattice site yields a monotonic enhancement of {xi} as a function of decreasing interaction, which we assume to persist until the superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate phase is entered. Besides, we study cold atomic gases expanding, by a diffusion process, in a weak random potential. We show that the density-density correlation function of the expanding gas is strongly affected by disorder and we estimate the typical size of a speckle spot, i.e., a region of enhanced or depleted density. Both a Fermi gas and a Bose-Einstein condensate (in a mean-field approach) are considered. (orig.)

  11. Spin-Seebeck effect in a strongly interacting Fermi gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, C.H.; Stoof, H.T.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074851357; Duine, R.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830127

    2012-01-01

    We study the spin-Seebeck effect in a strongly interacting, two-component Fermi gas and propose an experiment to measure this effect by relatively displacing spin-up and spin-down atomic clouds in a trap using spin-dependent temperature gradients. We compute the spin-Seebeck coefficient and related

  12. Symmetry-protected collisions between strongly interacting photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jeff D; Nicholson, Travis L; Liang, Qi-Yu; Cantu, Sergio H; Venkatramani, Aditya V; Choi, Soonwon; Fedorov, Ilya A; Viscor, Daniel; Pohl, Thomas; Lukin, Mikhail D; Vuletić, Vladan

    2017-02-09

    Realizing robust quantum phenomena in strongly interacting systems is one of the central challenges in modern physical science. Approaches ranging from topological protection to quantum error correction are currently being explored across many different experimental platforms, including electrons in condensed-matter systems, trapped atoms and photons. Although photon-photon interactions are typically negligible in conventional optical media, strong interactions between individual photons have recently been engineered in several systems. Here, using coherent coupling between light and Rydberg excitations in an ultracold atomic gas, we demonstrate a controlled and coherent exchange collision between two photons that is accompanied by a π/2 phase shift. The effect is robust in that the value of the phase shift is determined by the interaction symmetry rather than the precise experimental parameters, and in that it occurs under conditions where photon absorption is minimal. The measured phase shift of 0.48(3)π is in excellent agreement with a theoretical model. These observations open a route to realizing robust single-photon switches and all-optical quantum logic gates, and to exploring novel quantum many-body phenomena with strongly interacting photons.

  13. Unexpectedly strong anion-π interactions on the graphene flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guosheng; Ding, Yihong; Fang, Haiping

    2012-05-30

    Interactions of anions with simple aromatic compounds have received growing attention due to their relevancy in various fields. Yet, the anion-π interactions are generally very weak, for example, there is no favorable anion-π interaction for the halide anion F(-) on the simplest benzene surface unless the H-atoms are substituted by the highly negatively charged F. In this article, we report a type of particularly strong anion-π interactions by investigating the adsorptions of three halide anions, that is, F(-), Cl(-), and Br(-), on the hydrogenated-graphene flake using the density functional theory. The anion-π interactions on the graphene flake are shown to be unexpectedly strong compared to those on simple aromatic compounds, for example, the F(-)-adsorption energy is as large as 17.5 kcal/mol on a graphene flake (C(84) H(24)) and 23.5 kcal/mol in the periodic boundary condition model calculations on a graphene flake C(113) (the supercell containing a F(-) ion and 113 carbon atoms). The unexpectedly large adsorption energies of the halide anions on the graphene flake are ascribed to the effective donor-acceptor interactions between the halide anions and the graphene flake. These findings on the presence of very strong anion-π interactions between halide ions and the graphene flake, which are disclosed for the first time, are hoped to strengthen scientific understanding of the chemical and physical characteristics of the graphene in an electrolyte solution. These favorable interactions of anions with electron-deficient graphene flakes may be applicable to the design of a new family of neutral anion receptors and detectors. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Dynamic reservoir well interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, W.L.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Wolfswinkel, O. van; Peters, M.C.A.M.; Verhelst, F.J.P.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop smart well control systems for unstable oil wells, realistic modeling of the dynamics of the well is essential. Most dynamic well models use a semi-steady state inflow model to describe the inflow of oil and gas from the reservoir. On the other hand, reservoir models use steady

  15. Multi-State Quantum Dissipative Dynamics in Sub-Ohmic Environment: The Strong Coupling Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Magazzù

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We study the dissipative quantum dynamics and the asymptotic behavior of a particle in a bistable potential interacting with a sub-Ohmic broadband environment. The reduced dynamics, in the intermediate to strong dissipation regime, is obtained beyond the two-level system approximation by using a real-time path integral approach. We find a crossover dynamic regime with damped intra-well oscillations and incoherent tunneling and a completely incoherent regime at strong damping. Moreover, a nonmonotonic behavior of the left/right well population difference is found as a function of the damping strength.

  16. Acceleration of Strongly Coupled Fluid-Structure Interaction with Manifold Mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, D.S.; Van Zuylen, A.H.; Bijl, H.

    2014-01-01

    Strongly coupled partitioned fluid-structure interaction problems require multiple coupling iterations per time step. The fluid domain and the structure domain are solved multiple times in each time step such that the kinematic and dynamic interface conditions on the fluid-structure interface are

  17. Light asymmetric dark matter from new strong dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal; Sarkar, Subir; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai

    2011-01-01

    A ~5 GeV `dark baryon' with a cosmic asymmetry similar to that of baryons is a natural candidate for the dark matter. We study the possibility of generating such a state through dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking, and show that it can share the relic baryon asymmetry via sphaleron interactions...

  18. Relative Nonlinear Electrodynamics Interaction of Charged Particles with Strong and Super Strong Laser Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Avetissian, Hamlet

    2006-01-01

    This book covers a large class of fundamental investigations into Relativistic Nonlinear Electrodynamics. It explores the interaction between charged particles and strong laser fields, mainly concentrating on contemporary problems of x-ray lasers, new type small set-up high-energy accelerators of charged particles, as well as electron-positron pair production from super powerful laser fields of relativistic intensities. It will also discuss nonlinear phenomena of threshold nature that eliminate the concurrent inverse processes in the problems of Laser Accelerator and Free Electron Laser, thus creating new opportunities for solving these problems.

  19. Strongly-interacting mirror fermions at the LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triantaphyllou George

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of mirror fermions corresponding to an interchange of leftwith right-handed fermion quantum numbers of the Standard Model can lead to a model according to which the BEH mechanism is just an effective manifestation of a more fundamental theory while the recently-discovered Higgs-like particle is composite. This is achieved by a non-abelian gauge symmetry encompassing three mirror-fermion families strongly coupled at energies near 1 TeV. The corresponding non-perturbative dynamics lead to dynamical mirror-fermion masses between 0.14 - 1.2 TeV. Furthermore, one expects the formation of composite states, i.e. “mirror mesons”, with masses between 0.1 and 3 TeV. The number and properties of the resulting new degrees of freedom lead to a rich and interesting phenomenology, part of which is analyzed in the present work.

  20. SDI: Statistical dynamic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blann, M.; Mustafa, M.G. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Peilert, G.; Stoecker, H.; Greiner, W. (Frankfurt Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik)

    1991-04-01

    We focus on the combined statistical and dynamical aspects of heavy ion induced reactions. The overall picture is illustrated by considering the reaction {sup 36}Ar + {sup 238}U at a projectile energy of 35 MeV/nucleon. We illustrate the time dependent bound excitation energy due to the fusion/relaxation dynamics as calculated with the Boltzmann master equation. An estimate of the mass, charge and excitation of an equilibrated nucleus surviving the fast (dynamic) fusion-relaxation process is used as input into an evaporation calculation which includes 20 heavy fragment exit channels. The distribution of excitations between residue and clusters is explicitly calculated, as is the further deexcitation of clusters to bound nuclei. These results are compared with the exclusive cluster multiplicity measurements of Kim et al., and are found to give excellent agreement. We consider also an equilibrated residue system at 25% lower initial excitation, which gives an unsatisfactory exclusive multiplicity distribution. This illustrates that exclusive fragment multiplicity may provide a thermometer for system excitation. This analysis of data involves successive binary decay with no compressional effects nor phase transitions. Several examples of primary versus final (stable) cluster decay probabilities for an A = 100 nucleus at excitations of 100 to 800 MeV are presented. From these results a large change in multifragmentation patterns may be understood as a simple phase space consequence, invoking neither phase transitions, nor equation of state information. These results are used to illustrate physical quantities which are ambiguous to deduce from experimental fragment measurements. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Evolutionary dynamics under interactive diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qi; Li, Aming; Wang, Long

    2017-10-01

    As evidenced by many cases in human societies, individuals often make different behavior decisions in different interactions, and adaptively adjust their behavior in changeable interactive scenarios. However, up to now, how such diverse interactive behavior affects cooperation dynamics has still remained unknown. Here we develop a general framework of interactive diversity, which models individuals’ separated behavior against distinct opponents and their adaptive adjustment in response to opponents’ strategies, to explore the evolution of cooperation. We find that interactive diversity enables individuals to reciprocate every single opponent, and thus sustains large-scale reciprocal interactions. Our work witnesses an impressive boost of cooperation for a notably extensive range of parameters and for all pairwise games. These results are robust against well-mixed and various networked populations, and against degree-normalized and cumulative payoff patterns. From the perspective of network dynamics, distinguished from individuals competing for nodes in most previous work, in this paper, the system evolves in the form of behavior disseminating along edges. We propose a theoretical method based on evolution of edges, which predicts well both the frequency of cooperation and the compact cooperation clusters. Our thorough investigation clarifies the positive role of interactive diversity in resolving social dilemmas and highlights the significance of understanding evolutionary dynamics from the viewpoint of edge dynamics.

  2. The hadronic standard model for strong and electroweak interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raczka, R. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    We propose a new model for strong and electro-weak interactions. First, we review various QCD predictions for hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron processes. We indicate that the present formulation of strong interactions in the frame work of Quantum Chromodynamics encounters serious conceptual and numerical difficulties in a reliable description of hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron interactions. Next we propose to replace the strong sector of Standard Model based on unobserved quarks and gluons by the strong sector based on the set of the observed baryons and mesons determined by the spontaneously broken SU(6) gauge field theory model. We analyse various properties of this model such as asymptotic freedom, Reggeization of gauge bosons and fundamental fermions, baryon-baryon and meson-baryon high energy scattering, generation of {Lambda}-polarization in inclusive processes and others. Finally we extend this model by electro-weak sector. We demonstrate a remarkable lepton and hadron anomaly cancellation and we analyse a series of important lepton-hadron and hadron-hadron processes such as e{sup +} + e{sup -} {yields} hadrons, e{sup +} + e{sup -} {yields} W{sup +} + W{sup -}, e{sup +} + e{sup -} {yields} p + anti-p, e + p {yields} e + p and p + anti-p {yields} p + anti-p processes. We obtained a series of interesting new predictions in this model especially for processes with polarized particles. We estimated the value of the strong coupling constant {alpha}(M{sub z}) and we predicted the top baryon mass M{sub {Lambda}{sub t}} {approx_equal} 240 GeV. Since in our model the proton, neutron, {Lambda}-particles, vector mesons like {rho}, {omega}, {phi}, J/{psi} ect. and leptons are elementary most of experimentally analysed lepton-hadron and hadron-hadron processes in LEP1, LEP2, LEAR, HERA, HERMES, LHC and SSC experiments may be relatively easily analysed in our model. (author). 252 refs, 65 figs, 1 tab.

  3. Electron-phonon interaction in strongly correlated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalenko, V. A.

    1997-06-01

    By a canonical transformation, the Hubbard model, supplemented with the Holstein interaction of localized electrons and nondispersive optical phonons, is transformed into a model where the hoppings of polarons from one lattice site into another are possible and are accompanied by the hoppings of an unbounded number of phonons. This, together with the fact that strong one-site interactions of electrons are inherent in the Hubbard model, leads to the necessity of introducing a new diagram technique based on irreducible one-site multi-particle Green’s functions or Kubo cumulants. The presence of phonons leads to renormalization of single-particle and multi-particle Green’s functions. The Dyson equation for the renormalized electron Green’s function is obtained. However, we did not manage to obtain the Dyson equation for the phonon functions due to the multiplicity of phonons taking part in the hopping. The validity of the theorem of connected diagrams is proved.

  4. Ising models of strongly coupled biological networks with multivariate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchan, Lina; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    Biological networks consist of a large number of variables that can be coupled by complex multivariate interactions. However, several neuroscience and cell biology experiments have reported that observed statistics of network states can be approximated surprisingly well by maximum entropy models that constrain correlations only within pairs of variables. We would like to verify if this reduction in complexity results from intricacies of biological organization, or if it is a more general attribute of these networks. We generate random networks with p-spin (p > 2) interactions, with N spins and M interaction terms. The probability distribution of the network states is then calculated and approximated with a maximum entropy model based on constraining pairwise spin correlations. Depending on the M/N ratio and the strength of the interaction terms, we observe a transition where the pairwise approximation is very good to a region where it fails. This resembles the sat-unsat transition in constraint satisfaction problems. We argue that the pairwise model works when the number of highly probable states is small. We argue that many biological systems must operate in a strongly constrained regime, and hence we expect the pairwise approximation to be accurate for a wide class of problems. This research has been partially supported by the James S McDonnell Foundation grant No.220020321.

  5. Nonlinear dynamics of semiconductors in strong THz electric fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarekegne, Abebe Tilahun

    weak THz and near infrared pulses as probes. Firstly, an intense THz pulse is used to study THz-induced impact ionization (IMI) dynamics in silicon. Local field enhancement by metallic dipole antenna arrays has been used to generate strong electric fields of several MV/cm in the hot spots near...... uniquely. Finally it is demonstrated for the first time that SiC can be tailored to have extremely fast THz-induced nonlinear behavior in moderate THz electric fields by addition of appropriate dopants. A 4H-SiC sample with high concentrations of nitrogen and boron dopants shows a nonlinear THz...

  6. Dynamic Soil-Structure-Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellezi, Lindita

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate and develop alternative methods of analyzing problems in dynamic soil-structure-interaction. The main focus is the major difficulty posed by such an analysis - the phenomenon of waves which radiate outward from the excited structures towards infinity...... transmitting boundary at the edges of the computational mesh. To start with, an investigation of the main effects of the interaction phenomena is carried out employing a widely used model, considering dynamic stiffness of the unbounded soil as frequency independent. Then a complete description...... represents an attempt to construct a local stiffness for the unbounded soil domain....

  7. Superfluidity in an Atomic Gas of Strongly Interacting Fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    What is the benefit of realizing superfluidity in a gas a million times more dilute than air? Such systems consist of well-separated atoms which can be observed and manipulated with the control and precision of atomic physics, and which can be treated with first-principles calculations. By implementing scattering resonances, we have realized the strong-coupling limit of the Bardeen Schrieffer-Cooper (BCS) mechanism and observed a normalized transition temperature of 15% of the Fermi temperature, higher than in any superconductor. By tuning the strength of the interactions, the BEC-BCS crossover is realized. When the population of the two spin states is imbalanced, pairing is frustrated; and superfluidity is quenched at the Chandrasekhar-Clogston limit. These studies illustrate a new approach to condensed-matter physics where many-body Hamiltonians are realized in dilute atomic gases.

  8. Coherence of strongly interacting 2D quantum gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobirey, Lennart; Siegl, Jonas; Luick, Niclas; Hueck, Klaus; Lompe, Thomas; Moritz, Henning

    2017-04-01

    The dimensionality of a quantum system has a profound impact on its coherence and superfluid properties. In 2D systems true long-range coherence is precluded by thermal fluctuations, nevertheless they can still become superfluid as predicted by Berezinskii, Kosterlitz and Thouless. In this superfluid regime the first order coherence decays algebraically, free of any characteristic length scale. Here, we show coherence measurements in a strongly interacting 2D gas of diatomic 6Li molecules. A self-interference technique allows us to locally extract the algebraic decay exponent, which is directly linked to the superfluid density. Furthermore, we present our realization of a homogeneous ultracold 2D Fermi gas. It should enable the direct measurement of non-local quantities such as the momentum distribution, without the complication of averaging over the different densities present in a harmonic trap.

  9. Review of pseudogaps in strongly interacting Fermi gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Erich J.

    2017-10-01

    A central challenge in modern condensed matter physics is developing the tools for understanding nontrivial yet unordered states of matter. One important idea to emerge in this context is that of a ‘pseudogap’: the fact that under appropriate circumstances the normal state displays a suppression of the single particle spectral density near the Fermi level, reminiscent of the gaps seen in ordered states of matter. While these concepts arose in a solid state context, they are now being explored in cold gases. This article reviews the current experimental and theoretical understanding of the normal state of strongly interacting Fermi gases, with particular focus on the phenomonology which is traditionally associated with the pseudogap.

  10. Extreme states of matter in strong interaction physics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Satz, Helmut

    2018-01-01

    This book is a course-tested primer on the thermodynamics of strongly interacting matter – a profound and challenging area of both theoretical and experimental modern physics. Analytical and numerical studies of statistical quantum chromodynamics provide the main theoretical tool, while in experiments, high-energy nuclear collisions are the key for extensive laboratory investigations. As such, the field straddles statistical, particle and nuclear physics, both conceptually and in the methods of investigation used. The book addresses, above all, the many young scientists starting their scientific research in this field, providing them with a general, self-contained introduction that highlights the basic concepts and ideas and explains why we do what we do. Much of the book focuses on equilibrium thermodynamics: first it presents simplified phenomenological pictures, leading to critical behavior in hadronic matter and to a quark-hadron phase transition. This is followed by elements of finite temperature latti...

  11. Large mass hierarchies from strongly-coupled dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athenodorou, Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Cyprus,B.O. Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Bennett, Ed [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University,Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe (KMI),Nagoya University,Furo, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Bergner, Georg [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics,University of Bern,Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Elander, Daniel [National Institute for Theoretical Physics, School of Physics andMandelstam Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of the Witwatersrand,1 Jan Smuts Avenue, Johannesburg, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Lin, C.-J. David [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University,1001 Ta-Hsueh Road, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); CNRS, Aix Marseille Université, Université de Toulon, Centre de Physique Théorique,UMR 7332, F-13288 Marseille (France); Lucini, Biagio; Piai, Maurizio [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University,Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-20

    Besides the Higgs particle discovered in 2012, with mass 125 GeV, recent LHC data show tentative signals for new resonances in diboson as well as diphoton searches at high center-of-mass energies (2 TeV and 750 GeV, respectively). If these signals are confirmed (or other new resonances are discovered at the TeV scale), the large hierarchies between masses of new bosons require a dynamical explanation. Motivated by these tentative signals of new physics, we investigate the theoretical possibility that large hierarchies in the masses of glueballs could arise dynamically in new strongly-coupled gauge theories extending the standard model of particle physics. We study lattice data on non-Abelian gauge theories in the (near-)conformal regime as well as a simple toy model in the context of gauge/gravity dualities. We focus our attention on the ratio R between the mass of the lightest spin-2 and spin-0 resonances, that for technical reasons is a particularly convenient and clean observable to study. For models in which (non-perturbative) large anomalous dimensions arise dynamically, we show indications that this mass ratio can be large, with R>5. Moreover, our results suggest that R might be related to universal properties of the IR fixed point. Our findings provide an interesting step towards understanding large mass ratios in the non-perturbative regime of quantum field theories with (near) IR conformal behaviour.

  12. Kinetic approach to the dynamics of strongly coupled inhomogeneous plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kählert, Hanno; Kalman, Gabor J.; Bonitz, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Based on the BBGKY hierarchy and an extended STLS ansatz for the two-particle distribution function, we derive kinetic and fluid equations for strongly coupled inhomogeneous plasmas that take both strong coupling and thermal effects into account. The kinetic equation is employed to study the collective modes in a uniform plasma. The fluid equations are used to study the temperature dependence of the breathing mode of confined dusty plasmas, where excellent agreement with molecular dynamics simulations is observed. In the limit of weak density inhomogeneities, they can be reduced to the equations of linearized elasticity theory. The bulk and shear moduli emerge directly from the theory as integrals over the pair correlation function, and previous results in the literature are recovered. The theory should be useful to study the collective modes of confined strongly coupled plasmas, where large density variations make the application of methods that were developed for uniform systems impractical. Supported by the DAAD via a postdoctoral scholarship and the DFG via SFB-TR24.

  13. Dynamic sensorimotor interactions in locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol, Serge; Dubuc, Réjean; Gossard, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Locomotion results from intricate dynamic interactions between a central program and feedback mechanisms. The central program relies fundamentally on a genetically determined spinal circuitry (central pattern generator) capable of generating the basic locomotor pattern and on various descending pathways that can trigger, stop, and steer locomotion. The feedback originates from muscles and skin afferents as well as from special senses (vision, audition, vestibular) and dynamically adapts the locomotor pattern to the requirements of the environment. The dynamic interactions are ensured by modulating transmission in locomotor pathways in a state- and phase-dependent manner. For instance, proprioceptive inputs from extensors can, during stance, adjust the timing and amplitude of muscle activities of the limbs to the speed of locomotion but be silenced during the opposite phase of the cycle. Similarly, skin afferents participate predominantly in the correction of limb and foot placement during stance on uneven terrain, but skin stimuli can evoke different types of responses depending on when they occur within the step cycle. Similarly, stimulation of descending pathways may affect the locomotor pattern in only certain phases of the step cycle. Section ii reviews dynamic sensorimotor interactions mainly through spinal pathways. Section iii describes how similar sensory inputs from the spinal or supraspinal levels can modify locomotion through descending pathways. The sensorimotor interactions occur obviously at several levels of the nervous system. Section iv summarizes presynaptic, interneuronal, and motoneuronal mechanisms that are common at these various levels. Together these mechanisms contribute to the continuous dynamic adjustment of sensorimotor interactions, ensuring that the central program and feedback mechanisms are congruous during locomotion.

  14. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE STRONGLY INTERACTING WITH THEIR CIRCUMSTELLAR MEDIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Nugent, Peter E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, Iair; Ben-Ami, Sagi [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Howell, D. Andrew; Graham, Melissa L. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Cao, Yi; Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Coil, Alison L. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Griffith, Christopher V. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kasliwal, Mansi M., E-mail: jsilverman@astro.as.utexas.edu [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); and others

    2013-07-01

    Owing to their utility for measurements of cosmic acceleration, Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are perhaps the best-studied class of SNe, yet the progenitor systems of these explosions largely remain a mystery. A rare subclass of SNe Ia shows evidence of strong interaction with their circumstellar medium (CSM), and in particular, a hydrogen-rich CSM; we refer to them as SNe Ia-CSM. In the first systematic search for such systems, we have identified 16 SNe Ia-CSM, and here we present new spectra of 13 of them. Six SNe Ia-CSM have been well studied previously, three were previously known but are analyzed in depth for the first time here, and seven are new discoveries from the Palomar Transient Factory. The spectra of all SNe Ia-CSM are dominated by H{alpha} emission (with widths of {approx}2000 km s{sup -1}) and exhibit large H{alpha}/H{beta} intensity ratios (perhaps due to collisional excitation of hydrogen via the SN ejecta overtaking slower-moving CSM shells); moreover, they have an almost complete lack of He I emission. They also show possible evidence of dust formation through a decrease in the red wing of H{alpha} 75-100 days past maximum brightness, and nearly all SNe Ia-CSM exhibit strong Na I D absorption from the host galaxy. The absolute magnitudes (uncorrected for host-galaxy extinction) of SNe Ia-CSM are found to be -21.3 mag {<=} M{sub R} {<=} -19 mag, and they also seem to show ultraviolet emission at early times and strong infrared emission at late times (but no detected radio or X-ray emission). Finally, the host galaxies of SNe Ia-CSM are all late-type spirals similar to the Milky Way, or dwarf irregulars like the Large Magellanic Cloud, which implies that these objects come from a relatively young stellar population. This work represents the most detailed analysis of the SN Ia-CSM class to date.

  15. Strong anticipation: Multifractal cascade dynamics modulate scaling in synchronization behaviors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen, Damian G., E-mail: foovian@gmail.co [Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, 3 Blackfan Circle, Floor 5, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Dixon, James A. [Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut, 406 Babbidge Rd., Unit 1020, Storrs, CT 06269-1020 (United States); Haskins Laboratories, 300 George St., New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: We investigated anticipatory behaviors in response to chaotic metronomes. We assessed multifractal structure in tap intervals and onset intervals. Strength of multifractality in tap intervals appears to match that in onset intervals. - Abstract: Previous research on anticipatory behaviors has found that the fractal scaling of human behavior may attune to the fractal scaling of an unpredictable signal [Stephen DG, Stepp N, Dixon JA, Turvey MT. Strong anticipation: Sensitivity to long-range correlations in synchronization behavior. Physica A 2008;387:5271-8]. We propose to explain this attunement as a case of multifractal cascade dynamics [Schertzer D, Lovejoy S. Generalised scale invariance in turbulent phenomena. Physico-Chem Hydrodyn J 1985;6:623-5] in which perceptual-motor fluctuations are coordinated across multiple time scales. This account will serve to sharpen the contrast between strong and weak anticipation: whereas the former entails a sensitivity to the intermittent temporal structure of an unpredictable signal, the latter simply predicts sensitivity to an aggregate description of an unpredictable signal irrespective of actual sequence. We pursue this distinction through a reanalysis of Stephen et al.'s data by examining the relationship between the widths of singularity spectra for intertap interval time series and for each corresponding interonset interval time series. We find that the attunement of fractal scaling reported by Stephen et al. was not the trivial result of sensitivity to temporal structure in aggregate but reflected a subtle sensitivity to the coordination across multiple time scales of fluctuation in the unpredictable signal.

  16. Theoretical & Experimental Research in Weak, Electromagnetic & Strong Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandi, Satyanarayan [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Babu, Kaladi [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Rizatdinova, Flera [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Khanov, Alexander [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Haley, Joseph [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)

    2015-09-17

    The conducted research spans a wide range of topics in the theoretical, experimental and phenomenological aspects of elementary particle interactions. Theory projects involve topics in both the energy frontier and the intensity frontier. The experimental research involves energy frontier with the ATLAS Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In theoretical research, novel ideas going beyond the Standard Model with strong theoretical motivations were proposed, and their experimental tests at the LHC and forthcoming neutrino facilities were outlined. These efforts fall into the following broad categories: (i) TeV scale new physics models for LHC Run 2, including left-right symmetry and trinification symmetry, (ii) unification of elementary particles and forces, including the unification of gauge and Yukawa interactions, (iii) supersummetry and mechanisms of supersymmetry breaking, (iv) superworld without supersymmetry, (v) general models of extra dimensions, (vi) comparing signals of extra dimensions with those of supersymmetry, (vii) models with mirror quarks and mirror leptons at the TeV scale, (viii) models with singlet quarks and singlet Higgs and their implications for Higgs physics at the LHC, (ix) new models for the dark matter of the universe, (x) lepton flavor violation in Higgs decays, (xi) leptogenesis in radiative models of neutrino masses, (xii) light mediator models of non-standard neutrino interactions, (xiii) anomalous muon decay and short baseline neutrino anomalies, (xiv) baryogenesis linked to nucleon decay, and (xv) a new model for recently observed diboson resonance at the LHC and its other phenomenological implications. The experimental High Energy Physics group has been, and continues to be, a successful and productive contributor to the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Members of the group performed search for gluinos decaying to stop and top quarks, new heavy gauge bosons decaying to top and bottom quarks, and vector-like quarks

  17. Strong semiclassical approximation of Wigner functions for the Hartree dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Athanassoulis, Agissilaos

    2011-01-01

    We consider the Wigner equation corresponding to a nonlinear Schrödinger evolution of the Hartree type in the semiclassical limit h → 0. Under appropriate assumptions on the initial data and the interaction potential, we show that the Wigner function is close in L 2 to its weak limit, the solution of the corresponding Vlasov equation. The strong approximation allows the construction of semiclassical operator-valued observables, approximating their quantum counterparts in Hilbert-Schmidt topology. The proof makes use of a pointwise-positivity manipulation, which seems necessary in working with the L 2 norm and the precise form of the nonlinearity. We employ the Husimi function as a pivot between the classical probability density and the Wigner function, which - as it is well known - is not pointwise positive in general.

  18. Interaction effects in a microscopic quantum wire model with strong spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, G. W.; Ganahl, M.; Schuricht, D.; Evertz, H. G.; Andergassen, S.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the effect of strong interactions on the spectral properties of quantum wires with strong Rashba spin-orbit (SO) interaction in a magnetic field, using a combination of matrix product state and bosonization techniques. Quantum wires with strong Rashba SO interaction and magnetic field exhibit a partial gap in one-half of the conducting modes. Such systems have attracted wide-spread experimental and theoretical attention due to their unusual physical properties, among which are spin-dependent transport, or a topological superconducting phase when under the proximity effect of an s-wave superconductor. As a microscopic model for the quantum wire we study an extended Hubbard model with SO interaction and Zeeman field. We obtain spin resolved spectral densities from the real-time evolution of excitations, and calculate the phase diagram. We find that interactions increase the pseudo gap at k = 0 and thus also enhance the Majorana-supporting phase and stabilize the helical spin order. Furthermore, we calculate the optical conductivity and compare it with the low energy spiral Luttinger liquid result, obtained from field theoretical calculations. With interactions, the optical conductivity is dominated by an excotic excitation of a bound soliton-antisoliton pair known as a breather state. We visualize the oscillating motion of the breather state, which could provide the route to their experimental detection in e.g. cold atom experiments.

  19. A systematic study of the strong interaction with P¯ANDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messchendorp, J. G.

    2011-10-01

    The theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) reproduces the strong interaction at distances much shorter than the size of the nucleon. At larger distance scales, the generation of hadron masses and confinement cannot yet be derived from first principles on basis of QCD. The PANDA experiment at FAIR will address the origin of these phenomena in controlled environments. Beams of antiprotons together with a multi-purpose and compact detection system will provide unique tools to perform studies of the strong interaction. This will be achieved via precision spectroscopy of charmonium and open-charm states, an extensive search for exotic objects such as glueballs and hybrids, in-medium and hypernuclei spectroscopy, and more. An overview is given of the physics program of the P¯ANDA collaboration.

  20. The colours of strong interaction; L`interaction forte sous toutes ses couleurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The aim of this session is to draw a consistent framework about the different ways to consider strong interaction. A large part is dedicated to theoretical work and the latest experimental results obtained at the first electron collider HERA are discussed. (A.C.)

  1. Model for Thermal Relic Dark Matter of Strongly Interacting Massive Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Murayama, Hitoshi; Volansky, Tomer; Wacker, Jay G

    2015-07-10

    A recent proposal is that dark matter could be a thermal relic of 3→2 scatterings in a strongly coupled hidden sector. We present explicit classes of strongly coupled gauge theories that admit this behavior. These are QCD-like theories of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, where the pions play the role of dark matter. The number-changing 3→2 process, which sets the dark matter relic abundance, arises from the Wess-Zumino-Witten term. The theories give an explicit relationship between the 3→2 annihilation rate and the 2→2 self-scattering rate, which alters predictions for structure formation. This is a simple calculable realization of the strongly interacting massive-particle mechanism.

  2. Nonlinear dynamics of interacting populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bazykin, Alexander D

    1998-01-01

    This book contains a systematic study of ecological communities of two or three interacting populations. Starting from the Lotka-Volterra system, various regulating factors are considered, such as rates of birth and death, predation and competition. The different factors can have a stabilizing or a destabilizing effect on the community, and their interplay leads to increasingly complicated behavior. Studying and understanding this path to greater dynamical complexity of ecological systems constitutes the backbone of this book. On the mathematical side, the tool of choice is the qualitative the

  3. Ultrafast Polariton-Phonon Dynamics of Strongly Coupled Quantum Dot-Nanocavity Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Müller

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the influence of exciton-phonon coupling on the dynamics of a strongly coupled quantum dot-photonic crystal cavity system and explore the effects of this interaction on different schemes for nonclassical light generation. By performing time-resolved measurements, we map out the detuning-dependent polariton lifetime and extract the spectrum of the polariton-to-phonon coupling with unprecedented precision. Photon-blockade experiments for different pulse-length and detuning conditions (supported by quantum optical simulations reveal that achieving high-fidelity photon blockade requires an intricate understanding of the phonons’ influence on the system dynamics. Finally, we achieve direct coherent control of the polariton states of a strongly coupled system and demonstrate that their efficient coupling to phonons can be exploited for novel concepts in high-fidelity single-photon generation.

  4. Two Methods For Simulating the Strong-Strong Beam-Beam Interaction in Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnock, Robert L.

    2002-11-11

    We present and compare the method of weighted macro particle tracking and the Perron-Frobenius operator technique for simulating the time evolution of two beams coupled via the collective beam-beam interaction in 2-D and 4-D (transverse) phase space. The coherent dipole modes, with and without lattice nonlinearities and external excitation, are studied by means of the Vlasov-Poisson system.

  5. Number-squeezed and fragmented states of strongly interacting bosons in a double well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbo, Joel C.; DuBois, Jonathan L.; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2017-11-01

    We present a systematic study of the phenomena of number squeezing and fragmentation for a repulsive Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in a three-dimensional double-well potential over a range of interaction strengths and barrier heights, including geometries that exhibit appreciable overlap in the one-body wave functions localized in the left and right wells. We compute the properties of the condensate with numerically exact, full-dimensional path-integral ground-state (PIGS) quantum Monte Carlo simulations and compare with results obtained from using two- and eight-mode truncated basis models. The truncated basis models are found to agree with the numerically exact PIGS simulations for weak interactions, but fail to correctly predict the amount of number squeezing and fragmentation exhibited by the PIGS simulations for strong interactions. We find that both number squeezing and fragmentation of the BEC show nonmonotonic behavior at large values of interaction strength a . The number squeezing shows a universal scaling with the product of number of particles and interaction strength (N a ), but no such universal behavior is found for fragmentation. Detailed analysis shows that the introduction of repulsive interactions not only suppresses number fluctuations to enhance number squeezing, but can also enhance delocalization across wells and tunneling between wells, each of which may suppress number squeezing. This results in a dynamical competition whose resolution shows a complex dependence on all three physical parameters defining the system: interaction strength, number of particles, and barrier height.

  6. Theory of rf-spectroscopy of strongly interacting fermions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punk, M; Zwerger, W

    2007-10-26

    We show that strong pairing correlations in Fermi gases lead to the appearance of a gaplike structure in the rf spectrum, both in the balanced superfluid and in the normal phase above the Clogston-Chandrasekhar limit. The average rf shift of a unitary gas is proportional to the ratio of the Fermi velocity and the scattering length with the final state. In the strongly imbalanced case, the rf spectrum measures the binding energy of a minority atom to the Fermi sea of majority atoms. Our results provide a qualitative understanding of recent experiments by Schunck et al.

  7. Complex dynamics induced by strong confinement - From tracer diffusion in strongly heterogeneous media to glassy relaxation of dense fluids in narrow slits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Suvendu; Spanner-Denzer, Markus; Leitmann, Sebastian; Franosch, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    We provide an overview of recent advances of the complex dynamics of particles in strong confinements. The first paradigm is the Lorentz model where tracers explore a quenched disordered host structure. Such systems naturally occur as limiting cases of binary glass-forming systems if the dynamics of one component is much faster than the other. For a certain critical density of the host structure the tracers undergo a localization transition which constitutes a critical phenomenon. A series of predictions in the vicinity of the transition have been elaborated and tested versus computer simulations. Analytical progress is achieved for small obstacle densities. The second paradigm is a dense strongly interacting liquid confined to a narrow slab. Then the glass transition depends nonmonotonically on the separation of the plates due to an interplay of local packing and layering. Very small slab widths allow to address certain features of the statics and dynamics analytically.

  8. Strong interactions and exact solutions in nonlinear massive gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Koyama, Kazuya; Niz, Gustavo; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2011-01-01

    We investigate strong coupling effects in a covariant massive gravity model, which is a candidate for a ghost-free nonlinear completion of Fierz-Pauli. We analyze the conditions to recover general relativity via the Vainshtein mechanism in the weak field limit, and find three main cases depending on the choice of parameters. In the first case, the potential is such that all nonlinearities disappear and the vDVZ discontinuity cannot be avoided. In the second case, the Vainshtein mechanism allo...

  9. Weak interactions and local order in strong turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhot, Victor; Orszag, Steven A.; Yakhot, Alexander; Panda, Raj; Frisch, Uriel; Kraichnan, Robert H.

    1987-05-01

    Data from simulations of channel flow and decay of homogeneous turbulence indicate anomalously strong correlation of velocity and vorticity directions (local Beltramization) in band-filtered velocity fields when the band consists of a thin cigar shape in mode space (whose physical space representation is as an array of pancake eddies). Spherical shells or other broad bands in mode space do not seem to exhibit the effect.

  10. Physics Performance Report for PANDA : Strong Interaction Studies with Antiprotons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erni, W.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krusche, B.; Steinacher, M.; Heng, Y.; Liu, Z.; Liu, H.; Shen, X.; Wang, O.; Xu, H.; Becker, J.; Feldbauer, F.; Heinsius, F. -H.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Kopf, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Wiedner, U.; Zhong, J.; Bianconi, A.; Bragadireanu, M.; Pantea, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; De Napoli, M.; Giacoppo, F.; Raciti, G.; Rapisarda, E.; Sfienti, C.; Bialkowski, E.; Budzanowski, A.; Czech, B.; Kistryn, M.; Kliczewski, S.; Kozela, A.; Kulessa, P.; Pysz, K.; Schaefer, W.; Siudak, R.; Szczurek, A.; Czy. zycki, W.; Domagala, M.; Hawryluk, M.; Lisowski, E.; Lisowski, F.; Wojnar, L.; Gil, D.; Hawranek, P.; Kamys, B.; Kistryn, St.; Korcyl, K.; Krzemien, W.; Magiera, A.; Moskal, P.; Rudy, Z.; Salabura, P.; Smyrski, J.; Wronska, A.; Al-Turany, M.; Augustin, I.; Deppe, H.; Flemming, H.; Gerl, J.; Goetzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Luehning, J.; Maas, F.; Mishra, D.; Orth, H.; Peters, K.; Saito, T.; Schepers, G.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Voss, B.; Wieczorek, P.; Wilms, A.; Brinkmann, K. -T.; Freiesleben, H.; Jaekel, R.; Kliemt, R.; Wuerschig, T.; Zaunick, H. -G.; Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G.; Arefiev, A.; Astakhov, V. I.; Barabanov, M. Yu.; Batyunya, B. V.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Efremov, A. A.; Fedunov, A. G.; Feshchenko, A. A.; Galoyan, A. S.; Grigoryan, S.; Karmokov, A.; Koshurnikov, E. K.; Kudaev, V. Ch.; Lobanov, V. I.; Lobanov, Yu. Yu.; Makarov, A. F.; Malinina, L. V.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mustafaev, G. A.; Olshevski, A.; . Pasyuk, M. A.; Perevalova, E. A.; Piskun, A. A.; Pocheptsov, T. A.; Pontecorvo, G.; Rodionov, V. K.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Salmin, R. A.; Samartsev, A. G.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Shabratova, A.; Shabratova, G. S.; Skachkova, A. N.; Skachkov, N. B.; Strokovsky, E. A.; Suleimanov, M. K.; Teshev, R. Sh.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Uzhinsky, V. V.; Vodopianov, A. S.; Zaporozhets, S. A.; Zhuravlev, N. I.; Zorin, A. G.; Branford, D.; Foehl, K.; Glazier, D.; Watts, D.; Woods, P.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Teufel, A.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K.; Tann, B.; Tomaradze, A.; Bettoni, D.; Carassiti, V.; Cecchi, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Negrini, M.; Savri`e, M.; Stancari, G.; Dulach, B.; Gianotti, P.; Guaraldo, C.; Lucherini, V.; Pace, E.; Bersani, A.; Macri, M.; Marinelli, M.; Parodi, R. F.; Brodski, I.; Doering, W.; Drexler, P.; Dueren, M.; Gagyi-Palffy, Z.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kotulla, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, S.; Liu, M.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Novotny, R.; Salz, C.; Schneider, J.; Schoenmeier, P.; Schubert, R.; Spataro, S.; Stenzel, H.; Strackbein, C.; Thiel, M.; Thoering, U.; Yang, S.; Clarkson, T.; Cowie, E.; Downie, E.; Hill, G.; Hoek, M.; Ireland, D.; Kaiser, R.; Keri, T.; Lehmann, I.; Livingston, K.; Lumsden, S.; MacGregor, D.; McKinnon, B.; Murray, M.; Protopopescu, D.; Rosner, G.; Seitz, B.; Yang, G.; Babai, M.; Biegun, A. K.; Bubak, A.; Guliyev, E.; Suyam Jothi, Vanniarajan; Kavatsyuk, M.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.; Smit, H.; van der Weele, J. C.; Garcia, F.; Riska, D. -O.; Buescher, M.; Dosdall, R.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gillitzer, A.; Grunwald, D.; Jha, V.; Kemmerling, G.; Kleines, H.; Lehrach, A.; Maier, R.; Mertens, M.; Ohm, H.; Prasuhn, D.; Randriamalala, T.; Ritman, J.; Roeder, M.; Stockmanns, T.; Wintz, P.; Wuestner, P.; Kisiel, J.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Sun, Z.; Xu, H.; Fissum, S.; Hansen, K.; Isaksson, L.; Lundin, M.; Schroeder, B.; Achenbach, P.; Mora Espi, M. C.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sanchez, S.; Sanchez-Lorente, A.; Dormenev, V. I.; Fedorov, A. A.; Korzhik, M. V.; Missevitch, O. V.; Balanutsa, V.; Chernetsky, V.; Demekhin, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Fedorets, P.; Gerasimov, A.; Goryachev, V.; Boukharov, A.; Malyshev, O.; Marishev, I.; Semenov, A.; Hoeppner, C.; Ketzer, B.; Konorov, I.; Mann, A.; Neubert, S.; Paul, S.; Weitzel, Q.; Khoukaz, A.; Rausmann, T.; Taeschner, A.; Wessels, J.; Varma, R.; Baldin, E.; Kotov, K.; Peleganchuk, S.; Tikhonov, Yu.; Boucher, J.; Hennino, T.; Kunne, R.; Ong, S.; Pouthas, J.; Ramstein, B.; Rosier, P.; Sudol, M.; Van de Wiele, J.; Zerguerras, T.; Dmowski, K.; Korzeniewski, R.; Przemyslaw, D.; Slowinski, B.; Boca, G.; Braghieri, A.; Costanza, S.; Fontana, A.; Genova, P.; Lavezzi, L.; Montagna, P.; Rotondi, A.; Belikov, N. I.; Davidenko, A. M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Goncharenko, Y. M.; Grishin, V. N.; Kachanov, V. A.; Konstantinov, D. A.; Kormilitsin, V. A.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Matulenko, Y. A.; Melnik, Y. M.; Meschanin, A. P.; Minaev, N. G.; Mochalov, V. V.; Morozov, D. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Ryazantsev, A. V.; Semenov, P. A.; Soloviev, L. F.; Uzunian, A. V.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Yakutin, A. E.; Baeck, T.; Cederwall, B.; Bargholtz, C.; Geren, L.; Tegner, P. E.; Belostotski, S.; Gavrilov, G.; Itzotov, A.; Kisselev, A.; Kravchenko, P.; Manaenkov, S.; Miklukho, O.; Naryshkin, Y.; Veretennikov, D.; Vikhrov, V.; Zhadanov, A.; Fava, L.; Panzieri, D.; Alberto, D.; Amoroso, A.; Botta, E.; Bressani, T.; Bufalino, S.; Bussa, M. P.; Busso, L.; De Mori, F.; Destefanis, M.; Ferrero, L.; Grasso, A.; Greco, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Maggiora, M.; Marcello, S.; Serbanut, G.; Sosio, S.; Bertini, R.; Calvo, D.; Coli, S.; De Remigis, P.; Feliciello, A.; Filippi, A.; Giraudo, G.; Mazza, G.; Rivetti, A.; Szymanska, K.; Tosello, F.; Wheadon, R.; Morra, O.; Agnello, M.; Iazzi, F.; Szymanska, K.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Martin, A.; Clement, H.; Ekstroem, C.; Calen, H.; Grape, S.; Hoeistad, B.; Johansson, T.; Kupsc, A.; Marciniewski, P.; Thome, E.; Zlomanczuk, J.; Diaz, J.; Ortiz, A.; Borsuk, S.; Chlopik, A.; Guzik, Z.; Kopec, J.; Kozlowski, T.; Melnychuk, D.; Plominski, M.; Szewinski, J.; Traczyk, K.; Zwieglinski, B.; Buehler, P.; Gruber, A.; Kienle, P.; Marton, J.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Lutz, M. F. M.; Pire, B.; Scholten, O.; Timmermans, R.

    To study fundamental questions of hadron and nuclear physics in interactions of antiprotons with nucleons and nuclei, the universal PANDA detector will be built. Gluonic excitations, the physics of strange and charm quarks and nucleon structure studies will be performed with unprecedented accuracy

  11. Adsorbate-mediated strong metal-support interactions in oxide-supported Rh catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubu, John C.; Zhang, Shuyi; Derita, Leo; Marinkovic, Nebojsa S.; Chen, Jingguang G.; Graham, George W.; Pan, Xiaoqing; Christopher, Phillip

    2017-02-01

    The optimization of supported metal catalysts predominantly focuses on engineering the metal site, for which physical insights based on extensive theoretical and experimental contributions have enabled the rational design of active sites. Although it is well known that supports can influence the catalytic properties of metals, insights into how metal-support interactions can be exploited to optimize metal active-site properties are lacking. Here we utilize in situ spectroscopy and microscopy to identify and characterize a support effect in oxide-supported heterogeneous Rh catalysts. This effect is characterized by strongly bound adsorbates (HCOx) on reducible oxide supports (TiO2 and Nb2O5) that induce oxygen-vacancy formation in the support and cause HCOx-functionalized encapsulation of Rh nanoparticles by the support. The encapsulation layer is permeable to reactants, stable under the reaction conditions and strongly influences the catalytic properties of Rh, which enables rational and dynamic tuning of CO2-reduction selectivity.

  12. Strong Anisotropic Interaction Controls Unusual Sticking and Scattering of CO at Ru(0001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lončarić, Ivor; Füchsel, Gernot; Juaristi, J. I.; Saalfrank, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Complete sticking at low incidence energies and broad angular scattering distributions at higher energies are often observed in molecular beam experiments on gas-surface systems which feature a deep chemisorption well and lack early reaction barriers. Although CO binds strongly on Ru(0001), scattering is characterized by rather narrow angular distributions and sticking is incomplete even at low incidence energies. We perform molecular dynamics simulations, accounting for phononic (and electronic) energy loss channels, on a potential energy surface based on first-principles electronic structure calculations that reproduce the molecular beam experiments. We demonstrate that the mentioned unusual behavior is a consequence of a very strong rotational anisotropy in the molecule-surface interaction potential. Beyond the interpretation of scattering phenomena, we also discuss implications of our results for the recently proposed role of a precursor state for the desorption and scattering of CO from ruthenium.

  13. Breakdown of the Fermi Liquid Description for Strongly Interacting Fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagi, Yoav; Drake, Tara E.; Paudel, Rabin; Chapurin, Roman; Jin, Deborah S.

    2015-02-01

    The nature of the normal state of an ultracold Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover regime is an intriguing and controversial topic. While the many-body ground state remains a condensate of paired fermions, the normal state must evolve from a Fermi liquid to a Bose gas of molecules as a function of the interaction strength. How this occurs is still largely unknown. We explore this question with measurements of the distribution of single-particle energies and momenta in a nearly homogeneous gas above Tc . The data fit well to a function that includes a narrow, positively dispersing peak that corresponds to quasiparticles and an "incoherent background" that can accommodate broad, asymmetric line shapes. We find that the quasiparticle's spectral weight vanishes abruptly as the strength of interactions is modified, which signals the breakdown of a Fermi liquid description. Such a sharp feature is surprising in a crossover.

  14. QCD Green's Functions and Phases of Strongly-Interacting Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaefer B.J.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available After presenting a brief summary of functional approaches to QCD at vanishing temperatures and densities the application of QCD Green's functions at non-vanishing temperature and vanishing density is discussed. It is pointed out in which way the infrared behavior of the gluon propagator reflects the (de-confinement transition. Numerical results for the quark propagator are given thereby verifying the relation between (de--confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (restoration. Last but not least some results of Dyson-Schwinger equations for the color-superconducting phase at large densities are shown.

  15. Strong interactions and exact solutions in nonlinear massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Kazuya; Niz, Gustavo; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2011-09-01

    We investigate strong coupling effects in a covariant massive gravity model, which is a candidate for a ghost-free nonlinear completion of Fierz-Pauli. We analyze the conditions to recover general relativity via the Vainshtein mechanism in the weak field limit, and find three main cases depending on the choice of parameters. In the first case, the potential is such that all nonlinearities disappear and the vDVZ discontinuity cannot be avoided. In the second case, the Vainshtein mechanism allows to recover general relativity within a macroscopic radius from a source. In the last case, the strong coupling of the scalar graviton completely shields the massless graviton, and weakens gravity when approaching the source. In the second part of the paper, we explore new exact vacuum solutions, that asymptote to de Sitter or anti de Sitter space depending on the choice of parameters. The curvature of the space is proportional to the mass of the graviton, thus providing a cosmological background which may explain the present-day acceleration in terms of the graviton mass. Moreover, by expressing the potential for nonlinear massive gravity in a convenient form, we also suggest possible connections with a higher-dimensional framework.

  16. Plasma-Wall Interaction with Strong Electron Emission Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanell, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Half a century ago, Hobbs and Wesson derived a solution for the plasma sheath at a planar surface with emission coefficient γ. They predicted that the floating sheath potential remains negative when γ >1. Variations of their ``space-charge limited'' (SCL) sheath model have long been used to estimate the particle and energy fluxes at strongly emitting surfaces. Recent theory, simulation and experimental studies show that another plasma-wall equilibrium is possible when γ >1. In the ``inverse regime'', the sheath potential is positive, repelling ions from the wall. The quasineutral density gradient and force balance in the ``inverted presheath'' are much different from the Bohm presheaths contained in the SCL models. It turns out that a SCL plasma-wall equilibrium is only stable under the assumption of zero ionization inside the sheath. Otherwise, the cumulative trapping of new ions in the SCL's potential ``dip'' will force a transition to the inverse regime. It follows that only an inverse equilibrium should be possible in practice at floating surfaces with strong secondary, thermionic or photoelectron emissions. Applications will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Strongly modified plasmon-matter interaction with mesoscopic quantum emitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Lykke; Stobbe, Søren; Søndberg Sørensen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) provide useful means to couple light and matter in applications such as light-harvesting1, 2 and all-solid-state quantum information processing3, 4. This coupling can be increased by placing QDs in nanostructured optical environments such as photonic crystals...... that this description breaks down for QDs near plasmonic nanostructures. We observe an eightfold enhancement of the plasmon excitation rate, depending on QD orientation as a result of their mesoscopic character. Moreover, we show that the interaction can be enhanced or suppressed, determined by the geometry...

  18. Interaction of Azobenzene and Benzalaniline with Strong Amido Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornev, Alexander N; Sushev, Vyacheslav V; Zolotareva, Natalia V; Baranov, Evgenii V; Fukin, Georgy K; Abakumov, Gleb A

    2015-12-18

    The interaction of azobenzene with lithium dicyclohexylamide (Cy2NLi) in THF or Et2O afforded the ion-radical salt of azobenzene (1) structurally characterized for the first time and dicyclohexylaminyl radical, which begins a novel chain of transformations leading eventually to the imino-enamido lithium complex (3). Benzalaniline, being a relative of azobenzene, reacted with Cy2NLi without electron transfer by a proton-abstraction mechanism to form the dilithium salt of N(1),N(2),1,2-tetraphenylethene-1,2-diamine quantitatively.

  19. Measuring signatures of quantum chaos in strongly-interacting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentsen, Gregory; Swingle, Brian; Schleier-Smith, Monika; Hayden, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Strongly-coupled many-body quantum systems generically exhibit signatures of quantum chaos. Recent theoretical work on black holes has focused on probing these signatures using so-called ``out-of-time-order'' (OTO) correlation functions, which measure a quantum-mechanical version of the classical butterfly effect. We propose a general echo-type protocol to experimentally measure these correlators in arbitrary many-body systems that involves reversing the sign of the Hamiltonian. We detail a realistic implementation in a single-body system employing cold atoms and cavity quantum electrodynamics to verify feasibility with current technology. Applying this protocol to diverse experimental systems could place bounds on quantum information processing, uncover new bounds on transport coefficients, offer insight into closed-system thermalization, and perhaps even enable experimental tests of the holographic principle. NSF, AFOSR, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Simons Foundation, CIFAR.

  20. Strong Constraints on Aerosol-Cloud Interactions from Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavelle, Florent F.; Haywood, Jim M.; Jones, Andy; Gettelman, Andrew; Clarisse, Lieven; Bauduin, Sophie; Allan, Richard P.; Karset, Inger Helene H.; Kristjansson, Jon Egill; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; hide

    2017-01-01

    Aerosols have a potentially large effect on climate, particularly through their interactions with clouds, but the magnitude of this effect is highly uncertain. Large volcanic eruptions produce sulfur dioxide, which in turn produces aerosols; these eruptions thus represent a natural experiment through which to quantify aerosol-cloud interactions. Here we show that the massive 2014-2015 fissure eruption in Holuhraun, Iceland, reduced the size of liquid cloud droplets - consistent with expectations - but had no discernible effect on other cloud properties. The reduction in droplet size led to cloud brightening and global-mean radiative forcing of around minus 0.2 watts per square metre for September to October 2014. Changes in cloud amount or cloud liquid water path, however, were undetectable, indicating that these indirect effects, and cloud systems in general, are well buffered against aerosol changes. This result will reduce uncertainties in future climate projections, because we are now able to reject results from climate models with an excessive liquid-water-path response.

  1. Strong constraints on aerosol-cloud interactions from volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavelle, Florent F.; Haywood, Jim M.; Jones, Andy; Gettelman, Andrew; Clarisse, Lieven; Bauduin, Sophie; Allan, Richard P.; Karset, Inger Helene H.; Kristjánsson, Jón Egill; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Grosvenor, Daniel P.; Carslaw, Ken S.; Dhomse, Sandip; Mann, Graham W.; Schmidt, Anja; Coe, Hugh; Hartley, Margaret E.; Dalvi, Mohit; Hill, Adrian A.; Johnson, Ben T.; Johnson, Colin E.; Knight, Jeff R.; O'Connor, Fiona M.; Partridge, Daniel G.; Stier, Philip; Myhre, Gunnar; Platnick, Steven; Stephens, Graeme L.; Takahashi, Hanii; Thordarson, Thorvaldur

    2017-06-01

    Aerosols have a potentially large effect on climate, particularly through their interactions with clouds, but the magnitude of this effect is highly uncertain. Large volcanic eruptions produce sulfur dioxide, which in turn produces aerosols; these eruptions thus represent a natural experiment through which to quantify aerosol-cloud interactions. Here we show that the massive 2014-2015 fissure eruption in Holuhraun, Iceland, reduced the size of liquid cloud droplets—consistent with expectations—but had no discernible effect on other cloud properties. The reduction in droplet size led to cloud brightening and global-mean radiative forcing of around -0.2 watts per square metre for September to October 2014. Changes in cloud amount or cloud liquid water path, however, were undetectable, indicating that these indirect effects, and cloud systems in general, are well buffered against aerosol changes. This result will reduce uncertainties in future climate projections, because we are now able to reject results from climate models with an excessive liquid-water-path response.

  2. Electron dynamics in metals and semiconductors in strong THz fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductors and metals respond to strong electric fields in a highly nonlinear fashion. Using single-cycle THz field transients it is possible to investigate this response in regimes not accessible by transport-based measurements. Extremely high fields can be applied without material damage......, intrinsic, undoped materials can be studied, and field-induced electron emission into free space can be investigated in detail, thereby offering new knowledge about material response to strong THz-frequency fields relevant for near-future generations of electronic circuitry....

  3. Wigner method dynamics in the interaction picture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Dahl, Jens Peder; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1994-01-01

    The possibility of introducing an interaction picture in the semiclassical Wigner method is investigated. This is done with an interaction Picture description of the density operator dynamics as starting point. We show that the dynamics of the density operator dynamics as starting point. We show...... that the dynamics of the interaction picture Wigner function is solved by running a swarm of trajectories in the classical interaction picture introduced previously in the literature. Solving the Wigner method dynamics of collision processes in the interaction picture ensures that the calculated transition...... probabilities are unambiguous even when the asymptotic potentials are anharmonic. An application of the interaction picture Wigner method to a Morse oscillator interacting with a laser field is presented. The calculated transition probabilities are in good agreement with results obtained by a numerical...

  4. Strong delayed interactive effects of metal exposure and warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debecker, Sara; Dinh, Khuong Van; Stoks, Robby

    2017-01-01

    As contaminants are often more toxic at higher temperatures, predicting their impact under global warming remains a key challenge for ecological risk assessment. Ignoring delayed effects, synergistic interactions between contaminants and warming, and differences in sensitivity across species......’ ranges could lead to an important underestimation of the risks. We addressed all three mechanisms by studying effects of larval exposure to zinc and warming before, during, and after metamorphosis in Ischnura elegans damselflies from high- and lowlatitude populations. By integrating these mechanisms...... was especially remarkable in high-latitude animals, as they appeared almost insensitive to zinc during the larval stage. Second, the well-known synergism between metals and warming was manifested not only during the larval stage but also after metamorphosis, yet notably only in low-latitude damselflies...

  5. Statistical measures of complexity for strongly interacting systems

    CERN Document Server

    Solé, R V; Sole, Ricard V.; Luque, Bartolo

    1999-01-01

    In recent studies, new measures of complexity for nonlinear systems have been proposed based on probabilistic grounds, as the LMC measure (Phys. Lett. A {\\bf 209} (1995) 321) or the SDL measure (Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 59} (1999) 2). All these measures share an intuitive consideration: complexity seems to emerge in nature close to instability points, as for example the phase transition points characteristic of critical phenomena. Here we discuss these measures and their reliability for detecting complexity close to critical points in complex systems composed of many interacting units. Both a two-dimensional spatially extended problem (the 2D Ising model) and a analysed. It is shown that the LMC and the SDL measures can be easily generalized to extended systems but fails to detect real complexity.

  6. Effect of strong coupling on interfacial electron transfer dynamics in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transient absorption studies on TPP-cat/TiO2 system exciting both the Soret band at 400 nm and the Q-band at 800 nm have been carried out to determine excitation wavelength-dependence on ET dynamics. The reaction channel for the electron-injection process has been found to be different for both the excitation ...

  7. Strong dynamics, composite Higgs and the conformal window

    CERN Document Server

    Nogradi, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We review recent progress in the lattice investigations of near-conformal non-abelian gauge theories relevant for dynamical symmetry breaking and model building of composite Higgs models. The emphasis is placed on the mass spectrum and the running renormalized coupling. The role of a light composite scalar isosinglet particle as a composite Higgs particle is highlighted.

  8. Effect of strong coupling on interfacial electron transfer dynamics in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    regarded as the best sensitizing dyes for solar energy conversion for their strong visible absorption bands, long-lived excited states and excellent photochemi- cal stability. However, the development of organic sensitizers, which can exhibit performances similar to those of metal complexes, gained a lot of interest.

  9. <strong>Driving forces behind the increasing cardiovascular treatment intensity.strong>>A dynamic epidemiologic model of trends in Danish cardiovascular drug utilization. strong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Andersen, Morten

    -state (untreated, treated, dead) semi-Markov model to analyse the dynamics of drug use. Transitions were from untreated to treated (incidence), the reverse (discontinuation), and from either untreated or treated to dead. Stratified by sex and age categories, prevalence trends of "growth driving" drug categories...

  10. Natural Cold Baryogenesis from Strongly Interacting Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Konstandin, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of "cold electroweak baryogenesis" has been so far unpopular because its proposal has relied on the ad-hoc assumption of a period of hybrid inflation at the electroweak scale with the Higgs acting as the waterfall field. We argue here that cold baryogenesis can be naturally realized without the need to introduce any slow-roll potential. Our point is that composite Higgs models where electroweak symmetry breaking arises via a strongly first-order phase transition provide a well-motivated framework for cold baryogenesis. In this case, reheating proceeds by bubble collisions and we argue that this can induce changes in Chern-Simons number, which in the presence of new sources of CP violation commonly lead to baryogenesis. We illustrate this mechanism using as a source of CP violation an effective dimension-six operator which is free from EDM constraints, another advantage of cold baryogenesis compared to the standard theory of electroweak baryogenesis. Our results are general as they do not rely on...

  11. Exact tensor network ansatz for strongly interacting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaletel, Michael P.

    It appears that the tensor network ansatz, while not quite complete, is an efficient coordinate system for the tiny subset of a many-body Hilbert space which can be realized as a low energy state of a local Hamiltonian. However, we don't fully understand precisely which phases are captured by the tensor network ansatz, how to compute their physical observables (even numerically), or how to compute a tensor network representation for a ground state given a microscopic Hamiltonian. These questions are algorithmic in nature, but their resolution is intimately related to understanding the nature of quantum entanglement in many-body systems. For this reason it is useful to compute the tensor network representation of various `model' wavefunctions representative of different phases of matter; this allows us to understand how the entanglement properties of each phase are expressed in the tensor network ansatz, and can serve as test cases for algorithm development. Condensed matter physics has many illuminating model wavefunctions, such as Laughlin's celebrated wave function for the fractional quantum Hall effect, the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer wave function for superconductivity, and Anderson's resonating valence bond ansatz for spin liquids. This thesis presents some results on exact tensor network representations of these model wavefunctions. In addition, a tensor network representation is given for the time evolution operator of a long-range one-dimensional Hamiltonian, which allows one to numerically simulate the time evolution of power-law interacting spin chains as well as two-dimensional strips and cylinders.

  12. Gray solitons in a strongly interacting superfluid Fermi gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spuntarelli, Andrea; Pieri, Pierbiagio; Strinati, Giancarlo C [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Carr, Lincoln D, E-mail: pierbiagio.pieri@unicam.it [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    The Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) to Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) crossover problem is solved for stationary gray solitons via the Boguliubov-de Gennes equations at zero temperature. These crossover solitons exhibit a localized notch in the gap and a characteristic phase difference across the notch for all interaction strengths, from BEC to BCS regimes. However, they do not follow the well-known Josephson-like sinusoidal relationship between velocity and phase difference except in the far BEC limit: at unitarity, the velocity has a nearly linear dependence on phase difference over an extended range. For a fixed phase difference, the soliton is of nearly constant depth from the BEC limit to unitarity and then grows progressively shallower into the BCS limit, and on the BCS side, Friedel oscillations are apparent in both gap amplitude and phase. The crossover soliton appears fundamentally in the gap; we show, however, that the density closely follows the gap, and the soliton is therefore observable. We develop an approximate power-law relationship to express this fact: the density of gray crossover solitons varies as the square of the gap amplitude in the BEC limit and as a power of about 1.5 at unitarity.

  13. Fragmentation dynamics of molecular hydrogen in strong ultrashort laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudenko, A; Feuerstein, B; Zrost, K; Jesus, V L B de; Ergler, T; Dimopoulou, C; Schroeter, C D; Moshammer, R; Ullrich, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-03-14

    We present the results of a systematic experimental study of dissociation and Coulomb explosion of molecular hydrogen induced by intense ultrashort (7-25 fs) laser pulses. Using coincident recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy we can distinguish the contributions from dissociation and double ionization even if they result in the same kinetic energies of the fragments. The dynamics of all fragmentation channels drastically depends on the pulse duration, and for 7 fs pulses becomes extremely sensitive to the pulse shape.

  14. Delocalization of Electrons in Strong Insulators at High Dynamic Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Nellis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Systematics of material responses to shock flows at high dynamic pressures are discussed. Dissipation in shock flows drives structural and electronic transitions or crossovers, such as used to synthesize metallic liquid hydrogen and most probably Al2O3 metallic glass. The term “metal” here means electrical conduction in a degenerate system, which occurs by band overlap in degenerate condensed matter, rather than by thermal ionization in a non-degenerate plasma. Since H2 and probably disordered Al2O3 become poor metals with minimum metallic conductivity (MMC virtually all insulators with intermediate strengths do so as well under dynamic compression. That is, the magnitude of strength determines the split between thermal energy and disorder, which determines material response. These crossovers occur via a transition from insulators with electrons localized in chemical bonds to poor metals with electron energy bands. For example, radial extents of outermost electrons of Al and O atoms are 7 a0 and 4 a0, respectively, much greater than 1.7 a0 needed for onset of hybridization at 300 GPa. All such insulators are Mott insulators, provided the term “correlated electrons” includes chemical bonds.

  15. Static and Dynamic Amplification Using Strong Mechanical Coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Ilyas, Saad

    2016-07-28

    Amplifying the signal-to-noise ratio of resonant sensors is vital toward the effort to miniaturize devices into the sub-micro and nano regimes. In this paper, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally, amplification through mechanically coupled microbeams. The device is composed of two identical clamped-clamped beams, made of polyimide, connected at their middle through a third beam, which acts as a mechanical coupler. Each of the clamped-clamped microbeams and the coupler are designed to be actuated separately, hence providing various possibilities of actuation and sensing. The coupled resonator is driven into resonance near its first resonance mode and its dynamic behavior is explored via frequency sweeps. The results show significant amplification in the resonator amplitude when the signal is measured at the midpoint of the coupler compared with the response of the individual uncoupled beams. The static pull-in characteristics of the resonator are also studied. It is shown that the compliant mechanical coupler can serve as a low-power radio frequency switch actuated at low voltage loads. [2016-0100

  16. Control of VR-7 Dynamic Stall by Strong Steady Blowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, D.; McAlister, K. W.; Tso, J.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment was performed in a water tunnel on a Boeing-Vertol VR-7 airfoil to study the effects of tangential blowing over the upper surface. Blowing was applied at the quarter-chord location during sinusoidal pitching oscillations described by alpha = alpha(sub m) + 10 deg sin omega t. Results were obtained for a Reynolds number of 1 x 10(exp 5), mean angles of 10 and 15 deg, reduced frequencies ranging from 0.005 to 0.15, and blowing rates from C(sub mu) = 0.16 to 0.66. Unsteady lift, drag, and pitching moment loads are reported, along with fluorescent-dye flow visualizations. Strong steady blowing was found to prevent the bursting of the leading-edge separation bubble at several test points. When this occurred, the lift was increased significantly, stall was averted, and the shape of the moment response showed a positive damping in pitch. In almost all cases, steady blowing reduced the hysteresis amplitudes present in the loads, but the benefits diminished as the reduced frequency and mean angle of oscillation increased. A limited number of pulsed blowing cases indicated that for low blowing rates, the greatest gains were achieved at F(sup +) = 0.9.

  17. Non-Equilibrium Dynamics of C-QED Arrays in Strong Correlation Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Ding; Li, Zhi-Hang; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-11-01

    Recently increasing interests are attracted in the physics of controlled arrays of nonlinear cavity resonators because of the rapid experimental progress achieved in cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). For a driven-dissipative two-dimentional planar C-QED array, standard Markov master equation is generally used to study the dynamics of this system. However, when in the case that the on-site photon-photon interaction enters strong correlation regime, standard Markov master equation may lead to incorrect results. In this paper we study the non-equilibrium dynamics of a two-dimentional C-QED array, which is homogeneously pumped by an external pulse, at the same time dissipation exits. We study the evolution of the average photon number of a single cavity by deriving a modified master equation to. In comparison with the standard master equation, the numerical result obtained by our newly derived master equation shows significant difference for the non-equilibrium dynamics of the system.

  18. Quantum magnetism in strongly interacting one-dimensional spinor Bose systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salami Dehkharghani, Amin; Volosniev, A. G.; Lindgren, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    -range inter-species interactions much larger than their intra-species interactions and show that they have novel energetic and magnetic properties. In the strongly interacting regime, these systems have energies that are fractions of the basic harmonic oscillator trap quantum and have spatially separated...

  19. Uniform strongly interacting soliton gas in the frame of the Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelash, Andrey; Agafontsev, Dmitry

    2017-04-01

    The statistical properties of many soliton systems play the key role in the fundamental studies of integrable turbulence and extreme sea wave formation. It is well known that separated solitons are stable nonlinear coherent structures moving with constant velocity. After collisions with each other they restore the original shape and only acquire an additional phase shift. However, at the moment of strong nonlinear soliton interaction (i.e. when solitons are located close) the wave field are highly complicated and should be described by the theory of inverse scattering transform (IST), which allows to integrate the KdV equation, the NLSE and many other important nonlinear models. The usual approach of studying the dynamics and statistics of soliton wave field is based on relatively rarefied gas of solitons [1,2] or restricted by only two-soliton interactions [3]. From the other hand, the exceptional role of interacting solitons and similar coherent structures - breathers in the formation of rogue waves statistics was reported in several recent papers [4,5]. In this work we study the NLSE and use the most straightforward and general way to create many soliton initial condition - the exact N-soliton formulas obtained in the theory of the IST [6]. We propose the recursive numerical scheme for Zakharov-Mikhailov variant of the dressing method [7,8] and discuss its stability with respect to increasing the number of solitons. We show that the pivoting, i.e. the finding of an appropriate order for recursive operations, has a significant impact on the numerical accuracy. We use the developed scheme to generate statistical ensembles of 32 strongly interacting solitons, i.e. solve the inverse scattering problem for the high number of discrete eigenvalues. Then we use this ensembles as initial conditions for numerical simulations in the box with periodic boundary conditions and study statics of obtained uniform strongly interacting gas of NLSE solitons. Author thanks the

  20. Are strong empathizers better mentalizers? Evidence for independence and interaction between the routes of social cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanske, Philipp; Böckler, Anne; Trautwein, Fynn-Mathis; Parianen Lesemann, Franca H; Singer, Tania

    2016-09-01

    Although the processes that underlie sharing others' emotions (empathy) and understanding others' mental states (mentalizing, Theory of Mind) have received increasing attention, it is yet unclear how they relate to each other. For instance, are people who strongly empathize with others also more proficient in mentalizing? And (how) do the neural networks supporting empathy and mentalizing interact? Assessing both functions simultaneously in a large sample (N = 178), we show that people's capacities to empathize and mentalize are independent, both on a behavioral and neural level. Thus, strong empathizers are not necessarily proficient mentalizers, arguing against a general capacity of social understanding. Second, we applied dynamic causal modeling to investigate how the neural networks underlying empathy and mentalizing are orchestrated in naturalistic social settings. Results reveal that in highly emotional situations, empathic sharing can inhibit mentalizing-related activity and thereby harm mentalizing performance. Taken together, our findings speak against a unitary construct of social understanding and suggest flexible interplay of distinct social functions. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Strongly nonlinear dynamics and acoustics of coupled granular sonic vacua: Theoretical and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md Arif

    In this dissertation, we aim to analyze the strongly nonlinear dynamics of coupled ordered granular media and investigate interesting response regimes such as, passive wave redirection / redistribution and targeted energy transfer (TET). These studies are performed using numerical computations, analytical calculations, and experimental tests. In particular, we consider weakly coupled granular chains with or without on-site potentials, as well as two-dimensional granular networks with regularly placed intruders that act as effective coupling elements. Unlike previous studies of weakly coupled oscillatory chains, the dynamical systems considered herein incorporate both non-smooth effects due to possible separations between interacting neighboring beads (granules), as well as strongly nonlinear inter-particle Hertzian interactions. We show that these systems exhibit very rich and complex dynamics that, however, can be completely captured by our analytical approximations. For the case of weakly interacting granular networks, three independent mechanisms of efficient transport of energy from one chain to another are found. The first mechanism is a simple exchange of energy between the weakly interacting granular chains providing equi-partition of Nesterenko solitary waves through the chains. The second mechanism is a complete and recurrent exchange of energy (beating phenomenon) between the propagating breathers through the weakly coupled granular chains laying on a strong elastic foundation. The last mechanism is the most intriguing one and demonstrates targeted (irreversible) energy transfer between coupled granular chains due to appropriate stratification of their elastic foundations, in a macroscopic analogue of the well-known Landau-Zener Quantum effect in space. The aforementioned mechanisms of energy transfer and redirection in highly nonlinear granular chains are conceptually new and were presented for the first time. Analytical and computational studies of

  2. Symbolic dynamics of animal interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porfiri, Maurizio; Ruiz Marín, Manuel

    2017-12-21

    Since its introduction nearly two decades ago, transfer entropy has contributed to an improved understanding of cause-and-effect relationships in coupled dynamical systems from raw time series. In the context of animal behavior, transfer entropy might help explain the determinants of leadership in social groups and elucidate escape response to predator attacks. Despite its promise, the potential of transfer entropy in animal behavior is yet to be fully tested, and a number of technical challenges in information theory and statistics remain open. Here, we examine an alternative approach to the computation of transfer entropy based on symbolic dynamics. In this context, a symbol is associated with a specific locomotory bout across two or more consecutive time instants, such as reversing the swimming direction. Symbols encapsulate salient locomotory patterns and the associated permutation transfer entropy quantifies the ability to predict the patterns of an individual given those of another individual. We demonstrate this framework on an existing dataset on fish, for which we have knowledge of the underlying cause-and-effect relationship between the focal subject and the stimulus. Symbolic dynamics offers an intuitive and robust approach to study animal behavior, which could enable the inference of causal relationship from noisy experimental observations of limited duration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Biomass Reallocation between Juveniles and Adults Mediates Food Web Stability by Distributing Energy Away from Strong Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskenette, Amanda L; McCann, Kevin S

    2017-01-01

    Ecological theory has uncovered dynamical differences between food web modules (i.e. low species food web configurations) with only species-level links and food web modules that include within-species links (e.g. non-feeding links between mature and immature individuals) and has argued that these differences ought to cause food web theory that includes within-species links to contrast with classical food web theory. It is unclear, however, if life-history will affect the observed connection between interaction strength and stability in species-level theory. We show that when the predator in a species-level food chain is split into juvenile and adult stages using a simple nested approach, stage-structure can mute potentially strong interactions through the transfer of biomass within a species. Within-species biomass transfer distributes energy away from strong interactions promoting increased system stability consistent with classical food web theory.

  4. Dynamics of interacting information waves in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mirshahvalad, Atieh; Lizana, Ludvig; Rosvall, Martin

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the inner workings of information spreading, network researchers often use simple models to capture the spreading dynamics. But most models only highlight the effect of local interactions on the global spreading of a single information wave, and ignore the effects of interactions between multiple waves. Here we take into account the effect of multiple interacting waves by using an agent-based model in which the interaction between information waves is based on their novelty. We analyzed the global effects of such interactions and found that information that actually reaches nodes reaches them faster. This effect is caused by selection between information waves: slow waves die out and only fast waves survive. As a result, and in contrast to models with non-interacting information dynamics, the access to information decays with the distance from the source. Moreover, when we analyzed the model on various synthetic and real spatial road networks, we found that the decay rate also depends on ...

  5. Turbulent structure and dynamics of swirled, strongly pulsed jet diffusion flames

    KAUST Repository

    Liao, Ying-Hao

    2013-11-02

    The structure and dynamics of swirled, strongly pulsed, turbulent jet diffusion flames were examined experimentally in a co-flow swirl combustor. The dynamics of the large-scale flame structures, including variations in flame dimensions, the degree of turbulent flame puff interaction, and the turbulent flame puff celerity were determined from high-speed imaging of the luminous flame. All of the tests presented here were conducted with a fixed fuel injection velocity at a Reynolds number of 5000. The flame dimensions were generally found to be more impacted by swirl for the cases of longer injection time and faster co-flow flow rate. Flames with swirl exhibited a flame length up to 34% shorter compared to nonswirled flames. Both the turbulent flame puff separation and the flame puff celerity generally decreased when swirl was imposed. The decreased flame length, flame puff separation, and flame puff celerity are consistent with a greater momentum exchange between the flame and the surrounding co-flow, resulting from an increased rate of air entrainment due to swirl. Three scaling relations were developed to account for the impact of the injection time, the volumetric fuel-to-air flow rate ratio, and the jet-on fraction on the visible flame length. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  6. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny P Bartsch

    Full Text Available We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS, we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems.

  7. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Ronny P; Liu, Kang K L; Bashan, Amir; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS), we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems.

  8. Interplay Between Charge, Spin, and Phonons in Low Dimensional Strongly Interacting Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanieh-ha, Mohammad

    Interacting one-dimensional electron systems are generally referred to as "Luttinger liquids", after the effective low-energy theory in which spin and charge behave as separate degrees of freedom with independent energy scales. The "spin-incoherent Luttinger liquid" describes a finite-temperature regime that is realized when the temperature is very small relative to the Fermi energy, but larger than the characteristic spin energy scale, and it is realized for instance in the strongly interacting Hubbard chain (with large U). Similar physics can take place in the ground-state, when a Luttinger Liquid is coupled to a spin bath, which effectively introduces a "spin temperature" through its entanglement with the spin degree of freedom. We show that the spin-incoherent state can be exactly written as a factorized wave-function, with a spin wave-function that can be described within a valence bond formalism. This enables us to calculate exact expressions for the momentum distribution function and the entanglement entropy. This picture holds not only for two antiferromagnetically coupled t--J chains, but also for the t--J-Kondo chain with strongly interacting conduction electrons. In chapter 3 we argue that this theory is quite universal and may describe a family of problems that could be dubbed "spin-incoherent". This crossover to the spin-incoherent regime at finite temperatures can be understood by means of Ogata and Shiba's factorized wave-function, where charge and spin are totally decoupled, and assuming that the charge remains in the ground state, while the spin is thermally excited and at an effective "spin temperature". In chapter 4 we use the time-dependent density matrix renormalization group method (tDMRG) to calculate the dynamical contributions of the spin, to reconstruct the single-particle spectral function of the electrons. The crossover is characterized by a redistribution of spectral weight both in frequency and momentum, with an apparent shift by kF of

  9. Exploring Strong Interactions in Proteins with Quantum Chemistry and Examples of Their Applications in Drug Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neng-Zhong Xie

    Full Text Available Three strong interactions between amino acid side chains (salt bridge, cation-π, and amide bridge are studied that are stronger than (or comparable to the common hydrogen bond interactions, and play important roles in protein-protein interactions.Quantum chemical methods MP2 and CCSD(T are used in calculations of interaction energies and structural optimizations.The energies of three types of amino acid side chain interactions in gaseous phase and in aqueous solutions are calculated using high level quantum chemical methods and basis sets. Typical examples of amino acid salt bridge, cation-π, and amide bridge interactions are analyzed, including the inhibitor design targeting neuraminidase (NA enzyme of influenza A virus, and the ligand binding interactions in the HCV p7 ion channel. The inhibition mechanism of the M2 proton channel in the influenza A virus is analyzed based on strong amino acid interactions.(1 The salt bridge interactions between acidic amino acids (Glu- and Asp- and alkaline amino acids (Arg+, Lys+ and His+ are the strongest residue-residue interactions. However, this type of interaction may be weakened by solvation effects and broken by lower pH conditions. (2 The cation- interactions between protonated amino acids (Arg+, Lys+ and His+ and aromatic amino acids (Phe, Tyr, Trp and His are 2.5 to 5-fold stronger than common hydrogen bond interactions and are less affected by the solvation environment. (3 The amide bridge interactions between the two amide-containing amino acids (Asn and Gln are three times stronger than hydrogen bond interactions, which are less influenced by the pH of the solution. (4 Ten of the twenty natural amino acids are involved in salt bridge, or cation-, or amide bridge interactions that often play important roles in protein-protein, protein-peptide, protein-ligand, and protein-DNA interactions.

  10. Dynamics of colloidal particles with capillary interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Alvaro; Oettel, Martin; Dietrich, S

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the dynamics of colloids at a fluid interface driven by attractive capillary interactions. At submillimeter length scales, the capillary attraction is formally analogous to two-dimensional gravity. In particular it is a nonintegrable interaction and it can be actually relevant for collective phenomena in spite of its weakness at the level of the pair potential. We introduce a mean-field model for the dynamical evolution of the particle number density at the interface. For generic values of the physical parameters the homogeneous distribution is found to be unstable against large-scale clustering driven by the capillary attraction. We also show that for the instability to be observable, the appropriate values for the relevant parameters (colloid radius, surface charge, external electric field, etc.) are experimentally well accessible. Our analysis contributes to current studies of the structure and dynamics of systems governed by long-ranged interactions and points toward their experimental realizations via colloidal suspensions.

  11. Strong excitonic interactions in the oxygen K-edge of perovskite oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Kota; Miyata, Tomohiro [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Olovsson, Weine [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Mizoguchi, Teruyasu, E-mail: teru@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2017-07-15

    Excitonic interactions of the oxygen K-edge electron energy-loss near-edge structure (ELNES) of perovskite oxides, CaTiO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3}, and BaTiO{sub 3}, together with reference oxides, MgO, CaO, SrO, BaO, and TiO{sub 2}, were investigated using a first-principles Bethe–Salpeter equation calculation. Although the transition energy of oxygen K-edge is high, strong excitonic interactions were present in the oxygen K-edge ELNES of the perovskite oxides, whereas the excitonic interactions were negligible in the oxygen K-edge ELNES of the reference compounds. Detailed investigation of the electronic structure suggests that the strong excitonic interaction in the oxygen K-edge ELNES of the perovskite oxides is caused by the directionally confined, low-dimensional electronic structure at the Ti–O–Ti bonds. - Highlights: • Excitonic interaction in oxygen-K edge is investigated. • Strong excitonic interaction is found in the oxygen-K edge of perovskite oxides. • The strong excitonic interaction is ascribed to the low-dimensional and confined electronic structure.

  12. Red Queen dynamics with non-standard fitness interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Engelstädter

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Antagonistic coevolution between hosts and parasites can involve rapid fluctuations of genotype frequencies that are known as Red Queen dynamics. Under such dynamics, recombination in the hosts may be advantageous because genetic shuffling can quickly produce disproportionately fit offspring (the Red Queen hypothesis. Previous models investigating these dynamics have assumed rather simple models of genetic interactions between hosts and parasites. Here, we assess the robustness of earlier theoretical predictions about the Red Queen with respect to the underlying host-parasite interactions. To this end, we created large numbers of random interaction matrices, analysed the resulting dynamics through simulation, and ascertained whether recombination was favoured or disfavoured. We observed Red Queen dynamics in many of our simulations provided the interaction matrices exhibited sufficient 'antagonicity'. In agreement with previous studies, strong selection on either hosts or parasites favours selection for increased recombination. However, fast changes in the sign of linkage disequilibrium or epistasis were only infrequently observed and do not appear to be a necessary condition for the Red Queen hypothesis to work. Indeed, recombination was often favoured even though the linkage disequilibrium remained of constant sign throughout the simulations. We conclude that Red Queen-type dynamics involving persistent fluctuations in host and parasite genotype frequencies appear to not be an artefact of specific assumptions about host-parasite fitness interactions, but emerge readily with the general interactions studied here. Our results also indicate that although recombination is often favoured, some of the factors previously thought to be important in this process such as linkage disequilibrium fluctuations need to be reassessed when fitness interactions between hosts and parasites are complex.

  13. Red Queen dynamics with non-standard fitness interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelstädter, Jan; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2009-08-01

    Antagonistic coevolution between hosts and parasites can involve rapid fluctuations of genotype frequencies that are known as Red Queen dynamics. Under such dynamics, recombination in the hosts may be advantageous because genetic shuffling can quickly produce disproportionately fit offspring (the Red Queen hypothesis). Previous models investigating these dynamics have assumed rather simple models of genetic interactions between hosts and parasites. Here, we assess the robustness of earlier theoretical predictions about the Red Queen with respect to the underlying host-parasite interactions. To this end, we created large numbers of random interaction matrices, analysed the resulting dynamics through simulation, and ascertained whether recombination was favoured or disfavoured. We observed Red Queen dynamics in many of our simulations provided the interaction matrices exhibited sufficient 'antagonicity'. In agreement with previous studies, strong selection on either hosts or parasites favours selection for increased recombination. However, fast changes in the sign of linkage disequilibrium or epistasis were only infrequently observed and do not appear to be a necessary condition for the Red Queen hypothesis to work. Indeed, recombination was often favoured even though the linkage disequilibrium remained of constant sign throughout the simulations. We conclude that Red Queen-type dynamics involving persistent fluctuations in host and parasite genotype frequencies appear to not be an artefact of specific assumptions about host-parasite fitness interactions, but emerge readily with the general interactions studied here. Our results also indicate that although recombination is often favoured, some of the factors previously thought to be important in this process such as linkage disequilibrium fluctuations need to be reassessed when fitness interactions between hosts and parasites are complex.

  14. Dynamic Map: Representation of interactions between robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanardi, C. [GRPR, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    As robotics applications become more complex, the need for tools to analyze and explain interactions between robots has become more acute. We introduce the concept of Dynamic Map (DM), which can serve as a generic tool to analyze interactions between robots or with their environment. We show that this concept can be applied to different kinds of applications, like a predator-prey situation, or collision avoidance.

  15. Quantum nonlinear optics with single photons enabled by strongly interacting atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyronel, Thibault; Firstenberg, Ofer; Liang, Qi-Yu; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Gorshkov, Alexey V; Pohl, Thomas; Lukin, Mikhail D; Vuletić, Vladan

    2012-08-02

    The realization of strong nonlinear interactions between individual light quanta (photons) is a long-standing goal in optical science and engineering, being of both fundamental and technological significance. In conventional optical materials, the nonlinearity at light powers corresponding to single photons is negligibly weak. Here we demonstrate a medium that is nonlinear at the level of individual quanta, exhibiting strong absorption of photon pairs while remaining transparent to single photons. The quantum nonlinearity is obtained by coherently coupling slowly propagating photons to strongly interacting atomic Rydberg states in a cold, dense atomic gas. Our approach paves the way for quantum-by-quantum control of light fields, including single-photon switching, all-optical deterministic quantum logic and the realization of strongly correlated many-body states of light.

  16. Quantum nonlinear optics with single photons enabled by strongly interacting atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peyronel, Thibault; Firstenberg, Ofer; Liang, Qi Yu

    2012-01-01

    The realization of strong nonlinear interactions between individual light quanta (photons) is a long-standing goal in optical science and engineering, being of both fundamental and technological significance. In conventional optical materials, the nonlinearity at light powers corresponding...... to single photons is negligibly weak. Here we demonstrate a medium that is nonlinear at the level of individual quanta, exhibiting strong absorption of photon pairs while remaining transparent to single photons. The quantum nonlinearity is obtained by coherently coupling slowly propagating photons...... to strongly interacting atomic Rydberg states in a cold, dense atomic gas. Our approach paves the way for quantum-by-quantum control of light fields, including single-photon switching, all-optical deterministic quantum logic and the realization of strongly correlated many-body states of light....

  17. Simulation of Gas-Surface Dynamical Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    surface. The substrate with lattice constant a is represented in a simple ball and spring picture. on the particular problem. Time-independent...παvwell , (26) Simulation of Gas-Surface Dynamical Interactions 4 - 10 RTO-EN-AVT-142 g E ad v mvc ∆ v’well vc cM Figure 4

  18. Interactions Dominate the Dynamics of Visual Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Damian G.; Mirman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Many cognitive theories have described behavior as the summation of independent contributions from separate components. Contrasting views have emphasized the importance of multiplicative interactions and emergent structure. We describe a statistical approach to distinguishing additive and multiplicative processes and apply it to the dynamics of…

  19. Proceedings of Summer Institute of Particle Physics, July 27-August 7, 1981: the strong interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, A. (ed.)

    1982-01-01

    The ninth SLAC Summer Institute on Particle Physics was held in the period July 27 to August 7, 1981. The central topic was the strong interactions with the first seven days spent in a pedagogic mode and the last three in a topical conference. In addition to the morning lectures on experimental and theoretical aspects of the strong interactions, three were lectures on machine physics; this year it was electron-positron colliding beam machines, both storage rings and linear colliders. Twenty-three individual items from the meeting were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  20. Red-shifted carrier multiplication energy threshold and exciton recycling mechanisms in strongly interacting silicon nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marri, Ivan; Govoni, Marco; Ossicini, Stefano

    2014-09-24

    We present density functional theory calculations of carrier multiplication properties in a system of strongly coupled silicon nanocrystals. Our results suggest that nanocrystal-nanocrystal interaction can lead to a reduction of the carrier multiplication energy threshold without altering the carrier multiplication efficiency at high energies, in agreement with experiments. The time evolution of the number of electron-hole pairs generated in a system of strongly interacting nanocrystals upon absorption of high-energy photons is analyzed by solving a system of coupled rate equations, where exciton recycling mechanisms are implemented. We reconsider the role played by Auger recombination which is here accounted also as an active, nondetrimental process.

  1. Dynamical and bursty interactions in social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehlé, Juliette; Barrat, Alain; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2010-03-01

    We present a modeling framework for dynamical and bursty contact networks made of agents in social interaction. We consider agents’ behavior at short time scales in which the contact network is formed by disconnected cliques of different sizes. At each time a random agent can make a transition from being isolated to being part of a group or vice versa. Different distributions of contact times and intercontact times between individuals are obtained by considering transition probabilities with memory effects, i.e., the transition probabilities for each agent depend both on its state (isolated or interacting) and on the time elapsed since the last change in state. The model lends itself to analytical and numerical investigations. The modeling framework can be easily extended and paves the way for systematic investigations of dynamical processes occurring on rapidly evolving dynamical networks, such as the propagation of an information or spreading of diseases.

  2. Interactions Dominate the Dynamics of Visual Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Damian G.; Mirman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Many cognitive theories have described behavior as the summation of independent contributions from separate components. Contrasting views have emphasized the importance of multiplicative interactions and emergent structure. We describe a statistical approach to distinguishing additive and multiplicative processes and apply it to the dynamics of eye movements during classic visual cognitive tasks. The results reveal interaction-dominant dynamics in eye movements in each of the three tasks, and that fine-grained eye movements are modulated by task constraints. These findings reveal the interactive nature of cognitive processing and are consistent with theories that view cognition as an emergent property of processes that are broadly distributed over many scales of space and time rather than a componential assembly line. PMID:20070957

  3. Strong interactions of hyperons. [Summaries of research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemethy, P.; Hungerbuehler, V.; Majka, R.

    1975-01-01

    A summary of the strong interaction results obtained with the Yale--FNAL--BNL hyperon beam at the Brookhaven AGS is presented. Differential cross sections are reported for hyperon-proton elastic scattering with samples of 6200 ..sigma../sup -/p events and 67 ..xi../sup -/p events. Also a report is made on a search for hyperon resonances in inelastic scattering. Finally, the prospects for new results on hyperon interactions are reviewed.

  4. Electron dynamics controlled via self-interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Tamburini, Matteo; Di Piazza, Antonino

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of an electron in a strong laser field can be significantly altered by radiation reaction. This usually results in a strongly damped motion, with the electron losing a large fraction of its initial energy. Here we show that the electron dynamics in a bichromatic laser pulse can be indirectly controlled by a comparatively small radiation reaction force through its interplay with the Lorentz force. By changing the relative phase between the two frequency components of the bichromatic laser field, an ultrarelativistic electron bunch colliding head-on with the laser pulse can be deflected in a controlled way, with the deflection angle being independent of the initial electron energy. The effect is predicted to be observable with intensities available at upcoming laser facilities.

  5. Density functional theory and dynamical mean-field theory. A way to model strongly correlated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backes, Steffen

    2017-04-15

    The study of the electronic properties of correlated systems is a very diverse field and has lead to valuable insight into the physics of real materials. In these systems, the decisive factor that governs the physical properties is the ratio between the electronic kinetic energy, which promotes delocalization over the lattice, and the Coulomb interaction, which instead favours localized electronic states. Due to this competition, correlated electronic systems can show unique and interesting properties like the Metal-Insulator transition, diverse phase diagrams, strong temperature dependence and in general a high sensitivity to the environmental conditions. A theoretical description of these systems is not an easy task, since perturbative approaches that do not preserve the competition between the kinetic and interaction terms can only be applied in special limiting cases. One of the most famous approaches to obtain the electronic properties of a real material is the ab initio density functional theory (DFT) method. It allows one to obtain the ground state density of the system under investigation by mapping onto an effective non-interacting system that has to be found self-consistently. While being an exact theory, in practical implementations certain approximations have to be made to the exchange-correlation potential. The local density approximation (LDA), which approximates the exchange-correlation contribution to the total energy by that of a homogeneous electron gas with the corresponding density, has proven quite successful in many cases. Though, this approximation in general leads to an underestimation of electronic correlations and is not able to describe a metal-insulator transition due to electronic localization in the presence of strong Coulomb interaction. A different approach to the interacting electronic problem is the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT), which is non-perturbative in the kinetic and interaction term but neglects all non

  6. Interactive macroeconomics stochastic aggregate dynamics with heterogeneous and interacting agents

    CERN Document Server

    Di Guilmi, Corrado

    2017-01-01

    One of the major problems of macroeconomic theory is the way in which the people exchange goods in decentralized market economies. There are major disagreements among macroeconomists regarding tools to influence required outcomes. Since the mainstream efficient market theory fails to provide an internal coherent framework, there is a need for an alternative theory. The book provides an innovative approach for the analysis of agent based models, populated by the heterogeneous and interacting agents in the field of financial fragility. The text is divided in two parts; the first presents analytical developments of stochastic aggregation and macro-dynamics inference methods. The second part introduces macroeconomic models of financial fragility for complex systems populated by heterogeneous and interacting agents. The concepts of financial fragility and macroeconomic dynamics are explained in detail in separate chapters. The statistical physics approach is applied to explain theories of macroeconomic modelling a...

  7. Metastability and coherence of repulsive polarons in a strongly interacting Fermi mixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohstall, Cristoph; Zaccanti, Mattheo; Jag, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Ultracold Fermi gases with tunable interactions provide a test bed for exploring the many-body physics of strongly interacting quantum systems1, 2, 3, 4. Over the past decade, experiments have investigated many intriguing phenomena, and precise measurements of ground-state properties have provided...... implies the existence of a weakly bound molecular state, which makes the system intrinsically unstable against decay. Here we use radio-frequency spectroscopy to measure the complete excitation spectrum of fermionic 40K impurities resonantly interacting with a Fermi sea of 6Li atoms. In particular, we...

  8. n→π* Non-Covalent Interaction is Weak but Strong in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Santosh Kumar; Das, Aloke

    2017-06-01

    n→π* interaction is a newly discovered non-covalent interaction which involves delocalization of lone pair (n) electrons of an electronegative atom into π* orbital of a carbonyl group or an aromatic ring. It is widely observed in materials, biomolecules (protein, DNA, RNA), amino acids, neurotransmitter and drugs. However, due to its weak strength and counterintuitive nature its existence is debatable. Such weak interactions are often masked by solvent effects in condense phase or physiological conditions thereby, making it difficult to prove the presence of such weak interactions. Therefore, we have used isolated gas phase spectroscopy in combination with quantum chemical calculations to study n→π* interaction in several molecules where, our molecular systems are free from solvent effects or any external forces. Herein I will be discussing two of the molecular systems (phenyl formate and salicin) where, we have observed the significance of n→π* interaction in determining the conformational specificity of the molecules. We have proved the existence of n→π* interaction for the first time through IR spectroscopy by probing the carbonyl stretching frequency of phenyl formate. Our study is further pursued on a drug named salicin where, we have observed that its conformational preferences is ruled by n→π* interaction even though a strong hydrogen bonding interaction is present in the molecule. Our results show that n→π* interaction, in spite of its weak strength, should not be overlooked as it existence can play an important role in governing the structures of molecules like other strong non-covalent interactions do.

  9. Energy Densities in the Strong-Interaction Limit of Density Functional Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirtschink, A.; Seidl, M.; Gori Giorgi, P.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss energy densities in the strong-interaction limit of density functional theory, deriving an exact expression within the definition (gauge) of the electrostatic potential of the exchange-correlation hole. Exact results for small atoms and small model quantum dots (Hooke's atoms) are

  10. Merging of Landau levels in a strongly-interacting two-dimensional electron system in silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Shashkin, A.A.; Dolgopolov, V.T.; Clark, J. W.; Shaginyan, V. R.; Zverev, M. V.; Khodel, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    We show that the merging of the spin- and valley-split Landau levels at the chemical potential is an intrinsic property of a strongly-interacting two-dimensional electron system in silicon. Evidence for the level merging is given by available experimental data.

  11. Merging of Landau levels in a strongly interacting two-dimensional electron system in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashkin, A A; Dolgopolov, V T; Clark, J W; Shaginyan, V R; Zverev, M V; Khodel, V A

    2014-05-09

    We show that the merging of the spin- and valley-split Landau levels at the chemical potential is an intrinsic property of a strongly interacting two-dimensional electron system in silicon. Evidence for the level merging is given by available experimental data.

  12. Strongly interacting bosons in a one-dimensional optical lattice at incommensurate densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazarides, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315556668; Tieleman, O.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341386456; de Morais Smith, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304836346

    2011-01-01

    We investigate quantum phase transitions occurring in a system of strongly interacting ultracold bosons in a one-dimensional optical lattice. After discussing the commensurate-incommensurate transition, we focus on the phases appearing at an incommensurate filling. We find a rich phase diagram, with

  13. Strong pionic intermittency in 'cold'events in 12C–AgBr interactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper intermittent behaviour of the pions from `cold' and `hot' classes of events from 12C–AgBr interactions at 4.5 A GeV has been studied, separately. The results reveal strong intermittent pattern in case of `cold' class of events.

  14. Multi-level and quasi-Newton acceleration for strongly coupled partitioned fluid-structure interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreeft, J.J.; Weghs, M.; Van Zuijlen, A.H.; Bijl, H.

    2011-01-01

    Two reduced order models are presented for the simulation of physically strong coupled fluid-structure interaction problem, based on computationally partitioned flow and structure solvers. The reduced order models used are a class of quasi-Newton coupling methods to obtain a stable solution and to

  15. CERN LHC sensitivity to the resonance spectrum of a minimal strongly interacting electroweak symmetry breaking sector

    CERN Document Server

    Dobado, A; Peláez, J R; Ruiz-Morales, Ester

    2000-01-01

    We present a unified analysis of the two main production processes of vector boson pairs at the CERN LHC, VV-fusion and qq annihilation, in a minimal strongly interacting electroweak symmetry breaking sector. Using a unitarized electroweak chiral Lagrangian formalism and modeling the final V/sub L/V/sub L/ strong rescattering effects by a form factor, we describe qq annihilation processes in terms of the two chiral parameters that govern elastic V/sub L/V/sub L/ scattering. Depending on the values of these two chiral parameters, the unitarized amplitudes may present resonant enhancements in different angular momentum-isospin channels. Scanning this two parameter space, we generate the general resonance spectrum of a minimal strongly interacting electroweak symmetry breaking sector and determine the regions that can be probed at the CERN LHC. (47 refs).

  16. Coupling functions: Universal insights into dynamical interaction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovski, Tomislav; Pereira, Tiago; McClintock, Peter V. E.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2017-10-01

    The dynamical systems found in nature are rarely isolated. Instead they interact and influence each other. The coupling functions that connect them contain detailed information about the functional mechanisms underlying the interactions and prescribe the physical rule specifying how an interaction occurs. A coherent and comprehensive review is presented encompassing the rapid progress made recently in the analysis, understanding, and applications of coupling functions. The basic concepts and characteristics of coupling functions are presented through demonstrative examples of different domains, revealing the mechanisms and emphasizing their multivariate nature. The theory of coupling functions is discussed through gradually increasing complexity from strong and weak interactions to globally coupled systems and networks. A variety of methods that have been developed for the detection and reconstruction of coupling functions from measured data is described. These methods are based on different statistical techniques for dynamical inference. Stemming from physics, such methods are being applied in diverse areas of science and technology, including chemistry, biology, physiology, neuroscience, social sciences, mechanics, and secure communications. This breadth of application illustrates the universality of coupling functions for studying the interaction mechanisms of coupled dynamical systems.

  17. Strong persistent growth differences govern individual performance and population dynamics in a tropical forest understorey palm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, M.; Zuidema, P.A.; Anten, N.P.R.; Martínez-Ramos, M.

    2012-01-01

    1. Persistent variation in growth rate between individual plants can have strong effects on population dynamics as fast growers reach the reproductive size at an earlier age and thus potentially contribute more to population growth than slow growers. In tropical forests, such persistent growth

  18. Influences of dipole–quadrupole strong interactions in optical properties of plasmonic nanodimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrinkhat, F.; Fazel Najafabadi, A.; Pakizeh, T.

    2017-12-01

    An extended analytical method based on the dipole-quadrupole electromagnetic interaction is proposed to investigate the optical properties of strongly interacting plasmonic nanoparticles for which the known coupled dipoles approximation (CDA) is inaccurate. The introduced simple and novel method used here, namely coupled dipole-quadrupole approximation (CDQA), is used to elaborate on the optical interactions of individual modes including dipole-dipole, dipole-quadrupole and quadrupole-quadrupole. A simple and versatile formula is presented for the modified dipole-polarizability by considering an adjacent quadrupole effect, leading to accurate prediction of remarkable features in the optical properties of nanoparticle clusters in simple or complex forms. Interestingly, in a nanodimer configuration, it is shown that the quadrupole strongly affects the dipolar resonance energy, though the dipole impact on quadrupole properties are negligible. The findings are verified by the approximated methods, numerical computations and generalized Mie theory.

  19. Non-Linear Dynamics and Fundamental Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Khanna, Faqir

    2006-01-01

    The book is directed to researchers and graduate students pursuing an advanced degree. It provides details of techniques directed towards solving problems in non-linear dynamics and chos that are, in general, not amenable to a perturbative treatment. The consideration of fundamental interactions is a prime example where non-perturbative techniques are needed. Extension of these techniques to finite temperature problems is considered. At present these ideas are primarily used in a perturbative context. However, non-perturbative techniques have been considered in some specific cases. Experts in the field on non-linear dynamics and chaos and fundamental interactions elaborate the techniques and provide a critical look at the present status and explore future directions that may be fruitful. The text of the main talks will be very useful to young graduate students who are starting their studies in these areas.

  20. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-04-02

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  1. Construction of Exchange-Correlation Potentials for Strongly Interacting One-Dimensional Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J. Wildon O.; Vieira, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    One-dimensional (1D) systems are useful laboratories aiming further improvement of electronic structure calculations. In order to simulate electron-electron interactions, two types of expressions are commonly considered: soft-Coulomb and exponential. For both cases, in the context of density-functional theory (DFT), 1D systems can be employed to gain insight into the ingredients accurate exchange-correlation (XC) density functionals must incorporate. A question of major interest is the treatment of strongly interacting situations, one of the main modern challenges for DFT. In this manuscript, we propose a generalization of preexisting XC potentials which can be applied to investigate the transition from weak to strong interactions. Specifically, we employ the intriguing behavior of electrons confined in one dimension: the spin-charge separation, for which spin and charge are decoupled to form two independent quasiparticles, spinons, and chargons. By means of Friedel oscillations, our results indicate it is possible to reproduce the weak-strong interaction transition by using a simple strategy we name, from previous works, spin-charge separation correction (SCSC). In addition, SCSC also yields good results in reproducing the constancy of the highest occupied Kohn-Sham eigenvalues upon fractional electron charges.

  2. Measurement-induced deterministic and probabilistic entanglement with strong and weak interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Antonio

    2017-11-01

    A scheme is proposed to transform spatial coherence of a single particle into entanglement. Two quantum systems can be entangled by having them interact in parallel with an ancillary particle in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, then making a suitable post-selection of the particle followed by a conditional feedforward on one of the systems to be entangled. For a strong interaction between each system and the ancilla, the process works deterministically. For a weaker interaction only the probability of success is reduced, but the output continues to be a maximally entangled state. It is demonstrated that the process is optimal when the two interactions are symmetric, systems with continuous variables are considered, and the effects of the environment are taken into account.

  3. Evaluation of interaction dynamics of concurrent processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobecki, Piotr; Białasiewicz, Jan T.; Gross, Nicholas

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the wavelet tools that enable the detection of temporal interactions of concurrent processes. In particular, the determination of interaction coherence of time-varying signals is achieved using a complex continuous wavelet transform. This paper has used electrocardiogram (ECG) and seismocardiogram (SCG) data set to show multiple continuous wavelet analysis techniques based on Morlet wavelet transform. MATLAB Graphical User Interface (GUI), developed in the reported research to assist in quick and simple data analysis, is presented. These software tools can discover the interaction dynamics of time-varying signals, hence they can reveal their correlation in phase and amplitude, as well as their non-linear interconnections. The user-friendly MATLAB GUI enables effective use of the developed software what enables to load two processes under investigation, make choice of the required processing parameters, and then perform the analysis. The software developed is a useful tool for researchers who have a need for investigation of interaction dynamics of concurrent processes.

  4. Quantum magnetism in strongly interacting one-dimensional spinor Bose systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkharghani, Amin; Volosniev, Artem; Lindgren, Jonathan; Rotureau, Jimmy; Forssén, Christian; Fedorov, Dmitri; Jensen, Aksel; Zinner, Nikolaj

    2015-06-15

    Strongly interacting one-dimensional quantum systems often behave in a manner that is distinctly different from their higher-dimensional counterparts. When a particle attempts to move in a one-dimensional environment it will unavoidably have to interact and 'push' other particles in order to execute a pattern of motion, irrespective of whether the particles are fermions or bosons. A present frontier in both theory and experiment are mixed systems of different species and/or particles with multiple internal degrees of freedom. Here we consider trapped two-component bosons with short-range inter-species interactions much larger than their intra-species interactions and show that they have novel energetic and magnetic properties. In the strongly interacting regime, these systems have energies that are fractions of the basic harmonic oscillator trap quantum and have spatially separated ground states with manifestly ferromagnetic wave functions. Furthermore, we predict excited states that have perfect antiferromagnetic ordering. This holds for both balanced and imbalanced systems, and we show that it is a generic feature as one crosses from few- to many-body systems.

  5. Bogolubov–Hartree–Fock Theory for Strongly Interacting Fermions in the Low Density Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bräunlich, Gerhard [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Institute for Mathematics (Germany); Hainzl, Christian [University of Tübingen, Mathematical Institute (Germany); Seiringer, Robert, E-mail: robert.seiringer@ist.ac.at [Institute of Science and Technology Austria (Austria)

    2016-06-15

    We consider the Bogolubov–Hartree–Fock functional for a fermionic many-body system with two-body interactions. For suitable interaction potentials that have a strong enough attractive tail in order to allow for two-body bound states, but are otherwise sufficiently repulsive to guarantee stability of the system, we show that in the low-density limit the ground state of this model consists of a Bose–Einstein condensate of fermion pairs. The latter can be described by means of the Gross–Pitaevskii energy functional.

  6. Twenty years and going strong: A dynamic systems revolution in motor and cognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John P; Perone, Sammy; Buss, Aaron T

    2011-12-01

    This article reviews the major contributions of dynamic systems theory in advancing thinking about development, the empirical insights the theory has generated, and the key challenges for the theory on the horizon. The first section discusses the emergence of dynamic systems theory in developmental science, the core concepts of the theory, and the resonance it has with other approaches that adopt a systems metatheory. The second section reviews the work of Esther Thelen and colleagues, who revolutionized how researchers think about the field of motor development. It also reviews recent extensions of this work to the domain of cognitive development. Here, the focus is on dynamic field theory, a formal, neurally grounded approach that has yielded novel insights into the embodied nature of cognition. The final section proposes that the key challenge on the horizon is to formally specify how interactions among multiple levels of analysis interact across multiple time scales to create developmental change.

  7. Les Houches Summer School : Strongly Interacting Quantum Systems out of Equilibrium

    CERN Document Server

    Millis, Andrew J; Parcollet, Olivier; Saleur, Hubert; Cugliandolo, Leticia F

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade new experimental tools and theoretical concepts are providing new insights into collective nonequilibrium behavior of quantum systems. The exquisite control provided by laser trapping and cooling techniques allows us to observe the behavior of condensed bose and degenerate Fermi gases under nonequilibrium drive or after quenches' in which a Hamiltonian parameter is suddenly or slowly changed. On the solid state front, high intensity short-time pulses and fast (femtosecond) probes allow solids to be put into highly excited states and probed before relaxation and dissipation occur. Experimental developments are matched by progress in theoretical techniques ranging from exact solutions of strongly interacting nonequilibrium models to new approaches to nonequilibrium numerics. The summer school Strongly interacting quantum systems out of equilibrium' held at the Les Houches School of Physics as its XCIX session was designed to summarize this progress, lay out the open questions and define dir...

  8. Thermodynamics of strongly interacting fermions in two-dimensional optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khatami, Ehsan; Rigol, Marcos [Department of Physics, Georgetown University, Washington DC, 20057 (United States); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    We study finite-temperature properties of strongly correlated fermions in two-dimensional optical lattices by means of numerical linked cluster expansions, a computational technique that allows one to obtain exact results in the thermodynamic limit. We focus our analysis on the strongly interacting regime, where the on-site repulsion is of the order of or greater than the band width. We compute the equation of state, double occupancy, entropy, uniform susceptibility, and spin correlations for temperatures that are similar to or below the ones achieved in current optical lattice experiments. We provide a quantitative analysis of adiabatic cooling of trapped fermions in two dimensions, by means of both flattening the trapping potential and increasing the interaction strength.

  9. Thermodynamics of strongly interacting fermions in two-dimensional optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ehsan; Rigol, Marcos

    2011-11-01

    We study finite-temperature properties of strongly correlated fermions in two-dimensional optical lattices by means of numerical linked cluster expansions, a computational technique that allows one to obtain exact results in the thermodynamic limit. We focus our analysis on the strongly interacting regime, where the on-site repulsion is of the order of or greater than the band width. We compute the equation of state, double occupancy, entropy, uniform susceptibility, and spin correlations for temperatures that are similar to or below the ones achieved in current optical lattice experiments. We provide a quantitative analysis of adiabatic cooling of trapped fermions in two dimensions, by means of both flattening the trapping potential and increasing the interaction strength.

  10. On the Frequency Distribution of Neutral Particles from Low-Energy Strong Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Colecchia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The rejection of the contamination, or background, from low-energy strong interactions at hadron collider experiments is a topic that has received significant attention in the field of particle physics. This article builds on a particle-level view of collision events, in line with recently proposed subtraction methods. While conventional techniques in the field usually concentrate on probability distributions, our study is, to our knowledge, the first attempt at estimating the frequency distribution of background particles across the kinematic space inside individual collision events. In fact, while the probability distribution can generally be estimated given a model of low-energy strong interactions, the corresponding frequency distribution inside a single event typically deviates from the average and cannot be predicted a priori. We present preliminary results in this direction and establish a connection between our technique and the particle weighting methods that have been the subject of recent investigation at the Large Hadron Collider.

  11. STRONG SOLAR WIND DYNAMIC PRESSURE PULSES: INTERPLANETARY SOURCES AND THEIR IMPACTS ON GEOSYNCHRONOUS MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Pingbing; Feng, Xueshang; Wang, Yi [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Xie, Yanqiong [College of Meteorology and Oceanography, PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China); Xu, Xiaojun, E-mail: pbzuo@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn [Space Science Institute, Macau University of Science and Technology, Macao (China)

    2015-10-20

    In this investigation, we first present a statistical result of the interplanetary sources of very strong solar wind dynamic pressure pulses (DPPs) detected by WIND during solar cycle 23. It is found that the vast majority of strong DPPs reside within solar wind disturbances. Although the variabilities of geosynchronous magnetic fields (GMFs) due to the impact of positive DPPs have been well established, there appears to be no systematic investigations on the response of GMFs to negative DPPs. Here, we study both the decompression effects of very strong negative DPPs and the compression from strong positive DPPs on GMFs at different magnetic local time sectors. In response to the decompression of strong negative DPPs, GMFs on the dayside near dawn and near dusk on the nightside, are generally depressed. But near the midnight region, the responses of GMF are very diverse, being either positive or negative. For part of the events when GOES is located at the midnight sector, the GMF is found to abnormally increase as the result of magnetospheric decompression caused by negative DPPs. It is known that under certain conditions magnetic depression of nightside GMFs can be caused by the impact of positive DPPs. Here, we find that a stronger pressure enhancement may have a higher probability of producing the exceptional depression of GMF at the midnight region. Statistically, both the decompression effect of strong negative DPPs and the compression effect of strong positive DPPs depend on the magnetic local time, which are stronger at the noon sector.

  12. Limitations due to strong head-on beam-beam interactions (MD 1434)

    CERN Document Server

    Buffat, Xavier; Iadarola, Giovanni; Papadopoulou, Parthena Stefania; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Pellegrini, Dario; Pojer, Mirko; Crockford, Guy; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Trad, Georges; Barranco Garcia, Javier; Pieloni, Tatiana; Tambasco, Claudia; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    The results of an experiment aiming at probing the limitations due to strong head on beam-beam interactions are reported. It is shown that the loss rates significantly increase when moving the working point up and down the diagonal, possibly due to effects of the 10th and/or 14th order resonances. Those limitations are tighter for bunches with larger beam-beam parameters, a maximum total beam-beam tune shift just below 0.02 could be reached.

  13. Phase transitions of the dimerized Kane-Mele model with/without strong interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tao; Li, Yue-Xun; Li, Yan; Lu, He-Lin; Zhang, Hui

    2017-09-01

    The dimerized Kane-Mele model with/without strong interaction is studied using analytical methods. The boundary of the topological phase transition of the model without strong interaction is obtained. Our results show that the occurrence of the transition only depends on dimerized parameter α . From the one-particle spectrum, we obtain the completed phase diagram including the quantum spin Hall state and the topologically trivial insulator. Then, using different mean field methods, we investigate the Mott transition and the magnetic transition of the strongly correlated dimerized Kane-Mele model. In the region between the two transitions, the topological Mott insulator with characteristics of Mott insulators and topological phases may be the most interesting phase. In this work, the effects of hopping anisotropy and Hubbard interaction U on the boundaries of the two transitions are observed in detail. The completed phase diagram of the dimerized Kane-Mele-Hubbard model is also obtained in this work. Quantum fluctuations have extremely important influences on a quantum system. However, investigations are under the framework of mean field treatment in this work and the effects of fluctuations in this model will be discussed in the future.

  14. Semiclassical approach to dynamics of interacting fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Shainen M.; Sels, Dries; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the behaviour of interacting fermions is of fundamental interest in many fields ranging from condensed matter to high energy physics. Developing numerically efficient and accurate simulation methods is an indispensable part of this. Already in equilibrium, fermions are notoriously hard to handle due to the sign problem. Out of equilibrium, an important outstanding problem is the efficient numerical simulation of the dynamics of these systems. In this work we develop a new semiclassical phase-space approach (a.k.a. the truncated Wigner approximation) for simulating the dynamics of interacting fermions in arbitrary dimensions. As fermions are essentially non-classical objects, a phase-space is constructed out of all fermionic bilinears. Classical phase-space is thus comprised of highly non-local (hidden) variables representing these bilinears, and the cost of the method is that it scales quadratic rather than linear with system size. We demonstrate the strength of the method by comparing the results to the exact quantum dynamics of fermion expansion in the Hubbard model and quantum thermalization in the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model for small systems, where the semiclassics nearly perfectly reproduces correct results. We furthermore analyse fermion expansion in a larger, intractable by exact methods, 2D Hubbard model, which is directly relevant to recent cold atom experiments.

  15. Competing dynamical processes on two interacting networks

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Zuzek, L G; Braunstein, L A; Vazquez, F

    2016-01-01

    We propose and study a model for the competition between two different dynamical processes, one for opinion formation and the other for decision making, on two interconnected networks. The networks represent two interacting social groups, the society and the Congress. An opinion formation process takes place on the society, where the opinion S of each individual can take one of four possible values (S=-2,-1,1,2), describing its level of agreement on a given issue, from totally against (S=-2) to totally in favor (S=2). The dynamics is controlled by a reinforcement parameter r, which measures the ratio between the likelihood to become an extremist or a moderate. The dynamics of the Congress is akin to that of the Abrams-Strogatz model, where congressmen can adopt one of two possible positions, to be either in favor (+) or against (-) the issue. The probability that a congressman changes his decision is proportional to the fraction of interacting neighbors that hold the opposite opinion raised to a power $\\beta$...

  16. Strong interactive growth behaviours in solution-phase synthesis of three-dimensional metal oxide nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Min; No, You-Shin; Kim, Sungwoong; Park, Hong-Gyu; Park, Won Il

    2015-02-01

    Wet-chemical synthesis is a promising alternative to the conventional vapour-phase method owing to its advantages in commercial-scale production at low cost. Studies on nanocrystallization in solution have suggested that growth rate is commonly affected by the size and density of surrounding crystals. However, systematic investigation on the mutual interaction among neighbouring crystals is still lacking. Here we report on strong interactive growth behaviours observed during anisotropic growth of zinc oxide hexagonal nanorods arrays. In particular, we found multiple growth regimes demonstrating that the diameter of the rod is dependent on its height. Local interactions among the growing rods result in cases where height is irrelevant to the diameter, increased with increasing diameter or inversely proportional to the diameter. These phenomena originate from material diffusion and the size-dependent Gibbs-Thomson effect that are universally applicable to a variety of material systems, thereby providing bottom-up strategies for diverse three-dimensional nanofabrication.

  17. Multiphase Flow Dynamics 2 Mechanical Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov

    2012-01-01

    Multi-phase flows are part of our natural environment such as tornadoes, typhoons, air and water pollution and volcanic activities as well as part of industrial technology such as power plants, combustion engines, propulsion systems, or chemical and biological industry. The industrial use of multi-phase systems requires analytical and numerical strategies for predicting their behavior. .In its fourth extended edition the successful monograph package “Multiphase Flow Daynmics” contains theory, methods and practical experience for describing complex transient multi-phase processes in arbitrary geometrical configurations, providing a systematic presentation of the theory and practice of numerical multi-phase fluid dynamics. In the present second volume the methods for describing the mechanical interactions in multiphase dynamics are provided. This fourth edition includes various updates, extensions, improvements and corrections.   "The literature in the field of multiphase flows is numerous. Therefore, it i...

  18. Multiphase Flow Dynamics 3 Thermal Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov

    2012-01-01

    Multi-phase flows are part of our natural environment such as tornadoes, typhoons, air and water pollution and volcanic activities as well as part of industrial technology such as power plants, combustion engines, propulsion systems, or chemical and biological industry. The industrial use of multi-phase systems requires analytical and numerical strategies for predicting their behavior. .In its fourth extended edition the successful monograph package “Multiphase Flow Daynmics” contains theory, methods and practical experience for describing complex transient multi-phase processes in arbitrary geometrical configurations, providing a systematic presentation of the theory and practice of numerical multi-phase fluid dynamics. In the present third volume methods for describing of the thermal interactions in multiphase dynamics are provided. In addition a large number of valuable experiments is collected and predicted using the methods introduced in this monograph. In this way the accuracy of the methods is reve...

  19. Frequency tuning and coherent dynamics of two nanostring resonators in the strong coupling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebl, Hans; Pernpeintner, Matthias; Schmidt, Philip; Schwienbacher, Daniel; Gross, Rudolf

    Coupled nanomechanical resonators are interesting model systems for studying synchronization effects and nonlinear dynamics. This, however, requires the possibility to tune the relevant mode frequencies independently and to operate the resonators in the strong coupling regime. Here, we present a possible realization consisting of two high-quality nanostring resonators, coupled mechanically by a shared support structure. First, we demonstrate that the fundamental mode frequencies of both nanostrings can be tuned independently by a strong drive tone resonant with one of the higher harmonic modes. This technique relies on an effective increase of the pre-stress in a highly excited nanobeam, known as geometric nonlinearity. Using this frequency tuning concept, we investigate the coherent dynamics of the two strongly coupled nanostring resonators. With the two nanobeams tuned in resonance, we observe oscillations corresponding to Rabi oscillations, which indicates coherent excitation transfer between the fundamental modes of the two nanostrings. In addition, experimental investigation of classical Landau-Zener dynamics demonstrates that this coupling and tuning concept paves the way for a selective phonon transfer between two spatially separated mechanical resonators. Nanosystems Initiative Munich.

  20. Oenological prefermentation practices strongly impact yeast population dynamics and alcoholic fermentation kinetics in Chardonnay grape must.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertin, Warren; Miot-Sertier, Cécile; Bely, Marina; Marullo, Philippe; Coulon, Joana; Moine, Virginie; Colonna-Ceccaldi, Benoit; Masneuf-Pomarede, Isabelle

    2014-05-16

    Yeast species of Hanseniaspora and Candida genus are predominant during the early stages of winemaking, while species of Metschnikowia, Pichia, Zygoascus, Issatchenkia, Torulaspora and other genera are present at lower population levels. The impact of common oenological practices on yeast dynamics during the prefermentative stage and the early stage of alcoholic fermentation (AF) remains elusive. In this work, the effect of four prefermentative oenological practices (clarification degree, temperature, sulphite and starter yeast addition) on yeast dynamics was evaluated in a Chardonnay grape must. The growth curves of four genus or species, namely Saccharomyces spp., Hanseniaspora spp., Candida zemplinina and Torulaspora delbrueckii, were followed by quantitative PCR. The fermentation kinetics were also recorded, as well as the production of acetic acid. Variance analysis allowed determining the effect of each practice and their interaction factors, as well as their relative importance on yeast dynamics and fermentation kinetics. Our experimental design showed that the population dynamics of the four species were differently impacted by the oenological practices, with some species being more sensitive than others to the clarification degree (C. zemplinina), sulphite addition (Saccharomyces spp.), starter yeast inoculation (Hanseniaspora spp.) or prefermentation temperature (T. delbrueckii). Significant interaction effects between practices were revealed, highlighting the interest of experimental design allowing interaction analysis, as some factors may buffer the effect of other ones. Hanseniaspora genus showed atypical behaviour: growth dynamics showed a decrease during AF that we interpreted as early cellular lysis. In conclusion, this study provides new insights on the impact of common oenological practices on the dynamics of non-Saccharomyces yeast that will be useful for a better management of mixed fermentation between S. cerevisiae and non

  1. Dynamical analysis of strongly nonlinear fractional-order Mathieu-Duffing equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Shao-Fang; Shen, Yong-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Na; Yang, Shao-Pu; Xing, Hai-Jun

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the computation schemes for periodic solutions of the forced fractional-order Mathieu-Duffing equation are derived based on incremental harmonic balance (IHB) method. The general forms of periodic solutions are founded by the IHB method, which could be useful to obtain the periodic solutions with higher precision. The comparisons of the approximate analytical solutions by the IHB method and numerical integration are fulfilled, and the results certify the correctness and higher precision of the solutions by the IHB method. The dynamical analysis of strongly nonlinear fractional-order Mathieu-Duffing equation is investigated by the IHB method. Then, the effects of the excitation frequency, fractional order, fractional coefficient, and nonlinear stiffness coefficient on the complex dynamical behaviors are analyzed. At last, the detailed results are summarized and the conclusions are made, which present some useful information to analyze and/or control the dynamical response of this kind of system.

  2. Dynamic interactions between ionospheric plasma and spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, David B.

    1995-01-01

    Studies of the interactions between the Space Station Freedom and ionospheric plasma led to an improved understanding of the dynamics of these interactions. Some of the issues related to developing and sustaining arcs in ionospheric conditions are considered. A technique for the estimation of the amplitude and duration of arcs is presented. The technique uses the capacitance of the system to estimate the peak current and then uses the charge stored to estimate the arc duration. As new technologies are implemented on spacecraft, new environmental compatibility issues will arise. Some of the issues related to driving dielectric surfaces with alternating current voltages are considered. The steady state charging criteria is that over an oscillation, the ion charge collected is compensated for by the electron charge collected. This tends to drive the average potential negative so that the dielectric surface is positive for only a small portion of the cycle.

  3. Strong Selection Significantly Increases Epistatic Interactions in the Long-Term Evolution of a Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Gupta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Epistatic interactions between residues determine a protein's adaptability and shape its evolutionary trajectory. When a protein experiences a changed environment, it is under strong selection to find a peak in the new fitness landscape. It has been shown that strong selection increases epistatic interactions as well as the ruggedness of the fitness landscape, but little is known about how the epistatic interactions change under selection in the long-term evolution of a protein. Here we analyze the evolution of epistasis in the protease of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 using protease sequences collected for almost a decade from both treated and untreated patients, to understand how epistasis changes and how those changes impact the long-term evolvability of a protein. We use an information-theoretic proxy for epistasis that quantifies the co-variation between sites, and show that positive information is a necessary (but not sufficient condition that detects epistasis in most cases. We analyze the "fossils" of the evolutionary trajectories of the protein contained in the sequence data, and show that epistasis continues to enrich under strong selection, but not for proteins whose environment is unchanged. The increase in epistasis compensates for the information loss due to sequence variability brought about by treatment, and facilitates adaptation in the increasingly rugged fitness landscape of treatment. While epistasis is thought to enhance evolvability via valley-crossing early-on in adaptation, it can hinder adaptation later when the landscape has turned rugged. However, we find no evidence that the HIV-1 protease has reached its potential for evolution after 9 years of adapting to a drug environment that itself is constantly changing. We suggest that the mechanism of encoding new information into pairwise interactions is central to protein evolution not just in HIV-1 protease, but for any protein adapting to a changing

  4. Strong coupling electrostatics for randomly charged surfaces: antifragility and effective interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodrat, Malihe; Naji, Ali; Komaie-Moghaddam, Haniyeh; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-05-07

    We study the effective interaction mediated by strongly coupled Coulomb fluids between dielectric surfaces carrying quenched, random monopolar charges with equal mean and variance, both when the Coulomb fluid consists only of mobile multivalent counterions and when it consists of an asymmetric ionic mixture containing multivalent and monovalent (salt) ions in equilibrium with an aqueous bulk reservoir. We analyze the consequences that follow from the interplay between surface charge disorder, dielectric and salt image effects, and the strong electrostatic coupling that results from multivalent counterions on the distribution of these ions and the effective interaction pressure they mediate between the surfaces. In a dielectrically homogeneous system, we show that the multivalent counterions are attracted towards the surfaces with a singular, disorder-induced potential that diverges logarithmically on approach to the surfaces, creating a singular but integrable counterion density profile that exhibits an algebraic divergence at the surfaces with an exponent that depends on the surface charge (disorder) variance. This effect drives the system towards a state of lower thermal 'disorder', one that can be described by a renormalized temperature, exhibiting thus a remarkable antifragility. In the presence of an interfacial dielectric discontinuity, the singular behavior of counterion density at the surfaces is removed but multivalent counterions are still accumulated much more strongly close to randomly charged surfaces as compared with uniformly charged ones. The interaction pressure acting on the surfaces displays in general a highly non-monotonic behavior as a function of the inter-surface separation with a prominent regime of attraction at small to intermediate separations. This attraction is caused directly by the combined effects from charge disorder and strong coupling electrostatics of multivalent counterions, which dominate the surface-surface repulsion due to

  5. Observation of Spin-Polarons in a strongly interacting Fermi liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwierlein, Martin

    2009-03-01

    We have observed spin-polarons in a highly imbalanced mixture of fermionic atoms using tomographic RF spectroscopy. Feshbach resonances allow to freely tune the interactions between the two spin states involved. A single spin down atom immersed in a Fermi sea of spin up atoms can do one of two things: For strong attraction, it can form a molecule with exactly one spin up partner, but for weaker interaction it will spread its attraction and surround itself with a collection of majority atoms. This spin down atom ``dressed'' with a spin up cloud constitutes the spin-polaron. We have observed a striking spectroscopic signature of this quasi-particle for various interaction strengths, a narrow peak in the spin down spectrum that emerges above a broad background. The narrow width signals a long lifetime of the spin-polaron, much longer than the collision rate with spin up atoms, as it must be for a proper quasi-particle. The peak position allows to directly measure the polaron energy. The broad pedestal at high energies reveals physics at short distances and is thus ``molecule-like'': It is exactly matched by the spin up spectra. The comparison with the area under the polaron peak allows to directly obtain the quasi-particle weight Z. We observe a smooth transition from polarons to molecules. At a critical interaction strength of 1/kFa = 0.7, the polaron peak vanishes and spin up and spin down spectra exactly match, signalling the formation of molecules. This is the same critical interaction strength found earlier to separate a normal Fermi mixture from a superfluid molecular Bose-Einstein condensate. The spin-polarons determine the low-temperature phase diagram of imbalanced Fermi mixtures. In principle, polarons can interact with each other and should, at low enough temperatures, form a superfluid of p-wave pairs. We will present a first indication for interactions between polarons.

  6. Classical And Quantum Chaos: Strongly Interacting Particles In A Confined Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanushkin, P S

    2003-01-01

    This dissertation details the classical and quantum dynamics of two mechanical systems. The first one represents a charged particle confined inside a square elastic boundary acted on by a uniform magnetic field—the Square Magnetic Billiard. The second system, called the Circular Coulomb Billiard, consists of two particles, interacting by virtue of the Coulomb potential, and enclosed inside a circular boundary. One of the particles is considered to be massive and remains stationary. The first two chapters give a brief history of classical and quantum chaos, and review the major theoretical concepts. The third chapter analyzes the classical dynamics of the Square Magnetic Billiard. A number of approaches were used for numerical experiments: which shows that the system's classical behavior ranges from completely integrable to fully chaotic, but then the system restores it's integrability as the magnetic field continues to grow. The fourth chapter examines the Square Magnetic Billiard quantum mechanical...

  7. The strong interaction shift and width of the ground state of pionic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigg, D. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Villigen (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Teilchenphysik; Badertscher, A. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Villigen (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Teilchenphysik; Bogdan, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Villigen (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Teilchenphysik; Goudsmit, P.F.A. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Villigen (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Teilchenphysik; Leisi, H.J. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Villigen (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Teilchenphysik; Schroeder, H.-C. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Villigen (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Teilchenphysik; Zhao, Z.G. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Villigen (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Teilchenphysik; Chatellard, D. [Institut de Physique de l`Universite de Neuchatel, 2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Egger, J.-P. [Institut de Physique de l`Universite de Neuchatel, 2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Jeannet, E. [Institut de Physique de l`Universite de Neuchatel, 2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Aschenauer, E.C. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Gabathuler, K. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Simons, L.M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Rusi El Hassani, A.J. [Ecole Mohammadia d`Ingenieurs, Rabat (Morocco)

    1996-11-18

    The 3p-1s transition in pionic hydrogen was investigated with a high-resolution crystal spectrometer system. From the precisely measured transition energy, together with the (calculated) electromagnetic energy, the strong interaction shift of the 1s state was obtained as {epsilon}{sub 1s} = -7.127 {+-}0.028 (stat.) {+-}0.036 (syst.) eV (attractive). From the natural line width, measured for the first time, we determine the decay width of the 1s state: {Gamma}{sub 1s}{sup (decay)} = 0.97 {+-}0.10 (stat.) {+-}0.05 (syst.) eV. With the recently calculated electromagnetic corrections the s-wave scattering lengths of an isospin symmetric strong interaction are deduced. The scattering length for elastic scattering of a negative pion on a proton is a{sup h}{sub {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup -}p} = 0.0885 {+-}0.0003 (stat.) {+-}0.0006 (syst.) m{sub {pi}}{sup -1}. The scattering length for single charge exchange is found to be a{sup h}{sub {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup 0}n} = -0.136 {+-}0.007 (stat.) {+-}0.003 (syst.) m{sub {pi}}{sup -1}. The experiment was performed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland. A focussing crystal spectrometer with an array of bent crystals, the cyclotron trap (a magnetic system designed to increase the particle stop density) and a CCD (charge-coupled device) detector system were employed. The results from the pionic hydrogen experiment - together with those from the pionic deuterium experiment - were used to test the isospin symmetry of the strong interaction. The present data are still consistent with isospin symmetry. (orig.).

  8. Curie law, entropy excess, and superconductivity in heavy fermion metals and other strongly interacting fermi liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodel, V A; Zverev, M V; Yakovenko, Victor M

    2005-12-02

    Low-temperature thermodynamic properties of strongly interacting Fermi liquids with a fermion condensate are investigated. We demonstrate that the spin susceptibility of these systems exhibits the Curie-Weiss law, and the entropy contains a temperature-independent term. The excessive entropy is released at the superconducting transition, enhancing the specific heat jump deltaC and rendering it proportional to the effective Curie constant. The theoretical results are favorably compared with the experimental data on the heavy-fermion metal CeCoIn5, as well as 3He films.

  9. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Exact and simple results for the XYZ and strongly interacting fermion chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendley, Paul; Hagendorf, Christian

    2010-10-01

    We conjecture exact and simple formulas for some physical quantities in two quantum chains. A classic result of this type is Onsager, Kaufman and Yang's formula for the spontaneous magnetization in the Ising model, subsequently generalized to the chiral Potts models. We conjecture that analogous results occur in the XYZ chain when the couplings obey JxJy + JyJz + JxJz = 0, and in a related fermion chain with strong interactions and supersymmetry. We find exact formulas for the magnetization and gap in the former, and the staggered density in the latter, by exploiting the fact that certain quantities are independent of finite-size effects.

  10. Evidence for strong Breit interaction in dielectronic recombination of highly charged heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Kavanagh, Anthony P; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A; Li, Yueming; Kato, Daiji; Currell, Fred J; Ohtani, Shunsuke

    2008-02-22

    Resonant strengths have been measured for dielectronic recombination of Li-like iodine, holmium, and bismuth using an electron beam ion trap. By observing the atomic number dependence of the state-resolved resonant strength, clear experimental evidence has been obtained that the importance of the generalized Breit interaction (GBI) effect on dielectronic recombination increases as the atomic number increases. In particular, it has been shown that the GBI effect is exceptionally strong for the recombination through the resonant state [1s2s(2)2p(1/2)](1).

  11. Constraints on the relaxion mechanism with strongly interacting vector-fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchesne, Hugues; Bertuzzo, Enrico; di Cortona, Giovanni Grilli

    2017-08-01

    We study the experimental constraints on strongly interacting vector-fermions compatible with the relaxion mechanism and investigate any possible tuning. The focus is on a minimal model and low confinement scale. More precisely, we study bounds from electroweak precision tests, Higgs decay, Big Bang nucleosynthesis and direct collider searches. The effect of these new fermions on vacuum stability is also investigated. Combining our bounds, we show that the relaxion mechanism becomes increasingly constrained and finetuned as the confinement scale decreases. For example, a confinement scale of a few tens of MeVs would require tuning at the percent level.

  12. Strongly Interacting Matter Matter at Very High Energy Density: 3 Lectures in Zakopane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLerran, L.

    2010-06-09

    These lectures concern the properties of strongly interacting matter at very high energy density. I begin with the Color Glass Condensate and the Glasma, matter that controls the earliest times in hadronic collisions. I then describe the Quark Gluon Plasma, matter produced from the thermalized remnants of the Glasma. Finally, I describe high density baryonic matter, in particular Quarkyonic matter. The discussion will be intuitive and based on simple structural aspects of QCD. There will be some discussion of experimental tests of these ideas.

  13. News from strong interactions program of the NA61/SHINE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Grebieszkow, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The NA61/SHINE experiment aims to discover the critical point of strongly interacting matter and study the properties of the onset of deconfinement. This is performed by a two dimensional phase diagram ($T-\\mu_B$) scan of measurements of particle spectra and fluctuations in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions as a function of collision energy and system size. In this contribution new NA61/SHINE results on negative pion production, as well as transverse momentum and multiplicity fluctuations in Ar+Sc collisions are presented. Moreover, the latest results on higher order moments of net-charge multiplicity distribution in p+p collisions are also discussed. The Ar+Sc results are compared to NA61 p+p and Be+Be data, as well as to NA49 $A+A$ results.

  14. Mechanism for thermal relic dark matter of strongly interacting massive particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Volansky, Tomer; Wacker, Jay G

    2014-10-24

    We present a new paradigm for achieving thermal relic dark matter. The mechanism arises when a nearly secluded dark sector is thermalized with the standard model after reheating. The freeze-out process is a number-changing 3→2 annihilation of strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs) in the dark sector, and points to sub-GeV dark matter. The couplings to the visible sector, necessary for maintaining thermal equilibrium with the standard model, imply measurable signals that will allow coverage of a significant part of the parameter space with future indirect- and direct-detection experiments and via direct production of dark matter at colliders. Moreover, 3→2 annihilations typically predict sizable 2→2 self-interactions which naturally address the "core versus cusp" and "too-big-to-fail" small-scale structure formation problems.

  15. Dynamics of pollutant indicators during flood events in a small river under strong anthropogenic pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brion, Natacha; Carbonnel, Vincent; Elskens, Marc; Claeys, Philippe; Verbanck, Michel A.

    2017-04-01

    In densely populated regions, human activities profoundly modify natural water circulation as well as water quality, with increased hydrological risks (floods, droughts,…) and chemical hazards (untreated sewage releases, industrial pollution,…) as consequence. In order to assess water and pollutants dynamics and their mass-balance in strongly modified river system, it is important to take into account high flow events as a significant fraction of water and pollutants loads may occur during these short events which are generally underrepresented in classical mass balance studies. A good example of strongly modified river systems is the Zenne river in and around the city of Brussels (Belgium).The Zenne River (Belgium) is a rather small but dynamic rain fed river (about 10 m3/s in average) that is under the influence of strong contrasting anthropogenic pressures along its stretch. While the upstream part of its basin is rather characterized by agricultural land-use, urban and industrial areas dominate the downstream part. In particular, the city of Brussels (1.1M inhabitants) discharges in the Zenne River amounts of wastewater that are large compared to the natural riverine flow. In order to assess water and pollutants dynamics and their mass-balance in the Zenne hydrographic network, we followed water flows and concentrations of several water quality tracers during several flood episodes with an hourly frequency and at different locations along the stretch of the River. These parameters were chosen as indicators of a whole range of pollutions and anthropogenic activities. Knowledge of the high-frequency pollutants dynamics during floods is required for establishing accurate mass-balances of these elements. We thus report here the dynamics of selected parameters during entire flood events, from the baseline to the decreasing phase and at hourly frequency. Dynamics at contrasting locations, in agricultural or urban environments are compared. In particular, the

  16. Identifying two regimes of slip of simple fluids over smooth surfaces with weak and strong wall-fluid interaction energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haibao; Bao, Luyao; Priezjev, Nikolai V; Luo, Kai

    2017-01-21

    The slip behavior of simple fluids over atomically smooth surfaces was investigated in a wide range of wall-fluid interaction (WFI) energies at low shear rates using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The relationship between slip and WFI shows two regimes (the strong-WFI and weak-WFI regimes): as WFI decreases, the slip length increases in the strong-WFI regime and decreases in the weak-WFI regime. The critical value of WFI energy that separates these regimes increases with temperature, but it remains unaffected by the driving force. The mechanism of slip was analyzed by examining the density-weighted average energy barrier (ΔE¯) encountered by fluid atoms in the first fluid layer (FFL) during their hopping between minima of the surface potential. We demonstrated that the relationship between slip and WFI can be rationalized by considering the effect of the fluid density distribution in the FFL on ΔE¯ as a function of the WFI energy. Moreover, the dependence of the slip length on WFI and temperature is well correlated with the exponential factor exp(-ΔE¯/(kBT)), which also determines the critical value of WFI between the strong-WFI and weak-WFI regimes.

  17. Nonequilibrium self-energy functional theory. Accessing the real-time dynamics of strongly correlated fermionic lattice systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Felix

    2016-07-05

    The self-energy functional theory (SFT) is extended to the nonequilibrium case and applied to the real-time dynamics of strongly correlated lattice-fermions. Exploiting the basic structure of the well established equilibrium theory the entire formalism is reformulated in the language of Keldysh-Matsubara Green's functions. To this end, a functional of general nonequilibrium self-energies is constructed which is stationary at the physical point where it moreover yields the physical grand potential of the initial thermal state. Nonperturbative approximations to the full self-energy can be constructed by reducing the original lattice problem to smaller reference systems and varying the functional on the space of the respective trial self-energies, which are parametrized by the reference system's one-particle parameters. Approximations constructed in this way can be shown to respect the macroscopic conservation laws related to the underlying symmetries of the original lattice model. Assuming thermal equilibrium, the original SFT is recovered from the extended formalism. However, in the general case, the nonequilibrium variational principle comprises functional derivatives off the physical parameter space. These can be carried out analytically to derive inherently causal conditional equations for the optimal physical parameters of the reference system and a computationally realizable propagation scheme is set up. As a benchmark for the numerical implementation the variational cluster approach is applied to the dynamics of a dimerized Hubbard model after fast ramps of its hopping parameters. Finally, the time-evolution of a homogeneous Hubbard model after sudden quenches and ramps of the interaction parameter is studied by means of a dynamical impurity approximation with a single bath site. Sharply separated by a critical interaction at which fast relaxation to a thermal final state is observed, two differing response regimes can be distinguished, where the

  18. L. V. Keldysh’s “Ionization in the Field of a Strong Electromagnetic Wave” and modern physics of atomic interaction with a strong laser field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, M. V., E-mail: fedorov@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-15

    Basic premises, approximations, and results of L.V. Keldysh’s 1964 work on multiphoton ionization of atoms are discussed, as well as its influence on the modern science of the interaction of atomic–molecular systems with a strong laser field.

  19. Spin-orbital exchange of strongly interacting fermions in the p band of a two-dimensional optical lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhenyu; Zhao, Erhai; Liu, W Vincent

    2015-03-13

    Mott insulators with both spin and orbital degeneracy are pertinent to a large number of transition metal oxides. The intertwined spin and orbital fluctuations can lead to rather exotic phases such as quantum spin-orbital liquids. Here, we consider two-component (spin 1/2) fermionic atoms with strong repulsive interactions on the p band of the optical square lattice. We derive the spin-orbital exchange for quarter filling of the p band when the density fluctuations are suppressed, and show that it frustrates the development of long-range spin order. Exact diagonalization indicates a spin-disordered ground state with ferro-orbital order. The system dynamically decouples into individual Heisenberg spin chains, each realizing a Luttinger liquid accessible at higher temperatures compared to atoms confined to the s band.

  20. Ab initio simulations reveal that reaction dynamics strongly affect product selectivity for the cracking of alkanes over H-MFI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Paul M; Tranca, Diana C; Gomes, Joseph; Lambrecht, Daniel S; Head-Gordon, Martin; Bell, Alexis T

    2012-11-28

    Product selectivity of alkane cracking catalysis in the H-MFI zeolite is investigated using both static and dynamic first-principles quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations. These simulations account for the electrostatic- and shape-selective interactions in the zeolite and provide enthalpic barriers that are closely comparable to experiment. Cracking transition states for n-pentane lead to a metastable intermediate (a local minimum with relatively small barriers to escape to deeper minima) where the proton is shared between two hydrocarbon fragments. The zeolite strongly stabilizes these carbocations compared to the gas phase, and the conversion of this intermediate to more stable species determines the product selectivity. Static reaction pathways on the potential energy surface starting from the metastable intermediate include a variety of possible conversions into more stable products. One-picosecond quasiclassical trajectory simulations performed at 773 K indicate that dynamic paths are substantially more diverse than the potential energy paths. Vibrational motion that is dynamically sampled after the cracking transition state causes spilling of the metastable intermediate into a variety of different products. A nearly 10-fold change in the branching ratio between C2/C3 cracking channels is found upon inclusion of post-transition-state dynamics, relative to static electronic structure calculations. Agreement with experiment is improved by the same factor. Because dynamical effects occur soon after passing through the rate-limiting transition state, it is the dynamics, and not only the potential energy barriers, that determine the catalytic selectivity. This study suggests that selectivity in zeolite catalysis is determined by high temperature pathways that differ significantly from 0 K potential surfaces.

  1. Strong ties promote the epidemic prevalence in susceptible-infected-susceptible spreading dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Ai-Xiang; Zhou, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Understanding spreading dynamics will benefit society as a whole in better preventing and controlling diseases, as well as facilitating the socially responsible information while depressing destructive rumors. In network-based spreading dynamics, edges with different weights may play far different roles: a friend from afar usually brings novel stories, and an intimate relationship is highly risky for a flu epidemic. In this article, we propose a weighted susceptible-infected-susceptible model on complex networks, where the weight of an edge is defined by the topological proximity of the two associated nodes. Each infected individual is allowed to select limited number of neighbors to contact, and a tunable parameter is introduced to control the preference to contact through high-weight or low-weight edges. Experimental results on six real networks show that the epidemic prevalence can be largely promoted when strong ties are favored in the spreading process. By comparing with two statistical null models respe...

  2. Coherent Quantum Dynamics in Steady-State Manifolds of Strongly Dissipative Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, Paolo; Campos Venuti, Lorenzo

    2014-12-01

    Recently, it has been realized that dissipative processes can be harnessed and exploited to the end of coherent quantum control and information processing. In this spirit, we consider strongly dissipative quantum systems admitting a nontrivial manifold of steady states. We show how one can enact adiabatic coherent unitary manipulations, e.g., quantum logical gates, inside this steady-state manifold by adding a weak, time-rescaled, Hamiltonian term into the system's Liouvillian. The effective long-time dynamics is governed by a projected Hamiltonian which results from the interplay between the weak unitary control and the fast relaxation process. The leakage outside the steady-state manifold entailed by the Hamiltonian term is suppressed by an environment-induced symmetrization of the dynamics. We present applications to quantum-computation in decoherence-free subspaces and noiseless subsystems and numerical analysis of nonadiabatic errors.

  3. Real-time quantum trajectories for classically allowed dynamics in strong laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Plimak, L I

    2015-01-01

    Both the physical picture of the dynamics of atoms and molecules in intense infrared fields and its theoretical description use the concept of electron trajectories. Here we address a key question which arises in this context: Are distinctly quantum features of these trajectories, such as the complex-valued coordinates, physically relevant in the classically allowed region of phase space, and what is their origin? First, we argue that solutions of classical equations of motion can account for quantum effects. To this end, we construct an exact solution to the classical Hamilton-Jacobi equation which accounts for dynamics of the wave packet, and show that this solution is physically correct in the limit $\\hbar \\to 0$. Second, we show that imaginary components of classical trajectories are directly linked to the finite size of the initial wavepacket in momentum space. This way, if the electronic wavepacket produced by optical tunneling in strong infrared fiels is localised both in coordinate and momentum, its m...

  4. On the phase-correlation and phase-fluctuation dynamics of a strongly excited Bose gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakhel, Roger R., E-mail: rogersakhel@yahoo.com [Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Information Technology, Isra University, Amman 11622 (Jordan); The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34151 (Italy); Sakhel, Asaad R. [Department of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Engineering Technology, Balqa Applied University, Amman 11134 (Jordan); The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34151 (Italy); Ghassib, Humam B. [Department of Physics, The University of Jordan, Amman 11942 (Jordan)

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of a Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) is explored in the wake of a violent excitation caused by a strong time-dependent deformation of a trapping potential under the action of an intense stirring laser. The system is a two-dimensional BEC confined to a power-law trap with hard-wall boundaries. The stirring agent is a moving red-detuned laser potential. The time-dependent Gross–Pitaevskii equation is solved numerically by the split-step Crank–Nicolson method in real time. The phase correlations and phase fluctuations are examined as functions of time to demonstrate the evolving properties of a strongly-excited BEC. Of special significance is the occurrence of spatial fluctuations while the condensate is being excited. These oscillations arise from stirrer-induced density fluctuations. While the stirrer is inside the trap, a reduction in phase coherence occurs, which is attributed to phase fluctuations.

  5. Dynamic Elasticity of a Magnetic Fluid Column in a Strong Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polunin, V. M.; Ryapolov, P. A.; Shel'deshova, E. V.; Kuz'ko, A. E.; Aref'ev, I. M.

    2017-07-01

    The elastomagnetic parameters of a magnetic fluid kept by magnetic levitation in a tube placed horizontally in a strong magnetic field are measured, including the oscillation frequency, the ponderomotive and dynamic elasticity coefficients, the magnetization curve, and the magnetic field strength and its gradient. Results of calculations for the model of ponderomotive elasticity for the examined sample of the magnetic fluid corrected for the resistance of the moving viscous fluid are in good agreement with the experimental magnetization curve. The described method is of interest for a study of magnetophoresis, nanoparticle aggregations, viscosity, and their time dependences in magnetic colloids.

  6. Spin dynamics and spin-dependent recombination of a polaron pair under a strong ac drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, Rajesh K.; Raikh, M. E.

    2017-08-01

    We study theoretically the recombination within a pair of two polarons in magnetic field subject to a strong linearly polarized ac drive. Strong drive implies that the Zeeman frequencies of the pair partners are much smaller than the Rabi frequency, so that the rotating wave approximation does not apply. What makes the recombination dynamics nontrivial is that the partners recombine only when they form a singlet S . By admixing singlet to triplets, the drive induces the triplet recombination as well. We calculate the effective decay rate of all four spin modes. Our main finding is that, under the strong drive, the major contribution to the decay of the modes comes from short time intervals when the driving field passes through zero. When the recombination time in the absence of drive is short, fast recombination from S leads to anomalously slow recombination from the other spin states of the pair. We show that, with strong drive, this recombination becomes even slower. The corresponding decay rate falls off as a power law with the amplitude of the drive.

  7. Strong dynamics in a classically scale invariant extension of the standard model with a flat potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Yamada, Toshifumi

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the scenario where the standard model is extended with classical scale invariance, which is broken by chiral symmetry breaking and confinement in a new strongly coupled gauge theory that resembles QCD. The standard model Higgs field emerges as a result of the mixing of a scalar meson in the new strong dynamics and a massless elementary scalar field. The mass and scalar decay constant of that scalar meson, which are generated dynamically in the new gauge theory, give rise to the Higgs field mass term, automatically possessing the correct negative sign by the bosonic seesaw mechanism. Using analogy with QCD, we evaluate the dynamical scale of the new gauge theory and further make quantitative predictions for light pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons associated with the spontaneous breaking of axial symmetry along chiral symmetry breaking in the new gauge theory. A prominent consequence of the scenario is that there should be a standard model gauge singlet pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson with mass below 220 GeV, which couples to two electroweak gauge bosons through the Wess-Zumino-Witten term, whose strength is thus determined by the dynamical scale of the new gauge theory. Other pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons, charged under the electroweak gauge groups, also appear. Concerning the theoretical aspects, it is shown that the scalar quartic coupling can vanish at the Planck scale with the top quark pole mass as large as 172.5 GeV, realizing the flatland scenario without being in tension with the current experimental data.

  8. Fingering dynamics on the adsorbed solute with influence of less viscous and strong sample solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Chinar; Mishra, Manoranjan

    2014-12-07

    Viscous fingering is a hydrodynamic instability that sets in when a low viscous fluid displaces a high viscous fluid and creates complex patterns in porous media flows. Fundamental facets of the displacement process, such as the solute concentration distribution, spreading length, and the solute mixing, depend strongly on the type of pattern created by the unstable interface of the underlying fluids. In the present study, the frontal interface of the sample shows viscous fingering and the strong solvent causes the retention of the solute to depend on the solvent concentration. This work presents a computational investigation to explore the effect of the underlying physico-chemical phenomena, (i.e., the combined effects of solvent strength, retention, and viscous fingering) on the dynamics of the adsorbed solute. A linear adsorption isotherm has been assumed between the mobile and stationary phases of the solute. We carried out the numerical simulations by considering a rectangular Hele-Shaw cell as an analog to 2D-porous media containing a three component system (displacing fluid, sample solvent, solute) to map out the evolution of the solute concentration. We observed that viscous fingering at the frontal interface of the strong sample solvent intensifies the band broadening of the solute zone. Also notable increase in the spreading dynamics of the solute has been observed for less viscous and strong sample solvent as compared to the high viscous sample slices or in the pure dispersive case. On the contrary, the solute gets intensively mixed at early times for more viscous sample in comparison to less viscous one. The results of the simulations are in qualitative agreement with the behavior observed in the liquid chromatography column experiments.

  9. Predicting Protein Interactions by Brownian Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan-Yu Meng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a newly adapted Brownian-Dynamics (BD-based protein docking method for predicting native protein complexes. The approach includes global BD conformational sampling, compact complex selection, and local energy minimization. In order to reduce the computational costs for energy evaluations, a shell-based grid force field was developed to represent the receptor protein and solvation effects. The performance of this BD protein docking approach has been evaluated on a test set of 24 crystal protein complexes. Reproduction of experimental structures in the test set indicates the adequate conformational sampling and accurate scoring of this BD protein docking approach. Furthermore, we have developed an approach to account for the flexibility of proteins, which has been successfully applied to reproduce the experimental complex structure from the structure of two unbounded proteins. These results indicate that this adapted BD protein docking approach can be useful for the prediction of protein-protein interactions.

  10. Geometric evolutionary dynamics of protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przulj, Natasa; Kuchaiev, Oleksii; Stevanović, Aleksandar; Hayes, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the evolution and structure of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks is a central problem of systems biology. Since most processes in the cell are carried out by groups of proteins acting together, a theoretical model of how PPI networks develop based on duplications and mutations is an essential ingredient for understanding the complex wiring of the cell. Many different network models have been proposed, from those that follow power-law degree distributions and those that model complementarity of protein binding domains, to those that have geometric properties. Here, we introduce a new model for PPI network (and thus gene) evolution that produces well-fitting network models for currently available PPI networks. The model integrates geometric network properties with evolutionary dynamics of PPI network evolution.

  11. Interaction between telencephalic signals and respiratory dynamics in songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Jorge M; Mindlin, Gabriel B; Goller, Franz

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms by which telencephalic areas affect motor activities are largely unknown. They could either take over motor control from downstream motor circuits or interact with the intrinsic dynamics of these circuits. Both models have been proposed for telencephalic control of respiration during learned vocal behavior in birds. The interactive model postulates that simple signals from the telencephalic song control areas are sufficient to drive the nonlinear respiratory network into producing complex temporal sequences. We tested this basic assumption by electrically stimulating telencephalic song control areas and analyzing the resulting respiratory patterns in zebra finches and in canaries. We found strong evidence for interaction between the rhythm of stimulation and the intrinsic respiratory rhythm, including naturally emerging subharmonic behavior and integration of lateralized telencephalic input. The evidence for clear interaction in our experimental paradigm suggests that telencephalic vocal control also uses a similar mechanism. Furthermore, species differences in the response of the respiratory system to stimulation show parallels to differences in the respiratory patterns of song, suggesting that the interactive production of respiratory rhythms is manifested in species-specific specialization of the involved circuitry.

  12. Dynamics of tandem bubble interaction in a microfluidic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fang; Sankin, Georgy; Zhong, Pei

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of tandem bubble interaction in a microfluidic channel (800 × 21 μm, W × H) have been investigated using high-speed photography, with resultant fluid motion characterized by particle imaging velocimetry. A single or tandem bubble is produced reliably via laser absorption by micron-sized gold dots (6 μm in diameter with 40 μm in separation distance) coated on a glass surface of the microfluidic channel. Using two pulsed Nd:YAG lasers at λ = 1064 nm and ∼10 μJ/pulse, the dynamics of tandem bubble interaction (individual maximum bubble diameter of 50 μm with a corresponding collapse time of 5.7 μs) are examined at different phase delays. In close proximity (i.e., interbubble distance = 40 μm or γ = 0.8), the tandem bubbles interact strongly with each other, leading to asymmetric deformation of the bubble walls and jet formation, as well as the production of two pairs of vortices in the surrounding fluid rotating in opposite directions. The direction and speed of the jet (up to 95 m/s), as well as the orientation and strength of the vortices can be varied by adjusting the phase delay. PMID:22088007

  13. Nonlinear interaction of charged particles with strong laser pulses in a gaseous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Avetissian

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The charged particles nonlinear dynamics in the field of a strong electromagnetic wave pulse of finite duration and certain form of the envelope, in the refractive medium with a constant and variable refraction indexes, is investigated by means of numerical integration of the classical relativistic equations of motion. The particle energy dependence on the pulse intensity manifests the nonlinear threshold phenomenon of a particle reflection and capture by actual laser pulses in dielectric-gaseous media that takes place for a plane electromagnetic wave in the induced Cherenkov process. Laser acceleration of the particles in the result of the reflection from the pulse envelope and in the capture regime with the variable refraction index along the pulse propagation direction is investigated.

  14. Induction of gravity and strong interactions on non-associative algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Dorofeev, V Yu

    2013-01-01

    In this work we take view on space-time as dual representation of fields on manifold. Given we accept such view, the space of functions in operator representation becomes probability amplitudes f(x) of a particle. Since the probabilistic interpretation of f(x) module follows from f(x) and f*(x) duality, the problem of finding representation of wave function reduces to Frobenius theorem for division algebras. We then construct the gravity model and the model of strong interactions as a logical implication of the extension of fields interaction algebra to non-associative algebra of octonions. The application of Penrouse approach in spinor representation of space-time combined with the proposed approach further leads us to chirality of interactions and absence of right neutrino and left spinors in singleton state. We also show the obtained model is consistent with general theory of relativity and SU(3) for distances larger than Planck length. The obtained model also contains the generalization of general theory ...

  15. Studies of the strong and electroweak interactions at the Z0 pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildreth, Michael Douglas [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This thesis presents studies of the strong and electroweak forces, two of the fundamental interactions that govern the behavior of matter at high energies. The authors have used the hadronic decays of Z0 bosons produced with the unique experimental apparatus of the e+e- Linear Collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the SLAC Large Detector (SLD) for these measurements. Employing the precision tracking capabilities of the SLD, they isolated samples of Z0 events containing primarily the decays of the Z0 to a chosen quark type. With an inclusive selection technique, they have tested the flavor independence of the strong coupling, αs by measuring the rates of multi-jet production in isolated samples of light (uds), c, and b quark events. They find: α$s\\atop{uds}$/α$s\\atop{all}$ 0.987 ± 0.027(stat) ± 0.022(syst) ± 0.022(theory), α$c\\atop{s}$/α$all\\atop{s}$ = 1.012 ± 0.104(stat) ± 0.102(syst) ± 0.096(theory), α$b\\atop{s}$/α$all\\atop{s}$ = 1.026 {+-} 0.041(stat) ± 0.030(theory), which implies that the strong interaction is independent of quark flavor within the present experimental sensitivity. They have also measured the extent of parity-violation in the Z0 c$\\bar{c}$ coupling, given by the parameter A $0\\atop{c}$, using a sample of fully and partially reconstructed D* and D+ meson decays and the longitudinal polarization of the SLC electron beam. This sample of charm quark events was derived with selection techniques based on their kinematic properties and decay topologies. They find A$0\\atop{c}$ = 0.73 ± 0.22(stat) ± 0.10(syst). This value is consistent with that expected in the electroweak standard model of particle interactions.

  16. Ab initio electron propagators in molecules with strong electron-phonon interaction: II. Electron Green's function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahnovsky, Yuri

    2007-07-07

    Ab initio electron propagator methods are developed to study electronic properties of molecular systems with strong electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions. For the calculation of electron Green's functions we apply a canonical small polaron transformation that intrinsically contains strong electron-phonon effects. In the transformed Hamiltonian, the energy levels for the noninteracting particles are shifted down by the relaxation (solvation) energies. The Coulomb integrals are also renormalized by the electron-phonon interaction. For certain values of the electron-phonon coupling constants, the renormalized Coulomb integrals can be negative which implies the attraction between two electrons. Within the small polaron transformation we develop a diagrammatic technique for the calculation of electron Green's function in which the electron-phonon interaction is already included into the multiple phonon correlation functions. Since the decoupling of the phonon correlation functions is impossible, and therefore, a Wick's theorem for such correlation functions is invalid, there is no Dyson equation for the electron Green's function. To find the electron Green's function, we use different approximations. One of them is a link-cluster approximation that includes diagonal transitions for the renormalized zeroth Green's function. In the linked-cluster approach the Dyson equation is derived in the most general case, where the self-energy operator is an arbitrary functional (not only in the Hartree-Fock approximation). It is shown that even a Hartree-Fock electron (hole) is not a particle any longer. It is a quasiparticle with a finite lifetime that depends on energy of particle and hole states in different ways. As a consequence of this, a standard description of a Hartree-Fock approximation in terms of wave functions becomes inappropriate in this problem. To challenge the linked-cluster approximation we develop a different approach: a sequential propagation

  17. Atmospheric boundary layer dynamics in the Grenoble valley during strongly stable episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staquet, C.; Largeron, Y.; Chollet, J.

    2013-12-01

    This paper addresses the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer in the Grenoble valley under strongly stable and polluted conditions. Numerical modeling is used for this purpose, along with available ground temperature measurements. Though the Grenoble valley is the most populated area in the Alps and is subjected to serious pollution episodes in winter, no such study had been conducted previously. We first analyzed ground temperature data within the valley at altitudes ranging between 220 m (valley bottom) and 1730 m during 5 months of winter 2006-2007. These data were provided by Meteo-France et by Air Rhône-Alpes, the air quality agency of Région Rhône-Alpes. Our purpose was to detect strongly stable episodes, these being defined by the episode-averaged vertical gradient of the absolute temperature being larger than the winter average during at least three days. Five episodes were selected from this criterion. We also analyzed air quality data recorded by Air Rhône-Alpes during the same winter to detect strongly polluted events for PM10 and found that the five episodes were also strongly polluted ones. To perform a more detailed analysis of these five episodes, we used the numerical code Meso-NH developed by Météo-France and the Laboratory of Aérology in Toulouse and simulated the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer during each episode. Four nested domains were used, the horizontal resolution of the innermost (and smallest) domain, containing the Grenoble valley, being 333 m; from comparison with the ground temperature data, we found that the vertical resolution above ground level had to be as low as 4 meters. As expected, the boundary layer dynamics in the numerical simulation for each episode was found to be decoupled from the (anticyclonic, weak) synoptic flow, consistent with the value of the Froude number associated with the inversion layer. These dynamics are controlled by thermal (mostly katabatic) winds flowing from the higher altitude

  18. Relativistic quantum dynamics in strong fields: Photon emission from heavy, few-electron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsche, S. [Kassel Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Indelicato, P. [Lab. Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure et Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Stoehlker, T. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2005-03-01

    Recent progress in the study of the photon emission from highly-charged heavy ions is reviewed. These investigations show that high-Z ions provide a unique tool for improving the understanding of the electron-electron and electron-photon interaction in the presence of strong fields. Apart from the bound-state transitions, which are accurately described in the framework of quantum electrodynamics, much information has been obtained also from the radiative capture of (quasi-) free electrons by high-Z ions. Many features in the observed spectra hereby confirm the inherently relativistic behavior of even the simplest compound quantum systems in nature. (orig.)

  19. Baryon femtoscopy considering residual correlations as a tool to extract strong interaction potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymański Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the analysis of baryon-antibaryon femtoscopic correlations is presented. In particular, it is shown that taking into account residual correlations is crucial for the description of pΛ¯$\\bar \\Lambda $ and p̄Λ correlation functions measured by the STAR experiment in Au–Au collisions at the centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair √sNN = 200 GeV. This approach enables to obtain pΛ¯$\\bar \\Lambda $ (p̄Λ source size consistent with the sizes extracted from correlations in pΛ (p̄Λ¯$\\bar \\Lambda $ and lighter pair systems as well as with model predictions. Moreover, with this analysis it is possible to derive the unknown parameters of the strong interaction potential for baryon-antibaryon pairs under several assumptions.

  20. Modeling a nonperturbative spinor vacuum interacting with a strong gravitational wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Department of Theoretical and Nuclear Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Folomeev, Vladimir [Institute of Physicotechnical Problems and Material Science, NAS of the Kyrgyz Republic, Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan)

    2015-07-15

    We consider the propagation of strong gravitational waves interacting with a nonperturbative vacuum of spinor fields. To described the latter, we suggest an approximate model. The corresponding Einstein equation has the form of the Schroedinger equation. Its gravitational-wave solution is analogous to the solution of the Schroedinger equation for an electron moving in a periodic potential. The general solution for the periodic gravitational waves is found. The analog of the Kronig-Penney model for gravitational waves is considered. It is shown that the suggested gravitational-wave model permits the existence of weak electric charge and current densities concomitant with the gravitational wave. Based on this observation, a possible experimental verification of the model is suggested. (orig.)

  1. CONAN-The cruncher of local exchange coefficients for strongly interacting confined systems in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loft, N. J. S.; Kristensen, L. B.; Thomsen, A. E.; Volosniev, A. G.; Zinner, N. T.

    2016-12-01

    We consider a one-dimensional system of particles with strong zero-range interactions. This system can be mapped onto a spin chain of the Heisenberg type with exchange coefficients that depend on the external trap. In this paper, we present an algorithm that can be used to compute these exchange coefficients. We introduce an open source code CONAN (Coefficients of One-dimensional N-Atom Networks) which is based on this algorithm. CONAN works with arbitrary external potentials and we have tested its reliability for system sizes up to around 35 particles. As illustrative examples, we consider a harmonic trap and a box trap with a superimposed asymmetric tilted potential. For these examples, the computation time typically scales with the number of particles as O(N 3.5 ± 0.4) . Computation times are around 10 s for N = 10 particles and less than 10 min for N = 20 particles.

  2. Exact and simple results for the XYZ and strongly interacting fermion chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendley, Paul; Hagendorf, Christian, E-mail: fendley@virginia.ed [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4714 (United States)

    2010-10-08

    We conjecture exact and simple formulas for some physical quantities in two quantum chains. A classic result of this type is Onsager, Kaufman and Yang's formula for the spontaneous magnetization in the Ising model, subsequently generalized to the chiral Potts models. We conjecture that analogous results occur in the XYZ chain when the couplings obey J{sub x}J{sub y} + J{sub y}J{sub z} + J{sub x}J{sub z} = 0, and in a related fermion chain with strong interactions and supersymmetry. We find exact formulas for the magnetization and gap in the former, and the staggered density in the latter, by exploiting the fact that certain quantities are independent of finite-size effects. (fast track communication)

  3. The new finite temperature Schrödinger equations with strong or weak interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heling; Yang, Bin; Shen, Hongjun

    2017-07-01

    Implanting the thoughtway of thermostatistics into quantum mechanics, we formulate new Schrödinger equations of multi-particle and single-particle respectively at finite temperature. To get it, the pure-state free energies and the microscopic entropy operators are introduced and meantime the pure-state free energies take the places of mechanical energies at finite temperature. The definition of microscopic entropy introduced by Wu was also revised, and the strong or weak interactions dependent on temperature are considered in multi-particle Schrödinger Equations. Based on the new Schrödinger equation at finite temperature, two simple cases were analyzed. The first one is concerning some identical harmonic oscillators in N lattice points and the other one is about N unrelated particles in three dimensional in finite potential well. From the results gotten, we conclude that the finite temperature Schrödinger equation is particularly important for mesoscopic systems.

  4. Magnetism and local symmetry breaking in a Mott insulator with strong spin orbit interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, L; Song, M; Liu, W; Reyes, A P; Kuhns, P; Lee, H O; Fisher, I R; Mitrović, V F

    2017-02-09

    Study of the combined effects of strong electronic correlations with spin-orbit coupling (SOC) represents a central issue in quantum materials research. Predicting emergent properties represents a huge theoretical problem since the presence of SOC implies that the spin is not a good quantum number. Existing theories propose the emergence of a multitude of exotic quantum phases, distinguishable by either local point symmetry breaking or local spin expectation values, even in materials with simple cubic crystal structure such as Ba 2 NaOsO 6 . Experimental tests of these theories by local probes are highly sought for. Our local measurements designed to concurrently probe spin and orbital/lattice degrees of freedom of Ba 2 NaOsO 6 provide such tests. Here we show that a canted ferromagnetic phase which is preceded by local point symmetry breaking is stabilized at low temperatures, as predicted by quantum theories involving multipolar spin interactions.

  5. Transition Form Factors: A Unique Opportunity to Connect Non-Perturbative Strong Interactions to QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gothe, Ralf W. [University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Meson-photoproduction measurements and their reaction-amplitude analyses can establish more sensitively, and in some cases in an almost model-independent way, nucleon excitations and non-resonant reaction amplitudes. However, to investigate the strong interaction from explored — where meson-cloud degrees of freedom contribute substantially to the baryon structure — to still unexplored distance scales — where quark degrees of freedom dominate and the transition from dressed to current quarks occurs — we depend on experiments that allow us to measure observables that are probing this evolving non-perturbative QCD regime over its full range. Elastic and transition form factors are uniquely suited to trace this evolution by measuring elastic electron scattering and exclusive single-meson and double-pion electroproduction cross sections off the nucleon. These exclusive measurements will be extended to higher momentum transfers with the energy-upgraded CEBAF beam at JLab to study the quark degrees of freedom, where their strong interaction is responsible for the ground and excited nucleon state formations. After establishing unprecedented high-precision data, the imminent next challenge is a high-quality analysis to extract these relevant electrocoupling parameters for various resonances that then can be compared to state-of-the-art models and QCD-based calculations. Recent results will demonstrate the status of the analysis and of their theoretical descriptions, and an experimental and theoretical outlook will highlight what shall and may be achieved in the new era of the 12-GeV upgraded transition form factor program.

  6. Simulations of three one-dimensional limits of the strong-strong beam-beam interaction in hadron colliders using weighted macroparticle tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vogt

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available We develop the method of weighted macroparticle tracking (WMPT for simulating the time evolution of the moments of the phase space densities of two beams which are coupled via the collective (strong-strong beam-beam interaction in the absence of diffusion and damping. As an initial test we apply this method to study the π mode and the σ mode in three different 1D limits of the beam-beam interaction. The three limits are flat beams and transverse motion in the direction of the small width, round beams, and flat beams and motion in the direction of the large width. We have written a code (BBDeMo1D based on WMPT, which allows testing of all three limits and is suited for extension to 2 degrees of freedom.

  7. Coupled barrier island-resort model: 1. Emergent instabilities induced by strong human-landscape interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, D. E.; Werner, B. T.

    2008-03-01

    As humans increasingly occupy and modify marginal landscapes, previously unobserved long timescale, emergent behaviors related to interactions between natural processes and human agency are possible. Barrier islands, which are low-lying strips of sand separated from a coast by lagoons, cut by inlets and topped by sand dunes, have been significantly modified through the development of tourist resorts. Resorts and barrier islands are dynamically coupled through storm damage and beach erosion, and measures taken to prevent or mitigate them. In response to rising sea level, a natural barrier island migrates steadily up the continental shelf. In contrast, we show that in a novel numerical model-coupling barrier island processes with resort development, storm damage, and hazard mitigation, policy decisions driven by market dynamics destabilize barrier island response to rising sea level, giving rise to emergent, episodic boom and bust cycles, which alternate in phase alongshore, and less frequent, regionally extensive resort destruction events. Developed barrier islands are precariously maintained at lower elevations and further offshore than their natural counterparts, a situation exacerbated by insurance, which can lead to island inundation. Our results suggest that coastal areas that have recently instituted protection measures eventually will experience a widespread upsurge in damage if these practices are sustained, even in the absence of climate-change-induced increased storminess.

  8. Ultrafast and octave-spanning optical nonlinearities from strongly phase-mismatched quadratic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, B B; Chong, A; Wise, F W; Bache, M

    2012-07-27

    Cascaded nonlinearities have attracted much interest, but ultrafast applications have been seriously hampered by the simultaneous requirements of being near phase matching and having ultrafast femtosecond response times. Here we show that in strongly phase-mismatched nonlinear frequency conversion crystals the pump pulse can experience a large and extremely broadband self-defocusing cascaded Kerr-like nonlinearity. The large cascaded nonlinearity is ensured through interaction with the largest quadratic tensor element in the crystal, and the strong phase mismatch ensures an ultrafast nonlinear response with an octave-spanning bandwidth. We verify this experimentally by showing few-cycle soliton compression with noncritical cascaded second-harmonic generation: Energetic 47 fs infrared pulses are compressed in a just 1-mm long bulk lithium niobate crystal to 17 fs (under 4 optical cycles) with 80% efficiency, and upon further propagation an octave-spanning supercontinuum is observed. Such ultrafast cascading is expected to occur for a broad range of pump wavelengths spanning the near- and mid-IR using standard nonlinear crystals.

  9. Dichotomous Dynamics in E-I Networks with Strongly and Weakly Intra-connected Inhibitory Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Rich

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The interconnectivity between excitatory and inhibitory neural networks informs mechanisms by which rhythmic bursts of excitatory activity can be produced in the brain. One such mechanism, Pyramidal Interneuron Network Gamma (PING, relies primarily upon reciprocal connectivity between the excitatory and inhibitory networks, while also including intra-connectivity of inhibitory cells. The causal relationship between excitatory activity and the subsequent burst of inhibitory activity is of paramount importance to the mechanism and has been well studied. However, the role of the intra-connectivity of the inhibitory network, while important for PING, has not been studied in detail, as most analyses of PING simply assume that inhibitory intra-connectivity is strong enough to suppress subsequent firing following the initial inhibitory burst. In this paper we investigate the role that the strength of inhibitory intra-connectivity plays in determining the dynamics of PING-style networks. We show that networks with weak inhibitory intra-connectivity exhibit variations in burst dynamics of both the excitatory and inhibitory cells that are not obtained with strong inhibitory intra-connectivity. Networks with weak inhibitory intra-connectivity exhibit excitatory rhythmic bursts with weak excitatory-to-inhibitory synapses for which classical PING networks would show no rhythmic activity. Additionally, variations in dynamics of these networks as the excitatory-to-inhibitory synaptic weight increases illustrates the important role that consistent pattern formation in the inhibitory cells serves in maintaining organized and periodic excitatory bursts. Finally, motivated by these results and the known diversity of interneurons, we show that a PING-style network with two inhibitory subnetworks, one strongly intra-connected and one weakly intra-connected, exhibits organized and periodic excitatory activity over a larger parameter regime than networks with a

  10. Strong ferromagnetic exchange interaction under ambient pressure in BaFe2S3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Jin, S. J.; Yi, Ming; Song, Yu; Jiang, H. C.; Zhang, W. L.; Sun, H. L.; Luo, H. Q.; Christianson, A. D.; Bourret-Courchesne, E.; Lee, D. H.; Yao, Dao-Xin; Birgeneau, R. J.

    2017-02-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements have been performed to investigate the spin waves of the quasi-one-dimensional antiferromagnetic ladder compound BaFe2S3 , where a superconducting transition was observed under pressure [H. Takahashi et al., Nat. Mater. 14, 1008 (2015), 10.1038/nmat4351; T. Yamauchi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 246402 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.246402]. By fitting the spherically averaged experimental data collected on a powder sample to a Heisenberg Hamiltonian, we find that the one-dimensional antiferromagnetic ladder exhibits a strong nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic exchange interaction (S JR=-71 ±4 meV) along the rung direction, an antiferromagnetic S JL=49 ±3 meV along the leg direction, and a ferromagnetic S J2=-15 ±2 meV along the diagonal direction. Our data demonstrate that the antiferromagnetic spin excitations are a common characteristic for the iron-based superconductors, while specific relative values for the exchange interactions do not appear to be unique for the parent states of the superconducting materials.

  11. Strong Delayed Interactive Effects of Metal Exposure and Warming: Latitude-Dependent Synergisms Persist Across Metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debecker, Sara; Dinh, Khuong V; Stoks, Robby

    2017-02-21

    As contaminants are often more toxic at higher temperatures, predicting their impact under global warming remains a key challenge for ecological risk assessment. Ignoring delayed effects, synergistic interactions between contaminants and warming, and differences in sensitivity across species' ranges could lead to an important underestimation of the risks. We addressed all three mechanisms by studying effects of larval exposure to zinc and warming before, during, and after metamorphosis in Ischnura elegans damselflies from high- and low-latitude populations. By integrating these mechanisms into a single study, we could identify two novel patterns. First, during exposure zinc did not affect survival, whereas it induced mild to moderate postexposure mortality in the larval stage and at metamorphosis, and very strongly reduced adult lifespan. This severe delayed effect across metamorphosis was especially remarkable in high-latitude animals, as they appeared almost insensitive to zinc during the larval stage. Second, the well-known synergism between metals and warming was manifested not only during the larval stage but also after metamorphosis, yet notably only in low-latitude damselflies. These results highlight that a more complete life-cycle approach that incorporates the possibility of delayed interactions between contaminants and warming in a geographical context is crucial for a more realistic risk assessment in a warming world.

  12. New precision era of experiments on strong interaction with strangeness at DAFNE/LNF-INFN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishiwatari T.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The strong-interaction shifts and widths of kaonic hydrogen, deuterium, 3He, and 4He were measured in the SIDDHARTA experiment. The most precise values of the shift and width of the kaonic hydrogen 1s state were determined to be ϵ1s = −283 ± 36(stat±6(syst eV and Γ1s = 541±89(stat±22(syst eV. The upper limit of the kaonic deuterium Kα yield was found to be ≤ 0.39%. In addition, the shifts and widths of the kaonic 3He and 4He 2p states were determined to be ϵ2p(3He = −2 ± 2(stat ± 4(syst eV and Γ2p(3He = 6 ± 6(stat ± 7(syst eV; ϵ2p(4He = +5 ± 3(stat ± 4(syst eV and Γ2p(4He = 14 ± 8(stat ± 5(syst eV. These values are important for the constraints of the low-energy K¯N$\\bar KN$ interaction in theoretical approaches.

  13. Affective Dynamics in Triadic Peer Interactions in Early Childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavictoire, L.A.; Snyder, J.; Stoolmiller, M.; Hollenstein, T.P.

    2012-01-01

    In interpersonal interaction research, moving beyond dyadic to triadic dynamics can be analytically daunting. We explored the affective states expressed during triadic peer interactions to understand how patterns were associated with childhood psychopathology and sociometric status. High-risk

  14. Molecular dynamics study of flow past an obstacle in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charan, Harish; Ganesh, Rajaraman

    2016-12-01

    Turbulence is one of the outstanding open problems. Fluid flow past an obstacle is simplest of all paradigms to understand the transition to turbulence. For Navier-Stokes liquids, a transition to turbulence is fully governed by Reynolds number (Re). Using classical molecular dynamics simulation of particles interacting via a Yukawa-type interaction, it is demonstrated unequivocally that for a given Re, the transition from laminar to turbulent flow is controlled by strength and range of inter-particle potential. For a wide range of inter-particle interaction strengths and ranges, our simulation data are seen to collapse onto a universal Strouhal-Reynolds curve with new asymptotic values for a range of Re, 2 ≤ Re ≤ 35. From the emergence of vortex street structures behind the obstacle, it is evident that the onset of turbulence is possible at low Re in Yukawa liquids. Growth rates of the instability are obtained using atomistic calculations and are observed to increase quadratically with low values of Re.

  15. Fractional Dynamics of Network Growth Constrained by Aging Node Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdari, Hadiseh; Zare Kamali, Milad; Shirazi, Amirhossein; Khalighi, Moein; Jafari, Gholamreza; Ausloos, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    In many social complex systems, in which agents are linked by non-linear interactions, the history of events strongly influences the whole network dynamics. However, a class of "commonly accepted beliefs" seems rarely studied. In this paper, we examine how the growth process of a (social) network is influenced by past circumstances. In order to tackle this cause, we simply modify the well known preferential attachment mechanism by imposing a time dependent kernel function in the network evolution equation. This approach leads to a fractional order Barabási-Albert (BA) differential equation, generalizing the BA model. Our results show that, with passing time, an aging process is observed for the network dynamics. The aging process leads to a decay for the node degree values, thereby creating an opposing process to the preferential attachment mechanism. On one hand, based on the preferential attachment mechanism, nodes with a high degree are more likely to absorb links; but, on the other hand, a node's age has a reduced chance for new connections. This competitive scenario allows an increased chance for younger members to become a hub. Simulations of such a network growth with aging constraint confirm the results found from solving the fractional BA equation. We also report, as an exemplary application, an investigation of the collaboration network between Hollywood movie actors. It is undubiously shown that a decay in the dynamics of their collaboration rate is found, even including a sex difference. Such findings suggest a widely universal application of the so generalized BA model.

  16. Real-time quantum trajectories for classically allowed dynamics in strong laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plimak, L. I.; Ivanov, Misha Yu.

    2015-10-01

    Both the physical picture of the dynamics of atoms and molecules in intense infrared fields and its theoretical description use the concept of electron trajectories. Here, we address a key question which arises in this context: Are distinctly quantum features of these trajectories, such as the complex-valued coordinates, physically relevant in the classically allowed region of phase space, and what is their origin? First, we argue that solutions of classical equations of motion can account for quantum effects. To this end, we construct an exact solution to the classical Hamilton-Jacobi equation which accounts for dynamics of the wave packet, and show that this solution is physically correct in the limit ?. Second, we show that imaginary components of classical trajectories are directly linked to the finite size of the initial wave packet in momentum space. This way, if the electronic wave packet produced by optical tunnelling in strong infrared fields is localised both in coordinate and momentum, its motion after tunnelling ipso facto cannot be described with purely classical trajectories - in contrast to popular models in the literature.

  17. Kolmogorov flow in two dimensional strongly coupled Yukawa liquid: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akanksha; Ganesh, Rajaraman; Joy, Ashwin

    2015-10-01

    The transition from laminar to turbulent flows in liquids remains a problem of great interest despite decades of intensive research. Here, we report an atomistic study of this transition in a model Yukawa liquid using molecular dynamics simulations. Starting from an thermally equilibrated Yukawa liquid, for a given value of coupling parameter Γ (defined as ratio of potential energy to kinetic energy per particle) and screening length κ, a subsonic flow of magnitude U0 is superposed and transition to an unstable regime is observed eventually leading to turbulent flow at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers. We have performed a parametric study for a range of Reynolds number R and found that the flow is neutrally stable for R Rc(Γ) , where Rc is the critical value of Reynolds number. Strong molecular shear heating is observed in all cases studied here. It is found that the coupling parameter Γ decreases because of molecular shear heating on a time scale comparable to the instability time scale. Irrespective of the initial value of coupling parameter Γ, the average heating rate is found to be sensitive to the ratio of equilibrium flow speed to the thermal speed, say, α=U/0 vt h , where vt h=√{2/Γ } . Our results reported here are expected to be generic and should apply to a wide variety of strongly coupled systems such as laboratory dusty plasma, molten salts, and charged colloidal systems.

  18. Non-Markovian Dynamics and Self-Diffusion in Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Trevor; Langin, Thomas; McQuillen, Patrick; Daligault, Jerome; Maksimovich, Nikola; Killian, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    In weakly coupled plasmas, collisions are dominated by long range, small angle scattering, and each collision is an uncorrelated binary event. In contrast, collisions in strongly coupled plasmas (coupling parameter Γ > 1) are dominated by short range, large angle scattering in which the collisions may be correlated and non-independent in time, i.e., non-Markovian. In this work, we present experimental results indicative of non-Markovian processes in a strongly coupled ultracold neutral plasma (UCNP) created by photoionizing strontium atoms in a magneto-optical trap. We use optical pumping to create spin ``tagged'' subpopulations of ions having non-zero average velocity , and use laser induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging to measure the relaxation of back to equilibrium. We observe clear non-exponential decay in , which indicates non-Markovian dynamics. We further demonstrate there is a theoretical basis to consider as an approximation to the ion velocity autocorrelation function (VAF). We then calculate diffusion coefficients from our data, demonstrating experimental measurement of self-diffusion coefficients for 0 . 3 < Γ < 3 . 5 . This work was supported by the United States National Science Foundation and Department of Energy Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering (PHY-1102516) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550- 12-1-0267).

  19. PREFACE: International Seminar on Strong and Electromagnetic Interactions in High Energy Collisions 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, Giorgio; Sandorfi, Andrew; Pedroni, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    The International Seminar 'Strong and Electromagnetic Interaction in High Energy Collisions' was held in the Conference Hall 'Ettore Majorana' of the Department of Physics in Messina, Italy on October 12, 2012. The Seminar was organized by the University of Messina and 'Fondazione Bonino-Pulejo', with the aim of presenting and discussing the results of the current experiments and also new plans involving research at INFN-LNF (Italy), JLAB (USA), LHC-CERN, ELSA (Bonn), MAMI (Mainz). The main purpose of this Seminar was to deal with aspects of electromagnetic and strong forces by meson photoproduction and the electron-positron collider, and to search for dark energy. The recent results on hadron contributions to the muon anomalous magnetic moment and kaon interferometry at the DAFNE facility were also discussed. Editors: Giorgio Giardina (University of Messina), Andrew M Sandorfi (Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, USA), Paolo Pedroni (INFN 'Sezione di Pavia') Organizing Committee: Chairman: G Giardina (Messina - Italy) Co-Chairman: A M Sandorfi (Newport News, USA) Co-Chairman: P Pedroni (Pavia - Italy) Scientific Secretary: G Mandaglio (University of Messina - Italy) Organizing Institutions: University of Messina Fondazione Bonino-Pulejo (Messina) Topics: Meson photoproduction and baryon resonances Muon anomaly (g-2) Recent results in experiments at the Large Hadron Collider Kaon interferometry Local Organizing Committee: F Curciarello, V De Leo, G Fazio, G Giardina, G Mandaglio, M Romaniuk Sponsored by: University of Messina, Fondazione Bonino-Pulejo (Messina), INFN Sezione di Catania Web-Site: http://newcleo.unime.it/IntSem2012

  20. Numerical simulation of wave-current interaction under strong wind conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrañaga, Marco; Osuna, Pedro; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco Javier

    2017-04-01

    Although ocean surface waves are known to play an important role in the momentum and other scalar transfer between the atmosphere and the ocean, most operational numerical models do not explicitly include the terms of wave-current interaction. In this work, a numerical analysis about the relative importance of the processes associated with the wave-current interaction under strong off-shore wind conditions in Gulf of Tehuantepec (the southern Mexican Pacific) was carried out. The numerical system includes the spectral wave model WAM and the 3D hydrodynamic model POLCOMS, with the vertical turbulent mixing parametrized by the kappa-epsilon closure model. The coupling methodology is based on the vortex-force formalism. The hydrodynamic model was forced at the open boundaries using the HYCOM database and the wave model was forced at the open boundaries by remote waves from the southern Pacific. The atmospheric forcing for both models was provided by a local implementation of the WRF model, forced at the open boundaries using the CFSR database. The preliminary analysis of the model results indicates an effect of currents on the propagation of the swell throughout the study area. The Stokes-Coriolis term have an impact on the transient Ekman transport by modifying the Ekman spiral, while the Stokes drift has an effect on the momentum advection and the production of TKE, where the later induces a deepening of the mixing layer. This study is carried out in the framework of the project CONACYT CB-2015-01 255377 and RugDiSMar Project (CONACYT 155793).

  1. Critical Behavior of a Strongly-Interacting 2D Electron System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarachik, Myriam P.

    2013-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) electron systems that obey Fermi liquid theory at high electron densities are expected to undergo one or more transitions to spatially and/or spin-ordered phases as the density is decreased, ultimately forming a Wigner crystal in the dilute, strongly-interacting limit. Interesting, unexpected behavior is observed with decreasing electron density as the electrons' interactions become increasingly important relative to their kinetic energy: the resistivity undergoes a transition from metallic to insulating temperature dependence; the resistance increases sharply and then saturates abruptly with increasing in-plane magnetic field; a number of experiments indicate that the electrons' effective mass exhibits a substantial increase approaching a finite ``critical'' density. There has been a great deal of debate concerning the underlying physics in these systems, and many have questioned whether the change of the resistivity from metallic to insulating signals a phase transition or a crossover. In this talk, I will report measurements that show that with decreasing density ns, the thermopower S of a low-disorder 2D electron system in silicon exhibits a sharp increase by more than an order of magnitude, tending to a divergence at a finite, disorder-independent density nt, consistent with the critical form (- T / S) ~(ns -nt) x with x = 1 . 0 +/- 0 . 1 (T is the temperature). Unlike the resistivity which may not clearly distinguish between a transition and crossover behavior, the thermopower provides clear evidence that a true phase transition occurs with decreasing density to a new low-density phase. Work supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-84ER45153, BSF grant 2006375, RFBR, RAS, and the Russian Ministry of Science.

  2. Dynamics simulations for engineering macromolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Mosher, Avi; Shinar, Tamar; Silver, Pamela A.; Way, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    The predictable engineering of well-behaved transcriptional circuits is a central goal of synthetic biology. The artificial attachment of promoters to transcription factor genes usually results in noisy or chaotic behaviors, and such systems are unlikely to be useful in practical applications. Natural transcriptional regulation relies extensively on protein-protein interactions to insure tightly controlled behavior, but such tight control has been elusive in engineered systems. To help engineer protein-protein interactions, we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation framework that simplifies features of proteins moving by constrained Brownian motion, with the goal of performing long simulations. The behavior of a simulated protein system is determined by summation of forces that include a Brownian force, a drag force, excluded volume constraints, relative position constraints, and binding constraints that relate to experimentally determined on-rates and off-rates for chosen protein elements in a system. Proteins are abstracted as spheres. Binding surfaces are defined radially within a protein. Peptide linkers are abstracted as small protein-like spheres with rigid connections. To address whether our framework could generate useful predictions, we simulated the behavior of an engineered fusion protein consisting of two 20 000 Da proteins attached by flexible glycine/serine-type linkers. The two protein elements remained closely associated, as if constrained by a random walk in three dimensions of the peptide linker, as opposed to showing a distribution of distances expected if movement were dominated by Brownian motion of the protein domains only. We also simulated the behavior of fluorescent proteins tethered by a linker of varying length, compared the predicted Förster resonance energy transfer with previous experimental observations, and obtained a good correspondence. Finally, we simulated the binding behavior of a fusion of two ligands that could

  3. The Strong Control of Sea Ice Dynamics on Lower Cell Circulation Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsom, E. R.; Bitz, C. M.; Bryan, F.; Abernathey, R. P.; Gent, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Lower Cell of the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) is characterized by the formation of dense Antarctic Bottom Water, which descends into the abyssal ocean and is sequestered from the atmosphere for hundreds to thousands of years before outcropping again at the Southern Ocean surface. Thus, the dynamics, and changing dynamics, of the Lower Cell may mediate the heat content of the deep ocean and play a key role in determining the long-term rate of atmospheric warming. We examine its dynamics in the Community Climate System Model version 3.5 (CCSM 3.5), a fully-coupled global climate model which was run at two resolutions in the ocean and sea ice components: standard resolution (1.0 degrees) and high resolution (0.1 degrees). In the latter, eddies are explicitly resolved throughout most of the global ocean, and fine-scale sea ice processes are improved. We consider the response of the Lower Cell to two perturbations relevant to projected future climate change: an isolated wind-only experiment, in which westerly wind stress alone is increased, and a full "global warming" experiment, in which carbon dioxide was ramped until doubling. We show that in the mean state, this cell is primarily sustained by surface water mass transformation, itself enabled by heat loss from waters within the sea ice pack. Further, this circulation is notably stronger at fine resolution because of the improved simulation of sea ice dynamics. The response of the Lower Cell to each perturbation is strikingly distinct. Following the intensification of westerly wind stress, overturning in the Lower Cell strengthens by as much as 40%. However, in response to carbon dioxide doubling, the circulation is weakened by up to 60%. In both cases, the sensitivity of this circulation to forcing primarily stems from the strong control that sea ice properties exert on ocean heat loss. The varied response of the Lower Cell circulation to forcing subsequently impacts global ocean heat content. In the

  4. Study of strong interaction between atmosphere and solid Earth by using hurricane data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    The original energy of seismic noise is in the atmosphere although the most well-known seismic noise (microseism) gets excited through the ocean, i.e. the atmosphere (winds) excites ocean waves that in turn generate seismic noise in the solid earth. The oceans work as an intermediary in this case. But there is some seismic noise that is directly caused by the atmosphere-solid earth interactions. An extreme example for such a direct interaction can be found in the case of hurricanes (tropical cyclones) when they landfall and move on land. If we had such data, we could study the process of atmosphere-solid earth interactions directly. The Earthscope TA (Transportable Array) provided a few examples of such landfallen hurricanes which moved through the TA that had both seismometers and barometers. This data set allows us to study how ground motions changed as surface pressure (i.e., the source strength) varied over time. Because effects of surface pressure show up at short distances more clearly, we first examine the correlation between pressure and ground motion for the same stations. Plots of vertical ground velocity PSD (Power Spectral Density) vs. surface pressure PSD show that there are no significant ground motions unless pressure PSD becomes larger than 10 (Pa^2/s). Above this threshold, ground motion increases as P**1.69 (P is pressure and 1.69 is close to 5/3). Horizontal ground motions are larger than vertical ground motions (in seismic data), approximately by a factor of 10-30. But we note that the variations of horizontal motions with pressure show a linear relationship. Considering the instrumental design of TA stations, this is more likely due to the tilt of the whole recording system as (lateral) strong winds apply horizontal force on it. This linear trend exists for the whole range of the observed pressure PSD data, extending to small pressure values. We interpret that tilt signals overwhelmed other seismic signals in horizontal seismograms for

  5. Strong interactions between learned helplessness and risky decision-making in a rat gambling model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobrega, José N; Hedayatmofidi, Parisa S; Lobo, Daniela S

    2016-11-18

    Risky decision-making is characteristic of depression and of addictive disorders, including pathological gambling. However it is not clear whether a propensity to risky choices predisposes to depressive symptoms or whether the converse is the case. Here we tested the hypothesis that rats showing risky decision-making in a rat gambling task (rGT) would be more prone to depressive-like behaviour in the learned helplessness (LH) model. Results showed that baseline rGT choice behaviour did not predict escape deficits in the LH protocol. In contrast, exposure to the LH protocol resulted in a significant increase in risky rGT choices on retest. Unexpectedly, control rats subjected only to escapable stress in the LH protocol showed a subsequent decrease in riskier rGT choices. Further analyses indicated that the LH protocol affected primarily rats with high baseline levels of risky choices and that among these it had opposite effects in rats exposed to LH-inducing stress compared to rats exposed only to the escape trials. Together these findings suggest that while baseline risky decision making may not predict LH behaviour it interacts strongly with LH conditions in modulating subsequent decision-making behaviour. The suggested possibility that stress controllability may be a key factor should be further investigated.

  6. Strong interaction shift and width of the 1{ital s} level in pionic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigg, D.; Badertscher, A.; Bogdan, M.; Goudsmit, P.F.A.; Leisi, H.J.; Matsinos, E.; Schroeder, H.; Zhao, Z.G. [Institute for Particle Physics, Eidgenoessische Technische Hoschschule Zurich, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Chatellard, D.; Egger, J.; Jeannet, E. [Institut de Physique de l` Universite de Neuchatel, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Aschenauer, E.C.; Gabathuler, K.; Simons, L.M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Rusi El Hassani, A.J. [Ecole Mohammadia d`Ingenieurs, Rabat (Morocco)

    1995-10-30

    The 3{ital p}{minus}1{ital s} x-ray line of pionic hydrogen was measured with a reflecting bent crystal spectrometer. The strong interaction energy level shift and the total decay width of the 1{ital s} state, obtained from the transition energy and the linewidth, are {var_epsilon}{sub 1{ital s}}={minus}7.127{plus_minus}0.028(stat){plus_minus}0.036(syst)eV (attractive) and {Gamma}{sub 1{ital s}}=0.97{plus_minus}0.10(stat){plus_minus}0.05(syst)eV. The corresponding hadronic {pi}{ital N} {ital s}-wave scattering lengths for elastic scattering and single charge exchange are {ital a}{sub {pi}{sup {minus}}{ital p}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {minus}}{ital p}}{sup {ital h}}=0.0885{plus_minus}0.0009{ital m}{sub {pi}}{sup {minus}1} and {ital a}{sub {pi}{sup {minus}}{ital p}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{ital n}}{sup {ital h}}={minus}0.136{plus_minus}0.010{ital m}{sub {pi}}{sup {minus}1}. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  7. Strongly self-interacting vector dark matter via freeze-in

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duch, Mateusz; Grzadkowski, Bohdan; Huang, Da

    2018-01-01

    We study a vector dark matter (VDM) model in which the dark sector couples to the Standard Model sector via a Higgs portal. If the portal coupling is small enough the VDM can be produced via the freeze-in mechanism. It turns out that the electroweak phase transition have a substantial impact on the prediction of the VDM relic density. We further assume that the dark Higgs boson which gives the VDM mass is so light that it can induce strong VDM self-interactions and solve the small-scale structure problems of the Universe. As illustrated by the latest LUX data, the extreme smallness of the Higgs portal coupling required by the freeze-in mechanism implies that the dark matter direct detection bounds are easily satisfied. However, the model is well constrained by the indirect detections of VDM from BBN, CMB, AMS-02, and diffuse γ/X-rays. Consequently, only when the dark Higgs boson mass is at most of O (keV) does there exist a parameter region which leads to a right amount of VDM relic abundance and an appropriate VDM self-scattering while satisfying all other constraints simultaneously.

  8. Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics Study on Proton Dynamics of Strong Hydrogen Bonds in Aspirin Crystals, with Emphasis on Differences between Two Crystal Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brela, Mateusz Z; Wójcik, Marek J; Witek, Łukasz J; Boczar, Marek; Wrona, Ewa; Hashim, Rauzah; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2016-04-28

    In this study, the proton dynamics of hydrogen bonds for two forms of crystalline aspirin was investigated by the Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) method. Analysis of the geometrical parameters of hydrogen bonds using BOMD reveals significant differences in hydrogen bonding between the two crystalline forms of aspirin, Form I and Form II. Analysis of the trajectory for Form I shows spontaneous proton transfer in cyclic dimers, which is absent in Form II. Quantization of the O-H stretching modes allows a detailed discussion on the strength of hydrogen-bonding interactions. The focal point of our study is examination of the hydrogen bond characteristics in the crystal structure and clarification of the influence of hydrogen bonding on the presence of the two crystalline forms of aspirin. In the BOMD method, thermal motions were taken into account. Solving the Schrödinger equation for the snapshots of 2D proton potentials, extracted from MD, gives the best agreement with IR spectra. The character of medium-strong hydrogen bonds in Form I of aspirin was compared with that of weaker hydrogen bonds in aspirin Form II. Two proton minima are present in the potential function for the hydrogen bonds in Form I. The band contours, calculated by using one- and two-dimensional O-H quantization, reflect the differences in the hydrogen bond strengths between the two crystalline forms of aspirin, as well as the strong hydrogen bonding in the cyclic dimers of Form I and the medium-strong hydrogen bonding in Form II.

  9. A Unified Theory of Interaction: Gravitation, Electrodynamics and the Strong Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagener P.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A unified model of gravitation and electromagnetism is extended to derive the Yukawa potential for the strong force. The model satisfies the fundamental characteristics of the strong force and calculates the mass of the pion.

  10. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Approach to Equilibrium in Strongly Interacting Matter. Volume 118

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Venugopalan, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berges, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaizot, J. -P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gelis, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-04-09

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory*. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan and the U. S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The RBRC is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has theory, lattice gauge computing and experimental components. It is presently exploring the possibility of an astrophysics component being added to the program. The purpose of this Workshop is to critically review the recent progress on the theory and phenomenology of early time dynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions from RHIC to LHC energies, to examine the various approaches on thermalization and existing issues, and to formulate new research efforts for the future. Topics slated to be covered include Experimental evidence for equilibration/isotropization, comparison of various approaches, dependence on the initial conditions and couplings, and turbulent cascades and Bose-Einstein condensation.

  11. Dynamics of liquid metal droplets and jets influenced by a strong axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, D.; Karcher, Ch

    2017-07-01

    Non-contact electromagnetic control and shaping of liquid metal free surfaces is crucial in a number of high-temperature metallurgical processes like levitation melting and electromagnetic sealing, among others. Other examples are the electromagnetic bending or stabilization of liquid metal jets that frequently occur in casting or fusion applications. Within this context, we experimentally study the influence of strong axial magnetic fields on the dynamics of falling metal droplets and liquid metal jets. GaInSn in eutectic composition is used as test melt being liquid at room temperature. In the experiments, we use a cryogen-free superconducting magnet (CFM) providing steady homogeneous fields of up to 5 T and allowing a tilt angle between the falling melt and the magnet axis. We vary the magnetic flux density, the tilt angle, the liquid metal flow rate, and the diameter and material of the nozzle (electrically conducting/insulating). Hence, the experiments cover a parameter range of Hartmann numbers Ha, Reynolds numbers Re, and Weber numbers We within 0 magnetic field, droplet rotation ceases and the droplets are stretched in the field direction. Moreover, we observe that the jet breakup into droplets (spheroidization) is suppressed, and in the case of electrically conducting nozzles and tilt, the jets are bent towards the field axis.

  12. Viriato: a Fourier-Hermite spectral code for strongly magnetised fluid-kinetic plasma dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Nuno; Dorland, William; Fazendeiro, Luis; Kanekar, Anjor; Mallet, Alfred; Zocco, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    We report on the algorithms and numerical methods used in Viriato, a novel fluid-kinetic code that solves two distinct sets of equations: (i) the Kinetic Reduced Electron Heating Model equations [Zocco & Schekochihin, 2011] and (ii) the kinetic reduced MHD (KRMHD) equations [Schekochihin et al., 2009]. Two main applications of these equations are magnetised (Alfvnénic) plasma turbulence and magnetic reconnection. Viriato uses operator splitting to separate the dynamics parallel and perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field (assumed strong). Along the magnetic field, Viriato allows for either a second-order accurate MacCormack method or, for higher accuracy, a spectral-like scheme. Perpendicular to the field Viriato is pseudo-spectral, and the time integration is performed by means of an iterative predictor-corrector scheme. In addition, a distinctive feature of Viriato is its spectral representation of the parallel velocity-space dependence, achieved by means of a Hermite representation of the perturbed distribution function. A series of linear and nonlinear benchmarks and tests are presented, with focus on 3D decaying kinetic turbulence. Work partially supported by Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia via Grants UID/FIS/50010/2013 and IF/00530/2013.

  13. I.I. Rabi in Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics Prize Talk: Strongly Interacting Fermi Gases of Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwierlein, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Strongly interacting fermions govern physics at all length scales, from nuclear matter to modern electronic materials and neutron stars. The interplay of the Pauli principle with strong interactions can give rise to exotic properties that we do not understand even at a qualitative level. In recent years, ultracold Fermi gases of atoms have emerged as a new type of strongly interacting fermionic matter that can be created and studied in the laboratory with exquisite control. Feshbach resonances allow for unitarity limited interactions, leading to scale invariance, universal thermodynamics and a superfluid phase transition already at 17 Trapped in optical lattices, fermionic atoms realize the Fermi-Hubbard model, believed to capture the essence of cuprate high-temperature superconductors. Here, a microscope allows for single-atom, single-site resolved detection of density and spin correlations, revealing the Pauli hole as well as anti-ferromagnetic and doublon-hole correlations. Novel states of matter are predicted for fermions interacting via long-range dipolar interactions. As an intriguing candidate we created stable fermionic molecules of NaK at ultralow temperatures featuring large dipole moments and second-long spin coherence times. In some of the above examples the experiment outperformed the most advanced computer simulations of many-fermion systems, giving hope for a new level of understanding of strongly interacting fermions.

  14. On the absence of pentaquark states from dynamics in strongly coupled lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjos, Petrus Henrique Ribeiro dos [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil); Veiga, Paulo Afonso Faria da; O' Carroll, Michael [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil); Francisco Neto, Antonio [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: We consider an imaginary time functional integral formulation of a two-flavor, 3 + 1 lattice QCD model with Wilson's action and in the strong coupling regime (with a small hopping parameter, {kappa}0, and a much smaller plaquette coupling, {beta} = 1/g{sub 0}{sup 2}, so that the quarks and glueballs are heavy). The model has local SU(3){sub c} gauge and global SU(2){sub f} flavor symmetries, and incorporates the corresponding part of the eightfold way particles: baryons (mesons) of asymptotic mass -3ln{kappa}(-2 ln {kappa}). We search for pentaquark states as meson-baryon bound states in the energy-momentum spectrum of the model, using a lattice Bethe-Salpeter equation. This equation is solved within a ladder approximation, given by the lowest nonvanishing order in {kappa} and {beta} of the Bethe-Salpeter kernel. It includes order 2 contributions with a q-barq exchange potential together with a contribution that is a local-in-space, energy-dependent potential. The attractive or repulsive nature of the exchange interaction depends on the spin of the meson-baryon states. The Bethe-Salpeter equation presents integrable singularities, forcing the couplings to be above a threshold value for the meson and the baryon to bind in a pentaquark. We analyzed all the total isospin sectors, I = 1/2/3/2/ 5/2, for the system. For all I, the net attraction resulting from the two sources of interaction is not strong enough for the meson and the baryon to bind. Thus, within our approximation, these pentaquark states are not present up to near the free meson-baryon energy threshold of - 5 ln{kappa}. This result is to be contrasted with the spinless case for which our method detects meson-baryon bound states, as well as for Yukawa effective baryon and meson field models. A physical interpretation of our results emerges from an approximate correspondence between meson-baryon bound states and negative energy states of a one-particle lattice Schroedinger Hamiltonian

  15. The dynamic multisite interactions between two intrinsically disordered proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Shaowen

    2017-05-11

    Protein interactions involving intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) comprise a variety of binding modes, from the well characterized folding upon binding to dynamic fuzzy complex. To date, most studies concern the binding of an IDP to a structured protein, while the Interaction between two IDPs is poorly understood. In this study, we combined NMR, smFRET, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to characterize the interaction between two IDPs, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of protein 4.1G and the nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein. It is revealed that CTD and NuMA form a fuzzy complex with remaining structural disorder. Multiple binding sites on both proteins were identified by MD and mutagenesis studies. Our study provides an atomic scenario in which two IDPs bearing multiple binding sites interact with each other in dynamic equilibrium. The combined approach employed here could be widely applicable for investigating IDPs and their dynamic interactions.

  16. Dynamics of DNA conformations and DNA-protein interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, R.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen

    2005-01-01

    Optical tweezers, atomic force microscopes, patch clamping, or fluorescence techniques make it possible to study both the equilibrium conformations and dynamics of single DNA molecules as well as their interaction with binding proteins. In this paper we address the dynamics of local DNA denaturat......Optical tweezers, atomic force microscopes, patch clamping, or fluorescence techniques make it possible to study both the equilibrium conformations and dynamics of single DNA molecules as well as their interaction with binding proteins. In this paper we address the dynamics of local DNA...

  17. Dynamics of cavitation-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoyu; Wu, Qin; Huang, Biao

    2017-08-01

    Cavitation-structure interaction has become one of the major issues for most engineering applications. The present work reviews recent progress made toward developing experimental and numerical investigation for unsteady turbulent cavitating flow and cavitation-structure interaction. The goal of our overall efforts is to (1) summarize the progress made in the experimental and numerical modeling and approaches for unsteady cavitating flow and cavitation-structure interaction, (2) discuss the global multiphase structures for different cavitation regimes, with special emphasis on the unsteady development of cloud cavitation and corresponding cavitating flow-induced vibrations, with a high-speed visualization system and a structural vibration measurement system, as well as a simultaneous sampling system, (3) improve the understanding of the hydroelastic response in cavitating flows via combined physical and numerical analysis, with particular emphasis on the interaction between unsteady cavitation development and structural deformations. Issues including unsteady cavitating flow structures and cavitation-structure interaction mechanism are discussed.

  18. Cryptic population dynamics: rapid evolution masks trophic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takehito; Ellner, Stephen P; Jones, Laura E; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Lenski, Richard E; Hairston, Nelson G

    2007-09-01

    Trophic relationships, such as those between predator and prey or between pathogen and host, are key interactions linking species in ecological food webs. The structure of these links and their strengths have major consequences for the dynamics and stability of food webs. The existence and strength of particular trophic links has often been assessed using observational data on changes in species abundance through time. Here we show that very strong links can be completely missed by these kinds of analyses when changes in population abundance are accompanied by contemporaneous rapid evolution in the prey or host species. Experimental observations, in rotifer-alga and phage-bacteria chemostats, show that the predator or pathogen can exhibit large-amplitude cycles while the abundance of the prey or host remains essentially constant. We know that the species are tightly linked in these experimental microcosms, but without this knowledge, we would infer from observed patterns in abundance that the species are weakly or not at all linked. Mathematical modeling shows that this kind of cryptic dynamics occurs when there is rapid prey or host evolution for traits conferring defense against attack, and the cost of defense (in terms of tradeoffs with other fitness components) is low. Several predictions of the theory that we developed to explain the rotifer-alga experiments are confirmed in the phage-bacteria experiments, where bacterial evolution could be tracked. Modeling suggests that rapid evolution may also confound experimental approaches to measuring interaction strength, but it identifies certain experimental designs as being more robust against potential confounding by rapid evolution.

  19. Cryptic population dynamics: rapid evolution masks trophic interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehito Yoshida

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Trophic relationships, such as those between predator and prey or between pathogen and host, are key interactions linking species in ecological food webs. The structure of these links and their strengths have major consequences for the dynamics and stability of food webs. The existence and strength of particular trophic links has often been assessed using observational data on changes in species abundance through time. Here we show that very strong links can be completely missed by these kinds of analyses when changes in population abundance are accompanied by contemporaneous rapid evolution in the prey or host species. Experimental observations, in rotifer-alga and phage-bacteria chemostats, show that the predator or pathogen can exhibit large-amplitude cycles while the abundance of the prey or host remains essentially constant. We know that the species are tightly linked in these experimental microcosms, but without this knowledge, we would infer from observed patterns in abundance that the species are weakly or not at all linked. Mathematical modeling shows that this kind of cryptic dynamics occurs when there is rapid prey or host evolution for traits conferring defense against attack, and the cost of defense (in terms of tradeoffs with other fitness components is low. Several predictions of the theory that we developed to explain the rotifer-alga experiments are confirmed in the phage-bacteria experiments, where bacterial evolution could be tracked. Modeling suggests that rapid evolution may also confound experimental approaches to measuring interaction strength, but it identifies certain experimental designs as being more robust against potential confounding by rapid evolution.

  20. Time-resolved THz studies of carrier dynamics in semiconductors, superconductors, and strongly-correlated electron materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaindl, Robert A.; Averitt, Richard D.

    2006-11-14

    Perhaps the most important aspect of contemporary condensed matter physics involves understanding strong Coulomb interactions between the large number of electrons in a solid. Electronic correlations lead to the emergence of new system properties, such as metal-insulator transitions, superconductivity, magneto-resistance, Bose-Einstein condensation, the formation of excitonic gases, or the integer and fractional Quantum Hall effects. The discovery of high-Tc superconductivity in particular was a watershed event, leading to dramatic experimental and theoretical advances in the field of correlated-electron systems. Such materials often exhibit competition between the charge, lattice, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom, whose cause-effect relationships are difficult to ascertain. Experimental insight into the properties of solids is traditionally obtained by time-averaged probes, which measure e.g., linear optical spectra, electrical conduction properties, or the occupied band structure in thermal equilibrium. Many novel physical properties arise from excitations out of the ground state into energetically higher states by thermal, optical, or electrical means. This leads to fundamental interactions between the system's constituents, such as electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions, which occur on ultrafast timescales. While these interactions underlie the physical properties of solids, they are often only indirectly inferred from time-averaged measurements. Time-resolved spectroscopy, consequently, is playing an ever increasing role to provide insight into light-matter interaction, microscopic processes, or cause-effect relationships that determine the physics of complex materials. In the past, experiments using visible and near-infrared femtosecond pulses have been extensively employed, e.g. to follow relaxation and dephasing processes in metals and semiconductors. However, many basic excitations in strongly-correlated electron systems and nanoscale

  1. Fractional Dynamics of Network Growth Constrained by Aging Node Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadiseh Safdari

    Full Text Available In many social complex systems, in which agents are linked by non-linear interactions, the history of events strongly influences the whole network dynamics. However, a class of "commonly accepted beliefs" seems rarely studied. In this paper, we examine how the growth process of a (social network is influenced by past circumstances. In order to tackle this cause, we simply modify the well known preferential attachment mechanism by imposing a time dependent kernel function in the network evolution equation. This approach leads to a fractional order Barabási-Albert (BA differential equation, generalizing the BA model. Our results show that, with passing time, an aging process is observed for the network dynamics. The aging process leads to a decay for the node degree values, thereby creating an opposing process to the preferential attachment mechanism. On one hand, based on the preferential attachment mechanism, nodes with a high degree are more likely to absorb links; but, on the other hand, a node's age has a reduced chance for new connections. This competitive scenario allows an increased chance for younger members to become a hub. Simulations of such a network growth with aging constraint confirm the results found from solving the fractional BA equation. We also report, as an exemplary application, an investigation of the collaboration network between Hollywood movie actors. It is undubiously shown that a decay in the dynamics of their collaboration rate is found, even including a sex difference. Such findings suggest a widely universal application of the so generalized BA model.

  2. Proceedings of the 24. SLAC summer institute on particle physics: The strong interaction, from hadrons to partons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J.; DePorcel, L.; Dixon, L. [eds.

    1997-06-01

    This conference explored the role of the strong interaction in the physics of hadrons and partons. The Institute attracted 239 physicists from 16 countries to hear lectures on the underlying theory of Quantum Chromodynamics, modern theoretical calculational techniques, and experimental investigation of the strong interaction as it appears in various phenomena. Different regimes in which one can calculate reliably in QCD were addressed in series of lectures on perturbation theory, lattice gauge theories, and heavy quark expansions. Studies of QCD in hadron-hadron collisions, electron-positron annihilation, and electron-proton collisions all give differing perspectives on the strong interaction--from low-x to high-Q{sup 2}. Experimental understanding of the production and decay of heavy quarks as well as the lighter meson states has continued to evolve over the past years, and these topics were also covered at the School. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  3. Dynamics of social balance under temporal interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Ryosuke; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-08-01

    Real social contacts are often intermittent such that a link between a pair of nodes in a social network is only temporarily used. The effects of such temporal networks on social dynamics have been investigated for several phenomenological models such as epidemic spreading, linear diffusion processes, and nonlinear oscillations. Here, we numerically investigate nonlinear social balance dynamics in such a situation. Social balance is a classical psychological theory, which dictates that a triad is balanced if the three agents are mutual friends or if the two of them are the friends of each other and hostile to the other agent. We show that the social balance dynamics is slowed down on the temporal complete graph as compared to the corresponding static complete graph.

  4. Dynamical Engineering of Interactions in Qudit Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soonwon; Yao, Norman Y.; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2017-11-01

    We propose and analyze a method to engineer effective interactions in an ensemble of d -level systems (qudits) driven by global control fields. In particular, we present (i) a necessary and sufficient condition under which a given interaction can be decoupled, (ii) the existence of a universal sequence that decouples any (cancelable) interaction, and (iii) an efficient algorithm to engineer a target Hamiltonian from an initial Hamiltonian (if possible). We illustrate the potential of this method with two examples. Specifically, we present a 6-pulse sequence that decouples effective spin-1 dipolar interactions and demonstrate that a spin-1 Ising chain can be engineered to study transitions among three distinct symmetry protected topological phases. Our work enables new approaches for the realization of both many-body quantum memories and programmable analog quantum simulators using existing experimental platforms.

  5. Interaction of the electromagnetic precursor from a relativistic shock with the upstream flow - I. Synchrotron absorption of strong electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2018-02-01

    This paper is the first in the series of papers aiming to study interaction of the electromagnetic precursor waves generated at the front of a relativistic shock with the upstream flow. It is motivated by a simple consideration showing that the absorption of such an electromagnetic precursor could yield an efficient transformation of the kinetic energy of the upstream flow to the energy of accelerated particles. Taking into account that the precursor is a strong wave, in which electrons oscillate with relativistic velocities, the standard plasma-radiation interaction processes should be reconsidered. In this paper, I calculate the synchrotron absorption of strong electromagnetic waves.

  6. Dynamic representations on the interactive whiteboard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meij, Hans; van der Meij, Jan; de Vries, Erica; Scheiter, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    In this study we assessed whether presenting dynamic representations on an IWB would lead to better learning gains compared to presenting static representations. Participants were 7-8 year old primary school children learning about views (N = 151) and the water cycle (N = 182). The results showed

  7. Decoupled Associative and Dissociative Processes in Strong yet Highly Dynamic Host-Guest Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Eric A; Biedermann, Frank; Hoogland, Dominique; Del Barrio, Jesús; Driscoll, Max D; Hay, Sam; Wales, David J; Scherman, Oren A

    2017-09-20

    Kinetics and thermodynamics in supramolecular systems are intimately linked, yet both are independently important for application in sensing assays and stimuli-responsive switching/self-healing of materials. Host-guest interactions are of particular interest in many water-based materials, sensing, and drug delivery applications. Herein we investigate the binding dynamics of a variety of electron-rich aromatic moieties forming hetero-ternary complexes with the macrocycle cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) and an auxiliary guest, dimethyl viologen, with high selectivity and equilibrium binding constants (Keq up to 10(14) M(-2)). Using stopped-flow spectrofluorimetry, association rate constants were observed to approach the diffusion limit and were found to be insensitive to the structure of the guest. Conversely, the dissociation rate constants of the ternary complexes varied dramatically with the guest structure and were correlated with the thermodynamic binding selectivity. Hence differing molecular features were found to contribute to the associative and dissociative processes, mimicking naturally occurring reactions and giving rise to a decoupling of these kinetic parameters. Moreover, we demonstrate the ability to exploit these phenomena and selectively perturb the associative process with external stimuli (e.g., viscosity and pressure). Significantly, these complexes exhibit increased binding equilibria with increasing pressure, with important implications for the application of the CB[8] ternary complex for the formation of hydrogels, as these gels exhibit unprecedented pressure-insensitive rheological properties. A high degree of flexibility therefore exists in the design of host-guest systems with tunable kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for tailor-made applications across a broad range of fields.

  8. Live interaction distinctively shapes social gaze dynamics in rhesus macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piva, Matthew; Morris, Jason A.; Chang, Steve W. C.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic interaction of gaze between individuals is a hallmark of social cognition. However, very few studies have examined social gaze dynamics after mutual eye contact during real-time interactions. We used a highly quantifiable paradigm to assess social gaze dynamics between pairs of monkeys and modeled these dynamics using an exponential decay function to investigate sustained attention after mutual eye contact. When monkeys were interacting with real partners compared with static images and movies of the same monkeys, we found a significant increase in the proportion of fixations to the eyes and a smaller dispersion of fixations around the eyes, indicating enhanced focal attention to the eye region. Notably, dominance and familiarity between the interacting pairs induced separable components of gaze dynamics that were unique to live interactions. Gaze dynamics of dominant monkeys after mutual eye contact were associated with a greater number of fixations to the eyes, whereas those of familiar pairs were associated with a faster rate of decrease in this eye-directed attention. Our findings endorse the notion that certain key aspects of social cognition are only captured during interactive social contexts and dependent on the elapsed time relative to socially meaningful events. PMID:27486105

  9. Comparing numerical and analytical approaches to strongly interacting two-component mixtures in one dimensional traps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellotti, Filipe Furlan; Salami Dehkharghani, Amin; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas

    2017-01-01

    ) and exact diagonalization) and analytically. Since DMRG results do not converge as the interaction strength is increased, analytical solutions are used as a benchmark to identify the point where these calculations become unstable. We use the proposed mapping to set a quantitative limit on the interaction...

  10. High Performance Interactive System Dynamics Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, Brian W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gruchalla, Kenny M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Duckworth, Jonathan C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-14

    This brochure describes a system dynamics simulation (SD) framework that supports an end-to-end analysis workflow that is optimized for deployment on ESIF facilities(Peregrine and the Insight Center). It includes (I) parallel and distributed simulation of SD models, (ii) real-time 3D visualization of running simulations, and (iii) comprehensive database-oriented persistence of simulation metadata, inputs, and outputs.

  11. High Performance Interactive System Dynamics Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, Brian W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gruchalla, Kenny M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Duckworth, Jonathan C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-14

    This presentation describes a system dynamics simulation (SD) framework that supports an end-to-end analysis workflow that is optimized for deployment on ESIF facilities(Peregrine and the Insight Center). It includes (I) parallel and distributed simulation of SD models, (ii) real-time 3D visualization of running simulations, and (iii) comprehensive database-oriented persistence of simulation metadata, inputs, and outputs.

  12. Weak competing interactions control assembly of strongly bonded TCNQ ionic acceptor molecules on silver surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Changwon; Rojas, Geoffrey A.; Jeon, Seokmin; Kelly, Simon J.; Smith, Sean C.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Yoon, Mina; Maksymovych, Petro

    2014-09-01

    The energy scales of interactions that control molecular adsorption and assembly on surfaces can vary by several orders of magnitude, yet the importance of each contributing interaction is not apparent a priori. Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) is an archetypal electron acceptor molecule and it is a key component of organic metals. On metal surfaces, this molecule also acts as an electron acceptor, producing negatively charged adsorbates. It is therefore rather intriguing to observe attractive molecular interactions in this system that were reported previously for copper and silver surfaces. Our experiments compared TCNQ adsorption on noble metal surfaces of Ag(100) and Ag(111). In both cases we found net attractive interactions down to the lowest coverage. However, the morphology of the assemblies was strikingly different, with two-dimensional islands on Ag(100) and one-dimensional chains on Ag(111) surfaces. This observation suggests that the registry effect governed by the molecular interaction with the underlying lattice potential is critical in determining the dimensionality of the molecular assembly. Using first-principles density functional calculations with a van der Waals correction scheme, we revealed that the strengths of major interactions (i.e., lattice potential corrugation, intermolecular attraction, and charge-transfer-induced repulsion) are all similar in energy. The van der Waals interactions, in particular, almost double the strength of attractive interactions, making the intermolecular potential comparable in strength to the diffusion potential and promoting self-assembly. However, it is the anisotropy of local intermolecular interactions that is primarily responsible for the difference in the topology of the molecular islands on Ag(100) and Ag(111) surfaces. We anticipate that the intermolecular potential will become more attractive and dominant over the diffusion potential with increasing molecular size, providing new design strategies for the

  13. Dynamical Equilibrium of Interacting Ant Societies

    CERN Document Server

    Leok, B T M

    1996-01-01

    The sustainable biodiversity associated with a specific ecological niche as a function of land area is analysed computationally by considering the interaction of ant societies over a collection of islands. A power law relationship between sustainable species and land area is observed. We will further consider the effect a perturbative inflow of ants has upon the model.

  14. Dynamic Interactions for Network Visualization and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 GUI Graphical User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 MVC Model-View...applications, and web applets. Comprising a library of design algorithms, navigation and interaction techniques, prefuse aims to significantly sim- plify the...Information Visualization Reference Model of the Prefuse toolkit [15]. The prefuse toolkit is suitable for the Model-View-Controller ( MVC ) [15] soft- ware

  15. Dynamical theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Englert, F

    1974-01-01

    The gauge theory of unified weak and electromagnetic interactions is developed without the use of scalar mesons. It is shown that the Glashow Weinberg scheme is unrealistic, but that a similar such scheme is possible if one includes two pairs of leptons, identified with e-, νe and μ-, νμ.

  16. Models for the dynamics of interacting magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Mørup, Steen

    1998-01-01

    A critical review of models for the dynamics of interacting magnetic nanoparticles is given. It is shown that the basic assumptions in the Dormann-Bessais-Fiorani model are unrealistic. The experimental observations on systems of interacting magnetic nanoparticles can, at least qualitatively...

  17. A Comprehensive Analysis of Jet Quenching via a Hybrid Strong/Weak Coupling Model for Jet-Medium Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Matèria and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Gulhan, Doga Can [Laboratory for Nuclear Science and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Milhano, José Guilherme [CENTRA, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Pablos, Daniel [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Matèria and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Rajagopal, Krishna [Laboratory for Nuclear Science and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Within a hybrid strong/weak coupling model for jets in strongly coupled plasma, we explore jet modifications in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Our approach merges the perturbative dynamics of hard jet evolution with the strongly coupled dynamics which dominates the soft exchanges between the fast partons in the jet shower and the strongly coupled plasma itself. We implement this approach in a Monte Carlo, which supplements the DGLAP shower with the energy loss dynamics as dictated by holographic computations, up to a single free parameter that we fit to data. We then augment the model by incorporating the transverse momentum picked up by each parton in the shower as it propagates through the medium, at the expense of adding a second free parameter. We use this model to discuss the influence of the transverse broadening of the partons in a jet on intra-jet observables. In addition, we explore the sensitivity of such observables to the back-reaction of the plasma to the passage of the jet.

  18. Strong Raman-induced non-instantaneous soliton interactions in gas-filled photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Marini, Andrea; Biancalana, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an analytical model based on the perturbation theory in order to study the optical propagation of two successive intense solitons in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled with Raman-active gases. Based on the time delay between the two solitons, we have found that the trailing soliton dynamics can experience unusual nonlinear phenomena such as spectral and temporal soliton oscillations and transport towards the leading soliton. The overall dynamics can lead to a spatiotemporal modulation of the refractive index with a uniform temporal period and a uniform or chirped spatial period.

  19. Recent results from the search for the critical point of strongly interacting matter at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanek, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Recent searches at the CERN SPS for evidence of the critical point of strongly interacting matter are discussed. Experimental results on theoretically expected signatures, such as event-to-event fluctuations of the particle multiplicity and the average transverse momentum as well as intermittency in particle production are presented.

  20. Development of a partitioned finite volume-finite element fluid-structure interaction scheme for strongly-coupled problems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Suliman, Ridhwaan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This work details the development of a computational tool that can accurately model strongly-coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems, with a particular focus on thin-walled structures undergoing large, non-linear deformations. The first...

  1. The influence of strong field vacuum polarization on gravitational-electromagnetic wave interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Forsberg, Mats; Papadopoulos, Demetrios; Brodin, Gert

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between gravitational and electromagnetic waves in the presence of a static magnetic field is studied. The field strength of the static field is allowed to surpass the Schwinger critical field, such that the quantum electrodynamical (QED) effects of vacuum polarization and magnetization are significant. Equations governing the interaction are derived and analyzed. It turns out that the energy conversion from gravitational to electromagnetic waves can be significantly altered d...

  2. Phenomenological description of spin effects in electromagnetic and strong interactions of quarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silenko Alexander J.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenomenological description of interactions of relativistic quarks by the Dirac equation with the Cornell potential is given. The general form of the initial equation containing the vector and scalar parts of the Cornell potential is used at the arbitrary connection between these parts. The Hamiltonian in the Foldy-Wouthuysen representation is derived in the general form with allowance for the electromagnetic interactions. Unlike precedent investigations, it is relativistic and exact for terms of the zeroth and first powers in the Planck constant and also for such terms of the second power which describe contact interactions. General quantum mechanical equations of motion for the momentum and the spin are derived and the classical limit of the Hamiltonian and the equations of motion are found for the first time. A connection between the angular velocity of the quark spin precession and the force acting on it is determined. The energy of the spin-orbit interaction is rather high (of the order of 100 MeV. The terms describing the spin-orbit and contact interactions have opposite signs for the scalar and the vector parts of the Cornell potential. The evolution of the quark helicity and the spin-spin interaction of the quarks are also calculated.

  3. Interfacial interaction between polypropylene and nanotube: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Danhui; Yang, Houbo; Liu, Zhongkui; Liu, Anmin; Li, Yunfang

    2017-09-01

    The interfacial interaction between polypropylene (PE) and single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The result showed that the PE chain could stabilize the SWCNT and then extended along the direction of SWCNT. The mechanism of interfacial interaction between PE and SWCNT was also discussed. Furthermore, the interfacial interaction between more PE and SWCNT was also investigated and the position also deeply influenced the interaction. This will be beneficial to understanding the interfacial interaction between polymer and CNT in solution, and also guiding the fabrication of high performance polymer/CNT nanocomposites.

  4. Global Stability and Dynamics of Strongly Nonlinear Systems Using Koopman Operator Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    calculus, applied mathematics , Director’s Research Initiative 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18...public release; distribution is unlimited. iv List of Figures Fig. 1 Spectrum of nonlinear observable; computational fluid dynamics simulation (blue...are for the full-order computational fluid dynamics simulations of the forced system, while normal form (red) corresponds to Eq. 4

  5. Shape Displays: Spatial Interaction with Dynamic Physical Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leithinger, Daniel; Follmer, Sean; Olwal, Alex; Ishii, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Shape displays are an emerging class of devices that emphasize actuation to enable rich physical interaction, complementing concepts in virtual and augmented reality. The ability to render form introduces new opportunities to touch, grasp, and manipulate dynamic physical content and tangible objects, in both nearby and remote environments. This article presents novel hardware, interaction techniques, and applications, which point to the potential for extending the ways that we traditionally interact with the physical world, empowered by digital computation.

  6. Strong impact of lattice vibrations on electronic and magnetic properties of paramagnetic Fe revealed by disordered local moments molecular dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alling, B.; Kormann, F.H.W.; Grabowski, B; Glensk, A; Abrikosov, I.A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the impact of lattice vibrations on magnetic and electronic properties of paramagnetic bcc and fcc iron at finite temperature, employing the disordered local moments molecular dynamics (DLM-MD) method. Vibrations strongly affect the distribution of local magnetic moments at finite

  7. Detecting Friendship Within Dynamic Online Interaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Merritt, Sears; Jacobs, Abigail Z.; Mason, Winter; Clauset, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    In many complex social systems, the timing and frequency of interactions between individuals are observable but friendship ties are hidden. Recovering these hidden ties, particularly for casual users who are relatively less active, would enable a wide variety of friendship-aware applications in domains where labeled data are often unavailable, including online advertising and national security. Here, we investigate the accuracy of multiple statistical features, based either purely on temporal...

  8. Scale-up of Λ3 : Massive gravity with a higher strong interaction scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabadadze, Gregory

    2017-10-01

    Pure massive gravity is strongly coupled at a certain low scale, known as Λ3. I show that the theory can be embedded into another one, with new light degrees of freedom, to increase the strong scale to a significantly larger value. Certain universal aspects of the proposed mechanism are discussed, notably that the coupling of the longitudinal mode to a stress tensor is suppressed, thus making the linear theory consistent with the fifth-force exclusion. An example of the embedding theory studied in detail is five-dimensional anti-de Sitter massive gravity, with a large cosmological constant. In this example, the four-dimensional (4D) strong scale can be increased by 19 orders of magnitude. Holographic duality then suggests that the strong scale of the 4D massive gravity can be increased by coupling it to a 4D nonlocal conformal field theory, endowed with a UV cutoff; however, the five-dimensional classical gravity picture appears to be more tractable.

  9. Modeling human dynamics of face-to-face interaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Starnini, Michele; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2013-01-01

    Face-to-face interaction networks describe social interactions in human gatherings, and are the substrate for processes such as epidemic spreading and gossip propagation. The bursty nature of human behavior characterizes many aspects of empirical data, such as the distribution of conversation lengths, of conversations per person, or of inter-conversation times. Despite several recent attempts, a general theoretical understanding of the global picture emerging from data is still lacking. Here we present a simple model that reproduces quantitatively most of the relevant features of empirical face-to-face interaction networks. The model describes agents which perform a random walk in a two dimensional space and are characterized by an attractiveness whose effect is to slow down the motion of people around them. The proposed framework sheds light on the dynamics of human interactions and can improve the modeling of dynamical processes taking place on the ensuing dynamical social networks.

  10. Metal-insulator transition in SrIrO3 with strong spin-orbit interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei-Xiang; Zhou, Jian; Zhang, L Y; Chen, Y B; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Gu, Zheng-Bin; Yao, Shu-Hua; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2013-03-27

    The thickness-dependent metal-insulator transition is observed in meta-stable orthorhombic SrIrO3 thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition. SrIrO3 films with thicknesses less than 3 nm demonstrate insulating behaviour, whereas those thicker than 4 nm exhibit metallic conductivity at high temperature, and insulating-like behaviour at low temperature. Weak/Anderson localization is mainly responsible for the observed thickness-dependent metal-insulator transition in SrIrO3 films. Temperature-dependent resistance fitting shows that electrical-conductivity carriers are mainly scattered by the electron-boson interaction rather than the electron-electron interaction. Analysis of the magneto-conductance proves that the spin-orbit interaction plays a crucial role in the magneto-conductance property of SrIrO3.

  11. The preparation of an elastomer/silicate layer nanocompound with an exfoliated structure and a strong ionic interfacial interaction by utilizing an elastomer latex containing pyridine groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Shaojian; Wang Yiqing; Feng Yiping; Liu Qingsheng; Zhang Liqun, E-mail: zhanglq@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Nanomaterials, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2010-03-19

    A great variety of polymer/layered silicate (PLS) nanocomposites have been reported, however, there are few exfoliated PLS nanocomposites and their inorganic-organic interfaces are still a great problem, especially for the elastomers. In this research, a kind of exfoliated elastomer/silicate layer nanocompound was prepared and proved by XRD and TEM, in which 10 phr Na{sup +}-montmorillonite was dispersed in butadiene-styrene-vinyl pyridine rubber by latex compounding method with acidic flocculants. Moreover, a dynamic mechanical thermal analyzer (DMTA) suggested a strong interfacial interaction (interaction parameter B{sub H} = 4.91) between the silicate layers and macromolecules in addition to the weak inorganic-organic interfacial interaction, and solid state {sup 15}N NMR indicated the formation of a strong ionic interface through the acidifying pyridine. Subsequently, a remarkable improvement of the dispersing morphology, mechanical performance and gas barrier property appeared, compared to that using calcium ion flocculants. This supports the formation of an exfoliated structure and an improved interfacial interaction.

  12. Dynamical system analysis of interacting models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, S.; Borges, H. A.

    2018-01-01

    We perform a dynamical system analysis of a cosmological model with linear dependence between the vacuum density and the Hubble parameter, with constant-rate creation of dark matter. We show that the de Sitter spacetime is an asymptotically stable critical point, future limit of any expanding solution. Our analysis also shows that the Minkowski spacetime is an unstable critical point, which eventually collapses to a singularity. In this way, such a prescription for the vacuum decay not only predicts the correct future de Sitter limit, but also forbids the existence of a stable Minkowski universe. We also study the effect of matter creation on the growth of structures and their peculiar velocities, showing that it is inside the current errors of redshift space distortions observations.

  13. RAMAN LIGHT SCATTERING IN PSEUDOSPIN-ELECTRON MODEL AT STRONG PSEUDOSPIN-ELECTRON INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S.Mysakovych

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Anharmonic phonon contributions to Raman scattering in locally anharmonic crystal systems in the framework of the pseudospin-electron model with tunneling splitting of levels are investigated. The case of strong pseudospin-electron coupling is considered. Pseudospin and electron contributions to scattering are taken into account. Frequency dependences of Raman scattering intensity for different values of model parameters and for different polarization of scattering and incident light are investigated.

  14. Association in strongly interacting liquid binary alloys and nuclear spin relaxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Brinkmann, R.; von Hartrott, M.; Kiehl, M.; Maxim, P.; Paulick, C.A.; Willeke, F.; Quitmann, D.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental quantity sensitive to the time development of the distance between two atoms in a liquid alloy, is the quadrupolar nuclear spin relaxation rate RQ. The existing material for s-p-alloys shows a systematic occurrence of string enhancements of RQ if there is an attractive interaction

  15. On parallel scalability aspects of strongly coupled partitioned fluid-structure-acoustics interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, D.S.; Krupp, V.; Van Zuijlen, A.H.; Klimach, H.; Roller, S.; Bijl, H.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-physics simulations, such as fluid-structure-acoustics interaction (FSA), require a high performance computing environment in order to perform the simulation in a reasonable amount of computation time. Currently used coupling methods use a staggered execution of the fluid and solid solver [6],

  16. Virtual Partner Interaction (VPI: exploring novel behaviors via coordination dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J A Scott Kelso

    Full Text Available Inspired by the dynamic clamp of cellular neuroscience, this paper introduces VPI -- Virtual Partner Interaction -- a coupled dynamical system for studying real time interaction between a human and a machine. In this proof of concept study, human subjects coordinate hand movements with a virtual partner, an avatar of a hand whose movements are driven by a computerized version of the Haken-Kelso-Bunz (HKB equations that have been shown to govern basic forms of human coordination. As a surrogate system for human social coordination, VPI allows one to examine regions of the parameter space not typically explored during live interactions. A number of novel behaviors never previously observed are uncovered and accounted for. Having its basis in an empirically derived theory of human coordination, VPI offers a principled approach to human-machine interaction and opens up new ways to understand how humans interact with human-like machines including identification of underlying neural mechanisms.

  17. Dynamic Interaction between Cap & Trade and Electricity Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeev, Kumar

    Greenhouse Gases (GHG), such as Carbon-Dioxide (CO2), which is released in the atmosphere due to anthropogenic activities like power production, are now accepted as the main culprits for global warming. The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), an initiative of the North East and Mid-Atlantic States of the United States (US) for limiting the emission of GHG, has developed a regional cap-and-trade program for CO2 emissions for power plants. Existing cap-and-trade programs in US and Europe for Greenhouse Gases have recently been plagued by over-allocation. Carbon prices recently collapsed in all these markets during the global recession. Since then, there have been significant policy changes, which have resulted in the adoption of aggressive emission cap targets by most major carbon emission markets. This is expected to make carbon emissions availability more restrictive, raising the prices of these credits. These emissions markets are expected to have a major impact on the wholesale electricity markets. Two models to study the interaction of these two markets are presented. These models assess the impact of the emissions market on wholesale electricity prices. The first model characterizes the competition between two types of power plants (coal and gas) in both the electricity and emissions markets as a dynamic game using the Cournot approximation. Under this approximation, we find that in the Nash equilibrium the plants increase their permit allocation to high-demand periods and the marginal value of each credit for a plant is identical in all periods under their optimal equilibrium strategy. The second numerical model allows us to explicitly evaluate the closed loop equilibrium of the dynamic interaction of two competitors in these markets. We find that plants often try to corner the market and push prices all the way to the price cap. Power plants derive most of their profits from these extreme price regimes. In the experiments where trading is allowed

  18. Landau-Zener transition in photoassociation of cold atoms: strong interaction limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishkhanyan, Artur [Engineering Center of NAS of Armenia, Ashtarak-2, 0203 (Armenia); Javanainen, Juha [University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3046 (United States); Nakamura, Hiroki [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)

    2006-12-01

    The nonlinear Landau-Zener problem for two-mode photoassociation of cold atoms is studied. Based on an exact nonlinear Volterra integral equation for molecular state probability, a limit nonlinear first-order differential equation is applied to construct the first-order approximation to the solution of the problem at a strong coupling limit. An accurate approximate expression for the final transition probability to the molecular state is derived. The non-transition probability turns out to be inversely proportional to the Landau-Zener parameter in contrast to the linear two-state case when the dependence is exponential.

  19. Strong dispersal in a parasitoid wasp overwhelms habitat fragmentation and host population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couchoux, C; Seppä, P; van Nouhuys, S

    2016-07-01

    The population dynamics of a parasite depend on species traits, host dynamics and the environment. Those dynamics are reflected in the genetic structure of the population. Habitat fragmentation has a greater impact on parasites than on their hosts because resource distribution is increasingly fragmented for species at higher trophic levels. This could lead to either more or less genetic structure than the host, depending on the relative dispersal rates of species. We examined the spatial genetic structure of the parasitoid wasp Hyposoter horticola, and how it was influenced by dispersal, host population dynamics and habitat fragmentation. The host, the Glanville fritillary butterfly, lives as a metapopulation in a fragmented landscape in the Åland Islands, Finland. We collected wasps throughout the 50 by 70 km archipelago and determined the genetic diversity, spatial population structure and genetic differentiation using 14 neutral DNA microsatellite loci. We compared the genetic structure of the wasp with that of the host butterfly using published genetic data collected over the shared landscape. Using maternity assignment, we also identified full-siblings among the sampled parasitoids to estimate the dispersal range of individual females. We found that because the parasitoid is dispersive, it has low genetic structure, is not very sensitive to habitat fragmentation and has less spatial genetic structure than its butterfly host. The wasp is sensitive to regional rather than local host dynamics, and there is a geographic mosaic landscape for antagonistic co-evolution of host resistance and parasite virulence. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Discrete states of a protein interaction network govern interphase and mitotic microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Niethammer

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells is thought to adopt discrete "states" corresponding to different steady states of protein networks that govern changes in subcellular organization. For example, in Xenopus eggs, the interphase to mitosis transition is induced solely by activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1 that phosphorylates many proteins leading to a reorganization of the nucleus and assembly of the mitotic spindle. Among these changes, the large array of stable microtubules that exists in interphase is replaced by short, highly dynamic microtubules in metaphase. Using a new visual immunoprecipitation assay that quantifies pairwise protein interactions in a non-perturbing manner in Xenopus egg extracts, we reveal the existence of a network of interactions between a series of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs. In interphase, tubulin interacts with XMAP215, which is itself interacting with XKCM1, which connects to APC, EB1, and CLIP170. In mitosis, tubulin interacts with XMAP215, which is connected to EB1. We show that in interphase, microtubules are stable because the catastrophe-promoting activity of XKCM1 is inhibited by its interactions with the other MAPs. In mitosis, microtubules are short and dynamic because XKCM1 is free and has a strong destabilizing activity. In this case, the interaction of XMAP215 with EB1 is required to counteract the strong activity of XKCM1. This provides the beginning of a biochemical description of the notion of "cytoplasmic states" regarding the microtubule system.

  1. Intrinsic dynamics of weakly and strongly confined excitons in nonpolar nitride-based heterostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Corfdir, Pierre; Levrat, Jacques; Dussaigne, Amélie; Lefebvre, Pierre; Teisseyre, Henryk; Grzegory, Izabella; Suski, Tadeusz; Ganière, Jean-Daniel; Grandjean, Nicolas; Deveaud-Plédran, Benoît

    2011-01-01

    Both weakly and strongly confined excitons are studied by time-resolved photoluminescence in a nonpolar nitride-based heterostructure grown by molecular beam epitaxy on the a-facet of a bulk GaN crystal, with an ultralow dislocation density of 2 × 105 cm-2. Strong confinement is obtained in a 4 nm thick Al0.06Ga0.94N/GaN quantum well (QW), whereas weakly confined exciton-polaritons are observed in a 200 nm thick GaN epilayer. Thanks to the low dislocation density, the effective lifetime of st...

  2. Reaction-Diffusion Modeling ERK- and STAT-Interaction Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiev Nikola

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of the dynamics of interaction between ERK and STAT signaling pathways in the cell needs to establish the biochemical diagram of the corresponding proteins interactions as well as the corresponding reaction-diffusion scheme. Starting from the verbal description available in the literature of the cross talk between the two pathways, a simple diagram of interaction between ERK and STAT5a proteins is chosen to write corresponding kinetic equations. The dynamics of interaction is modeled in a form of two-dimensional nonlinear dynamical system for ERK—and STAT5a —protein concentrations. Then the spatial modeling of the interaction is accomplished by introducing an appropriate diffusion-reaction scheme. The obtained system of partial differential equations is analyzed and it is argued that the possibility of Turing bifurcation is presented by loss of stability of the homogeneous steady state and forms dissipative structures in the ERK and STAT interaction process. In these terms, a possible scaffolding effect in the protein interaction is related to the process of stabilization and destabilization of the dissipative structures (pattern formation inherent to the model of ERK and STAT cross talk.

  3. Social Dynamics in Web Page through Inter-Agent Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yugo; Katagiri, Yasuhiro

    Social persuasion abounds in human-human interactions. Attitudes and behaviors of people are invariably influenced by the attitudes and behaviors of other people as well as our social roles/relationships toward them. In the pedagogic scene, the relationship between teacher and learner produces one of the most typical interactions, in which the teacher makes the learner spontaneously study what he/she teaches. This study is an attempt to elucidate the nature and effectiveness of social persuasion in human-computer interaction environments. We focus on the social dynamics of multi-party interactions that involve both human-agent and inter-agent interactions. An experiment is conducted in a virtual web-instruction setting employing two types of agents: conductor agents who accompany and guide each learner throughout his/her learning sessions, and domain-expert agents who provide explanations and instructions for each stage of the instructional materials. In this experiment, subjects are assigned two experimental conditions: the authorized condition, in which an agent respectfully interacts with another agent, and the non-authorized condition, in which an agent carelessly interacts with another agent. The results indicate performance improvements in the authorized condition of inter-agent interactions. An analysis is given from the perspective of the transfer of authority from inter-agent to human-agent interactions based on social conformity. We argue for pedagogic advantages of social dynamics created by multiple animated character agents.

  4. Direct observation of ultrafast many-body electron dynamics in a strongly-correlated ultracold Rydberg gas

    CERN Document Server

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Genes, Claudiu; Pupillo, Guido; Goto, Haruka; Koyasu, Kuniaki; Chiba, Hisashi; Weidemüller, Matthias; Ohmori, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Many-body interactions govern a variety of important quantum phenomena ranging from superconductivity and magnetism in condensed matter to solvent effects in chemistry. Understanding those interactions beyond mean field is a holy grail of modern sciences. AMO physics with advanced laser technologies has recently emerged as a new platform to study quantum many-body systems. One of its latest developments is the study of long-range interactions among ultracold particles to reveal the effects of many-body correlations. Rydberg atoms distinguish themselves by their large dipole moments and tunability of dipolar interactions. Most of ultracold Rydberg experiments have been performed with narrow-band lasers in the Rydberg blockade regime. Here we demonstrate an ultracold Rydberg gas in a complementary regime, where electronic coherence is created using a broadband picosecond laser pulse, thus circumventing the Rydberg blockade to induce strong many-body correlations. The effects of long-range Rydberg interactions h...

  5. Non-linear quantum-classical scheme to simulate non-equilibrium strongly correlated fermionic many-body dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreula, J. M.; Clark, S. R.; Jaksch, D.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a non-linear, hybrid quantum-classical scheme for simulating non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly correlated fermions described by the Hubbard model in a Bethe lattice in the thermodynamic limit. Our scheme implements non-equilibrium dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) and uses a digital quantum simulator to solve a quantum impurity problem whose parameters are iterated to self-consistency via a classically computed feedback loop where quantum gate errors can be partly accounted for. We analyse the performance of the scheme in an example case.

  6. Dynamic interactions of neutrophils and biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefine Hirschfeld

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The majority of microbial infections in humans are biofilm-associated and difficult to treat, as biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and protect themselves from external threats in various ways. Biofilms are tenaciously attached to surfaces and impede the ability of host defense molecules and cells to penetrate them. On the other hand, some biofilms are beneficial for the host and contain protective microorganisms. Microbes in biofilms express pathogen-associated molecular patterns and epitopes that can be recognized by innate immune cells and opsonins, leading to activation of neutrophils and other leukocytes. Neutrophils are part of the first line of defense and have multiple antimicrobial strategies allowing them to attack pathogenic biofilms. Objective/design: In this paper, interaction modes of neutrophils with biofilms are reviewed. Antimicrobial strategies of neutrophils and the counteractions of the biofilm communities, with special attention to oral biofilms, are presented. Moreover, possible adverse effects of neutrophil activity and their biofilm-promoting side effects are discussed. Results/conclusion: Biofilms are partially, but not entirely, protected against neutrophil assault, which include the processes of phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. However, virulence factors of microorganisms, microbial composition, and properties of the extracellular matrix determine whether a biofilm and subsequent microbial spread can be controlled by neutrophils and other host defense factors. Besides, neutrophils may inadvertently contribute to the physical and ecological stability of biofilms by promoting selection of more resistant strains. Moreover, neutrophil enzymes can degrade collagen and other proteins and, as a result, cause harm to the host tissues. These parameters could be crucial factors in the onset of periodontal inflammation and the subsequent tissue breakdown.

  7. The evolution of antimicrobial peptide resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is shaped by strong epistatic interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochumsen, Nicholas; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Pedersen, Søren Damkiær

    2016-01-01

    independent loci that synergistically create the phenotype. Strong intergenic epistasis limits the number of possible evolutionary pathways to resistance. Mutations in transcriptional regulators are essential for resistance evolution and function as nodes that potentiate further evolution towards higher......Colistin is an antimicrobial peptide that has become the only remaining alternative for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections, but little is known of how clinical levels of colistin resistance evolve. We use in vitro experimental evolution and whole......-genome sequencing of colistin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients to reconstruct the molecular evolutionary pathways open for high-level colistin resistance. We show that the evolution of resistance is a complex, multistep process that requires mutation in at least five...

  8. Equilibration of a strongly interacting plasma: holographic analysis of local and nonlocal probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellantuono Loredana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The relaxation of a strongly coupled plasma towards the hydrodynamic regime is studied by analyzing the evolution of local and nonlocal observables in the holographic approach. The system is driven in an initial anisotropic and far-from equilibrium state through an impulsive time-dependent deformation (quench of the boundary spacetime geometry. Effective temperature and entropy density are related to the position and area of a black hole horizon, which has formed as a consequence of the distortion. The behavior of stress-energy tensor, equal-time correlation functions and Wilson loops of different shapes is examined, and a hierarchy among their thermalization times emerges: probes involving shorter length scales thermalize faster.

  9. Exchange interaction of strongly anisotropic tripodal erbium single-ion magnets with metallic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreiser, Jan; Wäckerlin, Christian; Ali, Md. Ehesan

    2014-01-01

    on a Ni thin film on Cu(100) single-crystalline surfaces. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements performed on Au(111) samples covered with molecular monolayers held at temperatures down to 4 K suggest that the easy axes of the strongly anisotropic molecules are randomly oriented......We present a comprehensive study of Er(trensal) single-ion magnets deposited in ultrahigh vacuum onto metallic surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the molecular structure is preserved after sublimation, and that the molecules are physisorbed on Au(111) while they are chemisorbed....... Furthermore XMCD indicates a weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling between the single-ion magnets and the ferromagnetic Ni/Cu(100) substrate. For the latter case, spin-Hamiltonian fits to the XMCD M(H) suggest a significant structural distortion of the molecules. Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals...

  10. Strong spatial variability in trace gas dynamics following experimental drought in a humid tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tana Wood; W. L. Silver

    2012-01-01

    [1] Soil moisture is a key driver of biogeochemical processes in terrestrial ecosystems, strongly affecting carbon (C) and nutrient availability as well as trace gas production and consumption in soils. Models predict increasing drought frequency in tropical forest ecosystems, which could feed back on future climate change directly via effects on trace gasdynamics and...

  11. Strongly coupled interaction between a ridge of fluid and an inviscid airflow

    KAUST Repository

    Paterson, C.

    2015-07-01

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. The behaviour of a steady thin sessile or pendent ridge of fluid on an inclined planar substrate which is strongly coupled to the external pressure gradient arising from an inviscid airflow parallel to the substrate far from the ridge is described. When the substrate is nearly horizontal, a very wide ridge can be supported against gravity by capillary and/or external pressure forces; otherwise, only a narrower (but still wide) ridge can be supported. Classical thin-aerofoil theory is adapted to obtain the governing singular integro-differential equation for the profile of the ridge in each case. Attention is focused mainly on the case of a very wide sessile ridge. The effect of strengthening the airflow is to push a pinned ridge down near to its edges and to pull it up near to its middle. At a critical airflow strength, the upslope contact angle reaches the receding contact angle at which the upslope contact line de-pins, and continuing to increase the airflow strength beyond this critical value results in the de-pinned ridge becoming narrower, thicker, and closer to being symmetric in the limit of a strong airflow. The effect of tilting the substrate is to skew a pinned ridge in the downslope direction. Depending on the values of the advancing and receding contact angles, the ridge may first de-pin at either the upslope or the downslope contact line but, in general, eventually both contact lines de-pin. The special cases in which only one of the contact lines de-pins are also considered. It is also shown that the behaviour of a very wide pendent ridge is qualitatively similar to that of a very wide sessile ridge, while the important qualitative difference between the behaviour of a very wide ridge and a narrower ridge is that, in general, for the latter one or both of the contact lines may never de-pin.

  12. Bubble interaction dynamics in Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinskii, Yurii A; Hamilton, Mark F; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A

    2007-02-01

    Two models of interacting bubble dynamics are presented, a coupled system of second-order differential equations based on Lagrangian mechanics, and a first-order system based on Hamiltonian mechanics. Both account for pulsation and translation of an arbitrary number of spherical bubbles. For large numbers of interacting bubbles, numerical solution of the Hamiltonian equations provides greater stability. The presence of external acoustic sources is taken into account explicitly in the derivation of both sets of equations. In addition to the acoustic pressure and its gradient, it is found that the particle velocity associated with external sources appears in the dynamical equations.

  13. Comparing the epidermal growth factor interaction with four different cell lines: intriguing effects imply strong dependency of cellular context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Björkelund

    Full Text Available The interaction of the epidermal growth factor (EGF with its receptor (EGFR is known to be complex, and the common over-expression of EGF receptor family members in a multitude of tumors makes it important to decipher this interaction and the following signaling pathways. We have investigated the affinity and kinetics of (125I-EGF binding to EGFR in four human tumor cell lines, each using four culturing conditions, in real time by use of LigandTracer®.Highly repeatable and precise measurements show that the overall apparent affinity of the (125I-EGF - EGFR interaction is greatly dependent on cell line at normal culturing conditions, ranging from K(D ≈ 200 pM on SKBR3 cells to K(D≈8 nM on A431 cells. The (125I-EGF - EGFR binding curves (irrespective of cell line have strong signs of multiple simultaneous interactions. Furthermore, for the cell lines A431 and SKOV3, gefitinib treatment increases the (125I-EGF - EGFR affinity, in particular when the cells are starved. The (125I-EGF - EGFR interaction on cell line U343 is sensitive to starvation while as on SKBR3 it is insensitive to gefitinib and starvation.The intriguing pattern of the binding characteristics proves that the cellular context is important when deciphering how EGF interacts with EGFR. From a general perspective, care is advisable when generalizing ligand-receptor interaction results across multiple cell-lines.

  14. Strong interaction between graphene layer and Fano resonance in terahertz metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shuyuan; Wang, Tao; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Yan, Xicheng; Cheng, Le; Wang, Boyun; Xu, Chen

    2017-05-01

    Graphene has emerged as a promising building block in modern optics and optoelectronics due to its novel optical and electrical properties. In the mid-infrared and terahertz (THz) regime, graphene behaves like metals and supports surface plasmon resonances (SPRs). Moreover, the continuously tunable conductivity of graphene enables active SPRs and gives rise to a range of active applications. However, the interaction between graphene and metal-based resonant metamaterials has not been fully understood. In this work, a simulation investigation on the interaction between the graphene layer and THz resonances supported by the two-gap split ring metamaterials is systematically conducted. The simulation results show that the graphene layer can substantially reduce the Fano resonance and even switch it off, while leaving the dipole resonance nearly unaffected, which is well explained with the high conductivity of graphene. With the manipulation of graphene conductivity via altering its Fermi energy or layer number, the amplitude of the Fano resonance can be modulated. The tunable Fano resonance here together with the underlying physical mechanism can be strategically important in designing active metal-graphene hybrid metamaterials. In addition, the ‘sensitivity’ to the graphene layer of the Fano resonance is also highly appreciated in the field of ultrasensitive sensing, where the novel physical mechanism can be employed in sensing other graphene-like two-dimensional materials or biomolecules with the high conductivity.

  15. Tunable self-assembled spin chains of strongly interacting cold atoms for demonstration of reliable quantum state transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, N. J. S.; Marchukov, O. V.; Petrosyan, D.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an efficient computational method to treat long, one-dimensional systems of strongly-interacting atoms forming self-assembled spin chains. Such systems can be used to realize many spin chain model Hamiltonians tunable by the external confining potential. As a concrete demonstrat...... demonstration, we consider quantum state transfer in a Heisenberg spin chain and we show how to determine the confining potential in order to obtain nearly-perfect state transfer....

  16. Law of Large Numbers for a Heterogeneous System of Stochastic Differential Equations with Strong Local Interaction and Economic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Finnoff, William

    1994-01-01

    A model for the activities of a finite number of agents in an economy is presented as the solution to a system of stochastic differential equations driven by general semimartingales and displaying an extended form of strong local interaction. We demonstrate a law of large numbers for the systems of processes as the number of agents goes to infinity under a weak convergence hypothesis on the triangular array of starting values and driving semimartingales which induces the systems of equations....

  17. A Contribution to Documenting and Validating Dynamic Interaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    . Controlled laboratory tests, employing a vibrating test floor carrying stationary crowds of people, are designed and carried out to investigate the dynamic interaction. The paper describes the tests and the modal identification procedures employed for the assessment of model validity. Besides from aspects......On structures carrying humans (e.g. floors, grandstands in stadia etc.) there may be two different types of crowds present: Active and passive crowds of people. The active crowd, comprising people in motion, may generate dynamic loads causing the structure to vibrate. The passive (stationary) crowd...... and a floor in vertical motion. The mechanism of crowd-structure interaction is not well understood and the primary aim of the paper is to present results of experimental investigations documenting effects of crowd-structure interaction and to exploring the validity of a crowd-structure interaction model...

  18. Interaction dynamics of multiple mobile robots with simple navigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P. K. C.

    1989-01-01

    The global dynamic behavior of multiple interacting autonomous mobile robots with simple navigation strategies is studied. Here, the effective spatial domain of each robot is taken to be a closed ball about its mass center. It is assumed that each robot has a specified cone of visibility such that interaction with other robots takes place only when they enter its visibility cone. Based on a particle model for the robots, various simple homing and collision-avoidance navigation strategies are derived. Then, an analysis of the dynamical behavior of the interacting robots in unbounded spatial domains is made. The article concludes with the results of computer simulations studies of two or more interacting robots.

  19. Electrical Control of Structural and Physical Properties via Strong Spin-Orbit Interactions in Sr2IrO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, G.; Terzic, J.; Zhao, H. D.; Zheng, H.; De Long, L. E.; Riseborough, Peter S.

    2018-01-01

    Electrical control of structural and physical properties is a long-sought, but elusive goal of contemporary science and technology. We demonstrate that a combination of strong spin-orbit interactions (SOI) and a canted antiferromagnetic Mott state is sufficient to attain that goal. The antiferromagnetic insulator Sr2IrO4 provides a model system in which strong SOI lock canted Ir magnetic moments to IrO6 octahedra, causing them to rigidly rotate together. A novel coupling between an applied electrical current and the canting angle reduces the Néel temperature and drives a large, nonlinear lattice expansion that closely tracks the magnetization, increases the electron mobility, and precipitates a unique resistive switching effect. Our observations open new avenues for understanding fundamental physics driven by strong SOI in condensed matter, and provide a new paradigm for functional materials and devices.

  20. Conserving approximations for strongly correlated electron systems - Bethe-Salpeter equation and dynamics for the two-dimensional Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickers, N. E.; Scalapino, D. J.; White, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    A semianalytical approach is described for strongly correlated electronic systems which satisfies microscopic conservation laws, treats strong frequency and momentum dependences, and provides information on both static and dynamic properties. This approach may be used to treat large systems and temperatures lower than those currently accessible to finite-temperature quantum Monte Carlo techniques. Examples of such systems include heavy-electron compounds, organic Bechegaard salts, bis-(ethylenedithiolo)-TTF superconductors, and the oxide superconductors. The technique is based on the derivation and self-consistent solution of infinite-order conserving approximations. The technique is used to derive a low-temperature phase diagram and dynamic correlation functions for the two-dimensional Hubbard lattice model.

  1. A model for strong interactions at high energy based on the CGC/saturation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotsman, E.; Maor, U. [Tel Aviv University, Department of Particle Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Science, Tel Aviv (Israel); Levin, E. [Tel Aviv University, Department of Particle Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Science, Tel Aviv (Israel); Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria and Centro Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso, Departamento de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2015-01-01

    We present our first attempt to develop a model for soft interactions at high energy, based on the BFKL Pomeron and the CGC/saturation approach. We construct an eikonal-type model, whose opacity is determined by the exchange of the dressed BFKL Pomeron. The Green function of the Pomeron is calculated in the framework of the CGC/saturation approach. Using five parameters we achieve a reasonable description of the experimental data at high energies (W ≥ 0.546TeV) with overall χ{sup 2}/d.o.f. ∼ 2. The model results in different behavior for the single- and double-diffraction cross sections at high energies.The singlediffraction cross section reaches a saturated value (about 10mb) at high energies, while the double-diffraction cross section continues growing slowly. (orig.)

  2. Electron Fluid Description of Wave-Particle Interactions in Strong Buneman Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Che, H

    2014-01-01

    To understand the nature of anomalous resistivity in magnetic reconnection, we investigate turbulence-induced momentum transport and energy dissipation during Buneman instability in force-free current sheets. Using 3D particle-in-cell simulations, we find that the macroscopic effects generated by wave-particle interactions in Buneman instability can be approximately described by a set of electron fluid equations. These equations show that the energy dissipation and momentum transports along current sheets are locally quasi-static but globally non-static and irreversible. Turbulence drag dissipates both the streaming energy of current sheets and the associated magnetic energy. The decrease of magnetic field maintains an inductive electric field that re-accelerates electrons. The net loss of streaming energy is converted into the heat of electrons moving along the magnetic field and increases the electron Boltzmann entropy. The growth of self-sustained Buneman waves satisfies a Bernoulli-like equation that rela...

  3. Dynamic Multiscale Tree Learning Using Ensemble Strong Classifiers for Multi-label Segmentation of Medical Images with Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Amiri, Samya; Mahjoub, Mohamed Ali; Rekik, Islem

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a dynamic multiscale tree (DMT) architecture that learns how to leverage the strengths of different existing classifiers for supervised multi-label image segmentation. Unlike previous works that simply aggregate or cascade classifiers for addressing image segmentation and labeling tasks, we propose to embed strong classifiers into a tree structure that allows bi-directional flow of information between its classifier nodes to gradually improve their performances. Our DMT is a gene...

  4. Entanglement Growth in Quench Dynamics with Variable Range Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schachenmayer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Studying entanglement growth in quantum dynamics provides both insight into the underlying microscopic processes and information about the complexity of the quantum states, which is related to the efficiency of simulations on classical computers. Recently, experiments with trapped ions, polar molecules, and Rydberg excitations have provided new opportunities to observe dynamics with long-range interactions. We explore nonequilibrium coherent dynamics after a quantum quench in such systems, identifying qualitatively different behavior as the exponent of algebraically decaying spin-spin interactions in a transverse Ising chain is varied. Computing the buildup of bipartite entanglement as well as mutual information between distant spins, we identify linear growth of entanglement entropy corresponding to propagation of quasiparticles for shorter-range interactions, with the maximum rate of growth occurring when the Hamiltonian parameters match those for the quantum phase transition. Counterintuitively, the growth of bipartite entanglement for long-range interactions is only logarithmic for most regimes, i.e., substantially slower than for shorter-range interactions. Experiments with trapped ions allow for the realization of this system with a tunable interaction range, and we show that the different phenomena are robust for finite system sizes and in the presence of noise. These results can act as a direct guide for the generation of large-scale entanglement in such experiments, towards a regime where the entanglement growth can render existing classical simulations inefficient.

  5. The human dynamic clamp as a paradigm for social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Guillaume; de Guzman, Gonzalo C; Tognoli, Emmanuelle; Kelso, J A Scott

    2014-09-02

    Social neuroscience has called for new experimental paradigms aimed toward real-time interactions. A distinctive feature of interactions is mutual information exchange: One member of a pair changes in response to the other while simultaneously producing actions that alter the other. Combining mathematical and neurophysiological methods, we introduce a paradigm called the human dynamic clamp (HDC), to directly manipulate the interaction or coupling between a human and a surrogate constructed to behave like a human. Inspired by the dynamic clamp used so productively in cellular neuroscience, the HDC allows a person to interact in real time with a virtual partner itself driven by well-established models of coordination dynamics. People coordinate hand movements with the visually observed movements of a virtual hand, the parameters of which depend on input from the subject's own movements. We demonstrate that HDC can be extended to cover a broad repertoire of human behavior, including rhythmic and discrete movements, adaptation to changes of pacing, and behavioral skill learning as specified by a virtual "teacher." We propose HDC as a general paradigm, best implemented when empirically verified theoretical or mathematical models have been developed in a particular scientific field. The HDC paradigm is powerful because it provides an opportunity to explore parameter ranges and perturbations that are not easily accessible in ordinary human interactions. The HDC not only enables to test the veracity of theoretical models, it also illuminates features that are not always apparent in real-time human social interactions and the brain correlates thereof.

  6. Strongly correlated bosons on optical superlattices: Dynamics and relaxation in the superfluid and insulating regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigol, Marcos; Olshanii, Maxim; Muramatsu, Alejandro

    2007-03-01

    We study the nonequilibrium dynamics of hard-core bosons (HCB's) on one-dimensional lattices. The dynamics is analyzed after a sudden switch-on or switch-off of a superlattice potential, which can bring the system into insulating or superfluid phases, respectively. A collapse and revival of the zero-momentum peak can be seen in the first case. We study in detail the relaxation of these integrable systems towards equilibrium. We show that after relaxation time averages of physical observables, like the momentum distribution function, can be predicted by means of a generalization of the Gibbs distribution. [M. Rigol, A. Muramatsu, and M. Olshanii, Phys. Rev. A 74, 053616 (2006).

  7. Disentangling weak and strong interactions in B→ K^{*}(→ Kπ )π Dalitz-plot analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Jérôme; Descotes-Genon, Sébastien; Ocariz, José; Pérez Pérez, Alejandro

    2017-08-01

    Dalitz-plot analyses of B→ Kπ π decays provide direct access to decay amplitudes, and thereby weak and strong phases can be disentangled by resolving the interference patterns in phase space between intermediate resonant states. A phenomenological isospin analysis of B→ K^*(→ Kπ )π decay amplitudes is presented exploiting available amplitude analyses performed at the BaBar, Belle and LHCb experiments. A first application consists in constraining the CKM parameters thanks to an external hadronic input. A method, proposed some time ago by two different groups and relying on a bound on the electroweak penguin contribution, is shown to lack the desired robustness and accuracy, and we propose a more alluring alternative using a bound on the annihilation contribution. A second application consists in extracting information on hadronic amplitudes assuming the values of the CKM parameters from a global fit to quark flavour data. The current data yields several solutions, which do not fully support the hierarchy of hadronic amplitudes usually expected from theoretical arguments (colour suppression, suppression of electroweak penguins), as illustrated from computations within QCD factorisation. Some prospects concerning the impact of future measurements at LHCb and Belle II are also presented. Results are obtained with the CKMfitter analysis package, featuring the frequentist statistical approach and using the Rfit scheme to handle theoretical uncertainties.

  8. Spin dynamical phase and anti-resonance in a strongly coupled magnon-photon system

    OpenAIRE

    Harder, Michael; Hyde, Paul; Bai, Lihui; Match, Christophe; Hu, Can-Ming

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally studied a strongly coupled magnon-photon system via microwave transmission measurements. An anti-resonance, i.e. the suppression of the microwave transmission, is observed, indicating a relative phase change between the magnon response and the driving microwave field. We show that this anti-resonance feature can be used to interpret the phase evolution of the coupled magnon-microwave system and apply this technique to reveal the phase evolution of magnon dark modes. Our work...

  9. Bose–Einstein condensation and liquid–gas phase transition in strongly interacting matter composed of α particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satarov, L. M.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Motornenko, A.; Vovchenko, V.; Mishustin, I. N.; Stoecker, H.

    2017-12-01

    Systems of Bose particles with both repulsive and attractive interactions are studied using the Skyrme-like mean-field model. The phase diagram of such systems exhibits two special lines in the chemical potential-temperature plane: one line which represents the first-order liquid–gas phase transition with the critical end point, and another line which represents the onset of Bose–Einstein condensation. The calculations are made for strongly interacting matter composed of α particles. The phase diagram of this matter is qualitatively similar to that observed for the atomic 4He liquid. The sensitivity of the results to the model parameters is studied. For weak interaction coupling, the critical point is located at the Bose-condensation line.

  10. Au@MoS2 Core-Shell Heterostructures with Strong Light-Matter Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Cain, Jeffrey D; Hanson, Eve D; Murthy, Akshay A; Hao, Shiqiang; Shi, Fengyuan; Li, Qianqian; Wolverton, Chris; Chen, Xinqi; Dravid, Vinayak P

    2016-12-14

    There are emerging opportunities to harness diverse and complex geometric architectures based on nominal two-dimensional atomically layered structures. Herein we report synthesis and properties of a new core-shell heterostructure, termed Au@MoS2, where the Au nanoparticle is snugly and contiguously encapsulated by few shells of MoS2 atomic layers. The heterostructures were synthesized by direct growth of multilayer fullerene-like MoS2 shell on Au nanoparticle cores. The Au@MoS2 heterostructures exhibit interesting light-matter interactions due to the structural curvature of MoS2 shell and the plasmonic effect from the underlying Au nanoparticle core. We observed significantly enhanced Raman scattering and photoluminescence emission on these heterostructures. We attribute these enhancements to the surface plasmon-induced electric field, which simulations show to mainly localize within the MoS2 shell. We also found potential evidence for the charge transfer-induced doping effect on the MoS2 shell. The DFT calculations further reveal that the structural curvature of MoS2 shell results in a modification of its electronic structure, which may facilitate the charge transfer from MoS2 to Au. Such Au@MoS2 core-shell heterostructures have the potential for future optoelectronic devices, optical imaging, and other energy-environmental applications.

  11. Thermomagnetic correlation lengths of strongly interacting matter in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Hernández, L. A.; Loewe, M.; Raya, Alfredo; Rojas, J. C.; Zamora, R.

    2017-08-01

    We study the correlation length between test quarks with the same electric and color charges in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, considering thermal and magnetic effects. We extract the correlation length from the quark correlation function. The latter is constructed from the probability amplitude to bring a given quark into the plasma once a previous one with the same quantum numbers is placed at a given distance apart. For temperatures below the transition temperature, the correlation length starts growing as the field strength increases to then decrease for large magnetic fields. For temperatures above the pseudocritical temperature, the correlation length continues increasing as the field strength increases. We found that such behavior can be understood as a competition between the tightening induced by the classical magnetic force versus the random thermal motion. For large enough temperatures, the increase of the occupation number contributes to the screening of the interaction between the test particles. The growth of the correlation distance with the magnetic field can be understood as due to the closer proximity between one of the test quarks and the ones popped up from the vacuum, which in turn appear due to the increase of the occupation number with the temperature.

  12. Interaction of energetic particles with waves in strongly inhomogeneous solar wind plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krafft, C. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Volokitin, A. S. [Space Research Institute, 84/32 Profsoyuznaya Str., 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Krasnoselskikh, V. V., E-mail: catherine.krafft@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l' Environnement et de l' Espace, 3A Av. de la Recherche Scientifique, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France)

    2013-12-01

    Observations performed in the solar wind by different satellites show that electron beams accelerated in the low corona during solar flares can propagate up to distances around 1 AU, that Langmuir waves' packets can be clumped into spikes with peak amplitudes three orders of magnitude above the mean, and that the average level of density fluctuations can reach several percents. A Hamiltonian model is built describing the properties of Langmuir waves propagating in a plasma with random density fluctuations by the Zakharov's equations and the beam by means of particles moving self-consistently in the fields of the waves. Numerical simulations, performed using parameters relevant to solar type III conditions at 1 AU, show that when the average level of density fluctuations is sufficiently low, the beam relaxation and the wave excitation processes are very similar to those in a homogeneous plasma and can be described by the quasilinear equations of the weak turbulence theory. On the contrary, when the average level of density fluctuations overcomes some threshold depending on the ratio of the thermal velocity to the beam velocity, the plasma inhomogeneities crucially influence the characteristics of the Langmuir turbulence and the beam-plasma interaction.

  13. Flutter-by Interactive Butterfly Using interactivity to excite and educate children about butterflies and the National Museum of Play at The Strong's Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Lydia

    The National Museum of Play at The Strong's Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden is a tropical rainforest that allows visitors to step into the world of butterflies, but lacks a more comprehensive educational element to teach visitors additional information about butterflies. Flutter-by Interactive Butterfly is a thesis project designed to enhance younger visitors' experience of the Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden with an interactive educational application that aligns with The Strong's mission of encouraging learning, creativity, and discovery. This was accomplished through a series of fun and educational games and animations, designed for use as a kiosk outside the garden and as a part of The Strong's website. Content, planning, and organization of this project has been completed through research and observation of the garden in the following areas: its visitors, butterflies, best usability practices for children, and game elements that educate and engage children. Flutter-by Interactive Butterfly teaches users about the butterfly's life cycle, anatomy, and characteristics as well as their life in the Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden. Through the use of the design programs Adobe Illustrator, Flash, and After Effects; the programming language ActionScript3.0; a child-friendly user interface and design; audio elements and user takeaways, Flutter-by Interactive Butterfly appeals to children of all ages, interests, and learning styles. The project can be viewed at lydiapowers.com/Thesis/FlutterByButterfly.html

  14. Quantum distillation: Dynamical generation of low-entropy states of strongly correlated fermions in an optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidrich-Meisner, F. [Institut fur Physikalische Chemie der RWTH; Manmana, S. R. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland; Rigol, M. [Georgetown University; Muramatsu, A. [Universitat Stuttgart, Institute fur Plasmaforschung, Germany; Feiguin, A. E. [University of Maryland; Dagotto, Elbio R [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Correlations between particles can lead to subtle and sometimes counterintuitive phenomena. We analyze one such case, occurring during the sudden expansion of fermions in a lattice when the initial state has a strong admixture of double occupancies. We promote the notion of quantum distillation: during the expansion and in the case of strongly repulsive interactions, doublons group together, forming a nearly ideal band insulator, which is metastable with low entropy. We propose that this effect could be used for cooling purposes in experiments with two-component Fermi gases.

  15. Water-Protein Interactions: The Secret of Protein Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Martini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water-protein interactions help to maintain flexible conformation conditions which are required for multifunctional protein recognition processes. The intimate relationship between the protein surface and hydration water can be analyzed by studying experimental water properties measured in protein systems in solution. In particular, proteins in solution modify the structure and the dynamics of the bulk water at the solute-solvent interface. The ordering effects of proteins on hydration water are extended for several angstroms. In this paper we propose a method for analyzing the dynamical properties of the water molecules present in the hydration shells of proteins. The approach is based on the analysis of the effects of protein-solvent interactions on water protons NMR relaxation parameters. NMR relaxation parameters, especially the nonselective (R1NS and selective (R1SE spin-lattice relaxation rates of water protons, are useful for investigating the solvent dynamics at the macromolecule-solvent interfaces as well as the perturbation effects caused by the water-macromolecule interactions on the solvent dynamical properties. In this paper we demonstrate that Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy can be used to determine the dynamical contributions of proteins to the water molecules belonging to their hydration shells.

  16. Component Based System Framework for Dynamic B2B Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu jinmin, Jinmin; Grefen, P.W.P.J.

    Business-to-Business (B2B) collaboration is becoming a pivotal way to bring today's enterprises to success in the dynamically changing e-business environment. Though many business-to-business protocols are developed to support B2B interaction, none are generally accepted. A B2B system should support

  17. Nonequilibrium dynamics in an interacting Fe-C nanoparticle system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, P.; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Nordblad, P.

    2000-01-01

    Nonequilibrium dynamics in an interacting Fe-C nanoparticle sample, exhibiting a low-temperature spin-glass-like phase, has been studied by low-frequency ac susceptibility and magnetic relaxation experiments. The nonequilibrium behavior shows characteristic spin-glass features, but some qualitative...

  18. Electron correlation dynamics of strong-field double ionization of atoms below recollision threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yunquan; Gong Qihuang [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ye Difa; Liu Jie [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, 100084 Beijing (China); Rudenko, A; Tschuch, S; Duerr, M; Moshammer, R; Ullrich, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Siegel, M; Morgner, U, E-mail: yunquan.liu@pku.edu.cn [Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Welfengarten 1, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2011-02-01

    In recent combined experimental and theoretical study we have explored nonsequential double ionization of neon and argon atoms in the infrared light field (800nm) below the recollision threshold. We find that the two-electron correlation dynamics depends on atomic structure- 'side-by-side emission' (correlation) for Ne and 'back-to-back emission' (anticorrelation) for argon atoms. This can be explained theoretically within our three dimensional classical model calculation including tunnelling effect. The multiple recollisions as well as recollision-induced-excitation-tunnelling (RIET) effect dominate the anticorrelation of argon, whereas the laser-assisted instantaneous recollision dominates the correlation of neon.

  19. Galaxy Zoo: Mergers - Dynamical models of interacting galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holincheck, Anthony J.; Wallin, John F.; Borne, Kirk; Fortson, Lucy; Lintott, Chris; Smith, Arfon M.; Bamford, Steven; Keel, William C.; Parrish, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The dynamical history of most merging galaxies is not well understood. Correlations between galaxy interaction and star formation have been found in previous studies, but require the context of the physical history of merging systems for full insight into the processes that lead to enhanced star formation. We present the results of simulations that reconstruct the orbit trajectories and disturbed morphologies of pairs of interacting galaxies. With the use of a restricted three-body simulation code and the help of citizen scientists, we sample 105 points in parameter space for each system. We demonstrate a successful recreation of the morphologies of 62 pairs of interacting galaxies through the review of more than 3 million simulations. We examine the level of convergence and uniqueness of the dynamical properties of each system. These simulations represent the largest collection of models of interacting galaxies to date, providing a valuable resource for the investigation of mergers. This paper presents the simulation parameters generated by the project. They are now publicly available in electronic format at http://data.galaxyzoo.org/mergers.html. Though our best-fitting model parameters are not an exact match to previously published models, our method for determining uncertainty measurements will aid future comparisons between models. The dynamical clocks from our models agree with previous results of the time since the onset of star formation from starburst models in interacting systems and suggest that tidally induced star formation is triggered very soon after closest approach.

  20. Strategy selection in evolutionary game dynamics on group interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shaolin; Feng, Shasha; Wang, Pei; Chen, Yao

    2014-11-01

    Evolutionary game theory provides an appropriate tool for investigating the competition and diffusion of behavioral traits in biological or social populations. A core challenge in evolutionary game theory is the strategy selection problem: Given two strategies, which one is favored by the population? Recent studies suggest that the answer depends not only on the payoff functions of strategies but also on the interaction structure of the population. Group interactions are one of the fundamental interactive modes within populations. This work aims to investigate the strategy selection problem in evolutionary game dynamics on group interaction networks. In detail, the strategy selection conditions are obtained for some typical networks with group interactions. Furthermore, the obtained conditions are applied to investigate selection between cooperation and defection in populations. The conditions for evolution of cooperation are derived for both the public goods game and volunteer's dilemma game. Numerical experiments validate the above analytical results.

  1. DMFT analysis of the superconductivity in the Holstein-Hubbard model - Interplay of strong Coulomb interaction and electron-phonon coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yuta; Werner, Philipp; Tsuji, Naoto; Aoki, Hideo

    2014-03-01

    Phonon-mediated superconductivity when, as in the alkali-doped fullerides and aromatic compounds, the Coulomb interaction, electron-phonon coupling and phonon frequencies are all comparable to the electronic band width poses an intriguing question. In order to obtain insights into the superconductivity in this regime, we have analyzed the Holstein-Hubbard model with the dynamical mean-field theory with a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver. We focus on the s-wave superconducting state when the Hubbard repulsion U, the phonon mediated attractive interaction λ and the phonon energy (ω0) are comparable to the bandwidth. A particular interest is the effects of the retardation and the strong Coulomb interaction on the behavior of the transition temperature TC, the superconductivity order parameter and gap in spectrum (Δ). We find that the Tc-dome against Ueff = U - λ significantly deviates from that in the anti-adiabatic limit, and that an effective model in the polaron representation reproduces the effect of the retardation and the Coulomb interaction well even for ω0 smaller than the bandwidth. We also show an unusual isotope effect for fast phonons and deviation of 2 Δ /kBTC from BCS value.

  2. Cirhin up-regulates a canonical NF-{kappa}B element through strong interaction with Cirip/HIVEP1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Bin; Mitchell, Grant A. [Genetique Medicale, Centre de Recherche CHU Sainte-Justine, Departement de Pediatrie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Richter, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.richter@umontreal.ca [Genetique Medicale, Centre de Recherche CHU Sainte-Justine, Departement de Pediatrie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2009-11-01

    North American Indian childhood cirrhosis (NAIC/CIRH1A) is a severe autosomal recessive intrahepatic cholestasis. All NAIC patients have a homozygous mutation in CIRH1A that changes conserved Arg565 to Trp (R565W) in Cirhin, a nucleolar protein of unknown function. Subcellular localization is unaffected by the mutation. Yeast two-hybrid screening identified Cirip (Cirhin interaction protein) and found that interaction between Cirip and R565W-Cirhin was weakened. Co-immunoprecipitation of the two proteins from nuclear extracts of HeLa cells strongly supports the yeast two hybrid results. Cirip has essentially the same sequence as the C-terminal of HIVEP1, a regulator of a canonical NF-{kappa}B sequence. Since Cirip has the zinc fingers required for this interaction, we developed an in vitro assay based on this element in mammalian cells to demonstrate functional Cirhin-Cirip interaction. The strong positive effect of Cirip on the NF-{kappa}B sequence was further increased by both Cirhin and R565W-Cirhin. Importantly, the effect of R565W-Cirhin was weaker than that of the wild type protein. We observed increased levels of Cirhin-Cirip complex in nuclear extracts in the presence of this NF-{kappa}B sequence. Our hypothesis is that Cirhin is a transcriptional regulatory factor of this NF-{kappa}B sequence and could be a participant in the regulation of other genes with NF-{kappa}B responsive elements. Since the activities of genes regulated through NF-{kappa}B responsive elements are especially important during development, this interaction may be a key to explain the perinatal appearance of NAIC.

  3. Temporal bird community dynamics are strongly affected by landscape fragmentation in a Central American tropical forest region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandón, A.C.; Perelman, S.B.; Ramírez, M.; López, A.; Javier, O.; Robbins, Chandler S.

    2016-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation are considered the main causes of species extinctions, particularly in tropical ecosystems. The objective of this work was to evaluate the temporal dynamics of tropical bird communities in landscapes with different levels of fragmentation in eastern Guatemala. We evaluated five bird community dynamic parameters for forest specialists and generalists: (1) species extinction, (2) species turnover, (3) number of colonizing species, (4) relative species richness, and (5) a homogeneity index. For each of 24 landscapes, community dynamic parameters were estimated from bird point count data, for the 1998–1999 and 2008–2009 periods, accounting for species’ detection probability. Forest specialists had higher extinction rates and a smaller number of colonizing species in landscapes with higher fragmentation, thus having lower species richness in both time periods. Alternatively, forest generalists elicited a completely different pattern, showing a curvilinear association to forest fragmentation for most parameters. Thus, greater community dynamism for forest generalists was shown in landscapes with intermediate levels of fragmentation. Our study supports general theory regarding the expected negative effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on the temporal dynamics of biotic communities, particularly for forest specialists, providing strong evidence from understudied tropical bird communities.

  4. Nonlinear dynamic susceptibilities of interacting and noninteracting magnetic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Joensson, P; García-Palacios, J L; Svedlindh, P

    2000-01-01

    The linear and cubic dynamic susceptibilities of solid dispersions of nanosized maghemite gamma-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 particles have been measured for three samples with a volume concentration of magnetic particles ranging from 0.3% to 17%, in order to study the effect of dipole-dipole interactions. Significant differences between the dynamic response of the samples are observed. While the linear and cubic dynamic susceptibilities of the most dilute sample compare reasonably well with the corresponding expressions proposed by Raikher and Stepanov for noninteracting particles, the nonlinear dynamic response of the most concentrated sample exhibits at low temperatures similar features as observed in a Ag(11 at% Mn) spin glass.

  5. Notes on the nonlinear beam dynamics with strong damping in the CLIC Damping Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Levichev, Eugene; Shatilov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    The beam is injected into the CLIC damping ring with the relatively large emittance and energy spread and then is damped to the extremely low phase volume. During the damping process the betatron frequency of each particle changes due to the space charge tune shift and nonlinear dependence of the betatron tune on the amplitude. This nonlinearity is produced by the strong chromatic sextupoles, wiggler nonlinear field components and, again, by the space charge force. During the damping, the particle cross resonances, which can trap some fraction of the beam, cause the loss of intensity, the beam blow up and degrade the beam quality. In this paper we study the evolution of the beam distribution in time during the damping for the original lattice of the CLIC DR (May 2005). Geneva, Switzerland June 2010 CLIC – Note – 850

  6. Fully angle-resolved strong-field ionization and dissociation of ethylene from rotational wavepacket dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarappan, Vinod; Ren, Xiaoming; Le, Anh-Thu; Makhija, Varun

    2015-05-01

    We obtain the full orientation dependence of strong field ionization and dissociation of ethylene, an asymmetric top molecule, by a linearly polarized laser pulse. The molecules are set into complex rotational motion by the non-resonant laser pulse and subsequently ionized or fragmented by a more intense probe pulse. By decomposing the delay dependent yields of ionization dissociation products in a suitable basis set, we obtain the orientation dependences of both processes and show that HOMO and HOMO-1 orbitals contribute to the ionization signal and that ionization from HOMO-1 and HOMO-2 lead to emission of a hydrogen atom. The time-dependent angular distribution and the initial rotational temperature of the molecules are also obtained from the same analysis. This work was supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy.

  7. Probing different regimes of strong field light-matter interaction with semiconductor quantum dots and few cavity photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargart, F.; Roy-Choudhury, K.; John, T.; Portalupi, S. L.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Hughes, S.; Michler, P.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we present an extensive experimental and theoretical investigation of different regimes of strong field light-matter interaction for cavity-driven quantum dot (QD) cavity systems. The electric field enhancement inside a high-Q micropillar cavity facilitates exceptionally strong interaction with few cavity photons, enabling the simultaneous investigation for a wide range of QD-laser detuning. In case of a resonant drive, the formation of dressed states and a Mollow triplet sideband splitting of up to 45 μeV is measured for a mean cavity photon number ≤slant 1. In the asymptotic limit of the linear AC Stark effect we systematically investigate the power and detuning dependence of more than 400 QDs. Some QD-cavity systems exhibit an unexpected anomalous Stark shift, which can be explained by an extended dressed 4-level QD model. We provide a detailed analysis of the QD-cavity systems properties enabling this novel effect. The experimental results are successfully reproduced using a polaron master equation approach for the QD-cavity system, which includes the driving laser field, exciton-cavity and exciton-phonon interactions.

  8. Pure gravity mediation and spontaneous B–L breaking from strong dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaladi S. Babu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In pure gravity mediation (PGM, the most minimal scheme for the mediation of supersymmetry (SUSY breaking to the visible sector, soft masses for the standard model gauginos are generated at one loop rather than via direct couplings to the SUSY-breaking field. In any concrete implementation of PGM, the SUSY-breaking field is therefore required to carry nonzero charge under some global or local symmetry. As we point out in this note, a prime candidate for such a symmetry might be B–L, the Abelian gauge symmetry associated with the difference between baryon number B and lepton number L. The F-term of the SUSY-breaking field then not only breaks SUSY, but also B–L, which relates the respective spontaneous breaking of SUSY and B–L at a fundamental level. As a particularly interesting consequence, we find that the heavy Majorana neutrino mass scale ends up being tied to the gravitino mass, ΛN∼m3/2. Assuming nonthermal leptogenesis to be responsible for the generation of the baryon asymmetry of the universe, this connection may then explain why SUSY necessarily needs to be broken at a rather high energy scale, so that m3/2≳1000 TeV in accord with the concept of PGM. We illustrate our idea by means of a minimal model of dynamical SUSY breaking, in which B–L is identified as a weakly gauged flavor symmetry. We also discuss the effect of the B–L gauge dynamics on the superparticle mass spectrum as well as the resulting constraints on the parameter space of our model. In particular, we comment on the role of the B–L D-term.

  9. Direction of Amygdala-Neocortex Interaction During Dynamic Facial Expression Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Wataru; Kochiyama, Takanori; Uono, Shota; Yoshikawa, Sakiko; Toichi, Motomi

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic facial expressions of emotion strongly elicit multifaceted emotional, perceptual, cognitive, and motor responses. Neuroimaging studies revealed that some subcortical (e.g., amygdala) and neocortical (e.g., superior temporal sulcus and inferior frontal gyrus) brain regions and their functional interaction were involved in processing dynamic facial expressions. However, the direction of the functional interaction between the amygdala and the neocortex remains unknown. To investigate this issue, we re-analyzed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from 2 studies and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data from 1 study. First, a psychophysiological interaction analysis of the fMRI data confirmed the functional interaction between the amygdala and neocortical regions. Then, dynamic causal modeling analysis was used to compare models with forward, backward, or bidirectional effective connectivity between the amygdala and neocortical networks in the fMRI and MEG data. The results consistently supported the model of effective connectivity from the amygdala to the neocortex. Further increasing time-window analysis of the MEG demonstrated that this model was valid after 200 ms from the stimulus onset. These data suggest that emotional processing in the amygdala rapidly modulates some neocortical processing, such as perception, recognition, and motor mimicry, when observing dynamic facial expressions of emotion. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Three-dimensional interactive Molecular Dynamics program for the study of defect dynamics in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patriarca, M.; Kuronen, A.; Robles, M.; Kaski, K.

    2007-01-01

    difficult to detect and track even within numerical experiments, especially when one is interested in studying their dynamical properties and time evolution. Furthermore, traditional simulation methods require the storage of a huge amount of data which in turn may imply a long work for their analysis. Method of solution:Simplifications of the simulation work described above strongly depend also on the computer performance. It has now become possible to realize some of such simplifications thanks to the real possibility of using interactive programs. The solution proposed here is based on the development of an interactive graphical simulation program both for avoiding large storage of data and the subsequent elaboration and analysis as well as for visualizing and tracking many phenomena inside three-dimensional samples. However, the full computational power of traditional simulation programs may not be available in general in programs with graphical user interfaces, due to their interactive nature. Nevertheless interactive programs can still be very useful for detecting processes difficult to visualize, restricting the range or making a fine tuning of the parameters, and tailoring the faster programs toward precise targets. Restrictions on the complexity of the problem:The restrictions on the applicability of the program are related to the computer resources available. The graphical interface and interactivity demand computational resources that depend on the particular numerical simulation to be performed. To preserve a balance between speed and resources, the choice of the number of atoms to be simulated is critical. With an average current computer, simulations of systems with more than 10 5 atoms may not be easily feasible on an interactive scheme. Another restriction is related to the fact that the program was originally designed to simulate systems in the solid phase, so that problems in the simulation may occur if some particular physical quantities are computed

  11. Dynamical mean-field theory and path integral renormalisation group calculations of strongly correlated electronic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilmann, D.B.

    2007-02-15

    The two-plane HUBBARD model, which is a model for some electronic properties of undoped YBCO superconductors as well as displays a MOTT metal-to-insulator transition and a metal-to-band insulator transition, is studied within Dynamical Mean-Field Theory using HIRSCH-FYE Monte Carlo. In order to find the different transitions and distinguish the types of insulator, we calculate the single-particle spectral densities, the self-energies and the optical conductivities. We conclude that there is a continuous transition from MOTT to band insulator. In the second part, ground state properties of a diagonally disordered HUBBARD model is studied using a generalisation of Path Integral Renormalisation Group, a variational method which can also determine low-lying excitations. In particular, the distribution of antiferromagnetic properties is investigated. We conclude that antiferromagnetism breaks down in a percolation-type transition at a critical disorder, which is not changed appreciably by the inclusion of correlation effects, when compared to earlier studies. Electronic and excitation properties at the system sizes considered turn out to primarily depend on the geometry. (orig.)

  12. Probing Sub-GeV Mass Strongly Interacting Dark Matter with a Low-Threshold Surface Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jonathan H

    2017-11-24

    Using data from the ν-cleus detector, based on the surface of Earth, we place constraints on dark matter in the form of strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs) which interact with nucleons via nuclear-scale cross sections. For large SIMP-nucleon cross sections, the sensitivity of traditional direct dark matter searches using underground experiments is limited by the energy loss experienced by SIMPs, due to scattering with the rock overburden and experimental shielding on their way to the detector apparatus. Hence, a surface-based experiment is ideal for a SIMP search, despite the much larger background resulting from the lack of shielding. We show using data from a recent surface run of a low-threshold cryogenic detector that values of the SIMP-nucleon cross section up to approximately 10^{-27}  cm^{2} can be excluded for SIMPs with masses above 100 MeV.

  13. Spray characterization and droplet interactions study using particle dynamic analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurteri, C. U.; Kadambi, Jaikrishnan R.; Arik, Engin B.

    1993-08-01

    Nozzles are utilized in atomizing liquids in many industrial and domestic applications. Examples include domestic and industrial heating units (furnaces and boilers), internal combustion engines, agricultural spraying, spray painting, etc. To improve atomizer design, it is necessary to obtain spray characteristics which include the simultaneous droplet size and velocity information. Also droplet interactions in the dense spray region affect the characteristics. Interacting spray configurations are also encountered in many industrial applications and lead to direct interactions among the droplets. The Particle Dynamic Analyzer which utilizes a combination of Laser Doppler Anemometry and Phase Doppler Interferometry to simultaneously measure droplet velocity and diameter was used to study (1) the spray characteristics of Delavan nozzles and (2) the interaction between two sprays. The results of the tests are discussed in this paper.

  14. Pump-probe reflectivity study of ultrafast dynamics of strongly correlated 5f electrons inUO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Au, Yongqiang Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Durakiewicz, Tomasz [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    5f electrons in the Mott insulator UO{sub 2} produce intriguing electronic states and dynamics, such as strong correlation and f-f excitations. We have performed femtosecond pump-probe reflectivity measurements on a single crystal UO{sub 2} at temperatures 5-300 K to study the ultrafast dynamics of photoexcited 5f electrons. The laser pulses at 400 nm pump 5 f electrons across the Mott gap, while those at 800 nm probe the pump-induced change of reflectivity. We find temperature-dependent excitation and relaxation processes and long-lived acoustic phonons, and extract picosecond risetimes and microsecond relaxation times at low temperatures. The observed slow relaxation is ascribed to the decay of Hubbard excitons formed by U{sup 3+}-U{sup 5+} pairs.

  15. Revisiting the monster: the mass profile of the galaxy cluster Abell 3827 using dynamical and strong lensing constrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo Carrasco Damele, Eleazar; Verdugo, Tomas

    2018-01-01

    The galaxy cluster Abell 3827 is one of the most massive clusters know at z ≦ 0.1 (Richness class 2, BM typeI, X-ray LX = 2.4 x 1044 erg s-1). The Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) in Abell 3827 is perhaps the most extreme example of ongoing galaxy cannibalism. The multi-component BCG hosts the stellar remnants nuclei of at least four bright elliptical galaxies embedded in a common assymetric halo extended up to 15 kpc. The most notorious characteristic of the BCG is the existence of a unique strong gravitational lens system located within the inner 15 kpc region. A mass estimation of the galaxy based on strong lensing model was presented in Carrasco et al (2010, ApJL, 715, 160). Moreover, the exceptional strong lensing lens system in Abell 3827 and the location of the four bright galaxies has been used to measure for the first time small physical separations between dark and ordinary matter (Williams et al. 2011, MNRAS, 415, 448, Massey et al. 2015, MNRAS, 449, 3393). In this contribution, we present a detailed strong lensing and dynamical analysis of the cluster Abell 3827 based on spectroscopic redshift of the lensed features and from ~70 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies inside 0.5 x 0.5 Mpc from the cluster center.

  16. Dynamics of Entangled Polymers: Role of Attractive Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grest, Gary S.; Koski, Jason

    The coupled dynamics of entangled polymers, which span broad time and length scales, govern their unique viscoelastic properties. Numerical simulations of highly coarse grained models are often used to follow chain mobility from the intermediate Rouse and reptation regimes to the late time diffusive regime. In these models, purely repulsive interactions between monomers are typically used because it is less computationally expensive than including attractive interactions. The effect of including the attractive interaction on the local and macroscopic properties of entangled polymer melts is explored over a wide temperature range using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. Attractive interactions are shown to have little effect on the local packing for all temperatures T and chain mobility for T higher than about twice the glass transition Tg. For lower T, the attractive interactions play a significant role, reducing the chain mobility compared to the repulsive case. As T approaches Tg breakdown of time-temperature superposition for the stress autocorrelation function is observed. Sandia National Labs is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U.S. Dept of Energy under Contract No. DEAC04-94AL85000.

  17. Evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aming; Broom, Mark; Du, Jinming; Wang, Long

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of populations is influenced by many factors, and the simple classical models have been developed in a number of important ways. Both population structure and multiplayer interactions have been shown to significantly affect the evolution of important properties, such as the level of cooperation or of aggressive behavior. Here we combine these two key factors and develop the evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations represented by regular graphs. The traditional linear and threshold public goods games are adopted as models to address the dynamics. We show that for linear group interactions, population structure can favor the evolution of cooperation compared to the well-mixed case, and we see that the more neighbors there are, the harder it is for cooperators to persist in structured populations. We further show that threshold group interactions could lead to the emergence of cooperation even in well-mixed populations. Here population structure sometimes inhibits cooperation for the threshold public goods game, where depending on the benefit to cost ratio, the outcomes are bistability or a monomorphic population of defectors or cooperators. Our results suggest, counterintuitively, that structured populations are not always beneficial for the evolution of cooperation for nonlinear group interactions.

  18. Introduction to weak interaction theories with dynamical symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, K.D.; Peskin, M.E.

    1980-07-01

    A straightforward introduction to theories of the weak interactions with dynamical symmetry breaking-theories of technicolor or hypercolor is presented. The intent is to inform experimentalists, but also to goad theorists. The motivation for considering theories of this type is described. The structure that such a theory must possess, including new gauge interactions at mass scales of 1-100 TeV is then outlined. Despite their reliance on phenomena at such enormous energies, these theories contain new phenomena observable at currently accessible energies. Three such effects which are especially likely to be observed are described.

  19. Optical pulling and pushing forces exerted on silicon nanospheres with strong coherent interaction between electric and magnetic resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongfeng; Panmai, Mingcheng; Peng, Yuanyuan; Lan, Sheng

    2017-05-29

    We investigated theoretically and numerically the optical pulling and pushing forces acting on silicon (Si) nanospheres (NSs) with strong coherent interaction between electric and magnetic resonances. We examined the optical pulling and pushing forces exerted on Si NSs by two interfering waves and revealed the underlying physical mechanism from the viewpoint of electric- and magnetic-dipole manipulation. As compared with a polystyrene (PS) NS, it was found that the optical pulling force for a Si NS with the same size is enlarged by nearly two orders of magnitude. In addition to the optical pulling force appearing at the long-wavelength side of the magnetic dipole resonance, very large optical pushing force is observed at the magnetic quadrupole resonance. The correlation between the optical pulling/pushing force and the directional scattering characterized by the ratio of the forward to backward scattering was revealed. More interestingly, it was found that the high-order electric and magnetic resonances in large Si NSs play an important role in producing optical pulling force which can be generated by not only s-polarized wave but also p-polarized one. Our finding indicates that the strong coherent interaction between the electric and magnetic resonances existing in nanoparticles with large refractive indices can be exploited to manipulate the optical force acting on them and the correlation between the optical force and the directional scattering can be used as guidance. The engineering and manipulation of optical forces will find potential applications in the trapping, transport and sorting of nanoparticles.

  20. Effective Dynamics of Microorganisms That Interact with Their Own Trail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, W. Till; Gelimson, Anatolij; Zhao, Kun; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Golestanian, Ramin

    2016-07-01

    Like ants, some microorganisms are known to leave trails on surfaces to communicate. We explore how trail-mediated self-interaction could affect the behavior of individual microorganisms when diffusive spreading of the trail is negligible on the time scale of the microorganism using a simple phenomenological model for an actively moving particle and a finite-width trail. The effective dynamics of each microorganism takes on the form of a stochastic integral equation with the trail interaction appearing in the form of short-term memory. For a moderate coupling strength below an emergent critical value, the dynamics exhibits effective diffusion in both orientation and position after a phase of superdiffusive reorientation. We report experimental verification of a seemingly counterintuitive perpendicular alignment mechanism that emerges from the model.

  1. A Numerical Study on Hydrodynamic Interactions between Dynamic Positioning Thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Doo Hwa; Lee, Sang Wook [University of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this study, we conducted computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for the unsteady hydrodynamic interaction of multiple thrusters by solving Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. A commercial CFD software, STAR-CCM+ was used for all simulations by employing a ducted thruster model with combination of a propeller and No. 19a duct. A sliding mesh technique was used to treat dynamic motion of propeller rotation and non-conformal hexahedral grid system was considered. Four different combinations in tilting and azimuth angles of the thrusters were considered to investigate the effects on the propulsion performance. We could find that thruster-hull and thruster-thruster interactions has significant effect on propulsion performance and further study will be required for the optimal configurations with the best tilting and relative azimuth angle between thrusters.

  2. Fluid-Solid Interaction and Multiscale Dynamic Processes: Experimental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra; Spina, Laura; Mendo-Pérez, Gerardo M.; Guzmán-Vázquez, Enrique; Scheu, Bettina; Sánchez-Sesma, Francisco J.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-04-01

    The speed and the style of a pressure drop in fluid-filled conduits determines the dynamics of multiscale processes and the elastic interaction between the fluid and the confining solid. To observe this dynamics we performed experiments using fluid-filled transparent tubes (15-50 cm long, 2-4 cm diameter and 0.3-1 cm thickness) instrumented with high-dynamic piezoelectric sensors and filmed the evolution of these processes with a high speed camera. We analyzed the response of Newtonian fluids to slow and sudden pressure drops from 3 bar-10 MPa to ambient pressure. We used fluids with viscosities of mafic to intermediate silicate melts of 1 to 1000 Pa s and water. The processes observed are fluid mass expansion, fluid flow, jets, bubbles nucleation, growth, coalescence and collapse, degassing, foam building at the surface and vertical wagging. All these processes (in fine and coarse scales) are triggered by the pressure drop and are sequentially coupled in time while interacting with the solid. During slow decompression, the multiscale processes are recognized occurring within specific pressure intervals, and exhibit a localized distribution along the conduit. In this, degassing predominates near the surface and may present piston-like oscillations. In contrast, during sudden decompression the fluid-flow reaches higher velocities, the dynamics is dominated by a sequence of gas-packet pulses driving jets of the gas-fluid mixture. The evolution of this multiscale phenomenon generates complex non-stationary microseismic signals recorded along the conduit. We discuss distinctive characteristics of these signals depending on the decompression style and compare them with synthetics. These synthetics are obtained numerically under an averaging modeling scheme, that accounted for the stress-strain of the cyclic dynamic interaction between the fluid and the solid wall, assuming an incompressible and viscous fluid that flows while the elastic solid responds oscillating

  3. Dynamic fluctuations of protein-carbohydrate interactions promote protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Voynov

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein-carbohydrate interactions are important for glycoprotein structure and function. Antibodies of the IgG class, with increasing significance as therapeutics, are glycosylated at a conserved site in the constant Fc region. We hypothesized that disruption of protein-carbohydrate interactions in the glycosylated domain of antibodies leads to the exposure of aggregation-prone motifs. Aggregation is one of the main problems in protein-based therapeutics because of immunogenicity concerns and decreased efficacy. To explore the significance of intramolecular interactions between aromatic amino acids and carbohydrates in the IgG glycosylated domain, we utilized computer simulations, fluorescence analysis, and site-directed mutagenesis. We find that the surface exposure of one aromatic amino acid increases due to dynamic fluctuations. Moreover, protein-carbohydrate interactions decrease upon stress, while protein-protein and carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions increase. Substitution of the carbohydrate-interacting aromatic amino acids with non-aromatic residues leads to a significantly lower stability than wild type, and to compromised binding to Fc receptors. Our results support a mechanism for antibody aggregation via decreased protein-carbohydrate interactions, leading to the exposure of aggregation-prone regions, and to aggregation.

  4. Dynamic Soil-Pile Interaction for large diameter monopile foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zania, Varvara

    2013-01-01

    so far driven by their dynamic performance. The excitation frequencies are imposed by the rotation of the rotor, hence they are lumped close to the rotation frequency of the rotor (1P) and the lower blade multiples (2P, 3P). The prevailing design concepts originate from an ‘avoidance of resonance...... of the study is to analyse the dynamic interaction of the soil and a single pile embedded in it by accounting for the geometric and stiffness properties of the pile. In doing so, a semi – analytical approach is adopted based on the fundamental solution of horizontal pile vibration by Novak and Nogami (1977......). The dynamic impedance functions of the monopile foundation are obtained for varying soil conditions and it is shown that the first eigenfrequency of the soil layer controls the reduction of the stiffness and the increase of the radiation damping induced by the vibration of the monopile. Higher...

  5. Flight Dynamic Simulation with Nonlinear Aeroelastic Interaction using the ROM-ROM Procedure Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology, Inc. proposes to develop an integrated flight dynamics simulation capability with nonlinear aeroelastic interactions by combining a flight dynamics...

  6. Research on quasi-cw and pulse interaction of strong laser radiation with the military technical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycyk, Antoni; CzyŻ, Krzysztof; Sarzyński, Antoni; Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech; Ostrowski, Roman; Strzelec, Marek; Jach, Karol; Świerczyński, Robert

    2016-12-01

    The paper describes work connected to the investigation of the interaction of strong laser radiation with selected metals, constituting typical materials applied in military technology, like aluminum, copper, brass and titanium. A special laser experimental stand was designed and constructed to achieve this objective. The system consisted of two Nd:YAG lasers working in the regime of free generation (quasi-cw) and another Nd:YAG laser, generating short pre-pulses in the Qswitching regime. During the concurrent operation of both quasi-cw systems it was possible to obtain pulse energies amounting to 10 J in a time period (pulses) of 1 ms. The synchronized, serial operation resulted in energy amounting to 5 J over a time period (pulse) of 2 ms. Variations of the target's surface reflection coefficient, caused by the interaction of short pre-pulses with high power density were determined. The experiments were performed using a standard Nd:YAG laser with amplifiers, generating output pulses whose duration amounted to 10 ns and energy to 1 J, with near Gaussian profile. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze the emission spectra of targets under the conditions of the interaction of destructive strong and weak as well as long and short excitation laser pulses. A decay of the spectra in the UV range from 200 to around 350 nm was observed when irradiating the target with a long, quasi-cw destructive pulse. Moreover, in the case of an Al target, some AlO molecular spectra appeared, suggesting a chemical reaction of the aluminum atoms with oxygen.

  7. Eight supramolecular assemblies constructed from bis(benzimidazole) and organic acids through strong classical hydrogen bonding and weak noncovalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shouwen; Wang, Daqi

    2014-05-01

    Eight crystalline organic acid-base adducts derived from alkane bridged bis(N-benzimidazole) and organic acids (2,4,6-trinitrophenol, p-nitrobenzoic acid, m-nitrobenzoic acid, 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 5-sulfosalicylic acid and oxalic acid) were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. Of the eight compounds five are organic salts (1, 4, 6, 7 and 8) and the other three (2, 3, and 5) are cocrystals. In all of the adducts except 1 and 8, the ratio of the acid and the base is 2:1. All eight supramolecular assemblies involve extensive intermolecular classical hydrogen bonds as well as other noncovalent interactions. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is ascertained. These weak interactions combined, all the complexes displayed 3D framework structure. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the classical N+-H⋯O-, O-H⋯O, and O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds (ionic or neutral) and other nonbonding associations between acids and ditopic benzimidazoles are sufficient to bring about the formation of cocrystals or organic salts.

  8. Dynamic interactions among badgers: implications for sociality and disease transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Monika; Palphramand, Kate L; Newton-Cross, Geraldine; Hutchings, Michael R; White, Piran C L

    2008-07-01

    1. Direct interactions between individuals play an important part in the sociality of group-living animals, their mating system and disease transmission. Here, we devise a methodology to quantify relative rates of proximity interaction from radio-tracking data and highlight potential asymmetries within the contact network of a moderate-density badger population in the north-east of England. 2. We analysed radio-tracking data from four contiguous social groups, collected over a 3-year period. Dynamic interaction analysis of badger dyads was used to assess the movement of individuals in relation to the movement of others, both within and between social groups. Dyads were assessed with regard to season, sex, age and sett use pattern of the badgers involved. 3. Intragroup separation distances were significantly shorter than intergroup separation distances, and interactions between groups were rare. Within groups, individuals interacted with each other more often than expected, and interaction patterns varied significantly with season and sett use pattern. Non-mover dyads (using the main sett for day-resting on > 50% of occasions) interacted more frequently than mover dyads (using an outlier sett for day-resting on > 50% of occasions) or mover-non-mover dyads. Interactions between group members occurred most frequently in winter. 4. Of close intragroup interactions (sociality and support the suggestion that badger social groups are comprised of different subgroups, in our case based on differential sett use patterns. 5. Asymmetries in contact structure within a population will affect the way in which diseases are transmitted through a social network. Assessment of these networks is essential for understanding the persistence and spread of disease within populations which do not mix freely or which exhibit heterogeneities in their spatial or social behaviour.

  9. Monitoring peptide-surface interaction by means of molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonella, Marco, E-mail: mnonella@pci.uzh.ch [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Seeger, Stefan, E-mail: sseeger@pci.uzh.ch [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-12-09

    Graphical abstract: Protein-surface interactions play a crucial role in a wide field of research areas like biology, biotechnology, or pharmacology. Only recently, it has been shown that not only peptide adsorption represents an important process but also spreading and clustering of adsorbed proteins. By means of classical molecular dynamics, peptide adsorption as well as the dynamics of adsorbed peptides have been investigated in order to gain deeper insight into such processes. The picture shows a snapshot of an adsorbed peptide on a silica surface showing strong direct hydrogen bonding. Research highlights: {yields} Simulation of peptide surface interaction. {yields} Dynamics of hydrogen bond formation and destruction. {yields} Internal flexibility of adsorbed peptides. - Abstract: Protein adsorption and protein surface interactions have become an important research topic in recent years. Very recently, for example, it has been shown that protein clusters can undergo a surface-induced spreading after adsorption. Such phenomena emphasize the need of a more detailed insight into protein-silica interaction at an atomic level. Therefore, we have studied a model system consisting of a short peptide, a silica slab, and water molecules by means of classical molecular dynamics simulations. The study reveals that, besides of electrostatic interactions caused by the chosen charge distribution, the peptide interacts with the silica surface through formation of direct peptide-surface hydrogen bonds as well as indirect peptide-water-surface hydrogen bonds. The number of created hydrogen bonds varies considerably among the simulated structures. The strength of hydrogen bonding determines the mobility of the peptide on the surface and the internal flexibility of the adsorbed peptide.

  10. Dynamics and interactions of particles in a thermophoretic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Benjamin; Fung, Frankie; Fieweger, Connor; Usatyuk, Mykhaylo; Gaj, Anita; DeSalvo, B. J.; Chin, Cheng

    2017-08-01

    We investigate dynamics and interactions of particles levitated and trapped by the thermophoretic force in a vacuum cell. Our analysis is based on footage taken by orthogonal cameras that are able to capture the three dimensional trajectories of the particles. In contrast to spherical particles, which remain stationary at the center of the cell, here we report new qualitative features of the motion of particles with non-spherical geometry. Singly levitated particles exhibit steady spinning around their body axis and rotation around the symmetry axis of the cell. When two levitated particles approach each other, repulsive or attractive interactions between the particles are observed. Our levitation system offers a wonderful platform to study interaction between particles in a microgravity environment.

  11. An Aspect of Dynamic Human-structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    on the structure) influence the dynamic behaviour and modal characteristics of the structure carrying them, whether being a grandstand, an office floor or similar. However, the interaction between the stationary humans and the structure is generally not well understood, and the paper addresses this interaction......It is known that humans and structures interact. Humans can cause structures to vibrate, and excessive vibrations may occur if the motion frequency of humans coincides with a resonant frequency of the structural system. It is also known that stationary humans (such as humans sitting or standing....... Focus is on how modal characteristics of the structure, i.e. its frequency and damping, are influenced by the presence of stationary humans. Vertical vibrations are considered, and particular focus is given the influence of human posture on modal characteristics of the supporting structure. Insight...

  12. Low genetic diversity and strong but shallow population differentiation suggests genetic homogenization by metapopulation dynamics in a social spider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settepani, V; Bechsgaard, J; Bilde, T

    2014-12-01

    Mating systems and population dynamics influence genetic diversity and structure. Species that experience inbreeding and limited gene flow are expected to evolve isolated, divergent genetic lineages. Metapopulation dynamics with frequent extinctions and colonizations may, on the other hand, deplete and homogenize genetic variation, if extinction rate is sufficiently high compared to the effect of drift in local demes. We investigated these theoretical predictions empirically in social spiders that are highly inbred. Social spiders show intranest mating, female-biased sex ratio, and frequent extinction and colonization events, factors that deplete genetic diversity within nests and populations and limit gene flow. We characterized population genetic structure in Stegodyphus sarasinorum, a social spider distributed across the Indian subcontinent. Species-wide genetic diversity was estimated over approximately 2800 km from Sri Lanka to Himalayas, by sequencing 16 protein-coding nuclear loci. We found 13 SNPs in 6592 bp (π = 0.00045) indicating low species-wide nucleotide diversity. Three genetic lineages were strongly differentiated; however, only one fixed difference among them suggests recent divergence. This is consistent with a scenario of metapopulation dynamics that homogenizes genetic diversity across the species' range. Ultimately, low standing genetic variation may hamper a species' ability to track environmental change and render social inbreeding spiders 'evolutionary dead-ends'. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  13. <strong>Driving forces behind the increasing cardiovascular treatment intensity.A dynamic epidemiologic model of trends in Danish cardiovascular drug utilization.strong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Andersen, Morten

    -state (untreated, treated, dead) semi-Markov model to analyse the dynamics of drug use. Transitions were from untreated to treated (incidence), the reverse (discontinuation), and from either untreated or treated to dead. Stratified by sex and age categories, prevalence trends of "growth driving" drug categories...

  14. Three-dimensional electromagnetic strong turbulence: Dependence of the statistics and dynamics of strong turbulence on the electron to ion temperature ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, D. B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Skjaeraasen, O.; Robinson, P. A.

    2012-02-01

    The temperature ratio Ti/Te of ions to electrons affects both the ion-damping rate and the ion-acoustic speed in plasmas. The effects of changing the ion-damping rate and ion-acoustic speed are investigated for electrostatic strong turbulence and electromagnetic strong turbulence in three dimensions. When ion damping is strong, density wells relax in place and act as nucleation sites for the formation of new wave packets. In this case, the density perturbations are primarily density wells supported by the ponderomotive force. For weak ion damping, corresponding to low Ti/Te, ion-acoustic waves are launched radially outwards when wave packets dissipate at burnout, thereby increasing the level of density perturbations in the system and thus raising the level of scattering of Langmuir waves off density perturbations. Density wells no longer relax in place so renucleation at recent collapse sites no longer occurs, instead wave packets form in background low density regions, such as superpositions of troughs of propagating ion-acoustic waves. This transition is found to occur at Ti/Te ≈ 0.1. The change in behavior with Ti/Te is shown to change the bulk statistical properties, scaling behavior, spectra, and field statistics of strong turbulence. For Ti/Te>rsim0.1, the electrostatic results approach the predictions of the two-component model of Robinson and Newman, and good agreement is found for Ti/Te>rsim0.15.

  15. Interspecies interactions are an integral determinant of microbial community dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Azwani Abdul Aziz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the factor that the determine the dynamics of bacterial communities in a complex system using multidisciplinary methods. Since real and engineered microbial ecosystems are too complex, six types of synthetic microbial ecosystems (SMEs were constructed under chemostat conditions with phenol as the sole carbon and energy source. 2-4 phenol-degrading, phylogenetically and physiologically different bacterial strains were used in each SEM. Phylogeny was based on the nucleotide sequence of 16S rRNA genes, while physiologic traits were based on kinetic and growth parameters on phenol. Two metrics, J parameter and ‘complex interaction’, were compared to predict which strain would become dominant in a SME. The J parameter is calculated from kinetic and growth parameters, whereas ‘complex interaction’, which was developed here, evaluated bacterial community dynamics by measuring specific growth activity as affected by the other strains. The specific growth activity was calculated as the proportion of growth activity under the presence of supernatant compared to control conditions. Population densities of strains used in SMEs were enumerated by real-time PCR targeting the gene encoding the large subunit of phenol hydroxylase and were compared to predictions made from J parameter and complex interaction calculations. In 4 of 6 SEMs tested the final dominant strain shown by real-time PCR analyses coincided with the strain predicted by both the J parameter and the complex interaction. However, in SMEII-2 and SMEII-3 the final dominant Variovorax strains coincided with prediction of the complex interaction but not the J parameter. These results demonstrate that the effects of complex interactions within microbial communities contribute to determining the dynamics of the microbial ecosystem.

  16. Optimal Passive Dynamics for Physical Interaction: Catching a Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Kemper

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available For manipulation tasks in uncertain environments, intentionally designed series impedance in mechanical systems can provide significant benefits that cannot be achieved in software. Traditionally, the design of actuated systems revolves around sizing torques, speeds, and control strategies without considering the system’s passive dynamics. However, the passive dynamics of the mechanical system, including inertia, stiffness, and damping along with other parameters such as torque and stroke limits often impose performance limitations that cannot be overcome with software control. In this paper, we develop relationships between an actuator’s passive dynamics and the resulting performance for the purpose of better understanding how to tune the passive dynamics for catching an unexpected object. We use a mathematically optimal controller subject to force limitations to stop the incoming object without breaking contact and bouncing. The use of an optimal controller is important so that our results directly reflect the physical system’s performance. We analytically calculate the maximum velocity that can be caught by a realistic actuator with limitations such as force and stroke limits. The results show that in order to maximize the velocity of an object that can be caught without exceeding the actuator’s torque and stroke limits, a soft spring along with a strong damper will be desired.

  17. Distribution of level populations for a three-level system in resonance interaction with three strong fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanov, Victor P.; Maltseva, Julia V.

    2000-01-01

    A stationary distribution of populations in a three-level quantum system interacting with three intense monochromatic fields resonant to two allowed and one forbidden transition is determined for three possible configurations of the considered system. The obtained algebraic expressions for populations of levels are exact within the frameworks of RWA and dependent on the phases of fields even in the limit of strong field intensities. The latter circumstance causes the absorption line profile to be noisy due to random phase modulation of fields. The sets of parameters of the system and field are founded at which the populations of all the levels are equal to 1/3 also with the regions where a resonance-like dependence of level populations on the difference of field phases takes place.

  18. A Phenomenological Equation of State of Strongly Interacting Matter with First-Order Phase Transitions and Critical Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Typel, Stefan; Blaschke, David

    2018-02-01

    An extension of the relativistic density functional approach to the equation of state for strongly interacting matter is suggested which generalizes a recently developed modified excluded-volume mechanism to the case of temperature and density dependent available-volume fractions. A parametrisation of this dependence is presented for which at low temperatures and suprasaturation densities a first-order phase transition is obtained. It changes for increasing temperatures to a crossover transition via a critical endpoint. This provides a benchmark case for studies of the role of such a point in hydrodynamic simulations of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. The approach is thermodynamically consistent and extendable to finite isospin asymmetries that are relevant for simulations of neutron stars, their mergers and core-collapse supernova explosions.

  19. <strong>The NA+/K+-ATPase controls gap junctions via membrane microdomain interactions in rat smooth muscles.strong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matchkov, Vladimir; Nilsson, Holger; Aalkjær, Christian

    of these interactions, while other responses may be independent of pumping activity. The Na+/K+-pump differs from other P-type ATPases by its sensitivity to cardiotonic steroids such as ouabain. However, rodent tissues express both ouabain-insensitive (α1) and ouabain-sensitive (α2 and α3) isoforms of Na...... in rat mesenteric small arteries. Paired cultured rat smooth muscle cells (A7r5) were used as a model for electrical coupling of SMC by measuring membrane capacitance (Cm). PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to identify the membrane transporters. SMCs were uncoupled (evaluated...

  20. Dynamic Plant-Plant-Herbivore Interactions Govern Plant Growth-Defence Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jorad; Evers, Jochem B; Poelman, Erik H

    2017-04-01

    Plants downregulate their defences against insect herbivores upon impending competition for light. This has long been considered a resource trade-off, but recent advances in plant physiology and ecology suggest this mechanism is more complex. Here we propose that to understand why plants regulate and balance growth and defence, the complex dynamics in plant-plant competition and plant-herbivore interactions needs to be considered. Induced growth-defence responses affect plant competition and herbivore colonisation in space and time, which has consequences for the adaptive value of these responses. Assessing these complex interactions strongly benefits from advanced modelling tools that can model multitrophic interactions in space and time. Such an exercise will allow a critical re-evaluation why and how plants integrate defence and competition for light. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The interaction of cannibalism and omnivory: consequences for community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Volker H W

    2007-11-01

    Although cannibalism is ubiquitous in food webs and frequent in systems where a predator and its prey also share a common resource (intraguild predation, IGP), its impacts on species interactions and the dynamics and structure of communities are still poorly understood. In addition, the few existing studies on cannibalism have generally focused on cannibalism in the top-predator, ignoring that it is frequent at intermediate trophic levels. A set of structured models shows that cannibalism can completely alter the dynamics and structure of three-species IGP systems depending on the trophic position where cannibalism occurs. Contrary to the expectations of simple models, the IG predator can exploit the resources more efficiently when it is cannibalistic, enabling the predator to persist at lower resource densities than the IG prey. Cannibalism in the IG predator can also alter the effect of enrichment, preventing predator-mediated extinction of the IG prey at high productivities predicted by simple models. Cannibalism in the IG prey can reverse the effect of top-down cascades, leading to an increase in the resource with decreasing IG predator density. These predictions are consistent with current data. Overall, cannibalism promotes the coexistence of the IG predator and IG prey. These results indicate that including cannibalism in current models can overcome the discrepancy between theory and empirical data. Thus, we need to measure and account for cannibalistic interactions to reliably predict the structure and dynamics of communities.

  2. A strong genetic correlation underlying a behavioural syndrome disappears during development because of genotype-age interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Class, Barbara; Brommer, Jon E

    2015-06-22

    In animal populations, as in humans, behavioural differences between individuals that are consistent over time and across contexts are considered to reflect personality, and suites of correlated behaviours expressed by individuals are known as behavioural syndromes. Lifelong stability of behavioural syndromes is often assumed, either implicitly or explicitly. Here, we use a quantitative genetic approach to study the developmental stability of a behavioural syndrome in a wild population of blue tits. We find that a behavioural syndrome formed by a strong genetic correlation of two personality traits in nestlings disappears in adults, and we demonstrate that genotype-age interaction is the likely mechanism underlying this change during development. A behavioural syndrome may hence change during organismal development, even when personality traits seem to be strongly physiologically or functionally linked in one age group. We outline how such developmental plasticity has important ramifications for understanding the mechanistic basis as well as the evolutionary consequences of behavioural syndromes. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Unveiling protein functions through the dynamics of the interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Sendiña-Nadal

    Full Text Available Protein interaction networks have become a tool to study biological processes, either for predicting molecular functions or for designing proper new drugs to regulate the main biological interactions. Furthermore, such networks are known to be organized in sub-networks of proteins contributing to the same cellular function. However, the protein function prediction is not accurate and each protein has traditionally been assigned to only one function by the network formalism. By considering the network of the physical interactions between proteins of the yeast together with a manual and single functional classification scheme, we introduce a method able to reveal important information on protein function, at both micro- and macro-scale. In particular, the inspection of the properties of oscillatory dynamics on top of the protein interaction network leads to the identification of misclassification problems in protein function assignments, as well as to unveil correct identification of protein functions. We also demonstrate that our approach can give a network representation of the meta-organization of biological processes by unraveling the interactions between different functional classes.

  4. Retraction With Face Saving: modelling conversational interaction through dynamic hypermedia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bolognesi

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes RWFS (Retraction With Face Saving, a hypermedia application which models an interview between a lawyer and his client - a lorry driver - facing court charges of reckless driving. At one level RWFS takes the form of a sophisticated game in which different outcomes to the interview are possible according to the learner's degree of skill. At another level, RWFS is designed to encourage the language learner's awareness and understanding of the pragmatic features of conversation. RWFS runs on HyperContext, a hybrid hypertextlexpert system developed in Pavia by two of the authors, Marco Piastra and Roberto Bolognesi, and which supports dynamic hypermedia units. HyperContext's dynamic linking capacity plays a vital role in simulating significant conversational features such as the conditioning of a current move in the conversation by information acquired much earlier in the course of the interview. In this connection, the paper discusses the contribution of RMCI (Re-usable Model of Conversational Interaction, a re-usable application-independent applied model of interaction on which the game is based, and which links a tactical level (the conversation to a metalevel which provides a moveby- move commentary on interactional theory. In its turn, RMCFs metalevel is linked to a strategic level which interprets the structure of the conversation in terms of a pyramid-like hierarchy of increasingly abstract theoretical concepts.

  5. Impact of cannibalism on predator-prey dynamics: size-structured interactions and apparent mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Volker H W

    2008-06-01

    Direct and indirect interactions between two prey species can strongly alter the dynamics of predator-prey systems. Most predators are cannibalistic, and as a consequence, even systems with only one predator and one prey include two prey types: conspecifics and heterospecifics. The effects of the complex direct and indirect interactions that emerge in such cannibalistic systems are still poorly understood. This study examined how the indirect interaction between conspecific and heterospecific prey affects cannibalism and predation rates and how the direct interactions between both species indirectly alter the effect of the cannibalistic predator. I tested for these effects using larvae of the stream salamanders Eurycea cirrigera (prey) and Pseudotriton ruber (cannibalistic predator) by manipulating the relative densities of the conspecific and heterospecific prey in the presence and absence of the predator in experimental streams. The rates of cannibalism and heterospecific predation were proportional to the respective densities and negatively correlated, indicating a positive indirect interaction between conspecific and heterospecific prey, similar to "apparent mutualism." Direct interactions between prey species did not alter the effect of the predator. Although both types of prey showed a similar 30% reduction in night activity and switch in microhabitat use in response to the presence of the predator, cannibalism rates were three times higher than heterospecific predation rates irrespective of the relative densities of the two types of prey. Cumulative predation risks differed even more due to the 48% lower growth rate of conspecific prey. Detailed laboratory experiments suggest that the 3:1 difference in cannibalism and predation rate was due to the higher efficiency of heterospecific prey in escaping immediate attacks. However, no difference was observed when the predator was a closely related salamander species, Gyrinophilus porphyriticus, indicating that

  6. The Dynamic Reactance Interaction - How Vested Interests Affect People's Experience, Behavior, and Cognition in Social Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steindl, Christina; Jonas, Eva

    2015-01-01

    In social interactions, individuals may sometimes pursue their own interests at the expense of their interaction partner. Such self-interested behaviors impose a threat to the interaction partner's freedom to act. The current article investigates this threat in the context of interdependence and reactance theory. We explore how vested interests influence reactance process stages of an advisor-client interaction. We aim to explore the interactional process that evolves. In two studies, participants took the perspective of a doctor (advisor) or a patient (client). In both studies we incorporated a vested interest. In Study 1 (N = 82) we found that in response to a vested interest of their interaction partner, patients indicated a stronger experience of reactance, more aggressive behavioral intentions, and more biased cognitions than doctors. A serial multiple mediation revealed that a vested interest engendered mistrust toward the interaction partner and this mistrust led to an emerging reactance process. Study 2 (N = 207) further demonstrated that doctors expressed their reactance in a subtle way: they revealed a classic confirmation bias when searching for additional information on their preliminary decision preference, indicating stronger defense motivation. We discuss how these findings can help us to understand how social interactions develop dynamically.

  7. Interactions Controlling the Slow Dynamic Conformational Motions of Ubiquitin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichiro Kitazawa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Rational mutation of proteins based on their structural and dynamic characteristics is a useful strategy for amplifying specific fluctuations in proteins. Here, we show the effects of mutation on the conformational fluctuations and thermodynamic stability of ubiquitin. In particular, we focus on the salt bridge between K11 and E34 and the hydrogen bond between I36 and Q41, which are predicted to control the fluctuation between the basic folded state, N1, and the alternatively folded state, N2, of the protein, using high-pressure NMR spectroscopy. The E34A mutation, which disrupts the salt bridge, did not alter picosecond–to–nanosecond, microsecond–to–millisecond dynamic motions, and stability of the protein, while the Q41N mutation, which destabilizes the hydrogen bond, specifically amplified the N1–N2 conformational fluctuation and decreased stability. Based on the observed thermodynamic stabilities of the various conformational states, we showed that in the Q41N mutant, the N1 state is more significantly destabilized than the N2 state, resulting in an increase in the relative population of N2. Identifying the interactions controlling specific motions of a protein will facilitate molecular design to achieve functional dynamics beyond native state dynamics.

  8. Wavelength dependence of sub-laser-cycle few-electron dynamics in strong-field multiple ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrwerth, O; Rudenko, A; Kremer, M; Jesus, V L B de; Fischer, B; Gademann, G; Simeonidis, K; Achtelik, A; Ergler, Th; Feuerstein, B; Schroeter, C D; Moshammer, R; Ullrich, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: Artem.Rudenko@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    2008-02-15

    Recoil-ion momentum distributions for double and triple ionization of Ne and Ar, as well as for double ionization of N{sub 2} molecule by intense (0.3-0.5 PW cm{sup -2}), short ({approx}35-40 fs) laser pulses have been recorded in a so far unexplored long laser-wavelength regime at 1300 nm. Compared to earlier results at 800 nm, the direct (e, ne) ionization pathway during recollision is strongly enhanced manifesting itself in a pronounced double-hump structure in the longitudinal ion momentum spectra not only for Ne, but also surprisingly distinct for Ar and, found for the first time, for molecules. Observed wavelength dependence of the sub-laser-cycle correlated few-electron dynamics might be of paramount importance for possible future applications in attosecond science, in particular, for imaging of ultrafast molecular processes via recollision-induced fragmentation.

  9. Dynamic soil-structure interaction of monopod and polypod foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    2016-01-01

    The paper concerns the importance of through–soil coupling for structures having foundations with more footings. First, a model for dynamic analysis of polypod footings is established in the frequency domain, employing Green’s function for wave propagation in a layered half-space. To allow analysis...... within the time domain, frequency-independent lumped-parameter models are developed. The paper proposes a decision criterion for determination of which components must be included within a lumped-parameter model in order to account for the structure–soil–structure interaction in an adequate and efficient...... manner. As a computational example, the dynamic response of a plane frame structure with two footings is compared for two cases: one with and one without the cross coupling. Homogeneous as well as layered soil is considered....

  10. Vortex dynamics and their interactions in quantum trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisniacki, D A [Departamento de Fisica ' J. J. Giambiagi' , FCEN, UBA, Pabellon 1, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pujals, E R [IMPA-OS, Dona Castorina 110, 22460-320, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Borondo, F [Departamento de Quimica C-IX, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-12-30

    Vortices are known to play a key role in many important processes in physics and chemistry. Here, we study vortices in connection with the quantum trajectories that can be defined in the framework provided by the de Broglie-Bohm formalism of quantum mechanics. In a previous work, it was shown that the presence of a single moving vortex is enough to induce chaos in these trajectories. Here, this situation is explored in more detail by discussing the relationship between Lyapunov exponents and the parameters characterizing the vortex dynamics. We also consider the issue when more than one vortex exists. In this case, the interaction among them can annihilate or create pairs of vortices with opposite vorticity. This phenomenon is analyzed from a dynamical point of view, showing how the size of the regular regions in phase space grows, as vortices disappear.

  11. Dynamic soil-structure interaction of monopod and polypod foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    2016-01-01

    within the time domain, frequency-independent lumped-parameter models are developed. The paper proposes a decision criterion for determination of which components must be included within a lumped-parameter model in order to account for the structure–soil–structure interaction in an adequate and efficient......The paper concerns the importance of through–soil coupling for structures having foundations with more footings. First, a model for dynamic analysis of polypod footings is established in the frequency domain, employing Green’s function for wave propagation in a layered half-space. To allow analysis...... manner. As a computational example, the dynamic response of a plane frame structure with two footings is compared for two cases: one with and one without the cross coupling. Homogeneous as well as layered soil is considered....

  12. Population reversal driven by unrestrained interactions in molecular dynamics simulations: A dialanine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Pullara

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Standard Molecular Dynamics simulations (MD are usually performed under periodic boundary conditions using the well-established “Ewald summation”. This implies that the distance among each element in a given lattice cell and its corresponding element in another cell, as well as their relative orientations, are constant. Consequently, protein-protein interactions between proteins in different cells—important in many biological activities, such as protein cooperativity and physiological/pathological aggregation—are severely restricted, and features driven by protein-protein interactions are lost. The consequences of these restrictions, although conceptually understood and mentioned in the literature, have not been quantitatively studied before. The effect of protein-protein interactions on the free energy landscape of a model system, dialanine, is presented. This simple system features a free energy diagram with well-separated minima. It is found that, in the case of absence of peptide-peptide (p-p interactions, the ψ = 150° dihedral angle determines the most energetically favored conformation (global free-energy minimum. When strong p-p interactions are induced, the global minimum switches to the ψ = 0° conformation. This shows that the free-energy landscape of an individual molecule is dramatically affected by the presence of other freely interacting molecules of its same type. Results of the study suggest how taking into account p-p interactions in MD allows having a more realistic picture of system activity and functional conformations.

  13. Fault Diagnosis in Dynamic Systems Using Fuzzy Interacting Observers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kolesov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of fault diagnosis in dynamic systems based on a fuzzy approach is proposed. The new method possesses two basic specific features which distinguish it from the other known fuzzy methods based on the application of fuzzy logic and a bank of state observers. First, this method uses a bank of interacting observers instead of traditional independent observers. The second specific feature of the proposed method is the assumption that there is no strict boundary between the serviceable and disabled technical states of the system, which makes it possible to specify a decision making rule for fault diagnosis.

  14. Dynamics of vortex interactions in two-dimensional flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, J.; Nielsen, A.H.; Naulin, V.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics and interaction of like-signed vortex structures in two dimensional flows are investigated by means of direct numerical solutions of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. Two vortices with distributed vorticity merge when their distance relative to their radius, d/R-0l. is below...... a critical value, a(c). Using the Weiss-field, a(c) is estimated for vortex patches. Introducing an effective radius for vortices with distributed vorticity, we find that 3.3 ... with the formation of "vortex crystals"....

  15. Neoantigen landscape dynamics during human melanoma-T cell interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdegaal, Els M. E.; De Miranda, Noel F. C. C.; Visser, Marten

    2016-01-01

    is constant over time is unclear. Here we analyse the stability of neoantigen-specific T-cell responses and the antigens they recognize in two patients with stage IV melanoma treated by adoptive T-cell transfer. The T-cell-recognized neoantigens can be selectively lost from the tumour cell population, either...... by overall reduced expression of the genes or loss of the mutant alleles. Notably, loss of expression of T-cell-recognized neoantigens was accompanied by development of neoantigen-specific T-cell reactivity in tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes. These data demonstrate the dynamic interactions between cancer...

  16. Emotional contagion and proto-organizing in human interaction dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazy, James K; Boyatzis, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    This paper combines the complexity notions of phase transitions and tipping points with recent advances in cognitive neuroscience to propose a general theory of human proto-organizing. It takes as a premise that a necessary prerequisite for organizing, or "proto-organizing," occurs through emotional contagion in subpopulations of human interaction dynamics in complex ecosystems. Emotional contagion is posited to engender emotional understanding and identification with others, a social process that acts as a mechanism that enables (or precludes) cooperative responses to opportunities and risks. Propositions are offered and further research is suggested.

  17. Emotional Contagion and Proto-Organizing in Human Interaction Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Hazy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper combines the complexity notions of phase transitions and tipping points with recent advances in cognitive neuroscience to propose a general theory of human proto-organizing. It takes as a premise that a necessary prerequisite for organizing, or proto-organizing, occurs through emotional contagion in subpopulations of human interaction dynamics in complex ecosystems. Emotional contagion is posited to engender emotional understanding and identification with others, a social process that acts as a mechanism that enables (or precludes cooperative responses to opportunities and risks. Propositions are offered and further research is suggested.

  18. Analysis of the dynamic interaction between SVOCs and airborne particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Cong; Shi, Shanshan; Weschler, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    A proper quantitative understanding of the dynamic interaction between gas-phase semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and airborne particles is important for human exposure assessment and risk evaluation. Questions regarding how to properly address gas/particle interactions have introduced...... of aerosols) is negligible compared with the external one (from bulk air to aerosol surfaces) is presented. The analysis is applicable regardless of the phase state of particles (either liquid or amorphous semisolid/solid). It is found that for both porous and nonporous particles, the internal resistance can...... cause a two orders of magnitude error in the estimation of the gas-phase concentration and a factor of two error in the estimation of the particle-phase concentration. Copyright © American Association for Aerosol Research....

  19. Revisiting dynamics near a liquid-liquid phase transition in Si and Ga: The fragile-to-strong transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cajahuaringa, Samuel; Koning, Maurice de, E-mail: dekoning@ifi.unicamp.br; Antonelli, Alex, E-mail: aantone@ifi.unicamp.br [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-12-14

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we analyze the dynamics of two atomic liquids that display a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT): Si described by the Stillinger-Weber potential and Ga as modeled by the modified embedded-atom model. In particular, our objective is to investigate the extent to which the presence of a dip in the self-intermediate scattering function is a manifestation of an excess of vibrational states at low frequencies and may be associated with a fragile-to-strong transition (FTST) across the LLPT, as suggested recently. Our results suggest a somewhat different picture. First, in the case of Ga we observe the appearance of an excess of vibrational states at low frequencies, even in the absence of the appearance of a dip in the self-intermediate scattering function across the LLPT. Second, studying the behavior of the shear viscosities traversing the LLPTs we find that both substances are fragile in character above and below their respective LLPT temperatures. Instead of a FTST in an absolute sense these findings are more in line with a view in which the LLPTs are accompanied by a transition from a more fragile to a less fragile liquid. Furthermore, we do not find this transition to correlate with the presence of a dip in the intermediate scattering function.

  20. The SCEC-USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Comparison Exercise - Simulations of Large Earthquakes and Strong Ground Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R.

    2015-12-01

    I summarize the progress by the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Dynamic Rupture Code Comparison Group, that examines if the results produced by multiple researchers' earthquake simulation codes agree with each other when computing benchmark scenarios of dynamically propagating earthquake ruptures. These types of computer simulations have no analytical solutions with which to compare, so we use qualitative and quantitative inter-code comparisons to check if they are operating satisfactorily. To date we have tested the codes against benchmark exercises that incorporate a range of features, including single and multiple planar faults, single rough faults, slip-weakening, rate-state, and thermal pressurization friction, elastic and visco-plastic off-fault behavior, complete stress drops that lead to extreme ground motion, heterogeneous initial stresses, and heterogeneous material (rock) structure. Our goal is reproducibility, and we focus on the types of earthquake-simulation assumptions that have been or will be used in basic studies of earthquake physics, or in direct applications to specific earthquake hazard problems. Our group's goals are to make sure that when our earthquake-simulation codes simulate these types of earthquake scenarios along with the resulting simulated strong ground shaking, that the codes are operating as expected. For more introductory information about our group and our work, please see our group's overview papers, Harris et al., Seismological Research Letters, 2009, and Harris et al., Seismological Research Letters, 2011, along with our website, scecdata.usc.edu/cvws.

  1. Modeling the Dynamics of Tidally Interacting Binary Neutron Stars up to the Merger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Nagar, Alessandro; Dietrich, Tim; Damour, Thibault

    2015-04-24

    The data analysis of the gravitational wave signals emitted by coalescing neutron star binaries requires the availability of an accurate analytical representation of the dynamics and waveforms of these systems. We propose an effective-one-body model that describes the general relativistic dynamics of neutron star binaries from the early inspiral up to the merger. Our effective-one-body model incorporates an enhanced attractive tidal potential motivated by recent analytical advances in the post-Newtonian and gravitational self-force description of relativistic tidal interactions. No fitting parameters are introduced for the description of tidal interaction in the late, strong-field dynamics. We compare the model energetics and the gravitational wave phasing with new high-resolution multiorbit numerical relativity simulations of equal-mass configurations with different equations of state. We find agreement within the uncertainty of the numerical data for all configurations. Our model is the first semianalytical model that captures the tidal amplification effects close to merger. It thereby provides the most accurate analytical representation of binary neutron star dynamics and waveforms currently available.

  2. Opinion dynamics on interacting networks: media competition and social influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The inner dynamics of the multiple actors of the informations systems – i.e, T.V., newspapers, blogs, social network platforms, – play a fundamental role on the evolution of the public opinion. Coherently with the recent history of the information system (from few main stream media to the massive diffusion of socio-technical system), in this work we investigate how main stream media signed interaction might shape the opinion space. In particular we focus on how different size (in the number of media) and interaction patterns of the information system may affect collective debates and thus the opinions' distribution. We introduce a sophisticated computational model of opinion dynamics which accounts for the coexistence of media and gossip as separated mechanisms and for their feedback loops. The model accounts also for the effect of the media communication patterns by considering both the simple case where each medium mimics the behavior of the most successful one (to maximize the audience) and the case where there is polarization and thus competition among media memes. We show that plurality and competition within information sources lead to stable configurations where several and distant cultures coexist. PMID:24861995

  3. Opinion dynamics on interacting networks: media competition and social influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-05-27

    The inner dynamics of the multiple actors of the informations systems - i.e, T.V., newspapers, blogs, social network platforms, - play a fundamental role on the evolution of the public opinion. Coherently with the recent history of the information system (from few main stream media to the massive diffusion of socio-technical system), in this work we investigate how main stream media signed interaction might shape the opinion space. In particular we focus on how different size (in the number of media) and interaction patterns of the information system may affect collective debates and thus the opinions' distribution. We introduce a sophisticated computational model of opinion dynamics which accounts for the coexistence of media and gossip as separated mechanisms and for their feedback loops. The model accounts also for the effect of the media communication patterns by considering both the simple case where each medium mimics the behavior of the most successful one (to maximize the audience) and the case where there is polarization and thus competition among media memes. We show that plurality and competition within information sources lead to stable configurations where several and distant cultures coexist.

  4. Molecular Dynamics of "Fuzzy" Transcriptional Activator-Coactivator Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie S Scholes

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional activation domains (ADs are generally thought to be intrinsically unstructured, but capable of adopting limited secondary structure upon interaction with a coactivator surface. The indeterminate nature of this interface made it hitherto difficult to study structure/function relationships of such contacts. Here we used atomistic accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD simulations to study the conformational changes of the GCN4 AD and variants thereof, either free in solution, or bound to the GAL11 coactivator surface. We show that the AD-coactivator interactions are highly dynamic while obeying distinct rules. The data provide insights into the constant and variable aspects of orientation of ADs relative to the coactivator, changes in secondary structure and energetic contributions stabilizing the various conformers at different time points. We also demonstrate that a prediction of α-helical propensity correlates directly with the experimentally measured transactivation potential of a large set of mutagenized ADs. The link between α-helical propensity and the stimulatory activity of ADs has fundamental practical and theoretical implications concerning the recruitment of ADs to coactivators.

  5. Opinion dynamics on interacting networks: media competition and social influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    The inner dynamics of the multiple actors of the informations systems - i.e, T.V., newspapers, blogs, social network platforms, - play a fundamental role on the evolution of the public opinion. Coherently with the recent history of the information system (from few main stream media to the massive diffusion of socio-technical system), in this work we investigate how main stream media signed interaction might shape the opinion space. In particular we focus on how different size (in the number of media) and interaction patterns of the information system may affect collective debates and thus the opinions' distribution. We introduce a sophisticated computational model of opinion dynamics which accounts for the coexistence of media and gossip as separated mechanisms and for their feedback loops. The model accounts also for the effect of the media communication patterns by considering both the simple case where each medium mimics the behavior of the most successful one (to maximize the audience) and the case where there is polarization and thus competition among media memes. We show that plurality and competition within information sources lead to stable configurations where several and distant cultures coexist.

  6. Evidence for carbon flux shortage and strong carbon/nitrogen interactions in pea nodules at early stages of water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, Loli; González, Esther M; Arrese-Igor, Cesar

    2005-09-01

    Symbiotic N2 fixation in legume nodules declines under a wide range of environmental stresses. A high correlation between N2 fixation decline and sucrose synthase (SS; EC 2.4.1.13) activity down-regulation has been reported, although it has still to be elucidated whether a causal relationship between SS activity down-regulation and N2 fixation decline can be established. In order to study the likely C/N interactions within nodules and the effects on N2 fixation, pea plants (Pisum sativum L. cv. Sugar snap) were subjected to progressive water stress by withholding irrigation. Under these conditions, nodule SS activity declined concomitantly with apparent nitrogenase activity. The levels of UDP-glucose, glucose-1-phosphate, glucose-6-phosphate, and fructose-6-phosphate decreased in water-stressed nodules compared with unstressed nodules. Drought also had a marked effect on nodule concentrations of malate, succinate, and alpha-ketoglutarate. Moreover, a general decline in nodule adenylate content was detected. NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH; EC 1.1.1.42) was the only enzyme whose activity increased as a result of water deficit, compensating for a possible C/N imbalance and/or supplying NADPH in circumstances that the pentose phosphate pathway was impaired, as suggested by the decline in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH; EC 1.1.1.49) activity. The overall results show the occurrence of strong C/N interactions in nodules subjected to water stress and support a likely limitation of carbon flux that might be involved in the decline of N2 fixation under drought.

  7. Radio Frequency Station - Beam Dynamics Interaction in Circular Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2010-08-01

    The longitudinal beam dynamics in circular accelerators is mainly defined by the interaction of the beam current with the accelerating Radio Frequency (RF) stations. For stable operation, Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback systems are employed to reduce coherent instabilities and regulate the accelerating voltage. The LLRF system design has implications for the dynamics and stability of the closed-loop RF systems as well as for the particle beam, and is very sensitive to the operating range of accelerator currents and energies. Stability of the RF loop and the beam are necessary conditions for reliable machine operation. This dissertation describes theoretical formalisms and models that determine the longitudinal beam dynamics based on the LLRF implementation, time domain simulations that capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction, and measurements from the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that validate the models and simulations. These models and simulations are structured to capture the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They also provide the opportunity to study diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Coupled-bunch instabilities and RF station power were the performance limiting effects for PEP-II. The sensitivity of the instabilities to individual LLRF parameters, the effectiveness of alternative operational algorithms, and the possible tradeoffs between RF loop and beam stability were studied. New algorithms were implemented, with significant performance improvement leading to a world record current during the last PEP-II run of 3212 mA for the Low Energy Ring. Longitudinal beam emittance growth due to RF noise is a major concern for LHC

  8. Correlative microscopy for 3D structural analysis of dynamic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Sangmi; Zhao, Gongpu; Ning, Jiying; Gibson, Gregory A; Watkins, Simon C; Zhang, Peijun

    2013-06-24

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryoET) allows 3D visualization of cellular structures at molecular resolution in a close-to-physiological state(1). However, direct visualization of individual viral complexes in their host cellular environment with cryoET is challenging(2), due to the infrequent and dynamic nature of viral entry, particularly in the case of HIV-1. While time-lapse live-cell imaging has yielded a great deal of information about many aspects of the life cycle of HIV-1(3-7), the resolution afforded by live-cell microscopy is limited (~200 nm). Our work was aimed at developing a correlation method that permits direct visualization of early events of HIV-1 infection by combining live-cell fluorescent light microscopy, cryo-fluorescent microscopy, and cryoET. In this manner, live-cell and cryo-fluorescent signals can be used to accurately guide the sampling in cryoET. Furthermore, structural information obtained from cryoET can be complemented with the dynamic functional data gained through live-cell imaging of fluorescent labeled target. In this video article, we provide detailed methods and protocols for structural investigation of HIV-1 and host-cell interactions using 3D correlative high-speed live-cell imaging and high-resolution cryoET structural analysis. HeLa cells infected with HIV-1 particles were characterized first by confocal live-cell microscopy, and the region containing the same viral particle was then analyzed by cryo-electron tomography for 3D structural details. The correlation between two sets of imaging data, optical imaging and electron imaging, was achieved using a home-built cryo-fluorescence light microscopy stage. The approach detailed here will be valuable, not only for study of virus-host cell interactions, but also for broader applications in cell biology, such as cell signaling, membrane receptor trafficking, and many other dynamic cellular processes.

  9. Experimental investigations of the interaction of multi-GeV particles with strong crystalline fields and applications in high-energy beam lines

    OpenAIRE

    Mikkelsen, U

    1997-01-01

    The thesis first introduces the theory of the interaction of energetic particles with strong crystalline fields. It then treats a number of experiments that investigate different phenomena which can be divided in two: Strong field effects and bent crystals. Both of these include a wealth of sub-topics, such as pair production, strong gamma-ray emission, radiative cooling, polarized gamma-rays and possible inhibiting effects as well as an investigation of the advantage of high-Z materials for ...

  10. ARE THE FIVE ASEAN STOCK PRICE INDICES DYNAMICALLY INTERACTED?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adwin Surja Atmadja

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to examine the dynamic interactions of stock price indices in five ASEAN countries, Indonesia; Malaysia; the Philippines; Singapore; and Thailand with particular attention to the 1997 Asian financial crisis and period onwards. Using monthly time series data of the stock price indices countries, a vector error correction model (VECM is employed to empirically examine the interaction among the variables. The finding is that the five ASEAN stock market prices were found to be integrated with two cointegrating vectors during the sample period, and that accounting innovation analyses show the short run dynamic interactions among those stock markets. The important implication might be drawn from the finding is that portfolio diversification across the five ASEAN stock markets is unlikely to reduce investment risk due to high degree of financial integration of these markets. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Studi ini bertujuan meneliti interaksi dinamis antara indeks harga saham yang terdapat di lima negara ASEAN, yaitu Indonesia, Malaysia, Filipina, Singapura, dan Thailan yang terjadi selama masa krisis finansial Asia tahun 1997 dan periode sesudahnya. Dengan menggunakan data time series bulanan indeks harga saham dari kelima negara tersebut selama periode penelitian, suatu vector error correction model (VECM diaplikasikan untuk meneliti secara empiris interaksi dinamis yang terjadi diantara berbagai variabel yang dipergunakan dalam penelitian ini. Dari hasil penelitian ditemukan dua vektor kointegrasi (cointegration vector selama masa penelitian, dan analisa inovasi akuntansi (accounting innovation analyses menunjukan adanya interaksi dinamis jangka pendek diantara pasar saham tersebut. Implikasi penting yang mungkin perlu diperhatikan dari penemuan ini adalah bahwa diversifikasi portofolio saham pada lima pasar saham tersebut agaknya tidak akan secara signifikan mengurangi tingkat resiko investasi. Hal ini dikarenakan oleh tingginya

  11. Stability of strong species interactions resist the synergistic effects of local and global pollution in kelp forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenberg, Laura J; Russell, Bayden D; Connell, Sean D

    2012-01-01

    Foundation species, such as kelp, exert disproportionately strong community effects and persist, in part, by dominating taxa that inhibit their regeneration. Human activities which benefit their competitors, however, may reduce stability of communities, increasing the probability of phase-shifts. We tested whether a foundation species (kelp) would continue to inhibit a key competitor (turf-forming algae) under moderately increased local (nutrient) and near-future forecasted global pollution (CO(2)). Our results reveal that in the absence of kelp, local and global pollutants combined to cause the greatest cover and mass of turfs, a synergistic response whereby turfs increased more than would be predicted by adding the independent effects of treatments (kelp absence, elevated nutrients, forecasted CO(2)). The positive effects of nutrient and CO(2) enrichment on turfs were, however, inhibited by the presence of kelp, indicating the competitive effect of kelp was stronger than synergistic effects of moderate enrichment of local and global pollutants. Quantification of physicochemical parameters within experimental mesocosms suggests turf inhibition was likely due to an effect of kelp on physical (i.e. shading) rather than chemical conditions. Such results indicate that while forecasted climates may increase the probability of phase-shifts, maintenance of intact populations of foundation species could enable the continued strength of interactions and persistence of communities.

  12. Aacsfi-PSC. Advanced accelerator concepts for strong field interaction simulated with the Plasma-Simulation-Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhl, Hartmut [Munich Univ. (Germany). Chair for Computational and Plasma Physics

    2016-11-01

    Since the installation of SuperMUC phase 2 the 9216 nodes of phase 1 are more easily available for large scale runs allowing for the thin foil and AWAKE simulations. Besides phase 2 could be used in parallel for high throughput of the ion acceleration simulations. Challenging to our project were the full-volume checkpoints required by PIC that strained the I/O-subsystem of SuperMUC to its limits. New approaches considered for the next generation system, like burst buffers could overcome this bottleneck. Additionally, as the FDTD solver in PIC is strongly bandwidth bound, PSC will benefit profoundly from high-bandwidth memory (HBM) that most likely will be available in future HPC machines. This will be of great advantage as in 2018 phase II of AWAKE should begin, with a longer plasma channel further increasing the need for additional computing resources. Last but not least, it is expected that our methods used in plasma physics (many body interaction with radiation) will be more and more adapted for medical diagnostics and treatments. For this research field we expect centimeter sized volumes with necessary resolutions of tens of micro meters resulting in boxes of >10{sup 12} voxels (100-200 TB) on a regular basis. In consequence the demand for computing time and especially for data storage and data handling capacities will also increase significantly.

  13. Looking for phase transitions of strongly interacting matter applying new method on basic of Random Matrix Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suleymanov, Mais [CIIT, Islamabad (Pakistan); Shahaliev, Ehtiram [HEPL, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    Over the last 25 years a lot of efforts have been made to search for new phases of strongly interacting matter. Heavy ion collisions are of great importance since they open a way to reproduce these phases in the Earth laboratory. But in this case the volume of information increases sharply as well as the background information. A method was introduced a method on the basic of Random Matrix Theory to study the fluctuations of neutron resonances in compound nuclei which doesn't depend on the background of measurements. To analyze the energetic levels of compound nuclei the function of distances between two energetic levels p(s{sub i}) is defined as the general distributions for probability of all kinds of ensembles. At values of the index of universality {nu}=0 it will change to Poisson type distributions pointing to absence of any correlations in the system and at the values of {nu}=1 it will change to Wigner type behavior directing to some correlation in the studying ensemble. We discuss that the experimental study of the behavior of p(s{sub i}) distribution for secondary particles could give a signal on the phase transitions.

  14. Microplastic interactions with freshwater microalgae: Hetero-aggregation and changes in plastic density appear strongly dependent on polymer type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, Fabienne; Olivier, Ophélie; Zanella, Marie; Daniel, Philippe; Hiard, Sophie; Caruso, Aurore

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the interactions between microplastics, chosen among the most widely used in industry such as polypropylene (PP) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE), and a model freshwater microalgae, Chlamydomas reinhardtii, were investigated. It was shown that the presence of high concentrations of microplastics with size >400 μm did not directly impact the growth of microalgae in the first days of contact and that the expression of three genes involved in the stress response was not modified after 78 days. In parallel, a similar colonization was observed for the two polymers. However, after 20 days of contact, in the case of PP only, hetero-aggregates constituted of microalgae, microplastics and exopolysaccharides were formed. An estimation of the hetero-aggregates composition was approximately 50% of PP fragments and 50% of microalgae, which led to a final density close to 1.2. Such hetero-aggregates appear as an important pathway for the vertical transport of PP microplastics from the water surface to sediment. Moreover, after more than 70 days of contact with microplastics, the microalgae genes involved in the sugar biosynthesis pathways were strongly over-expressed compared to control conditions. The levels of over-expression were higher in the case of HDPE than in PP condition. This work presents the first evidence that depending on their chemical nature, microplastics will follow different fates in the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Stability of strong species interactions resist the synergistic effects of local and global pollution in kelp forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J Falkenberg

    Full Text Available Foundation species, such as kelp, exert disproportionately strong community effects and persist, in part, by dominating taxa that inhibit their regeneration. Human activities which benefit their competitors, however, may reduce stability of communities, increasing the probability of phase-shifts. We tested whether a foundation species (kelp would continue to inhibit a key competitor (turf-forming algae under moderately increased local (nutrient and near-future forecasted global pollution (CO(2. Our results reveal that in the absence of kelp, local and global pollutants combined to cause the greatest cover and mass of turfs, a synergistic response whereby turfs increased more than would be predicted by adding the independent effects of treatments (kelp absence, elevated nutrients, forecasted CO(2. The positive effects of nutrient and CO(2 enrichment on turfs were, however, inhibited by the presence of kelp, indicating the competitive effect of kelp was stronger than synergistic effects of moderate enrichment of local and global pollutants. Quantification of physicochemical parameters within experimental mesocosms suggests turf inhibition was likely due to an effect of kelp on physical (i.e. shading rather than chemical conditions. Such results indicate that while forecasted climates may increase the probability of phase-shifts, maintenance of intact populations of foundation species could enable the continued strength of interactions and persistence of communities.

  16. An Interactive Simulator for Imposing Virtual Musculoskeletal Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Christopher

    2017-05-10

    Disease processes are often marked by both neural and muscular changes that alter movement control and execution, but these adaptations are difficult to tease apart because they occur simultaneously. This is addressed by swapping an individual's limb dynamics with a neurally-controlled facsimile using an interactive musculoskeletal simulator (IMS) that allows controlled modifications of musculoskeletal dynamics. This paper details the design and operation of the IMS, quantifies and describes human adaptation to the IMS, and determines whether the IMS allows users to move naturally, a prerequisite for manipulation experiments. Healthy volunteers (n = 4) practiced a swift goal-directed task (back-and-forth elbow flexion/extension) for 90 trials with the IMS off (normal dynamics) and 240 trials with the IMS on, i.e. the actions of a user's personalized electromyography-driven musculoskeletal model are robotically imposed back on to the user. After practicing with the IMS on, subjects could complete the task with end-point errors of 1.56°, close to the speed-matched IMS-off error of 0.57°. Muscle activity, joint torque, and arm kinematics for IMS-on and -off conditions were well matched for three subjects (root-meansquared error [RMSE] = 0.16 Nm), but the error was higher for one subject with a small stature (RMSE = 0.25 Nm). A well-matched musculoskeletal model allowed IMS users to perform a goal-directed task nearly as well as when the IMS was not active. This advancement permits real-time manipulations of musculoskeletal dynamics, which could increase our understanding of muscular and neural co-adaptations to injury, disease, disuse, and aging.

  17. Water–Soil–Vegetation Dynamic Interactions in Changing Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixi Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of land degradation, topsoil erosion, and hydrologic alteration typically focus on these subjects individually, missing important interrelationships among these important aspects of the Earth’s system. However, an understanding of water–soil–vegetation dynamic interactions is needed to develop practical and effective solutions to sustain the globe’s eco-environment and grassland agriculture, which depends on grasses, legumes, and other fodder or soil-building crops. This special issue is intended to be a platform for a discussion of the relevant scientific findings based on experimental and/or modeling studies. Its 12 peer-reviewed articles present data, novel analysis/modeling approaches, and convincing results of water–soil–vegetation interactions under historical and future climates. Two of the articles examine how lake/pond water quality is related to human activity and climate. Overall, these articles can serve as important references for future studies to further advance our understanding of how water, soil, and vegetation interactively affect the health and productivity of the Earth’s ecosystem.

  18. Quantum dynamics and topological excitations in interacting dipolar particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Ana

    2016-05-01

    Dipole-dipole interactions, long-range and anisotropic interactions that arise due to the virtual exchange of photons, are of fundamental importance in optical physics, and are enabling a range of new quantum technologies including quantum networks and optical lattice atomic clocks. In this talk I will first discuss how arrays of dipolar particles with a simple J = 0- J = 1 internal level structure can naturally host topological and chiral excitations including Weyl quasi-particles. Weyl fermions were first predicted to exist in the context of high energy physics but only recently have been observed in solid state systems. I will discuss a proposal of using Mott insulators of Sr atoms to observe and probe the Weyl excitation spectrum and its non-trivial chirality. Finally I will report on a recent experiment done at JILA which validates the underlying microscopic model that predicts the existence of these excitations. The experiment measured the collective emission from a coherently driven gas of ultracold 88 Sr atoms and observed a highly directional and anisotropic emission intensity and a substantial broadening of the atomic spectral lines. All of the measurements are well reproduced by the theoretical model. These investigations open the door for the exploration of novel quantum many-body systems involving strongly interacting atoms and photons, and are useful guides for further developments of optical atomic clocks and other applications involving dense atomic ensembles. AFOSR, MURI-AFOSR, ARO,NSF-PHY-1521080, JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844.

  19. Renormalization of the P- and T-odd nuclear potentials by the strong interaction and enhancement of P-odd effective field

    OpenAIRE

    Flambaum, V. V.; Vorov, O. K.

    1997-01-01

    Approximate analytical formulas for the self-consistent renormalization of P,T-odd and P-odd weak nuclear potentials by the residual nucleon-nucleon strong interaction are derived. The contact spin-flip nucleon-nucleon interaction reduces the constant of the P,T-odd potential 1.5 times for the proton and 1.8 times for the neutron. Renormalization of the P-odd potential is caused by the velocity dependent spin-flip component of the strong interaction. In the standard variant of $\\pi + \\rho$-ex...

  20. Study of two-particle response and phase changes in strongly correlated systems using Dynamical Mean Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Bismayan

    The study of strongly correlated materials is currently perhaps one of the most active areas of research in condensed matter physics. Strongly correlated materials contain localized electronic states which are often hybridized with more itinerant electrons. This interplay between localized and delocalized degrees of freedom means that these compounds have highly complex phase diagrams which makes these compounds very challenging to understand from a theoretical standpoint. Computer simulations have proved to be an invaluable tool in this regard with state of the art ab-initio simulation techniques harnessing the ever-increasing power of modern computers to produce highly accurate descriptions of a variety of strongly correlated materials. One of the most powerful simulation techniques currently in existence is Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT). This thesis describes this powerful simulation technique and its applications to various material systems, as well as addressing some theoretical questions concerning particular implementations of DMFT. This thesis is divided into two parts. In part 1, we describe the theory behind DMFT and its amalgamation with Density Functional Theory (DFT+DMFT). In chapters 2 and 3, we provide the basic theory behind DFT and DMFT respectively. In chapter 4, we describe how these two methods are merged to give us the computational framework that is used in this thesis, namely DFT+DMFT. Finally, we round off part 1 of the thesis in chapter 5, which provides a description of the Continuous Time Quantum Monte Carlo (CTQMC) impurity solver, which is at the heart of the DFT+DMFT algorithm and is used extensively throughout this thesis. In part two of the thesis, we apply the DFT+DMFT framework to address some important problems in condensed matter physics. In chapter 6, we study the Magnetic Spectral Function of strongly correlated f-shell materials to understand two important problems in condensed matter physics, namely the volume collapse

  1. An iterative method for hydrodynamic interactions in Brownian dynamics simulations of polymer dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Linling; Young, Charles D.; Sing, Charles E.

    2017-07-01

    Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulations are a standard tool for understanding the dynamics of polymers in and out of equilibrium. Quantitative comparison can be made to rheological measurements of dilute polymer solutions, as well as direct visual observations of fluorescently labeled DNA. The primary computational challenge with BD is the expensive calculation of hydrodynamic interactions (HI), which are necessary to capture physically realistic dynamics. The full HI calculation, performed via a Cholesky decomposition every time step, scales with the length of the polymer as O(N3). This limits the calculation to a few hundred simulated particles. A number of approximations in the literature can lower this scaling to O(N2 - N2.25), and explicit solvent methods scale as O(N); however both incur a significant constant per-time step computational cost. Despite this progress, there remains a need for new or alternative methods of calculating hydrodynamic interactions; large polymer chains or semidilute polymer solutions remain computationally expensive. In this paper, we introduce an alternative method for calculating approximate hydrodynamic interactions. Our method relies on an iterative scheme to establish self-consistency between a hydrodynamic matrix that is averaged over simulation and the hydrodynamic matrix used to run the simulation. Comparison to standard BD simulation and polymer theory results demonstrates that this method quantitatively captures both equilibrium and steady-state dynamics after only a few iterations. The use of an averaged hydrodynamic matrix allows the computationally expensive Brownian noise calculation to be performed infrequently, so that it is no longer the bottleneck of the simulation calculations. We also investigate limitations of this conformational averaging approach in ring polymers.

  2. Fractional dynamics of coupled oscillators with long-range interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Vasily E; Zaslavsky, George M

    2006-06-01

    We consider a one-dimensional chain of coupled linear and nonlinear oscillators with long-range powerwise interaction. The corresponding term in dynamical equations is proportional to 1//n-m/alpha+1. It is shown that the equation of motion in the infrared limit can be transformed into the medium equation with the Riesz fractional derivative of order alpha, when 0coupled oscillators and show how their synchronization can appear as a result of bifurcation, and how the corresponding solutions depend on alpha. The presence of a fractional derivative also leads to the occurrence of localized structures. Particular solutions for fractional time-dependent complex Ginzburg-Landau (or nonlinear Schrodinger) equation are derived. These solutions are interpreted as synchronized states and localized structures of the oscillatory medium.

  3. Dynamic interaction potential and the scattering cross sections of the semiclassical plasma particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Shalenov, E. O.; Gabdullina, G. L. [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 71al Farabi Street, Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2013-04-15

    The dynamic model of the charged particles interaction in non-ideal semiclassical plasma is presented. This model takes into account the quantum mechanical diffraction effect and the dynamic screening effect. On the basis of the dynamic interaction potential, the electron scattering cross sections are investigated. Comparison with the results obtained on the basis of other models and conclusions were made.

  4. Production Cross-Section Estimates for Strongly-Interacting Electroweak-Symmetry Breaking Sector Resonances at Particle Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobado, Antonio; Guo, Feng-Kun; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

    2015-12-01

    We are exploring a generic strongly-interacting Electroweak Symmetry Breaking Sector (EWSBS) with the low-energy effective field theory for the four experimentally known particles (W±L, ZL, h) and its dispersion-relation based unitary extension. In this contribution we provide simple estimates for the production cross-section of pairs of the EWSBS bosons and their resonances at proton-proton colliders as well as in a future e‑e+ (or potentially a μ‑μ+) collider with a typical few-TeV energy. We examine the simplest production mechanisms, tree-level production through a W (dominant when quantum numbers allow) and the simple effective boson approximation (in which the electroweak bosons are considered as collinear partons of the colliding fermions). We exemplify with custodial isovector and isotensor resonances at 2 TeV, the energy currently being discussed because of a slight excess in the ATLAS 2-jet data. We find it hard, though not unthinkable, to ascribe this excess to one of these WLWL rescattering resonances. An isovector resonance could be produced at a rate smaller than, but close to earlier CMS exclusion bounds, depending on the parameters of the effective theory. The ZZ excess is then problematic and requires additional physics (such as an additional scalar resonance). The isotensor one (that would describe all charge combinations) has smaller cross-section. Supported by the Spanish Excellence Network on Hadronic Physics FIS2014-57026-REDT, by Spanish Grants Universidad Complutense UCM:910309 and Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad MINECO:FPA2011-27853-C02-01, MINECO:FPA2014-53375-C2-1-P, by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and National Natural Science Foundation of China through Funds Provided to the Sino-German CRC 110 “Symmetries and the Emergence of Structure in QCD” (NSFC Grant No. 11261130311) and by NSFC (Grant No. 11165005)

  5. Interaction of Tenebrio Molitor Antifreeze Protein with Ice Crystal: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, L; Ramakrishnan, Vigneshwar

    2016-07-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) observed in cold-adapting organisms bind to ice crystals and prevent further ice growth. However, the molecular mechanism of AFP-ice binding and AFP-inhibited ice growth remains unclear. Here we report the interaction of the insect antifreeze protein (Tenebrio molitor, TmAFP) with ice crystal by molecular dynamics simulation studies. Two sets of simulations were carried out at 263 K by placing the protein near the primary prism plane (PP) and basal plane (BL) of the ice crystal. To delineate the effect of temperatures, both the PP and BL simulations were carried out at 253 K as well. The analyses revealed that the protein interacts strongly with the ice crystal in BL simulation than in PP simulation both at 263 K and 253 K. Further, it was observed that the interactions are primarily mediated through the interface waters. We also observed that as the temperature decreases, the interaction between the protein and the ice increases which can be attributed to the decreased flexibility and the increased structuring of the protein at low temperature. In essence, our study has shed light on the interaction mechanism between the TmAFP antifreeze protein and the ice crystal. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Cortical oscillatory dynamics in a social interaction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazev, Gennady G; Slobodskoj-Plusnin, Jaroslav Y; Bocharov, Andrey V; Pylkova, Liudmila V

    2013-03-15

    In this study we sought to investigate cortical oscillatory dynamics accompanying three major kinds of social behavior: aggressive, friendly, and avoidant. Behavioral and EEG data were collected in 48 participants during a computer game modeling social interactions with virtual 'persons'. 3D source reconstruction and independent component analysis were applied to EEG data. Results showed that social behavior was partly reactive and partly proactive with subject's personality playing an important role in shaping this behavior. Most salient differences were found between avoidance and approach behaviors, whereas the two kinds of approach behavior (i.e., aggression and friendship) did not differ from each other. Comparative to avoidance, approach behaviors were associated with higher induced responses in most frequency bands which were mostly observed in cortical areas overlapping with the default mode network. The difference between approach- and avoidance-related oscillatory dynamics was more salient in subjects predisposed to approach behaviors (i.e., in aggressive or sociable subjects) and was less pronounced in subjects predisposed to avoidance behavior (i.e., in high trait anxiety scorers). There was a trend to higher low frequency phase-locking in motor area in approach than in avoid condition. Results are discussed in light of the concept linking induced responses with top-down and evoked responses with bottom-up processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dynamic interactions between dermal macrophages and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Reinhild; Kolter, Julia; Henneke, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    The dermis, a major reservoir of immune cells in immediate vicinity to the colonizing skin microflora, serves as an important site of host-pathogen interactions. Macrophages (Mϕ) are the most frequent resident immune cell type in the dermis. They protect the host from invasive infections by highly adapted bacteria, such as staphylococci via pattern recognition of bacterial effectors, phagocytosis, and recruitment of other myeloid cells from the blood. Already under homeostatic conditions, the dermal Mϕ population receives a dynamic input of monocytes invading from the bloodstream. This quantitative renewal is promoted further at the beginning of life, when prenatally seeded cells are rapidly replaced and in healing phases after injuries or infections. Here, we discuss the potential implications of the dynamic dermal Mϕ biology on the establishment and maintenance of immunity against Staphylococcus aureus, which can either be a harmless colonizer or an invasive pathogen. The understanding of the heterogeneity of the "mature" dermal Mϕ compartment driven both by the influx of differentiating monocytes and by a bone marrow-independent Mϕ persistence and expansion may help to explain failing immunity and immunopathology originating from the skin, the important interface between host and environment. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  8. Interaction Dynamics Determine Signaling and Output Pathway Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klement Stojanovski

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of interaction dynamics in signaling pathways can shed light on pathway architecture and provide insights into targets for intervention. Here, we explored the relevance of kinetic rate constants of a key upstream osmosensor in the yeast high-osmolarity glycerol-mitogen-activated protein kinase (HOG-MAPK pathway to signaling output responses. We created mutant pairs of the Sln1-Ypd1 complex interface that caused major compensating changes in the association (kon and dissociation (koff rate constants (kinetic perturbations but only moderate changes in the overall complex affinity (Kd. Yeast cells carrying a Sln1-Ypd1 mutant pair with moderate increases in kon and koff displayed a lower threshold of HOG pathway activation than wild-type cells. Mutants with higher kon and koff rates gave rise to higher basal signaling and gene expression but impaired osmoadaptation. Thus, the kon and koff rates of the components in the Sln1 osmosensor determine proper signaling dynamics and osmoadaptation.

  9. Robust Generation of Dynamic Data Structure Visualizations with Multiple Interaction Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, James H., II; Hendrix, T. Dean; Umphress, David A.; Barowski, Larry A.; Jain, Jhilmil; Montgomery, Lacey N.

    2009-01-01

    jGRASP has three integrated approaches for interacting with its dynamic viewers for data structures: debugger, workbench, and text-based interactions that allow individual Java statements and expressions to be executed/evaluated. These approaches can be used together to provide a complementary set of interactions with the dynamic viewers. Data…

  10. Relaxation dynamics of interacting skyrmions in thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bart; Pleimling, Michel

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically protected spin textures which were recently observed in certain chiral magnets and thin films. Skyrmions can be moved by very low current densities which makes them very promising in spintronic applications such as data storage devices and logic gates. A thorough understanding of the relaxation processes for systems of interacting skyrmions far from equilibrium could prove invaluable in real world applications but is currently lacking in the literature. The dynamics are described by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, however, simulating many interacting skyrmions by solving the LLG equation is computationally infeasible. We employ a suitable two-dimensional particle based model derived from Thiele's approach to study the two-time density correlation function and other quantities. The particle model differs most notably from similar models which describe vortices in type-II superconductors by the addition of the Magnus force which points perpendicular to the skyrmion velocity in the plane. Numerical studies reveal non-universal scaling of the correlation function where the scaling exponent is a function of the ratio of the Magnus force strength to damping coefficient as well as of the Gaussian noise. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award DE-FG02-09ER46613.

  11. Dynamic metabolic exchange governs a marine algal-bacterial interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Einat; Wyche, Thomas P; Kim, Ki Hyun; Petersen, Jörn; Ellebrandt, Claire; Vlamakis, Hera; Barteneva, Natasha; Paulson, Joseph N; Chai, Liraz; Clardy, Jon; Kolter, Roberto

    2016-11-18

    Emiliania huxleyi is a model coccolithophore micro-alga that generates vast blooms in the ocean. Bacteria are not considered among the major factors influencing coccolithophore physiology. Here we show through a laboratory model system that the bacterium Phaeobacter inhibens, a well-studied member of the Roseobacter group, intimately interacts with E. huxleyi. While attached to the algal cell, bacteria initially promote algal growth but ultimately kill their algal host. Both algal growth enhancement and algal death are driven by the bacterially-produced phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid. Bacterial production of indole-3-acetic acid and attachment to algae are significantly increased by tryptophan, which is exuded from the algal cell. Algal death triggered by bacteria involves activation of pathways unique to oxidative stress response and programmed cell death. Our observations suggest that bacteria greatly influence the physiology and metabolism of E. huxleyi. Coccolithophore-bacteria interactions should be further studied in the environment to determine whether they impact micro-algal population dynamics on a global scale.

  12. Accessing Wireless Sensor Networks Via Dynamically Reconfigurable Interaction Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília Gomes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs technology is already perceived as fundamental for science across many domains, since it provides a low cost solution for environment monitoring. WSNs representation via the service concept and its inclusion in Web environments, e.g. through Web services, supports particularly their open/standard access and integration. Although such Web enabled WSNs simplify data access, network parameterization and aggregation, the existing interaction models and run-time adaptation mechanisms available to clients are still scarce. Nevertheless, applications increasingly demand richer and more flexible accesses besides the traditional client/server. For instance, applications may require a streaming model in order to avoid sequential data requests, or the asynchronous notification of subscribed data through the publish/subscriber. Moreover, the possibility to automatically switch between such models at runtime allows applications to define flexible context-based data acquisition. To this extent, this paper discusses the relevance of the session and pattern abstractions on the design of a middleware prototype providing richer and dynamically reconfigurable interaction models to Web enabled WSNs.

  13. Temporal dynamics of top predators interactions in the Barents Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël M Durant

    Full Text Available The Barents Sea system is often depicted as a simple food web in terms of number of dominant feeding links. The most conspicuous feeding link is between the Northeast Arctic cod Gadus morhua, the world's largest cod stock which is presently at a historical high level, and capelin Mallotus villosus. The system also holds diverse seabird and marine mammal communities. Previous diet studies may suggest that these top predators (cod, bird and sea mammals compete for food particularly with respect to pelagic fish such as capelin and juvenile herring (Clupea harengus, and krill. In this paper we explored the diet of some Barents Sea top predators (cod, Black-legged kittiwake Rissa tridactyla, Common guillemot Uria aalge, and Minke whale Balaenoptera acutorostrata. We developed a GAM modelling approach to analyse the temporal variation diet composition within and between predators, to explore intra- and inter-specific interactions. The GAM models demonstrated that the seabird diet is temperature dependent while the diet of Minke whale and cod is prey dependent; Minke whale and cod diets depend on the abundance of herring and capelin, respectively. There was significant diet overlap between cod and Minke whale, and between kittiwake and guillemot. In general, the diet overlap between predators increased with changes in herring and krill abundances. The diet overlap models developed in this study may help to identify inter-specific interactions and their dynamics that potentially affect the stocks targeted by fisheries.

  14. Dynamic protein interaction modules in human hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui; Lin, Chen-Ching; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Zhongming

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression profiles have been frequently integrated with the human protein interactome to uncover functional modules under specific conditions like disease state. Beyond traditional differential expression analysis, differential co-expression analysis has emerged as a robust approach to reveal condition-specific network modules, with successful applications in a few human disease studies. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is often interrelated with the Hepatitis C virus, typically develops through multiple stages. A comprehensive investigation of HCC progression-specific differential co-expression modules may advance our understanding of HCC's pathophysiological mechanisms. Compared with differentially expressed genes, differentially co-expressed genes were found more likely enriched with Hepatitis C virus binding proteins and cancer-mutated genes, and they were clustered more densely in the human reference protein interaction network. These observations indicated that a differential co-expression approach could outperform the standard differential expression network analysis in searching for disease-related modules. We then proposed a differential co-expression network approach to uncover network modules involved in HCC development. Specifically, we discovered subnetworks that enriched differentially co-expressed gene pairs in each HCC transition stage, and further resolved modules with coherent co-expression change patterns over all HCC developmental stages. Our identified network modules were enriched with HCC-related genes and implicated in cancer-related biological functions. In particular, APC and YWHAZ were highlighted as two most remarkable genes in the network modules, and their dynamic interaction partnership was resolved in HCC development. We demonstrated that integration of differential co-expression with the protein interactome could outperform the traditional differential expression approach in discovering network modules of human diseases

  15. ARCHITECTURAL LARGE CONSTRUCTED ENVIRONMENT. MODELING AND INTERACTION USING DYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fiamma

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available How to use for the architectural design, the simulation coming from a large size data model? The topic is related to the phase coming usually after the acquisition of the data, during the construction of the model and especially after, when designers must have an interaction with the simulation, in order to develop and verify their idea. In the case of study, the concept of interaction includes the concept of real time "flows". The work develops contents and results that can be part of the large debate about the current connection between "architecture" and "movement". The focus of the work, is to realize a collaborative and participative virtual environment on which different specialist actors, client and final users can share knowledge, targets and constraints to better gain the aimed result. The goal is to have used a dynamic micro simulation digital resource that allows all the actors to explore the model in powerful and realistic way and to have a new type of interaction in a complex architectural scenario. On the one hand, the work represents a base of knowledge that can be implemented more and more; on the other hand the work represents a dealt to understand the large constructed architecture simulation as a way of life, a way of being in time and space. The architectural design before, and the architectural fact after, both happen in a sort of "Spatial Analysis System". The way is open to offer to this "system", knowledge and theories, that can support architectural design work for every application and scale. We think that the presented work represents a dealt to understand the large constructed architecture simulation as a way of life, a way of being in time and space. Architecture like a spatial configuration, that can be reconfigurable too through designing.

  16. Dynamic interactions between visual working memory and saccade target selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneegans, Sebastian; Spencer, John P.; Schöner, Gregor; Hwang, Seongmin; Hollingworth, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recent psychophysical experiments have shown that working memory for visual surface features interacts with saccadic motor planning, even in tasks where the saccade target is unambiguously specified by spatial cues. Specifically, a match between a memorized color and the color of either the designated target or a distractor stimulus influences saccade target selection, saccade amplitudes, and latencies in a systematic fashion. To elucidate these effects, we present a dynamic neural field model in combination with new experimental data. The model captures the neural processes underlying visual perception, working memory, and saccade planning relevant to the psychophysical experiment. It consists of a low-level visual sensory representation that interacts with two separate pathways: a spatial pathway implementing spatial attention and saccade generation, and a surface feature pathway implementing color working memory and feature attention. Due to bidirectional coupling between visual working memory and feature attention in the model, the working memory content can indirectly exert an effect on perceptual processing in the low-level sensory representation. This in turn biases saccadic movement planning in the spatial pathway, allowing the model to quantitatively reproduce the observed interaction effects. The continuous coupling between representations in the model also implies that modulation should be bidirectional, and model simulations provide specific predictions for complementary effects of saccade target selection on visual working memory. These predictions were empirically confirmed in a new experiment: Memory for a sample color was biased toward the color of a task-irrelevant saccade target object, demonstrating the bidirectional coupling between visual working memory and perceptual processing. PMID:25228628

  17. Dynamic interactions between visual working memory and saccade target selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneegans, Sebastian; Spencer, John P; Schöner, Gregor; Hwang, Seongmin; Hollingworth, Andrew

    2014-09-16

    Recent psychophysical experiments have shown that working memory for visual surface features interacts with saccadic motor planning, even in tasks where the saccade target is unambiguously specified by spatial cues. Specifically, a match between a memorized color and the color of either the designated target or a distractor stimulus influences saccade target selection, saccade amplitudes, and latencies in a systematic fashion. To elucidate these effects, we present a dynamic neural field model in combination with new experimental data. The model captures the neural processes underlying visual perception, working memory, and saccade planning relevant to the psychophysical experiment. It consists of a low-level visual sensory representation that interacts with two separate pathways: a spatial pathway implementing spatial attention and saccade generation, and a surface feature pathway implementing color working memory and feature attention. Due to bidirectional coupling between visual working memory and feature attention in the model, the working memory content can indirectly exert an effect on perceptual processing in the low-level sensory representation. This in turn biases saccadic movement planning in the spatial pathway, allowing the model to quantitatively reproduce the observed interaction effects. The continuous coupling between representations in the model also implies that modulation should be bidirectional, and model simulations provide specific predictions for complementary effects of saccade target selection on visual working memory. These predictions were empirically confirmed in a new experiment: Memory for a sample color was biased toward the color of a task-irrelevant saccade target object, demonstrating the bidirectional coupling between visual working memory and perceptual processing. © 2014 ARVO.

  18. In situ oxygen dynamics in coral-algal interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wangpraseurt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral reefs degrade globally at an alarming rate, with benthic algae often replacing corals. However, the extent to which benthic algae contribute to coral mortality, and the potential mechanisms involved, remain disputed. Recent laboratory studies suggested that algae kill corals by inducing hypoxia on the coral surface, through stimulated microbial respiration. METHODS/FINDINGS: We examined the main premise of this hypothesis by measuring in situ oxygen microenvironments at the contact interface between the massive coral Porites spp. and turf algae, and between Porites spp. and crustose coralline algae (CCA. Oxygen levels at the interface were similar to healthy coral tissue and ranged between 300-400 µM during the day. At night, the interface was hypoxic (~70 µM in coral-turf interactions and close to anoxic (~2 µM in coral-CCA interactions, but these values were not significantly different from healthy tissue. The diffusive boundary layer (DBL was about three times thicker at the interface than above healthy tissue, due to a depression in the local topography. A numerical model, developed to analyze the oxygen profiles above the irregular interface, revealed strongly reduced net photosynthesis and dark respiration rates at the coral-algal interface compared to unaffected tissue during the day and at night, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that hypoxia was not a consistent feature in the microenvironment of the coral-algal interface under in situ conditions. Therefore, hypoxia alone is unlikely to be the cause of coral mortality. Due to the modified topography, the interaction zone is distinguished by a thicker diffusive boundary layer, which limits the local metabolic activity and likely promotes accumulation of potentially harmful metabolic products (e.g., allelochemicals and protons. Our study highlights the importance of mass transfer phenomena and the need for direct in situ measurements of

  19. Modelling social interaction as perceptual crossing: an investigation into the dynamics of the interaction process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froese, Tom; Di Paolo, Ezequiel A.

    2010-03-01

    This paper continues efforts to establish a mutually informative dialogue between psychology and evolutionary robotics in order to investigate the dynamics of social interaction. We replicate a recent simulation model of a minimalist experiment in perceptual crossing and confirm the results with significantly simpler artificial agents. A series of psycho-physical tests of their behaviour informs a hypothetical circuit model of their internal operation. However, a detailed study of the actual internal dynamics reveals this circuit model to be unfounded, thereby offering a tale of caution for those hypothesising about sub-personal processes in terms of behavioural observations. In particular, it is shown that the behaviour of the agents largely emerges out of the interaction process itself rather than being an individual achievement alone. We also extend the original simulation model in two novel directions in order to test further the extent to which perceptual crossing between agents can self-organise in a robust manner. These modelling results suggest new hypotheses that can become the basis for further psychological experiments.

  20. Strong electric fields at a prototypical oxide/water interface probed by ab initio molecular dynamics: MgO(001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporte, Sara; Finocchi, Fabio; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Blanchard, Marc; Balan, Etienne; Guyot, François; Saitta, Antonino Marco

    2015-08-21

    We report a density-functional theory (DFT)-based study of the interface of bulk water with a prototypical oxide surface, MgO(001), and focus our study on the often-overlooked surface electric field. In particular, we observe that the bare MgO(001) surface, although charge-neutral and defectless, has an intense electric field on the Å scale. The MgO(001) surface covered with 1 water monolayer (1 ML) is investigated via a supercell accounting for the experimentally-observed (2 × 3) reconstruction, stable at ambient temperature, and in which two out of six water molecules are dissociated. This 1 ML-hydrated surface is also found to have a high, albeit short-ranged, normal component of the field. Finally, the oxide/water interface is studied via room-temperature ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) using 34 H2O molecules between two MgO(001) surfaces. To our best knowledge this is the first AIMD study of the MgO(001)/liquid water interface in which all atoms are treated using DFT and including several layers above the first adsorbed layer. We observe that the surface electric field, averaged over the AIMD trajectories, is still very strong on the fully-wet surface, peaking at about 3 V Å(-1). Even in the presence of bulk-like water, the structure of the first layer in contact with the surface remains similar to the (2 × 3)-reconstructed ice ad-layer on MgO(001). Moreover, we observe proton exchange within the first layer, and between the first and second layers - indeed, the O-O distances close to the surface are found to be distributed towards shorter distances, a property which has been shown to directly promote proton transfer.

  1. The process-related dynamics of microbial community during a simulated fermentation of Chinese strong-flavored liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiangzhen; Tao, Yong; Jia, Jia; He, Xiaohong

    2017-09-15

    Famous Chinese strong-flavored liquor (CSFL) is brewed by microbial consortia in a special fermentation pit (FT). However, the fermentation process was not fully understood owing to the complicate community structure and metabolism. In this study, the process-related dynamics of microbial communities and main flavor compounds during the 70-day fermentation process were investigated in a simulated fermentation system. A three-phase model was proposed to characterize the process of the CSFL fermentation. (i) In the early fermentation period (1-23 days), glucose was produced from macromolecular carbohydrates (e.g., starch). The prokaryotic diversity decreased significantly. The Lactobacillaceae gradually predominated in the prokaryotic community. In contrast, the eukaryotic diversity rose remarkably in this stage. Thermoascus, Aspergillus, Rhizopus and unidentified Saccharomycetales were dominant eukaryotic members. (ii) In the middle fermentation period (23-48 days), glucose concentration decreased while lactate acid and ethanol increased significantly. Prokaryotic community was almost dominated by the Lactobacillus, while eukaryotic community was mainly comprised of Thermoascus, Emericella and Aspergillus. (iii) In the later fermentation period (48-70 days), the concentrations of ethyl esters, especially ethyl caproate, increased remarkably. The CSFL fermentation could undergo three stages: saccharification, glycolysis and esterification. Saccharomycetales, Monascus, and Rhizopus were positively correlated to glucose concentration (P microbial communities during the CSFL fermentation, and it further revealed the correlations between some crucial microorganisms and flavoring chemicals (FCs). The results from this study help to design effective strategies to manipulate microbial consortia for fermentation process optimization in the CSFL brew practice.

  2. Stress, strain, and structural dynamics an interactive handbook of formulas, solutions, and Matlab toolboxes

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Bingen

    2005-01-01

    Stress, Strain, and Structural Dynamics is a comprehensive and definitive reference to statics and dynamics of solids and structures, including mechanics of materials, structural mechanics, elasticity, rigid-body dynamics, vibrations, structural dynamics, and structural controls. This text integrates the development of fundamental theories, formulas and mathematical models with user-friendly interactive computer programs, written in the powerful and popular MATLAB. This unique merger of technical referencing and interactive computing allows instant solution of a variety of engineering problems

  3. Flight Dynamic Simulation with Nonlinear Aeroelastic Interaction using the ROM-ROM Procedure Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology, Inc. (ZONA) proposes to develop an integrated flight dynamics simulation capability with nonlinear aeroelastic interactions by combining a flight...

  4. Experimental investigations of the interaction of multi-GeV particles with strong crystalline fields and applications in high-energy beam lines

    CERN Document Server

    Mikkelsen, U

    1997-01-01

    The thesis first introduces the theory of the interaction of energetic particles with strong crystalline fields. It then treats a number of experiments that investigate different phenomena which can be divided in two: Strong field effects and bent crystals. Both of these include a wealth of sub-topics, such as pair production, strong gamma-ray emission, radiative cooling, polarized gamma-rays and possible inhibiting effects as well as an investigation of the advantage of high-Z materials for deflection of charged particles in crystals and an examination of the radiation hardness of the deflection phenomenon. A number of used and potential applications are considered.

  5. Nonlinear modeling of dynamic interactions within neuronal ensembles using Principal Dynamic Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmarelis, Vasilis Z; Shin, Dae C; Song, Dong; Hampson, Robert E; Deadwyler, Sam A; Berger, Theodore W

    2013-02-01

    A methodology for nonlinear modeling of multi-input multi-output (MIMO) neuronal systems is presented that utilizes the concept of Principal Dynamic Modes (PDM). The efficacy of this new methodology is demonstrated in the study of the dynamic interactions between neuronal ensembles in the Pre-Frontal Cortex (PFC) of a behaving non-human primate (NHP) performing a Delayed Match-to-Sample task. Recorded spike trains from Layer-2 and Layer-5 neurons were viewed as the "inputs" and "outputs", respectively, of a putative MIMO system/model that quantifies the dynamic transformation of multi-unit neuronal activity between Layer-2 and Layer-5 of the PFC. Model prediction performance was evaluated by means of computed Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves. The PDM-based approach seeks to reduce the complexity of MIMO models of neuronal ensembles in order to enable the practicable modeling of large-scale neural systems incorporating hundreds or thousands of neurons, which is emerging as a preeminent issue in the study of neural function. The "scaling-up" issue has attained critical importance as multi-electrode recordings are increasingly used to probe neural systems and advance our understanding of integrated neural function. The initial results indicate that the PDM-based modeling methodology may greatly reduce the complexity of the MIMO model without significant degradation of performance. Furthermore, the PDM-based approach offers the prospect of improved biological/physiological interpretation of the obtained MIMO models.

  6. Wolbachia-Host Interactions: Host Mating Patterns Affect Wolbachia Density Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Xiao Zhao

    Full Text Available Wolbachia are maternally inherited intracellular bacteria that infect a wide range of arthropods and cause an array of effects on host reproduction, fitness and mating behavior. Although our understanding of the Wolbachia-associated effects on hosts is rapidly expanding, our knowledge of the host factors that mediate Wolbachia dynamics is rudimentary. Here, we explore the interactions between Wolbachia and its host, the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch. Our results indicate that Wolbachia induces strong cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI, increases host fecundity, but has no effects on the longevity of females and the mating competitiveness of males in T. urticae. Most importantly, host mating pattern was found to affect Wolbachia density dynamics during host aging. Mating of an uninfected mite of either sex with an infected mite attenuates the Wolbachia density in the infected mite. According to the results of Wolbachia localization, this finding may be associated with the tropism of Wolbachia for the reproductive tissue in adult spider mites. Our findings describe a new interaction between Wolbachia and their hosts.

  7. The Effect of Exogenous Inputs and Defiant Agents on Opinion Dynamics with Local and Global Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Fotouhi, Babak

    2012-01-01

    Most of the conventional models for opinion dynamics mainly account for a fully local influence, where myopic agents decide their actions after they interact with other agents that are adjacent to them. For example, in the case of social interactions, this includes family, friends, and other strong social ties. The model proposed in this contribution, embodies a global influence as well where, by global, we mean that each node also observes a sample of the average behavior of the entire population (in the social example, people observe other people on the streets, subway, and other social venues). We consider a case where nodes have dichotomous states (examples include elections with two major parties, whether or not to adopt a new technology or product, and any yes/no opinion such as in voting on a referendum). The dynamics of states on a network with arbitrary degree distribution are studied. For a given initial condition, we find the probability to reach consensus on each state and the expected time reach ...

  8. 3D modelling of interaction of strongly nonlinear internal seiches with a concave lake topography and a phenomenon of the "lake monsters".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terletska, Kateryna; Maderich, Vladimir; Brovchenko, Igor; Jung, Kyung Tae

    2013-04-01

    In the freshwater lakes in moderate latitudes stratification occurs as a result of the seasonal warming of the surface water layer. Than the intense wind surges (usually in autumn) tilt the surface and generate long basin-scale low-frequency standing internal waves (seiches). Depending on the initial interface tilt and stratification wide spectra of possible flow regimes can be observed [1]-[2].They varied from small amplitude symmetric seiches to large amplitude nonlinear waves.Nonlinearity leads to an asymmetry of internal waves and appearance of the surge or bore and further disintegration of it on a sequence of solitary waves. In present study degeneration of the strongly nonlinear internal seiches in elongated lakes with a concave "spoon-like" topography is investigated.Two different three-dimensional non-hydrostatic free-surface numerical models are used to investigate degeneration of large internal waves and its subsequent interaction with the concave lake slope. One of this model is non-hydrostatic model [3] and the other is a well-known MIT model. At first we consider idealized elongated elliptic-shape lake with the dimension of 5 km X 1 km with the maximal depth 30 m. The stratification in lake is assumed to be given in a form of the tangent function with a density difference between upper and lower layers 2 kgm-3 . It is assumed that motion in such lake is initiated by inclination of thermocline on a certain angle. Than lake adjusts to return to its original state producing internal seiches which begin interacting with a bottom topography. The process of degeneration of internal seiches in the lake with concave ends consist of chain of elementary processes: 1) steeping of long basin scale large amplitude wave, that evolve into internal surge, 2) surge interact with concave lake ends that leads the concentration of the flow and formation of down slope bottom jet along the lake axis, 3) due to cumulative effect local velocity in the jet accelerates up to

  9. OTEC Cold Water Pipe-Platform Subsystem Dynamic Interaction Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varley, Robert [Lockheed Martin Corporation, Manassas, VA (United States); Halkyard, John [John Halkyard and Associates, Houston, TX (United States); Johnson, Peter [BMT Scientific Marine Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Shi, Shan [Houston Offshore Engineering, Houston, TX (United States); Marinho, Thiago [Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). LabOceano

    2014-05-09

    A commercial floating 100-megawatt (MW) ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power plant will require a cold water pipe (CWP) with a diameter of 10-meter (m) and length of up to 1,000 m. The mass of the cold water pipe, including entrained water, can exceed the mass of the platform supporting it. The offshore industry uses software-modeling tools to develop platform and riser (pipe) designs to survive the offshore environment. These tools are typically validated by scale model tests in facilities able to replicate real at-sea meteorological and ocean (metocean) conditions to provide the understanding and confidence to proceed to final design and full-scale fabrication. However, today’s offshore platforms (similar to and usually larger than those needed for OTEC applications) incorporate risers (or pipes) with diameters well under one meter. Secondly, the preferred construction method for large diameter OTEC CWPs is the use of composite materials, primarily a form of fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP). The use of these material results in relatively low pipe stiffness and large strains compared to steel construction. These factors suggest the need for further validation of offshore industry software tools. The purpose of this project was to validate the ability to model numerically the dynamic interaction between a large cold water-filled fiberglass pipe and a floating OTEC platform excited by metocean weather conditions using measurements from a scale model tested in an ocean basin test facility.

  10. Elucidating nitric oxide synthase domain interactions by molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Scott A; Holden, Jeffrey K; Li, Huiying; Poulos, Thomas L

    2016-02-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is a multidomain enzyme that catalyzes the production of nitric oxide (NO) by oxidizing L-Arg to NO and L-citrulline. NO production requires multiple interdomain electron transfer steps between the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and heme domain. Specifically, NADPH-derived electrons are transferred to the heme-containing oxygenase domain via the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and FMN containing reductase domains. While crystal structures are available for both the reductase and oxygenase domains of NOS, to date there is no atomic level structural information on domain interactions required for the final FMN-to-heme electron transfer step. Here, we evaluate a model of this final electron transfer step for the heme-FMN-calmodulin NOS complex based on the recent biophysical studies using a 105-ns molecular dynamics trajectory. The resulting equilibrated complex structure is very stable and provides a detailed prediction of interdomain contacts required for stabilizing the NOS output state. The resulting equilibrated complex model agrees well with previous experimental work and provides a detailed working model of the final NOS electron transfer step required for NO biosynthesis. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  11. Star-planet interactions and dynamical evolution of exoplanetary systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiani Cilia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamical evolution of planetary systems, after the evaporation of the accretion disk, is the result of the competition between tidal dissipation and the net angular momentum loss of the system. The description of the diversity of orbital configurations, and correlations between parameters of the observed system (e.g. in the case of hot jupiters, is still limited by our understanding of the transport of angular momentum within the stars, and its effective loss by magnetic braking. After discussing the challenges of modelling tidal evolution for exoplanets, I will review recent results showing the importance of tidal interactions to test models of planetary formation. This kind of studies rely on the determination of stellar radii, masses and ages. Major advances will thus be obtained with the results of the PLATO 2.0 mission, selected as the next M-class mission of ESA’s Cosmic Vision plan, that will allow the complete characterisation of host stars using asteroseismology.

  12. Dynamic protein interaction networks and new structural paradigms in signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csizmok, Veronika; Follis, Ariele Viacava; Kriwacki, Richard W.; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding signaling and other complex biological processes requires elucidating the critical roles of intrinsically disordered proteins and regions (IDPs/IDRs), which represent ~30% of the proteome and enable unique regulatory mechanisms. In this review we describe the structural heterogeneity of disordered proteins that underpins these mechanisms and the latest progress in obtaining structural descriptions of ensembles of disordered proteins that are needed for linking structure and dynamics to function. We describe the diverse interactions of IDPs that can have unusual characteristics such as “ultrasensitivity” and “regulated folding and unfolding”. We also summarize the mounting data showing that large-scale assembly and protein phase separation occurs within a variety of signaling complexes and cellular structures. In addition, we discuss efforts to therapeutically target disordered proteins with small molecules. Overall, we interpret the remodeling of disordered state ensembles due to binding and post-translational modifications within an expanded framework for allostery that provides significant insights into how disordered proteins transmit biological information. PMID:26922996

  13. Dynamic Interaction between Reinforcement Learning and Attention in Multidimensional Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Yuan Chang; Radulescu, Angela; Daniel, Reka; DeWoskin, Vivian; Niv, Yael

    2017-01-18

    Little is known about the relationship between attention and learning during decision making. Using eye tracking and multivariate pattern analysis of fMRI data, we measured participants' dimensional attention as they performed a trial-and-error learning task in which only one of three stimulus dimensions was relevant for reward at any given time. Analysis of participants' choices revealed that attention biased both value computation during choice and value update during learning. Value signals in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and prediction errors in the striatum were similarly biased by attention. In turn, participants' focus of attention was dynamically modulated by ongoing learning. Attentional switches across dimensions correlated with activity in a frontoparietal attention network, which showed enhanced connectivity with the ventromedial prefrontal cortex between switches. Our results suggest a bidirectional interaction between attention and learning: attention constrains learning to relevant dimensions of the environment, while we learn what to attend to via trial and error. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antenatal interpersonal sensitivity is more strongly associated than perinatal depressive symptoms with postnatal mother-infant interaction quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Karen; Cockshaw, Wendell; Boyce, Philip; Thorpe, Karen

    2016-10-01

    Maternal mental health has enduring effects on children's life chances and is a substantial cost driver for child health, education and social services. A key linking mechanism is the quality of mother-infant interaction. A body of work associates maternal depressive symptoms across the antenatal and postnatal (perinatal) period with less-than-optimal mother-infant interaction. Our study aims to build on previous research in the field through exploring the association of a maternal personality trait, interpersonal sensitivity, measured in early pregnancy, with subsequent mother-infant interaction quality. We analysed data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) to examine the association between antenatal interpersonal sensitivity and postnatal mother-infant interaction quality in the context of perinatal depressive symptoms. Interpersonal sensitivity was measured during early pregnancy and depressive symptoms in the antenatal year and across the first 21 months of the postnatal period. In a subsample of the ALSPAC, mother-infant interaction was measured at 12 months postnatal through a standard observation. For the subsample that had complete data at all time points (n = 706), hierarchical regression examined the contribution of interpersonal sensitivity to variance in mother-infant interaction quality. Perinatal depressive symptoms predicted little variance in mother-infant interaction. Antenatal interpersonal sensitivity explained a greater proportion of variance in mother-infant interaction quality. The personality trait, interpersonal sensitivity, measured in early pregnancy, is a more robust indicator of subsequent mother-infant-interaction quality than perinatal depressive symptoms, thus affording enhanced opportunity to identify vulnerable mother-infant relationships for targeted early intervention.

  15. Close-packed structure dynamics with finite-range interaction: computational mechanics with individual layer interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Horta, Edwin; Estevez-Rams, Ernesto; Lora-Serrano, Raimundo; Neder, Reinhard

    2017-09-01

    This is the second contribution in a series of papers dealing with dynamical models in equilibrium theories of polytypism. A Hamiltonian introduced by Ahmad & Khan [Phys. Status Solidi B (2000), 218, 425-430] avoids the unphysical assignment of interaction terms to fictitious entities given by spins in the Hägg coding of the stacking arrangement. In this paper an analysis of polytype generation and disorder in close-packed structures is made for such a Hamiltonian. Results are compared with a previous analysis using the Ising model. Computational mechanics is the framework under which the analysis is performed. The competing effects of disorder and structure, as given by entropy density and excess entropy, respectively, are discussed. It is argued that the Ahmad & Khan model is simpler and predicts a larger set of polytypes than previous treatments.

  16. Compressive characteristics of single walled carbon nanotube with water interactions investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.H., E-mail: chwong@ntu.edu.sg; Vijayaraghavan, V.

    2014-01-24

    The elastic properties of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with surrounding water interactions are studied using molecular dynamics simulation technique. The compressive loading characteristic of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a fluidic medium such as water is critical for its role in determining the lifetime and stability of CNT based nano-fluidic devices. In this paper, we conducted a comprehensive analysis on the effect of geometry, chirality and density of encapsulated water on the elastic properties of SWCNT. Our studies show that defect density and distribution can strongly impact the compressive resistance of SWCNTs in water. Further studies were conducted on capped SWCNTs with varying densities of encapsulated water, which is necessary to understand the strength of CNT as a potential drug carrier. The results obtained from this paper will help determining the potential applications of CNTs in the field of nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) such as nano-biological and nano-fluidic devices.

  17. Three dimensional modeling of the cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and brain interactions in the aqueduct of sylvius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fin, Loïc; Grebe, Reinhard

    2003-06-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method is presented to investigate the flow of cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) in the cerebral aqueduct. In addition to former approaches exhibiting a rigid geometry, we propose a model which includes a deformable membrane as the wall of this flow channel. An anatomical shape of the aqueduct was computed from magnetic resonance images (MRI) and the resulting meshing was immersed in a marker-and-cell (MAC) staggered grid for to take into account fluid-structure interactions. The time derivatives were digitized using the Crank-Nicolson scheme. The equation of continuity was modified by introducing an artificial compressibility and digitized by a finite difference scheme. Calculations were validated with the simulation of laminar flow in a rigid tube. Then, comparisons were made between simulations of a rigid aqueduct and a deformable one. We found that the deformability of the walls has a strong influence on the pressure drop for a given flow.

  18. Host-Parasite Interactions and Population Dynamics of Rock Ptarmigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenkewitz, Ute; Nielsen, Ólafur K; Skírnisson, Karl; Stefánsson, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Populations of rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta) in Iceland fluctuate in multiannual cycles with peak numbers c. every 10 years. We studied the ptarmigan-parasite community and how parasites relate to ptarmigan age, body condition, and population density. We collected 632 ptarmigan in northeast Iceland in early October from 2006 to 2012; 630 (99.7%) were infected with at least one parasite species, 616 (98%) with ectoparasites, and 536 (85%) with endoparasites. We analysed indices for the combined parasite community (16 species) and known pathogenic parasites, two coccidian protozoans Eimeria muta and Eimeria rjupa, two nematodes Capillaria caudinflata and Trichostrongylus tenuis, one chewing louse Amyrsidea lagopi, and one skin mite Metamicrolichus islandicus. Juveniles overall had more ectoparasites than adults, but endoparasite levels were similar in both groups. Ptarmigan population density was associated with endoparasites, and in particular prevalence of the coccidian parasite Eimeria muta. Annual aggregation level of this eimerid fluctuated inversely with prevalence, with lows at prevalence peak and vice versa. Both prevalence and aggregation of E. muta tracked ptarmigan population density with a 1.5 year time lag. The time lag could be explained by the host specificity of this eimerid, host density dependent shedding of oocysts, and their persistence in the environment from one year to the next. Ptarmigan body condition was negatively associated with E. muta prevalence, an indication of their pathogenicity, and this eimerid was also positively associated with ptarmigan mortality and marginally inversely with fecundity. There were also significant associations between fecundity and chewing louse Amyrsidea lagopi prevalence (negative), excess juvenile mortality and nematode Capillaria caudinflata prevalence (positive), and adult mortality and skin mite Metamicrolichus islandicus prevalence (negative). Though this study is correlational, it provides strong

  19. Visual Design Guidelines for Improving Learning from Dynamic and Interactive Digital Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Despite the dynamic and interactive features of digital text, the visual design guidelines for digital text are similar to those for printed text. The purpose of this study was to develop visual design guidelines for improving learning from dynamic and interactive digital text and to validate them by controlled testing. Two structure design…

  20. Spontaneous emission spectra and quantum light-matter interactions from a strongly coupled quantum dot metal-nanoparticle system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Vlack, C.; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Hughes, S.

    2012-01-01

    the dot to the detector, we demonstrate that the strong-coupling regime should be observable in the far-field spontaneous emission spectrum, even at room temperature. The vacuum-induced emission spectra show that the usual vacuum Rabi doublet becomes a rich spectral triplet or quartet with two of the four...

  1. Topological Kondo insulators in one dimension: Continuous Haldane-type ground-state evolution from the strongly interacting to the noninteracting limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisandrini, Franco T.; Lobos, Alejandro M.; Dobry, Ariel O.; Gazza, Claudio J.

    2017-08-01

    We study, by means of the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) technique, the evolution of the ground state in a one-dimensional topological insulator, from the noninteracting to the strongly interacting limit, where the system can be mapped onto a topological Kondo-insulator model. We focus on a toy model Hamiltonian (i.e., the interacting "s p -ladder" model), which could be experimentally realized in optical lattices with higher orbitals loaded with ultracold fermionic atoms. Our goal is to shed light on the emergence of the strongly interacting ground state and its topological classification as the Hubbard U interaction parameter of the model is increased. Our numerical results show that the ground state can be generically classified as a symmetry-protected topological phase of the Haldane type, even in the noninteracting case U =0 where the system can be additionally classified as a time-reversal Z2-topological insulator, and evolves adiabatically between the noninteracting and strongly interacting limits.

  2. Dynamics of fermionic Hubbard models after interaction quenches in one and two dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamerla, Simone Anke

    2013-10-15

    calculation up to second order in the interaction. Then the dynamics of the one-dimensional model is discussed with a focus on the relation of the results derived by the iterated equations of motion approach to results obtained by bosonization theory, the behavior for strong interactions and the dynamical transition from the weak to the strong quench regime. Furthermore, the Hubbard model is studied on a two-dimensional square lattice. This model is fundamentally different from the one-dimensional model: In contrast to the one-dimensional model the two-dimensional model is not integrable allowing a true relaxation of the system. For this system a calculation up to second order in the interaction is performed and compared to the results of the iterated equation of motion approach. Besides, the time evolution of the momentum distribution and the influence of doping on the dynamics is studied. Moreover, a first estimate for relaxation times is provided without relying on the assumption of a mixed state.

  3. Renormalization of the P- and T-odd nuclear potentials by the strong interaction and enhancement of P-odd effective field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flambaum, V. V.; Vorov, O. K.

    1994-04-01

    Approximate analytical formulas for the self-consistent renormalization of P,T-odd and P-odd weak nuclear potentials by the residual nucleon-nucleon strong interaction are derived. The contact spin-flip nucleon-nucleon interaction reduces the constant of the P,T-odd potential 1.5 times for the proton and 1.8 times for the neutron. Renormalization of the P-odd potential is caused by the velocity dependent spin-flip component of the strong interaction. In the standard variant of π+ρ exchange, the conventional strength value leads to anomalous enhancement of the P-odd potential. Moreover, the π-meson exchange contribution seems to be large enough to generate an instability (pole) in the nuclear response to a weak potential.

  4. Pesticide interactions with soil affected by olive mill wastewater (OMW): how strong and long-lasting is the OMW effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Yonatan; Borisover, Mikhail; Schaumann, Gabriele E.; Diehl, Dörte; Tamimi, Nisreen; Bukhanovsky, Nadezhda

    2017-04-01

    Sorption interactions with soils are well known to control the environmental fate of multiple organic compounds including pesticides. Pesticide-soil interactions may be affected by organic amendments or organic matter (OM)-containing wastewater brought to the field. Specifically, land spreading of olive mill wastewater (OMW), occurring intentionally or not, may also influence pesticide-soil interactions. The effects of the OMW disposed in the field on soil properties, including their ability to interact with pesticides, become of great interest due to the increasing demand for olive oil and a constant growth of world oil production. This paper summarizes some recent findings related to the effect of prior OMW land application on the ability of soils to interact with the organic compounds including pesticides, diuron and simazine. The major findings are as following: (1) bringing OMW to the field increases the potential of soils to sorb non-ionized pesticides; (2) this sorption increase may not be related solely to the increase in soil organic carbon content but it can reflect also the changes in the soil sorption mechanisms; (3) increased pesticide interactions with OMW-affected soils may become irreversible, due, assumedly, to the swelling of some components of the OMW-treated soil; (4) enhanced pesticide-soil interactions mitigate with the time passed after the OMW application, however, in the case of diuron, the remaining effect could be envisioned at least 600 days after the normal OMW application; (5) the enhancement effect of OMW application on soil sorption may increase with soil depth, in the 0-10 cm interval; (6) at higher pesticide (diuron) concentrations, larger extents of sorption enhancement, following the prior OMW-soil interactions, may be expected; (7) disposal of OMW in the field may be seasonal-dependent, and, in the case studied, it led to more distinct impacts on sorption when carried out in spring and winter, as compared with summer. It appears

  5. Nuclear proton dynamics and interactions with calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-07-01

    Biochemical signals acting on the nucleus can regulate gene expression. Despite the inherent affinity of nucleic acids and nuclear proteins (e.g. transcription factors) for protons, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate nuclear pH (pHnuc), and how these could be exploited to control gene expression. Here, we show that pHnuc dynamics can be imaged using the DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342. Nuclear pores allow the passage of medium-sized molecules (calcein), but protons must first bind to mobile buffers in order to gain access to the nucleoplasm. Fixed buffering residing in the nucleus of permeabilized cells was estimated to be very weak on the basis of the large amplitude of pHnuc transients evoked by photolytic H(+)-uncaging or exposure to weak acids/bases. Consequently, the majority of nuclear pH buffering is sourced from the cytoplasm in the form of mobile buffers. Effective proton diffusion was faster in nucleoplasm than in cytoplasm, in agreement with the higher mobile-to-fixed buffering ratio in the nucleus. Cardiac myocyte pHnuc changed in response to maneuvers that alter nuclear Ca(2+) signals. Blocking Ca(2+) release from inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors stably alkalinized the nucleus. This Ca(2+)-pH interaction may arise from competitive binding to common chemical moieties. Competitive binding to mobile buffers may couple the efflux of Ca(2+)via nuclear pores with a counterflux of protons. This would generate a stable pH gradient between cytoplasm and nucleus that is sensitive to the state of nuclear Ca(2+) signaling. The unusual behavior of protons in the nucleus provides new mechanisms for regulating cardiac nuclear biology. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Diet-dependent modular dynamic interactions of the equine cecal microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Camilla; Jensen, Rasmus Bovbjerg; Avershina, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge on dynamic interactions in microbiota is pivotal for understanding the role of bacteria in the gut. We herein present comprehensive dynamic models of the horse cecal microbiota, which include short-chained fatty acids, carbohydrate metabolic networks, and taxonomy. Dynamic models were d...

  7. Interaction of the Space Shuttle on-orbit autopilot with tether dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Edward V.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of Orbiter flight control on tether dynamics is studied by simulation. Open-loop effects of Orbiter jet firing on tether dynamics are shown, and the potential for closed-loop interaction between tether dynamics and Orbiter flight control is determined. The significance of these effects on Orbiter flight control and tether control is assessed.

  8. Dynamic interaction between retinal and extraretinal signals in motion integration for smooth pursuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogadhi, Amarender R; Montagnini, Anna; Masson, Guillaume S

    2013-11-04

    Due to the aperture problem, the initial direction of tracking responses to a translating bar is biased towards the direction orthogonal to the bar. This observation offers a powerful way to explore the interactions between retinal and extraretinal signals in controlling our actions. We conducted two experiments to probe these interactions by briefly (200 and 400 ms) blanking the moving target (45° or 135° tilted bar) during steady state (Experiment 1) and at different moments during the early phase of pursuit (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, we found a marginal but statistically significant directional bias on target reappearance for all subjects in at least one blank condition (200 or 400 ms). In Experiment 2, no systematic significant directional bias was observed at target reappearance after a blank. These results suggest that the weighting of retinal and extraretinal signals is dynamically modulated during the different phases of pursuit. Based on our previous theoretical work on motion integration, we propose a new closed-loop two-stage recurrent Bayesian model where retinal and extraretinal signals are dynamically weighted based on their respective reliabilities and combined to compute the visuomotor drive. With a single free parameter, the model reproduces many aspects of smooth pursuit observed across subjects during and immediately after target blanking. It provides a new theoretical framework to understand how different signals are dynamically combined based on their relative reliability to adaptively control our actions. Overall, the model and behavioral results suggest that human subjects rely more strongly on prediction during the early phase than in the steady state phase of pursuit.

  9. Successional changes in trophic interactions support a mechanistic model of post-fire population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Annabel L

    2017-11-22

    Models based on functional traits have limited power in predicting how animal populations respond to disturbance because they do not capture the range of demographic and biological factors that drive population dynamics, including variation in trophic interactions. I tested the hypothesis that successional changes in vegetation structure, which affected invertebrate abundance, would influence growth rates and body condition in the early-successional, insectivorous gecko Nephrurus stellatus. I captured geckos at 17 woodland sites spanning a succession gradient from 2 to 48 years post-fire. Body condition and growth rates were analysed as a function of the best-fitting fire-related predictor (invertebrate abundance or time since fire) with different combinations of the co-variates age, sex and location. Body condition in the whole population was positively affected by increasing invertebrate abundance and, in the adult population, this effect was most pronounced for females. There was strong support for a decline in growth rates in weight with time since fire. The results suggest that increased early-successional invertebrate abundance has filtered through to a higher trophic level with physiological benefits for insectivorous geckos. I integrated the new findings about trophic interactions into a general conceptual model of mechanisms underlying post-fire population dynamics based on a long-term research programme. The model highlights how greater food availability during early succession could drive rapid population growth by contributing to previously reported enhanced reproduction and dispersal. This study provides a framework to understand links between ecological and physiological traits underlying post-fire population dynamics.

  10. The structural dynamics of the flavivirus fusion peptide-membrane interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ygara S Mendes

    Full Text Available Membrane fusion is a crucial step in flavivirus infections and a potential target for antiviral strategies. Lipids and proteins play cooperative roles in the fusion process, which is triggered by the acidic pH inside the endosome. This acidic environment induces many changes in glycoprotein conformation and allows the action of a highly conserved hydrophobic sequence, the fusion peptide (FP. Despite the large volume of information available on the virus-triggered fusion process, little is known regarding the mechanisms behind flavivirus-cell membrane fusion. Here, we evaluated the contribution of a natural single amino acid difference on two flavivirus FPs, FLA(G ((98DRGWGNGCGLFGK(110 and FLA(H ((98DRGWGNHCGLFGK(110, and investigated the role of the charge of the target membrane on the fusion process. We used an in silico approach to simulate the interaction of the FPs with a lipid bilayer in a complementary way and used spectroscopic approaches to collect conformation information. We found that both peptides interact with neutral and anionic micelles, and molecular dynamics (MD simulations showed the interaction of the FPs with the lipid bilayer. The participation of the indole ring of Trp appeared to be important for the anchoring of both peptides in the membrane model, as indicated by MD simulations and spectroscopic analyses. Mild differences between FLA(G and FLA(H were observed according to the pH and the charge of the target membrane model. The MD simulations of the membrane showed that both peptides adopted a bend structure, and an interaction between the aromatic residues was strongly suggested, which was also observed by circular dichroism in the presence of micelles. As the FPs of viral fusion proteins play a key role in the mechanism of viral fusion, understanding the interactions between peptides and membranes is crucial for medical science and biology and may contribute to the design of new antiviral drugs.

  11. Experimental and numerical study of the strong interaction between wakes of cylindrical obstacles; Etude experimentale et numerique de l'interaction forte entre sillages d'obstacles cylindriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, Ch

    1998-04-02

    In the context of thermal-hydraulics of nuclear reactors, strong interaction between wakes is encountered in the bottom of reactor vessels where control and measurement rods of variable size and disposition interact with the overall wakes generated in these flow zones. This study deals with the strong interaction between two wakes developed downstream of two parallel cylinders with a small spacing. The analysis focusses on the effect of the Reynolds regime which controls the equilibrium between the inertia and viscosity forces of the fluid and influences the large scale behaviour of the flow with the development of hydrodynamic instabilities and turbulence. The document is organized as follows: the characteristic phenomena of wakes formation downstream of cylindrical obstacles are recalled in the first chapter (single cylinder, interaction between two tubes, case of a bundle of tubes perpendicular to the flow). The experimental setup (hydraulic loop, velocity and pressure measurement instrumentation) and the statistical procedures applied to the signals measured are detailed in chapters 2 and 3. Chapter 4 is devoted to the experimental study of the strong interaction between two tubes. Laser Doppler velocity measurements in the wakes close to cylinders and pressure measurements performed on tube walls are reported in this chapter. In chapter 5, a 2-D numerical simulation of two typical cases of interaction (Re = 1000 and Re = 5000) is performed. In the last chapter, a more complex application of strong interactions inside and downstream of a bunch of staggered tubes is analyzed experimentally for equivalent Reynolds regimes. (J.S.)

  12. The mycosphere constitutes an arena for horizontal gene transfer with strong evolutionary implications for bacterial-fungal interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, MiaoZhi; de Cassia Pereira e Silva, Michele; De Mares, Maryam Chaib; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    In the microhabitat that surrounds fungal hyphae in soil, coined the mycosphere, carbonaceous compounds that are released from the hyphae stimulate the growth of heterotrophic bacteria, and thus activate organism-to-organism contacts through genetic interactions. Therefore, the mycosphere is

  13. Azimuthal anisotropy and formation of an extreme state of strongly interacting matter at the relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okorokov, V. A.

    Experimental results obtained by studying the azimuthal anisotropy of final states in nucleus-nucleus interactions at the energies of the relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC) are systematized. The medium is found to exhibit a pronounced collective behavior, which is likely to be formed at an

  14. Dynamic nonlinear modeling of interactions between neuronal ensembles using principal dynamic modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmarelis, V Z; Shin, D C; Song, D; Hampson, R E; Deadwyler, S A; Berger, T W

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel methodology for modeling the interactions between neuronal ensembles that utilizes the concept of Principal Dynamic Modes (PDM) and their associated nonlinear functions (ANF). This new approach seeks to reduce the complexity of the multi-input/multi-output (MIMO) model of the interactions between neuronal ensembles--an issue of critical practical importance in scaling up the MIMO models to incorporate hundreds (or even thousands) of input-output neurons. Global PDMs were extracted from the data using estimated first-order and second-order kernels and singular value decomposition (SVD). These global PDMs represent an efficient "coordinate system" for the representation of the MIMO model. The ANFs of the PDMs are estimated from the histograms of the combinations of PDM output values that lead to output spikes. For initial testing and validation of this approach, we applied it to a set of data collected at the pre-frontal cortex of a non-human primate during a behavioral task (Delayed Match-to-Sample). Recorded spike trains from Layer-2 neurons were viewed as the "inputs" and from Layer-5 neurons as the outputs. Model prediction performance was evaluated by means of computed Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves. The results indicate that this methodology may greatly reduce the complexity of the MIMO model without significant degradation of performance.

  15. Investigation of the source size and strong interaction with the femtoscopic correlations of baryons and antibaryons in heavy-ion collisions registered by ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00508100

    The strong interaction is one of the four fundamental forces of nature. It binds together quarks inside protons and neutrons (which are example of baryons - particles composed of three quarks) and assures the stability of the atomic nucleus. Parameters describing the strong potential are also crucial for the neutron stars models used in astrophysics. What is more, a precise study of strongly interacting particles may help to better understand the process of baryon annihilation. The current knowledge of the strong interactions between baryons other than nucle- ons is limited - there exist only a few measurements of the cross sections for pairs of (anti)baryons. The reason is that in many cases it is not possible to perform scattering experiments with beams of particles and antiparticles, as the exotic matter (such as Λ, Ξ or Σ baryons) is very shot-living. This issue can be solved thanks to the recent particle colliders like the Large Hadron Collider and experiments dedicated to study the heavy-ion collisio...

  16. Short Time Impulse Response Function (STIRF) for automatic evaluation of the variation of the dynamic parameters of reinforced concrete framed structures during strong earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo Ponzo, Felice; Ditommaso, Rocco

    2015-04-01

    This study presents an innovative strategy for automatic evaluation of the variable fundamental frequency and related damping factor of nonlinear structures during strong motion phases. Most of methods for damage detection are based on the assessment of the variations of the dynamic parameters characterizing the monitored structure. A crucial aspect of these methods is the automatic and accurate estimation of both structural eigen-frequencies and related damping factors also during the nonlinear behaviour. A new method, named STIRF (Short-Time Impulse Response Function - STIRF), based on the nonlinear interferometric analysis combined with the Fourier Transform (FT) here is proposed in order to allow scientists and engineers to characterize frequencies and damping variations of a monitored structure. The STIRF approach helps to overcome some limitation derived from the use of techniques based on simple Fourier Transform. These latter techniques provide good results when the response of the monitored system is stationary, but fails when the system exhibits a non-stationary, time-varying behaviour: even non-stationary input, soil-foundation and/or adjacent structures interaction phenomena can show the inadequacy of classic techniques to analysing the nonlinear and/or non-stationary behaviour of structures. In fact, using this kind of approach it is possible to improve some of the existing methods for the automatic damage detection providing stable results also during the strong motion phase. Results are consistent with those expected if compared with other techniques. The main advantage derived from the use of the proposed approach (STIRF) for Structural Health Monitoring is based on the simplicity of the interpretation of the nonlinear variations of the fundamental frequency and the related equivalent viscous damping factor. The proposed methodology has been tested on both numerical and experimental models also using data retrieved from shaking table tests. Based on

  17. Effects of Acoustic and Fluid Dynamic Interactions in Resonators: Applications in Thermoacoustic Refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antao, Dion Savio

    Thermoacoustic refrigeration systems have gained increased importance in cryogenic cooling technologies and improvements are needed to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the current cryogenic refrigeration devices. These improvements in performance require a re-examination of the fundamental acoustic and fluid dynamic interactions in the acoustic resonators that comprise a thermoacoustic refrigerator. A comprehensive research program of the pulse tube thermoacoustic refrigerator (PTR) and arbitrarily shaped, circular cross-section acoustic resonators was undertaken to develop robust computational models to design and predict the transport processes in these systems. This effort was divided into three main focus areas: (a) studying the acoustic and fluid dynamic interactions in consonant and dissonant acoustic resonators, (b) experimentally investigating thermoacoustic refrigeration systems attaining cryogenic levels and (c) computationally studying the transport processes and energy conversion through fluid-solid interactions in thermoacoustic pulse tube refrigeration devices. To investigate acoustic-fluid dynamic interactions in resonators, a high fidelity computational fluid dynamic model was developed and used to simulate the flow, pressure and temperature fields generated in consonant cylindrical and dissonant conical resonators. Excitation of the acoustic resonators produced high-amplitude standing waves in the conical resonator. The generated peak acoustic overpressures exceeded the initial undisturbed pressure by two to three times. The harmonic response in the conical resonator system was observed to be dependent on the piston amplitude. The resultant strong acoustic streaming structures in the cone resonator highlighted its potential over a cylindrical resonator as an efficient mixer. Two pulse tube cryogenic refrigeration (PTR) devices driven by a linear motor (a pressure wave generator) were designed, fabricated and tested. The characterization

  18. A new scalar resonance at 750 GeV: towards a proof of concept in favor of strongly interacting theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Minho [CERN, Theory Division, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 335 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Urbano, Alfredo [CERN, Theory Division, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-05-31

    We interpret the recently observed excess in the diphoton invariant mass as a new spin-0 resonant particle. On theoretical grounds, an interesting question is whether this new scalar resonance belongs to a strongly coupled sector or a well-defined weakly coupled theory. A possible UV-completion that has been widely considered in literature is based on the existence of new vector-like fermions whose loop contributions — Yukawa-coupled to the new resonance — explain the observed signal rate. The large total width preliminarily suggested by data seems to favor a large Yukawa coupling, at the border of a healthy perturbative definition. This potential problem can be fixed by introducing multiple vector-like fermions or large electric charges, bringing back the theory to a weakly coupled regime. However, this solution risks to be only a low-energy mirage: large multiplicity or electric charge can dangerously reintroduce the strong regime by modifying the renormalization group running of the dimensionless couplings. This issue is also tightly related to the (in)stability of the scalar potential. First, we study — in the theoretical setup described above — the parametric behavior of the diphoton signal rate, total width, and one-loop β functions. Then, we numerically solve the renormalization group equations, taking into account the observed diphoton signal rate and total width, to investigate the fate of the weakly coupled theory. We find that — with the only exception of few fine-tuned directions — weakly coupled interpretations of the excess are brought back to a strongly coupled regime if the running is taken into account.

  19. Simulating market dynamics : Interactions between consumer psychology and social networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.A; Jager, W.

    2003-01-01

    Markets can show different types of dynamics, from quiet markets dominated by one or a few products, to markets with continual penetration of new and reintroduced products. in a previous article we explored the dynamics of markets from a psychological perspective using a multi-agent simulation

  20. Origin of the Strong Interaction between Polar Molecules and Copper(II) Paddle-Wheels in Metal Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongari, Daniele; Tiana, Davide; Stoneburner, Samuel J; Gagliardi, Laura; Smit, Berend

    2017-07-20

    The copper paddle-wheel is the building unit of many metal organic frameworks. Because of the ability of the copper cations to attract polar molecules, copper paddle-wheels are promising for carbon dioxide adsorption and separation. They have therefore been studied extensively, both experimentally and computationally. In this work we investigate the copper-CO2 interaction in HKUST-1 and in two different cluster models of HKUST-1: monocopper Cu(formate)2 and dicopper Cu2(formate)4. We show that density functional theory methods severely underestimate the interaction energy between copper paddle-wheels and CO2, even including corrections for the dispersion forces. In contrast, a multireference wave function followed by perturbation theory to second order using the CASPT2 method correctly describes this interaction. The restricted open-shell Møller-Plesset 2 method (ROS-MP2, equivalent to (2,2) CASPT2) was also found to be adequate in describing the system and used to develop a novel force field. Our parametrization is able to predict the experimental CO2 adsorption isotherms in HKUST-1, and it is shown to be transferable to other copper paddle-wheel systems.