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Sample records for strong insulating effect

  1. Strong correlation effects on surfaces of topological insulators via holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yunseok; Song, Geunho; Sin, Sang-Jin

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the effects of strong correlation on the surface state of a topological insulator (TI). We argue that electrons in the regime of crossover from weak antilocalization to weak localization are strongly correlated, and calculate the magnetotransport coefficients of TIs using the gauge-gravity principle. Then, we examine the magnetoconductivity (MC) formula and find excellent agreement with the data of chrome-doped Bi2Te3 in the crossover regime. We also find that the cusplike peak in MC at low doping is absent, which is natural since quasiparticles disappear due to the strong correlation.

  2. Effect of strong disorder on three-dimensional chiral topological insulators: Phase diagrams, maps of the bulk invariant, and existence of topological extended bulk states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juntao; Fine, Carolyn; Prodan, Emil

    2014-11-01

    The effect of strong disorder on chiral-symmetric three-dimensional lattice models is investigated via analytical and numerical methods. The phase diagrams of the models are computed using the noncommutative winding number, as functions of disorder strength and model's parameters. The localized/delocalized characteristic of the quantum states is probed with level statistics analysis. Our study reconfirms the accurate quantization of the noncommutative winding number in the presence of strong disorder, and its effectiveness as a numerical tool. Extended bulk states are detected above and below the Fermi level, which are observed to undergo the so-called "levitation and pair annihilation" process when the system is driven through a topological transition. This suggests that the bulk invariant is carried by these extended states, in stark contrast with the one-dimensional case where the extended states are completely absent and the bulk invariant is carried by the localized states.

  3. On effective holographic Mott insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggioli, Matteo; Pujolàs, Oriol [Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona,The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology,Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2016-12-20

    We present a class of holographic models that behave effectively as prototypes of Mott insulators — materials where electron-electron interactions dominate transport phenomena. The main ingredient in the gravity dual is that the gauge-field dynamics contains self-interactions by way of a particular type of non-linear electrodynamics. The electrical response in these models exhibits typical features of Mott-like states: i) the low-temperature DC conductivity is unboundedly low; ii) metal-insulator transitions appear by varying various parameters; iii) for large enough self-interaction strength, the conductivity can even decrease with increasing doping (density of carriers) — which appears as a sharp manifestation of ‘traffic-jam’-like behaviour; iv) the insulating state becomes very unstable towards superconductivity at large enough doping. We exhibit some of the properties of the resulting insulator-superconductor transition, which is sensitive to the momentum dissipation rate in a specific way. These models imply a clear and generic correlation between Mott behaviour and significant effects in the nonlinear electrical response. We compute the nonlinear current-voltage curve in our model and find that indeed at large voltage the conductivity is largely reduced.

  4. On effective holographic Mott insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baggioli, Matteo; Pujolàs, Oriol

    2016-01-01

    We present a class of holographic models that behave effectively as prototypes of Mott insulators — materials where electron-electron interactions dominate transport phenomena. The main ingredient in the gravity dual is that the gauge-field dynamics contains self-interactions by way of a particular type of non-linear electrodynamics. The electrical response in these models exhibits typical features of Mott-like states: i) the low-temperature DC conductivity is unboundedly low; ii) metal-insulator transitions appear by varying various parameters; iii) for large enough self-interaction strength, the conductivity can even decrease with increasing doping (density of carriers) — which appears as a sharp manifestation of ‘traffic-jam’-like behaviour; iv) the insulating state becomes very unstable towards superconductivity at large enough doping. We exhibit some of the properties of the resulting insulator-superconductor transition, which is sensitive to the momentum dissipation rate in a specific way. These models imply a clear and generic correlation between Mott behaviour and significant effects in the nonlinear electrical response. We compute the nonlinear current-voltage curve in our model and find that indeed at large voltage the conductivity is largely reduced.

  5. Thermal conductivity of magnetic insulators with strong spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamokostas, Georgios; Lapas, Panteleimon; Fiete, Gregory A.

    We study the influence of spin-orbit coupling on the thermal conductivity of various types of magnetic insulators. In the absence of spin-orbit coupling and orbital-degeneracy, the strong-coupling limit of Hubbard interactions at half filling can often be adequately described in terms of a pure spin Hamiltonian of the Heisenberg form. However, in the presence of spin-orbit coupling the resulting exchange interaction can become highly anisotropic. The effect of the atomic spin-orbit coupling, taken into account through the effect of magnon-phonon interactions and the magnetic order and excitations, on the lattice thermal conductivity of various insulating magnetic systems is studied. We focus on the regime of low temperatures where the dominant source of scattering is two-magnon scattering to one-phonon processes. The thermal current is calculated within the Boltzmann transport theory. We are grateful for financial support from NSF Grant DMR-0955778.

  6. Strong interband Faraday rotation in 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnoutek, L; Hakl, M; Veis, M; Piot, B A; Faugeras, C; Martinez, G; Yakushev, M V; Martin, R W; Drašar, Č; Materna, A; Strzelecka, G; Hruban, A; Potemski, M; Orlita, M

    2016-01-11

    The Faraday effect is a representative magneto-optical phenomenon, resulting from the transfer of angular momentum between interacting light and matter in which time-reversal symmetry has been broken by an externally applied magnetic field. Here we report on the Faraday rotation induced in the prominent 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3 due to bulk interband excitations. The origin of this non-resonant effect, extraordinarily strong among other non-magnetic materials, is traced back to the specific Dirac-type Hamiltonian for Bi2Se3, which implies that electrons and holes in this material closely resemble relativistic particles with a non-zero rest mass.

  7. Strong magnetization and Chern insulators in compressed graphene/CrI 3 van der Waals heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhao, Bao; Zhou, Tong; Xue, Yang; Ma, Chunlan; Yang, Zhongqin

    2018-02-01

    Graphene-based heterostructures are a promising material system for designing the topologically nontrivial Chern insulating devices. Recently, a two-dimensional monolayer ferromagnetic insulator CrI3 was successfully synthesized in experiments [B. Huang et al., Nature (London) 546, 270 (2017), 10.1038/nature22391]. Here, these two interesting materials are proposed to build a heterostructure (Gr /CrI3). Our first-principles calculations show that the system forms a van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure, which is relatively facilely fabricated in experiments. A Chern insulating state is acquired in the Gr /CrI3 heterostructure if the vdW gap is compressed to a distance between about 3.3 and 2.4 Å, corresponding to a required external pressure between about 1.4 and 18.3 GPa. Amazingly, very strong magnetization (about 150 meV) is found in graphene, induced by the substrate CrI3, despite the vdW interactions between them. A low-energy effective model is employed to understand the mechanism. The work functions, contact types, and band alignments of the Gr /CrI3 heterostructure system are also studied. Our work demonstrates that the Gr /CrI3 heterostructure is a promising system to observe the quantum anomalous Hall effect at high temperatures (up to 45 K) in experiments.

  8. Stratification of TAD boundaries reveals preferential insulation of super-enhancers by strong boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yixiao; Lazaris, Charalampos; Sakellaropoulos, Theodore; Lozano, Aurelie; Kambadur, Prabhanjan; Ntziachristos, Panagiotis; Aifantis, Iannis; Tsirigos, Aristotelis

    2018-02-07

    The metazoan genome is compartmentalized in areas of highly interacting chromatin known as topologically associating domains (TADs). TADs are demarcated by boundaries mostly conserved across cell types and even across species. However, a genome-wide characterization of TAD boundary strength in mammals is still lacking. In this study, we first use fused two-dimensional lasso as a machine learning method to improve Hi-C contact matrix reproducibility, and, subsequently, we categorize TAD boundaries based on their insulation score. We demonstrate that higher TAD boundary insulation scores are associated with elevated CTCF levels and that they may differ across cell types. Intriguingly, we observe that super-enhancers are preferentially insulated by strong boundaries. Furthermore, we demonstrate that strong TAD boundaries and super-enhancer elements are frequently co-duplicated in cancer patients. Taken together, our findings suggest that super-enhancers insulated by strong TAD boundaries may be exploited, as a functional unit, by cancer cells to promote oncogenesis.

  9. Effects of insulation on potted superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeller, A.F.; DeKamp, J.C.; Magsig, C.T.; Nolen, J.A.; McInturff, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    Test coils using identical wire but with either Formvar or Polyesterimid insulation were fabricated to determine the effects of insulation on training behavior. It was found that the type of insulation did not affect the training behavior. While considerable attention has been paid to epoxy formulations used for superconducting coils, little study has been devoted to the effects of the wire insulation on training behavior. If the insulation does not bind well with the epoxy, the wires will not be held securely in place, and training will be required to make the coil operate at its design limit. In fact, the coil may never reach its design current, showing considerable degredation. Conversely, if the epoxy-insulation reaction is to soften or weaken the insulation, then shorts and/or training may result. The authors have undertaken a study of the effects of the insulation on potted coils wet wound with Stycast 2850 FT epoxy. The wire was insulated with one of two insulting varnishes: Formvar (a polyvinyl formal resin) or Polyesterimid (a phenolic resin). Formvar is the standard insulation in the United States while Polyesterimid the European standard

  10. Transport of Dirac fermions on the surface of strong topological insulator and graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Arijit

    2012-06-14

    In this dissertation I study electronic transport through Dirac Fermions on the surface of strong topological insulator and graphene. I start by reviewing the physics of topological insulator and graphene and the low energy effective theory for the electronic states of the surface of a 3D strong topological insulator and graphene. Using this theory the electronic structure of the surface states of strong topological insulators of geometries with large surface to bulk ratio like nanowire and thin film are obtained. Then the energy spectrum and the spin-parity structure of the eigenstates for a finite size topological insulator quantum dot of the shape of a nanotube are considered. Numerical calculations show that even at the lowest energy scales, the ''spin-surface locking'' is broken, that is, the spin direction in a topologically protected surface mode is not locked to the surface. The calculations also show the existence of ''zero-momentum'' modes, and sub-gap states localized near the ''caps'' of the dot. Both the energy spectrum and the spin texture of the eigenstates are basically reproduced from an analytical surface Dirac fermion description. The results are compared to microscopic calculations using a tight-binding model for a strong topological insulator in a finite-length nanowire geometry, which shows qualitative similarity. Then, a theoretical study of electron-phonon scattering effects in thin films made of a strong topological insulator is presented. Phonons are modeled by isotropic elastic continuum theory with stress-free boundary conditions, and the interaction with the helical surface Dirac fermions is mediated by the deformation potential. The temperature-dependent electrical resistivity ρ(T) and the quasi-particle decay rate Γ(T) observable in photo-emission are computed numerically. The low and high-temperature power laws for both quantities are obtained analytically. Detailed

  11. Metal-insulator crossover in superconducting cuprates in strong magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, P.A.; Su Zhaobin; Yu Lu

    2001-02-01

    The metal-insulator crossover of the in-plane resistivity upon temperature decrease, recently observed in several classes of cuprate superconductors, when a strong magnetic field suppresses the superconductivity, is explained using the U(1)xSU(2) Chern-Simons gauge field theory. The origin of this crossover is the same as that for a similar phenomenon observed in heavily underdoped cuprates without magnetic field. It is due to the interplay between the diffusive motion of the charge carriers and the 'peculiar' localization effect due to short-range antiferromagnetic order. We also calculate the in-plane transverse magnetoresistance which is in a fairly good agreement with available experimental data. (author)

  12. Strong Energy-momentum Dispersion of Phonon Dressed Carriers in the Lightly Doped Band Insulator SrTiO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meevasana, Warawat

    2010-01-01

    Much progress has been made recently in the study of the effects of electron-phonon (el-ph) coupling in doped insulators using angle resolved photoemission (ARPES), yielding evidence for the dominant role of el-ph interactions in underdoped cuprates. As these studies have been limited to doped Mott insulators, the important question arises how this compares with doped band insulators where similar el-ph couplings should be at work. The archetypical case is the perovskite SrTiO 3 (STO), well known for its giant dielectric constant of 10000 at low temperature, exceeding that of La 2 CuO 4 by a factor of 500. Based on this fact, it has been suggested that doped STO should be the archetypical bipolaron superconductor. Here we report an ARPES study from high-quality surfaces of lightly doped SrTiO 3 . Comparing to lightly doped Mott insulators, we find the signatures of only moderate electron-phonon coupling: a dispersion anomaly associated with the low frequency optical phonon with a λ(prime) ∼ 0.3 and an overall bandwidth renormalization suggesting an overall λ(prime) ∼ 0.7 coming from the higher frequency phonons. Further, we find no clear signatures of the large pseudogap or small polaron phenomena. These findings demonstrate that a large dielectric constant itself is not a good indicator of el-ph coupling and highlight the unusually strong effects of the el-ph coupling in doped Mott insulators.

  13. (ajst) effects of ground insulation and greenhouse

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NORBERT OPIYO AKECH

    and quality of biogas generation from dairy cattle dung. The effects ... Therefore ground insulation of plastic biogas digester under greenhouse conditions significantly enhances ..... The low values obtained did not suggest failure of the system ...

  14. Proximity effects in topological insulator heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiao-Guang; Wu Guang-Fen; Zhang Gu-Feng; Culcer Dimitrie; Zhang Zhen-Yu; Chen Hua

    2013-01-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are bulk insulators that possess robust helical conducting states along their interfaces with conventional insulators. A tremendous research effort has recently been devoted to Tl-based heterostructures, in which conventional proximity effects give rise to a series of exotic physical phenomena. This paper reviews our recent studies on the potential existence of topological proximity effects at the interface between a topological insulator and a normal insulator or other topologically trivial systems. Using first-principles approaches, we have realized the tunability of the vertical location of the topological helical state via intriguing dual-proximity effects. To further elucidate the control parameters of this effect, we have used the graphene-based heterostructures as prototypical systems to reveal a more complete phase diagram. On the application side of the topological helical states, we have presented a catalysis example, where the topological helical state plays an essential role in facilitating surface reactions by serving as an effective electron bath. These discoveries lay the foundation for accurate manipulation of the real space properties of the topological helical state in TI-based heterostructures and pave the way for realization of the salient functionality of topological insulators in future device applications. (topical review - low-dimensional nanostructures and devices)

  15. Strongly gapped spin-wave excitation in the insulating phase of NaOsO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calder, S.; Vale, J. G.; Bogdanov, N.; Donnerer, C.

    2017-01-01

    NaOsO_3 hosts a rare manifestation of a metal-insulator transition driven by magnetic correlations, placing the magnetic exchange interactions in a central role. We use resonant inelastic x-ray scattering to directly probe these magnetic exchange interactions. A dispersive and strongly gapped (58 meV) excitation is observed indicating appreciable spin-orbit coupling in this 5d"3 system. The excitation is well described within a minimal model Hamiltonian with strong anisotropy and Heisenberg exchange (J_1 = J_2 = 13.9 meV). As a result, the observed behavior places NaOsO_3 on the boundary between localized and itinerant magnetism.

  16. Strong Electro-Absorption in GeSi Epitaxy on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Cunningham

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the selective epitaxial growth of GeSi bulk material on silicon-on-insulator substrates by reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition. We employed AFM, SIMS, and Hall measurements, to characterize the GeSi heteroepitaxy quality. Optimal growth conditions have been identified to achieve low defect density, low RMS roughness with high selectivity and precise control of silicon content. Fabricated vertical p-i-n diodes exhibit very low dark current density of 5 mA/cm2 at −1 V bias. Under a 7.5 V/µm E-field, GeSi alloys with 0.6% Si content demonstrate very strong electro-absorption with an estimated effective ∆α/α around 3.5 at 1,590 nm. We compared measured ∆α/α performance to that of bulk Ge. Optical modulation up to 40 GHz is observed in waveguide devices while small signal analysis indicates bandwidth is limited by device parasitics.

  17. Irradiation effects on organic insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasen, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    The overall objective of this work is to contribute to development of organic insulators having the cryogenic neutron irradiation resistance required for MFE systems utilizing superconducting magnet confinement. The system for producing standard 3.2-mm (0.125-in) diameter rod specimens discussed in previous reports has been further refined to permit the fabrication of both fiber-reinforced and heat-resin specimens from hot-melt resin systems. The method has been successfully used to produce very high quality specimens duplicating the G-11CR system and specimens from a variant of that system eliminating a boron-containing additive. We have also produced specimens from an epoxy system suitable for impregnation or potting operations and from a bismaleimide polyimide system. These materials will be used in the first irradiation program in the National Low Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility (NLTNIF) reactor at Oak Ridge. We have refined the 4-K torsional shear test method for evaluating radiation degradation of the fiber-matrix interface and have developed a method of quantitatively measuring changes in fracture energy as a function of radiation dose. Cooperative work with laboratories in Japan and England in this area is continuing and plans are being formulated for joint production, irradiation, and testing of specimens

  18. Infrared circular photogalvanic effect in topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Siyuan

    2018-04-01

    Topological insulators have attracted a lot of attention in recent years due to its unique phenomena. Circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) is one of the important phenomena in topological insulators. Bi2Se3, as one of the 3D topological insulators, consist of a single Dirac cone at the Γ point in k-space [1], corresponding to the surface states. Controlled by the Berry curvature of the surface band, the dominant photo response due to the interband transition is helicity dependent [2]. In addition, due to the spin-momentum locking in topological insulators' surface, the sign of spin-angular-momentum of obliquely incident light and photo currents are locked together. On the other hand, Bi2Se3 consists of quintuple layers which make it possible to be exfoliated and transferred based on graphene fabrication. In this paper, Bi2Se3 devices were fabricated and Ohm contact was achieved. We experimentally demonstrated the CPGE in Bi2Se3 using 1550nm incident laser.

  19. Giant magneto-optical Kerr effect and universal Faraday effect in thin-film topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Wang-Kong; MacDonald, A H

    2010-07-30

    Topological insulators can exhibit strong magneto-electric effects when their time-reversal symmetry is broken. In this Letter we consider the magneto-optical Kerr and Faraday effects of a topological insulator thin film weakly exchange coupled to a ferromagnet. We find that its Faraday rotation has a universal value at low frequencies θF=tan(-1)α, where α is the vacuum fine structure constant, and that it has a giant Kerr rotation θK=π/2. These properties follow from a delicate interplay between thin-film cavity confinement and the surface Hall conductivity of a topological insulator's helical quasiparticles.

  20. Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelhans, Leah

    2013-08-01

    Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

  1. The electric strength of high-voltage transformers insulation at effect of partial dischargers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoshravan, E.; Zeraatparvar, A.; Gashimov, A.M.; Mehdizadeh, R.N.

    2001-01-01

    Full text : In paper the change of electric strength of high-voltage transformers insulation at the effect of partial discharges with space charge accumulation was investigated. It is revealed that the effect of partial discharges of insulation materials results the reduction of their pulsing electric strength which can restore the own initial value at releasing of saved charge the volume of a material under condition of absence the ineversible structural changes in it. Researches of high-voltage transformers insulation's non-failure operation conditions show, that at increasing of insulation work time in a strong electrical field the reduction of average breakdown voltages with simultaneous increasing of spread in discharge voltage values takes place. It authentically testifies to reduction of short-time discharge voltage of insulation materials during their electrical aging. As the basic reason of insulation electrical aging the partial discharges occurring in gas cavities inside insulation were considered. It is known that the space charges will be formed in insulation elements of high-voltage devices which effects in dielectrical property of these elements including the electric strength and the space charge formation can occur also at partial discharges in an alternating voltage while the service of high-voltage transformers. In the given work the experiments in revealing separate influence partial discharges in pulsing electric strength of insulation materials at presence and at absence inside them the space charge were spent

  2. Quantum criticality around metal-insulator transitions of strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Takahiro; Imada, Masatoshi

    2007-03-01

    Quantum criticality of metal-insulator transitions in correlated electron systems is shown to belong to an unconventional universality class with violation of the Ginzburg-Landau-Wilson (GLW) scheme formulated for symmetry breaking transitions. This unconventionality arises from an emergent character of the quantum critical point, which appears at the marginal point between the Ising-type symmetry breaking at nonzero temperatures and the topological transition of the Fermi surface at zero temperature. We show that Hartree-Fock approximations of an extended Hubbard model on square lattices are capable of such metal-insulator transitions with unusual criticality under a preexisting symmetry breaking. The obtained universality is consistent with the scaling theory formulated for Mott transitions and with a number of numerical results beyond the mean-field level, implying that preexisting symmetry breaking is not necessarily required for the emergence of this unconventional universality. Examinations of fluctuation effects indicate that the obtained critical exponents remain essentially exact beyond the mean-field level. It further clarifies the whole structure of singularities by a unified treatment of the bandwidth-control and filling-control transitions. Detailed analyses of the criticality, containing diverging carrier density fluctuations around the marginal quantum critical point, are presented from microscopic calculations and reveal the nature as quantum critical “opalescence.” The mechanism of emerging marginal quantum critical point is ascribed to a positive feedback and interplay between the preexisting gap formation present even in metals and kinetic energy gain (loss) of the metallic carrier. Analyses of crossovers between GLW type at nonzero temperature and topological type at zero temperature show that the critical exponents observed in (V,Cr)2O3 and κ-ET -type organic conductors provide us with evidence for the existence of the present marginal

  3. Interaction effects and quantum phase transitions in topological insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varney, Christopher N.; Sun Kai; Galitski, Victor; Rigol, Marcos

    2010-01-01

    We study strong correlation effects in topological insulators via the Lanczos algorithm, which we utilize to calculate the exact many-particle ground-state wave function and its topological properties. We analyze the simple, noninteracting Haldane model on a honeycomb lattice with known topological properties and demonstrate that these properties are already evident in small clusters. Next, we consider interacting fermions by introducing repulsive nearest-neighbor interactions. A first-order quantum phase transition was discovered at finite interaction strength between the topological band insulator and a topologically trivial Mott insulating phase by use of the fidelity metric and the charge-density-wave structure factor. We construct the phase diagram at T=0 as a function of the interaction strength and the complex phase for the next-nearest-neighbor hoppings. Finally, we consider the Haldane model with interacting hard-core bosons, where no evidence for a topological phase is observed. An important general conclusion of our work is that despite the intrinsic nonlocality of topological phases their key topological properties manifest themselves already in small systems and therefore can be studied numerically via exact diagonalization and observed experimentally, e.g., with trapped ions and cold atoms in optical lattices.

  4. Effects of pressure on doped Kondo insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chengchung; Xu, Wang

    1999-08-01

    The effects of pressure on the doped Kondo insulators (KI) are studied in the framework of the slave-boson mean-field theory under the coherent potential approximation (CPA). A unified picture for both electron-type KI and hole-type KI is presented. The density of states of the f-electrons under the applied pressures and its variation with the concentration of the Kondo holes are calculated self-consistently. The specific heat coefficient, the zero-temperature magnetic susceptibility as well as the low temperature electric resistivity of the doped KI under various pressures are obtained. The two contrasting pressure-dependent effects observed in the doped KI systems can be naturally explained within a microscopic model. (author)

  5. Effective lagrangian for strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, P.

    1988-01-01

    We attempt to construct a realistic phenomenological Lagrangian in order to describe strong interactions. This is in general a very complicated problem and we shall explore its various aspects. We first include the vector mesons by writing down the most general chiral invariant terms proportional to the Levi-Civita symbol ε μναβ . These terms involve three unknown coefficients, which are calculated by using the experimental results of strong interaction processes. We then calculate the static nucleon properties by finding the solitonic excitations of this model. The results turn out to be, as is also the case for most other vector-pseudoscalar Lagrangians, better than the Skyrme model but are still somewhat different from the experiments. Another aspect that we shall study is the incorporation of scale anomaly of QCD into the Skyrme model. We thus introduce a scalar glueball in our Lagrangian. Here we find an interesting result that the effective glue field dynamically forms a bag for the soliton. Depending on the values of the parameters, we get either a deep bag or a shallow bag. However by including the scalar meson, we find that to get realistic scalar sector we must have the shallow bag. Finally we show some intriguing connections between the chiral quark model, in which the nucleon is described as a solitonic excitation, and the ordinary potential binding quark model

  6. Magnon Valve Effect between Two Magnetic Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H.; Huang, L.; Fang, C.; Yang, B. S.; Wan, C. H.; Yu, G. Q.; Feng, J. F.; Wei, H. X.; Han, X. F.

    2018-03-01

    The key physics of the spin valve involves spin-polarized conduction electrons propagating between two magnetic layers such that the device conductance is controlled by the relative magnetization orientation of two magnetic layers. Here, we report the effect of a magnon valve which is made of two ferromagnetic insulators (YIG) separated by a nonmagnetic spacer layer (Au). When a thermal gradient is applied perpendicular to the layers, the inverse spin Hall voltage output detected by a Pt bar placed on top of the magnon valve depends on the relative orientation of the magnetization of two YIG layers, indicating the magnon current induced by the spin Seebeck effect at one layer affects the magnon current in the other layer separated by Au. We interpret the magnon valve effect by the angular momentum conversion and propagation between magnons in two YIG layers and conduction electrons in the Au layer. The temperature dependence of the magnon valve ratio shows approximately a power law, supporting the above magnon-electron spin conversion mechanism. This work opens a new class of valve structures beyond the conventional spin valves.

  7. Effect of Sweating on Insulation of Footwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuklane, Kalev; Holmér, Ingvar

    1998-01-01

    The study aimed to find out the influence of sweating on footwear insulation with a thermal foot model. Simultaneously, the influence of applied weight (35 kg), sock, and steel toe cap were studied. Water to 3 sweat glands was supplied with a pump at the rate of 10 g/hr in total. Four models of boots with steel toe caps were tested. The same models were manufactured also without steel toe. Sweating reduced footwear insulation 19-25% (30-37% in toes). During static conditions, only a minimal amount of sweat evaporated from boots. Weight affected sole insulation: Reduction depended on compressibility of sole material. The influence of steel toe varied with insulation. The method of thermal foot model appears to be a practical tool for footwear evaluation.

  8. Observation of the spin Peltier effect for magnetic insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipse, J; Dejene, F K; Wagenaar, D; Bauer, G E W; Ben Youssef, J; van Wees, B J

    2014-07-11

    We report the observation of the spin Peltier effect (SPE) in the ferrimagnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG), i.e., a heat current generated by a spin current flowing through a platinum (Pt)|YIG interface. The effect can be explained by the spin transfer torque that transforms the spin current in the Pt into a magnon current in the YIG. Via magnon-phonon interactions the magnetic fluctuations modulate the phonon temperature that is detected by a thermopile close to the interface. By finite-element modeling we verify the reciprocity between the spin Peltier and spin Seebeck effect. The observed strong coupling between thermal magnons and phonons in YIG is attractive for nanoscale cooling techniques.

  9. Light and Strong Hierarchical Porous SiC Foam for Efficient Electromagnetic Interference Shielding and Thermal Insulation at Elevated Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Caiyun; Wang, Zhenfeng; Wu, Lina; Zhang, Xiaochen; Wang, Huan; Wang, Zhijiang

    2017-09-06

    A novel light but strong SiC foam with hierarchical porous architecture was fabricated by using dough as raw material via carbonization followed by carbothermal reduction with silicon source. A significant synergistic effect is achieved by embedding meso- and nanopores in a microsized porous skeleton, which endows the SiC foam with high-performance electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding, thermal insulation, and mechanical properties. The microsized skeleton withstands high stress. The meso- and nanosized pores enhance multiple reflection of the incident electromagnetic waves and elongate the path of heat transfer. For the hierarchical porous SiC foam with 72.8% porosity, EMI shielding can be higher than 20 dB, and specific EMI effectiveness exceeds 24.8 dB·cm 3 ·g -1 at a frequency of 11 GHz at 25-600 °C, which is 3 times higher than that of dense SiC ceramic. The thermal conductivity reaches as low as 0.02 W·m -1 ·K -1 , which is comparable to that of aerogel. The compressive strength is as high as 9.8 MPa. Given the chemical and high-temperature stability of SiC, the fabricated SiC foam is a promising candidate for modern aircraft and automobile applications.

  10. A New Numerical Method for Z2 Topological Insulators with Strong Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Yutaka; Katsura, Hosho; Koma, Tohru

    2017-12-01

    We propose a new method to numerically compute the Z2 indices for disordered topological insulators in Kitaev's periodic table. All of the Z2 indices are derived from the index formulae which are expressed in terms of a pair of projections introduced by Avron, Seiler, and Simon. For a given pair of projections, the corresponding index is determined by the spectrum of the difference between the two projections. This difference exhibits remarkable and useful properties, as it is compact and has a supersymmetric structure in the spectrum. These properties enable highly efficient numerical calculation of the indices of disordered topological insulators. The method, which we propose, is demonstrated for the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang and Wilson-Dirac models whose topological phases are characterized by a Z2 index in two and three dimensions, respectively.

  11. Liquid metal flows in manifolds and expansions of insulating rectangular ducts in the plane perpendicular to a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molokov, S.

    1994-01-01

    It is demonstrated the flow pattern in basic insulating 3-D geometries for the actual and for more advanced liquid-metal blanket concepts and discussed the ways to avoid pressure losses caused by flow redistribution. Flows in several geometries, such as symmetric and non-symmetric 180 turns with and without manifolds, sharp elbows, sharp and linear expansions with and without manifolds, T-junction, etc., have been calculated. They demonstrate high reliability of poloidal concepts of liquid-metal blankets, since they guarantee uniform conditions for heat transfer. If changes of the duct cross-section occur in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field (ideally a coolant should flow always in the radial-poloidal plane) the disturbances are local and the slug velocity profile is reached roughly at the distance equivalent to one duct width from the manifolds, expansions, etc. The effects of inertia in these flows are unimportant for the determination of the pressure drop and mean velocity profiles in the core of the flow but may favour heat transfer characteristics via instabilities and strongly anisotropic turbulence. (orig./HP) [de

  12. The effects of insulating coatings and current prepulse on tungsten planar wire array Z-pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M., E-mail: limo@nint.ac.cn; Li, Y. [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Radiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710024 (China); Sheng, L.; Wang, L. P.; Zhao, C.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, M.; Peng, B. D.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, S. G.; Qiu, M. T. [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Radiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710024 (China); Li, X. W. [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents experimental results on the effects of insulating coatings and current prepulse on tungsten planar wire array Z-pinches on ∼100 ns main current facility. Optical framing images indicated that without a current prepulse the wire ablation process was asymmetrical and the implosion was zippered. The x-ray peak power was ∼320 GW. By using insulating coatings on the wire surface the asymmetry remained, and the processes of ablation and implosion were delayed by ∼30 ns. The x-ray burst was narrow and decreased to ∼200 GW. When current prepulses were used on both standard and insulated wire arrays, implosion symmetry was improved and the x-ray burst was improved (to ∼520 GW peak power). In addition, there was a strong emitting precursor column for insulated loads with the current prepulse.

  13. Effects of radiation on insulation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poehlchen, R.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation will concentrate on the insulation materials which are suitable for the insulation of superconducting magnets for fusion. For the next generation of fusion machines with magnetic confinement as NET and ITER general agreement exists that the insulation will consist of fibre reinforced organic matrix material, a composite. Much effort has been put into the investigation of the radiation resistance of such materials during the last 20-30 years, see in particular the numerous reports of accelerator laboratories on this subject. But very few of the published data are relevant for the superconducting magnets of fusion machines. Either the irradiation and testing was carried out at RT or LN 2 temperature and/or the irradiation spectrum was not representative for a fusion machine and/or the materials investigated are not applicable for the insulation of S.C. fusion magnets. Therefore test programs have been launched recently, one by the NET team. The intention of the first chapter is to give guidance on the choice of materials which are suitable as insulation materials from a more general point of view. A good understanding of the coil manufacturing process is needed for this purpose. The second chapter explains the irradiation spectrum seen by the magnets. A third chapter does present the NET/ITER test programme. Step 1 was completed at the end of 1989, the second step will be carried out in the autumn of 1991. Finally, a general assessment of materials and testing methods will be given with recommendations for further testing

  14. Quantum effects in strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessler, Lars

    2014-01-01

    This work is devoted to quantum effects for photons in spatially inhomogeneous fields. Since the purely analytical solution of the corresponding equations is an unsolved problem even today, a main aspect of this work is to use the worldline formalism for scalar QED to develop numerical algorithms for correlation functions beyond perturbative constructions. In a first step we take a look at the 2-Point photon correlation function, in order to understand effects like vacuum polarization or quantum reflection. For a benchmark test of the numerical algorithm we reproduce analytical results in a constant magnetic background. For inhomogeneous fields we calculate for the first time local refractive indices of the quantum vacuum. In this way we find a new de-focusing effect of inhomogeneous magnetic fields. Furthermore the numerical algorithm confirms analytical results for quantum reflection obtained within the local field approximation. In a second step we take a look at higher N-Point functions, with the help of our numerical algorithm. An interesting effect at the level of the 3-Point function is photon splitting. First investigations show that the Adler theorem remains also approximately valid for inhomogeneous fields.

  15. Edge states and integer quantum Hall effect in topological insulator thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song-Bo; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Shen, Shun-Qing

    2015-08-25

    The integer quantum Hall effect is a topological state of quantum matter in two dimensions, and has recently been observed in three-dimensional topological insulator thin films. Here we study the Landau levels and edge states of surface Dirac fermions in topological insulators under strong magnetic field. We examine the formation of the quantum plateaux of the Hall conductance and find two different patterns, in one pattern the filling number covers all integers while only odd integers in the other. We focus on the quantum plateau closest to zero energy and demonstrate the breakdown of the quantum spin Hall effect resulting from structure inversion asymmetry. The phase diagrams of the quantum Hall states are presented as functions of magnetic field, gate voltage and chemical potential. This work establishes an intuitive picture of the edge states to understand the integer quantum Hall effect for Dirac electrons in topological insulator thin films.

  16. Radiation effects on insulators for superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernohan, R.H.; Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Long, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    In order to determine the radiation stability of electrical insulation that could be used in a superconducting magnet for containment of the plasma in a fusion energy device, 55 specimens of eight types of organic insulation were irradiated to a dose of about 2 x 10 8 R (2 x 10 6 J/Kg) at a temperature of 4.8 K in the Low-Temperature Irradiation Facility in the Bulk Shielding Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Four of the specimens were monitored for changes in electrical resistivity during the irradiation. The initial resistivities, which were of the order of 10 14 Ω cm, decreased to about 10 13 Ω cm under the influence of a weak radiation field. At full-power reactor operation (2 MW), the resistivities dropped to about 10 11 Ω cm, but changed little during the irradiation. After the irradiation the resistivities increased, but not to the initial values, because of residual radioactivity near or in the experiment assembly. Restoration to near the initial resistivity values was later observed upon warming the specimens to room temperature and purging the irradiation chamber. The latter result may be related to outgassing induced by the irradiation

  17. Strongly reduced band gap in a correlated insulator in close proximity to a metal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesper, R.; Tjeng, L.H; Sawatzky, G.A

    1997-01-01

    Using a combination of photoelectron and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that the band gap in a monolayer of C-60 on a Ag surface is strongly reduced from the solid C-60 surface value. We argue that this is a result of the reduction of the on-site molecular Coulomb interaction due to the

  18. Dynamic Test Method Based on Strong Electromagnetic Pulse for Electromagnetic Shielding Materials with Field-Induced Insulator-Conductor Phase Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Zhao, Min; Wang, Qingguo

    2018-01-01

    In order to measure the pulse shielding performance of materials with the characteristic of field-induced insulator-conductor phase transition when materials are used for electromagnetic shielding, a dynamic test method was proposed based on a coaxial fixture. Experiment system was built by square pulse source, coaxial cable, coaxial fixture, attenuator, and oscilloscope and insulating components. S11 parameter of the test system was obtained, which suggested that the working frequency ranges from 300 KHz to 7.36 GHz. Insulating performance is good enough to avoid discharge between conductors when material samples is exposed in the strong electromagnetic pulse field up to 831 kV/m. This method is suitable for materials with annular shape, certain thickness and the characteristic of field-induced insulator-conductor phase transition to get their shielding performances of strong electromagnetic pulse.

  19. Strong reflection and periodic resonant transmission of helical edge states in topological-insulator stub-like resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagaki, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The helical edge states of two-dimensional topological insulators (TIs) experience appreciable quantum mechanical scattering in narrow channels when the width changes abruptly. The interference of the geometry scattering in narrow-wide-narrow waveguide structures is shown to give rise to the strong suppression of transmission when the incident energy is barely above the propagation threshold. Periodic resonant transmission takes place in this high reflection regime while the length of the wide section is varied. The resonance condition is governed by the transverse confinement in the wide section, where the form of quantization is manifested to differ for the two orthogonal directions. The confined energy levels in TI quantum dots are derived based on this observation. In addition, the off-diagonal spin-orbit term is found to produce an anomalous resonance state, which merges with the bottom ordinary resonance state to annihilate

  20. Observation of the Spin Peltier Effect for Magnetic Insulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipse, J.; Dejene, F.K.; Wagenaar, D.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Ben Youssef, J.; Van Wees, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    We report the observation of the spin Peltier effect (SPE) in the ferrimagnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG), i.e., a heat current generated by a spin current flowing through a platinum (Pt)|YIG interface. The effect can be explained by the spin transfer torque that transforms the spin

  1. Strong Interlayer Magnon-Magnon Coupling in Magnetic Metal-Insulator Hybrid Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jilei; Liu, Chuanpu; Liu, Tao; Xiao, Yang; Xia, Ke; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Wu, Mingzhong; Yu, Haiming

    2018-05-01

    We observe strong interlayer magnon-magnon coupling in an on-chip nanomagnonic device at room temperature. Ferromagnetic nanowire arrays are integrated on a 20-nm-thick yttrium iron garnet (YIG) thin film strip. Large anticrossing gaps up to 1.58 GHz are observed between the ferromagnetic resonance of the nanowires and the in-plane standing spin waves of the YIG film. Control experiments and simulations reveal that both the interlayer exchange coupling and the dynamical dipolar coupling contribute to the observed anticrossings. The coupling strength is tunable by the magnetic configuration, allowing the coherent control of magnonic devices.

  2. Effect of thermal insulation on the electrical characteristics of NbOx threshold switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziwen; Kumar, Suhas; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Nishi, Yoshio

    2018-02-01

    Threshold switches based on niobium oxide (NbOx) are promising candidates as bidirectional selector devices in crossbar memory arrays and building blocks for neuromorphic computing. Here, it is experimentally demonstrated that the electrical characteristics of NbOx threshold switches can be tuned by engineering the thermal insulation. Increasing the thermal insulation by ˜10× is shown to produce ˜7× reduction in threshold current and ˜45% reduction in threshold voltage. The reduced threshold voltage leads to ˜5× reduction in half-selection leakage, which highlights the effectiveness of reducing half-selection leakage of NbOx selectors by engineering the thermal insulation. A thermal feedback model based on Poole-Frenkel conduction in NbOx can explain the experimental results very well, which also serves as a piece of strong evidence supporting the validity of the Poole-Frenkel based mechanism in NbOx threshold switches.

  3. Unconventional quantum Hall effect in Floquet topological insulators

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.

    2016-07-27

    We study an unconventional quantum Hall effect for the surface states of ultrathin Floquet topological insulators in a perpendicular magnetic field. The resulting band structure is modified by photon dressing and the topological property is governed by the low-energy dynamics of a single surface. An exchange of symmetric and antisymmetric surface states occurs by reversing the lights polarization. We find a novel quantum Hall state in which the zeroth Landau level undergoes a phase transition from a trivial insulator state, with Hall conductivity αyx = 0 at zero Fermi energy, to a Hall insulator state with αyx = e2/2h. These findings open new possibilities for experimentally realizing nontrivial quantum states and unusual quantum Hall plateaus at (±1/2,±3/2,±5/2, ...)e2/h. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK.

  4. Unconventional quantum Hall effect in Floquet topological insulators

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.; Vasilopoulos, P.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    We study an unconventional quantum Hall effect for the surface states of ultrathin Floquet topological insulators in a perpendicular magnetic field. The resulting band structure is modified by photon dressing and the topological property is governed by the low-energy dynamics of a single surface. An exchange of symmetric and antisymmetric surface states occurs by reversing the lights polarization. We find a novel quantum Hall state in which the zeroth Landau level undergoes a phase transition from a trivial insulator state, with Hall conductivity αyx = 0 at zero Fermi energy, to a Hall insulator state with αyx = e2/2h. These findings open new possibilities for experimentally realizing nontrivial quantum states and unusual quantum Hall plateaus at (±1/2,±3/2,±5/2, ...)e2/h. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK.

  5. Effects of ground insulation and greenhouse microenvironment on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted at Egerton University, Njoro, Kenya to establish the potential of plastic digester to produce biogas under natural and greenhouse microenvironment. The specific objectives were to evaluate the effects of greenhouse and ground insulation on the rate and quality of biogas generation. A greenhouse ...

  6. Effects of cryogenic reactor irradiation on organic insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Teruo

    1995-01-01

    Insulators for the superconducting magnets of fusion reactor are classified as electrical and thermal insulators for which tough organic materials will be used. When the magnet is exposed by fast neutrons and gamma-rays from plasma in a fusion reactor, the fusion reactor systems will cause fatal damage by the degradation of insulators. Therefore, it is necessary to select materials resistant irradiation damage for use as insulators. Electrical and mechanical tests were carried out at 4.2 K without warmup after the reactor irradiation at 5 K. The effects of reactor irradiation at the dose of 10 7 Gy on epoxy resins (bisphenol-A), G-10 CR, VL-E 200 and G-11 CR caused large decreases in mechanical strength. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK), polyimide and phenol novolac resins, which were used to laminate reinforced plastics with glass-cloth against irradiation, showed good resistance. Effects of cryogenic reactor irradiation on several organic materials and epoxy laminate-reinforced plastics with glass-cloth and Kevlar-cloth were also discussed. (author)

  7. Effects of ionizing radiation of electrical properites of refractory insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Lint, V.A.J.; Bunch, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The Los Alamos Reference Theta Pinch Reactor (RTPR) requires on the first wall an electrical insulator which will withstand transient high voltage at high temperature 10 sec after severe neutron and ionizing irradiation. Few measurements of electrical parameters for heavily disordered refractory insulators have been reported; estimates are made as to whether breakdown strength or conductivity will be degraded by the irradiation. The approach treats separately short-term ionization effects (free and trapped electrons and holes) and long-term gross damage effects (transmutation products and various lattice defects). The following processes could produce unacceptable conduction across the first wall insulator: (a) delayed electronic conductivity 10 sec after the prompt ionization by bremsstrahlung; (b) prompt electronic conductivity from delayed ionization; (c) electronic breakdown; (d) electronic or ionic conductivity due to thermal motion in the disordered material, possibly leading to thermal breakdown. Worst-case calculations based on lower limits to recombination coefficients limit process (a) to sigma much less than 5 x 10 -14 mho/cm. Data on ionization-induced conductivity in insulators predict for process (b) sigma much less than 10 -8 mho/cm. Electronic breakdown generally occurs at fields well above the 10 5 V/cm required for RTPR. Thermal breakdown is negligible due to the short voltage pulse. Ionic and electronic conduction must be studied theoretically and experimentally in the type of highly disordered materials that result from neutron irradiation of the first wall

  8. [Effects of functional interactions between nonhomologous insulators Wari and Su(Hw)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhin, M M; Georgiev, P G; Chetverina, D A

    2010-01-01

    Insulators are regulatory DNA elements restricting gene activation by enhancers. Interactions between insulators can lead to both insulation and activation of promoters by enhancers. In this work, we analyzed the effects of interaction of two Drosophila insulators, Wari and Su(Hw). The functional interaction between these insulators was found to enhance the activity of the Su(Hw) insulator only, but not of the Wari insulator. This suggests that the formation of a chromatin loop between interacting insulators is not a key factor for enhancement of insulation, which is in disagreement with the main idea of structural models. In addition, the effect of interaction between Wari and Su(Hw) depends on a distance between them and on the position in the system relative to other regulatory elements.

  9. Effect of insulating concrete forms in concrete compresive strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Jerez, Silvio R.

    The subject presented in this thesis is the effect of Insulating Concrete Forms (ICF's) on concrete compressive strength. This work seeks to identify if concrete cured in ICF's has an effect in compressive strength due to the thermal insulation provided by the forms. Modern construction is moving to energy efficient buildings and ICF's is becoming more popular in new developments. The thesis used a concrete mixture and a mortar mixture to investigate the effects of ICF's on concrete compressive strength. After the experimentations were performed, it was concluded that the ICF's do affect concrete strength. It was found that the forms increase concrete strength without the need for additional curing water. An increase of 50% in strength at 56 days was obtained. It was concluded that the longer concrete cures inside ICF's, the higher strength it reaches, and that ICF's effect on concrete strength is proportional to volume of concrete.

  10. Data compilation for radiation effects on ceramic insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuya, Koji; Terasawa, Mititaka; Nakahigashi, Shigeo; Ozawa, Kunio.

    1986-08-01

    Data of radiation effects on ceramic insulators were compiled from the literatures and summarized from the viewpoint of fast neutron irradiation effects. The data were classified according to the properties and ceramics. The properties are dimensional stability, mechanical property, thermal property and electrical and dielectric properties. The data sheets for each table or graph in the literatures were made. The characteristic feature of the data base was briefly described. (author)

  11. Disorder effects in strongly correlated uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suellow, S.; Maple, M.B.; Tomuta, D.; Nieuwenhuys, G.J.; Menovsky, A.A.; Mydosh, J.A.; Chau, R.

    2001-01-01

    Moderate levels of crystallographic disorder can dramatically affect the ground-state properties of heavy fermion compounds. In particular, the role of disorder close to a quantum critical point has been investigated in detail. However, crystallographic disorder is equally effective in altering the properties of magnetically ordered heavy fermion compounds like URh 2 Ge 2 , where disorder-induced spin-glass behavior has been observed. In this system, moreover, the magnetic ground state can be tuned from a spin-glass to a long-range ordered antiferromagnetic one by means of an annealing treatment. The transformation of the magnetic state is accompanied by a transition in the transport properties from 'quasi-insulating' (dρ/dT 2 Ge 2 will be discussed. Of particular interest is the resistivity of as-grown URh 2 Ge 2 , which resembles the Non-Fermi-liquid system UCu 4 Pd, suggesting that a common mechanism - the crystallographic disorder - controls the transport properties of these materials

  12. Disorder effect in two-dimensional topological insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xianglin; Feng Shiping; Guo Huaiming

    2012-01-01

    We conduct a systematic study on the disorder effect in two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators by calculating the Z 2 topological invariant. Starting from the trivial and nontrivial topological phases of the model describing HgTe/CdTe quantum wells (QWs), we introduce three different kinds of disorder into the system, including the fluctuations in the on-site potential, the hopping amplitude and the topological mass. These kinds of disorder commonly exist in HgTe/CdTe QWs grown experimentally. By explicit numerical calculations, we show that all three kinds of disorder have the similar effect: the topological phase in the system is not only robust to them, but also can be brought about by introducing them to the trivial insulator phase. These results make a further confirmation and extendability of the study on the interplay between the disorder and the topological phase.

  13. Spin-dependent Peltier effect in 3D topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Parijat; Kubis, Tillmann; Povolotskyi, Michael; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2013-03-01

    The Peltier effect represents the heat carrying capacity of a certain material when current passes through it. When two materials with different Peltier coefficients are placed together, the Peltier effect causes heat to flow either towards or away from the interface between them. This work utilizes the spin-polarized property of 3D topological insulator (TI) surface states to describe the transport of heat through the spin-up and spin-down channels. It has been observed that the spin channels are able to carry heat independently of each other. Spin currents can therefore be employed to supply or extract heat from an interface between materials with spin-dependent Peltier coefficients. The device is composed of a thin film of Bi2Se3 sandwiched between two layers of Bi2Te3. The thin film of Bi2Se3serves both as a normal and topological insulator. It is a normal insulator when its surfaces overlap to produce a finite band-gap. Using an external gate, Bi2Se3 film can be again tuned in to a TI. Sufficiently thick Bi2Te3 always retain TI behavior. Spin-dependent Peltier coefficients are obtained and the spin Nernst effect in TIs is shown by controlling the temperature gradient to convert charge current to spin current.

  14. Strong drifts effects on neoclassical transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessarotto, M.; Gregoratto, D.; White, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that strong drifts play an important role in plasma equilibrium, stability and confinement A significant example concerns, in particular for tokamak plasmas, the case of strong toroidal differential rotation produced by E x B drift which is currently regarded as potentially important for its influence in equilibrium, stability and transport. In fact, theoretically, it has been found that shear flow can substantially affect the stability of microinstabilities as well modify substantially transport. Recent experimental observations of enhanced confinement and transport regimes in Tokamaks, show, however, evidence of the existence of strong drifts in the plasma core. These are produced not only by the radial electric field [which gives rise to the E x B drift], but also by density [N s ], temperature [T s ] and mass flow [V = ωRe var-phi , with e var-phi the toroidal unit vector, R the distance for the symmetry axis of the torus and ω being the toroidal angular rotation velocity] profiles which are suitably steep. This implies that, in a significant part of the plasma core, the relevant scale lengths of the gradients [of N s , T s , ω], i.e., respectively L N , L T and L ω can be as large as the radial scale length characterizing the banana orbits, L b . Interestingly enough, the transport estimates obtained appear close or even lower than the predictions based on the simplest neoclassical model. However, as is well known, the latter applies, in a strict sense only in the case of weak drifts and also ignoring even the contribution of shear flow related to strong E x B drift. Thus a fundamental problem appears the extension of neoclassical transport theory to include the effect of strong drifts in Tokamak confinement systems. The goal of this investigation is to develop a general formulation of neoclassical transport embodying such important feature

  15. Quantum anomalous Hall effect and topological phase transition in two-dimensional antiferromagnetic Chern insulator NiOsCl6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei-Wei; Li, Lei; Zhao, Jing-Sheng; Liu, Xiao-Xiong; Deng, Jian-Bo; Tao, Xiao-Ma; Hu, Xian-Ru

    2018-05-01

    By doing calculations based on density functional theory, we predict that the two-dimensional anti-ferromagnetic (AFM) NiOsCl6 as a Chern insulator can realize the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect. We investigate the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energies in different magnetic configurations and the Néel AFM configuration is proved to be ground state. When considering spin–orbit coupling (SOC), this layered material with spins perpendicular to the plane shows properties as a Chern insulator characterized by an inversion band structure and a nonzero Chern number. The nontrivial band gap is 37 meV and the Chern number C  =  ‑1, which are induced by a strong SOC and AFM order. With strong SOC, the NiOsCl6 system performs a continuous topological phase transition from the Chern insulator to the trivial insulator upon the increasing Coulomb repulsion U. The critical U c is indicated as 0.23 eV, at which the system is in a metallic phase with . Upon increasing U, the E g reduces linearly with C  =  ‑1 for 0    U c . At last we analysis the QAH properties and this continuous topological phase transition theoretically in a two-band model. This AFM Chern insulator NiOsCl6 proposes not only a promising way to realize the QAH effect, but also a new material to study the continuous topological phase transition.

  16. Effect of radiation resistance additives for insulation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Yagyu, Hideki; Seguchi, Tadao.

    1988-01-01

    For the electric wires and cables used in radiation environment such as nuclear power stations and fuel reprocessing facilities, the properties of excellent radiation resistance are required. For these insulators and sheath materials, ethylene propylene rubber, polyethylene and other polymers have been used, but it cannot be said that they always have good radiation resistance. However, it has been well known that radiation resistance can be improved with small amount of additives, and heat resistance and burning retarding property as well as radiation resistance are given to the insulators of wires and cables for nuclear facilities by mixing various additives. In this research, the measuring method for quantitatively determining the effect of Anti-rad (radiation resistant additive) was examined. Through the measurement of gel fraction, radical formation and decomposed gas generation, the effect of Anti-rad protecting polymers from radiation deterioration was examined from the viewpoint of chemical reaction. The experimental method and the results are reported. The radiation energy for cutting C-H coupling is polymers is dispersed by Anti-rad, and the probability of cutting is lowered. Anti-rad catches and extinguishes radicals that start oxidation reaction. (K.I.)

  17. A Network Model for the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Rigid Fibrous Refractory Insulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Jochen; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A procedure is described for computing the effective thermal conductivity of a rigid fibrous refractory insulation. The insulation is modeled as a 3-dimensional Cartesian network of thermal conductance. The values and volume distributions of the conductance are assigned to reflect the physical properties of the insulation, its constituent fibers, and any permeating gas. The effective thermal conductivity is computed by considering the simultaneous energy transport by solid conduction, gas conduction and radiation through a cubic volume of model insulation; thus the coupling between heat transfer modes is retained (within the simplifications inherent to the model), rather than suppressed by treating these heat transfer modes as independent. The model takes into account insulation composition, density and fiber anisotropy, as well as the geometric and material properties of the constituent fibers. A relatively good agreement, between calculated and experimentally derived thermal conductivity values, is obtained for a variety of rigid fibrous insulations.

  18. Widespread spin polarization effects in photoemission from topological insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozwiak, C.; Chen, Y. L.; Fedorov, A. V.; Analytis, J. G.; Rotundu, C. R.; Schmid, A. K.; Denlinger, J. D.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Lee, D.-H.; Fisher, I. R.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Shen, Z.-X.; Hussain, Z.; Lanzara, A.

    2011-06-22

    High-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) was performed on the three-dimensional topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} using a recently developed high-efficiency spectrometer. The topological surface state's helical spin structure is observed, in agreement with theoretical prediction. Spin textures of both chiralities, at energies above and below the Dirac point, are observed, and the spin structure is found to persist at room temperature. The measurements reveal additional unexpected spin polarization effects, which also originate from the spin-orbit interaction, but are well differentiated from topological physics by contrasting momentum and photon energy and polarization dependencies. These observations demonstrate significant deviations of photoelectron and quasiparticle spin polarizations. Our findings illustrate the inherent complexity of spin-resolved ARPES and demonstrate key considerations for interpreting experimental results.

  19. Inhomogeneous field induced magnetoelectric effect in Mott insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulaevskii, Lev N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Cristian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We consider a Mott insulator like HoMnO{sub 3} whose magnetic lattice is geometrically frustrated and comprises a 3D array of triangular layers with magnetic moments ordered in a 120{sup o} structure. We show that the effect of a uniform magnetic field gradient, {gradient}H, is to redistribute the electronic charge of the magnetically ordered phase leading to a unfirom electric field gradient. The resulting voltage difference between the crystal edges is proportional to the square of the crystal thickness, or inter-edge distance, L. It can reach values of several volts for |{gradient}H| {approx} 0.01 T/cm and L {approx_equal} 1mm, as long as the crystal is free of antiferromagnetic domain walls.

  20. Strong interaction effects in hadronic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    The WKB method is applied to the calculation of strong interaction-induced level widths and shifts of hadronic atoms. The calculation, while elementary enough for undergraduate quantum mechanics students, gives a good account of kaonic and antiprotonic atom data

  1. Insulator contamination effects; Efectos de la contaminacion en aislamientos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Lucia [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1987-12-31

    Environmental contamination deteriorates the electric insulators, mechanically as well as electrically; the mechanical problems caused by contamination are related basically with materials corrosion and degradation and the electrical problems are related to the deterioration of their dielectric rigidity. From the electrical standpoint, the type of contamination that cause more problems are divided into: marine, desert and industrial. It is not uncommon to find various combinations of these types of contamination. When the electric installations operate in polluted environments, the insulator electric behavior deteriorates, provoking increments in the operation costs for maintenance as well as for replacement. Mexico has large extensions of coasts (marine contamination), where nowadays large cities and productions centers are developed (industrial pollution); also, in some cases for the energy transportation is necessary to go through large land extensions, where no vegetation of any kind exists. For this reason the contamination effect on the electric installations must be considered in order to obtain a reliable and economical energy supply. [Espanol] La contaminacion ambiental deteriora los aisladores electricos tanto mecanica como electricamente; los problemas mecanicos por contaminacion se relacionan en forma basica con la corrosion y degradacion de los materiales, y los electricos se vinculan con el deterioro de su rigidez dielectrica. Desde el punto de vista electrico, los tipos de contaminacion que mas problemas ocasionan se dividen en: marina, desertica e industrial. Es comun encontrar diversas combinaciones de estas. Cuando las instalaciones electricas operan en ambientes contaminados, el comportamiento electrico de los aisladores se deteriora, provocando incrementos en los costos de operacion, tanto por mantenimiento como por reposicion. Mexico cuenta con grandes extensiones de costas (contaminacion marina), donde actualmente se desarrollan ciudades y

  2. Insulator contamination effects; Efectos de la contaminacion en aislamientos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Lucia [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1986-12-31

    Environmental contamination deteriorates the electric insulators, mechanically as well as electrically; the mechanical problems caused by contamination are related basically with materials corrosion and degradation and the electrical problems are related to the deterioration of their dielectric rigidity. From the electrical standpoint, the type of contamination that cause more problems are divided into: marine, desert and industrial. It is not uncommon to find various combinations of these types of contamination. When the electric installations operate in polluted environments, the insulator electric behavior deteriorates, provoking increments in the operation costs for maintenance as well as for replacement. Mexico has large extensions of coasts (marine contamination), where nowadays large cities and productions centers are developed (industrial pollution); also, in some cases for the energy transportation is necessary to go through large land extensions, where no vegetation of any kind exists. For this reason the contamination effect on the electric installations must be considered in order to obtain a reliable and economical energy supply. [Espanol] La contaminacion ambiental deteriora los aisladores electricos tanto mecanica como electricamente; los problemas mecanicos por contaminacion se relacionan en forma basica con la corrosion y degradacion de los materiales, y los electricos se vinculan con el deterioro de su rigidez dielectrica. Desde el punto de vista electrico, los tipos de contaminacion que mas problemas ocasionan se dividen en: marina, desertica e industrial. Es comun encontrar diversas combinaciones de estas. Cuando las instalaciones electricas operan en ambientes contaminados, el comportamiento electrico de los aisladores se deteriora, provocando incrementos en los costos de operacion, tanto por mantenimiento como por reposicion. Mexico cuenta con grandes extensiones de costas (contaminacion marina), donde actualmente se desarrollan ciudades y

  3. Organic Insulation Materials, the Effect on Indoor Humidity, and the Necessity of a Vapor Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten

    1998-01-01

    Examples of organic insulation products are cellulose fiber, other plant fiber, and animal wool. These materials, which are all very hygroscopic, are associated with certain assertions about their building physical behavior that need to be verified.Examples of such assertions are: "A vapor barrier...... is not needed when using organic insulation materials" and "Organic insulation materials have a stabilizing effect on the indoor humidity".The paper presents some numerical analyses of the hygrothermal behavior of wall constructions and the occupied spaces they surround when an organic insulation material...

  4. Effect of antioxidants on aging of nuclear plant cable insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, A.B.; Ray, J.W.; Wlodkowski, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of various antioxidants and antioxidant concentrations on the radiation and thermal stability of EPDM and XLPE polymers used for insulation of electric cable in nuclear power plants were measured. The objective was to determine if particular antioxidants could be identified as being especially effective for stabilization against radiation aging and combined thermal and radiation aging. Elongation to rupture was used as the measure of stability. Materials were irradiated to doses up to 2 MGy (200 Mrad) at a dose rate of 200 to 300 Gy/h in the Cobalt-60 Gamma Irradiation Facility at the University of Virginia. All of the antioxidants tested, which were known to provide excellent thermal stability, also provided good stability for radiation aging and combined thermal/radiation aging, although small differences between antioxidants were noted. No antioxidant or antioxidant combination was identified as being especially outstanding. Stabilization against radiation increased with increasing antioxidant concentration, but this trend was not observed for thermal aging. Damage from thermal and radiation aging was superposable. 9 refs., 16 figs., 12 tabs

  5. Quantum spin/valley Hall effect and topological insulator phase transitions in silicene

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.

    2013-04-26

    We present a theoretical realization of quantum spin and quantum valley Hall effects in silicene. We show that combination of an electric field and intrinsic spin-orbit interaction leads to quantum phase transitions at the charge neutrality point. This phase transition from a two dimensional topological insulator to a trivial insulating state is accompanied by a quenching of the quantum spin Hall effect and the onset of a quantum valley Hall effect, providing a tool to experimentally tune the topological state of silicene. In contrast to graphene and other conventional topological insulators, the proposed effects in silicene are accessible to experiments.

  6. Quantum spin/valley Hall effect and topological insulator phase transitions in silicene

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.; Manchon, Aurelien; Sabeeh, K.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    We present a theoretical realization of quantum spin and quantum valley Hall effects in silicene. We show that combination of an electric field and intrinsic spin-orbit interaction leads to quantum phase transitions at the charge neutrality point. This phase transition from a two dimensional topological insulator to a trivial insulating state is accompanied by a quenching of the quantum spin Hall effect and the onset of a quantum valley Hall effect, providing a tool to experimentally tune the topological state of silicene. In contrast to graphene and other conventional topological insulators, the proposed effects in silicene are accessible to experiments.

  7. Strong crystal size effect on deformation twinning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Qian; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Li, Ju

    2010-01-01

    plasticity. Accompanying the transition in deformation mechanism, the maximum flow stress of the submicrometre-sized pillars was observed to saturate at a value close to titanium’s ideal strength9, 10. We develop a ‘stimulated slip’ model to explain the strong size dependence of deformation twinning......Deformation twinning1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 in crystals is a highly coherent inelastic shearing process that controls the mechanical behaviour of many materials, but its origin and spatio-temporal features are shrouded in mystery. Using micro-compression and in situ nano-compression experiments, here we...... find that the stress required for deformation twinning increases drastically with decreasing sample size of a titanium alloy single crystal7, 8, until the sample size is reduced to one micrometre, below which the deformation twinning is entirely replaced by less correlated, ordinary dislocation...

  8. Effective Induction Heating around Strongly Magnetized Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislyakova, K. G.; Fossati, L.; Johnstone, C. P.; Noack, L.; Lüftinger, T.; Zaitsev, V. V.; Lammer, H.

    2018-05-01

    Planets that are embedded in the changing magnetic fields of their host stars can experience significant induction heating in their interiors caused by the planet’s orbital motion. For induction heating to be substantial, the planetary orbit has to be inclined with respect to the stellar rotation and dipole axes. Using WX UMa, for which the rotation and magnetic axes are aligned, as an example, we show that for close-in planets on inclined orbits, induction heating can be stronger than the tidal heating occurring inside Jupiter’s satellite Io; namely, it can generate a surface heat flux exceeding 2 W m‑2. An internal heating source of such magnitude can lead to extreme volcanic activity on the planet’s surface, possibly also to internal local magma oceans, and to the formation of a plasma torus around the star aligned with the planetary orbit. A strongly volcanically active planet would eject into space mostly SO2, which would then dissociate into oxygen and sulphur atoms. Young planets would also eject CO2. Oxygen would therefore be the major component of the torus. If the O I column density of the torus exceeds ≈1012 cm‑2, the torus could be revealed by detecting absorption signatures at the position of the strong far-ultraviolet O I triplet at about 1304 Å. We estimate that this condition is satisfied if the O I atoms in the torus escape the system at a velocity smaller than 1–10 km s‑1. These estimates are valid also for a tidally heated planet.

  9. Dressed topological insulators. Rashba impurity, Kondo effect, magnetic impurities, proximity-induced superconductivity, hybrid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posske, Thore Hagen

    2016-01-01

    Topological insulators are electronic phases that insulate in the bulk and accommodate a peculiar, metallic edge liquid with a spin-dependent dispersion. They are regarded to be of considerable future use in spintronics and for quantum computation. Besides determining the intrinsic properties of this rather novel electronic phase, considering its combination with well-known physical systems can generate genuinely new physics. In this thesis, we report on such combinations including topological insulators. Specifically, we analyze an attached Rashba impurity, a Kondo dot in the two channel setup, magnetic impurities on the surface of a strong three-dimensional topological insulator, the proximity coupling of the latter system to a superconductor, and hybrid systems consisting of a topological insulator and a semimetal. Let us summarize our primary results. Firstly, we determine an analytical formula for the Kondo cloud and describe its possible detection in current correlations far away from the Kondo region. We thereby rely on and extend the method of refermionizable points. Furthermore, we find a class of gapless topological superconductors and semimetals, which accommodate edge states that behave similarly to the ones of globally gapped topological phases. Unexpectedly, we also find edge states that change their chirality when affected by sufficiently strong disorder. We regard the presented research helpful in future classifications and applications of systems containing topological insulators, of which we propose some examples.

  10. Dressed topological insulators. Rashba impurity, Kondo effect, magnetic impurities, proximity-induced superconductivity, hybrid systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posske, Thore Hagen

    2016-02-26

    Topological insulators are electronic phases that insulate in the bulk and accommodate a peculiar, metallic edge liquid with a spin-dependent dispersion. They are regarded to be of considerable future use in spintronics and for quantum computation. Besides determining the intrinsic properties of this rather novel electronic phase, considering its combination with well-known physical systems can generate genuinely new physics. In this thesis, we report on such combinations including topological insulators. Specifically, we analyze an attached Rashba impurity, a Kondo dot in the two channel setup, magnetic impurities on the surface of a strong three-dimensional topological insulator, the proximity coupling of the latter system to a superconductor, and hybrid systems consisting of a topological insulator and a semimetal. Let us summarize our primary results. Firstly, we determine an analytical formula for the Kondo cloud and describe its possible detection in current correlations far away from the Kondo region. We thereby rely on and extend the method of refermionizable points. Furthermore, we find a class of gapless topological superconductors and semimetals, which accommodate edge states that behave similarly to the ones of globally gapped topological phases. Unexpectedly, we also find edge states that change their chirality when affected by sufficiently strong disorder. We regard the presented research helpful in future classifications and applications of systems containing topological insulators, of which we propose some examples.

  11. Effect of wind on Svalbard reindeer fur insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Cuyler

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The heat transfer through Svalbard reindeer (Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus fur samples was studied with respect to wind velocity, season and animal age. A total of 33 dorsal fur sections were investigated using a wind tunnel. Insulation varied with season (calving, summer, autumn and winter. At zero wind velocity, fur insulation was significantly different between seasons for both calf and adult fur samples. At the same time, there was no significant difference between calf and adult insulation for the summer, autumn and winter seasons. Calf fur insulated as well as adult fur. Winter insulation of Svalbard reindeer was approximately 3 times that of summer. Increasing wind veloci¬ty increased heat loss, however, the increase was not dramatic. When wind coefficients (slope of the heat transfer regression lines were compared, between season and between calf and adult, no significant differences were reported. All fur samples showed similar increases in heat transfer for wind velocities between 0 and 10 m.s-1. The conductance of winter fur of Svalbard reindeer was almost half that of caribou fur. Also, conductance was not as greatly influenced by wind as caribou fur

  12. Strongly suppressed proximity effect and ferromagnetism in topological insulator/ferromagnet/superconductor thin film trilayers of Bi2Se3/SrRuO3/underdoped YBa2Cu3O x : a possible new platform for Majorana nano-electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Gad

    2018-07-01

    We report properties of a topological insulator–ferromagnet–superconductor trilayers comprised of thin films of 20 nm thick {Bi}}2{Se}}3 on 10 nm SrRuO3 on 30 nm {YBa}}2{Cu}}3{{{O}}}x. As deposited trilayers are underdoped and have a superconductive transition with {{T}}{{c}} onset at 75 K, zero resistance at 65 K, {{T}}Cueri} at 150 K and {{T}}* of about 200 K. Further reannealing under vacuum yields the 60 K phase of {YBa}}2{Cu}}3{{{O}}}x which still has zero resistance below about 40 K. Only when 10 × 100 microbridges were patterned in the trilayer, some of the bridges showed resistive behavior all the way down to low temperatures. Magnetoresistance versus temperature of the superconductive ones showed the typical peak due to flux flow against pinning below {{T}}{{c}}, while the resistive ones showed only the broad leading edge of such a peak. All this indicates clearly weak-link superconductivity in the resistive bridges between superconductive {YBa}}2{Cu}}3{{{O}}}x grains via the topological and ferromagnetic cap layers. Comparing our results to those of a reference trilayer (RTL) with the topological {Bi}}2{Se}}3 layer substituted by a non-superconducting highly overdoped {La}}1.65{Sr}}0.35{CuO}}4, indicates that the superconductive proximity effect as well as ferromagnetism in the topological trilayer are actually strongly suppressed compared to the non-topological RTL. This strong suppression could originate in lattice and Fermi levels mismatch as well as in short coherence length and unfavorable effects of strong spin–orbit coupling in {Bi}}2{Se}}3 on the d-wave pairing of {YBa}}2{Cu}}3{{{O}}}x. Proximity induced edge currents in the SRO/YBCO layer could lead to Majorana bound states, a possible signature of which is observed in the present study as zero bias conductance peaks.

  13. Effect of surface states on electrical characteristic of metal - insulator - semiconductor (MIS) diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altindal, S.; Doekme, I.; Tataroglu, A.; Sahingoez, R.

    2002-01-01

    The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor (MIS) Schottky barrier diodes which is consider distribution of interface states in equilibrium with semiconductor were determined at two (low and high) temperature. The interface states were responsible for non-ideal behavior of the forward I-V characteristic of diodes. Both diodes (n and p type Si) showed non-ideal behavior with an ideality factor 1.6 and 1.85 respectively at room temperature. The higher values of n-type Si were attributed to an order of magnitude higher density of interface states in the both diodes. The effect of an interfacial insulator layer between the metal and semiconductor are also studied. The high density of interface states also caused a reduction in the barrier height of the MIS diode. It is shown that by using Norde function at low and high temperature, barrier height □ b , series resistance R s and ideality factor n can be determined even in the case 1 s obtained from Norde function strongly depend on temperature, and decrease with increasing temperature. In addition, the potential barrier height increases with increasing temperature. The mean density of interface states N ss decreases with increasing temperature. Particularly at low temperature the I-V characteristics are controlled by interface states density

  14. Postcollaptical effects in strong Langmuir turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkin, V.M.

    1989-01-01

    The qualitative theory of Langmuir turbulence is constructed, which takes into account the postcollaptical effects. The spectra obtained for Langmuir waves and accelerated electrons differ substantially from those predicted earlier. An interesting feature of new spectra is their dependence on the collapse symmetry. 6 refs

  15. Effects of thermal ageing and gamma radiations on ethylene-propylene based insulator of electric cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baccaro, S.; D'Atanasio, P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of gamma radiation and thermal aging on cable insulator. The elastic properties degrade rapidly as the absorbed dose increases: the percent elongation at break attains nearly 100% value at 0.5 MGy absorbed dose. The gases evolved during the irradiation are mainly H 2 and CO 2 ; CO, CH 4 and C 2 H 6 are present in much lower concentrations. The damage undergone depends strongly on sequential radiation and thermal aging; the analysis of accelerated life test data by means of the Arrhenius model gave (1.23+-0.25) eV for the activation energy, about 1 eV higher than the values reported in the literature

  16. Valley polarized quantum Hall effect and topological insulator phase transitions in silicene

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.

    2013-01-25

    The electronic properties of silicene are distinct from both the conventional two dimensional electron gas and the famous graphene due to strong spin orbit interaction and the buckled structure. Silicene has the potential to overcome limitations encountered for graphene, in particular the zero band gap and weak spin orbit interaction. We demonstrate a valley polarized quantum Hall effect and topological insulator phase transitions. We use the Kubo formalism to discuss the Hall conductivity and address the longitudinal conductivity for elastic impurity scattering in the first Born approximation. We show that the combination of an electric field with intrinsic spin orbit interaction leads to quantum phase transitions at the charge neutrality point, providing a tool to experimentally tune the topological state. Silicene constitutes a model system for exploring the spin and valley physics not accessible in graphene due to the small spin orbit interaction.

  17. Strong effects in weak nonleptonic decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, M.B.

    1980-04-01

    In this report the weak nonleptonic decays of kaons and hyperons are examined with the hope of gaining insight into a recently proposed mechanism for the ΔI = 1/2 rule. The effective Hamiltonian for ΔS = 1 weak nonleptonic decays and that for K 0 -anti K 0 mixing are calculated in the six-quark model using the leading logarithmic approximation. These are used to examine the CP violation parameters of the kaon system. It is found that if Penguin-type diagrams make important contributions to K → ππ decay amplitudes then upcoming experiments may be able to distinguish the six-quark model for CP violation from the superweak model. The weak radiative decays of hyperons are discussed with an emphasis on what they can teach us about hyperon nonleptonic decays and the ΔI = 1/2 rule

  18. Valley polarized quantum Hall effect and topological insulator phase transitions in silicene

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    encountered for graphene, in particular the zero band gap and weak spin orbit interaction. We demonstrate a valley polarized quantum Hall effect and topological insulator phase transitions. We use the Kubo formalism to discuss the Hall conductivity and address

  19. A Review of Irradiation Effects on Organic-Matrix Insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, N.J.

    1993-01-01

    This review assesses the data base on epoxy and polyimide matrix insulation to determine whether organic electric insulation systems can be used in the toroidal field (TF) magnets of next generation fusion devices such as ITER* and TPX*. Owing to the difficulties of testing insulation under fusion reactor conditions, there is a considerable mismatch between the ITER requirements and the data that are currently available. For example, nearly all of the high-dose (5 x 10 7 to 10 8 Gy) data obtained on epoxy and polyimide matrix insulation employed gamma irradiation, electron irradiation, or reactor irradiation with a fast neutron fluence far below 10 23 /m 2 , the fluence expected for the insulation at the TF magnets, as set forth in ITER conceptual design documents. Also, the neutron spectrum did not contain a very high energy (E (ge) 5 MeV) component. Such data underestimate the actual damage that would be obtained with the neutron fluence and spectrum expected at a TF magnet. Experiments on a polyimide (Kapton) indicate that gamma or electron doses or mixed gamma and neutron reactor doses would have to be downgraded by a factor of up to ten to simulate fusion neutron doses. Even when neutrons did constitute a significant portion of the total dose, B-containing E-glass reinforcement was often used; therefore, excess damage from the 10 B + n → 7 Li + α reaction occurred near the glass-epoxy interface. This problem can easily be avoided by substituting B-free glass (R, S, or T types)

  20. Disorder effects on helical edge transport in graphene under a strong tilted magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chunli; Cazalilla, Miguel A.

    2015-10-01

    In a recent experiment, Young et al. [Nature (London) 505, 528 (2014), 10.1038/nature12800] observed a metal to insulator transition as well as transport through helical edge states in monolayer graphene under a strong, tilted magnetic field. Under such conditions, the bulk is a magnetic insulator which can exhibit metallic conduction through helical edges. It was found that the two-terminal conductance of the helical channels deviates from the expected quantized value (=e2/h per edge, at zero temperature). Motivated by this observation, we study the effect of disorder on the conduction through the edge channels. We show that, unlike for helical edges of topological insulators in semiconducting quantum wells, a disorder Rashba spin-orbit coupling does not lead to backscattering, at least to leading order. Instead, we find that the lack of perfect antialignment of the electron spins in the helical channels to be the most likely cause for backscattering arising from scalar (i.e., spin-independent) impurities. The intrinsic spin-orbit coupling and other time-reversal symmetry-breaking and/or sublattice parity-breaking potentials also lead to (subleading) corrections to the channel conductance.

  1. Effects of γ-radiation on the properties of insulating oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Aziz, M.M.; Elshazly-Zaghloul, M.; Zaghloul, A.R.M.; Fikry, L.; Raieh, M.

    1986-01-01

    Electrical Equipment used in an irradiated environment suffer from ionization and other effects. Insulating oil, e.g. of transformers, in a nuclear power station is subjected to γ-radiation. In this communication we provide a detailed experimental study of insulating oil subjected to γ-radiation. Unused oil samples of the type used in Egypt were subjected to γ-radiation for different time periods. The electrical properties of these samples are measured; dielectric constant and breakdown strength

  2. Irradiation effect of the insulating materials for fusion superconducting magnets at cryogenic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Koji; Akiyama, Yoko; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2017-09-01

    In ITER, superconducting magnets should be used in such severe environment as high fluence of fast neutron, cryogenic temperature and large electromagnetic forces. Insulating material is one of the most sensitive component to radiation. So radiation resistance on mechanical properties at cryogenic temperature are required for insulating material. The purpose of this study is to evaluate irradiation effect of insulating material at cryogenic temperature by gamma-ray irradiation. Firstly, glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) and hybrid composite were prepared. After irradiation at room temperature (RT) or liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT, 77 K), interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and glass-transition temperature (Tg) measurement were conducted. It was shown that insulating materials irradiated at room temperature were much degraded than those at cryogenic temperature.

  3. Top-gate pentacene-based organic field-effect transistor with amorphous rubrene gate insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroki, Mizuha; Maeda, Yasutaka; Ohmi, Shun-ichiro

    2018-02-01

    The scaling of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) is necessary for high-density integration and for this, OFETs with a top-gate configuration are required. There have been several reports of damageless lithography processes for organic semiconductor or insulator layers. However, it is still difficult to fabricate scaled OFETs with a top-gate configuration. In this study, the lift-off process and the device characteristics of the OFETs with a top-gate configuration utilizing an amorphous (α) rubrene gate insulator were investigated. We have confirmed that α-rubrene shows an insulating property, and its extracted linear mobility was 2.5 × 10-2 cm2/(V·s). The gate length and width were 10 and 60 µm, respectively. From these results, the OFET with a top-gate configuration utilizing an α-rubrene gate insulator is promising for the high-density integration of scaled OFETs.

  4. Effect of insulation thickness on the productivity of basin type solar stills: An experimental verification under local climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalifa, Abdul Jabbar N.; Hamood, Ahmad M.

    2009-01-01

    To achieve a high efficiency of a solar still, heat losses from the sides and base should be minimized by adequate insulation to insure the storage of the absorbed thermal energy. The effect of insulation on the productivity of a basin type solar still is verified in this study. Solar stills with insulation thickness of 30, 60 and 100 mm are investigated and the results are compared with those obtained for a still without insulation. It was found that the insulation thickness has a significant impact on the productivity of the still up to a thickness of 60 mm. The insulation thickness could influence the productivity of the still by over 80%. A performance correlation for the effect of insulation on productivity is also developed.

  5. Nonlinear charge reduction effect in strongly coupled plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmah, D; Tessarotto, M; Salimullah, M

    2006-01-01

    The charge reduction effect, produced by the nonlinear Debye screening of high-Z charges occurring in strongly coupled plasmas, is investigated. An analytic asymptotic expression is obtained for the charge reduction factor (f c ) which determines the Debye-Hueckel potential generated by a charged test particle. Its relevant parametric dependencies are analysed and shown to predict a strong charge reduction effect in strongly coupled plasmas

  6. Effect Of Low External Flow On Flame Spreading Over ETFE Insulated Wire Under Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Katsuhiro; Fujita, Osamu; Ito, Kenichi; Kikuchi, Masao; Olson, Sandra L.; Kashiwagi, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    Fire safety is one of the most important issues for manned space missions. A likely cause of fires in spacecraft is wire insulation combustion in electrical system. Regarding the wire insulation combustion it important to know the effect of low external flow on the combustion because of the presence of ventilation flow in spacecraft. Although, there are many researches on flame spreading over solid material at low external flows under microgravity, research dealing with wire insulation is very limited. An example of wire insulation combustion in microgravity is the Space Shuttle experiments carried out by Greenberg et al. However, the number of experiments was very limited. Therefore, the effect of low flow velocity is still not clear. The authors have reported results on flame spreading over ETFE (ethylene - tetrafluoroetylene) insulated wire in a quiescent atmosphere in microgravity by 10 seconds drop tower. The authors also performed experiments of polyethylene insulated nichrom wire combustion in low flow velocity under microgravity. The results suggested that flame spread rate had maximum value in low flow velocity condition. Another interesting issue is the effect of dilution gas, especially CO2, which is used for fire extinguisher in ISS. There are some researches working on dilution gas effect on flame spreading over solid material in quiescent atmosphere in microgravity. However the research with low external flow is limited and, of course, the research discussing a relation of the appearance of maximum wire flammability in low flow velocity region with different dilution gas cannot be found yet. The present paper, therefore, investigates the effect of opposed flow with different dilution gas on flame spreading over ETFE insulated wire and change in the presence of the maximum flammability depending on the dilution gas type is discussed within the limit of microgravity time given by ground-based facility.

  7. The effect of particulate debris on the insulation integrity of SSC coils during molding and collaring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehrlich, E.; Markley, F.; Rogers, D.

    1991-03-01

    In order to simulate the effect of accidentally introduced debris on SSC coil insulation integrity, models consisting of two pieces of insulated SSC cable have been loaded in an hydraulic press after introducing foreign particles between the layers. The tests were originally suggested by R. Palmer of the SSC Laboratory. A high voltage (2 Kv) was continually applied between the two cables and the load gradually increased until an electrical short occurred. The high voltage was used as an easy method of detecting insulation punctures and to continue the general type of testing begun at Brookhaven by J. Skaritka, now at the SSC Laboratory, and continued at Fermilab by F. Markley and presented at last year's session of the Conference. A range of particles of different size, shape, and hardness were used, and both conducting and insulating particles were included. Fine wires were also used. When the data are normalized using the control (no particles added), data for each cable batch used, there is a slight correlation between pressure at breakdown and particle size for cables insulated with Kapton only. Adjustment must be made for soft particles that tend to deform and for particles with aspect ratios greater than one. Additional measurements have also been made where the opoxy-fiberglass layer was added to the Kapton insulation overwrap. These show a correlation between conductivity and breakdown pressure. 1 ref., 7 figs

  8. Fatigue effects in insulation materials for fusion magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenkranz, P.

    2000-12-01

    The mechanical properties of insulation materials for the superconducting magnets of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and future fusion plants, i.e. woven fiber reinforced composites, have been identified as an area of concern for the long-term operation of such magnets. The magnets will be subjected to fast neutron and γ-radiation over their lifetime, which influence the mechanical properties of the insulation materials. The ultimate tensile strength and, above all, the interlaminar shear strength and their performance under dynamic load, corresponding to the pulsed operation of a TOKAMAK-confinement system, are sensitive indicators of material failure in fiber-reinforced laminates especially at cryogenic temperatures. To simulate these conditions, low frequency fatigue measurements at 10 Hz were made at 77 K up to one million cycles. Tension-tension fatigue tests were performed according to ASTM D3479. However, due to the space limitations in all irradiation facilities, the tests have to be done on samples, which are considerably smaller than those required for standard test conditions. The influence of the specimen geometry on the ultimate tensile strength under static and dynamic load conditions was, therefore, investigated on fiber-reinforced plastics. They did not show any systematic trends as long as the sample thickness does not exceed the thickness recommended in ASTM D3479. The double lap shear test method was chosen for the shear experiments because of the symmetry of the specimen geometry under tensile load and the suitability for fatigue tests. Like almost every existing test procedure for the interlaminar shear strength, this test method does not provide for a completely uniform interlaminar shear stress distribution over a sizable region in the test section of the specimen. A scaling program combined with FE-simulations was, therefore, initiated to assess the influence of the length of the test section and of the sample

  9. Spin-filtering effect and proximity effect in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator/normal metal/superconductor junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hong; Yang Wei; Yang Xinjian; Qin Minghui; Xu Yihong

    2007-01-01

    Taking into account the thickness of the ferromagnetic insulator (FI), the spin-filtering effect and proximity effect in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator/normal metal/superconductor (NM/FI/NM/SC) junctions are studied based on an extended Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk (BTK) theory. It is shown that a spin-dependent energy shift during the tunneling process induces splitting of the sub-energy gap conductance peaks and the spin polarization in the ferromagnetic insulator causes an imbalance of the peak heights. Different from the ferromagnet the spin-filtering effect of the FI cannot cause the reversion of the normalized conductance in NM/FI/NM/SC junctions

  10. Strong coupling effects between a meta-atom and MIM nanocavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San Chen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the strong coupling effects between a meta-atom and a metal-insulator-metal (MIM nanocavity. By changing the meta-atom sizes, we achieve the meta-atomic electric dipole, quadrupole or multipole interaction with the plasmonic nanocavity, in which characteristic anticrossing behaviors demonstrate the occurrence of the strong coupling. The various interactions present obviously different splitting values and behaviors of dependence on the meta-atomic position. The largest Rabi-type splittings, about 360.0 meV and 306.1 meV, have been obtained for electric dipole and quadrupole interaction, respectively. We attribute the large splitting to the highly-confined cavity mode and the large transition dipole of the meta-atom. Also the Rabi-type oscillation in time domain is given.

  11. OBSERVATION OF STRONG - STRONG AND OTHER BEAM - BEAM EFFECTS IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FISCHER, W.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; CAMERON, P.; CONNOLLY, R.; MONTAG, C.; PEGGS, S.; PILAT, F.; PTITSYN, V.; TEPIKIAN, S.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; VAN ZEIJTS, J.

    2003-01-01

    RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. For the first time, coherent beam-beam modes were observed in a bunched beam hadron collider. Other beam-beam effects in RHIC were observed in operation and in dedicated experiments with gold ions, deuterons and protons. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. During ramps unequal radio frequencies in the two rings cause the crossing points to move longitudinally. Thus bunches experience beam-beam interactions only in intervals and the tunes are modulated. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made so far

  12. Strong nonreciprocity of phonon polaritons of an insulator at its boundary with an ideal metal or superconductor in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chupis, I.E.; Mamaluy, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    Surface phonon polaritons in a semi-infinite insulator in a constant magnetic field at the boundary with an ideal metal or a superconductor have been considered. These phonon polaritons are induced by dynamic magnetoelectric interaction, which exists in the presence of a magnetic field. The modes of these surface polaritons appreciably differ in opposite directions of the magnetic field or the propagation of the wave. As a result, polaritons of a given optical or infrared frequency propagate only in one direction with respect to the magnetic field, which is the effect of rectification of surface electromagnetic waves. The inversion of the magnetic field results in 'switching on' or 'switching off' of surface polaritons. The existence of radiant surface polariton modes is predicted. (author)

  13. Effective conductivity by fluid analogy for a porous insulator filled with a conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    By combining of identities relating effective conductivity to tortuosity and tortuosity to induced mass, a general formula for the effective (electrical or thermal) conductivity of a porous insulator filled with a conductor is obtained. This formula depends on an induced-mass factor which arises by treating of the conducting material as an inviscid fluid. This induced-mass factor can be estimated with the use of an effective-medium theory. For random arrays of equal spheres, the estimates of conductivity obtained with the use of this fluid analogy are in good agreement with recent exact values derived for periodic arrays of insulating spheres to closest packing

  14. Correlated evolution of colossal thermoelectric effect and Kondo insulating behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Fuccillo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the magnetic and transport properties of the Ru1−xFexSb2 solid solution, showing how the colossal thermoelectric performance of FeSb2 evolves due to changes in the amount of 3d vs. 4d electron character. The physical property trends shed light on the physical picture underlying one of the best low-T thermoelectric power factors known to date. Some of the compositions warrant further study as possible n- and p-type thermoelements for Peltier cooling well below 300 K. Our findings enable us to suggest possible new Kondo insulating systems that might behave similarly to FeSb2 as advanced thermoelectrics.

  15. XUV preionization effects in high power magnetically insulated diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maenchen, J.; Woodworth, J.R.; Foltz, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    Electrode surface desorption and photoionization by an intense XUV pulse has been shown to dramatically improve a vacuum diode impedance history. The 6-Terawatt Applied-B ion diode experiment on PBFA I is limited by a delay in both diode and ion current initiation. The insulation magnetic field impedes electron crossings which are believed to aid the ion source initiation. The diode is therefore initially a severe overmatch to the accelerator 40-nsec, 2.2-MV, 0.5-ohm pulse. The diode current increases during the pulse, leading to a rapidly falling impedance history. The application of an intense (30 to 50-kW/cm 2 ) XUV flux from an array of sixteen 60-kA spark sources is found to cause immediate diode current flow, resulting in both a greatly improved impedance history and the prompt initiation of an intense higher power ion beam

  16. Local Peltier-effect-induced reversible metal–insulator transition in VO2 nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takami, Hidefumi; Kanki, Teruo; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    We report anomalous resistance leaps and drops in VO 2 nanowires with operating current density and direction, showing reversible and nonvolatile switching. This event is associated with the metal–insulator phase transition (MIT) of local nanodomains with coexistence states of metallic and insulating phases induced by thermoelectric cooling and heating effects. Because the interface of metal and insulator domains has much different Peltier coefficient, it is possible that a significant Peltier effect would be a source of the local MIT. This operation can be realized by one-dimensional domain configuration in VO 2 nanowires because one straight current path through the electronic domain-interface enables theoretical control of thermoelectric effects. This result will open a new method of reversible control of electronic states in correlated electron materials.

  17. Local Peltier-effect-induced reversible metal–insulator transition in VO{sub 2} nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takami, Hidefumi; Kanki, Teruo, E-mail: kanki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: h-tanaka@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp; Tanaka, Hidekazu, E-mail: kanki@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: h-tanaka@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    We report anomalous resistance leaps and drops in VO{sub 2} nanowires with operating current density and direction, showing reversible and nonvolatile switching. This event is associated with the metal–insulator phase transition (MIT) of local nanodomains with coexistence states of metallic and insulating phases induced by thermoelectric cooling and heating effects. Because the interface of metal and insulator domains has much different Peltier coefficient, it is possible that a significant Peltier effect would be a source of the local MIT. This operation can be realized by one-dimensional domain configuration in VO{sub 2} nanowires because one straight current path through the electronic domain-interface enables theoretical control of thermoelectric effects. This result will open a new method of reversible control of electronic states in correlated electron materials.

  18. Composite Behavior of a Novel Insulated Concrete Sandwich Wall Panel Reinforced with GFRP Shear Grids: Effects of Insulation Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, JunHee; You, Young-Chan

    2015-03-03

    A full-scale experimental program was used in this study to investigate the structural behavior of novel insulated concrete sandwich wall panels (SWPs) reinforced with grid-type glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) shear connectors. Two kinds of insulation-expanded polystyrene (EPS) and extruded polystyrene (XPS) with 100 mm thickness were incased between the two concrete wythes to meet the increasing demand for the insulation performance of building envelope. One to four GFRP shear grids were used to examine the degree of composite action of the two concrete wythes. Ten specimens of SWPs were tested under displacement control subjected to four-point concentrated loads. The test results showed that the SWPs reinforced with GFRP grids as shear connectors developed a high degree of composite action resulting in high flexural strength. The specimens with EPS foam exhibited an enhanced load-displacement behavior compared with the specimens with XPS because of the relatively stronger bond between insulation and concrete. In addition, the ultimate strength of the test results was compared to the analytical prediction with the mechanical properties of only GRFP grids. The specimens with EPS insulation presented higher strength-based composite action than the ones with XPS insulation.

  19. Plasma Deposited SiO2 for Planar Self-Aligned Gate Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors on Semi-Insulating InP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabory, Charles N.; Young, Paul G.; Smith, Edwyn D.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1994-01-01

    Metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) field effect transistors were fabricated on InP substrates using a planar self-aligned gate process. A 700-1000 A gate insulator of Si02 doped with phosphorus was deposited by a direct plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at 400 mTorr, 275 C, 5 W, and power density of 8.5 MW/sq cm. High frequency capacitance-voltage measurements were taken on MIS capacitors which have been subjected to a 700 C anneal and an interface state density of lxl0(exp 11)/eV/cq cm was found. Current-voltage measurements of the capacitors show a breakdown voltage of 107 V/cm and a insulator resistivity of 10(exp 14) omega cm. Transistors were fabricated on semi-insulating InP using a standard planar self-aligned gate process in which the gate insulator was subjected to an ion implantation activation anneal of 700 C. MIS field effect transistors gave a maximum extrinsic transconductance of 23 mS/mm for a gate length of 3 microns. The drain current drift saturated at 87.5% of the initial current, while reaching to within 1% of the saturated value after only 1x10(exp 3). This is the first reported viable planar InP self-aligned gate transistor process reported to date.

  20. Effect on the insulation material of a MOSFET device submitted to a standard diagnostic radiation beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Magalhaes, C M S; Dos Santos, L A P; Souza, D do N; Maia, A F

    2010-01-01

    MOSFET electronic devices have been used for dosimetry in radiology and radiotherapy. Several communications show that due to the radiation exposure defects appear on the semiconductor crystal lattice. Actually, the structure of a MOSFET consists of three materials: a semiconductor, a metal and an insulator between them. The MOSFET is a quadripolar device with a common terminal: gate-source is the input; drain-source is the output. The gate controls the electrical current passing through semiconductor medium by the field effect because the silicon oxide acts as insulating material. The proposal of this work is to show some radiation effects on the insulator of a MOSFET device. A 6430 Keithley sub-femtoamp SourceMeter was used to verify how the insulating material layer in the structure of the device varies with the radiation exposure. We have used the IEC 61267 standard radiation X-ray beams generated from a Pantak industrial unit in the radiation energy range of computed tomography. This range was chosen because we are using the MOSFET device as radiation detector for dosimetry in computed tomography. The results showed that the behaviour of the electrical current of the device is different in the insulator and semiconductor structures.

  1. Effects of Ion Beam Irradiation on Nanoscale InOx Cooper-Pair Insulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srdjan Milosavljević

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effects of irradiating indium oxide films of nanoscale thickness by ion beams, when these films are in the Cooper-pair insulator state. Radiation effects are predicted on the basis of Monte Carlo simulations of ion transport. Results of numerical experiments are interpreted within the theoretical model of a Cooper-pair insulator. The study suggests that radiation-induced changes in InOx films exposed to ion beams could significantly alter their current-voltage characteristics and that a transition to a metallic state is possible, due to radiation-induced perturbation of the fine-tuned granular structure. Furthermore, incident and displaced ions can break up enough Cooper pairs in InOx films to cause dissolution of this specific insulating state.

  2. Topological insulators

    CERN Document Server

    Franz, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Topological Insulators, volume six in the Contemporary Concepts of Condensed Matter Series, describes the recent revolution in condensed matter physics that occurred in our understanding of crystalline solids. The book chronicles the work done worldwide that led to these discoveries and provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of the field. Starting in 2004, theorists began to explore the effect of topology on the physics of band insulators, a field previously considered well understood. However, the inclusion of topology brings key new elements into this old field. Whereas it was

  3. Effect that radiation exerts to insulation breakdown of heat resistant polymer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Shigetaka; Baba, Makoto; Noto, Fumitoshi; Ruike, Mitsuo.

    1990-01-01

    Artificial satellites are always exposed to cosmic rays which contain the radiations which do not reach the ground, therefore, the radiation resistance of the polymer insulators for cables and others used in such environment becomes a problem. Also the polymer insulator materials used for nuclear facilities require excellent radiation resistance. It is important to examine the effect that radiation exerts to electric insulation characteristics from the viewpoint of material development. In this paper, the insulation breakdown characteristics of heat resistant polymer films and the mini-cables made for trial of heat resistant polymer materials in the case without irradiation and in the case of gamma ray irradiation, and the results of the structural analysis are reported. The specimens tested, the experimental method and the results are described. The insulation breakdown strength of PFA and FEP films lowered from 0.15-0.2 MGy, but that of PEEK film did not change up to 5 MGy. It was found that fluorine group resins were apt to deteriorate by oxidation as dose increased. (K.I.)

  4. Metal-insulator transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, Masatoshi; Fujimori, Atsushi; Tokura, Yoshinori

    1998-10-01

    Metal-insulator transitions are accompanied by huge resistivity changes, even over tens of orders of magnitude, and are widely observed in condensed-matter systems. This article presents the observations and current understanding of the metal-insulator transition with a pedagogical introduction to the subject. Especially important are the transitions driven by correlation effects associated with the electron-electron interaction. The insulating phase caused by the correlation effects is categorized as the Mott Insulator. Near the transition point the metallic state shows fluctuations and orderings in the spin, charge, and orbital degrees of freedom. The properties of these metals are frequently quite different from those of ordinary metals, as measured by transport, optical, and magnetic probes. The review first describes theoretical approaches to the unusual metallic states and to the metal-insulator transition. The Fermi-liquid theory treats the correlations that can be adiabatically connected with the noninteracting picture. Strong-coupling models that do not require Fermi-liquid behavior have also been developed. Much work has also been done on the scaling theory of the transition. A central issue for this review is the evaluation of these approaches in simple theoretical systems such as the Hubbard model and t-J models. Another key issue is strong competition among various orderings as in the interplay of spin and orbital fluctuations. Experimentally, the unusual properties of the metallic state near the insulating transition have been most extensively studied in d-electron systems. In particular, there is revived interest in transition-metal oxides, motivated by the epoch-making findings of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates and colossal magnetoresistance in manganites. The article reviews the rich phenomena of anomalous metallicity, taking as examples Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Ru compounds. The diverse phenomena include strong spin and

  5. Effects of surface exchange anisotropy in Heisenberg ferromagnetic insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selzer, S.; Majlis, N.

    1982-03-01

    We consider an fcc semi-infinite ferromagnetic insulator displaying an anisotropic exchange interaction between spins on the (111) surface plane of the form Jsub(parallel)[Ssub(i)sup(x)Ssub(j)sup(x)+Ssub(i)sup(y)Ssub(j)sup(y )+etaSsub(i)sup(z)Ssub(j)sup(z)], assuming all other interactions isotropic. A self-consistent RPA calculation is performed, with a Green function method valid for any spin S, up to the bulk transition temperature Tsub(c)sup(b), by imposing that the magnetization of the third layer equals the bulk value. For eta sufficiently large, the surface magnetization is non-zero for T>Tsub(c)sup(b), up to a transition temperature Tsub(c)sup(s)(eta) whenever eta>=etasub(c)>1, where Tsub(c)sup(s)(etasub(c))=Tsub(c)sup(b). For T>Tsub(c)sup(b) the system is equivalent to a film of three layers, where the magnetization of the third one is identically zero as a boundary condition. A discontinuity of the derivative in the curve of the magnetization of the first two layers vs. temperature is found at Tsub(c)sup(b). The results show clearly a cross-over from Heisenberg to Ising behaviour at the surface. (author)

  6. Effect of pollutant gases on electrical insulators deterioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamarad, A.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work ceramic materials as electrical insulators have been exposed in laboratory-based chambers. Water contact angle and FTIR of the surface before and after pollutant exposures have been studied. The results indicated that the reaction between the policrete and the atmospheric pollutant produce some salts deposits, some hydrolysis over the resin surface, modifying water contact angle.

    En este trabajo se exponen en cámaras atmosféricas de laboratorio materiales cerámicos usados como aislantes eléctricos. Se realiza un estudio de la superficie expuesta a la degradación medioambiental a través del ángulo de contacto de una gota de agua y de las sales depositadas, determinándose éstas últimas por espectroscopia infrarroja. Los resultados revelan el depósito de varias sales sobre la superficie de la muestra, e hidrólisis sobre la superficie de la resina, modificando el ángulo de contacto.

  7. Effect of particle size ratio on the conducting percolation threshold of granular conductive-insulating composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Da; Ekere, N N

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we apply Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the conductive percolation threshold of granular composite of conductive and insulating powders with amorphous structure. We focus on the effect of insulating to conductive particle size ratio λ = d i /d c on the conducting percolation threshold p c (the volume fraction of the conductive powder). Simulation results show that, for λ = 1, the percolation threshold p c lies between simple cubic and body centred cubic site percolation thresholds, and that as λ increases the percolation threshold decreases. We also use the structural information obtained by the simulation to study the nonlinear current-voltage characteristics of composite with solid volume fraction of conductive powder below p c in terms of electron tunnelling for nanoscale powders, dielectric breakdown for microscale or larger powders, and pressing induced conduction for non-rigid insulating powders

  8. Giant magneto-spin-Seebeck effect and magnon transfer torques in insulating spin valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yihong; Chen, Kai; Zhang, Shufeng

    2018-01-01

    We theoretically study magnon transport in an insulating spin valve (ISV) made of an antiferromagnetic insulator sandwiched between two ferromagnetic insulator (FI) layers. In the conventional metal-based spin valve, the electron spins propagate between two metallic ferromagnetic layers, giving rise to giant magnetoresistance and spin transfer torque. Here, the incoherent magnons in the ISV serve as angular momentum carriers and are responsible for the angular momentum transport between two FI layers across the antiferromagnetic spacer. We predict two transport phenomena in the presence of the temperature gradient: a giant magneto-spin-Seebeck effect in which the output voltage signal is controlled by the relative orientation of the two FI layers and magnon transfer torque that can be used for switching the magnetization of the FI layers with a temperature gradient of the order of 0.1 Kelvin per nanometer.

  9. Degradation by synergistic effect in synthetic insulators; Degradacion por efecto sinergico en aisladores sinteticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garza M, Anibal; Montesinos S, Jose I. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1991-12-31

    A study is presented of the main degradation phenomena experimented by synthetic insulators and the simultaneous participation of such phenomena to propitiate a synergistic effect. [Espanol] Se presenta un estudio de los principales fenomenos de degradacion que sufren los aisladores sinteticos y la participacion simultanea de dichos fenomenos para propiciar un efecto sinergico.

  10. Degradation by synergistic effect in synthetic insulators; Degradacion por efecto sinergico en aisladores sinteticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garza M, Anibal; Montesinos S, Jose I [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1992-12-31

    A study is presented of the main degradation phenomena experimented by synthetic insulators and the simultaneous participation of such phenomena to propitiate a synergistic effect. [Espanol] Se presenta un estudio de los principales fenomenos de degradacion que sufren los aisladores sinteticos y la participacion simultanea de dichos fenomenos para propiciar un efecto sinergico.

  11. Effects of Structural and Electronic Disorder in Topological Insulator Sb2Te3 Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzhovska, Inna

    Topological quantum matter is a unique and potentially transformative protectorate against disorder-induced backscattering. The ultimate disorder limits to the topological state, however, are still not known - understanding these limits is critical to potential applications in the fields of spintronics and information processing. In topological insulators spin-orbit interaction and time-reversal-symmetry invariance guarantees - at least up to a certain disorder strength - that charge transport through 2D gapless Dirac surface states is robust against backscattering by non-magnetic disorder. Strong disorder may destroy topological protection and gap out Dirac surface states, although recent theories predict that under severe electronic disorder a quantized topological conductance might yet reemerge. Very strong electronic disorder, however, is not trivial to install and quantify, and topological matter under such conditions thus far has not been experimentally tested. This thesis addresses the behavior of three-dimensional (3D) topological insulator (TI) films in a wide range of structural and electronic disorder. We establish strong positional disorder in thin (20-50 nm) Sb2Te 3 films, free of extrinsic magnetic dopants. Sb 2Te3 is a known 2nd generation topological insulator in the low-disorder crystalline state. It is also a known phase-change material that undergoes insulator-to-metal transition with the concurrent orders of magnitude resistive drop, where a huge range of disorder could be controllably explored. In this work we show that even in the absence of magnetic dopants, disorder may induce spin correlations detrimental to the topological state. Chapter 1 contains a brief introduction to the topological matter and describes the role played by disorder. This is followed by theory considerations and a survey of prior experimental work. Next we describe the motivation for our experiments and explain the choice of the material. Chapter 2 describes deposition

  12. Advanced Insulation for High Performance Cost-Effective Wall, Roof, and Foundation Systems Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costeux, Stephane [Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI (United States); Bunker, Shanon [Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI (United States)

    2013-12-20

    The objective of this project was to explore and potentially develop high performing insulation with increased R/inch and low impact on climate change that would help design highly insulating building envelope systems with more durable performance and lower overall system cost than envelopes with equivalent performance made with materials available today. The proposed technical approach relied on insulation foams with nanoscale pores (about 100 nm in size) in which heat transfer will be decreased. Through the development of new foaming methods, of new polymer formulations and new analytical techniques, and by advancing the understanding of how cells nucleate, expand and stabilize at the nanoscale, Dow successfully invented and developed methods to produce foams with 100 nm cells and 80% porosity by batch foaming at the laboratory scale. Measurements of the gas conductivity on small nanofoam specimen confirmed quantitatively the benefit of nanoscale cells (Knudsen effect) to increase insulation value, which was the key technical hypotheses of the program. In order to bring this technology closer to a viable semi-continuous/continuous process, the project team modified an existing continuous extrusion foaming process as well as designed and built a custom system to produce 6" x 6" foam panels. Dow demonstrated for the first time that nanofoams can be produced in a both processes. However, due to technical delays, foam characteristics achieved so far fall short of the 100 nm target set for optimal insulation foams. In parallel with the technology development, effort was directed to the determination of most promising applications for nanocellular insulation foam. Voice of Customer (VOC) exercise confirmed that demand for high-R value product will rise due to building code increased requirements in the near future, but that acceptance for novel products by building industry may be slow. Partnerships with green builders, initial launches in smaller markets (e.g. EIFS

  13. Higher dimensional quantum Hall effect as A-class topological insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasebe, Kazuki, E-mail: khasebe@stanford.edu

    2014-09-15

    We perform a detail study of higher dimensional quantum Hall effects and A-class topological insulators with emphasis on their relations to non-commutative geometry. There are two different formulations of non-commutative geometry for higher dimensional fuzzy spheres: the ordinary commutator formulation and quantum Nambu bracket formulation. Corresponding to these formulations, we introduce two kinds of monopole gauge fields: non-abelian gauge field and antisymmetric tensor gauge field, which respectively realize the non-commutative geometry of fuzzy sphere in the lowest Landau level. We establish connection between the two types of monopole gauge fields through Chern–Simons term, and derive explicit form of tensor monopole gauge fields with higher string-like singularity. The connection between two types of monopole is applied to generalize the concept of flux attachment in quantum Hall effect to A-class topological insulator. We propose tensor type Chern–Simons theory as the effective field theory for membranes in A-class topological insulators. Membranes turn out to be fractionally charged objects and the phase entanglement mediated by tensor gauge field transforms the membrane statistics to be anyonic. The index theorem supports the dimensional hierarchy of A-class topological insulator. Analogies to D-brane physics of string theory are discussed too.

  14. Cooperative effect of radiation and vapor environments on the deterioration of insulator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Yasuo; Okada, Sohei; Yagi, Toshiaki; Ito, Masayuki; Yoshida, Kenzo; Tamura, Naoyuki

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results and speculations are described on the cooperative effect of radiation and vapor environments for the deterioration of insulator cable cladding materials such as polyethylene chlorosulphonate, ethylene propylene rubber, cross-linked polyethylene, chloroprene and silicone rubber, by the separate, simultaneous or subsequent exposure of the above-mentioned two kinds of exposure factors. These experiment was carried out by considering main environmental factors in the LOCA (loss of coolant accident) conditions. Radiation experiment was made by employing 60 Co source of 9.7 kGy/h at a room-temperature air condition. Vapor environment exposure was conducted by the conditions of 120 to 160 deg C steam-saturated air conditions and others. With the experimental results described on the characteristics of the five kinds of the above-mentioned insulator materials in radiation and saturated vapor conditions, the following conclusions were obtained. Acceleration of deterioration by the cooperative action of radiation and saturated vapor was found for the examined materials except the cross-linked polyethylene. In the subsequent exposure of radiation and saturated vapor, deterioration behavior was dependent on insulator materials and component ratios of the insulator materials. For the cross-linked polyethylene, annealing effect by heat was found, and the effect was less significent in the simultaneous exposure. Restoration phenomenon was found in the cross-linked polyethylene even in the saturated vapor exposure stage of the subsequent exposure conditions of radiation exposure followed by saturated vapor. (Takagi, S.)

  15. Effect of Slow External Flow on Flame Spreading over Solid Material: Opposed Spreading over Polyethylene Wire Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, O.; Nishizawa, K.; Ito, K.; Olson, S. L.; Kashigawa, T.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of slow external flow on solid combustion is very important from the view of fire safety in space because the solid material in spacecraft is generally exposed to the low air flow for ventilation. Further, the effect of low external flow on fuel combustion is generally fundamental information for industrial combustion system, such as gas turbine, boiler incinerator and so on. However, it is difficult to study the effect of low external flow on solid combustion in normal gravity, because the buoyancy-induced flow strongly disturbs the flow field, especially for low flow velocity. In this research therefore, the effect of slow external flow on opposed flame spreading over polyethylene (PE) wire insulation have been investigated in microgravity. The microgravity environment was provided by Japan Microgravity Center (JAMIC) in Japan and KC-135 at NASA GRC. The tested flow velocity range is 0-30cm/s with different oxygen concentration and inert gas component.

  16. Accelerated Aging Effect on Epoxy-polysiloxane Polymeric Insulator Material with Rice Husk Ash Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochmadi .

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The performances of outdoor polymeric insulators are influenced by environmental conditions. This paper presents the effect of artificial tropical climate on the hydrophobicity, equivalent salt deposit density (ESDD, surface leakage current, flashover voltage, and surface degradation on epoxy-polysiloxane polymeric insulator materials with rice husk ash (RHA. Test samples are made at room temperature vulcanized (RTV of various composition of epoxy-polysiloxane with rice husk ash as filler. The aging was carried out in test chamber at temperature from 50oC to 62oC, relative humidity of 60% to 80%, and ultraviolet (UV  radiation 21.28 w/cm2 in daylight conditions for 96 hours. The experiment results showed that the flashover voltage fluctuates from 34.13 kV up to 40.92 kV and tends to decrease on each variation of material composition. The surface leakage current fluctuates and tends to increase. Test samples with higher filler content result greater hydrophobicity, smaller equivalent salt deposit density, and smaller critical leakage current, which caused the increase of the flashover voltage. Insulator material (RTVEP3 showed the best performance in tropical climate environment. Artificial tropical aging for short duration gives less effect to the surface degradation of epoxy-polysiloxane insulator material.

  17. Effects of gamma-rays irradiation on tracking resistance of organic insulating materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Boxue; Suzuki, Akio; Kobayashi, Shigeo [Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei (Japan). Faculty of Technology

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the influence of gamma-rays irradiation on tracking failure of organic insulating materials by use of the IEC Publ.112 method. Tracking resistance of organic insulating materials under wet polluted condition has been studied by many investigators with a test method of the IEC Publ.112. The investigations on irradiation effects on tracking resistance should be enhanced due to the increasing usage of organic insulating materials in the radiation environments. The tracking resistance seems to be affected by gamma-irradiation, but the knowledge on the influence of gamma-irradiation is quite a few and systematic studies are needed. In this paper, modified polyphenylene oxide, polybutylene naphthalate, modified polycarbonate and polybutylene terephthalate which were irradiated in air until 1x10{sup 7}R and 1x10{sup 8}R with dose rate of 10{sup 6}R/hr using {sup 60}Co gamma-source have been employed. The total dose effects on the number of drops to tracking failure, contact angle and charges of scintillation have been studied. As the total doses are increased, the number of drops to tracking failure decreases with polybutylene terephthalate. On the other hand, the number of drops to tracking failure increases with polybutylene naphthalate and modified polycarbonate when the total doses are increased. The effects of gamma-rays irradiation on tracking failure are due to radiation-induced degradation or cross-linking of organic insulating materials. When the organic insulating materials are degraded by gamma-irradiation, the tracking resistance decreases, but for cross-linking type materials, the tracking resistance increases. (author)

  18. Strong expectations cancel locality effects: evidence from Hindi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Husain

    Full Text Available Expectation-driven facilitation (Hale, 2001; Levy, 2008 and locality-driven retrieval difficulty (Gibson, 1998, 2000; Lewis & Vasishth, 2005 are widely recognized to be two critical factors in incremental sentence processing; there is accumulating evidence that both can influence processing difficulty. However, it is unclear whether and how expectations and memory interact. We first confirm a key prediction of the expectation account: a Hindi self-paced reading study shows that when an expectation for an upcoming part of speech is dashed, building a rarer structure consumes more processing time than building a less rare structure. This is a strong validation of the expectation-based account. In a second study, we show that when expectation is strong, i.e., when a particular verb is predicted, strong facilitation effects are seen when the appearance of the verb is delayed; however, when expectation is weak, i.e., when only the part of speech "verb" is predicted but a particular verb is not predicted, the facilitation disappears and a tendency towards a locality effect is seen. The interaction seen between expectation strength and distance shows that strong expectations cancel locality effects, and that weak expectations allow locality effects to emerge.

  19. Strong expectations cancel locality effects: evidence from Hindi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Samar; Vasishth, Shravan; Srinivasan, Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Expectation-driven facilitation (Hale, 2001; Levy, 2008) and locality-driven retrieval difficulty (Gibson, 1998, 2000; Lewis & Vasishth, 2005) are widely recognized to be two critical factors in incremental sentence processing; there is accumulating evidence that both can influence processing difficulty. However, it is unclear whether and how expectations and memory interact. We first confirm a key prediction of the expectation account: a Hindi self-paced reading study shows that when an expectation for an upcoming part of speech is dashed, building a rarer structure consumes more processing time than building a less rare structure. This is a strong validation of the expectation-based account. In a second study, we show that when expectation is strong, i.e., when a particular verb is predicted, strong facilitation effects are seen when the appearance of the verb is delayed; however, when expectation is weak, i.e., when only the part of speech "verb" is predicted but a particular verb is not predicted, the facilitation disappears and a tendency towards a locality effect is seen. The interaction seen between expectation strength and distance shows that strong expectations cancel locality effects, and that weak expectations allow locality effects to emerge.

  20. [Preventive effects of sound insulation windows on the indoor noise levels in a street residential building in Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bin; Huang, Jing; Guo, Xin-biao

    2015-06-18

    To evaluate the preventive effects of sound insulation windows on traffic noise. Indoor noise levels of the residential rooms (on both the North 4th ring road side and the campus side) with closed sound insulation windows were measured using the sound level meter, and comparisons with the simultaneously measured outdoor noise levels were made. In addition, differences of indoor noise levels between rooms with closed sound insulation windows and open sound insulation windows were also compared. The average outdoor noise levels of the North 4th ring road was higher than 70 dB(A), which exceeded the limitation stated in the "Environmental Quality Standard for Noise" (GB 3096-2008) in our country. However, with the sound insulation windows closed, the indoor noise levels reduced significantly to the level under 35 dB(A) (Pwindows had significant influence on the indoor noise levels (Pwindow, when the sound insulation windows were closed, the indoor noise levels reduced 18.8 dB(A) and 8.3 dB(A) in residential rooms facing North 4th ring road side and campus side, respectively. The results indicated that installation of insulation windows had significant noise reduction effects on street residential buildings especially on the rooms facing major traffic roads. Installation of the sound insulation windows has significant preventive effects on indoor noise in the street residential building.

  1. Magnon diffusion theory for the spin Seebeck effect in ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Sergio M.; Azevedo, Antonio; Rodríguez-Suárez, Roberto L.

    2018-05-01

    In magnetic insulators, spin currents are carried by the elementary excitations of the magnetization: spin waves or magnons. In simple ferromagnetic insulators there is only one magnon mode, while in two-sublattice antiferromagnetic insulators (AFIs) there are two modes, which carry spin currents in opposite directions. Here we present a theory for the diffusive magnonic spin current generated in a magnetic insulator layer by a thermal gradient in the spin Seebeck effect. We show that the formulations describing magnonic perturbation using a position-dependent chemical potential and those using a magnon accumulation are completely equivalent. Then we develop a drift–diffusion formulation for magnonic spin transport treating the magnon accumulation governed by the Boltzmann transport and diffusion equations and considering the full boundary conditions at the surfaces and interfaces of an AFI/normal metal bilayer. The theory is applied to the ferrimagnetic yttrium iron garnet and to the AFIs MnF2 and NiO, providing good quantitative agreement with experimental data.

  2. Moisture effect on the dielectric response and space charge behaviour of mineral oil impregnated paper insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Jian; Liao Ruijin; Chen, George

    2011-01-01

    Dielectric response and space charge behaviour of oil-paper insulation sample with different moisture contents were investigated using the frequency dielectric spectroscopy (FDS) and the pulsed electroacoustic (PEA) technique, respectively. The influence of moisture on the dielectric response and space charge behaviour of oil impregnated paper insulation was analysed. Results show that the moisture has great effect on the FDS and space charge behaviour of oil impregnated paper insulation. In the frequency range of 10 -2 ∼10 6 Hz, the conductivity and the capacitance of oil impregnated paper increases with its moisture content. The space charge distribution of oil-paper sample with lower and higher moisture contents is very different from each other. The higher the moisture concentration of the oil impregnated paper, the easier the negative charge penetration into the insulation paper. There is a significant amount of positive charge accumulated at the paper-paper interface near to the cathode for oilpaper sample with lower moisture content. However, the positive charge appears in the middle layer paper for oil-paper sample with higher moisture content. Due to the high conductivity, the charge trapped in the oil-paper sample with higher moisture content disappears much faster than that in the oil-paper sample with lower moisture content after removing the voltage.

  3. Effect of Rice Husk and Diatomite on the Insulating Properties of Kaolin - Clay Firebricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Ogo ONCHE

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This work was carried out to investigate the effect of rice husk and diatomite on the insulating properties of kaolin-clay firebrick. Five firebrick samples of different compositions were fired at 900°C, 1000°C, 1100°C, and 1200°C. Samples A-E are all insulating firebricks that can withstand temperatures ranging from 900°C to 1200°C since none of the samples crumbled during firing. The results showed that they all had good insulating characteristics with their highly porous structure making them suitable for backup insulation. Mixing ratios of 3:2:4:1 representing weight in grams of kaolin, plastic clay, rice husk and diatomite respectively for sample D gave the optimum performance values in terms of modulus of rupture, apparent porosity, apparent density, bulk density, and thermal conductivity at all temperatures. At 1200°C, the values are 22.57kgf/cm2 for modulus of rupture, 98.25% for apparent porosity, 2.38g/cm3 for apparent density, 1.11g/cm3 for bulk density, and 0.038w/mK for thermal conductivity.

  4. Moisture effect on the dielectric response and space charge behaviour of mineral oil impregnated paper insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao Jian; Liao Ruijin [State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System Security and New Technology, Chongqing University (China); Chen, George, E-mail: jh210v@ecs.soton.ac.uk [School of Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-12

    Dielectric response and space charge behaviour of oil-paper insulation sample with different moisture contents were investigated using the frequency dielectric spectroscopy (FDS) and the pulsed electroacoustic (PEA) technique, respectively. The influence of moisture on the dielectric response and space charge behaviour of oil impregnated paper insulation was analysed. Results show that the moisture has great effect on the FDS and space charge behaviour of oil impregnated paper insulation. In the frequency range of 10{sup -2}{approx}10{sup 6}Hz, the conductivity and the capacitance of oil impregnated paper increases with its moisture content. The space charge distribution of oil-paper sample with lower and higher moisture contents is very different from each other. The higher the moisture concentration of the oil impregnated paper, the easier the negative charge penetration into the insulation paper. There is a significant amount of positive charge accumulated at the paper-paper interface near to the cathode for oilpaper sample with lower moisture content. However, the positive charge appears in the middle layer paper for oil-paper sample with higher moisture content. Due to the high conductivity, the charge trapped in the oil-paper sample with higher moisture content disappears much faster than that in the oil-paper sample with lower moisture content after removing the voltage.

  5. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-17

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  6. Spin-filter effect in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator/normal metal/superconductor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hong; Yang, Wei; Yang, Xinjian; Qin, Minghui; Guo, Jianqin

    2007-01-01

    Taking into account the thickness of the ferromagnetic insulator, the spin-filter effect in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator/normal metal/superconductor (NM/FI/NM/SC) junctions is studied based on the Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk (BTK) theory. It is shown that a spin-dependent energy shift during the tunneling process induces splitting of the subgap resonance peaks. The spin polarization due to the spin-filter effect of the FI causes an imbalance of the peaks heights and can enhance the Zeeman splitting of the gap peaks caused by an applied magnetic field. The spin-filter effect has no contribution to the proximity-effect-induced superconductivity in NM interlayer

  7. Wall insulation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostek, P.T.

    1987-08-11

    In a channel specially designed to fasten semi-rigid mineral fibre insulation to masonry walls, it is known to be constructed from 20 gauge galvanized steel or other suitable material. The channel is designed to have pre-punched holes along its length for fastening of the channel to the drywall screw. The unique feature of the channel is the teeth running along its length which are pressed into the surface of the butted together sections of the insulation providing a strong grip between the two adjacent pieces of insulation. Of prime importance to the success of this system is the recent technological advancements of the mineral fibre itself which allow the teeth of the channel to engage the insulation fully and hold without mechanical support, rather than be repelled or pushed back by the inherent nature of the insulation material. After the insulation is secured to the masonry wall by concrete nail fastening systems, the drywall is screwed to the channel.

  8. Effectiveness of duct sealing and duct insulation in multi-family buildings. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karins, N.H.; Tuluca, A.; Modera, M.

    1997-07-01

    This research investigated the cost-effectiveness of sealing and insulating the accessible portions of duct systems exposed to unconditioned areas in multifamily housing. Airflow and temperature measurements were performed in 25 apartments served by 10 systems a 9 multi-family properties. The measurements were performed before and after each retrofit, and included apartment airflow (supply and return), duct system temperatures, system fan flow and duct leakage area. The costs for each retrofit were recorded. The data were analyzed and used to develop a prototypical multifamily house. This prototype was used in energy simulations (DOE-2.1E) and air infiltration simulations (COMIS 2.1). The simulations were performed for two climates: New York City and Albany. In each climate, one simulation was performed assuming the basement was tight, and another assuming the basement was leaky. Simulation results and average retrofit costs were used to calculate cost-effectiveness. The results of the analysis indicate that sealing leaks of the accessible ductwork is cost-effective under all conditions simulated (simple payback was between 3 and 4 years). Insulating the accessible ductwork, however, is only cost-effective for buildings with leaky basement, in both climates (simple paybacks were less than 5 years). The simple payback period for insulating the ducts in buildings with tight basements was greater than 10 years, the threshold of cost-effectiveness for this research. 13 refs., 5 figs., 27 tabs.

  9. Physics Colloquium: Theory of the spin wave Seebeck effect in magnetic insulators

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2011-01-01

    Geneva University Physics Department 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet CH-1211 Geneva 4 Lundi 28 février 2011 17h00 - École de Physique, Auditoire Stückelberg Theory of the spin wave Seebeck effect in magnetic insulators Prof. Gerrit Bauer Delft University of Technology The subfield of spin caloritronics addresses the coupling of heat, charge and spin currents in nanostructures. In the center of interest is here the spin Seebeck effect, which was discovered in an iron-nickel alloy. Uchida et al. recently observed the effect also in an electrically insulating Yttrium Iron Garnett (YIG) thin magnetic film. To our knowledge this is the first observation of a Seebeck effect generated by an insulator, implying that the physics is fundamentally different from the conventional Seebeck effect in metals. We explain the experiments by the pumping of a spin current into the detecting contacts by the thermally excited magnetization dynamics. In this talk I will give a brief overview over the state o...

  10. Façade insulation retrofitting policy implementation process and its effects on health equity determinants: A realist review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camprubí, Lluís; Malmusi, Davide; Mehdipanah, Roshanak

    2016-01-01

    Fuel poverty and cold housing constitute a significant public health problem. Energy efficiency interventions, such as façade retrofitting, address the problem from a structural and long-term perspective. Despite evidence of the health benefits of insulation, little is known about the political and social contexts that contribute to social inequalities in receiving and experiencing health benefits from these interventions. We used a realist review methodology to better understand the mechanisms that explain how and why variations across different social groups appear in receiving energy efficiency façade retrofitting interventions and in their impact on health determinants. We considered the four stages of the policy implementation framework: public policy approach; policy; receiving intervention and impact on health determinants. We found strong evidence that certain social groups (low-income, renters, elderly) suffering most from fuel poverty, experience more barriers for undertaking a building retrofitting (due to factors such as upfront costs, “presentism” thinking, split incentives, disruption and lack of control), and that some public policies on housing energy efficiency may exacerbate these inequalities. This can be avoided if such policies specifically aim at tackling fuel poverty or social inequities, are completely free to users, target the most affected groups and are adapted to their needs. - Highlights: •Health benefits of housing façade insulation more pronounced in fuel poor groups. •Social groups suffering most from fuel poverty least likely to undergo insulation. •Energy efficiency policies focused solely on CO_2 reduction may increase inequalities. •Split Incentives and “Take-Back” effect show socioeconomic and contextual variability. •Universal policies without targeting increase inequalities in retrofitting uptake.

  11. Strong-coupling polaron effect in quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Kadi; Gu Shiwei

    1993-11-01

    Strong-coupling polaron in a parabolic quantum dot is investigated by the Landau-Pekar variational treatment. The polaron binding energy and the average number of virtual phonons around the electron as a function of the effective confinement length of the quantum dot are obtained in Gaussian function approximation. It is shown that both the polaron binding energy and the average number of virtual phonons around the electron decrease by increasing the effective confinement length. The results indicate that the polaronic effects are more pronounced in quantum dots than those in two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases. (author). 15 refs, 4 figs

  12. A percolation approach to study the high electric field effect on electrical conductivity of insulating polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benallou, Amina; Hadri, Baghdad; Martinez-Vega, Juan; El Islam Boukortt, Nour

    2018-04-01

    The effect of percolation threshold on the behaviour of electrical conductivity at high electric field of insulating polymers has been briefly investigated in literature. Sometimes the dead ends links are not taken into account in the study of the electric field effect on the electrical properties. In this work, we present a theoretical framework and Monte Carlo simulation of the behaviour of the electric conductivity at high electric field based on the percolation theory using the traps energies levels which are distributed according to distribution law (uniform, Gaussian, and power-law). When a solid insulating material is subjected to a high electric field, and during trapping mechanism the dead ends of traps affect with decreasing the electric conductivity according to the traps energies levels, the correlation length of the clusters, the length of the dead ends, and the concentration of the accessible positions for the electrons. A reasonably good agreement is obtained between simulation results and the theoretical framework.

  13. Surface charge conductivity of a topological insulator in a magnetic field: The effect of hexagonal warping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akzyanov, R. S.; Rakhmanov, A. L.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the influence of hexagonal warping on the transport properties of topological insulators. We study the charge conductivity within Kubo formalism in the first Born approximation using low-energy expansion of the Hamiltonian near the Dirac point. The effects of disorder, magnetic field, and chemical-potential value are analyzed in detail. We find that the presence of hexagonal warping significantly affects the conductivity of the topological insulator. In particular, it gives rise to the growth of the longitudinal conductivity with the increase of the disorder and anisotropic anomalous in-plane magnetoresistance. Hexagonal warping also affects the quantum anomalous Hall effect and anomalous out-of-plane magnetoresistance. The obtained results are consistent with the experimental data.

  14. New results on strong-interaction effects in antiprotonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Gotta, D; Augsburger, M A; Borchert, G L; Castelli, C M; Chatellard, D; El-Khoury, P; Egger, J P; Gorke, H; Hauser, P R; Indelicato, P J; Kirch, K; Lenz, S; Nelms, N; Rashid, K; Schult, O W B; Siems, T; Simons, L M

    1999-01-01

    Lyman and Balmer transitions of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at the low-energy antiproton ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. The X-rays were detected using charge-coupled devices (CCDs) and a reflection type crystal spectrometer. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction. (33 refs).

  15. New results on strong-interaction effects in antiprotonic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anagnostopoulos, D. F.; Augsburger, M.; Borchert, G.; Castelli, C.; Chatellard, D.; El-Khoury, P.; Egger, J.-P.; Gorke, H.; Gotta, D.; Hauser, P.; Indelicato, P.; Kirch, K.; Lenz, S.; Nelms, N.; Rashid, K.; Schult, O. W. B.; Siems, Th.; Simons, L. M.

    1999-01-01

    Lyman and Balmer transitions of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. The X-rays were detected using Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) and a reflection type crystal spectrometer. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction

  16. Strong Gravity Effects of Rotating Black Holes: Quasiperiodic Oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Aliev, Alikram N.; Esmer, Göksel Daylan; Talazan, Pamir

    2012-01-01

    We explore strong gravity effects of the geodesic motion in the spacetime of rotating black holes in general relativity and braneworld gravity. We focus on the description of the motion in terms of three fundamental frequencies: The orbital frequency, the radial and vertical epicyclic frequencies. For a Kerr black hole, we perform a detailed numerical analysis of these frequencies at the innermost stable circular orbits and beyond them as well as at the characteristic stable orbits, at which ...

  17. Proximity Effect Induced Spin Injection in Phosphorene on Magnetic Insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haoqi; Li, Bin; Yang, Jinlong

    2017-11-08

    Black phosphorus is a promising candidate for future nanoelectronics with a moderate electronic band gap and a high carrier mobility. Introducing the magnetism into black phosphorus will widely expand its application scope and may present a bright prospect in spintronic nanodevices. Here, we report our first-principles calculations of spin-polarized electronic structure of monolayer black phosphorus (phosphorene) adsorbed on a magnetic europium oxide (EuO) substrate. Effective spin injection into the phosphorene is realized by means of interaction with the nearby EuO(111) surface, i.e., proximity effect, which results in spin-polarized electrons in the 3p orbitals of phosphorene, with the spin polarization at Fermi level beyond 30%, together with an exchange-splitting energy of ∼0.184 eV for conduction-band minimum of the adsorbed phosphorene corresponding to an energy region where only one spin channel is conductive. The energy region of these exchange-splitting and spin-polarized band gaps of the adsorbed phosphorene can be effectively modulated by in-plane strain. Intrinsically high and anisotropic carrier mobilities at the conduction-band minimum of the phosphorene also become spin-polarized mainly due to spin polarization of deformation potentials and are not depressed significantly after the adsorption. These extraordinary properties would endow black phosphorus with great potentials in the future spintronic nanodevices.

  18. Safe and Effective Gene Therapy for Murine Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Using an Insulated Lentiviral Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Singh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS is a life-threatening immunodeficiency caused by mutations within the WAS gene. Viral gene therapy to restore WAS protein (WASp expression in hematopoietic cells of patients with WAS has the potential to improve outcomes relative to the current standard of care, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. However, the development of viral vectors that are both safe and effective has been problematic. While use of viral transcriptional promoters may increase the risk of insertional mutagenesis, cellular promoters may not achieve WASp expression levels necessary for optimal therapeutic effect. Here we evaluate a self-inactivating (SIN lentiviral vector combining a chromatin insulator upstream of a viral MND (MPSV LTR, NCR deleted, dl587 PBS promoter driving WASp expression. Used as a gene therapeutic in Was−/− mice, this vector resulted in stable WASp+ cells in all hematopoietic lineages and rescue of T and B cell defects with a low number of viral integrations per cell, without evidence of insertional mutagenesis in serial bone marrow transplants. In a gene transfer experiment in non-human primates, the insulated MND promoter (driving GFP expression demonstrated long-term polyclonal engraftment of GFP+ cells. These observations demonstrate that the insulated MND promoter safely and efficiently reconstitutes clinically effective WASp expression and should be considered for future WAS therapy.

  19. Printing Semiconductor-Insulator Polymer Bilayers for High-Performance Coplanar Field-Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Laju; Hu, Mengxing; Lu, Wanlong; Wang, Ziyu; Lu, Guanghao

    2018-01-01

    Source-semiconductor-drain coplanar transistors with an organic semiconductor layer located within the same plane of source/drain electrodes are attractive for next-generation electronics, because they could be used to reduce material consumption, minimize parasitic leakage current, avoid cross-talk among different devices, and simplify the fabrication process of circuits. Here, a one-step, drop-casting-like printing method to realize a coplanar transistor using a model semiconductor/insulator [poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/polystyrene (PS)] blend is developed. By manipulating the solution dewetting dynamics on the metal electrode and SiO 2 dielectric, the solution within the channel region is selectively confined, and thus make the top surface of source/drain electrodes completely free of polymers. Subsequently, during solvent evaporation, vertical phase separation between P3HT and PS leads to a semiconductor-insulator bilayer structure, contributing to an improved transistor performance. Moreover, this coplanar transistor with semiconductor-insulator bilayer structure is an ideal system for injecting charges into the insulator via gate-stress, and the thus-formed PS electret layer acts as a "nonuniform floating gate" to tune the threshold voltage and effective mobility of the transistors. Effective field-effect mobility higher than 1 cm 2 V -1 s -1 with an on/off ratio > 10 7 is realized, and the performances are comparable to those of commercial amorphous silicon transistors. This coplanar transistor simplifies the fabrication process of corresponding circuits. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Fringing field effects in negative capacitance field-effect transistors with a ferroelectric gate insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Junichi; Fukuda, Koichi; Ikegami, Tsutomu; Ota, Hiroyuki; Migita, Shinji; Asai, Hidehiro; Toriumi, Akira

    2018-04-01

    We study the effects of fringing electric fields on the behavior of negative-capacitance (NC) field-effect transistors (FETs) with a silicon-on-insulator body and a gate stack consisting of an oxide film, an internal metal film, a ferroelectric film, and a gate electrode using our own device simulator that can properly handle the complicated relationship between the polarization and the electric field in ferroelectric materials. The behaviors of such NC FETs and the corresponding metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) FETs are simulated and compared with each other to evaluate the effects of the NC of the ferroelectric film. Then, the fringing field effects are evaluated by comparing the NC effects in NC FETs with and without gate spacers. The fringing field between the gate stack, especially the internal metal film, and the source/drain region induces more charges at the interface of the film with the ferroelectric film. Accordingly, the function of the NC to modulate the gate voltage and the resulting function to improve the subthreshold swing are enhanced. We also investigate the relationships of these fringing field effects to the drain voltage and four design parameters of NC FETs, i.e., gate length, gate spacer permittivity, internal metal film thickness, and oxide film thickness.

  1. MIS field effect transistor with barium titanate thin film as a gate insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firek, P., E-mail: pfirek@elka.pw.edu.p [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Werbowy, A.; Szmidt, J. [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland)

    2009-11-25

    The properties of barium titanate (BaTiO{sub 3}, BT) like, e.g. high dielectric constant and resistivity, allow it to find numerous applications in field of microelectronics. In this work silicon metal insulator semiconductor field effect transistor (MISFET) structures with BaTiO{sub 3} (containing La{sub 2}O{sub 3} admixture) thin films in a role of gate insulator were investigated. The films were produced by means of radio frequency plasma sputtering (RF PS) of sintered BaTiO{sub 3} + La{sub 2}O{sub 3} (2 wt.%) target. In the paper transfer and output current-voltage (I-V), transconductance and output conductance characteristics of obtained transistors are presented and discussed. Basic parameters of these devices like, e.g. threshold voltage (V{sub TH}), are determined and discussed.

  2. Strong gravity effects in accreting black-hole systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedzwiecki, A.

    2006-01-01

    I briefly review current status of studying effects of strong gravity in X-ray astronomy. Matter accreting onto a black hole probes the relativistic region of space-time and the high-energy radiation it produces should contain signatures of strong gravity effects. Current X-ray observations provide the evidence that the observed emission originates, in some cases, at a distance of a few gravitational radii from a black hole. Moreover, certain observations invoke interpretations favouring rapid rotation of the black hole. Some observational properties of black hole systems are supposed to result from the lack of a material surface in these objects. I consider further effects, specific for the black hole environment, which can be studied in X-ray data. Bulk motion Comptonization, which would directly reveal converging flow of matter plunging into a black hole, is unlikely to be important in formation of X-ray spectra. Similarly, Penrose processes are unlikely to give observational effects, although this issue has not been thoroughly studied so far for all plausible radiative mechanisms. (author)

  3. First-principles study of strong correlation effects in pyrochlore iridates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinaoka, Hiroshi [Department of Physics, Saitama University (Japan); Hoshino, Shintaro [Department of Basic Science, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Troyer, Matthias [Theoretische Physik, ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Werner, Philipp [Department of Physics, University of Fribourg (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    The pyrochlore iridates A{sub 2}Ir{sub 2}O{sub 7} (A=Pr, Nd, Y, etc.) are an ideal system to study fascinating phenomena induced by strong electron correlations and spin-orbit coupling. In this talk, we study strong correlation effects in the prototype compound Y{sub 2}Ir{sub 2}O{sub 7} using the local density approximation and dynamical mean-field theory (LDA+DMFT). We map out the phase diagram in the space of temperature, onsite Coulomb repulsion U, and filling. Consistent with experiments, we find that an all-in/all-out ordered insulating phase is stable for realistic values of U. We reveal the importance of the hybridization between j{sub eff} = 1/2 and j{sub eff} = 3/2 states under the Coulomb interaction and trigonal crystal field. We demonstrate a substantial band narrowing in the paramagnetic metallic phase and non-Fermi liquid behavior in the electron/hole doped system originating from long-lived quasi-spin moments induced by nearly flat bands. We further compare our results with recent experimental results of Eu{sub 2}Ir{sub 2}O{sub 7} under hydrostatic pressure.

  4. STRONG FIELD EFFECTS ON PULSAR ARRIVAL TIMES: GENERAL ORIENTATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yan; Creighton, Teviet; Price, Richard H.; Jenet, Frederick A.

    2009-01-01

    A pulsar beam passing close to a black hole can provide a probe of very strong gravitational fields even if the pulsar itself is not in a strong field region. In the case that the spin of the hole can be ignored, we have previously shown that all strong field effects on the beam can be understood in terms of two 'universal' functions: F(φ in ) and T(φ in ) of the angle of beam emission φ in ; these functions are universal in that they depend only on a single parameter, the pulsar/black hole distance from which the beam is emitted. Here we apply this formalism to general pulsar-hole-observer geometries, with arbitrary alignment of the pulsar spin axis and arbitrary pulsar beam direction and angular width. We show that the analysis of the observational problem has two distinct elements: (1) the computation of the location and trajectory of an observer-dependent 'keyhole' direction of emission in which a signal can be received by the observer; and (2) the determination of an annulus that represents the set of directions containing beam energy. Examples of each are given along with an example of a specific observational scenario.

  5. Silicon dioxide with a silicon interfacial layer as an insulating gate for highly stable indium phosphide metal-insulator-semiconductor field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, V. J.; Shokrani, M.

    1991-01-01

    A novel gate insulator consisting of silicon dioxide (SiO2) with a thin silicon (Si) interfacial layer has been investigated for high-power microwave indium phosphide (InP) metal-insulator-semiconductor field effect transistors (MISFETs). The role of the silicon interfacial layer on the chemical nature of the SiO2/Si/InP interface was studied by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicated that the silicon interfacial layer reacted with the native oxide at the InP surface, thus producing silicon dioxide, while reducing the native oxide which has been shown to be responsible for the instabilities in InP MISFETs. While a 1.2-V hysteresis was present in the capacitance-voltage (C-V) curve of the MIS capacitors with silicon dioxide, less than 0.1 V hysteresis was observed in the C-V curve of the capacitors with the silicon interfacial layer incorporated in the insulator. InP MISFETs fabricated with the silicon dioxide in combination with the silicon interfacial layer exhibited excellent stability with drain current drift of less than 3 percent in 10,000 sec, as compared to 15-18 percent drift in 10,000 sec for devices without the silicon interfacial layer. High-power microwave InP MISFETs with Si/SiO2 gate insulators resulted in an output power density of 1.75 W/mm gate width at 9.7 GHz, with an associated power gain of 2.5 dB and 24 percent power added efficiency.

  6. Effective interactions in strongly-coupled quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.M.C.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis, they study the role of effective interactions in strongly-coupled Fermi systems where the short-range correlations introduce difficulties requiring special treatment. The correlated basis function method provides the means to incorporate the short-range correlations and generate the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian and identity operators in a nonorthogonal basis of states which are so important to their studies. In the first half of the thesis, the particle-hole channel is examined to elucidate the effects of collective excitations. Proceeding from a least-action principle, a generalization of the random-phase approximation is developed capable of describing such strongly-interacting Fermi systems as nuclei, nuclear matter, neutron-star matter, and liquid 3 He. A linear response of dynamically correlated system to a weak external perturbation is also derived based on the same framework. In the second half of the thesis, the particle-particle channel is examined to elucidate the effects of pairing in nuclear and neutron-star matter

  7. Strong correlation effects in theoretical STM studies of magnetic adatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hung T.; dos Santos Dias, Manuel; Liebsch, Ansgar; Lounis, Samir

    2016-03-01

    We present a theoretical study for the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) spectra of surface-supported magnetic nanostructures, incorporating strong correlation effects. As concrete examples, we study Co and Mn adatoms on the Cu(111) surface, which are expected to represent the opposite limits of Kondo physics and local moment behavior, using a combination of density functional theory and both quantum Monte Carlo and exact diagonalization impurity solvers. We examine in detail the effects of temperature T , correlation strength U , and impurity d electron occupancy Nd on the local density of states. We also study the effective coherence energy scale, i.e., the Kondo temperature TK, which can be extracted from the STM spectra. Theoretical STM spectra are computed as a function of STM tip position relative to each adatom. Because of the multiorbital nature of the adatoms, the STM spectra are shown to consist of a complicated superposition of orbital contributions, with different orbital symmetries, self-energies, and Kondo temperatures. For a Mn adatom, which is close to half-filling, the STM spectra are featureless near the Fermi level. On the other hand, the quasiparticle peak for a Co adatom gives rise to strongly position-dependent Fano line shapes.

  8. Magnetic states, correlation effects and metal-insulator transition in FCC lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timirgazin, M. A.; Igoshev, P. A.; Arzhnikov, A. K.; Irkhin, V. Yu

    2016-12-01

    The ground-state magnetic phase diagram (including collinear and spiral states) of the single-band Hubbard model for the face-centered cubic lattice and related metal-insulator transition (MIT) are investigated within the slave-boson approach by Kotliar and Ruckenstein. The correlation-induced electron spectrum narrowing and a comparison with a generalized Hartree-Fock approximation allow one to estimate the strength of correlation effects. This, as well as the MIT scenario, depends dramatically on the ratio of the next-nearest and nearest electron hopping integrals {{t}\\prime}/t . In contrast with metallic state, possessing substantial band narrowing, insulator one is only weakly correlated. The magnetic (Slater) scenario of MIT is found to be superior over the Mott one. Unlike simple and body-centered cubic lattices, MIT is the first order transition (discontinuous) for most {{t}\\prime}/t . The insulator state is type-II or type-III antiferromagnet, and the metallic state is spin-spiral, collinear antiferromagnet or paramagnet depending on {{t}\\prime}/t . The picture of magnetic ordering is compared with that in the standard localized-electron (Heisenberg) model.

  9. Effect of Insulation Thickness on Thermal Stratification in Hot Water Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak KURŞUN

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the important factors to be considered in increasing the efficiency of hot water storage tanks used for thermal energy storage is thermal stratification. Reducing the temperature of the water at the base of the tank provides more utilization of the energy of the heat source during the heating of the water and improves the efficiency of the system. In this study, the effect of the insulation thickness on the outer surface of the tank and the ratio of the tank diameter to the height (D/H on the thermal stratification was investigated numerically. Numerical analyzes were carried out for the condition that the insulation thickness was constant and variable in the range of D/H=0,3-1. Water was used as the heat storage fluid and the analysis results were obtained for eight hours cooling period. Numerical results showed that the temperature difference between the bottom and top surfaces of the tank increased between 7-9 ° C for the range of D / H = 0,3-1 with changing the insulation thickness.

  10. Effect of Nano Al2O3 Doping on Thermal Aging Properties of Oil-Paper Insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningchuan Liang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The thermal aging property of oil-paper insulation is a key factor affecting the service life of transformers. In this study, nano-Al2O3 was added to insulating paper to improve its anti-thermal aging property and delay the aging rate of the insulating oil. The composite paper containing 2% nano-Al2O3 had the highest tensile strength and therefore was selected for the thermal aging test. The composite and normal papers were treated with an accelerated thermal aging experiment at the temperature of 130 °C for 56 days. The variations of the degree of polymerization (DP and tensile strength of the insulating papers with aging time were obtained. The characteristics of the insulating oil, including color, acid content, breakdown voltage, and dielectric loss were analyzed. The results revealed that compared with a plain paper, the composite paper maintained a higher DP, and its tensile strength decreased more slowly during the aging process. The oil-impregnated composite paper presented a lighter-colored oil, less viscosity changes, and a considerably lower quantity of thermal aging products. In addition, nano-Al2O3 can effectively adsorb copper compounds and keep part of the acid products and water away from the thermal aging process. This characteristic restrained the catalysis of copper compounds and H+ in the thermal aging reaction and reduced the thermal aging speed of both the insulating paper and the insulating oil.

  11. Strong effects of ionizing radiation from Chernobyl on mutation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy A

    2015-02-10

    In this paper we use a meta-analysis to examine the relationship between radiation and mutation rates in Chernobyl across 45 published studies, covering 30 species. Overall effect size of radiation on mutation rates estimated as Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was very large (E = 0.67; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.59 to 0.73), accounting for 44.3% of the total variance in an unstructured random-effects model. Fail-safe calculations reflecting the number of unpublished null results needed to eliminate this average effect size showed the extreme robustness of this finding (Rosenberg's method: 4135 at p = 0.05). Indirect tests did not provide any evidence of publication bias. The effect of radiation on mutations varied among taxa, with plants showing a larger effect than animals. Humans were shown to have intermediate sensitivity of mutations to radiation compared to other species. Effect size did not decrease over time, providing no evidence for an improvement in environmental conditions. The surprisingly high mean effect size suggests a strong impact of radioactive contamination on individual fitness in current and future generations, with potentially significant population-level consequences, even beyond the area contaminated with radioactive material.

  12. Strong mechanically induced effects in DC current-biased suspended Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Thomas; Deng, Hai-Yao; Isacsson, Andreas; Mariani, Eros

    2018-01-01

    Superconductivity is a result of quantum coherence at macroscopic scales. Two superconductors separated by a metallic or insulating weak link exhibit the AC Josephson effect: the conversion of a DC voltage bias into an AC supercurrent. This current may be used to activate mechanical oscillations in a suspended weak link. As the DC-voltage bias condition is remarkably difficult to achieve in experiments, here we analyze theoretically how the Josephson effect can be exploited to activate and detect mechanical oscillations in the experimentally relevant condition with purely DC current bias. We unveil how changing the strength of the electromechanical coupling results in two qualitatively different regimes showing dramatic effects of the oscillations on the DC-voltage characteristic of the device. These include the appearance of Shapiro-type plateaus for weak coupling and a sudden mechanically induced retrapping for strong coupling. Our predictions, measurable in state-of-the-art experimental setups, allow the determination of the frequency and quality factor of the resonator using DC only techniques.

  13. Strong-coupling effects in superfluid 3He in aerogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Kazushi; Ikeda, Ryusuke

    2007-01-01

    Effects of impurity scatterings on the strong-coupling (SC) contribution, stabilizing the ABM (axial) pairing state, to the quartic term of the Ginzburg-Landau free energy of superfluid 3 He are theoretically studied to examine recent observations suggestive of an anomalously small SC effect in superfluid 3 He in aerogels. To study the SC corrections, two approaches are used. One is based on a perturbation in the short-range repulsive interaction, and the other is a phenomenological approach used previously for the bulk liquid by Sauls and Serene [Phys. Rev. B 24, 183 (1981)]. It is found that the impurity scattering favors the BW pairing state and shrinks the region of the ABM pairing state in the T-P phase diagram. In the phenomenological approach, the resulting shrinkage of the ABM region is especially substantial and, if assuming an anisotropy over a large scale in aerogel, leads to justifying the phase diagrams determined experimentally

  14. Strong delayed interactive effects of metal exposure and warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debecker, Sara; Dinh, Khuong Van; Stoks, Robby

    2017-01-01

    ’ ranges could lead to an important underestimation of the risks. We addressed all three mechanisms by studying effects of larval exposure to zinc and warming before, during, and after metamorphosis in Ischnura elegans damselflies from high- and lowlatitude populations. By integrating these mechanisms...... into a single study, we could identify two novel patterns. First, during exposure zinc did not affect survival, whereas it induced mild to moderate postexposure mortality in the larval stage and at metamorphosis, and very strongly reduced adult lifespan. This severe delayed effect across metamorphosis...... was especially remarkable in high-latitude animals, as they appeared almost insensitive to zinc during the larval stage. Second, the well-known synergism between metals and warming was manifested not only during the larval stage but also after metamorphosis, yet notably only in low-latitude damselflies...

  15. Effectiveness of Advanced Stay Strong, Stay Healthy in Community Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily M. Crowe MS

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of the 10-week, University of Missouri (MU Extension strength training program Advanced Stay Strong, Stay Healthy (ASSSH. It was hypothesized that the program can improve strength, balance, agility, and flexibility—all physical measures of falling among seniors. Matched pair t tests were used to compare differences in five physical measures of health, body composition, and percent body fat (%BF. Two-way ANOVA was conducted to examine the age effects on changes in physical health from the start and finish of the exercise program. Following programming, participants significantly improved strength, flexibility, and balance, and significantly reduced %BF ( p < .05. Our data indicate that ASSSH can improve the physical health of senior citizens and can successfully be translated into community practice by MU Extension professionals.

  16. Effects of defeathering and insulative jackets on production by laying hens at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonyou, H W; Morrison, W D

    1983-07-01

    Exposure to a temperature of 5 degrees C compared with 20 degrees C resulted in a 20.5% increase in food consumption and an 18.8% decrease in efficiency of food utilisation with intermediate values resulting from exposure to 10 degrees C and 15 degrees C. Removal of feathers from the neck, back and (or) breast resulted in a 5 to 6% increase in food consumption. The effects of feather removal and temperature on food consumption were additive. Cloth jackets effectively insulated the back and breast areas when feathers had been removed but also resulted in increased food intake and lower efficiency.

  17. An effect of heat insulation parameters on thermal losses of water-cooled roofs for secondary steelmaking electric arc furnaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mihailov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is research in the insulation parameters effect on the thermal losses of watercooled roofs for secondary steelmaking electric arc furnaces. An analytical method has been used for the investigation in heat transfer conditions in the working area. The results of the research can be used to choose optimal cooling parameters and select a suitable kind of insulation for water-cooled surfaces.

  18. Strong impacts on aerosol indirect effects from historical oxidant changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsahl Karset, Inger Helene; Koren Berntsen, Terje; Storelvmo, Trude; Alterskjær, Kari; Grini, Alf; Olivié, Dirk; Kirkevåg, Alf; Seland, Øyvind; Iversen, Trond; Schulz, Michael

    2018-06-01

    Uncertainties in effective radiative forcings through aerosol-cloud interactions (ERFaci, also called aerosol indirect effects) contribute strongly to the uncertainty in the total preindustrial-to-present-day anthropogenic forcing. Some forcing estimates of the total aerosol indirect effect are so negative that they even offset the greenhouse gas forcing. This study highlights the role of oxidants in modeling of preindustrial-to-present-day aerosol indirect effects. We argue that the aerosol precursor gases should be exposed to oxidants of its era to get a more correct representation of secondary aerosol formation. Our model simulations show that the total aerosol indirect effect changes from -1.32 to -1.07 W m-2 when the precursor gases in the preindustrial simulation are exposed to preindustrial instead of present-day oxidants. This happens because of a brightening of the clouds in the preindustrial simulation, mainly due to large changes in the nitrate radical (NO3). The weaker oxidative power of the preindustrial atmosphere extends the lifetime of the precursor gases, enabling them to be transported higher up in the atmosphere and towards more remote areas where the susceptibility of the cloud albedo to aerosol changes is high. The oxidation changes also shift the importance of different chemical reactions and produce more condensate, thus increasing the size of the aerosols and making it easier for them to activate as cloud condensation nuclei.

  19. Strong impacts on aerosol indirect effects from historical oxidant changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. H. H. Karset

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainties in effective radiative forcings through aerosol–cloud interactions (ERFaci, also called aerosol indirect effects contribute strongly to the uncertainty in the total preindustrial-to-present-day anthropogenic forcing. Some forcing estimates of the total aerosol indirect effect are so negative that they even offset the greenhouse gas forcing. This study highlights the role of oxidants in modeling of preindustrial-to-present-day aerosol indirect effects. We argue that the aerosol precursor gases should be exposed to oxidants of its era to get a more correct representation of secondary aerosol formation. Our model simulations show that the total aerosol indirect effect changes from −1.32 to −1.07 W m−2 when the precursor gases in the preindustrial simulation are exposed to preindustrial instead of present-day oxidants. This happens because of a brightening of the clouds in the preindustrial simulation, mainly due to large changes in the nitrate radical (NO3. The weaker oxidative power of the preindustrial atmosphere extends the lifetime of the precursor gases, enabling them to be transported higher up in the atmosphere and towards more remote areas where the susceptibility of the cloud albedo to aerosol changes is high. The oxidation changes also shift the importance of different chemical reactions and produce more condensate, thus increasing the size of the aerosols and making it easier for them to activate as cloud condensation nuclei.

  20. Effective potential kinetic theory for strongly coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalrud, Scott D.; Daligault, Jérôme

    2016-11-01

    The effective potential theory (EPT) is a recently proposed method for extending traditional plasma kinetic and transport theory into the strongly coupled regime. Validation from experiments and molecular dynamics simulations have shown it to be accurate up to the onset of liquid-like correlation parameters (corresponding to Γ ≃ 10-50 for the one-component plasma, depending on the process of interest). Here, this theory is briefly reviewed along with comparisons between the theory and molecular dynamics simulations for self-diffusivity and viscosity of the one-component plasma. A number of new results are also provided, including calculations of friction coefficients, energy exchange rates, stopping power, and mobility. The theory is also cast in the Landau and Fokker-Planck kinetic forms, which may prove useful for enabling efficient kinetic computations.

  1. The Effects of Roof and Wall Insulation on the Energy Costs of Low Income Housing in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Lucero-Álvarez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Environmental conditions, such as air temperature and solar radiation, have a complex relationship with the energy requirements for heating and cooling of residential buildings. In this work, a comparative analysis of the insulation methods most commonly applied to low income single-family houses in Mexico is presented, in order to find the most energy-efficient combinations of methods for the various climates in this country. A common kind of building, small houses built with hollow cinder block walls and concrete slab roofs, was analyzed considering three insulation scenarios: walls only, roof only and both. We used dynamic simulation to evaluate energy consumption under the climate conditions found in several Mexican cities. From the energy consumption data and the cost of electricity in Mexico, we calculated net annual energy costs, including both annual energy savings and the annualized cost of the initial investment in better insulation. Results of this analysis show that insulating both roof and walls is most effective in cities with cold winters; insulating just the roof is best for temperate climates; and insulating walls (combined with high-albedo roofs is most effective for cities with year-long warm weather.

  2. Visual impact of overhead power transmission lines and dielectric and corona effects constraints on insulation coordination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deponti, F.; Fini, G.P.; Porrino, A.; Rosa, F.

    1992-06-01

    In assessing overhead power transmission line design and planning criteria for the optimization of visual impact, safety and the reduction of electro magnetic disturbance effects, this paper reviews the research findings of ENEL, the Italian Electricity Board. The on-going research activities involve theoretical calculations and laboratory performance tests to determine the best compact configurations for 380 kV lines. The parameters under examination include: insulator spacing, sizing and salt fog resistivity; allowable overvoltages; maximum line length; behaviour in lightning conditions; radio and acoustics disturbances

  3. Investigating the effect of multiple layers of insulation with a bubble wrap experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, Dolores; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2018-03-01

    We provide a fun, inexpensive laboratory experiment for students to investigate the effects of multiple layers of insulation and observe diminishing values for additional layers using bubble wrap. This experiment provides an opportunity for students to learn about heat transfer through conduction using readily available materials. A water-ice pack is placed on top of five layers of bubble wrap. The temperature is taken between each layer periodically for at least 15 min. Students determine asymptotic temperatures for varying layers. This experiment also suggests a real world application.

  4. High temperature study of flexible silicon-on-insulator fin field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Diab, Amer El Hajj

    2014-09-29

    We report high temperature electrical transport characteristics of a flexible version of the semiconductor industry\\'s most advanced architecture: fin field-effect transistor on silicon-on-insulator with sub-20 nm fins and high-κ/metal gate stacks. Characterization from room to high temperature (150 °C) was completed to determine temperature dependence of drain current (Ids), gate leakage current (Igs), transconductance (gm), and extracted low-field mobility (μ0). Mobility degradation with temperature is mainly caused by phonon scattering. The other device characteristics show insignificant difference at high temperature which proves the suitability of inorganic flexible electronics with advanced device architecture.

  5. Surface correlation effects in two-band strongly correlated slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, D Nasr; Covaci, L; Peeters, F M

    2014-02-19

    Using an extension of the Gutzwiller approximation for an inhomogeneous system, we study the two-band Hubbard model with unequal band widths for a slab geometry. The aim is to investigate the mutual effect of individual bands on the spatial distribution of quasi-particle weight and charge density, especially near the surface of the slab. The main effect of the difference in band width is the presence of two different length scales corresponding to the quasi-particle profile of each band. This is enhanced in the vicinity of the critical interaction of the narrow band where an orbitally selective Mott transition occurs and a surface dead layer forms for the narrow band. For the doped case, two different regimes of charge transfer between the surface and the bulk of the slab are revealed. The charge transfer from surface/center to center/surface depends on both the doping level and the average relative charge accumulated in each band. Such effects could also be of importance when describing the accumulation of charges at the interface between structures made of multi-band strongly correlated materials.

  6. Report of the 13th IEA workshop on radiation effects in ceramic insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    The 13th IEA Workshop on Radiation Effects in Ceramic Insulators, based on Annex II: Experimentation on Radiation Damage in Fusion Materials, to the IEA Implementing Agreement for a Programme of Research and Development on Radiation Damage in Fusion Materials, was held on the 9th, December, 2003, at Kyoto International Conference Center, in Kyoto, Japan, in conjunction with the 11th International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-11). 44 participants from 10 countries (26 from Japan, 5 from Spain, 3 from Belgium, 3 from USA, 2 from RF, each 1 from Austria, Greece, Italy, Romania, and UK) gathered together and discussed following issues extensively, with the newest experimental results, after the welcome remarks by one of the organizer and chairpersons, Dr. E.R. Hodgson of CIEMAT. Effects of electric field on radiation induced microstructural evolution, parasitic electrical current and voltage induced in cables and wires by radiation effects, optical materials, IFMIF related issues and fundamental aspects were discussed. Significant results such as an observation of γ-alumina and aluminum colloid formation for the Radiation Induced Electrical Degradation mechanism are obtained. This report is workshop summary, abstracts and documents of the 13th IEA Workshop on Radiation Effects in Ceramic Insulators. (author)

  7. Effect of air on speed of insulating material deterioration under simulated LOCA environment. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusama, Yasuo; Yagi, Toshiaki; Ito, Masayuki; Okada, Sohei; Yoshikawa, Masato (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma. Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment)

    1982-12-01

    To examine the quality approval testing method for the electric cables used for nuclear reactors, various covering insulating materials employed for the cables have been investigated from all angles. The factors which are considered to affect the deterioration of cable materials in a simulated LOCA (loss of coolant accident) environmental test are numerous. This paper reports on the result of investigation on the effect of air on the rate of deterioration of various organic materials usually used as the insulating and covering materials for the cables. Five kinds of polymer sheets (1 mm thick) used for reactor cables were employed as samples. The samples of both standard compounding ratio and the compounding ratio for practical reactor use were tested. As the deterioration prior to LOCA simulation, the thermal deterioration corresponding to 40 years aging (at 121 deg C for 7 days) was given, and subsequently, 50 Mrad gamma -irradiation at 1 Mrad/h was performed in the air. After that, the samples were subject to LOCA simulated environment. Since the results were different according to the kinds of samples, those are described separately for Hypalon, ethylene propylene rubber, cross-linked polyethylene, chloroprene and silicone rubber. The existence of air under LOCA environment accelerated the deterioration of insulation materials except silicone rubber, though its influence differed to the polymers. These materials swelled in the presence of air, and the degree of swelling increased with the temperature, having the close relation to oxidation deterioration. Polyethylene was more susceptible to the effect of air, and silicone rubber was rather stable. The samples of fire-retardant compounding ratio more swelled by water absorption than those of standard compounding ratio.

  8. Microscopic effects of Dy doping in the topological insulator Bi2Te3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, L. B.; Steinke, N.-J.; Krieger, J. A.; Figueroa, A. I.; Kummer, K.; Lancaster, T.; Giblin, S. R.; Pratt, F. L.; Blundell, S. J.; Prokscha, T.; Suter, A.; Langridge, S.; Strocov, V. N.; Salman, Z.; van der Laan, G.; Hesjedal, T.

    2018-05-01

    Magnetic doping with transition metal ions is the most widely used approach to break time-reversal symmetry in a topological insulator (TI)—a prerequisite for unlocking the TI's exotic potential. Recently, we reported the doping of Bi2Te3 thin films with rare-earth ions, which, owing to their large magnetic moments, promise commensurately large magnetic gap openings in the topological surface states. However, only when doping with Dy has a sizable gap been observed in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, which persists up to room temperature. Although disorder alone could be ruled out as a cause of the topological phase transition, a fundamental understanding of the magnetic and electronic properties of Dy-doped Bi2Te3 remained elusive. Here, we present an x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, polarized neutron reflectometry, muon-spin rotation, and resonant photoemission study of the microscopic magnetic and electronic properties. We find that the films are not simply paramagnetic but that instead the observed behavior can be well explained by the assumption of slowly fluctuating, inhomogeneous, magnetic patches with increasing volume fraction as the temperature decreases. At liquid helium temperatures, a large effective magnetization can be easily introduced by the application of moderate magnetic fields, implying that this material is very suitable for proximity coupling to an underlying ferromagnetic insulator or in a heterostructure with transition-metal-doped layers. However, the introduction of some charge carriers by the Dy dopants cannot be excluded at least in these highly doped samples. Nevertheless, we find that the magnetic order is not mediated via the conduction channel in these samples and therefore magnetic order and carrier concentration are expected to be independently controllable. This is not generally the case for transition-metal-doped topological insulators, and Dy doping should thus allow for improved TI quantum devices.

  9. Measurement of strong interaction effects in antiprotonic helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, J.D.; Gorringe, T.P.; Lowe, J.; Nelson, J.M.; Playfer, S.M.; Pyle, G.J.; Squier, G.T.A.

    1984-01-01

    The strong interaction shift and width for the 2 p level and the width for the 3d level have been measured for antiprotonic helium atoms. The results are compared with optical model calculations. The possible existence of strongly bound antiproton states in nuclei is discussed. (orig.)

  10. Specific Effects of Ionizing Energy on the Displacement Damage Calculation in Insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vila, R.; Mota, F.; Ortiz, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    The level of damage expected in functional materials for future fusion reactors is generally much lower than structural materials, but the degradation of their physical properties is also generally observed at very low dose levels compared to the latter. Normally the properties of interest (DC Electrical resistivity, HF dielectric absorption, optical transmission etc.) degrade long before mechanical integrity is an issue. This weakness is in part related to the more important effects of ionizing energy on both, covalent and ionic, insulators or semiconductors. As irradiation in fission and fusion reactors (even spallation sources) also involves the participation of gamma radiation, it has to be taken into account for total damage calculation. In the case of ions, the energy partition provides the amount of electronic (ionizing) energy lost in the material. In general and regarding radiation, insulating materials can be divided in two groups depending on whether they experience radiolysis, (i.e. purely ionizing radiation can produce noticeable amounts of atomic displacements) or not. First group includes for example alkali halides and fluorides. But, although radiolysis is negligible in the second group (radiation-hard materials), collateral effects of ionizing radiation have been observed (when combined with displacement damage). Therefore it is important to make some comments about the concept and use of dpa (displacements per atom) in this large family of materials

  11. Elimination of particle effects in SF/sub 6/ insulated transmission systems. First quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, S.J.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to develop methods and equipment to eliminate the adverse effect of particle contamination in SF/sub 6/-insulated transmission (CGIT) systems, so that the excellent dielectric properties of SF/sub 6/ can be fully exploited. Presently, CGIT systems are operated at about 10% of the dielectric strength capability of the SF/sub 6/ gas. The program includes theoretical and experimental evaluation of concepts, optimization and verification studies in CGIT systems, and reliability analysis, documentation of designs and economic analysis. Progress is now being made on evaluating alternative conductor and sheath designs to minimize the effect of particles. Materials for solid insulation is being investigated for the same purpose; the effort is presently concentrated on obtaining reliable quantitative measurement techniques of electrostatic properties. Computer calculation of particle trap configurations are being made to determine the optimum trap configurations. A novel particle trapping technique is being using adhesive materials. Manufacture and field control technique studies has commenced with a study of mechanical vibration techniques. An experimental test chamber consisting of a 9 m (30 foot) long 145 kV bus has been designed. This system will be used in testing of particle control concepts and in migration and optimization studies.

  12. Experimental study of the effects of alternating fields on HTS coils according to the winding insulation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y J; Lee, T S; Lee, W S; Ko, T K; Ahn, M C

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of alternating fields on high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coils according to the winding insulation condition. Alternating fields can occur in synchronous machines (armature reaction, faults) and other devices. In superconducting synchronous machines, alternating fields affect the operational characteristics of the machine and the superconducting field coil. Therefore, a method of reducing the effects of alternating fields is necessary in superconducting synchronous design. In this study, the effects of alternating fields on the HTS field coil according to the winding insulation condition were experimentally evaluated. The experimental results show that HTS coils made using the no-insulation technique can be a solution for reducing the effects of the alternating field. These results are expected to suggest useful data for applications of HTS field coils in superconducting synchronous machines. (paper)

  13. THE EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENT ON SHEAR IN STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Kenneth C.; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Keeton, Charles R.; Williams, Kurtis A.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.

    2011-01-01

    Using new photometric and spectroscopic data in the fields of nine strong gravitational lenses that lie in galaxy groups, we analyze the effects of both the local group environment and line-of-sight (LOS) galaxies on the lens potential. We use Monte Carlo simulations to derive the shear directly from measurements of the complex lens environment, providing the first detailed independent check of the shear obtained from lens modeling. We account for possible tidal stripping of the group galaxies by varying the fraction of total mass apportioned between the group dark matter halo and individual group galaxies. The environment produces an average shear of γ = 0.08 (ranging from 0.02 to 0.17), significant enough to affect quantities derived from lens observables. However, the direction and magnitude of the shears do not match those obtained from lens modeling in three of the six four-image systems in our sample (B1422, RXJ1131, and WFI2033). The source of this disagreement is not clear, implying that the assumptions inherent in both the environment and lens model approaches must be reconsidered. If only the local group environment of the lens is included, the average shear is γ = 0.05 (ranging from 0.01 to 0.14), indicating that LOS contributions to the lens potential are not negligible. We isolate the effects of various theoretical and observational uncertainties on our results. Of those uncertainties, the scatter in the Faber-Jackson relation and error in the group centroid position dominate. Future surveys of lens environments should prioritize spectroscopic sampling of both the local lens environment and objects along the LOS, particularly those bright (I< 21.5) galaxies projected within 5' of the lens.

  14. Fluorinated copper-phthalocyanine-based n-type organic field-effect transistors with a polycarbonate gate insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethuraman, Kunjithapatham; Kumar, Palanisamy; Santhakumar, Kannappan; Ochiai, Shizuyasu; Shin, Paikkyun

    2012-01-01

    Fluorinated copper-phthalocyanine (F 16 CuPc) thin films were prepared by using a vacuum evaporation technique and were applied to n-type organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) as active channel layers combined with a spin-coated polycarbonate thin-film gate insulator. The output characteristics of the resulting n-type OFET devices with bottom-gate/bottom-contact structures were investigated to evaluate the performances such as the field effect mobility (μ FE ), the on/off current ratio (I on/off ), and the threshold voltage (V th ). A relatively high field effect mobility of 6.0 x 10 -3 cm 2 /Vs was obtained for the n-type semiconductor under atmospheric conditions with an on/off current ratio of 1 x 10 4 and a threshold voltage of 5 V. The electron mobility of the n-type semiconductor was found to depend strongly on the growth temperature of the F 16 CuPc thin films. X-ray diffraction profiles showed that the crystallinity and the orientation of the F 16 CuPc on a polycarbonate thin film were enhanced with increasing growth temperature. Atomic force microscopy studies revealed various surface morphologies of the active layer. The field effect mobility of the F 16 CuPc-OFET was closely related to the crystallinity and the orientation of the F 16 CuPc thin film.

  15. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, G.J.; Howard, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The patent concerns high temperature thermal insulation of large vessels, such as the primary vessel of a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor. The thermal insulation consists of multilayered thermal insulation modules, and each module comprises a number of metal sheet layers sandwiched between a back and front plate. The layers are linked together by straps and clips to control the thickness of the module. (U.K.)

  16. Cellulose Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Fire retardant cellulose insulation is produced by shredding old newspapers and treating them with a combination of chemicals. Insulating material is blown into walls and attics to form a fiber layer which blocks the flow of air. All-Weather Insulation's founders asked NASA/UK-TAP to help. They wanted to know what chemicals added to newspaper would produce an insulating material capable of meeting federal specifications. TAP researched the query and furnished extensive information. The information contributed to successful development of the product and helped launch a small business enterprise which is now growing rapidly.

  17. Optical probing of quantum Hall effect of composite fermions and of the liquid-insulator transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossella, F; Bellani, V; Dionigi, F; Amado, M; Diez, E; Kowalik, K; Biasiol, G; Sorba, L

    2011-01-01

    In the photoluminescence spectra of a two-dimensional electron gas in the fractional quantum Hall regime we observe the states at filling factors ν = 4/5, 5/7, 4/11 and 3/8 as clear minima in the intensity or area emission peak. The first three states are described as interacting composite fermions in fractional quantum Hall regime. The minimum in the intensity at ν 3/8, which is not explained within this picture, can be an evidence of a suppression of the screening of the Coulomb interaction among the effective quasi-particles involved in this intriguing state. The magnetic field energy dispersion at very low temperatures is also discussed. At low field the emission follows a Landau dispersion with a screened magneto-Coulomb contribution. At intermediate fields the hidden symmetry manifests. At high field above ν = 1/3 the electrons correlate into an insulating phase, and the optical emission behaviour at the liquid-insulator transition is coherent with a charge ordering driven by Coulomb correlations.

  18. Diamond logic inverter with enhancement-mode metal-insulator-semiconductor field effect transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J. W., E-mail: liu.jiangwei@nims.go.jp [International Center for Young Scientists (ICYS), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Liao, M. Y.; Imura, M. [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Watanabe, E.; Oosato, H. [Nanofabrication Platform, NIMS, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Koide, Y., E-mail: koide.yasuo@nims.go.jp [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Nanofabrication Platform, NIMS, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Center of Materials Research for Low Carbon Emission, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2014-08-25

    A diamond logic inverter is demonstrated using an enhancement-mode hydrogenated-diamond metal-insulator-semiconductor field effect transistor (MISFET) coupled with a load resistor. The gate insulator has a bilayer structure of a sputtering-deposited LaAlO{sub 3} layer and a thin atomic-layer-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} buffer layer. The source-drain current maximum, extrinsic transconductance, and threshold voltage of the MISFET are measured to be −40.7 mA·mm{sup −1}, 13.2 ± 0.1 mS·mm{sup −1}, and −3.1 ± 0.1 V, respectively. The logic inverters show distinct inversion (NOT-gate) characteristics for input voltages ranging from 4.0 to −10.0 V. With increasing the load resistance, the gain of the logic inverter increases from 5.6 to as large as 19.4. The pulse response against the high and low input voltages shows the inversion response with the low and high output voltages.

  19. Quantum spin Hall effect in IV-VI topological crystalline insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, S.; Galicka, M.; Kacman, P.; Buczko, R.

    2015-06-01

    We envision that the quantum spin Hall effect should be observed in (111)-oriented thin films of SnSe and SnTe topological crystalline insulators. Using a tight-binding approach supported by first-principles calculations of the band structures, we demonstrate that in these films the energy gaps in the two-dimensional band spectrum depend in an oscillatory fashion on the layer thickness. These results as well as the calculated topological invariant indexes and edge state spin polarizations show that for films ˜20-40 monolayers thick a two-dimensional topological insulator phase appears. In this range of thicknesses in both SnSe and SnTe, (111)-oriented films edge states with Dirac cones with opposite spin polarization in their two branches are obtained. While in the SnTe layers a single Dirac cone appears at the projection of the {\\boldsymbol{}}\\bar{Γ } point of the two-dimensional Brillouin zone, in the SnSe (111)-oriented layers three Dirac cones at {\\boldsymbol{}}\\bar{M} points projections are predicted.

  20. Effect of spacers on the thermal performance of an annular multi-layer insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haim, Y.; Weiss, Y.; Letan, R.

    2014-01-01

    The current study presents a model and is experimentally conducted in a system of 40 stainless steel coaxial foils, of nitrogen gas, entrapped between the foils, and of spacers, which are zirconia, spherical, 50 μm in size particles, widely dispersed in the gaps between the foils. The model, experimentally verified, relates to radiation between the foils, unobstructed by particles, to conduction in the nitrogen gas, and to conduction across the particles. The study was, in particular, aimed to measure the effective thermal conductivity of the particles and to assess its effect upon the array. At vacuum of 0.092 Pa, the effective thermal conductivity of the particles was 2.13 × 10 −4  W/m K, while the effective thermal conductivity of the array was 4.74 × 10 −4  W/m K. Thus, the low contribution of the particles conduction at vacuum conditions improves the insulation. It reaches 45% of the heat transfer rate. At atmospheric pressure, the effective thermal conductivity of the array reaches 4.5 × 10 −2  W/m K. There, the spacers contribution is negligible. - Highlights: •The multi-layer insulation of cylinder consists of foils separated by particles. •The particles are widely spaced in gaps. •Particles heat transfer rate is almost half of the total in vacuum. •At higher pressures the particles contribution is negligible. •The predicted thermal performance agrees with experimental results

  1. Dimensional crossover and cold-atom realization of gapless and semi-metallic Mott insulating phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Peter P.; Scheurer, Mathias; Rachel, Stephan

    2014-03-01

    We propose a realistic cold-atom setup which allows for a dimensional crossover from a two-dimensional quantum spin Hall insulating phase to a three-dimensional strong topological insulator phase by simply tuning the hopping between the layers. We further employ cluster slave-rotor mean-field theory to study the effect of additional Hubbard onsite interactions that give rise to various spin liquid-like phases such as gapless and semi-metallic Mott insulating states.

  2. Silicon-on-insulator field effect transistor with improved body ties for rad-hard applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Draper, Bruce L.; Dodd, Paul E.

    2001-01-01

    A silicon-on-insulator (SOI) field-effect transistor (FET) and a method for making the same are disclosed. The SOI FET is characterized by a source which extends only partially (e.g. about half-way) through the active layer wherein the transistor is formed. Additionally, a minimal-area body tie contact is provided with a short-circuit electrical connection to the source for reducing floating body effects. The body tie contact improves the electrical characteristics of the transistor and also provides an improved single-event-upset (SEU) radiation hardness of the device for terrestrial and space applications. The SOI FET also provides an improvement in total-dose radiation hardness as compared to conventional SOI transistors fabricated without a specially prepared hardened buried oxide layer. Complementary n-channel and p-channel SOI FETs can be fabricated according to the present invention to form integrated circuits (ICs) for commercial and military applications.

  3. Effect of low temperature reactor irradiation on organic insulators in superconducting magnets, (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Teruo; Takamura, Saburo

    1983-01-01

    In order to study effects of irradiation at low temperature on insulating materials of superconducting magnets, flexural and impact tests are carried out at 4.2K without warmup after low temperature irradiation for several fiber reinforced plastics. The used materials are glass fiber reinforced epoxies and polyimide, and carbon fiber reinforced epoxies. After irradiation of 1.1 X 10 9 rad, the reduction in flexural strength of G-10 CR is about 70% and that of G-11 CR about 25%. No change are observed in strength of glass fiber reinforced polyimide by low temperature irradiation. Other kinds of glass fiber reinforced epoxies show a reduction in strength but the flexural strength of carbon fiber reinforced epoxies increases a small by irradiation. Irradiation effect of these materials on impact value is similar to that on flexural strength. (author)

  4. Effects of radiation at 5 K on organic insulators for superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Klabunde, C.E.; Kernohan, R.H.; Long, C.J.

    1979-10-01

    Recent studies of the effects of irradiation at 5 K on organic insulators for fusion reactors have extended the irradiation dose from 2 x 10 9 to 1 x 10 10 rads and have looked for changes due to fast neutrons. For radiation conditions in this experiment the latter had little effect upon electrical and mechanical properties. At a dose of 1 x 10 10 rads, particle-filled epoxies are at ''end of life'' in terms of mechanical strength, while fiberglass-cloth-filled epoxies retain sufficient strength for use. Electrical-resistivity and voltage-breakdown vaues are reduced in some materials but remain in a usable range. Two sheet-type materials show excellent stability in their electrical properties

  5. Preparation Nano-Structure Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE Functional Film on the Cellulose Insulation Polymer and Its Effect on the Breakdown Voltage and Hydrophobicity Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Hao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose insulation polymer is an important component of oil-paper insulation, which is widely used in power transformer. The weight of the cellulose insulation polymer materials is as high as tens of tons in the larger converter transformer. Excellent performance of oil-paper insulation is very important for ensuring the safe operation of larger converter transformer. An effective way to improve the insulation and the physicochemical property of the oil impregnated insulation pressboard/paper is currently a popular research topic. In this paper, the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE functional film was coated on the cellulose insulation pressboard by radio frequency (RF magnetron sputtering to improve its breakdown voltage and the hydrophobicity properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS results show that the nano-structure PTFE functional film was successfully fabricated on the cellulose insulation pressboard surface. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD present that the nanoscale size PTFE particles were attached to the pressboard surface and it exists in the amorphous form. Atomic force microscopy (AFM shows that the sputtered pressboard surface is still rough. The rough PTFE functional film and the reduction of the hydrophilic hydroxyl of the surface due to the shielding effect of PTFE improve the breakdown and the hydrophobicity properties of the cellulose insulation pressboard obviously. This paper provides an innovative way to improve the performance of the cellulose insulation polymer.

  6. Role of Shape and Numbers of Ridges and Valleys in the Insulating Effects of Topography on the Rayleigh Wave Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, J. P.; Kumar, Neeraj; Chauhan, Ranu

    2018-03-01

    This research work is inspired by the recently accepted concept that high frequency Rayleigh waves are generated in the epicentral zone of shallow earthquakes. Such high frequency Rayleigh waves with large amplitude may develop much of spatial variability in ground motion which in turn may cause unexpected damage to long-span structures like bridges, underground pipelines, dams, etc., in the hilly regions. Further, it has been reported that topography acts as an insulator for the Rayleigh waves (Ma et al. BSSA 97:2066-2079, 2007). The above mentioned scientific developments stimulated to quantify the role of shape and number of ridges and valleys falling in the path of Rayleigh wave in the insulating effect of topography on the Rayleigh waves. The simulated results reveals very large amplification of the horizontal component of Rayleigh wave near the top of a triangular ridge which may cause intensive landslides under favorable condition. The computed snapshots of the wave-field of Rayleigh wave reveals that the interaction of Rayleigh wave with the topography causes reflection, splitting, and diffraction of Rayleigh wave in the form of body waves which in turn provides the insulating capacity to the topography. Insulating effects of single valley is more than that of single ridge. Further this effect was more in case of elliptical ridge/valley than triangular ridge/valley. The insulating effect of topography was proportional to the frequency of Rayleigh wave and the number of ridges and valleys in the string. The obtained level of insulation effects of topography on the Rayleigh wave (energy of Rayleigh wave reduced to less than 4% after crossing a topography of span 4.5 km) calls for the consideration of role of hills and valleys in seismic hazard prediction, particularly in case of shallow earthquakes.

  7. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsky, G.P.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal insulation for vessels and piping within the reactor containment area of nuclear power plants is disclosed. The thermal insulation of this invention can be readily removed and replaced from the vessels and piping for inservice inspection, can withstand repeated wettings and dryings, and can resist high temperatures for long periods of time. 4 claims, 3 figures

  8. Effects on Magnetic Properties of GaMnAs Induced by Proximity of Topological Insulator Bi2Se3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bac, Seul-Ki; Lee, Hakjoon; Lee, Sangyeop; Choi, Seonghoon; Lee, Sanghoon; Liu, X.; Dobrowolska, M.; Furdyna, J. K.

    2018-04-01

    Effects induced by a topological insulator Bi2Se3 on the magnetic properties of an adjacent GaMnAs film have been investigated using transport measurements. We observed three conspicuous effects in the GaMnAs layer induced by the proximity of the Bi2Se3 overlayer. First, our resistivity data as a function of temperature show that the GaMnAs layer adjacent to the Bi2Se3 displayed strongly metallic behavior, as compared with the GaMnAs control specimen. Second, the Curie temperature of the GaMnAs in the bilayer was observed to be higher than that of the control layer, in our case by nearly a factor of two. Finally, we observed significant changes in the in-plane magnetic anisotropy of the GaMnAs in the bilayer, in the form of much higher values of both cubic and uniaxial anisotropy parameters. This latter feature manifests itself in a rather spectacular increase of the coercive field observed in magnetization reversal across the in-plane hard axis. These results suggest that proximity of an adjacent Bi2Se3 layer represents an important tool for modifying and controlling the ferromagnetic properties of GaMnAs film, and could thus be used to optimize this and similar materials for applications in spintronic devices.

  9. Effect of strong coupling on interfacial electron transfer dynamics in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    regarded as the best sensitizing dyes for solar energy conversion for their strong visible absorption bands, long-lived ... solar cells based on dye-sensitized nanocrystalline. TiO2. High affinity for the TiO2 surface, which is ... pump pulses at 400 nm, one part of 800 nm with. 200 µJ/pulse, is frequency doubled in BBO crystals.

  10. Electrical and proximity-magnetic effects induced quantum Goos–Hänchen shift on the surface of topological insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuai, Jian [School of Physics and Electronics, Yancheng Teachers College, Yancheng, 224002 Jiangsu (China); Da, H.X., E-mail: haixia8779@163.com [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-03-15

    We use scattering matrix method to theoretically demonstrate that the quantum Goos–Hänchen shift of the surface on three-dimensional topological insulator coated by ferromagnetic strips is sensitive to the magnitude of ferromagnetic magnetization. The dependence of quantum Goos–Hänchen shift on magnetization and gate bias is investigated by performing station phase approach. It is found that quantum Goos–Hänchen shift is positive and large under the magnetic barrier but may be positive as well as negative values under the gate bias. Furthermore, the position of quantum Goos–Hänchen peak can also be modulated by the combination of gate bias and proximity magnetic effects. Our results indicate that topological insulators are another candidates to support quantum Goos–Hänchen shift. - Highlights: • Quantum Goos–Hänchen shift of the surface on three-dimensional topological insulators is first investigated. • The magnetization affects quantum Goos–Hänchen shift of the surface on three-dimensional topological insulators. • Quantum Goos–Hänchen shift of the surface on three-dimensional topological insulators can be manipulated by the gate voltages.

  11. Spin Seebeck effect in insulating epitaxial γ−Fe2O3 thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jiménez-Cavero

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the fabrication of high crystal quality epitaxial thin films of maghemite (γ−Fe2O3, a classic ferrimagnetic insulating iron oxide. Spin Seebeck effect (SSE measurements in γ−Fe2O3/Pt bilayers as a function of sample preparation conditions and temperature yield a SSE coefficient of 0.5(1 μV/K at room temperature. Dependence on temperature allows us to estimate the magnon diffusion length in maghemite to be in the range of tens of nanometers, in good agreement with that of conducting iron oxide magnetite (Fe3O4, establishing the relevance of spin currents of magnonic origin in magnetic iron oxides.

  12. A novel double gate MOSFET by symmetrical insulator packets with improved short channel effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Zeinab; Orouji, Ali A.

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we study a novel double-gate SOI MOSFET structure incorporating insulator packets (IPs) at the junction between channel and source/drain (S/D) ends. The proposed MOSFET has great strength in inhibiting short channel effects and OFF-state current that are the main problems compared with conventional one due to the significant suppressed penetrations of both the lateral electric field and the carrier diffusion from the S/D into the channel. Improvement of the hot electron reliability, the ON to OFF drain current ratio, drain-induced barrier lowering, gate-induced drain leakage and threshold voltage over conventional double-gate SOI MOSFETs, i.e. without IPs, is displayed with the simulation results. This study is believed to improve the CMOS device reliability and is suitable for the low-power very-large-scale integration circuits.

  13. Observation of the universal magnetoelectric effect in a 3D topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziom, V.; Shuvaev, A.; Pimenov, A.; Astakhov, G. V.; Ames, C.; Bendias, K.; Böttcher, J.; Tkachov, G.; Hankiewicz, E. M.; Brüne, C.; Buhmann, H.; Molenkamp, L. W.

    2017-01-01

    The electrodynamics of topological insulators (TIs) is described by modified Maxwell's equations, which contain additional terms that couple an electric field to a magnetization and a magnetic field to a polarization of the medium, such that the coupling coefficient is quantized in odd multiples of α/4π per surface. Here we report on the observation of this so-called topological magnetoelectric effect. We use monochromatic terahertz (THz) spectroscopy of TI structures equipped with a semitransparent gate to selectively address surface states. In high external magnetic fields, we observe a universal Faraday rotation angle equal to the fine structure constant α=e2/2hc (in SI units) when a linearly polarized THz radiation of a certain frequency passes through the two surfaces of a strained HgTe 3D TI. These experiments give insight into axion electrodynamics of TIs and may potentially be used for a metrological definition of the three basic physical constants. PMID:28504268

  14. Effective Field Theories and Strong Interactions. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, Sean

    2011-01-01

    The framework of Effective Field Theories (EFTs) allows us to describe strong interactions in terms of degrees of freedom relevant to the energy regimes of interest, in the most general way consistent with the symmetries of QCD. Observables are expanded systematically in powers of M lo /M hi , where M lo (M hi ) denotes a low-(high-)energy scale. This organizational principle is referred to as 'power counting'. Terms of increasing powers in the expansion parameter are referred to as leading order (LO), next-to-leading order (NLO), etc. Details of the QCD dynamics not included explicitly are encoded in interaction parameters, or 'low-energy constants' (LECs), which can in principle be calculated from an explicit solution of QCD - for example via lattice simulations- but can also be determined directly from experimental data. QCD has an intrinsic scale M QCD ≅ 1 GeV, at which the QCD coupling constant α s (M QCD ) becomes large and the dynamics becomes non-perturbative. As a consequence M QCD sets the scale for the masses of most hadrons, such as the nucleon mass m N ≅ 940 MeV. EFTs can roughly be divided into two categories: those that can be matched onto QCD in perturbation theory, which we call high-energy EFTs, and those that cannot be matched perturbatively, which we call low-energy EFTs. In high-energy EFTs, M QCD typically sets the low-energy scale, and all the dynamics associated with this scale reside in matrix elements of EFT operators. These non-perturbative matrix elements are the LECs and are also referred to as long-distance contributions. Each matrix element is multiplied by a short-distance coefficient, which contains the dynamics from the high scale M hi . Since M hi >> M QCD , α s (M hi ) hi ∼ M Q , the heavy-quark mass, and in addition to M QCD there are low scales associated with the typical relative momentum ∼ M Q v and energy ∼ M Q v 2 of the heavy quarks. Depending on the sizes of M Q and the heavy-quark velocity v these scales can

  15. Spectator Effects during Leptogenesis in the Strong Washout Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Garbrecht, Bjorn

    2014-01-01

    By including spectator fields into the Boltzmann equations for Leptogenesis, we show that partially equilibrated spectator interactions can have a significant impact on the freeze-out value of the asymmetry in the strong washout regime. The final asymmetry is typically increased, since partially equilibrated spectators "hide" a part of the asymmetry from washout. We study examples with leptonic and non-leptonic spectator processes, assuming thermal initial conditions, and find up to 50% enhanced asymmetries compared to the limit of fully equilibrated spectators. Together with a comprehensive overview of the equilibration temperatures for various Standard Model processes, the numerical results indicate the ranges when the limiting cases of either fully equilibrated or negligible spectator fields are applicable and when they are not. Our findings also indicate an increased sensitivity to initial conditions and finite density corrections even in the strong washout regime.

  16. How strong and generalisable is the Generation Y effect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, Simone; Remaud, Hervé; Chabin, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This study aims to investigate how strongly Generation Y consumers differ in their values, attitudes and wine and alcoholic beverage consumption behaviour from older generations. The comparison spans seven culturally different markets. Design/methodology/approach – Large representative...... alcoholic beverage consumption. A number of noticeable differences appeared between countries: wine involvement and consumption increases with age in traditional European wine markets, while they decrease in North America; environmental concerns and purchase channel usage hardly differ between generations...

  17. The effects of imperfect insulator coatings on MHD and heat transfer in rectangular duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, A.Y.; Gaizer, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    In self cooled liquid metal blankets, the use of an insulator coating to reduce the flow of the eddy current to the structure leads to a significant reduction in MHD pressure drop. Furthermore, this insulating layer alters the velocity structure by reducing the potential difference between the side wall and boundary layer. The questions which arise are: (1) How the imperfections in the insulator coating affect the velocity profiles and their consequent impacts on heat transfer performance?; and, (2) How much crack can lead to an unacceptable MHD pressure drop? The dynamics of the crack healing in an insulator coating duct is one of the important subjects requiring study. The purpose of this work is to present numerical simulations of fully developed MHD flow and developing heat transfer characteristics in imperfectly insulated ducts, and to quantify the influences of crack locations, sizes and resistivities on 2-D MHD pressure drops. Comparisons of finite element solutions of pressure drops in partially insulated ducts with analytical solutions obtained from a circuit analogy show excellent agreement. In addition, the remarkable side layer velocity profile observed in a laminar MHD flow of a conducting duct gradually diminishes as the resistance of the insulating layer increases. The average side wall Nusselt number drops by a factor of 2 as the duct becomes fully insulated

  18. Effects of insulating vanadium oxide composite in concomitant mixed phases via interface barrier modulations on the performance improvements in metal-insulator-metal diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaleem Abbas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The performance of metal-insulator-metal diodes is investigated for insulating vanadium oxide (VOx composite composed of concomitant mixed phases using the Pt metal as the top and the bottom electrodes. Insulating VOx composite in the Pt/VOx/Pt diode exhibits a high asymmetry of 10 and a very high sensitivity of 2,135V−1 at 0.6 V. The VOx composite provides Schottky-like barriers at the interface, which controls the current flow and the trap-assisted conduction mechanism. Such dramatic enhancement in asymmetry and rectification performance at low applied bias may be ascribed to the dynamic control of the insulating and metallic phases in VOx composites. We find that the nanostructure details of the insulating VOx layer can be critical in enhancing the performance of MIM diodes.

  19. Semiconductor of spinons: from Ising band insulator to orthogonal band insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajollahpour, T; Jafari, S A

    2018-01-10

    We use the ionic Hubbard model to study the effects of strong correlations on a two-dimensional semiconductor. The spectral gap in the limit where on-site interactions are zero is set by the staggered ionic potential, while in the strong interaction limit it is set by the Hubbard U. Combining mean field solutions of the slave spin and slave rotor methods, we propose two interesting gapped phases in between: (i) the insulating phase before the Mott phase can be viewed as gapping a non-Fermi liquid state of spinons by the staggered ionic potential. The quasi-particles of underlying spinons are orthogonal to physical electrons, giving rise to the 'ARPES-dark' state where the ARPES gap will be larger than the optical and thermal gap. (ii) The Ising insulator corresponding to ordered phase of the Ising variable is characterized by single-particle excitations whose dispersion is controlled by Ising-like temperature and field dependences. The temperature can be conveniently employed to drive a phase transition between these two insulating phases where Ising exponents become measurable by ARPES and cyclotron resonance. The rare earth monochalcogenide semiconductors where the magneto-resistance is anomalously large can be a candidate system for the Ising band insulator. We argue that the Ising and orthogonal insulating phases require strong enough ionic potential to survive the downward renormalization of the ionic potential caused by Hubbard U.

  20. Semiconductor of spinons: from Ising band insulator to orthogonal band insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajollahpour, T.; Jafari, S. A.

    2018-01-01

    We use the ionic Hubbard model to study the effects of strong correlations on a two-dimensional semiconductor. The spectral gap in the limit where on-site interactions are zero is set by the staggered ionic potential, while in the strong interaction limit it is set by the Hubbard U. Combining mean field solutions of the slave spin and slave rotor methods, we propose two interesting gapped phases in between: (i) the insulating phase before the Mott phase can be viewed as gapping a non-Fermi liquid state of spinons by the staggered ionic potential. The quasi-particles of underlying spinons are orthogonal to physical electrons, giving rise to the ‘ARPES-dark’ state where the ARPES gap will be larger than the optical and thermal gap. (ii) The Ising insulator corresponding to ordered phase of the Ising variable is characterized by single-particle excitations whose dispersion is controlled by Ising-like temperature and field dependences. The temperature can be conveniently employed to drive a phase transition between these two insulating phases where Ising exponents become measurable by ARPES and cyclotron resonance. The rare earth monochalcogenide semiconductors where the magneto-resistance is anomalously large can be a candidate system for the Ising band insulator. We argue that the Ising and orthogonal insulating phases require strong enough ionic potential to survive the downward renormalization of the ionic potential caused by Hubbard U.

  1. Multiphoton above threshold effects in strong-field fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    B Madsen, C; Anis, F; B Madsen, L

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of multiphoton dissociative ionization from molecules. By solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for H2+ and projecting the solution onto double continuum scattering states, we observe the correlated electron-nuclear ionization dynamics in detail. We show—for the first...... time—how multiphoton structure prevails as long as one accounts for the energies of all the fragments. Our current work provides a new avenue to analyze strong-field fragmentation that leads to a deeper understanding of the correlated molecular dynamics....

  2. Insulating phase in Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4}: An investigation using critical analysis and magnetocaloric effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatti, Imtiaz Noor; Pramanik, A.K., E-mail: akpramanik@mail.jnu.ac.in

    2017-01-15

    The nature of insulating phase in 5d based Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} is quite debated as the theoretical as well as experimental investigations have put forward evidences in favor of both magnetically driven Slater-type and interaction driven Mott-type insulator. To understand this insulating behavior, we have investigated the nature of magnetic state in Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} through studying critical exponents, low temperature thermal demagnetization and magnetocaloric effect. The estimated critical exponents do not exactly match with any universality class, however, the values obey the scaling behavior. The exponent values suggest that spin interaction in present material is close to mean-field model. The analysis of low temperature thermal demagnetization data, however, shows dual presence of localized- and itinerant-type of magnetic interaction. Moreover, field dependent change in magnetic entropy indicates magnetic interaction is close to mean-field type. While this material shows an insulating behavior across the magnetic transition, yet a distinct change in slope in resistivity is observed around T{sub c}. We infer that though the insulating phase in Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} is more close to be Slater-type but the simultaneous presence of both Slater- and Mott-type is the likely scenario for this material. - Highlights: • Critical analysis shows Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} has ferromagnetic ordering temperature T{sub c}~225 K. • Obtained critical exponents imply spin interaction is close to mean-field model. • Analysis of magneto-entropy data also supports mean-field type interaction. • However, the presence of both itinerant and localized spin interaction is evident. • Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} has simultaneous presence of both Slater- and Mott-type insulating phase.

  3. A study on the barrier effect with respect to the condition of solid insulation materials in GN{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Mo, Young Kyu; Lee, On You; Kim, Jun Il; Bang, Seung Min; Kang, Jong O; Kang, Hyoung Ku [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Korea National University of Transportation, Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Seo Ho [Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Applied Superconductivity Lab., Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    High voltage superconducting apparatuses have been developed presently around the world under AC and DC sources. In order to improve electrical reliability of superconducting apparatuses with AC and DC networks, a study on the DC as well as the AC electrical breakdown characteristics of cryogenic insulations should be conducted for developing a high voltage superconducting apparatus. Recently, a sub-cooled liquid nitrogen cooling system is known to be promising method for developing a high voltage superconducting apparatus. A sub-cooled liquid nitrogen cooling system uses gaseous nitrogen to control the pressure and enhance the dielectric characteristics. However, the dielectric characteristics of gaseous nitrogen are not enough to satisfy the grade of insulation for a high voltage superconducting apparatus. In this case, the application of solid insulating barriers is regarded as an effective method to reinforce the dielectric characteristics of a high voltage superconducting apparatus. In this paper, it is dealt with a barrier effect on the DC and AC dielectric characteristics of gaseous nitrogen with respect to the position and number of solid insulating barriers. As results, the DC and AC electrical breakdown characteristics by various barrier effects is verified.

  4. Spin effects in strong-field laser-electron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrens, S; Bauke, H; Müller, T-O; Villalba-Chávez, S; Müller, C

    2013-01-01

    The electron spin degree of freedom can play a significant role in relativistic scattering processes involving intense laser fields. In this contribution we discuss the influence of the electron spin on (i) Kapitza-Dirac scattering in an x-ray laser field of high intensity, (ii) photo-induced electron-positron pair production in a strong laser wave and (iii) multiphoton electron-positron pair production on an atomic nucleus. We show that in all cases under consideration the electron spin can have a characteristic impact on the process properties and their total probabilities. To this end, spin-resolved calculations based on the Dirac equation in the presence of an intense laser field are performed. The predictions from Dirac theory are also compared with the corresponding results from the Klein-Gordon equation.

  5. Disorder Effects in Charge Transport and Spin Response of Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lukas Zhonghua

    Topological insulators are a class of solids in which the non-trivial inverted bulk band structure gives rise to metallic surface states that are robust against impurity backscattering. First principle calculations predicted Bi2Te3, Sb2Te3 and Bi2Se3 to be three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators with a single Dirac cone on the surface. The topological surface states were subsequently observed by angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The investigations of charge transport through topological surfaces of 3D topological insulators, however, have faced a major challenge due to large charge carrier densities in the bulk donated by randomly distributed defects such as vacancies and antisites. This bulk disorder intermixes surface and bulk conduction channels, thereby complicating access to the low-energy (Dirac point) charge transport or magnetic response and resulting in the relatively low measured carrier mobilities. Moreover, charge inhomogeneity arising from bulk disorder can result in pronounced nanoscale spatial fluctuations of energy on the surface, leading to the formation of surface `puddles' of different carrier types. Great efforts have been made to combat the undesirable effects of disorder in 3D topological insulators and to reduce bulk carriers through chemical doping, nanostructure fabrication, and electric gating. In this work we have developed a new way to reduce bulk carrier densities using high-energy electron irradiation, thereby allowing us access to the topological surface quantum channels. We also found that disorder in 3D topological insulators can be beneficial. It can play an important part in enabling detection of unusual magnetic response from Dirac fermions and in uncovering new excitations, namely surface superconductivity in Dirac `puddles'. In Chapter 3 we show how by using differential magnetometry we could probe spin rotation in the 3D topological material family (Bi2Se 3, Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3

  6. Radiation effects on relativistic electrons in strong external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    The effects of radiation of high energy electron beams are a major issue in almost all types of charged particle accelerators. The objective of this thesis is both the analytical and numerical study of radiation effects. Due to its many applications the study of the self force has become a very active and productive field of research. The main part of this thesis is devoted to the study of radiation effects in laser-based plasma accelerators. Analytical models predict the existence of radiation effects. The investigation of radiation reaction show that in laser-based plasma accelerators, the self force effects lower the energy gain and emittance for moderate energies electron beams and increase the relative energy spread. However, for relatively high energy electron beams, the self radiation and retardation (radiation effects of one electron on the other electron of the system) effects increase the transverse emittance of the beam. The energy gain decreases to even lower value and relative energy spread increases to even higher value due to high radiation losses. The second part of this thesis investigates with radiation reaction in focused laser beams. Radiation effects are very weak even for high energy electrons. The radiation-free acceleration and the simple practical setup make direct acceleration in a focused laser beam very attractive. The results presented in this thesis can be helpful for the optimization of future electron acceleration experiments, in particular in the case of laser-plasma accelerators.

  7. Effective magnetic moment of neutrinos in strong magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez M, A.; Perez R, H.; Masood, S.S.; Gaitan, R.; Rodriguez R, S.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we compute the effective magnetic moment of neutrinos propagating in dense high magnetized medium. Taking typical values of magnetic field and densities of astrophysical objects (such as the cores of supernovae and neutron stars) we obtain an effective type of dipole magnetic moment in agreement with astrophysical and cosmological bounds. (Author)

  8. Passive Collecting of Solar Radiation Energy using Transparent Thermal Insulators, Energetic Efficiency of Transparent Thermal Insulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smajo Sulejmanovic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains passive collection of solar radiation energy using transparent thermal insulators. Transparent thermal insulators are transparent for sunlight, at the same time those are very good thermal insulators. Transparent thermal insulators can be placed instead of standard conventional thermal insulators and additionally transparent insulators can capture solar radiation, transform it into heat and save heat just as standard insulators. Using transparent insulators would lead to reduce in usage of fossil fuels and would help protection of an environment and reduce effects of global warming, etc.

  9. The Connect Effect Building Strong Personal, Professional, and Virtual Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Dulworth, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Entrepreneur and executive development expert Mike Dulworth's THE CONNECT EFFECT provides readers with a simple framework and practical tools for developing that crucial competitive advantage: a high-quality personal, professional/organizational and virtual network.

  10. Effects of Electron Flow Current Density on Flow Impedance of Magnetically Insulated Transmission Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yong; Zou Wen-Kang; Song Sheng-Yi

    2011-01-01

    In modern pulsed power systems, magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs) are used to couple power between the driver and the load. The circuit parameters of MITLs are well understood by employing the concept of flow impedance derived from Maxwell's equations and pressure balance across the flow. However, the electron density in an MITL is always taken as constant in the application of flow impedance. Thus effects of electron flow current density (product of electron density and drift velocity) in an MITL are neglected. We calculate the flow impedances of an MITL and compare them under three classical MITL theories, in which the electron density profile and electron flow current density are different from each other. It is found that the assumption of constant electron density profile in the calculation of the flow impedance is not always valid. The electron density profile and the electron flow current density have significant effects on flow impedance of the MITL. The details of the electron flow current density and its effects on the operation impedance of the MITL should be addressed more explicitly by experiments and theories in the future. (nuclear physics)

  11. Coupling effect of topological states and Chern insulators in two-dimensional triangular lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhao, Bao; Xue, Yang; Zhou, Tong; Yang, Zhongqin

    2018-03-01

    We investigate topological states of two-dimensional (2D) triangular lattices with multiorbitals. Tight-binding model calculations of a 2D triangular lattice based on px and py orbitals exhibit very interesting doubly degenerate energy points at different positions (Γ and K /K' ) in momentum space, with quadratic non-Dirac and linear Dirac band dispersions, respectively. Counterintuitively, the system shows a global topologically trivial rather than nontrivial state with consideration of spin-orbit coupling due to the "destructive interference effect" between the topological states at the Γ and K /K' points. The topologically nontrivial state can emerge by introducing another set of triangular lattices to the system (bitriangular lattices) due to the breakdown of the interference effect. With first-principles calculations, we predict an intrinsic Chern insulating behavior (quantum anomalous Hall effect) in a family of the 2D triangular lattice metal-organic framework of Co(C21N3H15) (TPyB-Co) from this scheme. Our results provide a different path and theoretical guidance for the search for and design of new 2D topological quantum materials.

  12. Effect of Flow Direction on the Extinction Limit for Flame Spread over Wire Insulation in Microgravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagachi, Masashi; Mitsui, Fumiya; Citerne, Jean-Marie

    Experiments to determine the Limiting Oxygen Concentration (LOC) of a flame spread over electric wire insulation were carried out in microgravity provided by parabolic flights. The difference between the LOC in opposed and concurrent flows was evidenced. Polyethylene insulated Copper (Cu) wires...... and polyethylene insulated Nickel-Chrome (NiCr) wires with inner core diameter of 0.50 mm and insulation thickness of 0.30 mm were examined with external flow velocities ranging from 50mm/s to 200mm/s. The results for the Copper wires show that with increasing external flow velocity, the LOC monotonically...... decreased for the concurrent flow conditions and the LOC first decreased and then increased (“U” trend) for the opposed flow conditions. Similar trends were found in the experiments with NiCr wires. Also, in terms of the minimum LOC value, the minimum LOC was comparable for both wire types in both flow...

  13. Lightweight, Cost Effective LOX Compatible Aerogel Insulation Material for Cryogenic Fluid Transfer Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Energy-efficient cryogenic insulation is an imperative requirement for the future of space travel. In order to advance the space program, NASA must find cost...

  14. Solar Effects on Tensile and Optical Properties of Hubble Space Telescope Silver-Teflon(Registered Trademark) Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim, K.; Dever, Joyce A.; Snyder, Aaron; Kaminski, Sharon; McCarthy, Catherine E.; Rapoport, Alison L.; Rucker, Rochelle N.

    2006-01-01

    A section of the retrieved Hubble Space Telescope (HST) solar array drive arm (SADA) multilayer insulation (MLI), which experienced 8.25 years of space exposure, was analyzed for environmental durability of the top layer of silver-Teflon (DuPont) fluorinated ethylene propylene (Ag-FEP). Because the SADA MLI had solar and anti-solar facing surfaces and was exposed to the space environment for a long duration, it provided a unique opportunity to study solar effects on the environmental degradation of Ag-FEP, a commonly used spacecraft thermal control material. Data obtained included tensile properties, solar absorptance, surface morphology and chemistry. The solar facing surface was found to be extremely embrittled and contained numerous through-thickness cracks. Tensile testing indicated that the solar facing surface lost 60% of its mechanical strength and 90% of its elasticity while the anti-solar facing surface had ductility similar to pristine FEP. The solar absorptance of both the solar facing surface (0.155 plus or minus 0.032) and the anti-solar facing surface (0.208 plus or minus 0.012) were found to be greater than pristine Ag-FEP (0.074). Solar facing and anti-solar facing surfaces were microscopically textured, and locations of isolated contamination were present on the anti-solar surface resulting in increased localized texturing. Yet, the overall texture was significantly more pronounced on the solar facing surface indicating a synergistic effect of combined solar exposure and increased heating with atomic oxygen erosion. The results indicate a very strong dependence of degradation, particularly embrittlement, upon solar exposure with orbital thermal cycling having a significant effect.

  15. Strong effects of ionizing radiation from Chernobyl on mutation rates

    OpenAIRE

    M?ller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we use a meta-analysis to examine the relationship between radiation and mutation rates in Chernobyl across 45 published studies, covering 30 species. Overall effect size of radiation on mutation rates estimated as Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was very large (E = 0.67; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.59 to 0.73), accounting for 44.3% of the total variance in an unstructured random-effects model. Fail-safe calculations reflecting the number of unpublished null...

  16. Fault location method for unexposed gas trunk line insulation at stray current constant effect area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsenev, A. N.; Nosov, V. V.; Akimova, E. V.

    2017-10-01

    For the purpose of gas trunk lines safe operation, two types of pipe wall metal anticorrosion protection are generally used - the passive (insulation coating) protection and the active (electrochemical) protection. In the process of a pipeline long-term operation, its insulation is subject to wear and damage. Electrochemical protection means of a certain potential value prevent metal dissolution in the soil. When insulation wear and tear attains a level of insufficiency of the protection potential value, the insulating coating needs repair which is a labor-consuming procedure. To reduce the risk of such situation, it is necessary to make inspection rounds to monitor the condition of pipe insulation. A method for pipeline insulation coating unexposed fault location based on Pearson method is considered, wherein a working cathodic protection station signal of 100 Hz frequency is used, which makes installation of a generator unnecessary, and also a specific generator signal of 1 kHz frequency is used at high noise immunity and sensitivity of the instrument complex. This method enables detection and sizing of unexposed pipeline defects within the zones of earth current permanent action. High noise immunity of selective indicators allows for operation in proximity to 110 kV, 220 kV, and 500 kV power transmission lines in action.

  17. Effect of Nanoclay on Mechanical Properties and Ablation Behavior of a Nitrile-Based Heat Insulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Arabgol

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermal insulation of rocket motor chamber is one of the most important functions of elastomeric ablative material. Combustion of solid rocket motor propellant produces turbulent media containing gases with a velocity more than 1000 m/s, temperature and pressure more than 3000°C and 10 MPa, respectively,which destroys all metallic alloys. Elastomeric nanocomposite heat insulators are more attractive subjects in comparison to their non-elastomeric counterparts, due to their excellent thermal stresses and larger deformation bearing capacity. Nitrile rubber with high thermal properties is a proper candidate in such applications. Development in ablation performance of these heat shields is considered as an important challenge nowadays. A few works have been recently carried out using organoclay to enhancethe ablation and mechanical properties of heat insulators. In this work, an elastomeric heat insulator with superior ablative and mechanical properties was presented using nanotechnology. The results showed that an elastomeric nanocomposite heat insulator containing 15 wt% organoclay exhibits superior characteristics compared to its composite counterpart such as: 46% more tensile strength, 60% more elongationat-break, 1.7 times higher modulus (at 100% strain, 62% higher “insulating index number” and 36% lower mass ablation and erosion rates under a standard test with a heat flux of 2500 kW/m2 for 15 s.

  18. Strange effects of strong high-frequency excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2003-01-01

    Three general effects of mechanical high-frequency excitation (HFE) are described: Stiffening - an apparent change in the stiffness associated with an equilibrium; Biasing - a tendency for a system to move towards a particular state which does not exist or is unstable without HFE; and Smoothening...

  19. Effective bounds on strong unicity in L1-approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlenbach, Ulrich; Oliva, Paulo B.

    In this paper we present another case study in the general project of Proof Mining which means the logical analysis of prima facie non-effective proofs with the aim of extracting new computationally relevant data. We use techniques based on monotone functional interpretation (developed in [17]) t...

  20. Radiation Effects in Advanced Multiple Gate and Silicon-on-Insulator Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoen, Eddy; Gaillardin, Marc; Paillet, Philippe; Reed, Robert A.; Schrimpf, Ron D.; Alles, Michael L.; El-Mamouni, Farah; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Griffoni, Alessio; Claeys, Cor

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this review paper is to describe in a comprehensive manner the current understanding of the radiation response of state-of-the-art Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) and FinFET CMOS technologies. Total Ionizing Dose (TID) response, heavy-ion microdose effects and single-event effects (SEEs) will be discussed. It is shown that a very high TID tolerance can be achieved by narrow-fin SOI FinFET architectures, while bulk FinFETs may exhibit similar TID response to the planar devices. Due to the vertical nature of FinFETs, a specific heavy-ion response can be obtained, whereby the angle of incidence becomes highly important with respect to the vertical sidewall gates. With respect to SEE, the buried oxide in the SOI FinFETs suppresses the diffusion tails from the charge collection in the substrate compared to the planar bulk FinFET devices. Channel lengths and fin widths are now comparable to, or smaller than the dimensions of the region affected by the single ionizing ions or lasers used in testing. This gives rise to a high degree of sensitivity to individual device parameters and source-drain shunting during ion-beam or laser-beam SEE testing. Simulations are used to illuminate the mechanisms observed in radiation testing and the progress and needs for the numerical modeling/simulation of the radiation response of advanced SOI and FinFET transistors are highlighted.

  1. Space and military radiation effects in silicon-on-insulator devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwank, J.R.

    1996-09-01

    Advantages in transient ionizing and single-event upset (SEU) radiation hardness of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology spurred much of its early development. Both of these advantages are a direct result of the reduced charge collection volume inherent to SOI technology. The fact that SOI transistor structures do not include parasitic n-p-n-p paths makes them immune to latchup. Even though considerable improvement in transient and single-event radiation hardness can be obtained by using SOI technology, there are some attributes of SOI devices and circuits that tend to limit their overall hardness. These attributes include the bipolar effect that can ultimately reduce the hardness of SOI ICs to SEU and transient ionizing radiation, and charge buildup in buried and sidewall oxides that can degrade the total-dose hardness of SOI devices. Nevertheless, high-performance SOI circuits can be fabricated that are hardened to both space and nuclear radiation environments, and radiation-hardened systems remain an active market for SOI devices. The effects of radiation on SOI MOS devices are reviewed

  2. Low dielectric constant-based organic field-effect transistors and metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukah, Ndubuisi Benjamin

    This thesis describes a study of PFB and pentacene-based organic field-effect transistors (OFET) and metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitors with low dielectric constant (k) poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), poly(4-vinyl phenol) (PVP) and cross-linked PVP (c-PVP) gate dielectrics. A physical method -- matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) -- of fabricating all-polymer field-effect transistors and MIS capacitors that circumvents inherent polymer dissolution and solvent-selectivity problems, is demonstrated. Pentacene-based OFETs incorporating PMMA and PVP gate dielectrics usually have high operating voltages related to the thickness of the dielectric layer. Reduced PMMA layer thickness (≤ 70 nm) was obtained by dissolving the PMMA in propylene carbonate (PC). The resulting pentacene-based transistors exhibited very low operating voltage (below -3 V), minimal hysteresis in their transfer characteristics, and decent electrical performance. Also low voltage (within -2 V) operation using thin (≤ 80 nm) low-k and hydrophilic PVP and c-PVP dielectric layers obtained via dissolution in high dipole moment and high-k solvents -- PC and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), is demonstrated to be a robust means of achieving improved electrical characteristics and high operational stability in OFETs incorporating PVP and c-PVP dielectrics.

  3. Giant Faraday effect due to Pauli exclusion principle in 3D topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Hari P; Leuenberger, Michael N

    2014-02-26

    Experiments using ARPES, which is based on the photoelectric effect, show that the surface states in 3D topological insulators (TI) are helical. Here we consider Weyl interface fermions due to band inversion in narrow-bandgap semiconductors, such as Pb1-xSnxTe. The positive and negative energy solutions can be identified by means of opposite helicity in terms of the spin helicity operator in 3D TI as ĥ(TI) = (1/ |p|_ |) β (σ|_ x p|_ ) · z^, where β is a Dirac matrix and z^ points perpendicular to the interface. Using the 3D Dirac equation and bandstructure calculations we show that the transitions between positive and negative energy solutions, giving rise to electron-hole pairs, obey strict optical selection rules. In order to demonstrate the consequences of these selection rules, we consider the Faraday effect due to the Pauli exclusion principle in a pump-probe setup using a 3D TI double interface of a PbTe/Pb₀.₃₁Sn₀.₆₉Te/PbTe heterostructure. For that we calculate the optical conductivity tensor of this heterostructure, which we use to solve Maxwell's equations. The Faraday rotation angle exhibits oscillations as a function of probe wavelength and thickness of the heterostructure. The maxima in the Faraday rotation angle are of the order of mrds.

  4. Long-term radiation effects on commercial cable-insulating materials irradiated at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, P.; Stolarz, A.

    1983-01-01

    Long-term irradiation damage tests have been carried out on a variety of flexible cable-insulating materials offered to CERN by different European cable manufacturers. Tensile test specimens were exposed for a maximum of three years in high-level radiation areas of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and for comparison at high dose rates in a nuclear reactor. The degradation of mechanical properties after irradiation in air depends not only on the total absorbed dose, but also on the dose rate for most of these polymer compounds. These dose-rate effects vary between material types and for different compounds. The results presented here illustrate the difference in radiation damage between short-term and long-term irradiation conditions in a typical service application for the various materials tested. They also allow safety factors to be estimated for the extrapolation of the limiting exposure in service from accelerated material tests in the range of dose rates covered. A discussion of the available models of the dose-rate effects results in a conservative estimate for extrapolation to low dose rates from measured values at intermediate dose rates of the order of 0.1 Gy/s. Based on short-term irradiation tests only, the safety factors to be applied depend on the end-point criterion used, and may vary between 1 and 10 for the range of dose rates and materials considered here. (orig.)

  5. Thermodynamics of strong coupling superconductors including the effect of anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daams, J. M.; Carbotte, J. P.

    1981-05-01

    The thermodynamics of several elemental superconductors is computed from isotropic Eliashberg theory formulated on the imaginary frequency axis. A symmary of the available experimental literature is presented and a comparison with theory is given. The small disagreements that are found are all in the direction expected from anisotropy effects. We calculate the effect of a small amount of model anisotropy on the critical temperature, critical field, and high-temperature specific heat from an exact solution of the anisotropic Eliashberg equations. These are the first such results below the critical temperature; unlike previous analytical work, we include retardation, anisotropy in the mass enhancement, and the effect of the Coulomb repulsion in enhancing anisotropy, all of which are significant. We derive a new formula independent of any model anisotropy for the rate of decrease with impurity lifetime of the critical temperature. Finally we demonstrate how the commonly used formulas of Markowitz and Kadanoff and of Clem may give entirely misleading estimates of the gap anisotropy when used to interpret certain experiments.

  6. Effect of strong fragrance on olfactory detection threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasunla, Ayotunde James; Douglas, David Dayo; Adeosun, Aderemi Adeleke; Steinbach, Silke; Nwaorgu, Onyekwere George Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    To assess the olfactory threshold of healthy volunteers at the University College Hospital, Ibadan and to investigate the effect of perfume on their olfactory detection thresholds. A quasi-experimental study on olfactory detection thresholds of healthy volunteers from September 2013 to November 2013. Tertiary health institution. A structured questionniare was administered to the participants in order to obtain information on sociodemographics, occupation, ability to perceive smell, use of perfume, effects of perfume on appetite and self-confidence, history of allergy, and previous nasal surgery. Participants subjectively rated their olfactory performance. Subsequently, they had olfactory detection threshold testing done at baseline and after exposure to perfume with varied concentrations of n-butanol in a forced triple response and staircase fashion. Healthy volunteers, 37 males and 63 females, were evaluated. Their ages ranged from 19 to 59 years with a mean of 31 years ± 8. Subjectively, 94% of the participants had excellent olfactory function. In the pre-exposure forced triple response, 88% were able to detect the odor at ≤.25 mmol/l concentration while in the post-exposure forced triple response, only 66% were able to detect the odor at ≤.25 mmol/l concentration. There is also a statistical significant difference in the olfactory detection threshold score between the pre-exposure and post-exposure period in the participants (P fragrances affects the olfactory detection threshold. Therefore patients and clinicians should be aware of this and its effects on the outcome of test of olfaction. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  7. Effect of cadmium doping on some properties of glass-insulated bismuth-based microwires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meglei, D.; Dyntu, M.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: According to the literature, semiconductor converters based on films and wire crystals are widely used in present-day microelectronics. However, the production of efficient semiconductor converters requires crystals of high structural perfection with a given composition and desired electrical and mechanical properties. In this work, we describe the study of the perfection of the microstructure and mechanical properties of glass-insulated microwires based on Bi doped with cadmium (Cd) and the technique of preparation of micro resistors suitable for instrumentation applications. Microscopic studies of ground, polished, and chemically etched microwires doped with cadmium showed that they have smooth cylindrical surfaces in the entire range of diameters. Sizes of defects in the form of micropores, microcracks, dislocations, and twins on their surface are much smaller than those of pure bismuth microwire. It is also found that the tendency to twinning and the number and size of surface defects decrease with decreasing diameters; at the same time, their homogeneity increases. The tensile strength of the studied microwires with glass insulation is high for all tested diameters and ranges within 33.274.1 kg/mm with respect to internal diameters of 5.6 21.2 m; in addition, they withstand a breaking force up to 130 g and more, whereas the samples of pure bismuth microwires withstood a force up to 80 g. It is also found that the tensile strength of cadmium doped microwires is significantly higher than that of undoped samples. The bending strength as a measure of elasticity was determined using a special installation according to the critical bending radius of the sample at which the sample integrity is violated. The results of bending tests showed that, with increasing diameter of the doped samples, the critical radius linearly increases; that is, in this case, the elasticity increases with decreasing diameter. Metallographic analysis revealed that cadmium in the

  8. The Use of Ferroelectrics and Dipeptides as Insulators in Organic Field-Effect Transistor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knotts, Grant

    While the electrical transport characteristics of organic electronic devices are generally inferior to their inorganic counterparts, organic materials offer many advantages over inorganics. The materials used in organic devices can often be deposited using cheap and simple processing techniques such as spincoating, inkjet printing, or roll-to-roll processing; allow for large-scale, flexible devices; and can have the added benefits of being transparent or biodegradable. In this manuscript, we examine the role of solvents in the performance of pentacene-based devices using the ferroelectric copolymer polyvinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene (PVDF-TrFe) as a gate insulating layer. High dipole moment solvents, such as dimethyl sulfoxide, used to dissolve the copolymer for spincoating increase the charge carrier mobility in field-effect transistors (FETs) by nearly an order of magnitude as compared to lower dipole moment solvents. The polarization in Al/PVDF-TrFe/Au metal-ferroelectric-metal devices also shows an increase in remnant polarization of 20% in the sample using dimethyl sulfoxide as the solvent for the ferroelectric. Interestingly, at low applied electric fields of 100 MV/m a remnant polarization is seen in the high dipole moment device that is nearly 3.5 times larger than the value observed in the lower dipole moment samples, suggesting that the degree of dipolar order is higher at low operating voltages for the high dipole moment device. We will also discuss the use of peptide-based nanostructures derived from natural amino acids as building blocks for biocompatible devices. These peptides can be used in a bottom-up process without the need for expensive lithography. Thin films of L,L-diphenylalanine micro/nanostructures (FF-MNSs) were used as the dielectric layer in pentacene-based FETs and metal-insulator-semiconductor diodes both in bottom-gate and top-gate structures. It is demonstrated that the FFMNSs can be functionalized for detection of enzyme

  9. Strong crystal field effect in ? - optical absorption study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Z.; Krupa, J. C.

    1998-12-01

    =-1 Results of optical absorption measurements in polarized light on tetravalent neptunium diluted in a 0953-8984/10/50/021/img6 single crystal are reported. The recorded spectra are complex, pointing to the presence of an 0953-8984/10/50/021/img7 impurity. The electronic transitions assigned to the 0953-8984/10/50/021/img8 ion are interpreted in terms of the usual model, following the actual understanding of the neptunium electronic structure and independent theoretical predictions. R.m.s. deviations of the order of 0953-8984/10/50/021/img9 have been obtained for 42 levels fitted with 11 free parameters. The crystal field effect resulting from the fitting is considerably larger than that observed for the uranium ion in the same host.

  10. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durston, J.G.; Birch, W.; Facer, R.I.; Stuart, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors. In the arrangement described the reactor vessel is clad with thermal insulation comprising a layer of insulating blocks spaced from the wall and from each other; each block is rigidly secured to the wall, and the interspaces are substantially closed against convectional flow of liquid by resilient closure members. A membrane covering is provided for the layer of blocks, with venting means to allow liquid from the reactor vessel to penetrate between the covering and the layer of blocks. The membrane covering may comprise a stainless steel sheet ribbed in orthogonal pattern to give flexibility for the accommodation of thermal strain. The insulating blocks may be comprised of stainless steel or cellular or porous material and may be hollow shells containing ceramic material or gas fillings. (U.K.)

  11. Characterization of a vertically movable gate field effect transistor using a silicon-on-insulator wafer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, In-Hyouk; Forfang, William B. D.; Cole, Bryan; You, Byoung Hee

    2014-10-01

    The vertically movable gate field effect transistor (VMGFET) is a FET-based sensing element, whose gate moves in a vertical direction over the channel. A VMGFET gate covers the region between source and drain. A 1 μm thick air layer separates the gate and the substrate of the VMGFET. A novel fabrication process to form a VMGFET using a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer provides minimal internal stress of the gate structure. The enhancement-type n-channel VMGFET is fabricated with the threshold voltage of 2.32 V in steady state. A non-inverting amplifier is designed and integrated on a printable circuit board (PCB) to characterize device sensitivity and mechanical properties. The VMGFET is mechanically coupled to a speaker membrane to apply mechanical vibration. The oscillated drain current of FET are monitored and sampled with NI LabVIEW. The frequency of the output signal correlates with that of the input stimulus. The resonance frequency of the fabricated VMGFET is measured to be 1.11 kHz. The device sensitivity linearly increases by 0.106 mV/g Hz in the range of 150 Hz and 1 kHz.

  12. Characterization of a vertically movable gate field effect transistor using a silicon-on-insulator wafer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, In-Hyouk; Forfang, William B D; Cole, Bryan; Hee You, Byoung

    2014-01-01

    The vertically movable gate field effect transistor (VMGFET) is a FET-based sensing element, whose gate moves in a vertical direction over the channel. A VMGFET gate covers the region between source and drain. A 1 μm thick air layer separates the gate and the substrate of the VMGFET. A novel fabrication process to form a VMGFET using a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer provides minimal internal stress of the gate structure. The enhancement-type n-channel VMGFET is fabricated with the threshold voltage of 2.32 V in steady state. A non-inverting amplifier is designed and integrated on a printable circuit board (PCB) to characterize device sensitivity and mechanical properties. The VMGFET is mechanically coupled to a speaker membrane to apply mechanical vibration. The oscillated drain current of FET are monitored and sampled with NI LabVIEW. The frequency of the output signal correlates with that of the input stimulus. The resonance frequency of the fabricated VMGFET is measured to be 1.11 kHz. The device sensitivity linearly increases by 0.106 mV/g Hz in the range of 150 Hz and 1 kHz. (paper)

  13. Local sensor based on nanowire field effect transistor from inhomogeneously doped silicon on insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presnov, Denis E.; Bozhev, Ivan V.; Miakonkikh, Andrew V.; Simakin, Sergey G.; Trifonov, Artem S.; Krupenin, Vladimir A.

    2018-02-01

    We present the original method for fabricating a sensitive field/charge sensor based on field effect transistor (FET) with a nanowire channel that uses CMOS-compatible processes only. A FET with a kink-like silicon nanowire channel was fabricated from the inhomogeneously doped silicon on insulator wafer very close (˜100 nm) to the extremely sharp corner of a silicon chip forming local probe. The single e-beam lithographic process with a shadow deposition technique, followed by separate two reactive ion etching processes, was used to define the narrow semiconductor nanowire channel. The sensors charge sensitivity was evaluated to be in the range of 0.1-0.2 e /√{Hz } from the analysis of their transport and noise characteristics. The proposed method provides a good opportunity for the relatively simple manufacture of a local field sensor for measuring the electrical field distribution, potential profiles, and charge dynamics for a wide range of mesoscopic objects. Diagnostic systems and devices based on such sensors can be used in various fields of physics, chemistry, material science, biology, electronics, medicine, etc.

  14. Determination of the Thermal Insulation for the Model Building Approach and the Global Effects in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Onan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important considerations to be considered in the design of energy efficient buildings is the thickness of the insulation to be applied to the building. In this study the existing building stock in Turkey has been investigated depending on parameters such as the height and the area. A model building has been created covering all of these buildings. Fuel emission reduction of combustion system was calculated in the case of insulation applied to this model building. Heat loss of the existing building stock and exhaust emissions and the contribution to the country's economy with the model building methodology are also determined. The results show that the optimum insulation thicknesses vary between 3.21 and 7.12 cm, the energy savings vary between 9.23 US$/m2 and43.95 US$/m2, and the payback periods vary between 1 and 8.8 years depending on the regions. As a result of the study when the optimum insulation thickness is applied in the model building, the total energy savings for the country are calculated to be 41.7 billion US$. And also total CO2 emissions for the country are calculated to be 57.2 billion kg CO2 per year after insulation.

  15. Insulation effect on thermal stability of Coated Conductors wires in liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubeli, Thomas; Dutoit, Bertrand; Martynova, Irina; Makarevich, Artem; Molodyk, Alexander; Samoilenkov, Sergey

    2017-02-01

    Superconducting wires are not perfectly homogeneous in term of critical current as well as stabilization. In resistive fault current limiter applications this could lead to hot spots if the fault current is only slightly above the nominal current of the device. Increasing stabilization by using thicker silver coating for example may prevent this problem but this method implies longer wire length to maintain the same impedance during a fault. Very efficient cooling in another way to prevent hot spots, this can be achieved in nucleate boiling regime. Optimal insulation can be used to prevent film boiling regime, staying in nucleate boiling regime in a much broader temperature range. In this work a novel technique is used to monitor in real time the temperature of the wire during the quench. Using this method several increasing insulation thicknesses are tested, measuring for each the heat exchange rate to the nitrogen bath. Exchange rate measurements are made in quasistatic regime and during the re-cooling of the wire. SuperOx wires provided with different insulation thicknesses exhibit an excellent stability, far above a bare wire. On the other side, for very thick insulations the stability gain is lost. Re-cooling speeds dependency on insulation thicknesses is measured too.

  16. Substitution effect on metal-insulator transition of K2V8O16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Masahiko; Koishi, Shigenori; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Yamaura, Jun-ichi; Gotou, Hirotada; Yagi, Takehiko; Ueda, Yutaka

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the substitution of various ions on the metal-insulator (MI) transition at 170 K in K 2 V 8 O 16 has been investigated. Both Rb and Ti form complete solid solution systems: K 2-x Rb x V 8 O 16 and K 2 V 8-y Ti y O 16 , respectively. The substitution of Rb for K or of Ti for V splits the transition into two transitions: the high-temperature transition is a first-order MI transition from a tetragonal structure to a tetragonal structure, and the low-temperature transition is a second-order transition to a monoclinic structure. In K 2-x Rb x V 8 O 16 , the former terminates to an MI transition at around 220 K in Rb 2 V 8 O 16 , while the latter disappears at x > 0.6. In K 2 V 8-y Ti y O 16 , both transitions disappear at y > 0.5. The substitution of Cr for V also results in a similar splitting of the transition and the rapid disappearance of both transitions. The substitution of Na or Ba for K suppresses the MI transition without any splitting of the transition, although the solubility of both ions is limited. These substitution effects reveal that the MI transition of K 2 V 8 O 16 consists of two parts: a first-order MI transition and a parasitic second-order structural transition; the substitution of some ions causes a clear splitting of these transitions, probably due to the difference between the chemical pressure effects on the two transitions. The first-order MI transition is very sensitive to charge randomness, suggesting the charge ordering nature of the MI transition, while the second-order structural transition is very sensitive to both charge and structural randomnesses. (author)

  17. Effect of oxygen in the simulated LOCA environments of the degradation of cable insulating materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusuma, Y.; Okada, S.; Itoh, M.; Yagi, T.; Yoshikawa, M.; Yoshida, K.; Machi, S.; Tamura, N.; Kawakami, W.

    1990-01-01

    Five kinds of insulating and jacketing materials for the cables used in nuclear power plants were exposed to various LOCA environments of both simultaneous and sequential methods using SEAMATE-II. Experimental conditions of the simultaneous LOCA tests were done at different radiation dose rate, steam temperature and amount of air added to the LOCA environments. The sequential tests consist of two stages, that is, pre-irradiation and subsequent steam/spray exposure. Pre-irradiation conditions and subsequent steam/spray exposure conditions of the sequential LOCA tests are systematically changed in order to find appropriate conditions which can bring about the degradation of same degree to those obtained for various simultaneous LOCA simulations. Tensile properties, insulating resistance and water sorption of the insulating materials exposed to various LOCA environments are measured and discussed. (author). 11 refs, 19 figs, 3 tabs

  18. The effects of fillers on polyurethane resin-based electrical insulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altafim Ruy Alberto Corrêa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasingly widespread use of polymeric insulators in vehicle distributors and transmission systems has led to an ongoing quest for quality and low costs. This quest has, in turn, resulted in improved performance and cost benefits, brought about by the use of new polymeric and composite resins. Occasionally, however, while some properties are improved, others may show a loss of optimal performance. Therefore, to understand the behavior of fillers, such as carbon black, silica and mica added to castor oil-derived polyurethane resins, several thermal, mechanical and electrical tests were conducted on samples and insulators produced specifically for this purpose, using these new materials. The results of these tests clearly demonstrated that this type of resin and its composites can be used to manufacture indoor electrical insulators and that the fillers analyzed in this study improve or maintain the characteristics of the pure resins.

  19. Effects of micro-water on decomposition of the environment-friendly insulating medium C5F10O

    OpenAIRE

    Song Xiao; Yi Li; Xiaoxing Zhang; Shuangshuang Tian; Zaitao Deng; Ju Tang

    2017-01-01

    SF6 is widely used in all kinds of high-voltage electrical equipment because of its excellent insulation and arc-extinguishing performance. However, this compound leads to serious greenhouse effect, which harms the environment. Many research institutions are now actively in search of SF6 alternative gas. C5F10O has attracted much attention as an alternative gas with low global warming potential (GWP) and excellent dielectric strength. In this paper, we analyzed the possible decomposition path...

  20. Poole Frenkel current and Schottky emission in SiN gate dielectric in AlGaN/GaN metal insulator semiconductor heterostructure field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Mina J.; Zhao, Han; Lee, Jack C.

    2012-10-01

    We analyze the anomalous I-V behavior in SiN prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition for use as a gate insulator in AlGaN/GaN metal insulator semiconductor heterostructure filed effect transistors (HFETs). We observe leakage current across the dielectric with opposite polarity with respect to the applied electric field once the voltage sweep reaches a level below a determined threshold. This is observed as the absolute minimum of the leakage current does not occur at minimum voltage level (0 V) but occurs earlier in the sweep interval. Curve-fitting analysis suggests that the charge-transport mechanism in this region is Poole-Frenkel current, followed by Schottky emission due to band bending. Despite the current anomaly, the sample devices have shown a notable reduction of leakage current of over 2 to 6 order of magnitudes compared to the standard Schottky HFET. We show that higher pressures and higher silane concentrations produce better films manifesting less trapping. This conforms to our results that we reported in earlier publications. We found that higher chamber pressure achieves higher sheet carrier concentration that was found to be strongly dependent on the trapped space charge at the SiN/GaN interface. This would suggest that a lower chamber pressure induces more trap states into the SiN/GaN interface.

  1. Tunneling Planar Hall Effect in Topological Insulators: Spin Valves and Amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Benedikt; Matos-Abiague, Alex; Han, Jong E; Hankiewicz, Ewelina M; Žutić, Igor

    2016-10-14

    We investigate tunneling across a single ferromagnetic barrier on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator. In the presence of a magnetization component along the bias direction, a tunneling planar Hall conductance (TPHC), transverse to the applied bias, develops. Electrostatic control of the barrier enables a giant Hall angle, with the TPHC exceeding the longitudinal tunneling conductance. By changing the in-plane magnetization direction, it is possible to change the sign of both the longitudinal and transverse differential conductance without opening a gap in the topological surface state. The transport in a topological-insulator-ferromagnet junction can, thus, be drastically altered from a simple spin valve to an amplifier.

  2. Thermal resistances of air in cavity walls and their effect upon the thermal insulation performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekkouche, S.M.A.; Cherier, M.K.; Hamdani, M.; Benamrane, N. [Application of Renewable Energies in Arid and Semi Arid Environments /Applied Research Unit on Renewable Energies/ EPST Development Center of Renewable Energies, URAER and B.P. 88, ZI, Gart Taam Ghardaia (Algeria); Benouaz, T. [University of Tlemcen, BP. 119, Tlemcen R.p. 13000 (Algeria); Yaiche, M.R. [Development Center of Renewable Energies, CDER and B.P 62, 16340, Route de l' Observatoire, Bouzareah, Algiers (Algeria)

    2013-07-01

    The optimum thickness in cavity walls in buildings is determined under steady conditions; the heat transfer has been calculated according to ISO 15099:2003. Two forms of masonry units are investigated to conclude the advantage of high thermal emissivity. The paper presents also some results from a study of the thermal insulation performance of air cavities bounded by thin reflective material layer 'eta = 0.05'. The results show that the most economical cavity configuration depends on the thermal emissivity and the insulation material used.

  3. Effect of static charge fluctuations on the conduction along the edge of two-dimensional topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayrynen, Jukka; Goldstein, Moshe; Glazman, Leonid

    2013-03-01

    Static charge disorder may create electron puddles in the bulk of a material which nominally is in the insulating state. A single puddle - quantum dot - coupled to the helical edge of a two-dimensional topological insulator enhances the electron backscattering within the edge. The backscattering rate increases with the electron dwelling time in the dot. While remaining inelastic, the backscattering off a dot may be far more effective than the proposed earlier inelastic processes involving a local scatterer with no internal structure. We find the temperature dependence of the dot-induced correction to the universal conductance of the edge. In addition to the single-dot effect, we calculate the classical temperature-independent conductance correction caused by a weakly conducting bulk. We use our theory to assess the effect of static charge fluctuations in a heterostructure on the edge electron transport in a two-dimensional topological insulator. The work at Yale University is supported by NSF DMR Grant No. 1206612 and the Simons Foundation.

  4. A method to restrain the charging effect on an insulating substrate in high energy electron beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingyan, Yu; Shirui, Zhao; Yupeng, Jing; Yunbo, Shi; Baoqin, Chen

    2014-12-01

    Pattern distortions caused by the charging effect should be reduced while using the electron beam lithography process on an insulating substrate. We have developed a novel process by using the SX AR-PC 5000/90.1 solution as a spin-coated conductive layer, to help to fabricate nanoscale patterns of poly-methyl-methacrylate polymer resist on glass for phased array device application. This method can restrain the influence of the charging effect on the insulating substrate effectively. Experimental results show that the novel process can solve the problems of the distortion of resist patterns and electron beam main field stitching error, thus ensuring the accuracy of the stitching and overlay of the electron beam lithography system. The main characteristic of the novel process is that it is compatible to the multi-layer semiconductor process inside a clean room, and is a green process, quite simple, fast, and low cost. It can also provide a broad scope in the device development on insulating the substrate, such as high density biochips, flexible electronics and liquid crystal display screens.

  5. Effect of the Ignition Method on the Extinction Limit for a Flame Spreading over Electric Wire Insulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitsui, Fumiya; Nagachi, Masashi; Citerne, Jean-Marie

    . The experimental results show that the LOC of NiCr core wires assume an almost constant value under normal gravity conditions once ignition occurred, whereas under microgravity conditions, the LOC gradually decreases as the ignition power or heating time increases and eventually it reaches an almost constant value......Flame spread experiments with wire insulation were conducted in microgravity (parabolic flights) and in normal gravity to understand the effect of the ignition condition on the Limiting Oxygen Concentration (LOC) for an opposed air flow condition of 100 mm/s (typical flow velocity on ISS). Both...... the ignition power (50-110 W) and the igniter heating time (5-15 s) were varied. Polyethylene-coated Nickel-Chrome or copper wires with inner core diameter of 0.50 mm and insulation thickness of 0.30 mm were used as sample wires, and a 0.50 mm diameter coiled Kanthal wire was used as the igniter...

  6. Analysis of aluminum base-reaction effect in density, porosity, and thermal insulation of porous fire bricks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wismogroho, Agus Sukarto; Firmansyah, Trisna Bagus; Meidianto, Alwi; Widayatno, Wahyu Bambang; Amal, Muhamad Ikhlasul

    2018-05-01

    This paper reports the effect of aluminium corrosion reaction on the density, porosity, and thermal insulation capability of porous fire bricks. The reaction between aluminium and alkaline solution produces hydrogen and other sediment products. The test specimens of fire bricks were made from the mixture of castable cement, aluminium powder of 325 mesh in size (0, 0.1, 1, and 2 wt% with respect to castable cement), and 0.185 M KOH solution. The structural examination of the specimens shows the increase of porosity to 22.7 - 30.6% and the decrease of density in the range of 1.135-1.503 g/mL. In addition, the samples possess average pore size of 0.001-0.003 cm3 with the thermal insulation in the range of 47-78%.

  7. Stability of low-carrier-density topological-insulator Bi2Se3 thin films and effect of capping layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, Maryam; Brahlek, Matthew; Koirala, Nikesh; Moon, Jisoo; Oh, Seongshik; Wu, Liang; Armitage, N. P.

    2015-01-01

    Although over the past number of years there have been many advances in the materials aspects of topological insulators (TIs), one of the ongoing challenges with these materials is the protection of them against aging. In particular, the recent development of low-carrier-density bulk-insulating Bi 2 Se 3 thin films and their sensitivity to air demands reliable capping layers to stabilize their electronic properties. Here, we study the stability of the low-carrier-density Bi 2 Se 3 thin films in air with and without various capping layers using DC and THz probes. Without any capping layers, the carrier density increases by ∼150% over a week and by ∼280% over 9 months. In situ-deposited Se and ex situ-deposited poly(methyl methacrylate) suppress the aging effect to ∼27% and ∼88%, respectively, over 9 months. The combination of effective capping layers and low-carrier-density TI films will open up new opportunities in topological insulators

  8. The effect of nanoparticle surfactant polarization on trapping depth of vegetable insulating oil-based nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian, E-mail: lijian@cqu.edu.cn; Du, Bin; Wang, Feipeng; Yao, Wei; Yao, Shuhan

    2016-02-05

    Nanoparticles can generate charge carrier trapping and reduce the velocity of streamer development in insulating oils ultimately leading to an enhancement of the breakdown voltage of insulating oils. Vegetable insulating oil-based nanofluids with three sizes of monodispersed Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were prepared and their trapping depths were measured by thermally stimulated method (TSC). It is found that the nanoparticle surfactant polarization can significantly influence the trapping depth of vegetable insulating oil-based nanofluids. A nanoparticle polarization model considering surfactant polarization was proposed to calculate the trapping depth of the nanofluids at different nanoparticle sizes and surfactant thicknesses. The results show the calculated values of the model are in a fairly good agreement with the experimental values. - Highlights: • Three different sized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} vegetable-oil based nanofluids was successfully prepared. • The trapping depth of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanofluids was investigated. • A new model considering surfactant polarization was proposed to calculate the trapping depth of the nanofluids.

  9. The Effect of Moisture and Fungus on Electrical and Mechanical Properties of Plastic Insulating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1945-10-01

    0110 106 280000 46000 7.6 30000 6.2 27000 4.2 24000 1.2 10000 Samples and eleotrode arrangement were humidity exposure tests« aa...VARIOUS INSULATING MATERIALS TEMPERATURE 25°C.; RELATIVE HUMIDITY 979b; EXCEPT WHERE NOTED OTHERWISE 140 160 ISO 200 220 240 260 270

  10. Describing a Strongly Correlated Model System with Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jing; Proynov, Emil; Yu, Jianguo; Pachter, Ruth

    2017-07-06

    The linear chain of hydrogen atoms, a basic prototype for the transition from a metal to Mott insulator, is studied with a recent density functional theory model functional for nondynamic and strong correlation. The computed cohesive energy curve for the transition agrees well with accurate literature results. The variation of the electronic structure in this transition is characterized with a density functional descriptor that yields the atomic population of effectively localized electrons. These new methods are also applied to the study of the Peierls dimerization of the stretched even-spaced Mott insulator to a chain of H 2 molecules, a different insulator. The transitions among the two insulating states and the metallic state of the hydrogen chain system are depicted in a semiquantitative phase diagram. Overall, we demonstrate the capability of studying strongly correlated materials with a mean-field model at the fundamental level, in contrast to the general pessimistic view on such a feasibility.

  11. Emerging Trends in Topological Insulators and Topological ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    /fulltext/reso/022/08/0787-0800. Keywords. Superconductor, quantum Hall effect, topological insulator, Majorana fermions. Abstract. Topological insulators are new class of materials which arecharacterized by a bulk band gap like ordinary ...

  12. Effects of reductive annealing on insulating polycrystalline thin films of Nb-doped anatase TiO2: recovery of high conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Shoichiro; Hirose, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    We studied the effects of reductive annealing on insulating polycrystalline thin films of anatase Nb-doped TiO 2 (TNO). The insulating TNO films were intentionally fabricated by annealing conductive TNO films in oxygen ambient at 400 °C. Reduced free carrier absorption in the insulating TNO films indicated carrier compensation due to excess oxygen. With H 2 -annealing, both carrier density and Hall mobility recovered to the level of conducting TNO, demonstrating that the excess oxygen can be efficiently removed by the annealing process without introducing additional scattering centers. (paper)

  13. Effect of resin composition to the electrical and mechanical properties of high voltage insulator material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totok Dermawan; Elin Nuraini; Suyamto

    2012-01-01

    A solid insulator manufacture of resins for high voltage with a variation of resin and hardener composition has been made. The purpose of research to know electrical and mechanical properties of high voltage insulator material of resin. To determine its electric properties, the material is tested its breakdown voltage and the flashover voltage that occurred on the surface. While to determine the mechanical properties were tested by measuring its strength with a tensile test. From testing with variety of mixed composition it is known that for composition between hardener and resin of 1 : 800 has most advantageous properties because it has good strength with a tensile strength of 19.86 MPa and enough high dielectric strength of 43.2 kV / mm). (author)

  14. Neutron and gamma irradiation effects on organic insulating materials for fusion magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, W.

    1985-10-01

    Available low-temperature neutron and gamma irradiation data for organic insulating materials are collected and compared with room temperature data. Only the most promising polymers in terms of mechanical strength for magnet insulation are taken into account. For characterization and comparison of different materials the 75% dose is used, i.e. the dose, where the mechanical strength is reduced by 25%, and 75% is retained. For room temperature special prepared polyimide and epoxy materials reinforced with glass fibre retained 75% of the mechanical strength up to a dose of 7x10 7 Gy. For 5 K irradiation the best epoxy material retained the 75% dose up to 1x10 7 Gy, the best polyimide material up to 1x10 8 Gy. (orig.) [de

  15. Tetradymites as thermoelectrics and topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heremans, Joseph P.; Cava, Robert J.; Samarth, Nitin

    2017-10-01

    Tetradymites are M2X3 compounds — in which M is a group V metal, usually Bi or Sb, and X is a group VI anion, Te, Se or S — that crystallize in a rhombohedral structure. Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 are archetypical tetradymites. Other mixtures of M and X elements produce common variants, such as Bi2Te2Se. Because tetradymites are based on heavy p-block elements, strong spin-orbit coupling greatly influences their electronic properties, both on the surface and in the bulk. Their surface electronic states are a cornerstone of frontier work on topological insulators. The bulk energy bands are characterized by small energy gaps, high group velocities, small effective masses and band inversion near the centre of the Brillouin zone. These properties are favourable for high-efficiency thermoelectric materials but make it difficult to obtain an electrically insulating bulk, which is a requirement of topological insulators. This Review outlines recent progress made in bulk and thin-film tetradymite materials for the optimization of their properties both as thermoelectrics and as topological insulators.

  16. Effect of artificial aging on polymeric surge arresters and polymer insulators for electricity distribution networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to evaluate new and laboratory-aged samples of surge arresters and anchorage polymeric insulators, for 12 and 24 kV networks, which are used by the Rio Grande Energia (RGE. Power Utility Polymeric compounds were analyzed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TG, Dynamic-Mechanic Analysis (DMA, Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM to verify changes in the insulator properties due to degradation occurred during the experiments. The analyses were carried out before and after 6 months of aging in laboratory devices (weatherometer, 120 °C, salt spray, immersion in water. After the aging experiments, high-voltage electrical tests were also conducted: a radio interference voltage test and, simultaneously, the total and the internal leakage currents were measured to verify the surface degradation of the polymeric material used in the housing. The impulse current test was applied with current values close to 5, 10 and 30 kA, in order to force an internal degradation. Results showed that only surface degradation is detected at the polymer. The main properties of the parts were not affected by the aging. It confirms that polymer insulator and surge arrestor are appropriate for use in electricity distribution networks.

  17. Effect of artificial aging on polymeric surge arresters and polymer insulators for electricity distribution networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Carlos A.; Coser, E. [Laboratorio de Materiais Polimericos, Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)], e-mail: ferreira.carlos@ufrgs.br; Angelini, Joceli M.G. [Departamento de Materiais Eletricos, CPqD, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Rossi, Jose A.D. [Materiais Alta Tensao, CPqD, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Martinez, Manuel L.B. [Departamento de Engenharia Eletrica, UNIFEI, Itajuba, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate new and laboratory-aged samples of surge arresters and anchorage polymeric insulators, for 12 and 24 kV networks, which are used by the Rio Grande Energia (RGE). Power utility polymeric compounds were analyzed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TG), Dynamic-Mechanic Analysis (DMA), Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) to verify changes in the insulator properties due to degradation occurred during the experiments. The analyses were carried out before and after 6 months of aging in laboratory devices (weather meter, 120 deg C, salt spray, immersion in water). After the aging experiments, high-voltage electrical tests were also conducted: a radio interference voltage test and, simultaneously, the total and the internal leakage currents were measured to verify the surface degradation of the polymeric material used in the housing. The impulse current test was applied with current values close to 5, 10 and 30 k A, in order to force an internal degradation. Results showed that only surface degradation is detected at the polymer. The main properties of the parts were not affected by the aging. It confirms that polymer insulator and surge arrester are appropriate for use in electricity distribution networks. (author)

  18. Ambipolar field effect in the ternary topological insulator (BixSb1–x)2Te3 by composition tuning

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, Desheng

    2011-10-02

    Topological insulators exhibit a bulk energy gap and spin-polarized surface states that lead to unique electronic properties 1-9, with potential applications in spintronics and quantum information processing. However, transport measurements have typically been dominated by residual bulk charge carriers originating from crystal defects or environmental doping 10-12, and these mask the contribution of surface carriers to charge transport in these materials. Controlling bulk carriers in current topological insulator materials, such as the binary sesquichalcogenides Bi 2Te 3, Sb 2Te 3 and Bi 2Se 3, has been explored extensively by means of material doping 8,9,11 and electrical gating 13-16, but limited progress has been made to achieve nanostructures with low bulk conductivity for electronic device applications. Here we demonstrate that the ternary sesquichalcogenide (Bi xSb 1-x) 2Te 3 is a tunable topological insulator system. By tuning the ratio of bismuth to antimony, we are able to reduce the bulk carrier density by over two orders of magnitude, while maintaining the topological insulator properties. As a result, we observe a clear ambipolar gating effect in (Bi xSb 1-x) 2Te 3 nanoplate field-effect transistor devices, similar to that observed in graphene field-effect transistor devices 17. The manipulation of carrier type and density in topological insulator nanostructures demonstrated here paves the way for the implementation of topological insulators in nanoelectronics and spintronics. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  19. Total heat loss coefficient of flat roof constructions with external insulation in tapered layers including the effects of thermal bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    In order to achieve durability of flat roofs with external insulation, it is necessary to secure proper drainage of the roof, i.e. to avoid water leaking into the insulation. The design of the tapered insulation of the roof is quite difficult as requirements with respect to both drainage...

  20. Effect of electric field in the characterization of pultruded GFRP boron-free composite insulator for the extra high voltage by the ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Hissae; Silva Junior, Edmilson Jose; Shinohara, Armando Hideki [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Xavier, Gustavo Jose Vasconcelos [CHESF, Recife, PE (Brazil); Costa, Edson Guedes [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Lott Neto, Henrique Batista Duffles Teixeira; Britto, Paulo Roberto Ranzan; Fontan, Marcio A.B. [Sistema de Transmissao do Nordeste S.A., Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: The pultruded boron-free glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite has been widely used material for the electrical insulators in the high, extra and ultra high voltage overhead lines worldwide. In terms of design, the composite insulator has a highly complex geometry and large size. Aging of materials begin as soon as the insulators start their operation due to the strong electric field, mechanical load due to the weight of conductor cables, environment, corona discharge, generation of acids, and as a result, GFRP can fail mechanically by the stress corrosion crack (SCC) and electrical breakdown known as flashover. In order to mitigate the mechanical and electrical failures, the insulators in the field are frequently monitored by visual inspection, infrared thermography, UV detection, variation of measurement of distribution of electric field variation. However, new technologies for characterization and inspection of the composite insulator in the field are required for reliable operation. Imaging characterization using ionizing radiation (X-ray or g-ray) is an interesting technique, however, it can reduce drastically breakdown voltage due to the Townsend discharge, which free electrons are accelerated by an electric field, collide with gas molecules of air, and free additional electrons resulting in an avalanche multiplication that allows an electrical conduction through the air. In this study, in order to evaluate the potential application of ionization radiation for characterization of composite insulator under electric field, testing were conducted in high voltage laboratory by applying voltages up to 640 kV and varying radiation area of the composite insulator. As a result, even though there was an occurrence of flame on Imaging Plate (IP) detector case when it was located near the phase, corona discharge, but no breakdown discharge (flashover) occurred and high quality imaging of radiography could be obtained when X-ray source was employed

  1. Tank Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    For NASA's Apollo program, McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, Huntington Beach, California, developed and built the S-IVB, uppermost stage of the three-stage Saturn V moonbooster. An important part of the development task was fabrication of a tank to contain liquid hydrogen fuel for the stage's rocket engine. The liquid hydrogen had to be contained at the supercold temperature of 423 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. The tank had to be perfectly insulated to keep engine or solar heat from reaching the fuel; if the hydrogen were permitted to warm up, it would have boiled off, or converted to gaseous form, reducing the amount of fuel available to the engine. McDonnell Douglas' answer was a supereffective insulation called 3D, which consisted of a one-inch thickness of polyurethane foam reinforced in three dimensions with fiberglass threads. Over a 13-year development and construction period, the company built 30 tanks and never experienced a failure. Now, after years of additional development, an advanced version of 3D is finding application as part of a containment system for transporting Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) by ship.

  2. Effects of micro-water on decomposition of the environment-friendly insulating medium C5F10O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Xiao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available SF6 is widely used in all kinds of high-voltage electrical equipment because of its excellent insulation and arc-extinguishing performance. However, this compound leads to serious greenhouse effect, which harms the environment. Many research institutions are now actively in search of SF6 alternative gas. C5F10O has attracted much attention as an alternative gas with low global warming potential (GWP and excellent dielectric strength. In this paper, we analyzed the possible decomposition paths of C5F10O under micro-water environment through density functional theory. We also evaluated the ionization parameters and toxicity of the decomposition products. The results show that OH• and H• produced by H2O exhibited a catalytic effect on the decomposition of C5F10O. CF4, C2F6, C3F6, C3F8, C4F10, C5F12, C6F14, C3F7COH, C3F7OH, CF3COH, C3F7H, and CF3OH were produced in the micro-water environment. Based on molecular configuration calculation, the ionization parameters of these products were inferior to perfluorocarbons, such as C3F8, leading to reduced insulation performance of the system. Moreover, CF2O and HF are hazardous to human health and equipment safety. Results will provide a basis for further study of the insulation characteristic of the C5F10O gas mixture under micro-water condition to guide the formulation of their relevant international standards prior to engineering applications.

  3. Effects of micro-water on decomposition of the environment-friendly insulating medium C5F10O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Song; Li, Yi; Zhang, Xiaoxing; Tian, Shuangshuang; Deng, Zaitao; Tang, Ju

    2017-06-01

    SF6 is widely used in all kinds of high-voltage electrical equipment because of its excellent insulation and arc-extinguishing performance. However, this compound leads to serious greenhouse effect, which harms the environment. Many research institutions are now actively in search of SF6 alternative gas. C5F10O has attracted much attention as an alternative gas with low global warming potential (GWP) and excellent dielectric strength. In this paper, we analyzed the possible decomposition paths of C5F10O under micro-water environment through density functional theory. We also evaluated the ionization parameters and toxicity of the decomposition products. The results show that OH• and H• produced by H2O exhibited a catalytic effect on the decomposition of C5F10O. CF4, C2F6, C3F6, C3F8, C4F10, C5F12, C6F14, C3F7COH, C3F7OH, CF3COH, C3F7H, and CF3OH were produced in the micro-water environment. Based on molecular configuration calculation, the ionization parameters of these products were inferior to perfluorocarbons, such as C3F8, leading to reduced insulation performance of the system. Moreover, CF2O and HF are hazardous to human health and equipment safety. Results will provide a basis for further study of the insulation characteristic of the C5F10O gas mixture under micro-water condition to guide the formulation of their relevant international standards prior to engineering applications.

  4. Investigation of magnetically self-insulated effect in an ion diode with an explosive emission potential electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushkarev, A. I.; Isakova, J. I.; Saltimakov, M. S.; Sazonov, R. V.

    2010-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of a magnetically self-insulated effect in an ion diode in bipolar-pulse mode are presented. The investigations were accomplished at the TEMP-4M accelerator by formation of a first negative pulse (100 ns, 150-200 kV) and a second positive pulse (80 ns, 200-300 kV) [G. E. Remnev et al., Surf. Coat. Technol. 114, 206 (1999)]. Plasma behavior in the anode-cathode gap was analyzed according to the current-voltage characteristics of the diode with a time resolution of 0.5 ns. It is shown that during the discrete emissive surface mode, the magnetic field influence on plasma dynamics is slight. During the space charge limitation mode, the current-voltage characteristics of the diode are well-described by the Child-Langmuir ratio. The drift speed of electrons in the diode exceeds 80 mm/ns and the effect of magnetic insulation is insignificant. It was discovered, when plasma formation at the potential electrode is complete and up until the second positive pulse that the plasma speed is constant and equals to 1.3±0.2 cm/μs. After the voltage polarity at the potential electrode changes (second pulse), plasma breakup at the anode-cathode gap takes place. The impedance of the diode begins to increase and, when the total current is more than 30 kA, the diode impedance exceeds the calculated values by more than three times. The energy efficiency and limiting characteristics of the magnetically self-insulated diode are determined.

  5. Electrode Conduction Processes Segmented Electrode-Insulator Ratio Effects in MHD Power Generation Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pain, H. J.; Fearn, D. G.; Distefano, E. [Imperial College. London (United Kingdom)

    1966-10-15

    (a) Electrode conduction processes have been investigated using a plasma produced in an electromagnetic shock tube operating with argon at 70 {mu}mHg pressure. Complete voltage-current characteristics were obtained by the variation of load and applied voltage. These indicated the existence of two conduction regimes with a complex transition region. In the first regime the current, controlled by ion mobility, rose linearly with voltage to saturate between 10 mA and 1 A depending on conditions. Electrode contamination was significant. The second regime involved large currents controlled by electron mobility and emission from the cathode. The current again increased linearly with voltage and reached 200 A. Observation of induced voltages in transverse magnetic fields and of plasma deceleration in non-uniform fields showed that in the electromagnetic shock tube the plasma was heated predominantly by the driver discharge. Its conductivity was calculated using properties measured by a Langmuir double probe. In both regimes the plasma conductivity was also found from the gradient of the voltage current characteristics using experimental electric field fringing factors and the experimental values were compared with theory. (b) Larger-scale experiments used a combustion-driven shock tube where argon plasma flow, magnetic field and induced current flow were mutually orthogonal. The supersonic flow velocity and thermodynamic parameters of the plasma were accurately known. The electrode channel consisted of a segmented system of 12 electrode pairs with an electrode insulator ratio ranging from 1 to 21, with electrode plus insulator length remaining constant, and with maximum Hall parameter values of unity. Different electrode load combinations (Faraday and Hall generators) have been studied in measuring the power generated and the flow of longitudinal currents between adjacent electrodes. A maximum power of 0,8 MW was obtained, the power output decreasing inversely with the

  6. Electrode Conduction Processes Segmented Electrode-Insulator Ratio Effects in MHD Power Generation Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pain, H.J.; Fearn, D.G.; Distefano, E.

    1966-01-01

    (a) Electrode conduction processes have been investigated using a plasma produced in an electromagnetic shock tube operating with argon at 70 μmHg pressure. Complete voltage-current characteristics were obtained by the variation of load and applied voltage. These indicated the existence of two conduction regimes with a complex transition region. In the first regime the current, controlled by ion mobility, rose linearly with voltage to saturate between 10 mA and 1 A depending on conditions. Electrode contamination was significant. The second regime involved large currents controlled by electron mobility and emission from the cathode. The current again increased linearly with voltage and reached 200 A. Observation of induced voltages in transverse magnetic fields and of plasma deceleration in non-uniform fields showed that in the electromagnetic shock tube the plasma was heated predominantly by the driver discharge. Its conductivity was calculated using properties measured by a Langmuir double probe. In both regimes the plasma conductivity was also found from the gradient of the voltage current characteristics using experimental electric field fringing factors and the experimental values were compared with theory. (b) Larger-scale experiments used a combustion-driven shock tube where argon plasma flow, magnetic field and induced current flow were mutually orthogonal. The supersonic flow velocity and thermodynamic parameters of the plasma were accurately known. The electrode channel consisted of a segmented system of 12 electrode pairs with an electrode insulator ratio ranging from 1 to 21, with electrode plus insulator length remaining constant, and with maximum Hall parameter values of unity. Different electrode load combinations (Faraday and Hall generators) have been studied in measuring the power generated and the flow of longitudinal currents between adjacent electrodes. A maximum power of 0,8 MW was obtained, the power output decreasing inversely with the

  7. Effect of pipe insulation losses on a loss-of-heat sink accident for an LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, W.C.; Guppy, J.G.; Wood, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    The efficacy of pipe radiation losses as a heat sink during LOHS in a loop-type LMR plant is investigated. The Super System Code (SSC), which was modified to include pipe radiation losses, was used to simulate such an LOHS in an LMR plant. In order to enhance these losses, the pipes were assumed to be insulated by rock wool, a material whose thermal conductivity increases with increasing temperature. A transient was simulated for a total of eight days, during which the coolant temperatures peaked well below saturation conditions and then declined steadily. The coolant flow rate in the loop remained positive throughout the transient

  8. Impact of high-frequency pumping on anomalous finite-size effects in three-dimensional topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervishko, Anastasiia A.; Yudin, Dmitry; Shelykh, Ivan A.

    2018-02-01

    Lowering of the thickness of a thin-film three-dimensional topological insulator down to a few nanometers results in the gap opening in the spectrum of topologically protected two-dimensional surface states. This phenomenon, which is referred to as the anomalous finite-size effect, originates from hybridization between the states propagating along the opposite boundaries. In this work, we consider a bismuth-based topological insulator and show how the coupling to an intense high-frequency linearly polarized pumping can further be used to manipulate the value of a gap. We address this effect within recently proposed Brillouin-Wigner perturbation theory that allows us to map a time-dependent problem into a stationary one. Our analysis reveals that both the gap and the components of the group velocity of the surface states can be tuned in a controllable fashion by adjusting the intensity of the driving field within an experimentally accessible range and demonstrate the effect of light-induced band inversion in the spectrum of the surface states for high enough values of the pump.

  9. Strain effects in topological insulators: Topological order and the emergence of switchable topological interface states in Sb2Te3/Bi2Te3 heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramberri, H.; Muñoz, M. C.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the effects of strain on the topological order of the Bi2Se3 family of topological insulators by ab initio first-principles methods. Strain can induce a topological phase transition and we present the phase diagram for the 3D topological insulators, Bi2Te3 , Sb2Te3 , Bi2Se3 , and Sb2Se3 , under combined uniaxial and biaxial strain. Their phase diagram is universal and shows metallic and insulating phases, both topologically trivial and nontrivial. In particular, uniaxial tension can drive the four compounds into a topologically trivial insulating phase. We propose a Sb2Te3/Bi2Te3 heterojunction in which a strain-induced topological interface state arises in the common gap of this normal insulator-topological insulator heterojunction. Unexpectedly, the interface state is confined in the topologically trivial subsystem and is physically protected from ambient impurities. It can be switched on or off by means of uniaxial strain and therefore Sb2Te3 /Bi2Te3 heterojunctions provide a topological system which hosts tunable robust helical interface states with promising spintronic applications.

  10. The electro-mechanical effect from charge dynamics on polymeric insulation lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, H.; Chen, G.; Vaughan, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    For polymeric material used as electrical insulation, the presence of space charges could be the consequence of material degradations that are thermally activated but increased by the application of an electric field. The dynamics of space charge, therefore, can be potentially used to characterize the material. In this direction, a new aging model in which parameters have clear physical meanings has been developed and applied to the material to extrapolate the lifetime. The kinetic equation has been established based on charge trapping and detrapping of the injected charge from the electrodes. The local electromechanical energy stored in the region surrounding the trap is able to reduce the trap-depth with a value related to the electric field. At a level where the internal electric field exceeds the detrapping field in the material, an electron can be efficiently detrapped and the released energy from detrapping process can cause a weak bond or chain scission i.e. material degradation. The model has been applied to the electro-thermally aged low density polyethylene film samples, showing well fitted result, as well as interesting relationships between parameter estimates and insulation morphology.

  11. Conductance fluctuations in a macroscopic 3-dimensional Anderson insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanquer, M.

    1990-01-01

    We report magnetoconductance experiment on a amorphous Y x -Si 1-x alloy (∼0.3). which is an Anderson insulator where spin-orbit scattering is strong. Two principal and new features emerge from the data: the first one is an halving of the localization length by the application of a magnetic field of about 2.5 Teslas. This effect is predicted by a new approach of transport in Anderson insulators where basic symetry considerations are the most important ingredient. The second one is the observation of reproducible conductance fluctuations at very low temperature in this macroscopic 3 D amorphous material

  12. High temperature annealing effects on deep-level defects in a high purity semi-insulating 4H-SiC substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Naoya, E-mail: naoya.iwamoto@smn.uio.no; Azarov, Alexander; Svensson, Bengt G. [Department of Physics, Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Ohshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, 370-1292 Gunma (Japan); Moe, Anne Marie M. [Washington Mills AS, N-7300 Orkanger (Norway)

    2015-07-28

    Effects of high-temperature annealing on deep-level defects in a high-purity semi-insulating 4H silicon carbide substrate have been studied by employing current-voltage, capacitance-voltage, junction spectroscopy, and chemical impurity analysis measurements. Secondary ion mass spectrometry data reveal that the substrate contains boron with concentration in the mid 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −3} range, while other impurities including nitrogen, aluminum, titanium, vanadium and chromium are below their detection limits (typically ∼10{sup 14 }cm{sup −3}). Schottky barrier diodes fabricated on substrates annealed at 1400–1700 °C exhibit metal/p-type semiconductor behavior with a current rectification of up to 8 orders of magnitude at bias voltages of ±3 V. With increasing annealing temperature, the series resistance of the Schottky barrier diodes decreases, and the net acceptor concentration in the substrates increases approaching the chemical boron content. Admittance spectroscopy results unveil the presence of shallow boron acceptors and deep-level defects with levels in lower half of the bandgap. After the 1400 °C annealing, the boron acceptor still remains strongly compensated at room temperature by deep donor-like levels located close to mid-gap. However, the latter decrease in concentration with increasing annealing temperature and after 1700 °C, the boron acceptor is essentially uncompensated. Hence, the deep donors are decisive for the semi-insulating properties of the substrates, and their thermal evolution limits the thermal budget for device processing. The origin of the deep donors is not well-established, but substantial evidence supporting an assignment to carbon vacancies is presented.

  13. Spin injection and inverse Edelstein effect in the surface states of topological Kondo insulator SmB6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qi; Mi, Jian; Zhao, Dan; Su, Tang; Yuan, Wei; Xing, Wenyu; Chen, Yangyang; Wang, Tianyu; Wu, Tao; Chen, Xian Hui; Xie, X. C.; Zhang, Chi; Shi, Jing; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in exploiting the spin degrees of freedom of electrons for potential information storage and computing technologies. Topological insulators (TIs), a class of quantum materials, have special gapless edge/surface states, where the spin polarization of the Dirac fermions is locked to the momentum direction. This spin–momentum locking property gives rise to very interesting spin-dependent physical phenomena such as the Edelstein and inverse Edelstein effects. However, the spin injection in pure surface states of TI is very challenging because of the coexistence of the highly conducting bulk states. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the spin injection and observe the inverse Edelstein effect in the surface states of a topological Kondo insulator, SmB6. At low temperatures when only surface carriers are present, a clear spin signal is observed. Furthermore, the magnetic field angle dependence of the spin signal is consistent with spin–momentum locking property of surface states of SmB6. PMID:27834378

  14. Proximity induced ferromagnetism, superconductivity, and finite-size effects on the surface states of topological insulator nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Parijat; Kubis, Tillmann; Tan, Yaohua; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 are well known 3D-topological insulators (TI). Films made of these materials exhibit metal-like surface states with a Dirac dispersion and possess high mobility. The high mobility metal-like surface states can serve as building blocks for a variety of applications that involve tuning their dispersion relationship and opening a band gap. A band gap can be opened either by breaking time reversal symmetry, the proximity effect of a superconductor or ferromagnet or adjusting the dimensionality of the TI material. In this work, methods that can be employed to easily open a band gap for the TI surface states are assessed. Two approaches are described: (1) Coating the surface states with a ferromagnet which has a controllable magnetization axis. The magnetization strength of the ferromagnet is incorporated as an exchange interaction term in the Hamiltonian. (2) An s-wave superconductor, because of the proximity effect, when coupled to a 3D-TI opens a band gap on the surface. Finally, the hybridization of the surface Dirac cones can be controlled by reducing the thickness of the topological insulator film. It is shown that this alters the band gap significantly.

  15. Disorder-induced transitions in resonantly driven Floquet topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titum, Paraj; Lindner, Netanel H.; Refael, Gil

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the effects of disorder in Floquet topological insulators (FTIs) occurring in semiconductor quantum wells. Such FTIs are induced by resonantly driving a transition between the valence and conduction bands. We show that when disorder is added, the topological nature of such FTIs persists as long as there is a mobility gap at the resonant quasienergy. For strong enough disorder, this gap closes and all the states become localized as the system undergoes a transition to a trivial insulator. Interestingly, the effects of disorder are not necessarily adverse: we show that in the same quantum well, disorder can also induce a transition from a trivial to a topological system, thereby establishing a Floquet topological Anderson insulator (FTAI). We identify the conditions on the driving field necessary for observing such a transition.

  16. The quantum Zeno and anti-Zeno effects with strong system-environment coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Adam Zaman

    2017-05-11

    To date, studies of the quantum Zeno and anti-Zeno effects focus on quantum systems that are weakly interacting with their environment. In this paper, we investigate what happens to a quantum system under the action of repeated measurements if the quantum system is strongly interacting with its environment. We consider as the quantum system a single two-level system coupled strongly to a collection of harmonic oscillators. A so-called polaron transformation is then used to make the problem in the strong system-environment coupling regime tractable. We find that the strong coupling case exhibits quantitative and qualitative differences as compared with the weak coupling case. In particular, the effective decay rate does not depend linearly on the spectral density of the environment. This then means that, in the strong coupling regime that we investigate, increasing the system-environment coupling strength can actually decrease the effective decay rate. We also consider a collection of two-level atoms coupled strongly with a common environment. In this case, we find that there are further differences between the weak and strong coupling cases since the two-level atoms can now indirectly interact with one another due to the common environment.

  17. Modeled effects of an improved building insulation scenario in Europe on air pollution, health and societal costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønløkke, Jakob Hjort; Holst, Gitte Juel; Sigsgaard, Torben

    2015-01-01

    scenario in Europe would have substantial benefits on health through improvements in air pollution. Health effects and societal cost savings may significantly counterbalance investment costs and should be taken into account when evaluating strategies for mitigation of global warming....... with extensions. Mean annual changes in the main air pollutants were derived for each country. World Health Organization (WHO) and European Union (EU) data on populations and on impacts of pollutants were used to derive health effects and costs. Effects on indoor air quality were not assessed. Results: Projected...... 78678 LY in Europe. A total of 7173 cases of persistent chronic bronchitis could be avoided annually. Several other health outcomes improved similarly. The saved societal costs totaled 6.64 billion € annually. Conclusions: In addition to carbon emission reductions, an improved building insulation...

  18. Thermal conductivity of thin insulating films determined by tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect measurements and finite-element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Torsten; Martens, Ulrike; Walowski, Jakob; Münzenberg, Markus; Thomas, Andy; Reiss, Günter; Kuschel, Timo

    2018-06-01

    In general, it is difficult to access the thermal conductivity of thin insulating films experimentally by electrical means. Here, we present a new approach utilizing the tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect (TMS) in combination with finite-element modeling (FEM). We detect the laser-induced TMS and the absolute thermovoltage of laser-heated magnetic tunnel junctions with 2.6 nm thin barriers of MgAl2O4 (MAO) and MgO, respectively. A second measurement of the absolute thermovoltage after a dielectric breakdown of the barrier grants insight into the remaining thermovoltage of the stack. Thus, the pure TMS without any parasitic Nernst contributions from the leads can be identified. In combination with FEM via COMSOL, we are able to extract values for the thermal conductivity of MAO (0.7 W (K · m)‑1) and MgO (5.8 W (K · m)‑1), which are in very good agreement with theoretical predictions. Our method provides a new promising way to extract the experimentally challenging parameter of the thermal conductivity of thin insulating films.

  19. Nontrivial effects of high-frequency excitation for strongly damped mechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidlin, Alexander; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2008-01-01

    Some non-trivial effects are investigated, which can occur if strongly damped mechanical systems are subjected to strong high-frequency (HF) excitation. The main result is a theoretical prediction, supported by numerical simulation, that for such systems the (quasi-)equilibrium states can change...... that can be substantial depending on the strength of the HF excitation) for finite values of the damping. The analysis is focused on the differences between the classic results for weakly damped systems, and new effects for which the strong damping terms are responsible. The analysis is based on a slightly...... modified averaging technique, and includes an elementary example of an elliptically excited pendulum for illustration, alongside with a generalization to a broader class of strongly damped dynamical systems with HF excitation. As an application example, the nontrivial behavior of a classical optimally...

  20. Nontrivial effects of high-frequency excitation for strongly damped mechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidlin, Alexander; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    Some nontrivial effects are investigated, which can occur if strongly damped mechanical systems are subjected to strong high-frequency (HF) excitation. The main result is a theoretical prediction, supported by numerical simulation, that for such systems the (quasi-)equilibrium states can change...... that can be substantial (depending on the strength of the HF excitation) for finite values of the damping. The analysis is focused on the differences between the classic results for weakly damped systems, and new effects for which the strong damping terms are responsible. The analysis is based...... on a slightly modified averaging technique, and includes an elementary example of an elliptically excited pendulum for illustration, alongside with a generalization to a broader class of strongly damped dynamical systems with HF excitation. As an application example, the nontrivial behavior of a classical...

  1. β-Ga2O3 on insulator field-effect transistors with drain currents exceeding 1.5 A/mm and their self-heating effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hong; Maize, Kerry; Qiu, Gang; Shakouri, Ali; Ye, Peide D.

    2017-08-01

    We have demonstrated that depletion/enhancement-mode β-Ga2O3 on insulator field-effect transistors can achieve a record high drain current density of 1.5/1.0 A/mm by utilizing a highly doped β-Ga2O3 nano-membrane as the channel. β-Ga2O3 on insulator field-effect transistor (GOOI FET) shows a high on/off ratio of 1010 and low subthreshold slope of 150 mV/dec even with 300 nm thick SiO2. The enhancement-mode GOOI FET is achieved through surface depletion. An ultra-fast, high resolution thermo-reflectance imaging technique is applied to study the self-heating effect by directly measuring the local surface temperature. High drain current, low Rc, and wide bandgap make the β-Ga2O3 on insulator field-effect transistor a promising candidate for future power electronics applications.

  2. Optical absorption spectra of semiconductors and insulators: ab initio calculation of many-body effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, Stefan

    1999-01-01

    A method for the inclusion of self-energy and excitonic effects in first-principle calculations of absorption spectra, within the state-of-the-art plane wave pseudopotential approach, is presented. Starting from a ground state calculation, using density functional theory (DFT) in the local density approximation (LDA), we correct the exchange-correlation potential of DFT-LDA with the self-energy applying Hedin's GW approximation to obtain the physical quasiparticles states. The electron-hole interaction is treated solving an effective two-particle equation, which we derive from Hedin's coupled integral equations, leading to the fundamental Bethe-Salpeter equation in an intermediate step. The interaction kernel contains the screened electron-hole Coulomb interaction and the electron-hole exchange effects, which reflect the microscopic structure of the system and are thus also called local-field effects. We obtain the excitonic eigenstates through diagonalization. This allows us a detailed analysis of the optical properties. The application of symmetry properties enables us to reduce the size of the two-particle Hamiltonian matrix, thus minimizing the computational effort. We apply our method to silicon, diamond, lithium oxide and the sodium tetramer. Good agreement with experiment is obtained for the absorption spectra of Si and diamond, the static dielectric constant of diamond, and for the onset of optical absorption of Li 2 O due to discrete bound excitons. We discuss various approximations of our method and show the strong mixing of independent particle transitions to a bound excitonic state in the Na 4 cluster. The influence of ground state calculations on optical spectra is investigated under particular consideration of the pseudopotential generation and we discuss the use of different Brillouin zone point sampling schemes for spectral calculations. (author) [fr

  3. A comparison of atom and ion induced SSIMS - evidence for a charge induced damage effect in insulator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, A.; Berg, J.A. van den; Vickerman, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    A static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SSIMS) study of two very low conductivity materials, polystyrene and niobium pentoxide, using on the one hand a primary ion beam with electron neutralisation, and on the other, atom bombardment, shows that whilst the initial spectra obtained were quite similar, subsequent damage effects were much greater under ion impact conditions. For an equivalent flux density the half-life of the polystyrene surface structure was four times longer under atom bombardment. Significant reduction of the niobium surface was observed under ion bombardment whereas an equivalent atom flux had little apparent effect on the surface oxidation state. These data suggest that the requirement to dissipate the charge delivered to the sample by the primary ion beam contributes significantly to the damage mechanisms in electrically insulating materials. (author)

  4. Electric detection of the spin-Seebeck effect in magnetic insulator in the presence of interface barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, K; Ota, T; Kajiwara, Y; Saitoh, E; Umezawa, H; Kawai, H

    2011-01-01

    The spin-Seebeck effect (SSE), the spin-voltage generation as a result of a temperature gradient, has recently been observed in ferrimagnetic insulator LaY 2 Fe 5 O 12 films by means of the inverse spin-Hall effect in Pt films. Here we investigate the SSE using LaY 2 Fe 5 O 12 /SiO 2 (Cu)/Pt systems, where the LaY 2 Fe 5 O 12 and Pt layers are separated by SiO 2 (Cu) thin-film barriers. The experimental results show that the SSE signal disappears in the LaY 2 Fe 5 O 12 /SiO 2 /Pt system, but the finite signal appears in the LaY 2 Fe 5 O 12 /Cu/Pt system, indicating that the direct contacts between the LaY 2 Fe 5 O 12 and normal metals is necessary for generating the SSE signal.

  5. Using strong nonlinearity and high-frequency vibrations to control effective properties of discrete elastic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Thomsen, Jon Juel; Snaeland, Sveinn Orri

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate how highfrequency (HF) excitation, combined with strong nonlinear elastic material behavior, influences the effective material or structural properties for low-frequency excitation and wave propagation. The HF effects are demonstrated on discrete linear s...

  6. Line-of-sight effects in strong lensing: putting theory into practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birrer, Simon; Welschen, Cyril; Amara, Adam; Refregier, Alexandre, E-mail: simon.birrer@phys.ethz.ch, E-mail: cyril.welschen@student.ethz.ch, E-mail: adam.amara@phys.ethz.ch, E-mail: alexandre.refregier@phys.ethz.ch [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, 8093, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-04-01

    We present a simple method to accurately infer line of sight (LOS) integrated lensing effects for galaxy scale strong lens systems through image reconstruction. Our approach enables us to separate weak lensing LOS effects from the main strong lens deflector. We test our method using mock data and show that strong lens systems can be accurate probes of cosmic shear with a precision on the shear terms of ± 0.003 (statistical error) for an HST-like dataset. We apply our formalism to reconstruct the lens COSMOS 0038+4133 and its LOS. In addition, we estimate the LOS properties with a halo-rendering estimate based on the COSMOS field galaxies and a galaxy-halo connection. The two approaches are independent and complementary in their information content. We find that when estimating the convergence at the strong lens system, performing a joint analysis improves the measure by a factor of two compared to a halo model only analysis. Furthermore the constraints of the strong lens reconstruction lead to tighter constraints on the halo masses of the LOS galaxies. Joint constraints of multiple strong lens systems may add valuable information to the galaxy-halo connection and may allow independent weak lensing shear measurement calibrations.

  7. Fabrication of Al2O3 Nano-Structure Functional Film on a Cellulose Insulation Polymer Surface and Its Space Charge Suppression Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Hao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose insulation polymer (paper/pressboard has been widely used in high voltage direct current (HVDC transformers. One of the most challenging issues in the insulation material used for HVDC equipment is the space charge accumulation. Effective ways to suppress the space charge injection/accumulation in insulation material is currently a popular research topic. In this study, an aluminium oxide functional film was deposited on a cellulose insulation pressboard surface using reactive radio frequency (RF magnetron sputtering. The sputtered thin film was characterized by the scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM/EDS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The influence of the deposited functional film on the dielectric properties and the space charge injection/accumulation behaviour was investigated. A preliminary exploration of the space charge suppression effect is discussed. SEM/EDS, XPS, and XRD results show that the nano-structured Al2O3 film with amorphous phase was successfully fabricated onto the fibre surface. The cellulose insulation pressboard surface sputtered by Al2O3 film has lower permittivity, conductivity, and dissipation factor values in the lower frequency (<103 Hz region. The oil-impregnated sputtered pressboard presents an apparent space-charge suppression effect. Compared with the pressboard sputtered with Al2O3 film for 90 min, the pressboard sputtered with Al2O3 film for 60 min had a better space charge suppression effect. Ultra-small Al2O3 particles (<10 nm grew on the surface of the larger nanoparticles. The nano-structured Al2O3 film sputtered on the fibre surface could act as a functional barrier layer for suppression of the charge injection and accumulation. This study offers a new perspective in favour of the application of insulation pressboard with a nano-structured function surface against space charge injection/accumulation in HVDC equipment.

  8. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  9. Compact vacuum insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  10. Cylinder wall insulation effects on the first- and second-law balances of a turbocharged diesel engine operating under transient load conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giakoumis, E.G.

    2007-01-01

    During the last decades there has been an increasing interest in the low heat rejection (LHR) diesel engine. In an LHR engine, an increased level of temperatures inside the cylinder is achieved, resulting from the insulation applied to the walls. The steady-state, LHR engine operation has been studied so far by applying either first- or second-law balances. Only a few works, however, have treated this subject during the very important transient operation with the results limited to the engine speed response. To this aim an experimentally validated transient diesel engine simulation code has been expanded so as to include the second-law balance. Two common insulators for the engine in hand, i.e. silicon nitride and plasma spray zirconia are studied and their effect is compared to the nominal non-insulated operation from the first- and second-law perspective. It is revealed that after a step increase in load, the second-law values unlike the first-law ones are heavily impacted by the insulation scheme applied. Combustion and total engine irreversibilities decrease significantly (up to 23% for the cases examined) with increasing insulation. Unfortunately, this decrease is not transformed into an increase in the mechanical work but rather increases the potential for extra work recovery owing to the higher availability content of the exhaust gas

  11. Experimental observation of strong coupling effects on the dispersion of dust acoustic waves in a plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandyopadhyay, P. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)], E-mail: pintu@ipr.res.in; Prasad, G.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P.K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2007-09-03

    The dispersion properties of low frequency dust acoustic waves in the strong coupling regime are investigated experimentally in an argon plasma embedded with a mixture of kaolin and MnO{sub 2} dust particles. The neutral pressure is varied over a wide range to change the collisional properties of the dusty plasma. In the low collisional regime the turnover of the dispersion curve at higher wave numbers and the resultant region of {partial_derivative}{omega}/{partial_derivative}k<0 are identified as signatures of dust-dust correlations. In the high collisional regime dust neutral collisions produce a similar effect and prevent an unambiguous identification of strong coupling effects.

  12. Experimental observation of strong coupling effects on the dispersion of dust acoustic waves in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P.; Prasad, G.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P.K.

    2007-01-01

    The dispersion properties of low frequency dust acoustic waves in the strong coupling regime are investigated experimentally in an argon plasma embedded with a mixture of kaolin and MnO 2 dust particles. The neutral pressure is varied over a wide range to change the collisional properties of the dusty plasma. In the low collisional regime the turnover of the dispersion curve at higher wave numbers and the resultant region of ∂ω/∂k<0 are identified as signatures of dust-dust correlations. In the high collisional regime dust neutral collisions produce a similar effect and prevent an unambiguous identification of strong coupling effects

  13. Experimental observation of strong coupling effects on the dispersion of dust acoustic waves in a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, P.; Prasad, G.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P. K.

    2007-09-01

    The dispersion properties of low frequency dust acoustic waves in the strong coupling regime are investigated experimentally in an argon plasma embedded with a mixture of kaolin and MnO2 dust particles. The neutral pressure is varied over a wide range to change the collisional properties of the dusty plasma. In the low collisional regime the turnover of the dispersion curve at higher wave numbers and the resultant region of ∂ω/∂k<0 are identified as signatures of dust dust correlations. In the high collisional regime dust neutral collisions produce a similar effect and prevent an unambiguous identification of strong coupling effects.

  14. The effect of insulated combustion chamber surfaces on direct-injected diesel engine performance, emissions, and combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Daniel W.; Vinyard, Shannon; Keribar, Rifat

    1988-01-01

    The combustion chamber of a single-cylinder, direct-injected diesel engine was insulated with ceramic coatings to determine the effect of low heat rejection (LHR) operation on engine performance, emissions, and combustion. In comparison to the baseline cooled engine, the LHR engine had lower thermal efficiency, with higher smoke, particulate, and full load carbon monoxide emissions. The unburned hydrocarbon emissions were reduced across the load range. The nitrous oxide emissions increased at some part-load conditions and were reduced slightly at full loads. The poor LHR engine performance was attributed to degraded combustion characterized by less premixed burning, lower heat release rates, and longer combustion duration compared to the baseline cooled engine.

  15. Spin-flip scattering effect on the current-induced spin torque in ferromagnet-insulator-ferromagnet tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhengang; Su Gang; Jin Biao; Zheng Qingrong

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the current-induced spin transfer torque of a ferromagnet-insulator-ferromagnet tunnel junction by taking the spin-flip scatterings into account. It is found that the spin-flip scattering can induce an additional spin torque, enhancing the maximum of the spin torque and giving rise to an angular shift compared to the case when the spin-flip scatterings are neglected. The effects of the molecular fields of the left and right ferromagnets on the spin torque are also studied. It is found that τ Rx /I e (τ Rx is the spin-transfer torque acting on the right ferromagnet and I e is the tunneling electrical current) does vary with the molecular fields. At two certain angles, τ Rx /I e is independent of the molecular field of the right ferromagnet, resulting in two crossing points in the curve of τ Rx /I e versus the relevant orientation for different molecular fields

  16. Experimental study on the effects of AC electric fields on flame spreading over polyethylene-insulated electric-wire

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Young Kyu

    2010-11-01

    In this present study, we experimentally investigated the effects of electric fields on the characteristics of flames spreading over electric-wires with AC fields. The dependence of the rate at which a flame spreads over polyethylene-insulated wires on the frequency and amplitude of the applied AC electric field was examined. The spreading of the flame can be categorized into linear spreading and non-linearly accelerated spreading of flame. This categorization is based on the axial distribution of the field strength of the applied electric field. The rate at which the flame spreads is highly dependent on the inclined direction of the wire fire. It could be possible to explain the spreading of the flame on the basis of thermal balance. © 2010 The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  17. Summary of the 9th IEA workshop on radiation effects in ceramic insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hodgson, E.R.; Shikama, T.

    1997-08-01

    Twenty one scientists attended an IEA workshop in Cincinnati, Ohio on May 8-9, 1997, which was mainly devoted to reviewing the current knowledge base on the phenonenon of radiation induced electrical degradation in ceramic insulators. Whereas convincing evidence for bulk RIED behavior has been observed by two research groups in sapphire after electron irradiation, definitive levels of bulk RIED have not been observed in high purity Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} by several research groups during energetic ion or fission neutron irradiation. Possible reasons for the conflicting RIED results obtained by different research groups were discussed. It was conducted that RIED does not appear to be of immediate concern for near-term fusion devices such as ITER. However, continued research on the RIED phenomenon with particular emphasis on electron irradiations of single crystal alumina was recommended in order to determine the underlying physical mechanisms. This will allow a better determination of whether RIED might occur under any of the widely varying experimental conditions in a fusion energy device. Several critical issues which are recommended for future study were outlined by the workshop attendees.

  18. Summary of the 9th IEA workshop on radiation effects in ceramic insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Hodgson, E.R.; Shikama, T.

    1997-01-01

    Twenty one scientists attended an IEA workshop in Cincinnati, Ohio on May 8-9, 1997, which was mainly devoted to reviewing the current knowledge base on the phenonenon of radiation induced electrical degradation in ceramic insulators. Whereas convincing evidence for bulk RIED behavior has been observed by two research groups in sapphire after electron irradiation, definitive levels of bulk RIED have not been observed in high purity Al 2 O 3 by several research groups during energetic ion or fission neutron irradiation. Possible reasons for the conflicting RIED results obtained by different research groups were discussed. It was conducted that RIED does not appear to be of immediate concern for near-term fusion devices such as ITER. However, continued research on the RIED phenomenon with particular emphasis on electron irradiations of single crystal alumina was recommended in order to determine the underlying physical mechanisms. This will allow a better determination of whether RIED might occur under any of the widely varying experimental conditions in a fusion energy device. Several critical issues which are recommended for future study were outlined by the workshop attendees

  19. Geometric effects on surface states in topological insulator Bi2Te3 nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Parijat; Kubis, Tillman; Povolotskyi, Michael; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2012-02-01

    Bismuth Telluride (BT) is a 3D topological insulator (TI) with surface states that have energy dispersion linear in momentum and forms a Dirac cone at low energy. In this work we investigate the surface properties of a BT nanowire and demonstrate the existence of TI states. We also show how such states vanish under certain geometric conditions. An atomistic model (sp3d5s* TB) is used to compute the energy dispersion in a BT nanowire. Penetration depth of the surface states is estimated by ratio of Fermi velocity and band-gap. BT possesses a tiny band-gap, which creates small localization of surface states and greater penetration in to the bulk. To offset this large spatial penetration, which is undesirable to avoid a direct coupling between surfaces, we expect that bigger cross-sections of BT nanowires would be needed to obtain stable TI states. Our numerical work validates this prediction. Furthermore, geometry of the nanowire is shown to influence the TI states. Using a combined analytical and numerical approach our results reveal that surface roughness impact electronic structure leading to Rashba type splits along z-direction. Cylindrical and square cross-sections are given as illustrative examples.

  20. Effects of Exterior Insulation on Moisture Performance of Wood-Frame Walls in the Pacific Northwest: Measurements and Hygrothermal Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel V. Glass; Borjen Yeh; Benjamin J. Herzog

    2016-01-01

    Continuous exterior insulation on above-grade walls is becoming more common in many parts of North America. It is generally accepted that exterior insulation provides advantages for energy performance, by reducing thermal bridging, and for moisture performance, by warming the wood structural members, thereby reducing the potential for wintertime moisture accumulation....

  1. Linear accelerator with x-ray absorbing insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, P.H.

    1975-01-01

    Annular insulators for supporting successive annular electrodes in a linear accelerator have embedded x-ray absorbing shield structures extending around the accelerating path. The shield members are disposed to intercept x-ray radiation without disrupting the insulative effect of the insulator members. In preferred forms, the structure comprises a plurality of annular members of heavy metal disposed in an x-ray blocking array, spaced from each other by the insulating substance of the insulator member. (auth)

  2. Wide gap Chern Mott insulating phases achieved by design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongli; Gangopadhyay, Shruba; Köksal, Okan; Pentcheva, Rossitza; Pickett, Warren E.

    2017-12-01

    Quantum anomalous Hall insulators, which display robust boundary charge and spin currents categorized in terms of a bulk topological invariant known as the Chern number (Thouless et al Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 405-408 (1982)), provide the quantum Hall anomalous effect without an applied magnetic field. Chern insulators are attracting interest both as a novel electronic phase and for their novel and potentially useful boundary charge and spin currents. Honeycomb lattice systems such as we discuss here, occupied by heavy transition-metal ions, have been proposed as Chern insulators, but finding a concrete example has been challenging due to an assortment of broken symmetry phases that thwart the topological character. Building on accumulated knowledge of the behavior of the 3d series, we tune spin-orbit and interaction strength together with strain to design two Chern insulator systems with bandgaps up to 130 meV and Chern numbers C = -1 and C = 2. We find, in this class, that a trade-off between larger spin-orbit coupling and strong interactions leads to a larger gap, whereas the stronger spin-orbit coupling correlates with the larger magnitude of the Hall conductivity. Symmetry lowering in the course of structural relaxation hampers obtaining quantum anomalous Hall character, as pointed out previously; there is only mild structural symmetry breaking of the bilayer in these robust Chern phases. Recent growth of insulating, magnetic phases in closely related materials with this orientation supports the likelihood that synthesis and exploitation will follow.

  3. Engineering the Dynamics of Effective Spin-Chain Models for Strongly Interacting Atomic Gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volosniev, A. G.; Petrosyan, D.; Valiente, M.

    2015-01-01

    We consider a one-dimensional gas of cold atoms with strong contact interactions and construct an effective spin-chain Hamiltonian for a two-component system. The resulting Heisenberg spin model can be engineered by manipulating the shape of the external confining potential of the atomic gas. We...

  4. Non-Oberbeck-Boussinesq effects in strongly turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahlers, Günter; Brown, Eric; Fontenele Araujo Junior, F.; Funfschilling, Denis; Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    Non-Oberbeck–Boussinesq (NOB) effects on the Nusselt number $Nu$ and Reynolds number $\\hbox{\\it Re}$ in strongly turbulent Rayleigh–Bénard (RB) convection in liquids were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. In the experiments the heat current, the temperature difference, and the

  5. Room temperature strong coupling effects from single ZnO nanowire microcavity

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Ayan; Heo, Junseok; Bayraktaroglu, Adrian; Guo, Wei; Ng, Tien Khee; Phillips, Jamie; Ooi, Boon S.; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2012-01-01

    Strong coupling effects in a dielectric microcavity with a single ZnO nanowire embedded in it have been investigated at room temperature. A large Rabi splitting of ?100 meV is obtained from the polariton dispersion and a non

  6. Effects of interaction imbalance in a strongly repulsive one-dimensional Bose gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfknecht, Rafael Emilio; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas; Foerster, Angela

    2018-01-01

    We calculate the spatial distributions and the dynamics of a few-body two-component strongly interacting Bose gas confined to an effectively one-dimensional trapping potential. We describe the densities for each component in the trap for different interaction and population imbalances. We calculate...

  7. High-Performance Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Louise F. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States); Mosiman, Garrett E. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A more accurate assessment of slab-on-grade foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulation at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated).

  8. The inaccuracy of heat transfer characteristics for non-insulated and insulated spherical containers neglecting the influence of heat radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, King-Leung; Salazar, Jose Luis Leon; Prasad, Leo; Chen, Wen-Lih

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation, the differences of heat transfer characteristics for insulated and non-insulated spherical containers between considering and neglecting the influence of heat radiation are studied by the simulations in some practical situations. It is found that the heat radiation effect cannot be ignored in conditions of low ambient convection heat coefficients (such ambient air) and high surface emissivities, especially for the non-insulated and thin insulated cases. In most practical situations when ambient temperature is different from surroundings temperature and the emissivity of insulation surface is different from that of metal wall surface, neglecting heat radiation will result in inaccurate insulation effect and heat transfer errors even with very thick insulation. However, the insulation effect considering heat radiation will only increase a very small amount after some dimensionless insulated thickness (such insulation thickness/radius ≥0.2 in this study), thus such dimensionless insulated thickness can be used as the optimum thickness in practical applications. Meanwhile, wrapping a material with low surface emissivity (such as aluminum foil) around the oxidized metal wall or insulation layer (always with high surface emissivity) can achieve very good insulated effect for the non-insulated or thin insulated containers.

  9. Heavy quark mass effects and improved tests of the flavor independence of strong interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, P.N. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); SLD Collaboration

    1998-08-01

    A review is given of latest results on tests of the flavor independence of strong interactions. Heavy quark mass effects are evident in the data and are now taken into account at next-to-leading order in QCD perturbation theory. The strong-coupling ratios {alpha}{sub s}{sup b}/{alpha}{sub s}{sup uds} and {alpha}{sub s}{sup c}/{alpha}{sub s}{sup uds} are found to be consistent with unity. Determinations of the b-quark mass m{sub b} (M{sub Z}) are discussed.

  10. Classical anomalous absorption in strongly magnetized plasmas and effective shielding length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, K.

    1981-01-01

    The high-frequency conductivity tensor of a plasma in a magnetic field has been evaluated. An anomalous perpendicular conductivity is obtained for a strongly magnetized plasma. Contrarily to the previous prediction, the effective shielding length is found to be the Debye length even when the Debye length is larger than the electron gyroradius. The effective shielding length is further discussed by presenting the generalized Balescu-Lenard equation

  11. Effects of Interaction Imbalance in a Strongly Repulsive One-Dimensional Bose Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfknecht, R. E.; Foerster, A.; Zinner, N. T.

    2018-05-01

    We calculate the spatial distributions and the dynamics of a few-body two-component strongly interacting Bose gas confined to an effectively one-dimensional trapping potential. We describe the densities for each component in the trap for different interaction and population imbalances. We calculate the time evolution of the system and show that, for a certain ratio of interactions, the minority population travels through the system as an effective wave packet.

  12. Instanton and tensor-force effects in the strong decays of mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnaz, R.; Silvestre-Brac, B.

    2001-01-01

    The strong decays of mesons are studied in the framework of the 3 P 0 model with a momentum-dependent vertex. The mesons wave functions are obtained from quark-antiquark potentials including a finite quark size, instanton effects, spin-orbit and tensor-force effects. Several prescriptions for treating the decays into three mesons are proposed and analyzed. Comparison to experimental data is presented in detail. (author)

  13. Quasi-particles and effective mean field in strongly interacting matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levai, P.; Ko, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a quasi-particle model of strongly interacting quark-gluon matter and explore the possible connection to an effective field theoretical description consisting of a scalar σ field by introducing a dynamically generated mass, M(σ), and a self-consistently determined interaction term, B(σ). We display a possible connection between the two types of effective description, using the Friedberg-Lee model.

  14. Coherence and correlations in a Mott insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerbier, F.; Widera, A.; Foelling, S.; Mandel, O.; Gericke, T.; Bloch, I.

    2005-01-01

    The observation of the super fluid to Mott insulator transition has triggered an intense interest in studying ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices. Such a transition is commonly associated with the disappearance of the interference pattern observed when releasing a coherent (i.e. Bose condensed) ensemble from the lattice. In this talk, I will show that even in the insulating phase, the visibility of this interference pattern remains finite. Our results show that although long-range order is absent, short-range coherence still persists in a rather broad range, and that this can be identified as a characteristic feature of the system for large, but finite lattice depths. For even deeper lattices, the visibility is close to zero, and the interference pattern unobservable. I will explain that information is still present in such featureless images, and can be extracted by studying the density-density correlation function of the expanded cloud, as proposed theoretically. A sharp diffraction-like pattern observed in the correlations reveals the underlying lattice structure, and can be understood by generalizing the well-known Hanbury-Brown and Twiss effect to many bosonic sources '' emitting '' from each lattice site. This new detection method allows in principle the detection of spin ordering in a multi-component Mott insulator. As a first step in this direction, we have recently observed spin dynamics in a Mott insulator, where a spin-dependent collisional coupling induces strongly under damped Rabi oscillations between two-particle states with the same total magnetization. I will briefly report on these results. (author)

  15. Segregation and Clustering Effects on Complex Boron Redistribution in Strongly Doped Polycrystalline-Silicon Layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abadli, S.; Mansour, F.

    2011-01-01

    This work deals with the investigation of the complex phenomenon of boron (B) transient enhanced diffusion (TED) in strongly implanted silicon (Si) layers. It concerns the instantaneous influences of the strong B concentrations, the Si layers crystallization, the clustering and the B trapping/segregation during thermal post-implantation annealing. We have used Si thin layers obtained from disilane (Si2H6) by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) and then B implanted with a dose of 4 x 1015 atoms/cm2 at an energy of 15 keV. To avoid long redistributions, thermal annealing was carried out at relatively low-temperatures (700, 750 and 800 'deg'C) for various short-times ranging between 1 and 30 minutes. To investigate the experimental secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) doping profiles, a redistribution model well adapted to the particular structure of Si-LPCVD layers and to the effects of strong-concentrations has been established. The good adjustment of the simulated profiles with the experimental SIMS profiles allowed a fundamental understanding about the instantaneous physical phenomena giving and disturbing the TED process in strongly doped Si-LPCVD layers. It was found that boron TED is strongly affected by the simultaneous complex kinetics of clustering, crystallization, trapping and segregation during annealing. The fast formation of small Si-B clusters enhances the B diffusivity whereas the evolution of the clusters and segregation reduce this enhancement. (author)

  16. On the stability of silicon field effect capacitors with phosphate buffered saline electrolytic gate and self assembled monolayer gate insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemed, Nofar Mintz; Inberg, Alexandra; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2013-01-01

    We herein report on the stability of Electrolyte/Insulator/Semiconductor (EIS) devices with Self-Assembled Monolayer (SAM) gate insulator layers, i.e. Electrolyte/SAM/Semiconductor (ESS) devices. ESS devices can be functionalized creating highly specific sensors that can be integrated on standard silicon platform. However, biosensors by their nature are in contact with biological solutions that contain ions and molecules that may affect the device characteristics and cause electrical instability. In this paper we present a list of potential hazards to ESS devices and a study of the device stability under common testing conditions analyzing possible causes for the instabilities. ESS capacitors under open circuit conditions (i.e. open circuit bias of ∼0.6 V vs. Ag/AgCl reference electrode) were periodically characterized. We measured the complex impedance of the capacitors versus bias and extracted the effective capacitance vs. voltage (C–V) curves using two methods. We observed a parallel shift of the C–V curves toward negative bias; showing an effective accumulation of positive charge. The quantitative analysis of the drift vs. time was found to depend on the effective capacitance evaluation method. This effect is discussed and a best-known method is proposed. The devices surface composition was tested before and after the stress experiment by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and sodium accumulation was observed. To further explore the flat-band voltage drift effect and to challenge the assumption that alkali ions are involved in the drift we conceived a novel alkali-free phosphate buffer saline (AF-PBS) where the sodium and potassium ions are replaced by ammonium ion and tested the capacitor under similar conditions to standard PBS. We found that the drift of the AF-PBS solution was much less at the first hour but was similar to that of the conventional PBS for longer stress times; hence, AF-PBS does not solve the long-term instability problem

  17. Spintronics Based on Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yabin; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-10-01

    Spintronics using topological insulators (TIs) as strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) materials have emerged and shown rapid progress in the past few years. Different from traditional heavy metals, TIs exhibit very strong SOC and nontrivial topological surface states that originate in the bulk band topology order, which can provide very efficient means to manipulate adjacent magnetic materials when passing a charge current through them. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the TI-based magnetic spintronics research field. In particular, we focus on the spin-orbit torque (SOT)-induced magnetization switching in the magnetic TI structures, spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR) measurements in the TI/ferromagnet structures, spin pumping and spin injection effects in the TI/magnet structures, as well as the electrical detection of the surface spin-polarized current in TIs. Finally, we discuss the challenges and opportunities in the TI-based spintronics field and its potential applications in ultralow power dissipation spintronic memory and logic devices.

  18. Effect of applied DC voltages and temperatures on space charge behaviour of multi-layer oil-paper insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Chao; Liao Ruijin [The State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System Security and New Technology, Chongqing University (China); Chen, G [School of Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton (United Kingdom); Fu, M, E-mail: tangchao_1981@163.co [AVERA T and D Technology Centre, Stafford (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, space charge in a multi-layer oil-paper insulation system was investigated using the pulsed electroacoustic (PEA) technique. A series of measurements had been carried following subjection of the insulation system to different applied voltages and different temperatures. Charge behaviours in the insulation system were analyzed and the influence of temperature on charge dynamics was discussed. The test results shows that homocharge injection takes place under all the test conditions, the applied DC voltage mainly affects the amount of space charge, while the temperature has greater influence on the distribution and mobility of space charge inside oil-paper samples.

  19. Quantum Hall effect on top and bottom surface states of topological insulator (Bi1-xSbx)2Te3 films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimi, R; Tsukazaki, A; Kozuka, Y; Falson, J; Takahashi, K S; Checkelsky, J G; Nagaosa, N; Kawasaki, M; Tokura, Y

    2015-04-14

    The three-dimensional topological insulator is a novel state of matter characterized by two-dimensional metallic Dirac states on its surface. To verify the topological nature of the surface states, Bi-based chalcogenides such as Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3, Sb2Te3 and their combined/mixed compounds have been intensively studied. Here, we report the realization of the quantum Hall effect on the surface Dirac states in (Bi1-xSbx)2Te3 films. With electrostatic gate-tuning of the Fermi level in the bulk band gap under magnetic fields, the quantum Hall states with filling factor ±1 are resolved. Furthermore, the appearance of a quantum Hall plateau at filling factor zero reflects a pseudo-spin Hall insulator state when the Fermi level is tuned in between the energy levels of the non-degenerate top and bottom surface Dirac points. The observation of the quantum Hall effect in three-dimensional topological insulator films may pave a way toward topological insulator-based electronics.

  20. Electrical Performance of Distribution Insulators with Chlorella vulgaris Growth on its Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Enrique Rojas Cubides

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study about electrical performance of ceramic and polymeric insulators bio-contaminated with alga Chlorella vulgaris. The performed tests involve ANSI 55-2 and ANSI 52-1 ceramic insulators and ANSI DS-15 polymeric insulators, all of them used in distribution systems of Colombia. Biological contamination of insulators is realized using a controlled environment chamber that adjusts the temperature, humidity and light radiation. The laboratory tests include measurements of flashover voltages and leakage currents and they were performed to determine how insulators are affected by biological contamination. After a series of laboratory tests, it was concluded that the presence of Chlorella vulgaris on the contaminated ceramic insulators reduces the wet flashover voltage up to 12% and increases their leakage currents up to 80%. On the other hand, for polymeric insulators the effect of algae growth on flashover voltages was not to strong, although the leakage currents increase up to 60%.

  1. Radiation effects on organic insulators for superconducting magnets. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Klabunde, C.E.; Kernohan, R.H.; Long, C.J.

    1979-11-01

    The most recent efforts in a program to study the effects of irradiation near 5 K on organic insulators for fusion reactors have extended the irradiation dose from 2 x 10 9 to 1 x 10 10 rads and have studied additional effects due to fast neutrons. When added to a gamma-ray dose of 2.4 x 10 9 rads, a fast-neutron fluence of 2.4 x 10 20 n/m 2 has little effect upon changes in electrical and mechanical properties. At this dose, present results are in agreement with previous results. At a dose of 1 x 10 10 rads, particle-filled epoxies are at end of life in terms of mechanical strength, while fiberglass-cloth-filled epoxies retain sufficient strength for use. Electrical-resistivity and voltage-breakdown values were reduced in some materials but remained in a usable range. Two sheet-type materials showed excellent stability in their electrical properties. Dimensional stability was generally good, except for one epoxy which showed considerable swelling at the higher dose

  2. Strong toroidal effects on tokamak tearing mode stability in the hybrid and conventional scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, C J; Connor, J W; Cowley, S C; Gimblett, C G; Hastie, R J; Hender, T C; Martin, T J

    2012-01-01

    The hybrid scenario is thought to be an important mode of operation for the ITER tokamak. Analytic and numerical calculations demonstrate that toroidal effects at finite β have a strong influence on tearing mode stability of hybrid modes. Indeed, they persist in the large aspect ratio limit, R/a → ∞. A similar strong coupling effect is found between the m = 1, n = 1 harmonic and the m = 2, n = 1 harmonic if the minimum safety factor is less than unity. In both cases the tearing stability index, Δ′ increases rapidly as β approaches ideal marginal stability, providing a potential explanation for the onset of linearly unstable tearing modes. The numerical calculations have used an improved version of the T7 code (Fitzpatrick et al 1993 Nucl. Fusion 33 1533), and complete agreement is obtained with the analytic theory for this demanding test of the code. (paper)

  3. Graphene nanomesh-based devices exhibiting a strong negative differential conductance effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung Nguyen, V; Mazzamuto, F; Saint-Martin, J; Bournel, A; Dollfus, P

    2012-01-01

    Using atomistic quantum simulation based on a tight binding model, we have investigated the transport characteristics of graphene nanomesh-based devices and evaluated the possibilities of observing negative differential conductance. It is shown that by taking advantage of bandgap opening in the graphene nanomesh lattice, a strong negative differential conductance effect can be achieved at room temperature in pn junctions and n-doped structures. Remarkably, the effect is improved very significantly (with a peak-to-valley current ratio of a few hundred) and appears to be weakly sensitive to the transition length in graphene nanomesh pn hetero-junctions when inserting a pristine (gapless) graphene section in the transition region between n and p zones. The study therefore suggests new design strategies for graphene electronic devices which may offer strong advantages in terms of performance and processing over the devices studied previously. (paper)

  4. Strong coupling electrostatics for randomly charged surfaces: antifragility and effective interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodrat, Malihe; Naji, Ali; Komaie-Moghaddam, Haniyeh; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-05-07

    We study the effective interaction mediated by strongly coupled Coulomb fluids between dielectric surfaces carrying quenched, random monopolar charges with equal mean and variance, both when the Coulomb fluid consists only of mobile multivalent counterions and when it consists of an asymmetric ionic mixture containing multivalent and monovalent (salt) ions in equilibrium with an aqueous bulk reservoir. We analyze the consequences that follow from the interplay between surface charge disorder, dielectric and salt image effects, and the strong electrostatic coupling that results from multivalent counterions on the distribution of these ions and the effective interaction pressure they mediate between the surfaces. In a dielectrically homogeneous system, we show that the multivalent counterions are attracted towards the surfaces with a singular, disorder-induced potential that diverges logarithmically on approach to the surfaces, creating a singular but integrable counterion density profile that exhibits an algebraic divergence at the surfaces with an exponent that depends on the surface charge (disorder) variance. This effect drives the system towards a state of lower thermal 'disorder', one that can be described by a renormalized temperature, exhibiting thus a remarkable antifragility. In the presence of an interfacial dielectric discontinuity, the singular behavior of counterion density at the surfaces is removed but multivalent counterions are still accumulated much more strongly close to randomly charged surfaces as compared with uniformly charged ones. The interaction pressure acting on the surfaces displays in general a highly non-monotonic behavior as a function of the inter-surface separation with a prominent regime of attraction at small to intermediate separations. This attraction is caused directly by the combined effects from charge disorder and strong coupling electrostatics of multivalent counterions, which dominate the surface-surface repulsion due to

  5. Strong coupling gauge theories and effective field theories. Proceedings of the 2002 international workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Masayasu; Kikukawa, Yoshio; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2003-01-01

    This issue presents the important recent progress in both theoretical and phenomenological issues of strong coupling gauge theories, with/without supersymmetry and extra dimensions, etc. Emphasis in a placed on dynamical symmetry breaking with large anomalous dimensions governed by the dynamics near the nontrivial fixed point. Also presented are recent developments of the corresponding effective field theories. The 43 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N)

  6. Generalized Models from Beta(p, 2) Densities with Strong Allee Effect: Dynamical Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Aleixo, Sandra M.; Rocha, J. Leonel

    2012-01-01

    A dynamical approach to study the behaviour of generalized populational growth models from Beta(p, 2) densities, with strong Allee effect, is presented. The dynamical analysis of the respective unimodal maps is performed using symbolic dynamics techniques. The complexity of the correspondent discrete dynamical systems is measured in terms of topological entropy. Different populational dynamics regimes are obtained when the intrinsic growth rates are modified: extinction, bistability, chaotic ...

  7. Effect of an improved molecular potential on strong-field tunneling ionization of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Songfeng; Jin Cheng; Le, Anh-Thu; Lin, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    We study the effect of one-electron model potentials on the tunneling ionization rates of molecules in strong fields. By including electron correlation using the modified Leeuwen-Baerends (LB α) model, the binding energies of outer shells of molecules are significantly improved. However, we show that the tunneling ionization rates from the LB α do not differ much from the earlier calculations [Phys. Rev. A 81, 033423 (2010)], in which the local correlation potential was neglected.

  8. Empty creditors and strong shareholders: The real effects of credit risk trading. Second draft

    OpenAIRE

    Colonnello, Stefano; Efing, Matthias; Zucchi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Credit derivatives give creditors the possibility to transfer debt cash flow rights to other market participants while retaining control rights. We use the market for credit default swaps (CDSs) as a laboratory to show that the real effects of such debt unbundling crucially hinge on shareholder bargaining power. We find that creditors buy more CDS protection when facing strong shareholders to secure themselves a valuable outside option in distressed renegotiations. After the start of CDS trad...

  9. Economically optimal thermal insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berber, J.

    1978-10-01

    Exemplary calculations to show that exact adherence to the demands of the thermal insulation ordinance does not lead to an optimal solution with regard to economics. This is independent of the mode of financing. Optimal thermal insulation exceeds the values given in the thermal insulation ordinance.

  10. Poppers, Kaposi's sarcoma, and HIV infection: empirical example of a strong confounding effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabia, A

    1995-01-01

    Are there empirical examples of strong confounding effects? Textbooks usually show examples of weak confounding or use hypothetical examples of strong confounding to illustrate the paradoxical consequences of not separating out the effect of the studied exposure from that of second factor acting as a confounder. HIV infection is a candidate strong confounder of the spuriously high association reported between consumption of poppers, a sexual stimulant, and risk of Kaposi's sarcoma in the early phase of the AIDS epidemic. To examine this hypothesis, assumptions must be made on the prevalence of HIV infection among cases of Kaposi's sarcoma and on the prevalence of heavy popper consumption according to HIV infection in cases and controls. Results show that HIV infection may have confounded the poppers-Kaposi's sarcoma association. However, it cannot be ruled out that HIV did not qualify as a confounder because it was either an intermediate variable or an effect modifier of the association between popper inhalation and Kaposi's sarcoma. This example provides a basis to discuss the mechanism by which confounding occurs as well as the practical importance of confounding in epidemiologic research.

  11. Geomagnetic and strong static magnetic field effects on growth and chlorophyll a fluorescence in Lemna minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Luka; Fefer, Dušan; Košmelj, Katarina; Gaberščik, Alenka; Jerman, Igor

    2015-04-01

    The geomagnetic field (GMF) varies over Earth's surface and changes over time, but it is generally not considered as a factor that could influence plant growth. The effects of reduced and enhanced GMFs and a strong static magnetic field on growth and chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence of Lemna minor plants were investigated under controlled conditions. A standard 7 day test was conducted in extreme geomagnetic environments of 4 µT and 100 µT as well as in a strong static magnetic field environment of 150 mT. Specific growth rates as well as slow and fast Chl a fluorescence kinetics were measured after 7 days incubation. The results, compared to those of controls, showed that the reduced GMF significantly stimulated growth rate of the total frond area in the magnetically treated plants. However, the enhanced GMF pointed towards inhibition of growth rate in exposed plants in comparison to control, but the difference was not statistically significant. This trend was not observed in the case of treatments with strong static magnetic fields. Our measurements suggest that the efficiency of photosystem II is not affected by variations in GMF. In contrast, the strong static magnetic field seems to have the potential to increase initial Chl a fluorescence and energy dissipation in Lemna minor plants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. On Drift Effects in Velocity and Displacement of Greek Uncorrected Digital Strong Motion Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarlatoudis, A.; Margaris, B.

    2005-12-01

    Fifty years after the first installation of analog accelerographs, digital instruments recording the strong-motion came in operation. Their advantages comparing to the analog ones are obvious and they have been described in detail in several works. Nevertheless it has been pointed out that velocity and displacement values derived from several accelerograms, recorded in various strong earthquakes worldwide (e.g. 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, Hector Mine, 2002 Denali) by digital instruments, are plagued by drifts when only a simple baseline correction derived from the pre-event portion of the record is removed. In Greece a significant number of accelerographic networks and arrays have been deployed covering the whole area. Digital accelerographs now constitute a significant part of the National Strong Motion network of the country. Detailed analyses of the data processing of accelerograms recorded by digital instruments exhibited that the same drifts exist in the Greek strong motion database. In this work, a methodology proposed and described in various articles (Boore, 2001; 2003; 2005) for removing the aforementioned drifts of the accelerograms is applied. It is also attempted a careful look of the nature of the drifts for understanding the noise characteristics relative to the signal. The intrinsic behaviour of signal to noise ratio is crucial for the adequacy of baseline corrections applied on digital uncorrected accelerograms. Velocities and displacements of the uncorrected and corrected accelerograms are compared and the drift effects in the Fourier and response spectra are presented.

  13. Process insulation. Isolation thermique des equipements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    A manual is presented to assist managers and operating personnel to recognize industrial energy management opportunities, and provides mathematical equations, general information on proven techniques and technology, and examples. It deals with process insulation, focusing on the insulation of mechanical systems such as piping, process vessels, equipment, and ductwork. The manual describes the effects of insulation materials; commonly encountered types of insulation, coverings and protective finishes as well as common applications; energy management opportunities, divided into housekeeping, low cost, and retrofit; and includes worked examples of each. Includes glossary. 17 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Strong field effects on binary systems in Einstein-aether theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, Brendan Z.

    2007-01-01

    'Einstein-aether' theory is a generally covariant theory of gravity containing a dynamical preferred frame. This article continues an examination of effects on the motion of binary pulsar systems in this theory, by incorporating effects due to strong fields in the vicinity of neutron star pulsars. These effects are included through an effective approach, by treating the compact bodies as point particles with nonstandard, velocity dependent interactions parametrized by dimensionless sensitivities. Effective post-Newtonian equations of motion for the bodies and the radiation damping rate are determined. More work is needed to calculate values of the sensitivities for a given fluid source; therefore, precise constraints on the theory's coupling constants cannot yet be stated. It is shown, however, that strong field effects will be negligible given current observational uncertainties if the dimensionless couplings are less than roughly 0.1 and two conditions that match the PPN parameters to those of pure general relativity are imposed. In this case, weak field results suffice. There then exists a one-parameter family of Einstein-aether theories with 'small-enough' couplings that passes all current observational tests. No conclusion can be reached for larger couplings until the sensitivities for a given source can be calculated

  15. Low-frequency noise in AlTiO/AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor heterojunction field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Son Phuong; Ui, Toshimasa; Nguyen, Tuan Quy; Shih, Hong-An; Suzuki, Toshi-kazu, E-mail: tosikazu@jaist.ac.jp [Center for Nano Materials and Technology, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2016-05-28

    Using aluminum titanium oxide (AlTiO, an alloy of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}) as a high-k gate insulator, we fabricated and investigated AlTiO/AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor heterojunction field-effect transistors. From current low-frequency noise (LFN) characterization, we find Lorentzian spectra near the threshold voltage, in addition to 1/f spectra for the well-above-threshold regime. The Lorentzian spectra are attributed to electron trapping/detrapping with two specific time constants, ∼25 ms and ∼3 ms, which are independent of the gate length and the gate voltage, corresponding to two trap level depths of 0.5–0.7 eV with a 0.06 eV difference in the AlTiO insulator. In addition, gate leakage currents are analyzed and attributed to the Poole-Frenkel mechanism due to traps in the AlTiO insulator, where the extracted trap level depth is consistent with the Lorentzian LFN.

  16. Superconductivity and ferromagnetism in topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duming

    Topological insulators, a new state of matter discovered recently, have attracted great interest due to their novel properties. They are insulating inside the bulk, but conducting at the surface or edges. This peculiar behavior is characterized by an insulating bulk energy gap and gapless surface or edge states, which originate from strong spin-orbit coupling and time-reversal symmetry. The spin and momentum locked surface states not only provide a model system to study fundamental physics, but can also lead to applications in spintronics and dissipationless electronics. While topological insulators are interesting by themselves, more exotic behaviors are predicted when an energy gap is induced at the surface. This dissertation explores two types of surface state gap in topological insulators, a superconducting gap induced by proximity effect and a magnetic gap induced by chemical doping. The first three chapters provide introductory theory and experimental details of my research. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the theoretical background of topological insulators. Chapter 2 is dedicated to material synthesis principles and techniques. I will focus on two major synthesis methods: molecular beam epitaxy for the growth of Bi2Se3 thin films and chemical vapor deposition for the growth of Bi2Se3 nanoribbons and nanowires. Material characterization is discussed in Chapter 3. I will describe structural, morphological, magnetic, electrical, and electronic characterization techniques used to study topological insulators. Chapter 4 discusses the experiments on proximity-induced superconductivity in topological insulator (Bi2Se3) nanoribbons. This work is motivated by the search for the elusive Majorana fermions, which act as their own antiparticles. They were proposed by Ettore Majorara in 1937, but have remained undiscovered. Recently, Majorana's concept has been revived in condensed matter physics: a condensed matter analog of Majorana fermions is predicted to

  17. Anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect in a cobalt ferrofluid with strong interparticle interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, J.M., E-mail: julia.linke@tu-dresden.de; Odenbach, S.

    2015-12-15

    The anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect (MVE) of a cobalt ferrofluid has been studied in a slit die viscometer for three orientations of the applied magnetic field: in the direction of the fluid flow (Δη{sub 1}), the velocity gradient (Δη{sub 2}), and the vorticity (Δη{sub 3}). The majority of the cobalt particles in the ferrofluid exhibit a strong dipole–dipole interaction, which corresponds to a weighted interaction parameter of λ{sub w}≈10.6. Thus the particles form extended microstructures inside the fluid which lead to enhanced MVE ratios Δη{sub 2}/Δη{sub 1}>3 and Δη{sub 3}/Δη{sub 1}>0.3 even for strong shearing and weak magnetic fields compared to fluids which contain non-interacting spherical particles with Δη{sub 2}/Δη{sub 1}≈1 and Δη{sub 3}/Δη{sub 1}=0. Furthermore, a non-monotonic increase has been observed in the shear thinning behavior of Δη{sub 2} for weak magnetic fields <10 kA/m, which cannot be explained solely by the magnetization of individual particles and the formation and disintegration of linear particle chains but indicates the presence of heterophase structures. - Highlights: • The magnetoviscous effect in a ferrofluid with strong interaction is anisotropic. • The strongest effects are found in a magnetic field parallel to the shear gradient. • In strong magnetic fields the microstructure of the fluid is stable against shearing. • In weak fields the fluid behavior indicates the presence of heterophase structures.

  18. Influence of magnetic disorders on quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetic topological insulator films beyond the two-dimensional limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yanxia; Xu, Fuming; Cheung, King Tai; Sun, Qing-feng; Wang, Jian; Yao, Yugui

    2018-04-01

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) has been experimentally realized in magnetic topological insulator (MTI) thin films fabricated on magnetically doped {({{Bi}},{{Sb}})}2{{{Te}}}3. In an MTI thin film with the magnetic easy axis along the normal direction (z-direction), orientations of magnetic dopants are randomly distributed around the magnetic easy axis, acting as magnetic disorders. With the aid of the non-equilibrium Green's function and Landauer–Büttiker formalism, we numerically study the influence of magnetic disorders on QAHE in an MTI thin film modeled by a three-dimensional tight-binding Hamiltonian. It is found that, due to the existence of gapless side surface states, QAHE is protected even in the presence of magnetic disorders as long as the z-component of magnetic moment of all magnetic dopants are positive. More importantly, such magnetic disorders also suppress the dissipation of the chiral edge states and enhance the quality of QAHE in MTI films. In addition, the effect of magnetic disorders depends very much on the film thickness, and the optimal influence is achieved at certain thickness. These findings are new features for QAHE in three-dimensional systems, not present in two-dimensional systems.

  19. Ge-on-insulator tunneling FET with abrupt source junction formed by utilizing snowplow effect of NiGe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Ryo; Katoh, Takumi; Takaguchi, Ryotaro; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi

    2018-04-01

    Tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs) attract much attention for use in realizing next-generation low-power processors. In particular, Ge-on-insulator (GOI) TFETs are expected to realize low power operation with a high on-current/off-current (I on/I off) ratio, owing to their narrow bandgap. Here, to improve the performance of GOI-TFETs, a source junction with a high doping concentration and an abrupt impurity profile is essential. In this study, a snowplow effect of NiGe combined with low-energy BF2 + implantation has been investigated to realize an abrupt p+/n Ge junction for GOI n-channel TFETs. By optimizing the Ni thickness to form NiGe (thickness: 4 nm), an abrupt junction with a B profile abruptness of ˜5 nm/dec has been realized with a high doping concentration of around 1021 cm-3. The operation of GOI n-TFETs with this source junction having the abrupt B profile has been demonstrated, and the improvement of TFET properties such as the I on/I off ratio from 311 to 743 and the subthreshold slope from 368 to 239 mV/dec has been observed. This junction formation technology is attractive for enhancing the TFET performance.

  20. Strong Stability Preserving Explicit Runge--Kutta Methods of Maximal Effective Order

    KAUST Repository

    Hadjimichael, Yiannis

    2013-07-23

    We apply the concept of effective order to strong stability preserving (SSP) explicit Runge--Kutta methods. Relative to classical Runge--Kutta methods, methods with an effective order of accuracy are designed to satisfy a relaxed set of order conditions but yield higher order accuracy when composed with special starting and stopping methods. We show that this allows the construction of four-stage SSP methods with effective order four (such methods cannot have classical order four). However, we also prove that effective order five methods---like classical order five methods---require the use of nonpositive weights and so cannot be SSP. By numerical optimization, we construct explicit SSP Runge--Kutta methods up to effective order four and establish the optimality of many of them. Numerical experiments demonstrate the validity of these methods in practice.

  1. Quantum screening effects on the ion-ion collisions in strongly coupled semiclassical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, Dae-Han; Jung, Young-Dae

    2010-01-01

    The quantum screening effects on the ion-ion collisions are investigated in strongly coupled semiclassical hydrogen plasmas. The method of stationary phase and effective interaction potential containing the quantum mechanical effect are employed to obtain the scattering phase shift and scattering cross section as functions of the impact parameter, collision energy, de Broglie wavelength, and Debye length. The result shows that the scattering phase and cross section decrease with increasing de Broglie wavelength. It is also shown that the scattering cross section increases with an increase of the Debye length. Hence, it is found that the quantum effect suppresses the scattering cross section. In addition, the quantum effect on the scattering cross section is found to be more important in small Debye length domains.

  2. Strong Stability Preserving Explicit Runge--Kutta Methods of Maximal Effective Order

    KAUST Repository

    Hadjimichael, Yiannis; Macdonald, Colin B.; Ketcheson, David I.; Verner, James H.

    2013-01-01

    We apply the concept of effective order to strong stability preserving (SSP) explicit Runge--Kutta methods. Relative to classical Runge--Kutta methods, methods with an effective order of accuracy are designed to satisfy a relaxed set of order conditions but yield higher order accuracy when composed with special starting and stopping methods. We show that this allows the construction of four-stage SSP methods with effective order four (such methods cannot have classical order four). However, we also prove that effective order five methods---like classical order five methods---require the use of nonpositive weights and so cannot be SSP. By numerical optimization, we construct explicit SSP Runge--Kutta methods up to effective order four and establish the optimality of many of them. Numerical experiments demonstrate the validity of these methods in practice.

  3. Three-loop Standard Model effective potential at leading order in strong and top Yukawa couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Stephen P. [Santa Barbara, KITP

    2014-01-08

    I find the three-loop contribution to the effective potential for the Standard Model Higgs field, in the approximation that the strong and top Yukawa couplings are large compared to all other couplings, using dimensional regularization with modified minimal subtraction. Checks follow from gauge invariance and renormalization group invariance. I also briefly comment on the special problems posed by Goldstone boson contributions to the effective potential, and on the numerical impact of the result on the relations between the Higgs vacuum expectation value, mass, and self-interaction coupling.

  4. Polarization effects in above-threshold ionization with a mid-infrared strong laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hui-Peng; Xu, Song-Po; Wang, Yan-Lan; Yu, Shao-Gang; Zhao, Xiao-Yun; Hao, Xiao-Lei; Lai, Xuan-Yang; Pfeifer, Thomas; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Jing; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhi-Zhan

    2018-05-01

    Using a semiclassical approach, we theoretically study the above-threshold ionization of magnesium by intense, mid-infrared laser pulses. The formation of low-energy structures in the photoelectron spectrum is found to be enhanced by comparing with a calculation based on the single-active electron approximation. By performing electron trajectory and recollision-time distribution analysis, we demonstrate that this phenomenon is due to the laser-induced ionic core polarization effects on the recolliding electrons. We also show that the polarization effects should be experimentally detectable. Our finding provides new insight into ultrafast control of strong-field photoionization and imaging of polar molecules.

  5. Using strong nonlinearity and high-frequency vibrations to control effective mechanical stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2008-01-01

    the method of direct separation of motions with results of a modified multiple scales ap-proach, valid also for strong nonlinearity, the stiffening ef-fect is predicted for a generic 1-dof system, and results are tested against numerical simulation and ((it is planned)) laboratory experiments.......High-frequency excitation (HFE) can be used to change the effective stiffness of an elastic structure, and related quanti-ties such as resonance frequencies, wave speed, buckling loads, and equilibrium states. There are basically two ways to do this: By using parametrical HFE (with or without non...

  6. Charging-delay effect on longitudinal dust acoustic shock wave in strongly coupled dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Samiran; Gupta, M.R.

    2005-01-01

    Taking into account the charging-delay effect, the nonlinear propagation characteristics of longitudinal dust acoustic wave in strongly coupled collisional dusty plasma described by generalized hydrodynamic model have been investigated. In the 'hydrodynamic limit', a Korteweg-de Vries Burger (KdVB) equation with a damping term arising due to dust-neutral collision is derived in which the Burger term is proportional to the dissipation due to dust viscosity through dust-dust correlation and charging-delay-induced anomalous dissipation. On the other hand, in the 'kinetic limit', a KdVB equation with a damping term and a nonlocal nonlinear forcing term arising due to memory-dependent strong correlation effect of dust fluid is derived in which the Burger term depends only on the charging-delay-induced dissipation. Numerical solution of integrodifferential equations reveals that (i) dissipation due to dust viscosity and principally due to charging delay causes excitation of the longitudinal dust acoustic shock wave in strongly coupled dusty plasma and (ii) dust-neutral collision does not appear to play any direct role in shock formation. The condition for the generation of shock is also discussed briefly

  7. Thermal insulating panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, J.T.

    1985-09-11

    A panel of thermal insulation material has at least one main portion which comprises a dry particulate insulation material compressed within a porous envelope so that it is rigid or substantially rigid and at least one auxiliary portion which is secured to and extends along at least one of the edges of the main portions. The auxiliary portions comprise a substantially uncompressed dry particulate insulation material contained within an envelope. The insulation material of the auxiliary portion may be the same as or may be different from the insulation material of the main portion. The envelope of the auxiliary portion may be made of a porous or a non-porous material. (author).

  8. The effect of strong intermolecular and chemical interactions on the compatibility of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askadskii, Andrei A

    1999-01-01

    The data on compatibility and on the properties of polymer blends are generalised. The emphasis is placed on the formation of strong intermolecular interactions (dipole-dipole interaction and hydrogen bonding) between the components of blends, as well as on the chemical reactions between them. A criterion for the prediction of compatibility of polymers is described in detail. Different cases of compatibility are considered and the dependences of the glass transition temperatures on the composition of blends are analysed. The published data on the effect of strong intermolecular interactions between the blend components on the glass transition temperature are considered. The preparation of interpolymers is described whose macromolecules are composed of incompatible polymers, which leads to the so-called 'forced compatibility.' The bibliography includes 80 references.

  9. Three-dimensional photodissociation in strong laser fields: Memory-kernel effective-mode expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xuan; Thanopulos, Ioannis; Shapiro, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a method for the efficient computation of non-Markovian quantum dynamics for strong (and time-dependent) system-bath interactions. The past history of the system dynamics is incorporated by expanding the memory kernel in exponential functions thereby transforming in an exact fashion the non-Markovian integrodifferential equations into a (larger) set of ''effective modes'' differential equations (EMDE). We have devised a method which easily diagonalizes the EMDE, thereby allowing for the efficient construction of an adiabatic basis and the fast propagation of the EMDE in time. We have applied this method to three-dimensional photodissociation of the H 2 + molecule by strong laser fields. Our calculations properly include resonance-Raman scattering via the continuum, resulting in extensive rotational and vibrational excitations. The calculated final kinetic and angular distribution of the photofragments are in overall excellent agreement with experiments, both when transform-limited pulses and when chirped pulses are used.

  10. Small Fermi surfaces and strong correlation effects in Dirac materials with holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yunseok; Song, Geunho; Park, Chanyong; Sin, Sang-Jin

    2017-10-01

    Recent discovery of transport anomaly in graphene demonstrated that a system known to be weakly interacting may become strongly correlated if system parameter (s) can be tuned such that fermi surface is sufficiently small. We study the strong correlation effects in the transport coefficients of Dirac materials doped with magnetic impurity under the magnetic field using holographic method. The experimental data of magneto-conductivity are well fit by our theory, however, not much data are available for other transports of Dirac material in such regime. Therefore, our results on heat transport, thermo-electric power and Nernst coefficients are left as predictions of holographic theory for generic Dirac materials in the vicinity of charge neutral point with possible surface gap. We give detailed look over each magneto-transport observable and 3Dplots to guide future experiments.

  11. arXiv Strong reduction of the effective radiation length in an oriented PWO scintillator crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Bandiera, L.; Romagnoni, M.; Argiolas, N.; Bagli, E.; Ballerini, G.; Berra, A.; Brizzolani, C.; Camattari, R.; De Salvador, D.; Haurylavets, V.; Mascagna, V.; Mazzolari, A.; Prest, M.; Soldani, M.; Sytov, A.; Vallazza, E.

    We measured a considerable increase of the emitted radiation by 120 GeV/c electrons in an axially oriented lead tungstate scintillator crystal, if compared to the case in which the sample was not aligned with the beam direction. This enhancement resulted from the interaction of particles with the strong crystalline electromagnetic field. The data collected at the external lines of CERN SPS were critically compared to Monte Carlo simulations based on the Baier Katkov quasiclassical method, highlighting a reduction of the scintillator radiation length by a factor of five in case of beam alignment with the [001] crystal axes. The observed effect opens the way to the realization of compact electromagnetic calorimeters/detectors based on oriented scintillator crystals in which the amount of material can be strongly reduced with respect to the state of the art. These devices could have relevant applications in fixed-target experiments as well as in satellite-borne gamma-telescopes.

  12. Strong Quantum Size Effects in Pb(111) Thin Films Mediated by Anomalous Friedel Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yu; Wu, Biao; Li, Chong; Einstein, T. L.; Weitering, H. H.; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2010-08-01

    Using first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we study Friedel oscillations (FOs) in the electron density at different metal surfaces and their influence on the lattice relaxation and stability of ultrathin metal films. We show that the FOs at the Pb(111) surface decay as 1/x with the distance x from the surface, different from the conventional 1/x2 power law at other metal surfaces. The underlying physical reason for this striking difference is tied to the strong nesting of the two different Fermi sheets along the Pb(111) direction. The interference of the strong FOs emanating from the two surfaces of a Pb(111) film, in turn, not only results in superoscillatory interlayer relaxations around the center of the film, but also determines its stability in the quantum regime. As a simple and generic picture, the present findings also explain why quantum size effects are exceptionally robust in Pb(111) films.

  13. Validation of cooling effect of insulated containers for the shipment of corneal tissue and recommendations for transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas D; Maxwell, Andrew J; Lindquist, Thomas D; Requard, Jake

    2013-01-01

    To determine the cooling effect of generic insulated shipping containers in ambient and high-temperature environments. Twenty-seven shipping containers were packed with wet ice according to industry standards. The ice in each container was weighed. Ambient temperatures were recorded by data loggers affixed to the exterior. Internal temperatures were recorded by data loggers packed inside the containers, for as long as the data loggers remained at ≤8°C. The cooling effect, or minutes per gram of ice a data logger maintained a temperature of ≤8°C, was calculated using linear regression; 8 similar containers were subjected to elevated summer temperatures. Small, medium, and large containers held mean masses of wet ice of 685, 1929, and 4439 g, respectively. The linear regression equation for grams of ice to duration of time at ≤8°C was y = 0.1994x + 385.13 for small containers, y = 0.1854x + 1273.3 for medium, and y = 0.5892x + 1410.3 for large containers, resulting in a cooling effect of 25.1 hours for small, 58.9 hours for medium, and 85.7 hours for large containers at ambient temperature. The duration of cooling effect in the summer profile group was consistent with that of the ambient temperature group. All of the container sizes successfully maintained proper cooling when packed with the appropriate grams of wet ice for the needed time interval. This study validates current practice for the shipment of corneal tissue in inexpensive, generic containers that can maintain effective cooling for the duration required for local, national, and international shipment.

  14. Effective action for superfluid Fermi systems in the strong-coupling limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, N.

    2005-01-01

    We derive the low-energy effective action for three-dimensional superfluid Fermi systems in the strong-coupling limit, where superfluidity originates from Bose-Einstein condensation of composite bosons. Taking into account density and pairing fluctuations on the same footing, we show that the effective action involves only the fermion density ρ r and its conjugate variable, the phase θ r of the pairing order parameter Δ r . We recover the standard action of a Bose superfluid of density ρ r /2, where the bosons have a mass m B =2m and interact via a repulsive contact potential with amplitude g B =4πa B /m B ,a B =2a (a the s-wave scattering length associated to the fermion-fermion interaction in vacuum). For lattice models, the derivation of the effective action is based on the mapping of the attractive Hubbard model onto the Heisenberg model in a uniform magnetic field, and a coherent state path integral representation of the partition function. The effective description of the Fermi superfluid in the strong-coupling limit is a Bose-Hubbard model with an intersite hopping amplitude t B =J/2 and an on-site repulsive interaction U B =2Jz, where J=4t 2 /U (t and -U are the intersite hopping amplitude and the on-site attraction in the (fermionic) Hubbard model, z the number of nearest-neighbor sites)

  15. Effective action for superfluid Fermi systems in the strong-coupling limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, N.

    2005-07-01

    We derive the low-energy effective action for three-dimensional superfluid Fermi systems in the strong-coupling limit, where superfluidity originates from Bose-Einstein condensation of composite bosons. Taking into account density and pairing fluctuations on the same footing, we show that the effective action involves only the fermion density ρr and its conjugate variable, the phase θr of the pairing order parameter Δr . We recover the standard action of a Bose superfluid of density ρr/2 , where the bosons have a mass mB=2m and interact via a repulsive contact potential with amplitude gB=4πaB/mB,aB=2a ( a the s -wave scattering length associated to the fermion-fermion interaction in vacuum). For lattice models, the derivation of the effective action is based on the mapping of the attractive Hubbard model onto the Heisenberg model in a uniform magnetic field, and a coherent state path integral representation of the partition function. The effective description of the Fermi superfluid in the strong-coupling limit is a Bose-Hubbard model with an intersite hopping amplitude tB=J/2 and an on-site repulsive interaction UB=2Jz , where J=4t2/U ( t and -U are the intersite hopping amplitude and the on-site attraction in the (fermionic) Hubbard model, z the number of nearest-neighbor sites).

  16. Experimental Investigation of Multi-layer Insulation Effect on Damage of Stuffed Shield by High-velocity Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUAN Gong-shun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The stuffed shield with multi-layer insulation(MLI was designed by improving on Al Whipple shield, and a series of high-velocity impact tests were practiced with a two-stage light gas gun facility at vacuum environment. The damage model of the stuffed shield with different MLI location by Al-sphere projectile impacting was obtained. The effect of MLI on damage of the stuffed shield by high-velocity impact was studied. The results indicate when the MLI is located at front side of the first Al-plate, the protection performance of the stuffed shield is improved with the larger perforation diameter of the first Al-plate and more impact kinetic energy dissipation of the projectile. When MLI is arranged at back side of the first Al-plate, the expansion of the secondary debris cloud from projectile impacting the first Al-plate is restrained, it is not good to improve the protection performance of the stuffed shield. When MLI is arranged at front side of the stuffed wall, the perforation size of the stuffed wall increases; when MLI is arranged at front side of the rear wall, the distribution range of crater on the rear wall decreases.

  17. Current-Nonlinear Hall Effect and Spin-Orbit Torque Magnetization Switching in a Magnetic Topological Insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, K.; Tsukazaki, A.; Yoshimi, R.; Kondou, K.; Takahashi, K. S.; Otani, Y.; Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y.

    2017-09-01

    The current-nonlinear Hall effect or second harmonic Hall voltage is widely used as one of the methods for estimating charge-spin conversion efficiency, which is attributed to the magnetization oscillation by spin-orbit torque (SOT). Here, we argue the second harmonic Hall voltage under a large in-plane magnetic field with an in-plane magnetization configuration in magnetic-nonmagnetic topological insulator (TI) heterostructures, Crx (Bi1 -ySby )2 -xTe3 /(Bi1 -ySby )2Te3 , where it is clearly shown that the large second harmonic voltage is governed not by SOT but mainly by asymmetric magnon scattering without macroscopic magnetization oscillation. Thus, this method does not allow an accurate estimation of charge-spin conversion efficiency in TI. Instead, the SOT contribution is exemplified by current pulse induced nonvolatile magnetization switching, which is realized with a current density of 2.5 ×1010 A m-2 , showing its potential as a spintronic material.

  18. Efficient charge-spin conversion and magnetization switching through the Rashba effect at topological-insulator/Ag interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuyuan; Wang, Aizhu; Wang, Yi; Ramaswamy, Rajagopalan; Shen, Lei; Moon, Jisoo; Zhu, Dapeng; Yu, Jiawei; Oh, Seongshik; Feng, Yuanping; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2018-01-01

    We report the observation of efficient charge-to-spin conversion in the three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) B i2S e3 and Ag bilayer by the spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance technique. The spin-orbit-torque ratio in the B i2S e3/Ag /CoFeB heterostructure shows a significant enhancement as the Ag thickness increases to ˜2 nm and reaches a value of 0.5 for 5 nm Ag, which is ˜3 times higher than that of B i2S e3/CoFeB at room temperature. The observation reveals the interfacial effect of B i2S e3/Ag exceeds that of the topological surface states (TSSs) in the B i2S e3 layer and plays a dominant role in the charge-to-spin conversion in the B i2S e3/Ag /CoFeB system. Based on first-principles calculations, we attribute our observation to the large Rashba splitting bands which wrap the TSS band and have the same net spin polarization direction as the TSS of B i2S e3 . Subsequently, we demonstrate Rashba-induced magnetization switching in B i2S e3/Ag /Py with a low current density of 5.8 ×105A /c m2 .

  19. Characteristics of epoxy resin/SiO2 nanocomposite insulation: effects of plasma surface treatment on the nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Phung, B T; Han, Zhao Jun; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2013-05-01

    The present study compares the effects of two different material processing techniques on modifying hydrophilic SiO2 nanoparticles. In one method, the nanoparticles undergo plasma treatment by using a custom-developed atmospheric-pressure non-equilibrium plasma reactor. With the other method, they undergo chemical treatment which grafts silane groups onto their surface and turns them into hydrophobic. The treated nanoparticles are then used to synthesize epoxy resin-based nanocomposites for electrical insulation applications. Their characteristics are investigated and compared with the pure epoxy resin and nanocomposite fabricated with unmodified nanofillers counterparts. The dispersion features of the nanoparticles in the epoxy resin matrix are examined through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. All samples show evidence that the agglomerations are smaller than 30 nm in their diameters. This indicates good dispersion uniformity. The Weibull plot of breakdown strength and the recorded partial discharge (PD) events of the epoxy resin/plasma-treated hydrophilic SiO2 nanocomposite (ER/PTI) suggest that the plasma-treated specimen yields higher breakdown strength and lower PD magnitude as compared to the untreated ones. In contrast, surprisingly, lower breakdown strength is found for the nanocomposite made by the chemically treated hydrophobic particles, whereas the PD magnitude and PD numbers remain at a similar level as the plasma-treated ones.

  20. Bond and flux-disorder effects on the superconductor-insulator transition of a honeycomb array of Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Enzo

    2018-05-01

    We study the effects of disorder on the zero-temperature quantum phase transition of a honeycomb array of Josephson junctions in a magnetic field with an average of fo flux quantum per plaquette. Bond disorder due to spatial variations in the Josephson couplings and magnetic flux disorder due to variations in the plaquette areas are considered. The model can describe the superconductor-insulator transition in ultra-thin films with a triangular pattern of nanoholes. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations of the equivalent (2 + 1)-dimensional classical model are used to study the critical behavior and estimate the universal resistivity at the transition. The results show that bond disorder leads to a rounding of the first-order phase transition for fo = 1 / 3 to a continuous transition. For integer fo, the decrease of the critical coupling parameter with flux disorder is significantly different from that of the same model defined on a square lattice. The results are compared with recent experimental observations on nanohole thin films with geometrical disorder and external magnetic field.

  1. Cryogenic Insulation Standard Data and Methodologies Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, Burton; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Mullenix, Pamela; Fesmire, James; Swanger, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Extending some recent developments in the area of technical consensus standards for cryogenic thermal insulation systems, a preliminary Inter-Laboratory Study of foam insulation materials was performed by NASA Kennedy Space Center and LeTourneau University. The initial focus was ambient pressure cryogenic boil off testing using the Cryostat-400 flat-plate instrument. Completion of a test facility at LETU has enabled direct, comparative testing, using identical cryostat instruments and methods, and the production of standard thermal data sets for a number of materials under sub-ambient conditions. The two sets of measurements were analyzed and indicate there is reasonable agreement between the two laboratories. Based on cryogenic boiloff calorimetry, new equipment and methods for testing thermal insulation systems have been successfully developed. These boiloff instruments (or cryostats) include both flat plate and cylindrical models and are applicable to a wide range of different materials under a wide range of test conditions. Test measurements are generally made at large temperature difference (boundary temperatures of 293 K and 78 K are typical) and include the full vacuum pressure range. Results are generally reported in effective thermal conductivity (ke) and mean heat flux (q) through the insulation system. The new cryostat instruments provide an effective and reliable way to characterize the thermal performance of materials under subambient conditions. Proven in through thousands of tests of hundreds of material systems, they have supported a wide range of aerospace, industry, and research projects. Boiloff testing technology is not just for cryogenic testing but is a cost effective, field-representative methodology to test any material or system for applications at sub-ambient temperatures. This technology, when adequately coupled with a technical standards basis, can provide a cost-effective, field-representative methodology to test any material or system

  2. Poly-ϵ-caprolactone/chitosan nanoparticles provide strong adjuvant effect for hepatitis B antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Sandra; Soares, Edna; Borchard, Gerrit; Borges, Olga

    2017-10-01

    This work aims to investigate the adjuvant effect of poly-ϵ-caprolactone/chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and the plasmid DNA encoding HBsAg (pRC/CMV-HBs). Both antigens were adsorbed onto preformed NPs. Vaccination studies were performed in C57BL/6 mice. Transfection efficiency was investigated in A549 cell line. HBsAg-adsorbed NPs generated strong anti-HBsAg IgG titers, mainly of IgG1 isotype, and induced antigen-specific IFN-γ and IL-17 secretion by spleen cells. The addition of pRC/CMV-HBs to the HBsAg-adsorbed NPs inhibited IL-17 secretion but had minor effect on IFN-γ levels. Lastly, pRC/CMV-HBs-loaded NPs generated a weak serum antibody response. Poly-ϵ-caprolactone/chitosan NPs provide a strong humoral adjuvant effect for HBsAg and induce a Th1/Th17-mediated cellular immune responses worth explore for hepatitis B virus vaccination.

  3. Effects of copper ions on the characteristics of egg white gel induced by strong alkali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yaoyao; Zhao, Yan; Xu, Mingsheng; Chen, Zhangyi; Wang, Shuzhen; Tu, Yonggang

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of copper ions on egg white (EW) gel induced by strong alkali. Changes in gel characteristics were examined through texture profile analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical methods. The value of gel strength reached its maximum when 0.1% copper ions was added. However, the lowest cohesiveness values were observed at 0.1%. The springiness of gel without copper ions was significantly greater than the gel with copper ions added. SEM results illustrated that the low concentration of copper ions contributes to a dense and uniform gel network, and an open matrix was formed at 0.4%. The free and total sulphhydryl group content in the egg white protein gel significantly decreased with the increased copper. The increase of copper ions left the contents of ionic and hydrogen bonds basically unchanged, hydrophobic interaction presented an increasing trend, and the disulfide bond exhibited a completely opposite change. The change of surface hydrophobicity proved that the main binding force of copper induced gel was hydrophobic interaction. However, copper ions had no effect on the protein component of the gels. Generally, a low level of copper ions facilitates protein-protein association, which is involved in the characteristics of gels. Instead, high ionic strength had a negative effect on gels induced by strong alkali. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  4. Effect of Dislocation Density on Deformation Behavior of Super Strong Bainitic Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Avishan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Presence of nanoscale bainitic ferrites and high carbon retained austenites that are stable at ambient temperature within the microstructures of super strong bainitic steels makes it possible to achieve exceptional strengths and ductility properties in these groups of nanostructured steels. This article aims to study the effect of the dislocation density variations during tensile testing in ambient temperature on deformation behavior of nanostructured low temperature bainitic steels. Results indicate that dislocation absorption from bainitic ferrite subunits by surrounding retained austenite reduces the work hardening and therefore increases the formability of bainitic ferrite during deformation, which in turn results in a suitable combination of strength and ductility.

  5. Dispersion of Co/CNTs via strong electrostatic adsorption method: Thermal treatment effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbarzadeh, Omid, E-mail: omid.akbarzadeh63@gmail.com; Abdullah, Bawadi, E-mail: bawadi-abdullah@petronas.com.my; Subbarao, Duvvuri, E-mail: duvvuri-subbarao@petronas.com.my [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Zabidi, Noor Asmawati Mohd, E-mail: noorasmawati-mzabidi@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    The effect of different thermal treatment temperature on the structure of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and Co particle dispersion on CNTs support is studied using Strong electrostatic adsorption (SEA) method. The samples tested by N{sub 2}-adsorption, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). N{sub 2}-adsorption results showed BET surface area increased using thermal treatment and TEM images showed that increasing the thermal treatment temperature lead to flaky CNTs and defects introduced on the outer surface and Co particle dispersion increased.

  6. Apparent competition and native consumers exacerbate the strong competitive effect of an exotic plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrock, John L; Dutra, Humberto P; Marquis, Robert J; Barber, Nicholas

    2015-04-01

    Direct and indirect effects can play a key role in invasions, but experiments evaluating both are rare. We examined the roles of direct competition and apparent competition by exotic Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) by manipulating (1) L. maackii vegetation, (2) presence of L. maackii fruits, and (3) access to plants by small mammals and deer. Direct competition with L. maackii reduced the abundance and richness of native and exotic species, and native consumers significantly reduced the abundance and richness of native species. Although effects of direct competition and consumption were more pervasive, richness of native plants was also reduced through apparent competition, as small-mammal consumers reduced richness only when L. maackii fruits were present. Our experiment reveals the multiple, interactive pathways that affect the success and impact of an invasive exotic plant: exotic plants may directly benefit from reduced attack by native consumers, may directly exert strong competitive effects on native plants, and may also benefit from apparent competition.

  7. A Novel Fully Depleted Air AlN Silicon-on-Insulator Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Yang; Yong, Gao; Peng-Liang, Gong

    2008-01-01

    A novel fully depleted air AlN silicon-on-insulator (SOI) metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOS-FET) is presented, which can eliminate the self-heating effect and solve the problem that the off-state current of SOI MOSFETs increases and the threshold voltage characteristics become worse when employing a high thermal conductivity material as a buried layer. The simulation results reveal that the lattice temperature in normal SOI devices is 75 K higher than the atmosphere temperature, while the lattice temperature is just 4K higher than the atmosphere temperature resulting in less severe self-heating effect in air AlN SOI MOSFETs and AlN SOI MOSFETs. The on-state current of air AlN SOI MOSFETs is similar to the AlN SOI structure, and improves 12.3% more than that of normal SOI MOSFETs. The off-state current of AlN SOI is 6.7 times of normal SOI MOSFETs, while the counterpart of air AlN SOI MOSFETs is lower than that of SOI MOSFETs by two orders of magnitude. The threshold voltage change of air AlN SOI MOSFETs with different drain voltage is much less than that of AlN SOI devices, when the drain voltage is biased at 0.8 V, this difference is 28mV, so the threshold voltage change induced by employing high thermal conductivity material is cured. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  8. Floquet topological insulators for sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Romain; Khanikaev, Alexander B.; Alù, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    The unique conduction properties of condensed matter systems with topological order have recently inspired a quest for the similar effects in classical wave phenomena. Acoustic topological insulators, in particular, hold the promise to revolutionize our ability to control sound, allowing for large isolation in the bulk and broadband one-way transport along their edges, with topological immunity against structural defects and disorder. So far, these fascinating properties have been obtained relying on moving media, which may introduce noise and absorption losses, hindering the practical potential of topological acoustics. Here we overcome these limitations by modulating in time the acoustic properties of a lattice of resonators, introducing the concept of acoustic Floquet topological insulators. We show that acoustic waves provide a fertile ground to apply the anomalous physics of Floquet topological insulators, and demonstrate their relevance for a wide range of acoustic applications, including broadband acoustic isolation and topologically protected, nonreciprocal acoustic emitters.

  9. Use of cermet thin film resistors with nitride passivated metal insulator field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G. A.; Harrap, V.

    1971-01-01

    Film deposition of cermet resistors on same chip with metal nitride oxide silicon field effect transistors permits protection of contamination sensitive active devices from contaminants produced in cermet deposition and definition processes. Additional advantages include lower cost, greater reliability, and space savings.

  10. Theory of insulated gate field effect transistor with negative differential electron mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, A.S.

    1995-09-01

    We study the consequences of negative differential electron mobility in FETs using the field model and the gradual channel approximation. We find that the FET may show convective or absolute instability. The fluctuations growths is governed by diffusion law with negative effective diffusion coefficient. (author). 4 refs, 2 figs

  11. Effects of disorder on coexistence and competition between superconducting and insulating states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostovoy, MV; Marchetti, FM; Simons, BD; Littlewood, PB

    We study effects of nonmagnetic impurities on the competition between the superconducting and electron-hole pairing. We show that disorder can result in coexistence of these two types of ordering in a uniform state, even when in clean materials they are mutually exclusive.

  12. Non-adiabatic effects in the electron and phonon spectra of a Peierls insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzyub, I.P.; Zerov, Yu.E.

    1989-08-01

    The phonon and electron spectra of the discrete version of the Su, Schrieffer and Heeger model are calculated taking into account the polarization effects. It is shown that there exists a finite probability of electron states relaxation even at zero temperature. (author). 5 refs, 1 fig

  13. Insulated piggyBac vectors for insect transgenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn Carsten

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germ-line transformation of insects is now a widely used method for analyzing gene function and for the development of genetically modified strains suitable for pest control programs. The most widely used transposable element for the germ-line transformation of insects is piggyBac. The site of integration of the transgene can influence gene expression due to the effects of nearby transcription enhancers or silent heterochromatic regions. Position effects can be minimized by flanking a transgene with insulator elements. The scs/scs' and gypsy insulators from Drosophila melanogaster as well as the chicken β-globin HS4 insulator function in both Drosophila and mammalian cells. Results To minimize position effects we have created a set of piggyBac transformation vectors that contain either the scs/scs', gypsy or chicken β-globin HS4 insulators. The vectors contain either fluorescent protein or eye color marker genes and have been successfully used for germ-line transformation of Drosophila melanogaster. A set of the scs/scs' vectors contains the coral reef fluorescent protein marker genes AmCyan, ZsGreen and DsRed that have not been optimized for translation in human cells. These marker genes are controlled by a combined GMR-3xP3 enhancer/promoter that gives particularly strong expression in the eyes. This is also the first report of the use of the ZsGreen and AmCyan reef fluorescent proteins as transformation markers in insects. Conclusion The insulated piggyBac vectors should protect transgenes against position effects and thus facilitate fine control of gene expression in a wide spectrum of insect species. These vectors may also be used for transgenesis in other invertebrate species.

  14. Effects of Edge on-Site Potential in a Honeycomb Topological Magnon Insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleón, Pierre A.; Xian, Yang

    2018-06-01

    While the deviation of the edge on-site potential from the bulk values in a magnonic topological honeycomb lattice leads to the formation of edge states in a bearded boundary, this is not the case for a zigzag termination, where no edge state is found. In a semi-infinite lattice, the intrinsic on-site interactions along the boundary sites generate an effective defect and this gives rise to Tamm-like edge states. If a nontrivial gap is induced, both Tamm-like and topologically protected edge states appear in the band structure. The effective defect can be strengthened by an external on-site potential, and the dispersion relation, velocity and magnon density of the edge states all become tunable.

  15. STRONG FIELD EFFECTS ON EMISSION LINE PROFILES: KERR BLACK HOLES AND WARPED ACCRETION DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yan; Li Xiangdong

    2012-01-01

    If an accretion disk around a black hole is illuminated by hard X-rays from non-thermal coronae, fluorescent iron lines will be emitted from the inner region of the accretion disk. The emission line profiles will show a variety of strong field effects, which may be used as a probe of the spin parameter of the black hole and the structure of the accretion disk. In this paper, we generalize the previous relativistic line profile models by including both the black hole spinning effects and the non-axisymmetries of warped accretion disks. Our results show different features from the conventional calculations for either a flat disk around a Kerr black hole or a warped disk around a Schwarzschild black hole by presenting, at the same time, multiple peaks, rather long red tails, and time variations of line profiles with the precession of the disk. We show disk images as seen by a distant observer, which are distorted by the strong gravity. Although we are primarily concerned with the iron K-shell lines in this paper, the calculation is general and is valid for any emission lines produced from a warped accretion disk around a black hole.

  16. Channeling effect in electronic spectra produced by grazing impact of fast protons on insulator surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archubi, C D; Gravielle, M S, E-mail: archubi@iafe.uba.a, E-mail: msilvia@iafe.uba.a [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-11-01

    Electron emission due to grazing scattering of fast protons from LiF and KCl surfaces is studied under axial incidence conditions. The differential emission probability is calculated within a distorted-wave formalism, taking into account axial channeled trajectories. For different emission angles, electronic spectra for proton incidence along the two principal crystal axes ([100] and [110]) are compared with those corresponding to an impact velocity in a random direction, finding effects associated with the channeling conditions.

  17. The melt/shrink effect of low density thermoplastics insulates: Cone calorimeter tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The melt/shrink effects on the fire behavior of low density thermoplastic foam have been studied in a cone calorimeter. The experiments have been performed with four samples of expanded polystyrene foams having different thicknesses and two extruded polystyrene foams. Decrease in surface area and increase in density, characterizing the melt/shrink effect have been measured at different incident heat fluxes. Three of these foams tested have been also examined by burning tests at an incident heat flux of 50 kW/m2. It was assessed that the fire behavior predictions based the current literature models provided incorrect results if the cone test results were applied directly. However, the correct models provided adequate results when the initial burning area and the density of the molten foam were used to correct the initial cone calorimeter data. This communication refers to the fact that both the effective burning area and the density of the molten foam affect the cone calorimeter data, which requires consequent corrections to attain adequate predictions of models about the materials fire behavior.

  18. Ultra-thin films of polysilsesquioxanes possessing 3-methacryloxypropyl groups as gate insulator for organic field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Yoshio; Kawa, Haruna; Yoshiki, Jun; Kumei, Maki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Oi, Fumio; Yamakado, Hideo; Fukuda, Hisashi; Kimura, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    Polysilsesquioxanes (PSQs) possessing 3-methacryloxypropyl groups as an organic moiety of the side chain were synthesized by sol–gel condensation copolymerization of the corresponding trialkoxysilanes. The ultra-thin PSQ film with a radical initiator and a cross-linking agent was prepared by a spin-coating method, and the film was cured integrally at low temperatures of less than 120 °C through two different kinds of polymeric reactions, which were radical polymerization of vinyl groups and sol–gel condensation polymerization of terminated silanol and alkoxy groups. The obtained PSQ film showed the almost perfect solubilization resistance to acetone, which is a good solvent of PSQ before polymerization. It became clear by atomic force microscopy observation that the surface of the PSQ film was very smooth at a nano-meter level. Furthermore, pentacene-based organic field-effect transistor (OFET) with the PSQ film as a gate insulator showed typical p-channel enhancement mode operation characteristics and therefore the ultra-thin PSQ film has the potential to be applicable for solution-processed OFET systems. - Highlights: ► Polysilsesquioxanes (PSQs) possessing 3-methacryloxypropyl groups were synthesized. ► The ultra-thin PSQ film could be cured at low temperatures of less than 120 °C. ► The PSQ film showed the almost perfect solubilization resistance to organic solvent. ► The surface of the PSQ film was very smooth at a nano-meter level. ► Pentacene-based organic field-effect transistor with the PSQ film was fabricated.

  19. Ultra-thin films of polysilsesquioxanes possessing 3-methacryloxypropyl groups as gate insulator for organic field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, Yoshio; Kawa, Haruna [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Systems Engineering, Wakayama University, 930 Sakae-dani, Wakayama 640-8510 (Japan); Yoshiki, Jun [Division of Information and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto-cho, Muroran 050-8585 (Japan); Kumei, Maki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Oi, Fumio [Konishi Chemical IND. Co., LTD., 3-4-77 Kozaika, Wakayama 641-0007 (Japan); Yamakado, Hideo [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Systems Engineering, Wakayama University, 930 Sakae-dani, Wakayama 640-8510 (Japan); Fukuda, Hisashi [Division of Engineering for Composite Functions, Faculty of Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto-cho, Muroran 050-8585 (Japan); Kimura, Keiichi, E-mail: kkimura@center.wakayama-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Systems Engineering, Wakayama University, 930 Sakae-dani, Wakayama 640-8510 (Japan)

    2012-10-01

    Polysilsesquioxanes (PSQs) possessing 3-methacryloxypropyl groups as an organic moiety of the side chain were synthesized by sol-gel condensation copolymerization of the corresponding trialkoxysilanes. The ultra-thin PSQ film with a radical initiator and a cross-linking agent was prepared by a spin-coating method, and the film was cured integrally at low temperatures of less than 120 Degree-Sign C through two different kinds of polymeric reactions, which were radical polymerization of vinyl groups and sol-gel condensation polymerization of terminated silanol and alkoxy groups. The obtained PSQ film showed the almost perfect solubilization resistance to acetone, which is a good solvent of PSQ before polymerization. It became clear by atomic force microscopy observation that the surface of the PSQ film was very smooth at a nano-meter level. Furthermore, pentacene-based organic field-effect transistor (OFET) with the PSQ film as a gate insulator showed typical p-channel enhancement mode operation characteristics and therefore the ultra-thin PSQ film has the potential to be applicable for solution-processed OFET systems. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polysilsesquioxanes (PSQs) possessing 3-methacryloxypropyl groups were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ultra-thin PSQ film could be cured at low temperatures of less than 120 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PSQ film showed the almost perfect solubilization resistance to organic solvent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface of the PSQ film was very smooth at a nano-meter level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pentacene-based organic field-effect transistor with the PSQ film was fabricated.

  20. Characteristics and Motivational Factors of Effective Extension Advisory Leaders: Implications for Building Strong Extension Advisory Councils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Kish

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics and motivational factors of effective Extension advisory leaders. This Delphi study was conducted with a selected group of County Extension Directors and a group of Extension State Advisory Leaders. The study identified 10 characteristics that distinguish an effective Extension advisory leader. Some of these characteristics are explicit and easy to observe, while others are implicit and difficult to directly observe. Therefore, it is practical to use directly observable characteristics of effective advisory leaders when selecting volunteers. Once potential volunteers are spotted in the community, implicit characteristics of effective advisory leaders should be used to further screen them before they are selected. The study also identified the eight most important factors motivating individuals to volunteer as effective advisory leaders. Understanding these motivational factors is helpful for creating an environment for attracting and retaining effective volunteers. Understanding their motivation for volunteer work and creating an environment for them to meet the motivating factors for volunteering will lead to volunteer satisfaction and retention. The findings of this study can be used to build strong Extension advisory councils.

  1. Boson localization and the superfluid-insulator transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, M.P.A.; Weichman, P.B.; Grinstein, G.; Fisher, D.S.; Condensed Matter Physics 114-36, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125; IBM Research Division, Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598; Joseph Henry Laboratory of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544)

    1989-01-01

    The phase diagrams and phase transitions of bosons with short-ranged repulsive interactions moving in periodic and/or random external potentials at zero temperature are investigated with emphasis on the superfluid-insulator transition induced by varying a parameter such as the density. Bosons in periodic potentials (e.g., on a lattice) at T=0 exhibit two types of phases: a superfluid phase and Mott insulating phases characterized by integer (or commensurate) boson densities, by the existence of a gap for particle-hole excitations, and by zero compressibility. Generically, the superfluid onset transition in d dimensions from a Mott insulator to superfluidity is ''ideal,'' or mean field in character, but at special multicritical points with particle-hole symmetry it is in the universality class of the (d+1)-dimensional XY model. In the presence of disorder, a third, ''Bose glass'' phase exists. This phase is insulating because of the localization effects of the randomness and analogous to the Fermi glass phase of interacting fermions in a strongly disordered potential

  2. Trapped in the extinction vortex? Strong genetic effects in a declining vertebrate population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsson Mikael

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inbreeding and loss of genetic diversity are expected to increase the extinction risk of small populations, but detailed tests in natural populations are scarce. We combine long-term population and fitness data with those from two types of molecular markers to examine the role of genetic effects in a declining metapopulation of southern dunlins Calidris alpina schinzii, an endangered shorebird. Results The decline is associated with increased pairings between related individuals, including close inbreeding (as revealed by both field observations of parentage and molecular markers. Furthermore, reduced genetic diversity seems to affect individual fitness at several life stages. Higher genetic similarity between mates correlates negatively with the pair's hatching success. Moreover, offspring produced by related parents are more homozygous and suffer from increased mortality during embryonic development and possibly also after hatching. Conclusions Our results demonstrate strong genetic effects in a rapidly declining population, emphasizing the importance of genetic factors for the persistence of small populations.

  3. Strong strain rate effect on the plasticity of amorphous silica nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Yonghai; Zheng, Kun

    2014-01-01

    With electron-beam (e-beam) off, in-situ tensile experiments on amorphous silica nanowires (NWs) were performed inside a transmission electron microscope (TEM). By controlling the loading rates, the strain rate can be adjusted accurately in a wide range. The result shows a strong strain rate effect on the plasticity of amorphous silica NWs. At lower strain rate, the intrinsic brittle materials exhibit a pronounced elongation higher than 100% to failure with obvious necking near ambient temperature. At the strain rate higher than 5.23 × 10 −3 /s, the elongation of the NW decreased dramatically, and a brittle fracture feature behavior was revealed. This ductile feature of the amorphous silica NWs has been further confirmed with the in-situ experiments under optical microscopy while the effect of e-beam irradiation could be eliminated.

  4. Strongly correlated Fermi-systems: Non-Fermi liquid behavior, quasiparticle effective mass and their interplay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaginyan, V.R. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, RAS, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)], E-mail: vrshag@thd.pnpi.spb.ru; Amusia, M.Ya. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Popov, K.G. [Komi Science Center, Ural Division, RAS, Syktyvkar 167982 (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    Basing on the density functional theory of fermion condensation, we analyze the non-Fermi liquid behavior of strongly correlated Fermi-systems such as heavy-fermion metals. When deriving equations for the effective mass of quasiparticles, we consider solids with a lattice and homogeneous systems. We show that the low-temperature thermodynamic and transport properties are formed by quasiparticles, while the dependence of the effective mass on temperature, number density, magnetic fields, etc., gives rise to the non-Fermi liquid behavior. Our theoretical study of the heat capacity, magnetization, energy scales, the longitudinal magnetoresistance and magnetic entropy are in good agreement with the remarkable recent facts collected on the heavy-fermion metal YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2}.

  5. Strongly correlated Fermi-systems: Non-Fermi liquid behavior, quasiparticle effective mass and their interplay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaginyan, V.R.; Amusia, M.Ya.; Popov, K.G.

    2009-01-01

    Basing on the density functional theory of fermion condensation, we analyze the non-Fermi liquid behavior of strongly correlated Fermi-systems such as heavy-fermion metals. When deriving equations for the effective mass of quasiparticles, we consider solids with a lattice and homogeneous systems. We show that the low-temperature thermodynamic and transport properties are formed by quasiparticles, while the dependence of the effective mass on temperature, number density, magnetic fields, etc., gives rise to the non-Fermi liquid behavior. Our theoretical study of the heat capacity, magnetization, energy scales, the longitudinal magnetoresistance and magnetic entropy are in good agreement with the remarkable recent facts collected on the heavy-fermion metal YbRh 2 Si 2 .

  6. Effect of linear chirp on strong field photodissociation of H+2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhudesai, Vaibhav; Natan, Adi; Bruner, Barry; Silberberg, Yaron; Lev, Uri; Heber, Oded; Strasser, Daniel; Schwalm, Dirk; Zajfman, Daniel; Ben-Itzhak, Itzik

    2011-01-01

    We report the experimental findings of a systematic study of the effect of linear chirp on strong field photodissociation of H + 2 . For vibrational levels around or above the one photon crossing, the effect manifests itself in terms of a shift in the kinetic energy release (KER) peaks. The peaks shift up for negative chirp whereas they shift down for positive chirp. The measurements are carried out by varying two of the three laser pulse characteristics, energy, pulse peak intensity and linear chirp, while keeping the third constant. The shifts in the KER peaks are found to be intensity dependent for a given value of chirp. However, in the last two cases (i.e., fixed pulsed energy and fixed pulse peak intensity), they are found to be independent of the chirp magnitude. The results are understood on the basis of saturation of photodissociation probabilities for these levels.

  7. Effect of linear chirp on strong field photodissociation of H{sup +}{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhudesai, Vaibhav; Natan, Adi; Bruner, Barry; Silberberg, Yaron; Lev, Uri; Heber, Oded; Strasser, Daniel; Schwalm, Dirk; Zajfman, Daniel [Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 (Israel); Ben-Itzhak, Itzik [Kansas State University, Kansas (United States)

    2011-10-15

    We report the experimental findings of a systematic study of the effect of linear chirp on strong field photodissociation of H{sup +}{sub 2}. For vibrational levels around or above the one photon crossing, the effect manifests itself in terms of a shift in the kinetic energy release (KER) peaks. The peaks shift up for negative chirp whereas they shift down for positive chirp. The measurements are carried out by varying two of the three laser pulse characteristics, energy, pulse peak intensity and linear chirp, while keeping the third constant. The shifts in the KER peaks are found to be intensity dependent for a given value of chirp. However, in the last two cases (i.e., fixed pulsed energy and fixed pulse peak intensity), they are found to be independent of the chirp magnitude. The results are understood on the basis of saturation of photodissociation probabilities for these levels.

  8. Using billing and weather data to separate thermostat from insulation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fels, M F; Goldberg, M L

    1984-05-01

    A simple methodology, which uses aggregate utility sales data to measure and decompose residential conservation trends, is demonstrated. The data base is the aggregate natural gas consumption of the nearly one million houses in New Jersey which use gas for heating. The conservation index resulting from the analysis is normalized annual consumption, which adjusts per-household consumption to typical weather conditions. To smooth erratic year-to-year changes, four-year composite analyses are moved forward in time over the period 1970-82. Dramatic decreases in consumption, totaling 26% since the oil embargo, are evident. A decomposition of the results for the four years following the embargo suggests that over half of this conservation effect is due to changes in interior temperatures, with the policy implication that thermostat setbacks have played a far greater conservation role than have either structural change through retrofitting or modifications in appliance usage. In more recent years, for which the overall reduction in energy usage is lower, the dominant conservation role appears to have shifted to reductions in temperature-independent, base-level consumption by water heaters and appliances, while the effects of retrofitting remain relatively small.

  9. Panels of microporous insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWilliams, J.A.; Morgan, D.E.; Jackson, J.D.J.

    1990-08-07

    Microporous thermal insulation materials have a lattice structure in which the average interstitial dimension is less than the mean free path of the molecules of air or other gas in which the material is arranged. This results in a heat flow which is less than that attributable to the molecular heat diffusion of the gas. According to this invention, a method is provided for manufacturing panels of microporous thermal insulation, in particular such panels in which the insulation material is bonded to a substrate. The method comprises the steps of applying a film of polyvinyl acetate emulsion to a non-porous substrate, and compacting powdery microporous thermal insulation material against the film so as to cause the consolidated insulation material to bond to the substrate and form a panel. The polyvinyl acetate may be applied by brushing or spraying, and is preferably allowed to dry prior to compacting the insulation material. 1 fig.

  10. Long-term effects of the strong African American families program on youths' alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Gene H; Chen, Yi-Fu; Kogan, Steven M; Murry, Velma McBride; Brown, Anita C

    2010-04-01

    This report extends earlier accounts by addressing the effects of the Strong African American Families (SAAF) program across 65 months. Two hypotheses were tested: (a) Rural African American youths randomly assigned to participate in SAAF would demonstrate lower rates of alcohol use than would control youths more than 5 years later, and (b) SAAF's effects on deterring the onset of alcohol use in early adolescence would carry forward to mediate the program's long-term effects. African American youths in rural Georgia (mean age at pretest = 10.8 years) were assigned randomly to the SAAF group (n = 369) or to a control group (n = 298). Past-month alcohol use was assessed at pretest and at 9, 18, 29, 53, and 65 months after pretest. SAAF participants increased their alcohol use at a slower rate than did adolescents in the control condition across the follow-up assessments. At the 65-month assessment, SAAF participants reported having drunk alcohol half as often as did youths in the control group. Consistent with the second hypothesis, SAAF's effects on deterring initiation carried forward to account for its effects on alcohol use across time. Training in protective parenting processes and self-regulatory skills during preadolescence may contribute to a self-sustaining trajectory of disinterest in and avoidance of alcohol use during adolescence when peers begin to model and sanction it. (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved

  11. Estimation of thermal insulation performance in multi-layer insulator for liquid helium pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibanuma, Kiyoshi; Kuriyama, Masaaki; Shibata, Takemasa

    1991-01-01

    For a multi-layer insulator around the liquid helium pipes for cryopumps of JT-60 NBI, a multi-layer insulator composed of 10 layers, which can be wound around the pipe at the same time and in which the respective layers are in concentric circles by shifting them in arrangement, has been developed and tested. As the result, it was shown that the newly developed multi-layer insulator has better thermal insulation performance than the existing one, i.e. the heat load of the newly developed insulator composed of 10 layers was reduced to 1/3 the heat load of the existing insulator, and the heat leak at the joint of the insulator in longitudinal direction of the pipe was negligible. In order to clarify thermal characteristics of the multi-layer insulator, the heat transfer through the insulator has been analyzed considering the radiation heat transfer by the netting spacer between the reflectors, and the temperature dependence on the emissivities and the heat transmission coefficients of these two components of the insulator. The analytical results were in good agreements with the experimental ones, so that the analytical method was shown to be valid. Concerning the influence of the number of layers and the layer density on the insulation performance of the insulator, analytical results showed that the multi-layer insulator with the number of layer about N = 20 and the layer density below 2.0 layer/mm was the most effective for the liquid helium pipe of a JT-60 cryopump. (author)

  12. The Effects of Perlite Concentration and Coating Thickness of the Polyester Nonwoven Structures on Thermal and Acoustic Insulation and Also Electromagnetic Radiation Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyda EYUPOGLU

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the improvement of the thermal and acoustic insulation and also electromagnetic radiation properties of polyester (PET nonwoven fabric (NWF with 180 g/m2 weight was investigated. For this purpose, PET NWF was coated with perlite stone powder having 210 – 590 µm particle size using polyurethane (PU based coating. Five different concentrations from 1 to 5 % of perlite stone powder were applied to the surface of PET NWF having five different thicknesses. And then the effect of perlite concentration and its thickness to thermal, acoustic and electromagnetic radiation properties were studied. It was found that the addition of perlite stone powder increased the thermal and acoustic insulation properties of PET NWF. Furthermore, the addition of perlite stone powder does not affect the electromagnetic radiation properties of samples.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.24.1.17562

  13. Aluminum nitride insulating films for MOSFET devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, G. W.; Maserjian, J.

    1972-01-01

    Application of aluminum nitrides as electrical insulator for electric capacitors is discussed. Electrical properties of aluminum nitrides are analyzed and specific use with field effect transistors is defined. Operational limits of field effect transistors are developed.

  14. COMBINED EFFECT OF THE AIRBORNE AND IMPACT NOISE PRODUCED ONTO THE SOUND INSULATION OF INSERTED FLOORS OF RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS: THEORETICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saltykov Ivan Petrovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The indoor environment of residential buildings is a complex system. It consists of diverse though related elements. An optimal correlation of parameters of the indoor space converts into the appropriate equilibrium and harmonious human living free from any stimulating or irritating factors that interfere with any working and/or relaxation processes. The author has selected the following three principal factors of the indoor environment. They include heat, daylight and sound. The research has revealed a strong linkn between these factors. Noise pollution of residential houses is taken into account through the introduction of the airborne insulation index and the impact sound index underneath the inserted floor. The findings of theoretical researches and experiments have proven a strong functional relationship between airborne and impact sound values.

  15. General observation of the memory effect in metal-insulator-ITO structures due to indium diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiaojing; Xu, Huihua; Zhao, Ni; Wang, Yu; Rogach, Andrey L; Shen, Yingzhong

    2015-01-01

    Resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices based on metal oxides, organic molecules and inorganic nanocrystals (NCs) have been studied extensively in recent years. Different memory switching mechanisms have been proposed and shown to be closely related to the device architectures. In this work, we demonstrate that the use of an ITO/active layer/InGa structure can yield nonvolatile resistive memory behavior in a variety of active materials, including polymers, organic small molecules, and colloidal NCs. Through the electrode material and thickness-dependent study, we show that the ON state of the devices is associated with filamentary conduction induced by indium diffusion from the ITO electrode, occurring mostly within around 40–50 nm from the ITO/active layer interface. A negative differential resistance (NDR) regime is observed during transition from the ON to OFF state, and is explained by the space charge limited current (SCLC) effect due to hole injection at the ITO/active layer interface. Our study reveals the impact of indium diffusion at the ITO/active layer interface, an important factor that should be taken into consideration when designing thin printed RRAM devices. (paper)

  16. Effects of nuclear spins on the transport properties of the edge of two-dimensional topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chen-Hsuan; Stano, Peter; Klinovaja, Jelena; Loss, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    The electrons in the edge channels of two-dimensional topological insulators can be described as a helical Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. They couple to nuclear spins embedded in the host materials through the hyperfine interaction, and are therefore subject to elastic spin-flip backscattering on the nuclear spins. We investigate the nuclear-spin-induced edge resistance due to such backscattering by performing a renormalization-group analysis. Remarkably, the effect of this backscattering mechanism is stronger in a helical edge than in nonhelical channels, which are believed to be present in the trivial regime of InAs/GaSb quantum wells. In a system with sufficiently long edges, the disordered nuclear spins lead to an edge resistance which grows exponentially upon lowering the temperature. On the other hand, electrons from the edge states mediate an anisotropic Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida nuclear spin-spin interaction, which induces a spiral nuclear spin order below the transition temperature. We discuss the features of the spiral order, as well as its experimental signatures. In the ordered phase, we identify two backscattering mechanisms, due to charge impurities and magnons. The backscattering on charge impurities is allowed by the internally generated magnetic field, and leads to an Anderson-type localization of the edge states. The magnon-mediated backscattering results in a power-law resistance, which is suppressed at zero temperature. Overall, we find that in a sufficiently long edge the nuclear spins, whether ordered or not, suppress the edge conductance to zero as the temperature approaches zero.

  17. Effects of bulk charged impurities on the bulk and surface transport in three-dimensional topological insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, B.; Chen, T.; Shklovskii, B. I., E-mail: shklovsk@physics.spa.umn.edu [University of Minnesota, Fine Theoretical Physics Institute (United States)

    2013-09-15

    In the three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), the physics of doped semiconductors exists literally side-by-side with the physics of ultrarelativistic Dirac fermions. This unusual pairing creates a novel playground for studying the interplay between disorder and electronic transport. In this mini-review, we focus on the disorder caused by the three-dimensionally distributed charged impurities that are ubiquitous in TIs, and we outline the effects it has on both the bulk and surface transport in TIs. We present self-consistent theories for Coulomb screening both in the bulk and at the surface, discuss the magnitude of the disorder potential in each case, and present results for the conductivity. In the bulk, where the band gap leads to thermally activated transport, we show how disorder leads to a smaller-than-expected activation energy that gives way to variable-range hopping at low temperatures. We confirm this enhanced conductivity with numerical simulations that also allow us to explore different degrees of impurity compensation. For the surface, where the TI has gapless Dirac modes, we present a theory of disorder and screening of deep impurities, and we calculate the corresponding zero-temperature conductivity. We also comment on the growth of the disorder potential in passing from the surface of the TI into the bulk. Finally, we discuss how the presence of a gap at the Dirac point, introduced by some source of time-reversal symmetry breaking, affects the disorder potential at the surface and the mid-gap density of states.

  18. Effects of bulk charged impurities on the bulk and surface transport in three-dimensional topological insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, B.; Chen, T.; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2013-01-01

    In the three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), the physics of doped semiconductors exists literally side-by-side with the physics of ultrarelativistic Dirac fermions. This unusual pairing creates a novel playground for studying the interplay between disorder and electronic transport. In this mini-review, we focus on the disorder caused by the three-dimensionally distributed charged impurities that are ubiquitous in TIs, and we outline the effects it has on both the bulk and surface transport in TIs. We present self-consistent theories for Coulomb screening both in the bulk and at the surface, discuss the magnitude of the disorder potential in each case, and present results for the conductivity. In the bulk, where the band gap leads to thermally activated transport, we show how disorder leads to a smaller-than-expected activation energy that gives way to variable-range hopping at low temperatures. We confirm this enhanced conductivity with numerical simulations that also allow us to explore different degrees of impurity compensation. For the surface, where the TI has gapless Dirac modes, we present a theory of disorder and screening of deep impurities, and we calculate the corresponding zero-temperature conductivity. We also comment on the growth of the disorder potential in passing from the surface of the TI into the bulk. Finally, we discuss how the presence of a gap at the Dirac point, introduced by some source of time-reversal symmetry breaking, affects the disorder potential at the surface and the mid-gap density of states

  19. Mental health care and average happiness: strong effect in developed nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touburg, Giorgio; Veenhoven, Ruut

    2015-07-01

    Mental disorder is a main cause of unhappiness in modern society and investment in mental health care is therefore likely to add to average happiness. This prediction was checked in a comparison of 143 nations around 2005. Absolute investment in mental health care was measured using the per capita number of psychiatrists and psychologists working in mental health care. Relative investment was measured using the share of mental health care in the total health budget. Average happiness in nations was measured with responses to survey questions about life-satisfaction. Average happiness appeared to be higher in countries that invest more in mental health care, both absolutely and relative to investment in somatic medicine. A data split by level of development shows that this difference exists only among developed nations. Among these nations the link between mental health care and happiness is quite strong, both in an absolute sense and compared to other known societal determinants of happiness. The correlation between happiness and share of mental health care in the total health budget is twice as strong as the correlation between happiness and size of the health budget. A causal effect is likely, but cannot be proved in this cross-sectional analysis.

  20. Effect of Floodplain Inundation on River Pollution in Taiwan's Strong Monsoonal Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, E. T.; Lin, A. Y. C.

    2017-12-01

    River-floodplain interaction provides important benefits such as flood mitigation, provision of ecological habitat, and improved water quality. Human actions have historically reduced such interaction and associated benefits by diking, floodplain fill, and river regulation. In response, floodplain restoration has become popular in North America and Europe, but is less practiced in Asia. In Taiwan, unusually strong monsoons and steep terrain alter floodplain dynamics relative to elsewhere around the world, and provide a unique environment for floodplain management. We used numerical models of flow, transport, and reaction in river channels and floodplains to quantify the effect of river-floodplain interaction on water quality in Taiwan's strong monsoon and high topographic relief. We conducted sensitivity analyses of parameters such as river slope, monsoon severity, reservoir operation mode, degree of floodplain reconnection, contaminant reaction rate, and contaminant reaction type on floodplain connectivity and contaminant mitigation. We found significant differences in floodplain hydraulics and residence times in Taiwan's steep monsoonal environment relative to the shallower non-monsoonal environment typical of the eastern USA, with significant implications for water quality. For example, greater flashiness of floodplain inundation in Taiwan provides greater challenges for reconnecting sufficient floodplain volume to handle monsoonal runoff. Yet longer periods when floodplains are reliably dry means that such lands may have greater value for seasonal use such as parks or agriculture. The potential for floodplain restoration in Taiwan is thus significant, but qualitatively different than in the eastern USA.

  1. Effect of parameter mismatch on the dynamics of strongly coupled self sustained oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Nilaj; Jain, Aditya; Lal, Nijil; Das Gupta, Kantimay; Parmananda, Punit

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present an experimental setup and an associated mathematical model to study the synchronization of two self-sustained, strongly coupled, mechanical oscillators (metronomes). The effects of a small detuning in the internal parameters, namely, damping and frequency, have been studied. Our experimental system is a pair of spring wound mechanical metronomes; coupled by placing them on a common base, free to move along a horizontal direction. We designed a photodiode array based non-contact, non-magnetic position detection system driven by a microcontroller to record the instantaneous angular displacement of each oscillator and the small linear displacement of the base, coupling the two. In our system, the mass of the oscillating pendula forms a significant fraction of the total mass of the system, leading to strong coupling of the oscillators. We modified the internal mechanism of the spring-wound "clockwork" slightly, such that the natural frequency and the internal damping could be independently tuned. Stable synchronized and anti-synchronized states were observed as the difference in the parameters was varied in the experiments. The simulation results showed a rapid increase in the phase difference between the two oscillators beyond a certain threshold of parameter mismatch. Our simple model of the escapement mechanism did not reproduce a complete 180° out of phase state. However, the numerical simulations show that increased mismatch in parameters leads to a synchronized state with a large phase difference.

  2. The short-term effects of antenna insulation thickness on path losses in wireless telemetry implants at microwave frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Kneisz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Various physiological parameters can be monitored non-invasively using wireless biotelemetry links. The development of sophisticated ultra low power consuming transceivers allows the transmission of large amounts of data from the inside of the body to an external receiver in real time at microwave frequencies.Antenna impedance matching is crucial for obtaining an acceptable propagation link budget in a wireless telemetry link. The dielectric properties of biological tissue induce detuning to transceiver antennas when implanted into the body. To counteract detuning problems, implant antennas are coated with biocompatible insulating material. The study investigates the propagation losses of a wireless communication link at different insulation thicknesses of medical grade silicone in the Industrial-Scientific-Medical (ISM radio band at 2.45 GHz. The wireless link consisted of an implantable unit which was placed between two pads of tissue substitute material and an external receiver which was connected to a laptop. Predefined data packets were transmitted from the implant, the received packets were analyzed, packet errors and packet losses were logged and the received signal strength indicator values (RSSI were recorded. Our results showed that the mean RSSI values of insulated transmitter antennas - embedded in tissue equivalent material - provide more safety distance to critical receiver sensitivity level than uncoated antennas.The conducted measurements let us conclude that with increasing thickness of the insulation layer, the antenna becomes less sensitive to detuning by adjacent tissue substitute material. Therefore tuned antennas are less influenced by the surrounding tissue after implantation.

  3. Attic Retrofits Using Nail-Base Insulated Panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallay, David [Home Innovation Research Labs; Kochkin, Vladimir [Home Innovation Research Labs

    2018-03-26

    This project developed and demonstrated a roof/attic energy retrofit solution using nail-base insulated panels for existing homes where traditional attic insulation approaches are not effective or feasible. Nail-base insulated panels (retrofit panels) consist of rigid foam insulation laminated to one face of a wood structural panel. The prefabricated panels are installed above the existing roof deck during a reroofing effort.

  4. High Performance Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Louise F. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States); Mosiman, Garrett E. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    ?A more accurate assessment of SOG foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulation at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated). The optimum insulation strategy was applied to single and multi-family residential buildings in climate zone 4 - 7. The highest site energy savings of 5% was realized for a single family home in Duluth, MN, and the lowest savings of 1.4 % for a 4-unit townhouse in Richmond, VA. SOG foundation insulation retrofit simple paybacks ranged from 18 to 47 years. There are other benefits of SOG foundation insulation resulting from the increase in the slab surface temperatures. These include increased occupant thermal comfort, and a decrease in slab surface condensation particularly around the slab perimeter.

  5. Interferon-β gene transfer induces a strong cytotoxic bystander effect on melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Úrsula A; Gil-Cardeza, María L; Villaverde, Marcela S; Finocchiaro, Liliana M E; Glikin, Gerardo C

    2015-05-01

    A local gene therapy scheme for the delivery of type I interferons could be an alternative for the treatment of melanoma. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of interferon-β (IFNβ) gene lipofection on tumor cell lines derived from three human cutaneous and four canine mucosal melanomas. The cytotoxicity of human IFNβ gene lipofection resulted higher or equivalent to that of the corresponding addition of the recombinant protein (rhIFNβ) to human cells. IFNβ gene lipofection was not cytotoxic for only one canine melanoma cell line. When cultured as monolayers, three human and three canine IFNβ-lipofected melanoma cell lines displayed a remarkable bystander effect. As spheroids, the same six cell lines were sensitive to IFNβ gene transfer, two displaying a significant multicell resistance phenotype. The effects of conditioned IFNβ-lipofected canine melanoma cell culture media suggested the release of at least one soluble thermolabile cytotoxic factor that could not be detected in human melanoma cells. By using a secretion signal-free truncated human IFNβ, we showed that its intracellular expression was enough to induce cytotoxicity in two human melanoma cell lines. The lower cytoplasmatic levels of reactive oxygen species detected after intracellular IFNβ expression could be related to the resistance displayed by one human melanoma cell line. As IFNβ gene transfer was effective against most of the assayed melanomas in a way not limited by relatively low lipofection efficiencies, the clinical potential of this approach is strongly supported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Biodiversity effects in the wild are common and as strong as key drivers of productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, J Emmett; Godwin, Casey M; Cardinale, Bradley J

    2017-09-14

    More than 500 controlled experiments have collectively suggested that biodiversity loss reduces ecosystem productivity and stability. Yet the importance of biodiversity in sustaining the world's ecosystems remains controversial, largely because of the lack of validation in nature, where strong abiotic forcing and complex interactions are assumed to swamp biodiversity effects. Here we test this assumption by analysing 133 estimates reported in 67 field studies that statistically separated the effects of biodiversity on biomass production from those of abiotic forcing. Contrary to the prevailing opinion of the previous two decades that biodiversity would have rare or weak effects in nature, we show that biomass production increases with species richness in a wide range of wild taxa and ecosystems. In fact, after controlling for environmental covariates, increases in biomass with biodiversity are stronger in nature than has previously been documented in experiments and comparable to or stronger than the effects of other well-known drivers of productivity, including climate and nutrient availability. These results are consistent with the collective experimental evidence that species richness increases community biomass production, and suggest that the role of biodiversity in maintaining productive ecosystems should figure prominently in global change science and policy.

  7. Room temperature strong coupling effects from single ZnO nanowire microcavity

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Ayan

    2012-05-01

    Strong coupling effects in a dielectric microcavity with a single ZnO nanowire embedded in it have been investigated at room temperature. A large Rabi splitting of ?100 meV is obtained from the polariton dispersion and a non-linearity in the polariton emission characteristics is observed at room temperature with a low threshold of 1.63 ?J/cm2, which corresponds to a polariton density an order of magnitude smaller than that for the Mott transition. The momentum distribution of the lower polaritons shows evidence of dynamic condensation and the absence of a relaxation bottleneck. The polariton relaxation dynamics were investigated by timeresolved measurements, which showed a progressive decrease in the polariton relaxation time with increase in polariton density. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  8. Biodestruction of strongly swelling polymer hydrogels and its effect on the water retention capacity of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smagin, A. V.; Sadovnikova, N. B.; Smagina, M. V.

    2014-06-01

    The biodestruction of strongly swelling polymer hydrogels (water adsorbing soil conditioners of the new generation) has been studied at the quantitative level using original mathematical models. In laboratory experiments, a relationship between the hydrogel degradation rate and the temperature has been obtained, and the effect of the biodestruction on the water retention curve of soil compositions with hydrogels (used as an index of their water retention capacity) has been assessed. From the automatic monitoring data of the temperature regime of soils, the potential biodestruction of hydrogels has been predicted for different climatic conditions. The loss of hydrogels during three months of the vegetation period because of destruction can exceed 30% of their initial content in irrigated agriculture under arid climatic conditions and more than 10% under humid climatic conditions. Thus, the biodestruction of hydrogels is one of the most important factors decreasing their efficiency under actual soil conditions.

  9. Generalized Euler transformation for summing strongly divergent Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation series: the Zeeman effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    A generalized Euler transformation (GET) is introduced which provides a powerful alternative method of accurately summing strongly divergent Rayleigh-Schroedinger (RS) perturbation series when other summability methods fail or are difficult to apply. The GET is simple to implement and, unlike a number of other summation procedures, requires no a priori knowledge of the analytic properties of the function underlying the RS series. Application of the GET to the difficult problem of the RS weak-field ground-state eigenvalue series of the hydrogen atom in a magnetic field (quadratic Zeeman effect) yields sums of good accuracy over a very wide range of field strengths up to the most intense fields of 10 14 G. The GET results are compared with those obtained by other summing methods

  10. Effect of mechanical boundary conditions on the dynamic and static properties of a strongly anisotropic ferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelikov, G. A.; Fridman, Yu. A.

    2013-01-01

    The spectra of coupled magnetoelastic waves in a semi-infinite strongly anisotropic easy-plane ferromagnet with a rigidly fixed face are analyzed for two variants of fixation (in the basal plane and perpendicularly to it). The phase states of the system are determined. Differences in the phase diagrams and elementary excitation spectra depending on the choice of the sample fixation plane are considered. When rotational invariance is taken into account, the nonreciprocity effect for the velocities of sound in a crystal appears. It is shown that the velocity of sound in the sample considerably depends on the symmetry of the imposed mechanical boundary conditions. The phase diagrams of the system under investigation are presented

  11. Controlled self-assembly of multiferroic core-shell nanoparticles exhibiting strong magneto-electric effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreenivasulu, Gollapudi; Hamilton, Sean L.; Lehto, Piper R.; Srinivasan, Gopalan, E-mail: srinivas@oakland.edu [Physics Department, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309-4401 (United States); Popov, Maksym [Physics Department, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309-4401 (United States); Radiophysics Department, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Kyiv 01601 (Ukraine); Chavez, Ferman A. [Chemistry Department, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309-4401 (United States)

    2014-02-03

    Ferromagnetic-ferroelectric composites show strain mediated coupling between the magnetic and electric sub-systems due to magnetostriction and piezoelectric effects associated with the ferroic phases. We have synthesized core-shell multiferroic nano-composites by functionalizing 10–100 nm barium titanate and nickel ferrite nanoparticles with complementary coupling groups and allowing them to self-assemble in the presence of a catalyst. The core-shell structure was confirmed by electron microscopy and magnetic force microscopy. Evidence for strong strain mediated magneto-electric coupling was obtained by static magnetic field induced variations in the permittivity over 16–18 GHz and polarization and by electric field induced by low-frequency ac magnetic fields.

  12. Strong-field effects in Rabi oscillations between a single state and a superposition of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhdanovich, S.; Milner, V.; Hepburn, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    Rabi oscillations of quantum population are known to occur in two-level systems driven by spectrally narrow laser fields. In this work we study Rabi oscillations induced by shaped broadband femtosecond laser pulses. Due to the broad spectral width of the driving field, the oscillations are initiated between a ground state and a coherent superposition of excited states, or a ''wave packet,'' rather than a single excited state. Our experiments reveal an intricate dependence of the wave-packet phase on the intensity of the laser field. We confirm numerically that the effect is associated with the strong-field nature of the interaction and provide a qualitative picture by invoking a simple theoretical model.

  13. Strong correlation effects on the d-wave superconductor- spectral weight analysis by variational wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, C-P; Lee, T K; Ho, C-M

    2009-01-01

    We examine the strong correlation effects of the d-wave superconducting state by including the Gutzwiller projection for no electron double occupancy at each lattice site. The spectral weights (SW's) for adding and removing an electron on the projected superconducting state, the ground state of the 2-dimensional t-t'-t - J model with moderate doped holes describing the high T c cuprates, are studied numerically on finite lattices and compared with the observation made by low-temperature tunneling (particle asymmetry of tunneling conductance) and angle-resolved photoemission (SW transfer from the projected Fermi liquid state) spectroscopies. The contrast with the d-wave case without projection is alo presented.

  14. Topological Insulators Dirac Equation in Condensed Matters

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Shun-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Topological insulators are insulating in the bulk, but process metallic states around its boundary owing to the topological origin of the band structure. The metallic edge or surface states are immune to weak disorder or impurities, and robust against the deformation of the system geometry. This book, Topological insulators, presents a unified description of topological insulators from one to three dimensions based on the modified Dirac equation. A series of solutions of the bound states near the boundary are derived, and the existing conditions of these solutions are described. Topological invariants and their applications to a variety of systems from one-dimensional polyacetalene, to two-dimensional quantum spin Hall effect and p-wave superconductors, and three-dimensional topological insulators and superconductors or superfluids are introduced, helping readers to better understand this fascinating new field. This book is intended for researchers and graduate students working in the field of topological in...

  15. Effect of scaffolding on helping introductory physics students solve quantitative problems involving strong alternative conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that introductory physics students often have alternative conceptions that are inconsistent with established physical principles and concepts. Invoking alternative conceptions in the quantitative problem-solving process can derail the entire process. In order to help students solve quantitative problems involving strong alternative conceptions correctly, appropriate scaffolding support can be helpful. The goal of this study is to examine how different scaffolding supports involving analogical problem-solving influence introductory physics students' performance on a target quantitative problem in a situation where many students' solution process is derailed due to alternative conceptions. Three different scaffolding supports were designed and implemented in calculus-based and algebra-based introductory physics courses involving 410 students to evaluate the level of scaffolding needed to help students learn from an analogical problem that is similar in the underlying principles involved but for which the problem-solving process is not derailed by alternative conceptions. We found that for the quantitative problem involving strong alternative conceptions, simply guiding students to work through the solution of the analogical problem first was not enough to help most students discern the similarity between the two problems. However, if additional scaffolding supports that directly helped students examine and repair their knowledge elements involving alternative conceptions were provided, e.g., by guiding students to contemplate related issues and asking them to solve the targeted problem on their own first before learning from the analogical problem provided, students were more likely to discern the underlying similarities between the problems and avoid getting derailed by alternative conceptions when solving the targeted problem. We also found that some scaffolding supports were more effective in the calculus-based course than in the algebra

  16. Effective model with strong Kitaev interactions for α -RuCl3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takafumi; Suga, Sei-ichiro

    2018-04-01

    We use an exact numerical diagonalization method to calculate the dynamical spin structure factors of three ab initio models and one ab initio guided model for a honeycomb-lattice magnet α -RuCl3 . We also use thermal pure quantum states to calculate the temperature dependence of the heat capacity, the nearest-neighbor spin-spin correlation function, and the static spin structure factor. From the results obtained from these four effective models, we find that, even when the magnetic order is stabilized at low temperature, the intensity at the Γ point in the dynamical spin structure factors increases with increasing nearest-neighbor spin correlation. In addition, we find that the four models fail to explain heat-capacity measurements whereas two of the four models succeed in explaining inelastic-neutron-scattering experiments. In the four models, when temperature decreases, the heat capacity shows a prominent peak at a high temperature where the nearest-neighbor spin-spin correlation function increases. However, the peak temperature in heat capacity is too low in comparison with that observed experimentally. To address these discrepancies, we propose an effective model that includes strong ferromagnetic Kitaev coupling, and we show that this model quantitatively reproduces both inelastic-neutron-scattering experiments and heat-capacity measurements. To further examine the adequacy of the proposed model, we calculate the field dependence of the polarized terahertz spectra, which reproduces the experimental results: the spin-gapped excitation survives up to an onset field where the magnetic order disappears and the response in the high-field region is almost linear. Based on these numerical results, we argue that the low-energy magnetic excitation in α -RuCl3 is mainly characterized by interactions such as off-diagonal interactions and weak Heisenberg interactions between nearest-neighbor pairs, rather than by the strong Kitaev interactions.

  17. Inverse participation ratio and localization in topological insulator phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calixto, M; Romera, E

    2015-01-01

    Fluctuations of Hamiltonian eigenfunctions, measured by the inverse participation ratio (IPR), turn out to characterize topological-band insulator transitions occurring in 2D Dirac materials like silicene, which is isostructural with graphene but with a strong spin–orbit interaction. Using monotonic properties of the IPR, as a function of a perpendicular electric field (which provides a tunable band gap), we define topological-like quantum numbers that take different values in the topological-insulator and band-insulator phases. (paper)

  18. Effects of strong and electromagnetic correlations on neutrino interactions in dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, S.; Prakash, M.; Lattimer, J.M.; Reddy, S.; Pons, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    An extensive study of the effects of correlations on both charged and neutral current weak interaction rates in dense matter is performed. Both strong and electromagnetic correlations are considered. The propagation of particle-hole interactions in the medium plays an important role in determining the neutrino mean free paths. The effects due to Pauli blocking and density, spin, and isospin correlations in the medium significantly reduce the neutrino cross sections. As a result of the lack of experimental information at high density, these correlations are necessarily model dependent. For example, spin correlations in nonrelativistic models are found to lead to larger suppressions of neutrino cross sections compared to those of relativistic models. This is due to the tendency of the nonrelativistic models to develop spin instabilities. Notwithstanding the above caveats, and the differences between nonrelativistic and relativistic approaches such as the spin- and isospin-dependent interactions and the nucleon effective masses, suppressions of order 2 - 3, relative to the case in which correlations are ignored, are obtained. Neutrino interactions in dense matter are especially important for supernova and early neutron star evolution calculations. The effects of correlations for protoneutron star evolution are calculated. Large effects on the internal thermodynamic properties of protoneutron stars, such as the temperature, are found. These translate into significant early enhancements in the emitted neutrino energies and fluxes, especially after a few seconds. At late times, beyond about 10 s, the emitted neutrino fluxes decrease more rapidly compared to simulations without the effects of correlations, due to the more rapid onset of neutrino transparency in the protoneutron star. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  19. Low-voltage organic field-effect transistors based on novel high-κ organometallic lanthanide complex for gate insulating materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi; Li, Yi; Zhang, Yang; Song, You, E-mail: wangxzh@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: yli@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: yousong@nju.edu.cn; Wang, Xizhang, E-mail: wangxzh@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: yli@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: yousong@nju.edu.cn; Hu, Zheng [Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry of MOE, Jiangsu Provincial Lab for Nanotechnology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China. High-Tech Research Institute of Nanjing University (Suzhou), Suzhou 215123 (China); Sun, Huabin; Li, Yun, E-mail: wangxzh@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: yli@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: yousong@nju.edu.cn; Shi, Yi [School of Electronic Science and Engineering and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Photonic and Electronic Materials, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-08-15

    A novel high-κ organometallic lanthanide complex, Eu(tta){sub 3}L (tta=2-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate, L = 4,5-pinene bipyridine), is used as gate insulating material to fabricate low-voltage pentacene field-effect transistors (FETs). The optimized gate insulator exhibits the excellent properties such as low leakage current density, low surface roughness, and high dielectric constant. When operated under a low voltage of −5 V, the pentacene FET devices show the attractive electrical performance, e.g. carrier mobility (μ{sub FET}) of 0.17 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, threshold voltage (V{sub th}) of −0.9 V, on/off current ratio of 5 × 10{sup 3}, and subthreshold slope (SS) of 1.0 V dec{sup −1}, which is much better than that of devices obtained on conventional 300 nm SiO{sub 2} substrate (0.13 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, −7.3 V and 3.1 V dec{sup −1} for μ{sub FET}, V{sub th} and SS value when operated at −30 V). These results indicate that this kind of high-κ organometallic lanthanide complex becomes a promising candidate as gate insulator for low-voltage organic FETs.

  20. Low-voltage organic field-effect transistors based on novel high-κ organometallic lanthanide complex for gate insulating materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Liu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel high-κ organometallic lanthanide complex, Eu(tta3L (tta=2-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate, L = 4,5-pinene bipyridine, is used as gate insulating material to fabricate low-voltage pentacene field-effect transistors (FETs. The optimized gate insulator exhibits the excellent properties such as low leakage current density, low surface roughness, and high dielectric constant. When operated under a low voltage of −5 V, the pentacene FET devices show the attractive electrical performance, e.g. carrier mobility (μFET of 0.17 cm2 V−1 s−1, threshold voltage (Vth of −0.9 V, on/off current ratio of 5 × 103, and subthreshold slope (SS of 1.0 V dec−1, which is much better than that of devices obtained on conventional 300 nm SiO2 substrate (0.13 cm2 V−1 s−1, −7.3 V and 3.1 V dec−1 for μFET, Vth and SS value when operated at −30 V. These results indicate that this kind of high-κ organometallic lanthanide complex becomes a promising candidate as gate insulator for low-voltage organic FETs.

  1. Channel-closing effects in strong-field ionization by a bicircular field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milošević, D. B.; Becker, W.

    2018-03-01

    Channel-closing effects, such as threshold anomalies and resonantlike intensity-dependent enhancements in strong-field ionization by a bicircular laser field are analyzed. A bicircular field consists of two coplanar corotating or counter-rotating circularly polarized fields having different frequencies. For the total detachment rate of a negative ion by a bicircular field we observe threshold anomalies and explain them using the Wigner threshold law and energy and angular momentum conservation. For the corotating bicircular case, these effects are negligible, while for the counter-rotating case they are pronounced and their position depends on the magnetic quantum number of the initial state. For high-order above-threshold ionization of rare-gas atoms by a counter-rotating bicircular laser field we observe very pronounced intensity-dependent enhancements. We find all four types of threshold anomalies known from collision theory. Contrary to the case of linear polarization, channel-closing effects for a bicircular field are visible also in the cutoff region of the electron energy spectrum, which is explained using quantum-orbit theory.

  2. Strong quantum-confined stark effect in germanium quantum-well structures on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, Y.; Lee, Y. K.; Gei, Y.; Ren, S; Roth, J. E.; Miller, D. A.; Harris, J. S.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon is the dominant semiconductor for electronics, but there is now a growing need to integrate such component with optoelectronics for telecommunications and computer interconnections. Silicon-based optical modulators have recently been successfully demonstrated but because the light modulation mechanisms in silicon are relatively weak, long (for example, several millimeters) devices or sophisticated high-quality-factor resonators have been necessary. Thin quantum-well structures made from III-V semiconductors such as GaAs, InP and their alloys exhibit the much stronger Quantum-Confined Stark Effect (QCSE) mechanism, which allows modulator structures with only micrometers of optical path length. Such III-V materials are unfortunately difficult to integrate with silicon electronic devices. Germanium is routinely integrated with silicon in electronics, but previous silicon-germanium structures have also not shown strong modulation effects. Here we report the discovery of the QCSE, at room temperature, in thin germanium quantum-well structures grown on silicon. The QCSE here has strengths comparable to that in III-V materials. Its clarity and strength are particularly surprising because germanium is an indirect gap semiconductor, such semiconductors often display much weak optical effects than direct gap materials (such as the III-V materials typically used for optoelectronics). This discovery is very promising for small, high-speed, low-power optical output devices fully compatible with silicon electronics manufacture. (author)

  3. Strong Delayed Interactive Effects of Metal Exposure and Warming: Latitude-Dependent Synergisms Persist Across Metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debecker, Sara; Dinh, Khuong V; Stoks, Robby

    2017-02-21

    As contaminants are often more toxic at higher temperatures, predicting their impact under global warming remains a key challenge for ecological risk assessment. Ignoring delayed effects, synergistic interactions between contaminants and warming, and differences in sensitivity across species' ranges could lead to an important underestimation of the risks. We addressed all three mechanisms by studying effects of larval exposure to zinc and warming before, during, and after metamorphosis in Ischnura elegans damselflies from high- and low-latitude populations. By integrating these mechanisms into a single study, we could identify two novel patterns. First, during exposure zinc did not affect survival, whereas it induced mild to moderate postexposure mortality in the larval stage and at metamorphosis, and very strongly reduced adult lifespan. This severe delayed effect across metamorphosis was especially remarkable in high-latitude animals, as they appeared almost insensitive to zinc during the larval stage. Second, the well-known synergism between metals and warming was manifested not only during the larval stage but also after metamorphosis, yet notably only in low-latitude damselflies. These results highlight that a more complete life-cycle approach that incorporates the possibility of delayed interactions between contaminants and warming in a geographical context is crucial for a more realistic risk assessment in a warming world.

  4. Spin-transfer torque generated by a topological insulator

    KAUST Repository

    Mellnik, A. R.

    2014-07-23

    Magnetic devices are a leading contender for the implementation of memory and logic technologies that are non-volatile, that can scale to high density and high speed, and that do not wear out. However, widespread application of magnetic memory and logic devices will require the development of efficient mechanisms for reorienting their magnetization using the least possible current and power. There has been considerable recent progress in this effort; in particular, it has been discovered that spin-orbit interactions in heavy-metal/ferromagnet bilayers can produce strong current-driven torques on the magnetic layer, via the spin Hall effect in the heavy metal or the Rashba-Edelstein effect in the ferromagnet. In the search for materials to provide even more efficient spin-orbit-induced torques, some proposals have suggested topological insulators, which possess a surface state in which the effects of spin-orbit coupling are maximal in the sense that an electron\\' s spin orientation is fixed relative to its propagation direction. Here we report experiments showing that charge current flowing in-plane in a thin film of the topological insulator bismuth selenide (Bi2Se3) at room temperature can indeed exert a strong spin-transfer torque on an adjacent ferromagnetic permalloy (Ni81Fe19) thin film, with a direction consistent with that expected from the topological surface state. We find that the strength of the torque per unit charge current density in Bi 2Se3 is greater than for any source of spin-transfer torque measured so far, even for non-ideal topological insulator films in which the surface states coexist with bulk conduction. Our data suggest that topological insulators could enable very efficient electrical manipulation of magnetic materials at room temperature, for memory and logic applications. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  5. Translucent insulating building envelope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek, Jens Eg

    1997-01-01

    A new type of translucent insulating material has been tested. This material is made of Celulose-Acetat and have a honey-comb structure. The material has a high solar transmittance and is highly insulating. The material is relatively cheap to produce. Danish Title: Translucent isolerende klimaskærm....

  6. An attempt of modelling debris flows characterised by strong inertial effects through Cellular Automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovine, G.; D'Ambrosio, D.

    2003-04-01

    Cellular Automata models do represent a valid method for the simulation of complex phenomena, when these latter can be described in "a-centric" terms - i.e. through local interactions within a discrete time-space. In particular, flow-type landslides (such as debris flows) can be viewed as a-centric dynamical system. SCIDDICA S4b, the last release of a family of two-dimensional hexagonal Cellular Automata models, has recently been developed for simulating debris flows characterised by strong inertial effects. It has been derived by progressively enriching an initial simplified CA model, originally derived for simulating very simple cases of slow-moving flow-type landslides. In S4b, by applying an empirical strategy, the inertial characters of the flowing mass have been translated into CA terms. In the transition function of the model, the distribution of landslide debris among the cells is computed by considering the momentum of the debris which move among the cells of the neighbourhood, and privileging the flow direction. By properly setting the value of one of the global parameters of the model (the "inertial factor"), the mechanism of distribution of the landslide debris among the cells can be influenced in order to emphasise the inertial effects, according to the energy of the flowing mass. Moreover, the high complexity of both the model and of the phenomena to be simulated (e.g. debris flows characterised by severe erosion along their path, and by strong inertial effects) suggested to employ an automated technique of evaluation, for the determination of the best set of global parameters. Accordingly, the calibration of the model has been performed through Genetic Algorithms, by considering several real cases of study: these latter have been selected among the population of landslides triggered in Campania (Southern Italy) in May 1998 and December 1999. Obtained results are satisfying: errors computed by comparing the simulations with the map of the real

  7. High-performance insulator structures for accelerator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampayan, S.E.; Caporaso, G.J.; Sanders, D.M.; Stoddard, R.D.; Trimble, D.O.; Elizondo, J.; Krogh, M.L.; Wieskamp, T.F.

    1997-05-01

    A new, high gradient insulator technology has been developed for accelerator systems. The concept involves the use of alternating layers of conductors and insulators with periods of order 1 mm or less. These structures perform many times better (about 1.5 to 4 times higher breakdown electric field) than conventional insulators in long pulse, short pulse, and alternating polarity applications. We describe our ongoing studies investigating the degradation of the breakdown electric field resulting from alternate fabrication techniques, the effect of gas pressure, the effect of the insulator-to-electrode interface gap spacing, and the performance of the insulator structure under bi-polar stress

  8. Quantum magnetotransport properties of topological insulators under strain

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.

    2012-08-15

    We present a detailed theoretical investigation of the quantum magnetotransport properties of topological insulators under strain. We consider an external magnetic field perpendicular to the surface of the topological insulator in the presence of strain induced by the substrate. The strain effects mix the lower and upper surface states of neighboring Landau levels into two unequally spaced energy branches. Analytical expressions are derived for the collisional conductivity for elastic impurity scattering in the first Born approximation. We also calculate the Hall conductivity using the Kubo formalism. Evidence for the beating of Shubnikov–de Haas oscillations is found from the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the collisional and Hall conductivities. In the regime of a strong magnetic field, the beating pattern is replaced by a splitting of the magnetoresistance peaks due to finite strain energy. These results are in excellent agreement with recent HgTe transport experiments.

  9. Sound Insulation between Dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory sound insulation requirements for dwellings exist in more than 30 countries in Europe. In some countries, requirements have existed since the 1950s. Findings from comparative studies show that sound insulation descriptors and requirements represent a high degree of diversity...... and initiate – where needed – improvement of sound insulation of new and existing dwellings in Europe to the benefit of the inhabitants and the society. A European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established and runs...... 2009-2013. The main objectives of TU0901 are to prepare proposals for harmonized sound insulation descriptors and for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality classes for dwellings. Findings from the studies provide input for the discussions in COST TU0901. Data collected from 24...

  10. Atmospheres and spectra of strongly magnetized neutron stars - II. The effect of vacuum polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wynn C. G.; Lai, Dong

    2003-01-01

    We study the effect of vacuum polarization on the atmosphere structure and radiation spectra of neutron stars with surface magnetic fields B= 1014-1015 G, as appropriate for magnetars. Vacuum polarization modifies the dielectric property of the medium and gives rise to a resonance feature in the opacity; this feature is narrow and occurs at a photon energy that depends on the plasma density. Vacuum polarization can also induce resonant conversion of photon modes via a mechanism analogous to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) mechanism for neutrino oscillation. We construct atmosphere models in radiative equilibrium with an effective temperature of a few ×106 K by solving the full radiative transfer equations for both polarization modes in a fully ionized hydrogen plasma. We discuss the subtleties in treating the vacuum polarization effects in the atmosphere models and present approximate solutions to the radiative transfer problem which bracket the true answer. We show from both analytic considerations and numerical calculations that vacuum polarization produces a broad depression in the X-ray flux at high energies (a few keV <~E<~ a few tens of keV) as compared to models without vacuum polarization; this arises from the density dependence of the vacuum resonance feature and the large density gradient present in the atmosphere. Thus the vacuum polarization effect softens the high-energy tail of the thermal spectrum, although the atmospheric emission is still harder than the blackbody spectrum because of the non-grey opacities. We also show that the depression of continuum flux strongly suppresses the equivalent width of the ion cyclotron line and therefore makes the line more difficult to observe.

  11. Unraveling nonadiabatic ionization and Coulomb potential effect in strong-field photoelectron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaohong; Lin, Cheng; Sheng, Zhihao; Liu, Peng; Chen, Zhangjin; Yang, Weifeng; Hu, Shilin; Lin, C D; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-22

    Strong field photoelectron holography has been proposed as a means for interrogating the spatial and temporal information of electrons and ions in a dynamic system. After ionization, part of the electron wave packet may directly go to the detector (the reference wave), while another part may be driven back and scatters off the ion(the signal wave). The interference hologram of the two waves may be used to extract target information embedded in the collision process. Unlike conventional optical holography, however, propagation of the electron wave packet is affected by the Coulomb potential as well as by the laser field. In addition, electrons are emitted over the whole laser pulse duration, thus multiple interferences may occur. In this work, we used a generalized quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo method to investigate the effect of Coulomb potential and the nonadiabatic subcycle ionization on the photoelectron hologram. We showed that photoelectron hologram can be well described only when the effect of nonadiabatic ionization is accounted for, and Coulomb potential can be neglected only in the tunnel ionization regime. Our results help paving the way for establishing photoelectron holography for probing spatial and dynamic properties of atoms and molecules.

  12. Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yoshihisa; Tomishige, Masahiko; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Fujiwara, Masao; Shibata, Naho; Kosaka, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-05-01

    Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum was studied by using a superconducting magnet. Around a centre of a round vessel, random swimming at 0 T and aligned swimming parallel to the magnetic field (MF) of 8 T were observed. Near a wall of the vessel, however, swimming round and round along the wall at 0 T and aligned swimming of turning at right angles upon collision with the wall, which was remarkable around 1-4 T, were detected. It was experimentally revealed that the former MF-induced parallel swimming at the vessel centre was caused physicochemically by the parallel magnetic orientation of the cell itself. From magnetic field dependence of the extent of the orientation, the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy (χ ∥-χ ⊥) was first obtained to be 3.4× 10-23 emu cell-1 at 298 K for Paramecium caudatum. The orientation of the cell was considered to result from the magnetic orientation of the cell membrane. On the other hand, although mechanisms of the latter swimming near the vessel wall regardless of the absence and presence of the magnetic field are unclear at present, these experimental results indicate that whether the cell exists near the wall alters the magnetic field effect on the swimming in the horizontal magnetic field.

  13. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields and recently updated safety guidelines for strong static magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Sekino, Masaki; Ueno, Shoogo

    2011-01-01

    Humans are exposed daily to artificial and naturally occurring magnetic fields that originate from many different sources. We review recent studies that examine the biological effects of and medical applications involving electromagnetic fields, review the properties of static and pulsed electromagnetic fields that affect biological systems, describe the use of a pulsed electromagnetic field in combination with an anticancer agent as an example of a medical application that incorporates an electromagnetic field, and discuss the recently updated safety guidelines for static electromagnetic fields. The most notable modifications to the 2009 International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection guidelines are the increased exposure limits, especially for those who work with or near electromagnetic fields (occupational exposure limits). The recommended increases in exposure were determined using recent scientific evidence obtained from animal and human studies. Several studies since the 1994 publication of the guidelines have examined the effects on humans after exposure to high static electromagnetic fields (up to 9.4 tesla), but additional research is needed to ascertain further the safety of strong electromagnetic fields. (author)

  14. Counter-rotating effects and entanglement dynamics in strongly coupled quantum-emitter-metallic-nanoparticle structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulos, Nikos; Thanopulos, Ioannis; Yannopapas, Vassilios; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2018-03-01

    We study the spontaneous emission of a two-level quantum emitter next to a plasmonic nanoparticle beyond the Markovian approximation and the rotating-wave approximation (RWA) by combining quantum dynamics and classical electromagnetic calculations. For emitters with decay times in the picosecond to nanosecond time regime, as well as located at distances from the nanoparticle up to its radius, the dynamics with and without the RWA and the transition from the non-Markovian to the Markovian regime are investigated. For emitters with longer decay times, the Markov approximation proves to be adequate for distances larger than half the nanoparticle radius. However, the RWA is correct for all distances of the emitter from the nanoparticle. For short decay time emitters, the Markov approximation and RWA are both inadequate, with only the RWA becoming valid again at a distance larger than half the nanoparticle radius. We also show that the entanglement dynamics of two initially entangled qubits interacting independently with the nanoparticle may have a strong non-Markovian character when counter-rotating effects are included. Interesting effects such as entanglement sudden death, periodic entanglement revival, entanglement oscillations, and entanglement trapping are further observed when different initial two-qubit states and different distances between the qubit and the nanoparticle are considered.

  15. Mechanical effects of strong measurement: back-action noise and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Keith

    2007-03-01

    Our recent experiments show that it is now possible to prepare and measure mechanical systems with thermal occupation factors of N˜25 and perform continuous position measurements close to the limits required by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle (1). I will discuss our back-action measurements with nanomechanical structures strongly coupled to single electron transistors. We have been able to observe the stochastic back-action forces exerted by the SET as well as a cooling effect which has analogies to cooling in optical cavities. Furthermore, I will discuss progress using optical fields coupled to mechanical modes which show substantial cooling using the pondermotive effects of the photons impacting a flexible dielectric mirror (2). Both of these techniques pave the way to demonstrating the true quantum properties of a mechanical device: squeezed states, superposition states, and entangled states. (1) ``Quantum Measurement Backaction and Cooling Observed with a Nanomechanical Resonator,'' A. Naik, O. Buu, M.D. LaHaye, M.P. Blencowe, A.D. Armour, A.A. Clerk, K.C. Schwab, Nature 443, 193 (2006). (2) ``Self-cooling of a micro-mirror by radiation pressure,'' S. Gigan, H.R. Boehm, M. Patemostro, F. Blaser, G. Langer, J. Hertzberg, K. Schwab, D. Baeuerle, M. Aspelmeyer, A. Zeilinger, Nature 444, 67 (2006).

  16. An effective strong-coupling theory of composite particles in UV-domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, She-Sheng

    2017-05-01

    We briefly review the effective field theory of massive composite particles, their gauge couplings and characteristic energy scale in the UV-domain of UV-stable fixed point of strong four-fermion coupling, then mainly focus the discussions on the decay channels of composite particles into the final states of the SM gauge bosons, leptons and quarks. We calculate the rates of composite bosons decaying into two gauge bosons γγ, γZ 0, W + W -, Z 0 Z 0 and give the ratios of decay rates of different channels depending on gauge couplings only. It is shown that a composite fermion decays into an elementary fermion and a composite boson, the latter being an intermediate state decays into two gauge bosons, leading to a peculiar kinematics of final states of a quark (or a lepton) and two gauge bosons. These provide experimental implications of such an effective theory of composite particles beyond the SM. We also present some speculative discussions on the channels of composite fermions decaying into W W , W Z and ZZ two boson-tagged jets with quark jets, or to four-quark jets. Moreover, at the same energy scale of composite particles produced in high-energy experiments, composite particles are also produced by high-energy sterile neutrino (dark matter) collisions, their decays lead to excesses of cosmic ray particles in space and signals of SM particles in underground laboratories.

  17. An effective strong-coupling theory of composite particles in UV-domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, She-Sheng [ICRANet,Piazzale della Repubblica 10, 10-65122, Pescara (Italy); Physics Department, Sapienza University of Rome,Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2017-05-29

    We briefly review the effective field theory of massive composite particles, their gauge couplings and characteristic energy scale in the UV-domain of UV-stable fixed point of strong four-fermion coupling, then mainly focus the discussions on the decay channels of composite particles into the final states of the SM gauge bosons, leptons and quarks. We calculate the rates of composite bosons decaying into two gauge bosons γγ, γZ{sup 0}, W{sup +}W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}Z{sup 0} and give the ratios of decay rates of different channels depending on gauge couplings only. It is shown that a composite fermion decays into an elementary fermion and a composite boson, the latter being an intermediate state decays into two gauge bosons, leading to a peculiar kinematics of final states of a quark (or a lepton) and two gauge bosons. These provide experimental implications of such an effective theory of composite particles beyond the SM. We also present some speculative discussions on the channels of composite fermions decaying into WW, WZ and ZZ two boson-tagged jets with quark jets, or to four-quark jets. Moreover, at the same energy scale of composite particles produced in high-energy experiments, composite particles are also produced by high-energy sterile neutrino (dark matter) collisions, their decays lead to excesses of cosmic ray particles in space and signals of SM particles in underground laboratories.

  18. Effect of thermal-treatment sequence on sound absorbing and mechanical properties of porous sound-absorbing/thermal-insulating composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chen-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to recent rapid commercial and industrial development, mechanical equipment is supplemented massively in the factory and thus mechanical operation causes noise which distresses living at home. In livelihood, neighborhood, transportation equipment, jobsite construction noises impact on quality of life not only factory noise. This study aims to preparation technique and property evaluation of porous sound-absorbing/thermal-insulating composites. Hollow three-dimensional crimp PET fibers blended with low-melting PET fibers were fabricated into hollow PET/low-melting PET nonwoven after opening, blending, carding, lapping and needle-bonding process. Then, hollow PET/low-melting PET nonwovens were laminated into sound-absorbing/thermal-insulating composites by changing sequence of needle-bonding and thermal-treatment. The optimal thermal-treated sequence was found by tensile strength, tearing strength, sound-absorbing coefficient and thermal conductivity coefficient tests of porous composites.

  19. Detailed site effect estimation in the presence of strong velocity reversals within a small-aperture strong-motion array in Iceland

    KAUST Repository

    Rahpeyma, Sahar

    2016-08-11

    The rock site characterization for earthquake engineering applications in Iceland is common due to the easily exposed older bedrock and more recent volcanic lava rock. The corresponding site amplification is generally assumed to be low but has not been comprehensively quantified, especially for volcanic rock. The earthquake strong-motion of the Mw6.3 Ölfus earthquake on 29 May 2008 and 1705 of its aftershocks recorded on the first small-aperture strong-motion array (ICEARRAY I) in Iceland showed consistent and significant variations in ground motion amplitudes over short distances (<2 km) in an urban area located mostly on lava rock. This study analyses the aftershock recordings to quantify the local site effects using the Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and Standard Spectral Ratio (SSR) methods. Additionally, microseismic data has been collected at array stations and analyzed using the HVSR method. The results between the methods are consistent and show that while the amplification levels remain relatively low, the predominant frequency varies systematically between stations and is found to correlate with the geological units. In particular, for stations on lava rock the underlying geologic structure is characterized by repeated lava-soil stratigraphy characterized by reversals in the shear wave velocity with depth. As a result, standard modeling of HVSR using vertically incident body waves does not apply. Instead, modeling the soil structure as a two-degree-of-freedom dynamic system is found to capture the observed predominant frequencies of site amplification. The results have important implications for earthquake resistant design of structures on rock sites characterized by velocity reversals. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  20. Axial grazing collisions with insulator surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravielle, M.S. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (IAFE), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina) and Departamento de Fisica, FCEN, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: msilvia@iafe.uba.ar; Miraglia, J.E. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (IAFE), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, FCEN, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-05-15

    Electron capture and emission processes from insulator surfaces produced by grazing impact of fast ions are investigated under axial incidence conditions. For crystal surfaces we develop a model based on distorted wave methods, which allows us to express the coherent transition amplitude along the projectile path as a sum of atomic amplitudes, each one associated with a different lattice site. The method is applied to 100 keV protons colliding with LiF surfaces. For electron transitions from a given initial crystal state, the probabilities display strong interference effects as a function of the crystal orientation. But the interference patterns disappear when these partial probabilities are added to derive the total probability from the surface band.

  1. Axial grazing collisions with insulator surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravielle, M.S.; Miraglia, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Electron capture and emission processes from insulator surfaces produced by grazing impact of fast ions are investigated under axial incidence conditions. For crystal surfaces we develop a model based on distorted wave methods, which allows us to express the coherent transition amplitude along the projectile path as a sum of atomic amplitudes, each one associated with a different lattice site. The method is applied to 100 keV protons colliding with LiF surfaces. For electron transitions from a given initial crystal state, the probabilities display strong interference effects as a function of the crystal orientation. But the interference patterns disappear when these partial probabilities are added to derive the total probability from the surface band

  2. Effective potential in the strong-coupling lattice QCD with next-to-next-to-learning order effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Takashi Z.; Miura, Kohtaroh; Ohnishi, Akira

    2010-01-01

    We derive an analytic expression of the effective potential at finite temperature (T) and chemical potential (μ) in the strong-coupling lattice QCD for color SU(3) including next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) effects in the strong coupling expansion. NNLO effective action terms are systematically evaluated in the leading order of the large dimensional (1/d) expansion, and are found to come from some types of connected two-plaquette configurations. We apply the extended Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation and a gluonic-dressed fermion technique to the effective action, and obtain the effective potential as a function of T, μ, and two order parameters: chiral condensate and vector potential field. The next-to-leading order (NLO) and NNLO effects result in modifications of the wave function renormalization factor, quark mass, and chemical potential. We find that T c,μ =0 and μ c,T =0 are similar to the NLO results, whereas the position of the critical point is sensitive to NNLO corrections. (author)

  3. Computer modelling of RF ablation in cortical osteoid osteoma: Assessment of the insulating effect of the reactive zone

    OpenAIRE

    Irastorza, Ramiro M.; Trujillo Guillen, Macarena; Martel Villagran, Jose; Berjano, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Hyperthermia on 10 Feb 2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.3109/02656736.2015.1135998 Purpose: The aim was to study by computer simulations the insulating role of the reactive zone surrounding a cortical osteoid osteoma (OO) in terms of electrical and thermal performance during radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Material and methods: We modelled a cortical OO consi...

  4. Modelling of a DBR laser based on Raman effect in a silicon-on-insulator rib waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Leonardis, Francesco; Dimastrodonato, Valeria; Passaro, Vittorio M N

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, third-order nonlinearities in silicon-on-insulator rib waveguides are investigated to obtain complete modelling, describing the behaviour of a stimulated Raman scattering based laser. The simulations of a distributed Bragg reflector laser operation in a time domain allow for the first time to study in detail the dependence of threshold and output powers on different device parameters. Both continuous wave and pulsed laser operations are theoretically demonstrated, as well as their dependence on device parameters

  5. Insulating characteristics of polyvinyl alcohol for integrated electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Etten, Eliana A.; Ximenes, Eder S.; Tarasconi, Lucas T.; Garcia, Irene T.S.; Forte, Maria M.C.; Boudinov, Henri

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the effects of molecular weight, hydrolysis degree, and cross-link on the performance of Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) when applied as dielectric material in organic field effect transistors. For this purpose, metal–insulator-structures and polymeric films were characterized. The polymer structure was analyzed by thermogravimetry and calorimetry, and the electrical characterization of the films was performed through current–voltage and capacitance–voltage curves; and dielectric spectrometry. Cross-linkage, followed by hydrolysis degree, presented the major impact on polymer properties, due to the strong influence on chain mobility. The chain mobility increases the dielectric response and decreases the insulation capacity, generating the need to compromise between these two properties. The largest drawback encountered was the high sensitivity of the films to ambient humidity. The best performance of the organic insulator was obtained from cross-linked films made of an incompletely hydrolyzed PVA. - Highlights: • Effect of molecular weight, hydrolysis and cross-link on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) dielectric • Cross-linkage, followed by hydrolysis, showed the major impact on properties. • Cross-linkage followed by hydrolysis showed the strongest effect on chain mobility. • Best dielectric performance: cross-linked films made of incompletely hydrolyzed PVA • Largest drawback is the high sensitivity of the films to ambient humidity

  6. Spin filter effect of hBN/Co detector electrodes in a 3D topological insulator spin valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaklinova, Kristina; Polyudov, Katharina; Burghard, Marko; Kern, Klaus

    2018-03-01

    Topological insulators emerge as promising components of spintronic devices, in particular for applications where all-electrical spin control is essential. While the capability of these materials to generate spin-polarized currents is well established, only very little is known about the spin injection/extraction into/out of them. Here, we explore the switching behavior of lateral spin valves comprising the 3D topological insulator Bi2Te2Se as channel, which is separated from ferromagnetic Cobalt detector contacts by an ultrathin hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) tunnel barrier. The corresponding contact resistance displays a notable variation, which is correlated with a change of the switching characteristics of the spin valve. For contact resistances below ~5 kΩ, the hysteresis in the switching curve reverses upon reversing the applied current, as expected for spin-polarized currents carried by the helical surface states. By contrast, for higher contact resistances an opposite polarity of the hysteresis loop is observed, which is independent of the current direction, a behavior signifying negative spin detection efficiency of the multilayer hBN/Co contacts combined with bias-induced spin signal inversion. Our findings suggest the possibility to tune the spin exchange across the interface between a ferromagnetic metal and a topological insulator through the number of intervening hBN layers.

  7. Effects of multi-photon interferences from internally generated fields in strongly resonant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Lu; Payne, Marvin G.; Garrett, William R.

    2006-01-01

    In studies of various nonlinear optical phenomena, strong resonant features in the atomic or molecular response to multi-photon driven processes have been used to greatly enhance the visibility of otherwise weak higher-order processes. However, there are well defined circumstances where a multi-photon-resonant response of a target system leads to the generation of one or more new electromagnetic fields that can drastically change the overall system response from what would be expected from the imposed laser fields alone. New effects can occur and dominate some aspects of the nonlinear optical response because of the constructive or destructive interference between transition amplitudes along multiple excitation pathways between a given set of optically coupled states, where one of the pathways involve internally generated field(s). Under destructive interference some resonant enhancements can become completely canceled (suppressed). This review focuses on the class of optical interference effects associated with internally generated fields, that have been found to be capable of influencing a very significant number of basic physical phenomena in gas or vapor phase systems. It provides a historical overview of experimental and theoretical developments and a modern understanding of the underlying physics and its various manifestations that include: suppression of multi-photon excitation processes, suppression of stimulated emissions (Raman, hyper-Raman, and optically pumped stimulated emissions), saturation of parametric wave-mixing, pressure and beam-geometry dependent shifting of multi-photon-resonant absorption lines, and the suppression of Autler-Townes splitting and ac-stark shifts. Additionally, optical interference effects in some modern contexts, such as achieving multi-photon induced transparency, establishing single-photon self-interference based induced transparency, and generating entangled single photon states, are reviewed

  8. Effect of initial perturbation amplitude on Richtmyer-Meshkov flows induced by strong shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell, Z.; Abarzhi, S. I., E-mail: snezhana.abarzhi@gmail.com, E-mail: sabarji@andrew.cmu.edu [Mellon College of Science and Carnegie Mellon University – Qatar, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15231 (United States); Stellingwerf, R. F. [Stellingwerf Consulting, Huntsville, Alabama 35803 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We systematically study the effect of the initial perturbation on Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) flows induced by strong shocks in fluids with contrasting densities. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics simulations are employed. A broad range of shock strengths and density ratios is considered. The amplitude of the initial single mode sinusoidal perturbation of the interface varies from 0% to 100% of its wavelength. The simulations results are compared, wherever possible, with four rigorous theories, and with other experiments and simulations, achieving good quantitative and qualitative agreement. Our study is focused on early time dynamics of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). We analyze the initial growth-rate of RMI immediately after the shock passage, when the perturbation amplitude increases linearly with time. For the first time, to the authors' knowledge, we find that the initial growth-rate of RMI is a non-monotone function of the initial perturbation amplitude, thus restraining the amount of energy that can be deposited by the shock at the interface. The maximum value of the initial growth-rate depends on the shock strength and the density ratio, whereas the corresponding value of the initial perturbation amplitude depends only slightly on the shock strength and density ratio.

  9. Strong human leukocyte antigen matching effect in nonsensitized kidney recipients with high pretransplant soluble CD30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süsal, Caner; Pelzl, Steffen; Opelz, Gerhard

    2003-10-27

    The influence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching on graft survival is greater in patients with preformed lymphocytotoxic antibodies than in nonsensitized patients. Pretransplant serum soluble CD30 (sCD30) affects graft outcome independently of presensitization status. The impact of HLA compatibility on kidney transplant survival was analyzed in 3980 nonsensitized first cadaveric kidney recipients in relation to the pretransplant serum sCD30 content. Although HLA compatibility influenced graft outcome only marginally in nonsensitized recipients with low sCD30 (at 3 years: P=0.0095; at 5 years: P=0.1033), a strong HLA matching effect was observed in nonsensitized recipients with high sCD30 (at 3 years: PsCD30 benefit from an HLA well-matched kidney. Patients should be tested for sCD30 while on the waiting list for a kidney transplant, and HLA well-matched kidneys should be allocated to patients with high sCD30.

  10. Quantum Fluctuations and the Unruh effect in strongly-coupled conformal field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Elena; Chernicoff, Mariano; Güijosa, Alberto; Pedraza, Juan F.

    2010-06-01

    Through the AdS/CFT correspondence, we study a uniformly accelerated quark in the vacuum of strongly-coupled conformal field theories in various dimensions, and determine the resulting stochastic fluctuations of the quark trajectory. From the perspective of an inertial observer, these are quantum fluctuations induced by the gluonic radiation emitted by the accelerated quark. From the point of view of the quark itself, they originate from the thermal medium predicted by the Unruh effect. We scrutinize the relation between these two descriptions in the gravity side of the correspondence, and show in particular that upon transforming the conformal field theory from Rindler space to the open Einstein universe, the acceleration horizon disappears from the boundary theory but is preserved in the bulk. This transformation allows us to directly connect our calculation of radiation-induced fluctuations in vacuum with the analysis by de Boer et al. of the Brownian motion of a quark that is on average static within a thermal medium. Combining this same bulk transformation with previous results of Emparan, we are also able to compute the stress-energy tensor of the Unruh thermal medium.

  11. Source, propagation and site effects: impact on mapping strong ground motion in Bucharest area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radulian, R.; Kuznetsov, I.; Panza, G.F.

    2004-01-01

    Achievements in the framework of the NATO SfP project 972266 focused on the impact of Vrancea earthquakes on the security of Bucharest urban area are presented. The problem of Bucharest city security to Vrancea earthquakes is discussed in terms of numerical modelling of seismic motion and intermediate term earthquake prediction. A hybrid numerical scheme developed by Faeh et al. (1990; 1993) for frequencies up to 1 Hz is applied for the realistic modelling of the seismic ground motion in Bucharest. The method combines the modal summation for the 1D bedrock model and the finite differences for the 2D local structure model. All the factors controlling the ground motion at the site are considered: source, propagation and site effects, respectively. The input data includes the recent records provided by the digital accelerometer network developed within the Romanian-German CRC461 cooperation programme and CALIXTO'99, VRANCEA'99, VRANCEA2001 experiments. The numerical simulation proves to be a powerful tool in mapping the strong ground motion for realistic structures, reproducing acceptably from engineering point of view the observations. A new model of the Vrancea earthquake scaling is obtained and implications for the determination of the seismic motion parameters are analyzed. The role of the focal mechanism and attenuation properties upon the amplitude and spectral content of the ground motion are outlined. CN algorithm is applied for predicting Vrancea earthquakes. Finally, implications for the disaster management strategy are discussed. (authors)

  12. Effect of dipole polarizability on positron binding by strongly polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribakin, G F; Swann, A R

    2015-01-01

    A model for positron binding to polar molecules is considered by combining the dipole potential outside the molecule with a strongly repulsive core of a given radius. Using existing experimental data on binding energies leads to unphysically small core radii for all of the molecules studied. This suggests that electron–positron correlations neglected in the simple model play a large role in determining the binding energy. We account for these by including the polarization potential via perturbation theory and non-perturbatively. The perturbative model makes reliable predictions of binding energies for a range of polar organic molecules and hydrogen cyanide. The model also agrees with the linear dependence of the binding energies on the polarizability inferred from the experimental data (Danielson et al 2009 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 235203). The effective core radii, however, remain unphysically small for most molecules. Treating molecular polarization non-perturbatively leads to physically meaningful core radii for all of the molecules studied and enables even more accurate predictions of binding energies to be made for nearly all of the molecules considered. (paper)

  13. Strong gravity effects of rotating black holes: quasi-periodic oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, Alikram N; Esmer, Göksel Daylan; Talazan, Pamir

    2013-01-01

    We explore strong gravity effects of the geodesic motion in the spacetime of rotating black holes in general relativity and braneworld gravity. We focus on the description of the motion in terms of three fundamental frequencies: the orbital frequency, the radial and vertical epicyclic frequencies. For a Kerr black hole, we perform a detailed numerical analysis of these frequencies at the innermost stable circular orbits and beyond them as well as at the characteristic stable orbits, at which the radial epicyclic frequency attains its highest value. We find that the values of the epicyclic frequencies for a class of stable orbits exhibit good qualitative agreement with the observed frequencies of the twin peaks quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in some black hole binaries. We also find that at the characteristic stable circular orbits, where the radial (or the vertical) epicyclic frequency has maxima, the vertical and radial epicyclic frequencies exhibit an approximate 2:1 ratio even in the case of near-extreme rotation of the black hole. Next, we perform a similar analysis of the fundamental frequencies for a rotating braneworld black hole and argue that the existence of such a black hole with a negative tidal charge, whose angular momentum exceeds the Kerr bound in general relativity, does not confront with the observations of high-frequency QPOs. (paper)

  14. Polyimide Foams Offer Superior Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, Erik Weiser and his colleagues in the Advanced Materials and Processing Branch were working with a new substance for fabricating composites for use in supersonic aircraft. The team, however, was experiencing some frustration. Every time they tried to create a solid composite from the polyimide (an advanced polymer) material, it bubbled and foamed. It seemed like the team had reached a dead end in their research - until they had another idea. "We said, This isn t going to work for composites, but maybe we could make a foam out of it," Weiser says. "That was kind of our eureka moment, to see if we could go in a whole other direction. And it worked." Weiser and his colleagues invented a new kind of polyimide foam insulation they named TEEK. The innovation displayed a host of advantages over existing insulation options. Compared to other commercial foams, Weiser explains, polyimide foams perform well across a broad range of temperatures, noting that the NASA TEEK foams provide effective structural insulation up to 600 F and down to cryogenic temperatures. The foam does not burn or off-gas toxic fumes, and even at -423 F - the temperature of liquid hydrogen - the material stays flexible. The inventors could produce the TEEK foam at a range of densities, from 0.5 pounds per cubic foot up to 20 pounds per cubic foot, making the foam ideal for a range of applications, including as insulation for reusable launch vehicles and for cryogenic tanks and lines. They also developed a unique, friable balloon format for manufacturing the foam, producing it as hollow microspheres that allowed the foam to be molded and then cured into any desired shape - perfect for insulating pipes of different sizes and configurations. The team s originally unplanned invention won an "R&D 100" award, and a later form of the foam, called LaRC FPF-44 (Spinoff 2009), was named "NASA Invention of the Year" in 2007.

  15. Structural and proximity-induced ferromagnetic properties of topological insulator-magnetic insulator heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilong Jiang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneously broken time reversal symmetry can lead to the formation of an energy gap in the Dirac spectrum of the surface states of a topological insulator (TI which can consequently give rise to a variety of interesting phenomena potentially useful for spintronics. In this work, we couple a non-magnetic TI to a high Curie temperature TC magnetic insulator to induce strong exchange interaction via the proximity effect. We have successfully grown 5 quintuple layer thick ternary TI (BixSb1-x2Te3 films on atomically flat yttrium iron garnet (YIG film with the combination of molecular beam epitaxy and pulsed laser deposition, in which the Fermi level position relative to the Dirac point is varied by controlling the Bi:Sb ratio. The anomalous Hall effect (AHE and suppressed weak antilocalization (WAL measured under out of plane magnetic fields reveal that the TI surface in contact with YIG is magnetized. Our high-quality (BixSb1-x2Te3/Y IG heterostructure provides a tunable system for exploring the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE at higher temperatures in TI-based spintronic devices.

  16. Heat insulation support device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Koda, Tomokazu; Motojima, Osamu; Yamamoto, Junya.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention comprises a plurality of heat insulation legs disposed in a circumferential direction. Each of the heat insulative support legs has a hollow shape, and comprises an outer column and an inner column as support structures having a heat insulative property (heat insulative structure), and a thermal anchor which absorbs compulsory displacement by a thin flat plate (displacement absorber). The outer column, the thermal anchor and the inner column are connected by a support so as to offset the positional change of objects to be supported due to shrinkage when they are shrunk. In addition, the portion between the superconductive coils as the objects to be supported and the inner column is connected by the support. The superconductive thermonuclear device is entirely contained in a heat insulative vacuum vessel, and the heat insulative support legs are disposed on a lower lid of the heat insulative vacuum vessel. With such a constitution, they are strengthened against lateral load and buckling, thereby enabling to reduce the amount of heat intrusion while keeping the compulsory displacement easy to be absorbed. (I.N.)

  17. Dopamine D(1) receptor deletion strongly reduces neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ares-Santos, S; Granado, N; Oliva, I; O'Shea, E; Martin, E D; Colado, M I; Moratalla, R

    2012-02-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a potent, highly addictive psychostimulant consumed worldwide. In humans and experimental animals, repeated exposure to this drug induces persistent neurodegenerative changes. Damage occurs primarily to dopaminergic neurons, accompanied by gliosis. The toxic effects of METH involve excessive dopamine (DA) release, thus DA receptors are highly likely to play a role in this process. To define the role of D(1) receptors in the neurotoxic effects of METH we used D(1) receptor knock-out mice (D(1)R(-/-)) and their WT littermates. Inactivation of D(1)R prevented METH-induced dopamine fibre loss and hyperthermia, and increases in gliosis and pro-inflammatory molecules such as iNOS in the striatum. In addition, D(1)R inactivation prevented METH-induced loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. To explore the relationship between hyperthermia and neurotoxicity, METH was given at high ambient temperature (29 °C). In this condition, D(1)R(-/-) mice developed hyperthermia following drug delivery and the neuroprotection provided by D(1)R inactivation at 23 °C was no longer observed. However, reserpine, which empties vesicular dopamine stores, blocked hyperthermia and strongly potentiated dopamine toxicity in D(1)R(-/-) mice, suggesting that the protection afforded by D(1)R inactivation is due to both hypothermia and higher stored vesicular dopamine. Moreover, electrical stimulation evoked higher DA overflow in D(1)R(-/-) mice as demonstrated by fast scan cyclic voltammetry despite their lower basal DA content, suggesting higher vesicular DA content in D(1)R(-/-) than in WT mice. Altogether, these results indicate that the D(1)R plays a significant role in METH-induced neurotoxicity by mediating drug-induced hyperthermia and increasing the releasable cytosolic DA pool. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Autler-Townes effect in a strongly driven electromagnetically induced transparency resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lijun; Zhang Lianshui; Li Xiaoli; Han Li; Fu Guangsheng; Manson, Neil B.; Suter, Dieter; Wei Changjiang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we study the nonlinear behavior of an electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) resonance subject to a coherent driving field. The EIT is associated with a Λ three-level system where two hyperfine levels within an electronic ground state are coupled to a common excited state level by a coupling field and a probe field. In addition there is an radio-frequency (rf) field driving a hyperfine transition within the ground state. The paper contrasts two different situations. In one case the rf-driven transition shares a common level with the probed transition and in the second case it shares a common level with the coupled transition. In both cases the EIT resonance is split into a doublet and the characteristics of the EIT doublet are determined by the strength and frequency of the rf-driving field. The doublet splitting originates from the rf-field induced dynamic Stark effect and has close analogy with the Autler-Townes effect observed in three-level pump-probe spectroscopy study. The situation changes when the rf field is strong and the two cases are very different. One is analogous to two Λ three-level systems with EIT resonance associated with each. The other corresponds to a doubly driven three-level system with rf-field-induced electromagnetically induced absorption resonance. The two situations are modeled using numerical solutions of the relevant equation of motion of density matrix. In addition a physical account of their behaviors is given in terms of a dressed state picture

  19. Nonlinear Dielectric Response of Water Treed XLPE Cable Insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hvidsten, Sverre

    1999-07-01

    frequency domain dielectric response was larger, and found to be more nonlinear than values measured in time domain. This thesis describes a new mechanism for the nonlinear dielectric response. It is assumed that at low or no applied electric stress the water treed region is characterised by spherical micro voids filled with liquid water separated by channels of crazed insulation. The effect of increasing the test voltage is to cause Maxwell mechanical tensile stresses strong enough to open up the crazing zones and elongate the water droplets into the mechanically weak crazing zones. Finite Element Method (FEM) calculations show that the effect of the re-opening of crazing zones by an increased test voltage, strongly increases the dielectric loss of the water treed insulation. This is qualitatively in good agreement with the experimental results obtained on water treed insulation, where increasing the test voltage above a certain value caused the losses to increase. The typical frequency independent dielectric response of water treed insulation can, however, not be explained by this model. Numerical calculations of losses, indicated that the mechanism of voltage assisted ingress of water is more likely in treed regions with rather low contents of water. The micro-FTIR measurements of single vented water trees indicated that such regions were likely to be present 3-400 (my)m within the tree tip, and close to the insulation screen. The process of refilling water into water tree structures is likely to be associated with a hysteresis effect. When removing (or reducing) the electric field, mechanical relaxation causes the channel to collapse and to slowly recover its former structure. Dielectric response measurements showed that a hysteresis was typically present when the response was nonlinear.

  20. Hybridization and crystal-field effects in Kondo insulators studied by means of core-level spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strigari, Fabio

    2015-04-13

    This thesis is mainly focused on the class of Kondo insulators, which also comprises Kondo semiconductors and semimetals. When the right conditions are met - i.e. for a certain number of electrons per unit cell and for certain symmetries of the electronic structure - the interaction between the conduction and f electrons opens a narrow hybridization gap close to the Fermi level. Here we investigate the Kondo semiconductor CeNiSn, as well as the CeM{sub 2}Al{sub 10} compound family with M=Ru, Os and Fe. Many explanations for the low-temperature behavior have been suggested, all of which stress the significance of the 4f crystalline-electric-field (CEF) ground state, which is investigated in the framework of this thesis. We determine the CEF wave functions in this compound family and quantify the degree of c-f hybridization in order to address speculations about the impact of hybridization on the magnetic order. In addition, on the search for parameters which correlate with ground-state properties in heavy-fermion compounds, we investigate the CEF ground states of the intermetallic substitution series CeRh{sub 1-x}Ir{sub x}In{sub 5} since its phase diagram covers all phases of interest, from antiferromagnetic to superconducting as well as regions of phase coexistence. To shed light on the issues above, namely the CEF ground state and the hybridization strength, respectively, two new experimental approaches are used: polarization-dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES). Recently, linearly polarized XAS at the Ce M{sub 4,5} edge has been proven to be highly useful when it comes to the determination of the 4f ground-state wave function in tetragonal rare earth systems. In the present thesis the same technique is applied to the above-mentioned materials, demonstrating that linearly polarized XAS can be employed to obtain an unambiguous and reliable picture of the CEF ground state even in Kondo-insulating systems

  1. Vacuum foil insulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, J.P.; Sabolcik, R.E.; Svedberg, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    In a multifoil thermal insulation package having a plurality of concentric cylindrical cups, means are provided for reducing heat loss from the penetration region which extends through the cups. At least one cup includes an integral skirt extending from one end of the cup to intersection with the penetration means. Assembly of the insulation package with the skirted cup is facilitated by splitting the cup to allow it to be opened up and fitted around the other cups during assembly. The insulation is for an implantable nuclear powered artificial heart

  2. On the Concept of Electrode to Discharge Phenomena in Surface Roughness With Reference Strongly Electronegative Gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1986-01-01

    The use of geometrically well-defined protrusions in studies es of the effects of electrode surface roughness upon the insulation strength of strongly electronegative gases is discussed. It is argued that, with respect to the roughness associated with production processes, the dimensions of artif...

  3. Soft Coulomb gap and asymmetric scaling towards metal-insulator quantum criticality in multilayer MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byoung Hee; Bae, Jung Jun; Joo, Min-Kyu; Choi, Homin; Han, Gang Hee; Lim, Hanjo; Lee, Young Hee

    2018-05-24

    Quantum localization-delocalization of carriers are well described by either carrier-carrier interaction or disorder. When both effects come into play, however, a comprehensive understanding is not well established mainly due to complexity and sparse experimental data. Recently developed two-dimensional layered materials are ideal in describing such mesoscopic critical phenomena as they have both strong interactions and disorder. The transport in the insulating phase is well described by the soft Coulomb gap picture, which demonstrates the contribution of both interactions and disorder. Using this picture, we demonstrate the critical power law behavior of the localization length, supporting quantum criticality. We observe asymmetric critical exponents around the metal-insulator transition through temperature scaling analysis, which originates from poor screening in insulating regime and conversely strong screening in metallic regime due to free carriers. The effect of asymmetric scaling behavior is weakened in monolayer MoS 2 due to a dominating disorder.

  4. Quantum fluctuations in insulating ferroelectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riseborough, Peter S.

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: It has been proposed that in a ferroelectric insulator, an applied magnetic field may couple the transverse phonon modes and produce left and right circularly polarized phonon modes which are no longer degenerate. We quantize the theory and examine the effects of quantal fluctuations. In particular, we show that the zero point fluctuations result in a large diamagnetic contribution to the magnetic susceptibility. - Abstract: It has been proposed that in a ferroelectric insulator, an applied magnetic field may couple the transverse phonon modes and produce left and right circularly polarized phonon modes which are no longer degenerate. We quantize the theory and examine the effects of quantal fluctuations. In particular, we show that the zero-point fluctuations result in a large diamagnetic contribution to the magnetic susceptibility.

  5. Strong and nonlinear effects of fragmentation on ecosystem service provision at multiple scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Matthew G. E.; Bennett, Elena M.; Gonzalez, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Human actions, such as converting natural land cover to agricultural or urban land, result in the loss and fragmentation of natural habitat, with important consequences for the provision of ecosystem services. Such habitat loss is especially important for services that are supplied by fragments of natural land cover and that depend on flows of organisms, matter, or people across the landscape to produce benefits, such as pollination, pest regulation, recreation and cultural services. However, our quantitative knowledge about precisely how different patterns of landscape fragmentation might affect the provision of these types of services is limited. We used a simple, spatially explicit model to evaluate the potential impact of natural land cover loss and fragmentation on the provision of hypothetical ecosystem services. Based on current literature, we assumed that fragments of natural land cover provide ecosystem services to the area surrounding them in a distance-dependent manner such that ecosystem service flow depended on proximity to fragments. We modeled seven different patterns of natural land cover loss across landscapes that varied in the overall level of landscape fragmentation. Our model predicts that natural land cover loss will have strong and unimodal effects on ecosystem service provision, with clear thresholds indicating rapid loss of service provision beyond critical levels of natural land cover loss. It also predicts the presence of a tradeoff between maximizing ecosystem service provision and conserving natural land cover, and a mismatch between ecosystem service provision at landscape versus finer spatial scales. Importantly, the pattern of landscape fragmentation mitigated or intensified these tradeoffs and mismatches. Our model suggests that managing patterns of natural land cover loss and fragmentation could help influence the provision of multiple ecosystem services and manage tradeoffs and synergies between services across different human

  6. Effects of strong bite force on the facial vertical dimension of pembarong performers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Christina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A pembarong performer is a reog dancer who bites on a piece of wood inserted into his/her mouth in order to support a 60 kg Barongan or Dadak Merak mask. The teeth supporting this large and heavy mask are directly affected, as the strong bite force exerted during a dance could affect their vertical and sagital facial dimensions. Purpose: This study aimed to examine the influence of the bite force of pembarong performers due to their vertical and sagital facial dimensions. Methods: The study reported here involved fifteen pembarong performers and thirteen individuals with normal occlusion (with specific criteria. The bite force of these subjects was measured with a dental prescale sensor during its centric occlusion. A cephalometric variation measurement was subsequently performed on all subjects with its effects on their vertical and sagital facial dimensions being measured. Results: The bite force value of the pembarong performers was 394.3816 ± 7.68787 Newtons, while the normal occlusion was 371.7784 ± 4.77791 Newtons. There was no correlation between the bite force and the facial sagital dimension of these subjects. However, a significant correlation did exist between bite force and lower facial height/total facial height (LFH/TFH ratio (p = 0.013. Conversely, no significant correlation between bite force and posterior facial height/total facial height (PFH/TFH ratio (p = 0.785 was detected. There was an inverse correlation between bite force and LFH/TFH ratio (r = -.464. Conclusion: Bite force is directly related to the decrease in LFH/TFH ratio. Occlusal pressure exerted by the posterior teeth on the alveolar bone may increase bone density at the endosteal surface of cortical bone.

  7. Strong ligand field effects of blue phosphorescent Ir(III) complexes with phenylpyrazole and phosphines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Se Won; Ham, Ho Wan; Kim, Young Sik

    2012-04-01

    In the paper, we describe new Ir complexes for achieving efficient blue phosphorescence. New blue-emitting mixed-ligand Ir complexes comprising one cyclometalating, two phosphines trans to each other such as Ir(dppz)(PPh3)2(H)(L) (Ll= Cl, NCMe+, CN), [dppz = 3,5-Diphenylpyrazole] were synthesized and studied to tune the phosphorescence wavelength to the deep blue region and to enhance the luminescence efficiencies. To gain insight into the factors responsible for the emission color change and the variation of luminescence efficiency, we investigate the electron-withdrawing capabilities of ancillary ligands using DFT and TD-DFT calculations on the ground and excited states of the complexes. To achieve deep blue emission and increase the emission efficiency, (1) we substitute the phenyl group on the 3-position of the pyrazole ring that lowers the triplet energy enough that the quenching channel is not thermally accessible and (2) change the ancillary ligands coordinated to iridium atom to phosphine and cyano groups known as very strong field ligands. Their inclusion in the coordination sphere can increase the HOMO-LUMO gap to achieve the hypsochromic shift in emission color and lower the HOMO and LUMO energy level, which causes a large d-orbital energy splitting and avoids the quenching effect to improve the luminescence efficiency. The maximum emission spectra of Ir(dppz)(PPh3)2(H)(CI) and Ir(dppz)(PPh3)2(H)(CN) were in the ranges of 439, 432 nm, respectively.

  8. Cooper Pairs in Insulators?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valles, James

    2008-01-01

    Nearly 50 years elapsed between the discovery of superconductivity and the emergence of the microscopic theory describing this zero resistance state. The explanation required a novel phase of matter in which conduction electrons joined in weakly bound pairs and condensed with other pairs into a single quantum state. Surprisingly, this Cooper pair formation has also been invoked to account for recently uncovered high-resistance or insulating phases of matter. To address this possibility, we have used nanotechnology to create an insulating system that we can probe directly for Cooper pairs. I will present the evidence that Cooper pairs exist and dominate the electrical transport in these insulators and I will discuss how these findings provide new insight into superconductor to insulator quantum phase transitions.

  9. Gas insulated substations

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an overview on the particular development steps of gas insulated high-voltage switchgear, and is based on the information given with the editor's tutorial. The theory is kept low only as much as it is needed to understand gas insulated technology, with the main focus of the book being on delivering practical application knowledge. It discusses some introductory and advanced aspects in the meaning of applications. The start of the book presents the theory of Gas Insulated Technology, and outlines reliability, design, safety, grounding and bonding, and factors for choosing GIS. The third chapter presents the technology, covering the following in detail: manufacturing, specification, instrument transformers, Gas Insulated Bus, and the assembly process. Next, the book goes into control and monitoring, which covers local control cabinet, bay controller, control schemes, and digital communication. Testing is explained in the middle of the book before installation and energization. Importantly, ...

  10. Radiation induced ion currents in vacuum due to residual He and H, and their expected effect on insulating surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, E.R.; Morono, A.; Gonzalez de Vicente, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Ceramic insulators and windows in ITER will be subjected to bombardment by energetic hydrogen isotopes and helium as a consequence of ionization of the residual gas by gamma radiation and acceleration of the ions by the local electric fields. Most of the energy carried by these particles will be deposited at or very near the surface giving rise to possible electrical and optical degradation. Severe surface electrical degradation has recently been observed when oxide materials are implanted to low doses (10 15 ions/cm 2 ) with protons and alpha particles at temperatures between 50 and 450 o C. In order to estimate the relevance to fusion applications and hence the lifetime of ceramic insulators in ITER it is necessary to quantify possible ion currents generated in the residual gas by measuring radiation induced electrical conductivity for hydrogen isotopes and helium gases at low pressures and then perform experiments in which ceramic candidate materials are subjected to ion bombardment at representative currents and energies. To determine the magnitude of radiation generated ion currents, experiments have been carried out in a special gas chamber mounted in the beam line of a 2 MeV Van de Graaff electron accelerator, with the gases being irradiated through an 0.05 x 10 -3 m thick aluminium window with 1.8 MeV electrons. A guarded volume was defined between two parallel square copper plate electrodes separated by 1.5 x 10 -2 m. The experimental set-up permitted an electric field to be applied to the irradiated volume of gas, and the electric current flowing through the ionized gas to be measured. For these experiments the radiation beam was perpendicular to the electric field direction. In this way radiation induced conductivity for helium and hydrogen has been measured at pressures between about 1000 and 10 -3 mbar (10 -5 to 10 -1 Pa), radiation dose rates of 30 Gy/s and applied voltages up to 1500 volts. The radiation induced electrical currents for low pressure

  11. The effect of van der Waal's gap expansions on the surface electronic structure of layered topological insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremeev, S V; Vergniory, M G; Chulkov, E V; Menshchikova, T V; Shaposhnikov, A A

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of relativistic ab initio calculations, we show that an expansion of van der Waal's (vdW) spacings in layered topological insulators caused by intercalation of deposited atoms, leads to the simultaneous emergence of parabolic and M-shaped two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) bands as well as Rashba-splitting of the former states. The expansion of vdW spacings and the emergence of the 2DEG states localized in the (sub)surface region are also accompanied by a relocation of the topological surface state to the lower quintuple layers, that can explain the absence of inter-band scattering found experimentally. (paper)

  12. Wrapped Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    New NASA vehicles, such as Earth Departure Stage (EDS), Orion, landers, and orbiting fuel depots, need improved cryogenic propellant transfer and storage for long-duration missions. Current cryogen feed line multilayer insulation (MLI) performance is 10 times worse per area than tank MLI insulation. During each launch, cryogenic piping loses approximately 150,000 gallons (equivalent to $300,000) in boil-off during transfer, chill down, and ground hold. Quest Product Development Corp., teaming with Ball Aerospace, developed an innovative advanced insulation system, Wrapped MLI (wMLI), to provide improved thermal insulation for cryogenic feed lines. wMLI is high-performance multilayer insulation designed for cryogenic piping. It uses Quest's innovative discrete-spacer technology to control layer spacing/ density and reduce heat leak. The Phase I project successfully designed, built, and tested a wMLI prototype with a measured heat leak 3.6X lower than spiral-wrapped conventional MLI widely used for piping insulation. A wMLI prototype had a heat leak of 7.3 W/m2, or 27 percent of the heat leak of conventional MLI (26.7 W/m2). The Phase II project is further developing wMLI technology with custom, molded polymer spacers and advancing the product toward commercialization via a rigorous testing program, including developing advanced vacuuminsulated pipe for ground support equipment.

  13. Spin-torque generation in topological insulator based heterostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Fischer, Mark H.; Vaezi, Abolhassan; Manchon, Aurelien; Kim, Eun-Ah

    2016-01-01

    Heterostructures utilizing topological insulators exhibit a remarkable spin-torque efficiency. However, the exact origin of the strong torque, in particular whether it stems from the spin-momentum locking of the topological surface states or rather

  14. The effect of dust charge inhomogeneity on low-frequency modes in a strongly coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farid, T.; Mamun, A.A.; Shukla, P.K.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of low-frequency modes accounting for dust grain charge fluctuation and equilibrium grain charge inhomogeneity in a strongly coupled dusty plasma is presented. The existence of an extremely low frequency mode, which is due to the inhomogeneity in the equilibrium dust grain charge, is reported. Besides, the equilibrium dust grain charge inhomogeneity makes the dust-acoustic mode unstable. The strong correlations in the dust fluid significantly drive a new mode as well as the existing dust-acoustic mode. The applications of these results to recent experimental and to some space and astrophysical situations are discussed

  15. Insulating fcc YH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molen, S. J. van der; Nagengast, D. G.; Gogh, A. T. M. van; Kalkman, J.; Kooij, E. S.; Rector, J. H.; Griessen, R.

    2001-01-01

    We study the structural, optical, and electrical properties of Mg z Y 1-z switchable mirrors upon hydrogenation. It is found that the alloys disproportionate into essentially pure YH 3-δ and MgH 2 with the crystal structure of YH 3-δ dependent on the Mg concentration z. For 0 3-δ are observed, whereas for z≥0.1 only cubic YH 3-δ is present. Interestingly, cubic YH 3-δ is expanded compared to YH 2 , in disagreement with theoretical predictions. From optical and electrical measurements we conclude that cubic YH 3-δ is a transparent insulator with properties similar to hexagonal YH 3-δ . Our results are inconsistent with calculations predicting fcc YH 3-δ to be metallic, but they are in good agreement with recent GW calculations on both hcp and fcc YH 3 . Finally, we find an increase in the effective band gap of the hydrided Mg z Y 1-z alloys with increasing z. Possibly this is due to quantum confinement effects in the small YH 3 clusters

  16. Concrete elements with better insulation and less thermal bridge effect; Betonelementer med bedre isolering og mindre kuldebroer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monefeldt Tommerup, H

    2000-09-01

    In this project new concrete sandwich panel solutions with better thermal properties have been developed, usable for highly-insulated buildings, responding to the needs that occur when the demands to the permissible energy consumption for heating is further increased. This is expected to happen in 2005. The improved thermal properties have been obtained without increasing the costs more than of the extra insulation. Removing concrete ribs at window reveals and at horizontal joints enables a thermal improvement as well as reduced costs due to simpler manufacturing of the panel. A natural grouping of concrete sandwich panels into two categories formed the basis of the work. One is panels with covering concrete reveals as typically used in residential housing and office buildings. The other is about panels with load bearing ribs serving as columns, typically used in industrial and commercial building. Of course there are panels that are a combination of the two categories, but this fact has not been crucial for the analyses. (au)

  17. The effects of receiving room dimensions and absorption in the measurement of impact insulation class (IIC) rating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Rose Mary; Tocci, Gregory

    2005-09-01

    The measurement of the Impact Insulation Class (IIC) rating of any floor/ceiling construction requires the use of a certified laboratory space. In a recent investigation into the IIC rating of a new floor system, several tests were conducted in a certified laboratory. In many tests, the IIC rating was controlled by the 100-Hz 1/3-octave frequency band, despite changes in the floor/ceiling construction. The base floor/ceiling construction included a wood structural floor on open-web wood joists and a GWB ceiling below. This paper will investigate the possibility that room resonances influenced the IIC ratings of the several floor systems tested. These data will be compared with IIC data collected for the same floor construction with the GWB ceiling removed. The removal of the GWB ceiling increased the receiver room volume and exposed the glass fiber insulation to the receiver room, thus eliminating the control of the 100-Hz 1/3-octave band over the IIC rating.

  18. Survey of thermal insulation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Izumi

    1983-01-01

    Better thermal insulations have been developed to meet the growing demands of industry, and studies on thermal insulation at both high temperature and low temperature have been widely performed. The purpose of this survey is to summarize data on the performances and characteristics of thermal insulation materials and thermal insulation structures (for instance, gas cooled reactors, space vehicles and LNG storage tanks), and to discuss ravious problems regarding the design of thermal insulation structures of pool-type LMFBRs. (author)

  19. Strain-enhanced optical absorbance of topological insulator films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brems, Mathias Rosdahl; Paaske, Jens; Lunde, Anders Mathias

    2018-01-01

    Topological insulator films are promising materials for optoelectronics due to a strong optical absorption and a thickness-dependent band gap of the topological surface states. They are superior candidates for photodetector applications in the THz-infrared spectrum, with a potential performance...... thickness, the surface-state band gap, and thereby the optical absorption, can be effectively tuned by the application of uniaxial strain epsilon(zz), leading to a divergent band-edge absorbance for epsilon(zz) greater than or similar to 6%. Shear strain breaks the crystal symmetry and leads...

  20. Strongly enhanced flow effect from Landau-Vlasov versus Vlasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, C.; Remaud, B.; Sebille, F.; Schuck, P.

    1988-01-01

    The simulation of the collision integral in the Landau-Vlasov approach for heavy ion collisions is examined. It turns out that quantities like the nucleon mean free path can be compared with parallel ensemble models. Convergency of results with time step and sampling is clearly established. Quadratic quantities, like the internal pressure, are found to be strongly underestimated in parallel ensemble models

  1. Research on the strong optical feedback effects based on spectral analysis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhaoli; Qu, XueMin; Li, Weina; Zhang, Min; Wang, Hao; Li, Tuo

    2018-01-01

    The strong optical feedback has the advantage of generating high resolution fringes. However, these feedback fringes usually seem like the noise signal when the feedback level is high. This defect severely limits its practical application. In this paper, the generation mechanism of noise fringes with strong optical feedback is studied by using spectral analysis method. The spectral analysis results show that, in most cases, the noise-like fringes are observed owing to the strong multiple high-order feedback. However, at certain feedback cavity condition, there may be only one high-order feedback beam goes back to the laser cavity, the noise-like fringes can change to the cosine-like fringes. And the resolution of this fringe is dozens times than that of the weak optical feedback. This research provides a method to obtain high resolution cosine-like fringes rather than noise signal in the strong optical feedback, which makes it possible to be used in nanoscale displacement measurements.

  2. Communication: Strong excitonic and vibronic effects determine the optical properties of Li₂O₂

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Lastra, Juan Maria; Bass, J. D.; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2011-01-01

    The band structure and optical absorption spectrum of lithium peroxide (Li2O2) is calculated from first-principles using the G0W0 approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation, respectively. A strongly localized (Frenkel type) exciton corresponding to the π*→σ* transition on the O2 −2 peroxide ion...

  3. Localization and interaction effects during superconductor-insulator transition of Bi2Sr2Ca1-xGdxCu2O8+d

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaram, B.; Lanchester, P.C.; Weller, M.T.

    1991-01-01

    An extensive study has been made of the resistivity of superconducting and semiconducting samples of the Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca 1-x Gd x Cu 2 O 8+d system. The effect of changing the Gd concentration and the annealing conditions is found to be a gradual change in the normal-state resistivity measured at 280 K (ρ n ). With the increase in ρ n , T c is depressed. The form of the T c depression is found to be consistent with a theory of localization and interaction effects on the superconductivity. In the insulator regime, however, the resistivity is due to variable-range hopping (VRH), the dimensionality of which changes from two to three as the ρ n increases away from the superconductor-insulator boundary. The observation of the two-dimensional VRH behavior in juxtaposition with the superconductivity is in qualitative agreement with a theoretical model that considers the competition between superconductivity and localization in a disordered system. When ρ n >1 Ω cm, the resistivity variation is found to be dominated by multiphonon-assisted hopping

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of the effect of shape and size of SiO2 nanoparticle dopants on insulation paper cellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Tang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of silica nanoparticle (Nano-SiO2 dopants on insulation paper cellulose, and the interaction between them, was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The mechanical properties, interactions, and cellulose-Nano-SiO2 compatibility of composite models of cellulose doped with Nano-SiO2 were studied. An increase in Nano-SiO2 size leads to a decrease in the mechanical properties, and a decrease in the anti-deformation ability of the composite model. The binding energies and bond energies per surface area of the composite models indicate that the bonding interaction between spherical Nano-SiO2 and cellulose is the strongest among the four different Nano-SiO2 shapes that are investigated. The solubilities of the four composite models decrease with increasing Nano-SiO2 size, and the difference between the solubility of pure cellulose and those of the composite models increases with increasing Nano-SiO2 size. Good doping effects with the highest cellulose-Nano-SiO2 compatibility are achieved for the cellulose model doped with spherical Nano-SiO2 of 10 Å in diameter. These findings provide a method for modifying the mechanical properties of cellulose by doping, perhaps for improving insulation dielectrics.

  5. Topological insulators Dirac equation in condensed matter

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Shun-Qing

    2017-01-01

    This new edition presents a unified description of these insulators from one to three dimensions based on the modified Dirac equation. It derives a series of solutions of the bound states near the boundary, and describes the current status of these solutions. Readers are introduced to topological invariants and their applications to a variety of systems from one-dimensional polyacetylene, to two-dimensional quantum spin Hall effect and p-wave superconductors, three-dimensional topological insulators and superconductors or superfluids, and topological Weyl semimetals, helping them to better understand this fascinating field. To reflect research advances in topological insulators, several parts of the book have been updated for the second edition, including: Spin-Triplet Superconductors, Superconductivity in Doped Topological Insulators, Detection of Majorana Fermions and so on. In particular, the book features a new chapter on Weyl semimetals, a topic that has attracted considerable attention and has already b...

  6. Coulomb effects on the transport properties of quantum dots in strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldoveanu, V.; Aldea, A.; Manolescu, A.; Nita, M.

    2000-08-01

    We investigate the transport properties of quantum dots placed in strong magnetic field using a quantum-mechanical approach based on the 2D tight-binding Hamiltonian with direct Coulomb interaction and the Landauer-Buettiker (LB) formalism. The electronic transmittance and the Hall resistance show Coulomb oscillations and also prove multiple addition processes. We identify this feature as the 'bunching' of electrons observed in recent experiments and give an elementary explanation in terms of spectral characteristics of the dot. The spatial distribution of the added electrons may distinguish between edge and bulk states and it has specific features for bunched electrons. The dependence of the charging energy on the number of electrons is discussed for strong magnetic field. The crossover from the tunneling to quantum Hall regime is analyzed in terms of dot-lead coupling. (author)

  7. Small Fermi energy, strong electron-phonon effects and anharmonicity in MgB2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappelluti, E.; Pietronero, L.

    2007-01-01

    The investigation of the electron-phonon properties in MgB 2 has attracted a huge interest after the discovery of superconductivity with T c 39 K in this compound. Although superconductivity is often described in terms of the conventional Eliashberg theory, properly generalized in the multiband/multigap scenario, important features distinguish MgB 2 from other conventional strong-coupling superconductors. Most important it is the fact that a large part of the total electron-phonon strength seems to be concentrated here in only one phonon mode, the boron-boron E 2g stretching mode. Another interesting property is the small Fermi energy of the σ bands, which are strongly coupled with the E 2g mode. In this contribution, we discuss how the coexistence of both these features give rise to an unconventional phenomenology of the electron-phonon properties

  8. Interference effects at photoionization of Rydberg atoms by a strong electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movsesyan, A.M.; Fedorov, M.V.

    1989-01-01

    The photoionization of Rydberg atoms in a strong electromagnetic field is considered. Degeneration of the levels with respect to the orbital moment, their Stark splitting and the possibility of resonant interaction with levels of lower energy are taken into account. The complex quasi-energies of the system, photoelectron spectrum in the limit of an infinite duration of interaction and the time dependence of the total ionization probability are found. It is shown that a narrowing of the quasi-energy levels occurs in a strong field. Against a background of the quasi- continuum the quasi-energy spectrum consists of more or less narrow levels. In this case the photoelectron spectrum acquires a multi-peak form. With increasing field strength the height of the peaks increases, whereas their width decreases. The ionization rate decreases with increasing field strength. The presence of a quasi-continuum is the cause of the partially non-exponential nature of the atomic disintegration

  9. Effect of tilted anisotropy on spin states of strongly anisotropic 2D film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridman, Yu. A.; Klevets, F. N.; Gorelikov, G. A.

    2012-01-01

    The spin states of a 2D film with a strong easy-plane anisotropy and single-ion tilted anisotropy, the axis of which forms a certain angle with the normal to the film plane are investigated. In this system, an angular ferromagnetic phase, a spatially inhomogeneous state, and a quadrupole phase can be formed; the realization of these states noticeably depends on the degree of tilted anisotropy.

  10. Effects of strong cathodic polarization of the Ni-YSZ interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karin Vels; Chen, Ming; Jacobsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    Long-term strong cathodic polarization experiments of down to -2.4 V vs. E°(O2) of the Ni-YSZ interface were performed at 900°C in 97% H2/3% H2O on model electrodes. The Ni-YSZ interface underwent extensive changes and a large affected volume with a complex microstructure and phase distribution r...

  11. Strong quasi-particle tunneling study in the paired quantum Hall states

    OpenAIRE

    Nomura, Kentaro; Yoshioka, Daijiro

    2001-01-01

    The quasi-particle tunneling phenomena in the paired fractional quantum Hall states are studied. A single point-contact system is first considered. Because of relevancy of the quasi-particle tunneling term, the strong tunneling regime should be investigated. Using the instanton method it is shown that the strong quasi-particle tunneling regime is described as the weak electron tunneling regime effectively. Expanding to the network model the paired quantum Hall liquid to insulator transition i...

  12. Mechanism of floating body effect mitigation via cutting off source injection in a fully-depleted silicon-on-insulator technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Pengcheng; Chen Shuming; Chen Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of floating body effect (FBE) on a single event transient generation mechanism in fully depleted (FD) silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is investigated using three-dimensional technology computer-aided design (3D-TCAD) numerical simulation. The results indicate that the main SET generation mechanism is not carrier drift/diffusion but floating body effect (FBE) whether for positive or negative channel metal oxide semiconductor (PMOS or NMOS). Two stacking layout designs mitigating FBE are investigated as well, and the results indicate that the in-line stacking (IS) layout can mitigate FBE completely and is area penalty saving compared with the conventional stacking layout. (paper)

  13. Theoretical studies of strongly correlated fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, D [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    Strongly correlated fermions are investigated. An understanding of strongly correlated fermions underpins a diverse range of phenomena such as metal-insulator transitions, high-temperature superconductivity, magnetic impurity problems and the properties of heavy-fermion systems, in all of which local moments play an important role. (author).

  14. The Effect of Shell Thickness, Insulation and Casting Temperature on Defects Formation During Investment Casting of Ni-base Turbine Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raza M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Turbine blades have complex geometries with free form surface. Blades have different thickness at the trailing and leading edges as well as sharp bends at the chord-tip shroud junction and sharp fins at the tip shroud. In investment casting of blades, shrinkage at the tip-shroud and cord junction is a common casting problem. Because of high temperature applications, grain structure is also critical in these castings in order to avoid creep. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of different process parameters, such as, shell thickness, insulation and casting temperature on shrinkage porosity and grain size. The test geometry used in this study was a thin-walled air-foil structure which is representative of a typical hot-gas-path rotating turbine component. It was observed that, in thin sections, increased shell thickness helps to increase the feeding distance and thus avoid interdendritic shrinkage. It was also observed that grain size is not significantly affected by shell thickness in thin sections. Slower cooling rate due to the added insulation and steeper thermal gradient at metal mold interface induced by the thicker shell not only helps to avoid shrinkage porosity but also increases fill-ability in thinner sections.

  15. Effect of the V{sub As}V{sub Ga} complex defect doping on properties of the semi-insulating GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Deming, E-mail: xautmdm@163.com; Qiao, Hongbo; Shi, Wei; Li, Enling [Department of Applied Physics, Xi' an University of Technology, Xi' an 710054 (China)

    2014-04-21

    The different position V{sub As}V{sub Ga} cluster defect doping in semi-insulating (SI) GaAs has been studied by first-principles calculation based on hybrid density functional theory. Our calculated results show that EL6 level is formed due to the V{sub As}V{sub Ga} complex defect, which is very close to the experimental result. It provides the explanation of the absorption of laser with the wavelength beyond in semi-insulating GaAs. The formation energy of V{sub As}V{sub Ga} complex defect is found to decrease from surface to interior gradually. The conduction band minima and valence band maxima of GaAs (001) surface with the V{sub As}V{sub Ga} complex defect are all located at Γ point, and some defect levels are produced in the forbidden band. In contrast, the conduction band minima and valence band maxima of GaAs with the interior V{sub As}V{sub Ga} complex defect are not located at the same k-point, so it might involve the change of momentum in the electron transition process. The research will help strengthen the understanding of photoelectronic properties and effectively guide the preparation of the SI-GaAs materials.

  16. Secondary electron emission from insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaya, K.; Ono, S.; Ishigaki, F.

    1978-01-01

    The high yield of secondary electron emission from insulators due to electron bombardment may be the result of an increase of the depth of escape. The free-electron scattering theory is applied to the high energy of primary beams, but cannot be applied to the low energy of secondary escaping beams because of the large energy gap of the insulators. The plasmon loss with the valence electron is considered when the secondary electrons escape. Based on the energy retardation power formula of the penetration and energy loss of an electron probe into solid targets, secondary electron emissions from insulators are calculated from the assumptions that the distribution of the secondary electrons due to both incident and back-scattered electrons within the target is isotropic and that it follows the absorption law of the Lenard type. The universal yield-energy curve of the secondary electron emission, which is deduced as a function of three parameters such as ionisation potential, valence electron and the back-scattered coefficient in addition to the free-electron density effect, is found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. (author)

  17. Effect of electric field configuration on streamer and partial discharge phenomena in a hydrocarbon insulating liquid under AC stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Z; Liu, Q; Wang, Z D

    2016-01-01

    This paper concerns pre-breakdown phenomena, including streamer characteristics from a fundamental perspective and partial discharge (PD) measurements from an industrial perspective, in a hydrocarbon insulating liquid. The aim was to investigate the possible changes of the liquid’s streamer and PD characteristics and their correlations when the uniformity of the AC electric field varies. In the experiments, a plane-to-plane electrode system incorporating a needle protrusion was used in addition to a needle-to-plane electrode system. When the applied electric field became more uniform, fewer radial branches occurred and streamer propagation towards the ground electrode was enhanced. The transition from streamer propagation dominated breakdown in divergent fields to streamer initiation dominated breakdown in uniform fields was evidenced. Relationships between streamer and PD characteristics were established, which were found to be electric field dependent. PD of the same apparent charge would indicate longer streamers if the electric field is more uniform. (paper)

  18. The effect of heat and mass transfer on the cellular plastic insulation and the long-term aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Youchen [VTT Building Technology, Espoo (Finland). Building Physics, Building Services and Fire Technology

    1997-12-31

    To produce environmental-friendly products, foamed plastic industries are facing the challenge to replace the traditional blowing agents chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) with zero ozone depletion potential (ODP) alternatives. After a series of studies were completed, more understandings and new findings have been achieved with respect to the rigid closed-cell cellular plastic insulations or foamed plastic insulations (FPIs). The mechanism of heat transfer within the FPIs was examined. A new formula for calculating the solid polymer matrix thermal conductivity has been deduced based on the law of energy conservation and Fourier equation of heat conduction. All the parameters involved in this formula can be easily measured. By comparing the simulation results with measurements, the Brokaw equation is recommended for the prediction of the thermal conductivity of a cell-gas mixture. The foamed plastic deformation was also discussed. A new model has been established for predicting the elastic modulus of the foamed plastics. In comparison to the published measurements, it was found that the new model gives fairly good results. A diffusion chamber has been designed and constructed for measuring the gaseous transport properties within the FPIs. To overcome the difficulties of the traditional method, a new measurement procedure and post test data treatment have been suggested. The measurement accuracy is equivalent to the traditional method with an exception of much short time being required. The diffusion coefficients of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} within five n-pentane/CO{sub 2} based polyurethane (PUR) foams have been obtained from the diffusion chamber tests. Measurements showed that the relationship between the gaseous diffusion coefficients within FPIs and temperature follows the Arrhenius type. No identical relationship between diffusion coefficients and foam density was reached. To predict the long-term aging property of CFC-free foamed plastic insulations, a two

  19. Combined effect of bulk and surface damage on strip insulation properties of proton irradiated n$^{+}$-p silicon strip sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Dalal, R; Ranjan, K; Moll, M; Elliott-Peisert, A

    2014-01-01

    Silicon sensors in next generation hadron colliders willface a tremendously harsh radiation environment. Requirement tostudy rarest reaction channels with statistical constraints hasresulted in a huge increment in radiation flux, resulting in bothsurface damage and bulk damage. For sensors which are used in acharged hadron environment, both of these degrading processes takeplace simultaneously. Recently it has been observed in protonirradiated n$^{+}$-p Si strip sensors that n$^{+}$ strips had a goodinter-strip insulation with low values of p-spray and p-stop dopingdensities which is contrary to the expected behaviour from thecurrent understanding of radiation damage. In this work a simulationmodel has been devised incorporating radiation damage to understandand provide a possible explanation to the observed behaviour ofirradiated sensors.

  20. Effect of La doping on interface barrier between Si-passivated Ge and insulating HfO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolomiiets, Nadiia M.; Afanas' ev, Valery V.; Madia, Oreste; Stesmans, Andre [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Cott, Daire J.; Collaert, Nadine [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Thean, Aaron [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2016-12-15

    By analyzing internal photoemission of electrons from Si/SiO{sub x}-passivated Ge into insulating HfO{sub 2} we found that insertion of additional La interlayer between SiO{sub x} and HfO{sub 2} leads to dramatic increase (more than by factor of 20) of the barrier transparency. However, no measurable variation of the interface barrier height is observed suggesting that La induces intermixing of near-interface oxide stack resulting in development of additional density of states corresponding to conduction band of LaO{sub x} and HfO{sub x} sub-networks. At the same time, photoemission results indicate the presence of discrete positive charges in the near-interface oxide layer which may explain the observed ∝1 V shift of capacitance-voltage curves. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)