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Sample records for strong hydrogen-bond interactions

  1. Eight supramolecular assemblies constructed from bis(benzimidazole) and organic acids through strong classical hydrogen bonding and weak noncovalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shouwen; Wang, Daqi

    2014-05-01

    Eight crystalline organic acid-base adducts derived from alkane bridged bis(N-benzimidazole) and organic acids (2,4,6-trinitrophenol, p-nitrobenzoic acid, m-nitrobenzoic acid, 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 5-sulfosalicylic acid and oxalic acid) were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. Of the eight compounds five are organic salts (1, 4, 6, 7 and 8) and the other three (2, 3, and 5) are cocrystals. In all of the adducts except 1 and 8, the ratio of the acid and the base is 2:1. All eight supramolecular assemblies involve extensive intermolecular classical hydrogen bonds as well as other noncovalent interactions. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is ascertained. These weak interactions combined, all the complexes displayed 3D framework structure. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the classical N+-H⋯O-, O-H⋯O, and O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds (ionic or neutral) and other nonbonding associations between acids and ditopic benzimidazoles are sufficient to bring about the formation of cocrystals or organic salts.

  2. Strong and weak hydrogen bonds in drug–DNA complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The dataset was extracted from the protein data bank (PDB). The analysis was performed with an in-house software, hydrogen bond analysis tool (HBAT). In addition to strong hydrogen bonds such as O−H···O and N−H···O, the ubiquitous presence of weak hydrogen bonds such as C−H···O is implicated in molecular ...

  3. Theoretical Characterization of Hydrogen Bonding Interactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The highest stabilization results in case of (H2N)CHO as hydrogen bond acceptor. The variation of the substituents at –OH functional group also influences the strength of hydrogen bond; nearly all the substituents increase the stabilization energy relative to HOH. The analysis of geometrical parameters; proton affinities, ...

  4. Short strong hydrogen bonds in proteins: a case study of rhamnogalacturonan acetylesterase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langkilde, Annette; Kristensen, Søren M.; Lo Leggio, Leila; Mølgaard, Anne; Jensen, Jan H.; Houk, Andrew R.; Navarro Poulsen, Jens-Christian; Kauppinen, Sakari; Larsen, Sine

    2008-01-01

    The short hydrogen bonds in rhamnogalacturonan acetylesterase have been investigated by structure determination of an active-site mutant, 1 H NMR spectra and computational methods. Comparisons are made to database statistics. A very short carboxylic acid carboxylate hydrogen bond, buried in the protein, could explain the low-field (18 p.p.m.) 1 H NMR signal. An extremely low-field signal (at approximately 18 p.p.m.) in the 1 H NMR spectrum of rhamnogalacturonan acetylesterase (RGAE) shows the presence of a short strong hydrogen bond in the structure. This signal was also present in the mutant RGAE D192N, in which Asp192, which is part of the catalytic triad, has been replaced with Asn. A careful analysis of wild-type RGAE and RGAE D192N was conducted with the purpose of identifying possible candidates for the short hydrogen bond with the 18 p.p.m. deshielded proton. Theoretical calculations of chemical shift values were used in the interpretation of the experimental 1 H NMR spectra. The crystal structure of RGAE D192N was determined to 1.33 Å resolution and refined to an R value of 11.6% for all data. The structure is virtually identical to the high-resolution (1.12 Å) structure of the wild-type enzyme except for the interactions involving the mutation and a disordered loop. Searches of the Cambridge Structural Database were conducted to obtain information on the donor–acceptor distances of different types of hydrogen bonds. The short hydrogen-bond interactions found in RGAE have equivalents in small-molecule structures. An examination of the short hydrogen bonds in RGAE, the calculated pK a values and solvent-accessibilities identified a buried carboxylic acid carboxylate hydrogen bond between Asp75 and Asp87 as the likely origin of the 18 p.p.m. signal. Similar hydrogen-bond interactions between two Asp or Glu carboxy groups were found in 16% of a homology-reduced set of high-quality structures extracted from the PDB. The shortest hydrogen bonds in RGAE are

  5. Hydrogen Bonding Interaction between Atmospheric Gaseous Amides and Methanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailiang Zhao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Amides are important atmospheric organic–nitrogen compounds. Hydrogen bonded complexes of methanol (MeOH with amides (formamide, N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, acetamide, N-methylacetamide and N,N-dimethylacetamide have been investigated. The carbonyl oxygen of the amides behaves as a hydrogen bond acceptor and the NH group of the amides acts as a hydrogen bond donor. The dominant hydrogen bonding interaction occurs between the carbonyl oxygen and the OH group of methanol as well as the interaction between the NH group of amides and the oxygen of methanol. However, the hydrogen bonds between the CH group and the carbonyl oxygen or the oxygen of methanol are also important for the overall stability of the complexes. Comparable red shifts of the C=O, NH- and OH-stretching transitions were found in these MeOH–amide complexes with considerable intensity enhancement. Topological analysis shows that the electron density at the bond critical points of the complexes fall in the range of hydrogen bonding criteria, and the Laplacian of charge density of the O–H∙∙∙O hydrogen bond slightly exceeds the upper value of the Laplacian criteria. The energy decomposition analysis further suggests that the hydrogen bonding interaction energies can be mainly attributed to the electrostatic, exchange and dispersion components.

  6. Hydrogen Bonding Interaction between Atmospheric Gaseous Amides and Methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hailiang; Tang, Shanshan; Xu, Xiang; Du, Lin

    2016-12-30

    Amides are important atmospheric organic-nitrogen compounds. Hydrogen bonded complexes of methanol (MeOH) with amides (formamide, N -methylformamide, N , N -dimethylformamide, acetamide, N -methylacetamide and N , N -dimethylacetamide) have been investigated. The carbonyl oxygen of the amides behaves as a hydrogen bond acceptor and the NH group of the amides acts as a hydrogen bond donor. The dominant hydrogen bonding interaction occurs between the carbonyl oxygen and the OH group of methanol as well as the interaction between the NH group of amides and the oxygen of methanol. However, the hydrogen bonds between the CH group and the carbonyl oxygen or the oxygen of methanol are also important for the overall stability of the complexes. Comparable red shifts of the C=O, NH- and OH-stretching transitions were found in these MeOH-amide complexes with considerable intensity enhancement. Topological analysis shows that the electron density at the bond critical points of the complexes fall in the range of hydrogen bonding criteria, and the Laplacian of charge density of the O-H∙∙∙O hydrogen bond slightly exceeds the upper value of the Laplacian criteria. The energy decomposition analysis further suggests that the hydrogen bonding interaction energies can be mainly attributed to the electrostatic, exchange and dispersion components.

  7. Hirshfeld atom refinement for modelling strong hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woińska, Magdalena; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Spackman, Mark A; Edwards, Alison J; Dominiak, Paulina M; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Nishibori, Eiji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Grabowsky, Simon

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution low-temperature synchrotron X-ray diffraction data of the salt L-phenylalaninium hydrogen maleate are used to test the new automated iterative Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) procedure for the modelling of strong hydrogen bonds. The HAR models used present the first examples of Z' > 1 treatments in the framework of wavefunction-based refinement methods. L-Phenylalaninium hydrogen maleate exhibits several hydrogen bonds in its crystal structure, of which the shortest and the most challenging to model is the O-H...O intramolecular hydrogen bond present in the hydrogen maleate anion (O...O distance is about 2.41 Å). In particular, the reconstruction of the electron density in the hydrogen maleate moiety and the determination of hydrogen-atom properties [positions, bond distances and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs)] are the focus of the study. For comparison to the HAR results, different spherical (independent atom model, IAM) and aspherical (free multipole model, MM; transferable aspherical atom model, TAAM) X-ray refinement techniques as well as results from a low-temperature neutron-diffraction experiment are employed. Hydrogen-atom ADPs are furthermore compared to those derived from a TLS/rigid-body (SHADE) treatment of the X-ray structures. The reference neutron-diffraction experiment reveals a truly symmetric hydrogen bond in the hydrogen maleate anion. Only with HAR is it possible to freely refine hydrogen-atom positions and ADPs from the X-ray data, which leads to the best electron-density model and the closest agreement with the structural parameters derived from the neutron-diffraction experiment, e.g. the symmetric hydrogen position can be reproduced. The multipole-based refinement techniques (MM and TAAM) yield slightly asymmetric positions, whereas the IAM yields a significantly asymmetric position.

  8. Probing hydrogen bonding interactions and proton transfer in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Beining

    Scope and method of study. Hydrogen bonding is a fundamental element in protein structure and function. Breaking a single hydrogen bond may impair the stability of a protein. It is therefore important to probe dynamic changes in hydrogen bonding interactions during protein folding and function. Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is highly sensitive to hydrogen bonding interactions. However, it lacks quantitative correlation between the vibrational frequencies and the number, type, and strength of hydrogen bonding interactions of ionizable and polar residues. We employ quantum physics theory based ab initio calculations to study the effects of hydrogen bonding interactions on vibrational frequencies of Asp, Glu, and Tyr residues and to develop vibrational spectral markers for probing hydrogen bonding interactions using infrared spectroscopy. In addition, proton transfer process plays a crucial role in a wide range of energy transduction, signal transduction, and enzymatic reactions. We study the structural basis for proton transfer using photoactive yellow protein as an excellent model system. Molecular dynamics simulation is employed to investigate the structures of early intermediate states. Quantum theory based ab initio calculations are used to study the impact of hydrogen bond interactions on proton affinity and proton transfer. Findings and conclusions. Our extensive density function theory based calculations provide rich structural, spectral, and energetic information on hydrogen bonding properties of protonated side chain groups of Asp/Glu and Tyr. We developed vibrational spectral markers and 2D FTIR spectroscopy for structural characterization on the number and the type of hydrogen bonding interactions of the COOH group of Asp/Glu and neutral phenolic group of Tyr. These developments greatly enhance the power of time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy as a major experimental tool for structural characterization of functionally important

  9. NMR and IR Investigations of Strong Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poul Erik Hansen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of this review, strong hydrogen bonds have been defined on the basis of experimental data, such as OH stretching wavenumbers, νOH, and OH chemical shifts, δOH (in the latter case, after correction for ring current effects. Limits for O–H···Y systems are taken as 2800 > νOH > 1800 cm−1, and 19 ppm > δOH > 15 ppm. Recent results as well as an account of theoretical advances are presented for a series of important classes of compounds such as β-diketone enols, β-thioxoketone enols, Mannich bases, proton sponges, quinoline N-oxides and diacid anions. The O···O distance has long been used as a parameter for hydrogen bond strength in O–H···O systems. On a broad scale, a correlation between OH stretching wavenumbers and O···O distances is observed, as demonstrated experimentally as well as theoretically, but for substituted β-diketone enols this correlation is relatively weak.

  10. NMR and IR investigations of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    been used as a parameter for hydrogen bond strength in O–H···O systems. On a broad scale, a correlation between OH stretching wavenumbers and O···O distances is observed, as demonstrated experimentally as well as theoretically, but for substituted beta-diketone enols this correlation is relatively weak.......–1, and 19 >  dOH > 15 ppm. Recent results as well as an account of theoretical advances are presented for a series of important classes of compounds such as beta-diketone enols, beta-thioxoketone enols, Mannich bases, proton sponges, quinoline N-oxides and diacid anions. The O···O distance has long...

  11. Layered vanadyl (IV) nitroprusside: Magnetic interaction through a network of hydrogen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, D.M. [Instituto de Química Física, Facultad de Bioquímica, Química y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Lorenzo 456, T4000CAN San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); Osiry, H. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México (Mexico); Pomiro, F.; Varetti, E.L. [CEQUINOR (CONICET-UNLP), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 47 and 115, 1900, La Plata (Argentina); Carbonio, R.E. [INFIQC – CONICET, Departamento de Físico Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Haya de la Torre esq, Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Córdoba (Argentina); Alejandro, R.R. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México (Mexico); Ben Altabef, A. [INQUINOA-UNT-CONICET, Instituto de Química Física, Facultad de Bioquímica, Química y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Lorenzo 456, T4000CAN San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); and others

    2016-07-15

    The hydrogen bond and π-π stacking are two non-covalent interactions able to support cooperative magnetic ordering between paramagnetic centers. This contribution reports the crystal structure and related magnetic properties for VO[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]·2H{sub 2}O, which has a layered structure. This solid crystallizes with an orthorhombic unit cell, in the Pna2{sub 1} space group, with cell parameters a=14.1804(2), b=10.4935(1), c=7.1722(8) Å and four molecules per unit cell (Z=4). Its crystal structure was solved and refined from powder X-ray diffraction data. Neighboring layers remain linked through a network of hydrogen bonds involving a water molecule coordinated to the axial position for the V atom and the unbridged axial NO and CN ligands. An uncoordinated water molecule is found forming a triple bridge between these last two ligands and the coordinated water molecule. The magnetic measurements, recorded down to 2 K, shows a ferromagnetic interaction between V atoms located at neighboring layers, with a Curie-Weiss constant of 3.14 K. Such ferromagnetic behavior was interpreted as resulting from a superexchange interaction through the network of strong OH····O{sub H2O}, OH····N{sub CN}, and OH····O{sub NO} hydrogen bonds that connects neighboring layers. The interaction within the layer must be of antiferromagnetic nature and it was detected close to 2 K. - Graphical abstract: Coordination environment for the metals in vanadyl (II) nitroprusside dihydrate. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Crystal structure of vanadyl nitroprusside dehydrate. • Network of hydrogen bonds. • Magnetic interactions through a network of hydrogen bonds. • Layered transition metal nitroprussides.

  12. On the mean kinetic energy of the proton in strong hydrogen bonded systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkelstein, Y. [Nuclear Research Center–Negev, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel); Moreh, R. [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shang, S. L.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Shchur, Ya. [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, 1 Svientsitskii str., L’viv 79011 (Ukraine)

    2016-02-07

    The mean atomic kinetic energies of the proton, Ke(H), and of the deuteron, Ke(D), were calculated in moderate and strongly hydrogen bonded (HB) systems, such as the ferro-electric crystals of the KDP type (XH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, X = K, Cs, Rb, Tl), the DKDP (XD{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, X = K, Cs, Rb) type, and the X{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} superprotonic conductors (X = K, Rb). All calculations utilized the simulated partial phonon density of states, deduced from density functional theory based first-principle calculations and from empirical lattice dynamics simulations in which the Coulomb, short range, covalent, and van der Waals interactions were accounted for. The presently calculated Ke(H) values for the two systems were found to be in excellent agreement with published values obtained by deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements carried out using the VESUVIO instrument of the Rutherford Laboratory, UK. The Ke(H) values of the M{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} compounds, in which the hydrogen bonds are centro-symmetric, are much lower than those of the KDP type crystals, in direct consistency with the oxygen-oxygen distance R{sub OO}, being a measure of the HB strength.

  13. On the mean kinetic energy of the proton in strong hydrogen bonded systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelstein, Y.; Moreh, R.; Shang, S. L.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. K.; Shchur, Ya.

    2016-01-01

    The mean atomic kinetic energies of the proton, Ke(H), and of the deuteron, Ke(D), were calculated in moderate and strongly hydrogen bonded (HB) systems, such as the ferro-electric crystals of the KDP type (XH 2 PO 4 , X = K, Cs, Rb, Tl), the DKDP (XD 2 PO 4 , X = K, Cs, Rb) type, and the X 3 H(SO 4 ) 2 superprotonic conductors (X = K, Rb). All calculations utilized the simulated partial phonon density of states, deduced from density functional theory based first-principle calculations and from empirical lattice dynamics simulations in which the Coulomb, short range, covalent, and van der Waals interactions were accounted for. The presently calculated Ke(H) values for the two systems were found to be in excellent agreement with published values obtained by deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements carried out using the VESUVIO instrument of the Rutherford Laboratory, UK. The Ke(H) values of the M 3 H(SO 4 ) 2 compounds, in which the hydrogen bonds are centro-symmetric, are much lower than those of the KDP type crystals, in direct consistency with the oxygen-oxygen distance R OO , being a measure of the HB strength

  14. Hydrogen bonding interactions between ethylene glycol and water: density, excess molar volume, and spectral study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JianBin; ZHANG PengYan; MA Kai; HAN Fang; CHEN GuoHua; WEI XiongHui

    2008-01-01

    Studies of the density and the excess molar volume of ethylene glycol (EG)-water mixtures were carried out to illustrate the hydrogen bonding interactions of EG with water at different temperatures, The re-sults suggest that a likely complex of 3 ethylene glycol molecules bonding with 4 water molecules in an ethylene glycol-water mixture (EGW) is formed at the maximal excess molar volume, which displays stronger absorption capabilities for SO2 when the concentration of SO2 reaches 400×106 (volume ratio) in the gas phase. Meanwhile, FTIR and UV spectra of EGWs were recorded at various EG concentra-tions to display the hydrogen bonding interactions of EG with water. The FTIR spectra show that the stretching vibrational band of hydroxyl in the EGWs shifts to a lower frequency and the bending vibra-tional band of water shifts to a higher frequency with increasing the EG concentration, respectively. Furthermore, the UV spectra show that the electron transferring band of the hydroxyl oxygen in EG shows red shift with increasing the EG concentration. The frequency shifts in FTIR spectra and the shifts of absorption bands in UV absorption spectra of EGWs are interpreted as the strong hydrogen bonding interactions of the hydrogen atoms in water with the hydroxyl oxygen atoms of EG.

  15. Gas phase detection of the NH-P hydrogen bond and importance of secondary interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kristian Holten; Hansen, Anne Schou; Kjærgaard, Henrik Grum

    2015-01-01

    bond compared to secondary interactions. We find that B3LYP favors the hydrogen bond and M06-2X favors the secondary interactions leading to under- and overestimation, respectively, of the hydrogen bond angle relative to a DF-LCCSD(T)-F12a calculated angle. The remaining functionals tested, B3LYP-D3, B......3LYP-D3BJ, CAM-B3LYP, and ωB97X-D, as well as MP2, show comparable contributions from the hydrogen bond and the secondary interactions and are close to DF-LCCSD(T)-F12a results....

  16. Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions Trigger a Spin-Flip in Iron(III) Porphyrin Complexes**

    OpenAIRE

    Sahoo, Dipankar; Quesne, Matthew G; de?Visser, Sam P; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2015-01-01

    A key step in cytochrome?P450 catalysis includes the spin-state crossing from low spin to high spin upon substrate binding and subsequent reduction of the heme. Clearly, a weak perturbation in P450 enzymes triggers a spin-state crossing. However, the origin of the process whereby enzymes reorganize their active site through external perturbations, such as hydrogen bonding, is still poorly understood. We have thus studied the impact of hydrogen-bonding interactions on the electronic structure ...

  17. Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions Trigger a Spin-Flip in Iron(III) Porphyrin Complexes**

    OpenAIRE

    Sahoo, Dipankar; Quesne, Matthew G; de Visser, Sam P; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2015-01-01

    A key step in cytochrome P450 catalysis includes the spin-state crossing from low spin to high spin upon substrate binding and subsequent reduction of the heme. Clearly, a weak perturbation in P450 enzymes triggers a spin-state crossing. However, the origin of the process whereby enzymes reorganize their active site through external perturbations, such as hydrogen bonding, is still poorly understood. We have thus studied the impact of hydrogen-bonding interactions on the electronic structure ...

  18. Interstellar hydrogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etim, Emmanuel E.; Gorai, Prasanta; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Arunan, Elangannan

    2018-06-01

    This paper reports the first extensive study of the existence and effects of interstellar hydrogen bonding. The reactions that occur on the surface of the interstellar dust grains are the dominant processes by which interstellar molecules are formed. Water molecules constitute about 70% of the interstellar ice. These water molecules serve as the platform for hydrogen bonding. High level quantum chemical simulations for the hydrogen bond interaction between 20 interstellar molecules (known and possible) and water are carried out using different ab-intio methods. It is evident that if the formation of these species is mainly governed by the ice phase reactions, there is a direct correlation between the binding energies of these complexes and the gas phase abundances of these interstellar molecules. Interstellar hydrogen bonding may cause lower gas abundance of the complex organic molecules (COMs) at the low temperature. From these results, ketenes whose less stable isomers that are more strongly bonded to the surface of the interstellar dust grains have been observed are proposed as suitable candidates for astronomical observations.

  19. Intrinsic self-healing thermoset through covalent and hydrogen bonding interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araya-Hermosilla, R.; Lima, G. M. R.; Raffa, P.; Fortunato, G.; Pucci, A.; Flores, Mario E.; Moreno-Villoslada, I.; Broekhuis, A. A.; Picchioni, F.

    The intrinsic self-healing ability of polyketone (PK) chemically modified into furan and/or OH groups containing derivatives is presented. Polymers bearing different ratios of both functional groups were cross-linked via furan/bis-maleimide (Diels-Alder adducts) and hydrogen bonding interactions

  20. Hydrogen bonding interactions between ethylene glycol and water:density,excess molar volume,and spectral study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Studies of the density and the excess molar volume of ethylene glycol (EG)-water mixtures were carried out to illustrate the hydrogen bonding interactions of EG with water at different temperatures. The re-sults suggest that a likely complex of 3 ethylene glycol molecules bonding with 4 water molecules in an ethylene glycol-water mixture (EGW) is formed at the maximal excess molar volume,which displays stronger absorption capabilities for SO2 when the concentration of SO2 reaches 400×10?6 (volume ratio) in the gas phase. Meanwhile,FTIR and UV spectra of EGWs were recorded at various EG concentra-tions to display the hydrogen bonding interactions of EG with water. The FTIR spectra show that the stretching vibrational band of hydroxyl in the EGWs shifts to a lower frequency and the bending vibra-tional band of water shifts to a higher frequency with increasing the EG concentration,respectively. Furthermore,the UV spectra show that the electron transferring band of the hydroxyl oxygen in EG shows red shift with increasing the EG concentration. The frequency shifts in FTIR spectra and the shifts of absorption bands in UV absorption spectra of EGWs are interpreted as the strong hydrogen bonding interactions of the hydrogen atoms in water with the hydroxyl oxygen atoms of EG.

  1. Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions Trigger a Spin-Flip in Iron(III) Porphyrin Complexes**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Dipankar; Quesne, Matthew G; de Visser, Sam P; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2015-01-01

    A key step in cytochrome P450 catalysis includes the spin-state crossing from low spin to high spin upon substrate binding and subsequent reduction of the heme. Clearly, a weak perturbation in P450 enzymes triggers a spin-state crossing. However, the origin of the process whereby enzymes reorganize their active site through external perturbations, such as hydrogen bonding, is still poorly understood. We have thus studied the impact of hydrogen-bonding interactions on the electronic structure of a five-coordinate iron(III) octaethyltetraarylporphyrin chloride. The spin state of the metal was found to switch reversibly between high (S=5/2) and intermediate spin (S=3/2) with hydrogen bonding. Our study highlights the possible effects and importance of hydrogen-bonding interactions in heme proteins. This is the first example of a synthetic iron(III) complex that can reversibly change its spin state between a high and an intermediate state through weak external perturbations. PMID:26109743

  2. Communication: Hydrogen bonding interactions in water-alcohol mixtures from X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Royce K.; Smith, Jacob W.; Saykally, Richard J., E-mail: saykally@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-21

    While methanol and ethanol are macroscopically miscible with water, their mixtures exhibit negative excess entropies of mixing. Despite considerable effort in both experiment and theory, there remains significant disagreement regarding the origin of this effect. Different models for the liquid mixture structure have been proposed to address this behavior, including the enhancement of the water hydrogen bonding network around the alcohol hydrophobic groups and microscopic immiscibility or clustering. We have investigated mixtures of methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol with water by liquid microjet X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the oxygen K-edge, an atom-specific probe providing details of both inter- and intra-molecular structure. The measured spectra evidence a significant enhancement of hydrogen bonding originating from the methanol and ethanol hydroxyl groups upon the addition of water. These additional hydrogen bonding interactions would strengthen the liquid-liquid interactions, resulting in additional ordering in the liquid structures and leading to a reduction in entropy and a negative enthalpy of mixing, consistent with existing thermodynamic data. In contrast, the spectra of the isopropanol-water mixtures exhibit an increase in the number of broken alcohol hydrogen bonds for mixtures containing up to 0.5 water mole fraction, an observation consistent with existing enthalpy of mixing data, suggesting that the measured negative excess entropy is a result of clustering or micro-immiscibility.

  3. Communication: Hydrogen bonding interactions in water-alcohol mixtures from X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Royce K.; Smith, Jacob W.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2016-05-01

    While methanol and ethanol are macroscopically miscible with water, their mixtures exhibit negative excess entropies of mixing. Despite considerable effort in both experiment and theory, there remains significant disagreement regarding the origin of this effect. Different models for the liquid mixture structure have been proposed to address this behavior, including the enhancement of the water hydrogen bonding network around the alcohol hydrophobic groups and microscopic immiscibility or clustering. We have investigated mixtures of methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol with water by liquid microjet X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the oxygen K-edge, an atom-specific probe providing details of both inter- and intra-molecular structure. The measured spectra evidence a significant enhancement of hydrogen bonding originating from the methanol and ethanol hydroxyl groups upon the addition of water. These additional hydrogen bonding interactions would strengthen the liquid-liquid interactions, resulting in additional ordering in the liquid structures and leading to a reduction in entropy and a negative enthalpy of mixing, consistent with existing thermodynamic data. In contrast, the spectra of the isopropanol-water mixtures exhibit an increase in the number of broken alcohol hydrogen bonds for mixtures containing up to 0.5 water mole fraction, an observation consistent with existing enthalpy of mixing data, suggesting that the measured negative excess entropy is a result of clustering or micro-immiscibility.

  4. Water's Interfacial Hydrogen Bonding Structure Reveals the Effective Strength of Surface-Water Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sucheol; Willard, Adam P

    2018-06-05

    We combine all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with a mean field model of interfacial hydrogen bonding to analyze the effect of surface-water interactions on the structural and energetic properties of the liquid water interface. We show that the molecular structure of water at a weakly interacting ( i.e., hydrophobic) surface is resistant to change unless the strength of surface-water interactions are above a certain threshold. We find that below this threshold water's interfacial structure is homogeneous and insensitive to the details of the disordered surface, however, above this threshold water's interfacial structure is heterogeneous. Despite this heterogeneity, we demonstrate that the equilibrium distribution of molecular orientations can be used to quantify the energetic component of the surface-water interactions that contribute specifically to modifying the interfacial hydrogen bonding network. We identify this specific energetic component as a new measure of hydrophilicity, which we refer to as the intrinsic hydropathy.

  5. FTIR study of hydrogen bonding interaction between fluorinated alcohol and unsaturated esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xia; Jiang, Xiaotong; Zhao, Hailiang; Wan, Dongjin; Liu, Yongde; Ngwenya, Cleopatra Ashley; Du, Lin

    2018-06-01

    The 1:1 complexes of two unsaturated esters with 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) were investigated experimentally and computationally. The experimental observations of the spectral shifts of the OH-stretching vibrational transitions were obtained at 113 cm-1 for TFE-methyl acrylate (MA) and 92 cm-1 for TFE-vinyl acetate (VA). There are three docking sites in the two unsaturated esters for the incoming TFE. The predicted red shifts of the OH-stretching vibrational transitions were found to be larger for the Osbnd H⋯Odbnd C hydrogen bonded conformer than those for the Osbnd H⋯π and Osbnd H⋯O ones. The binding energies further prove that the Osbnd H⋯Odbnd C hydrogen bonded conformers are the most stable ones. On the basis of the DFT calculations as well as previous works, the carbonyl group is the best docking site for TFE. Furthermore, the thermodynamic equilibrium constants of TFE-MA and TFE-VA were obtained at 0.28 and 0.15 by combining the experimental spectra data and the DFT calculations. Consequently, the Gibbs free energies of formation were determined to be 3.2 and 4.8 kJ mol-1 for TFE-MA and TFE-VA, respectively. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (AIM) and generalized Kohn-Sham energy decomposition analysis (GKS-EDA) were carried out for further characterization of the hydrogen bonding interactions. GKS-EDA shows an "electrostatic" dominated hydrogen bonding character for the Osbnd H⋯Odbnd C hydrogen bonds.

  6. Hydrogen Bonding Interaction between 1-Propanol and Acrylic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    equilibria, the rates of chemical reactions, polymerization, and so on. Recently solvent effects on the infrared spectra of binary systems of MMA with organic solvents to investigate solute– solvent interactions were extensively reported by Zheng et al.2 and Liu et al.3 Recently our research group has investigated the complex ...

  7. Probing the role of backbone hydrogen bonds in protein-peptide interactions by amide-to-ester mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eildal, Jonas N N; Hultqvist, Greta; Balle, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    -protein interactions, those of the PDZ domain family involve formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds: C-termini or internal linear motifs of proteins bind as β-strands to form an extended antiparallel β-sheet with the PDZ domain. Whereas extensive work has focused on the importance of the amino acid side chains...... of the protein ligand, the role of the backbone hydrogen bonds in the binding reaction is not known. Using amide-to-ester substitutions to perturb the backbone hydrogen-bonding pattern, we have systematically probed putative backbone hydrogen bonds between four different PDZ domains and peptides corresponding...... to natural protein ligands. Amide-to-ester mutations of the three C-terminal amides of the peptide ligand severely affected the affinity with the PDZ domain, demonstrating that hydrogen bonds contribute significantly to ligand binding (apparent changes in binding energy, ΔΔG = 1.3 to >3.8 kcal mol(-1...

  8. Weak hydrogen bonding interactions influence slip system activity and compaction behavior of pharmaceutical powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomane, Kailas S; Bansal, Arvind K

    2013-12-01

    Markedly different mechanical behavior of powders of polymorphs, cocrystals, hydrate/anhydrate pairs, or structurally similar molecules has been attributed to the presence of active slip planes system in their crystal structures. Presence of slip planes in the crystal lattice allows easier slip under the applied compaction pressure. This allows greater plastic deformation of the powder and results into increased interparticulate bonding area and greater tensile strength of the compacts. Thus, based on this crystallographic feature, tableting performance of the active pharmaceutical ingredients can be predicted. Recently, we encountered a case where larger numbers of CH···O type interactions across the proposed slip planes hinder the slip and thus resist plastic deformation of the powder under the applied compaction pressure. Hence, attention must be given to these types of interactions while identifying slip planes by visualization method. Generally, slip planes are visualized as flat layers often strengthened by a two-dimensional hydrogen-bonding network within the layers or planes. No hydrogen bonding should exist between these layers to consider them as slip planes. Moreover, one should also check the presence of CH···O type interactions across these planes. Mercury software provides an option for visualization of these weak hydrogen bonding interactions. Hence, caution must be exercised while selecting appropriate solid form based on this crystallographic feature. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  9. Performance of Several Density Functional Theory Methods on Describing Hydrogen-Bond Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Li; Ke, Hongwei; Fu, Gang; Xu, Xin; Yan, Yijing

    2009-01-13

    We have investigated eleven density functionals, including LDA, PBE, mPWPW91, TPSS, B3LYP, X3LYP, PBE0, O3LYP, B97-1, MPW1K, and TPSSh, for their performances on describing hydrogen bond (HB) interactions. The emphasis has been laid not only on their abilities to calculate the intermolecular hydrogen bonding energies but also on their performances in predicting the relative energies of intermolecular H-bonded complexes and the conformer stabilities due to intramolecular hydrogen bondings. As compared to the best theoretical values, we found that although PBE and PBE0 gave the best estimation of HB strengths, they might fail to predict the correct order of relative HB energies, which might lead to a wrong prediction of the global minimum for different conformers. TPSS and TPSSh did not always improve over PBE and PBE0. B3LYP was found to underestimate the intermolecular HB strengths but was among the best performers in calculating the relative HB energies. We showed here that X3LYP and B97-1 were able to give good values for both absolute HB strengths and relative HB energies, making these functionals good candidates for HB description.

  10. The nature of hydrogen-bonding interactions in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs revealed by polarized IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachuła, Barbara

    2018-01-01

    The influence of hydrogen-bonding interactions in the solid phase on the IR spectroscopic pattern of the νOsbnd H band of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was studied experimentally by IR spectroscopy with the use of polarized light at two temperatures (293 K and 77 K) and in isotopic dilution. The neat and deuterated crystals of (S)-naproxen ((S)-NPX), (R)-flurbiprofen ((R)-FBP), (RS)-flurbiprofen ((RS)-FBP) and (RS)-ketoprofen ((RS)-KTP) were obtained by melt crystallization between the two squeezed CaF2 plates. The vibrational spectra of selected α-aryl propionic acid derivatives (2APAs) reflected the characteristics of their hydrogen-bond networks, i.e., 2APAs were characterized by the chain ((S)-NPX, (R)-FBP) and by dimeric ((RS)-FBP, (RS)-KTP) arrangement of hydrogen bonds in the crystal lattice. Spectroscopic results showed that the interchain (through-space) exciton coupling, between two laterally-spaced hydrogen bonds, dominates in the crystals of four NSAIDs. The same exciton coupled hydrogen bonds were also responsible for the H/D isotopic recognition mechanism in the crystalline spectra of deuterated 2APAs. The presented spectral results may help to predict the hydrogen bond motifs in the crystalline NSAIDs, which structures are not yet known, based on their IR spectra of hydrogen bond in the crystals.

  11. DNA base dimers are stabilized by hydrogen-bonding interactions including non-Watson-Crick pairing near graphite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Akshaya; Jagota, Anand; Mittal, Jeetain

    2012-10-11

    Single- and double-stranded DNA are increasingly being paired with surfaces and nanoparticles for numerous applications, such as sensing, imaging, and drug delivery. Unlike the majority of DNA structures in bulk that are stabilized by canonical Watson-Crick pairing between Ade-Thy and Gua-Cyt, those adsorbed on surfaces are often stabilized by noncanonical base pairing, quartet formation, and base-surface stacking. Not much is known about these kinds of interactions. To build an understanding of the role of non-Watson-Crick pairing on DNA behavior near surfaces, one requires basic information on DNA base pair stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions. All-atom molecular simulations of DNA bases in two cases--in bulk water and strongly adsorbed on a graphite surface--are conducted to study the relative strengths of stacking and hydrogen bond interactions for each of the 10 possible combinations of base pairs. The key information obtained from these simulations is the free energy as a function of distance between two bases in a pair. We find that stacking interactions exert the dominant influence on the stability of DNA base pairs in bulk water as expected. The strength of stability for these stacking interactions is found to decrease in the order Gua-Gua > Ade-Gua > Ade-Ade > Gua-Thy > Gua-Cyt > Ade-Thy > Ade-Cyt > Thy-Thy > Cyt-Thy > Cyt-Cyt. On the other hand, mutual interactions of surface-adsorbed base pairs are stabilized mostly by hydrogen-bonding interactions in the order Gua-Cyt > Ade-Gua > Ade-Thy > Ade-Ade > Cyt-Thy > Gua-Gua > Cyt-Cyt > Ade-Cyt > Thy-Thy > Gua-Thy. Interestingly, several non-Watson-Crick base pairings, which are commonly ignored, have similar stabilization free energies due to interbase hydrogen bonding as Watson-Crick pairs. This clearly highlights the importance of non-Watson-Crick base pairing in the development of secondary structures of oligonucleotides near surfaces.

  12. Microscopic models for proton transfer in water and strongly hydrogen-bonded complexes with a single-well proton potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    A new mechanism and formalism for proton transfer in donor-acceptor complexes with long hydrogen bonds introduced recently [1], is applied to a proton transfer in liquid water. "Structural diffusion" of hydroxonium ions is regarded as totally adiabatic process, with synchronous hindered translation...... of two closest water molecules to and from the reaction complex as crucial steps. The water molecules induce a "gated" shift of the proton from the donor to the acceptor in the double-well potential with simultaneous breaking/formation of hydrogen bonds between these molecules and the proton donor...... and acceptor. The short-range and long-range proton transfer as "structural diffusion" of Zundel complexes is also considered. The theoretical formalism is illustrated with the use of Morse, exponential, and harmonic molecular potentials. This approach is extended to proton transfer in strongly hydrogen...

  13. Vibrational tug-of-war: The pKA dependence of the broad vibrational features of strongly hydrogen-bonded carboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoozen, Brian L.; Petersen, Poul B.

    2018-04-01

    Medium and strong hydrogen bonds give rise to broad vibrational features frequently spanning several hundred wavenumbers and oftentimes exhibiting unusual substructures. These broad vibrational features can be modeled from first principles, in a reduced dimensional calculation, that adiabatically separates low-frequency modes, which modulate the hydrogen bond length, from high-frequency OH stretch and bend modes that contribute to the vibrational structure. Previously this method was used to investigate the origin of an unusual vibrational feature frequently found in the spectra of dimers between carboxylic acids and nitrogen-containing aromatic bases that spans over 900 cm-1 and contains two broad peaks. It was found that the width of this feature largely originates from low-frequency modes modulating the hydrogen bond length and that the structure results from Fermi resonance interactions. In this report, we examine how these features change with the relative acid and base strength of the components as reflected by their aqueous pKA values. Dimers with large pKA differences are found to have features that can extend to frequencies below 1000 cm-1. The relationships between mean OH/NH frequency, aqueous pKA, and O-N distance are examined in order to obtain a more rigorous understanding of the origin and shape of the vibrational features. The mean OH/NH frequencies are found to correlate well with O-N distances. The lowest OH stretch frequencies are found in dimer geometries with O-N distances between 2.5 and 2.6 Å. At larger O-N distances, the hydrogen bonding interaction is not as strong, resulting in higher OH stretch frequencies. When the O-N distance is smaller than 2.5 Å, the limited space between the O and N determines the OH stretch frequency, which gives rise to frequencies that decrease with O-N distances. These two effects place a lower limit on the OH stretch frequency which is calculated to be near 700 cm-1. Understanding how the vibrational features

  14. Theoretical study of hydrogen bond interactions of fluvastatin with ι-carrageenan and λ-carrageenan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Anastasios G; Sigalas, Michael P

    2011-07-01

    The binding of the reductase inhibitor drug fluvastatin, hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A, with the hydrophilic ι- or λ-carrageenan polymers, serving as potential controllers of the drug's release rate, have been studied at the density functional level of theory with the B3LYP exchange correlation functional. Three low energy conformers of fluvastatin have been calculated. The vibrational spectroscopic properties calculated for the most stable conformer were in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. A series of hydrogen bonded complexes of the most stable conformer of fluvastatin anion with low molecular weight models of the polymers have been fully optimized. In almost all, intermolecular H-bonds are formed between the sulfate groups of ι- or λ-carrageenan and fluvastatin's hydroxyls, resulting in a red shift of the fluvastatin's O - H stretching vibrations. Cooperative intramolecular H-bonds within fluvastatin or ι-, λ-carrageenan are also present. The BSSE and ZPE corrected interaction energies were estimated in the range 281-318 kJ mol⁻¹ for ι-carrageenan - fluvastatin and 145-200 kJ mol⁻¹ for λ-carrageenan - fluvastatin complexes. The electron density (ρ (bcp)) and Laplacian (∇²ρ (bcp)) properties at critical points of the intermolecular hydrogen bonds, estimated by AIM (atoms in molecules) calculations, have a low and positive character (∇²ρ(bcp) > 0), consistent with the electrostatic character of the hydrogen bonds. The structural and energetic data observed, as well as the extent of the red shift of the fluvastatin's O - H stretching vibrations upon complex formation and the properties of electron density show a stronger binding of fluvastatin to ι- than to λ-carrageenan.

  15. A Relativity Enhanced, Medium-Strong Au(I)···H-N Hydrogen Bond in a Protonated Phenylpyridine-Gold(I) Thiolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Raphael J F; Schoiber, Jürgen; Monkowius, Uwe

    2017-01-17

    Gold is an electron-rich metal with a high electronegativity comparable to that of sulfur. Hence, hydrogen bonds of the Au(I)···H-E (E = electronegative element) type should be possible, but their existence is still under debate. Experimental results are scarce and often contradictory. As guidance for possible preparative work, we have theoretically investigated (ppyH)Au(SPh) (ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) bearing two monoanionic ligands which are not strongly electronegative at the same time to further increase the charge density on the gold(I) atom. The protonated pyridine nitrogen atom in ppy is geometrically ideally suited to place a proton in close proximity to the gold atom in a favorable geometry for a classical hydrogen bond arrangement. Indeed, the results of the calculations indicate that the hydrogen bonded conformation of (ppyH)Au(SPh) represents a minimum geometry with bond metrics in the expected range for medium-strong hydrogen bonds [r(N-H) = 1.043 Å, r(H···Au) = 2.060 Å, a(N-H···Au) = 141.4°]. The energy difference between the conformer containing the H···Au bond and another conformer without a hydrogen bond amounts to 7.8 kcal mol -1 , which might serve as an estimate of the hydrogen bond strength. Spectroscopic properties were calculated, yielding further characteristics of such hydrogen bonded gold species.

  16. Azobenzene dye-coupled quadruply hydrogen-bonding modules as colorimetric indicators for supramolecular interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagang Zhang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The facile coupling of azobenzene dyes to the quadruply hydrogen-bonding modules 2,7-diamido-1,8-naphthyridine (DAN and 7-deazaguanine urea (DeUG is described. The coupling of azobenzene dye 2 to mono-amido DAN units 4, 7, and 9 was effected by classic 4-(dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP-catalyzed peptide synthesis with N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl-N’-ethyl carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC as activating agent, affording the respective amide products 5, 8, and 10 in 60–71% yield. The amide linkage was formed through either the aliphatic or aromatic ester group of 2, allowing both the flexibility and absorption maximum to be tuned. Azobenzene dye 1 was coupled to the DeUG unit 11 by Steglich esterification to afford the product amide 12 in 35% yield. Alternatively, azobenzene dye 16 underwent a room-temperature copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition with DeUG alkyne 17 to give triazole 18 in 71% yield. Azobenzene coupled DAN modules 5, 8, and 10 are bright orange–red in color, and azobenzene coupled DeUG modules 12 and 18 are orange–yellow in color. Azobenzene coupled DAN and DeUG modules were successfully used as colorimetric indicators for specific DAN–DeUG and DAN–UPy (2-ureido-4(1H-pyrimidone quadruply hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  17. COGNAC: a web server for searching and annotating hydrogen-bonded base interactions in RNA three-dimensional structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Hamdani, Hazrina Yusof; Nadzirin, Nurul; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan; Willett, Peter; Artymiuk, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen bonds are crucial factors that stabilize a complex ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecule's three-dimensional (3D) structure. Minute conformational changes can result in variations in the hydrogen bond interactions in a particular structure. Furthermore, networks of hydrogen bonds, especially those found in tight clusters, may be important elements in structure stabilization or function and can therefore be regarded as potential tertiary motifs. In this paper, we describe a graph theoretical algorithm implemented as a web server that is able to search for unbroken networks of hydrogen-bonded base interactions and thus provide an accounting of such interactions in RNA 3D structures. This server, COGNAC (COnnection tables Graphs for Nucleic ACids), is also able to compare the hydrogen bond networks between two structures and from such annotations enable the mapping of atomic level differences that may have resulted from conformational changes due to mutations or binding events. The COGNAC server can be accessed at http://mfrlab.org/grafss/cognac. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Solution Phase Measurement of Both Weak Sigma and C-H---X- Hydrogen Bonding Interactions in Synthetic Anion Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, Mr. Orion B. [University of Oregon; Sather, Mr. Aaron C [University of Oregon; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL; Meisner, Mr. Jeffrey S. [University of Oregon; Johnson, Prof. Darren W. [University of Oregon

    2008-01-01

    A series of tripodal receptors preorganize electron-deficient aromatic rings to bind halides in organic solvents using weak sigma anion-to-arene interactions or C-H---X- hydrogen bonds. 1H NMR spectroscopy proves to be a powerful technique for quantifying binding in solution, and determining the interaction motifs, even in cases of weak binding.

  19. Di-ureasil hybrids doped with LiBF{sub 4}: Spectroscopic study of the ionic interactions and hydrogen bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Mariana [Departamento de Quimica/CQ-VR, Universidade de Tras-os-Montes e Alto Douro, 5001-801 Vila Real (Portugal); Barbosa, Paula C.; Manuela Silva, M.; Smith, Michael J. [Departamento de Quimica/Centro de Quimica, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Zea Bermudez, Veronica de, E-mail: vbermude@utad.pt [Departamento de Quimica/CQ-VR, Universidade de Tras-os-Montes e Alto Douro, 5001-801 Vila Real (Portugal)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize cation interactions in two LiBF{sub 4}-doped di-ureasil networks incorporating POE chains with different length. {yields} Over the range of salt content analyzed the cations bond to amorphous POE chains and form ion contact pairs with BF{sub 4}{sup -}. {yields} A crystalline POE/LiBF{sub 4} complex of unknown stoichiometry emerges at high salt concentration. - Abstract: In the present work Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the cation/polymer, cation/cross-link, cation/anion and hydrogen bonding interactions in hybrid electrolytes composed of lithium tetrafluoroborate (LiBF{sub 4}) and di-urea cross-linked poly(oxyethylene) (POE)/siloxane hybrid networks (di-ureasils) designated as d-U(2000) and d-U(600) and incorporating polyether chains with ca. 40.5 and 8.5 oxyethylene repeat units, respectively. Samples with {infinity} > n {>=} 2.5 (where n, composition, is the molar ratio of CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O units per Li{sup +} ion) were analyzed. In both di-ureasil systems over the whole range of salt content examined the Li{sup +} ions bond to the ether oxygen atoms of amorphous POE chains and to BF{sub 4}{sup -} ions forming ion contact pairs. Spectroscopic evidences and SEM images confirm the presence of a crystalline POE/LiBF{sub 4} complex of unknown stoichiometry at n < 20 and 25, respectively. Ionic association is particularly important in the case of the d-U(600)-based materials, as a result of the presence of strong hydrogen-bonded aggregates that prevent the establishment of Li{sup +}/urea carbonyl oxygen atom interactions.

  20. Anion-assisted trans-cis isomerization of palladium(II) phosphine complexes containing acetanilide functionalities through hydrogen bonding interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Xia; Tang, Hau-San; Ko, Chi-Chiu; Wong, Jenny Ka-Yan; Zhu, Nianyong; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2005-03-28

    The anion-assisted shift of trans-cis isomerization equilibrium of a palladium(II) complex containing acetanilide functionalities brought about by allosteric hydrogen bonding interactions has been established by UV/Vis, 1H NMR, 31P NMR and ESI-MS studies.

  1. Enhanced dispersion stability and mobility of carboxyl-functionalized carbon nanotubes in aqueous solutions through strong hydrogen bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahk, Yeon Kyoung; He, Xu; Gitsis, Emmanouil; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Kim, Nayoung; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Dispersion of carbon nanotubes has been heavily studied due to its importance for their technical applications, toxic effects, and environmental impacts. Common electrolytes, such as sodium chloride and potassium chloride, promote agglomeration of nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. On the contrary, we discovered that acetic electrolytes enhanced the dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with carboxyl functional group through the strong hydrogen bond, which was confirmed by UV–Vis spectrometry, dispersion observations and aerosolization-quantification method. When concentrations of acetate electrolytes such as ammonium acetate (CH 3 CO 2 NH 4 ) and sodium acetate (CH 3 CO 2 Na) were lower than 0.03 mol per liter, MWCNT suspensions showed better dispersion and had higher mobility in porous media. The effects by the acetic environment are also applicable to other nanoparticles with the carboxyl functional group, which was demonstrated with polystyrene latex particles as an example

  2. Enhanced dispersion stability and mobility of carboxyl-functionalized carbon nanotubes in aqueous solutions through strong hydrogen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Yeon Kyoung; He, Xu; Gitsis, Emmanouil; Kuo, Yu-Ying [ETH Zurich, Institute of Environmental Engineering (Switzerland); Kim, Nayoung [EMPA, Building Energy Materials and Components (Switzerland); Wang, Jing, E-mail: jing.wang@ifu.baug.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Institute of Environmental Engineering (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    Dispersion of carbon nanotubes has been heavily studied due to its importance for their technical applications, toxic effects, and environmental impacts. Common electrolytes, such as sodium chloride and potassium chloride, promote agglomeration of nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. On the contrary, we discovered that acetic electrolytes enhanced the dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with carboxyl functional group through the strong hydrogen bond, which was confirmed by UV–Vis spectrometry, dispersion observations and aerosolization-quantification method. When concentrations of acetate electrolytes such as ammonium acetate (CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}NH{sub 4}) and sodium acetate (CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}Na) were lower than 0.03 mol per liter, MWCNT suspensions showed better dispersion and had higher mobility in porous media. The effects by the acetic environment are also applicable to other nanoparticles with the carboxyl functional group, which was demonstrated with polystyrene latex particles as an example.

  3. A computational approach for the annotation of hydrogen-bonded base interactions in crystallographic structures of the ribozymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamdani, Hazrina Yusof, E-mail: hazrina@mfrlab.org [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi (Malaysia); Advanced Medical and Dental Institute, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Bertam, Kepala Batas (Malaysia); Artymiuk, Peter J., E-mail: p.artymiuk@sheffield.ac.uk [Dept. of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Firth Court, University of Sheffield, S10 T2N Sheffield (United Kingdom); Firdaus-Raih, Mohd, E-mail: firdaus@mfrlab.org [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    A fundamental understanding of the atomic level interactions in ribonucleic acid (RNA) and how they contribute towards RNA architecture is an important knowledge platform to develop through the discovery of motifs from simple arrangements base pairs, to more complex arrangements such as triples and larger patterns involving non-standard interactions. The network of hydrogen bond interactions is important in connecting bases to form potential tertiary motifs. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of automated methods for annotating RNA 3D structures based on hydrogen bond interactions. COnnection tables Graphs for Nucleic ACids (COGNAC) is automated annotation system using graph theoretical approaches that has been developed for the identification of RNA 3D motifs. This program searches for patterns in the unbroken networks of hydrogen bonds for RNA structures and capable of annotating base pairs and higher-order base interactions, which ranges from triples to sextuples. COGNAC was able to discover 22 out of 32 quadruples occurrences of the Haloarcula marismortui large ribosomal subunit (PDB ID: 1FFK) and two out of three occurrences of quintuple interaction reported by the non-canonical interactions in RNA (NCIR) database. These and several other interactions of interest will be discussed in this paper. These examples demonstrate that the COGNAC program can serve as an automated annotation system that can be used to annotate conserved base-base interactions and could be added as additional information to established RNA secondary structure prediction methods.

  4. A computational approach for the annotation of hydrogen-bonded base interactions in crystallographic structures of the ribozymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdani, Hazrina Yusof; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of the atomic level interactions in ribonucleic acid (RNA) and how they contribute towards RNA architecture is an important knowledge platform to develop through the discovery of motifs from simple arrangements base pairs, to more complex arrangements such as triples and larger patterns involving non-standard interactions. The network of hydrogen bond interactions is important in connecting bases to form potential tertiary motifs. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of automated methods for annotating RNA 3D structures based on hydrogen bond interactions. COnnection tables Graphs for Nucleic ACids (COGNAC) is automated annotation system using graph theoretical approaches that has been developed for the identification of RNA 3D motifs. This program searches for patterns in the unbroken networks of hydrogen bonds for RNA structures and capable of annotating base pairs and higher-order base interactions, which ranges from triples to sextuples. COGNAC was able to discover 22 out of 32 quadruples occurrences of the Haloarcula marismortui large ribosomal subunit (PDB ID: 1FFK) and two out of three occurrences of quintuple interaction reported by the non-canonical interactions in RNA (NCIR) database. These and several other interactions of interest will be discussed in this paper. These examples demonstrate that the COGNAC program can serve as an automated annotation system that can be used to annotate conserved base-base interactions and could be added as additional information to established RNA secondary structure prediction methods

  5. A spectroscopic study of the hydrogen bonding and pi-pi stacking interactions of harmane with quinoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balón, M; Guardado, P; Muñoz, M A; Carmona, C

    1998-01-01

    A spectroscopic (UV-vis, Fourier transform IR, steady state, and time-resolved fluorescence) study of the interactions of the ground and excited singlet states of harmane (1-methyl-9H-pyrido/3,4-b/indole) with quinoline has been carried out in cyclohexane, toluene, and buffered pH=8.7 aqueous solutions. To analyze how the number of rings in the substrate influences these interactions, pyridine and phenanthridine have also been included in this study. In cyclohexane and toluene 1:1 stoichiometric hydrogen-bonded complexes are formed in both the ground and the excited singlet states. As the number of rings of the benzopyridines and the solvent polarity increase hydrogen-bonding interactions weaken and pi-pi van der Waals interactions become apparent.

  6. Hydrogen bonding in cytosinium dihydrogen phosphite

    OpenAIRE

    Nourredine Benali-Cherif; Amel Messai; Erwann Jeanneau; Dominique Luneau

    2009-01-01

    In the title compound, C4H8N3O4P+·H2PO3−, the cytosine molecule is monoprotonated and the phosphoric acid is in the monoionized state. Strong hydrogen bonds, dominated by N—H...O interactions, are responsible for cohesion between the organic and inorganic layers and maintain the stability of this structure.

  7. Hydrogen bonding in cytosinium dihydrogen phosphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourredine Benali-Cherif

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C4H8N3O4P+·H2PO3−, the cytosine molecule is monoprotonated and the phosphoric acid is in the monoionized state. Strong hydrogen bonds, dominated by N—H...O interactions, are responsible for cohesion between the organic and inorganic layers and maintain the stability of this structure.

  8. Hydrogen Bonding to Alkanes: Computational Evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Steen; Olesen, Solveig Gaarn

    2009-01-01

    The structural, vibrational, and energetic properties of adducts of alkanes and strong cationic proton donors were studied with composite ab initio calculations. Hydrogen bonding in [D-H+ H-alkyl] adducts contributes to a significant degree to the interactions between the two components, which is...

  9. Isotope dependent, temperature regulated, energy repartitioning in a low-barrier, short-strong hydrogen bonded cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X. H.; Oomens, J.; Eyler, J. R.; Moore, D. T.; Iyengar, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate and analyze the vibrational properties, including hydrogen/deuterium isotope effects, in a fundamental organic hydrogen bonded system using multiple experimental (infrared multiple photon dissociation and argon-tagged action spectroscopy) and computational techniques. We note a

  10. Strong and weak hydrogen bonds in drug–DNA complexes: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    minor groove-binding interactions are electrostatic, van der Waals, hydrophobic ... the protein data bank (PDB) and the nucleic acid data bank. (NDB) (Berman et al ... is defined as an interaction X–H···A wherein a hydrogen atom forms a bond ...

  11. NMR Study on the Interaction of Trehalose with Lactose and Its Effect on the Hydrogen Bond Interaction in Lactose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Morssing Vilén

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose, a well-known stress-protector of biomolecules, has been investigated for its effect on the mobility, hydration and hydrogen bond interaction of lactose using diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy and NMR of hydroxy protons. In ternary mixtures of trehalose, lactose and water, the two sugars have the same rate of diffusion. The chemical shifts, temperature coefficients, vicinal coupling constants and ROE of the hydroxy protons in trehalose, lactose and sucrose were measured for the disaccharides alone in water/acetone-d6 solutions as well as in mixtures. The data indicated that addition of trehalose did not change significantly the strength of the hydrogen bond interaction between GlcOH3 and GalO5' in lactose. Small upfield shifts were however measured for all hydroxy protons when the sugar concentration was increased. The chemical shift of the GlcOH3 signal in lactose showed less change, attributed to the spatial proximity to GalO5'. Chemical exchange between hydroxy protons of lactose and trehalose was observed in the ROESY NMR spectra. Similar effects were observed with sucrose indicating no specific effect of trehalose at the concentrations investigated (73 to 763 mg/mL and suggesting that it is the concentration of hydroxy groups more than the type of sugars which is guiding intermolecular interactions.

  12. A quantum-chemical validation about the formation of hydrogen bonds and secondary interactions in intermolecular heterocyclic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz Galdino Oliveira

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We have performed a detailed theoretical study in order to understand the charge density topology of the C2H4O···C2H2 and C2H4S···C2H2 heterocyclic hydrogen-bonded complexes. Through the calculations derived from Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM, it was observed the formation of hydrogen bonds and secondary interactions. Such analysis was performed through the determination of optimized geometries at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p level of theory, by which is that QTAIM topological operators were computed, such as the electronic density ρ(r, Laplacian Ñ2ρ(r, and ellipticity ε. The examination of the hydrogen bonds has been performed through the measurement of ρ(r, Ñ2ρ(r and ε between (O···H—C and (S···H—C, whereas the secondary interaction between axial hydrogen atoms Hα and carbon of acetylene. In this insight, it was verified the existence of secondary interaction only in C2H4S···C2H2 complex because its structure is propitious to form multiple interactions.

  13. Diels-Alder reactions in water : Enforced hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberts, Jan B.F.N.

    1995-01-01

    Second-order rate constants have been measured for the Diels-Alder (DA) reactions of cyclopentadiene with dienophiles of varying hydrophobicity and hydrogen-bond acceptor capacity in water, in a series of organic solvents and in alcohol-water mixtures. The intramolecular DA reaction of

  14. DIELS-ALDER REACTIONS IN WATER - ENFORCED HYDROPHOBIC INTERACTION AND HYDROGEN-BONDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    Second-order rate constants have been measured for the Diels-Alder (DA) reactions of cyclopentadiene with dienophiles of varying hydrophobicity and hydrogen-bond acceptor capacity in water, in a series of organic solvents and in alcohol-water mixtures. The intramolecular DA reaction of

  15. Theoretical investigation on hydrogen bond interaction of diketo/keto-enol form uracil and thymine tautomers with intercalators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anithaa, V S; Vijayakumar, S; Sudha, M; Shankar, R

    2017-11-06

    The interaction of diketo and keto-enol form of thymine and uracil tautomers with acridine (Acr), phenazine (Phen), benzo[c]cinnoline (Ben), 1,10-phenanthroline (1,10-Phe), and 4,7-phenenthroline (4,7-Phe) intercalating drug molecules was studied using density functional theory at B3LYP/6-311++G** and M05-2×/6-311++G** levels of theory. From the interaction energy, it is found that keto-enol form tautomers have stronger interaction with intercalators than diketone form tautomers. On complex formation of thymine and uracil tautomers with benzo[c]cinnoline the drug molecules have high interaction energy values of -20.14 (BenT3) and -20.55 (BenU3) kcal mol -1 , while phenazine has the least interaction energy values of -6.52 (PhenT2) and -6.67 (PhenU2) kcal mol -1 . The closed shell intermolecular type interaction between the molecules with minimum elliptical value of 0.018 and 0.019 a.u at both levels of theory has been found from topological analysis. The benzo[c]cinnoline drug molecule with thymine and uracil tautomers has short range intermolecular N-H…N, C-H…O, and O-H...N hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) resulting in higher stability than other drug molecules. The proper hydrogen bonds N-H..N and O-H..N have the frequency shifted toward the lower side (red shifted) with the elongation in their bond length while the improper hydrogen bond C-H...O has the frequency shifted toward the higher side (blue shifted) of the spectral region with the contraction in their bond length. Further, the charge transfer between proton acceptor and donor along with stability of the bond is studied using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Graphical abstract Hydrogen bond interaction of diketo/keto-enol form uracil and thymine tautomers with intercalators.

  16. Effects of hydrogen bonds on solid state TATB, RDX, and DATB under high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Feng; Hu Hai-Quan; Zhang Hong; Cheng Xin-Lu

    2014-01-01

    To probe the behavior of hydrogen bonds in solid energetic materials, we conduct ReaxFF and SCC–DFTB molecular dynamics simulations of crystalline TATB, RDX, and DATB. By comparing the intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bonding rates, we find that the crystal structures are stabilized by inter-molecular hydrogen bond networks. Under high-pressure, the inter- and intra-molecular hydrogen bonds in solid TATB and DATB are nearly equivalent. The hydrogen bonds in solid TATB and DATB are much shorter than in solid RDX, which suggests strong hydrogen bond interactions existing in these energetic materials. Stretching of the C–H bond is observed in solid RDX, which may lead to further decomposition and even detonation. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  17. Spectroscopic study of uracil, 1-methyluracil and 1-methyl-4-thiouracil: Hydrogen bond interactions in crystals and ab-initio molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brela, Mateusz Z.; Boczar, Marek; Malec, Leszek M.; Wójcik, Marek J.; Nakajima, Takahito

    2018-05-01

    Hydrogen bond networks in uracil, 1-methyluracil and 1-methyl-4-thiouracil were studied by ab initio molecular dynamics as well as analysis of the orbital interactions. The power spectra calculated by ab initio molecular dynamics for atoms involved in hydrogen bonds were analyzed. We calculated spectra by using anharmonic approximation based on the autocorrelation function of the atom positions obtained from the Born-Oppenheimer simulations. Our results show the differences between hydrogen bond networks in uracil and its methylated derivatives. The studied methylated derivatives, 1-methyluracil as well as 1-methyl-4-thiouracil, form dimeric structures in the crystal phase, while uracil does not form that kind of structures. The presence of sulfur atom instead oxygen atom reflects weakness of the hydrogen bonds that build dimers.

  18. Self-assembly of Hydrazide-based Heterodimers Driven by Hydrogen Bonding and Donor-Acceptor Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG,Dai-Jun; WANG,Peng; LI,Xiao-Qiang; LI,Zhan-Ting

    2006-01-01

    A new series of hydrogen bonding-driven heterodimers have been self-assembled in chloroform from hydrazide-based monomers. Additional intermolecular donor-acceptor interaction between the electron-rich bis(p-phenylene)-34-crown-10 unit and the electron-deficient naphthalene diimide unit has been utilized to increase the stability of the dimmers, and pronounced cooperativity of the two discrete non-covalent forces to stabilize the dimer has been revealed by the quantitative 1H (2D) NMR and UV-Vis experiments.

  19. Hydrogen-bonding interactions in thiosemicarbazones of carboxylic acids: Structure of 2-ketobutyric acid thiosemicarbazone hemihydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonawane, P.; Chikate, R.; Kumbhar, A.; Padhye, S.; Doedens, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    2-Thiosemicarbazonobutanoic acid hemihydrate, C 5 H 9 N 3 O 2 S.0.5H 2 O, M r =184.22, triclinic, Panti 1, a=8.163(2), b=8.868(2), c=12.438(2) A, α=72.99(2), β=79.47(2), γ=84.06(2)deg, V=845.3(3) A 3 , Z=4, D x =1.447 Mg m -3 , λ(Mo Kα)=0.71073 A, μ=0.332 mm -1 , F(000)=392, T=296 K, R=0.038 for 3830 independent reflections with I>3σ(I). Three hydrogen bonds link the two crystallographically independent molecules in a pairwise fashion. The two molecules both have E configurations about each C-N and N-N bond, but differ by nearly 180deg in the orientation of the -COOH group. (orig.)

  20. A combined experimental and theoretical approach to the study of hydrogen bond interaction in the binary mixture of N-methylimidazole with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Rongyi; Du, Rongbin; Liu, Guangxiang; Zhao, Xiuqin; Ye, Shiyong; Wu, Genhua

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Densities of N-methylimidazole with water binary mixture were measured. ► Excess molar volumes were fitted to Redlich–Kister polynomial equation. ► Excess molar volumes are negative in the whole mole fraction range. ► 1:1 Hydrogen complex formation between the unlike components was observed. ► Formation of hydrogen bonds in the binary mixture was confirmed by DFT//B3LYP. - Abstract: The intermolecular hydrogen bond interactions in the N-methylimidazole (MeIm) with water binary mixture have been studied by a combined experimental and theoretical approach. The densities of the binary mixture have been measured at T = (288.15 to 323.15) K and at atmospheric pressure. From the experimental data, excess molar volumes were determined as a function of composition at each temperature. The results reveal the formation of 1:1 hydrogen bond complex between MeIm with water at the maximal excess molar volume. Meanwhile, the formation of hydrogen bonds in the binary mixture was further confirmed by high level theoretical calculation. The structures, interactional energies and bond characteristics of the hydrogen bond complexes were calculated in the gas phase using density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) theory levels. The changes of thermodynamic properties from the monomers to hydrogen bond complexes with the temperature ranging from (288.15 to 323.15) K were obtained using the statistical thermodynamic method. Thermodynamic analyses have been interpreted in terms of intermolecular interactions and excess molar volume changes in the binary mixture. It was also found that the formation reaction of the hydrogen bond complex of MeIm with water was an exothermic, entropy reduced and spontaneous thermodynamic process at all the temperature studied.

  1. The unusually strong hydrogen bond between the carbonyl of Q(A) and His M219 in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center is not essential for efficient electron transfer from Q(A)(-) to Q(B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Jacques; Lavergne, Jérôme; Wakeham, Marion C; Nabedryk, Eliane; Jones, Michael R

    2007-06-05

    In native reaction centers (RCs) from photosynthetic purple bacteria the primary quinone (QA) and the secondary quinone (QB) are interconnected via a specific His-Fe-His bridge. In Rhodobacter sphaeroides RCs the C4=O carbonyl of QA forms a very strong hydrogen bond with the protonated Npi of His M219, and the Ntau of this residue is in turn coordinated to the non-heme iron atom. The second carbonyl of QA is engaged in a much weaker hydrogen bond with the backbone N-H of Ala M260. In previous work, a Trp side chain was introduced by site-directed mutagenesis at the M260 position in the RC of Rb. sphaeroides, resulting in a complex that is completely devoid of QA and therefore nonfunctional. A photochemically competent derivative of the AM260W mutant was isolated that contains a Cys side chain at the M260 position (denoted AM260(W-->C)). In the present work, the interactions between the carbonyl groups of QA and the protein in the AM260(W-->C) suppressor mutant have been characterized by light-induced FTIR difference spectroscopy of the photoreduction of QA. The QA-/QA difference spectrum demonstrates that the strong interaction between the C4=O carbonyl of QA and His M219 is lost in the mutant, and the coupled CO and CC modes of the QA- semiquinone are also strongly perturbed. In parallel, a band assigned to the perturbation of the C5-Ntau mode of His M219 upon QA- formation in the native RC is lacking in the spectrum of the mutant. Furthermore, a positive band between 2900 and 2400 cm-1 that is related to protons fluctuating within a network of highly polarizable hydrogen bonds in the native RC is reduced in amplitude in the mutant. On the other hand, the QB-/QB FTIR difference spectrum is essentially the same as for the native RC. The kinetics of electron transfer from QA- to QB were measured by the flash-induced absorption changes at 780 nm. Compared to native RCs the absorption transients are slowed by a factor of about 2 for both the slow phase (in the

  2. Strong Coupling between Nanofluidic Transport and Interfacial Chemistry: How Defect Reactivity Controls Liquid-Solid Friction through Hydrogen Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Laurent; Tocci, Gabriele; Merabia, Samy; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-04-07

    Defects are inevitably present in nanofluidic systems, yet the role they play in nanofluidic transport remains poorly understood. Here, we report ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of the friction of liquid water on defective graphene and boron nitride sheets. We show that water dissociates at certain defects and that these "reactive" defects lead to much larger friction than the "nonreactive" defects at which water molecules remain intact. Furthermore, we find that friction is extremely sensitive to the chemical structure of reactive defects and to the number of hydrogen bonds they can partake in with the liquid. Finally, we discuss how the insight obtained from AIMD can be used to quantify the influence of defects on friction in nanofluidic devices for water treatment and sustainable energy harvesting. Overall, we provide new insight into the role of interfacial chemistry on nanofluidic transport in real, defective systems.

  3. Hydrogen bond interactions in sulfamerazine: DFT study of the O-17, N-14, and H-2 electric field gradient tensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghazadeh, Mustafa; Mirzaei, Mahmoud

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen bond (HB) interactions are studied in the real crystalline structure of sulfamerazine by density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the electric field gradient (EFG) tensors at the sites of O-17, N-14, and H-2 nuclei. One-molecule (single) and four-molecule (cluster) models of sulfamerazine are created by available crystal coordinates and the EFG tensors are calculated in both models to indicate the influence of HB interactions on the tensors. Directly relate to the experiments, the calculated EFG tensors are converted to the experimentally measurable nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) parameters, quadrupole coupling constant (qcc) and asymmetry parameter (η Q ). The evaluated NQR parameters reveal that due to contribution of the target molecule to N-H...N and N-H...O types of HB interactions, the EFG tensors at the sites of various nuclei are influenced from single model to the target molecule in cluster. Additionally, O2, N4, and H2 nuclei of the target molecule are significantly influenced by HB interactions, consequently, they have the major contributions to HB interactions in cluster model of sulfamerazine. The calculations are performed employing B3LYP method and 6-311++G** basis set using GAUSSIAN 98 suite of program

  4. Modeling liquid-vapor equilibria with an equation of state taking into account dipolar interactions and association by hydrogen bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perfetti, E.

    2006-11-01

    Modelling fluid-rock interactions as well as mixing and unmixing phenomena in geological processes requires robust equations of state (EOS) which must be applicable to systems containing water, gases over a broad range of temperatures and pressures. Cubic equations of state based on the Van der Waals theory (e. g. Soave-Redlich-Kwong or Peng-Robinson) allow simple modelling from the critical parameters of the studied fluid components. However, the accuracy of such equations becomes poor when water is a major component of the fluid since neither association trough hydrogen bonding nor dipolar interactions are accounted for. The Helmholtz energy of a fluid may be written as the sum of different energetic contributions by factorization of partition function. The model developed in this thesis for the pure H 2 O and H 2 S considers three contributions. The first contribution represents the reference Van der Waals fluid which is modelled by the SRK cubic EOS. The second contribution accounts for association through hydrogen bonding and is modelled by a term derived from Cubic Plus Association (CPA) theory. The third contribution corresponds to the dipolar interactions and is modelled by the Mean Spherical Approximation (MSA) theory. The resulting CPAMSA equation has six adjustable parameters, which three represent physical terms whose values are close to their experimental counterpart. This equation results in a better reproduction of the thermodynamic properties of pure water than obtained using the classical CPA equation along the vapour-liquid equilibrium. In addition, extrapolation to higher temperatures and pressure is satisfactory. Similarly, taking into account dipolar interactions together with the SRK cubic equation of state for calculating molar volume of H 2 S as a function of pressure and temperature results in a significant improvement compared to the SRK equation alone. Simple mixing rules between dipolar molecules are proposed to model the H 2 O-H 2 S

  5. Mechanism of conformational coupling in SecA: Key role of hydrogen-bonding networks and water interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenkovic, Stefan; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta

    2016-02-01

    SecA uses the energy yielded by the binding and hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to push secretory pre-proteins across the plasma membrane in bacteria. Hydrolysis of ATP occurs at the nucleotide-binding site, which contains the conserved carboxylate groups of the DEAD-box helicases. Although crystal structures provide valuable snapshots of SecA along its reaction cycle, the mechanism that ensures conformational coupling between the nucleotide-binding site and the other domains of SecA remains unclear. The observation that SecA contains numerous hydrogen-bonding groups raises important questions about the role of hydrogen-bonding networks and hydrogen-bond dynamics in long-distance conformational couplings. To address these questions, we explored the molecular dynamics of SecA from three different organisms, with and without bound nucleotide, in water. By computing two-dimensional hydrogen-bonding maps we identify networks of hydrogen bonds that connect the nucleotide-binding site to remote regions of the protein, and sites in the protein that respond to specific perturbations. We find that the nucleotide-binding site of ADP-bound SecA has a preferred geometry whereby the first two carboxylates of the DEAD motif bridge via hydrogen-bonding water. Simulations of a mutant with perturbed ATP hydrolysis highlight the water-bridged geometry as a key structural element of the reaction path. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Anion-selective interaction and colorimeter by an optical metalloreceptor based on ruthenium(II) 2,2'-biimidazole: hydrogen bonding and proton transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ying; Mo, Hao-Jun; Chen, Jin-Can; Niu, Yan-Li; Zhong, Yong-Rui; Zheng, Kang-Cheng; Ye, Bao-Hui

    2007-08-06

    A new anion sensor [Ru(bpy)2(H2biim)](PF6)2 (1) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and H2biim = 2,2'-biimidazole) has been developed, in which the Ru(II)-bpy moiety acts as a chromophore and the H2biim ligand as an anion receptor via hydrogen bonding. A systematic investigation shows that 1 is an eligible sensor for various anions. It donates protons for hydrogen bonding to Cl-, Br-, I-, NO3-, HSO4-, H2PO4-, and OAc- anions and further actualizes monoproton transfer to the OAc- anion, changing color from yellow to orange brown. The fluoride ion has a high affinity toward the N-H group of the H2biim ligand for proton transfer, rather than hydrogen bonding, because of the formation of the highly stable HF2- anion, resulting in stepwise deprotonation of the two N-H fragments. These processes are signaled by vivid color changes from yellow to orange brown and then to violet because of second-sphere donor-acceptor interactions between Ru(II)-H2biim and the anions. The significant color changes can be distinguished visually. The processes are not only determined by the basicity of anion but also by the strength of hydrogen bonding and the stability of the anion-receptor complexes. The design strategy and remarkable photophysical properties of sensor 1 help to extend the development of anion sensors.

  7. Strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froissart, Marcel

    1976-01-01

    Strong interactions are introduced by their more obvious aspect: nuclear forces. In hadron family, the nucleon octet, OMEGA - decuplet, and quark triply are successively considered. Pion wave having been put at the origin of nuclear forces, low energy phenomena are described, the force being explained as an exchange of structure corresponding to a Regge trajectory in a variable rotating state instead of the exchange of a well defined particle. At high energies the concepts of pomeron, parton and stratons are introduced, pionization and fragmentation are briefly differentiated [fr

  8. The subtle balance of weak supramolecular interactions: The hierarchy of halogen and hydrogen bonds in haloanilinium and halopyridinium salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Raatikainen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The series of haloanilinium and halopyridinium salts: 4-IPhNH3Cl (1, 4-IPhNH3Br (5, 4-IPhNH3H2PO4 (6, 4-ClPhNH3H2PO4 (8, 3-IPyBnCl (9, 3-IPyHCl (10 and 3-IPyH-5NIPA (3-iodopyridinium 5-nitroisophthalate, 13, where hydrogen or/and halogen bonding represents the most relevant non-covalent interactions, has been prepared and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. This series was further complemented by extracting some relevant crystal structures: 4-BrPhNH3Cl (2, CCDC ref. code TAWRAL, 4-ClPhNH3Cl (3, CURGOL, 4-FPhNH3Cl (4, ANLCLA, 4-BrPhNH3H2PO4, (7, UGISEI, 3-BrPyHCl, (11, CIHBAX and 3-ClPyHCl, (12, VOQMUJ from Cambridge Structural Database for sake of comparison. Based on the X-ray data it was possible to highlight the balance between non-covalent forces acting in these systems, where the relative strength of the halogen bonding C–X···A− (X = I, Br or Cl and the ratio between the halogen and hydrogen bonds [C–X···A− : D–H···A−] varied across the series.

  9. Hydrogen bonding interactions in PN...HX complexes: DFT and ab initio studies of structure, properties and topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadwaj, Pradeep Risikrishna

    2010-05-01

    Spin-restricted DFT (X3LYP and B3LYP) and ab initio (MP2(fc) and CCSD(fc)) calculations in conjunction with the Aug-CC-pVDZ and Aug-CC-pVTZ basis sets were performed on a series of hydrogen bonded complexes PN...HX (X = F, Cl, Br) to examine the variations of their equilibrium gas phase structures, energetic stabilities, electronic properties, and vibrational characteristics in their electronic ground states. In all cases the complexes were predicted to be stable with respect to the constituent monomers. The interaction energy (Delta E) calculated using a super-molecular model is found to be in this order: PN...HF > PN...HCl > PN...HBr in the series examined. Analysis of various physically meaningful contributions arising from the Kitaura-Morokuma (KM) and reduced variational space self-consistent-field (RVS-SCF) energy decomposition procedures shows that the electrostatic energy has significant contribution to the over-all interaction energy. Dipole moment enhancement (Delta mu) was observed in these complexes expected of predominant dipole-dipole electrostatic interaction and was found to follow the trend PN...HF > PN...HCl > PN...HBr at the CCSD level. However, the DFT (X3LYP and B3LYP) and MP2 levels less accurately determined these values (in this order HF 0, nabla(2)rho(c) > 0 and H(c) > 0 at the BCP) whilst the bonds in PN (rho(c) > 0, nabla(2)rho(c) > 0 and H(c) 0, nabla(2)rho(c) BD*(HX) delocalization.

  10. Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions in Luminescent Quinoline-Triazoles with Dominant 1D Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Qiang Bai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Quinoline-triazoles 2-((4-(diethoxymethyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-ylmethylquinoline (1, 2-((4-(m-tolyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-ylmethylquinoline (2 and 2-((4-(p-tolyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-ylmethylquinoline (3 have been prepared with CuAAC click reactions and used as a model series to probe the relationship between lattice H-bonding interaction and crystal direction of growth. Crystals of 1–3 are 1D tape and prism shapes that correlate with their intermolecular and solvent 1D lattice H-bonding interactions. All compounds were thermally stable up to about 200 C and blue-green emissive in solution.

  11. Dielectric relaxation and hydrogen bonding interaction in xylitol-water mixtures using time domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rander, D. N.; Joshi, Y. S.; Kanse, K. S.; Kumbharkhane, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The measurements of complex dielectric permittivity of xylitol-water mixtures have been carried out in the frequency range of 10 MHz-30 GHz using a time domain reflectometry technique. Measurements have been done at six temperatures from 0 to 25 °C and at different weight fractions of xylitol (0 xylitol-water can be well described by Cole-Davidson model having an asymmetric distribution of relaxation times. The dielectric parameters such as static dielectric constant and relaxation time for the mixtures have been evaluated. The molecular interaction between xylitol and water molecules is discussed using the Kirkwood correlation factor ( g eff ) and thermodynamic parameter.

  12. [FHF]−—The Strongest Hydrogen Bond under the Influence of External Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir J. Grabowski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A search through the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD for crystal structures containing the [FHF]− anion was carried out. Forty five hydrogen bifluoride structures were found mainly with the H-atom moved from the mid-point of the F…F distance. However several [FHF]− systems characterized by D∞h symmetry were found, the same as this anion possesses in the gas phase. The analysis of CSD results as well as the analysis of results of ab initio calculations on the complexes of [FHF]− with Lewis acid moieties show that the movement of the H-atom from the central position depends on the strength of interaction of this anion with external species. The analysis of the electron charge density distribution in complexes of [FHF]− was performed with the use of the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM approach and the Natural Bond Orbitals (NBO method.

  13. Hydrogen bonding interaction of small acetaldehyde clusters studied with core-electron excitation spectroscopy in the oxygen K-edge region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabayashi, K.; Chohda, M.; Yamanaka, T.; Tsutsumi, Y.; Takahashi, O.; Yoshida, H.; Taniguchi, M.

    2010-06-01

    In order to examine inner-shell electron excitation spectra of molecular clusters with strong multipole interactions, excitation spectra and time-of-flight (TOF) fragment-mass spectra of small acetaldehyde (AA) clusters have been studied under the beam conditions. The TOF spectra at the oxygen K-edge region showed an intense growth of the protonated clusters, MnH+ (M=CH3CHO) in the cluster beams. "cluster-specific" excitation spectra could be generated by monitoring partial-ion-yields of the protonated clusters. The most intense band of O1s→π*CO was found to shift to a higher energy by 0.15 eV relative to the monomer band upon clusterization. X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) were also calculated for the representative dimer configurations using a computer modelling program based on the density functional theory. The XAS prediction for the most stable (non-planar) configuration was found to give a close comparison with the cluster-band shift observed. The band shift was interpreted as being due to the HOMO-LUMO interaction within the complex where a contribution of vibrationally blue-shifting hydrogen bonding could be identified.

  14. Thermodynamics of hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions of organic solutes in solutions of imidazolium based ionic liquids: “Structure-property” relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varfolomeev, Mikhail A., E-mail: vma.ksu@gmail.com; Khachatrian, Artashes A.; Akhmadeev, Bulat S.; Solomonov, Boris N.

    2016-06-10

    Highlights: • Solution enthalpies of organic solutes in imidazolium based ionic liquids were measured. • van der Waals interactions scale of imidazolium based ionic liquids was proposed. • Enthalpies of solvation of organic solutes in ionic liquids were determined. • Hydrogen bond enthalpies of organic solutes with ionic liquids were calculated. • Relationships between structure of ionic liquids and thermochemical data were obtained. - Abstract: In the present work thermochemistry of intermolecular interactions of organic compounds in solutions of imidazolium based ionic liquids (ILs) has been studied using solution calorimetry method. Enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution of non-polar (alkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons) and polar (alcohols, amides, and etc.) organic solutes in two ionic liquids 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate were measured at 298.15 K. The scale of van der Waals interactions of imidazolium based ILs has been proposed on the basis of solution enthalpies of n-alkanes in their media. The effect of the cation and anion structure of ILs on the enthalpies of solvation was analyzed. Enthalpies of hydrogen bonding of organic solutes with imidazolium based ILs were determined. It has been shown that these values are close to zero for proton acceptor solutes. At the same time, enthalpies of hydrogen bonding of proton donor solutes with ionic liquids are increased depending the anion: tetrafluoroborate ≈ bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide < 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl sulfate < trifluoromethanesulfonate. Enthalpies of van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding in the solutions of imidazolium based ionic liquids were compared with the same data for molecular solvents.

  15. Thermodynamics of hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions of organic solutes in solutions of imidazolium based ionic liquids: “Structure-property” relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varfolomeev, Mikhail A.; Khachatrian, Artashes A.; Akhmadeev, Bulat S.; Solomonov, Boris N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Solution enthalpies of organic solutes in imidazolium based ionic liquids were measured. • van der Waals interactions scale of imidazolium based ionic liquids was proposed. • Enthalpies of solvation of organic solutes in ionic liquids were determined. • Hydrogen bond enthalpies of organic solutes with ionic liquids were calculated. • Relationships between structure of ionic liquids and thermochemical data were obtained. - Abstract: In the present work thermochemistry of intermolecular interactions of organic compounds in solutions of imidazolium based ionic liquids (ILs) has been studied using solution calorimetry method. Enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution of non-polar (alkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons) and polar (alcohols, amides, and etc.) organic solutes in two ionic liquids 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate were measured at 298.15 K. The scale of van der Waals interactions of imidazolium based ILs has been proposed on the basis of solution enthalpies of n-alkanes in their media. The effect of the cation and anion structure of ILs on the enthalpies of solvation was analyzed. Enthalpies of hydrogen bonding of organic solutes with imidazolium based ILs were determined. It has been shown that these values are close to zero for proton acceptor solutes. At the same time, enthalpies of hydrogen bonding of proton donor solutes with ionic liquids are increased depending the anion: tetrafluoroborate ≈ bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide < 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl sulfate < trifluoromethanesulfonate. Enthalpies of van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding in the solutions of imidazolium based ionic liquids were compared with the same data for molecular solvents.

  16. Orbital interactions and charge redistribution in weak hydrogen bonds: The Watson-Crick AT mimic adenine-2,4-difluorotoluene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonseca Guerra, C.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2003-01-01

    An overview is given of results that reestablish hydrogen bonding as an essential factor in DNA replication involving natural bases as well as less polar mimics and they also confirm the importance of steric factors, in line with Kool's experimental work. In addition they show that knowledge of the

  17. A theoretical perspective of the nature of hydrogen-bond types - the atoms in molecules approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaya Pandiyan, B.; Kolandaivel, P.; Deepa, P.

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogen bonds and their strength were analysed based on their X-H proton-donor bond properties and the parameters of the H-Y distance (Y proton acceptor). Strong, moderate and weak interactions in hydrogen-bond types were verified through the proton affinities of bases (PA), deprotanation enthalpies of acids (DPE) and the chemical shift (σ). The aromaticity and anti-aromaticity were analysed by means of the NICS (0) (nucleus-independent chemical shift), NICS (1) and ΔNICS (0), ΔNICS (1) of hydrogen-bonded molecules. The strength of a hydrogen bond depends on the capacity of hydrogen atom engrossing into the electronegative acceptor atom. The correlation between the above parameters and their relations were discussed through curve fitting. Bader's theory of atoms in molecules has been applied to estimate the occurrence of hydrogen bonds through eight criteria reported by Popelier et al. The lengths and potential energy shifts have been found to have a strong negative linear correlation, whereas the lengths and Laplacian shifts have a strong positive linear correlation. This study illustrates the common factors responsible for strong, moderate and weak interactions in hydrogen-bond types.

  18. Hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with covalently-bound hexafluoroisopropanol groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Grate, Jay W.

    2010-06-01

    Fluorinated hydrogen-bond acidic groups are directly attached to the backbone of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) without the introduction of intermediate electron donating surface groups. Hexafluoroalcohol functional groups are exceptionally strong hydrogen bond acids, and are added to the nanotube surface using the aryl diazonium approach to create hydrogen-bond acidic carbon nanotube (CNT) surfaces. These groups can promote strong hydrogen-bonding interactions with matrix materials in composites or with molecular species to be concentrated and sensed. In the latter case, this newly developed material is expected to find useful application in chemical sensors and in CNT-based preconcentrator devices for the detection of pesticides, chemical warfare agents and explosives.

  19. Hydrogen bonded supramolecular materials

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date text covering topics in utilizing hydrogen bonding for constructing functional architectures and supramolecular materials. The first chapter addresses the control of photo-induced electron and energy transfer. The second chapter summarizes the formation of nano-porous materials. The following two chapters introduce self-assembled gels, many of which exhibit unique functions. Other chapters cover the advances in supramolecular liquid crystals and the versatility of hydrogen bonding in tuning/improving the properties and performance of materials. This book is designed

  20. Biased Gs Versus Gq Proteins and β-Arrestin Signaling in the NK1 Receptor Determined by Interactions in the Water Hydrogen Bond Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, Louise; Frimurer, Thomas M; Mokrosinski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    X-ray structures, molecular dynamics simulations, and mutational analysis have previously indicated that an extended water hydrogen bond network between trans-membranes I-III, VI, and VII constitutes an allosteric interface essential for stabilizing different active and inactive helical...... of the highly conserved AspII:10 (2.50). Here, we find that this GluII:10 occupies the space of a putative allosteric modulating Na(+) ion and makes direct inter-helical interactions in particular with SerIII:15 (3.39) and AsnVII:16 (7.49) of the NPXXY motif. Mutational changes in the interface between GluII:10....... It is concluded that the interface between position II:10 (2.50), III:15 (3.39), and VII:16 (7.49) in the center of the water hydrogen bond network constitutes a focal point for fine-tuning seven trans-membrane receptor conformations activating different signal transduction pathways....

  1. The specific cleavage of lactone linkage to open-loop in cyclic lipopeptide during negative ESI tandem mass spectrometry: the hydrogen bond interaction effect of 4-ethyl guaiacol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengzhe Guo

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry is a valuable tool for the analysis and identification of chemical compounds, particularly proteins and peptides. Lichenysins G, the major cyclic lipopeptide of lichenysin, and the non-covalent complex of lichenysins G and 4-ethylguaiacol were investigated with negative ion ESI tandem mass spectrometry. The different fragmentation mechanisms for these compounds were investigated. Our study shows the 4-ethylguaiacol hydrogen bond with the carbonyl oxygen of the ester group in the loop of lichenysins G. With the help of this hydrogen bond interaction, the ring structure preferentially opens in lactone linkage rather than O-C bond of the ester-group to produce alcohol and ketene. Isothermal titration 1H-NMR analysis verified the hydrogen bond and determined the proportion of subject and ligand in the non-covalent complex to be 1∶1. Theoretical calculations also suggest that the addition of the ligand can affect the energy of the transition structures (TS during loop opening.

  2. Examination of hydrogen-bonding interactions between dissolved solutes and alkylbenzene solvents based on Abraham model correlations derived from measured enthalpies of solvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varfolomeev, Mikhail A.; Rakipov, Ilnaz T. [Chemical Institute, Kazan Federal University, Kremlevskaya 18, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Acree, William E., E-mail: acree@unt.edu [Department of Chemistry, 1155 Union Circle # 305070, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-5017 (United States); Brumfield, Michela [Department of Chemistry, 1155 Union Circle # 305070, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-5017 (United States); Abraham, Michael H. [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-20

    Highlights: • Enthalpies of solution measured for 48 solutes dissolved in mesitylene. • Enthalpies of solution measured for 81 solutes dissolved in p-xylene. • Abraham model correlations derived for enthalpies of solvation of solutes in mesitylene. • Abraham model correlations derived for enthalpies of solvation of solutes in p-xylene. • Hydrogen-bonding enthalpies reported for interactions of aromatic hydrocarbons with hydrogen-bond acidic solutes. - Abstract: Enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution of 48 organic solutes in mesitylene and 81 organic solutes in p-xylene were measured using isothermal solution calorimeter. Enthalpies of solvation for 92 organic vapors and gaseous solutes in mesitylene and for 130 gaseous compounds in p-xylene were determined from the experimental and literature data. Abraham model correlations are determined from the experimental enthalpy of solvation data. The derived correlations describe the experimental gas-to-mesitylene and gas-to-p-xylene solvation enthalpies to within average standard deviations of 1.87 kJ mol{sup −1} and 2.08 kJ mol{sup −1}, respectively. Enthalpies of X-H⋯π (X-O, N, and C) hydrogen bond formation of proton donor solutes (alcohols, amines, chlorinated hydrocarbons etc.) with mesitylene and p-xylene were calculated based on the Abraham solvation equation. Obtained values are in good agreement with the results determined using conventional methods.

  3. Dynamic high pressure induced strong and weak hydrogen bonds enhanced by pre-resonance stimulated Raman scattering in liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenghan; Fang, Wenhui; Li, Fabing; Gong, Nan; Li, Zhanlong; Li, Zuowei; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2017-12-11

    355 nm pulsed laser is employed to excite pre-resonance forward stimulated Raman scattering (FSRS) of liquid water at ambient temperature. Due to the shockwave induced dynamic high pressure, the obtained Raman spectra begin to exhibit double peaks distribution at 3318 and 3373 cm -1 with the input energy of 17 mJ,which correspond with OH stretching vibration with strong and weak hydrogen (H) bonds. With laser energy rising from 17 to 27 mJ, the Stokes line at 3318 cm -1 shifts to 3255 and 3230 cm -1 because of the high pressure being enlarged. When the energy is up to 32 mJ, only 3373 cm -1 peak exists. The strong and weak H bond exhibit quite different energy dependent behaviors.

  4. Hydrogen Bonds and Life in the Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Vladilo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific community is allocating more and more resources to space missions and astronomical observations dedicated to the search for life beyond Earth. This experimental endeavor needs to be backed by a theoretical framework aimed at defining universal criteria for the existence of life. With this aim in mind, we have explored which chemical and physical properties should be expected for life possibly different from the terrestrial one, but similarly sustained by genetic and catalytic molecules. We show that functional molecules performing genetic and catalytic tasks must feature a hierarchy of chemical interactions operating in distinct energy bands. Of all known chemical bonds and forces, only hydrogen bonds are able to mediate the directional interactions of lower energy that are needed for the operation of genetic and catalytic tasks. For this reason and because of the unique quantum properties of hydrogen bonding, the functional molecules involved in life processes are predicted to have extensive hydrogen-bonding capabilities. A molecular medium generating a hydrogen-bond network is probably essential to support the activity of the functional molecules. These hydrogen-bond requirements constrain the viability of hypothetical biochemistries alternative to the terrestrial one, provide thermal limits to life molecular processes, and offer a conceptual framework to define a transition from a “covalent-bond stage” to a “hydrogen-bond stage” in prebiotic chemistry.

  5. Hydrogen Bonds and Life in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The scientific community is allocating more and more resources to space missions and astronomical observations dedicated to the search for life beyond Earth. This experimental endeavor needs to be backed by a theoretical framework aimed at defining universal criteria for the existence of life. With this aim in mind, we have explored which chemical and physical properties should be expected for life possibly different from the terrestrial one, but similarly sustained by genetic and catalytic molecules. We show that functional molecules performing genetic and catalytic tasks must feature a hierarchy of chemical interactions operating in distinct energy bands. Of all known chemical bonds and forces, only hydrogen bonds are able to mediate the directional interactions of lower energy that are needed for the operation of genetic and catalytic tasks. For this reason and because of the unique quantum properties of hydrogen bonding, the functional molecules involved in life processes are predicted to have extensive hydrogen-bonding capabilities. A molecular medium generating a hydrogen-bond network is probably essential to support the activity of the functional molecules. These hydrogen-bond requirements constrain the viability of hypothetical biochemistries alternative to the terrestrial one, provide thermal limits to life molecular processes, and offer a conceptual framework to define a transition from a “covalent-bond stage” to a “hydrogen-bond stage” in prebiotic chemistry. PMID:29301382

  6. Hydrogen Bonds and Life in the Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladilo, Giovanni; Hassanali, Ali

    2018-01-03

    The scientific community is allocating more and more resources to space missions and astronomical observations dedicated to the search for life beyond Earth. This experimental endeavor needs to be backed by a theoretical framework aimed at defining universal criteria for the existence of life. With this aim in mind, we have explored which chemical and physical properties should be expected for life possibly different from the terrestrial one, but similarly sustained by genetic and catalytic molecules. We show that functional molecules performing genetic and catalytic tasks must feature a hierarchy of chemical interactions operating in distinct energy bands. Of all known chemical bonds and forces, only hydrogen bonds are able to mediate the directional interactions of lower energy that are needed for the operation of genetic and catalytic tasks. For this reason and because of the unique quantum properties of hydrogen bonding, the functional molecules involved in life processes are predicted to have extensive hydrogen-bonding capabilities. A molecular medium generating a hydrogen-bond network is probably essential to support the activity of the functional molecules. These hydrogen-bond requirements constrain the viability of hypothetical biochemistries alternative to the terrestrial one, provide thermal limits to life molecular processes, and offer a conceptual framework to define a transition from a "covalent-bond stage" to a "hydrogen-bond stage" in prebiotic chemistry.

  7. Peptide-Driven Charge-Transfer Organogels Built from Synergetic Hydrogen Bonding and Pyrene-Naphthalenediimide Donor-Acceptor Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartocci, Silvia; Berrocal, José Augusto; Guarracino, Paola; Grillaud, Maxime; Franco, Lorenzo; Mba, Miriam

    2018-02-26

    The peptide-driven formation of charge transfer (CT) supramolecular gels featuring both directional hydrogen-bonding and donor-acceptor (D-A) complexation is reported. Our design consists of the coassembly of two dipeptide-chromophore conjugates, namely diphenylalanine (FF) dipeptide conveniently functionalized at the N-terminus with either a pyrene (Py-1, donor) or naphthalene diimide (NDI-1, acceptor). UV/Vis spectroscopy confirmed the formation of CT complexes. FTIR and 1 H NMR spectroscopy studies underlined the pivotal role of hydrogen bonding in the gelation process, and electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements unraveled the advantage of preorganized CT supramolecular architectures for charge transport over solutions containing non-coassembled D and A molecular systems. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A tensegrity model for hydrogen bond networks in proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Bywater, Robert P.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen-bonding networks in proteins considered as structural tensile elements are in balance separately from any other stabilising interactions that may be in operation. The hydrogen bond arrangement in the network is reminiscent of tensegrity structures in architecture and sculpture. Tensegrity has been discussed before in cells and tissues and in proteins. In contrast to previous work only hydrogen bonds are studied here. The other interactions within proteins are either much stronger − c...

  9. Relating hydrogen-bonding interactions with the phase behavior of naproxen/PVP K 25 solid dispersions: evaluation of solution-cast and quench-cooled films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Amrit; Nies, Erik; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2012-11-05

    In this work, we investigated the relationship between various intermolecular hydrogen-bonding (H-bonding) interactions and the miscibility of the model hydrophobic drug naproxen with the hydrophilic polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) across an entire composition range of solid dispersions prepared by quasi-equilibrium film casting and nonequilibrium melt quench cooling. The binary phase behavior in solid dispersions exhibited substantial processing method dependence. The solid state solubility of crystalline naproxen in PVP to form amorphous solid dispersions was 35% and 70% w/w naproxen in solution-cast films and quench-cooled films, respectively. However, the presence of a single mixed phase glass transition indicated the amorphous miscibility to be 20% w/w naproxen for the films, beyond which amorphous-amorphous and/or crystalline phase separations were apparent. This was further supported by the solution state interactions data such as PVP globular size distribution and solution infrared spectral profiles. The borderline melt composition showed cooling rate dependence of amorphization. The glass transition and melting point depression profiles of the system were treated with the analytical expressions based on Flory-Huggins mixing theory to interpolate the equilibrium solid solubility. FTIR analysis and subsequent spectral deconvolution revealed composition and miscibility dependent variations in the strength of drug-polymer intermolecular H-bonding. Two types of H-bonded populations were evidenced from 25% w/w and 35% w/w naproxen in solution-cast films and quench-cooled films, respectively, with the higher fraction of strongly H-bonded population in the drug rich domains of phase separated amorphous film compositions and highly drug loaded amorphous quench-cooled dispersions.

  10. Simulation of the effect of hydrogen bonds on water activity of glucose and dextran using the Veytsman model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito, Francesca; Veytsman, Boris; Painter, Paul; Kokini, Jozef L

    2015-03-06

    Carbohydrates exhibit either van der Waals and ionic interactions or strong hydrogen bonding interactions. The prominence and large number of hydrogen bonds results in major contributions to phase behavior. A thermodynamic framework that accounts for hydrogen bonding interactions is therefore necessary. We have developed an extension of the thermodynamic model based on the Veytsman association theory to predict the contribution of hydrogen bonds to the behavior of glucose-water and dextran-water systems and we have calculated the free energy of mixing and its derivative leading to chemical potential and water activity. We compared our calculations with experimental data of water activity for glucose and dextran and found excellent agreement far superior to the Flory-Huggins theory. The validation of our calculations using experimental data demonstrated the validity of the Veytsman model in properly accounting for the hydrogen bonding interactions and successfully predicting water activity of glucose and dextran. Our calculations of the concentration of hydrogen bonds using the Veytsman model were instrumental in our ability to explain the difference between glucose and dextran and the role that hydrogen bonds play in contributing to these differences. The miscibility predictions showed that the Veytsman model is also able to correctly describe the phase behavior of glucose and dextran. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. N-H···S Interaction Continues To Be an Enigma: Experimental and Computational Investigations of Hydrogen-Bonded Complexes of Benzimidazole with Thioethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wategaonkar, Sanjay; Bhattacherjee, Aditi

    2018-05-03

    The N-H···S hydrogen bond, even though classified as an unconventional hydrogen bond, is found to bear important structural implications on protein structure and folding. In this article, we report a gas-phase study of the N-H···S hydrogen bond between the model compounds of histidine (benzimidazole, denoted BIM) and methionine (dimethyl sulfide, diethyl sulfide, and tetrahydrothiophene, denoted Me 2 S, Et 2 S, and THT, respectively). A combination of laser spectroscopic methods such as laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2cR2PI), and fluorescence depletion by infrared spectroscopy (FDIR) is used in conjunction with DFT and ab initio calculations to characterize the nature of this prevalent H-bonding interaction in simple bimolecular complexes. A single conformer was found to exist for the BIM-Me 2 S complex, whereas the BIM-Et 2 S and BIM-THT complexes showed the presence of three and two conformers, respectively. These conformers were characterized on the basis of IR spectroscopic results and electronic structure calculations. Quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), natural bond orbital (NBO), and energy decomposition (NEDA) analyses were performed to investigate the nature of the N-H···S H-bond. Comparison of the results with the N-H···O type of interactions in BIM and indole revealed that the strength of the N-H···S H-bond is similar to N-H···O in these binary gas-phase complexes.

  12. Evidence for excited-state intramolecular proton transfer in 4-chlorosalicylic acid from combined experimental and computational studies: Quantum chemical treatment of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Calcutta 700009 (India); Guchhait, Nikhil, E-mail: nikhil.guchhait@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Calcutta 700009 (India)

    2012-07-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental and computational studies on the photophysics of 4-chlorosalicylic acid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectroscopically established ESIPT reaction substantiated by theoretical calculation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum chemical treatment of IMHB unveils strength, nature and directional nature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Superiority of quantum chemical treatment of H-bond over geometric criteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Role of H-bond as a modulator of aromaticity. -- Abstract: The photophysical study of a pharmaceutically important chlorine substituted derivative of salicylic acid viz., 4-chlorosalicylic acid (4ClSA) has been carried out by steady-state absorption, emission and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. A large Stokes shifted emission band with negligible solvent polarity dependence marks the spectroscopic signature of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction in 4ClSA. Theoretical calculation by ab initio and Density Functional Theory methods yields results consistent with experimental findings. Theoretical potential energy surfaces predict the occurrence of proton transfer in S{sub 1}-state. Geometrical and energetic criteria, Atoms-In-Molecule topological parameters, Natural Bond Orbital population analysis have been exploited to evaluate the intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) interaction and to explore its directional nature. The inter-correlation between aromaticity and resonance assisted H-bond is also discussed in this context. Our results unveil that the quantum chemical treatment is a more accurate tool to assess hydrogen bonding interaction in comparison to geometrical criteria.

  13. Role of hydrogen-bonding and photoinduced electron transfer (PET) on the interaction of resorcinol based acridinedione dyes with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumaran, Rajendran; Vanjinathan, Mahalingam; Ramamurthy, Perumal

    2015-01-01

    Resorcinol based acridinedione (ADDR) dyes are a class of laser dyes and have structural similarity with purine derivatives, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) analogs. These dyes are classified into photoinduced electron transfer (PET) and non-photoinduced electron transfer dyes, and the photophysical properties of family of these dyes exhibiting PET behavior are entirely different from that of non-PET dyes. The PET process in ADDR dyes is governed by the solvent polarity such that an ADDR dye exhibits PET process through space in an aprotic solvent like acetonitrile and does not exhibit the same in protic solvents like water and methanol. A comparison on the fluorescence emission, lifetime and nature of interaction of various ADDR dyes with a large globular protein like Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) was carried out in aqueous solution. The interaction of PET based ADDR dyes with BSA in water is found to be largely hydrophobic, but hydrogen-bonding interaction of BSA with dye molecule influences the fluorescence emission of the dye and shifts the emission towards red region. Fluorescence spectral studies reveal that the excited state properties of PET based ADDR dyes are largely influenced by the addition of BSA. The microenvironment around the dye results in significant change in the fluorescence lifetime and emission. Fluorescence enhancement with a red shift in the emission results after the addition of BSA to ADDR dyes containing free amino hydrogen in the 10th position of basic acridinedione dye. The amino hydrogen (N–H) in the 10th position of ADDR dye is replaced by methyl group (N–CH 3 ), a significant decrease in the fluorescence intensity with no apparent shift in the emission maximum was observed after the addition of BSA. The nature of interaction between ADDR dyes with BSA is hydrogen-bonding and the dye remains unbound even at the highest concentration of BSA. Circular Dichroism (CD) studies show that the addition of dye to BSA results in a

  14. Hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Patricia A; Ashworth, Claire R; Matthews, Richard P

    2015-03-07

    Ionic liquids (IL) and hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) are two diverse fields for which there is a developing recognition of significant overlap. Doubly ionic H-bonds occur when a H-bond forms between a cation and anion, and are a key feature of ILs. Doubly ionic H-bonds represent a wide area of H-bonding which has yet to be fully recognised, characterised or explored. H-bonds in ILs (both protic and aprotic) are bifurcated and chelating, and unlike many molecular liquids a significant variety of distinct H-bonds are formed between different types and numbers of donor and acceptor sites within a given IL. Traditional more neutral H-bonds can also be formed in functionalised ILs, adding a further level of complexity. Ab initio computed parameters; association energies, partial charges, density descriptors as encompassed by the QTAIM methodology (ρBCP), qualitative molecular orbital theory and NBO analysis provide established and robust mechanisms for understanding and interpreting traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds. In this review the applicability and extension of these parameters to describe and quantify the doubly ionic H-bond has been explored. Estimating the H-bonding energy is difficult because at a fundamental level the H-bond and ionic interaction are coupled. The NBO and QTAIM methodologies, unlike the total energy, are local descriptors and therefore can be used to directly compare neutral, ionic and doubly ionic H-bonds. The charged nature of the ions influences the ionic characteristics of the H-bond and vice versa, in addition the close association of the ions leads to enhanced orbital overlap and covalent contributions. The charge on the ions raises the energy of the Ylp and lowers the energy of the X-H σ* NBOs resulting in greater charge transfer, strengthening the H-bond. Using this range of parameters and comparing doubly ionic H-bonds to more traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds it is clear that doubly ionic H-bonds cover the full range of weak

  15. O hydrogen bonds in alkaloids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An overview of general classification scheme, medicinal importance and crystal structure analysis with emphasis on the role of hydrogen bonding in some alkaloids is presented in this paper. The article is based on a general kind of survey while crystallographic analysis and role of hydrogen bonding are limited to only ...

  16. Distance criterion for hydrogen bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Distance criterion for hydrogen bond. In a D-H ...A contact, the D...A distance must be less than the sum of van der Waals Radii of the D and A atoms, for it to be a hydrogen bond.

  17. Hydrogen bonding between hydrides of the upper-right part of the periodic table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simončič, Matjaž; Urbic, Tomaz

    2018-05-01

    One of the most important electrostatic interactions between molecules is most definitely the hydrogen bond. Understanding the basis of this interaction may offer us the insight needed to understand its effect on the macroscopic scale. Hydrogen bonding is for example the reason for anomalous properties in compounds like water and naturally life as we know it. The strength of the bond depends on numerous factors, among them the electronegativity of participating atoms. In this work we calculated the strength of hydrogen bonds between hydrides of the upper-right part of the periodic table (C, N, O, F, P, S, Cl, As, Se, Br) using quantum-chemical methods. The aim was to determine what influences the strength of strong and weak hydrogen bonds in simple hydrides. Various relationships were checked. A relation between the strength of the bond and the electronegativity of the participating atoms was found. We also observed a correlation between the strength of hydrogen bonds and the inter-atomic distances, along with the dependence on the charge transfer on the atom of the donor. We also report characteristic geometries of different dimers.

  18. Predictions of glass transition temperature for hydrogen bonding biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sman, R G M

    2013-12-19

    We show that the glass transition of a multitude of mixtures containing hydrogen bonding materials correlates strongly with the effective number of hydroxyl groups per molecule, which are available for intermolecular hydrogen bonding. This correlation is in compliance with the topological constraint theory, wherein the intermolecular hydrogen bonds constrain the mobility of the hydrogen bonded network. The finding that the glass transition relates to hydrogen bonding rather than free volume agrees with our recent finding that there is little difference in free volume among carbohydrates and polysaccharides. For binary and ternary mixtures of sugars, polyols, or biopolymers with water, our correlation states that the glass transition temperature is linear with the inverse of the number of effective hydroxyl groups per molecule. Only for dry biopolymer/sugar or sugar/polyol mixtures do we find deviations due to nonideal mixing, imposed by microheterogeneity.

  19. Characterization of Hydrogen Bonds by IR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojta, D.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the identification and quantification of hydrogen bond, as one of the most abundant non-covalent interactions in phenomena like self-assembly and molecular recognition, IR spectrosopy has been employed as the most sensitive method. The performance of the high dilution method enables determination of the stability constant of hydrogen-bonded complex as one of the most important thermodynamic quantities used in their characterization. However, the alleged experimental simplicity of the mentioned method is loaded with errors originating not only from researcher intervention but also independent from it. The second source of error is particularly emphasized and elaborated in this paper, which is designed as the recipe for the successful characterization of hydrogen bonds. Besides the enumeration of all steps in the determination of hydrogen-bonded stability constants, the reader can be acquainted with the most important ex perimental conditions that should be fulfilled in order to minimize the naturally occurring errors in this type of investigation. In the spectral analysis, the application of both uni- and multivariate approach has been discussed. Some computer packages, considering the latter, are mentioned, described, and recommended. KUI -10/2012Received August 1, 2011Accepted October 24, 2011

  20. The hydrogen bond in ice probed by soft x-ray spectroscopy and density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, A.; Ogasawara, H.; Cavalleri, M.; Nordlund, D.; Nyberg, M.; Wernet, Ph.; Pettersson, L.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    We combine photoelectron and x-ray absorption spectroscopy with density functional theory to derive a molecular orbital picture of the hydrogen bond in ice. We find that the hydrogen bond involves donation and back-donation of charge between the oxygen lone pair and the O-H antibonding orbitals on neighboring molecules. Together with internal s-p rehybridization this minimizes the repulsive charge overlap of the connecting oxygen and hydrogen atoms, which is essential for a strong attractive electrostatic interaction. Our joint experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that an electrostatic model based on only charge induction from the surrounding medium fails to properly describe the internal charge redistributions upon hydrogen bonding

  1. Why are Hydrogen Bonds Directional?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    century and most chemists appear to think of 'chemi- cal bond' as ..... These complexes, in their global min- ima, have ... taneously act as hydrogen bond donor and acceptor displaying ... also has a local minimum, which is linear and similar to.

  2. dimensional architectures via hydrogen bonds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    organization and has potential applications in the field of magnetism ... The concepts of crystal engineering ... 4. However, the utilization of hydrogen bond supramolecular syn- ... sembling the coordination networks by designing the ligands ...

  3. Hydrogen bonding in tight environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrotta, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C.; Franco, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The single-molecule force spectroscopy of a prototypical class of hydrogen-bonded complexes is computationally investigated. The complexes consist of derivatives of a barbituric acid and a Hamilton receptor that can form up to six simultaneous hydrogen bonds. The force-extension (F-L) isotherms...... of the host-guest complexes are simulated using classical molecular dynamics and the MM3 force field, for which a refined set of hydrogen bond parameters was developed from MP2 ab initio computations. The F-L curves exhibit peaks that signal conformational changes during elongation, the most prominent...... of which is in the 60-180 pN range and corresponds to the force required to break the hydrogen bonds. These peaks in the F-L curves are shown to be sensitive to relatively small changes in the chemical structure of the host molecule. Thermodynamic insights into the supramolecular assembly were obtained...

  4. Existence of both blue-shifting hydrogen bond and Lewis acid-base interaction in the complexes of carbonyls and thiocarbonyls with carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tien Trung; Nguyen, Phi Hung; Tran, Thanh Hue; Minh, Tho Nguyen

    2011-08-21

    In this study, 16 gas phase complexes of the pairs of XCHZ and CO(2) (X = F, Cl, Br; Z = O, S) have been identified. Interaction energies calculated at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level including both BSSE and ZPE corrections range from -5.6 to -10.5 kJ mol(-1) for XCHOCO(2) and from -5.7 to -9.1 kJ mol(-1) for XCHS···CO(2). Substitution of one H atom by one halogen in formaldehyde and thioformaldehyde reduces the interaction energy of XCHZ···CO(2), while a CH(3) substitution increases the interaction energy of both CH(3)CHO···CO(2) and CH(3)CHS···CO(2). NBO and AIM analyses also point out that the strength of Lewis acid-base interactions decreases going from >C1=S3···C6 to >C1=O3C6 and to >C1-X4···C6. This result suggests the higher capacity of solubility of thiocarbonyl compounds in scCO(2), providing an enormous potential application for designing CO(2)-philic materials based on the >C=S functional group in competition with >C=O. The Lewis acid-base interaction of the types >C=S···C, >C-Cl···C and >C-Br···C is demonstrated for the first time. The contribution of the hydrogen bonding interaction to the total interaction energy is larger for XCHS···CO(2) than for XCHO···CO(2). Upon complexation, a contraction of the C1-H2 bond length and a blue shift of its stretching frequency have been observed, as compared to the isolated monomer, indicating the existence of a blue-shifting hydrogen bond in all complexes examined. Calculated results also lend further support for the viewpoint that when acting as proton donor, a C-H bond having a weaker polarization will induce a stronger distance contraction and frequency blue shift upon complexation, and vice versa.

  5. What is a hydrogen bond?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. What is a hydrogen bond? Precise definition of a hydrogen bond is still elusive!1. Several criteria are listed usually for X-H•••Y, X and Y initially thought to be F, O and N only1. Structural: The X-Y bond length is less than the sum of their van der Waals radii. X-H•••Y is ...

  6. A tensegrity model for hydrogen bond networks in proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Bywater

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen-bonding networks in proteins considered as structural tensile elements are in balance separately from any other stabilising interactions that may be in operation. The hydrogen bond arrangement in the network is reminiscent of tensegrity structures in architecture and sculpture. Tensegrity has been discussed before in cells and tissues and in proteins. In contrast to previous work only hydrogen bonds are studied here. The other interactions within proteins are either much stronger − covalent bonds connecting the atoms in the molecular skeleton or weaker forces like the so-called hydrophobic interactions. It has been demonstrated that the latter operate independently from hydrogen bonds. Each category of interaction must, if the protein is to have a stable structure, balance out. The hypothesis here is that the entire hydrogen bond network is in balance without any compensating contributions from other types of interaction. For sidechain-sidechain, sidechain-backbone and backbone-backbone hydrogen bonds in proteins, tensegrity balance (“closure” is required over the entire length of the polypeptide chain that defines individually folding units in globular proteins (“domains” as well as within the repeating elements in fibrous proteins that consist of extended chain structures. There is no closure to be found in extended structures that do not have repeating elements. This suggests an explanation as to why globular domains, as well as the repeat units in fibrous proteins, have to have a defined number of residues. Apart from networks of sidechain-sidechain hydrogen bonds there are certain key points at which this closure is achieved in the sidechain-backbone hydrogen bonds and these are associated with demarcation points at the start or end of stretches of secondary structure. Together, these three categories of hydrogen bond achieve the closure that is necessary for the stability of globular protein domains as well as repeating

  7. A tensegrity model for hydrogen bond networks in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywater, Robert P

    2017-05-01

    Hydrogen-bonding networks in proteins considered as structural tensile elements are in balance separately from any other stabilising interactions that may be in operation. The hydrogen bond arrangement in the network is reminiscent of tensegrity structures in architecture and sculpture. Tensegrity has been discussed before in cells and tissues and in proteins. In contrast to previous work only hydrogen bonds are studied here. The other interactions within proteins are either much stronger - covalent bonds connecting the atoms in the molecular skeleton or weaker forces like the so-called hydrophobic interactions. It has been demonstrated that the latter operate independently from hydrogen bonds. Each category of interaction must, if the protein is to have a stable structure, balance out. The hypothesis here is that the entire hydrogen bond network is in balance without any compensating contributions from other types of interaction. For sidechain-sidechain, sidechain-backbone and backbone-backbone hydrogen bonds in proteins, tensegrity balance ("closure") is required over the entire length of the polypeptide chain that defines individually folding units in globular proteins ("domains") as well as within the repeating elements in fibrous proteins that consist of extended chain structures. There is no closure to be found in extended structures that do not have repeating elements. This suggests an explanation as to why globular domains, as well as the repeat units in fibrous proteins, have to have a defined number of residues. Apart from networks of sidechain-sidechain hydrogen bonds there are certain key points at which this closure is achieved in the sidechain-backbone hydrogen bonds and these are associated with demarcation points at the start or end of stretches of secondary structure. Together, these three categories of hydrogen bond achieve the closure that is necessary for the stability of globular protein domains as well as repeating elements in fibrous proteins.

  8. Ab initio and DFT study of hydrogen bond interactions between ascorbic acid and dimethylsulfoxide based on FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazazari, Naser; Zatikyan, Ashkhen L.; Markarian, Shiraz A.

    2013-06-01

    The hydrogen bonding of 1:1 complexes formed between L-ascorbic acid (LAA) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) has been studied by means of ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Solutions of L-ascorbic acid (AA) in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) have been studied by means of both FT-IR (4000-220 cm-1) and FT-Raman spectroscopy. Ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and DFT methods have been used to determine the structure and energies of stable conformers of various types of L-AA/DMSO complexes in gas phase and solution. The basis sets 6-31++G∗∗ and 6-311+G∗ were used to describe the structure, energy, charges and vibrational frequencies of interacting complexes in the gas phase. The optimized geometric parameters and interaction energies for various complexes at different theories have been estimated. Binding energies have been corrected for basis set superposition error (BSSE) and harmonic vibrational frequencies of the structures have been calculated to obtain the stable forms of the complexes. The self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) has been used to calculate the effect of DMSO as the solvent on the geometry, energy and charges of complexes. The solvent effect has been studied using the Onsager models. It is shown that the polarity of the solvent plays an important role on the structures and relative stabilities of different complexes. The results obtained show that there is a satisfactory correlation between experimental and theoretical predictions.

  9. Testing strong interaction theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses possible tests of the current theories of the strong interaction, in particular, quantum chromodynamics. High energy e + e - interactions should provide an excellent means of studying the strong force. (W.D.L.)

  10. Altering intra- to inter-molecular hydrogen bonding by dimethylsulfoxide: A TDDFT study of charge transfer for coumarin 343

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaochun; Yin, Hang; Li, Hui; Shi, Ying

    2017-04-01

    DFT and TDDFT methods were carried out to investigate the influences of intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonding on excited state charge transfer for coumarin 343 (C343). Intramolecular hydrogen bonding is formed between carboxylic acid group and carbonyl group in C343 monomer. However, in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution, DMSO 'opens up' the intramolecular hydrogen bonding and forms solute-solvent intermolecular hydrogen bonded C343-DMSO complex. Analysis of frontier molecular orbitals reveals that intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) occurs in the first excited state both for C343 monomer and complex. The results of optimized geometric structures indicate that the intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction is strengthened while the intermolecular hydrogen bonding is weakened in excited state, which is confirmed again by monitoring the shifts of characteristic peaks of infrared spectra. We demonstrated that DMSO solvent can not only break the intramolecular hydrogen bonding to form intermolecular hydrogen bonding with C343 but also alter the mechanism of excited state hydrogen bonding strengthening.

  11. Nitroxide stable radicals interacting as Lewis bases in hydrogen bonds: A search in the Cambridge structural data base for intermolecular contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Elguero, Eric

    2017-11-01

    1125 X-ray structures of nitroxide free radicals presenting intermolecular hydrogen bonds have been reported in the Cambridge Structural Database. We will report in this paper a qualitative and quantitative analysis of these bonds. The observation in some plots of an excluded region was statistically analyzed using convex hull and kernel smooting methodologies. A theoretical study at the MP2 level with different basis has been carried out indicating that the nitronyl nitroxide radicals (five electrons) lie just in between nitroso compounds (four electrons) and amine N-oxides (six electrons) as far as hydrogen-bond basicity is concerned.

  12. Geometrical criteria versus quantum chemical criteria for assessment of intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) interaction: A computational comparison into the effect of chlorine substitution on IMHB of salicylic acid in its lowest energy ground state conformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Calcutta 700009 (India); Guchhait, Nikhil, E-mail: nikhil.guchhait@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Calcutta 700009 (India)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) in salicylic acid and its chloro derivatives. ► A complex effect of +R and −I effect of chlorine substituents on IMHB energy. ► Interplay between IMHB energy and aromaticity. ► Directional nature of IMHB from quantum chemical assessment. ► Quantum chemical treatment vs. geometrical criteria to assess weak interaction. - Abstract: Density functional theory based computational study has been performed to characterize intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) interaction in a series of salicylic acid derivatives varying in chlorine substitution on the benzene ring. The molecular systems studied are salicylic acid, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, 3,5-dichlorosalicylic acid and 3,5,6-tricholorosalicylic acid. Major emphasis is rendered on the analysis of IMHB interaction by calculation of electron density ρ(r) and Laplacian ∇{sup 2}ρ(r) at the bond critical point using atoms-in-molecule theory. Topological features, energy densities based on ρ(r) through perturbing the intramolecular H-bond distances suggest that at equilibrium geometry the IMHB interaction develops certain characteristics typical of covalent interaction. The interplay between aromaticity and resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RAHB) is discussed using both geometrical and magnetic criteria as the descriptors of aromaticity. The optimized geometry features, molecular electrostatic potential map analysis are also found to produce a consensus view in relation with the formation of RAHB in these systems.

  13. Geometrical criteria versus quantum chemical criteria for assessment of intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) interaction: A computational comparison into the effect of chlorine substitution on IMHB of salicylic acid in its lowest energy ground state conformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) in salicylic acid and its chloro derivatives. ► A complex effect of +R and −I effect of chlorine substituents on IMHB energy. ► Interplay between IMHB energy and aromaticity. ► Directional nature of IMHB from quantum chemical assessment. ► Quantum chemical treatment vs. geometrical criteria to assess weak interaction. - Abstract: Density functional theory based computational study has been performed to characterize intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) interaction in a series of salicylic acid derivatives varying in chlorine substitution on the benzene ring. The molecular systems studied are salicylic acid, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, 3,5-dichlorosalicylic acid and 3,5,6-tricholorosalicylic acid. Major emphasis is rendered on the analysis of IMHB interaction by calculation of electron density ρ(r) and Laplacian ∇ 2 ρ(r) at the bond critical point using atoms-in-molecule theory. Topological features, energy densities based on ρ(r) through perturbing the intramolecular H-bond distances suggest that at equilibrium geometry the IMHB interaction develops certain characteristics typical of covalent interaction. The interplay between aromaticity and resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RAHB) is discussed using both geometrical and magnetic criteria as the descriptors of aromaticity. The optimized geometry features, molecular electrostatic potential map analysis are also found to produce a consensus view in relation with the formation of RAHB in these systems

  14. Competing Intramolecular vs. Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds in Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter I. Nagy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A hydrogen bond for a local-minimum-energy structure can be identified according to the definition of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC recommendation 2011 or by finding a special bond critical point on the density map of the structure in the framework of the atoms-in-molecules theory. Nonetheless, a given structural conformation may be simply favored by electrostatic interactions. The present review surveys the in-solution competition of the conformations with intramolecular vs. intermolecular hydrogen bonds for different types of small organic molecules. In their most stable gas-phase structure, an intramolecular hydrogen bond is possible. In a protic solution, the intramolecular hydrogen bond may disrupt in favor of two solute-solvent intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The balance of the increased internal energy and the stabilizing effect of the solute-solvent interactions regulates the new conformer composition in the liquid phase. The review additionally considers the solvent effects on the stability of simple dimeric systems as revealed from molecular dynamics simulations or on the basis of the calculated potential of mean force curves. Finally, studies of the solvent effects on the type of the intermolecular hydrogen bond (neutral or ionic in acid-base complexes have been surveyed.

  15. Computational study of the signature of hydrogen-bond strength on the infrared spectra of a hydrogen-bonded complex dissolved in a polar liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, Gabriel; Geva, Eitan

    2010-01-01

    The signature of hydrogen-bond strength on the one- and two-dimensional infrared spectra of the hydrogen-stretch in a hydrogen-bonded complex dissolved in a polar liquid was investigated via mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations. Non-Condon effects were found to intensify with increasing hydrogen-bond strength and to shift oscillator strength from the stable configurations that correspond to the ionic and covalent tautomers into unstable configurations that correspond to the transition-state between them. The transition-state peak is observed to blue shift and increase in intensity with increasing hydrogen-bond strength, and to dominate the spectra in the case of a strong hydrogen-bond. It is argued that the application of multidimensional infrared spectroscopy in the region of the transition-state peak can provide a uniquely direct probe of the molecular events underlying breaking and forming of hydrogen-bonds in the condensed phase.

  16. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in malonaldehyde and its radical analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen; Kumar, Manoj; Finney, Brian A; Francisco, Joseph S

    2017-09-28

    High level Brueckner doubles with triples correction method-based ab initio calculations have been used to investigate the nature of intramolecular hydrogen bonding and intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer in cis-malonaldehyde (MA) and its radical analogues. The radicals considered here are the ones that correspond to the homolytic cleavage of C-H bonds in cis-MA. The results suggest that cis-MA and its radical analogues, cis-MA RS , and cis-MA RA , both exist in planar geometry. The calculated intramolecular O-H⋯O=C bond in cis-MA is shorter than that in the radical analogues. The intramolecular hydrogen bond in cis-MA is stronger than in its radicals by at least 3.0 kcal/mol. The stability of a cis-malonaldehyde radical correlates with the extent of electron spin delocalization; cis-MA RA , in which the radical spin is more delocalized, is the most stable MA radical, whereas cis-MA RS , in which the radical spin is strongly localized, is the least stable radical. The natural bond orbital analysis indicates that the intramolecular hydrogen bonding (O⋯H⋯O) in cis-malonaldehyde radicals is stabilized by the interaction between the lone pair orbitals of donor oxygen and the σ * orbital of acceptor O-H bond (n → σ * OH ). The calculated barriers indicate that the intramolecular proton transfer in cis-MA involves 2.2 kcal/mol lower barrier than that in cis-MA RS .

  17. Structural and vibrational spectroscopic studies on charge transfer and ionic hydrogen bonding interactions of melaminium benzoate dihydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagathara, N.; Marchewka, M. K.; Drozd, M.; Gunasekaran, S.; Rajakumar, P. R.; Anbalagan, G.

    2015-06-01

    Single crystals of melaminium benzoate dihydrate (MBDH) have been grown from aqueous solution by the slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature. Crystalline nature of the grown crystal has been confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction studies. The optimized geometry, frequency and intensity of the vibrational bands of MBDH were obtained by the Hartree-Fock and density functional theory using B3LYP/cam-B3LYP with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated and the scaled values have been compared with the experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral values. The obtained vibrational wavenumbers and optimized geometric parameters are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. UV-Visible spectrum was recorded in the region 200-400 nm and the electronic properties, HOMO-LUMO energies and other related electronic parameters are calculated. The isotropic chemical shifts computed by 1H and 13C NMR analysis also show good agreement with experimental observation. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis has been performed on MBDH compound to analyze the stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalization. Molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEP) has also been performed by DFT/cam-B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Differential scanning calorimetric measurements performed on the powder sample indicate the phase transition point approximately at 368 and 358 K for heating and cooling, respectively.

  18. Amide proton temperature coefficients as hydrogen bond indicators in proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cierpicki, Tomasz; Otlewski, Jacek

    2001-01-01

    Correlations between amide proton temperature coefficients (Δσ HN /ΔT) and hydrogen bonds were investigated for a data set of 793 amides derived from 14 proteins. For amide protons showing temperature gradients more positive than -4.6 ppb/K there is a hydrogen bond predictivity value exceeding 85%. It increases to over 93% for amides within the range between -4 and -1 ppb/K. Detailed analysis shows an inverse proportionality between amide proton temperature coefficients and hydrogen bond lengths. Furthermore, for hydrogen bonds of similar bond lengths, values of temperature gradients in α-helices are on average 1 ppb/K more negative than in β-sheets. In consequence, a number of amide protons in α-helices involved in hydrogen bonds shorter than 2 A show Δσ HN /ΔT 10 helices and 98% in β-turns have temperature coefficients more positive than -4.6ppb/K. Ring current effect also significantly influences temperature coefficients of amide protons. In seven out of eight cases non-hydrogen bonded amides strongly deshielded by neighboring aromatic rings show temperature coefficients more positive than -2 ppb/K. In general, amide proton temperature gradients do not change with pH unless they correspond to conformational changes. Three examples of pH dependent equilibrium showing hydrogen bond formation at higher pH were found. In conclusion, amide proton temperature coefficients offer an attractive and simple way to confirm existence of hydrogen bonds in NMR determined structures

  19. Orbital interactions and charge redistribution in weak hydrogen bonds: Watson-Crick GC mimic involving C-H proton donor and F proton acceptor groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonseca Guerra, C.; Baerends, E.J.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    The discovery by Kool and coworkers that 2,4-difluorotoluene (F) mimics thymine (T) in DNA replication has led to controversy regarding the question of whether this mimic has the capability of forming hydrogen bonds with adenine (A). Recently, we have provided evidence for an important role of both

  20. Inversion symmetry and local vs. dispersive interactions in the nucleation of hydrogen bonded cyclic n-mer and tape of imidazolecarboxamidines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Substitutional changes to imidazolecarboxamidine that preserved intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the solid state were used to study the relationship between packing and the hydrogen bond motif. Various motifs competed, but the most common imidazolecarboxamidine crystalline phase was a Ci symmetric dimer that established inversion centers by associating enantiomeric tautomers. Counter to intuition, the calculated gas-phase energies per molecule of the solid state atomic coordinates of the Ci dimer motifs were higher than those of the C1 dimer, trimer, tetramer and tape motifs, while the packing densities of Ci dimers were found to be higher. This result was interpreted as an enhanced ability of the Ci dimers to pack. If other motifs competed, the hydrogen bonds and conformations should be lower in energy than the Ci dimer. The results detail the effect of packing on the conformation in these molecules. The results are interpreted as a rough measure of the energetic compromise between packing and the energies related to the coordinates involving one dihedral angle and hydrogen bonding. The results establish a connection between solution and solid phase conformation.

  1. Simple inorganic complexes but intricate hydrogen bonding ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    We are interested in obtaining single crystals of metal-opda complexes because their crystal structures would show complex hydrogen bonding network due to the presence of. –NH2 groups in the opda ligand (hydrogen bonding donor sites) and inorganic anions having mostly oxo groups (hydrogen bonding acceptor sites) ...

  2. Template Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Magnetic Properties of a Dinuclear Copper(II) Complex with Cooperative Hydrogen Bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Shin Geol; Nam, Kwang Hee; Min, Kil Sik; Lee, Uk

    2011-01-01

    The dinuclear complex with cooperative hydrogen bonds can be prepared by the metal-directed reaction of Eq. This work shows that the coordinated hydroxyl group trans to the secondary amino group is deprotonated more readily than that trans to the tertiary amino group and acts as the hydrogen-bond accepter. The lattice water molecules in act as bridges between the two mononuclear units through hydrogen bonds. The complex is quite stable as the dimeric form even in various polar solvents. The complex exhibits a weak antiferromagnetic interaction between the metal ions in spite of relatively long Cu···Cu distance. This strongly supports the suggestion that the antiferromagnetic behavior is closely related to the cooperative hydrogen bonds. The design and synthesis of polynuclear transition metal complexes have received much attention because of their potential applications in various fields, such as catalysis, supramolecular chemistry, and materials chemistry. Until now, various types of dinuclear copper(II) complexes have been prepared and investigated. Some dinuclear copper(II) complexes resulting from cooperative hydrogen bonding, such as containing two N_2O_2 donor sets, are also reported

  3. A series of Cd(II) complexes with π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions: Structural diversities by varying the ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiuli; Zhang Jinxia; Liu Guocheng; Lin Hongyan

    2011-01-01

    Seven new Cd(II) complexes consisting of different phenanthroline derivatives and organic acid ligands, formulated as [Cd(PIP) 2 (dnba) 2 ] (1), [Cd(PIP)(ox)].H 2 O (2), [Cd(PIP)(1,4-bdc)(H 2 O)].4H 2 O (3), [Cd(3-PIP) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ].4H 2 O (4), [Cd 2 (3-PIP) 4 (4,4'-bpdc)(H 2 O) 2 ].5H 2 O (5), [Cd(3-PIP)(nip)(H 2 O)].H 2 O (6), [Cd 2 (TIP) 4 (4,4'-bpdc)(H 2 O) 2 ].3H 2 O (7) (PIP=2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, 3-PIP=2-(3-pyridyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, TIP=2-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, Hdnba=3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, H 2 ox=oxalic acid, 1,4-H 2 bdc=benzene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid, 4,4'-H 2 bpdc=biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid, H 2 nip=5-nitroisophthalic acid) have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Complexes 1 and 4 possess mononuclear structures; complexes 5 and 7 are isostructural and have dinuclear structures; complexes 2 and 3 feature 1D chain structures; complex 6 contains 1D double chain, which are further extended to a 3D supramolecular structure by π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions. The N-donor ligands with extended π-system and organic acid ligands play a crucial role in the formation of the final supramolecular frameworks. Moreover, thermal properties and fluorescence of 1-7 are also investigated. -- Graphical abstract: Seven new supramolecular architectures have been successfully isolated under hydrothermal conditions by reactions of different phen derivatives and Cd(II) salts together with organic carboxylate anions auxiliary ligands. Display Omitted Research highlights: → Complexes 1-7 are 0D or 1D polymeric structure, the π-π stacking and H-bonding interactions extend the complexes into 3D supramolecular network. To our knowledge, systematic study on π-π stacking and H-bonding interactions in cadmium(II) complexes are still limited. → The structural differences among the title complexes indicate the importance of N-donor chelating ligands for the creation of molecular

  4. Rapid Sampling of Hydrogen Bond Networks for Computational Protein Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Jack B; Boyken, Scott E; Baker, David; Kuhlman, Brian

    2018-05-08

    Hydrogen bond networks play a critical role in determining the stability and specificity of biomolecular complexes, and the ability to design such networks is important for engineering novel structures, interactions, and enzymes. One key feature of hydrogen bond networks that makes them difficult to rationally engineer is that they are highly cooperative and are not energetically favorable until the hydrogen bonding potential has been satisfied for all buried polar groups in the network. Existing computational methods for protein design are ill-equipped for creating these highly cooperative networks because they rely on energy functions and sampling strategies that are focused on pairwise interactions. To enable the design of complex hydrogen bond networks, we have developed a new sampling protocol in the molecular modeling program Rosetta that explicitly searches for sets of amino acid mutations that can form self-contained hydrogen bond networks. For a given set of designable residues, the protocol often identifies many alternative sets of mutations/networks, and we show that it can readily be applied to large sets of residues at protein-protein interfaces or in the interior of proteins. The protocol builds on a recently developed method in Rosetta for designing hydrogen bond networks that has been experimentally validated for small symmetric systems but was not extensible to many larger protein structures and complexes. The sampling protocol we describe here not only recapitulates previously validated designs with performance improvements but also yields viable hydrogen bond networks for cases where the previous method fails, such as the design of large, asymmetric interfaces relevant to engineering protein-based therapeutics.

  5. Hydrogen Bonding and Stability of Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Perovskites

    KAUST Repository

    El-Mellouhi, Fedwa

    2016-09-08

    In the past few years, the efficiency of solar cells based on hybrid organic–inorganic perovskites has exceeded the level needed for commercialization. However, existing perovskites solar cells (PSCs) suffer from several intrinsic instabilities, which prevent them from reaching industrial maturity, and stabilizing PSCs has become a critically important problem. Here we propose to stabilize PSCs chemically by strengthening the interactions between the organic cation and inorganic anion of the perovskite framework. In particular, we show that replacing the methylammonium cation with alternative protonated cations allows an increase in the stability of the perovskite by forming strong hydrogen bonds with the halide anions. This interaction also provides opportunities for tuning the electronic states near the bandgap. These mechanisms should have a universal character in different hybrid organic–inorganic framework materials that are widely used.

  6. Hydrogen Bonding and Stability of Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Perovskites

    KAUST Repository

    El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Marzouk, Asma; Bentria, El Tayeb; Rashkeev, Sergey N.; Kais, Sabre; Alharbi, Fahhad H.

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, the efficiency of solar cells based on hybrid organic–inorganic perovskites has exceeded the level needed for commercialization. However, existing perovskites solar cells (PSCs) suffer from several intrinsic instabilities, which prevent them from reaching industrial maturity, and stabilizing PSCs has become a critically important problem. Here we propose to stabilize PSCs chemically by strengthening the interactions between the organic cation and inorganic anion of the perovskite framework. In particular, we show that replacing the methylammonium cation with alternative protonated cations allows an increase in the stability of the perovskite by forming strong hydrogen bonds with the halide anions. This interaction also provides opportunities for tuning the electronic states near the bandgap. These mechanisms should have a universal character in different hybrid organic–inorganic framework materials that are widely used.

  7. The role of hydrogen bonds in the melting points of sulfonate-based protic organic salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Jiangshui

    2016-01-01

    There are three main types of interactions inside organic salts - electrostatic interaction, hydrogen bonding and van der Waals force [1-4]. While van der Waals force is relatively weak, it is hydrogen bonding and particularly electrostatic interaction that determine the lattice energies of ionic...

  8. Measurement and Theory of Hydrogen Bonding Contribution to Isosteric DNA Base Pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Khakshoor, Omid; Wheeler, Steven E.; Houk, K. N.; Kool, Eric T.

    2012-01-01

    We address the recent debate surrounding the ability of 2,4-difluorotoluene (F), a low-polarity mimic of thymine (T), to form a hydrogen-bonded complex with adenine in DNA. The hydrogen bonding ability of F has been characterized as small to zero in various experimental studies, and moderate to small in computational studies. However, recent X-ray crystallographic studies of difluorotoluene in DNA/RNA have indicated, based on interatomic distances, possible hydrogen bonding interactions betwe...

  9. Cooperativity in Surface Bonding and Hydrogen Bonding of Water and Hydroxyl at Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Ogasawara, H.; Naslund, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    of the mixed phase at metal surfaces. The surface bonding can be considered to be similar to accepting a hydrogen bond, and we can thereby apply general cooperativity rules developed for hydrogen-bonded systems. This provides a simple understanding of why water molecules become more strongly bonded...... to the surface upon hydrogen bonding to OH and why the OH surface bonding is instead weakened through hydrogen bonding to water. We extend the application of this simple model to other observed cooperativity effects for pure water adsorption systems and H3O+ on metal surfaces.......We examine the balance of surface bonding and hydrogen bonding in the mixed OH + H2O overlayer on Pt(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) via density functional theory calculations. We find that there is a cooperativity effect between surface bonding and hydrogen bonding that underlies the stability...

  10. Mapping the force field of a hydrogen-bonded assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetman, A. M.; Jarvis, S. P.; Sang, Hongqian; Lekkas, I.; Rahe, P.; Wang, Yu; Wang, Jianbo; Champness, N. R.; Kantorovich, L.; Moriarty, P.

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogen bonding underpins the properties of a vast array of systems spanning a wide variety of scientific fields. From the elegance of base pair interactions in DNA to the symmetry of extended supramolecular assemblies, hydrogen bonds play an essential role in directing intermolecular forces. Yet fundamental aspects of the hydrogen bond continue to be vigorously debated. Here we use dynamic force microscopy (DFM) to quantitatively map the tip-sample force field for naphthalene tetracarboxylic diimide molecules hydrogen-bonded in two-dimensional assemblies. A comparison of experimental images and force spectra with their simulated counterparts shows that intermolecular contrast arises from repulsive tip-sample interactions whose interpretation can be aided via an examination of charge density depletion across the molecular system. Interpreting DFM images of hydrogen-bonded systems therefore necessitates detailed consideration of the coupled tip-molecule system: analyses based on intermolecular charge density in the absence of the tip fail to capture the essential physical chemistry underpinning the imaging mechanism.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Pan, Yong; Cao, Shuya; Ding, Mingyu

    2014-05-01

    Hexafluoroisopropanol phenyl group functionalized materials have great potential in the application of gas-sensitive materials for nerve agent detection, due to the formation of strong hydrogen-bonding interactions between the group and the analytes. In this paper, take full advantage of ultra-large specific surface area and plenty of carbon-carbon double bonds and hexafluoroisopropanol phenyl functionalized graphene was synthesized through in situ diazonium reaction between -C=C- and p-hexafluoroisopropanol aniline. The identity of the as-synthesis material was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis. The synthesis method is simply which retained the excellent physical properties of original graphene. In addition, the novel material can be assigned as an potential candidate for gas sensitive materials towards organophosphorus nerve agent detection.

  12. The Relative Hydrogen Bonding Strength of Oxygen and Nitrogen Atoms as a Proton Acceptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Jong Cheol; Lee, Ho Jin; Kim, Nak Kyoon; Choi, Young Sang; Park, Jeung Hee; Yoon, Chang Ju

    1999-01-01

    The thermodynamic parameters for the formation of the hydrogen bonding were widely used to understand the protein- ligand interaction. We have been interested in the hydrogen bonding strength of various proton acceptors toward the amide in a nonpolar solvent, This work is in the line of our interest. In drug design, the functional group is often replaced in order to enhance or reduce the binding affinity, which is usually determined by hydrogen bonding strength. Therefore, to understand this biochemical process the knowledge of relative hydrogen bonding strength is of importance.

  13. Strongly interacting Fermi gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakr W.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Strongly interacting gases of ultracold fermions have become an amazingly rich test-bed for many-body theories of fermionic matter. Here we present our recent experiments on these systems. Firstly, we discuss high-precision measurements on the thermodynamics of a strongly interacting Fermi gas across the superfluid transition. The onset of superfluidity is directly observed in the compressibility, the chemical potential, the entropy, and the heat capacity. Our measurements provide benchmarks for current many-body theories on strongly interacting fermions. Secondly, we have studied the evolution of fermion pairing from three to two dimensions in these gases, relating to the physics of layered superconductors. In the presence of p-wave interactions, Fermi gases are predicted to display toplogical superfluidity carrying Majorana edge states. Two possible avenues in this direction are discussed, our creation and direct observation of spin-orbit coupling in Fermi gases and the creation of fermionic molecules of 23Na 40K that will feature strong dipolar interactions in their absolute ground state.

  14. Alkyl Radicals as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors: Computational Evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Steen

    2009-01-01

    Spectroscopic, energetic and structural information obtained by DFT and G3-type computational studies demonstrates that charged proton donors can form moderately strong hydrogen bonds to simple alkyl radicals. The presence of these bonds stabilizes the adducts and modifies their structure......, and gives rise to pronounced shifts of IR stretching frequencies and to increased absorption intensities. The hydrogen bond acceptor properties of alkyl radicals equal those of many conventional acceptors, e.g., the bond length changes and IR red-shifts suggest that tert-butyl radicals are slightly better...... acceptors than formaldehyde molecules, while propyl radicals are as good as H2O. The hydrogen bond strength appears to depend on the proton affinity of the proton donor and on the ionization energy of the acceptor alkyl radical, not on the donor-acceptor proton affinity difference, reflecting...

  15. Defining the hydrogen bond: An account (IUPAC Technical Report)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arunan, E.; Desiraju, G. R.; Klein, R. A.; Sadlej, J.; Scheiner, S.; Alkorta, I.; Clary, D. C.; Crabtree, R. H.; Dannenberg, J. J.; Hobza, Pavel; Kjaergaard, H. G.; Legon, A. C.; Mennucci, B.; Nesbitt, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 8 (2011), s. 1619-1636 ISSN 0033-4545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : bonding * electrostatic interactions * hydrogen bonding * molecular interactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.789, year: 2011

  16. Theoretical study of the changes in the vibrational characteristics arising from the hydrogen bonding between Vitamin C ( L-ascorbic acid) and H 2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Yordanka

    2006-02-01

    The vibrational characteristics (vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities and Raman activities) for the hydrogen-bonded system of Vitamin C ( L-ascorbic acid) with five water molecules have been predicted using ab initio SCF/6-31G(d, p) calculations and DFT (BLYP) calculations with 6-31G(d, p) and 6-31++G(d, p) basis sets. The changes in the vibrational characteristics from free monomers to a complex have been calculated. The ab initio and BLYP calculations show that the complexation between Vitamin C and five water molecules leads to large red shifts of the stretching vibrations for the monomer bonds involved in the hydrogen bonding and very strong increase in their IR intensity. The predicted frequency shifts for the stretching vibrations from Vitamin C taking part in the hydrogen bonding are up to -508 cm -1. The magnitude of the wavenumber shifts is indicative of relatively strong OH···H hydrogen-bonded interactions. In the same time the IR intensity and Raman activity of these vibrations increase upon complexation. The IR intensity increases dramatically (up to 12 times) and Raman activity increases up to three times. The ab initio and BLYP calculations show, that the symmetric OH vibrations of water molecules are more sensitive to the complexation. The hydrogen bonding leads to very large red shifts of these vibrations and very strong increase in their IR intensity. The asymmetric OH stretching vibrations of water, free from hydrogen bonding are less sensitive to the complexation than the hydrogen-bonded symmetric O sbnd H stretching vibrations. The increases of the IR intensities for these vibrations are lower and red shifts are negligible.

  17. A conformation-selective IR-UV study of the dipeptides Ac-Phe-Ser-NH2 and Ac-Phe-Cys-NH2: probing the SH···O and OH···O hydrogen bond interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bin; Jaeqx, Sander; van der Zande, Wim J; Rijs, Anouk M

    2014-06-14

    The conformational preferences of peptides are mainly controlled by the stabilizing effect of intramolecular interactions. In peptides with polar side chains, not only the backbone but also the side chain interactions determine the resulting conformations. In this paper, the conformational preferences of the capped dipeptides Ac-Phe-Ser-NH2 (FS) and Ac-Phe-Cys-NH2 (FC) are resolved under laser-desorbed jet cooling conditions using IR-UV ion dip spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) quantum chemistry calculations. As serine (Ser) and cysteine (Cys) only differ in an OH (Ser) or SH (Cys) moiety; this subtle alteration allows us to study the effect of the difference in hydrogen bonding for an OH and SH group in detail, and its effect on the secondary structure. IR absorption spectra are recorded in the NH stretching region (3200-3600 cm(-1)). In combination with quantum chemical calculations the spectra provide a direct view of intramolecular interactions. Here, we show that both FS as FC share a singly γ-folded backbone conformation as the most stable conformer. The hydrogen bond strength of OH···O (FS) is stronger than that of SH···O (FC), resulting in a more compact gamma turn structure. A second conformer is found for FC, showing a β turn interaction.

  18. Dendritic biomimicry: microenvironmental hydrogen-bonding effects on tryptophan fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, S; Müller, L; Smith, D K

    2001-03-02

    Two series of dendritically modified tryptophan derivatives have been synthesised and their emission spectra measured in a range of different solvents. This paper presents the syntheses of these novel dendritic structures and discusses their emission spectra in terms of both solvent and dendritic effects. In the first series of dendrimers, the NH group of the indole ring is available for hydrogen bonding, whilst in the second series, the indole NH group has been converted to NMe. Direct comparison of the emission wavelengths of analogous NH and NMe derivatives indicates the importance of the Kamlet-Taft solvent beta3 parameter, which reflects the ability of the solvent to accept a hydrogen bond from the NH group, an effect not possible for the NMe series of dendrimers. For the NH dendrimers, the attachment of a dendritic shell to the tryptophan subunit leads to a red shift in emission wavelength. This dendritic effect only operates in non-hydrogen-bonding solvents. For the NMe dendrimers, however, the attachment of a dendritic shell has no effect on the emission spectra of the indole ring. This proves the importance of hydrogen bonding between the branched shell and the indole NH group in causing the dendritic effect. This is the first time a dendritic effect has been unambiguously assigned to individual hydrogen-bonding interactions and indicates that such intramolecular interactions are important in dendrimers, just as they are in proteins. Furthermore, this paper sheds light on the use of tryptophan residues as a probe of the microenvironment within proteins--in particular, it stresses the importance of hydrogen bonds formed by the indole NH group.

  19. Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds : Nature and role in DNA replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogen bonds in DNA Watson–Crick base pairs have long been considered predominantly electrostatic phenomena. In this chapter, we show with state-of-the-art calculations that this is not true and that electrostatic interactions and covalent contributions in these hydrogen bonds are in fact of

  20. The Nature of the Hydrogen Bond Outline of a Comprehensive Hydrogen Bond Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gilli, Gastone

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen bond (H-bond) effects are known: it makes sea water liquid, joins cellulose microfibrils in trees, shapes DNA into genes and polypeptide chains into wool, hair, muscles or enzymes. Its true nature is less known and we may still wonder why O-H...O bond energies range from less than 1 to more than 30 kcal/mol without apparent reason. This H-bond puzzle is re-examined here from its very beginning and presented as an inclusive compilation of experimental H-bond energies andgeometries.New concepts emerge from this analysis: new classes of systematically strong H-bonds (CAHBs and RAHBs: cha

  1. Hydrogen bond dynamics in bulk alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinokita, Keisuke; Cunha, Ana V.; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bonded liquids play a significant role in numerous chemical and biological phenomena. In the past decade, impressive developments in multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy and combined molecular dynamics–quantum mechanical simulation have established many intriguing features of hydrogen bond dynamics in one of the fundamental solvents in nature, water. The next class of a hydrogen-bonded liquid—alcohols—has attracted much less attention. This is surprising given such important differences between water and alcohols as the imbalance between the number of hydrogen bonds, each molecule can accept (two) and donate (one) and the very presence of the hydrophobic group in alcohols. Here, we use polarization-resolved pump-probe and 2D infrared spectroscopy supported by extensive theoretical modeling to investigate hydrogen bond dynamics in methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol employing the OH stretching mode as a reporter. The sub-ps dynamics in alcohols are similar to those in water as they are determined by similar librational and hydrogen-bond stretch motions. However, lower density of hydrogen bond acceptors and donors in alcohols leads to the appearance of slow diffusion-controlled hydrogen bond exchange dynamics, which are essentially absent in water. We anticipate that the findings herein would have a potential impact on fundamental chemistry and biology as many processes in nature involve the interplay of hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups

  2. Hydrogen bond dynamics in bulk alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinokita, Keisuke; Cunha, Ana V; Jansen, Thomas L C; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S

    2015-06-07

    Hydrogen-bonded liquids play a significant role in numerous chemical and biological phenomena. In the past decade, impressive developments in multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy and combined molecular dynamics-quantum mechanical simulation have established many intriguing features of hydrogen bond dynamics in one of the fundamental solvents in nature, water. The next class of a hydrogen-bonded liquid--alcohols--has attracted much less attention. This is surprising given such important differences between water and alcohols as the imbalance between the number of hydrogen bonds, each molecule can accept (two) and donate (one) and the very presence of the hydrophobic group in alcohols. Here, we use polarization-resolved pump-probe and 2D infrared spectroscopy supported by extensive theoretical modeling to investigate hydrogen bond dynamics in methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol employing the OH stretching mode as a reporter. The sub-ps dynamics in alcohols are similar to those in water as they are determined by similar librational and hydrogen-bond stretch motions. However, lower density of hydrogen bond acceptors and donors in alcohols leads to the appearance of slow diffusion-controlled hydrogen bond exchange dynamics, which are essentially absent in water. We anticipate that the findings herein would have a potential impact on fundamental chemistry and biology as many processes in nature involve the interplay of hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups.

  3. Collision-Induced Dissociation Study of Strong Hydrogen-Bonded Cluster Ions Y-(HF) n (Y=F, O2) Using Atmospheric Pressure Corona Discharge Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combined with a HF Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kenya; Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) was produced by a homemade HF generator in order to investigate the properties of strong hydrogen-bonded clusters such as (HF) n . The HF molecules were ionized in the form of complex ions associated with the negative core ions Y - produced by atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI). The use of APCDI in combination with the homemade HF generator led to the formation of negative-ion HF clusters Y - (HF) n (Y=F, O 2 ), where larger clusters with n ≥4 were not detected. The mechanisms for the formation of the HF, F - (HF) n , and O 2 - (HF) n species were discussed from the standpoints of the HF generator and APCDI MS. By performing energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments on the cluster ions F - (HF) n ( n =1-3), the energies for the loss of HF from F - (HF) 3 , F - (HF) 2 , and F - (HF) were evaluated to be 1 eV or lower, 1 eV or higher, and 2 eV, respectively, on the basis of their center-of-mass energy ( E CM ). These E CM values were consistent with the values of 0.995, 1.308, and 2.048 eV, respectively, obtained by ab initio calculations. The stability of [O 2 (HF) n ] - ( n =1-4) was discussed on the basis of the bond lengths of O 2 H-F - (HF) n and O 2 - H-F(HF) n obtained by ab initio calculations. The calculations indicated that [O 2 (HF) 4 ] - separated into O 2 H and F - (HF) 3 .

  4. Strongly interacting Higgs bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelquist, T.; Bernard, C.

    1980-01-01

    The sensitivity of present-energy weak interactions to a strongly interacting heavy-Higgs-boson sector is discussed. The gauged nonlinear sigma model, which is the limit of the linear model as the Higgs-boson mass goes to infinity, is used to organize and catalogue all possible heavy-Higgs-boson effects. As long as the SU(2)/sub L/ x SU(2)/sub R/ symmetry of the Higgs sector is preserved, these effects are found to be small, of the order of the square of the gauge coupling times logarithms (but not powers) of the Higgs-boson mass divided by the W mass. We work in the context of a simplified model with gauge group SU(2)/sub L/; the extension to SU(2)/sub L/ x U(1) is briefly discussed

  5. Supramolecular network through Nsbnd H…O, Osbnd H…O and Csbnd H…O hydrogen bonding interaction and density functional theory studies of 4-methylanilinium-3-carboxy-4-hydroxybenzenesulphonate crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, M.; Muthuraja, P.; Dhandapani, M.; Chandramohan, A.

    2018-02-01

    By utilizing the hydrogen bonding strategy, 4-methylanilinium-3-hydroxy-4-corboxy-benzenesulphonate (4MABS), an organic proton transfer molecular salt was synthesized and single crystals of it were successfully grown by slow solvent evaporation solution growth technique at ambient temperature. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded to establish the molecular structure of the title salt. The single crystal XRD analysis reveals that the title salt crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system with centrosymmetric space group, P21/n. Further, the title salt involves extensive intermolecular Nsbnd H…O, Osbnd H…O and Csbnd H…O as well as intramolecular Osbnd H…O hydrogen bonding interactions to construct supramolecular architecture. All quantum chemical calculations were performed at the level of density functional theory (DFT) with B3LYP functional using 6-311G (d,p) basis atomic set. The photoluminescence spectrum was recorded to explore the emission property of the title crystal. The presence of the various vibrational modes and functional groups in the synthesized salt was confirmed by FT-IR studies. The thermal behaviour of title crystal was established employing TG/DTA analyses. The mechanical properties of the grown crystal were determined by Vicker's microhardness studies. Dielectric measurements were carried out on the grown crystal at a different temperature to evaluate electrical properties.

  6. Single-crystal neutron diffraction studies of hydrogen-bonded systems: Two recent examples from IPNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koetzle, Thomas F. [IPNS Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: tkoetzle@anl.gov; Piccoli, Paula M.B.; Schultz, Arthur J. [IPNS Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-02-21

    Beginning with work in the 1950s at the first generation of research reactors, studies of hydrogen-bonded systems have been a prime application for single-crystal neutron diffraction. The range of systems studied was extended in the 1960s and 1970s, with the advent of high flux reactor sources, and beginning around 1980 studies at pulsed neutron sources have made increasingly important contributions. Recently at the Argonne Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), working with collaborators, we completed two studies of hydrogen-bonded systems that will serve to illustrate topics of current interest. In the first study, on andrographolide, an active diterpenoid natural product, our neutron diffraction results definitively characterize the hydrogen-bonding interactions. The second IPNS study is on tetraacetylethane (TAE), a {beta}-diketone enol system with a very short, strong intramolecular O-H...O hydrogen bond. At IPNS, we have determined the neutron crystal structure of TAE at five temperatures between 20 and 298 K to investigate changes in the structure with temperature and to probe for disorder. Despite the successes illustrated by the two examples presented here and by many other studies, at present applications of single-crystal neutron diffraction continue to be extremely flux limited and constrained by the requirement for mm-size crystals for many problems. These limitations are being addressed through the realization of powerful instruments at a new generation of pulsed neutron sources, including in the USA the TOPAZ and MaNDi single-crystal diffractometers that are under development at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

  7. Single-crystal neutron diffraction studies of hydrogen-bonded systems: Two recent examples from IPNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koetzle, Thomas F.; Piccoli, Paula M. B.; Schultz, Arthur J.

    2009-02-01

    Beginning with work in the 1950s at the first generation of research reactors, studies of hydrogen-bonded systems have been a prime application for single-crystal neutron diffraction. The range of systems studied was extended in the 1960s and 1970s, with the advent of high flux reactor sources, and beginning around 1980 studies at pulsed neutron sources have made increasingly important contributions. Recently at the Argonne Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), working with collaborators, we completed two studies of hydrogen-bonded systems that will serve to illustrate topics of current interest. In the first study, on andrographolide, an active diterpenoid natural product, our neutron diffraction results definitively characterize the hydrogen-bonding interactions. The second IPNS study is on tetraacetylethane (TAE), a β-diketone enol system with a very short, strong intramolecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond. At IPNS, we have determined the neutron crystal structure of TAE at five temperatures between 20 and 298 K to investigate changes in the structure with temperature and to probe for disorder. Despite the successes illustrated by the two examples presented here and by many other studies, at present applications of single-crystal neutron diffraction continue to be extremely flux limited and constrained by the requirement for mm-size crystals for many problems. These limitations are being addressed through the realization of powerful instruments at a new generation of pulsed neutron sources, including in the USA the TOPAZ and MaNDi single-crystal diffractometers that are under development at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS).

  8. Single-crystal neutron diffraction studies of hydrogen-bonded systems: Two recent examples from IPNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koetzle, Thomas F.; Piccoli, Paula M.B.; Schultz, Arthur J.

    2009-01-01

    Beginning with work in the 1950s at the first generation of research reactors, studies of hydrogen-bonded systems have been a prime application for single-crystal neutron diffraction. The range of systems studied was extended in the 1960s and 1970s, with the advent of high flux reactor sources, and beginning around 1980 studies at pulsed neutron sources have made increasingly important contributions. Recently at the Argonne Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), working with collaborators, we completed two studies of hydrogen-bonded systems that will serve to illustrate topics of current interest. In the first study, on andrographolide, an active diterpenoid natural product, our neutron diffraction results definitively characterize the hydrogen-bonding interactions. The second IPNS study is on tetraacetylethane (TAE), a β-diketone enol system with a very short, strong intramolecular O-H...O hydrogen bond. At IPNS, we have determined the neutron crystal structure of TAE at five temperatures between 20 and 298 K to investigate changes in the structure with temperature and to probe for disorder. Despite the successes illustrated by the two examples presented here and by many other studies, at present applications of single-crystal neutron diffraction continue to be extremely flux limited and constrained by the requirement for mm-size crystals for many problems. These limitations are being addressed through the realization of powerful instruments at a new generation of pulsed neutron sources, including in the USA the TOPAZ and MaNDi single-crystal diffractometers that are under development at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS).

  9. Strong-interaction nonuniversality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkas, R.R.; Foot, R.; He, X.; Joshi, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    The universal QCD color theory is extended to an SU(3) 1 direct product SU(3) 2 direct product SU(3) 3 gauge theory, where quarks of the ith generation transform as triplets under SU(3)/sub i/ and singlets under the other two factors. The usual color group is then identified with the diagonal subgroup, which remains exact after symmetry breaking. The gauge bosons associated with the 16 broken generators then form two massive octets under ordinary color. The interactions between quarks and these heavy gluonlike particles are explicitly nonuniversal and thus an exploration of their physical implications allows us to shed light on the fundamental issue of strong-interaction universality. Nonuniversality and weak flavor mixing are shown to generate heavy-gluon-induced flavor-changing neutral currents. The phenomenology of these processes is studied, as they provide the major experimental constraint on the extended theory. Three symmetry-breaking scenarios are presented. The first has color breaking occurring at the weak scale, while the second and third divorce the two scales. The third model has the interesting feature of radiatively induced off-diagonal Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements

  10. Role of hydrogen-bonding and its interplay with octahedral tilting in CH3NH3PbI3

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Paul David; Bristowe, Nicholas C; Bristowe, Paul D; Cheetham, Anthony Kevin

    2015-01-01

    First principles calculations on the hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 predict strong hydrogen-bonding which influences the structure and dynamics of the methylammonium cation and reveal its interaction with the tilting of the PbI6 octahedra. The calculated atomic coordinates are in excellent agreement with neutron diffraction results. [Image - see article] Funding from the Winton Programme for the Physics of Sustainability at the University of Cambridge is gratefully acknowledged. NCB acknowle...

  11. Functional chiral hydrogen-bonded assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateos timoneda, Miguel

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis different aspects of functional hydrogen-bonded (double and tetrarosette) assemblies are described. The functions were inspired by naturally occurring mechanisms such as molecular recognition, supramolecular chirality and its origin, and biostrategies for the correct folding of

  12. Tyrosine B10 triggers a heme propionate hydrogen bonding network loop with glutamine E7 moiety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos-Santana, Brenda J.; López-Garriga, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► H-bonding network loop by PheB10Tyr mutation is proposed. ► The propionate group H-bonding network restricted the flexibility of the heme. ► The hydrogen bonding interaction modulates the electron density of the iron. ► Propionate H-bonding network loop explains the heme-ligand stabilization. -- Abstract: Propionates, as peripheral groups of the heme active center in hemeproteins have been described to contribute in the modulation of heme reactivity and ligand selection. These electronic characteristics prompted the question of whether the presence of hydrogen bonding networks between propionates and distal amino acids present in the heme ligand moiety can modulate physiological relevant events, like ligand binding association and dissociation activities. Here, the role of these networks was evaluated by NMR spectroscopy using the hemoglobin I PheB10Tyr mutant from Lucina pectinata as model for TyrB10 and GlnE7 hemeproteins. 1 H-NMR results for the rHbICN PheB10Tyr derivative showed chemical shifts of TyrB10 OHη at 31.00 ppm, GlnE7 N ε1 H/N ε2 H at 10.66 ppm/−3.27 ppm, and PheE11 C δ H at 11.75 ppm, indicating the presence of a crowded, collapsed, and constrained distal pocket. Strong dipolar contacts and inter-residues crosspeaks between GlnE7/6-propionate group, GlnE7/TyrB10 and TyrB10/CN suggest that this hydrogen bonding network loop between GlnE7, TyrB10, 6-propionate group, and the heme ligand contribute significantly to the modulation of the heme iron electron density as well as the ligand stabilization mechanism. Therefore, the network loop presented here support the fact that the electron withdrawing character of the hydrogen bonding is controlled by the interaction of the propionates and the nearby electronic environments contributing to the modulation of the heme electron density state. Thus, we hypothesize that in hemeproteins with similar electrostatic environment the flexibility of the heme-6-propionate promotes a hydrogen

  13. Smart supramolecular sensing with cucurbit[n]urils: probing hydrogen bonding with SERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Nijs, Bart; Kamp, Marlous; Szabó, Istvan; Barrow, Steven J; Benz, Felix; Wu, Guanglu; Carnegie, Cloudy; Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Wang, Wenting; Deacon, William M; Rosta, Edina; Baumberg, Jeremy J; Scherman, Oren A

    2017-12-04

    Rigid gap nano-aggregates of Au nanoparticles formed using cucurbit[n]uril (CB[n]) molecules are used to investigate the competitive binding of ethanol and methanol in an aqueous environment. We show it is possible to detect as little as 0.1% methanol in water and a ten times higher affinity to methanol over ethanol, making this a useful technology for quality control in alcohol production. We demonstrate strong interaction effects in the SERS peaks, which we demonstrate are likely from the hydrogen bonding of water complexes in the vicinity of the CB[n]s.

  14. Non-Classical C–H···X Hydrogen Bonding and Its Role in Asymmetric Organocatalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Ajitha, Manjaly John; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Non-classical hydrogen bonds (NCHBs) have attracted significant interest in the past decade particularly because of their important role in asymmetric catalytic systems. These weak interactions (< 4 kcal/mol) offer much flexibility1 Introduction2 Hydrogen Bonds (HBs) and Non-Classical Hydrogen Bonds (NCHBs)3 Early Developments in NCHBs4 Selected Examples of NCHBs in Organic Transformations5 Recent Examples of NCHBs in Enantioselective Reactions6 Conclusions and Outlook

  15. Hydrogen peroxide coordination to cobalt(II) facilitated by second-sphere hydrogen bonding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wallen, C.M.; Palatinus, Lukáš; Bacsa, J.; Scarborough, C.C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 39 (2016), s. 11902-11906 ISSN 0044-8249 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : cobalt * hydrogen bonds * peroxides * peroxido ligands * second-sphere interactions Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  16. New insights into the interactions between cork chemical components and pesticides. The contribution of π-π interactions, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivella, M À; Bazzicalupi, C; Bianchi, A; Fiol, N; Villaescusa, I

    2015-01-01

    The role of chemical components of cork in the sorption of several pesticides has been investigated. For this purpose raw cork and three cork extracted fractions (i.e. cork free of aliphatic extractives, cork free of all extractives and cork free of all extractives and suberin) were used as sorbent of three ionic pesticides (propazine, 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) and alachlor) and five non-ionic pesticides (chlorpyrifos, isoproturon, metamitron, methomyl and oxamyl) with a logKow within the range -0.47 to 4.92. The effect of cations on the ionic pesticides, propazine and 2,4-D sorption was also analyzed. Results indicated that the highest yields were obtained for chlorpyrifos and alachlor sorption onto raw cork (>55%). After removal of aliphatic extractives sorption of all pesticides increased that ranged from 3% for propazine to 31% for alachlor. In contrast, removal of phenolic extractives caused a sorption decrease. Low sorption yields were obtained for hydrophobic pesticides such as metamitron, oxamyl and methomyl (cork fractions and extremely low when using raw cork (cork toward aromatic pesticides. Results presented in this paper gain insights into the cork affinities for pesticides and the interactions involved in the sorption process and also enables to envisage sorption affinity of cork for other organic pollutants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantum confinement in hydrogen bond of DNA and RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Santos, C S; Filho, E Drigo; Ricotta, R M

    2015-01-01

    The hydrogen bond is a fundamental ingredient to stabilize the DNA and RNA macromolecules. The main contribution of this work is to describe quantitatively this interaction as a consequence of the quantum confinement of the hydrogen. The results for the free and confined system are compared with experimental data. The formalism to compute the energy gap of the vibration motion used to identify the spectrum lines is the Variational Method allied to Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics. (papert)

  18. Determination of Hydrogen Bond Structure in Water versus Aprotic Environments To Test the Relationship Between Length and Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigala, Paul A; Ruben, Eliza A; Liu, Corey W; Piccoli, Paula M B; Hohenstein, Edward G; Martínez, Todd J; Schultz, Arthur J; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-05-06

    Hydrogen bonds profoundly influence the architecture and activity of biological macromolecules. Deep appreciation of hydrogen bond contributions to biomolecular function thus requires a detailed understanding of hydrogen bond structure and energetics and the relationship between these properties. Hydrogen bond formation energies (ΔGf) are enormously more favorable in aprotic solvents than in water, and two classes of contributing factors have been proposed to explain this energetic difference, focusing respectively on the isolated and hydrogen-bonded species: (I) water stabilizes the dissociated donor and acceptor groups much better than aprotic solvents, thereby reducing the driving force for hydrogen bond formation; and (II) water lengthens hydrogen bonds compared to aprotic environments, thereby decreasing the potential energy within the hydrogen bond. Each model has been proposed to provide a dominant contribution to ΔGf, but incisive tests that distinguish the importance of these contributions are lacking. Here we directly test the structural basis of model II. Neutron crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and quantum mechanical calculations demonstrate that O-H···O hydrogen bonds in crystals, chloroform, acetone, and water have nearly identical lengths and very similar potential energy surfaces despite ΔGf differences >8 kcal/mol across these solvents. These results rule out a substantial contribution from solvent-dependent differences in hydrogen bond structure and potential energy after association (model II) and thus support the conclusion that differences in hydrogen bond ΔGf are predominantly determined by solvent interactions with the dissociated groups (model I). These findings advance our understanding of universal hydrogen-bonding interactions and have important implications for biology and engineering.

  19. Hydrogen bonds of sodium alginate/Antarctic krill protein composite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lijun; Guo, Jing; Yu, Yue; An, Qingda; Wang, Liyan; Li, Shenglin; Huang, Xuelin; Mu, Siyang; Qi, Shanwei

    2016-05-20

    Sodium alginate/Antarctic krill protein composite material (SA/AKP) was successfully obtained by blending method. The hydrogen bonds of SA/AKP composite material were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Nuclear magnetic resonance hydrogen spectrum (HNMR). Experiment manifested the existence of intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonds in SA/AKP system; strength of intermolecular hydrogen bond enhanced with the increase of AKP in the composite material and the interaction strength of hydrogen bonding followed the order: OH…Ether O>OH…π>OH…N. The percentage of intermolecular hydrogen bond decreased with increase of pH. At the same time, the effect of hydrogen bonds on properties of the composite material was discussed. The increase of intermolecular hydrogen bonding led to the decrease of crystallinity, increase of apparent viscosity and surface tension, as well as obvious decrease of heat resistance of SA/AKP composite material. SA/AKP fiber SEM images and energy spectrum showed that crystallized salt was separated from the fiber, which possibly led to the fibrillation of the composite fibers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An AAA-DDD triply hydrogen-bonded complex easily accessible for supramolecular polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yi-Fei; Chen, Wen-Qiang; Wang, Hong-Bo; Yuan, Ying-Xue; Wu, Na-Na; Song, Xiang-Zhi; Yang, Lan

    2014-12-15

    For a complementary hydrogen-bonded complex, when every hydrogen-bond acceptor is on one side and every hydrogen-bond donor is on the other, all secondary interactions are attractive and the complex is highly stable. AAA-DDD (A=acceptor, D=donor) is considered to be the most stable among triply hydrogen-bonded sequences. The easily synthesized and further derivatized AAA-DDD system is very desirable for hydrogen-bonded functional materials. In this case, AAA and DDD, starting from 4-methoxybenzaldehyde, were synthesized with the Hantzsch pyridine synthesis and Friedländer annulation reaction. The association constant determined by fluorescence titration in chloroform at room temperature is 2.09×10(7)  M(-1) . The AAA and DDD components are not coplanar, but form a V shape in the solid state. Supramolecular polymers based on AAA-DDD triply hydrogen bonded have also been developed. This work may make AAA-DDD triply hydrogen-bonded sequences easily accessible for stimuli-responsive materials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Strong interaction phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giffon, M.

    1989-01-01

    A brief review of high energy hadronic data (Part I)is followed by an introduction to the standard (Weinberg Salam Glashow) model of electroweak interactions and its extension to the hadrons (Part II). Rudiments of QCD and of the parton model area given in Part III together with a quick review of the spectroscopy of heavy flavours whereas Part IV is devoted to the introduction to deep inelastic scattering and to the so-called EMC effects. (author)

  2. Optimising hydrogen bonding in solid wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang

    2009-01-01

    The chemical bonds of wood are both covalent bonds within the wood polymers and hydrogen bonds within and between the polymers. Both types of bonds are responsible for the coherence, strength and stiffness of the material. The hydrogen bonds are more easily modified by changes in load, moisture...... and temperature distorting the internal bonding state. A problem arises when studying hydrogen bonding in wood since matched wood specimens of the same species will have very different internal bonding states. Thus, possible changes in the bonding state due to some applied treatment such as conditioning...... maintaining 100 % moisture content of the wood. The hypothesis was that this would enable a fast stress relaxation as a result of reorganization of bonds, since moisture plasticizes the material and temperature promotes faster kinetics. Hereby, all past bond distortions caused by various moisture, temperature...

  3. TD-DFT investigation of the potential energy surface for Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) reaction of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline: Topological (AIM) and population (NBO) analysis of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report a Density Functional Theoretical (DFT) study on the photophysics of a potent Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) molecular system, viz., 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline (HBQ). Particular emphasis has been rendered on the assessment of the proton transfer reaction in HBQ in the ground and excited-states through elucidation and a careful perusal of the potential energy surfaces (PES). The non-viability of Ground-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (GSIPT) process is dictated by a high-energy barrier coupled with no energy minimum for the proton transferred (K-form) form at the ground-state (S 0 ) PES. Remarkable reduction of the barrier along with thermodynamic stability inversion between the enol (E-form) and the keto forms (K-form) of HBQ upon photoexcitation from S 0 to the S 1 -state advocate for the operation of ESIPT process. These findings have been cross-validated on the lexicon of analysis of optimized geometry parameters, Mulliken's charge distribution on the heavy atoms, and molecular orbitals (MO) of the E- and the K-forms of HBQ. Our computational results also corroborate to experimental observations. From the modulations in optimized geometry parameters in course of the PT process a critical assessment has been endeavoured to delve into the movement of the proton during the process. Additional stress has been placed on the analysis of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) interaction in HBQ. The IMHB interaction has been explored by calculation of electron density ρ(r) and the Laplacian ∇ 2 ρ(r) at the bond critical point (BCP) using Atoms-In-Molecule (AIM) method and by calculation of interaction between σ* of OH with the lone pair of the nitrogen atom using Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. - Highlights: → Theoretical modelling of the photophysics of an ESIPT probe 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline (HBQ). → Calculation of intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) energy. → Role of hyperconjugative charge transfer

  4. H/D Isotope Effects in Hydrogen Bonded Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Filarowski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An extremely strong H/D isotope effect observed in hydrogen bonded A-H…B systems is connected with a reach diversity of the potential shape for the proton/deuteron motion. It is connected with the anharmonicity of the proton/deuteron vibrations and of the tunneling effect, particularly in cases of short bridges with low barrier for protonic and deuteronic jumping. Six extreme shapes of the proton motion are presented starting from the state without possibility of the proton transfer up to the state with a full ionization. The manifestations of the H/D isotope effect are best reflected in the infra-red absorption spectra. A most characteristic is the run of the relationship between the isotopic ratio nH/nD and position of the absorption band shown by using the example of NHN hydrogen bonds. One can distinguish a critical range of correlation when the isotopic ratio reaches the value of ca. 1 and then increases up to unusual values higher than . The critical range of the isotope effect is also visible in NQR and NMR spectra. In the critical region one observes a stepwise change of the NQR frequency reaching 1.1 MHz. In the case of NMR, the maximal isotope effect is reflected on the curve presenting the dependence of Δd (1H,2H on d (1H. This effect corresponds to the range of maximum on the correlation curve between dH and ΔpKa that is observed in various systems. There is a lack in the literature of quantitative information about the influence of isotopic substitution on the dielectric properties of hydrogen bond except the isotope effect on the ferroelectric phase transition in some hydrogen bonded crystals.

  5. Unusual hydrogen bonding in L-cysteine hydrogen fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkov, V S; Ghazaryan, V V; Boldyreva, E V; Petrosyan, A M

    2015-08-01

    L-Cysteine hydrogen fluoride, or bis(L-cysteinium) difluoride-L-cysteine-hydrogen fluoride (1/1/1), 2C3H8NO2S(+)·2F(-)·C3H7NO2S·HF or L-Cys(+)(L-Cys···L-Cys(+))F(-)(F(-)...H-F), provides the first example of a structure with cations of the 'triglycine sulfate' type, i.e. A(+)(A···A(+)) (where A and A(+) are the zwitterionic and cationic states of an amino acid, respectively), without a doubly charged counter-ion. The salt crystallizes in the monoclinic system with the space group P2(1). The dimeric (L-Cys···L-Cys(+)) cation and the dimeric (F(-)···H-F) anion are formed via strong O-H···O or F-H···F hydrogen bonds, respectively, with very short O···O [2.4438 (19) Å] and F···F distances [2.2676 (17) Å]. The F···F distance is significantly shorter than in solid hydrogen fluoride. Additionally, there is another very short hydrogen bond, of O-H···F type, formed by a L-cysteinium cation and a fluoride ion. The corresponding O···F distance of 2.3412 (19) Å seems to be the shortest among O-H···F and F-H···O hydrogen bonds known to date. The single-crystal X-ray diffraction study was complemented by IR spectroscopy. Of special interest was the spectral region of vibrations related to the above-mentioned hydrogen bonds.

  6. TDDFT study on intramolecular hydrogen bond of photoexcited methyl salicylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Peng; Tian, Dongxu

    2014-01-01

    The equilibrium geometries, IR-spectra and transition mechanism of intramolecular hydrogen-bonded methyl salicylate in excited state were studied using DFT and TDDFT with 6-31++G (d, p) basis set. The length of hydrogen bond OH⋯OC is decreased from 1.73 Å in the ground state to 1.41 and 1.69 Å in the excited S1 and S3 states. The increase of bond length for HO and CO group also indicates that in excited state the hydrogen bond OH⋯OC is strengthened. IR spectra show HO and CO stretching bands are strongly redshifted by 1387 and 67 cm(-1) in the excited S1 and S3 states comparing to the ground state. The excitation energy and the absorption spectrum show the S3 state is the main excited state of the low-lying excited states. By analyzing the frontier molecular orbitals, the transition from the ground state to the excited S1 and S3 states was predicted to be the π→π∗ mode. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Hydrogen-Bonding Catalysis of Tetraalkylammonium Salts in an Aza-Diels-Alder Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumatabara, Yusuke; Kaneko, Shiho; Nakata, Satoshi; Shirakawa, Seiji; Maruoka, Keiji

    2016-08-05

    A piperidine-derived tetraalkylammonium salt with a non-coordinating counteranion worked as an effective hydrogen-bonding catalyst in an aza-Diels-Alder reaction of imines and a Danishefsky diene. The hydrogen-bonding interaction between the ammonium salt and an imine was observed as part of a (1) H NMR titration study. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Molecular and ionic hydrogen bond formation in fluorous solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Kristi L; Weber, Stephen G

    2009-01-08

    There are only a few studies of noncovalent association in fluorous solvents and even fewer that are quantitative. A full understanding, particularly of stoichiometry and binding strength of noncovalent interactions in fluorous solvents could be very useful in improved molecular-receptor-based extractions, advancements in sensor technologies, crystal engineering, and supramolecular chemistry. This work investigates hydrogen bonding between heterocyclic bases and a perfluoropolyether with a terminal carboxylic acid group (Krytox 157FSH (1)), chiefly in FC-72 (a mixture of perfluorohexanes). In particular, we were interested in whether or not proton transfer occurs, and if so, under what conditions in H-bonded complexes. Continuous variations experiments show that in FC-72 weaker bases (pyrazine, pyrimidine, and quinazoline) form 1:1 complexes with 1, whereas stronger bases (quinoline, pyridine, and isoquinoline) form 1:3 complexes. Ultraviolet and infrared spectral signatures reveal that the 1:1 complexes are molecular (B.HA) whereas the 1:3 complexes are ionic (BH+.A-HAHA). Infrared spectra of 1:3 ionic complexes are discussed in detail. Literature and experimental data on complexes between N-heterocyclic bases and carboxylic acids in a range of solvents are compiled to compare solvent effects on proton transfer. Polar solvents support ionic hydrogen bonds at a 1:1 mol ratio. In nonpolar organic solvents, ionic hydrogen bonds are only observed in complexes with 1:2 (base/acid) stoichiometries. In fluorous solvents, a larger excess of acid, 1:3, is necessary to facilitate proton transfer in hydrogen bonds between carboxylic acids and the bases studied.

  9. High strength films from oriented, hydrogen-bonded "graphamid" 2D polymer molecular ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz-Rosado, Emil; Beaudet, Todd D; Andzelm, Jan W; Wetzel, Eric D

    2018-02-27

    The linear polymer poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide), better known by its tradename Kevlar, is an icon of modern materials science due to its remarkable strength, stiffness, and environmental resistance. Here, we propose a new two-dimensional (2D) polymer, "graphamid", that closely resembles Kevlar in chemical structure, but is mechanically advantaged by virtue of its 2D structure. Using atomistic calculations, we show that graphamid comprises covalently-bonded sheets bridged by a high population of strong intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Molecular and micromechanical calculations predict that these strong intermolecular interactions allow stiff, high strength (6-8 GPa), and tough films from ensembles of finite graphamid molecules. In contrast, traditional 2D materials like graphene have weak intermolecular interactions, leading to ensembles of low strength (0.1-0.5 GPa) and brittle fracture behavior. These results suggest that hydrogen-bonded 2D polymers like graphamid would be transformative in enabling scalable, lightweight, high performance polymer films of unprecedented mechanical performance.

  10. Quantum mechanical electronic structure calculation reveals orientation dependence of hydrogen bond energy in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Abhisek; Datta, Saumen

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen bond plays a unique role in governing macromolecular interactions with exquisite specificity. These interactions govern the fundamental biological processes like protein folding, enzymatic catalysis, molecular recognition. Despite extensive research work, till date there is no proper report available about the hydrogen bond's energy surface with respect to its geometric parameters, directly derived from proteins. Herein, we have deciphered the potential energy landscape of hydrogen bond directly from the macromolecular coordinates obtained from Protein Data Bank using quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations. The findings unravel the hydrogen bonding energies of proteins in parametric space. These data can be used to understand the energies of such directional interactions involved in biological molecules. Quantitative characterization has also been performed using Shannon entropic calculations for atoms participating in hydrogen bond. Collectively, our results constitute an improved way of understanding hydrogen bond energies in case of proteins and complement the knowledge-based potential. Proteins 2017; 85:1046-1055. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effect of pressure on the solution structure and hydrogen bond properties of aqueous N-methylacetamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, Rahul; Paul, Sandip

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NMA molecules are associated mostly through their hydrophobic methyl groups. ► High pressure reduces association propensity causing dispersion of these moieties. ► Orientational polarization of vicinal water molecules near O and H atoms of NMA. ► NMA prefers to be a H-bond acceptor rather than a donor in interaction with water. ► Energy of these hydrogen bonds reduces slightly at high pressure. -- Abstract: Effects of high pressure on hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions are investigated by employing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of aqueous N-methylacetamide (NMA) solutions. Such systems are of interest mainly because high pressure causes protein denaturation and NMA is a computationally effective model to understand the atomic-level picture of pressure-induced structural transitions of protein. Simulations are performed for five different pressure values ranging from 1 atm to 8000 atm. We find that NMA molecules are associated mostly through their hydrophobic methyl groups and high pressure reduces this association propensity, causing dispersion of these moieties. At high pressure, structural void decreases and the packing efficiency of water molecules around NMA molecules increases. Hydrogen bond properties calculations show favorable NMA–NMA hydrogen bonds as compared to those of NMA–water hydrogen bonds and preference of NMA to be a hydrogen bond acceptor rather than a donor in interaction with water.

  12. Chirality Transfer and Modulation in LB Films Derived From the Diacetylene/Melamine Hydrogen-Bonded Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu; Xu, Yangyang; Zou, Gang; Zhang, Qijin

    2015-08-01

    Introduction of hydrogen-bonding interaction into π-conjugated systems is a promising strategy, since the highly selective and directional hydrogen-bonding can increase the binding strength, provide enhanced stability to the assemblies, and position the π-conjugated molecules in a desired arrangement. The helical packing of the rigid melamine cores seems to play a dominating role in the subsequent formation of the peripheral helical PDA backbone. The polymerized Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films exhibited reversible colorimetric and chiroptical changes during repeated heating-cooling cycles, which should be ascribed to the strong hydrogen-bonding interaction between the carboxylic acid and the melamine core. Further, the closely helical packing of the melamine cores could be destroyed upon exposure to HCl or NH(3) gas, whereas the peripheral helical polyaniline and polydiacetylene (PDA) backbone exhibited excellent stability. Although similar absorption changes could be observed for the films upon exposure to HCl or NH(3) gas, their distinct circular dichroism (CD) responses enabled us to distinguish the above two stimuli. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Vibrational polarizabilities of hydrogen-bonded water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torii, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Vibrational polarizabilities of hydrogen-bonded water are analyzed theoretically. ► Total vibrational polarizability is (at least) comparable to the electronic one. ► Molecular translations contribute to the vibrational polarizability below 300 cm −1 . ► Intermolecular charge fluxes along H bonds are induced by molecular translations. ► The results are discussed in relation to the observed dielectric properties. - Abstract: The vibrational polarizabilities and the related molecular properties of hydrogen-bonded water are analyzed theoretically, taking the case of (water) 30 clusters as an example case. It is shown that some off-diagonal dipole derivatives are large for the translations of incompletely hydrogen-bonded molecules, and this is reasonably explained by the scheme of intermolecular charge fluxes induced along hydrogen bonds. In total, because of these intermolecular charge fluxes, molecular translations give rise to the vibrational polarizability of 2.8–3.3 a 0 3 per molecule, which is as large as about 40% of the electronic polarizability, mainly in the frequency region below 300 cm −1 . Adding the contributions of the molecular rotations (librations) and the translation–rotation cross term, the total polarizability (electronic + vibrational) at ∼100 cm −1 is slightly larger than the double of that at >4000 cm −1 . The relation of these results to some observed time- and frequency-dependent dielectric properties of liquid water is briefly discussed

  14. Improper, Blue-Shifting Hydrogen Bond

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hobza, Pavel; Havlas, Zdeněk

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 108, - (2002), s. 325-334 ISSN 1432-881X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905; CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : improper, blue-shifting hydrogen bond * properties * nature Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.421, year: 2002

  15. Intramolecularly Hydrogen-Bonded Polypyrroles as Electro-Optical Sensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicholson, Jesse

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a new class of polypyrroles bearing both hydrogen-bond acceptor and hydrogen-donor groups such that the intramolecular hydrogen bonding holds the system planar enhancing conjugation...

  16. Three closely related (2E,2′E-3,3′-(1,4-phenylenebis[1-(methoxyphenylprop-2-en-1-ones]: supramolecular assemblies in one dimension mediated by hydrogen bonding and C—H...π interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijia Sim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the title compounds, (2E,2′E-3,3′-(1,4-phenylenebis[1-(2-methoxyphenylprop-2-en-1-one], C26H22O4 (I, (2E,2′E-3,3′-(1,4-phenylenebis[1-(3-methoxyphenylprop-2-en-1-one], C26H22O4 (II and (2E,2′E-3,3′-(1,4-phenylenebis[1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenylprop-2-en-1-one], C28H26O6 (III, the asymmetric unit consists of a half-molecule, completed by crystallographic inversion symmetry. The dihedral angles between the central and terminal benzene rings are 56.98 (8, 7.74 (7 and 7.73 (7° for (I, (II and (III, respectively. In the crystal of (I, molecules are linked by pairs of C—H...π interactions into chains running parallel to [101]. The packing for (II and (III, features inversion dimers linked by pairs of C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming R22(16 and R22(14 ring motifs, respectively, as parts of [201] and [101] chains, respectively.

  17. Cations form sequence selective motifs within DNA grooves via a combination of cation-pi and ion-dipole/hydrogen bond interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mikaela; Dunlap, Tori; Dourlain, Elizabeth; Grant, Bryce; McFail-Isom, Lori

    2013-01-01

    The fine conformational subtleties of DNA structure modulate many fundamental cellular processes including gene activation/repression, cellular division, and DNA repair. Most of these cellular processes rely on the conformational heterogeneity of specific DNA sequences. Factors including those structural characteristics inherent in the particular base sequence as well as those induced through interaction with solvent components combine to produce fine DNA structural variation including helical flexibility and conformation. Cation-pi interactions between solvent cations or their first hydration shell waters and the faces of DNA bases form sequence selectively and contribute to DNA structural heterogeneity. In this paper, we detect and characterize the binding patterns found in cation-pi interactions between solvent cations and DNA bases in a set of high resolution x-ray crystal structures. Specifically, we found that monovalent cations (Tl⁺) and the polarized first hydration shell waters of divalent cations (Mg²⁺, Ca²⁺) form cation-pi interactions with DNA bases stabilizing unstacked conformations. When these cation-pi interactions are combined with electrostatic interactions a pattern of specific binding motifs is formed within the grooves.

  18. Hydrogen Bond Dynamics in Aqueous Solutions: Ab initio Molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rate equation for the decay of CHB(t) · Definition of Hydrogen Bonds · Results of Molecular Dynamics · Dynamics of anion-water and water-water hydrogen bonds · Structural relaxation of anion-water & water-water H-bonds · Ab initio Molecular Dynamics : · Slide 14 · Dynamics of hydrogen bonds : CPMD results · Slide 16.

  19. Intramolecular Energy Transfer, Charge Transfer & Hydrogen Bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ultrafast Dynamics of Chemical Reactions in Condensed Phase: Intramolecular Energy Transfer, Charge Transfer & Hydrogen Bond · PowerPoint Presentation · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19.

  20. Hydrogen bond donor–acceptor–donor organocatalysis for conjugate addition of benzylidene barbiturates via complementary DAD– ADA hydrogen bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leung, King-Chi; Cui, Jian-Fang; Hui, Tsz-Wai; Zhou, Zhong-Yuan; Wong, Man-Kin

    2014-01-01

    A new class of hydrogen bond donor-acceptor-donor (HB-DAD) organocatalysts has been developed for conjugate addition of benzylidene barbiturates. HB-DAD organocatalyst 1a (featuring para-chloro-pyrimidine as the hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA), N-H as the hydrogen bond donor (HBD) and a trifluoroacetyl

  1. Anharmonicity and hydrogen bonding in electrooptic sucrose crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, M. M.; Giermańska, J.

    1990-03-01

    The polarized absorption spectra of the sucrose crystal in the 5300 - 7300 cm -1 region have been measured. The assignments of all the eight OH stretching overtones are proposed and their mechanical anharmonicities are estimated. The discrepancies from the oriented gas model (OGM) in the observed relative band intensities, especially of the -CH vibrations, are assumed to be connected with vibronic couplings enhanced by the helical arrangement of molecules joined by hydrogen bondings. It seems that this kind of interactions might be important for the second harmonic generation (SHG) by the sucrose crystal.

  2. The CH/π hydrogen bond: Implication in chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, M.

    2012-06-01

    The CH/π hydrogen bond is the weakest extreme of hydrogen bonds that occurs between a soft acid CH and a soft base π-system. Implication in chemistry of the CH/π hydrogen bond includes issues of conformation, crystal packing, and specificity in host/guest complexes. The result obtained by analyzing the Cambridge Structural Database is reviewed. The peculiar axial preference of isopropyl group in α-phellandrene and folded conformation of levopimaric acid have been explained in terms of the CH/π hydrogen bond, by high-level ab initio MO calculations. Implication of the CH/π hydrogen bond in structural biology is also discussed, briefly.

  3. Investigation of glutathione-derived electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions and their role in defining Grx5 [2Fe-2S] cluster optical spectra and transfer chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sambuddha; Bonfio, Claudia; Mansy, Sheref S; Cowan, J A

    2018-03-01

    Human glutaredoxin 5 (Grx5) is one of the core components of the Isc (iron-sulfur cluster) assembly and trafficking machinery, and serves as an intermediary cluster carrier, putatively delivering cluster from the Isu scaffold protein to target proteins. The tripeptide glutathione is intimately involved in this role, providing cysteinyl coordination to the iron center of the Grx5-bound [2Fe-2S] cluster. Grx5 has a well-defined glutathione-binding pocket with protein amino acid residues providing many ionic and hydrogen binding contacts to the bound glutathione. In this report, we investigated the importance of these interactions in cluster chirality and exchange reactivity by systematically perturbing the crucial contacts by use of natural and non-natural amino acid substitutions to disrupt the binding contacts from both the protein and glutathione. Native Grx5 could be reconstituted with all of the glutathione analogs used, as well as other thiol ligands, such as DTT or L-cysteine, by in vitro chemical reconstitution, and the holo proteins were found to transfer [2Fe-2S] cluster to apo ferredoxin 1 at comparable rates. However, the circular dichroism spectra of these derivatives displayed prominent differences that reflect perturbations in local cluster chirality. These studies provided a detailed molecular understanding of glutathione-protein interactions in holo Grx5 that define both cluster spectroscopy and exchange chemistry.

  4. How Do Organic Chemistry Students Understand and Apply Hydrogen Bonding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderleiter, J.; Smart, R.; Anderson, J.; Elian, O.

    2001-08-01

    Students completing a year-long organic chemistry sequence were interviewed to assess how they understood, explained, and applied knowledge of hydrogen bonding to the physical behavior of molecules. Students were asked to define hydrogen bonding and explain situations in which hydrogen bonding could occur. They were asked to predict and explain how hydrogen bonding influences boiling point, the solubility of molecules, and NMR and IR spectra. Results suggest that although students may be able to give appropriate definitions of hydrogen bonding and may recognize when this phenomenon can occur, significant numbers cannot apply their knowledge of hydrogen bonding to physical properties of molecules or to the interpretation of spectral data. Some possess misconceptions concerning boiling points and the ability of molecules to induce hydrogen bonding. Instructional strategies must be adjusted to address these issues.

  5. Adaptive polymeric nanomaterials utilizing reversible covalent and hydrogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neikirk, Colin

    Adaptive materials based on stimuli responsive and reversible bonding moieties are a rapidly developing area of materials research. Advances in supramolecular chemistry are now being adapted to novel molecular architectures including supramolecular polymers to allow small, reversible changes in molecular and nanoscale structure to affect large changes in macroscale properties. Meanwhile, dynamic covalent chemistry provides a complementary approach that will also play a role in the development of smart adaptive materials. In this thesis, we present several advances to the field of adaptive materials and also provide relevant insight to the areas of polymer nanocomposites and polymer nanoparticles. First, we have utilized the innate molecular recognition and binding capabilities of the quadruple hydrogen bonding group ureidopyrimidinone (UPy) to prepare supramolecular polymer nanocomposites based on supramolecular poly(caprolactone) which show improved mechanical properties, but also an increase in particle aggregation with nanoparticle UPy functionalization. We also present further insight into the relative effects of filler-filler, filler-matrix, and matrix-matrix interactions using a UPy side-chain functional poly(butyl acrylate). These nanocomposites have markedly different behavior depending on the amount of UPy sidechain functionality. Meanwhile, our investigations of reversible photo-response showed that coumarin functionality in polymer nanoparticles not only facilitates light mediated aggregation/dissociation behavior, but also provides a substantial overall reduction in particle size and improvement in nanoparticle stability for particles prepared by Flash NanoPrecipitation. Finally, we have combined these stimuli responsive motifs as a starting point for the development of multiresponsive adaptive materials. The synthesis of a library of multifunctional materials has provided a strong base for future research in this area, although our initial

  6. Measurement and theory of hydrogen bonding contribution to isosteric DNA base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakshoor, Omid; Wheeler, Steven E; Houk, K N; Kool, Eric T

    2012-02-15

    We address the recent debate surrounding the ability of 2,4-difluorotoluene (F), a low-polarity mimic of thymine (T), to form a hydrogen-bonded complex with adenine in DNA. The hydrogen bonding ability of F has been characterized as small to zero in various experimental studies, and moderate to small in computational studies. However, recent X-ray crystallographic studies of difluorotoluene in DNA/RNA have indicated, based on interatomic distances, possible hydrogen bonding interactions between F and natural bases in nucleic acid duplexes and in a DNA polymerase active site. Since F is widely used to measure electrostatic contributions to pairing and replication, it is important to quantify the impact of this isostere on DNA stability. Here, we studied the pairing stability and selectivity of this compound and a closely related variant, dichlorotoluene deoxyriboside (L), in DNA, using both experimental and computational approaches. We measured the thermodynamics of duplex formation in three sequence contexts and with all possible pairing partners by thermal melting studies using the van't Hoff approach, and for selected cases by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Experimental results showed that internal F-A pairing in DNA is destabilizing by 3.8 kcal/mol (van't Hoff, 37 °C) as compared with T-A pairing. At the end of a duplex, base-base interactions are considerably smaller; however, the net F-A interaction remains repulsive while T-A pairing is attractive. As for selectivity, F is found to be slightly selective for adenine over C, G, T by 0.5 kcal mol, as compared with thymine's selectivity of 2.4 kcal/mol. Interestingly, dichlorotoluene in DNA is slightly less destabilizing and slightly more selective than F, despite the lack of strongly electronegative fluorine atoms. Experimental data were complemented by computational results, evaluated at the M06-2X/6-31+G(d) and MP2/cc-pVTZ levels of theory. These computations suggest that the pairing energy of F to A

  7. Protein-ligand interfaces are polarized: discovery of a strong trend for intermolecular hydrogen bonds to favor donors on the protein side with implications for predicting and designing ligand complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschka, Sebastian; Wolf, Alex J; Bemister-Buffington, Joseph; Kuhn, Leslie A

    2018-04-01

    Understanding how proteins encode ligand specificity is fascinating and similar in importance to deciphering the genetic code. For protein-ligand recognition, the combination of an almost infinite variety of interfacial shapes and patterns of chemical groups makes the problem especially challenging. Here we analyze data across non-homologous proteins in complex with small biological ligands to address observations made in our inhibitor discovery projects: that proteins favor donating H-bonds to ligands and avoid using groups with both H-bond donor and acceptor capacity. The resulting clear and significant chemical group matching preferences elucidate the code for protein-native ligand binding, similar to the dominant patterns found in nucleic acid base-pairing. On average, 90% of the keto and carboxylate oxygens occurring in the biological ligands formed direct H-bonds to the protein. A two-fold preference was found for protein atoms to act as H-bond donors and ligand atoms to act as acceptors, and 76% of all intermolecular H-bonds involved an amine donor. Together, the tight chemical and geometric constraints associated with satisfying donor groups generate a hydrogen-bonding lock that can be matched only by ligands bearing the right acceptor-rich key. Measuring an index of H-bond preference based on the observed chemical trends proved sufficient to predict other protein-ligand complexes and can be used to guide molecular design. The resulting Hbind and Protein Recognition Index software packages are being made available for rigorously defining intermolecular H-bonds and measuring the extent to which H-bonding patterns in a given complex match the preference key.

  8. Protein-ligand interfaces are polarized: discovery of a strong trend for intermolecular hydrogen bonds to favor donors on the protein side with implications for predicting and designing ligand complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschka, Sebastian; Wolf, Alex J.; Bemister-Buffington, Joseph; Kuhn, Leslie A.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding how proteins encode ligand specificity is fascinating and similar in importance to deciphering the genetic code. For protein-ligand recognition, the combination of an almost infinite variety of interfacial shapes and patterns of chemical groups makes the problem especially challenging. Here we analyze data across non-homologous proteins in complex with small biological ligands to address observations made in our inhibitor discovery projects: that proteins favor donating H-bonds to ligands and avoid using groups with both H-bond donor and acceptor capacity. The resulting clear and significant chemical group matching preferences elucidate the code for protein-native ligand binding, similar to the dominant patterns found in nucleic acid base-pairing. On average, 90% of the keto and carboxylate oxygens occurring in the biological ligands formed direct H-bonds to the protein. A two-fold preference was found for protein atoms to act as H-bond donors and ligand atoms to act as acceptors, and 76% of all intermolecular H-bonds involved an amine donor. Together, the tight chemical and geometric constraints associated with satisfying donor groups generate a hydrogen-bonding lock that can be matched only by ligands bearing the right acceptor-rich key. Measuring an index of H-bond preference based on the observed chemical trends proved sufficient to predict other protein-ligand complexes and can be used to guide molecular design. The resulting Hbind and Protein Recognition Index software packages are being made available for rigorously defining intermolecular H-bonds and measuring the extent to which H-bonding patterns in a given complex match the preference key.

  9. Enhanced Antibacterial Activity of Ent-Labdane Derivatives of Salvic Acid (7α-Hydroxy-8(17)-ent-Labden-15-Oic Acid): Effect of Lipophilicity and the Hydrogen Bonding Role in Bacterial Membrane Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverría, Javier; Urzúa, Alejandro; Sanhueza, Loreto; Wilkens, Marcela

    2017-06-23

    In the present study, the antibacterial activity of several ent -labdane derivatives of salvic acid (7α-hydroxy-8(17)- ent -labden-15-oic acid) was evaluated in vitro against the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus . For all of the compounds, the antibacterial activity was expressed as the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) in liquid media and minimum inhibitory amount (MIA) in solid media. Structure activity relationships (SAR) were employed to correlate the effect of the calculated lipophilicity parameters (logP ow ) on the inhibitory activity. Employing a phospholipidic bilayer (POPG) as a bacterial membrane model, ent -labdane-membrane interactions were simulated utilizing docking studies. The results indicate that (i) the presence of a carboxylic acid in the C-15 position, which acted as a hydrogen-bond donor (HBD), was essential for the antibacterial activity of the ent -labdanes; (ii) an increase in the length of the acylated chain at the C-7 position improved the antibacterial activity until an optimum length of five carbon atoms was reached; (iii) an increase in the length of the acylated chain by more than five carbon atoms resulted in a dramatic decrease in activity, which completely disappeared in acyl chains of more than nine carbon atoms; and (iv) the structural factors described above, including one HBD at C-15 and a hexanoyloxi moiety at C-7, had a good fit to a specific lipophilic range and antibacterial activity. The lipophilicity parameter has a predictive characteristic feature on the antibacterial activity of this class of compounds, to be considered in the design of new biologically active molecules.

  10. Strong interactions at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmino, M.

    1995-01-01

    Spin effects in strong interaction high energy processes are subtle phenomena which involve both short and long distance physics and test perturbative and non perturbative aspects of QCD. Moreover, depending on quantities like interferences between different amplitudes and relative phases, spin observables always test a theory at a fundamental quantum mechanical level; it is then no surprise that spin data are often difficult to accommodate within the existing models. A report is made on the main issues and contributions discussed in the parallel Session on the open-quote open-quote Strong interactions at high energy close-quote close-quote in this Conference. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  11. RAFT Polymerization of Styrene and Maleimide in the Presence of Fluoroalcohol: Hydrogen Bonding Effects with Classical Alternating Copolymerization as Reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangjun Yao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of hydrogen bonding on polymerization behavior has been of interest for a long time; however, universality and in-depth understanding are still lacking. For the first time, the effect of hydrogen bonding on the classical alternating-type copolymerization of styrene and maleimide was explored. N-phenylmaleimide (N-PMI/styrene was chosen as a model monomer pair in the presence of hydrogen bonding donor solvent 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP, which interacted with N-PMI via hydrogen bonding. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT technique was used to guarantee the “living” polymerization and thus the homogeneity of chain compositions. In comparison with the polymerization in nonhydrogen bonding donor solvent (toluene, the copolymerization in HFIP exhibited a high rate and a slight deviation from alternating copolymerization tendency. The reactivity ratios of N-PMI and St were revealed to be 0.078 and 0.068, respectively, while the reactivity ratios in toluene were 0.026 and 0.050. These interesting results were reasonably explained by using computer simulations, wherein the steric repulsion and electron induction by the hydrogen bonding between HFIP and NPMI were revealed. This work first elucidated the hydrogen bonding interaction in the classical alternating-type copolymerization, which will enrich the research on hydrogen bonding-induced polymerizations.

  12. The colours of strong interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this session is to draw a consistent framework about the different ways to consider strong interaction. A large part is dedicated to theoretical work and the latest experimental results obtained at the first electron collider HERA are discussed. (A.C.)

  13. DNA-inspired hierarchical polymer design: electrostatics and hydrogen bonding in concert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemp, Sean T; Long, Timothy E

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acids and proteins, two of nature's biopolymers, assemble into complex structures to achieve desired biological functions and inspire the design of synthetic macromolecules containing a wide variety of noncovalent interactions including electrostatics and hydrogen bonding. Researchers have incorporated DNA nucleobases into a wide variety of synthetic monomers/polymers achieving stimuli-responsive materials, supramolecular assemblies, and well-controlled macromolecules. Recently, scientists utilized both electrostatics and complementary hydrogen bonding to orthogonally functionalize a polymer backbone through supramolecular assembly. Diverse macromolecules with noncovalent interactions will create materials with properties necessary for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Ross H.; Bekker, Christiaan; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2014-05-01

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, X-H⋯Y, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (X) and acceptor (Y) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O-H⋯O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4 - 3.0 Å, i.e., from strong to weak hydrogen bonds. The position of the proton (which determines the X-H bond length) and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are described quantitatively. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effect, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of bending modes is also considered: their quantum effects compete with those of the stretching mode for weak to moderate H-bond strengths. In spite of the economy in the parametrization of the model used, it offers key insights into the defining features of H-bonds, and semi-quantitatively captures several trends.

  15. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, Ross H.; Bekker, Christiaan; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2014-01-01

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, X–H⋯Y, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (X) and acceptor (Y) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O–H⋯O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4 − 3.0 Å, i.e., from strong to weak hydrogen bonds. The position of the proton (which determines the X–H bond length) and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are described quantitatively. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effect, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of bending modes is also considered: their quantum effects compete with those of the stretching mode for weak to moderate H-bond strengths. In spite of the economy in the parametrization of the model used, it offers key insights into the defining features of H-bonds, and semi-quantitatively captures several trends

  16. The Role of Backbone Hydrogen Bonds in the Transition State for Protein Folding of a PDZ Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren W. Pedersen

    Full Text Available Backbone hydrogen bonds are important for the structure and stability of proteins. However, since conventional site-directed mutagenesis cannot be applied to perturb the backbone, the contribution of these hydrogen bonds in protein folding and stability has been assessed only for a very limited set of small proteins. We have here investigated effects of five amide-to-ester mutations in the backbone of a PDZ domain, a 90-residue globular protein domain, to probe the influence of hydrogen bonds in a β-sheet for folding and stability. The amide-to-ester mutation removes NH-mediated hydrogen bonds and destabilizes hydrogen bonds formed by the carbonyl oxygen. The overall stability of the PDZ domain generally decreased for all amide-to-ester mutants due to an increase in the unfolding rate constant. For this particular region of the PDZ domain, it is therefore clear that native hydrogen bonds are formed after crossing of the rate-limiting barrier for folding. Moreover, three of the five amide-to-ester mutants displayed an increase in the folding rate constant suggesting that the hydrogen bonds are involved in non-native interactions in the transition state for folding.

  17. Infrared intensities and charge mobility in hydrogen bonded complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galimberti, Daria; Milani, Alberto; Castiglioni, Chiara [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica “Giulio Natta,” Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-08-21

    The analytical model for the study of charge mobility in the molecules presented by Galimberti et al.[J. Chem. Phys. 138, 164115 (2013)] is applied to hydrogen bonded planar dimers. Atomic charges and charge fluxes are obtained from density functional theory computed atomic polar tensors and related first derivatives, thus providing an interpretation of the IR intensity enhancement of the X–H stretching band observed upon aggregation. Our results show that both principal and non-principal charge fluxes have an important role for the rationalization of the spectral behavior; moreover, they demonstrate that the modulation of the charge distribution during vibrational motions of the –XH⋯Y– fragment is not localized exclusively on the atoms directly involved in hydrogen bonding. With these premises we made some correlations between IR intensities, interaction energies, and charge fluxes. The model was tested on small dimers and subsequently to the bigger one cytosine-guanine. Thus, the model can be applied to complex systems.

  18. Hydrogen Bond Basicity Prediction for Medicinal Chemistry Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Peter W; Montanari, Carlos A; Prokopczyk, Igor M; Ribeiro, Jean F R; Sartori, Geraldo Rodrigues

    2016-05-12

    Hydrogen bonding is discussed in the context of medicinal chemistry design. Minimized molecular electrostatic potential (Vmin) is shown to be an effective predictor of hydrogen bond basicity (pKBHX), and predictive models are presented for a number of hydrogen bond acceptor types relevant to medicinal chemistry. The problems posed by the presence of nonequivalent hydrogen bond acceptor sites in molecular structures are addressed by using nonlinear regression to fit measured pKBHX to calculated Vmin. Predictions are made for hydrogen bond basicity of fluorine in situations where relevant experimental measurements are not available. It is shown how predicted pKBHX can be used to provide insight into the nature of bioisosterism and to profile heterocycles. Examples of pKBHX prediction for molecular structures with multiple, nonequivalent hydrogen bond acceptors are presented.

  19. Tetrahedrality and hydrogen bonds in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, Eszter; Varga, Imre K.; Baranyai, András

    2016-06-01

    We carried out extensive calculations of liquid water at different temperatures and pressures using the BK3 model suggested recently [P. T. Kiss and A. Baranyai, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 204507 (2013)]. In particular, we were interested in undercooled regions to observe the propensity of water to form tetrahedral coordination of closest neighbors around a central molecule. We compared the found tetrahedral order with the number of hydrogen bonds and with the partial pair correlation functions unfolded as distributions of the closest, the second closest, etc. neighbors. We found that contrary to the number of hydrogen bonds, tetrahedrality changes substantially with state variables. Not only the number of tetrahedral arrangements increases with lowering the pressure, the density, and the temperature but the domain size of connecting tetrahedral structures as well. The difference in tetrahedrality is very pronounced between the two sides of the Widom line and even more so between the low density amorphous (LDA) and high density amorphous (HDA) phases. We observed that in liquid water and in HDA, the 5th water molecule, contrary to ice and LDA, is positioned between the first and the second coordination shell. We found no convincing evidence of structural heterogeneity or regions referring to structural transition.

  20. Strongly interacting light dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggisser, Sebastian; Riva, Francesco; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    In the presence of approximate global symmetries that forbid relevant interactions, strongly coupled light Dark Matter (DM) can appear weakly coupled at small-energy and generate a sizable relic abundance. Fundamental principles like unitarity restrict these symmetries to a small class, where the leading interactions are captured by effective operators up to dimension-8. Chiral symmetry, spontaneously broken global symmetries and non-linearly realized supersymmetry are examples of this. Their DM candidates (composite fermions, pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone Bosons and Goldstini) are interesting targets for LHC missing-energy searches.

  1. Scalar strong interaction hadron theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hoh, Fang Chao

    2015-01-01

    The scalar strong interaction hadron theory, SSI, is a first principles' and nonlocal theory at quantum mechanical level that provides an alternative to low energy QCD and Higgs related part of the standard model. The quark-quark interaction is scalar rather than color-vectorial. A set of equations of motion for mesons and another set for baryons have been constructed. This book provides an account of the present state of a theory supposedly still at its early stage of development. This work will facilitate researchers interested in entering into this field and serve as a basis for possible future development of this theory.

  2. Hydrogen Bonding, (1)H NMR, and Molecular Electron Density Topographical Characteristics of Ionic Liquids Based on Amino Acid Cations and Their Ester Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Soniya S; Bejoy, Namitha Brijit; Gejji, Shridhar P

    2015-08-13

    Amino acid ionic liquids (AAILs) have attracted significant attention in the recent literature owing to their ubiquitous applications in diversifying areas of modern chemistry, materials science, and biosciences. The present work focuses on unraveling the molecular interactions underlying AAILs. Electronic structures of ion pairs consisting of amino acid cations ([AA(+)], AA = Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, Pro, Ser, Thr) and their ester substituted derivatives [AAE(+)] interacting with nitrate anion [NO3(-)] have been obtained from the dispersion corrected M06-2x density functional theory. The formation of ion pair is accompanied by the transfer of proton from quaternary nitrogen to anion facilitated via hydrogen bonding. The [Ile], [Pro], [Ser], and [Thr] and their esters reveal relatively strong inter- as well as intramolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions. Consequently, the hierarchy in binding energies of [AA][NO3] ion pairs and their ester analogues turns out to be [Gly] > [Ala] > [Ser] ∼ [Val] ∼ [Ile] > [Leu] ∼ [Thr] > [Pro]. The work underlines how the interplay of intra- as well as intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions in [AA]- and [AAE]-based ILs manifest in their infrared and (1)H NMR spectra. Substitution of -OCH3 functional group in [AA][NO3] ILs lowers the melting point attributed to weaker hydrogen-bonding interactions, making them suitable for room temperature applications. As opposed to gas phase structures, the presence of solvent (DMSO) does not bring about any proton transfer in the ion pairs or their ester analogues. Calculated (1)H NMR chemical shifts of the solvated structures agree well with those from experiment. Correlations of decomposition temperatures in [AA]- and [AAE]-based ILs with binding energies and electron densities at the bond critical point(s) in molecular electron density topography, have been established.

  3. Mechanical tunability via hydrogen bonding in metal-organic frameworks with the perovskite architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Thirumurugan, A; Barton, Phillip T; Lin, Zheshuai; Henke, Sebastian; Yeung, Hamish H-M; Wharmby, Michael T; Bithell, Erica G; Howard, Christopher J; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2014-06-04

    Two analogous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with the perovskite architecture, [C(NH2)3][Mn(HCOO)3] (1) and [(CH2)3NH2][Mn(HCOO)3] (2), exhibit significantly different mechanical properties. The marked difference is attributed to their distinct modes of hydrogen bonding between the A-site amine cation and the anionic framework. The stronger cross-linking hydrogen bonding in 1 gives rise to Young's moduli and hardnesses that are up to twice those in 2, while the thermal expansion is substantially smaller. This study presents clear evidence that the mechanical properties of MOF materials can be substantially tuned via hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  4. On the physical origin of blue-shifted hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaosong; Liu, Lei; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2002-08-14

    For blue-shifted hydrogen-bonded systems, the hydrogen stretching frequency increases rather than decreases on complexation. In computations at various levels of theory, the blue-shift in the archetypical system, F(3)C-H.FH, is reproduced at the Hartree-Fock level, indicating that electron correlation is not the primary cause. Calculations also demonstrate that a blue-shift does not require either a carbon center or the absence of a lone pair on the proton donor, because F(3)Si-H.OH(2), F(2)NH.FH, F(2)PH.NH(3), and F(2)PH.OH(2) have substantial blue-shifts. Orbital interactions are shown to lengthen the X-H bond and lower its vibrational frequency, and thus cannot be the source of the blue-shift. In the F(3)CH.FH system, the charge redistribution in F(3)CH can be reproduced very well by replacing the FH with a simple dipole, which suggests that the interactions are predominantly electrostatic. When modeled with a point charge for the proton acceptor, attractive electrostatic interactions elongate the F(3)C-H, while repulsive interactions shorten it. At the equilibrium geometry of a hydrogen-bonded complex, the electrostatic attraction between the dipole moments of the proton donor and proton acceptor must be balanced by the Pauli repulsion between the two fragments. In the absence of orbital interactions that cause bond elongation, this repulsive interaction leads to compression of the X-H bond and a blue-shift in its vibrational frequency.

  5. The effect of strong intermolecular and chemical interactions on the compatibility of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askadskii, Andrei A

    1999-01-01

    The data on compatibility and on the properties of polymer blends are generalised. The emphasis is placed on the formation of strong intermolecular interactions (dipole-dipole interaction and hydrogen bonding) between the components of blends, as well as on the chemical reactions between them. A criterion for the prediction of compatibility of polymers is described in detail. Different cases of compatibility are considered and the dependences of the glass transition temperatures on the composition of blends are analysed. The published data on the effect of strong intermolecular interactions between the blend components on the glass transition temperature are considered. The preparation of interpolymers is described whose macromolecules are composed of incompatible polymers, which leads to the so-called 'forced compatibility.' The bibliography includes 80 references.

  6. Similar strength of the NH⋯O and NH⋯S hydrogen bonds in binary complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Cecilie Lindholm; Jensen, Christine S.; Mackeprang, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    to be extremely small with only 5 and 19 cm-1 for DMA-DME and DMA-DMS, respectively. The experimentally determined integrated absorbance has been combined with a calculated oscillator strength to determine an equilibrium constant of 2 × 10-3 and 4 × 10-3 for the DMA-DME and DMA-DMS complexes, respectively....... The topological analyses reveal that several hydrogen bond interactions are present in the complexes. The calculated binding energies, geometric parameters, observed redshifts, and topological analyses suggest that oxygen and sulfur are hydrogen bond acceptors of similar strength. (Graph Presented)....

  7. Solution and solid-phase halogen and C-H hydrogen bonding to perrhenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massena, Casey J; Riel, Asia Marie S; Neuhaus, George F; Decato, Daniel A; Berryman, Orion B

    2015-01-28

    (1)H NMR spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic investigations of a 1,3-bis(4-ethynyl-3-iodopyridinium)benzene scaffold with perrhenate reveal strong halogen bonding in solution, and bidentate association in the solid state. A nearly isostructural host molecule demonstrates significant C-H hydrogen bonding to perrhenate in the same phases.

  8. Toward accurate prediction of potential energy surfaces and the spectral density of hydrogen bonded systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekik, Najeh

    2014-01-01

    Despite the considerable progress made in quantum theory and computational methods, detailed descriptions of the potential energy surfaces of hydrogen-bonded systems have not yet been achieved. In addition, the hydrogen bond (H-bond) itself is still so poorly understood at the fundamental level that it remains unclear exactly what geometry constitutes a “real” H-bond. Therefore, in order to investigate features essential for hydrogen bonded complexes, a simple, efficient, and general method for calculating matrix elements of vibrational operators capable of describing the stretching modes and the H-bond bridges of hydrogen-bonded systems is proposed. The derived matrix elements are simple and computationally easy to evaluate, which makes the method suitable for vibrational studies of multiple-well potentials. The method is illustrated by obtaining potential energy surfaces for a number of two-dimensional systems with repulsive potentials chosen to be in Gaussian form for the stretching mode and of the Morse-type for the H-bond bridge dynamics. The forms of potential energy surfaces of weak and strong hydrogen bonds are analyzed by varying the asymmetry of the Gaussian potential. Moreover, the choice and applicability of the selected potential for the stretching mode and comparison with other potentials used in the area of hydrogen bond research are discussed. The approach for the determination of spectral density has been constructed in the framework of the linear response theory for which spectral density is obtained by Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function of the dipole moment operator of the fast mode. The approach involves anharmonic coupling between the high frequency stretching vibration (double well potential) and low-frequency donor-acceptor stretching mode (Morse potential) as well as the electrical anharmonicity of the dipole moment operator of the fast mode. A direct relaxation mechanism is incorporated through a time decaying exponential

  9. Hydrogen bonds in concreto and in computro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouten, Pieter F. W.; Kroon, Jan

    1988-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water and liquid methanol have been carried out. For both liquids an effective pair potential was used. The models were fitted to the heat of vaporization, pressure and various radial distribution functions resulting from diffraction experiments on liquids. In both simulations 216 molecules were put in a cubic periodical ☐. The system was loosely coupled to a temperature bath and to a pressure bath. Following an initial equilibration period relevant data were sampled during 15 ps. The distributions of oxygen—oxygen distances in hydrogen bonds obtained from the two simulations are essentially the same. The distribution obtained from crystal data is somewhat different: the maximum has about the same position, but the curve is much narrower, which can be expected merely from the fact that diffraction experiments only supply average atomic positions and hence average interatomic distances. When thermal motion is taken into account a closer likeness is observed.

  10. Porous Hydrogen-Bonded Organic Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Fei Han

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ordered porous solid-state architectures constructed via non-covalent supramolecular self-assembly have attracted increasing interest due to their unique advantages and potential applications. Porous metal-coordination organic frameworks (MOFs are generated by the assembly of metal coordination centers and organic linkers. Compared to MOFs, porous hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks (HOFs are readily purified and recovered via simple recrystallization. However, due to lacking of sufficiently ability to orientate self-aggregation of building motifs in predictable manners, rational design and preparation of porous HOFs are still challenging. Herein, we summarize recent developments about porous HOFs and attempt to gain deeper insights into the design strategies of basic building motifs.

  11. Proton tunnelling in intermolecular hydrogen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsewill, A J [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Johnson, M R [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Trommsdorff, H P [Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France)

    1997-04-01

    The wavefunctions of particles extend beyond the classically accessible regions of potential energy-surfaces (PES). A manifestation of this partial delocalization is the quantum-mechanical tunneling effect which enables a particle to escape from a metastable potential-well. Tunnelling is most important for the lightest atoms, so that the determination of its contribution to proton transfer, one of the most fundamental chemical reactions, is an important issue. QENS and NMR techniques have been employed to study the motion of protons in the hydrogen bond of benzoic-acid crystals, a system which has emerged as a particularly suitable model since proton transfer occurs in a near symmetric double-well potential. The influence of quantum tunnelling was revealed and investigated in these experiments. This work provides an experimental benchmark for theoretical descriptions of translational proton-tunnelling. (author). 7 refs.

  12. Conformation and hydrogen bonding in 4-Aminobutanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Andrew S.; Duguay, Taylor M.; Lavrich, Richard J.

    2017-06-01

    Rotational spectra of the most abundant and four 13C isotopomers of 4-aminobutanol have been recorded in natural abundance using a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer. For the most abundant isotopomer, 56 hyperfine components from the fifteen a- and b-type transitions measured were fit to the quadupole coupling constants, χaa = -3.843(3) MHz, χbb = 1.971(3) MHz. Rotational and centrifugal distortion constants determined from fits of the resulting unsplit line centers to the Watson A-reduction Hamiltonian are A = 4484.893(3) MHz, B = 2830.721(1) MHz, C = 1942.9710(3) MHz, ΔJ = 0.98(3) kHz, ΔJK = 1.4(1) kHz, ΔK = - 2.6(5) kHz, δJ = 0.27(1) kHz, and δK = 1.7(1) kHz. Between nine and eleven rotational transitions were measured for the 13C isotopes and rotational constants were determined by fixing the distortion constants to the values found for the normal isotope. The five sets of moments of inertia were used to determine the 4-aminobutanol substitution structure as well to perform a least-squares fit of the lowest energy ab initio structure. The heavy atom coordinates determined from these two methods are in excellent agreement. The conformation of 4-aminobutanol is stabilized by an intramolecular hydrogen bond from the alcohol proton to amino nitrogen with a resulting hydrogen bond distance of 1.891 Å. The experimental structure is consistent with the lowest energy ab initio [MP2/6-311++G(d,p)] structure.

  13. Effective lagrangian for strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, P.

    1988-01-01

    We attempt to construct a realistic phenomenological Lagrangian in order to describe strong interactions. This is in general a very complicated problem and we shall explore its various aspects. We first include the vector mesons by writing down the most general chiral invariant terms proportional to the Levi-Civita symbol ε μναβ . These terms involve three unknown coefficients, which are calculated by using the experimental results of strong interaction processes. We then calculate the static nucleon properties by finding the solitonic excitations of this model. The results turn out to be, as is also the case for most other vector-pseudoscalar Lagrangians, better than the Skyrme model but are still somewhat different from the experiments. Another aspect that we shall study is the incorporation of scale anomaly of QCD into the Skyrme model. We thus introduce a scalar glueball in our Lagrangian. Here we find an interesting result that the effective glue field dynamically forms a bag for the soliton. Depending on the values of the parameters, we get either a deep bag or a shallow bag. However by including the scalar meson, we find that to get realistic scalar sector we must have the shallow bag. Finally we show some intriguing connections between the chiral quark model, in which the nucleon is described as a solitonic excitation, and the ordinary potential binding quark model

  14. Thermodynamic functions of hydrogen bonding of amines in methanol derived from solution calorimetry data and headspace analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaitseva, Ksenia V.; Varfolomeev, Mikhail A.; Solomonov, Boris N.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Solution enthalpies and activity coefficients of amines in methanol were measured. ► Thermodynamic functions of H-bonding of amines with methanol were determined. ► Specific interaction entropy of amines in methanol can be about zero or positive. ► Cooperativity of H-bonds in methanol media is smaller than in water solutions. ► A new view on analysis of specific interaction of solute with methanol is presented. - Abstract: Reactivity and equilibrium properties of organic molecules in self-associated liquids greatly depend on the hydrogen bonding with solvent. This work contains comprehensive thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen bonding of aliphatic and aromatic amines in self-associated solvent methanol. Enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution and limiting activity coefficients for the studied systems were measured experimentally. Enthalpies and Gibbs energies of hydrogen bonding of amines with neat methanol were determined. These values were found to be decreased compared with hydrogen bond energy in equimolar complexes “methanol–amine” determined in inert solvent or base media. A linear dependence between enthalpies and Gibbs energies of hydrogen bonding of amines with neat methanol was observed. It was firstly revealed that the entropy of specific interactions of amines with neat methanol can be about zero or positive. Disruption of solvent–solvent hydrogen bonds can be regarded as the most important step during dissolution of amine in methanol. It was found that the cooperative effect influences on the Gibbs energies of hydrogen bonding of amines in methanol, but in a lesser extent than in aqueous solutions. The new results show that the hydrogen bonding process in the self-associated solvents differs significantly from equimolar complexation in aprotic media.

  15. Thermodynamic functions of hydrogen bonding of amines in methanol derived from solution calorimetry data and headspace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitseva, Ksenia V., E-mail: zaitseva.ksenia@gmail.com [Chemical Institute, Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University, Kremlevskaya 18, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Varfolomeev, Mikhail A., E-mail: vma.ksu@gmail.com [Chemical Institute, Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University, Kremlevskaya 18, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Solomonov, Boris N., E-mail: boris.solomonov@ksu.ru [Chemical Institute, Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University, Kremlevskaya 18, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation)

    2012-05-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solution enthalpies and activity coefficients of amines in methanol were measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermodynamic functions of H-bonding of amines with methanol were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific interaction entropy of amines in methanol can be about zero or positive. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cooperativity of H-bonds in methanol media is smaller than in water solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new view on analysis of specific interaction of solute with methanol is presented. - Abstract: Reactivity and equilibrium properties of organic molecules in self-associated liquids greatly depend on the hydrogen bonding with solvent. This work contains comprehensive thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen bonding of aliphatic and aromatic amines in self-associated solvent methanol. Enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution and limiting activity coefficients for the studied systems were measured experimentally. Enthalpies and Gibbs energies of hydrogen bonding of amines with neat methanol were determined. These values were found to be decreased compared with hydrogen bond energy in equimolar complexes 'methanol-amine' determined in inert solvent or base media. A linear dependence between enthalpies and Gibbs energies of hydrogen bonding of amines with neat methanol was observed. It was firstly revealed that the entropy of specific interactions of amines with neat methanol can be about zero or positive. Disruption of solvent-solvent hydrogen bonds can be regarded as the most important step during dissolution of amine in methanol. It was found that the cooperative effect influences on the Gibbs energies of hydrogen bonding of amines in methanol, but in a lesser extent than in aqueous solutions. The new results show that the hydrogen bonding process in the self-associated solvents differs significantly from equimolar complexation in aprotic media.

  16. Hydrogen bonded 1D-3D supramolecular structures from Benzylamine and organic acidic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xingjun; Li, XiaoLiang; Jin, Shouwen; Hu, Kaikai; Guo, Jianzhong; Guo, Ming; Xu, Weiqiang; Wang, Daqi

    2018-03-01

    Cocrystallization of the commonly available organic amine, benzylamine, with a series of organic acids afforded a total of seven organic salts with the compositions: (benzylamine)2: (p-nitrophenol)2: (H2O) (1) [(HL)2+⋯(npl-)2⋯(H2O), npl- = p-nitrophenolate], (benzylamine): (4-tert-butylbenzoic acid) (2) [(HL+)⋯(tba-), tba- = 4-tert-butylbenzoate], (benzylamine): (3,4-dichlorobenzoic acid) (3) [(HL+)⋯dcba-), dcba- = 3,4-dichlorobenzoate], (benzylamine): (2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid) (4) [(HL+)⋯(dhba-), dhba- = 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate], (benzylamine): (2-bromo-but-2-enedioic acid) (5) [(HL+)⋯(Hbba-), Hbba- = 2-bromo-hydrogenbut-2-enedioate], (benzylamine): (2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid) (6) [(HL+)⋯(Hpdc-), Hpdc- = 2,6-pyridine hydrogendicarboxylate], and (benzylamine)2: (3-nitrophthalic acid): 2(H2O) (7) [(HL+)2⋯(npa2-)⋯(H2O)2, npa2- = 3-nitrophthalate]. The seven salts have been characterised by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, and elemental analysis, and the melting points of all the salts were also reported. And their structural and supramolecular aspects are fully analyzed. The results reveal that among the seven investigated crystals the NH2 in the benzylamine are protonated when the organic acids are deprotonated, and the crystal packing is interpreted in terms of the strong charge-assisted Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond between the NH3+ and deprotonated acidic groups. Except the Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond, the Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) were also found at the salts 1, 4, 5, 6, and 7. Further analysis of the crystal packing of the salts indicated that a different family of additional CHsbnd O/CH2sbnd O, CH-π/CH2-π, Cπ-Cπ, Osbnd O, O-Cπ, O-π, and Cl-π associations also contribute to the stabilization and expansion of the total high-dimensional framework structures. For the coexistence of the various weak nonbonding interactions, these structures adopted a variety of

  17. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds: From temperature-driven proton ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We have combined neutron scattering and a range of numerical simulations to study hydrogen bonds in condensed matter. Two examples from a recent thesis will be presented. The first concerns proton transfer with increasing temperature in short inter- molecular hydrogen bonds [1,2]. These bonds have unique ...

  18. Hydrogen bonded supra-molecular framework in inorganic-organic hybrid compounds: Syntheses, structures, and photoluminescent properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Liu, Wei; Li, Chuanbi; Wang, Yifei; Ma, Li; Dong, Qinqin

    2013-03-01

    Two novel compounds constructed from aromatic acid and N-Heterocyclic ligands have been synthesized by hydrothermal reaction: [Cd(mip)(1,8-NDC)(H2O)]2 (1) [mip = 2-(3-methoxyphenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline, 1,8-NDC = naphthalene-1,8-dicarboxylic acid] and Cd(mip)2(NTC)2 (2) [NTC = nicotinic acid]. Compounds 1 and 2 are characterized by elemental analysis, IR, single crystal X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Single-crystal X-ray investigation reveals that compounds 1-2 are 0 dimensional (0D) structures, and the existence of hydrogen bonds and π-π interactions lead the 0D to 2D novel framework. Hydrogen bonds and π-π interactions are powerful non-covalent intermolecular interactions for directing supra-molecular architectures. TG analysis shows clear courses of weight loss, which corresponds to the decomposition of different ligands. At room temperature, compound 1 exhibits emission at 449 nm upon excitation at 325 nm, and compound 2 shows a strong emission at 656 nm upon excitation at 350 nm. Fluorescent spectrum displays that compounds 1 and 2 are potential luminescent materials.

  19. n-Electrons of heteroatoms in hydrogen bond and luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karyakin, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen bond energy in the process of interaction between water molecules, water molecules and heteroatoms of organic solvents, water molecules and inorganic compounds, is determined, its mechanism being studied. On the basis of X-ray structure and IR-spectroscopic data water state in easily hydrolized compounds of zirconium and hafnium, including sulfates, nitrates, oxychlorides etc. is analyzed. Water state in uranyl nitrate hydrates, the structure of the compounds and their behaviour when they are extracted by TBP, are considered. The reasons for stability of uranyl nitrate hydrates are discussed. The effect of n-electrons of heteroatoms of simple aromatic compound on structural spectra of luminescence in aliphatic and inorganic matrices is investigated

  20. Strongly interacting W's and Z's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1984-01-01

    The study focussed primarily on the dynamics of a strongly interacting W, Z(SIW) sector, with the aim of sharpening predictions for total W, Z yield and W, Z multiplicities expected from WW fusion for various scenarios. Specific issues raised in the context of the general problem of modeling SIW included the specificity of the technicolor (or, equivalently, QCD) model, whether or not a composite scalar model can be evaded, and whether the standard model necessarily implies an I = J = O state (≅ Higgs particle) that is relatively ''light'' (M ≤ hundreds of TeV). The consensus on the last issue was that existing arguments are inconclusive. While the author shall briefly address compositeness and alternatives to the technicolor model, quantitative estimates will be of necessity based on technicolor or an extrapolation of pion data

  1. Hydrogen Bonding With a Hydrogen Bond: The CH4•••H2O Dimer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    X-H•••C hydrogen bonds in n-alkane-HX (X = F, OH) complexes are stronger than C-H•••X hydrogen bonds. R Parajuli* and E Arunan**. *Department of Physics, Amrit Campus, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal. **Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560012, India.

  2. Excited state hydrogen bonding fluorescent probe: Role of structure and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Debarati, E-mail: debaratidey07@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Vidyasagar College, 39 Sankar Ghosh Lane, Kolkata 700006 (India); Sarangi, Manas Kumar [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Ray, Angana; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay [Computational Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Maity, Dilip Kumar [Department of Chemistry, University College of Science and Technology, 92 A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)

    2016-05-15

    An environment sensitive fluorescent probe, 11-benzoyl-dibenzo[a,c]phenazine (BDBPZ), has been synthesized and characterized that acts via excited state hydrogen bonding (ESHB). On interaction with hydrogen bond donating solvents the fluorescence intensity of BDBPZ increases abruptly with a concomitant bathochromic shift. The extent of fluorescence increment and the red-shift of λ{sub max} depend on hydrogen bond donating ability of the solvent associated. ESHB restricts the free rotation of the benzoyl group and hence blocks the non-radiative deactivation pathway. BDBPZ forms an exciplex with organic amine in nonpolar medium that readily disappears on increasing the polarity of the solvent. In polar environment the fluorescence of both the free molecule and excited state hydrogen bonded species are quenched on addition of amine unlike its parent dibenzo[a,c]phenazine (DBPZ), that remains very much inaccessible towards the solvent as well as quencher molecules due to its structure. This newly synthesized derivative BDBPZ is much more interactive due to the benzoyl group that is flanked outside the skeletal aromatic rings of DBPZ, which helps to sense the environment properly and thus shows better ESHB capacity than DBPZ.

  3. Multicomponent hydrogen-bonding organic solids constructed from 6-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid and N-heterocycles: Synthesis, structural characterization and synthon discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yingxia; Shao, Hui; Pang, Yanyan; Wang, Debao; Liu, Kang; Wang, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Seven novel multicomponent crystals involving various substituted organic amine molecules and 6-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid were prepared and characterized by using single crystal X-ray diffraction, infrared and thermogravimetric analyses (TGA). Crystal structures with 1,4-bis(imidazol) butane (L1) 1, 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)benzene (L2) 2, 1-phenyl piperazine 3, 2-amino-4-hydroxy-6-methyl pyrimidine 4, 4,4'-bipyridine 5, 5,5'-dimethyl-2,2'-dipyridine 6, 2-amino-4,6-dimethyl pyrimidine 7 were determined. Among the seven molecular complexes, total proton transfer from 6-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid to coformer has occurred in crystals 1-4, while the remaining were cocrystals. X-ray single-crystal structures of these complexes reveal that strong hydrogen bonding O-H···O/N-H···O/O-H···N and weak C-H···O/C-H···π/π···π intermolecular interactions direct the packing modes of molecular crystals together. The analysis of supramolecular synthons in the present structures shows that some classical supramolecular synthons like pyridine-carboxylic acid heterosynthon R22 (7) and aminopyridine-carboxylic acid heterosynthon R22 (8), are again observed in constructing the hydrogen-bonding networks in this paper. Besides, we noticed that water molecules act as a significant hydrogen-bonding connector in constructing supramolecular architectures of 3, 4, 6, and 7.

  4. Ferroelectric phase transition in hydrogen-bonded 2-aminopyridine phosphate (NC sub 4 H sub 4 NH sub 2)centre dot H sub 3 PO sub 4

    CERN Document Server

    Czapla, Z; Waskowska, A

    2003-01-01

    A new crystal of 2-aminopyridine phosphate (NC sub 4 H sub 4 NH sub 2)centre dot H sub 3 PO sub 4 has been grown and its x-ray structure and physical properties were studied. At room temperature the crystals are monoclinic, space group C2/c. The flat 2-aminopyridine cations are hydrogen bonded to the anionic [PO sub 4 ] groups. The interesting feature of the crystal structure is the three-dimensional network of hydrogen bonds including, among others, two strong, symmetrical O centre dot centre dot centre dot H, H centre dot centre dot centre dot O interactions with disordered proton locations. Symmetrically related PO sub 4 anions linked through these protons form infinite (PO sub 4) subinfinity chains along the crystal a-axis. The anomalies in the temperature dependence of the electric permittivity showed that the crystal undergoes ferroelectric phase transition at T sub c = 103.5 K. The spontaneous polarization takes place along the crystal a-axis, being parallel to the chains of the hydrogen-bonded PO sub ...

  5. The Different Sensitive Behaviors of a Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer-Coated SAW Sensor for Chemical Warfare Agents and Their Simulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Long

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A linear hydrogen-bond acidic (HBA linear functionalized polymer (PLF, was deposited onto a bare surface acoustic wave (SAW device to fabricate a chemical sensor. Real-time responses of the sensor to a series of compounds including sarin (GB, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP, mustard gas (HD, chloroethyl ethyl sulphide (2-CEES, 1,5-dichloropentane (DCP and some organic solvents were studied. The results show that the sensor is highly sensitive to GB and DMMP, and has low sensitivity to HD and DCP, as expected. However, the sensor possesses an unexpected high sensitivity toward 2-CEES. This good sensing performance can’t be solely or mainly attributed to the dipole-dipole interaction since the sensor is not sensitive to some high polarity solvents. We believe the lone pair electrons around the sulphur atom of 2-CEES provide an electron-rich site, which facilitates the formation of hydrogen bonding between PLF and 2-CEES. On the contrary, the electron cloud on the sulphur atom of the HD molecule is offset or depleted by its two neighbouring strong electron-withdrawing groups, hence, hydrogen bonding can hardly be formed.

  6. Contributions to reversed-phase column selectivity: III. Column hydrogen-bond basicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, P W; Dolan, J W; Dorsey, J G; Snyder, L R; Kirkland, J J

    2015-05-22

    Column selectivity in reversed-phase chromatography (RPC) can be described in terms of the hydrophobic-subtraction model, which recognizes five solute-column interactions that together determine solute retention and column selectivity: hydrophobic, steric, hydrogen bonding of an acceptor solute (i.e., a hydrogen-bond base) by a stationary-phase donor group (i.e., a silanol), hydrogen bonding of a donor solute (e.g., a carboxylic acid) by a stationary-phase acceptor group, and ionic. Of these five interactions, hydrogen bonding between donor solutes (acids) and stationary-phase acceptor groups is the least well understood; the present study aims at resolving this uncertainty, so far as possible. Previous work suggests that there are three distinct stationary-phase sites for hydrogen-bond interaction with carboxylic acids, which we will refer to as column basicity I, II, and III. All RPC columns exhibit a selective retention of carboxylic acids (column basicity I) in varying degree. This now appears to involve an interaction of the solute with a pair of vicinal silanols in the stationary phase. For some type-A columns, an additional basic site (column basicity II) is similar to that for column basicity I in primarily affecting the retention of carboxylic acids. The latter site appears to be associated with metal contamination of the silica. Finally, for embedded-polar-group (EPG) columns, the polar group can serve as a proton acceptor (column basicity III) for acids, phenols, and other donor solutes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Effects of Concentration on Hydrogen Bonding in Aqueous Solutions of Methanol, Ethylene Glycol and Glycerol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Weizhong; Chen, Cong; Zuo, Jianguo; Weng, Lindong

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen bonding interaction between alcohols and water molecules is an important characteristic in the aqueous solutions of alcohols. In this paper, a series of molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the aqueous solutions of low molecular weight alcohols (methanol, ethylene glycol and glycerol) at the concentrations covering a broad range from 1 to 90 mol %. The work focuses on studying the effect of the alcohols molecules on the hydrogen bonding of water molecules in binary mixtures. By analyzing the hydrogen bonding ability of the hydroxyl (-OH) groups for the three alcohols, it is found that the hydroxyl group of methanol prefers to form more hydrogen bonds than that of ethylene glycol and glycerol due to the intra-and intermolecular effects. It is also shown that concentration has significant effect on the ability of alcohol molecule to hydrogen bond water molecules. Understanding the hydrogen bonding characteristics of the aqueous solutions is helpful to reveal the cryoprotective mechanisms of methanol, ethylene glycol and glycerol in aqueous solutions

  8. Local electronic and geometrical structures of hydrogen-bonded complexes studied by soft X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The hydrogen bond is one of the most important forms of intermolecular interactions. It occurs in all-important components of life. However, the electronic structures of hydrogen-bonded complexes in liquid phases have long been difficult to determine due to the lack of proper experimental techniques. In this talk, a recent joint theoretical and experimental effort to understand hydrogen bonding in liquid water and alcohol/water mixtures using synchrotron radiation based soft-X-ray spectroscopy will be presented. The complexity of the liquid systems has made it impossible to interpret the spectra with physical intuition alone. Theoretical simulations have thus played an essential role in understanding the spectra and providing valuable insights on the local geometrical and electronic structures of these liquids. Our study sheds light on a 40-year controversy over what kinds of molecular structures are formed in pure liquid methanol. It also suggests an explanation for the well-known puzzle of why alcohol and water do not mix completely: the system must balance nature's tendency toward greater disorder (entropy) with the molecules' tendency to form hydrogen bonds. The observation of electron sharing and broken hydrogen bonding local structures in liquid water will be presented. The possible use of X-ray spectroscopy to determinate the local arrangements of hydrogen-bonded nanostructures will also been discussed

  9. The influence of hydrogen bonding on partition coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Nádia Melo; Kenny, Peter W.; Montanari, Carlos A.; Prokopczyk, Igor M.; Ribeiro, Jean F. R.; Rocha, Josmar R.; Sartori, Geraldo Rodrigues

    2017-02-01

    This Perspective explores how consideration of hydrogen bonding can be used to both predict and better understand partition coefficients. It is shown how polarity of both compounds and substructures can be estimated from measured alkane/water partition coefficients. When polarity is defined in this manner, hydrogen bond donors are typically less polar than hydrogen bond acceptors. Analysis of alkane/water partition coefficients in conjunction with molecular electrostatic potential calculations suggests that aromatic chloro substituents may be less lipophilic than is generally believed and that some of the effect of chloro-substitution stems from making the aromatic π-cloud less available to hydrogen bond donors. Relationships between polarity and calculated hydrogen bond basicity are derived for aromatic nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen. Aligned hydrogen bond acceptors appear to present special challenges for prediction of alkane/water partition coefficients and this may reflect `frustration' of solvation resulting from overlapping hydration spheres. It is also shown how calculated hydrogen bond basicity can be used to model the effect of aromatic aza-substitution on octanol/water partition coefficients.

  10. Manifestation of hydrogen bonds of aqueous ethanol solutions in the Raman scattering spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolenko, T A; Burikov, S A; Patsaeva, S V; Yuzhakov, V I

    2011-01-01

    Spectra of Raman scattering of light by aqueous ethanol solutions in the range of concentrations from pure water to 96% alcohol are studied. For water, 25%, and 40% solutions of ethanol in water, as well as for 96% alcohol the Raman spectra are measured at temperatures from the freezing point to nearly the boiling point. The changes in the shape of the stretching OH band are interpreted in terms of strengthening or weakening of hydrogen bonds between the molecules in the solution. The strongest hydrogen bonding of hydroxyl groups is observed at the ethanol content from 20 to 25 volume percent, which is explained by formation of ethanol hydrates of a definite type at the mentioned concentrations of alcohol. This is confirmed by means of the method of multivariate curve resolution, used to analyse the Raman spectra of aqueous ethanol solutions. With growing temperature the weakening of hydrogen bonding occurs in all studied systems, which consists in reducing the number of OH groups, linked by strong hydrogen bonds. (laser applications and other problems in quantum electronics)

  11. Hydrogen-Bonding Surfaces for Ice Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Hadley, Kevin R.; McDougall, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Ice formation on aircraft, either on the ground or in-flight, is a major safety issue. While ground icing events occur predominantly during the winter months, in-flight icing can happen anytime during the year. The latter is more problematic since it could result in increased drag and loss of lift. Under a Phase I ARMD NARI Seedling Activity, coated aluminum surfaces possessing hydrogen-bonding groups were under investigation for mitigating ice formation. Hydroxyl and methyl terminated dimethylethoxysilanes were prepared via known chemistries and characterized by spectroscopic methods. These materials were subsequently used to coat aluminum surfaces. Surface compositions were based on pure hydroxyl and methyl terminated species as well as mixtures of the two. Coated surfaces were characterized by contact angle goniometry. Receding water contact angle data suggested several potential surfaces that may exhibit reduced ice adhesion. Qualitative icing experiments performed under representative environmental temperatures using supercooled distilled water delivered via spray coating were inconclusive. Molecular modeling studies suggested that chain mobility affected the interface between ice and the surface more than terminal group chemical composition. Chain mobility resulted from the creation of "pockets" of increased free volume for longer chains to occupy.

  12. Spectroscopic, DFT, and XRD Studies of Hydrogen Bonds in N-Unsubstituted 2-Aminobenzamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mphahlele, Malose Jack; Maluleka, Marole Maria; Rhyman, Lydia; Ramasami, Ponnadurai; Mampa, Richard Mokome

    2017-01-04

    The structures of the mono- and the dihalogenated N -unsubstituted 2-aminobenzamides were characterized by means of the spectroscopic (¹H-NMR, UV-Vis, FT-IR, and FT-Raman) and X-ray crystallographic techniques complemented with a density functional theory (DFT) method. The hindered rotation of the C(O)-NH₂ single bond resulted in non-equivalence of the amide protons and therefore two distinct resonances of different chemical shift values in the ¹H-NMR spectra of these compounds were observed. 2-Amino-5-bromobenzamide ( ABB ) as a model confirmed the presence of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds between oxygen and the amine hydrogen. However, intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the carbonyl oxygen and the amine protons was not observed in the solution phase due to a rapid exchange of these two protons with the solvent and fast rotation of the Ar-NH₂ single bond. XRD also revealed the ability of the amide unit of these compounds to function as a hydrogen bond donor and acceptor simultaneously to form strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding between oxygen of one molecule and the NH moiety of the amine or amide group of the other molecule and between the amine nitrogen and the amide hydrogen of different molecules. DFT calculations using the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set revealed that the conformer ( A ) with oxygen and 2-amine on the same side predominates possibly due to the formation of a six-membered intramolecular ring, which is assisted by hydrogen bonding as observed in the single crystal XRD structure.

  13. Spectroscopic, DFT, and XRD Studies of Hydrogen Bonds in N-Unsubstituted 2-Aminobenzamides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malose Jack Mphahlele

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The structures of the mono- and the dihalogenated N-unsubstituted 2-aminobenzamides were characterized by means of the spectroscopic (1H-NMR, UV-Vis, FT-IR, and FT-Raman and X-ray crystallographic techniques complemented with a density functional theory (DFT method. The hindered rotation of the C(O–NH2 single bond resulted in non-equivalence of the amide protons and therefore two distinct resonances of different chemical shift values in the 1H-NMR spectra of these compounds were observed. 2-Amino-5-bromobenzamide (ABB as a model confirmed the presence of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds between oxygen and the amine hydrogen. However, intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the carbonyl oxygen and the amine protons was not observed in the solution phase due to a rapid exchange of these two protons with the solvent and fast rotation of the Ar–NH2 single bond. XRD also revealed the ability of the amide unit of these compounds to function as a hydrogen bond donor and acceptor simultaneously to form strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding between oxygen of one molecule and the NH moiety of the amine or amide group of the other molecule and between the amine nitrogen and the amide hydrogen of different molecules. DFT calculations using the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p basis set revealed that the conformer (A with oxygen and 2-amine on the same side predominates possibly due to the formation of a six-membered intramolecular ring, which is assisted by hydrogen bonding as observed in the single crystal XRD structure.

  14. Quantitative separation of the influence of hydrogen bonding of ethanol/water mixture on the shape recovery behavior of polyurethane shape memory polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Haibao; Leng, Jinsong; Min Huang, Wei; Fu, Y Q

    2014-01-01

    A thermally responsive polyurethane shape memory polymer (SMP) can be actuated in water through a hydrogen bonding interaction between water and the SMP. In this work, we present a comprehensive approach to quantify the hydrogen bonding on the shape recovery behavior of a polyurethane SMP. The stimuli response to the hydrogen bonding of the polyurethane SMP was investigated in ethanol/water mixtures by varying the water content. It was found that depending on the water content, the SMP features a critical hydrogen bonding strength associated with its shape recovery behavior. The Hildebrand solubility parameter theory was employed to quantitatively identify and separate the hydrogen bonding effect of the ethanol/water mixture on the shape recovery ratio and the time. Furthermore, a phenomenological model was developed to predict the glass transition temperature and the shape recovery time of a polyurethane SMP and was verified by the available experimental results. (paper)

  15. The Born-Oppenheimer molecular simulations of infrared spectra of crystalline poly-(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate with analysis of weak Csbnd H⋯Odbnd C hydrogen bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brela, Mateusz Z.; Boczar, Marek; Wójcik, Marek J.; Sato, Harumi; Nakajima, Takahito; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2017-06-01

    In this letter we present results of study of weak Csbnd H⋯Odbnd C hydrogen bonds of crystalline poly-(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) by using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. The polymeric structure and IR spectra of PHB result from the presence of the weak hydrogen bonds. We applied the post-molecular dynamics analysis to consider a Cdbnd O motion as indirectly involved in the hydrogen bonds. Quantization of the nuclear motion of the oxygens was done to perform detailed analysis of the strength and properties of the Cdbnd O bands involved in the weak hydrogen bonds. We have also shown the dynamic character of the weak hydrogen bond interactions.

  16. Photoinduced Intramolecular Bifurcate Hydrogen Bond: Unusual Mutual Influence of the Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigalov, Mark V; Shainyan, Bagrat A; Sterkhova, Irina V

    2017-09-01

    A series of 7-hydroxy-2-methylidene-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-ones with 2-pyrrolyl (3), 4-dimethylaminophenyl (4), 4-nitrophenyl (5), and carboxyl group (6) as substituents at the exocyclic double bond was synthesized in the form of the E-isomers (4-6) or predominantly as the Z-isomer (3) which in solution is converted to the E-isomer. The synthesized compounds and their model analogues were studied by NMR spectroscopy, X-ray analysis, and MP2 theoretical calculations. The E-isomers having intramolecular O-H···O═C hydrogen bond are converted by UV irradiation to the Z-isomers having bifurcated O-H···O···H-X hydrogen bond. Unexpected shortening (and, thus, strengthening) of the O-H···O═C component of the bifurcated hydrogen bond upon the formation of the C═O···H-X hydrogen bond was found experimentally, proved theoretically (MP2), and explained by a roundabout interaction of the H-donor (HX) and H-acceptor (C═O) via the system of conjugated bonds.

  17. Hydrogen bond strengths in phosphorylated and sulfated amino acid residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaya Rapp

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification by the addition of an oxoanion functional group, usually a phosphate group and less commonly a sulfate group, leads to diverse structural and functional consequences in protein systems. Building upon previous studies of the phosphoserine residue (pSer, we address the distinct nature of hydrogen bonding interactions in phosphotyrosine (pTyr and sulfotyrosine (sTyr residues. We derive partial charges for these modified residues and then study them in the context of molecular dynamics simulation of model tripeptides and sulfated protein complexes, potentials of mean force for interacting residue pairs, and a survey of the interactions of modified residues among experimental protein structures. Overall, our findings show that for pTyr, bidentate interactions with Arg are particularly dominant, as has been previously demonstrated for pSer. sTyr interactions with Arg are significantly weaker, even as compared to the same interactions made by the Glu residue. Our work sheds light on the distinct nature of these modified tyrosine residues, and provides a physical-chemical foundation for future studies with the goal of understanding their roles in systems of biological interest.

  18. Strongly interacting photons and atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alge, W.

    1999-05-01

    This thesis contains the main results of the research topics I have pursued during the my PhD studies at the University of Innsbruck and partly in collaboration with the Institut d' Optique in Orsay, France. It is divided into three parts. The first and largest part discusses the possibility of using strong standing waves as a tool to cool and trap neutral atoms in optical cavities. This is very important in the field of nonlinear optics where several successful experiments with cold atoms in cavities have been performed recently. A discussion of the optical parametric oscillator in a regime where the nonlinearity dominates the evolution is the topic of the second part. We investigated mainly the statistical properties of the cavity output of the three interactive cavity modes. Very recently a system has been proposed which promises fantastic properties. It should exhibit a giant Kerr nonlinearity with negligible absorption thus leading to a photonic turnstile device based on cold atoms in cavity. We have shown that this model suffers from overly simplistic assumptions and developed several more comprehensive approaches to study the behavior of this system. Apart from the division into three parts of different contents the thesis is divided into publications, supplements and invisible stuff. The intention of the supplements is to reach researchers which work in related areas and provide them with more detailed information about the concepts and the numerical tools we used. It is written especially for diploma and PhD students to give them a chance to use the third part of our work which is actually the largest one. They consist of a large number of computer programs we wrote to investigate the behavior of the systems in parameter regions where no hope exists to solve the equations analytically. (author)

  19. Effects of dimethyl sulfoxide on the hydrogen bonding structure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar 751 013, India e-mail: .... molecules are modeled by the 4-site P2 model of Luzar and Chandler9 which ..... lifetime of hydrogen bond acceptance by carbonyl oxy-.

  20. Energetics of hydrogen bonding in proteins: a model compound study.

    OpenAIRE

    Habermann, S. M.; Murphy, K. P.

    1996-01-01

    Differences in the energetics of amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds in proteins have been explored from the effect of hydroxyl groups on the structure and dissolution energetics of a series of crystalline cyclic dipeptides. The calorimetrically determined energetics are interpreted in light of the crystal structures of the studied compounds. Our results indicate that the amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds both provide considerable enthalpic stability, but that the amide-...

  1. Modeling liquid-vapor equilibria with an equation of state taking into account dipolar interactions and association by hydrogen bonding; Modelisation des proprietes PVTX des fluides du systeme H{sub 2}O-gaz prenant en compte l'association par liaisons hydrogenes et les interactions dipolaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perfetti, E

    2006-11-15

    Modelling fluid-rock interactions as well as mixing and unmixing phenomena in geological processes requires robust equations of state (EOS) which must be applicable to systems containing water, gases over a broad range of temperatures and pressures. Cubic equations of state based on the Van der Waals theory (e. g. Soave-Redlich-Kwong or Peng-Robinson) allow simple modelling from the critical parameters of the studied fluid components. However, the accuracy of such equations becomes poor when water is a major component of the fluid since neither association trough hydrogen bonding nor dipolar interactions are accounted for. The Helmholtz energy of a fluid may be written as the sum of different energetic contributions by factorization of partition function. The model developed in this thesis for the pure H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}S considers three contributions. The first contribution represents the reference Van der Waals fluid which is modelled by the SRK cubic EOS. The second contribution accounts for association through hydrogen bonding and is modelled by a term derived from Cubic Plus Association (CPA) theory. The third contribution corresponds to the dipolar interactions and is modelled by the Mean Spherical Approximation (MSA) theory. The resulting CPAMSA equation has six adjustable parameters, which three represent physical terms whose values are close to their experimental counterpart. This equation results in a better reproduction of the thermodynamic properties of pure water than obtained using the classical CPA equation along the vapour-liquid equilibrium. In addition, extrapolation to higher temperatures and pressure is satisfactory. Similarly, taking into account dipolar interactions together with the SRK cubic equation of state for calculating molar volume of H{sub 2}S as a function of pressure and temperature results in a significant improvement compared to the SRK equation alone. Simple mixing rules between dipolar molecules are proposed to model the H

  2. Ultrafast dynamics of hydrogen bond exchange in aqueous ionic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungnam; Odelius, Michael; Gaffney, Kelly J

    2009-06-04

    The structural and dynamical properties of aqueous ionic solutions influence a wide range of natural and biological processes. In these solutions, water has the opportunity to form hydrogen bonds with other water molecules and anions. Knowing the time scale with which these configurations interconvert represents a key factor to understanding the influence of molecular scale heterogeneity on chemical events in aqueous ionic solutions. We have used ultrafast IR spectroscopy and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations to investigate the hydrogen bond (H-bond) structural dynamics in aqueous 6 M sodium perchlorate (NaClO4) solution. We have measured the H-bond exchange dynamics between spectrally distinct water-water and water-anion H-bond configurations with 2DIR spectroscopy and the orientational relaxation dynamics of water molecules in different H-bond configurations with polarization-selective IR pump-probe experiments. The experimental H-bond exchange time correlates strongly with the experimental orientational relaxation time of water molecules. This agrees with prior observations in water and aqueous halide solutions, and has been interpreted within the context of an orientational jump model for the H-bond exchange. The CPMD simulations performed on aqueous 6 M NaClO4 solution clearly demonstrate that water molecules organize into two radially and angularly distinct structural subshells within the first solvation shell of the perchlorate anion, with one subshell possessing the majority of the water molecules that donate H-bonds to perchlorate anions and the other subshell possessing predominantly water molecules that donate two H-bonds to other water molecules. Due to the high ionic concentration used in the simulations, essentially all water molecules reside in the first ionic solvation shells. The CPMD simulations also demonstrate that the molecular exchange between these two structurally distinct subshells proceeds more slowly than the H

  3. Strong interactions in low dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Baeriswyl, D

    2007-01-01

    This book provides an attempt to convey the colorful facets of condensed matter systems with reduced dimensionality. Some of the specific features predicted for interacting one-dimensional electron systems, such as charge- and spin-density waves, have been observed in many quasi-one-dimensional materials. The two-dimensional world is even richer: besides d-wave superconductivity and the Quantum Hall Effect - perhaps the most spectacular phases explored during the last two decades - many collective charge and spin states have captured the interest of researchers, such as charge stripes or spont

  4. Remnants of strong tidal interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mcglynn, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the properties of stellar systems that have recently undergone a strong tidal shock, i.e., a shock which removes a significant fraction of the particles in the system, and where the shocked system has a much smaller mass than the producer of the tidal field. N-body calculations of King models shocked in a variety of ways are performed, and the consequences of the shocks are investigated. The results confirm the prediction of Jaffe for shocked systems. Several models are also run where the tidal forces on the system are constant, simulating a circular orbit around a primary, and the development of tidal radii under these static conditions appears to be a mild process which does not dramatically affect material that is not stripped. The tidal radii are about twice as large as classical formulas would predict. Remnant density profiles are compared with a sample of elliptical galaxies, and the implications of the results for the development of stellar populations and galaxies are considered. 38 refs

  5. Spectroscopic identification of ethanol-water conformers by large-amplitude hydrogen bond librational modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jonas; Heimdal, J.; Larsen, René Wugt

    2015-01-01

    ⋯HO hydrogen bond acceptor in the two most stable conformations. In the most stable conformation, the water subunit forces the ethanol molecule into its less stable gauche configuration upon dimerization owing to a cooperative secondary weak O⋯HC hydrogen bondinteraction evidenced by a significantly blue......-shift of the low-frequency in-plane donor OH librational band origin. The strong correlation between the low-frequency in-plane donor OH librational motion and the secondary intermolecular O⋯HC hydrogen bond is demonstrated by electronic structure calculations. The experimental findings are further supported...... by CCSD(T)-F12/aug-cc-pVQZ calculations of the conformationalenergy differences together with second-order vibrational perturbation theory calculations of the large-amplitude donor OH librational band origins....

  6. The Role of Molecule Clustering by Hydrogen Bond in Hydrous Ethanol on Laminar Burning Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Suarta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of hydrogen bond molecule clustering in laminar burning velocities was observed. The water in hydrous ethanol can change the interaction between water-ethanol molecules. A certain amount of water can become oxygenated which increases the burning velocity. The hydrogen bond interaction pattern of ethanol and water molecules was modeled. Based on the molecular model, azeotropic behavior emerges from ethanol-water hydrogen bond, which is at a 95.1%v composition. The interaction with water molecule causes the ethanol molecule to be clustered with centered oxygenated compound. So, it supplies extra oxygen and provides intermolecular empty spaces that are easily infiltrated by the air. In the azeotropic composition, the molecular bond chain is the shortest, so hypothetically the burning velocity is anticipated to increase. The laminar burning velocity of ethanol fuel was tested in a cylindrical explosion bomb in lean, stoichiometric, and rich mixtures. The experimental result showed that the maximum burning velocity occurred at hydrous ethanol of 95.5%v composition. This discrepancy is the result of the addition of energy from 7.7% free ethanol molecules that are not clustered. At the rich mixture, the burning velocity of this composition is higher than that of anhydrous ethanol.

  7. Measuring the relative hydrogen-bonding strengths of alcohols in aprotic organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessensohn, Malcolm E; Lee, Melvyn; Hirao, Hajime; Webster, Richard D

    2015-01-12

    Voltammetric experiments with 9,10-anthraquinone and 1,4-benzoquinone performed under controlled moisture conditions indicate that the hydrogen-bond strengths of alcohols in aprotic organic solvents can be differentiated by the electrochemical parameter ΔEp (red) =|Ep (red(1)) -Ep (red(2)) |, which is the potential separation between the two one-electron reduction processes. This electrochemical parameter is inversely related to the strength of the interactions and can be used to differentiate between primary, secondary, tertiary alcohols, and even diols, as it is sensitive to both their steric and electronic properties. The results are highly reproducible across two solvents with substantially different hydrogen-bonding properties (CH3 CN and CH2 Cl2 ) and are supported by density functional theory calculations. This indicates that the numerous solvent-alcohol interactions are less significant than the quinone-alcohol hydrogen-bonding interactions. The utility of ΔEp (red) was illustrated by comparisons between 1) 3,3,3-trifluoro-n-propanol and 1,3-difluoroisopropanol and 2) ethylene glycol and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Neutron Crystallography for the Study of Hydrogen Bonds in Macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esko Oksanen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The hydrogen bond (H bond is one of the most important interactions that form the foundation of secondary and tertiary protein structure. Beyond holding protein structures together, H bonds are also intimately involved in solvent coordination, ligand binding, and enzyme catalysis. The H bond by definition involves the light atom, H, and it is very difficult to study directly, especially with X-ray crystallographic techniques, due to the poor scattering power of H atoms. Neutron protein crystallography provides a powerful, complementary tool that can give unambiguous information to structural biologists on solvent organization and coordination, the electrostatics of ligand binding, the protonation states of amino acid side chains and catalytic water species. The method is complementary to X-ray crystallography and the dynamic data obtainable with NMR spectroscopy. Also, as it gives explicit H atom positions, it can be very valuable to computational chemistry where exact knowledge of protonation and solvent orientation can make a large difference in modeling. This article gives general information about neutron crystallography and shows specific examples of how the method has contributed to structural biology, structure-based drug design; and the understanding of fundamental questions of reaction mechanisms.

  9. Short hydrogen bonds in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR LESKOVAC

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The survey of crystallographic data from the Protein Data Bank for 37 structures of trypsin and other serine proteases at a resolution of 0.78–1.28 Å revealed the presence of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the enzymes, which are formed between the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues and are on average 2.7 Å long. This is the typical bond length for normal hydrogen bonds. The geometric properties of the hydrogen bonds in the active site indicate that the H atom is not centered between the heteroatoms of the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues in the active site. Taken together, these findings exclude the possibility that short “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds are formed in the ground state structure of the active sites examined in this work. Some time ago, it was suggested by Cleland that the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis is operative in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases, and requires the presence of short hydrogen bonds around 2.4 Å long in the active site, with the H atom centered between the catalytic heteroatoms. The conclusions drawn from this work do not exclude the validity of the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis at all, but they merely do not support it in this particular case, with this particular class of enzymes.

  10. Hydrogen bonding characterization in water and small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi

    2017-06-01

    The prototypical hydrogen bond in water dimer and hydrogen bonds in the protonated water dimer, in other small molecules, in water cyclic clusters, and in ice, covering a wide range of bond strengths, are theoretically investigated by first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, considering not only a standard generalized gradient approximation functional but also, for the water dimer, hybrid and van der Waals corrected functionals. We compute structural, energetic, and electrostatic (induced molecular dipole moments) properties. In particular, hydrogen bonds are characterized in terms of differential electron density distributions and profiles, and of the shifts of the centres of maximally localized Wannier functions. The information from the latter quantities can be conveyed to a single geometric bonding parameter that appears to be correlated with the Mayer bond order parameter and can be taken as an estimate of the covalent contribution to the hydrogen bond. By considering the water trimer, the cyclic water hexamer, and the hexagonal phase of ice, we also elucidate the importance of cooperative/anticooperative effects in hydrogen-bonding formation.

  11. Cocrystals of 5-fluorocytosine. I. Coformers with fixed hydrogen-bonding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutughamiarso, Maya; Wagner, Guido; Egert, Ernst

    2012-08-01

    The antifungal drug 5-fluorocytosine (4-amino-5-fluoro-1,2-dihydropyrimidin-2-one) was cocrystallized with five complementary compounds in order to better understand its drug-receptor interaction. The first two compounds, 2-aminopyrimidine (2-amino-1,3-diazine) and N-acetylcreatinine (N-acetyl-2-amino-1-methyl-5H-imidazol-4-one), exhibit donor-acceptor sites for R(2)(2)(8) heterodimer formation with 5-fluorocytosine. Such a heterodimer is observed in the cocrystal with 2-aminopyrimidine (I); in contrast, 5-fluorocytosine and N-acetylcreatinine [which forms homodimers in its crystal structure (II)] are connected only by a single hydrogen bond in (III). The other three compounds 6-aminouracil (6-amino-2,4-pyrimidinediol), 6-aminoisocytosine (2,6-diamino-3H-pyrimidin-4-one) and acyclovir [acycloguanosine or 2-amino-9-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-1,9-dihydro-6H-purin-6-one] possess donor-donor-acceptor sites; therefore, they can interact with 5-fluorocytosine to form a heterodimer linked by three hydrogen bonds. In the cocrystals with 6-aminoisocytosine (Va)-(Vd), as well as in the cocrystal with the antiviral drug acyclovir (VII), the desired heterodimers are observed. However, they are not formed in the cocrystal with 6-aminouracil (IV), where the components are connected by two hydrogen bonds. In addition, a solvent-free structure of acyclovir (VI) was obtained. A comparison of the calculated energies released during dimer formation helped to rationalize the preference for hydrogen-bonding interactions in the various cocrystal structures.

  12. Role of hydrogen bonds in the reaction mechanism of chalcone isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jez, Joseph M; Bowman, Marianne E; Noel, Joseph P

    2002-04-23

    In flavonoid, isoflavonoid, and anthocyanin biosynthesis, chalcone isomerase (CHI) catalyzes the intramolecular cyclization of chalcones into (S)-flavanones with a second-order rate constant that approaches the diffusion-controlled limit. The three-dimensional structures of alfalfa CHI complexed with different flavanones indicate that two sets of hydrogen bonds may possess critical roles in catalysis. The first set of interactions includes two conserved amino acids (Thr48 and Tyr106) that mediate a hydrogen bond network with two active site water molecules. The second set of hydrogen bonds occurs between the flavanone 7-hydroxyl group and two active site residues (Asn113 and Thr190). Comparison of the steady-state kinetic parameters of wild-type and mutant CHIs demonstrates that efficient cyclization of various chalcones into their respective flavanones requires both sets of contacts. For example, the T48A, T48S, Y106F, N113A, and T190A mutants exhibit 1550-, 3-, 30-, 7-, and 6-fold reductions in k(cat) and 2-3-fold changes in K(m) with 4,2',4'-trihydroxychalcone as a substrate. Kinetic comparisons of the pH-dependence of the reactions catalyzed by wild-type and mutant enzymes indicate that the active site hydrogen bonds contributed by these four residues do not significantly alter the pK(a) of the intramolecular cyclization reaction. Determinations of solvent kinetic isotope and solvent viscosity effects for wild-type and mutant enzymes reveal a change from a diffusion-controlled reaction to one limited by chemistry in the T48A and Y106F mutants. The X-ray crystal structures of the T48A and Y106F mutants support the assertion that the observed kinetic effects result from the loss of key hydrogen bonds at the CHI active site. Our results are consistent with a reaction mechanism for CHI in which Thr48 polarizes the ketone of the substrate and Tyr106 stabilizes a key catalytic water molecule. Hydrogen bonds contributed by Asn113 and Thr190 provide additional

  13. Does the Intramolecular Hydrogen Bond Affect the Spectroscopic Properties of Bicyclic Diazole Heterocycles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Misiak

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond in pyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrazin-1(2H-one bicyclic diazoles was analyzed, and the influence of N-substitution on HB formation is discussed in this study. B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations were performed for the diazole, and the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM approach as well as the natural bond orbital (NBO method was applied to analyze the strength of this interaction. It was found that the intramolecular hydrogen bond that closes an extra ring between the C=O proton acceptor group and the CH proton donor, that is, C=O⋯H–C, influences the spectroscopic properties of pyrrolopyrazine bicyclic diazoles, particularly the carbonyl frequencies. The influence of N-substitution on the aromaticity of heterocyclic rings is also discussed in this report.

  14. A third-generation dispersion and third-generation hydrogen bonding corrected PM6 method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Jimmy Charnley; Christensen, Anders Steen; Svendsen, Casper Steinmann

    2014-01-01

    We present new dispersion and hydrogen bond corrections to the PM6 method, PM6-D3H+, and its implementation in the GAMESS program. The method combines the DFT-D3 dispersion correction by Grimme et al. with a modified version of the H+ hydrogen bond correction by Korth. Overall, the interaction...... in GAMESS, while the corresponding numbers for PM6-DH+ implemented in MOPAC are 54, 17, 15, and 2. The PM6-D3H+ method as implemented in GAMESS offers an attractive alternative to PM6-DH+ in MOPAC in cases where the LBFGS optimizer must be used and a vibrational analysis is needed, e.g., when computing...... vibrational free energies. While the GAMESS implementation is up to 10 times slower for geometry optimizations of proteins in bulk solvent, compared to MOPAC, it is sufficiently fast to make geometry optimizations of small proteins practically feasible....

  15. Ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics and the quantum nature of hydrogen bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yexin; Chen Ji; Wang Enge; Li Xin-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen bond (HB) is an important type of intermolecular interaction, which is generally weak, ubiquitous, and essential to life on earth. The small mass of hydrogen means that many properties of HBs are quantum mechanical in nature. In recent years, because of the development of computer simulation methods and computational power, the influence of nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) on the structural and energetic properties of some hydrogen bonded systems has been intensively studied. Here, we present a review of these studies by focussing on the explanation of the principles underlying the simulation methods, i.e., the ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics. Its extension in combination with the thermodynamic integration method for the calculation of free energies will also be introduced. We use two examples to show how this influence of NQEs in realistic systems is simulated in practice. (topical review)

  16. Biasing hydrogen bond donating host systems towards chemical warfare agent recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscock, Jennifer R; Wells, Neil J; Ede, Jayne A; Gale, Philip A; Sambrook, Mark R

    2016-10-12

    A series of neutral ditopic and negatively charged, monotopic host molecules have been evaluated for their ability to bind chloride and dihydrogen phosphate anions, and neutral organophosphorus species dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), pinacolyl methylphosphonate (PMP) and the chemical warfare agent (CWA) pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate (GD, soman) in organic solvent via hydrogen bonding. Urea, thiourea and boronic acid groups are shown to bind anions and neutral guests through the formation of hydrogen bonds, with the urea and thiourea groups typically exhibiting higher affinity interactions. The introduction of a negative charge on the host structure is shown to decrease anion affinity, whilst still allowing for high stability host-GD complex formation. Importantly, the affinity of the host for the neutral CWA GD is greater than for anionic guests, thus demonstrating the potential for selectivity reversal based on charge repulsion.

  17. Studies of Hydrogen Bonding Between N, N-Dimethylacetamide and Primary Alcohols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Manjunath

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen bonding between N, N-dimethylacetamide (DMA and alcohols has been studied in carbon tetrachloride solution by an X-band Microwave bench at 936GHz. The dielectric relaxation time (τ of the binary system are obtained by both Higasi's method and Gopalakrishna method. The most likely association complex between alcohol and DMA is 1:1 stoichiometric complex through the hydroxyl group of the alcohol and the carbonyl group of amide. The results show that the interaction between alcohols and amides is 1:1 complex through the free hydroxyl group of the alcohol and the carbonyl group of amide and the alkyl chain-length of both the alcohols and amide plays an important role in the determination of the strength of hydrogen bond (O-H: C=O formed and suggests that the proton donating ability of alcohols is in the order: 1-propanol < 1-butanol < 1-pentanol and the accepting ability of DMA.

  18. Examining student heuristic usage in a hydrogen bonding assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kathryn; Kim, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    This study investigates the role of representational competence in student responses to an assessment of hydrogen bonding. The assessment couples the use of a multiple-select item ("Choose all that apply") with an open-ended item to allow for an examination of students' cognitive processes as they relate to the assignment of hydrogen bonding within a structural representation. Response patterns from the multiple-select item implicate heuristic usage as a contributing factor to students' incorrect responses. The use of heuristics is further supported by the students' corresponding responses to the open-ended assessment item. Taken together, these data suggest that poor representational competence may contribute to students' previously observed inability to correctly navigate the concept of hydrogen bonding. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(5):411-416, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Reassigning hydrogen-bond centering in dense ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, Magali; Romero, Aldo H.; Marx, Dominik

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds in H 2 O ice change dramatically upon compression. Thereby a hydrogen-bonded molecular crystal, ice VII, is transformed to an atomic crystal, ice X. Car-Parrinello simulations reproduce the features of the x-ray diffraction spectra up to about 170 GPa but allow for analysis in real space. Starting from molecular ice VII with static orientational disorder, dynamical translational disordering occurs first via creation of ionic defects, which results in a systematic violation of the ice rules. As a second step, the transformation to an atomic solid and thus hydrogen-bond centering occurs around 110 GPa at 300 K and no novel phase is found up to at least 170 GPa

  20. Trimeric Hydrogen Bond in Geometrically Frustrated Hydroxyl Cobalt Halogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Dong, Liu; Masato, Hagihala; Xu-Guang, Zheng; Dong-Dong, Meng; Wan-Jun, Tao; Sen-Lin, Zhang; Qi-Xin, Guo

    2011-01-01

    The mid-infrared absorption spectra of geometrically frustrated hydroxyl cobalt halogenides Co 2 (OH) 3 Cl and Co 2 (OH) 3 Br are measured by FTIR spectrometers, and the stretching vibrational modes of hydroxyl groups are found to be 3549cm −1 and 3524cm −1 respectively. Through finding their true terminal O-H group stretching vibration frequencies, we obtain 107cm −1 and 99cm −1 red shift caused by the corresponding O-H···Cl and O-H···Br hydrogen bonds. Rarely reported trimeric hydrogen bonds (Co 3 ≡O-H) 3 ···Cl/Br are pointed out to demonstrate the relative weakness of this kind of hydrogen bond which may have a critical effect on the lattice symmetry and magnetic structures. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  1. Positively charged phosphorus as a hydrogen bond acceptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Schou; Du, Lin; Kjærgaard, Henrik Grum

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an element that is essential to the life of all organisms, and the atmospheric detection of phosphine suggests the existence of a volatile biogeochemical P cycle. Here, we investigate the ability of P to participate in the formation of OH···P hydrogen bonds. Three bimolecular......-stretching frequency red shifts and quantum chemical calculations, we find that P is an acceptor atom similar in strength to O and S and that all three P, O, and S atoms are weaker acceptors than N. The quantum chemical calculations show that both H and P in the OH···P hydrogen bond have partial positive charges......, as expected from their electronegativities. However, the electrostatic potentials show a negative potential area on the electron density surface around P that facilitates formation of hydrogen bonds....

  2. [Cleavage time for a hydrogen bond under a load].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalov, S V; Tolpygo, K B

    1993-01-01

    Statistics of the hydrogen bond formation and break in a bundle of actin and myosin filaments realizing the attractive force in the sarcomere of a muscle is studied. Purely mechanical problem of the attractive-force formation and motion of myosin heads and action globules under their action is supplemented by accounting for the irreversible processes: 1. Thermal de-excitation of the latter in the chain of hydrogen bond during the elementary act of the ATP energy use resulting in fixing the extended actin filament. 2. Break of the hydrogen bonds, realizing this fixing, due to thermal fluctuations for the time tau. The average life-time turns out to be the order of time necessary for the movement of z-membrane sarcomere for the value of action filament extension delta 1, which is necessary for the process of muscle contraction to be continued.

  3. Deuteriation of an asymmetric short hydrogen bond. X-ray crystal structure of KF.(CH2CO2D)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emsley, J.; Jones, D.J.; Kuroda, R.

    1981-01-01

    Deuteriation of the strong hydrogen bonds of KF.(CH 2 CO 2 H) 2 shows no isotope effect on the bond lengths. The only significant change is in the bond angle at the fluoride ion which widens to 128.5 from 116 0 . The i.r. spectrum shows very little change. Since the O-H ... F - hydrogen bonds are highly asymmetric, these observations challenge previous predictions about the effects of deuteriation on such bonds. (author)

  4. Effect of solvent on proton location and dynamic behavior in short intramolecular hydrogen bonds studied by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Yukie, E-mail: mori.yukie@ocha.ac.jp; Masuda, Yuichi

    2015-09-08

    Highlights: • MD simulations were performed to study dynamics of strong hydrogen bonds. • Nuclear magnetic relaxation times of proton were measured in solution. • The hydrogen bond of dibenzoylmethane enol is asymmetric in methanol solution. • Formation or breakage of intermolecular hydrogen bonds can trigger proton transfer. • Dimethylsulfoxide may form a bifurcated hydrogen bond with a hydrogen-bonded system. - Abstract: Hydrogen phthalate anion has a short strong O–H–O hydrogen bond (H-bond). According to previous experimental studies, the H-bond is asymmetric and two tautomers are interconverted in aqueous solutions. In the present study, the effects of polar solvents on the H-bond in a zwitterionic hydrogen phthalate derivative 1 were investigated by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The analyses of the trajectories for the methanol solution showed that the H-bonding proton tends to be located closer to the carboxylate group that forms fewer intermolecular H-bonds, than to the other carboxylate group and that the intramolecular proton transfer in 1 is triggered by the breakage and/or formation of an intermolecular H-bond. The enol form of dibenzoylmethane (2) also has a short H-bond, and the OH bond is reported to be rather long (>1.1 Å) in the crystal. In the present study, the effects of the solvent on the H-bond in 2 were investigated by molecular orbital (MO) calculations, MD simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations for 2 in vacuum indicated that the barrier height for the intramolecular proton transfer is almost the same as the zero-point energy of the vibrational ground state, resulting in broad distribution of the proton density along the H-bond, owing to the nuclear quantum effect. The OH distances were determined in CCl{sub 4}, acetonitrile, and dimethylsulfoxide solutions from the magnetic dipolar interactions between the {sup 17

  5. Effect of solvent on proton location and dynamic behavior in short intramolecular hydrogen bonds studied by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Yukie; Masuda, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • MD simulations were performed to study dynamics of strong hydrogen bonds. • Nuclear magnetic relaxation times of proton were measured in solution. • The hydrogen bond of dibenzoylmethane enol is asymmetric in methanol solution. • Formation or breakage of intermolecular hydrogen bonds can trigger proton transfer. • Dimethylsulfoxide may form a bifurcated hydrogen bond with a hydrogen-bonded system. - Abstract: Hydrogen phthalate anion has a short strong O–H–O hydrogen bond (H-bond). According to previous experimental studies, the H-bond is asymmetric and two tautomers are interconverted in aqueous solutions. In the present study, the effects of polar solvents on the H-bond in a zwitterionic hydrogen phthalate derivative 1 were investigated by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The analyses of the trajectories for the methanol solution showed that the H-bonding proton tends to be located closer to the carboxylate group that forms fewer intermolecular H-bonds, than to the other carboxylate group and that the intramolecular proton transfer in 1 is triggered by the breakage and/or formation of an intermolecular H-bond. The enol form of dibenzoylmethane (2) also has a short H-bond, and the OH bond is reported to be rather long (>1.1 Å) in the crystal. In the present study, the effects of the solvent on the H-bond in 2 were investigated by molecular orbital (MO) calculations, MD simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations for 2 in vacuum indicated that the barrier height for the intramolecular proton transfer is almost the same as the zero-point energy of the vibrational ground state, resulting in broad distribution of the proton density along the H-bond, owing to the nuclear quantum effect. The OH distances were determined in CCl 4 , acetonitrile, and dimethylsulfoxide solutions from the magnetic dipolar interactions between the 17 O and 1

  6. Ultrafast Hydrogen-Bonding Dynamics in Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Ileana M; Ma, Jianqiang; Mukherjee, Debopreeti; Gai, Feng

    2018-06-08

    While there are many studies on the subject of hydrogen bonding dynamics in biological systems, few, if any, have investigated this fundamental process in amyloid fibrils. Herein, we seek to add insight into this topic by assessing the dynamics of a hydrogen bond buried in the dry interface of amyloid fibrils. To prepare a suitable model peptide system for this purpose, we introduce two mutations into the amyloid-forming Aβ(16-22) peptide. The first one is a lysine analog at position 19, which is used to help form structurally homogeneous fibrils, and the second one is an aspartic acid derivative (DM) at position 17, which is intended (1) to be used as a site-specific infrared probe and (2) to serve as a hydrogen-bond acceptor to lysine so that an inter-β-sheet hydrogen bond can be formed in the fibrils. Using both infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, we show that (1) this mutant peptide indeed forms well defined fibrils, (2) when bulk solvent is removed, there is no detectable water present in the fibrils, (3) infrared results obtained with the DM probe are consistent with a protofibril structure that is composed of two antiparallel β-sheets stacked in a parallel fashion, leading to formation of the expected hydrogen bond. Using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, we further show that the dynamics of this hydrogen bond occur on a timescale of ~2.3 ps, which is attributed to the rapid rotation of the -NH3+ group of lysine around its Cε-Nζ bond. Taken together, these results suggest that (1) DM is a useful infrared marker in facilitating structure determination of amyloid fibrils and (2) even in the tightly packed core of amyloid fibrils certain amino acid sidechains can undergo ultrafast motions, hence contributing to the thermodynamic stability of the system.

  7. Physics challenges in the strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, S.D.

    1992-01-01

    The study of strong interactions is now a mature field for which scientist now know that the correct underlying theory is QCD. Here, an overview of the challenges to be faced in the area of the strong interactions during the 1990's is presented. As an illustrative example special attention is given to the analysis of jets as studied at hadron colliders

  8. Physics challenges in the strong interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, S.D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The study of strong interactions is now a mature field for which scientist now know that the correct underlying theory is QCD. Here, an overview of the challenges to be faced in the area of the strong interactions during the 1990`s is presented. As an illustrative example special attention is given to the analysis of jets as studied at hadron colliders.

  9. Solute's perspective on how trimethylamine oxide, urea, and guanidine hydrochloride affect water's hydrogen bonding ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Ileana M; Gai, Feng

    2012-10-18

    While the thermodynamic effects of trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), urea, and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) on protein stability are well understood, the underlying mechanisms of action are less well characterized and, in some cases, even under debate. Herein, we employ the stretching vibration of two infrared (IR) reporters, i.e., nitrile (C≡N) and carbonyl (C═O), to directly probe how these cosolvents mediate the ability of water to form hydrogen bonds with the solute of interest, e.g., a peptide. Our results show that these three agents, despite having different effects on protein stability, all act to decrease the strength of the hydrogen bonds formed between water and the infrared probe. While the behavior of TMAO appears to be consistent with its protein-protecting ability, those of urea and GdnHCl are inconsistent with their role as protein denaturants. The latter is of particular interest as it provides strong evidence indicating that although urea and GdnHCl can perturb the hydrogen-bonding property of water their protein-denaturing ability does not arise from a simple indirect mechanism.

  10. Hydrogen bonded nonlinear optical γ-glycine: Crystal growth and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana Moolya, B.; Jayarama, A.; Sureshkumar, M. R.; Dharmaprakash, S. M.

    2005-07-01

    Single crystals of γ-glycine(GG) were grown by solvent evaporation technique from a mixture of aqueous solutions of glycine and ammonium nitrate at ambient temperature. X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectral techniques were employed to characterize the crystal. The lattice parameters were calculated and they agree well with the reported values. GG exists as dipolar ions in which the carboxyl group is present as a carboxylate ion and the amino group as an ammonium ion. Due to this dipolar nature, glycine has a high decomposition temperature. The UV cutoff of GG is below 300 nm and has a wide transparency window, which is suitable for second harmonic generation of laser in the blue region. Nonlinear optical characteristics of GG were studied using Q switched Nd:YAG laser ( λ=1064 nm). The second harmonic generation conversion efficiency of GG is 1.5 times that of potassium dihydrogen phosphate . The X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectral studies show the presence of strong hydrogen bonds which create and stabilize the crystal structure in GG. The main contributions to the nonlinear optical properties in GG results from the presence of the hydrogen bond and from the vibrational part due to very intense infrared bands of the hydrogen bond vibrations. GG is thermally stable up to 441 K.

  11. Probing the Watson-Crick, wobble, and sugar-edge hydrogen bond sites of uracil and thymine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Andreas; Frey, Jann A; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2005-06-16

    The nucleobases uracil (U) and thymine (T) offer three hydrogen-bonding sites for double H-bond formation via neighboring N-H and C=O groups, giving rise to the Watson-Crick, wobble and sugar-edge hydrogen bond isomers. We probe the hydrogen bond properties of all three sites by forming hydrogen bonded dimers of U, 1-methyluracil (1MU), 3-methyluracil (3MU), and T with 2-pyridone (2PY). The mass- and isomer-specific S1 origins exhibit large spectral blue shifts relative to the 2PY monomer. Ab initio CIS calculations of the spectral shifts of the different hydrogen-bonded dimers show a linear correlation with experiment. This correlation allows us to identify the R2PI spectra of the weakly populated Watson-Crick and wobble isomers of both 2PY.U and 2PY.T. (3) PW91 density functional calculation of the ground-state binding and dissociation energies De and D0 are in agreement with the assignment of the dominant hydrogen bond isomers of 2PY.U, 2PY.3MU and 2PY.T as the sugar-edge form. For 2PY.U, 2PY.T and 2PY.1MU the measured wobble:Watson-Crick:sugar-edge isomer ratios are in good agreement with the calculated ratios, based on the ab initio dissociation energies and gas-phase statistical mechanics. The Watson-Crick and wobble isomers are thereby determined to be several kcal/mol less strongly bound than the sugar-edge isomers. The 36 observed intermolecular frequencies of the nine different H-bonded isomers give detailed insight into the intermolecular force field.

  12. A Protein Data Bank survey reveals shortening of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in ligand-protein complexes when a halogenated ligand is an H-bond donor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Poznański

    Full Text Available Halogen bonding in ligand-protein complexes is currently widely exploited, e.g. in drug design or supramolecular chemistry. But little attention has been directed to other effects that may result from replacement of a hydrogen by a strongly electronegative halogen. Analysis of almost 30000 hydrogen bonds between protein and ligand demonstrates that the length of a hydrogen bond depends on the type of donor-acceptor pair. Interestingly, lengths of hydrogen bonds between a protein and a halogenated ligand are visibly shorter than those estimated for the same family of proteins in complexes with non-halogenated ligands. Taking into account the effect of halogenation on hydrogen bonding is thus important when evaluating structural and/or energetic parameters of ligand-protein complexes. All these observations are consistent with the concept that halogenation increases the acidity of the proximal amino/imino/hydroxyl groups and thus makes them better, i.e. stronger, H-bond donors.

  13. A Protein Data Bank survey reveals shortening of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in ligand-protein complexes when a halogenated ligand is an H-bond donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznański, Jarosław; Poznańska, Anna; Shugar, David

    2014-01-01

    Halogen bonding in ligand-protein complexes is currently widely exploited, e.g. in drug design or supramolecular chemistry. But little attention has been directed to other effects that may result from replacement of a hydrogen by a strongly electronegative halogen. Analysis of almost 30000 hydrogen bonds between protein and ligand demonstrates that the length of a hydrogen bond depends on the type of donor-acceptor pair. Interestingly, lengths of hydrogen bonds between a protein and a halogenated ligand are visibly shorter than those estimated for the same family of proteins in complexes with non-halogenated ligands. Taking into account the effect of halogenation on hydrogen bonding is thus important when evaluating structural and/or energetic parameters of ligand-protein complexes. All these observations are consistent with the concept that halogenation increases the acidity of the proximal amino/imino/hydroxyl groups and thus makes them better, i.e. stronger, H-bond donors.

  14. Hydrogen-bond network and pH sensitivity in human transthyretin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Takeshi, E-mail: tyokoya3@pha.u-toyama.ac.jp; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Nabeshima, Yuko [University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0914 (Japan); Kusaka, Katsuhiro; Yamada, Taro [Ibaraki University, 162-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Hosoya, Takaaki [Ibaraki University, 162-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Ibaraki University, 4-12-1 Naka-Narusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Ohhara, Takashi [Comprehensive Research Organization for Science and Society, 162-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Kurihara, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Tanaka, Ichiro [Ibaraki University, 162-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Ibaraki University, 4-12-1 Naka-Narusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Niimura, Nobuo [Ibaraki University, 162-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The neutron crystal structure of human transthyretin is presented. Transthyretin (TTR) is a tetrameric protein. TTR misfolding and aggregation are associated with human amyloid diseases. Dissociation of the TTR tetramer is believed to be the rate-limiting step in the amyloid fibril formation cascade. Low pH is known to promote dissociation into monomer and the formation of amyloid fibrils. In order to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying pH sensitivity and structural stabilities of TTR, neutron diffraction studies were conducted using the IBARAKI Biological Crystal Diffractometer with the time-of-flight method. Crystals for the neutron diffraction experiments were grown up to 2.5 mm{sup 3} for four months. The neutron crystal structure solved at 2.0 Å revealed the protonation states of His88 and the detailed hydrogen-bond network depending on the protonation states of His88. This hydrogen-bond network is involved in monomer–monomer and dimer–dimer interactions, suggesting that the double protonation of His88 by acidification breaks the hydrogen-bond network and causes the destabilization of the TTR tetramer. Structural comparison with the X-ray crystal structure at acidic pH identified the three amino acid residues responsible for the pH sensitivity of TTR. Our neutron model provides insights into the molecular stability related to amyloidosis.

  15. Infrared matrix isolation study of hydrogen bonds involving C-H bonds: Substituent effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeng, M.L.H.; Ault, B.S.

    1989-01-01

    The matrix isolation technique combined with infrared spectroscopy has been employed to isolate and characterize hydrogen-bonded complexes between a series of substituted alkynes and several oxygen and nitrogen bases. Distinct evidence for hydrogen bond formation was observed in each case, with a characteristic red shift of the hydrogen stretching motion ν r . Shifts between 100 and 300 cm -1 were observed, the largest being for the complex of CF 3 CCH with (CH 3 ) 3 N. The perturbed carbon-carbon triple bond stretching vibration was observed for most complexes, as was the alkynic hydrogen bending motion. Attempts were made to correlate the magnitude of the red shift of ν s with substituent constants for the different substituted alkynes; a roughly linear correlation was found with the Hammett σ parameter. Lack of correlation Δν s with either σ 1 or σ R alone suggests that both inductive and resonance contributions to the strength of the hydrogen-bonding interaction are important

  16. Algebra of strong and electroweak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolokhov, S.V.; Vladimirov, Yu.S.

    2004-01-01

    The algebraic approach to describing the electroweak and strong interactions is considered within the frames of the binary geometrophysics, based on the principles of the Fokker-Feynman direct interparticle interaction theories of the Kaluza-Klein multidimensional geometrical models and the physical structures theory. It is shown that in this approach the electroweak and strong elementary particles interaction through the intermediate vector bosons, are characterized by the subtypes of the algebraic classification of the complex 3 x 3-matrices [ru

  17. Supramolecular materials based on hydrogen-bonded polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brinke, Gerrit; Ruokolainen, Janne; Ikkala, Olli; Binder, W

    2007-01-01

    Combining supramolecular principles with block copolymer self-assembly offers unique possibilities to create materials with responsive and/or tunable properties. The present chapter focuses on supramolecular materials based on hydrogen bonding and (block co-) polymers. Several cases will be

  18. Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding of unlocked nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Niels; Wengel, Jesper; Pasternak, Anna

    2015-01-01

    We herein describe the synthesis of two new unlocked nucleic acid building blocks containing hypoxanthine and 2,6-diaminopurine as nucleobase moieties and their incorporation into oligonucleotides. The modified oligonucleotides were used to examine the thermodynamic properties of UNA against unmo...... unmodified oligonucleotides and the resulting thermodynamic data support that the hydrogen bonding face of UNA is Watson-Crick like....

  19. Binding of reactive organophosphate by oximes via hydrogen bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this contribution, the ability of simple oximes to bind a well-known nerve agent simulant (dimethylmethylphosphonate, DMMP) via hydrogen bond is reported. UV/Vis measurements indicate the formation of 1:1 complexes. 1H-, 31P-NMR titrations and T-ROESY experiments confirm that oximes bind the organophosphate ...

  20. Formation of a hydrogen-bonded barbiturate [2]-rotaxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tron, Arnaud; Thornton, Peter J; Rocher, Mathias; Jacquot de Rouville, Henri-Pierre; Desvergne, Jean-Pierre; Kauffmann, Brice; Buffeteau, Thierry; Cavagnat, Dominique; Tucker, James H R; McClenaghan, Nathan D

    2014-03-07

    Interlocked structures containing the classic Hamilton barbiturate binding motif comprising two 2,6-diamidopyridine units are reported for the first time. Stable [2]-rotaxanes can be accessed either through hydrogen-bonded preorganization by a barbiturate thread followed by a Cu(+)-catalyzed "click" stoppering reaction or by a Cu(2+)-mediated Glaser homocoupling reaction.

  1. thermodynamic stability of hydrogen-bonded nanostructures: a calorimetric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Cate, M.G.J.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Crego Calama, Mercedes; Reinhoudt, David

    2004-01-01

    The self-assembly of hydrogen-bonded aggregates (rosettes) in solvent mixtures of different polarity has been studied by calorimetry. The C50 parameter, the concentration when 50 % of the components are incorporated in the assembly, is used to compare assemblies with different stoichiometry. C50 for

  2. Controlling the amplification of chirality in hydrogen-bonded assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateos timoneda, Miguel; Crego Calama, Mercedes; Reinhoudt, David

    2005-01-01

    The amplification of chirality (a high enantiomeric or diastereomeric excess induced by a small initial amount of chiral bias) on hydrogen-bonded assemblies has been studied using “sergeants-and-soldiers” experiments under thermodynamically controlled conditions. Here it is shown that different

  3. Amplification of Chirality in Hydrogen-Bonded Tetrarosette Helices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateos timoneda, Miguel; Crego Calama, Mercedes; Reinhoudt, David

    2006-01-01

    The amplification of chirality in hydrogen-bonded tetrarosette assemblies under thermodynamic equilibrium is described. The extent of the chiral amplification obtained by means of “sergeants-and-soldiers” experiments depends only on the structure of the assembly and it is independent of the

  4. Hydrogen Bonding in Phosphine Oxide/Phosphate-Phenol Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuypers, R.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Zuilhof, H.

    2010-01-01

    To develop a new solvent-impregnated resin (SIR) system for the removal of phenols and thiophenols from water, complex formation by hydrogen bonding of phosphine oxides and phosphates is studied using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and quantum chemical modeling. Six different computational

  5. Effects of ion concentration on the hydrogen bonded structure of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Effects of ion concentration on the hydrogen bonded structure of water in the vicinity of ions in aqueous NaCl solutions. A NAG. 1. , D CHAKRABORTY and A CHANDRA*. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016. 1. Present address: Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering,.

  6. OH stretching frequencies in systems with intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens; Hansen, Bjarke Knud Vilster; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2011-01-01

    OH stretching wavenumbers were investigated for 30 species with intramolecularly hydrogen bonded hydroxyl groups, covering the range from 3600 to ca. 1900 cm-1. Theoretical wavenumbers were predicted with B3LYP/6-31G(d) density functional theory using the standard harmonic approximation, as well...

  7. Polarization-induced sigma-holes and hydrogen bonding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hennemann, M.; Murray, J. S.; Politzer, P.; Riley, Kevin Eugene; Clark, T.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 6 (2012), s. 2461-2469 ISSN 1610-2940 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : hydrogen bond * sigma-hole * polarization * field effect * ab initio calculation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.984, year: 2012

  8. Polyamides : hydrogen bonding, the Brill transition, and superheated water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra - Vinken, E.

    2008-01-01

    Aliphatic polyamide, commonly known as nylon, was the world’s first synthetic fiber and has found its largest application range in tires, carpets, stockings, upholstery, and adhesives. All polyamides have a recurring amide group (–CONH–) present in the molecular structure with hydrogen bonds between

  9. Hydrogen bonding of formamide, urea, urea monoxide and their thio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ab initio and DFT methods have been employed to study the hydrogen bonding ability of formamide, urea, urea monoxide, thioformamide, thiourea and thiourea monoxide with one water molecule and the homodimers of the selected molecules. The stabilization energies associated with themonohydrated adducts and ...

  10. A novel hydrogen-bonded cyclic dibromide in an organic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel, Olshausenstraße 40, D-24098 ... H2O molecules are linked to bromide anions via O–H⋅⋅⋅Br hydrogen bonding ..... Weiss R, Reichel S, Handlke M and Hampel F 1998.

  11. Microstructure and hydrogen bonding in water-acetonitrile mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountain, Raymond D

    2010-12-16

    The connection of hydrogen bonding between water and acetonitrile in determining the microheterogeneity of the liquid mixture is examined using NPT molecular dynamics simulations. Mixtures for six, rigid, three-site models for acetonitrile and one water model (SPC/E) were simulated to determine the amount of water-acetonitrile hydrogen bonding. Only one of the six acetonitrile models (TraPPE-UA) was able to reproduce both the liquid density and the experimental estimates of hydrogen bonding derived from Raman scattering of the CN stretch band or from NMR quadrupole relaxation measurements. A simple modification of the acetonitrile model parameters for the models that provided poor estimates produced hydrogen-bonding results consistent with experiments for two of the models. Of these, only one of the modified models also accurately determined the density of the mixtures. The self-diffusion coefficient of liquid acetonitrile provided a final winnowing of the modified model and the successful, unmodified model. The unmodified model is provisionally recommended for simulations of water-acetonitrile mixtures.

  12. Hydrogen bonds in concreto and in computro: the sequel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouten, Pieter F. W.; Van Eijck, Bouke P.; Kroon, Jan

    1991-02-01

    In the framework of our comparative research concerning hydrogen bonding in the crystalline and liquid phases we have carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid methanol. Six different rigid three site models are compared. Five of them had been reported in the literature and one (OM2) we developed by a fit to the experimental molar volume, heat of vaporization and neutron weighted radial distribution function. In general the agreement with experiment is satisfactory for the different models. None of the models has an explicit hydrogen bond potential, but five of the six models show a degree of hydrogen bonding comparable to experiments on liquid methanol. The analysis of the simulation hydrogen bonds indicates that there is a distinct preference of the O⋯O axis to lie in the acceptor lone pairs plane, but hardly any for the lone pair directions. Ab initio calculations and crystal structure statistics of OH⋯O hydrogen bonds agree with this observation. The O⋯O hydrogen bond length distributions are similar for most models. The crystal structures show a sharper O⋯O distribution. Explicit introduction of harmonic motion with a quite realistic root mean square amplitude of 0.08 Å to the thermally averaged crystal distribution results in a distribution comparable to OM2 although the maximum of the former is found at shorter distance. On the basis of the analysis of the static properties of all models we conclude that our OM2, Jorgenson's OPLS and Haughney, Ferrario and McDonald's HFM1 models are good candidates for simulations of liquid methanol under isothermal, isochoric conditions. Partly flexible and completely rigid OM2 are simulated at constant pressure and with fixed volume. The flexible simulations give essentially the same (correct) results under both conditions, which is not surprising because the flexible form was fitted under both conditions. Rigid OM2 has a similar potential energy but larger pressure in the

  13. Physics challenges in the strong interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, S.D.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the challenges to be faced in the area of the strong interactions during the 1990`s is presented. As an illustrative example special attention is given to the analysis of jets as studied at hadron colliders.

  14. Physics challenges in the strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, S.D.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the challenges to be faced in the area of the strong interactions during the 1990's is presented. As an illustrative example special attention is given to the analysis of jets as studied at hadron colliders

  15. Strong interaction effects in hadronic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    The WKB method is applied to the calculation of strong interaction-induced level widths and shifts of hadronic atoms. The calculation, while elementary enough for undergraduate quantum mechanics students, gives a good account of kaonic and antiprotonic atom data

  16. The Charm and Beauty of Strong Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bennich, Bruno

    2018-01-01

    We briefly review common features and overlapping issues in hadron and flavor physics focussing on continuum QCD approaches to heavy bound states, their mass spectrum and weak decay constants in different strong interaction models.

  17. In situ ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering study under uniaxial stretching of colloidal crystals prepared by silica nanoparticles bearing hydrogen-bonding polymer grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryohei Ishige

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A molded film of single-component polymer-grafted nanoparticles (SPNP, consisting of a spherical silica core and densely grafted polymer chains bearing hydrogen-bonding side groups capable of physical crosslinking, was investigated by in situ ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS measurement during a uniaxial stretching process. Static USAXS revealed that the molded SPNP formed a highly oriented twinned face-centered cubic (f.c.c. lattice structure with the [11−1] plane aligned nearly parallel to the film surface in the initial state. Structural analysis of in situ USAXS using a model of uniaxial deformation induced by rearrangement of the nanoparticles revealed that the f.c.c. lattice was distorted in the stretching direction in proportion to the macroscopic strain until the strain reached 35%, and subsequently changed into other f.c.c. lattices with different orientations. The lattice distortion and structural transition behavior corresponded well to the elastic and plastic deformation regimes, respectively, observed in the stress–strain curve. The attractive interaction of the hydrogen bond is considered to form only at the top surface of the shell and then plays an effective role in cross-linking between nanoparticles. The rearrangement mechanism of the nanoparticles is well accounted for by a strong repulsive interaction between the densely grafted polymer shells of neighboring particles.

  18. The role of hydrogen bonding in the fluorescence quenching of 2,6-bis((E)-2-(benzoxazol-2-yl)vinyl)naphthalene (BBVN) in methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammam, Essam; Basahi, Jalal; Ismail, Iqbal; Hassan, Ibrahim; Almeelbi, Talal

    2017-02-01

    The excited state hydrogen bonding dynamics of BBVN in hydrogen donating methanol solvent was explored at the TD-BMK/cc-pVDZ level of theory with accounting for the bulk environment effects at the polarizable continuum model (PCM). The heteroatoms of the BBVN laser dye form hydrogen bonds with four methanol molecules. In the formed BBVN-(MeOH)4 complex, the A-type hydrogen bond (N…HO), of an average strength of 25 kJ mol- 1, is twofold stronger than the B-type (O…HO) one. Upon photon absorption, the total HB binding energy increases from 78.5 kJ mol- 1 in the ground state to 82.6 kJ mol- 1 in the first singlet (S1) excited state. In consequence of the hydrogen bonding interaction, the absorption band maximum of the BBVN-(MeOH)4 complex, which was anticipated at 398 nm (exp. 397), is redshifted by 5 nm relative to that of the free dye in methanol. The spectral shift of the stretching vibrational mode for the hydrogen bonded hydroxyl groups (with a maximum shift of 285 cm- 1) from that of the free methanol indicated the elevated strengthening of hydrogen bonds in the excited state. The vibrational modes associated with hydrogen bonding provide effective accepting modes for the dissipation of the excitation energy, thus, decreasing the fluorescence quantum yield of BBVN in alcohols as compared to that in the polar aprotic solvents. Since there is no sign of photochemistry or phosphorescence, it seems reasonable in view of the outcomes of this study to assign the major decay process of the excited singlet (S1) of BBVN in alcohols to vibronically induced internal conversion (IC) facilitated by hydrogen bonding.

  19. Dual field theory of strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akers, D.

    1987-01-01

    A dual field theory of strong interactions is derived from a Lagrangian of the Yang-Mills and Higgs fields. The existence of a magnetic monopole of mass 2397 MeV and Dirac charge g = (137/2)e is incorporated into the theory. Unification of the strong, weak, and electromagnetic forces is shown to converge at the mass of the intermediate vector boson W/sup +/-/. The coupling constants of the strong and weak interactions are derived in terms of the fine-structure constant α = 1/137

  20. Two independent hydrogen bonded complexes of bis(1-piperidiniumacetate) hydrochloride in crystal and in the PM3 optimized structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dega-Szafran, Z.; Petryna, M.; Dutkiewicz, G.; Kosturkiewicz, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Bis(1-piperidiniumacetate) hydrochloride, (PAA) 2 H · Cl + , has been synthesized and its structure solved by X-ray diffraction. The crystals belong to the triclinic system with two symmetrically independent hydrogen bonded complexes, denoted A and B, at two different inversion centers. The compound crystallizes in the space group P1 with a = 8.559(1), b = 9.625(1), c = 11.441(1) A, α = 74.85(1) o , β = 68.22(1) o , γ 84.10(1) o , Z = 2, R = 0.036. Each complex consists of two 1-piperidiniumacetate moieties. Four 1-piperidiniumacetates, as zwitterions, are held together by a network of hydrogen bonds of the types O...H...O (2.462(3) and 2.463(3) A), N-H...O (2.755(2) A) and N-H...Cl (3.167(2) A). Both N-H atoms in a complex A interact with chlorine anions. A number of weak C-H...Cl contacts stabilize the three-dimensional crystal structure. In the isolated molecule of (PAA) 2 H · Cl + optimized by the PM3 method, there also are two independent hydrogen bonded complexes. In complex A the natural form of 1-piperidineacetic acid interacts with its anionic form, while in complex B the 1-piperidiniumacetic acid, as a cation, forms a hydrogen bond with its zwitterionic form. FTIR spectrum of bis(1-piperidiniumacetate) hydrochloride has been analysed and discussed. (author)

  1. Hydrogen bonding analysis of hydroxyl groups in glucose aqueous solutions by a molecular dynamics simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Cong; Li, Wei Zhong; Song, Yong Chen; Weng, Lin Dong; Zhang, Ning

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate hydrogen bonding characteristics of hydroxyl groups in glucose aqueous solutions with different concentrations. The hydrogen bonding abilities and strength of different O and H atom types have been calculated and compared. The acceptor/donor efficiencies have been predicted and it has been found that: (1) O2-HO2 and O3-HO3 are more efficient intramolecular hydrogen bonding acceptors than donors; (2) O1-HO1, O4-HO4 and O6-HO6 are more efficient intramolecular hydrogen bonding donors than acceptors; (5) O1-HO1 and O6-HO6 are more efficient intermolecular hydrogen bonding acceptors than donors while hydroxyl groups O2-HO2 and O4-HO4 are more efficient intermolecular hydrogen bonding donors than acceptors. The hydrogen bonding abilities of hydroxyl groups revealed that: (1) the hydrogen bonding ability of OH2-H w is larger than that of hydroxyl groups in glucose; (2) among the hydroxyl groups in glucose, the hydrogen bonding ability of O6-HO6 is the largest and the hydrogen bonding ability of O4-HO4 is the smallest; (3) the intermolecular hydrogen bonding ability of O6-HO6 is the largest; (4) the order for intramolecular hydrogen bonding abilities (from large to small) is O2-HO2, O1-HO1, O3-HO3, O6-HO6 and O4-HO4

  2. Hydrogen bonding strength of diblock copolymers affects the self-assembled structures with octa-functionalized phenol POSS nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Syuan; Yu, Chia-Yu; Lin, Yung-Chih; Kuo, Shiao-Wei

    2016-02-28

    In this study, the influence of the functional groups by the diblock copolymers of poly(styrene-b-4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP), poly(styrene-b-2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP), and poly(styrene-b-methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) on their blends with octa-functionalized phenol polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (OP-POSS) nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated. The relative hydrogen bonding strengths in these blends follow the order PS-b-P4VP/OP-POSS > PS-b-P2VP/OP-POSS > PS-b-PMMA/OP-POSS based on the Kwei equation from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analyses. Small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopic analyses show that the morphologies of the self-assembly structures are strongly dependent on the hydrogen bonding strength at relatively higher OP-POSS content. The PS-b-P4VP/OP-POSS hybrid complex system with the strongest hydrogen bonds shows the order-order transition from lamellae to cylinders and finally to body-centered cubic spheres upon increasing OP-POSS content. However, PS-b-P2VP/OP-POSS and PS-b-PMMA/OP-POSS hybrid complex systems, having relatively weaker hydrogen bonds, transformed from lamellae to cylinder structures at lower OP-POSS content (50 wt%).

  3. Near-infrared analysis of hydrogen-bonding in glass- and rubber-state amorphous saccharide solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izutsu, Ken-ichi; Hiyama, Yukio; Yomota, Chikako; Kawanishi, Toru

    2009-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic analysis of noncrystalline polyols and saccharides (e.g., glycerol, sorbitol, maltitol, glucose, sucrose, maltose) was performed at different temperatures (30-80 degrees C) to elucidate the effect of glass transition on molecular interaction. Transmission NIR spectra (4,000-12,000 cm(-1)) of the liquids and cooled-melt amorphous solids showed broad absorption bands that indicate random configuration of molecules. Heating of the samples decreased an intermolecular hydrogen-bonding OH vibration band intensity (6,200-6,500 cm(-1)) with a concomitant increase in a free and intramolecular hydrogen-bonding OH group band (6,600-7,100 cm(-1)). Large reduction of the intermolecular hydrogen-bonding band intensity at temperatures above the glass transition (T(g)) of the individual solids should explain the higher molecular mobility and lower viscosity in the rubber state. Mixing of the polyols with a high T(g) saccharide (maltose) or an inorganic salt (sodium tetraborate) shifted both the glass transition and the inflection point of the hydrogen-bonding band intensity to higher temperatures. The implications of these results for pharmaceutical formulation design and process monitoring (PAT) are discussed.

  4. Understanding the influence of low-frequency vibrations on the hydrogen bonds of acetic acid and acetamide dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Christopher; Menon, Omkaran; Majumdar, D; Roszak, Szczepan; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2017-09-20

    Low-frequency vibrations coupled to high-frequency modes are known to influence the hydrogen bond strengths in a weakly interacting dimer. In this context, various acetic acid and acetamide dimers were analyzed using Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation (MP2) and density functional theory (DFT)-based approaches with explicit anharmonicity corrections. The computed low-frequency fundamentals as well as the high-frequency modes, which were found to be related to hydrogen bonding (OH/NH stretching modes), were analyzed and their computed intensities were correlated with their hydrogen-bond strengths/binding energies. There are similarities in the nature of eight low-frequency fundamentals of these two dimers, and the in-plane bending and stretch-bend fundamentals of the different dimers of these two species (in this low-frequency region) have specific roles in their relative stability order. The computed linear correlations were further verified against the results from coupled cluster calculations including triple excitation (CCSD(T)), Gaussian-G4 (G4), Gaussian-G2-MP2 (G2MP2) and complete basis set (CBS-QB3) methods of high accuracy energy calculations. As a consequence of such linear correlations, an additive property of local fragment energies (responsible for hydrogen bonding) was found to be a valid approximation to predict the binding energies of such dimers and the idea was found to be extendable to the other homologues of these acids/amides.

  5. A theory of the strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    The most promising candidate for a fundamental microscopic theory of the strong interactions is a gauge theory of colored quarks-Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). There are many excellent reasons for believing in this theory. It embodies the broken symmetries, SU(3) and chiral SU(3)xSU(3), of the strong interactions and reflects the success of (albeit crude) quark models in explaining the spectrum of the observed hadrons. The hidden quantum number of color, necessary to account for the quantum numbers of the low lying hadrons, plays a fundamental role in this theory as the SU(3) color gauge vector 'gluons' are the mediators of the strong interactions. The absence of physical quark states can be 'explained' by the hypothesis of color confinement i.e. that hadrons are permanently bound in color singlet bound states. Finally this theory is unique in being asymptotically free, thus accounting for the almost free field theory behvior of quarks observed at short distances. (Auth.)

  6. Nuclear quantum effects and hydrogen bond fluctuations in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriotti, Michele; Cuny, Jérôme; Parrinello, Michele; Manolopoulos, David E.

    2013-01-01

    The hydrogen bond (HB) is central to our understanding of the properties of water. However, despite intense theoretical and experimental study, it continues to hold some surprises. Here, we show from an analysis of ab initio simulations that take proper account of nuclear quantum effects that the hydrogen-bonded protons in liquid water experience significant excursions in the direction of the acceptor oxygen atoms. This generates a small but nonnegligible fraction of transient autoprotolysis events that are not seen in simulations with classical nuclei. These events are associated with major rearrangements of the electronic density, as revealed by an analysis of the computed Wannier centers and 1H chemical shifts. We also show that the quantum fluctuations exhibit significant correlations across neighboring HBs, consistent with an ephemeral shuttling of protons along water wires. We end by suggesting possible implications for our understanding of how perturbations (solvated ions, interfaces, and confinement) might affect the HB network in water. PMID:24014589

  7. Experimental and Theoretical Studies in Hydrogen-Bonding Organocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Žabka

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chiral thioureas and squaramides are among the most prominent hydrogen-bond bifunctional organocatalysts now extensively used for various transformations, including aldol, Michael, Mannich and Diels-Alder reactions. More importantly, the experimental and computational study of the mode of activation has begun to attract considerable attention. Various experimental, spectroscopic and calculation methods are now frequently used, often as an integrated approach, to establish the reaction mechanism, the mode of activation or explain the stereochemical outcome of the reaction. This article comprises several case studies, sorted according to the method used in their study. The aim of this review is to give the investigators an overview of the methods currently utilized for mechanistic investigations in hydrogen-bonding organocatalysis.

  8. Structure and weak hydrogen bonds in liquid acetaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordeiro Maria A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to investigate the structure and hydrogen bonds formation in liquid acetaldehyde. An all atom model for the acetaldehyde have been optimized in the present work. Theoretical values obtained for heat of vaporisation and density of the liquid are in good agreement with experimental data. Graphics of radial distribution function indicate a well structured liquid compared to other similar dipolar organic liquids. Molecular mechanics minimization in gas phase leads to a trimer of very stable structure. The geometry of this complex is in very good agreement with the rdf. The shortest site-site correlation is between oxygen and the carbonyl hydrogen, suggesting that this correlation play a important role in the liquid structure and properties. The OxxxH average distance and the C-HxxxO angle obtained are characteristic of weak hydrogen bonds.

  9. Interaction of strong electromagnetic fields with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandi, H.S.; Davidovich, L.; Zagury, N.

    1982-06-01

    Several non-linear processes involvoing the interaction of atoms with strong laser fields are discussed, with particular emphasis on the ionization problem. Non-perturbative methods which have been proposed to tackle this problem are analysed, and shown to correspond to an expansion in the intra-atomic potential. The relation between tunneling and multiphoton absorption as ionization mechanisms, and the generalization of Einstein's photoelectric equation to the strong-field case are discussed. (Author) [pt

  10. Triplet excited electronic state switching induced by hydrogen bonding: A transient absorption spectroscopy and time-dependent DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravi Kumar, Venkatraman; Ariese, Freek; Umapathy, Siva, E-mail: umapathy@ipc.iisc.ernet.in [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Department, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2016-03-21

    The solvent plays a decisive role in the photochemistry and photophysics of aromatic ketones. Xanthone (XT) is one such aromatic ketone and its triplet-triplet (T-T) absorption spectra show intriguing solvatochromic behavior. Also, the reactivity of XT towards H-atom abstraction shows an unprecedented decrease in protic solvents relative to aprotic solvents. Therefore, a comprehensive solvatochromic analysis of the triplet-triplet absorption spectra of XT was carried out in conjunction with time dependent density functional theory using the ad hoc explicit solvent model approach. A detailed solvatochromic analysis of the T-T absorption bands of XT suggests that the hydrogen bonding interactions are different in the corresponding triplet excited states. Furthermore, the contributions of non-specific and hydrogen bonding interactions towards differential solvation of the triplet states in protic solvents were found to be of equal magnitude. The frontier molecular orbital and electron density difference analysis of the T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} states of XT indicates that the charge redistribution in these states leads to intermolecular hydrogen bond strengthening and weakening, respectively, relative to the S{sub 0} state. This is further supported by the vertical excitation energy calculations of the XT-methanol supra-molecular complex. The intermolecular hydrogen bonding potential energy curves obtained for this complex in the S{sub 0}, T{sub 1}, and T{sub 2} states support the model. In summary, we propose that the different hydrogen bonding mechanisms exhibited by the two lowest triplet excited states of XT result in a decreasing role of the nπ{sup ∗} triplet state, and are thus responsible for its reduced reactivity towards H-atom abstraction in protic solvents.

  11. Electrostatics determine vibrational frequency shifts in hydrogen bonded complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Arghya; Mondal, Sohidul Islam; Sen, Saumik; Ghosh, Debashree; Patwari, G Naresh

    2014-12-14

    The red-shifts in the acetylenic C-H stretching vibration of C-H∙∙∙X (X = O, N) hydrogen-bonded complexes increase with an increase in the basicity of the Lewis base. Analysis of various components of stabilization energy suggests that the observed red-shifts are correlated with the electrostatic component of the stabilization energy, while the dispersion modulates the stabilization energy.

  12. Finite size effects on hydrogen bonds in confined water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musat, R.; Renault, J.P.; Le Caer, S.; Pommeret, S.; Candelaresi, M.; Palmer, D.J.; Righini, R.

    2008-01-01

    Femtosecond IR spectroscopy was used to study water confined in 1-50 nm pores. The results show that even large pores induce significant changes (for example excited-state lifetimes) to the hydrogen-bond network, which are independent of pore diameter between 1 and 50 nm. Thus, the changes are not surface-induced but rather finite size effects, and suggest a confinement-induced enhancement of the acidic character of water. (authors)

  13. The interplay of covalency, hydrogen bonding, and dispersion leads to a long range chiral network: The example of 2-butanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liriano, Melissa L.; Lewis, Emily A.; Murphy, Colin J.; Lawton, Timothy J.; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Therrien, Andrew J.; Sykes, E. Charles H.; Carrasco, Javier; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of complex structures in nature is driven by an interplay between several intermolecular interactions, from strong covalent bonds to weaker dispersion forces. Understanding and ultimately controlling the self-assembly of materials requires extensive study of how these forces drive local nanoscale interactions and how larger structures evolve. Surface-based self-assembly is particularly amenable to modeling and measuring these interactions in well-defined systems. This study focuses on 2-butanol, the simplest aliphatic chiral alcohol. 2-butanol has recently been shown to have interesting properties as a chiral modifier of surface chemistry; however, its mode of action is not fully understood and a microscopic understanding of the role non-covalent interactions play in its adsorption and assembly on surfaces is lacking. In order to probe its surface properties, we employed high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory (DFT) simulations. We found a surprisingly rich degree of enantiospecific adsorption, association, chiral cluster growth and ultimately long range, highly ordered chiral templating. Firstly, the chiral molecules acquire a second chiral center when adsorbed to the surface via dative bonding of one of the oxygen atom lone pairs. This interaction is controlled via the molecule’s intrinsic chiral center leading to monomers of like chirality, at both chiral centers, adsorbed on the surface. The monomers then associate into tetramers via a cyclical network of hydrogen bonds with an opposite chirality at the oxygen atom. The evolution of these square units is surprising given that the underlying surface has a hexagonal symmetry. Our DFT calculations, however, reveal that the tetramers are stable entities that are able to associate with each other by weaker van der Waals interactions and tessellate in an extended square network. This network of homochiral square pores grows to cover the whole Au(111) surface. Our

  14. The interplay of covalency, hydrogen bonding, and dispersion leads to a long range chiral network: The example of 2-butanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liriano, Melissa L.; Lewis, Emily A.; Murphy, Colin J.; Lawton, Timothy J.; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Therrien, Andrew J.; Sykes, E. Charles H., E-mail: charles.sykes@tufts.edu [Department of Chemistry, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155 (United States); Carrasco, Javier [CIC Energigune, Albert Einstein 48, 01510 Miñano, Álava (Spain); Michaelides, Angelos [Thomas Young Centre, London Centre for Nanotechnology and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-07

    The assembly of complex structures in nature is driven by an interplay between several intermolecular interactions, from strong covalent bonds to weaker dispersion forces. Understanding and ultimately controlling the self-assembly of materials requires extensive study of how these forces drive local nanoscale interactions and how larger structures evolve. Surface-based self-assembly is particularly amenable to modeling and measuring these interactions in well-defined systems. This study focuses on 2-butanol, the simplest aliphatic chiral alcohol. 2-butanol has recently been shown to have interesting properties as a chiral modifier of surface chemistry; however, its mode of action is not fully understood and a microscopic understanding of the role non-covalent interactions play in its adsorption and assembly on surfaces is lacking. In order to probe its surface properties, we employed high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory (DFT) simulations. We found a surprisingly rich degree of enantiospecific adsorption, association, chiral cluster growth and ultimately long range, highly ordered chiral templating. Firstly, the chiral molecules acquire a second chiral center when adsorbed to the surface via dative bonding of one of the oxygen atom lone pairs. This interaction is controlled via the molecule’s intrinsic chiral center leading to monomers of like chirality, at both chiral centers, adsorbed on the surface. The monomers then associate into tetramers via a cyclical network of hydrogen bonds with an opposite chirality at the oxygen atom. The evolution of these square units is surprising given that the underlying surface has a hexagonal symmetry. Our DFT calculations, however, reveal that the tetramers are stable entities that are able to associate with each other by weaker van der Waals interactions and tessellate in an extended square network. This network of homochiral square pores grows to cover the whole Au(111) surface. Our

  15. Hydrogen bond controlled adduct formation of meso-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin with protic acids: a UV-vis spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakavi, Saeed; Rahiminezhad, Hajar; Alizadeh, Robabeh

    2010-12-01

    Interaction of meso-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (H2tppS4) with weak and strong protic acid have been studied by UV-vis spectroscopy in water, dichloromethane and methanol. Different shifts of the Soret and Q(0,0) bands in the three solvents, the aggregation of diprotonated species and the stability of porphyrin-acid adducts in the solution, may be explained by the inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Whilst, the addition of excess amounts of tetra-n-butylammonium chloride to H2tppS4(Cl)2 in dichloromethane has little to no effect on the UV-vis spectrum of the dication, gradual addition of tetra-n-butylammonium hydrogen sulfate to the dichloromethane solution of H2tppS4(H2SO4)2 leads to the degradation of adducts and the release of porphryin. The results of this study clearly show the crucial role played by hydrogen bonds between the porphyrin diprotonated species and the counter ion in the stability of porphyrin diacids in solution. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A new empirical potential function and its application to hydrogen bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.K.; Jhon, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    A new potential function based on spectroscopic results for diatomic molecules is presented and applied to the hydrogen bonding systems. The potential energy of interaction is supposed to have electrostatic, polarization, dispersion, repulsion and effective charge-transfer contributions. Estimates of the effective charge-transfer quantity have been made based on the average charge of the proton donor and the acceptor atoms. For dimers such as water, methanol, acetic acid and formic acid, the vibrational stretching frequencies and dimerization energies are calculated and discussed in connection with Badger-Bauer rule. (author)

  17. Analysis of polarization in hydrogen bonded complexes: An asymptotic projection approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drici, Nedjoua

    2018-03-01

    The asymptotic projection technique is used to investigate the polarization effect that arises from the interaction between the relaxed, and frozen monomeric charge densities of a set of neutral and charged hydrogen bonded complexes. The AP technique based on the resolution of the original Kohn-Sham equations can give an acceptable qualitative description of the polarization effect in neutral complexes. The significant overlap of the electron densities, in charged and π-conjugated complexes, impose further development of a new functional, describing the coupling between constrained and non-constrained electron densities within the AP technique to provide an accurate representation of the polarization effect.

  18. Multiple Hydrogen Bond Tethers for Grazing Formic Acid in Its Complexes with Phenylacetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karir, Ginny; Kumar, Gaurav; Kar, Bishnu Prasad; Viswanathan, K S

    2018-03-01

    Complexes of phenylacetylene (PhAc) and formic acid (FA) present an interesting picture, where the two submolecules are tethered, sometimes multiply, by hydrogen bonds. The multiple tentacles adopted by PhAc-FA complexes stem from the fact that both submolecules can, in the same complex, serve as proton acceptors and/or proton donors. The acetylenic and phenyl π systems of PhAc can serve as proton acceptors, while the ≡C-H or -C-H of the phenyl ring can act as a proton donor. Likewise, FA also is amphiprotic. Hence, more than 10 hydrogen-bonded structures, involving O-H···π, C-H···π, and C-H···O contacts, were indicated by our computations, some with multiple tentacles. Interestingly, despite the multiple contacts in the complexes, the barrier between some of the structures is small, and hence, FA grazes around PhAc, even while being tethered to it, with hydrogen bonds. We used matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy to experimentally study the PhAc-FA complexes, with which we located global and a few local minima, involving primarily an O-H···π interaction. Experiments were corroborated by ab initio computations, which were performed using MP2 and M06-2X methods, with 6-311++G (d,p) and aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets. Single-point energy calculations were also done at MP2/CBS and CCSD(T)/CBS levels. The nature, strength, and origin of these noncovalent interactions were studied using AIM, NBO, and LMO-EDA analysis.

  19. Computational insights into the photocyclization of diclofenac in solution: effects of halogen and hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani-Yaseen, Abdulilah Dawoud

    2016-08-21

    The effects of noncovalent interactions, namely halogen and hydrogen bonding, on the photochemical conversion of the photosensitizing drug diclofenac (DCF) in solution were investigated computationally. Both explicit and implicit solvent effects were qualitatively and quantitatively assessed employing the DFT/6-31+G(d) and SQM(PM7) levels of theory. Full geometry optimizations were performed in solution for the reactant DCF, hypothesized radical-based intermediates, and the main product at both levels of theories. Notably, in good agreement with previous experimental results concerning the intermolecular halogen bonding of DCF, the SQM(PM7) method revealed different values for d(ClO, Å) and ∠(C-ClO, °) for the two chlorine-substituents of DCF, with values of 2.63 Å/162° and 3.13 Å/142° for the trans and cis orientations, respectively. Employing the DFT/6-31+G(d) method with implicit solvent effects was not conclusive; however, explicit solvent effects confirmed the key contribution of hydrogen and halogen bonding in stabilizing/destabilizing the reactant and hypothesized intermediates. Interestingly, the obtained results revealed that a protic solvent such as water can increase the rate of photocyclization of DCF not only through hydrogen bonding effects, but also through halogen bonding. Furthermore, the atomic charges of atoms majorly involved in the photocyclization of DCF were calculated using different methods, namely Mulliken, Hirshfeld, and natural bond orbital (NBO). The obtained results revealed that in all cases there is a notable nonequivalency in the noncovalent intermolecular interactions of the two chlorine substituents of DCF and the radical intermediates with the solvent, which in turn may account for the discrepancy of their reactivity in different media. These computational results provide insight into the importance of halogen and hydrogen bonding throughout the progression of the photochemical conversion of DCF in solution.

  20. Physics challenges in the strong interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, S.D.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the challenges to be faced in the area of the strong interactions during the 1990's is presented. As an illustrative example special attention is given to the analysis of jets as studied at hadron colliders.

  1. Competing intramolecular N-H⋯O=C hydrogen bonds and extended intermolecular network in 1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-3-(2-methyl-4-oxopentan-2-yl) thiourea analyzed by experimental and theoretical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeed, Aamer, E-mail: aamersaeed@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Khurshid, Asma [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Jasinski, Jerry P. [Department of Chemistry, Keene State College, 229 Main Street Keene, NH 03435-2001 (United States); Pozzi, C. Gustavo; Fantoni, Adolfo C. [Instituto de Física La Plata, Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 49 y 115, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Erben, Mauricio F., E-mail: erben@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [CEQUINOR (UNLP, CONICET-CCT La Plata), Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 962, (1900) La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-03-18

    Highlights: • Two distinct N-H⋯O=C intramolecular competing hydrogen bonds are feasible in the title molecule. • Crystal structures and vibrational properties were determined. • The C=O and C=S double bonds of the acyl-thiourea group are mutually oriented in opposite directions. • A strong hyperconjugative lpO1 → σ{sup ∗}(N2-H) remote interaction was detected. • Topological analysis reveals a Cl⋯N interaction playing a relevant role in crystal packing. - Abstract: The synthesis of a novel 1-acyl-thiourea species (C{sub 14}H{sub 17}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}SCl), has been tailored in such a way that two distinct N-H⋯O=C intramolecular competing hydrogen bonds are feasible. The X-ray structure analysis as well as the vibrational (FT-IR and FT-Raman) data reveal that the S conformation is preferred, with the C=O and C=S bonds of the acyl-thiourea group pointing in opposite directions. The preference for the intramolecular N-H⋯O=C hydrogen bond within the -C(O)NHC(S)NH- core is confirmed. The Natural Bond Orbital and the Atom in Molecule approaches demonstrate that a strong hyperconjugative lpO → σ{sup ∗}(N-H) remote interaction between the acyl and the thioamide N-H groups is responsible for the stabilization of the S conformation. Intermolecular interactions have been characterized in the periodic system electron density and the topological analysis reveals the presence of an extended intermolecular network in the crystal, including a Cl⋯N interaction playing a relevant role in crystal packing.

  2. Hydrogen bond based smart polymer for highly selective and tunable capture of multiply phosphorylated peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Guangyan; Lu, Qi; Li, Xiuling; Liu, Jing; Ye, Mingliang; Liang, Xinmiao; Sun, Taolei

    2017-09-06

    Multisite phosphorylation is an important and common mechanism for finely regulating protein functions and subsequent cellular responses. However, this study is largely restricted by the difficulty to capture low-abundance multiply phosphorylated peptides (MPPs) from complex biosamples owing to the limitation of enrichment materials and their interactions with phosphates. Here we show that smart polymer can serve as an ideal platform to resolve this challenge. Driven by specific but tunable hydrogen bonding interactions, the smart polymer displays differential complexation with MPPs, singly phosphorylated and non-modified peptides. Importantly, MPP binding can be modulated conveniently and precisely by solution conditions, resulting in highly controllable MPP adsorption on material surface. This facilitates excellent performance in MPP enrichment and separation from model proteins and real biosamples. High enrichment selectivity and coverage, extraordinary adsorption capacities and recovery towards MPPs, as well as high discovery rates of unique phosphorylation sites, suggest its great potential in phosphoproteomics studies.Capture of low-abundance multiply phosphorylated peptides (MPPs) is difficult due to limitation of enrichment materials and their interactions with phosphates. Here the authors show, a smart polymer driven by specific but tunable hydrogen bonding interactions can differentially complex with MPPs, singly phosphorylated and non-modified peptides.

  3. Polarized IR spectra of resonance assisted hydrogen bond (RAHB) in 2-hydroxyazobenzenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rospenk, Maria; Majewska, Paulina; Czarnik-Matusewicz, Boguslawa; Sobczyk, Lucjan

    2006-01-01

    The polarized IR spectra in the region 4000-400 cm -1 over the temperature range 298-370 K of liquid crystalline (LC) 4-chloro-2'-hydroxy-4'-pentyloxyazobenzene (CHPAB) containing strong O-H...N RAHBs were studied. It has been established that molecules of this compound undergoes a spontaneous ordering in thin layers (10-20 μm) between the KRS-5 plates. The order degree expressed by the S parameter exceeds 0.6 for the Smectic A and crystalline phases. The best indicator of orientation is the mode at 1084 cm -1 as its transition dipole moment is oriented parallel to the long axis of the molecule. A good marker is also the γ(OH) band with the transition dipole moment nearly perpendicular to the long axis. The intramolecular O-H...N hydrogen bonding shows features characteristic of RAHB. The transition dipole moment of the ν(OH) vibrations forms with the long axis of the molecule the angle equal to 43 ± 3 deg. (the OH bond is oriented to this axis at the angle of 9 deg.) that convincingly speaks in favour of a coupling between the proton and π-electron motions. Similar behaviour is manifested by a broad absorption in the finger print region that can be interpreted in terms of the modification of the potential energy shape due to the plane-to-plane intermolecular interaction and appearance of the second minimum. A marked ordering of molecules in the isotropic phase is also observed evidencing some alignment of molecules extended far beyond the monomolecular layers on the surfaces of the KRS-5 windows

  4. Thermal generation and mobility of charge carriers in collective proton transport in hydrogen-bonded chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrard, M.; Boesch, R.; Kourakis, I.

    1991-01-01

    The transport of protons in hydrogen-bonded systems is a long standing problem which has not yet obtained a satisfactorily theoretical description. Although this problem was examined first for ice, it is relevant in many systems and in particular in biology for the transport along proteins or for proton conductance across membranes, an essential process in cell life. The broad relevance makes the study of proton conduction very appealing. Since the original work of Bernal and Fowler on ice, the idea that the transport occurs through chains of hydrogen bonds has been well accepted. Such ''proton wires'' were invoked by Nagle and Morowitz for proton transport across membranes proteins and more recently across lipid bilayers. In this report, we assume the existence of such an hydrogen-bonded chain and discuss its consequences on the dynamics of the charge carriers. We show that this assumption leads naturally to the idea of soliton transport and we put a special emphasis on the role of the coupling between the protons and heavy ions motions. The model is presented. We show how the coupling affects strongly the dynamics of the charge carriers and we discuss the role it plays in the thermal generation of carriers. The work presented has been performed in 1986 and 87 with St. Pnevmatikos and N. Flyzanis and was then completed in collaboration with D. Hochstrasser and H. Buettner. Therefore the results presented in this part are not new but we think that they are appropriate in the context of this multidisciplinary workshop because they provide a rather complete example of the soliton picture for proton conduction. This paper discusses the thermal generation of the charge carriers when the coupling between the protons and heavy ions dynamics is taken into account. The results presented in this part are very recent and will deserve further analysis but they already show that the coupling can assist for the formation of the charge carriers

  5. Novel method for concentrating and drying polymeric nanoparticles: hydrogen bonding coacervate precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addio, Suzanne M; Kafka, Concepcion; Akbulut, Mustafa; Beattie, Patrick; Saad, Walid; Herrera, Margarita; Kennedy, Michael T; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2010-04-05

    Nanoparticles have significant potential in therapeutic applications to improve the bioavailability and efficacy of active drug compounds. However, the retention of nanometer sizes during concentrating or drying steps presents a significant problem. We report on a new concentrating and drying process for poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) stabilized nanoparticles, which relies upon the unique pH sensitive hydrogen bonding interaction between PEG and polyacid species. In the hydrogen bonding coacervate precipitation (HBCP) process, PEG protected nanoparticles rapidly aggregate into an easily filterable precipitate upon the addition various polyacids. When the resulting solid is neutralized, the ionization of the acid groups eliminates the hydrogen bonded structure and the approximately 100 nm particles redisperse back to within 10% of their original size when poly(acrylic acid) and citric acid are used and 45% when poly(aspartic acid) is used. While polyacid concentrations of 1-5 wt % were used to form the precipitates, the incorporation of the acid into the PEG layer is approximately 1:1 (acid residue):(ethylene oxide unit) in the final dried precipitate. The redispersion of dried beta-carotene nanoparticles protected with PEG-b-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) polymers dried by HBCP was compared with the redispersion of particles dried by freeze-drying with sucrose as a cryprotectant, spray freeze-drying, and normal drying. Freeze-drying with 0, 2, and 12 wt % sucrose solutions resulted in size increases of 350%, 50%, and 6%, respectively. Spray freeze-drying resulted in particles with increased sizes of 50%, but no cryoprotectant and only moderate redispersion energy was required. Conventional drying resulted in solids that could not be redispersed back to nanometer size. The new HBCP process offers a promising and efficient way to concentrate or convert nanoparticle dispersions into a stable dry powder form.

  6. Two new hydrogen bond-supported supramolecular compounds assembly from polyoxovanadate and organoamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Weijie; Cui Xiaobing; Xu Yan; Xu Jiqing; Yu Haihui; Yi Zhihui; Cui Jiwen; Wang Tiegang

    2007-01-01

    Two novel organic-inorganic hybrid compounds based on organoamines and polyoxovanadates formulated as (H 2 dien) 4 [H 10 V 18 O 42 (PO 4 )](PO 4 ).2H 2 O (1) (dien=diethylenetriamine) and (Him) 8 [HV 18 O 42 (PO 4 )] (2) (im=imidazole) have been prepared under hydrothermal conditions by using different starting materials, and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, ESR, XPS, TGA and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Crystal data for compound 1: C 16 H 74 N 12 O 52 V 18 P 2 , Monoclinic, space group C2/c, a=23.9593(4) A, b=13.0098(2) A, c=20.1703(4) A, β=105.566(3) o , V=6056.6(19) A 3 , Z=4; for compound 2, C 24 H 41 N 16 O 46 V 18 P, Tetragonal, space group I4/mmm, a=13.5154(8) A, b=13.5154(8) A, c=19.1136 A, β=90 o , V=3491.4(3) A 3 , Z=2. Compound 1 consists of protonated diens together with polyoxovanadates [H 10 V 18 O 42 (PO 4 )] 5- . Compound 2 is composed of protonated ims and polyoxovanadates [HV 18 O 42 (PO 4 )] 8- . There are hydrogen-bonding interactions between polyoxovanadates and different organoamines in 1 and 2. Polyoxovanadates are linked through H 2 dien into a three-dimensional network via hydrogen bonds in 1, while polyoxovanadates are linked by Him into a two-dimensional layer network via hydrogen bonds in 2. The crystal packing patterns of the two compounds reveal various supramolecular frameworks. - Graphical abstract: Two new organic-inorganic hybrid compounds based on [V 18 O 42 (PO 4 )] building blocks have been hydrothermally synthesized. 1 is the first 3-D supramolecular network structure consisting of [V 18 O 42 (PO 4 )] unit, while 2 possesses 2-D layered supramolecular structure

  7. Unification of electromagnetic, strong and weak interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duong Van Phi; Duong Anh Duc

    1993-09-01

    The Unification of Electromagnetic, Strong and Weak Interactions is realized in the framework of the Quantum Field Theory, established in an 8-dimensional Unified Space. Two fundamental, spinor and vector field equations are considered. The first of the matter particles and the second is of the gauge particles. Interaction Lagrangians are formed from the external and internal currents and the external and internal vector field operators. Generators of the local gauge transformations are the combinations of the matrices of the first field equation. (author). 15 refs

  8. The thermodynamic stability of hydrogen bonded and cation bridged complexes of humic acid models-A theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, Adelia J.A.; Tunega, Daniel; Pasalic, Hasan; Haberhauer, Georg; Gerzabek, Martin H.; Lischka, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen bonded and cation bridged complexation of poly(acrylic acid) oligomers, representing a model compound for humic acids, with acetic acid and the herbicide (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) acetic acid (MCPA) have been studied by means of density functional theory. Solvation effects were computed by means of a combination of microsolvation (explicit insertion of water molecules) and global solvation (polarizable continuum approach). The stability of hydrogen bonded complexes in solution is characterized by a strong competition between solute and solvent molecules. The cation bridged complexes of the negatively charged (deprotonated) ligands were found to be strongly favored explaining the capability of humic acids to fixate anionic species from soil solutions and the ability to form cross-linking structures within the humic acid macromolecules

  9. Super symmetry in strong and weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seshavatharam, U.V.S.; Lakshminarayana, S.

    2010-01-01

    For strong interaction two new fermion mass units 105.32 MeV and 11450 MeV are assumed. Existence of "Integral charge quark bosons", "Integral charge effective quark fermions", "Integral charge (effective) quark fermi-gluons" and "Integral charge quark boso-gluons" are assumed and their masses are estimated. It is noticed that, characteristic nuclear charged fermion is X s · 105.32 = 938.8 MeV and corresponding charged boson is X s (105.32/x) = 415.0 where X s = 8.914 is the inverse of the strong coupling constant and x = 2.26234 is a new number by using which "super symmetry" can be seen in "strong and weak" interactions. 11450 MeV fermion and its boson of mass = 11450/x = 5060 MeV plays a crucial role in "sub quark physics" and "weak interaction". 938.8 MeV strong fermion seems to be the proton. 415 MeV strong boson seems to be the mother of the presently believed 493,496 and 547 MeV etc, strange mesons. With 11450 MeV fermion "effective quark-fermi-gluons" and with 5060 MeV boson "quark boso-gluon masses" are estimated. "Effective quark fermi-gluons" plays a crucial role in ground state charged baryons mass generation. Light quark bosons couple with these charged baryons to form doublets and triplets. "Quark boso-gluons" plays a crucial role in ground state neutral and charged mesons mass generation. Fine and super-fine rotational levels can be given by [I or (I/2)] power(1/4) and [I or (I/2)] power(1/12) respectively. Here, I = n(n+1) and n = 1, 2, 3, … (author)

  10. Strongly interacting matter in magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Landsteiner, Karl; Schmitt, Andreas; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2013-01-01

    The physics of strongly interacting matter in an external magnetic field is presently emerging as a topic of great cross-disciplinary interest for particle, nuclear, astro- and condensed matter physicists. It is known that strong magnetic fields are created in heavy ion collisions, an insight that has made it possible to study a variety of surprising and intriguing phenomena that emerge from the interplay of quantum anomalies, the topology of non-Abelian gauge fields, and the magnetic field. In particular, the non-trivial topological configurations of the gluon field induce a non-dissipative electric current in the presence of a magnetic field. These phenomena have led to an extended formulation of relativistic hydrodynamics, called chiral magnetohydrodynamics. Hitherto unexpected applications in condensed matter physics include graphene and topological insulators. Other fields of application include astrophysics, where strong magnetic fields exist in magnetars and pulsars. Last but not least, an important ne...

  11. Quantum mechanics models of the methanol dimer: OH⋯O hydrogen bonds of β-d-glucose moieties from crystallographic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintrón, Michael Santiago; Johnson, Glenn P; French, Alfred D

    2017-04-18

    The interaction of two methanol molecules, simplified models of carbohydrates and cellulose, was examined using a variety of quantum mechanics (QM) levels of theory. Energy plots for hydrogen bonding distance (H⋯O) and angle (OH⋯O) were constructed. All but two experimental structures were located in stabilized areas on the vacuum phase energy plots. Each of the 399 models was analyzed with Bader's atoms-in-molecules (AIM) theory, which showed a widespread ability by the dimer models to form OH⋯O hydrogen bonds that have bond paths and Bond Critical Points. Continuum solvation calculations suggest that a portion of the energy-stabilized structures could occur in the presence of water. A survey of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) for all donor-acceptor interactions in β-D-glucose moieties examined the similarities and differences among the hydroxyl groups and acetal oxygen atoms that participate in hydrogen bonds. Comparable behavior was observed for the O2H, O3H, O4H, and O6H hydroxyls, acting either as acceptors or donors. Ring O atoms showed distinct hydrogen bonding behavior that favored mid-length hydrogen bonds. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Communication: A hydrogen-bonded difluorocarbene complex: Ab initio and matrix isolation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosulin, Ilya S.; Shiryaeva, Ekaterina S.; Tyurin, Daniil A.; Feldman, Vladimir I.

    2017-10-01

    Structure and spectroscopic features of the CF2⋯HF complexes were studied by ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T) level and matrix isolation FTIR spectroscopy. The calculations predict three stable structures. The most energetically favorable structure corresponds to hydrogen bonding of HF to the lone pair of the C atom (the interaction energy of 3.58 kcal/mol), whereas two less stable structures are the H⋯F bonded complexes (the interaction energies of 0.30 and 0.24 kcal/mol). The former species was unambiguously characterized by the absorptions in the FTIR spectra observed after X-ray irradiation of fluoroform in a xenon matrix at 5 K. The corresponding features appear at 3471 (H-F stretching), 1270 (C-F symmetric stretching, shoulder), 1175 (antisymmetric C-F stretching), and 630 (libration) cm-1, in agreement with the computational predictions. To our knowledge, it is the first hydrogen-bonded complex of dihalocarbene. Possible weaker manifestations of the H⋯F bonded complexes were also found in the C-F stretching region; however, their assignment is tentative. The H⋯C bonded complex is protected from reaction yielding a fluoroform molecule by a remarkably high energy barrier (23.85 kcal/mol), so it may be involved in various chemical reactions.

  13. Laser spectroscopic visualization of hydrogen bond motions in liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratos, S.; Leicknam, J.-Cl.; Pommeret, S.; Gallot, G.

    2004-12-01

    Ultrafast pump-probe experiments are described permitting a visualization of molecular motions in diluted HDO/D 2O solutions. The experiments were realized in the mid-infrared spectral region with a time resolution of 150 fs. They were interpreted by a careful theoretical analysis, based on the correlation function approach of statistical mechanics. Combining experiment and theory, stretching motions of the OH⋯O bonds as well as HDO rotations were 'filmed' in real time. It was found that molecular rotations are the principal agent of hydrogen bond breaking and making in water. Recent literatures covering the subject, including molecular dynamics simulations, are reviewed in detail.

  14. Fragility and cooperativity concepts in hydrogen-bonded organic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpouve, N., E-mail: delpouve.nicolas@gmail.com [AMME-LECAP EA 4528 International Laboratory, University of Rouen, Avenue de l' Universite BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Vuillequez, A.; Saiter, A.; Youssef, B.; Saiter, J.M. [AMME-LECAP EA 4528 International Laboratory, University of Rouen, Avenue de l' Universite BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France)

    2012-09-01

    Molecular dynamics at the glass transition of three lactose/oil glassy systems have been investigated according to the cooperativity and fragility approaches. From Donth's approach, the cooperativity length is estimated by modulated temperature calorimetric measurements. Results reveal that modification of the disaccharide by oil leads to increase the disorder degree in the lactose, the size of the cooperative domains and the fragility index. These particular hydrogen-bonded organic glasses follow the general tendency observed on organic and inorganic polymers: the higher the cooperativity length, the higher the value of the fragility index at T{sub g}.

  15. Fragility and cooperativity concepts in hydrogen-bonded organic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpouve, N.; Vuillequez, A.; Saiter, A.; Youssef, B.; Saiter, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics at the glass transition of three lactose/oil glassy systems have been investigated according to the cooperativity and fragility approaches. From Donth's approach, the cooperativity length is estimated by modulated temperature calorimetric measurements. Results reveal that modification of the disaccharide by oil leads to increase the disorder degree in the lactose, the size of the cooperative domains and the fragility index. These particular hydrogen-bonded organic glasses follow the general tendency observed on organic and inorganic polymers: the higher the cooperativity length, the higher the value of the fragility index at T g .

  16. Non-Classical C–H···X Hydrogen Bonding and Its Role in Asymmetric Organocatalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Ajitha, Manjaly John

    2016-08-17

    Non-classical hydrogen bonds (NCHBs) have attracted significant interest in the past decade particularly because of their important role in asymmetric catalytic systems. These weak interactions (< 4 kcal/mol) offer much flexibility in the preorganization of molecular entities required to achieve high enantioselectivity. Herein, we review some recent important organocatalytic asymmetric reactions where a NCHB serves as a critical factor in determining the stereoselectivity.

  17. A strongly interacting polaritonic quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ningyuan; Schine, Nathan; Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Ryou, Albert; Clark, Logan W.; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2018-06-01

    Polaritons are promising constituents of both synthetic quantum matter1 and quantum information processors2, whose properties emerge from their components: from light, polaritons draw fast dynamics and ease of transport; from matter, they inherit the ability to collide with one another. Cavity polaritons are particularly promising as they may be confined and subjected to synthetic magnetic fields controlled by cavity geometry3, and furthermore they benefit from increased robustness due to the cavity enhancement in light-matter coupling. Nonetheless, until now, cavity polaritons have operated only in a weakly interacting mean-field regime4,5. Here we demonstrate strong interactions between individual cavity polaritons enabled by employing highly excited Rydberg atoms as the matter component of the polaritons. We assemble a quantum dot composed of approximately 150 strongly interacting Rydberg-dressed 87Rb atoms in a cavity, and observe blockaded transport of photons through it. We further observe coherent photon tunnelling oscillations, demonstrating that the dot is zero-dimensional. This work establishes the cavity Rydberg polariton as a candidate qubit in a photonic information processor and, by employing multiple resonator modes as the spatial degrees of freedom of a photonic particle, the primary ingredient to form photonic quantum matter6.

  18. New strong interactions above the electroweak scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.R.

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical arguments for a new higher-color quark sector, based on Pomeron physics in QCD, are briefly described. The electroweak symmetry-breaking, Strong CP conservation, and electroweak scale CP violation, that is naturally produced by this sector is also outlined. A further consequence is that above the electroweak scale there will be a radical change in the strong interaction. Electroweak states, in particular multiple W's and Z's, and new, semi-stable, very massive, baryons, will be commonly produced. The possible correlation of expected phenomena with a wide range of observed Cosmic Ray effects at and above the primary spectrum knee is described. Related phenomena that might be seen in the highest energy hard scattering events at the Fermilab Tevatron, some of which could be confused with top production, are also briefly discussed

  19. Hydrogen-bonded structure in highly concentrated aqueous LiBr solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imano, Masahiro; Kameda, Yasuo; Usuki, Takeshi; Uemura, Osamu

    2001-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements were carried out for H/D isotopically substituted aqueous 10, 25 and 33 mol% LiBr solutions in order to obtain structural information on the intermolecular hydrogen bonds among water molecules in highly concentrated aqueous solutions. Observed scattering cross sections for D 2 O (99.9 % D), 0 H 2 O(35.9 % D) and 0-2 H 2 O(68.0 % D) solutions were combined to deduce partial structure factors, a HH (Q), a XH (Q) and a XX (Q) (X: O, Br and Li). The least squares fitting analysis was applied to the observed partial structure factors to determine the nearest neighbor interatomic distance, root-mean-square amplitude and coordination number. Intermolecular distances, r OH =1.91(1) A, r HH =2.38(1) A and r OO =3.02(1) A, between the nearest neighbor water molecules, were obtained for the 10 mol% LiBr solution. On the other hand, the intermolecular O···H interaction was found to almost disappear in concentrated 25 and 33 mol% LiBr solutions. The result implies that the hydrogen-bonded network is completely broken in highly concentrated aqueous LiBr solutions. (author)

  20. Hydrogen bonding in (substituted benzene)·(water)n clusters with n≤4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barth, H.-D.; Buchhold, K.; Djafari, S.; Reimann, B.; Lommatzsch, U.; Brutschy, B.

    1998-01-01

    Infrared ion-depletion spectroscopy, a double resonance method combining vibrational predissociation with resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy, has been applied to study mixed clusters of the type (substituted benzene)·(H 2 O) n with n≤4. The UV chromophores were p-difluorobenzene, fluorobenzene, benzene, toluene, p-xylene and anisole. From the IR depletion spectra in the region of the OH stretching vibrations it could be shown that the water molecules are attached as subclusters to the chromophores. Size and configuration of the subclusters could be deduced from the IR depletion spectra. In the anisole·(H 2 O) 1 a nd 2 complexes the water clusters form an ordinary hydrogen bond to the oxygen atom of the methoxy group. In all other mixed complexes a π-hydrogen bond is formed between one of the free OH groups of a water subcluster and the π-system of the chromophore. According to the strength of this interaction the frequency of the respective absorption band exhibits a characteristic red-shift which could be related to the total atomic charges in the aromatic ring. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  1. Hydrogen Bond Induces Hierarchical Self-Assembly in Liquid-Crystalline Block Copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuai; Pang, Linlin; Chen, Yuxuan; Zhou, Liming; Fang, Shaoming; Yu, Haifeng

    2018-03-01

    Microphase-separated structures of block copolymers (BCs) with a size of sub-10 nm are usually obtained by hydrogen-bond-induced self-assembly of BCs through doping with small molecules as functional additives. Here, fabrication of hierarchically self-assembled sub-10 nm structures upon microphase separation of amphiphilic liquid-crystalline BCs (LCBCs) at the existence of hydrogen bonds but without any dopants is reported. The newly introduced urethane groups in the side chain of the hydrophobic block of LCBCs interact with the ether groups of the hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) block, leading to imperfect crystallization of the PEO blocks. Both crystalline and amorphous domains coexist in the separated PEO phase, enabling a lamellar structure to appear inside the PEO nanocylinders. This provides an elegant method to fabricate controllable sub-10 nm microstructures in well-defined polymer systems without the introduction of any dopants. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Many Body Structure of Strongly Interacting Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Arenhövel, Hartmuth; Drechsel, Dieter; Friedrich, Jörg; Kaiser, Karl-Heinz; Walcher, Thomas; Symposium on 20 Years of Physics at the Mainz Microtron MAMI

    2006-01-01

    This carefully edited proceedings volume provides an extensive review and analysis of the work carried out over the past 20 years at the Mainz Microtron (MAMI). This research centered around the application of Quantum Chromodynamics in the strictly nonperturbative regime at hadronic scales of about 1 fm. Due to the many degrees of freedom in hadrons at this scale the leitmotiv of this research is "Many body structure of strongly interacting systems". Further, an outlook on the research with the forthcoming upgrade of MAMI is given. This volume is an authoritative source of reference for everyone interested in the field of the electro-weak probing of the structure of hadrons.

  3. Strong Interaction Studies with PANDA at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönning, Karin

    2016-10-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany, provides unique possibilities for a new generation of nuclear-, hadron- and atomic physics experiments. The future PANDA experiment at FAIR will offer a broad physics programme with emphasis on different aspects of hadron physics. Understanding the strong interaction in the perturbative regime remains one of the greatest challenges in contemporary physics and hadrons provide several important keys. In these proceedings, PANDA will be presented along with some high-lights of the planned physics programme.

  4. Strong Interaction Studies with PANDA at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schönning, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany, provides unique possibilities for a new generation of nuclear-, hadron- and atomic physics experiments. The future PANDA experiment at FAIR will offer a broad physics programme with emphasis on different aspects of hadron physics. Understanding the strong interaction in the perturbative regime remains one of the greatest challenges in contemporary physics and hadrons provide several important keys. In these proceedings, PANDA will be presented along with some high-lights of the planned physics programme

  5. Strongly interacting Higgs sector without technicolor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chuan; Kuti, J.

    1994-12-01

    Simulation results are presented on Higgs mass calculations in the spontaneously broken phase of the Higgs sector in the minimal Standard Model with a higher derviative regulator. A heavy Higgs particle is found in the TeV mass range in the presence of a complex conjugate ghost pair at higher energies. The ghost pair evades easy experimental detection. As a finite and unitary theory in the continuum, this model serves as an explicit and simple example of a strong interacting Higgs sector without technicolor. (orig.)

  6. Strong Interactions Physics at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pioppi, M.

    2005-03-14

    Recent results obtained by BABAR experiment and related to strong interactions physics are presented, with particular attention to the extraction of the first four hadronic-mass moments and the first three lepton-energy moments in semileptonic decays. From a simultaneous fit to the moments, the CKM element |V{sub cb}|, the inclusive B {yields} X{sub c}lv and other heavy quark parameters are derived. The second topic is the ambiguity-free measurement of cos(2{beta}) in B {yields} J/{Psi}K* decays. With approximately 88 million of B{bar B} pairs, negative solutions for cos(2{beta}) are excluded at 89%.

  7. On the nature of hydrogen bonding between the phosphatidylcholine head group and water and dimethylsulfoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.; Lawrence, M. Jayne; McLain, Sylvia E.; Lorenz, Christian D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to provide a detailed investigation of the hydrogen bond networks around the phosphatidylcholine (PC) head group in 1,2-dipropionyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine in pure water, 10 mol.% and 30 mol.% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-water solutions. Specifically, it is observed that DMSO replaces those water molecules that are within the first solvation shell of the choline, phosphate and ester groups of the PC head group, but are not hydrogen-bonded to the group. The effect of the presence of DMSO on the hydrogen bond network around the PC head groups of the lipid changes with the concentration of DMSO. In comparison to the hydrogen bond network observed in the pure water system, the number of hydrogen-bonded chains of solvent molecules increases slightly for the 10 mol.% DMSO system, while, in the 30 mol.% DMSO system, the number of hydrogen-bonded chains of solvent molecules decreases.

  8. Reversible, All-Aqueous Assembly of Hydrogen-Bonded Polymersomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhao; Sukhishvili, Svetlana

    2015-03-01

    We report on sub-micron-sized polymersomes formed through single-step, all-aqueous assembly of hydrogen-bonded amphiphilic polymers. The hollow morphology of these assemblies was revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Stable in acidic media, these polymersomes could be dissolved by exposure to basic pH values. Importantly, the diameter of assembled hollow structures could be controlled in a wide range from 30 nm to 1 μm by the molecular weight of hydrogen-bonding polymers. We will discuss key quantitative aspects of these assemblies, including kinetics of hollow structure formation, time evolution of polymersome size, and the role of polymer molecular weight on membrane thickness and bending rigidity. We believe that our approach demonstrates an efficient and versatile way to rationally design nanocontainers for drug delivery, catalysis and personal care applications. This work was supported by the Innovation & Entrepreneurship doctoral fellowship from Stevens Institute of Technology.

  9. Strong Interactive Massive Particles from a Strong Coupled Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu. Khlopov, Maxim; Kouvaris, Christoforos

    2008-01-01

    (-2). These excessive techniparticles are all captured by $^4He$, creating \\emph{techni-O-helium} $tOHe$ ``atoms'', as soon as $^4He$ is formed in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. The interaction of techni-O-helium with nuclei opens new paths to the creation of heavy nuclei in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. Due...

  10. Finite temperature system of strongly interacting baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, R.L.; Gleeson, A.M.; Pedigo, R.D.; Wheeler, J.W.

    1976-07-01

    A fully relativistic finite temperature many body theory is constructed and used to examine the bulk properties of a system of strongly interacting baryons. The strong interactions are described by a two parameter phenomenological model fit to a simple description of nuclear matter at T = 0. The zero temperature equation of state for such a system which has already been discussed in the literature was developed to give a realistic description of nuclear matter. The model presented here is the exact finite temperature extension of that model. The effect of the inclusion of baryon pairs for T greater than or equal to 2mc 2 /k is discussed in detail. The phase transition identified with nuclear matter vanishes for system temperatures in excess of T/sub C/ = 1.034 x 10 11 0 K. All values of epsilon (P,T) correspond to systems that are causal in the sense that the locally determined speed of sound never exceeds the speed of light

  11. Finite temperature system of strongly interacting baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, R.L.; Gleeson, A.M.; Pedigo, R.D.; Wheeler, J.W.

    1976-07-01

    A fully relativistic finite temperature many body theory is constructed and used to examine the bulk properties of a system of strongly interacting baryons. The strong interactions are described by a two parameter phenomenological model fit to a simple description of nuclear matter at T = 0. The zero temperature equation of state for such a system which has already been discussed in the literature was developed to give a realistic description of nuclear matter. The model presented here is the exact finite temperature extension of that model. The effect of the inclusion of baryon pairs for T greater than or equal to 2mc/sup 2//k is discussed in detail. The phase transition identified with nuclear matter vanishes for system temperatures in excess of T/sub C/ = 1.034 x 10/sup 11/ /sup 0/K. All values of epsilon (P,T) correspond to systems that are causal in the sense that the locally determined speed of sound never exceeds the speed of light.

  12. Substituent Effects on the Hydrogen Bonding Between Phenolate and HF, H2O and NH3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    B3LYP/6-31+g(d) calculations were performed on the hydrogen bonded complexes between substituted phenolates and HF, H2O as well as NH3. It was found that some properties of the non-covalent complexes, including the interaction energies, donor-acceptor (host-guest) distances, bond lengths, and vibration frequencies, could show well-defined substituent effects. Thus, from the substituent studies we can not only understand the mechanism of a particular non-covalent interaction better, but also easily predict the interaction energies and structures of a particular non-covalent complex, which might otherwise be very hard or resource-consuming to be known. This means that substituent effect is indeed a useful tool to be used in supramolecular chemistry and therefore, many valuable studies remain to be carried out.

  13. Subtle differences in the hydrogen bonding of alcohol to divalent oxygen and sulfur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Lin; Tang, Shanshan; Hansen, Anne Schou

    2017-01-01

    complexes are more stable and form stronger hydrogen bonds compared to complexes with MeOH and EtOH, which are comparable, and only for the stronger hydrogen bond donor (TFE) are the small differences in acceptor molecules highlighted. The equilibrium constant for complex formation was determined from......The Osingle bondH⋯O and Osingle bondH⋯S hydrogen bonds were investigated by gas phase FTIR spectroscopy of alcohol–dimethylether and alcohol–dimethylsulfide complexes, with alcohols of increasing hydrogen bond donor strength; methanol (MeOH), ethanol (EtOH) and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE). The TFE...

  14. Hydrogen-bond coordination in organic crystal structures: statistics, predictions and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galek, Peter T A; Chisholm, James A; Pidcock, Elna; Wood, Peter A

    2014-02-01

    Statistical models to predict the number of hydrogen bonds that might be formed by any donor or acceptor atom in a crystal structure have been derived using organic structures in the Cambridge Structural Database. This hydrogen-bond coordination behaviour has been uniquely defined for more than 70 unique atom types, and has led to the development of a methodology to construct hypothetical hydrogen-bond arrangements. Comparing the constructed hydrogen-bond arrangements with known crystal structures shows promise in the assessment of structural stability, and some initial examples of industrially relevant polymorphs, co-crystals and hydrates are described.

  15. Side-by-Side Comparison of Hydroperoxide and Corresponding Alcohol as Hydrogen-Bond Donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kristian Holten; Tram, Camilla Mia; Kjærgaard, Henrik Grum

    2017-01-01

    tert-butanol (t-BuOH), with dimethyl ether (DME) as the hydrogen-bond acceptor. Using a combination of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations, we compare the strength of the OH-O hydrogen bond and the total strength of complexation. We find that, both in terms...... results, we find that the hydroperoxide complex is stabilized by ∼4 kJ/mol (Gibbs free energy) more than the alcohol complex. Measured red shifts show the same trend in hydrogen-bond strength with trimethylamine (N acceptor atom) and dimethyl sulfide (S acceptor atom) as the hydrogen-bond acceptors....

  16. Micropolarity and Hydrogen-Bond Donor Ability of Environmentally Friendly Anionic Reverse Micelles Explored by UV/Vis Absorption of a Molecular Probe and FTIR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Valeria R; Silber, Juana J; Falcone, Ruben Darío; Correa, N Mariano

    2018-03-19

    In the present work we show how two biocompatible solvents, methyl laurate (ML) and isopropyl myristate (IPM), can be used as a less toxic alternative to replace the nonpolar component in a sodium 1,4-bis-2-ethylhexylsulfosuccinate (AOT) reverse micelles (RMs) formulation. In this sense, the micropolarity and the hydrogen-bond ability of the interface were monitored through the use of the solvatochromism of a molecular probe (1-methyl-8-oxyquinolinium betaine, QB) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Our results demonstrate that the micropolarity sensed by QB in ML RMs is lower than in IPM RMs. Additionally, the water molecules form stronger H-bond interactions with the polar head of AOT in ML than in IPM. By FTIR was revealed that more water molecules interact with the interface in ML/AOT RMs. On the other hand, for AOT RMs generated in IPM, the weaker water-surfactant interaction allows the water molecules to establish hydrogen bonds with each other trending to bulk water more easily than in ML RMs, a consequence of the dissimilar penetration of nonpolar solvents into the interfacial region. The penetration process is strongly controlled by the polarity and viscosity of the external solvents. All of these results allow us to characterize these biocompatible systems, providing information about interfacial properties and how they can be altered by changing the external solvent. The ability of the nontoxic solvent to penetrate or not into the AOT interface produces a new interface with attractive properties. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Estimation of strength in different extra Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds in DNA double helices through quantum chemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, D; Bhattacharyya, D

    2006-10-15

    It was shown earlier, from database analysis, model building studies, and molecular dynamics simulations that formation of cross-strand bifurcated or Extra Watson-Crick hydrogen (EWC) bonds between successive base pairs may lead to extra rigidity to DNA double helices of certain sequences. The strengths of these hydrogen bonds are debatable, however, as they do not have standard linear geometry criterion. We have therefore carried out detailed ab initio quantum chemical studies using RHF/6-31G(2d,2p) and B3LYP/6-31G(2p,2d) basis sets to determine strengths of several bent hydrogen bonds with different donor and acceptors. Interaction energy calculations, corrected for the basis set superposition errors, suggest that N-H...O type bent EWC hydrogen bonds are possible along same strands or across the strands between successive base pairs, leading to significant stability (ca. 4-9 kcal/mol). The N-H...N and C-H...O type interactions, however, are not so stabilizing. Hence, consideration of EWC N-H...O H-bonds can lead to a better understanding of DNA sequence directed structural features. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Influence of intermolecular amide hydrogen bonding on the geometry, atomic charges, and spectral modes of acetanilide: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binoy, J.; Prathima, N. B.; Murali Krishna, C.; Santhosh, C.; Hubert Joe, I.; Jayakumar, V. S.

    2006-08-01

    Acetanilide, a compound of pharmaceutical importance possessing pain-relieving properties due to its blocking the pulse dissipating along the nerve fiber, is subjected to vibrational spectral investigation using NIR FT Raman, FT-IR, and SERS. The geometry, Mulliken charges, and vibrational spectrum of acetanilide have been computed using the Hartree-Fock theory and density functional theory employing the 6-31G (d) basis set. To investigate the influence of intermolecular amide hydrogen bonding, the geometry, charge distribution, and vibrational spectrum of the acetanilide dimer have been computed at the HF/6-31G (d) level. The computed geometries reveal that the acetanilide molecule is planar, while twisting of the secondary amide group with respect to the phenyl ring is found upon hydrogen bonding. The trans isomerism and “amido” form of the secondary amide, hyperconjugation of the C=O group with the adjacent C-C bond, and donor-acceptor interaction have been investigated using computed geometry. The carbonyl stretching band position is found to be influenced by the tendency of the phenyl ring to withdraw nitrogen lone pair, intermolecular hydrogen bonding, conjugation, and hyperconjugation. A decrease in the NH and C=O bond orders and increase in the C-N bond orders due to donor-acceptor interaction can be observed in the vibrational spectra. The SERS spectral analysis reveals that the flat orientation of the molecule on the adsorption plane is preferred.

  19. Combinatorial description of space and strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenczykowski, P.

    1988-01-01

    A reinterpretation is given of a successful phenomenological approach to hadron self-energy effects known as the unitarized quark model. General arguments are given that the proper description of strong interactions may require abandoning the assignment of a primary role to continuous concepts such as position and momentum in favor of discrete ones such as spin or W-spin. The reinterpretation exploits an analogy between the W-spin diagrams occurring in the calculations of hadronic loop effects and the spin network idea of Penrose. A connection between the S-matrix approach to hadron masses and the purely algebraic approach characteristic of the quark model is indicated. Several hadron mass relations generated by a resulting SU(6)/sub w/-group-theoretic expression are presented and discussed. Results of an attempt to generalize the scheme to the description of hadron vertices are reported

  20. Intercomponent interactions and mobility in hydrogen-bonded rotaxanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagesar, D.C.

    2010-01-01

    Dhiredj Jagesar onderzocht zogeheten rotaxanen. Deze moleculen kunnen als moleculaire motoren functioneren. Hierbij gebruiken ze licht en elektronen als brandstof. De minuscule motoren kunnen vergelijkbare bewegingen uitvoeren als de motoren in de macroscopische wereld. Toepassingen van moleculaire

  1. Hydrogen Bonding Interaction between 1-Propanol and Acrylic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The association between 1-propanol and acrylic esters (methyl methacrylate, ethyl methacrylate and butyl methacrylate) in non-polar solvents, viz. n-heptane, CCl4, and benzene has been investigated by means of FTIR spectroscopy. The formation constants of the 1:1 complexes have been calculated using Nash's method.

  2. Reversible polymer networks containing covalent and hydrogen bonding interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araya-Hermosilla, R.; Broekhuis, A.A.; Picchioni, F.

    Thermally reversible polymers with relatively high glass transition temperatures (T-g) are difficult to prepare but very interesting from an application point of view. In this work we present a novel reversible thermoset with tunable T-g based on chemical modification of aliphatic polyketones (PM)

  3. Crystal and molecular structures of sixteen charge-assisted hydrogen bond-mediated diisopropylammonium salts from different carboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhihao; Hu, Kaikai; Jin, Shouwen; Ding, Aihua; Wang, Yining; Dong, Lingfeng; Gao, Xingjun; Wang, Daqi

    2017-10-01

    salts were also reported. And their structural and supramolecular aspects are fully analyzed. The result reveals that among the sixteen investigated crystals the NH groups in the diisopropylamine are protonated when the carboxylic acids are deprotonated, and the crystal packing is interpreted in terms of the strong charge-assisted Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond formation between the ammonium and the deprotonated COOH groups. Except the Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond, the Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) were also found at the salts 6, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, and 16. Further analysis of the crystal packing of the salts indicated that a different family of additional CHsbnd O/CH2sbnd O/CH3sbnd O, CH-π/CH3-π, CH3-Cπ, N-π, and π-π associations contribute to the stabilization and expansion of the total structures. For the coexistence of the various weak interactions these structures adopted homo or hetero supramolecular synthons or both.

  4. Study of optical shuttering action in supramolecular hydrogen bonded nematogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, C.; Pongali Sathya Prabu, N.; Madhu Mohan, M. L. N.

    2012-11-01

    Supramolecular hydrogen bonded mesogens are formed between p-n-undecyloxy benzoic acid (11BAO) and p-n-alkyl benzoic acids (nBA, where n = 2-8). The isolated mesogens are characterized by distinct techniques in order to appreciate the optical, thermal, electrical, and dielectric properties. The optical tilt angle measurement is studied for all the members of this homologous series and is found to concur with the mean field theory predicted value. An interesting factor to notice is the observation of optical shuttering action in nematic phase of the entire series which privilege these materials to be used as light modulators. Dielectric measurements were carried out and the dispersion curves were discussed in terms of relaxation frequency and activation energies.

  5. Excited hydrogen bonds in the molecular mechanism of muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalova, S V; Tolpygo, K B

    1991-11-21

    The mechanism of muscle contraction is considered. The hydrolysis of an ATP molecule is assumed to produce the excitation of hydrogen bonds A--H...B between electronegative atoms A and B, which are contained in the myosin head and actin filament. This excitation energy epsilon f depends on the interatomic distance AB = R and generates the tractive force f = -delta epsilon f/delta R, that makes atoms AB approach each other. The swing of the myosin head results in macroscopic mutual displacement of actin and myosin polymers. The motion of the actin filament under the action of this force is studied. The conditions under which a considerable portion of the excitation energy converts into the potential tension energy of the actin filament are analysed, and the probability of higher muscle efficiency existence is discussed.

  6. Structure, vibrations, and hydrogen bond parameters of dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawinkowski, S.; Eilmes, J.; Waluk, J.

    2010-07-01

    Geometry and vibrational structure of dibenzo[ b, i][1,4,8,11]tetraaza[14]annulene (TAA) have been studied using infrared and Raman spectroscopy combined with quantum-chemical calculations. The assignments were proposed for 106 out of the total of 108 TAA vibrations, based on comparison of the theoretical predictions with the experimental data obtained for the parent molecule and its isotopomer in which the NH protons were replaced by deuterons. Reassignments were suggesteded for the NH stretching and out-of-plane vibrations. The values of the parameters of the intramolecular NH⋯N hydrogen bonds were analysed in comparison with the corresponding data for porphyrin and porphycene, molecules with the same structural motif, a cavity composed of four nitrogen atoms and two inner protons. Both experiment and calculations suggest that the molecule of TAA is not planar and is present in a trans tautomeric form, with the protons located on the opposite nitrogen atoms.

  7. Mechanical measurement of hydrogen bonded host-guest systems under non-equilibrium, near-physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Teresa; Cerrón, Fernando; Nieto-Ortega, Belén; Latorre, Alfonso; Somoza, Álvaro; Ibarra, Borja; Pérez, Emilio M

    2017-09-01

    Decades after the birth of supramolecular chemistry, there are many techniques to measure noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, under equilibrium conditions. As ensembles of molecules rapidly lose coherence, we cannot extrapolate bulk data to single-molecule events under non-equilibrium conditions, more relevant to the dynamics of biological systems. We present a new method that exploits the high force resolution of optical tweezers to measure at the single molecule level the mechanical strength of a hydrogen bonded host-guest pair out of equilibrium and under near-physiological conditions. We utilize a DNA reporter to unambiguously isolate single binding events. The Hamilton receptor-cyanuric acid host-guest system is used as a test bed. The force required to dissociate the host-guest system is ∼17 pN and increases with the pulling rate as expected for a system under non-equilibrium conditions. Blocking one of the hydrogen bonding sites results in a significant decrease of the force-to-break by 1-2 pN, pointing out the ability of the method to resolve subtle changes in the mechanical strength of the binding due to the individual H-bonding components. We believe the method will prove to be a versatile tool to address important questions in supramolecular chemistry.

  8. Syntheses, Crystal Structures, Magnetic Behaviours, and Thermal Properties of Three Hydrogen-Bonding Networks Containing Dicyanamide and 4-Hydroxypyridine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three new dicyanamide-bridged polymeric complexes of {[Mn(dca2(L2]·2H2O}n (1, {[Cd(dca2(L2]·2H2O}n (2, and {[Co(dca2(L2]2(L}n (3 (dca = dicyanamide, L = pyridinium-4-olate have been synthesized and structurally characterized. In the three compounds, the protons of hydroxyl groups of 4-hydroxypyridine transfer to pyridyl nitrogen atoms. Compounds 1 and 2 are isomorphous forming one-dimensional [M(dca2(L2]n chains where metals are connected by double dca anions. These one-dimensional chains are extended into two-dimensional layers through weak C–H⋯N hydrogen bonds. Further, these layers are assembled into a three-dimensional supramolecular network through N–H⋯O, O–H⋯O hydrogen bonds. Complex 3 is a coordination layer of (4, 4 topology with octahedral metal centers linked by four single μ1,5-bridges. These layers are interlocked by N–H⋯O, O–H⋯O hydrogen bonds from coordinated water molecules and free L molecules, which leads to a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture. The variable temperature magnetic susceptibilities measurement of compounds 1 and 3 shows the existence of weak antiferromagnetic interactions between the metal centers. The thermogravimetric analyses of the compounds 1–3 are also discussed.

  9. Observation of paramorphic phenomenon and non-tilted orthogonal smectic phases in hydrogen bonded ferroelectric liquid crystals for photonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhasri, P.; Venugopal, D.; Jayaprakasam, R.; Chitravel, T.; Vijayakumar, V. N.

    2018-06-01

    A new class of hydrogen bonded ferroelectric liquid crystals (HBFLC) have been designed and synthesized by intermolecular hydrogen bonds between mesogenic 4-decyloxybenzoic acid (10OBA) and non-mesogenic (R)-(+)-Methylsuccinic acid (MSA) which have been confirmed through experimental and theoretical studies. Further, Mulliken population analysis clearly reveals that the existence of hydrogen bonds, strength and dynamic properties. Textural observation and its corresponding enthalpy values are analyzed by polarizing optical microscope (POM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) respectively. Paramorphic changes in Sm C* phase due to the change of refractive index, which clearly reveal that the complex could be used for filtering action in photonic devices. The transition from lone pair to π* with large stabilization energy evidently exposes the chiral phases in the present HBFLC complex. Intermolecular interaction is analyzed by using natural bond orbital (NBO) studies. The highest energy in the HOMO-LUMO shows the stable phase in the HBFLC complex. Molecular structure of the HBFLC complex possesses the monoclinic which has been evinced through x-ray analysis. The randomly oriented bunch of homogeneous molecules in Sm A* phase of the HBFLC complex is reported.

  10. Tunable GLUT-Hexose Binding and Transport via Modulation of Hexose C-3 Hydrogen-Bonding Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Kondapi, Venkata Pavan; Soueidan, Olivier-Mohamad; Cheeseman, Christopher I; West, Frederick G

    2017-06-12

    The importance of the hydrogen bonding interactions in the GLUT-hexose binding process (GLUT=hexose transporter) has been demonstrated by studying the binding of structurally modified d-fructose analogues to GLUTs, and in one case its transport into cells. The presence of a hydrogen bond donor at the C-3 position of 2,5-anhydro-d-mannitol derivatives is essential for effective binding to GLUT5 and transport into tumor cells. Surprisingly, installation of a group that can function only as a hydrogen bond acceptor at C-3 resulted in selective recognition by GLUT1 rather than GLUT5. A fluorescently labelled analogue clearly showed GLUT-mediated transport and low efflux properties of the probe. This study reveals that a single positional modification of a 2,5-anhydro-d-mannitol derivative is sufficient to switch its binding preference from GLUT5 to GLUT1, and uncovers general scaffolds that are suitable for the potential selective delivery of molecular payloads into tumor cells via GLUT transport machinery. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Hydrogen-Bonding Network and OH Stretch Vibration of Cellulose: Comparison of Computational Modeling with Polarized IR and SFG Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christopher M; Kubicki, James D; Fan, Bingxin; Zhong, Linghao; Jarvis, Michael C; Kim, Seong H

    2015-12-10

    Hydrogen bonds play critical roles in noncovalent directional interactions determining the crystal structure of cellulose. Although diffraction studies accurately determined the coordinates of carbon and oxygen atoms in crystalline cellulose, the structural information on hydrogen atoms involved in hydrogen-bonding is still elusive. This could be complemented by vibrational spectroscopy; but the assignment of the OH stretch peaks has been controversial. In this study, we performed calculations using density functional theory with dispersion corrections (DFT-D2) for the cellulose Iβ crystal lattices with the experimentally determined carbon and oxygen coordinates. DFT-D2 calculations revealed that the OH stretch vibrations of cellulose are highly coupled and delocalized through intra- and interchain hydrogen bonds involving all OH groups in the crystal. Additionally, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a single cellulose microfibril showed that the conformations of OH groups exposed at the microfibril surface are not well-defined. Comparison of the computation results with the experimentally determined IR dichroism of uniaxially aligned cellulose microfibrils and the peak positions of various cellulose crystals allowed unambiguous identification of OH stretch modes observed in the vibrational spectra of cellulose.

  12. Point-of-Care Determination of Acetaminophen Levels with Multi-Hydrogen Bond Manipulated Single-Molecule Recognition (eMuHSiR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Huang, Zhongyuan; Wang, Letao; Wang, Chunming; Zhang, Changde; Wiese, Tomas; Wang, Guangdi; Riley, Kevin; Wang, Zhe

    2018-04-03

    This work aims to face the challenge of monitoring small molecule drugs accurately and rapidly for point-of-care (POC) diagnosis in current clinical settings. Overdose of acetaminophen (AP), a commonly used over the counter (OTC) analgesic drug, has been determined to be a major cause of acute liver failure in the US and the UK. However, there is no rapid and accurate detection method available for this drug in the emergency room. The present study examined an AP sensing strategy that relies on a previously unexplored strong interaction between AP and the arginine (Arg) molecule. It was found that as many as 4 hydrogen bonds can be formed between one Arg molecule and one AP molecule. By taking advantages of this structural selectivity and high tenability of hydrogen bonds, Arg, immobilized on a graphene surface via electrostatic interactions, was utilized to structurally capture AP. Interestingly, bonded AP still remained the perfect electrochemical activities. The extent of Arg-AP bonds was quantified using a newly designed electrochemical (EC) sensor. To verify the feasibility of this novel assay, based on multihydrogen bond manipulated single-molecule recognition (eMuHSiR), both pharmaceutical and serum sample were examined. In commercial tablet measurement, no significant difference was seen between the results of eMuHSiR and other standard methods. For measuring AP concentration in the mice blood, the substances in serum, such as sugars and fats, would not bring any interference to the eMuHSiR in a wide concentration range. This eMuHSiR method opens the way for future development of small molecule detection for the POC testing.

  13. Combined effects of π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding on the (N1) acidity of uracil and hydrolysis of 2'-deoxyuridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellie, Jennifer L; Navarro-Whyte, Lex; Carvey, Matthew T; Wetmore, Stacey D

    2012-03-01

    M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p) is used to study the simultaneous effects of π-π stacking interactions with phenylalanine (modeled as benzene) and hydrogen bonding with small molecules (HF, H(2)O, and NH(3)) on the N1 acidity of uracil and the hydrolytic deglycosylation of 2'-deoxyuridine (dU) (facilitated by fully (OH(-)) or partially (HCOO(-)···H(2)O) activated water). When phenylalanine is complexed with isolated uracil, the proton affinity of all acceptor sites significantly increases (by up to 28 kJ mol(-1)), while the N1 acidity slightly decreases (by ~6 kJ mol(-1)). When small molecules are hydrogen bound to uracil, addition of the phenylalanine ring can increase or decrease the acidity of uracil depending on the number and nature (acidity) of the molecules bound. Furthermore, a strong correlation between the effects of π-π stacking on the acidity of U and the dU deglycosylation reaction energetics is found, where the hydrolysis barrier can increase or decrease depending on the nature and number of small molecules bound, the nucleophile considered (which dictates the negative charge on U in the transition state), and the polarity of the (bulk) environment. These findings emphasize that the catalytic (or anticatalytic) role of the active-site aromatic amino acid residues is highly dependent on the situation under consideration. In the case of uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG), which catalyzes the hydrolytic excision of uracil from DNA, the type of discrete hydrogen-bonding interactions with U, the nature of the nucleophile, and the anticipated weak, nonpolar environment in the active site suggest that phenylalanine will be slightly anticatalytic in the chemical step, and therefore experimentally observed contributions to catalysis may entirely result from associated structural changes that occur prior to deglycosylation.

  14. Influence of hydrogen bond accepting ability of anions on the adsorption performance of ionic liquid surface molecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guifen; Gao, Xia; Wang, Xiaolong; Wang, Jianji; Fan, Jing

    2018-01-12

    To illuminate the influence mechanism of anionic structure of ionic liquids (ILs) on the adsorption performance of surface molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), in this work, six newly designed MIPs were prepared on the surface of amino-poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) particles by using imidazolium ILs with the same cation [C 4 mim] + but different anions (Cl, CH 3 SO 3 , PF 6 , BF 4 , C 4 F 7 O 2 , C 4 F 9 SO 3 ) as template molecules, methacrylic acid as functional monomer, and ethylene dimethacrylate as cross-linker. The resulting MIP materials were characterized by IR and SEM, and the influence of hydrogen bond accepting ability of anions on the adsorption performance of the MIPs for the ILs was investigated in acetonitrile. It was found that adsorption capacity of the MIPs towards the ILs decreased in the order MIP [C4mim][Cl]  > MIP [C4mim][C4F7O2]  ≥ MIP [C4mim][BF4] and MIP [C4mim][CH3SO3]  > MIP [C4mim][C4F9SO3]  > MIP [C4mim][PF6] , which is in good agreement with the ability of anions of the ILs to form hydrogen bonds. Ultraviolet, 1 H-NMR and 35 Cl-NMR spectroscopy was then used to study the interactions of anions of the ILs with the functional monomer. It was found that the hydrogen bond interaction between anions of the ILs and acidic proton of the functional monomer was the main driving force for the high adsorption selectivity of the imprinted polymers, and the stronger hydrogen bond interaction indicates higher binding capacity and higher selectivity of the polymers towards the ILs. It was also verified that the ILs with stronger hydrogen bond accepting ability of anions could be selectively extracted by the corresponding IL-MIPs. These results may provide new insight into the recognition mechanism of MIPs for ILs, and are also useful for the rational design of this new class of imprinting materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantum mechanics models of the methanol dimer: O-H…O hydrogen bonds of ß-D-glucose moieties from crystallographic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, a survey of the Cambridge Crystal Structure Database for all donor-acceptor interactions in ß-D-glucose moieties was performed to examine the similarities and differences among the different hydroxyl groups and ether oxygen atoms that participate in hydrogen bonds. Comparable behavior...

  16. Adenine versus Guanine Quartets in Aqueous Solution. Dispersion-Corrected DFT Study on the Differences in π-Stacking and Hydrogen-Bonding Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonseca Guerra, C.; van der Wijst, T.; Poater, J.; Swart, M.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the performance of the dispersion-corrected density functionals (BLYP-D, BP86-D and PBE-D) and the widely used B3LYP functional for describing the hydrogen bonds and the stacking interactions in DNA base dimers. For the gas-phase situation, the bonding energies have been

  17. Self-assembly of a [2 x 2] hydrogen bonded grid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipkowski, P.R.; Bielejewska, A.G.; Kooijman, Huub; Spek, Anthony L.; Timmerman, P.; Reinhoudt, David

    1999-01-01

    Formation of 24 cooperative hydrogen bonds drives the spontaneous assembly of a rigid bifunctional trimelamine and bis(barbituric acid) to give selectively the [2 × 2] hydrogen-bonded grid, in preference to the corresponding [1 × 1] or polymeric assemblies.

  18. Substituent Effects on Hydrogen Bonds in DNA : A Kohn-Sham DFT Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias

    2006-01-01

    In this Chapter, we discuss how the hydrogen bonds in Watson-Crick base pairs can be tuned both structurally and in terms of bond strength by exposing the DNA bases to different kinds of substitutions: (1) substitution in the X-H Y hydrogen bonding moiety, (2) remote substitution, i.e., introducing

  19. Kinetic stabilities of double, tetra- and hexarosette hydrogen-bonded assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.J.; Neuteboom, Edda E.; Paraschiv, V.; Crego Calama, Mercedes; Timmerman, P.; Reinhoudt, David

    2002-01-01

    A study of the kinetic stabilities of hydrogen-bonded double, tetra-, and hexarosette assemblies, comprising 36, 72, and 108 hydrogen bonds, respectively, is described. The kinetic stabilities are measured using both chiral amplification and racemization experiments. The chiral amplification studies

  20. Investigating Hydrogen Bonding in Phenol Using Infrared Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, Anna M.; Toda, Megan J.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogen bonding of phenol can be used as an introductory model for biological systems because of its structural similarities to tyrosine, a para-substituted phenol that is an amino acid essential to the synthesis of proteins. Phenol is able to form hydrogen bonds readily in solution, which makes it a suitable model for biological…

  1. Performance of various density functionals for the hydrogen bonds in DNA base pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijst, T.; Fonseca Guerra, C.; Swart, M.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the performance of seven popular density functionals (B3LYP, BLYP, BP86, mPW, OPBE, PBE, PW91) for describing the geometry and stability of the hydrogen bonds in DNA base pairs. For the gas-phase situation, the hydrogen-bond lengths and strengths in the DNA pairs have been

  2. Transport coefficients of strongly interacting matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckmann, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigate the dissipative transport phenomena of strongly interacting matter. The special interest is in the shear viscosity and its value divided by entropy density. The performed calculations are based on effective models for Quantum Chromodynamics, mostly focused on the 2-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. This allows us to study the hadronic sector as well as the quark sector within one single model. We expand the models up to next-to-leading order in inverse numbers of colors. We present different possibilities of calculating linear transport coefficients and give an overview over qualitative properties as well as over recent ideas concerning ideal fluids. As present methods are not able to calculate the quark two-point function in Minkowski space-time in the self-consistent approximation scheme of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, a new method for this purpose is developed. This self-energy parametrization method is applied to the expansion scheme, yielding the quark spectral function with meson back-coupling effects. The usage of this spectral function in the transport calculation is only one result of this work. We also test the application of different transport approaches in the NJL model, and find an interesting behavior of the shear viscosity at the critical end point of the phase diagram. We also use the NJL model to calculate the viscosity of a pion gas in the dilute regime. After an analysis of other models for pions and their interaction, we find that the NJL-result leads to an important modification of transport properties in comparison with the calculations which purely rely on pion properties in the vacuum. (orig.)

  3. Strong and Electromagnetic Interactions at SPS Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Ribicki, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Particle production in peripheral Pb+Pb collisions has been measured at a beam energy of 158 GeV per nucleon, corresponding to psNN 17.3 GeV. The measurements provide full double differential coverage in a wide range of longitudinal and transverse momenta, including the central (“mid-rapidity”) area and extending far into the projectile fragmentation region. The resulting analysis shows the heavy ion reaction as a mixture of different processes. In particular, surprising phenomena, like the presence of large and strongly varying structures in the shape of the double differential cross section d2s /dxFd pT , are induced by the final state electromagnetic interaction between produced particles and the charged spectator system. This effect is largest at low transverse momenta, where it results in a deep valley in the xF -dependence of the produced p+/p− ratio. The basic characteristics of the electromagnetic phenomenon described above agree with the results of a theoretical analysis, performed by means of ...

  4. Conduction properties of strongly interacting Fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantut, Jean-Philippe; Stadler, David; Krinner, Sebastian; Meineke, Jakob; Esslinger, Tilman

    2013-05-01

    We experimentally study the transport process of ultracold fermionic atoms through a mesoscopic, quasi two-dimensional channel connecting macroscopic reservoirs. By observing the current response to a bias applied between the reservoirs, we directly access the resistance of the channel in a manner analogous to a solid state conduction measurement. The resistance is further controlled by a gate potential reducing the atomic density in the channel, like in a field effect transistor. In this setup, we study the flow of a strongly interacting Fermi gas, and observe a striking drop of resistance with increasing density in the channel, as expected at the onset of superfluidity. We relate the transport properties to the in-situ evolution of the thermodynamic potential, providing a model independant thermodynamic scale. The resistance is compared to that of an ideal Fermi gas in the same geometry, which shows an order of magnitude larger resistance, originating from the contact resistance between the channel and the reservoirs. The extension of this study to a channel containing a tunable disorder is briefly outlined.

  5. Toward a Strongly Interacting Scalar Higgs Particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalaby, Abouzeid M.; El-Houssieny, M.

    2008-01-01

    We calculate the vacuum energy of the non-Hermitian and PT symmetric (-gφ 4 ) 2+1 scalar field theory. Rather than the corresponding Hermitian theory and due to the asymptotic freedom property of the theory, the vacuum energy does not blow up for large energy scales which is a good sign to solve the hierarchy problem when using this model to break the U(1)xSU(2) symmetry in the standard model. The theory is strongly interacting and in fact, all the dimensionful parameters in the theory like mass and energy are finite even for very high energy scales. Moreover, relative to the vacuum energy for the Hermitian φ 4 theory, the vacuum energy of the non-Hermitian and PT symmetric (-gφ 4 ) 2+1 theory is tiny, which is a good sign toward the solution of the cosmological constant problem. Remarkably, these features of the non-Hermitian and PT symmetric (-gφ 4 ) 2+1 scalar field theory make it very plausible to be employed as a Higgs mechanism in the standard model instead of the problematic Hermitian Higgs mechanism

  6. Intra- und intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Spectroscopic, quantum chemical and molecular dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simperler, A.

    1999-03-01

    Intra- and intermolecular H-bonds have been investigated with spectroscopic, quantum chemical, and molecular dynamics methods. The work is divided into the following three parts: 1. Intramolecular interactions in ortho-substituted phenols. Theoretical and experimental data that characterizes the intramolecular hydrogen bonds in 48 different o-substituted phenols are discussed. The study covers various kinds of O-H ... Y -type interactions (Y= N, O, S, F, Cl, Br, I, C=C, C=-C, and C-=N). The bond strength sequences for several series of systematically related compounds as obtained from IR spectroscopy data (i.e., v(OH) stretching frequencies) are discussed and reproduced with several theoretical methods (B3LYP/6-31G(d,p), B3LYP/6-311G(d,p), B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p), B3LYP/DZVP, MP2/6-31G(d,p), and MP2/6-31++G(d,p) levels of theory). The experimentally determined sequences are interpreted in terms of the intrinsic properties of the molecules: hydrogen bond distances, Mulliken partial charges, van der Waals radii, and electron densities of the Y-proton acceptors. 2. Competitive hydrogen bonds and conformational equilibria in 2,6-disubstituted phenols containing two different carbonyl substituents. The rotational isomers of ten unsymmetrical 2,6-disubstituted phenols as obtained by combinations of five different carbonyl substituents (COOH, COOCH 3 , CHO, COCH 3 , and CONH 2 ) have been theoretically investigated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The relative stability of four to five conformers of each compound were determined by full geometry optimization for free molecules as well as for molecules in reaction fields with dielectric constants up to ε=37.5. A comparison with IR spectroscopic data of available compounds revealed excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted stability sequences and conformational equilibria. The stability of a conformer could be interpreted to be governed by the following two contributions: (i) an attractive hydrogen bond

  7. The hydrogen-bond network of water supports propagating optical phonon-like modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elton, Daniel C; Fernández-Serra, Marivi

    2016-01-04

    The local structure of liquid water as a function of temperature is a source of intense research. This structure is intimately linked to the dynamics of water molecules, which can be measured using Raman and infrared spectroscopies. The assignment of spectral peaks depends on whether they are collective modes or single-molecule motions. Vibrational modes in liquids are usually considered to be associated to the motions of single molecules or small clusters. Using molecular dynamics simulations, here we find dispersive optical phonon-like modes in the librational and OH-stretching bands. We argue that on subpicosecond time scales these modes propagate through water's hydrogen-bond network over distances of up to 2 nm. In the long wavelength limit these optical modes exhibit longitudinal-transverse splitting, indicating the presence of coherent long-range dipole-dipole interactions, as in ice. Our results indicate the dynamics of liquid water have more similarities to ice than previously thought.

  8. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy to Study Diffusion of Polymer Chains within Layered Hydrogen-Bonded Polymer Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pristinski, Denis; Kharlampieva, Evguenia; Sukhishvili, Svetlana

    2002-03-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) has been used to probe molecular motions within polymer multilayers formed by hydrogen-bonding sequential self-assembly. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules were end-labeled with the fluorescent tags, and self-assembled with polymethacrylic acid (PMAA) using layer-by-layer deposition. We have found that molecules included in the top adsorbed layer have significant mobility at the millisecond time scale, probably due to translational diffusion. However, their dynamics deviate from classical Brownian motion with a single diffusion time. Possible reasons for the deviation are discussed. We found that motions were significantly slowed with increasing depth within the PEG/PMAA multilayer. This phenomena occured in a narrow pH range around 4.0 in which intermolecular interactions were relatively weak.

  9. The Origin of the Non-Additivity in Resonance-Assisted Hydrogen Bond Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xuhui; Zhang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Wei; Mo, Yirong

    2017-11-09

    The concept of resonance-assisted hydrogen bond (RAHB) has been widely accepted, and its impact on structures and energetics can be best studied computationally using the block-localized wave function (BLW) method, which is a variant of ab initio valence bond (VB) theory and able to derive strictly electron-localized structures self-consistently. In this work, we use the BLW method to examine a few molecules that result from the merging of two malonaldehyde molecules. As each of these molecules contains two hydrogen bonds, these intramolecular hydrogen bonds may be cooperative or anticooperative, depended on their relative orientations, and compared with the hydrogen bond in malonaldehyde. Apart from quantitatively confirming the concept of RAHB, the comparison of the computations with and without π resonance shows that both σ-framework and π-resonance contribute to the nonadditivity in these RAHB systems with multiple hydrogen bonds.

  10. Neutron diffraction of α, β and γ cyclodextrins: hydrogen bonding patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hingerty, B.E.; Klar, B.; Hardgrove, G.; Betzel, C.; Saenger, W.

    1983-01-01

    Cyclodextrins (CD's) are torus-shaped molecules composed of six (α), seven (β) or eight (γ) (1 → 4) linked glucoses. α-CD has been shown to have two different structures with well-defined hydrogen bonds, one tense and the other relaxed. An induced-fit-like mechanism for α-CD complex formation has been proposed. Circular hydrogen bond networks have also been found for α-CD due to the energetically favored cooperative effect. β-CD with a disordered water structure possesses an unusual flip-flop hydrogen bonding system of the type O-H H-O representing an equilibrium between two states; O-H O reversible H-O. γ-CD with a disordered water structure similar to β-CD also possesses the flip-flop hydrogen bond. This study demonstrates that hydrogen bonds are operative in disordered systems and display dynamics even in the solid state

  11. Hydrogen bond disruption in DNA base pairs from (14)C transmutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Michel; Carter, Damien J; Uberuaga, Blas P; Stanek, Christopher R; Mancera, Ricardo L; Marks, Nigel A

    2014-09-04

    Recent ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have shown that radioactive carbon does not normally fragment DNA bases when it decays. Motivated by this finding, density functional theory and Bader analysis have been used to quantify the effect of C → N transmutation on hydrogen bonding in DNA base pairs. We find that (14)C decay has the potential to significantly alter hydrogen bonds in a variety of ways including direct proton shuttling (thymine and cytosine), thermally activated proton shuttling (guanine), and hydrogen bond breaking (cytosine). Transmutation substantially modifies both the absolute and relative strengths of the hydrogen bonding pattern, and in two instances (adenine and cytosine), the density at the critical point indicates development of mild covalent character. Since hydrogen bonding is an important component of Watson-Crick pairing, these (14)C-induced modifications, while infrequent, may trigger errors in DNA transcription and replication.

  12. Redshift or adduct stabilization -- a computational study of hydrogen bonding in adducts of protonated carboxylic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Solveig Gaarn; Hammerum, Steen

    2009-01-01

    It is generally expected that the hydrogen bond strength in a D-H-A adduct is predicted by the difference between the proton affinities of D and A, measured by the adduct stabilization, and demonstrated by the IR redshift of the D-H bond stretching vibrational frequency. These criteria do...... not always yield consistent predictions, as illustrated by the hydrogen bonds formed by the E and Z OH groups of protonated carboxylic acids. The delta-PA and the stabilization of a series of hydrogen bonded adducts indicate that the E OH group forms the stronger hydrogen bonds, whereas the bond length...... carboxylic acids are different. The OH bond length and IR redshift afford the better measure of hydrogen bond strength....

  13. The role of hydrogen bonds in the crystals of 2-amino-4-methyl-5-nitropyridinium trifluoroacetate monohydrate and 4-hydroxybenzenesulfonate - X-ray and spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryndal, I; Marchewka, M; Wandas, M; Sąsiadek, W; Lorenc, J; Lis, T; Dymińska, L; Kucharska, E; Hanuza, J

    2014-04-05

    Two new organic-organic salts, 2-amino-4-methyl-5-nitropyridinium trifluoroacetate monohydrate (AMNP-TFA), and 2-amino-4-methyl-5-nitropyridinium 4-hydroxybenzenesulfonate (AMNP-HBS), were obtained and characterized by means of FT-IR, FT-Raman and single crystal X-ray crystallography. In the former crystal, the cations, anions and water molecules are linked into layers by three types of hydrogen bonds, NPH⋯O, NAH⋯O and OH⋯O. These layers are connected by weaker CH⋯O hydrogen bonds. In the latter crystal, the cations and anions form one-dimensional structure through a number of hydrogen-bonding interactions involving the OH, NH(+) and NH2 groups as donors. In this case the NPH⋯O and NAH⋯O hydrogen bonds are formed. The combination of interactions between cations and anions results in the formation of columns. Additionally, there are π-π stacking interactions between the columns. The obtained X-ray structural data are related to the vibrational spectra of the studied crystals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sulfate Recognition by Persistent Crystalline Capsules with Rigidified Hydrogen Bonding Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Custelcean, Radu; Remy, Priscilla; Jiang, Deen; Bonnesen, Peter V; Moyer, Bruce A

    2008-01-01

    electivity is a fundamental property of pervasive importance in chemistry and biology as reflected in phenomena as diverse as membrane transport, catalysis, sensing, adsorption, complexation, and crystallization. Although the key principles of complementarity and preorganization governing the binding interactions underlying such phenomena were delineated long ago, truly profound selectivity has proven elusive by design in part because synthetic molecular architectures are neither maximally complementary for binding target species nor sufficiently rigid. Even if a host molecule possesses a high degree of complementarity for a guest species, it all too often can distort its structure or even rearrange its conformation altogether to accommodate competing guests. One approach taken by researchers to overcome this challenge has been to devise extremely rigid molecules that bind species within complementary cavities. Although examples have been reported to demonstrate the principle, such cases are not generally of practical utility, because of inefficient synthesis and often poor kinetics. Alternatively, flexible building blocks can be employed, but then the challenge becomes one of locking them in place. Taking a cue from natural binding agents that derive their rigidity from a network of molecular interactions, especially hydrogen bonding, we present herein an example of a crystalline, self-assembled capsule that binds sulfate by a highly complementary array of rigidified hydrogen bonds (H-bonds). Although covalent or self-assembled capsules have been previously employed as anion hosts, they typically lack the strict combination of complementarity and rigidity required for high selectivity. Furthermore, the available structural data for these systems is either restricted to a limited number of anions of similar size and shape, or varies significantly from one anion to another, which hampers the rationalization of the observed selectivity. We have been employing

  15. Molecularly Tuning the Radicaloid N-H···O═C Hydrogen Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Norman; Chung, Wei-Cheng; Ley, Rebecca M; Lin, Kwan-Yu; Francisco, Joseph S; Negishi, Ei-Ichi

    2016-03-03

    Substituent effects on the open shell N-H···O═C hydrogen-bond has never been reported. This study examines how 12 functional groups composed of electron donating groups (EDG), halogen atoms and electron withdrawing groups (EWG) affect the N-H···O═C hydrogen-bond properties in a six-membered cyclic model system of O═C(Y)-CH═C(X)N-H. It is found that group effects on this open shell H-bonding system are significant and have predictive trends when X = H and Y is varied. When Y is an EDG, the N-H···O═C hydrogen-bond is strengthened; and when Y is an EWG, the bond is weakened; whereas the variation in electronic properties of X group do not exhibit a significant impact upon the hydrogen bond strength. The structural impact of the stronger N-H···O═C hydrogen-bond are (1) shorter H and O distance, r(H···O) and (2) a longer N-H bond length, r(NH). The stronger N-H···O═C hydrogen-bond also acts to pull the H and O in toward one another which has an effect on the bond angles. Our findings show that there is a linear relationship between hydrogen-bond angle and N-H···O═C hydrogen-bond energy in this unusual H-bonding system. In addition, there is a linear correlation of the r(H···O) and the hydrogen bond energy. A short r(H···O) distance corresponds to a large hydrogen bond energy when Y is varied. The observed trends and findings have been validated using three different methods (UB3LYP, M06-2X, and UMP2) with two different basis sets.

  16. Strong field interaction of laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pukhov, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    The Review covers recent progress in laser-matter interaction at intensities above 10 18 W cm -2 . At these intensities electrons swing in the laser pulse with relativistic energies. The laser electric field is already much stronger than the atomic fields, and any material is instantaneously ionized, creating plasma. The physics of relativistic laser-plasma is highly non-linear and kinetic. The best numerical tools applicable here are particle-in-cell (PIC) codes, which provide the most fundamental plasma model as an ensemble of charged particles. The three-dimensional (3D) PIC code Virtual Laser-Plasma Laboratory runs on a massively parallel computer tracking trajectories of up to 10 9 particles simultaneously. This allows one to simulate real laser-plasma experiments for the first time. When the relativistically intense laser pulses propagate through plasma, a bunch of new physical effects appears. The laser pulses are subject to relativistic self-channelling and filamentation. The gigabar ponderomotive pressure of the laser pulse drives strong currents of plasma electrons in the laser propagation direction; these currents reach the Alfven limit and generate 100 MG quasistatic magnetic fields. These magnetic fields, in turn, lead to the mutual filament attraction and super-channel formation. The electrons in the channels are accelerated up to gigaelectronvolt energies and the ions gain multi-MeV energies. We discuss different mechanisms of particle acceleration and compare numerical simulations with experimental data. One of the very important applications of the relativistically strong laser beams is the fast ignition (FI) concept for the inertial fusion energy (IFE). Petawatt-class lasers may provide enough energy to isochorically ignite a pre-compressed target consisting of thermonuclear fuel. The FI approach would ease dramatically the constraints on the implosion symmetry and improve the energy gain. However, there is a set of problems to solve before the FI

  17. The hydrogen bond between N-H or O-H and organic fluorine: favourable yes, competitive no.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robin

    2017-06-01

    A study was made of X-H...F-C interactions (X = N or O) in small-molecule crystal structures. It was primarily based on 6728 structures containing X-H and C-F and no atom heavier than chlorine. Of the 28 451 C-F moieties in these structures, 1051 interact with X-H groups. However, over three-quarters of these interactions are either the weaker components of bifurcated hydrogen bonds (so likely to be incidental contacts) or occur in structures where there is a clear insufficiency of good hydrogen-bond acceptors such as oxygen, nitrogen or halide. In structures where good acceptors are entirely absent, there is about a 2 in 3 chance that a given X-H group will donate to fluorine. Viable alternatives are X-H...π hydrogen bonds (especially to electron-rich aromatics) and dihydrogen bonds. The average H...F distances of X-H...F-C interactions are significantly shorter for CR 3 F (R = C or H) and Csp 2 -F acceptors than for CRF 3 . The X-H...F angle distribution is consistent with a weak energetic preference for linearity, but that of H...F-C suggests a flat energy profile in the range 100-180°. X-H...F-C interactions are more likely when the acceptor is Csp 2 -F or CR 3 F, and when the donor is C-NH 2 . They also occur significantly more often in structures containing tertiary alcohols or solvent molecules, or with Z' > 1, i.e. when there may be unusual packing problems. It is extremely rare to find X-H...F-C interactions in structures where there are several unused good acceptors. When it does happen, there is often a clear reason, e.g. awkwardly shaped molecules whose packing isolates a donor group from the good acceptors.

  18. Hydration dynamics of a lipid membrane: Hydrogen bond networks and lipid-lipid associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abhinav; Debnath, Ananya

    2018-03-01

    Dynamics of hydration layers of a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer are investigated using an all atom molecular dynamics simulation. Based upon the geometric criteria, continuously residing interface water molecules which form hydrogen bonds solely among themselves and then concertedly hydrogen bonded to carbonyl, phosphate, and glycerol head groups of DMPC are identified. The interface water hydrogen bonded to lipids shows slower relaxation rates for translational and rotational dynamics compared to that of the bulk water and is found to follow sub-diffusive and non-diffusive behaviors, respectively. The mean square displacements and the reorientational auto-correlation functions are slowest for the interfacial waters hydrogen bonded to the carbonyl oxygen since these are buried deep in the hydrophobic core among all interfacial water studied. The intermittent hydrogen bond auto-correlation functions are calculated, which allows breaking and reformations of the hydrogen bonds. The auto-correlation functions for interfacial hydrogen bonded networks develop humps during a transition from cage-like motion to eventual power law behavior of t-3/2. The asymptotic t-3/2 behavior indicates translational diffusion dictated dynamics during hydrogen bond breaking and formation irrespective of the nature of the chemical confinement. Employing reactive flux correlation analysis, the forward rate constant of hydrogen bond breaking and formation is calculated which is used to obtain Gibbs energy of activation of the hydrogen bond breaking. The relaxation rates of the networks buried in the hydrophobic core are slower than the networks near the lipid-water interface which is again slower than bulk due to the higher Gibbs energy of activation. Since hydrogen bond breakage follows a translational diffusion dictated mechanism, chemically confined hydrogen bond networks need an activation energy to diffuse through water depleted hydrophobic environments. Our calculations

  19. Crystal structure, vibrational spectra and DFT studies of hydrogen bonded 1,2,4-triazolium hydrogenselenate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V.; Thirunarayanan, S.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2017-10-01

    The new hydrogen bonded molecular complex 1,2,4-triazolium hydrogenselenate (THS) is prepared by the reaction of 1H-1,2,4-triazole and selenic acid. This complex is stabilised by N-H⋯O and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonding and electrostatic attractive forces between 1H and 1,2,4-triazolium cations and hydrogen selenate anions. The XRD studies revealed that intermolecular proton transfer occur from selenic acid to 1H-1,2,4-triazole molecule, results in the formation of 1,2,4-triazolium hydrogenselenate which contains 1,2,4-triazolium cations and hydrogenselenate anions. The molecular structure of THS crystal has also been optimised by using Density Functional Theory (DFT) using B3LYP/cc-pVTZ and B3LYP/6-311++G** methods in order to find the whole characteristics of the molecular complex. The theoretical structural parameters such as bond length, bond angle and dihedral angle determined by DFT methods are well agreed with the XRD parameters. The atomic charges and thermodynamic properties are also calculated and analysed. The energies of frontier molecular orbitals HOMO, LUMO, HOMO-1, LUMO+1 and LUMO-HUMO energy gap are calculated to understand the kinetic stability and chemical reactivity of the molecular complex. The natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) has been performed in order to study the intramolecular bonding interactions and delocalisation of electrons. These intra molecular charge transfer may induce biological activities such as antimicrobials, antiinflammatory, antifungal etc. The complete vibrational assignments of THS have been performed by using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra.

  20. Hydrogen bond dynamics and water structure in glucose-water solutions by depolarized Rayleigh scattering and low-frequency Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolantoni, Marco; Sassi, Paola; Morresi, Assunta; Santini, Sergio

    2007-07-01

    The effect of glucose on the relaxation process of water at picosecond time scales has been investigated by depolarized Rayleigh scattering (DRS) experiments. The process is assigned to the fast hydrogen bonding dynamics of the water network. In DRS spectra this contribution can be safely separated from the slower relaxation process due to the sugar. The detected relaxation time is studied at different glucose concentrations and modeled considering bulk and hydrating water contributions. As a result, it is found that in diluted conditions the hydrogen bond lifetime of proximal water molecules becomes about three times slower than that of the bulk. The effect of the sugar on the hydrogen bond water structure is investigated by analyzing the low-frequency Raman (LFR) spectrum sensitive to intermolecular modes. The addition of glucose strongly reduces the intensity of the band at 170cm-1 assigned to a collective stretching mode of water molecules arranged in cooperative tetrahedral domains. These findings indicate that proximal water molecules partially lose the tetrahedral ordering typical of the bulk leading to the formation of high density environments around the sugar. Thus the glucose imposes a new local order among water molecules localized in its hydration shell in which the hydrogen bond breaking dynamics is sensitively retarded. This work provides new experimental evidences that support recent molecular dynamics simulation and thermodynamics results.

  1. Soliton patterns and breakup thresholds in hydrogen-bonded chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchakoutio Nguetcho, A.S.; Kofane, T.C.

    2006-12-01

    We study the dynamics of protons in hydrogen-bonded quasi one-dimensional networks in terms of a diatomic lattice model of protons and heavy ions, with a phi-four on-site substrate potential. We show that the model with linear and nonlinear coupling between lattice sites of the quartic type for the protons admits a richer dynamics that cannot be found with linear coupling. Depending on the two types of physical boundary conditions namely, the drop and condensate types of boundary conditions, and on conditions that require the presence of linear and nonlinear dispersion terms, soliton patterns that are represented by soliton with compact support, peak, drop, bell, cusp, shock, kink, bubble and loop solitons, are derived within a continuum approximation. The phase trajectories, as well as an analytical analysis, provide information on an disintegration of soliton patterns upon reaching some critical values of the lattice parameters. The total energies of soliton patterns are exactly calculated in the displacive limit. We also show that when the phonon anharmonism is taken into account, the width and the energy of soliton patterns are in qualitative agreement with experimental data. (author)

  2. Synthesis, Structure and Spectroscopy of Two Structurally Related Hydrogen Bonded Compounds in the dpma/HClO4 System; dpma (dimethylphosphorylmethanamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido J. Reiss

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The new phosphine oxide compound, (dimethylphosphorylmethanaminium perchlorate, dpmaHClO4 (1, was synthesized by the reaction of (dimethylphosphoryl methanamine (dpma with concentrated perchloric acid. (Dimethylphosphorylmethanaminium perchlorate (dimethylphosphorylmethanamine solvate, dpmaHClO4•dpma (2 was obtained by the slow evaporation of an equimolar methanolic solution of 1 and dpma at room temperature. For both compounds, single-crystal X-ray structures, IR and Raman spectra are reported. The assignment of the spectroscopic data were supported by quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G(2d,p level of theory. In 1, the dpmaH cations form polymeric, polar double-strands along [010] by head to tail connections via N–H∙∙∙O hydrogen bonds. The perchlorate anions are located between these strands attached by one medium strong and two weaker un-bifurcated hydrogen bonds (monoclinic, centrosymmetric space group C2/c, a = 17.8796(5 Å, b = 5.66867(14 Å, c = 17.0106(5 Å, β = 104.788(3°, V = 1666.9(1 Å3, Z = 8, T = 293 K, R(F [I > 2σ(I] = 0.0391, wR(F2 [all] = 0.1113. In 2, besides the N–H∙∙∙O hydrogen bonds, medium strong N–H∙∙∙N hydrogen bonds are present. One dpmaH cation and the neutral dpma molecule are connected head to tail by two N–H∙∙∙O hydrogen bonds forming a monocationic cyclic unit. These cyclic units are further connected by N–H∙∙∙O and N–H∙∙∙N hydrogen bonds forming polymeric, polar double-strands along [001]. The perchlorate anions fill the gaps between these strands, and each [ClO4]− anion is weakly connected to the NH2 group by one N–H∙∙∙O hydrogen bond (orthorhombic, non-centrosymmetric space group Pca21 (No. 29, a = 18.5821(5 Å, b = 11.4320(3 Å, c = 6.89400(17 Å, V = 1464.50(6 Å3, Z = 4, T = 100 K, R(F [I > 2σ(I] = 0.0234, wR(F2 [all] = 0.0575. Both structures are structurally related, and their commonalities are discussed in terms of a graph

  3. Friedel-Crafts reaction of benzyl fluorides: selective activation of C-F bonds as enabled by hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Pier Alexandre; Benhassine, Yasmine; Desroches, Justine; Paquin, Jean-François

    2014-12-08

    A Friedel-Crafts benzylation of arenes with benzyl fluorides has been developed. The reaction produces 1,1-diaryl alkanes in good yield under mild conditions without the need for a transition metal or a strong Lewis acid. A mechanism involving activation of the C-F bond through hydrogen bonding is proposed. This mode of activation enables the selective reaction of benzylic C-F bonds in the presence of other benzylic leaving groups. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Translational vibrations between chains of hydrogen-bonded molecules in solid-state aspirin form I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masae; Ishikawa, Yoichi

    2013-06-01

    We perform dispersion-corrected first-principles calculations, and far-infrared (terahertz) spectroscopic experiments at 4 K, to examine translational vibrations between chains of hydrogen-bonded molecules in solid-state aspirin form I. The calculated frequencies and relative intensities reproduce the observed spectrum to accuracy of 11 cm-1 or less. The stronger one of the two peaks assigned to the translational mode includes the stretching vibration of the weak hydrogen bond between the acetyl groups of a neighboring one-dimensional chain. The calculation of aspirin form II performed for comparison gives the stretching vibration of the weak hydrogen bond in one-dimensional chain.

  5. De Sitter vacua of strongly interacting QFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchel, Alex [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario,London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario,London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, Ontario N2J 2W9 (Canada); Karapetyan, Aleksandr [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario,London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2017-03-22

    We use holographic correspondence to argue that Euclidean (Bunch-Davies) vacuum is a late-time attractor of the dynamical evolution of quantum gauge theories at strong coupling. The Bunch-Davies vacuum is not an adiabatic state, if the gauge theory is non-conformal — the comoving entropy production rate is nonzero. Using the N=2{sup ∗} gauge theory holography, we explore prospects of explaining current accelerated expansion of the Universe as due to the vacuum energy of a strongly coupled QFT.

  6. Effect of cationic substitution on the double-well hydrogen-bond potential in [K1-x(NH4)x]3H(SO4)2 proton conductors: a single-crystal neutron diffraction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, R R; Chitra, R; Selezneva, E V; Makarova, I P

    2017-10-01

    The structure of the mixed crystal [K 1-x (NH 4 ) x ] 3 H(SO 4 ) 2 as obtained from single-crystal neutron diffraction is compared with the previously reported room-temperature neutron structure of crystalline K 3 H(SO 4 ) 2 . The two structures are very similar, as indicated by the high value of their isostructurality index (94.8%). It was found that the replacement of even a small amount (3%) of K + with NH 4 + has a significant influence on the short strong hydrogen bond connecting the two SO 4 2- ions. Earlier optical measurements had revealed that the kinetics of the superionic transition in the solid solution [K 1-x (NH 4 ) x ] 3 H(SO 4 ) 2 are much faster than in K 3 H(SO 4 ) 2 ; this reported difference in the kinetics of the superionic phase transition in this class of crystal is explained on the basis of the difference in strength of the hydrogen-bond interactions in the two structures.

  7. Computational and Empirical Trans-hydrogen Bond Deuterium Isotope Shifts Suggest that N1-N3 A:U Hydrogen Bonds of RNA are Shorter than those of A:T Hydrogen Bonds of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong-Ick; Manalo, Marlon N.; Perez, Lisa M.; LiWang, Andy

    2006-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations of isolated Watson-Crick A:U and A:T base pairs predict that adenine 13 C2 trans-hydrogen bond deuterium isotope shifts due to isotopic substitution at the pyrimidine H3, 2h Δ 13 C2, are sensitive to the hydrogen-bond distance between the N1 of adenine and the N3 of uracil or thymine, which supports the notion that 2h Δ 13 C2 is sensitive to hydrogen-bond strength. Calculated 2h Δ 13 C2 values at a given N1-N3 distance are the same for isolated A:U and A:T base pairs. Replacing uridine residues in RNA with 5-methyl uridine and substituting deoxythymidines in DNA with deoxyuridines do not statistically shift empirical 2h Δ 13 C2 values. Thus, we show experimentally and computationally that the C7 methyl group of thymine has no measurable affect on 2h Δ 13 C2 values. Furthermore, 2h Δ 13 C2 values of modified and unmodified RNA are more negative than those of modified and unmodified DNA, which supports our hypothesis that RNA hydrogen bonds are stronger than those of DNA. It is also shown here that 2h Δ 13 C2 is context dependent and that this dependence is similar for RNA and DNA

  8. Electromagnetic probes of strongly interacting matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-07

    May 7, 2015 ... Collisions between two nuclei at relativistic energies will create charged particles – either in .... The thermal cutting rules give a systematic procedure to express ...... mesons due to its interaction with the thermal partons [80] and employment of running .... [16] J Deng, Q Wang, N Xu and P Zhuang, Phys. Lett.

  9. Relativistic rapprochement of electromagnetic and strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strel'tsov, V.N.

    1995-01-01

    On the basis of the Lienard-Wiechert potential and the relativistic Yukawa potential it is shown that the corresponding interactions with velocity growth increase differently (the electromagnetic one increases faster). According to preliminary estimations they are equivalent, at distances of the 'action radius' of nuclear forces, at γ≅ 960, where γ is the Lorentz factor. 2 refs

  10. Raman Spectra and Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds of Quinoline in Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukhvatullin, F.H.; Jumabayev, A.; Hushvaktov, H.; Absanov, A.; Hudoyberdiev, B.

    2012-01-01

    The half-widths of the 1014- and 1033-cm -1 bands of the Raman spectrum of quinoline at its dilution in neutral solvents (benzene, CCl 4 ) are narrowed by 1.3-1.5 times at high dilutions. This effect is associated with the increased time of the vibrational relaxation. For the 520-cm -1 band in pure liquid quinoline, the parallel polarized component at 20 o C is asymmetric in the high-frequency region. The shape of the perpendicular polarized component is complicated. A non-coincidence of the peak frequencies of the parallel and perpendicular polarized components is observed (∼ 2 cm -1 ). Quantum-chemical calculations showed that, in the region of 520 cm -1 for a monomer molecule, we should really have two near located lines with the wavenumbers 530 and 527 cm -1 (scaling factor 0.97), and with the depolarization ratios 0.61 and 0.26. In the solutions with propan-2-ol, the 1033.8-cm -1 band becomes of a doublet character. The resolution of the doublet becomes better by the dilution of a binary quinoline-alcohol solution with a large amount of a neutral solvent (benzene). The wavenumbers of bands in the triple mixture are 1033 cm -1 and 1039 cm -1 . The doublet nature of the band in the binary and triple mixtures is associated with the presence of monomer molecules and quinoline-propan-2-ol aggregates (the high-frequency line) in the liquid mixture. Quantum-chemical calculations showed that the hydrogen bonds with a length of 1.958 A and an energy gain of 22.0 kJ/mole can be formed between molecules of quinoline and alcohol. The formation of aggregates can be also detected in the 820-cm -1 band of propan-2-ol. A similar picture is observed for the 667-cm -1 band of chloroform in its solution with quinoline.

  11. Hydrogen bond dynamical properties of adsorbed liquid water monolayers with various TiO2 interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Niall J.; Kavathekar, Ritwik S.; MacElroy, J. M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Equilibrium classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to investigate the hydrogen-bonding kinetics of water in contact with rutile-(110), rutile-(101), rutile-(100), and anatase-(101) surfaces at room temperature (300 K). It was observed that anatase-(101) exhibits the longest-lived hydrogen bonds in terms of overall persistence, followed closely by rutile-(110). The relaxation times, defined as the integral of the autocorrelation of the hydrogen bond persistence function, were also longer for these two cases, while decay of the autocorrelation function was slower. The increased number and overall persistence of hydrogen bonds in the adsorbed water monolayers at these surfaces, particularly for anatase-(101), may serve to promote possible water photolysis activity thereon.

  12. Chemometric characterization of the hydrogen bonding complexes of secondary amides and aromatic hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Jović, Branislav; Nikolić, Aleksandar; Petrović, Slobodan

    2012-01-01

    The paper reports the results of the study of hydrogen bonding complexes between secondary amides and various aromatic hydrocarbons. The possibility of using chemometric methods was investigated in order to characterize N-H•••π hydrogen bonded complexes. Hierarchical clustering and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) have been applied on infrared spectroscopic and Taft parameters of 43 N-substituted amide complexes with different aromatic hydrocarbons. Results obtained in this report are...

  13. Hydrogen bonds of DsrD protein revealed by neutron crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatake, Toshiyuki; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Mizuno, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo; Morimoto, Yukio

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds of DNA-binding protein DsrD have been determined by neutron diffraction. In terms of proton donors and acceptors, DsrD protein shows striking differences from other proteins. The features of hydrogen bonds in DsrD protein from sulfate-reducing bacteria have been investigated by neutron protein crystallography. The function of DsrD has not yet been elucidated clearly, but its X-ray crystal structure revealed that it comprises a winged-helix motif and shows the highest structural homology to the DNA-binding proteins. Since any neutron structure of a DNA recognition protein has not yet been obtained, here detailed information on the hydrogen bonds in the winged-helix-motif protein is given and the following features found. (i) The number of hydrogen bonds per amino acid of DsrD is relatively fewer than for other proteins for which neutron structures were determined previously. (ii) Hydrogen bonds are localized between main-chain and main-chain atoms; there are few hydrogen bonds between main-chain and side-chain atoms and between side-chain and side-chain atoms. (iii) Hydrogen bonds inducted by protonation of specific amino acid residues (Glu50) seem to play an essential role in the dimerization of DsrD. The former two points are related to the function of the DNA-binding protein; the three-dimensional structure was mainly constructed by hydrogen bonds in main chains, while the side chains appeared to be used for another role. The latter point would be expected to contribute to the crystal growth of DsrD

  14. Alignment of paired molecules of C60 within a hexagonal platform networked through hydrogen-bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisaki, Ichiro; Nakagawa, Shoichi; Sato, Hiroyasu; Tohnai, Norimitsu

    2016-07-28

    We demonstrate, for the first time, that a hydrogen-bonded low-density organic framework can be applied as a platform to achieve periodic alignment of paired molecules of C60, which is the smallest example of a finite-numbered cluster of C60. The framework is a layered assembly of a hydrogen-bonded 2D hexagonal network (LA-H-HexNet) composed of dodecadehydrotribenzo[18]annulene derivatives.

  15. Relativistic rapprochement of weak and strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strel'tsov, V.N.

    1995-01-01

    On the basis of the relativistic Yukawa potentials for the nuclear (quark) field and the field of intermediate vector W-, Z-bosons, it is shown that the interactions described by them increase differently with growing velocity (the weak one increases more rapidly). According to the estimates, they are compared (at distances of the 'action radius' of nuclear forces) at an energy of about 10 12 GeV (10 6 GeV for the pion field) what is smaller than the corresponding value in the model of 'grand unification'. 3 refs., 2 tabs

  16. Strong Interactions, (De)coherence and Quarkonia

    CERN Document Server

    Bellucci, Stefano; Tiwari, Bhupendra Nath

    2011-01-01

    Quarkonia are the central objects to explore the non-perturbative nature of non-abelian gauge theories. We describe the confinement-deconfinement phases for heavy quarkonia in a hot QCD medium and thereby the statistical nature of the inter-quark forces. In the sense of one-loop quantum effects, we propose that the "quantum" nature of quark matters follows directly from the thermodynamic consideration of Richardson potential. Thereby we gain an understanding of the formation of hot and dense states of quark gluon plasma matter in heavy ion collisions and the early universe. In the case of the non-abelian theory, the consideration of the Sudhakov form factor turns out to be an efficient tool for soft gluons. In the limit of the Block-Nordsieck resummation, the strong coupling obtained from the Sudhakov form factor yields the statistical nature of hadronic bound states, e.g. kaons and Ds particles.

  17. Strong and electromagnetic interactions in hadron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aissat, N.; Amghar, A.; Cano, F.; Gonzalez, F.; Noguera, S.; Carbonell, J.; Desplanques, B.; Silvestre-Brac, B.; Karmanov, V.; Mathiot, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    The pionic strong decay amplitudes of baryon resonances are studied in a constituent quark model. Particular attention is given to the operator describing the transition. The nucleon form factors are calculated in a non-relativistic approach, with emphasis on the highest momentum transfers. The aim is to determine the ingredients that are essential in getting correct results and are likely to be required for a more realistic estimate in a fully relativistic approach. The deuteron form factors have been calculated in the light-front approach using wave functions determined in a perturbative way. The derivation of the neutron charge form factor from the deuteron structure function, A(q 2 ), is reanalyzed including further mesonic exchange contributions. (authors)

  18. "Strong interaction" for particle physics laboratories

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A new Web site pooling the communications resources of particle physics centres all over the world has just been launched. The official launching of the new particle physics website Interactions.org during the Lepton-Proton 2003 Conference at the American laboratory Fermilab was accompanied by music and a flurry of balloons. On the initiative of Fermilab, the site was created by a collaboration of communication teams from over fifteen of the world's particle physics laboratories, including KEK, SLAC, INFN, JINR and, of course, CERN, who pooled their efforts to develop the new tool. The spectacular launching of the new particle physics website Interactions.org at Fermilab on 12 August 2003. A real gateway to particle physics, the site not only contains all the latest news from the laboratories but also offers images, graphics and a video/animation link. In addition, it provides information about scientific policies, links to the universities, a very useful detailed glossary of particle physics and astrophysic...

  19. Direct 13C-detected NMR experiments for mapping and characterization of hydrogen bonds in RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fürtig, Boris; Schnieders, Robbin; Richter, Christian; Zetzsche, Heidi; Keyhani, Sara; Helmling, Christina; Kovacs, Helena; Schwalbe, Harald

    2016-01-01

    In RNA secondary structure determination, it is essential to determine whether a nucleotide is base-paired and not. Base-pairing of nucleotides is mediated by hydrogen bonds. The NMR characterization of hydrogen bonds relies on experiments correlating the NMR resonances of exchangeable protons and can be best performed for structured parts of the RNA, where labile hydrogen atoms are protected from solvent exchange. Functionally important regions in RNA, however, frequently reveal increased dynamic disorder which often leads to NMR signals of exchangeable protons that are broadened beyond 1 H detection. Here, we develop 13 C direct detected experiments to observe all nucleotides in RNA irrespective of whether they are involved in hydrogen bonds or not. Exploiting the self-decoupling of scalar couplings due to the exchange process, the hydrogen bonding behavior of the hydrogen bond donor of each individual nucleotide can be determined. Furthermore, the adaption of HNN-COSY experiments for 13 C direct detection allows correlations of donor–acceptor pairs and the localization of hydrogen-bond acceptor nucleotides. The proposed 13 C direct detected experiments therefore provide information about molecular sites not amenable by conventional proton-detected methods. Such information makes the RNA secondary structure determination by NMR more accurate and helps to validate secondary structure predictions based on bioinformatics.

  20. Pressure-induced localisation of the hydrogen-bond network in KOH-VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, Andreas, E-mail: a.hermann@ed.ac.uk; Nelmes, Richard J.; Loveday, John S. [Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Guthrie, Malcolm [Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); European Spallation Source AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-12-28

    Using a combination of ab initio crystal structure prediction and neutron diffraction techniques, we have solved the full structure of KOH-VI at 7 GPa. Rather than being orthorhombic and proton-ordered as had previously be proposed, we find that this high-pressure phase of potassium hydroxide is tetragonal (space group I4/mmm) and proton disordered. It has an unusual hydrogen bond topology, where the hydroxyl groups form isolated hydrogen-bonded square planar (OH){sub 4} units. This structure is stable above 6.5 GPa and, despite being macroscopically proton-disordered, local ice rules enforce microscopic order of the hydrogen bonds. We suggest the use of this novel type of structure to study concerted proton tunneling in the solid state, while the topology of the hydrogen bond network could conceivably be exploited in data storage applications based solely on the manipulations of hydrogen bonds. The unusual localisation of the hydrogen bond network under applied pressure is found to be favored by a more compact packing of the constituents in a distorted cesium chloride structure.

  1. Hydrogen bonds and heat diffusion in α-helices: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miño, German; Barriga, Raul; Gutierrez, Gonzalo

    2014-08-28

    Recent evidence has shown a correlation between the heat diffusion pathways and the known allosteric communication pathways in proteins. Allosteric communication in proteins is a central, yet unsolved, problem in biochemistry, and the study and characterization of the structural determinants that mediate energy transfer among different parts of proteins is of major importance. In this work, we characterized the role of hydrogen bonds in diffusivity of thermal energy for two sets of α-helices with different abilities to form hydrogen bonds. These hydrogen bonds can be a constitutive part of the α-helices or can arise from the lateral chains. In our in vacuo simulations, it was observed that α-helices with a higher possibility of forming hydrogen bonds also had higher rates of thermalization. Our simulations also revealed that heat readily flowed through atoms involved in hydrogen bonds. As a general conclusion, according to our simulations, hydrogen bonds fulfilled an important role in heat diffusion in structural patters of proteins.

  2. Water’s dual nature and its continuously changing hydrogen bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henchman, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    A model is proposed for liquid water that is a continuum between the ordered state with predominantly tetrahedral coordination, linear hydrogen bonds and activated dynamics and a disordered state with a continuous distribution of multiple coordinations, multiple types of hydrogen bond, and diffusive dynamics, similar to that of normal liquids. Central to water’s heterogeneous structure is the ability of hydrogen to donate to either one acceptor in a conventional linear hydrogen bond or to multiple acceptors as a furcated hydrogen. Linear hydrogen bonds are marked by slow, activated kinetics for hydrogen-bond switching to more crowded acceptors and sharp first peaks in the hydrogen-oxygen radial distribution function. Furcated hydrogens, equivalent to free, broken, dangling or distorted hydrogens, have barrierless, rapid kinetics and poorly defined first peaks in their hydrogen-oxygen radial distribution function. They involve the weakest donor in a local excess of donors, such that barrierless whole-molecule vibration rapidly swaps them between the linear and furcated forms. Despite the low number of furcated hydrogens and their transient existence, they are readily created in a single hydrogen-bond switch and free up the dynamics of numerous surrounding molecules, bringing about the disordered state. Hydrogens in the ordered state switch with activated dynamics to make the non-tetrahedral coordinations of the disordered state, which can also combine to make the ordered state. Consequently, the ordered and disordered states are both connected by diffusive dynamics and differentiated by activated dynamics, bringing about water’s continuous heterogeneity. (paper)

  3. Supersymmetry and weak, electromagnetic and strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayet, P.

    1977-01-01

    A supersymmetric theory of particle interactions is discussed. It is based on the earlier model which involves gauge (or vector) superfields, and matter (or chiral) superfields; each of them describes a vector and a Majorana spinor in the first case, or a two-component Dirac spinor and a complex scalar in the second case. The new theory suggests the possible existence of spin - 1/2 gluons and heavy spin-0 quarks, besides spin - 1 gluons and spin - 1/2 quarks. To prevent scalar particles to be exchanged in processes such as μ or β decays a new class of leptons with its own quantum number is introduced; it includes charged leptons and a ''photonic neutrino''

  4. Heterogeneous Amyloid β-Sheet Polymorphs Identified on Hydrogen Bond Promoting Surfaces Using 2D SFG Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jia-Jung; Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Zhang, Tianqi O; Zanni, Martin T

    2018-02-08

    Two-dimensional sum-frequency generation spectroscopy (2D SFG) is used to study the structures of the pentapeptide FGAIL on hydrogen bond promoting surfaces. FGAIL is the most amyloidogenic portion of the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin). In the presence of a pure gold surface, FGAIL does not form ordered structures. When the gold is coated with a self-assembled monolayer of mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA), 2D SFG spectra reveal features associated with β-sheets. Also observed are cross peaks between the FGAIL peptides and the carboxylic acid groups of the MBA monolayer, indicating that the peptides are in close contact with the surface headgroups. In the second set of samples, FGAIL peptides chemically ligated to the MBA monolayer also exhibited β-sheet features but with a much simpler spectrum. From simulations of the experiments, we conclude that the hydrogen bond promoting surface catalyzes the formation of both parallel and antiparallel β-sheet structures with several different orientations. When ligated, parallel sheets with only a single orientation are the primary structure. Thus, this hydrogen bond promoting surface creates a heterogeneous distribution of polymorph structures, consistent with a concentration effect that allows nucleation of many different amyloid seeding structures. A single well-defined seed favors one polymorph over the others, showing that the concentrating influence of a membrane can be counterbalanced by factors that favor directed fiber growth. These experiments lay the foundation for the measurement and interpretation of β-sheet structures with heterodyne-detected 2D SFG spectroscopy. The results of this model system suggest that a heterogeneous distribution of polymorphs found in nature are an indication of nonselective amyloid aggregation whereas a narrow distribution of polymorph structures is consistent with a specific protein or lipid interaction that directs fiber growth.

  5. Can hydrogen bonds improve the hole-mobility in amorphous organic semiconductors? Experimental and theoretical insights

    KAUST Repository

    Mimaite, Viktorija; Grazulevicius, Juozas Vidas; Laurinaviciute, Rasa; Volyniuk, Dmytro; Jankauskas, Vygintas; Sini, Gjergji

    2015-01-01

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. Five hole-transporting triphenylamine derivatives containing methoxy and methyl groups are synthesized and investigated. The hole-mobility increases in the presence of methyl and methoxy substituents, exceeding 10-2 cm2 V-1 s-1 in the case of methyl groups. Quantum mechanical calculations on these compounds indicate very different dipole moments and intermolecular interaction strengths, with intriguing correlations with the trend in hole-mobility. Temperature dependent hole-mobility measurements indicate disorder dominated hole transport. The values of the energetic disorder parameter (σ) decrease upon methyl and methoxy substitutions despite the increase in dipole moments. This trend is discussed as a function of the interaction energy between adjacent molecules, the dipole moment, the molecular polarizability, and the conformational degree of freedom. Our results indicate that the global decrease of σ upon methyl and methoxy substitutions is dominated by the larger decrease in the geometrical randomness component of the energetic disorder. A direct correlation is established between the decrease in geometrical randomness and the increase in intermolecular interaction energies, mainly stemming from the additional C-H⋯π, O, N hydrogen bonds induced by methyl and methoxy groups.

  6. Signatures for strongly interacting W's and Z's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1985-09-01

    The observed structure of the electroweak interactions is understood in terms of a spontaneously broken gauge theory. Although we have as yet no experimental indication as to the nature of the phenomenon responsible for symmetry breaking, general theoretical arguments set an upper limit of 1 or 2 TeV on the energy scale at which some manifestation of this phenomenon must occur. This scale defines a target for the effective hard collision energy that should be achieved in the next accelerator facility; the work reported here was aimed at sharpening this requirement by studying the minimal manifestations of electroweak symmetry breaking that can be expected to occur in the TeV energy region if a Higgs particle with m/sub H/ < 1 TeV is not found. While we used the minimal Higgs model as a guide, the results obtained are of far more general validity. Our analysis relied on three tools, briefly discussed. These are: the equivalence at high energies of longitudinally polarized W's and Z's to their scalar counterparts, the Goldstone bosons; the symmetries of the scalar sector; and the vector boson fusion process. 8 refs

  7. Supramolecular Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles in PS-b-P2VP Diblock Copolymers via Hydrogen Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Se Gyu; Hawker, Craig J.; Kramer, Edward J.

    2011-03-01

    We report a simple route to control the spatial distribution of Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) in PS- b -P2VP diblock copolymers using hydrogen bonding between P2VP and the hydroxyl-containing (PI-OH) units in PS- b -PIOH thiol-terminated ligands on Au-NP. End-functional thiol ligands of poly(styrene- b -1,2&3,4-isoprene-SH) are synthesized by anionic polymerization. After synthesis of Au-NPs, the inner PI block is hydroxylated by hydroboration and the resulting micelle-like Au-NPs consist of a hydrophobic PS outer brush and a hydrophilic inner PI-OH block. The influence of the hydroxyl groups is significant with strong segregation being observed to the PS/P2VP interface and then to the P2VP domain of lamellar-forming PS-b-P2VP diblock copolymers as the length of the PI-OH block is increased. The strong hydrogen bonding between nanoparticle block copolymer ligands and the P2VP block allows the Au-NPs to be incorporated within the P2VP domain to high Au--NP volume fractions ϕp without macrophase separation, driving transitions from lamellar to bicontinuous morphologies as ϕp increases.

  8. A DFT investigation on interactions between asymmetric derivatives of cisplatin and nucleobase guanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Truong Ba; Nhat, Pham Vu

    2017-07-01

    The interactions of hydrolysis products of cisplatin and its asymmetric derivatives cis- and trans-[PtCl2(iPram)(Mepz)] with guanine were studied using DFT methods. These interactions are dominated by electrostatic effects, namely hydrogen bond contributions and there exists a charge flow from H-atoms of ligands to the O-atoms of guanine. The replacement of NH3 moieties by larger functional groups accompanies with a moderate reaction between PtII and guanine molecule, diminishing the cytotoxicity of the drug. The asymmetric and symmetric NH2 stretching modes of complexes having strong hydrogen bond interactions are red shifted importantly as compared to complexes without presence of hydrogen bond interactions.

  9. QCD : the theory of strong interactions Conference MT17

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The theory of strong interactions,Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), predicts that the strong interaction is transmitted by the exchange of particles called gluons. Unlike the messengers of electromagnetism photons, which are electrically neutral - gluons carry a strong charge associated with the interaction they mediate. QCD predicts that the strength of the interaction between quarks and gluons becomes weaker at higher energies. LEP has measured the evolution of the strong coupling constant up to energies of 200 GeV and has confirmed this prediction.

  10. IR-UV double resonance spectroscopic investigation of phenylacetylene-alcohol complexes. Alkyl group induced hydrogen bond switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant Chandra; Patwari, G Naresh

    2008-06-12

    The electronic transitions of phenylacetylene complexes with water and trifluoroethanol are shifted to the blue, while the corresponding transitions for methanol and ethanol complexes are shifted to the red relative to the phenylacetylene monomer. Fluorescence dip infrared (FDIR) spectra in the O-H stretching region indicate that, in all the cases, phenylacetylene is acting as a hydrogen bond acceptor to the alcohols. The FDIR spectrum in the acetylenic C-H stretching region shows Fermi resonance bands for the bare phenylacetylene, which act as a sensitive tool to probe the intermolecular structures. The FDIR spectra reveal that water and trifluoroethanol interact with the pi electron density of the acetylene C-C triple bond, while methanol and ethanol interact with the pi electron density of the benzene ring. It can be inferred that the hydrogen bonding acceptor site on phenylacetylene switches from the acetylene pi to the benzene pi with lowering in the partial charge on the hydrogen atom of the OH group. The most significant finding is that the intermolecular structures of water and methanol complexes are notably distinct, which, to the best of our knowledge, this is first such observation in the case of complexes of substituted benzenes.

  11. Interpretation of IR and Raman spectra of dopamine neurotransmitter and effect of hydrogen bond in HCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, T.; Mukherjee, V.

    2018-05-01

    The potential energy scanning with respect to the different dihedral angles were performed to search possible numbers of dopamine (neutral) conformers and further, fifteen conformers of dopamine were identified on the basis of energy minima. Vibrational frequencies were calculated for all the conformers of dopamine. Density functional theory was employed to carry out all the computations. The exchange correlation functional B3LYP and the basis set 6-31++G(d,p) were included in DFT calculation. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of dopamine hydrochloride were also recorded in the spectral region 400-4000 cm-1 and 50-4000 cm-1 respectively. The normal coordinate analysis was also performed to scale DFT calculated force constants and to calculate potential energy distributions. The detailed vibrational spectral analysis and the assignments of the bands, done on the best-fit basis comparison of the experimentally obtained and theoretically calculated IR and Raman spectra, match quite well indicating DFT calculations as very accurate source of normal mode assignments. The interaction of the most stable conformer of dopamine with HCl was also studied to know the effect of hydrogen bond on its geometry and dynamics. The stability of the dopamine in isolated and protonated forms arising from hyperconjugative interactions was also analyzed by natural bond orbital analysis.

  12. A systematic structural study of halogen bonding versus hydrogen bonding within competitive supramolecular systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christer B. Aakeröy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As halogen bonds gain prevalence in supramolecular synthesis and materials chemistry, it has become necessary to examine more closely how such interactions compete with or complement hydrogen bonds whenever both are present within the same system. As hydrogen and halogen bonds have several fundamental features in common, it is often difficult to predict which will be the primary interaction in a supramolecular system, especially as they have comparable strength and geometric requirements. To address this challenge, a series of molecules containing both hydrogen- and halogen-bond donors were co-crystallized with various monotopic, ditopic symmetric and ditopic asymmetric acceptor molecules. The outcome of each reaction was examined using IR spectroscopy and, whenever possible, single-crystal X-ray diffraction. 24 crystal structures were obtained and subsequently analyzed, and the synthon preferences of the competing hydrogen- and halogen-bond donors were rationalized against a background of calculated molecular electrostatic potential values. It has been shown that readily accessible electrostatic potentials can offer useful practical guidelines for predicting the most likely primary synthons in these co-crystals as long as the potential differences are weighted appropriately.

  13. An optimized intermolecular force field for hydrogen-bonded organic molecular crystals using atomic multipole electrostatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O.; Thompson, Hugh P. G.; Day, Graeme M.

    2016-01-01

    An empirically parameterized intermolecular force field is developed for crystal structure modelling and prediction. The model is optimized for use with an atomic multipole description of electrostatic interactions. We present a re-parameterization of a popular intermolecular force field for describing intermolecular interactions in the organic solid state. Specifically we optimize the performance of the exp-6 force field when used in conjunction with atomic multipole electrostatics. We also parameterize force fields that are optimized for use with multipoles derived from polarized molecular electron densities, to account for induction effects in molecular crystals. Parameterization is performed against a set of 186 experimentally determined, low-temperature crystal structures and 53 measured sublimation enthalpies of hydrogen-bonding organic molecules. The resulting force fields are tested on a validation set of 129 crystal structures and show improved reproduction of the structures and lattice energies of a range of organic molecular crystals compared with the original force field with atomic partial charge electrostatics. Unit-cell dimensions of the validation set are typically reproduced to within 3% with the re-parameterized force fields. Lattice energies, which were all included during parameterization, are systematically underestimated when compared with measured sublimation enthalpies, with mean absolute errors of between 7.4 and 9.0%

  14. DNA polymerase catalysis in the absence of Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapova, Olga; Chan, Chikio; DeLucia, Angela M.; Helquist, Sandra A.; Kool, Eric T.; Grindley, Nigel D. F.; Joyce, Catherine M.

    2008-01-01

    We report the first pre-steady-state kinetic studies of DNA replication in the absence of hydrogen bonds. We have used nonpolar nucleotide analogues that mimic the shape of a Watson-Crick base pair in order to investigate the kinetic consequences of a lack of hydrogen bonds in the polymerase reaction catalyzed by the Klenow fragment of DNA Polymerase I from Escherichia coli. With a thymine isostere lacking hydrogen bonding ability in the nascent pair, the efficiency (kpol/Kd) of the polymerase reaction is decreased by 30-fold, affecting ground state (Kd) and transition state (kpol) approximately equally. When both thymine and adenine analogues in the nascent pair lack hydrogen bonding ability, the efficiency of the polymerase reaction is decreased by about 1000-fold, with most the decrease attributable to the transition state. Reactions using nonpolar analogues at the primer terminal base pair demonstrated the requirement for a hydrogen bond between the polymerase and the minor groove of the primer-terminal base. The R668A mutation of Klenow fragment abolished this requirement, identifying R668 as the probable hydrogen bond donor. Detailed examination of the kinetic data suggested that Klenow fragment has an extremely low tolerance of even minor deviations of the analogue base pairs from ideal Watson-Crick geometry. Consistent with this idea, some analogue pairings were better tolerated by Klenow fragment mutants having more spacious active sites. By contrast, the Y-family polymerase Dbh was much less sensitive to changes in base pair dimensions, and more dependent on hydrogen bonding between base-paired partners. PMID:16411765

  15. Hydrophobic fluorine mediated switching of the hydrogen bonding site as well as orientation of water molecules in the aqueous mixture of monofluoroethanol: IR, molecular dynamics and quantum chemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Saptarsi; Biswas, Biswajit; Nandy, Tonima; Singh, Prashant Chandra

    2017-09-20

    The local structures between water-water, alcohol-water and alcohol-alcohol have been investigated for aqueous mixtures of ethanol (ETH) and monofluoroethanol (MFE) by the deconvolution of IR bands in the OH stretching region, molecular dynamics simulation and quantum chemical calculations. It has been found that the addition of a small amount of ETH into the aqueous medium increases the strength of the hydrogen bonds between water molecules. In an aqueous mixture of MFE, the substitution of a single fluorine induces a change in the orientation as well as the hydrogen bonding site of water molecules from the oxygen to the fluorine terminal of MFE. The switching of the hydrogen bonding site of water in the aqueous mixture of MFE results in comparatively strong hydrogen bonds between MFE and water molecules as well as less clustering of water molecules, unlike the case of the aqueous mixture of ETH. These findings about the modification of a hydrogen bond network by the hydrophobic fluorine group probably make fluorinated molecules useful for pharmaceutical as well as biological applications.

  16. Comparison of Degrees of Potential-Energy-Surface Anharmonicity for Complexes and Clusters with Hydrogen Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovskaya, E. N.; Doroshenko, I. Yu.; Pogorelov, V. E.; Vaskivskyi, Ye. V.; Pitsevich, G. A.

    2018-01-01

    Previously calculated multidimensional potential-energy surfaces of the MeOH monomer and dimer, water dimer, malonaldehyde, formic acid dimer, free pyridine-N-oxide/trichloroacetic acid complex, and protonated water dimer were analyzed. The corresponding harmonic potential-energy surfaces near the global minima were constructed for series of clusters and complexes with hydrogen bonds of different strengths based on the behavior of the calculated multidimensional potential-energy surfaces. This enabled the introduction of an obvious anharmonicity parameter for the calculated potential-energy surfaces. The anharmonicity parameter was analyzed as functions of the size of the analyzed area near the energy minimum, the number of points over which energies were compared, and the dimensionality of the solved vibrational problem. Anharmonicity parameters for potential-energy surfaces in complexes with strong, medium, and weak H-bonds were calculated under identical conditions. The obtained anharmonicity parameters were compared with the corresponding diagonal anharmonicity constants for stretching vibrations of the bridging protons and the lengths of the hydrogen bridges.

  17. Dynamics of Strong Interactions and the S-Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omnes, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Hautes Energies, Universite de Paris, Orsay (France)

    1969-08-15

    The physical principles underlying the S-matrix theory of strong interactions are reviewed. In particular, the problem of whether these principles are sufficient to completely determine the S-matrix, i.e. to yield a dynamical theory of strong interactions, is discussed. (author)

  18. Strong enhancement of transport by interaction on contact links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Dan; Schmitteckert, P.

    2007-01-01

    Strong repulsive interactions within a one-dimensional Fermi system in a two-probe configuration normally lead to a reduced off-resonance conductance. We show that if the repulsive interaction extends to the contact regions, a strong increase of the conductance may occur, even for systems where o...

  19. QCD : the theory of strong interactions Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The theory of strong interactions,Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD),predicts that the strong interac- tion is transmitted by the exchange of particles called glu- ons.Unlike the messengers of electromagnetism -pho- tons,which are electrically neutral -gluons carry a strong charge associated with the interaction they mediate. QCD predicts that the strength of the interaction between quarks and gluons becomes weaker at higher energies.LEP has measured the evolution of the strong coupling constant up to energies of 200 GeV and has confirmed this prediction.

  20. Hydrogen bonded C-H···Y (Y = O, S, Hal) molecular complexes: A natural bond orbital analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaev, A. N.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen bonded C-H···Y complexes formed by H2O, H2S molecules, hydrogen halides, and halogen-ions with methane, halogen substituted methane as well as with the C2H2 and NCH molecules were studied at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level. The structure of NBOs corresponding to lone pair of acceptor Y, n Y, and vacant anti-σ-bond C-H of proton donor was analyzed and estimates of second order perturbation energy E(2) characterizing donor-acceptor n Y → σ C-H * charge-transfer interaction were obtained. Computational results for complexes of methane and its halogen substituted derivatives show that for each set of analogous structures, the EnY→σ*C-H (2) energy tends to grow with an increase in the s-component percentage in the lone pair NBO of acceptor Y. Calculations for different C···Y distances show that the equilibrium geometries of complexes lie in the region where the E(2) energy is highest and it changes symbatically with the length of the covalent E-H bond when the R(C···Y) distance is varied. The performed analysis allows us to divide the hydrogen bonded complexes into two groups, depending on the pattern of overlapping for NBOs of the hydrogen bridge.

  1. A third-generation dispersion and third-generation hydrogen bonding corrected PM6 method: PM6-D3H+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy C. Kromann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We present new dispersion and hydrogen bond corrections to the PM6 method, PM6-D3H+, and its implementation in the GAMESS program. The method combines the DFT-D3 dispersion correction by Grimme et al. with a modified version of the H+ hydrogen bond correction by Korth. Overall, the interaction energy of PM6-D3H+ is very similar to PM6-DH2 and PM6-DH+, with RMSD and MAD values within 0.02 kcal/mol of one another. The main difference is that the geometry optimizations of 88 complexes result in 82, 6, 0, and 0 geometries with 0, 1, 2, and 3 or more imaginary frequencies using PM6-D3H+ implemented in GAMESS, while the corresponding numbers for PM6-DH+ implemented in MOPAC are 54, 17, 15, and 2. The PM6-D3H+ method as implemented in GAMESS offers an attractive alternative to PM6-DH+ in MOPAC in cases where the LBFGS optimizer must be used and a vibrational analysis is needed, e.g., when computing vibrational free energies. While the GAMESS implementation is up to 10 times slower for geometry optimizations of proteins in bulk solvent, compared to MOPAC, it is sufficiently fast to make geometry optimizations of small proteins practically feasible.

  2. Towards quantifying the role of exact exchange in the prediction hydrogen bond spin-spin coupling constants involving fluorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Fabián, J.; Omar, S.; García de la Vega, J. M., E-mail: garcia.delavega@uam.es [Departamento de Química Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-08-28

    The effect of a fraction of Hartree-Fock exchange on the calculated spin-spin coupling constants involving fluorine through a hydrogen bond is analyzed in detail. Coupling constants calculated using wavefunction methods are revisited in order to get high-level calculations using the same basis set. Accurate MCSCF results are obtained using an additive approach. These constants and their contributions are used as a reference for density functional calculations. Within the density functional theory, the Hartree-Fock exchange functional is split in short- and long-range using a modified version of the Coulomb-attenuating method with the SLYP functional as well as with the original B3LYP. Results support the difficulties for calculating hydrogen bond coupling constants using density functional methods when fluorine nuclei are involved. Coupling constants are very sensitive to the Hartree-Fock exchange and it seems that, contrary to other properties, it is important to include this exchange for short-range interactions. Best functionals are tested in two different groups of complexes: those related with anionic clusters of type [F(HF){sub n}]{sup −} and those formed by difluoroacetylene and either one or two hydrogen fluoride molecules.

  3. Crystal structure and hydrogen bonding in N-(1-deoxy-β-d-fructopyranos-1-yl-2-aminoisobutyric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeri V. Mossine

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, alternatively called d-fructose-2-aminoisobutyric acid (FruAib, C10H19NO7, (I, crystallizes exclusively in the β-pyranose form, with two conformationally non-equivalent molecules [(IA and (IB] in the asymmetric unit. In solution, FruAib establishes an equilibrium, with 75.6% of the population consisting of β-pyranose, 10.4% β-furanose, 10.1% α-furanose, 3.0% α-pyranose and <0.7% the acyclic forms. The carbohydrate ring in (I has the normal 2C5 chair conformation and the amino acid portion is in the zwitterion form. Bond lengths and valence angles compare well with the average values from related pyranose structures. All carboxyl, hydroxy and ammonium groups are involved in hydrogen bonding and form a three-dimensional network of infinite chains that are connected through homodromic rings and short chains. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds bridge the amino acid and sugar portions in both molecules. A comparative Hirshfeld surfaces analysis of FruAib and four other sugar–amino acids suggests an increasing role of intramolecular heteroatom interactions in crystal structures with an increasing proportion of C—H bonds.

  4. Stability of Hydrogen-Bonded Supramolecular Architecture under High Pressure Conditions: Pressure-Induced Amorphization in Melamine-Boric Acid Adduct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, K.; Duan, D.; Wang, R.; Lin, A.; Cui, Q.; Liu, B.; Cui, T.; Zou, B.; Zhang, X.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of high pressure on the structural stability of the melamine-boric acid adduct (C3N6H6 2H3BO3, M 2B), a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded supramolecular architecture, were studied by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. M 2B exhibited a high compressibility and a strong anisotropic compression, which can be explained by the layerlike crystal packing. Furthermore, evolution of XRD patterns and Raman spectra indicated that the M 2B crystal undergoes a reversible pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) at 18 GPa. The mechanism for the PIA was attributed to the competition between close packing and long-range order. Ab initio calculations were also performed to account for the behavior of hydrogen bonding under high pressure.

  5. Unambiguous Determination of Intermolecular Hydrogen Bond of NMR Structure by Molecular Dynamics Refinement Using All-Atom Force Field and Implicit Solvent Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jee, Jun Goo

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that AMD refinement is very useful for defining an intermolecular hydrogen bond in NMR structure calculation. The refined structure also provides a clue for explaining the pH dependence in Ub and UIM complexes. As reported by Choi et al., serine-mediated hydrogen bonds are the third most populated hydrogen bonds found in protein-protein intermolecular interactions, after the backbone-backbone and backbone-aspartate ones. The abundance imposes the requirement of an method to determine the interface of protein-protein complexes. The precise geometry is particularly important in the complex structures between Ub and UBDs. Ub recognizes various targets with the same surface, where both hydrophobic and hydrophobic interactions are involved. Hence, the details of the hydrophilic interactions are necessary to find the common binding modes. The structure determination of a biomolecule by NMR depends heavily on the distance restraints derived by the NOE cross peaks that are observed between two protons within 6 A through space. Therefore, the existence of the NOE peaks and their correct assignments to two corresponding protons are essential for an accurate and precise structure determination. Recent developments of NOE assignment and calculation algorithms have enabled the determination of protein 3D structures without any manual interpretation, provided chemical shifts are assigned in most atoms and sufficient NOE peaks exist. Along with these advances, the necessity of determining complicated structures such as complexes is increasing

  6. Miscibility and Hydrogen Bonding in Blends of Poly(4-vinylphenol/Poly(vinyl methyl ketone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Bourara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The miscibility and phase behavior of poly(4-vinylphenol (PVPh with poly(vinyl methyl ketone (PVMK was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. It was shown that all blends of PVPh/PVMK are totally miscible. A DSC study showed the apparition of a single glass transition (Tg over their entire composition range. When the amount of PVPh exceeds 50% in blends, the obtained Tgs are found to be significantly higher than those observed for each individual component of the mixture, indicating that these blends are capable of forming interpolymer complexes. FTIR analysis revealed the existence of preferential specific interactions via hydrogen bonding between the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups, which intensified when the amount of PVPh was increased in blends. Furthermore, the quantitative FTIR study carried out for PVPh/PVMK blends was also performed for the vinylphenol (VPh and vinyl methyl ketone (VMK functional groups. These results were also established by scanning electron microscopy study (SEM.

  7. Change of hydrogen bonding structure in ionic liquid mixtures by anion type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Seoncheol; Kim, Doseok

    2018-05-01

    Ionic liquid mixtures have gained attention as a way of tuning material properties continuously with composition changes. For some mixture systems, physicochemical properties such as excess molar volume have been found to be significantly different from the value expected by linear interpolation, but the origin of this deviation is not well understood yet. The microstructure of the mixture, which can range from an ideal mixture of two initial consisting ionic liquids to a different structure from those of pure materials, has been suggested as the origin of the observed deviation. The structures of several different ionic liquid mixtures are studied by IR spectroscopy to confirm this suggestion, as a particular IR absorption band (νC(2)-D) for the moiety participating in the hydrogen bonding changes sensitively with the change of the anion in the ionic liquid. The absorbance of νC(2)-D changes proportionally with the composition, and a relatively small excess molar volume is observed for the mixtures containing an electronegative halide anion. By contrast, the absorbance changes nonlinearly, and the excess molar volumes are larger for the mixtures of which one of the anions has multiple interaction sites.

  8. Comparison of hydrogen bonding in 1-octanol and 2-octanol as probed by spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombo, Francesca; Sassi, Paola; Paolantoni, Marco; Morresi, Assunta; Cataliotti, Rosario Sergio

    2006-09-14

    Liquid 1-octanol and 2-octanol have been investigated by infrared (IR), Raman, and Brillouin experiments in the 10-90 degrees C temperature range. Self-association properties of the neat liquids are described in terms of a three-state model in which OH oscillators differently implicated in the formation of H-bonds are considered. The results are in quantitative agreement with recent computational studies for 1-octanol. The H-bond probability is obtained by Raman data, and a stochastic model of H-bonded chains gives a consistent picture of the self-association characteristics. Average values of hydrogen bond enthalpy and entropy are evaluated. The H-bond formation enthalpy is ca. -22 kJ/mol and is slightly dependent on the structural isomerism. The different degree of self-association for the two octanols is attributed to entropic factors. The more shielded 2-isomer forms larger fractions of smaller, less cooperative, and more ordered clusters, likely corresponding to cyclic structures. Signatures of a different cluster organization are also evidenced by comparing the H-bond energy dispersion (HBED) of OH stretching IR bands. A limiting cooperative H-bond enthalpy value of 27 kJ/mol is found. It is also proposed that the different H-bonding capabilities may modulate the extent of interaggregate hydrocarbon interactions, which is important in explaining the differences in molar volume, compressibility, and vaporization enthalpy for the two isomers.

  9. Characterization of the hydrogen bond in molecular systems of biological interest by neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavillon, F.

    2004-10-01

    This work presents a methodology for the analysis of the scattering spectra of neutrons on molecular liquids. This method is based on the adjustment of the molecular form factor concerning great momentum transfer. The subtraction of the intra-molecular contributions gives access to information on inter-molecular interactions such as the hydrogen bond. 3 systems with increasing levels of difficulty have been studied: the ammonia molecule, the N-methyl-formamide (NMF) and the N-methyl-acetamide (NMA). The value we get for the N-D intermolecular distance of the liquid ammonia molecule is 1.7 angstrom, this value is different from the value generally admitted (2.3 angstrom) but we have validated it by studying the isotopic substitution N 14 /N 15 . The adjustment to the NMF is obtained with a good accuracy but the characterization of the hydrogen bound is more delicate to infer. A preliminary study of the NMA molecule shows that this method can give relevant results on complex molecules

  10. Increased helix and protein stability through the introduction of a new tertiary hydrogen bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R W; Nicholson, E M; Thapar, R; Klevit, R E; Scholtz, J M

    1999-03-12

    In an effort to quantify the importance of hydrogen bonding and alpha-helix formation to protein stability, a capping box motif was introduced into the small phosphocarrier protein HPr. Previous studies had confirmed that Ser46, at the N-cap position of the short helix-B in HPr, serves as an N-cap in solution. Thus, only a single-site mutation was required to produce a canonical S-X-X-E capping box: Lys49 at the N3 position was substituted with a glutamic acid residue. Thermal and chemical denaturation studies on the resulting K49E HPr show that the designed variant is approximately 2 kcal mol-1 more stable than the wild-type protein. However, NMR studies indicate that the side-chain of Glu49 does not participate in the expected capping H-bond interaction, but instead forms a new tertiary H-bond that links helix-B to the four-stranded beta-sheet of HPr. Here, we demonstrate that a strategy in which new non-native H-bonds are introduced can generate proteins with increased stability. We discuss why the original capping box design failed, and compare the energetic consequences of the new tertiary side-chain to main-chain H-bond with a local (helix-capping) side-chain to main-chain H-bond on the protein's global stability. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  11. Interaction of N-hydroxyurea with strong proton donors: HCl and HF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sałdyka, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 1:1 and 1:2 N-hydroxyurea complexes with HCl and HF are trapped in argon matrices. • The complexes are stabilized by strong X–H⋯O bond. • Hydrogen bonds in the cyclic 1:2 complexes show strong cooperativity. • The C=O group is the strongest proton acceptor centre in the N-hydroxyurea molecule. - Abstract: An infrared spectroscopic and MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) study of strong hydrogen bonded complexes of N-hydroxyurea (NH 2 CONHOH) with hydrogen halides (HCl and HF) trapped in solid argon matrices is reported. 1:1 and 1:2 complexes between N-hydroxyurea and hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride have been identified in the NH 2 CONHOH/HCl/Ar, NH 2 CONHOH/HF/Ar matrices, respectively; their structures were determined by comparison of the spectra with the results of calculations. In the 1:1 complexes, identified for both hydrogen halide molecules, the cyclic structure stabilized by the X–H⋯O and N–H⋯X bonds is present; for the NH 2 CONHOH⋯HF system another isomeric 1:1 complex is also observed. Two 1:2 complexes were identified for the N-hydroxyurea–hydrogen chloride system characterised by the Cl–H⋯O and N–H⋯Cl bonds. The results of the study evidence that N-hydroxyurea is an oxygen base in the gas-phase with the carbonyl group as the strongest proton acceptor centre in the molecule

  12. Interaction of N-hydroxyurea with strong proton donors: HCl and HF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sałdyka, Magdalena, E-mail: magdalena.saldyka@chem.uni.wroc.pl

    2014-11-24

    Highlights: • 1:1 and 1:2 N-hydroxyurea complexes with HCl and HF are trapped in argon matrices. • The complexes are stabilized by strong X–H⋯O bond. • Hydrogen bonds in the cyclic 1:2 complexes show strong cooperativity. • The C=O group is the strongest proton acceptor centre in the N-hydroxyurea molecule. - Abstract: An infrared spectroscopic and MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) study of strong hydrogen bonded complexes of N-hydroxyurea (NH{sub 2}CONHOH) with hydrogen halides (HCl and HF) trapped in solid argon matrices is reported. 1:1 and 1:2 complexes between N-hydroxyurea and hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride have been identified in the NH{sub 2}CONHOH/HCl/Ar, NH{sub 2}CONHOH/HF/Ar matrices, respectively; their structures were determined by comparison of the spectra with the results of calculations. In the 1:1 complexes, identified for both hydrogen halide molecules, the cyclic structure stabilized by the X–H⋯O and N–H⋯X bonds is present; for the NH{sub 2}CONHOH⋯HF system another isomeric 1:1 complex is also observed. Two 1:2 complexes were identified for the N-hydroxyurea–hydrogen chloride system characterised by the Cl–H⋯O and N–H⋯Cl bonds. The results of the study evidence that N-hydroxyurea is an oxygen base in the gas-phase with the carbonyl group as the strongest proton acceptor centre in the molecule.

  13. Hydrogen Bonding: Between Strengthening the Crystal Packing and Improving Solubility of Three Haloperidol Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saluja, Hardeep; Mehanna, Ahmed; Panicucci, Riccardo; Atef, Eman

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to confirm the impact of polar functional groups on inter and intra-molecular hydrogen bonding in haloperidol (HP) and droperidol (DP) and, hence, their effects on dissolution using a new approach. To confirm our theory, a new molecule: deshydroxy-haloperidol (DHP) was designed and its synthesis was requested from a contract laboratory. The molecule was then studied and compared to DP and HP. Unlike DHP, both the HP and DP molecules have hydrogen donor groups, therefore, DHP was used to confirm the relative effects of the hydrogen donor group on solubility and crystal packing. The solid dispersions of the three structurally related molecules: HP, DP, and DHP were prepared using PVPK30, and characterized using XRPD and IR. A comparative dissolution study was carried out in aqueous medium. The absence of a hydrogen bonding donor group in DHP resulted in an unexpected increase in its aqueous solubility and dissolution rate from solid dispersion, which is attributed to weaker crystal pack. The increased dissolution rate of HP and DP from solid dispersions is attributed to drug-polymer hydrogen bonding that interferes with the drug-drug intermolecular hydrogen bonding and provides thermodynamic stability of the dispersed drug molecules. The drug-drug intermolecular hydrogen bond is the driving force for precipitation and crystal packing.

  14. Hydrogen Bonding: Between Strengthening the Crystal Packing and Improving Solubility of Three Haloperidol Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardeep Saluja

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to confirm the impact of polar functional groups on inter and intra-molecular hydrogen bonding in haloperidol (HP and droperidol (DP and, hence, their effects on dissolution using a new approach. To confirm our theory, a new molecule: deshydroxy-haloperidol (DHP was designed and its synthesis was requested from a contract laboratory. The molecule was then studied and compared to DP and HP. Unlike DHP, both the HP and DP molecules have hydrogen donor groups, therefore, DHP was used to confirm the relative effects of the hydrogen donor group on solubility and crystal packing. The solid dispersions of the three structurally related molecules: HP, DP, and DHP were prepared using PVPK30, and characterized using XRPD and IR. A comparative dissolution study was carried out in aqueous medium. The absence of a hydrogen bonding donor group in DHP resulted in an unexpected increase in its aqueous solubility and dissolution rate from solid dispersion, which is attributed to weaker crystal pack. The increased dissolution rate of HP and DP from solid dispersions is attributed to drug-polymer hydrogen bonding that interferes with the drug-drug intermolecular hydrogen bonding and provides thermodynamic stability of the dispersed drug molecules. The drug-drug intermolecular hydrogen bond is the driving force for precipitation and crystal packing.

  15. Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding and Conformational Preferences of Arzanol—An Antioxidant Acylphloroglucinol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Mammino

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Arzanol is a naturally-occurring prenylated acylphloroglucinol isolated from Helichrysum italicum and exhibiting anti-oxidant, antibiotic and antiviral activities. The molecule contains an α-pyrone moiety attached to the phloroglucinol moiety through a methylene bridge. The presence of several hydrogen bond donor or acceptor sites makes intramolecular hydrogen bonding patterns the dominant stabilising factor. Conformers with all the possible different hydrogen bonding patterns were calculated at the HF/6-31G(d,p and DFT/B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p levels with fully relaxed geometry in vacuo and in three solvents—chloroform, acetonitrile and water (these levels being chosen to enable comparisons with previous studies on acylphloroglucinols. Calculations in solution were performed with the Polarisable Continuum Model. The results show that the lowest energy conformers have the highest number of stronger intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The influence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding patterns on the other molecular properties is also analysed.

  16. Numerical Calculation of the Phase Space Density for the Strong-Strong Beam-Beam Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobol, A.; Ellison, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    We developed a parallel code to calculate the evolution of the 4D phase space density of two colliding beams, which are coupled via the collective strong-strong beam-beam interaction, in the absence of diffusion and damping, using the Perron-Frobenius (PF) operator technique

  17. Substituent Effects on the Hydrogen Bonding between 4-Substituted Phenols and HF, H2O, NH3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程宇辉; 傅尧; 刘磊; 郭庆祥

    2003-01-01

    Density function theory UB3LYP/6-31+g(d) calculations were performed to study the hydrogen bonds between para-substituted phenols and HF, H2O, or NH3. It revealed that many properties of the non-covalent complexes, such as the interaction energies, donor-acceptor distances, bond lengths and vibration frequencies, showed well-defined substituent effects. Therefore, from the substituent effects not only the mechanism of a certain non-covalent interaction can be better understood, but also the interaction energies and structures of a certain non-covalent complex, which otherwise might be very hard or resource-consuming to estimate, can be easily predicted.

  18. Mannobiose Binding Induces Changes in Hydrogen Bonding and Protonation States of Acidic Residues in Concanavalin A As Revealed by Neutron Crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlits, Oksana O. [UT/ORNL; Coates, Leighton [Biology; Woods, Robert J. [Complex; Kovalevsky, Andrey [Biology

    2017-08-30

    Plant lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins with various biomedical applications. Concanavalin A (Con A) holds promise in treating cancerous tumors. To better understand the Con A carbohydrate binding specificity, we obtained a room-temperature neutron structure of this legume lectin in complex with a disaccharide Manα1–2Man, mannobiose. The neutron structure afforded direct visualization of the hydrogen bonding between the protein and ligand, showing that the ligand is able to alter both protonation states and interactions for residues located close to and distant from the binding site. An unprecedented low-barrier hydrogen bond was observed forming between the carboxylic side chains of Asp28 and Glu8, with the D atom positioned equidistant from the oxygen atoms having an O···D···O angle of 101.5°.

  19. Structures and the Hydrogen Bonding Abilities of Estrogens Studied by Supersonic Jet/laser Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Fumiya; Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Ebata, Takayuki

    2013-06-01

    Estrone, estradiol, estriol are known as endogenous estrogen which have the same steroidal frame with different substituent, leading to difference of physiological activity upon the formation of hydrogen bond with estrogen receptor. In the present study, structures of estrogens and their hydrated clusters in a supersonic jet have been studied by various laser spectroscopic techniques and density functional theory calculation to study how the difference of substituents affects their hydrogen bonding ability. Infrared spectra in the OH stretching region indicate a formation of intramolecular hydrogen-bond in estriol, which may lead to weaker physiological activity among the three estrogens. We also measured electronic and infrared spectra of 1:1 hydrated clusters of estrogen. The results show a switch of stable hydration site from the phenolic OH group to the five member ring by substituting one more OH group.

  20. Theoretical research on effects of substituents and the solvent on quadruple hydrogen bonded complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingjia Xu

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Semiempirical AM1 and INDO/CIS methods were used to study the structures and spectroscopy of hydrogen bonded complexes formed by the oligophenyleneethynylene (monomer A with isophthalic acid (monomer B. The binding energies of the complexes are lowered by increasing electron-donating abilities of the substituents near the hydrogen bonds on monomer A. The first absorptions in the electronic spectra and the vibration frequencies of the N-H bonds in the IR spectra for the complexes are both red-shifted compared with those of the monomers. The presence of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO can reduce the binding energy of the complex through hydrogen bonding. This results in a blue-shift for the first absorption in the electronic spectrum and red-shift for the vibration frequencies of the N-H bonds in the IR spectrum of the complex.

  1. Hydrogen bond dynamics governs the effective photoprotection mechanism of plant phenolic sunscreens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Du, Likai; Lan, Zhenggang; Gao, Jun

    2017-02-15

    Sinapic acid derivatives are important sunscreen species in natural plants, which could provide protection from solar UV radiation. Using a combination of ultrafast excited state dynamics, together with classical molecular dynamics studies, we demonstrate that there is direct coupling of hydrogen bond motion with excited state photoprotection dynamics as part of the basic mechanism in solution. Beyond the intra-molecular degree of freedom, the inter-molecular motions on all timescales are potentially important for the photochemical or photophysical events, ranging from the ultrafast hydrogen bond motion to solvent rearrangements. This provides not only an enhanced understanding of the anomalous experimental spectroscopic results, but also the key idea in the development of sunscreen agents with improved photo-chemical properties. We suggest that the hydrogen bond dynamics coupled excited state photoprotection mechanism may also be possible in a broad range of bio-related molecules in the condensed phase.

  2. Reduction of Line Edge Roughness of Polystyrene-block-Poly(methyl methacrylate) Copolymer Nanopatterns By Introducing Hydrogen Bonding at the Junction Point of Two Block Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu Seong; Lee, Jaeyong; Kwak, Jongheon; Moon, Hong Chul; Kim, Jin Kon

    2017-09-20

    To apply well-defined block copolymer nanopatterns to next-generation lithography or high-density storage devices, small line edge roughness (LER) of nanopatterns should be realized. Although polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) copolymer (PS-b-PMMA) has been widely used to fabricate nanopatterns because of easy perpendicular orientation of the block copolymer nanodomains and effective removal of PMMA block by dry etching, the fabricated nanopatterns show poorer line edge roughness (LER) due to relatively small Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (χ) between PS and PMMA chains. Here, we synthesized PS-b-PMMA with urea (U) and N-(4-aminomethyl-benzyl)-4-hydroxymethyl-benzamide (BA) moieties at junction of PS and PMMA chains (PS-U-BA-PMMA) to improve the LER. The U-BA moieties serves as favorable interaction (hydrogen bonding) sites. The LER of PS line patterns obtained from PS-U-BA-PMMA was reduced ∼25% compared with that obtained from neat PS-b-PMMA without BA and U moieties. This is attributed to narrower interfacial width induced by hydrogen bonding between two blocks, which is confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering. This result implies that the introduction of hydrogen bonding into block copolymer interfaces offers an opportunity to fabricate well-defined nanopatterns with improved LER by block copolymer self-assembly, which could be a promising alternative to next-generation extreme ultraviolet lithography.

  3. An S-N2-model for proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    A new mechanism of proton transfer in donor-acceptor complexes with long hydrogen bonds is suggested. The transition is regarded as totally adiabatic. Two closest water molecules that move synchronously by hindered translation to and from the reaction complex are crucial. The water molecules induce...... a shift of the proton from the donor to the acceptor with simultaneous breaking/formation of hydrogen bonds between these molecules and the proton donor and acceptor. Expressions for the activation barrier and kinetic hydrogen isotope effect are derived. The general scheme is illustrated with the use...... of model molecular potentials, and with reference to the excess proton conductivity in aqueous solution....

  4. Chemometric characterization of the hydrogen bonding complexes of secondary amides and aromatic hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Branislav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports the results of the study of hydrogen bonding complexes between secondary amides and various aromatic hydrocarbons. The possibility of using chemometric methods was investigated in order to characterize N-H•••π hydrogen bonded complexes. Hierarchical clustering and Principal Component Analysis (PCA have been applied on infrared spectroscopic and Taft parameters of 43 N-substituted amide complexes with different aromatic hydrocarbons. Results obtained in this report are in good agreement with conclusions of other spectroscopic and thermodynamic analysis.

  5. A Computational and Theoretical Study of Conductance in Hydrogen-bonded Molecular Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Michael

    This thesis is devoted to the theoretical and computational study of electron transport in molecular junctions where one or more hydrogen bonds are involved in the process. While electron transport through covalent bonds has been extensively studied, in recent work the focus has been shifted towards hydrogen-bonded systems due to their ubiquitous presence in biological systems and their potential in forming nano-junctions between molecular electronic devices and biological systems. This analysis allows us to significantly expand our comprehension of the experimentally observed result that the inclusion of hydrogen bonding in a molecular junction significantly impacts its transport properties, a fact that has important implications for our understanding of transport through DNA, and nano-biological interfaces in general. In part of this work I have explored the implications of quasiresonant transport in short chains of weakly-bonded molecular junctions involving hydrogen bonds. I used theoretical and computational analysis to interpret recent experiments and explain the role of Fano resonances in the transmission properties of the junction. In a different direction, I have undertaken the study of the transversal conduction through nucleotide chains that involve a variable number of different hydrogen bonds, e.g. NH˙˙˙O, OH˙˙˙O, and NH˙˙˙N, which are the three most prevalent hydrogen bonds in biological systems and organic electronics. My effort here has focused on the analysis of electronic descriptors that allow a simplified conceptual and computational understanding of transport properties. Specifically, I have expanded our previous work where the molecular polarizability was used as a conductance descriptor to include the possibility of atomic and bond partitions of the molecular polarizability. This is important because it affords an alternative molecular description of conductance that is not based on the conventional view of molecular orbitals as

  6. Hydrogen bonding-mediated dehydrogenation in the ammonia borane combined graphene oxide systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Anlong; Liu, Taijuan; Kuang, Minquan; Yang, Ruifeng; Huang, Rui; Wang, Guangzhao; Yuan, Hongkuan; Chen, Hong; Yang, Xiaolan

    2018-03-01

    The dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB) adsorbed on three different graphene oxide (GO) sheets is investigated within the ab initio density functional theory. The energy barriers to direct combination the hydrogens of hydroxyl groups and the hydridic hydrogens of AB to release H2 are relatively high, indicating that the process is energetically unfavorable. Our theoretical study demonstrates that the dehydrogenation mechanism of the AB-GO systems has undergone two critical steps, first, there is the formation of the hydrogen bond (O-H-O) between two hydroxyl groups, and then, the hydrogen bond further react with the hydridic hydrogens of AB to release H2 with low reaction barriers.

  7. Long range order and hydrogen bonding in liquid methanol: A Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shilov, I.Y.; Rode, B.M. [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, Institute of General, Inorganic and Theoretical Chemistry, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Durov, V.A. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1999-02-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of liquid methanol was performed in NVT ensemble at 298 K using a cubic simulation box containing 500 molecules. Long-range correlations in the liquid are discussed on the basis of site-site radial distribution functions. Hydrogen bonding and topological structure of the methanol aggregates were evaluated in detail, namely the number of linked molecules, formation of branches and cyclic structures. The necessity of larger simulation boxes for a full structural description and thermodynamic characterization of hydrogen-bonded liquids is clearly established by the results. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  8. Prospects for strong interaction physics at ISABELLE. [Seven papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, D P; Trueman, T L

    1977-01-01

    Seven papers are presented resulting from a conference intended to stimulate thinking about how ISABELLE could be used for studying strong interactions. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for inclusion in DOE Energy Research Abstracts (ERA). (PMA)

  9. The Hirshfeld surface of three new isonicotinylhydrazine co-crystals: Comparison of hydrogen bonds and crystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Mariana S.; Ribeiro, Carlos Eduardo P.; Corrêa, Charlane C.; Diniz, Renata

    2017-12-01

    The influence of the change of aromatic acids ligand in the interactions with isonicotinylhydrazine (ISO) molecule in three new co-crystals has been investigated as well as a study of the hydrogen bonds formed between the ligands through Hirshfeld surface analysis and fingerprint plots. These analyses are extremely sensitive to the chemical environment of the molecule and are unique to a particular molecule so they can identify the differences between the crystal packing in the solid state. Although the conformation of ISO molecule being practically identical in all three compounds and the interactions mainly involve the Nsbnd H⋯O and Osbnd H⋯N type, the fingerprint plots only for ISO molecule in the three compounds are different and exhibit the influence in this molecule due to the modification of the functional groups of ligands.

  10. A theory of strong interactions ''from'' general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldirola, P.; Recami, E.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper a previous letter (where, among other things, a classical ''quark confinement'' was derived from general relativity plus dilatation-covariance), is completed by showing that the theory is compatible also with quarks ''asymptotic freedom''. Then -within a bi-scale theory of gravitational and strong interactions- a classical field theory is proposed for the (strong) interactions between hadrons. Various consequences are briefly analysed

  11. A Fast and Cost-Effective Detection of Melamine by Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Using a Novel Hydrogen Bonding-Assisted Supramolecular Matrix and Gold-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Neng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A fast and cost-effective melamine detection approach has been developed based on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS using a novel hydrogen bonding-assisted supramolecular matrix. The detection utilizes Fe3O4/Au magnetic nanoparticles coated with 5-aminoorotic acid (AOA as a SERS active substrate (Fe3O4/Au–AOA, and Rhodamine B (RhB conjugated AOA as a Raman reporter (AOA–RhB. Upon mixing the reagents with melamine, a supramolecular complex [Fe3O4/Au–AOA•••melamine•••AOA–RhB] was formed due to the strong multiple hydrogen bonding interactions between AOA and melamine. The complex was separated and concentrated to a pellet by an external magnet and used as a supramolecular matrix for the melamine detection. Laser excitation of the complex pellet produced a strong SERS signal diagnostic for RhB. The logarithmic intensity of the characteristic RhB peaks was found to be proportional to the concentration of melamine with a limit of detection of 2.5 µg/mL and a detection linearity range of 2.5~15.0 µg/mL in milk. As Fe3O4 nanoparticles and AOA are thousands of times less expensive than the monoclonal antibody used in a traditional sandwich immunoassay, the current assay drastically cut down the cost of melamine detection. The current approach affords promise as a biosensor platform that cuts down sample pre-treatment steps and measurement expense.

  12. Measurement of strong interaction effects in antiprotonic helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, J.D.; Gorringe, T.P.; Lowe, J.; Nelson, J.M.; Playfer, S.M.; Pyle, G.J.; Squier, G.T.A.

    1984-01-01

    The strong interaction shift and width for the 2 p level and the width for the 3d level have been measured for antiprotonic helium atoms. The results are compared with optical model calculations. The possible existence of strongly bound antiproton states in nuclei is discussed. (orig.)

  13. Photoinduced electron transfer through hydrogen bonds in a rod-like donor-acceptor molecule: A time-resolved EPR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakob, Manuela; Berg, Alexander; Stavitski, Eli; Chernick, Erin T.; Weiss, Emily A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Levanon, Haim

    2006-01-01

    Light-driven multi-step intramolecular electron transfer in a rod-like triad, in which two of the three redox components are linked by three hydrogen bonds, was studied by time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TREPR) and optical spectroscopies. One part of the molecule consists of a p-methoxyaniline primary electron donor (MeOAn) covalently linked to a 4-aminonaphthalene-1, 8-dicarboximide (6ANI) chromophoric electron acceptor (MeOAn-6ANI). The unsubstituted dicarboximide of 6ANI serves as one half of a hydrogen bonding receptor pair. The other half of the receptor pair consists of a melamine linked to a naphthalene-1,8:4,5-bis(dicarboximide) (NI) secondary electron acceptor (MEL-NI). TREPR spectroscopy is used to probe the electronic interaction between the radicals within the photogenerated, spin-correlated radical ion pair MeOAn ·+ -6ANI/MEL-NI ·- . The results are compared to those obtained in earlier studies in which MeOAn-6ANI is covalently linked to NI through a 2,5-dimethylphenyl group (MeOAn-6ANI-Ph-NI). We show that the electronic coupling between the oxidized donor and reduced acceptor in the hydrogen-bonded radical ion pair MeOAn ·+ -6ANI/MEL-NI ·- is very similar to that of MeOAn ·+ -6ANI-Ph-NI ·-

  14. Energy of Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in ortho-Hydroxybenzaldehydes, Phenones and Quinones. Transfer of Aromaticity from ipso-Benzene Ring to the Enol System(s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Rusinska-Roszak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Intramolecular hydrogen bonding (HB is one of the most studied noncovalent interactions of molecules. Many physical, spectral, and topological properties of compounds are under the influence of HB, and there are many parameters used to notice and to describe these changes. Hitherto, no general method of measurement of the energy of intramolecular hydrogen bond (EHB has been put into effect. We propose the molecular tailoring approach (MTA for EHB calculation, modified to apply it to Ar-O-H∙∙∙O=C systems. The method, based on quantum calculations, was checked earlier for hydroxycarbonyl-saturated compounds, and for structures with resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RAHB. For phenolic compounds, the accuracy, repeatability, and applicability of the method is now confirmed for nearly 140 structures. For each structure its aromaticity HOMA indices were calculated for the central (ipso ring and for the quasiaromatic rings given by intramolecular HB. The comparison of calculated HB energies and values of estimated aromaticity indices allowed us to observe, in some substituted phenols and quinones, the phenomenon of transfer of aromaticity from the ipso-ring to the H-bonded ring via the effect of electron delocalization.

  15. Interaction between Electron Holes in a Strongly Magnetized Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynov, Jens-Peter; Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans

    1980-01-01

    The interaction between electron holes in a strongly magnetized, plasma-filled waveguide is investigated by means of computer simulation. Two holes may or may not coalesce, depending on their amplitudes and velocities. The interaction between holes and Trivelpiece-Gould solitons is demonstrated...

  16. Quark imprisonment as the origin of strong interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Amati, Daniele

    1974-01-01

    A formal scheme is suggested in which the only dynamical ingredients are weak and electro-magnetic interactions with quarks and leptons treated on the same footing. Strong interactions are generated by the requirement that quarks do not appear physically. (7 refs).

  17. Yeast ribonuclease III uses a network of multiple hydrogen bonds for RNA binding and cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Mathieu; Abou Elela, Sherif

    2008-08-19

    Members of the bacterial RNase III family recognize a variety of short structured RNAs with few common features. It is not clear how this group of enzymes supports high cleavage fidelity while maintaining a broad base of substrates. Here we show that the yeast orthologue of RNase III (Rnt1p) uses a network of 2'-OH-dependent interactions to recognize substrates with different structures. We designed a series of bipartite substrates permitting the distinction between binding and cleavage defects. Each substrate was engineered to carry a single or multiple 2'- O-methyl or 2'-fluoro ribonucleotide substitutions to prevent the formation of hydrogen bonds with a specific nucleotide or group of nucleotides. Interestingly, introduction of 2'- O-methyl ribonucleotides near the cleavage site increased the rate of catalysis, indicating that 2'-OH are not required for cleavage. Substitution of nucleotides in known Rnt1p binding site with 2'- O-methyl ribonucleotides inhibited cleavage while single 2'-fluoro ribonucleotide substitutions did not. This indicates that while no single 2'-OH is essential for Rnt1p cleavage, small changes in the substrate structure are not tolerated. Strikingly, several nucleotide substitutions greatly increased the substrate dissociation constant with little or no effect on the Michaelis-Menten constant or rate of catalysis. Together, the results indicate that Rnt1p uses a network of nucleotide interactions to identify its substrate and support two distinct modes of binding. One mode is primarily mediated by the dsRNA binding domain and leads to the formation of stable RNA/protein complex, while the other requires the presence of the nuclease and N-terminal domains and leads to RNA cleavage.

  18. Activation and thermodynamic parameter study of the heteronuclear C=O···H-N hydrogen bonding of diphenylurethane isomeric structures by FT-IR spectroscopy using the regularized inversion of an eigenvalue problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spegazzini, Nicolas; Siesler, Heinz W; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2012-08-02

    The doublet of the ν(C=O) carbonyl band in isomeric urethane systems has been extensively discussed in qualitative terms on the basis of FT-IR spectroscopy of the macromolecular structures. Recently, a reaction extent model was proposed as an inverse kinetic problem for the synthesis of diphenylurethane for which hydrogen-bonded and non-hydrogen-bonded C=O functionalities were identified. In this article, the heteronuclear C=O···H-N hydrogen bonding in the isomeric structure of diphenylurethane synthesized from phenylisocyanate and phenol was investigated via FT-IR spectroscopy, using a methodology of regularization for the inverse reaction extent model through an eigenvalue problem. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of this system were derived directly from the spectroscopic data. The activation and thermodynamic parameters of the isomeric structures of diphenylurethane linked through a hydrogen bonding equilibrium were studied. The study determined the enthalpy (ΔH = 15.25 kJ/mol), entropy (TΔS = 14.61 kJ/mol), and free energy (ΔG = 0.6 kJ/mol) of heteronuclear C=O···H-N hydrogen bonding by FT-IR spectroscopy through direct calculation from the differences in the kinetic parameters (δΔ(‡)H, -TδΔ(‡)S, and δΔ(‡)G) at equilibrium in the chemical reaction system. The parameters obtained in this study may contribute toward a better understanding of the properties of, and interactions in, supramolecular systems, such as the switching behavior of hydrogen bonding.

  19. Monitoring peptide-surface interaction by means of molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonella, Marco, E-mail: mnonella@pci.uzh.ch [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Seeger, Stefan, E-mail: sseeger@pci.uzh.ch [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-12-09

    Graphical abstract: Protein-surface interactions play a crucial role in a wide field of research areas like biology, biotechnology, or pharmacology. Only recently, it has been shown that not only peptide adsorption represents an important process but also spreading and clustering of adsorbed proteins. By means of classical molecular dynamics, peptide adsorption as well as the dynamics of adsorbed peptides have been investigated in order to gain deeper insight into such processes. The picture shows a snapshot of an adsorbed peptide on a silica surface showing strong direct hydrogen bonding. Research highlights: {yields} Simulation of peptide surface interaction. {yields} Dynamics of hydrogen bond formation and destruction. {yields} Internal flexibility of adsorbed peptides. - Abstract: Protein adsorption and protein surface interactions have become an important research topic in recent years. Very recently, for example, it has been shown that protein clusters can undergo a surface-induced spreading after adsorption. Such phenomena emphasize the need of a more detailed insight into protein-silica interaction at an atomic level. Therefore, we have studied a model system consisting of a short peptide, a silica slab, and water molecules by means of classical molecular dynamics simulations. The study reveals that, besides of electrostatic interactions caused by the chosen charge distribution, the peptide interacts with the silica surface through formation of direct peptide-surface hydrogen bonds as well as indirect peptide-water-surface hydrogen bonds. The number of created hydrogen bonds varies considerably among the simulated structures. The strength of hydrogen bonding determines the mobility of the peptide on the surface and the internal flexibility of the adsorbed peptide.

  20. Substructure and strong interactions at the TeV scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peskin, M.E.

    1985-12-01

    A review is given of the current status of the three main theoretical ideas relevant to strong-interaction 1 TeV physics. These are composite vector bosons, Higgs bosons (''Technicolor''), and matter fermions. All involve the assumption that some object which is assumed to be fundamental in the standard model actually has dynamical internal structure. Complex, mechanistic models of the new physics are discussed. A brief digression is then made on how the weak interaction allows probing for this new structure. Direct manifestations of new 1 TeV strong interactions are discussed. 125 refs., 18 figs

  1. Semicalssical quantization of interacting anyons in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levit, S.; Sivan, N.

    1992-01-01

    We represent a semiclassical theory of charged interacting anyons in strong magnetic fields. We apply this theory to a number of few anyons systems including two interacting anyons in the presence of an impurity and three interacting anyons. We discuss the dependence of their energy levels on the statistical parameter and find regions in which this dependence follows very different patterns. The semiclassical arguments allow to correlate these patterns with the change in the character of the classical motion of the system. (author)

  2. Supramolecular structures in N-isonicotinoyl arylaldehydehydrazones: multiple hydrogen-bonding modes in series of geometric isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardell, Solange M S V; de Souza, Marcus V N; Wardell, James L; Low, John N; Glidewell, Christopher

    2007-12-01

    Sixteen N-isonicotinoyl arylaldehydehydrazones, NC(5)H(4)CONHN=CHC(6)H(4)R, have been studied and the structures of 14 of them have been determined, including the unsubstituted parent compound with R = H, and the complete sets of 2-, 3- and 4-substituted geometric isomers for R = F, Br and OMe, and two of the three isomers for R = Cl and OEt. The 2-chloro and 3-chloro derivatives are isostructural with the corresponding bromo isomers, and all compounds contain trans amide groups apart from the isostructural pair where R = 2-Cl and 2-Br, which contain cis amide groups. The structures exhibit a wide range of direction-specific intermolecular interactions, including eight types of hydrogen bonds, N-H...N, N-H...O, O-H...O, O-H...N, C-H...N, C-H...O, C-H...pi(arene) and C-H...pi(pyridyl), as well as pi...pi stacking interactions. The structures exhibit a very broad range of combinations of these interactions: the resulting hydrogen-bonded supramolecular structures range from one-dimensional when R = 2-F, 2-OMe or 2-OEt, via two-dimensional when R = 4-F, 3-Cl, 3-Br, 4-OMe or 3-OEt, to three-dimensional when R = H, 3-F, 2-Cl, 2-Br, 4-Br or 3-OMe. Minor changes in either the identity of the substituent or its location can lead to substantial changes in the pattern of supramolecular aggregation, posing significant problems of predictability. The new structures are compared with the recently published structures of the isomeric series having R = NO(2), with several monosubstituted analogues containing 2-pyridyl or 3-pyridyl units rather than 4-pyridyl, and with a number of examples having two or three substituents in the aryl ring: some 30 structures in all are discussed.

  3. Experimental evidence for the blue-shifted hydrogen-bonded complexes of CHF3 with π-electron donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopi, R; Ramanathan, N; Sundararajan, K

    2017-06-15

    Blue-shifted hydrogen-bonded complexes of fluoroform (CHF 3 ) with benzene (C 6 H 6 ) and acetylene (C 2 H 2 ) have been investigated using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy and ab initio computations. For CHF 3 -C 6 H 6 complex, calculations performed at the B3LYP and MP2 levels of theory using 6-311++G (d,p) and aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets discerned two minima corresponding to a 1:1 hydrogen-bonded complex. The global minimum correlated to a structure, where the interaction is between the hydrogen of CHF 3 and the π-electrons of C 6 H 6 and a weak local minimum was stabilized through H…F interaction. For the CHF 3 -C 2 H 2 complex, computation performed at MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory yielded two minima, corresponding to the cyclic C-H…π complex A (global) and a linear C-H…F (n-σ) complex B (local). Experimentally a blue-shift of 32.3cm -1 and 7.7cm -1 was observed in the ν 1 C-H stretching mode of CHF 3 sub-molecule in Ar matrix for the 1:1 C-H…π complexes of CHF 3 with C 6 H 6 and C 2 H 2 respectively. Natural bond orbital (NBO), Atoms-in-molecule (AIM) and energy decomposition (EDA) analyses were carried out to explain the blue-shifting and the nature of the interaction in these complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. On Hydrogen Bonding in the Intramolecularly Chelated Taitomers of Enolic Malondialdehyde and its Mono- and Dithio-Analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Lars; Duus, Fritz

    1980-01-01

    The intramolecular hydrogen bondings in enolic malondialdehyde and it mono- and dithio-analogues have been evaluated by a semiempricial SCF–MO–CNDO method. The calculations predict that the hydrogen bonds play an important part in the stabilities of malondialdehyde and monothiomalondialdehyde...

  5. Ultrafast OH-stretching frequency shifts of hydrogen- bonded 2-naphthol photoacid-base complexes in solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batista VictorS.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We characterize the transient solvent-dependent OH-stretching frequency shifts of photoacid 2-naphthol hydrogen-bonded with CH3CN in the S0- and S1-states using a combined experimental and theoretical approach, and disentangle specific hydrogen-bonding contributions from nonspecific dielectric response.

  6. The influence of large-amplitude librational motion on the hydrogen bond energy for alcohol–water complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jonas; Heimdal, J.; Larsen, René Wugt

    2015-01-01

    is a superior hydrogen bond acceptor. The class of large-amplitude donor OH librational motion is shown to account for up to 5.1 kJ mol-1 of the destabilizing change of vibrational zero-point energy upon intermolecular OH...O hydrogen bond formation. The experimental findings are supported by complementary...

  7. Hydrogen bond nature of ferroelectric material studied by X-ray and neutron diffraction. Electric dipole moment and proton tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Yukio; Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Mochida, Tomoyuki; Sugawara, Tadashi

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen bond nature of MeHPLN and BrHPLN is studied using x-ray and neutron diffraction technique. We found that electric dipole moment of hydrogen atom plays an important role for the phase transition, and proton tunneling model is confirmed on this isolated hydrogen bond system. (author)

  8. Vibrational transitions in hydrogen bonded bimolecular complexes – A local mode perturbation theory approach to transition frequencies and intensities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjærgaard, Henrik Grum

    2017-01-01

    The local mode perturbation theory (LMPT) model was developed to improve the description of hydrogen bonded XH-stretching transitions, where X is typically O or N. We present a modified version of the LMPT model to extend its application from hydrated bimolecular complexes to hydrogen bonded...

  9. Control of structural isomerism in noncovalent hydrogen-bonded assemblies using peripheral chiral information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.J.; Jolliffe, K.A.; Hulst, A.J.R.L.; Timmerman, P.; Reinhoudt, David

    2000-01-01

    The results of a systematic study of the structural isomerism in more than 30 noncovalent hydrogen-bonded assemblies are described. These dynamic assemblies, composed of three calix[4]arene dimelamines and six barbiturates/cyanurates, can be present in three isomeric forms with either D3, C3h, or Cs

  10. Noncovalent assembly of a fifteen-component hydrogen-bonded nanostructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jolliffe, K.A.; Timmerman, P.; Reinhoudt, David

    1999-01-01

    A total of 72 hydrogen bonds are formed in the spontaneous association of calix[4]arene tetramelamine and barbituric acid derivatives to give nanosized assemblies of the type represented in the picture. These consist of 15 components that assemble in a completely diastereoselective sense: of the

  11. Hydrogen bonded networks in formamide [HCONH2]n (n = 1 − 10 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    clusters: A computational exploration of preferred aggregation patterns. #. A SUBHA ... Application of quantum chemical calculations is vital in understanding hydrogen bonding observed in formamide ... up approach of building large assemblies from con- ..... representation of AIM analysis of all clusters is pro- vided in the ...

  12. Watson-Crick base pairs with thiocarbonyl groups: How sulfur changes the hydrogen bonds in DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonseca Guerra, C.; Baerends, E.J.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2008-01-01

    We have theoretically analyzed mimics of Watson-Crick AT and GC base pairs in which N-H•••O hydrogen bonds are replaced by N-H•••S, using the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of density functional theory at BP86/TZ2P level. The general effect of the above substitutions is an elongation and a

  13. Solvent effects on hydrogen bonds in Watson-Crick, mismatched, and modified DNA base pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poater, Jordi; Swart, Marcel; Guerra, Celia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias

    2012-01-01

    We have theoretically analyzed a complete series of Watson–Crick and mismatched DNA base pairs, both in gas phase and in solution. Solvation causes a weakening and lengthening of the hydrogen bonds between the DNA bases because of the stabilization of the lone pairs involved in these bonds. We have

  14. NMR Determination of Hydrogen Bond Thermodynamics in a Simple Diamide: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Janine G.; Joe, Candice L.; Stolla, Massiel C.; Koshland, Sophia R.; Londergan, Casey H.; Schofield, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Variable temperature NMR spectroscopy is used to determine the ?H° and ?S° of hydrogen bond formation in a simple diamide. In this two- or three-day experiment, students synthesize N,N'-dimethylmalonamide, dimethylsuccinamide, dimethylglutaramide, or dimethyladipamide from methylamine and the corresponding diester (typically in 50% recrystallized…

  15. Hydrogen bonding properties and intermediate structure of N-(2-carboxyphenyl)salicylidenimine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligtenbarg, Alette G.J.; Hage, Ronald; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Ben L.

    1999-01-01

    The hydrogen bonding properties, the nature of the tautomeric structure and dimerization of N-(2-carboxyphenyl)salicylidenimine 1 has been studied. The crystal and molecular structure of 1 has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. This compound forms a dimer in the solid

  16. A theoretical perspective of the nature of hydrogen-bond types - the atoms in molecules approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pandiyan, B. V.; Kolandaivel, P.; Deepa, Palanisamy

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 12 (2014), s. 1609-1623 ISSN 0026-8976 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : hydrogen bond * proton affinity * deprotanation enthalpy * atoms in molecules * chemical shift Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.720, year: 2014

  17. Hydrogen Bonding in DNA Base Pairs: Reconciliation of Theory and Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonseca Guerra, C.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.; Snijders, J.G.; Baerends, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    Up till now, there has been a significant disagreement between theory and experiment regarding hydrogen bond lengths in Watson - Crick base pairs. To investigate the possible sources of this discrepancy, we have studied numerous model systems for adenine - thymine (AT) and guanine - cytosine (GC)

  18. What Is a Hydrogen Bond? Resonance Covalency in the Supramolecular Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinhold, Frank; Klein, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    We address the broader conceptual and pedagogical implications of recent recommendations of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) concerning the re-definition of hydrogen bonding, drawing upon the recommended IUPAC statistical methodology of mutually correlated experimental and theoretical descriptors to operationally…

  19. On prediction of OH stretching frequencies in intramolecularly hydrogen bonded systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    OH stretching frequencies are investigated for a series of non-tautomerizing systems with intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Effective OH stretching wavenumbers are predicted by the application of empirical correlation procedures based on the results of B3LYP/6-31G(d) theoretical calculations...

  20. Restructuring the crystalline cellulose hydrogen bond network enhances its depolymerization rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishir P.S. Chundawat; Giovanni Bellesia; Nirmal Uppugundla; Leonardo da Costa Sousa; Dahai Gao; Albert M. Cheh; Umesh P. Agarwal; Christopher M. Bianchetti; George N. Phillips; Paul Langan; Venkatesh Balan; S. Gnanakaran; Bruce E. Dale

    2011-01-01

    Conversion of lignocellulose to biofuels is partly inefficient due to the deleterious impact of cellulose crystallinity on enzymatic saccharification. We demonstrate how the synergistic activity of cellulases was enhanced by altering the hydrogen bond network within crystalline cellulose fibrils. We provide a molecular-scale explanation of these phenomena through...