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Sample records for strong frequency dependence

  1. On Strong Positive Frequency Dependencies of Quality Factors in Local-Earthquake Seismic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Igor B.; Jhajhria, Atul; Deng, Wubing

    2018-03-01

    Many observations of seismic waves from local earthquakes are interpreted in terms of the frequency-dependent quality factor Q( f ) = Q0 f^{η } , where η is often close to or exceeds one. However, such steep positive frequency dependencies of Q require careful analysis with regard to their physical consistency. In particular, the case of η = 1 corresponds to frequency-independent (elastic) amplitude decays with time and consequently requires no Q-type attenuation mechanisms. For η > 1, several problems with physical meanings of such Q-factors occur. First, contrary to the key premise of seismic attenuation, high-frequency parts of the wavefield are enhanced with increasing propagation times relative to the low-frequency ones. Second, such attenuation cannot be implemented by mechanical models of wave-propagating media. Third, with η > 1, the velocity dispersion associated with such Q(f) occurs over unrealistically short frequency range and has an unexpected oscillatory shape. Cases η = 1 and η > 1 are usually attributed to scattering; however, this scattering must exhibit fortuitous tuning into the observation frequency band, which appears unlikely. The reason for the above problems is that the inferred Q values are affected by the conventional single-station measurement procedure. Both parameters Q 0 and are apparent, i.e., dependent on the selected parameterization and inversion method, and they should not be directly attributed to the subsurface. For η ≈ 1, parameter Q 0 actually describes the frequency-independent amplitude decay in access of some assumed geometric spreading t -α , where α is usually taken equal one. The case η > 1 is not allowed physically and could serve as an indicator of problematic interpretations. Although the case 0 < η < 1 is possible, its parameters Q 0 and may also be biased by the measurement procedure. To avoid such difficulties of Q-based approaches, we recommend measuring and interpreting the amplitude-decay rates

  2. Low-frequency ac electroporation shows strong frequency dependence and yields comparable transfection results to dc electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yihong; Cao, Zhenning; Bao, Ning; Li, Jianbo; Wang, Jun; Geng, Tao; Lin, Hao; Lu, Chang

    2012-06-28

    Conventional electroporation has been conducted by employing short direct current (dc) pulses for delivery of macromolecules such as DNA into cells. The use of alternating current (ac) field for electroporation has mostly been explored in the frequency range of 10kHz-1MHz. Based on Schwan equation, it was thought that with low ac frequencies (10Hz-10kHz), the transmembrane potential does not vary with the frequency. In this report, we utilized a flow-through electroporation technique that employed continuous 10Hz-10kHz ac field (based on either sine waves or square waves) for electroporation of cells with defined duration and intensity. Our results reveal that electropermeabilization becomes weaker with increased frequency in this range. In contrast, transfection efficiency with DNA reaches its maximum at medium frequencies (100-1000Hz) in the range. We postulate that the relationship between the transfection efficiency and the ac frequency is determined by combined effects from electrophoretic movement of DNA in the ac field, dependence of the DNA/membrane interaction on the ac frequency, and variation of transfection under different electropermeabilization intensities. The fact that ac electroporation in this frequency range yields high efficiency for transfection (up to ~71% for Chinese hamster ovary cells) and permeabilization suggests its potential for gene delivery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Frequency dependence of sonophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezel, A; Sens, A; Tuchscherer, J; Mitragotri, S

    2001-12-01

    Application of low-frequency ultrasound has been shown to increase skin permeability, thereby facilitating delivery of macromolecules (low-frequency sonophoresis). In this study, we sought to determine the dependence of low-frequency sonophoresis on ultrasound frequency, intensity and energy density. Pig skin was exposed to low-frequency ultrasound over a range of ultrasound frequency and intensity conditions. The degree of skin permeabilization was measured using its conductivity. Imaging experiments were also carried out to visualize the transport pathways created by ultrasound. The data showed that for each frequency (in the range of 19.6-93.4 kHz), there exists a threshold intensity below which no detectable conductivity enhancement was observed. The threshold intensity increased with frequency. It is feasible to achieve the desired conductivity (permeability) enhancement regardless of the choice of frequency, although the necessary energy density is higher at higher frequencies. Low frequencies (approximately 20 kHz) induced localized transport compared to a more dispersed effect seen with higher frequencies (approximately 58.9 kHz). This study provides a quantitative understanding of the effects of low-frequency ultrasound on skin permeability.

  4. Frequency dependent polarization in blazars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernsson, C.I.

    1984-10-01

    It is argued that the intrinsic frequency dependent polarization in blazars finds its most straightforward explanations in terms of a single rather than a multicomponent sourcemodel. In order to reproduce the observations, under the assumption that the emission mechanism is optically thin synchrotron radiation, both a well ordered magnetic field and an electron distribution with a sharp break or cuttoff are necessary. Non-uniform pitch angle distribution and/or environments where synchrotron losses are important are both conducive to producing strong frequency dependent polarization. Reasons are put forth as to why such conditions ar expected to occur in blazars. Two specific models are discussed in detail and it is shown that they are both able to produce strong frequency dependent polarization, even when the spectral index changes by a small amount only. (orig.)

  5. Frequency Dependent Attenuation in Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-20

    WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO 62714E 7A10 DA DA 1𔃻 T. ,E (Incude Security Clasification ) Frequency Dependent Attenuation in Rocks Ŗ 0E;SO’.A_...P., and L. Peselnick, Investigation of internal friction in fused quartz, steel , plexiglass, and Westerly granite from 0.01 to 1.00 Hertz at 10- to 10...P., and L. Peselnick, Investigation of internal friction in fused quartz, steel , plexiglas, and Westerly granite from 0.01 to 1.00 Hertz at 10-8 to 10

  6. High-frequency filtering of strong-motion records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, J.; Boore, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of noise in strong-motion records is most problematic at low and high frequencies where the signal to noise ratio is commonly low compared to that in the mid-spectrum. The impact of low-frequency noise (5 Hz) on computed pseudo-absolute response spectral accelerations (PSAs). In contrast to the case of low-frequency noise our analysis shows that filtering to remove high-frequency noise is only necessary in certain situations and that PSAs can often be used up to 100 Hz even if much lower high-cut corner frequencies are required to remove the noise. This apparent contradiction can be explained by the fact that PSAs are often controlled by ground accelerations associated with much lower frequencies than the natural frequency of the oscillator because path and site attenuation (often modelled by Q and κ, respectively) have removed the highest frequencies. We demonstrate that if high-cut filters are to be used, then their corner frequencies should be selected on an individual basis, as has been done in a few recent studies.

  7. Frequency-dependent heat capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrens, Claus Flensted

    The frequency–dependent heat capacity of super-cooled glycerol near the glass transition is measured using the 3w detection technique. An electrical conducting thin film with a temperature–dependent electrical resistance is deposited on a substrate. The thin film is used simultaneously as a heater...... and as a thermometer. The aim of the work is to improve and understand this planar heater experiment. I find: • Carbon has advantages as heater material over the traditionally used metal (nickel) heaters. • The thermal coupling to the surrounding temperature bath should not be made through the liquid but through...... the substrate. • Edge effects, as a result of the finite size of the heater, play an important role. The traditionally way of dealing with these effects are not entirely correct. • The Cole–Davidson function with bCD...

  8. Computing effective properties of nonlinear structures exposed to strong high-frequency loading at multiple frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2006-01-01

    Effects of strong high-frequency excitation at multiple frequencies (multi-HFE) are analyzed for a class of generally nonlinear systems. The effects are illustrated for a simple pendulum system with a vibrating support, and for a parametrically excited flexible beam. For the latter, theoretical...

  9. Topological Frequency Conversion in Strongly Driven Quantum Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivar Martin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available When a physical system is subjected to a strong external multifrequency drive, its dynamics can be conveniently represented in the multidimensional Floquet lattice. The number of Floquet lattice dimensions equals the number of irrationally-related drive frequencies, and the evolution occurs in response to a built-in effective “electric” field, whose components are proportional to the corresponding drive frequencies. The mapping allows us to engineer and study temporal analogs of many real-space phenomena. Here, we focus on the specific example of a two-level system under a two-frequency drive that induces topologically nontrivial band structure in the 2D Floquet space. The observable consequence of such a construction is the quantized pumping of energy between the sources with frequencies ω_{1} and ω_{2}. When the system is initialized into a Floquet band with the Chern number C, the pumping occurs at a rate P_{12}=-P_{21}=(C/2πℏω_{1}ω_{2}, an exact counterpart of the transverse current in a conventional topological insulator.

  10. Ionization of atoms in strong low-frequency electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krainov, V. P.

    2010-01-01

    The ionization of atoms in a low-frequency linearly polarized electromagnetic field (the photon energy is much lower than the ionization potential of an atom) is considered under new conditions, in which the Coulomb interaction of an electron with the atomic core in the final state of the continuum cannot be considered in perturbation theory in the interaction of the electron with the electromagnetic field. The field is assumed to be much weaker that the atomic field. In these conditions, the classical motion of the electron in the final state of the continuum becomes chaotic (so-called dynamic chaos). Using the well-known Chirikov method of averaging over chaotic variations of the phase of motion, the problem can be reduced to non-linear diffusion on the energy scale. We calculate the classical electron energy in the final state, which is averaged over fast chaotic oscillations and takes into account both the Coulomb field and the electromagnetic field. This energy is used to calculate the probability of ionization from the ground state of the atom to a lower-lying state in the continuum using the Landau-Dykhne approximation (to exponential accuracy). This ionization probability noticeably depends on the field frequency. Upon a decrease in frequency, a transition to the well-known tunnel ionization limit with a probability independent of the field frequency is considered.

  11. Dependence of synchronization frequency of Kuramoto oscillators ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. December 2014 physics pp. 945–953. Dependence of synchronization frequency of Kuramoto oscillators on symmetry of intrinsic frequency in ring ... In this article, we study the difference between networks with sym- ... The dynamics of a general ith oscillator in a system of N Kuramoto oscillators is given as.

  12. Local frequency dependence in transcranial ultrasound transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, P J; Clement, G T; Hynynen, K [Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2006-05-07

    The development of large-aperture multiple-source transducer arrays for ultrasound transmission through the human skull has demonstrated the possibility of controlled and substantial acoustic energy delivery into the brain parenchyma without the necessitation of a craniotomy. The individual control of acoustic parameters from each ultrasound source allows for the correction of distortions arising from transmission through the skull bone and also opens up the possibility for electronic steering of the acoustic focus within the brain. In addition, the capability to adjust the frequency of insonation at different locations on the skull can have an effect on ultrasound transmission. To determine the efficacy and applicability of a multiple-frequency approach with such a device, this study examined the frequency dependence of ultrasound transmission in the range of 0.6-1.4 MHz through a series of 17 points on four ex vivo human skulls. Effects beyond those that are characteristic of frequency-dependent attenuation were examined. Using broadband pulses, it was shown that the reflected spectra from the skull revealed information regarding ultrasound transmission at specific frequencies. A multiple-frequency insonation with optimized frequencies over the entirety of five skull specimens was found to yield on average a temporally brief 230% increase in the transmitted intensity with an 88% decrease in time-averaged intensity transmission within the focal volume. This finding demonstrates a potential applicability of a multiple-frequency approach in transcranial ultrasound transmission.

  13. Frequency-dependent Escherichia coli chemotaxis behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xuejun; Si, Guangwei; Deng, Nianpei; Ouyang, Qi; Wu, Tailin; He, Zhuoran; Jiang, Lili; Luo, Chunxiong; Tu, Yuhai

    2012-01-01

    We study Escherichia coli chemotaxis behaviors in environments with spatially and temporally varying attractant sources by developing a unique microfluidic system. Our measurements reveal a frequency-dependent chemotaxis behavior. At low frequency, the E. coli population oscillate in synchrony with the attractant. In contrast, in fast-changing environments, the population response becomes smaller and out of phase with the attractant waveform. These observations are inconsistent with the well-...

  14. Frequency dependence of magnetic susceptibility of weakly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the frequency dependence of magnetic susceptibility of weakly contaminated soil sediments. Low field magnetic susceptibility measurements were carried out on soil sediments at Bomo irrigation dam, Samaru College of Agriculture, Ahmadu Bello University, (ABU), Zaria, using the MS2D field loop.

  15. Nontrivial effects of high-frequency excitation for strongly damped mechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidlin, Alexander; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    Some nontrivial effects are investigated, which can occur if strongly damped mechanical systems are subjected to strong high-frequency (HF) excitation. The main result is a theoretical prediction, supported by numerical simulation, that for such systems the (quasi-)equilibrium states can change...... that can be substantial (depending on the strength of the HF excitation) for finite values of the damping. The analysis is focused on the differences between the classic results for weakly damped systems, and new effects for which the strong damping terms are responsible. The analysis is based...... on a slightly modified averaging technique, and includes an elementary example of an elliptically excited pendulum for illustration, alongside with a generalization to a broader class of strongly damped dynamical systems with HF excitation. As an application example, the nontrivial behavior of a classical...

  16. Nontrivial effects of high-frequency excitation for strongly damped mechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidlin, Alexander; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2008-01-01

    Some non-trivial effects are investigated, which can occur if strongly damped mechanical systems are subjected to strong high-frequency (HF) excitation. The main result is a theoretical prediction, supported by numerical simulation, that for such systems the (quasi-)equilibrium states can change...... that can be substantial depending on the strength of the HF excitation) for finite values of the damping. The analysis is focused on the differences between the classic results for weakly damped systems, and new effects for which the strong damping terms are responsible. The analysis is based on a slightly...... modified averaging technique, and includes an elementary example of an elliptically excited pendulum for illustration, alongside with a generalization to a broader class of strongly damped dynamical systems with HF excitation. As an application example, the nontrivial behavior of a classical optimally...

  17. Evolutionary Graphs with Frequency Dependent Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Pu-Yan; Zhang, Pei-Ai

    Evolutionary graph theory was recently proposed by Lieberman et al. in 2005. In the previous papers about evolutionary graphs (EGs), the fitness of the residents in the EGs is in general assumed to be unity, and the fitness of a mutant is assumed to be a constant r. We aim to extend EG to general cases in this paper, namely, the fitness of a mutant is heavily dependent upon frequency. The corresponding properties for these new EGs are analyzed, and the fixation probability is obtained for large population.

  18. Frequency-dependent Lg Q within the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, D.; McNamara, D.E.; Benz, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Frequency-dependent crustal attenuation (1/Q) is determined for seven distinct physiographic/tectonic regions of the continental United States using high-quality Lg waveforms recorded on broadband stations in the frequency band 0.5 to 16 Hz. Lg attenuation is determined from time-domain amplitude measurements in one-octave frequency bands centered on the frequencies 0.75, 1.0, 3.0, 6.0, and 12.0 Hz. Modeling errors are determined using a delete-j jackknife resampling technique. The frequency-dependent quality factor is modeled in the form of Q = Q0 fη. Regions were initially selected based on tectonic provinces but were eventually limited and adjusted to maximize ray path coverage in each area. Earthquake data was recorded on several different networks and constrained to events occurring within the crust (decomposition inversion technique was applied to the data to simultaneously solve for source and receiver terms along with Q for each region at specific frequencies. The lowest crustal Q was observed in northern and southern California where Q is described by the functions Q = 152(±37)f0.72(±0.16) and Q = 105(±26)f0.67(±0.16), respectively. The Basin and Range Province, Pacific Northwest, and Rocky Mountain states also display lower Q and a strong frequency dependence characterized by the functions Q = 200(±40)f0.68(±0.12), Q = 152(±49)f0.76(±0.18), and Q = 166(±37)f0.61(±0.14), respectively. In contrast, in the central and northeast United States Q functions are Q = 640(±225)f0.344(±0.22) and Q = 650(±143)f0.36(±0.14), respectively, show a high crustal Q and a weaker frequency dependence. These results improve upon previous Lg modeling by subdividing the United States into smaller, distinct tectonic regions and using significantly more data that provide improved constraints on frequency-dependent attenuation and errors. A detailed attenuation map of the continental United States can provide significant input into hazard map mitigation. Both

  19. Dynamic chaos in the tunnelling ionization produced by a strong low-frequency electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krainov, V P

    2014-01-01

    Ionization of atoms by a strong low-frequency linearly polarized electromagnetic field (the photon energy is small compared to the atomic ionization potential) is considered under new conditions compared to the well known Keldysh approach. The field strength is supposed to be small in comparison to the atomic field strength. But the Coulomb interaction of an electron with atomic core is assumed to be of the same order of magnitude as the interaction between an electron and the external electromagnetic field. It was shown that then classical electron motion in the continuum becomes chaotic (this is so-called dynamic chaos). Using the averaging procedure of Chirikov about the chaotic variation of the phase of motion, the considered Newton problem is transformed into the problem of nonlinear electron diffusion over energy scale. In this work we derive the classical electron energy averaged over fast chaotic oscillations of an electron in the final continuum state which takes into account both the Coulomb field and electromagnetic field. This energy is used for analytic calculation of the ionization rate of the ground atomic state into the low lying continuum state based on the Landau–Dykhne approximation (with exponential accuracy). We found that the ionization rate depends significantly on the field frequency. When field frequency decreases, the well known tunnelling limit has been obtained, and then the ionization rate does not depend on the field frequency. (paper)

  20. DPOAE generation dependence on primary frequencies ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Teresa; Sisto, Renata; Moleti, Arturo; D'Amato, Luisa; Sanjust, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Two different mechanisms are responsible for the DPOAE generation. The nonlinear distortion wave-fixed mechanism generates the DPOAE Zero-Latency (ZL) component, as a backward traveling wave from the "overlap" region. Linear reflection of the forward DP wave (IDP) generates the DPOAE Long-Latency (LL) component through a place-fixed mechanism. ZL and LL components add up vectorially to generate the DPOAE recorded in the ear canal. The 2f1 - f2 and 2f2 - f1 DPOAE intensity depends on the stimulus level and on the primary frequency ratio r = f2/f1, where f1 and f2 are the primary stimuli frequencies. Here we study the behavior of the ZL and LL DPOAE components as a function of r by both numerical and laboratory experiments, measuring DPAOEs with an equal primary levels (L1 = L2) paradigm in the range [35, 75] dB SPL, with r ranging in [1.1, 1.45]. Numerical simulations of a nonlocal nonlinear model have been performed without cochlear roughness, to suppress the linear reflection mechanism. In this way the model solution at the base represents the DPOAE ZL component, and the solution at the corresponding DPOAE tonotopic place corresponds to the IDP. This technique has been not effectual to study the 2f2 - f1 DPOAE, as a consequence of its generation mechanism. While the 2f1 - f2 generation place is known to be the tonotopic place x(f2), the 2f2 - f1 DPOAE one has to be assumed basal to its corresponding reflection place. That is because ZL components generated in x(f2) cannot significantly pass through their resonant place. Moreover increasing the ratio r, 2f2 - f1 ZL and LL generation place approach each other, because the overlap region of primary tones decreases. Consequently, the distinction between the two places becomes complicated. DPOAEs have been measured in six young normal-hearing subjects. DPOAE ZL and LL components have been separated by a time-frequency filtering method based on the wavelet transform 1. due to their different phase gradient delay

  1. Frequency-dependent Dispersion Measures and Implications for Pulsar Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, J. M.; Shannon, R. M.; Stinebring, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, is shown to be frequency dependent because of multipath scattering from small-scale electron-density fluctuations. DMs vary between propagation paths whose transverse extent varies strongly with frequency, yielding arrival times that deviate from the high-frequency scaling expected for a cold, uniform, unmagnetized plasma (1/frequency2). Scaling laws for thin phase screens are verified with simulations; extended media are also analyzed. The rms DM difference across an octave band near 1.5 GHz is ˜ 4 × 10-5 pc cm-3 for pulsars at ˜1 kpc distance. The corresponding arrival-time variations are a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for DM ≲ 30 pc cm-3 but increase rapidly to microseconds or more for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges. Chromatic DMs introduce correlated noise into timing residuals with a power spectrum of “low pass” form. The correlation time is roughly the geometric mean of the refraction times for the highest and lowest radio frequencies used, ranging from days to years, depending on the pulsar. We discuss implications for methodologies that use large frequency separations or wide bandwidth receivers for timing measurements. Chromatic DMs are partially mitigable by including an additional chromatic term in arrival time models. Without mitigation, an additional term in the noise model for pulsar timing is implied. In combination with measurement errors from radiometer noise, an arbitrarily large increase in total frequency range (or bandwidth) will yield diminishing benefits and may be detrimental to overall timing precision.

  2. Variation in female morph frequencies and mating frequencies : random, frequency-dependent harassment or male mimicry?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammers, Martijn; Van Gossum, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Female-limited colour polymorphisms occur in a variety of species, where often one female morph (androchrome) resembles the body coloration of the conspecific male, whereas the other (gynochrome) does not. We tested predictions of two frequency-dependent hypotheses that are commonly invoked to

  3. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Densmore, Jeffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelly, Thompson G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbatish, Todd J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-17

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

  4. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-09-07

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  5. Density-dependent electron scattering in photoexcited GaAs in strongly diffusive regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mics, Zoltán; D’Angio, Andrea; Jensen, Søren A.

    2013-01-01

    In a series of systematic optical pump–terahertz probe experiments, we study the density-dependent electron scattering rate in photoexcited GaAs in the regime of strong carrier diffusion. The terahertz frequency-resolved transient sheet conductivity spectra are perfectly described by the Drude...... model, directly yielding the electron scattering rates. A diffusion model is applied to determine the spatial extent of the photoexcited electron-hole gas at each moment after photoexcitation, yielding the time-dependent electron density, and hence the density-dependent electron scattering time. We find...... that the electron scattering time decreases from 320 to 60 fs, as the electron density changes from 1015 to 1019 cm−3....

  6. Deep Ocean Sound Propagation in Environments with Strong Range Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    follow carbon dioxide uptake into the ocean from the atmosphere have been modeled to have a small but potentially detectable impact on ocean acoustic...to scattering). This work is being presented at the NPAL workshop. 8. Ambient noise level change due to ocean acidification A simplified model...range dependence. In addition, a study of oceanic acoustic response to acidification has been made. IMPACT/APPLICATIONS The research described

  7. Frequency Dependent Losses in Transmission Cable Conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Holbøll, Joachim; Guðmundsdóttir, Unnur Stella

    2011-01-01

    , such as thermal conditions in and around the cable, as well as the heat generated in conductors, screens, armours etc., taking into account proximity and skin effects. The work performed and presented in this paper is concerned with an improved determination of the losses generated in the conductor, by means...... of better calculation of the AC resistance of transmission cable conductors, in particular regarding higher frequencies. In this way, also losses under harmonics can be covered. Furthermore, the model is suitable for modelling of transient attenuation in high voltage cables. The AC resistance is calculated...

  8. Autobiographical Memory Performance in Alzheimer's Disease Depends on Retrieval Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stephan; Mychajliw, Christian; Reichert, Carolin; Melcher, Tobias; Leyhe, Thomas

    2016-04-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by memory disturbances primarily caused by pathogenic mechanisms affecting medial temporal lobe structures. As proposed by current theories of memory formation, this decrease is mediated by the age of the acquired knowledge. However, they cannot fully explain specific patterns of retrograde amnesia in AD. In the current study we examined an alternative approach and investigated whether the extent and severity of retrograde amnesia in AD is mediated by the frequency of memory retrieval or whether it depends on the mere age of knowledge. We compared recall of autobiographical incidents from three life periods in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), patients with early dementia of Alzheimer type (eDAT), and healthy control (HC) individuals using the Autobiographical Memory Interview. Retrieval frequency was operationalized by a paired comparison analysis. In contrast to HC individuals, recall of autobiographical incidents was impaired in patients with aMCI and eDAT following Ribot's gradient, with a reduced memory loss for remote compared to more recent life events. However, there was a strong effect of retrieval frequency on memory performance with frequently retrieved incidents memorized in more detail than less frequently retrieved episodes. Remote memories were recalled more often than recent ones. These findings suggest that more frequently retrieved autobiographical memories generally become more independent of the hippocampal complex and might thus be better protected against early hippocampal damage related to AD. Hence, the extent of retrograde amnesia in AD appears mainly mediated by the frequency of memory retrieval, which could plausibly explain why cognitive activity can effectively delay the onset of memory decline in AD.

  9. Strong dependence of ultracold chemical rates on electric dipole moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quemener, Goulven; Bohn, John L.

    2010-01-01

    We use the quantum threshold laws combined with a classical capture model to provide an analytical estimate of the chemical quenching cross sections and rate coefficients of two colliding particles at ultralow temperatures. We apply this quantum threshold model (QT model) to indistinguishable fermionic polar molecules in an electric field. At ultracold temperatures and in weak electric fields, the cross sections and rate coefficients depend only weakly on the electric dipole moment d induced by the electric field. In stronger electric fields, the quenching processes scale as d 4(L+(1/2)) where L>0 is the orbital angular-momentum quantum number between the two colliding particles. For p-wave collisions (L=1) of indistinguishable fermionic polar molecules at ultracold temperatures, the quenching rate thus scales as d 6 . We also apply this model to pure two-dimensional collisions and find that chemical rates vanish as d -4 for ultracold indistinguishable fermions. This model provides a quick and intuitive way to estimate chemical rate coefficients of reactions occuring with high probability.

  10. Frequency-dependent ultrasound-induced transformation in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeks, Jeremy; Windmill, James; Agbeze-Onuma, Maduka; Kalin, Robert M; Argondizza, Peter; Knapp, Charles W

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasound-enhanced gene transfer (UEGT) is continuing to gain interest across many disciplines; however, very few studies investigate UEGT efficiency across a range of frequencies. Using a variable frequency generator, UEGT was tested in E. coli at six ultrasonic frequencies. Results indicate frequency can significantly influence UEGT efficiency positively and negatively. A frequency of 61 kHz improved UEGT efficiency by ~70 % higher, but 99 kHz impeded UEGT to an extent worse than no ultrasound exposure. The other four frequencies (26, 133, 174, and 190 kHz) enhanced transformation compared to no ultrasound, but efficiencies did not vary. The influence of frequency on UEGT efficiency was observed across a range of operating frequencies. It is plausible that frequency-dependent dynamics of mechanical and chemical energies released during cavitational-bubble collapse (CBC) are responsible for observed UEGT efficiencies.

  11. Damping at positive frequencies in the limit J⊥-->0 in the strongly correlated Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Minette M.

    1992-08-01

    I show damping in the two-dimensional strongly correlated Hubbard model within the retraceable-path approximation, using an expansion around dominant poles for the self-energy. The damping half-width ~J2/3z occurs only at positive frequencies ω>5/2Jz, the excitation energy of a pure ``string'' state of length one, where Jz is the Ising part of the superexchange interaction, and occurs even in the absence of spin-flip terms ~J⊥ in contrast to other theoretical treatments. The dispersion relation for both damped and undamped peaks near the upper band edge is found and is shown to have lost the simple J2/3z dependence characteristic of the peaks near the lower band edge. The position of the first three peaks near the upper band edge agrees well with numerical simulations on the t-J model. The weight of the undamped peaks near the upper band edge is ~J4/3z, contrasting with Jz for the weight near the lower band edge.

  12. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forbes, P.A.; Siegmund, G.P.; Schouten, A.C.; Blouin, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular

  13. Approximate relationship between frequency-dependent skin depth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 7. Approximate relationship between frequency-dependent skin depth resolved from geoelectromagnetic pedotransfer function and depth of investigation resolved from geoelectrical measurements: A case study of coastal formation, southern Nigeria.

  14. Observation of strong magnetic effects in visible-infrared sum frequency generation from magnetic structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirilyuk, A.; Knippels, G.M.H.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Renard, S.; Rasing, T.; Heskamp, I. R.; Lodder, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    We have observed very strong magnetization-induced changes of the infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) intensity from thin magnetic films using a free electron laser as a tunable infrared source. With the help of a magnetic grating a clear resonance is observed due to the excitation of

  15. Ultrasonic Characterization of Tissues via Backscatter Frequency Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stetson, Paul F.; Sommer, F.G.

    1997-01-01

    Phantom and patient studies were performed to assess the potential of backscatter frequency dependence as a useful parameter for tissue characterization. A commercial phased-array ultrasonic scanner was adapted to allow digitization of the intermediate-frequency ultrasonic data, Studies of agar p...

  16. Acoustic Volume Scattering: Its Dependence on Frequency and Biological Scatterers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses the dependence of acoustic valume scattering on frequency and biological scatterers in the Westfall Seamount Area, 200 miles off... the coast of San Diego, California. Theoretical calculations and experimental data both showed a correlation between the frequency dependence of...scattering (from 1 to 20 kilohertz) and midwater gas-bladder fishes. It is the hypothesis of the report that the size limitation of the swimbladders

  17. Using strong nonlinearity and high-frequency vibrations to control effective mechanical stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency excitation (HFE) can be used to change the effective stiffness of an elastic structure, and related quanti-ties such as resonance frequencies, wave speed, buckling loads, and equilibrium states. There are basically two ways to do this: By using parametrical HFE (with or without non...... the method of direct separation of motions with results of a modified multiple scales ap-proach, valid also for strong nonlinearity, the stiffening ef-fect is predicted for a generic 1-dof system, and results are tested against numerical simulation and ((it is planned)) laboratory experiments....

  18. Frequency and time domain analysis of an external cavity laser with strong filtered optical feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detoma, Enrico; Tromborg, Bjarne; Montrosset, Ivo

    The stability properties of an external cavity laser with strong grating-filtered optical feedback to an anti-reflection coated facet are studied with a general frequency domain model. The model takes into account non-linear effects like four wave mixing and gain compression. A small......-signal analysis in the frequency domain allows a calculation of the range of operation without mode hopping around the grating reflectivity peak. This region should be as large as possible for proper operation of the tunable laser source. The analysis shows this stabilizing effect of mode coupling and gain...

  19. On the Frequency Distribution of Neutral Particles from Low-Energy Strong Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Colecchia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The rejection of the contamination, or background, from low-energy strong interactions at hadron collider experiments is a topic that has received significant attention in the field of particle physics. This article builds on a particle-level view of collision events, in line with recently proposed subtraction methods. While conventional techniques in the field usually concentrate on probability distributions, our study is, to our knowledge, the first attempt at estimating the frequency distribution of background particles across the kinematic space inside individual collision events. In fact, while the probability distribution can generally be estimated given a model of low-energy strong interactions, the corresponding frequency distribution inside a single event typically deviates from the average and cannot be predicted a priori. We present preliminary results in this direction and establish a connection between our technique and the particle weighting methods that have been the subject of recent investigation at the Large Hadron Collider.

  20. Using strong nonlinearity and high-frequency vibrations to control effective properties of discrete elastic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Thomsen, Jon Juel; Snaeland, Sveinn Orri

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate how highfrequency (HF) excitation, combined with strong nonlinear elastic material behavior, influences the effective material or structural properties for low-frequency excitation and wave propagation. The HF effects are demonstrated on discrete linear...... spring-mass chains with non-linear inclusions. The presented analytical and numerical results suggest that the effective material properties can easily be altered by establishing finite amplitude HF standing waves in the non-linear regions of the chain....

  1. Frequency-Dependent Properties of Magnetic Nanoparticle Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majetich, Sara [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-05-17

    In the proposed research program we will investigate the time- and frequency-dependent behavior of ordered nanoparticle assemblies, or nanoparticle crystals. Magnetostatic interactions are long-range and anisotropic, and this leads to complex behavior in nanoparticle assemblies, particularly in the time- and frequency-dependent properties. We hypothesize that the high frequency performance of composite materials has been limited because of the range of relaxation times; if a composite is a dipolar ferromagnet at a particular frequency, it should have the advantages of a single phase material, but without significant eddy current power losses. Arrays of surfactant-coated monodomain magnetic nanoparticles can exhibit long-range magnetic order that is stable over time. The magnetic domain size and location of domain walls is governed not by structural grain boundaries but by the shape of the array, due to the local interaction field. Pores or gaps within an assembly pin domain walls and limit the domain size. Measurements of the magnetic order parameter as a function of temperature showed that domains can exist at high temoerature, and that there is a collective phase transition, just as in an exchange-coupled ferromagnet. Dipolar ferromagnets are not merely of fundamental interest; they provide an interesting alternative to exchange-based ferromagnets. Dipolar ferromagnets made with high moment metallic particles in an insulating matrix could have high permeability without large eddy current losses. Such nanocomposites could someday replace the ferrites now used in phase shifters, isolators, circulators, and filters in microwave communications and radar applications. We will investigate the time- and frequency-dependent behavior of nanoparticle crystals with different magnetic core sizes and different interparticle barrier resistances, and will measure the magnetic and electrical properties in the DC, low frequency (0.1 Hz - 1 kHz), moderate frequency (10 Hz - 500

  2. Observations of height-dependent pressure-perturbation structure of a strong mesoscale gravity wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, David O'C.; Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Weng, Chi Y.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne observations using a downward-looking, dual-frequency, near-infrared, differential absorption lidar system provide the first measurements of the height-dependent pressure-perturbation field associated with a strong mesoscale gravity wave. A pressure-perturbation amplitude of 3.5 mb was measured within the lowest 1.6 km of the atmosphere over a 52-km flight line. Corresponding vertical displacements of 250-500 m were inferred from lidar-observed displacement of aerosol layers. Accounting for probable wave orientation, a horizontal wavelength of about 40 km was estimated. Satellite observations reveal wave structure of a comparable scale in concurrent cirrus cloud fields over an extended area. Smaller-scale waves were also observed. Local meteorological soundings are analyzed to confirm the existence of a suitable wave duct. Potential wave-generation mechanisms are examined and discussed. The large pressure-perturbation wave is attributed to rapid amplification or possible wave breaking of a gravity wave as it propagated offshore and interacted with a very stable marine boundary layer capped by a strong shear layer.

  3. Operational Risk Aggregation across Business Lines Based on Frequency Dependence and Loss Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In loss distribution approach (LDA, the most popular approach in operational risk modeling, frequency dependence and loss distribution dependence across business lines are two dependences which banks should consider. In practice, mainly for simplicity, many banks only model frequency dependence although they think that the impact of frequency dependence is insignificant. In this study, two approaches, respectively, models frequency dependence and loss distribution dependence, are introduced. Both approaches are modeled by copula function, which is capable of capturing nonlinear correlation. Based on the most comprehensive operational risk dataset of Chinese banking as far as we know, the operational risk capital charge of the overall Chinese banking is calculated by the two approaches. The results show that there is an obvious distinction between the capital calculated by modeling frequency dependence and the capital calculated by modeling loss dependence. The approach with very limited attention exactly yields a much larger capital result. So it is advised in this paper that banks should not just rely on the approach to modeling frequency dependence for it is natural and easy to deal with. A safer and more effective way for banks is to comprehensively take the results of the two kinds of approach into consideration.

  4. Implications of Microwave Holography Using Minimum Required Frequency Samples for Weakly- and Strongly-Scattering Indications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahpour, M.; Case, J. T.; Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.

    2010-01-01

    Microwave imaging techniques, an integral component of nondestructive testing and evaluation (NDTE), have received significant attention in the past decade. These techniques have included the implementation of synthetic aperture focusing (SAF) algorithms for obtaining high spatial resolution images. The next important step in these developments is the implementation of 3-D holographic imaging algorithms. These are well-known wideband imaging technique requiring a swept-frequency (i.e., wideband), which unlike SAF that is a single frequency technique, are not easily performed on a real-time basis. This is due to the fact that a significant number of data points (in the frequency domain) must be obtained within the frequency band of interest. This not only makes for a complex imaging system design, it also significantly increases the image-production time. Consequently in an attempt to reduce the measurement time and system complexity, an investigation was conducted to determine the minimum required number of frequency samples needed to image a specific object while preserving a desired maximum measurement range and range resolution. To this end the 3-D holographic algorithm was modified to use properlyinterpolated frequency data. Measurements of the complex reflection coefficient for several samples were conducted using a swept-frequency approach. Subsequently, holographical images were generated using data containing a relatively large number of frequency samples and were compared with images generated by the reduced data set data. Quantitative metrics such as average, contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio were used to evaluate the quality of images generated using reduced data sets. Furthermore, this approach was applied to both weakly- and strongly-scattering indications. This paper presents the methods used and the results of this investigation.

  5. Comment on “Frequency-dependent dispersion in porous media”

    KAUST Repository

    Davit, Yohan

    2012-07-10

    In a recent paper, Valdès-Parada and Alvarez-Ramirez used the technique of volume averaging to derive a "frequency-dependent" dispersion tensor, Dγ*, the goal of which is to describe solute transport in porous media undergoing periodic processes. We describe two issues related to this dispersion tensor. First, we demonstrate that the definition of Dγ* is erroneous and derive a corrected version, Dγ*c. With this modification, the approach of Valdès-Parada and Alvarez-Ramirez becomes strictly equivalent to the one devised by Moyne. Second, we show that the term "frequency-dependent dispersion" is misleading because Dγ* and Dγ*c do not depend on the process operating frequency, χ. The study carried out by Valdès-Parada and Alvarez-Ramirez represents a spectral analysis of the relaxation of Dγ* towards its steady-state, independent of any periodic operation or excitation. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  6. Fluctuation-dissipation theorem for frequency-dependent specific heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe; Nielsen, Johannes K.

    1996-01-01

    A derivation of the fluctuation-dissipation (FD) theorem for the frequency-dependent specific heat of a system described by a master equation is presented. The FD theorem is illustrated by a number of simple examples, including a system described by a linear Langevin equation, a two-level system......, and a system described by the energy master equation. It is shown that for two quite different models with low-energy cutoffs—a collection of two-level systems and a system described by the energy master equation—the frequency-dependent specific heat in dimensionless units becomes universal at low temperatures......, i.e., independent of both energy distribution and temperature. These two models give almost the same universal frequency-dependent specific heat, which compares favorably to experiments on supercooled alcohols....

  7. Frequency dependence of anomalous transport in field theory and holography⋆,⋆⋆

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megías Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the frequency dependence of anomalous transport coefficients for a relativistic gas of free chiral fermions and for a strongly coupled conformal field theory with holographic dual. We perform the computation by using the Kubo formulae for- malism, and compare with a hydrodynamic calculation of two point functions. Some implications for heavy ion physics are discussed.

  8. Frequency-difference-dependent stochastic resonance in neural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Daqing; Perc, Matjaž; Zhang, Yangsong; Xu, Peng; Yao, Dezhong

    2017-08-01

    Biological neurons receive multiple noisy oscillatory signals, and their dynamical response to the superposition of these signals is of fundamental importance for information processing in the brain. Here we study the response of neural systems to the weak envelope modulation signal, which is superimposed by two periodic signals with different frequencies. We show that stochastic resonance occurs at the beat frequency in neural systems at the single-neuron as well as the population level. The performance of this frequency-difference-dependent stochastic resonance is influenced by both the beat frequency and the two forcing frequencies. Compared to a single neuron, a population of neurons is more efficient in detecting the information carried by the weak envelope modulation signal at the beat frequency. Furthermore, an appropriate fine-tuning of the excitation-inhibition balance can further optimize the response of a neural ensemble to the superimposed signal. Our results thus introduce and provide insights into the generation and modulation mechanism of the frequency-difference-dependent stochastic resonance in neural systems.

  9. Tunable photonic crystal for THz radiation in layered superconductors: Strong magnetic-field dependence of the transmission coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savel'ev, Sergey; Rakhmanov, A.L.; Nori, Franco

    2006-01-01

    Josephson plasma waves are scattered by the Josephson vortex lattice. This scattering results in a strong dependence, on the in-plane magnetic-field H ab , of the reflection and transmission of THz radiation propagating in layered superconductors. In particular, a tunable band-gap structure (THz photonic crystal) occurs in such a medium. These effects can be used, by varying H ab , for the selective frequency-filtering of THz radiation

  10. The vestibular implant: Frequency-dependency of the electrically evoked Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond eVan De Berg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR shows frequency-dependent behavior. This study investigated whether the characteristics of the electrically evoked VOR (eVOR elicited by a vestibular implant, showed the same frequency-dependency.Twelve vestibular electrodes implanted in 7 patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction were tested. Stimuli consisted of amplitude-modulated electrical stimulation with a sinusoidal profile at frequencies of 0.5Hz, 1Hz, and 2Hz. The main characteristics of the eVOR were evaluated and compared to the natural VOR characteristics measured in a group of age-matched healthy volunteers who were subjected to horizontal whole body rotations with equivalent sinusoidal velocity profiles at the same frequencies.A strong and significant effect of frequency was observed in the total peak eye velocity of the eVOR. This effect was similar to that observed in the natural VOR. Other characteristics of the (eVOR (angle, habituation-index, and asymmetry showed no significant frequency-dependent effect. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that, at least at the specific (limited frequency range tested, responses elicited by a vestibular implant closely mimic the frequency-dependency of the normal vestibular system.

  11. Structural and frequency dependencies of a.c. and dielectric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this work, heterojunction of InSb/InP was grown by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE). Surface morphology and crystalline structure of the heterojunction were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and. X-ray diffraction (XRD). The frequency and temperature dependences of a.c. conductivity and ...

  12. Nonseparable frequency dependence of the two-particle vertex in interacting fermion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilardi, Demetrio; Taranto, Ciro; Metzner, Walter

    2017-12-01

    We derive functional flow equations for the two-particle vertex and the self-energy in interacting fermion systems which capture the full frequency dependence of both quantities. The equations are applied to the hole-doped two-dimensional Hubbard model as a prototype system with entangled magnetic, charge, and pairing fluctuations. Each fluctuation channel acquires substantial dependencies on all three Matsubara frequencies, such that the frequency dependence of the vertex cannot be accurately represented by a channel sum with only one frequency variable in each term. At the temperatures we are able to access, the leading instabilities are mostly antiferromagnetic, with an incommensurate wave vector. However, at large doping, a divergence in the charge channel occurs at a finite frequency transfer, if the vertex flow is computed without self-energy feedback. This enigmatic instability was already observed in a calculation by Husemann et al. [C. Husemann, K.-U. Giering, and M. Salmhofer, Phys. Rev. B 85, 075121 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevB.85.075121], who used an approximate separable ansatz for the frequency dependence of the vertex. We identify a simple mechanism for this instability in terms of a random-phase approximation for the charge channel with a frequency dependent effective magnetic interaction as input. In spite of the strong momentum and frequency dependence of the vertex, the self-energy has a Fermi-liquid form. At the moderate interaction strength where our approach is applicable, we obtain a moderate reduction of the quasiparticle weight and a sizable decay rate with a pronounced momentum dependence. Nevertheless, the self-energy feedback into the vertex flow turns out to be crucial, as it suppresses the unphysical finite frequency charge instability.

  13. Tuning of Human Modulation Filters Is Carrier-Frequency Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Andrew J. R.; Reiss, Joshua D.; McAlpine, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies employing speech stimuli to investigate ‘cocktail-party’ listening have focused on entrainment of cortical activity to modulations at syllabic (5 Hz) and phonemic (20 Hz) rates. The data suggest that cortical modulation filters (CMFs) are dependent on the sound-frequency channel in which modulations are conveyed, potentially underpinning a strategy for separating speech from background noise. Here, we characterize modulation filters in human listeners using a novel behavioral method. Within an ‘inverted’ adaptive forced-choice increment detection task, listening level was varied whilst contrast was held constant for ramped increments with effective modulation rates between 0.5 and 33 Hz. Our data suggest that modulation filters are tonotopically organized (i.e., vary along the primary, frequency-organized, dimension). This suggests that the human auditory system is optimized to track rapid (phonemic) modulations at high sound-frequencies and slow (prosodic/syllabic) modulations at low frequencies. PMID:24009759

  14. Frequency filtering decompositions for unsymmetric matrices and matrices with strongly varying coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, C.

    1996-12-31

    In 1992, Wittum introduced the frequency filtering decompositions (FFD), which yield a fast method for the iterative solution of large systems of linear equations. Based on this method, the tangential frequency filtering decompositions (TFFD) have been developed. The TFFD allow the robust and efficient treatment of matrices with strongly varying coefficients. The existence and the convergence of the TFFD can be shown for symmetric and positive definite matrices. For a large class of matrices, it is possible to prove that the convergence rate of the TFFD and of the FFD is independent of the number of unknowns. For both methods, schemes for the construction of frequency filtering decompositions for unsymmetric matrices have been developed. Since, in contrast to Wittums`s FFD, the TFFD needs only one test vector, an adaptive test vector can be used. The TFFD with respect to the adaptive test vector can be combined with other iterative methods, e.g. multi-grid methods, in order to improve the robustness of these methods. The frequency filtering decompositions have been successfully applied to the problem of the decontamination of a heterogeneous porous medium by flushing.

  15. Strong Field-Induced Frequency Conversion of Laser Radiation in Plasma Plumes: Recent Achievements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Ganeev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available New findings in plasma harmonics studies using strong laser fields are reviewed. We discuss recent achievements in the growth of the efficiency of coherent extreme ultraviolet (XUV radiation sources based on frequency conversion of the ultrashort pulses in the laser-produced plasmas, which allowed for the spectral and structural studies of matter through the high-order harmonic generation (HHG spectroscopy. These studies showed that plasma HHG can open new opportunities in many unexpected areas of laser-matter interaction. Besides being considered as an alternative method for generation of coherent XUV radiation, it can be used as a powerful tool for various spectroscopic and analytical applications.

  16. Wavelength dependence of light diffusion in strongly scattering macroporous gallium phosphide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, W.H.; Vellekoop, Ivo Micha; Mosk, Allard; Lagendijk, Aart

    2008-01-01

    We present time-resolved measurements of light transport through strongly scattering macroporous gallium phosphide at various vacuum wavelengths between 705 nm and 855 nm. Within this range the transport mean free path is strongly wavelength dependent, whereas the observed energy velocity is shown

  17. Spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance in amblyopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, MiYoung; Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C.; Bex, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    While amblyopia involves both binocular imbalance and deficits in processing high spatial frequency information, little is known about the spatial-frequency dependence of binocular imbalance. Here we examined binocular imbalance as a function of spatial frequency in amblyopia using a novel computer-based method. Binocular imbalance at four spatial frequencies was measured with a novel dichoptic letter chart in individuals with amblyopia, or normal vision. Our dichoptic letter chart was composed of band-pass filtered letters arranged in a layout similar to the ETDRS acuity chart. A different chart was presented to each eye of the observer via stereo-shutter glasses. The relative contrast of the corresponding letter in each eye was adjusted by a computer staircase to determine a binocular Balance Point at which the observer reports the letter presented to either eye with equal probability. Amblyopes showed pronounced binocular imbalance across all spatial frequencies, with greater imbalance at high compared to low spatial frequencies (an average increase of 19%, p amblyopia and as an outcome measure for recovery of binocular vision following therapy. PMID:26603125

  18. Peak ground motions, effective duration of strong motions and frequency content of Iranian earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranizadeh, M.; Hamedi, F.

    2002-01-01

    The characteristics of earthquake ground motion have great influences on the response of structures to the earthquakes. Peak ground motions, duration of strong motions and frequency content are important characteristics of earthquakes, which are studied in this paper. The relation between peak ground acceleration, velocity and displacement have been taken into account and the effects of magnitude, epicentral distance and recorded duration of earthquakes on peak ground acceleration have been presented as graphs. The frequency content of ground motion can be examined by power spectral density of accel ero grams. In this study the power spectral density of the records have been determined and normalized power spectral densities are compared. There are different formulas for the smoothed power spectral density function such as Kanai-Tajimi's model. In this study, comparing with Kanai-Tajim's formula, the extreme value model is suggested for the spectral density function. This model is evaluated for accel ero grams on different soil conditions and the smoothed mean power spectral density function are determined for each soil groups. The central frequency and predominant period of earthquakes are also estimated

  19. Frequency-dependent complex modulus of the uterus: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiss, Miklos Z [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Hobson, Maritza A [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Varghese, Tomy [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Harter, Josephine [Department of Surgical Pathology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Kliewer, Mark A [Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Hartenbach, Ellen M [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Zagzebski, James A [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2006-08-07

    The frequency-dependent complex moduli of human uterine tissue have been characterized. Quantification of the modulus is required for developing uterine ultrasound elastography as a viable imaging modality for diagnosing and monitoring causes for abnormal uterine bleeding and enlargement, as well assessing the integrity of uterine and cervical tissue. The complex modulus was measured in samples from hysterectomies of 24 patients ranging in age from 31 to 79 years. Measurements were done under small compressions of either 1 or 2%, at low pre-compression values (either 1 or 2%), and over a frequency range of 0.1-100 Hz. Modulus values of cervical tissue monotonically increased from approximately 30-90 kPa over the frequency range. Normal uterine tissue possessed modulus values over the same range, while leiomyomas, or uterine fibroids, exhibited values ranging from approximately 60-220 kPa.

  20. Frequency Dependence of Damping and Compliance in Loudspeaker Suspensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Knud; Tinggaard, Carsten; Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2010-01-01

    ]. It is an empirical model mathematically describing the effects of visco-elasticity in loudspeaker suspensions. The evaluation is to a high degree based on test loudspeakers with rubber surrounds with a high content of plasticizer combining high compliance and high damping. This is very effective to reduce rim...... resonances, but less used in high quality loudspeakers today – where “Low Loss Rubber Surround” is currently seen as a marketing feature, as it is expected to have positive impact on sound quality. The plasticized type of surround shows significant creep, followed by compliance and damping increasing towards...... - with the additives normally used to adjust stiffness and damping - neither frequency dependency of compliance nor creep are significant problems. Despite this, experience shows that frequency dependent mechanical damping nevertheless might be present. In this paper some modifications to the LOG-model are proposed...

  1. Direct measurements of the frequency-dependent dielectrophoresis force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ming-Tzo; Junio, Joseph; Ou-Yang, H Daniel

    2009-01-02

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), the phenomenon of directed motion of electrically polarizable particles in a nonuniform electric field, is promising for applications in biochemical separation and filtration. For colloidal particles in suspension, the relaxation of the ionic species in the shear layer gives rise to a frequency-dependent, bidirectional DEP force in the radio frequency range. However, quantification methods of the DEP force on individual particles with the pico-Newton resolution required for the development of theories and design of device applications are lacking. We report the use of optical tweezers as a force sensor and a lock-in phase-sensitive technique for analysis of the particle motion in an amplitude modulated DEP force. The coherent detection and sensing scheme yielded not only unprecedented sensitivity for DEP force measurements, but also provided a selectivity that clearly distinguishes the pure DEP force from all the other forces in the system, including electrophoresis, electro-osmosis, heat-induced convection, and Brownian forces, all of which can hamper accurate measurements through other existing methods. Using optical tweezers-based force transducers already developed in our laboratory, we have results that quantify the frequency-dependent DEP force and the crossover frequency of individual particles with this new experimental method.

  2. Exact-exchange time-dependent density-functional theory with the frequency-dependent kernel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigeta, Yasuteru; Hirao, Kimihiko; Hirata, So

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the adiabatic approximation in time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) on dynamic polarizabilities and van der Waals C 6 coefficients have been analyzed quantitatively. These effects are shown to be small in the off-resonance region of the perturbation frequencies by comparing the results from the exact-exchange TDDFT employing the optimized effective potentials and the corresponding frequency-dependent kernel [time-dependent optimized effective potentials (TDOEP)] and those from the frequency-independent kernel [adiabatic TDOEP (ATDOEP)]. The magnitude of the computed dynamic polarizabilities near the static limit is found to be in the order: time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF)>ATDOEP>TDOEP, whereas that of C 6 is: TDHF>TDOEP>ATDOEP

  3. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ 1 (r) cos(kz) cos(ωt−lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ω R , is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ v r /ω T , so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles

  4. Collective strong coupling with homogeneous Rabi frequencies using a 3D lumped element microwave resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angerer, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.angerer@tuwien.ac.at; Astner, Thomas; Wirtitsch, Daniel; Majer, Johannes, E-mail: johannes.majer@tuwien.ac.at [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Atominstitut, TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Sumiya, Hitoshi [Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd., Itami 664-001 (Japan); Onoda, Shinobu [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Isoya, Junichi [Research Centre for Knowledge Communities, University of Tsukuba, 1-2 Kasuga, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8550 (Japan); Putz, Stefan [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Atominstitut, TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2016-07-18

    We design and implement 3D-lumped element microwave cavities that spatially focus magnetic fields to a small mode volume. They allow coherent and uniform coupling to electron spins hosted by nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond. We achieve large homogeneous single spin coupling rates, with an enhancement of more than one order of magnitude compared to standard 3D cavities with a fundamental resonance at 3 GHz. Finite element simulations confirm that the magnetic field distribution is homogeneous throughout the entire sample volume, with a root mean square deviation of 1.54%. With a sample containing 10{sup 17} nitrogen vacancy electron spins, we achieve a collective coupling strength of Ω = 12 MHz, a cooperativity factor C = 27, and clearly enter the strong coupling regime. This allows to interface a macroscopic spin ensemble with microwave circuits, and the homogeneous Rabi frequency paves the way to manipulate the full ensemble population in a coherent way.

  5. Non trivial effect of strong high-frequency excitation on a nonlinear controlled system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidlin, A.; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2004-01-01

    due to control is usually high compared to uncontrolled systems. A standard optimal controller for a standard nonlinear system (a movable cart used to balance a pendulum vertically) is shown to exhibit pronounced bias error in presence of HF-excitation. The bias increases with increased excitation......Nontrivial effects of high-frequency excitation on mechanical uncontrolled systems have been investigated intensively in the last decade. Some of these effects are usually used in controlled systems in form of dither to smoothen out undesired friction and hysteresis. However the level of damping...... intensity, but it also increases with the increased control power. Analytic prediction for the bias shows, the interaction between fast excitation and strong damping terms in the control system to be the cause of the permanent control error. A "slow observer" ignoring fast motions is shown...

  6. Multiphoton-resonance-induced fluorescence of a strongly driven two-level system under frequency modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yiying; Lü, Zhiguo; Luo, JunYan; Zheng, Hang

    2018-03-01

    We study the fluorescence spectrum of a strongly driven two-level system (TLS) with modulated transition frequency, which is a bichromatically driven TLS and has multiple resonance frequencies. We are aiming to provide a reliable description of the fluorescence in a regime that is difficult to tackle with perturbation theory and the rotating-wave approximation (RWA), and illustrate the spectral features of the fluorescence under off- and multiphoton-resonance conditions. To go beyond the RWA, we use a semianalytical counter-rotating-hybridized rotating-wave method that combines a unitary transformation and Floquet theory to calculate the two-mode Floquet states and quasienergies for the bichromatically driven TLS. We then solve the master equation accounting for the spontaneous decay in the bases of the two-mode Floquet states, and derive a physically transparent fluorescence spectrum. In comparison with the numerically exact spectrum from the generalized Floquet-Liouville approach, the present spectrum is found to be applicable in a wide range of the parameters where the RWA and the secular approximation may break down. We find that the counter-rotating (CR) terms of the transverse field omitted in the RWA have non-negligible contributions to the spectrum under certain conditions. Particularly, at the multiphoton resonance the width of which is comparable with the Bloch-Siegert shift, the RWA and non-RWA spectra markedly differ from each other because of the CR-induced shift. We also analyze the symmetry of the spectrum in terms of the transition matrix elements between the two-mode Floquet states. We show that the strict symmetry of the spectrum cannot be expected without the RWA but the almost symmetric spectrum can be obtained at the single-photon resonance that takes the Bloch-Siegert shift into account if the driving is moderately strong and at the multiphoton resonance with a sufficiently weak transverse field.

  7. Dual-frequency sound-absorbing metasurface based on visco-thermal effects with frequency dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, H.; Jeon, W.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate theoretically an acoustic metasurface with a high absorption coefficient at two frequencies and design it from subwavelength structures. We propose the use of a two-dimensional periodic array of four Helmholtz resonators in two types to obtain a metasurface with nearly perfect sound absorption at given target frequencies via interactions between waves emanating from different resonators. By considering how fluid viscosity affects acoustic energy dissipation in the narrow necks of the Helmholtz resonators, we obtain effective complex-valued material properties that depend on frequency and on the geometrical parameters of the resonators. We furthermore derive the effective acoustic impedance of the metasurface from the effective material properties and calculate the absorption spectra from the theoretical model, which we compare with the spectra obtained from a finite-element simulation. As a practical application of the theoretical model, we derive empirical formulas for the geometrical parameters of a metasurface which would yield perfect absorption at a given frequency. While previous works on metasurfaces based on Helmholtz resonators aimed to absorb sound at single frequencies, we use optimization to design a metasurface composed of four different Helmholtz resonators to absorb sound at two distinct frequencies.

  8. Filter frequency response of time dependent signal using Laplace transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shestakov, Aleksei I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-16

    We analyze the effect a filter has on a time dependent signal x(t). If X(s) is the Laplace transform of x and H (s) is the filter Transfer function, the response in frequency space is X (s) H (s). Consequently, in real space, the response is the convolution (x*h) (t), where hi is the Laplace inverse of H. Effects are analyzed and analytically for functions such as (t/tc)2 e-t/t$_c$, where tc = const. We consider lowpass, highpass and bandpass filters.

  9. Asymptotic dependence of Gross–Tulub polaron ground-state energy in the strong coupling region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.I. Kashirina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The properties of translationally invariant polaron functional have been investigated in the region of strong and extremely strong coupling. It has been shown that the Gross–Tulub polaron functional obtained earlier using the methods of field theory was derived only for the region , where is the Fröhlich constant of the electron-phonon coupling. Various representations of exact and approximate polaron functionals have been considered. Asymptotic dependences of the polaron energy have been obtained using a functional extending the Gross–Tulub functional to the region of extremely strong coupling. The asymptotic dependence of polaron energies for an extremely strong coupling are (for the one-parameter variational function fk, and (for a two-parameter function . It has been shown that the virial theorem 1:3:4 holds for the two-parameter function . Minimization of the approximate functional obtained by expanding the exact Gross–Tulub functional in a series on leads to a quadratic dependence of the polaron energy. This approximation is justified for . For a two-parameter function , the corresponding dependence has the form . However, the use of approximate functionals, in contrast to the strict variational procedure, when the exact polaron functional varies, does not guarantee obtaining the upper limit for the polaron energy.

  10. Interpretation of the temperature dependence of the strong visible photoluminescence of porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkbeiner, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Weber, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    1995-01-15

    The temperature dependence of the strong visible photoluminescence (550-850nm) is studied in differently prepared porous silicon samples. The variation in the photoluminescence intensity with temperature is a result of a decrease in the radiative decay time and an increase in the non-radiative recombination process with increasing temperatures. The strong visible photoluminescence is interpreted by a recombination of singlet and triplet excitons. The singlet-triplet splitting is comparable for all samples but depends on the detection wavelength and on sample preparation. We present similar data for the recombination process in siloxene which supports the model of a common origin of the strong visible photoluminescence in these very differently prepared samples. ((orig.))

  11. Spin dynamics and spin-dependent recombination of a polaron pair under a strong ac drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, Rajesh K.; Raikh, M. E.

    2017-08-01

    We study theoretically the recombination within a pair of two polarons in magnetic field subject to a strong linearly polarized ac drive. Strong drive implies that the Zeeman frequencies of the pair partners are much smaller than the Rabi frequency, so that the rotating wave approximation does not apply. What makes the recombination dynamics nontrivial is that the partners recombine only when they form a singlet S . By admixing singlet to triplets, the drive induces the triplet recombination as well. We calculate the effective decay rate of all four spin modes. Our main finding is that, under the strong drive, the major contribution to the decay of the modes comes from short time intervals when the driving field passes through zero. When the recombination time in the absence of drive is short, fast recombination from S leads to anomalously slow recombination from the other spin states of the pair. We show that, with strong drive, this recombination becomes even slower. The corresponding decay rate falls off as a power law with the amplitude of the drive.

  12. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Patrick A.; Siegmund, Gunter P.; Schouten, Alfred C.; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular information is relevant to postural control, while in neck muscles they are maintained regardless of the requirement to maintain head on trunk balance. Recent investigations have also shown that the bandwidth of vestibular input on neck muscles is much broader than appendicular muscles (up to a factor of 3). This result challenges the notion that vestibular reflexes only contribute to postural control across the behavioral and physiological frequency range of the vestibular organ (i.e., 0–20 Hz). In this review, we explore and integrate these task-, muscle- and frequency-related differences in the vestibular system’s contribution to posture, and propose that the human nervous system has adapted vestibular signals to match the mechanical properties of the system that each group of muscles controls. PMID:25620919

  13. Calculation of low-frequency sound fields in irregular waveguides with strong backscattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulin, O. E.

    2008-07-01

    An approach is developed for calculating the sound fields in a non-stratified sea medium with irregularities that are not weak. The method of cross sections for horizontal parts of acoustic modes is used to obtain first-order causal equations that are equivalent to the boundary-value problem. A matrix equation describing the backscattered field of modes is analyzed, and the conditions that determine the weakness of the irregularities of the medium and the validity of the known approximate methods of sound field calculations are considered. The approximation of unidirectional propagation is represented in the form of quadratures. The example of a 2D shallow-water waveguide with a strongly irregular profile of a perfectly rigid bottom is considered to illustrate the advantages of the proposed approach in comparison with the approximate methods for specific low frequencies. The qualitative and quantitative differences that arise because of taking into account the backscattering between the curves of propagation losses corresponding to the exact solution and the conventional approximate methods are discussed.

  14. Frequency-dependent springs in the seismic analysis of structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyapin, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a two-step algorithm for the seismic analysis of structure resting on the rigid embedded basement. Frequency-domain analysis of SSI is carried out on the second step for a platform model with special 'soil spring' which is complex, frequency-dependent, wave-dependent and non-balanced. Theory is presented to obtain the parameters of the soil spring on the first step of the analysis, performed without structure (only geometry of the basement is used) using well-known SASSI code (Lysmer et al, 1981) or in some other ways. On the second step in the SASSI analysis the soil spring is included in the model as a special finite element. Thus, the first step enables to save the computer resources on structure, the second step-to save resources on soil. Soil spring is the most general form for a SSI linear analysis: conventional springs and dashpots can be easily represented in such a format. Thus, the presented approach enables to study the impact of various factors (such as the embedment depth and soil-structure separation, the off-diagonal stiffness, various formulas for stiffness and damping, etc.) on the soil spring parameters. These parameters can be studied separately from the structure itself. As an example, the study of the horizontal soil mesh size is presented. Lumped soil spring may be used on the second step to obtain structural response spectra. To get stresses complex stiffness may be distributed over the basement slab and embedded walls. The proposed approach may be considered to be the alternative to the impedance method (see ASCE4-98). (authors)

  15. The frequency dependence of friction in experiment, theory, and observations of low frequency earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, A.; Beeler, N. M.; Burgmann, R.; Shelly, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) are small amplitude, short duration events composing tectonic tremor, probably generated by shear slip on asperities downdip of the seismogenic zone. In Parkfield, Shelly and Hardebeck [2010] have identified 88 LFE families, or hypocentral locations, that contain over half a million LFEs since 2001 on a 160-km-long section of the San Andreas fault between 16 and 30 km depth. A number of studies have demonstrated the extreme sensitivity of low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) near Parkfield to stress changes ranging from contingent upon the amplitude and frequency content of the applied stress. We attempt to test this framework by comparing observations of LFEs triggered in response to stresses spanning several orders of magnitude in both frequency and amplitude (e.g. tides, teleseismic surface waves, static stress changes, etc.) to the predicted response of a single degree of freedom slider block model with rate and state dependent strength. The sensitivity of failure time in the friction model as developed in previous studies does not distinguish between shear and normal stresses; laboratory experiments show a more complicated sensitivity of failure time to normal stress change than in the published model. Because the shear and normal tidal stresses at Parkfield have different amplitudes and are not in phase, we have modified the model to include the expected sensitivity to normal stress. Our prior investigations of the response of both regular and low frequency earthquakes to tidal stresses [Thomas et al., 2009; Shelly and Johnson, 2011] are qualitatively consistent with the predictions of the friction model , as both the timing and degree (probability) of correlation are in agreement.

  16. Strongly nonlinear evolution of low-frequency wave packets in a dispersive plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Bernard J.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of strongly nonlinear, strongly modulated wave packets is investigated in a dispersive plasma using a hybrid numerical code. These wave packets have amplitudes exceeding the strength of the external magnetic field, along which they propagate. Alfven (left helicity) wave packets show strong steepening for p Schrodinger (DNLS) equation.

  17. Frequency-dependent selection at rough expanding fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhr, Jan-Timm; Stark, Holger

    2015-10-01

    Microbial colonies are experimental model systems for studying the colonization of new territory by biological species through range expansion. We study a generalization of the two-species Eden model, which incorporates local frequency-dependent selection, in order to analyze how social interactions between two species influence surface roughness of growing microbial colonies. The model includes several classical scenarios from game theory. We then concentrate on an expanding public goods game, where either cooperators or defectors take over the front depending on the system parameters. We analyze in detail the critical behavior of the nonequilibrium phase transition between global cooperation and defection and thereby identify a new universality class of phase transitions dealing with absorbing states. At the transition, the number of boundaries separating sectors decays with a novel power law in time and their superdiffusive motion crosses over from Eden scaling to a nearly ballistic regime. In parallel, the width of the front initially obeys Eden roughening and, at later times, passes over to selective roughening.

  18. Frequency-dependent effects of rupture for the 2004 Parkfield mainshock, results from UPSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jon B.

    2014-01-01

    The frequency-dependent effects of rupture propagation of the Parkfield, California earthquake (Sept. 28, 2004, M6) to the northwest along the San Andreas fault can be seen in acceleration records at UPSAR (USGS Parkfield Seismic Array) in at least two ways. First, we can see the effects of directivity in the acceleration traces at UPSAR, which is about 11.5 km from the epicenter. Directivity or the seismic equivalent of a Doppler shift has been documented in many cases by comparing short duration, high-amplitude pulses (P or S) in the forward direction with longer duration body waves in the backward direction. In this case we detect a change from a relatively large amplitude, coherent, high-frequency signal at the start of rupture to a low-amplitude, low-coherent, low-frequency signal at about the time the rupture front transfers from the forward azimuth to the back azimuth at about 34-36 s (time is UTC and are the seconds after day 272 and 17 hours and 15 minutes. S arrival is just after 30s) for rays leaving the fault and propagating to UPSAR. The frequency change is obvious in the band about 5 to 30 Hz, which is significantly above the corner frequency of the earthquake (about 0.11Hz). From kinematic source models, the duration of faulting is about 9.2 s and the change in frequency is during faulting as the rupture extends to the northwest. Understanding the systematic change in frequency and amplitude of seismic waves in relation to the propagation of the rupture front is important for predicting strong ground motion. Second, we can filter the acceleration records from the array to determine if the low frequency energy emerges from the same part of the fault as the high frequency signal (e.g. has the same back azimuth and apparent velocity at UPSAR) an important clue to the dynamics of rupture. Analysis of sources of strong motion (characterized by relatively high frequencies) compared to kinematic slip models (relatively low frequency) for the

  19. Unprecedentedly strong and narrow electromagnetic emissions stimulated by high-frequency radio waves in the ionosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norin, L; Leyser, T B; Nordblad, E; Thidé, B; McCarrick, M

    2009-02-13

    Experimental results of secondary electromagnetic radiation, stimulated by high-frequency radio waves irradiating the ionosphere, are reported. We have observed emission peaks, shifted in frequency up to a few tens of Hertz from radio waves transmitted at several megahertz. These emission peaks are by far the strongest spectral features of secondary radiation that have been reported. The emissions are attributed to stimulated Brillouin scattering, long predicted but hitherto never unambiguously identified in high-frequency ionospheric interaction experiments. The experiments were performed at the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP), Alaska, USA.

  20. Time- and frequency-resolved detection of atomic coherence in the regime of strong-field interaction with intense femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konorov, S. O.; Hepburn, J. W.; Milner, V.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the effect of strong laser pulses on the evolution of an atomic or molecular wave function is important in the context of coherent control in the strong-field regime, when power broadening and dynamic Stark shifts become comparable with or bigger than the bandwidth of the control field. We experimentally demonstrate the method of complete characterization of a complex-valued amplitude of a quantum state driven by a strong two-photon field. The method is based on coherent scattering of a weak probe pulse from the strong-field-induced atomic coherence, followed by the detection of the time- and frequency-resolved parametric four-wave-mixing signal. We show that the proposed technique corresponds to a cross-correlation frequency-resolved optical gating (XFROG) of the highly perturbed evolution of an atomic quantum state. Utilizing the XFROG retrieval algorithm, we determine both the amplitude and phase of an atomic wave function at any time moment throughout the interaction with the driving field. The direct retrieval of the time-dependent phase of the wave function, rather than the population dynamics only, enables us to observe the strong-field effects with arbitrary time and frequency resolution.

  1. On the penetration of a hot diapir through a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, S. F.; Raefsky, A.

    1985-01-01

    The ascent of a hot spherical body through a fluid with a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity has been studied using an axisymmetric finite element method. Numerical solutions range over Peclet numbers of 0.1 - 1000 from constant viscosity up to viscosity variations of 100,000. Both rigid and stress-free boundary conditions were applied at the surface of the sphere. The dependence of drag on viscosity variation was shown to have no dependence on the stress boundary condition except for a Stokes flow scaling factor. A Nusselt number parameterization based on the stress-free constant viscosity functional dependence on the Peclet number scaled by a parameter depending on the viscosity structure fits both stress-free and rigid boundary condition data above viscosity variations of 100. The temperature scale height was determined as a function of sphere radius. For the simple physical model studied in this paper pre-heating is required to reduce the ambient viscosity of the country rock to less than 10 to the 22nd sq cm/s in order for a 10 km diapir to penetrate a distance of several radii.

  2. Female elk contacts are neither frequency nor density dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Paul C.; Creech, Tyler G.; Ebinger, Michael R.; Manlove, Kezia R.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Henningsen, John C.; Rogerson, Jared D.; Scurlock, Brandon M.; Creely, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Identifying drivers of contact rates among individuals is critical to understanding disease dynamics and implementing targeted control measures. We studied the interaction patterns of 149 female elk (Cervus canadensis) distributed across five different regions of western Wyoming over three years, defining a contact as an approach within one body length (∼2 m). Using hierarchical models that account for correlations within individuals, pairs, and groups, we found that pairwise contact rates within a group declined by a factor of three as group sizes increased 33-fold. Per capita contact rates, however, increased with group size according to a power function, such that female elk contact rates fell in between the predictions of density- or frequency-dependent disease models. We found similar patterns for the duration of contacts. Our results suggest that larger elk groups are likely to play a disproportionate role in the disease dynamics of directly transmitted infections in elk. Supplemental feeding of elk had a limited impact on pairwise interaction rates and durations, but per capita rates were more than two times higher on feeding grounds. Our statistical approach decomposes the variation in contact rate into individual, dyadic, and environmental effects, and provides insight into factors that may be targeted by disease control programs. In particular, female elk contact patterns were driven more by environmental factors such as group size than by either individual or dyad effects.

  3. Extraordinary Photoluminescence and Strong Temperature/Angle-Dependent Raman Responses in Few-Layer Phosphorene

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Jiong; Xu, Renjing; Wang, Fan; Li, Weifeng; Ghufran, Muhammad; Zhang, Yong-wei; Yu, Zongfu; Zhang, Gang; Qin, Qinghua; Lu, Yuerui

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorene is a new family member of two-dimensional materials. We observed strong and highly layer-dependent photoluminescence in few-layer phosphorene (2 to 5 layers). The results confirmed the theoretical prediction that few-layer phosphorene has a direct and layer-sensitive band gap. We also demonstrated that few-layer phosphorene is more sensitive to temperature modulation than graphene and MoS2 in Raman scattering. The anisotropic Raman response in few-layer phosphorene has enabled us ...

  4. Strong temperature dependence of extraordinary magnetoresistance correlated to mobility in a two-contact device

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian

    2012-02-21

    A two-contact extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) device has been fabricated and characterized at various temperatures under magnetic fields applied in different directions. Large performance variations across the temperature range have been found, which are due to the strong dependence of the EMR effect on the mobility. The device shows the highest sensitivity of 562ω/T at 75 K with the field applied perpendicularly. Due to the overlap between the semiconductor and the metal shunt, the device is also sensitive to planar fields but with a lower sensitivity of about 20 to 25% of the one to perpendicular fields. © 2012 The Japan Society of Applied Physics.

  5. Intensity dependent waiting time for strong electron trapping events in speckle stimulated raman scatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Harvey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daughton, W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yin, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The onset of Stimulated Raman scatter from an intense laser speckle is the simplest experimentally realizable laser-plasma-interaction environment. Despite this data and recent 3D particle simulations, the controlling mechanism at the onset of backscatter in the kinetic regime when strong electron trapping in the daughter Langmuir wave is a dominant nonlinearity is not understood. This paper explores the consequences of assuming that onset is controlled by large thermal fluctuations. A super exponential dependence of mean reflectivity on speckle intensity in the onset regime is predicted.

  6. Prediction of strong acceleration motion depended on focal mechanism; Shingen mechanism wo koryoshita jishindo yosoku ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneda, Y.; Ejiri, J. [Obayashi Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes simulation results of strong acceleration motion with varying uncertain fault parameters mainly for a fault model of Hyogo-ken Nanbu earthquake. For the analysis, based on the fault parameters, the strong acceleration motion was simulated using the radiation patterns and the breaking time difference of composite faults as parameters. A statistic waveform composition method was used for the simulation. For the theoretical radiation patterns, directivity was emphasized which depended on the strike of faults, and the maximum acceleration was more than 220 gal. While, for the homogeneous radiation patterns, the maximum accelerations were isotopically distributed around the fault as a center. For variations in the maximum acceleration and the predominant frequency due to the breaking time difference of three faults, the response spectral value of maximum/minimum was about 1.7 times. From the viewpoint of seismic disaster prevention, underground structures including potential faults and non-arranging properties can be grasped using this simulation. Significance of the prediction of strong acceleration motion was also provided through this simulation using uncertain factors, such as breaking time of composite faults, as parameters. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Frequency dependence of junction capacitance of BPW34 and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Capacitance–frequency measurements were carried out using Hewlett Packard HP. 4192A impedance analyser operating at frequencies 100 Hz to 10 MHz. The de- vice was mounted in the sampler holder of the helium cryostat (Oxford) and the measurements were made in vacuum at temperatures between 100 K and 300 ...

  8. Threshold for strong thermal dephasing in periodically poled KTP in external cavity frequency doubling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundeman, Jesper Holm; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Andersen, Peter E.

    2009-01-01

    We present a measurement series of the efficiency of periodically poled KTP used for second-harmonic generation in an external phase-locked cavity. Due to the high absorption (0.01 cm^−1) in the PPKTP crystal at the pump wavelength a strong thermal dephasing of the periodically poled grating...

  9. Extraordinary photoluminescence and strong temperature/angle-dependent Raman responses in few-layer phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Jiong; Xu, Renjing; Wang, Fan; Li, Weifeng; Ghufran, Muhammad; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Yu, Zongfu; Zhang, Gang; Qin, Qinghua; Lu, Yuerui

    2014-09-23

    Phosphorene is a new family member of two-dimensional materials. We observed strong and highly layer-dependent photoluminescence in few-layer phosphorene (two to five layers). The results confirmed the theoretical prediction that few-layer phosphorene has a direct and layer-sensitive band gap. We also demonstrated that few-layer phosphorene is more sensitive to temperature modulation than graphene and MoS2 in Raman scattering. The anisotropic Raman response in few-layer phosphorene has enabled us to use an optical method to quickly determine the crystalline orientation without tunneling electron microscopy or scanning tunneling microscopy. Our results provide much needed experimental information about the band structures and exciton nature in few-layer phosphorene.

  10. Fast gain recovery rates with strong wavelength dependence in a non-linear SOA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Ciaran S; Power, Mark J; Schneider, Simon; Webb, Roderick P; Manning, Robert J

    2010-12-06

    We report remarkably fast and strongly wavelength-dependent gain recovery in a single SOA without the aid of an offset filter. Full gain recovery times as short as 9 ps were observed in pump-probe measurements when pumping to the blue wavelength side of a continuous wave probe, in contrast to times of 25 to 30 ps when pumping to the red wavelength side. Experimental and numerical analysis indicate that the long effective length and high gain led to deep saturation of the second half of the SOA by the probe. The consequent absorption of blue-shifted pump pulses in this region resulted in device dynamics analogous to those of the Turbo-Switch.

  11. Strongly enhanced temperature dependence of the chemical potential in FeSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, L. C.; Watson, M. D.; Haghighirad, A. A.; Eschrig, M.; Kim, T. K.

    2017-05-01

    Employing a 10-orbital tight-binding model, we present a set of hopping parameters fitted directly to our latest high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data for the high-temperature tetragonal phase of FeSe. Using these parameters, we predict a large 10 meV shift of the chemical potential as a function of temperature. To confirm this large temperature dependence, we performed ARPES experiments on FeSe and observed a ˜25 meV rigid shift to the chemical potential between 100 and 300 K. This strong shift has important implications for theoretical models of superconductivity and of nematic order in FeSe materials.

  12. The Frequency Dependent Characteristics of the 2010 Chile Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, E.; Ishii, M.

    2010-12-01

    The 2010 Chile earthquake is important both because of its magnitude (Mw 8.8), and its spatial relationship to geological features (e.g., the Juan Fernandez Ridge) and past large events (e.g., the1960 Mw 9.5 Chile earthquake). To determine the spatio-temporal relationship of the rupture propagation, we use seismic data from the USArray Transportable Array (TA) and apply a back-projection method. The TA data are filtered into three frequency ranges, 1-5 Hz, 0.1 - 0.5 Hz, and 0.05 - 0.01 Hz. The back-projection results from these three frequency ranges reveal unique aspects of the Chilean earthquake. The highest frequency data (1-5 Hz) show that slip occurred on two separate segments. The initial low-amplitude rupture is bilateral and has rupture velocities as low as 0.8 km/s near its southern end, near the Arauco Peninsula. The second high-amplitude segment is updip and to the north of the initial rupture and has a much higher rupture velocity (3.0 km/s). The gap between the two rupture regions and their timing suggests that the initial rupture triggered the second rupture. A similar rupture pattern is obtained using the intermediate-frequency data (0.1-0.5 Hz). However, for the second, northern rupture, the energy at intermediate-frequency lags behind the high-frequency energy. This observation suggests that slower slip is following the rupture front, which supports the hypothesis that fault lubrication is an important factor for the slips associated with giant earthquakes. Finally, the results using the lowest-frequency data (0.01-0.05 Hz) show a much different picture of the rupture than the other two frequency ranges. Here, the highest amplitude energy is at the southern extent of the initial rupture, near the Arauco Peninsula. These lowest-frequency results agree well with the available geodetic observations, which show largest deformation south of the epicenter. In general, it appears that the northern rupture, which corresponds to the area of the 1985

  13. Testing of Dependencies between Stock Returns and Trading Volume by High Frequency Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Gurgul

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with a dependence analysis of returns, return volatility and trading volume for five companies listed on the Vienna Stock Exchange and five from theWarsaw Stock Exchange. Taking into account high frequency data for these companies, tests based on a comparison of Bernstein copula densities using the Hellinger distance were conducted. The paper presents some patterns of causal and other relationships between stock returns, realized volatility and expected and unexpected trading volume. There is a linear causality running from realized volatility to expected trading volume, and a lack of nonlinear dependence in the opposite direction. The authors detected strong linear and nonlinear causality from stock returns to expected trading volume. They did not find causality running in the opposite direction. In addition, the existence of fractional cointegration was examined. Despite the equality of the long memory parameters of realized volatility and trading volumes, they do not move together in the long term horizon.

  14. Frequency-Dependent Blanking with Digital Linear Chirp Waveform Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Andrews, John M. [General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Wideband radar systems, especially those that operate at lower frequencies such as VHF and UHF, are often restricted from transmitting within or across specific frequency bands in order to prevent interference to other spectrum users. Herein we describe techniques for notching the transmitted spectrum of a generated and transmitted radar waveform. The notches are fully programmable as to their location, and techniques are given that control the characteristics of the notches.

  15. Application of modified homotopy perturbation method and amplitude frequency formulation to strongly nonlinear oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    seyd ghasem enayati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, two powerful analytical methods known as modified homotopy perturbation method and Amplitude Frequency Formulation called respectively MHPM and AFF, are introduced to derive approximate solutions of a system of ordinary differential equations appear in mechanical applications. These methods convert a difficult problem into a simple one, which can be easily handled. The obtained solutions are compared with numerical fourth order runge-kutta method to show the applicability and accuracy of both MHPM and AFF in solving this sample problem. The results attained in this paper confirm the idea that MHPM and AFF are powerful mathematical tools and they can be applied to linear and nonlinear problems.

  16. Ionization of highly excited states of a hydrogen atom by a strong low-frequency field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bersons, I.Y.

    1984-01-01

    The probability of ionization of highly excited states of a hydrogen atom by a low-frequency field is estimated by using the previously derived quasi-classical wave function of an electron in a Coulomb field and in a radiation field. The expression obtained predicts an ionization threshold at field intensities approximately equal to those observed experimentally, but predicts an increase in ionization probability that is approximately ten times the increase observed experimentally when the field intensity in the threshold region is increased. The approximations underlying the derivation of the equation for the ionization probability are discussed

  17. Frequency and temperature dependence of high damping elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1993-01-01

    High damping steel-laminated elastomeric seismic isolation bearings are one of the preferred devices for isolating large buildings and structures. In the US, the current reference design for the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) uses laminated bearings for seismic isolation. These bearings are constructed from alternating layers of high damping rubber and steel plates. They are typically designed for shear strains between 50 and 100% and are expected to sustain two to three times these levels for beyond design basis loading conditions. Elastomeric bearings are currently designed to provide a system frequency between 0.4 and 0.8 Hz and expected to operate between -20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. To assure proper performance of isolation bearings, it is necessary to characterize the elastomer's response under expected variations of frequency and temperature. The dynamic response of the elastomer must be characterized within the frequency range that spans the bearing acceptance test frequency, which may be as low as 0.005 Hz, and the design frequency. Similarly, the variation in mechanical characteristics of the elastomer must be determined over the design temperature range, which is between -20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. This paper reports on (1) the capabilities of a testing facility at ANL for testing candidate elastomers, (2) the variation with frequency and temperature of the stiffness and damping of one candidate elastomer, and (3) the effect of these variations on bearing acceptance testing criteria and on the choice of bearing design values for stiffness and damping

  18. Frequency and temperature dependence of high damping elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1993-08-01

    High damping steel-laminated elastomeric seismic isolation bearings are one of the preferred devices for isolating large buildings and structures. In the US, the current reference design for the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) uses laminated bearings for seismic isolation. These bearings are constructed from alternating layers of high damping rubber and steel plates. They are typically designed for shear strains between 50 and 100% and are expected to sustain two to three times these levels for beyond design basis loading conditions. Elastomeric bearings are currently designed to provide a system frequency between 0.4 and 0.8 Hz and expected to operate between {minus}20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. To assure proper performance of isolation bearings, it is necessary to characterize the elastomer`s response under expected variations of frequency and temperature. The dynamic response of the elastomer must be characterized within the frequency range that spans the bearing acceptance test frequency, which may be as low as 0.005 Hz, and the design frequency. Similarly, the variation in mechanical characteristics of the elastomer must be determined over the design temperature range, which is between {minus}20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. This paper reports on (1) the capabilities of a testing facility at ANL for testing candidate elastomers, (2) the variation with frequency and temperature of the stiffness and damping of one candidate elastomer, and (3) the effect of these variations on bearing acceptance testing criteria and on the choice of bearing design values for stiffness and damping.

  19. Frequency dependence of microflows upon acoustic interactions with fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiller, Benjamin; Reboud, Julien; Tassieri, Manlio; Wilson, Rab; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2017-12-01

    Rayleigh surface acoustic waves (SAWs), generated on piezoelectric substrates, can interact with liquids to generate fast streaming flows. Although studied extensively, mainly phenomenologically, the effect of the SAW frequency on streaming in fluids in constrained volumes is not fully understood, resulting in sub-optimal correlations between models and experimental observations. Using microfluidic structures to reproducibly define the fluid volume, we use recent advances modeling the body force generated by SAWs to develop a deeper understanding of the effect of acoustic frequency on the magnitude of streaming flows. We implement this as a new predictive tool using a finite element model of fluid motion to establish optimized conditions for streaming. The model is corroborated experimentally over a range of different acoustic excitation frequencies enabling us to validate a design tool, linking microfluidic channel dimensions with frequencies and streaming efficiencies. We show that in typical microfluidic chambers, the length and height of the chamber are critical in determining the optimum frequency, with smaller geometries requiring higher frequencies.

  20. Ascaroside expression in Caenorhabditis elegans is strongly dependent on diet and developmental stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Kaplan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The ascarosides form a family of small molecules that have been isolated from cultures of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. They are often referred to as "dauer pheromones" because most of them induce formation of long-lived and highly stress resistant dauer larvae. More recent studies have shown that ascarosides serve additional functions as social signals and mating pheromones. Thus, ascarosides have multiple functions. Until now, it has been generally assumed that ascarosides are constitutively expressed during nematode development.Cultures of C. elegans were developmentally synchronized on controlled diets. Ascarosides released into the media, as well as stored internally, were quantified by LC/MS. We found that ascaroside biosynthesis and release were strongly dependent on developmental stage and diet. The male attracting pheromone was verified to be a blend of at least four ascarosides, and peak production of the two most potent mating pheromone components, ascr#3 and asc#8 immediately preceded or coincided with the temporal window for mating. The concentration of ascr#2 increased under starvation conditions and peaked during dauer formation, strongly supporting ascr#2 as the main population density signal (dauer pheromone. After dauer formation, ascaroside production largely ceased and dauer larvae did not release any ascarosides. These findings show that both total ascaroside production and the relative proportions of individual ascarosides strongly correlate with these compounds' stage-specific biological functions.Ascaroside expression changes with development and environmental conditions. This is consistent with multiple functions of these signaling molecules. Knowledge of such differential regulation will make it possible to associate ascaroside production to gene expression profiles (transcript, protein or enzyme activity and help to determine genetic pathways that control ascaroside biosynthesis. In conjunction with findings

  1. Disentangling the roles of frequency- vs. state-dependence in generating individual differences in behavioural plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathot, Kimberley J.; van den Hout, Piet J.; Piersma, Theunis; Kempenaers, Bart; Reale, Denis; Dingemanse, Niels J.

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical work suggests that both negative frequency-dependent payoffs and state-dependent payoffs can lead to individual variation in behavioural plasticity. We investigated the roles of both frequency- and state-dependence on the occurrence of individual variation in behavioural plasticity in a

  2. Pressure dependent resonant frequency of micromechanical drumhead resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, D. R.; Craighead, H. G.; Parpia, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    We examine the relationship between squeeze film effects and resonance frequency in drum-type resonators. We find that the resonance frequency increases linearly with pressure as a result of the additional restoring force contribution from compression of gas within the drum cavity. We demonstrate trapping of the gas by squeeze film effects and geometry. The pressure sensitivity is shown to scale inversely with cavity height and sound radiation is found to be the predominant loss mechanism near and above atmospheric pressure. Drum resonators exhibit linearity and sensitivity suitable to barometry from below 10 Torr up to several atmospheres.

  3. [Effects of post-anthesis irrigation frequency on the grain quality of strong gluten winter wheat cultivars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Feng-juan; He, Ming-rong; Li, Fei; Xu, Liang-liang; Huang, Chuan-hua; Qu, Mu

    2008-12-01

    In order to investigate the effects of post-anthesis irrigation frequency on the grain quality of strong gluten winter wheat, two cultivars Jimai 20 and Gaocheng 8901 were subjected to a series of irrigation frequencies under rainfall proof conditions, with their grain yield and grain quality (farinograph parameters and loaf volume) and protein composition evaluated. The results indicated that with increasing irrigation frequency, the grain yield of the two cultivars, their wheat flour dough development time, dough stability time, and loaf volume were noted to be increased first but decreased then. The grain yield and quality of Gaocheng 8901 were the highest when irrigated once after anthesis, while those of Jimai 20 were the best when irrigated twice after anthesis, respectively. The contents of monomeric protein, soluble glutenin, insoluble glutenin, total glutenin, flour protein, and wet gluten in the grains displayed the similar trends. Stepwise regression analysis showed that under the test post-anthesis irrigation frequencies, the key factor affecting dough stability time was insoluble glutenin content, and loaf volume was significantly correlated with total glutenin content. It was suggested that to maintain the quality stability of high grade strong gluten winter wheat, irrigation management should take the improvement of grain protein composition, and glutenin in particular, as the target.

  4. Counteracting radio frequency inhomogeneity in the human brain at 7 Tesla using strongly modulating pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulant, N; Mangin, J-F; Amadon, A

    2009-05-01

    We report flip angle and spoiled gradient echo measurements at 7 Tesla on human brains in three-dimensional imaging, using strongly modulating pulses to counteract the transmitted radiofrequency inhomogeneity problem. Compared with the standard square pulse results, three points of improvement are demonstrated, namely: (i) the removal of the bright center (typical at high fields when using a quadrature head coil), (ii) the substantial gain of signal in the regions of low B(1) intensity, and (iii) an increased 35% signal uniformity over the whole brain at the flip angle where maximum contrast between white and gray matter occurs. We also find by means of simulations that standard BIR-4 adiabatic pulses need several times more energy to reach a similar performance at the same field strength. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Exploring the physics of superconducting qubits strongly coupled to microwave frequency photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallraff, Andreas [ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01

    Using modern micro and nano-fabrication techniques combined with superconducting materials we realize electronic circuits the properties of which are governed by the laws of quantum mechanics. In such circuits the strong interaction of photons with superconducting quantum two-level systems allows us to probe fundamental quantum properties of light and to develop components for applications in quantum information technology. Here, I present experiments in which we have created and probed entanglement between stationary qubits and microwave photons freely propagating down a transmission line. In these experiments we use superconducting parametric amplifiers realized in our lab to detect both qubit and photon states efficiently. Using similar techniques we aim at demonstrating a deterministic scheme for teleportation of quantum states in a macroscopic system based on superconducting circuits.

  6. Frequency dependence of the active impedance component of silicon thin-film resistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belogurov, S.V.; Gostilo, V.V.; Yurov, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    A high-resistant resistor on the silicon thin-film substrate considerably superior in noise and frequency performance than commercial resistors is described. The frequency dependence of the active impedance component is tested for determining noise and frequency dependences of silicon thin-film resistors. The obtained results permit to calculate the energy equivalent of resistor noise in nuclear radiation detection units at any temperature according to its frequency characteristic at room temperature

  7. Frequency Dependence of Measured Massive MIMO Channel Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveras Martínez, Àlex; Carvalho, Elisabeth De; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum

    2016-01-01

    A multi-user massive MIMO measurement campaign is conducted to study the channel propagation characteristics (e.g. user correlation, sum of eigenvalues and condition number), focusing on the stability over frequencies and the impact of the array aperture. We use 3 arrays with 64 antennas (6m linear...

  8. Approximate relationship between frequency-dependent skin depth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    over the layered earth and thus, can be linked to the direct current earth response functions as an aid for estimating .... penetration resolved from direct current resistivity measurements at the frequency of the alternating current source. The reason for the possibility of ..... State, southern Nigeria, around the Gulf of Guinea; Int.

  9. Strong composition-dependent disorder in InAs1-xNx alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benaissa, H.; Zaoui, A.; Ferhat, M.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the main causes of disorder in the InAs 1-x N x alloys (x = 0, 0.03125, 0.0625, 0.09375, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 0.875, 0.90625, 0.9375, 0.96875 and 1). The calculation is based on the density-functional theory in the local-density approximation. We use a plane wave-expansion non-norm conserving ab initio Vanderbilt pseudopotentials. To avoid the difficulty of considering the huge number of atomic configurations, we use an appropriate strategy in which we consider four configurations for a given composition where the N atoms are not randomly distributed. We mainly show that the band gap decreases (increases) rapidly with increasing (decreasing) compositions of N. As a consequence the optical band gap bowing is found to be strong and composition dependent. The obtained compounds, from these alloys, may change from semi-conducting to metal (passing to a negative bowing) and could be useful for device applications, especially at certain composition.

  10. Very Long Baseline Interferometry: Dependencies on Frequency Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothnagel, Axel; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald

    2018-04-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is a differential technique observing radiation of compact extra-galactic radio sources with pairs of radio telescopes. For these observations, the frequency standards at the telescopes need to have very high stability. In this article we discuss why this is, and we investigate exactly how precise the frequency standards need to be. Four areas where good clock performance is needed are considered: coherence, geodetic parameter estimation, correlator synchronization, and UT1 determination. We show that in order to ensure the highest accuracy of VLBI, stability similar to that of a hydrogen maser is needed for time-scales up to a few hours. In the article, we are considering both traditional VLBI where extra-galactic radio sources are observed, as well as observation of man-made artificial radio sources emitted by satellites or spacecrafts.

  11. Frequency dependence of alternating current electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetwani, Nishant; Cassou, Catherine A; Go, David B; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2011-04-15

    The novel effects resulting from the entrainment of low mobility ions during alternating current (ac) electrospray ionization are examined through mass spectrometry and voltage/current measurements. Curious phenomena such as pH modulation at high frequencies (>150 kHz) of an applied ac electric field are revealed and explained using simple mechanistic arguments. Current measurements are utilized to supplement these observations, and a simplified one-dimensional transient diffusion model for charge transport is used to arrive at a scaling law that provides better insight into the ac electrospray ionization process. Moreover, because of the different pathway for ion formation in comparison to direct current (dc) electrospray, ac electrospray (at frequencies >250 kHz) is shown to reduce the effects of ionization suppression in a mixture of two molecules with different surface activities. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  12. Ion–Cyclotron Resonance Frequency Interval Dependence on the O ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... The frequency intervals in which O VI ions get in resonance with ion–cyclotron waves are calculated using the kinetic model, for the latest six values found in literature on O VI ion number densities in the 1.5–3 region of the NPCH. It is found that the common resonance interval is 1.5 kHz to 3 kHz.

  13. Ion–Cyclotron Resonance Frequency Interval Dependence on the O ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The frequency intervals in which O VI ions get in resonance with ion–cyclotron waves are calculated using the kinetic model, for the latest six values found in literature on O VI ion number densities in the 1.5–3 region of the NPCH. It is found that the common resonance interval is 1.5 kHz to 3 kHz. The -variations of wave ...

  14. A theoretical analysis of low-frequency sonophoresis: dependence of transdermal transport pathways on frequency and energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezel, Ahmet; Sens, Ashley; Mitragotri, Samir

    2002-12-01

    Application of low-frequency ultrasound has been shown to increase skin permeability, thereby facilitating delivery of macromolecules (low-frequency sonophoresis). In this study, we seek to determine the dependence of transport pathways during low-frequency sonophoresis on ultrasound parameters. Pig skin is exposed to low-frequency ultrasound over a range of frequencies to achieve different skin resistivities. The porous pathway model is used to study the dependence of average pore size, porosity, and tortuosity on ultrasound parameters. Imaging experiments are also carried out to visualize the transport pathways created by ultrasound. The data show that the average pore size, determined from the porous pathway model, does not depend on application frequency. Both in the presence and absence of ultrasound the average pore size determined from mannitol delivery is the same (28 +/- 12 A). With the application of ultrasound the skin porosity could be increased by up to 1700-fold. The effect of ultrasound on skin is heterogeneous thereby creating localized transport pathways (LTP). The porosity of these transport pathways is of the same order of magnitude as that of the dermis. With this study it is shown that low-frequency ultrasound increases skin permeability by increasing skin porosity rather than by increasing the size of the pores that are responsible for permeant delivery.

  15. Frequency dependence of p-mode frequency shifts induced by magnetic activity in Kepler solar-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salabert, D.; Régulo, C.; Pérez Hernández, F.; García, R. A.

    2018-04-01

    The variations of the frequencies of the low-degree acoustic oscillations in the Sun induced by magnetic activity show a dependence on radial order. The frequency shifts are observed to increase towards higher-order modes to reach a maximum of about 0.8 μHz over the 11-yr solar cycle. A comparable frequency dependence is also measured in two other main sequence solar-like stars, the F-star HD 49933, and the young 1 Gyr-old solar analog KIC 10644253, although with different amplitudes of the shifts of about 2 μHz and 0.5 μHz, respectively. Our objective here is to extend this analysis to stars with different masses, metallicities, and evolutionary stages. From an initial set of 87 Kepler solar-like oscillating stars with known individual p-mode frequencies, we identify five stars showing frequency shifts that can be considered reliable using selection criteria based on Monte Carlo simulations and on the photospheric magnetic activity proxy Sph. The frequency dependence of the frequency shifts of four of these stars could be measured for the l = 0 and l = 1 modes individually. Given the quality of the data, the results could indicate that a physical source of perturbation different from that in the Sun is dominating in this sample of solar-like stars.

  16. A direct method for soil-structure interaction analysis based on frequency-dependent soil masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danisch, R.; Delinic, K.; Marti, J.; Trbojevic, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    In a soil-structure interaction analysis, the soil, as a subsystem of the global vibrating system, exerts a strong influence on the response of the nuclear reactor building to the earthquake excitation. The volume of resources required for dealing with the soil have led to a number of different types of frequency-domain solutions, most of them based on the impedance function approach. These procedures require coupling the soil to the lumped-mass finite-element model of the reactor building. In most practical cases, the global vibrating system is analysed in the time domain (i.e. modal time history, linear or non-linear direct time-integration). Hence, it follows that the frequency domain solution for soil must be converted to an 'equivalent' soil model in the time domain. Over the past three decades, different approaches have been developed and used for earthquake analysis of nuclear power plants. In some cases, difficulties experienced in modelling the soil have affected the methods of global analysis, thus leading to approaches like the substructuring technique, e.g. 3-step method. In the practical applications, the limitations of each specific method must be taken into account in order to avoid unrealistic results. The aim of this paper is to present the recent development on an equivalent SDOF system for soil including frequency-dependent soil masses. The method will be compared with the classical 3-step method. (author)

  17. Frequency Dependence of Damping and Compliance in Loudspeaker Suspensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Knud; Tinggaard, Carsten; Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2010-01-01

    textiles used for spiders - have more or less visco-elastic properties; best known is the “creep” effect. This phenomenon in itself is normally of little interest in the audio frequency range. It is mainly a DC phenomenon. As such it manifests itself when a static (DC) force probes the speaker voice coil....... At first, it moves fast very close to the expected position, but then it “creeps” slowly a little further (see [1, Fig.1]) A widely accepted model giving account for the visco-elastic effects in loudspeaker surrounds is the so called LOG-model evaluated by M.H. Knudsen and J. G. Jensen [1...

  18. Frequency dependent dynamical electromechanical response of mixed ionic-electronic conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozovska, A. N.; Eliseev, E. A.; Bravina, S. L.; Ciucci, Francesco; Svechnikov, G. S.; Chen, Long-Qing; Kalinin, S. V.

    2012-01-01

    Frequency dependent dynamic electromechanical response of the mixed ionic-electronic conductor film to a periodic electric bias is analyzed for different electronic and ionic boundary conditions. Dynamic effects of mobile ions concentration (stoichiometry contribution), charge state of acceptors (donors), electron concentration (electron-phonon coupling via the deformation potential), and flexoelectric effect contribution are discussed. A variety of possible nonlinear dynamic electromechanical responses of mixed electronic ionic conductors (MIEC) films including quasi-elliptic curves, asymmetric hysteresis-like loops with pronounced memory window, and butterfly-like curves are calculated. The electromechanical response of ionic semiconductor is predicted to be a powerful descriptor of local valence states, band structure and electron-phonon correlations thatcan be readily measured in the nanoscale volumes and in the presence of strong electronic conductivity.

  19. Frequency-Dependent FDTD Algorithm Using Newmark’s Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Wei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the characteristics of the polarizability in frequency domain of three common models of dispersive media, the relation between the polarization vector and electric field intensity is converted into a time domain differential equation of second order with the polarization vector by using the conversion from frequency to time domain. Newmark βγ difference method is employed to solve this equation. The electric field intensity to polarizability recursion is derived, and the electric flux to electric field intensity recursion is obtained by constitutive relation. Then FDTD iterative computation in time domain of electric and magnetic field components in dispersive medium is completed. By analyzing the solution stability of the above differential equation using central difference method, it is proved that this method has more advantages in the selection of time step. Theoretical analyses and numerical results demonstrate that this method is a general algorithm and it has advantages of higher accuracy and stability over the algorithms based on central difference method.

  20. A strong angular dependence of magnetic properties of magnetosome chains: Implications for rock magnetism and paleomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Ge, Kunpeng; Pan, Yongxin; Williams, Wyn; Liu, Qingsong; Qin, Huafeng

    2013-10-01

    Single-domain magnetite particles produced by magnetotactic bacteria (magnetosomes) and aligned in chains are of great interest in the biosciences and geosciences. Here, we investigated angular variation of magnetic properties of aligned Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 cells, each of which contains one single fragmental chain of magnetosomes. With measurements at increasing angles from the chain direction, we observed that (i) the hysteresis loop gradually changes from nearly rectangular to a ramp-like shape (e.g., Bc and remanence decrease), (ii) the acquisition and demagnetization curves of IRM shift toward higher fields (e.g., Bcr increases), and (iii) the FORC diagram shifts toward higher coercivity fields (e.g., Bc,FORC increases). For low-temperature results, compared to unoriented samples, the samples containing aligned chains have a much lower remanence loss of field-cooled (δFC) and zero-field-cooled (δZFC) remanence upon warming through the Verwey transition, higher δ-ratio (δ = δFC/δZFC) for the measurement parallel to the chain direction, and lower δ-ratio, larger δFC and δZFC values for the perpendicular measurement. Micromagnetic simulations confirm the experimental observations and reveal that the magnetization reversal of magnetosome chain appears to be noncoherent at low angles and coherent at high angles. The simulations also demonstrate that the angular dependence of magnetic properties is related to the dispersion degree of individual chains, indicating that effects of anisotropy need to be accounted for when using rock magnetism to identify magnetosomes or magnetofossils once they have been preserved in aligned chains. Additionally, this study experimentally demonstrates an empirical correspondence of the parameter Bc,FORC to Bcr rather than Bc, at least for magnetite chains with strong shape anisotropy. This suggests FORC analysis is a good discriminant of magnetofossils in sediments and rocks.

  1. Suppressing an anti-inflammatory cytokine reveals a strong age-dependent survival cost in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Belloni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The central paradigm of ecological immunology postulates that selection acts on immunity as to minimize its cost/benefit ratio. Costs of immunity may arise because the energetic requirements of the immune response divert resources that are no longer available for other vital functions. In addition to these resource-based costs, mis-directed or over-reacting immune responses can be particularly harmful for the host. In spite of the potential importance of immunopathology, most studies dealing with the evolution of the immune response have neglected such non resource-based costs. To keep the immune response under control, hosts have evolved regulatory pathways that should be considered when studying the target of the selection pressures acting on immunity. Indeed, variation in regulation may strongly modulate the negative outcome of immune activation, with potentially important fitness consequences. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we experimentally assessed the survival costs of reduced immune regulation by inhibiting an anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10 with anti-IL-10 receptor antibodies (anti-IL-10R in mice that were either exposed to a mild inflammation or kept as control. The experiment was performed on young (3 months and old (15 months individuals, as to further assess the age-dependent cost of suppressing immune regulation. IL-10 inhibition induced high mortality in old mice exposed to the mild inflammatory insult, whereas no mortality was observed in young mice. However, young mice experienced a transitory lost in body mass when injected with the anti-IL-10R antibodies, showing that the treatment was to a lesser extent also costly for young individuals. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest a major role of immune regulation that deserves attention when investigating the evolution of immunity, and indicate that the capacity to down-regulate the inflammatory response is crucial for late survival and longevity.

  2. Automatic detection of frequency changes depends on auditory stimulus intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, S; Lang, A H; Aaltonen, O; Lertola, K; Kärki, T

    1999-06-01

    A cortical cognitive auditory evoked potential, mismatch negativity (MMN), reflects automatic discrimination and echoic memory functions of the auditory system. For this study, we examined whether this potential is dependent on the stimulus intensity. The MMN potentials were recorded from 10 subjects with normal hearing using a sine tone of 1000 Hz as the standard stimulus and a sine tone of 1141 Hz as the deviant stimulus, with probabilities of 90% and 10%, respectively. The intensities were 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80 dB HL for both standard and deviant stimuli in separate blocks. Stimulus intensity had a statistically significant effect on the mean amplitude, rise time parameter, and onset latency of the MMN. Automatic auditory discrimination seems to be dependent on the sound pressure level of the stimuli.

  3. Frequency, moisture content, and temperature dependent dielectric properties of potato starch related to drying with radio-frequency/microwave energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhuozhuo; Guo, Wenchuan

    2017-08-24

    To develop advanced drying methods using radio-frequency (RF) or microwave (MW) energy, dielectric properties of potato starch were determined using an open-ended coaxial-line probe and network analyzer at frequencies between 20 and 4,500 MHz, moisture contents between 15.1% and 43.1% wet basis (w.b.), and temperatures between 25 and 75 °C. The results showed that both dielectric constant (ε') and loss factor (ε″) were dependent on frequency, moisture content, and temperature. ε' decreased with increasing frequency at a given moisture content or temperature. At low moisture contents (≤25.4% w.b.) or low temperatures (≤45 °C), ε″ increased with increasing frequency. However, ε″ changed from decrease to increase with increasing frequency at high moisture contents or temperatures. At low temperatures (25-35 °C), both ε' and ε″ increased with increasing moisture content. At low moisture contents (15.1-19.5% w.b.), they increased with increasing temperature. The change trends of ε' and ε″ were different and dependent on temperature and moisture content at their high levels. The penetration depth (d p ) decreased with increasing frequency. RF treatments may provide potential large-scale industrial drying application for potato starch. This research offers useful information on dielectric properties of potato starch related to drying with electromagnetic energy.

  4. Method of frequency dependent correlations: investigating the variability of total solar irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelt, J.; Käpylä, M. J.; Olspert, N.

    2017-04-01

    Context. This paper contributes to the field of modeling and hindcasting of the total solar irradiance (TSI) based on different proxy data that extend further back in time than the TSI that is measured from satellites. Aims: We introduce a simple method to analyze persistent frequency-dependent correlations (FDCs) between the time series and use these correlations to hindcast missing historical TSI values. We try to avoid arbitrary choices of the free parameters of the model by computing them using an optimization procedure. The method can be regarded as a general tool for pairs of data sets, where correlating and anticorrelating components can be separated into non-overlapping regions in frequency domain. Methods: Our method is based on low-pass and band-pass filtering with a Gaussian transfer function combined with de-trending and computation of envelope curves. Results: We find a major controversy between the historical proxies and satellite-measured targets: a large variance is detected between the low-frequency parts of targets, while the low-frequency proxy behavior of different measurement series is consistent with high precision. We also show that even though the rotational signal is not strongly manifested in the targets and proxies, it becomes clearly visible in FDC spectrum. A significant part of the variability can be explained by a very simple model consisting of two components: the original proxy describing blanketing by sunspots, and the low-pass-filtered curve describing the overall activity level. The models with the full library of the different building blocks can be applied to hindcasting with a high level of confidence, Rc ≈ 0.90. The usefulness of these models is limited by the major target controversy. Conclusions: The application of the new method to solar data allows us to obtain important insights into the different TSI modeling procedures and their capabilities for hindcasting based on the directly observed time intervals.

  5. Frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in Internet gaming disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao eLin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies have revealed that the task-related functional brain activities are impaired in Internet gaming disorder (IGD subjects. However, little is known about the alternations in spontaneous brain activities about them. Recent studies have proposed that the brain activities of different frequency ranges are generated by different nervous activities and have different physiological and psychological functions. Thus, in this study, we set to explore the spontaneous brain activities in IGD subjects by measuring the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF, to investigate band-specific changes of resting-state fALFF. We subdivided the frequency range into five bands based on literatures. Comparing to healthy controls, the IGD group showed decreased fALFF values in the cerebellum posterior lobe and increased fALFF values in superior temporal gyrus. Significant interactions between frequency bands and groups were found in the cerebellum, the anterior cingulate, the lingual gyrus, the middle temporal gyrus and the middle frontal gyrus. Those brain regions are proved related to the executive function and decision-making. These results revealed the changed spontaneous brain activity of IGD, which contributed to understanding the underlying pathophysiology of IGD.

  6. Correlation distance dependence of the resonance frequency of intermolecular zero quantum coherences and its implication for MR thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le; McCallister, Andrew; Koshlap, Karl M; Branca, Rosa Tamara

    2018-03-01

    Because the resonance frequency of water-fat intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) reflects the water-fat frequency separation at the microscopic scale, these frequencies have been proposed and used as a mean to obtain more accurate temperature information. The purpose of this work was to investigate the dependence of the water-fat iZQC resonance frequency on sample microstructure and on the specific choice of the correlation distance. The effect of water-fat susceptibility gradients on the water-methylene iZQC resonance frequency was first computed and then measured for different water-fat emulsions and for a mixture of porcine muscle and fat. Similar measurements were also performed for mixed heteronuclear spin systems. A strong dependence of the iZQC resonance frequency on the sample microstructure and on the specific choice of the correlation distance was found for spin systems like water and fat that do not mix, but not for spin systems that mix at the molecular level. Because water and fat spins do not mix at the molecular level, the water-fat iZQC resonance frequency and its temperature coefficient are not only affected by sample microstructure but also by the specific choice of the correlation distance. Magn Reson Med 79:1429-1438, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. Frequency Dependence of C-V Characteristics of MOS Capacitors Containing Nanosized High-κ Ta2O5 Dielectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Novkovski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Capacitance of metal–insulator–Si structures containing high permittivity dielectric exhibits complicated behaviour when voltage and frequency dependencies are studied. From our study on metal (Al, Au, W–Ta2O5/SiO2–Si structures, we identify serial C-R measurement mode to be more convenient for use than the parallel one usually used in characterization of similar structures. Strong frequency dependence that is not due to real variations in the dielectric permittivity of the layers is observed. Very high capacitance at low frequencies is due to the leakage in Ta2O5 layer. We found that the above observation is mainly due to different leakage current mechanisms in the two different layers composing the stack. The effect is highly dependent on the applied voltage, since the leakage currents are strongly nonlinear functions of the electric field in the layers. Additionally, at low frequencies, transition currents influence the measured value of the capacitance. From the capacitance measurements several parameters are extracted, such as capacitance in accumulation, effective dielectric constant, and oxide charges. Extracting parameters of the studied structures by standard methods in the case of high-κ/interfacial layer stacks can lead to substantial errors. Some cases demonstrating these deficiencies of the methods are presented and solutions for obtaining better results are proposed.

  8. Vibrational tug-of-war: The pKA dependence of the broad vibrational features of strongly hydrogen-bonded carboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoozen, Brian L.; Petersen, Poul B.

    2018-04-01

    Medium and strong hydrogen bonds give rise to broad vibrational features frequently spanning several hundred wavenumbers and oftentimes exhibiting unusual substructures. These broad vibrational features can be modeled from first principles, in a reduced dimensional calculation, that adiabatically separates low-frequency modes, which modulate the hydrogen bond length, from high-frequency OH stretch and bend modes that contribute to the vibrational structure. Previously this method was used to investigate the origin of an unusual vibrational feature frequently found in the spectra of dimers between carboxylic acids and nitrogen-containing aromatic bases that spans over 900 cm-1 and contains two broad peaks. It was found that the width of this feature largely originates from low-frequency modes modulating the hydrogen bond length and that the structure results from Fermi resonance interactions. In this report, we examine how these features change with the relative acid and base strength of the components as reflected by their aqueous pKA values. Dimers with large pKA differences are found to have features that can extend to frequencies below 1000 cm-1. The relationships between mean OH/NH frequency, aqueous pKA, and O-N distance are examined in order to obtain a more rigorous understanding of the origin and shape of the vibrational features. The mean OH/NH frequencies are found to correlate well with O-N distances. The lowest OH stretch frequencies are found in dimer geometries with O-N distances between 2.5 and 2.6 Å. At larger O-N distances, the hydrogen bonding interaction is not as strong, resulting in higher OH stretch frequencies. When the O-N distance is smaller than 2.5 Å, the limited space between the O and N determines the OH stretch frequency, which gives rise to frequencies that decrease with O-N distances. These two effects place a lower limit on the OH stretch frequency which is calculated to be near 700 cm-1. Understanding how the vibrational features

  9. Strings on a Violin: Location Dependence of Frequency Tuning in Active Dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anindita; Rathour, Rahul K; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2017-01-01

    Strings on a violin are tuned to generate distinct sound frequencies in a manner that is firmly dependent on finger location along the fingerboard. Sound frequencies emerging from different violins could be very different based on their architecture, the nature of strings and their tuning. Analogously, active neuronal dendrites, dendrites endowed with active channel conductances, are tuned to distinct input frequencies in a manner that is dependent on the dendritic location of the synaptic inputs. Further, disparate channel expression profiles and differences in morphological characteristics could result in dendrites on different neurons of the same subtype tuned to distinct frequency ranges. Alternately, similar location-dependence along dendritic structures could be achieved through disparate combinations of channel profiles and morphological characteristics, leading to degeneracy in active dendritic spectral tuning. Akin to strings on a violin being tuned to different frequencies than those on a viola or a cello, different neuronal subtypes exhibit distinct channel profiles and disparate morphological characteristics endowing each neuronal subtype with unique location-dependent frequency selectivity. Finally, similar to the tunability of musical instruments to elicit distinct location-dependent sounds, neuronal frequency selectivity and its location-dependence are tunable through activity-dependent plasticity of ion channels and morphology. In this morceau, we explore the origins of neuronal frequency selectivity, and survey the literature on the mechanisms behind the emergence of location-dependence in distinct forms of frequency tuning. As a coda to this composition, we present some future directions for this exciting convergence of biophysical mechanisms that endow a neuron with frequency multiplexing capabilities.

  10. Strong invariance principles for sequential Bahadur--Kiefer and Vervaat error processes of long-range dependent sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Csörgő, Miklós; Szyszkowicz, Barbara; Wang, Lihong

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we study strong approximations (invariance principles) of the sequential uniform and general Bahadur--Kiefer processes of long-range dependent sequences. We also investigate the strong and weak asymptotic behavior of the sequential Vervaat process, that is, the integrated sequential Bahadur--Kiefer process, properly normalized, as well as that of its deviation from its limiting process, the so-called Vervaat error process. It is well known that the Bahadur--Kiefer and the Vervaa...

  11. Strong renormalization scheme dependence in τ-lepton decay: Fact or fiction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chyla, J.

    1995-01-01

    The question of the renormalization scheme dependence of the τ semileptonic decay rate is examined in response to a recent criticism. Particular attention is payed to a distinction between a consistent quantitative description of this dependence and the actual selection of a subset of ''acceptable'' renormalization schemes. It is pointed out that this criticism is valid only within a particular definition of the ''strength'' of the renormalization scheme dependence and should not discourage further attempts to use the semileptonic τ decay rate for quantitative tests of perturbative QCD

  12. On local strong solutions to the three-dimensional nonhomogeneous incompressible magnetohydrodynamic equations with density-dependent viscosity and vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sisi

    2018-04-01

    This paper concerns the three-dimensional nonhomogeneous incompressible magnetohydrodynamic equations with density-dependent viscosity and vacuum on Ω \\subset R^3. The domain Ω \\subset R^3 is a general connected smooth one, either bounded or unbounded. In particular, the initial density can have compact support when Ω is unbounded. First, we obtain the local existence and uniqueness of strong solution to the three-dimensional nonhomogeneous incompressible magnetohydrodynamic equations without any compatibility condition assumed on the initial data. Then, we also prove the continuous dependence of strong solution on the initial data under an additional compatibility condition.

  13. Precise Aperture-Dependent Motion Compensation with Frequency Domain Fast Back-Projection Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Precise azimuth-variant motion compensation (MOCO is an essential and difficult task for high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR imagery. In conventional post-filtering approaches, residual azimuth-variant motion errors are generally compensated through a set of spatial post-filters, where the coarse-focused image is segmented into overlapped blocks concerning the azimuth-dependent residual errors. However, image domain post-filtering approaches, such as precise topography- and aperture-dependent motion compensation algorithm (PTA, have difficulty of robustness in declining, when strong motion errors are involved in the coarse-focused image. In this case, in order to capture the complete motion blurring function within each image block, both the block size and the overlapped part need necessary extension leading to degeneration of efficiency and robustness inevitably. Herein, a frequency domain fast back-projection algorithm (FDFBPA is introduced to deal with strong azimuth-variant motion errors. FDFBPA disposes of the azimuth-variant motion errors based on a precise azimuth spectrum expression in the azimuth wavenumber domain. First, a wavenumber domain sub-aperture processing strategy is introduced to accelerate computation. After that, the azimuth wavenumber spectrum is partitioned into a set of wavenumber blocks, and each block is formed into a sub-aperture coarse resolution image via the back-projection integral. Then, the sub-aperture images are straightforwardly fused together in azimuth wavenumber domain to obtain a full resolution image. Moreover, chirp-Z transform (CZT is also introduced to implement the sub-aperture back-projection integral, increasing the efficiency of the algorithm. By disusing the image domain post-filtering strategy, robustness of the proposed algorithm is improved. Both simulation and real-measured data experiments demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of the proposal.

  14. In Vivo and In Silico Investigation Into Mechanisms of Frequency Dependence of Repolarization Alternans in Human Ventricular Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Orini, Michele; Hanson, Ben; Hayward, Martin; Taggart, Peter; Lambiase, Pier D; Burrage, Kevin; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2016-01-22

    Repolarization alternans (RA) are associated with arrhythmogenesis. Animal studies have revealed potential mechanisms, but human-focused studies are needed. RA generation and frequency dependence may be determined by cell-to-cell variability in protein expression, which is regulated by genetic and external factors. To characterize in vivo RA in human and to investigate in silico using human models, the ionic mechanisms underlying the frequency-dependent differences in RA behavior identified in vivo. In vivo electrograms were acquired at 240 sites covering the epicardium of 41 patients at 6 cycle lengths (600-350 ms). In silico investigations were conducted using a population of biophysically detailed human models incorporating variability in protein expression and calibrated using in vivo recordings. Both in silico and in vivo, 2 types of RA were identified, with Fork- and Eye-type restitution curves, based on RA persistence or disappearance, respectively, at fast pacing rates. In silico simulations show that RA are strongly correlated with fluctuations in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium, because of strong release and weak reuptake. Large L-type calcium current conductance is responsible for RA disappearance at fast frequencies in Eye-type (30% larger in Eye-type versus Fork-type; Psilico, 2 types of RA are identified, with RA persistence/disappearance as frequency increases. In silico, L-type calcium current and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger current determine RA human cell-to-cell differences through intracellular and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium regulation. © 2015 The Authors.

  15. Anomalous frequency-dependent ionic conductivity of lesion-laden human-brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emin, David; Akhtari, Massoud; Fallah, Aria; Vinters, Harry V.; Mathern, Gary W.

    2017-10-01

    We study the effect of lesions on our four-electrode measurements of the ionic conductivity of (˜1 cm3) samples of human brain excised from patients undergoing pediatric epilepsy surgery. For most (˜94%) samples, the low-frequency ionic conductivity rises upon increasing the applied frequency. We attributed this behavior to the long-range (˜0.4 mm) diffusion of solvated sodium cations before encountering intrinsic impenetrable blockages such as cell membranes, blood vessels, and cell walls. By contrast, the low-frequency ionic conductivity of some (˜6%) brain-tissue samples falls with increasing applied frequency. We attribute this unusual frequency-dependence to the electric-field induced liberation of sodium cations from traps introduced by the unusually severe pathology observed in samples from these patients. Thus, the anomalous frequency-dependence of the ionic conductivity indicates trap-producing brain lesions.

  16. Effect of excitation frequency on temperature dependent electroluminescence of ZnS : Cu, Mn : (H)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, L.K.

    1986-04-01

    The temperature dependent electroluminescence yields of Hydrogen coactivated (ZnS : Cu, Mn) Phosphor have been investigated under the influence of excitation field frequencies. It was observed that brightness maximum of electroluminescent intensity shifts towards higher temperature region for all emissions. The shift for blue emission is remarkable at some higher frequency. Electroluminescent output under simultaneous effect of frequency and temperature shows the validity of interrelation, f=A e(-c/KT). (author)

  17. Frequency dependence of the pump-to-signal RIN transfer in fiber optical parametric amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakarzadeh Dezfuli Nezhad, Hassan; Rottwitt, Karsten; Zakery, A.

    2009-01-01

    Using a numerical model, the frequency dependence of the pump-to-signal RIN transfer in FOPAs has been investigated. The model includes fiber loss, pump depletion as well as difference in group velocity among interacting beams.......Using a numerical model, the frequency dependence of the pump-to-signal RIN transfer in FOPAs has been investigated. The model includes fiber loss, pump depletion as well as difference in group velocity among interacting beams....

  18. STRONG VELOCITY DEPENDENCE OF ELECTRON-CAPTURE IN COLLISIONS BETWEEN ALIGNED NA-ASTERISK(3P) AND HE-2+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHLATMANN, AR; HOEKSTRA, R; MORGENSTERN, R; OLSON, RE; PASCALE, J

    1993-01-01

    By analyzing spectra of emitted photons, we have studied state-selective electron capture in collisions of He2+ on aligned Na*(3p) atoms that span the ''velocity-matching'' energy between projectile and target electron. We find a strong dependence of the capture cross sections on the Na*(3p) orbital

  19. A note on the almost sure central limit theorems for the maxima of strongly dependent nonstationary Gaussian vector sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zeng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We prove some almost sure central limit theorems for the maxima of strongly dependent nonstationary Gaussian vector sequences under some mild conditions. The results extend the ASCLT to nonstationary Gaussian vector sequences and give substantial improvements for the weight sequence obtained by Lin et al. (Comput. Math. Appl. 62(2:635-640, 2011.

  20. Recognition of speech in noise after application of time-frequency masks: dependence on frequency and threshold parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinex, Donal G

    2013-04-01

    Binary time-frequency (TF) masks can be applied to separate speech from noise. Previous studies have shown that with appropriate parameters, ideal TF masks can extract highly intelligible speech even at very low speech-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Two psychophysical experiments provided additional information about the dependence of intelligibility on the frequency resolution and threshold criteria that define the ideal TF mask. Listeners identified AzBio Sentences in noise, before and after application of TF masks. Masks generated with 8 or 16 frequency bands per octave supported nearly-perfect identification. Word recognition accuracy was slightly lower and more variable with 4 bands per octave. When TF masks were generated with a local threshold criterion of 0 dB SNR, the mean speech reception threshold was -9.5 dB SNR, compared to -5.7 dB for unprocessed sentences in noise. Speech reception thresholds decreased by about 1 dB per dB of additional decrease in the local threshold criterion. Information reported here about the dependence of speech intelligibility on frequency and level parameters has relevance for the development of non-ideal TF masks for clinical applications such as speech processing for hearing aids.

  1. Mutational jackpot events generate effective frequency-dependent selection in adapting populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallatschek, Oskar

    The site-frequency spectrum is one the most easily measurable quantities that characterize the genetic diversity of a population. While most neutral models predict that site frequency spectra should decay with increasing frequency, a high-frequency uptick has been reported in many populations. Anomalies in the high-frequency tail are particularly unsettling because the highest frequencies can be measured with greatest accuracy. Here, we show that an uptick in the spectrum of neutral mutations generally arises when mutant frequencies are dominated by rare jackpot events, mutational events with large descendant numbers. This leads to an effective pattern of frequency-dependent selection (or unstable internal equilibrium at one half frequency) that causes an accumulation of high-frequency polymorphic sites. We reproduce the known uptick occurring for recurrent hitchhiking (genetic draft) as well as rapid adaptation, and (in the future) generalize the shape of the high-frequency tail to other scenarios that are dominated by jackpot events, such as frequent range expansions. We also tackle (in the future) the inverse approach to use the high-frequency uptick for learning about the tail of the offspring number distribution. Positively selected alleles need to surpass, typically, an u NSF Career Award (PoLS), NIH NIGMS R01, Simons Foundation.

  2. Rapid Transition of the Hole Rashba Effect from Strong Field Dependence to Saturation in Semiconductor Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jun-Wei; Li, Shu-Shen; Zunger, Alex

    2017-09-22

    The electric field manipulation of the Rashba spin-orbit coupling effects provides a route to electrically control spins, constituting the foundation of the field of semiconductor spintronics. In general, the strength of the Rashba effects depends linearly on the applied electric field and is significant only for heavy-atom materials with large intrinsic spin-orbit interaction under high electric fields. Here, we illustrate in 1D semiconductor nanowires an anomalous field dependence of the hole (but not electron) Rashba effect (HRE). (i) At low fields, the strength of the HRE exhibits a steep increase with the field so that even low fields can be used for device switching. (ii) At higher fields, the HRE undergoes a rapid transition to saturation with a giant strength even for light-atom materials such as Si (exceeding 100 meV Å). (iii) The nanowire-size dependence of the saturation HRE is rather weak for light-atom Si, so size fluctuations would have a limited effect; this is a key requirement for scalability of Rashba-field-based spintronic devices. These three features offer Si nanowires as a promising platform for the realization of scalable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible spintronic devices.

  3. Comparison of Bergeron and Frequency-dependent cable models for the simulation of electromagnetic transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da

    2016-01-01

    is simulated for three different target frequencies: transient’s resonance frequency, 50Hz and an in-between frequency. The results are analysed theoretically using modal propagation theory and the error is quantified for the case under examination. It is concluded that for a realistic case, which requires...... analyses the simulation errors of different Bergeron models to a reference frequency-dependent model for a 150kV cable. The simulations consider flat and trefoil installation, both-ends bonding and cross-bonding, ideal voltage source and modelling of the area around the cable. The Bergeron model...

  4. Frequency-dependent changes of local resting oscillations in sleep-deprived brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Gao

    Full Text Available Sleep deprivation (SD adversely affects brain function and is accompanied by frequency dependent changes in EEG. Recent studies have suggested that BOLD fluctuations pertain to a spatiotemporal organization with different frequencies. The present study aimed to investigate the frequency-dependent SD-related brain oscillatory activity by using the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF analysis. The ALFF changes were measured across different frequencies (Slow-4: 0.027-0.073 Hz; Slow-5: 0.01-0.027 Hz; and Typical band: 0.01-0.08 Hz in 24 h SD as compared to rested wakeful during resting-state fMRI. Sixteen volunteers underwent two fMRI sessions, once during rested wakefulness and once after 24 h of SD. SD showed prominently decreased ALFF in the right inferior parietal lobule (IPL, bilateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, while increased ALFF in the visual cortex, left sensorimotor cortex and fusiform gyrus. Across the Slow-4 and Slow-5, results differed significantly in the OFC, DLPFC, thalamus and caudate in comparison to typical frequency band; and Slow-4 showed greater differences. In addition, negative correlations of behavior performance and ALFF patterns were found mainly in the right IPL across the typical frequency band. These observations provided novel insights about the physiological responses of SD, identified how it disturbs the brain rhythms, and linked SD with frequency-dependent alterations in amplitude patterns.

  5. Dependence of modal attenuation coefficient frequency variation on upper sediment attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saintval, Wendy; Siegmann, William L.; Carey, William M.; Pierce, Allan D.; Lynch, James F.

    2005-04-01

    The range-averaged transmission loss increase in shallow water propagation depends critically on the intrinsic attenuation of the upper sediment. The attenuation coefficients of low-frequency (sandy-silty sediments are compared to numerical calculations, it is found that a nonlinear-frequency dependent attenuation is required with an exponent between 1.5 and 2. The question considered here is how the intrinsic upper-sediment attenuation produces such behavior. A recent simplification of the Biot model [A. D. Pierce et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 2345 (2003)] has a power-law exponent of two. With this frequency-dependent bottom attenuation, a two-layer Pekeris waveguide yields modal attenuation coefficients that decrease with frequency as observed by Ingenito. However, a depth-dependent attenuation profile or a third near-surface layer with requisite properties can reverse this behavior. This suggests why higher-frequency numerical computations may require nonlinear frequency-dependent sediment profiles to calculate sound transmission accurately. [Work partially supported by ONR.

  6. Characterization of frequency-dependent glass transition temperature by Vogel-Fulcher relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Yu; Jin Li

    2008-01-01

    The complex mechanical modulus of polymer and polymer based composite materials showed a frequency-dependent behaviour during glass transition relaxation, which was historically modelled by the Arrhenius equation. However, this might not be true in a broad frequency domain based on the experience from the frequency dependence of the complex dielectric permittivity, which resulted from the same glass transition relaxation as for the complex mechanical modulus. Considering a good correspondence between dielectric and mechanical relaxation during glass transition, the Vogel-Fulcher relationship, previously proposed for the frequency dependence of dielectric permittivity, is introduced for that of the mechanical modulus; and the corresponding static glass transition temperature (T f ) was first determined for polymer and polymer based composite materials. (fast track communication)

  7. Laser based imaging of time depending microscopic scenes with strong light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahlweg, Cornelius; Wilhelm, Eugen; Rothe, Hendrik

    2011-10-01

    Investigating volume scatterometry methods based on short range LIDAR devices for non-static objects we achieved interesting results aside the intended micro-LIDAR: the high speed camera recording of the illuminated scene of an exploding wire -intended for Doppler LIDAR tests - delivered a very effective method of observing details of objects with extremely strong light emission. As a side effect a schlieren movie is gathered without any special effort. The fact that microscopic features of short time processes with high emission and material flow might be imaged without endangering valuable equipment makes this technique at least as interesting as the intended one. So we decided to present our results - including latest video and photo material - instead of a more theoretical paper on our progress concerning the primary goal.

  8. Stay tuned: active amplification tunes tree cricket ears to track temperature-dependent song frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhatre, Natasha; Pollack, Gerald; Mason, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Tree cricket males produce tonal songs, used for mate attraction and male-male interactions. Active mechanics tunes hearing to conspecific song frequency. However, tree cricket song frequency increases with temperature, presenting a problem for tuned listeners. We show that the actively amplified frequency increases with temperature, thus shifting mechanical and neuronal auditory tuning to maintain a match with conspecific song frequency. Active auditory processes are known from several taxa, but their adaptive function has rarely been demonstrated. We show that tree crickets harness active processes to ensure that auditory tuning remains matched to conspecific song frequency, despite changing environmental conditions and signal characteristics. Adaptive tuning allows tree crickets to selectively detect potential mates or rivals over large distances and is likely to bestow a strong selective advantage by reducing mate-finding effort and facilitating intermale interactions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Generalized Doppler and aberration kernel for frequency-dependent cosmological observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasini, Siavash; Pierpaoli, Elena

    2017-11-01

    We introduce a frequency-dependent Doppler and aberration transformation kernel for the harmonic multipoles of a general cosmological observable with spin weight s , Doppler weight d and arbitrary frequency spectrum. In the context of cosmic microwave background (CMB) studies, the frequency-dependent formalism allows to correct for the motion-induced aberration and Doppler effects on individual frequency maps with different masks. It also permits to deboost background radiations with non-blackbody frequency spectra, like extragalactic foregrounds and CMB spectra with primordial spectral distortions. The formalism can also be used to correct individual E and B polarization modes and account for motion-induced E/B mixing of polarized observables with d ≠1 at different frequencies. We apply the generalized aberration kernel on polarized and unpolarized specific intensity at 100 and 217 GHz and show that the motion-induced effects typically increase with the frequency of observation. In all-sky CMB experiments, the frequency-dependence of the motion-induced effects for a blackbody spectrum are overall negligible. However in a cut-sky analysis, ignoring the frequency dependence can lead to percent level error in the polarized and unpolarized power spectra over all angular scales. In the specific cut-sky used in our analysis (b >4 5 ° ,fsky≃14 % ), and for the dipole-inferred velocity β =0.00123 typically attributed to our peculiar motion, the Doppler and aberration effects can change polarized and unpolarized power spectra of specific intensity in the CMB rest frame by 1 - 2 % , but we find the polarization cross-leakage between E and B modes to be negligible.

  10. Orientation dependent slip and twinning during compression and tension of strongly textured magnesium AZ31 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Samman, T., E-mail: al-samman@imm.rwth-aachen.de [Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, RWTH Aachen, Kopernikusstr. 14, D-52064 Aachen (Germany); Li, X. [Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, RWTH Aachen, Kopernikusstr. 14, D-52064 Aachen (Germany); Chowdhury, S. Ghosh [CSIR National Metallurgical Laboratory, MST Division, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

    2010-06-15

    Over recent years there have been a remarkable number of studies dealing with compression of magnesium. A literature search, however, shows a noticeably less number of papers concerned with tension and a very few papers comparing both modes, systematically, in one study. The current investigation reports the anisotropic deformation behavior and concomitant texture and microstructure evolution investigated in uniaxial tension and compression tests in two sample directions performed on an extruded commercial magnesium alloy AZ31 at different Z conditions. For specimens with the loading direction parallel to the extrusion axis, the tension-compression strength anisotropy was pronounced at high Z conditions. Loading at 45{sup o} from the extrusion axis yielded a tension-compression strength behavior that was close to isotropic. During tensile loading along the extrusion direction the extrusion texture resists twinning and favors prismatic slip (contrary to compression). This renders the shape change maximum in the basal plane and equal to zero along the c-axis, which resulted in the orientation of individual grains remaining virtually intact during all tension tests at different Z conditions. For the other investigated sample direction, straining was accommodated along the c-axis, which was associated with a lattice rotation, and thus, a change of crystal orientation. Uniaxial compression at a low Z condition (400 deg. C/10{sup -4} s{sup -1}) yielded a desired texture degeneration, which was explained on the basis of a more homogeneous partitioning of slip systems that reduces anisotropy and enhanced dynamic recrystallization (DRX), which counteracts the strong deformation texture. The critical strains for the nucleation of DRX in tensiled specimens at the highest investigated Z condition (200 deg. C/10{sup -2} s{sup -1}) were found to range between 4% and 5.6%.

  11. Traveltime dispersion in an isotropic elastic mantle: strong lower-mantle signal in differential-frequency residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuberth, Bernhard S. A.; Zaroli, Christophe; Nolet, Guust

    2015-12-01

    signals depending on the associated wavelengths and the length scales of structure at shallow depth. Differential-frequency residuals may thus prove useful to precondition tomographic inversions for the lower-mantle structure such as to reduce the influence of the upper mantle for certain length scales. Overall, standard deviations of the diffraction-induced traveltime dispersion between the longest (51 s) and the shortest (15 s) period considered here are 0.6 and 1.0 s for P- and S-waves, respectively. For comparison, the corresponding standard deviations of the 15 s residuals are 1.0 s and 2.8 s. In the lower-mantle model, standard deviations are 0.3 and 0.6 s, respectively, which gives an average lower-mantle contribution to the total dispersion of 50 per cent for P-waves and 60 per cent for S-waves.

  12. Dependence of low-frequency sonophoresis on ultrasound parameters; distance of the horn and intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terahara, T; Mitragotri, S; Kost, J; Langer, R

    2002-03-20

    Sonophoresis at a frequency of 20 kHz has been shown to enhance transdermal drug delivery, a phenomenon referred to as low-frequency sonophoresis. This study provides an investigation of the dependence of low-frequency sonophoresis on various ultrasound parameters, including the distance of the horn from the skin, intensity, and frequency. We performed in vitro experiments with full thickness pig skin to measure enhancements of skin conductivity and drug permeability. Ultrasound was applied to pretreat the skin using a sonicator operating at a frequency of either 20 or 40 kHz. We also measured pitting of aluminum foil to measure cavitation, which is the principal mechanism of low-frequency sonophoresis. The skin conductivity enhancement was found to be inversely proportional to the distance of the horn from the skin. As the intensity increased, skin conductivity enhancement also increased up to a certain threshold, and then dropped off. The intensities (I(max)) at which maximum enhancement occur are about 14 W/cm2 for 20 kHz and 17 W/cm2 for 40 kHz. These findings may be useful in optimizing low-frequency sonophoresis. Overall, the dependence of transport on ultrasound parameters is similar to that of aluminum foil pitting. These results support the role of cavitation in low-frequency sonophoresis.

  13. Temperature dependence of low-frequency polarized Raman scattering spectra in TlInS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paucar, Raul; Wakita, Kazuki [Electronics and Computer Engineering, Chiba Institute of Technology, Chiba (Japan); Shim, YongGu; Mimura, Kojiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka (Japan); Alekperov, Oktay; Mamedov, Nazim [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2017-06-15

    In this work, we examined phase transitions in the layered ternary thallium chalcogenide TlInS{sub 2} by studying the temperature dependence of polarized Raman spectra with the aid of the Raman confocal microscope system. The Raman spectra were measured over the temperature range of 77-320 K (which includes the range of successive phase transitions) in the low-frequency region of 35-180 cm{sup -1}. The optical phonons that showed strong temperature dependence were identified as interlayer vibrations related to phase transitions, while the phonons that showed weak temperature dependence were identified as intralayer vibrations. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Frequency-dependent Lg attenuation in Northeast China and its implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Nishath Rajiv; Gallegos, Andrea; Hearn, Thomas; Ni, James; Sandvol, Eric

    2018-03-01

    Lg attenuation and site responses in Northeast (NE) China are estimated by implementing the Reverse Two Station Method (RTSM) at narrow band central frequencies of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 Hz using 453 earthquakes recorded by 201 seismic stations deployed in the region from 1995 to 2013. The RTSM has the advantage of removing source and site effects without requiring a priori models. Tomographic images produced at a resolution of 2° × 2° at all frequencies exhibit a high degree of lateral variation of Lg attenuation in NE China. The Great Xing'an, Lesser Xing'an and Songen-Zhangguangcai Ranges show Q values above 400 at all frequencies. At central frequencies of 0.5 and 1 Hz, Sanjiang Basin Songliao Basin, Erlian Basin and Hailar Basin consistently show Q values lower than 400. Holocene and Pleistocene volcanoes, including the Wudalianchi and Jingpuhi volcanic fields, also appear as regions of low Q (frequencies the effects of volcanoes diminish. At high frequencies (≥2 Hz), the sedimentary basins show Q values higher than 400 and overall Q values increase with frequency in NE China, thus obeying a power-law frequency dependence. A linear regression of frequencies in the range of 0.25-4.5 Hz results in the parameters describing the power-law frequency dependence of the region, with an average Q0 value of 428 and a frequency-dependent factor (η), describing the strength of dependence, of 0.68. Overall, Lg attenuation in NE China appears to be due to thick late Cretaceous sediments, Holocene and Pleistocene volcanism, moderate to high heat flow, partial melts and variation in the thickness of the crustal wave guide. The site responses calculated at 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3 Hz show a high degree of lateral variation as well as variation with frequency in NE China. At 0.5 and 1.0 Hz, the Great Xing'an and Lesser Xing'an Ranges show deamplification while the Hailar, Erlian and southern Songliao basins and the Songen-Zhangguangcai Range show amplification. At higher

  15. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faqi Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102. This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results.

  16. PROLARM: Cancer risk from medical diagnostic exposures is strongly dependent upon patients' prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschner, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Matthias; Dietlein, Markus; Schicha, Harald

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: a) To evaluate the impact of the reduced life expectancy of patients (compared to a non-patient group with same age distribution) on their risk of developing cancer from the diagnostic use of radiation. b) To find an approximation to such reduction in risk which depends only on the patient's age, a, and his life expectancy, but is independent of the choice of values for the baseline risk of cancer incidence, m(a), and the enhanced relative risk ERR(a) from radiation exposure. Method: The lifetime attributable risk LAR (of a radiation-induced malignancy to manifest itself) is a function of age at exposure, e, and given by integrating over attained age, a, the product of ERR(a), baseline cancer risk m(a) and the relative probability of surviving to age a, S'(a,e). We define a 'prognosis-based LAR modifier' (PROLARM) as the ratio of risks for non-patient, LAR(a), and patient, LAR p (a), a dimensionless quantity that gives a measure of reduction of LAR due to the patient's prognosis. With the survival of the patient group, S p ' (a,e), and for any choice of fitted function for ERR(a) like those used in BEIR VII report, PROLARM ≥∫d'(a,e) da/∫S p '(a,e) da, i.e. the ratio of the survival integrals gives a lower (thus conservative) estimate of the reduction in risk. Results: The method was applied to n=4285 patients with metastatic breast cancer for whom survival as a function of age at metastasis was known. Figure shows that LAR is decreased significantly for all ages at exposure. At younger ages, this decrease is more pronounced (PROLARM ≥ 20 for e ≤ 65). Example: using ERR values of BEIR VII, the LAR due to 10 mSv effective dose at age a = 50 would drop from 1.2 E-3 for non-patient to 4.3E-5 for a patient, i.e. by a factor (PROLARM) of 29. Using only survival data, that factor is 27 (but no LAR can be computed). In other words: 10 mSv for a patient correspond risk-wise to 0.4 mSv for non-patient. The method can be applied to any pathology

  17. Hydrogen-enhanced fatigue crack growth in steels and its frequency dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Hisao; Takakuwa, Osamu; Yamabe, Junichiro; Matsuoka, Saburo

    2017-06-01

    In the context of the fatigue life design of components, particularly those destined for use in hydrogen refuelling stations and fuel cell vehicles, it is important to understand the hydrogen-induced, fatigue crack growth (FCG) acceleration in steels. As such, the mechanisms for acceleration and its influencing factors are reviewed and discussed in this paper, with a special focus on the peculiar frequency dependence of the hydrogen-induced FCG acceleration. Further, this frequency dependence is debated by introducing some potentially responsible elements, along with new experimental data obtained by the authors. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  18. Frequency dependent loss analysis and minimization of system losses in switchmode audio power amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamauchi, Akira; Knott, Arnold; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, frequency dependent losses in switch-mode audio power amplifiers are analyzed and a loss model is improved by taking the voltage dependence of the parasitic capacitance of MOSFETs into account. The estimated power losses are compared to the measurement and great accuracy is achieved....... By choosing the optimal switching frequency based on the proposed analysis, the experimental results show that system power losses of the reference design are minimized and an efficiency improvement of 8 % in maximum is achieved without compromising audio performances....

  19. Visuomotor Entrainment and the Frequency-Dependent Response of Walking Balance to Perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Jason R; Francis, Carrie; Allen, Matt; Thelen, Darryl G

    2016-08-26

    Visuomotor entrainment, or the synchronization of motor responses to visual stimuli, is a naturally emergent phenomenon in human standing. Our purpose was to investigate the prevalence and resolution of visuomotor entrainment in walking and the frequency-dependent response of walking balance to perturbations. We used a virtual reality environment to manipulate optical flow in ten healthy young adults during treadmill walking. A motion capture system recorded trunk, sacrum, and heel marker trajectories during a series of 3-min conditions in which we perturbed a virtual hallway mediolaterally with systematic changes in the driving frequencies of perceived motion. We quantified visuomotor entrainment using spectral analyses and balance deficits using trunk sway, gait variability, and detrended fluctuation analyses (DFA). ML kinematics were highly sensitive to visual perturbations, and instinctively synchronized (i.e., entrained) to a broad range of driving frequencies of perceived ML motion. However, the influence of visual perturbations on metrics of walking balance was frequency-dependent and governed by their proximity to stride frequency. Specifically, we found that a driving frequency nearest to subjects' average stride frequency uniquely compromised trunk sway, gait variability, and step-to-step correlations. We conclude that visuomotor entrainment is a robust and naturally emerging phenomenon during human walking, involving coordinated and frequency-dependent adjustments in trunk sway and foot placement to maintain balance at the whole-body level. These findings provide mechanistic insight into how the visuomotor control of walking balance is disrupted by visual perturbations and important reference values for the emergence of balance deficits due to age, injury, or disease.

  20. Numerical Study of Frequency-dependent Seismoelectric Coupling in Partially-saturated Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djuraev Ulugbek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The seismoelectric phenomenon associated with propagation of seismic waves in fluid-saturated porous media has been studied for many decades. The method has a great potential to monitor subsurface fluid saturation changes associated with production of hydrocarbons. Frequency of the seismic source has a significant impact on measurement of the seismoelectric effects. In this paper, the effects of seismic wave frequency and water saturation on the seismoelectric response of a partially-saturated porous media is studied numerically. The conversion of seismic wave to electromagnetic wave was modelled by extending the theoretically developed seismoelectric coupling coefficient equation. We assumed constant values of pore radius and zeta-potential of 80 micrometers and 48 microvolts, respectively. Our calculations of the coupling coefficient were conducted at various water saturation values in the frequency range of 10 kHz to 150 kHz. The results show that the seismoelectric coupling is frequency-dependent and decreases exponentially when frequency increases. Similar trend is seen when water saturation is varied at different frequencies. However, when water saturation is less than about 0.6, the effect of frequency is significant. On the other hand, when the water saturation is greater than 0.6, the coupling coefficient shows monotonous trend when water saturation is increased at constant frequency.

  1. Dependence of the colored frequency noise in spin torque oscillators on current and magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eklund, Anders; Sani, Sohrab R.; Chung, Sunjae; Amir Hossein Banuazizi, S.; Östling, Mikael; Gunnar Malm, B.; Bonetti, Stefano; Majid Mohseni, S.; Persson, Johan; Iacocca, Ezio; Åkerman, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The nano-scale spin torque oscillator (STO) is a compelling device for on-chip, highly tunable microwave frequency signal generation. Currently, one of the most important challenges for the STO is to increase its longer-time frequency stability by decreasing the 1/f frequency noise, but its high level makes even its measurement impossible using the phase noise mode of spectrum analyzers. Here, we present a custom made time-domain measurement system with 150 MHz measurement bandwidth making possible the investigation of the variation of the 1/f as well as the white frequency noise in a STO over a large set of operating points covering 18–25 GHz. The 1/f level is found to be highly dependent on the oscillation amplitude-frequency non-linearity and the vicinity of unexcited oscillation modes. These findings elucidate the need for a quantitative theoretical treatment of the low-frequency, colored frequency noise in STOs. Based on the results, we suggest that the 1/f frequency noise possibly can be decreased by improving the microstructural quality of the metallic thin films

  2. Spatial resolution dependence on spectral frequency in human speech cortex electrocorticography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Leah; Hamilton, Liberty S.; Edwards, Erik; Bouchard, Kristofer E.; Chang, Edward F.

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Electrocorticography (ECoG) has become an important tool in human neuroscience and has tremendous potential for emerging applications in neural interface technology. Electrode array design parameters are outstanding issues for both research and clinical applications, and these parameters depend critically on the nature of the neural signals to be recorded. Here, we investigate the functional spatial resolution of neural signals recorded at the human cortical surface. We empirically derive spatial spread functions to quantify the shared neural activity for each frequency band of the electrocorticogram. Approach. Five subjects with high-density (4 mm center-to-center spacing) ECoG grid implants participated in speech perception and production tasks while neural activity was recorded from the speech cortex, including superior temporal gyrus, precentral gyrus, and postcentral gyrus. The cortical surface field potential was decomposed into traditional EEG frequency bands. Signal similarity between electrode pairs for each frequency band was quantified using a Pearson correlation coefficient. Main results. The correlation of neural activity between electrode pairs was inversely related to the distance between the electrodes; this relationship was used to quantify spatial falloff functions for cortical subdomains. As expected, lower frequencies remained correlated over larger distances than higher frequencies. However, both the envelope and phase of gamma and high gamma frequencies (30-150 Hz) are largely uncorrelated (<90%) at 4 mm, the smallest spacing of the high-density arrays. Thus, ECoG arrays smaller than 4 mm have significant promise for increasing signal resolution at high frequencies, whereas less additional gain is achieved for lower frequencies. Significance. Our findings quantitatively demonstrate the dependence of ECoG spatial resolution on the neural frequency of interest. We demonstrate that this relationship is consistent across patients and

  3. Maxwell-Wagner polarization and frequency-dependent injection at aqueous electrical interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Mitchell; Mavrogiannis, Nicholas; Gagnon, Zachary

    2012-11-02

    We demonstrate a new type of alternating current (ac) interfacial polarization and frequency-dependent fluid displacement phenomenon at a liquid-liquid electrical interface. Two fluid streams--one with a greater electrical conductivity and the other a greater dielectric constant--are made to flow side by side in a microfluidic channel. An ac electric field is applied perpendicular to the interface formed between the liquid lamellae, and fluid is observed to displace across the liquid-liquid interface. The direction and magnitude of this displacement is frequency dependent. At low ac frequency, below the interfacial inverse charge relaxation time, the high-conductivity fluid displaces into the high-dielectric stream. At high frequency the direction of liquid displacement reverses, and the high-dielectric stream injects into the high-conductivity stream. The interfacial crossover frequency where the liquid displacement direction reverses is dependent on differences in electrical properties between the two fluid streams, and is well explained by Maxwell-Wagner polarization mechanics.

  4. Low-frequency (0.7-7.4 mHz geomagnetic field fluctuations at high latitude: frequency dependence of the polarization pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Cafarella

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A statistical analysis of the polarization pattern of low-frequency geomagnetic field fluctuations (0.7-7.4 mHz covering the entire 24-h interval was performed at the Antarctic station Terra Nova Bay (80.0°S geomagnetic latitude throughout 1997 and 1998. The results show that the polarization pattern exhibits a frequency dependence, as can be expected from the frequency dependence of the latitude where the coupling between the magnetospheric compressional mode and the field line resonance takes place. The polarization analysis of single pulsation events shows that wave packets with different polarization sense, depending on frequency, can be simultaneously observed.

  5. Frequency-dependent effects of the pyrethroid insecticide decamethrin in frog myelinated nerve fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijverberg, H.P.M.; Bercken, J. van den

    1979-01-01

    The pyrethroid insectide decamethrin (10−6M) caused a frequency-dependent depression of the action potential in frog myelinated nerve fibres which was associated with a progressive membrane depolarisation brought about by summation of depolarising after-potentials. Voltage clamp experiments with

  6. Ecological genetics of the Bromus tectorum (Poaceae) - Ustilago Bullata (Ustilaginaceae): A role for frequency dependent selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan E. Meyer; David L. Nelson; Suzette Clement; Alisa Ramakrishnan

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary processes that maintain genetic diversity in plants are likely to include selection imposed by pathogens. Negative frequency-dependent selection is a mechanism for maintenance of resistance polymorphism in plant - pathogen interactions. We explored whether such selection operates in the Bromus tectorum - Ustilago bullata pathosystem. Gene-for-gene...

  7. Assessing frequency-dependent site polarisabilities in linear response polarisable embedding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Morten S.; Vahtras, Olav; Norman, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    equations defining specific molecular properties. On the other hand, we also show from a numerical point of view that the consequences of using such a frequency-dependent embedding potential is almost negligible. Thus, for the kind of systems and processes studied in this paper the general recommendation...

  8. Evolution of dominance under frequency-dependent intraspecific competition in an assortatively mating population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peischl, Stephan; Schneider, Kristan A

    2010-02-01

    We study the evolution of higher levels of dominance as a response to negative frequency-dependent selection. In contrast to previous studies, we focus on the effect of assortative mating on the evolution of dominance under frequency-dependent intraspecific competition. We analyze a two-locus two-allele model, in which the primary locus has a major effect on a quantitative trait that is under a mixture of frequency-independent stabilizing selection, density-dependent selection, and frequency-dependent selection caused by intraspecific competition for a continuum of resources. The second (modifier) locus determines the degree of dominance at the trait level. Additionally, the population mates assortatively with respect to similarities in the ecological trait. Our analysis shows that the parameter region in which dominance can be established decreases if small levels of assortment are introduced. In addition, the degree of dominance that can be established also decreases. In contrast, if assortment is intermediate, sexual selection for extreme types can be established, which leads to evolution of higher levels of dominance than under random mating. For modifiers with large effects, intermediate levels of assortative mating are most favorable for the evolution of dominance. For large modifiers, the speed of fixation can even be higher for intermediate levels of assortative mating than for random mating.

  9. Staurosporine Inhibits Frequency-Dependent Myofilament Desensitization in Intact Rabbit Cardiac Trabeculae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth D. Varian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myofilament calcium sensitivity decreases with frequency in intact healthy rabbit trabeculae and associates with Troponin I and Myosin light chain-2 phosphorylation. We here tested whether serine-threonine kinase activity is primarily responsible for this frequency-dependent modulations of myofilament calcium sensitivity. Right ventricular trabeculae were isolated from New Zealand White rabbit hearts and iontophoretically loaded with bis-fura-2. Twitch force-calcium relationships and steady state force-calcium relationships were measured at frequencies of 1 and 4 Hz at 37 °C. Staurosporine (100 nM, a nonspecific serine-threonine kinase inhibitor, or vehicle (DMSO was included in the superfusion solution before and during the contractures. Staurosporine had no frequency-dependent effect on force development, kinetics, calcium transient amplitude, or rate of calcium transient decline. The shift in the pCa50 of the force-calcium relationship was significant from 6.05±0.04 at 1 Hz versus 5.88±0.06 at 4 Hz under control conditions (vehicle, P<0.001 but not in presence of staurosporine (5.89±0.08 at 1 Hz versus 5.94±0.07 at 4 Hz, P=NS. Phosphoprotein analysis (Pro-Q Diamond stain confirmed that staurosporine significantly blunted the frequency-dependent phosphorylation at Troponin I and Myosin light chain-2. We conclude that frequency-dependent modulation of calcium sensitivity is mediated through a kinase-specific effect involving phosphorylation of myofilament proteins.

  10. Modeling of frequency-dependent negative differential capacitance in InGaAs/InP photodiode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yidong; Chen, Jun; Xu, Jintong; Li, Xiangyang

    2018-03-01

    The negative differential capacitance (NDC) of p-i-n InGaAs/InP photodetector has been clearly observed, and the small signal model of frequency-dependent NDC is established, based on the accumulation and emission of electrons at the p-InP/i-InGaAs interface. The NDC phenomenon is contributed by the additional capacitance (CT), which is caused by the charging-discharging process in the p-InP/i-InGaAs interface. It is found that the NDC becomes more obvious with decreasing frequency, which is consistent with the conclusion of the experiment. It is proved that the probability of electron capture/escape in the p-i interface is affected by frequency. Therefore, the smaller frequency applied, the higher additional capacitance is obtained.

  11. Multi-resonance frequency spin dependent charge pumping and spin dependent recombination - applied to the 4H-SiC/SiO2 interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, M. A.; Lenahan, P. M.; Lelis, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    We report on a new electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) approach involving spin dependent charge pumping (SDCP) and spin dependent recombination (SDR) at high (K band, about 16 GHz) and ultra-low (360 and 85 MHz) magnetic resonance frequencies to investigate the dielectric/semiconductor interface in 4H-SiC metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). A comparison of SDCP and SDR allows for a comparison of deep level defects and defects with energy levels throughout most of the bandgap. Additionally, a comparison of high frequency and ultra-low frequency measurements allows for (1) the partial separation of spin-orbit coupling and hyperfine effects on magnetic resonance spectra, (2) the observation of otherwise forbidden half-field effects, which make EDMR, at least, in principle, quantitative, and (3) the observation of Breit-Rabi shifts in superhyperfine measurements. (Observation of the Breit-Rabi shift helps in both the assignment and the measurement of superhyperfine parameters.) We find that, as earlier work also indicates, the SiC silicon vacancy is the dominating defect in n-MOSFETs with as-grown oxides and that post-oxidation NO anneals significantly reduce their population. In addition, we provide strong evidence that NO anneals result in the presence of nitrogen very close to a large fraction of the silicon vacancies. The results indicate that the presence of nearby nitrogen significantly shifts the silicon vacancy energy levels. Our results also show that the introduction of nitrogen introduces a disorder at the interface. This nitrogen induced disorder may provide at least a partial explanation for the relatively modest improvement in mobility after the NO anneals. Finally, we compare the charge pumping and SDCP response as a function of gate amplitude and charge pumping frequency.

  12. Influence of Gaussian white noise on the frequency-dependent linear polarizability of doped quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganguly, Jayanta [Department of Chemistry, Brahmankhanda Basapara High School, Basapara, Birbhum 731 215, West Bengal (India); Ghosh, Manas, E-mail: pcmg77@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India)

    2014-06-25

    Highlights: • Linear polarizability of quantum dot has been studied. • Quantum dot is doped with a repulsive impurity. • The polarizabilities are frequency-dependent. • Influence of Gaussian white noise has been monitored. • Noise exploited is of additive and multiplicative nature. - Abstract: We investigate the profiles of diagonal components of frequency-dependent linear (α{sub xx} and α{sub yy}) optical response of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots. The dopant impurity potential chosen assumes Gaussian form. The study principally puts emphasis on investigating the role of noise on the polarizability components. In view of this we have exploited Gaussian white noise containing additive and multiplicative characteristics (in Stratonovich sense). The frequency-dependent polarizabilities are studied by exposing the doped dot to a periodically oscillating external electric field of given intensity. The oscillation frequency, confinement potentials, dopant location, and above all, the noise characteristics tune the linear polarizability components in a subtle manner. Whereas the additive noise fails to have any impact on the polarizabilities, the multiplicative noise influences them delicately and gives rise to additional interesting features.

  13. Influence of Gaussian white noise on the frequency-dependent linear polarizability of doped quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Ghosh, Manas

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Linear polarizability of quantum dot has been studied. • Quantum dot is doped with a repulsive impurity. • The polarizabilities are frequency-dependent. • Influence of Gaussian white noise has been monitored. • Noise exploited is of additive and multiplicative nature. - Abstract: We investigate the profiles of diagonal components of frequency-dependent linear (α xx and α yy ) optical response of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots. The dopant impurity potential chosen assumes Gaussian form. The study principally puts emphasis on investigating the role of noise on the polarizability components. In view of this we have exploited Gaussian white noise containing additive and multiplicative characteristics (in Stratonovich sense). The frequency-dependent polarizabilities are studied by exposing the doped dot to a periodically oscillating external electric field of given intensity. The oscillation frequency, confinement potentials, dopant location, and above all, the noise characteristics tune the linear polarizability components in a subtle manner. Whereas the additive noise fails to have any impact on the polarizabilities, the multiplicative noise influences them delicately and gives rise to additional interesting features

  14. Nitric oxide donors enhance the frequency dependence of dopamine release in nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Henrike; Threlfell, Sarah; Cragg, Stephanie J

    2011-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is critically involved in normal as well as maladaptive motivated behaviors including drug addiction. Whether the striatal neuromodulator nitric oxide (NO) influences DA release in NAc is unknown. We investigated whether exogenous NO modulates DA transmission in NAc core and how this interaction varies depending on the frequency of presynaptic activation. We detected DA with cyclic voltammetry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes in mouse NAc in slices following stimuli spanning a full range of DA neuron firing frequencies (1-100 Hz). NO donors 3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1) or z-1-[N-(3-ammoniopropyl)-N-(n-propyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (PAPA/NONOate) enhanced DA release with increasing stimulus frequency. This NO-mediated enhancement of frequency sensitivity of DA release was not prevented by inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), DA transporters, or large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, and did not require glutamatergic or GABAergic input. However, experiments to identify whether frequency-dependent NO effects were mediated via changes in powerful acetylcholine-DA interactions revealed multiple components to NO modulation of DA release. In the presence of a nicotinic receptor antagonist (dihydro-β-erythroidine), NO donors increased DA release in a frequency-independent manner. These data suggest that NO in the NAc can modulate DA release through multiple GC-independent neuronal mechanisms whose net outcome varies depending on the activity in DA neurons and accumbal cholinergic interneurons. In the presence of accumbal acetylcholine, NO promotes the sensitivity of DA release to presynaptic activation, but with reduced acetylcholine input, NO will promote DA release in an activity-independent manner through a direct action on dopaminergic terminals.

  15. Contact area affects frequency-dependent responses to vibration in the peripheral vascular and sensorineural systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnak, Kristine; Miller, G R; Waugh, Stacey

    2018-01-01

    Repetitive exposure to hand-transmitted vibration is associated with development of peripheral vascular and sensorineural dysfunctions. These disorders and symptoms associated with it are referred to as hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). Although the symptoms of the disorder have been well characterized, the etiology and contribution of various exposure factors to development of the dysfunctions are not well understood. Previous studies performed using a rat-tail model of vibration demonstrated that vascular and peripheral nervous system adverse effects of vibration are frequency-dependent, with vibration frequencies at or near the resonant frequency producing the most severe injury. However, in these investigations, the amplitude of the exposed tissue was greater than amplitude typically noted in human fingers. To determine how contact with vibrating source and amplitude of the biodynamic response of the tissue affects the risk of injury occurring, this study compared the influence of frequency using different levels of restraint to assess how maintaining contact of the tail with vibrating source affects the transmission of vibration. Data demonstrated that for the most part, increasing the contact of the tail with the platform by restraining it with additional straps resulted in an enhancement in transmission of vibration signal and elevation in factors associated with vascular and peripheral nerve injury. In addition, there were also frequency-dependent effects, with exposure at 250 Hz generating greater effects than vibration at 62.5 Hz. These observations are consistent with studies in humans demonstrating that greater contact and exposure to frequencies near the resonant frequency pose the highest risk for generating peripheral vascular and sensorineural dysfunction.

  16. Effect of neutron flux on the frequency dependencies of electrical conductivity of silicon nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huseynov, E.; Garibli, A., E-mail: elchin.huse@yahoo.com [National Nuclear Research Center, Department of Nanotechnology and Radiation Material Science, 1073, Inshaatchilar pr. 4, Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2016-11-01

    It has been reviewed the frequency dependencies of electrical conductivity of nanoparticles affected by neutron flux at different times and initial state, at various constant temperatures such as 100, 200, 300 and 400 K. Measurements have been carried out at each temperature at the different 97 values of frequency in the 1 Hz - 1 MHz range. From interdependence between real and imaginary parts of electrical conductivity it has been determined the type of conductivity. Moreover, in the work it is given the mechanism of electrical conductivity according to the obtained results. (Author)

  17. An analysis of boundary-effects in obtaining the frequency dependent specific heat by effusivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tage Emil; Behrens, Claus

    generator is measured, made this possible. The method relied on a 1-d solution to the heat diffusion equation. There have been attempts to invoke the boundary effects to first order. However we present the fully 3-d solution to the problem including these effects. The frequency range can hereby......The frequency dependent specific heat is a significant response function characterizing the glass transition. Contrary to the dielectric response it is not easily measured over many decades. The introduction of the 3-omega method, where the temperature oscillations at a planar oscillatoric heat...

  18. Polarized Line Formation in Arbitrary Strength Magnetic Fields Angle-averaged and Angle-dependent Partial Frequency Redistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampoorna, M.; Nagendra, K. N. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bengaluru 560 034 (India); Stenflo, J. O., E-mail: sampoorna@iiap.res.in, E-mail: knn@iiap.res.in, E-mail: stenflo@astro.phys.ethz.ch [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere leave their fingerprints in the polarized spectrum of the Sun via the Hanle and Zeeman effects. While the Hanle and Zeeman effects dominate, respectively, in the weak and strong field regimes, both these effects jointly operate in the intermediate field strength regime. Therefore, it is necessary to solve the polarized line transfer equation, including the combined influence of Hanle and Zeeman effects. Furthermore, it is required to take into account the effects of partial frequency redistribution (PRD) in scattering when dealing with strong chromospheric lines with broad damping wings. In this paper, we present a numerical method to solve the problem of polarized PRD line formation in magnetic fields of arbitrary strength and orientation. This numerical method is based on the concept of operator perturbation. For our studies, we consider a two-level atom model without hyperfine structure and lower-level polarization. We compare the PRD idealization of angle-averaged Hanle–Zeeman redistribution matrices with the full treatment of angle-dependent PRD, to indicate when the idealized treatment is inadequate and what kind of polarization effects are specific to angle-dependent PRD. Because the angle-dependent treatment is presently computationally prohibitive when applied to realistic model atmospheres, we present the computed emergent Stokes profiles for a range of magnetic fields, with the assumption of an isothermal one-dimensional medium.

  19. SNP rs16969968 as a Strong Predictor of Nicotine Dependence and Lung Cancer Risk in a North Indian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Namita; Pal, Soumyadip; Sharma, Lokesh Kumar; Guleria, Randeep; Mohan, Anant; Srivastava, Tapasya

    2017-01-01

    Background: The 15q24-25 loci contain genes (CHRNA5 and CHRNA3) encoding nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits. We here determined for the first time the association of genetic variants rs16969968 and rs3743074 in CHRNA5 and CHRNA3, respectively, on nicotine dependence and lung cancer risk in a North Indian population by a case-control approach. Methods: Venous blood samples were obtained from 324 participants (108 lung cancer patients and 216 healthy individuals). DNA was extracted and PCR amplified with primers flanking the SNPs rs16969968 and rs3743074. Amplicons were subjected to sequencing and logistic regression was used to analyze association between variables. Results: The risk variant SNP rs16969968 in both heterozygous and homozygous forms appeared to exert a significant effect on nicotine dependence [GA (OR=2.77) and AA (OR=2.53)]. As expected, smoking was strongly associated with lung cancer (OR= 2.62). Risk allele rs16969968 in CHRNA5 also showed a significant association with increased lung cancer risk in our cohort, alone (OR= 4.99) and with smoking as a co-variable (OR= 4.28). Comparison of our analysis with other populations suggested that individuals with rs16969968 risk allele in the Indian population are more susceptible to lung cancer. Conclusion: Overall, the results strongly indicated that, in our cohort North Indian population, the genetic variant rs16969968, but not rs3743074, is significantly associated with both nicotine dependence and increased risk of lung cancer. While the results are significant, there is further need to increase the sample size and improve precision of our risk prediction. PMID:29172281

  20. Constraints on frequency-dependent violations of Shapiro delay from GW150914

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre O. Kahya

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available On 14th September 2015, a transient gravitational wave (GW150914 was detected by the two LIGO detectors at Hanford and Livingston from the coalescence of a binary black hole system located at a distance of about 400 Mpc. We point out that GW150914 experienced a Shapiro delay due to the gravitational potential of the mass distribution along the line of sight of about 1800 days. Also, the near-simultaneous arrival of gravitons over a frequency range of about 200 Hz within a 0.2 s window allows us to constrain any violations of Shapiro delay and Einstein's equivalence principle between the gravitons at different frequencies. From the calculated Shapiro delay and the observed duration of the signal, frequency-dependent violations of the equivalence principle for gravitons are constrained to an accuracy of O(10−9.

  1. A Polarization-Dependent Frequency-Selective Metamaterial Absorber with Multiple Absorption Peaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangsheng Deng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A polarization-dependent, frequency-selective metamaterial (MM absorber based on a single-layer patterned resonant structure intended for F frequency band is proposed. The design, fabrication, and measurement for the proposed absorber are presented. The absorber’s absorption properties at resonant frequencies have unique characteristics of a single-band, dual-band, or triple-band absorption for different polarization of the incident wave. The calculated surface current distributions and power loss distribution provide further understanding of physical mechanism of resonance absorption. Moreover, a high absorption for a wide range of TE-polarized oblique incidence was achieved. Hence, the MM structure realized on a highly flexible polyimide film, makingthe absorber suitable for conformal geometry applications. The proposed absorber has great potential in the development of polarization detectors and polarizers.

  2. HbA1c as the diagnostic criterion for diabetes reduces incidence and prevalence of DM2 by 25% but strongly depending on analytical quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandslund, Ivan; Nielsen, Aneta Aleksandra; Hyldtoft Petersen, Per

    HbA1c as the diagnostic criterion for diabetes reduces incidence and prevalence of DM2 by 25% but strongly depending on analytical quality......HbA1c as the diagnostic criterion for diabetes reduces incidence and prevalence of DM2 by 25% but strongly depending on analytical quality...

  3. Real-time correction of tsunami site effect by frequency-dependent tsunami-amplification factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, H.

    2017-12-01

    For tsunami early warning, I developed frequency-dependent tsunami-amplification factor and used it to design a recursive digital filter that can be applicable for real-time correction of tsunami site response. In this study, I assumed that a tsunami waveform at an observing point could be modeled by convolution of source, path and site effects in time domain. Under this assumption, spectral ratio between offshore and the nearby coast can be regarded as site response (i.e. frequency-dependent amplification factor). If the amplification factor can be prepared before tsunamigenic earthquakes, its temporal convolution to offshore tsunami waveform provides tsunami prediction at coast in real time. In this study, tsunami waveforms calculated by tsunami numerical simulations were used to develop frequency-dependent tsunami-amplification factor. Firstly, I performed numerical tsunami simulations based on nonlinear shallow-water theory from many tsuanmigenic earthquake scenarios by varying the seismic magnitudes and locations. The resultant tsunami waveforms at offshore and the nearby coastal observing points were then used in spectral-ratio analysis. An average of the resulted spectral ratios from the tsunamigenic-earthquake scenarios is regarded as frequency-dependent amplification factor. Finally, the estimated amplification factor is used in design of a recursive digital filter that can be applicable in time domain. The above procedure is applied to Miyako bay at the Pacific coast of northeastern Japan. The averaged tsunami-height spectral ratio (i.e. amplification factor) between the location at the center of the bay and the outside show a peak at wave-period of 20 min. A recursive digital filter based on the estimated amplification factor shows good performance in real-time correction of tsunami-height amplification due to the site effect. This study is supported by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) KAKENHI grant 15K16309.

  4. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    OpenAIRE

    Faqi Li; Dan Song; Deping Zeng; Zhou Lin; Min He; Guangrong Lei; Junru Wu; Dong Zhang; Zhibiao Wang

    2015-01-01

    Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102). This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasoun...

  5. Rolling estimations of long range dependence volatility for high frequency S&P500 index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Chin Wen; Pei, Tan Pei

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluates the time-varying long range dependence behaviors of the S&P500 volatility index using the modified rescaled adjusted range (R/S) statistic. For better computational result, a high frequency rolling bipower variation realized volatility estimates are used to avoid possible abrupt jump. The empirical analysis findings allow us to understand better the informationally market efficiency before and after the subprime mortgage crisis.

  6. Frequency Dependent Harmonic Powers in a Modified Uni-Traveling Carrier (MUTC) Photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-27

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/5651--17-9712 Frequency Dependent Harmonic Powers in a Modified Uni- Traveling Carrier...MereditH N. HutcHiNsoN Photonics Technology Branch Optical Sciences Division curtis r. MeNYuk University of Maryland Baltimore, Maryland i REPORT...MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S)9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 11. SPONSOR / MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION

  7. Pressure at the ISM-halo interface: A reheating frequency dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirković M.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of the thermal pressure of hot galactic halos on a model parameter describing the frequency of major reheating episodes during galactic history is investigated. Pressure on the interface between interstellar medium and the halo gas is especially interesting, since empirical evidence here offers one of the simplest constraints on halo models. It is shown that two-phase model of Mo & Miralda-Escudé is sufficiently robust with respect to uncertainties in the average interval between reheating.

  8. He 2++ molecular ion in a strong time-dependent magnetic field: a current-density functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikas

    2011-08-01

    The He 2++ molecular ion exposed to a strong ultrashort time-dependent (TD) magnetic field of the order of 10(9) G is investigated through a quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) and current-density functional theory (CDFT) based approach using vector exchange-correlation (XC) potential and energy density functional that depend not only on the electronic charge-density but also on the current density. The TD-QFD-CDFT computations are performed in a parallel internuclear-axis and magnetic field-axis configuration at the field-free equilibrium internuclear separation R = 1.3 au with the field-strength varying between 0 and 10(11) G. The TD behavior of the exchange- and correlation energy of the He 2++ is analyzed and compared with that obtained using a [B-TD-QFD-density functional theory (DFT)] approach based on the conventional TD-DFT under similar computational constraints but using only scalar XC potential and energy density functional dependent on the electronic charge-density alone. The CDFT based approach yields TD exchange- and correlation energy and TD electronic charge-density significantly different from that obtained using the conventional TD-DFT based approach, particularly, at typical magnetic field strengths and during a typical time period of the TD field. This peculiar behavior of the CDFT-based approach is traced to the TD current-density dependent vector XC potential, which can induce nonadiabatic effects causing retardation of the oscillating electronic charge density. Such dissipative electron dynamics of the He 2++ molecular ion is elucidated by treating electronic charge density as an electron-"fluid" in the terminology of QFD. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Factors related to frequency of narghile (waterpipe) use: the first insights on tobacco dependence in narghile users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziak, W; Ward, K D; Eissenberg, T

    2004-10-05

    To evaluate factors related to level of narghile (waterpipe) use as a first step towards modeling tobacco dependence among narghile users. Cross sectional survey done in 2003 using interviewer-administered anonymous questionnaires. Cafes/restaurants serving narghiles in Aleppo, Syria. Narghile smokers (161 men and 107 women; mean age, 30.1 +/- 10.2, 161; age range, 18-68 years; response rate, 95.3%) randomly selected from the 17 cafes/restaurants sampled. Frequency of narghile use (daily, weekly, monthly) was assessed as a function of several factors potentially indicative of dependence, including situational characteristics (where, when, and with whom smoking occurs; seasonality of use, and sharing of narghile), attitudes, and experience with quitting narghile use, escalation of use over time, future intentions regarding use, perception of being "hooked" on narghile, and cognitions/behaviors engaged in to support use (carrying one's own narghile; think of narghile when it is not available; considering narghile for selection of cafes/restaurants). Frequency of narghile use was strongly correlated with participant's subjective judgment of how hooked they are on narghile (coefficient, 0.5). Predictors of narghile use frequency according to multinomial logistic regression were: male gender, smoking mainly alone versus with others; smoking mainly at home versus outside; smoking more frequently since initiation, being hooked on narghile, carrying narghile, and considering it for cafe/restaurant choice. Our data reveal two main domains of a tobacco dependence syndrome likely to be relevant to narghile; the first reflects the effects of nicotine contained in narghile tobacco, and is not very different from what is seen with other tobacco products, and the second is unique to narghile and is related mainly to its social dimension, with more intensive smokers showing an increasingly individual pattern of narghile smoking.

  10. Noise-induced extinction for a ratio-dependent predator-prey model with strong Allee effect in prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Partha Sarathi

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we study a stochastically forced ratio-dependent predator-prey model with strong Allee effect in prey population. In the deterministic case, we show that the model exhibits the stable interior equilibrium point or limit cycle corresponding to the co-existence of both species. We investigate a probabilistic mechanism of the noise-induced extinction in a zone of stable interior equilibrium point. Computational methods based on the stochastic sensitivity function technique are applied for the analysis of the dispersion of random states near stable interior equilibrium point. This method allows to construct a confidence domain and estimate the threshold value of the noise intensity for a transition from the coexistence to the extinction.

  11. High frequency equipment promotes antibacterial effects dependent on intensity and exposure time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wietzikoski Lovato EC

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Evellyn Claudia Wietzikoski Lovato,1 Patrícia Amaral Gurgel Velasquez,1 Cristiana dos Santos Oliveira,1 Camila Baruffi,1 Thais Anghinoni,1 Raquel Costa Machado,1 Francislaine Aparecida dos Reis Lívero,2 Samantha Wietzikoski Sato,1 Lisiane de Almeida Martins1 1Laboratory of Microbiology of Natural Products, Paranaense University, Umuarama, Brazil; 2Laboratory of Preclinical Research of Natural Products, Paranaense University, Umuarama, Brazil Background: The indiscriminate use of antibiotics has caused bacteria to develop mechanisms of resistance to antibacterial agents, limiting treatment options. Therefore, there is a great need for alternative methods to control infections, especially those related to skin. One of the alternative methods is the high frequency equipment (HFE, which is used on skin conditions as an analgesic, an anti-inflammatory, and mainly to accelerate cicatricial processes and have a bactericidal effect through the formation of ozone. This research investigated the antibacterial effect of HFE on standard cultures of bacteria.Materials and methods: Dilutions (104 colony forming unit mL−1 were performed for Enterobacter aerogenes and Staphylococcus aureus with 24-hour growth bacteria. Then, 1 μL of each dilution was pipetted into suitable medium and the HFE flashing technique was used at intensities of 6, 8 and 10 mA for 30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 seconds. The control group received no treatment. Plates were incubated at 37°C for 24 hours and then read.Results: The spark at intensity of 6 mA had no bactericidal effect on the E. aerogenes; however, a significant bacterial growth reduction occurred at intensity of 8 mA after 120 and 180 seconds, and at 10 mA, reduction in bacterial growth could already be verified at 30 seconds and total bacterial growth inhibition occurred in 180 seconds. For S. aureus, there was a strong bacterial growth inhibition at all intensities used; however, at 6 mA, absence of bacterium growth after

  12. Experiments on Frequency Dependence of the Deflection of Light in Yang-Mills Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yun; Zhu, Yiyi; Hsu, Jong-Ping

    2018-01-01

    In Yang-Mills gravity based on flat space-time, the eikonal equation for a light ray is derived from the modified Maxwell's wave equations in the geometric-optics limit. One obtains a Hamilton-Jacobi type equation, GLµv∂µΨ∂vΨ = 0 with an effective Riemannian metric tensor GLµv. According to Yang-Mills gravity, light rays (and macroscopic objects) move as if they were in an effective curved space-time with a metric tensor. The deflection angle of a light ray by the sun is about 1.53″ for experiments with optical frequencies ≈ 1014Hz. It is roughly 12% smaller than the usual value 1.75″. However, the experimental data in the past 100 years for the deflection of light by the sun in optical frequencies have uncertainties of (10-20)% due to large systematic errors. If one does not take the geometric-optics limit, one has the equation, GLµv[∂µΨ∂vΨcosΨ+ (∂µ∂vΨ)sinΨ] = 0, which suggests that the deflection angle could be frequency-dependent, according to Yang-Mills gravity. Nowadays, one has very accurate data in the radio frequencies ≈ 109Hz with uncertainties less than 0.1%. Thus, one can test this suggestion by using frequencies ≈ 1012 Hz, which could have a small uncertainty 0.1% due to the absence of systematic errors in the very long baseline interferometry.

  13. Frequency-Dependent Solvent Impedance and Colloid Microelectrophoresis Measurements in Partially Polar Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Edward; Aljabal, Zena; Yethiraj, Anand

    2017-05-16

    We carry out frequency-dependent solvent impedance measurements and alternating current (ac) colloid microelectrophoresis experiments in partially polar solvents in the low-frequency regime (0.25 Hz ≤ f ≤ 10 Hz). Solvent electrode polarization effects are quantified first in partially polar solvent mixtures containing bromocyclohexane (CHB). We find that the polarization capacitance from electrode polarization exhibits a clear power law behavior C p = C p0 f -m with power law exponent m = 0.25 ± 0.04. Once we account for electrode polarization effects, we are able to obtain quantitative mobilities in the low-frequency regime from our ac microelectrophoresis measurements; for these measurements, we use poly(methyl methacrylate colloids that are gravitationally confined to a plane while suspended in a low-polar solvent mixture of cis-trans decahydronapthalene and CHB. We find that the dimensionless electrophoretic mobility is constant, consistent with expectations for frequencies below the ion-diffusion frequency, and has a value E = 1.6 ± 0.4.

  14. Viscoelastic characterization of compacted pharmaceutical excipient materials by analysis of frequency-dependent mechanical relaxation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, K.; Mousavi, S.; Lundberg, B.; Strømme, M.

    2005-09-01

    A newly developed method for determining the frequency-dependent complex Young's modulus was employed to analyze the mechanical response of compacted microcrystalline cellulose, sorbitol, ethyl cellulose and starch for frequencies up to 20 kHz. A Debye-like relaxation was observed in all the studied pharmaceutical excipient materials and a comparison with corresponding dielectric spectroscopy data was made. The location in frequency of the relaxation peak was shown to correlate to the measured tensile strength of the tablets, and the relaxation was interpreted as the vibrational response of the interparticle hydrogen and van der Waals bindings in the tablets. Further, the measured relaxation strength, holding information about the energy loss involved in the relaxation processes, showed that the weakest material in terms of tensile strength, starch, is the material among the four tested ones that is able to absorb the most energy within its structure when exposed to external perturbations inducing vibrations in the studied frequency range. The results indicate that mechanical relaxation analysis performed over relatively broad frequency ranges should be useful for predicting material properties of importance for the functionality of a material in applications such as, e.g., drug delivery, drug storage and handling, and also for clarifying the origin of hitherto unexplained molecular processes.

  15. Size-dependent Young’s modulus in ZnO nanowires with strong surface atomic bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shiwen; Bi, Sheng; Li, Qikun; Guo, Qinglei; Liu, Junshan; Ouyang, Zhongliang; Jiang, Chengming; Song, Jinhui

    2018-03-01

    The mechanical properties of size-dependent nanowires are important in nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMSs), and have attracted much research interest. Characterization of the size effect of nanowires in atmosphere directly to broaden their practical application instead of just in high vacuum situations, as reported previously, is desperately needed. In this study, we systematically studied the Young’s modulus of vertical ZnO nanowires in atmosphere. The diameters ranged from 48 nm to 239 nm with a resonance method using non-contact atomic force microscopy. The values of Young’s modulus in atmosphere present extremely strong increasing tendency with decreasing diameter of nanowire due to stronger surface atomic bonds compared with that in vacuum. A core-shell model for nanowires is proposed to explore the Young’s modulus enhancement in atmosphere, which is correlated with atoms of oxygen occurring near the nanowire surface. The modified model is more accurate for analyzing the mechanical behavior of nanowires in atmosphere compared with the model in vacuum. Furthermore, it is possible to use this characterization method to measure the size-related elastic properties of similar wire-sharp nanomaterials in atmosphere and estimate the corresponding mechanical behavior. The study of the size-dependent Young’s modulus in ZnO nanowires in atmosphere will improve the understanding of the mechanical properties of nanomaterials as well as providing guidance for applications in NEMSs, nanogenerators, biosensors and other related areas.

  16. Frequency and voltage dependent electrical responses of poly(triarylamine) thin film-based organic Schottky diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuar Mohamad, Khairul; Tak Hoh, Hang; Alias, Afishah; Ghosh, Bablu Kumar; Fukuda, Hisashi

    2017-11-01

    A metal-organic-metal (MOM) type Schottky diode based on poly (triarylamine) (PTAA) thin films has been fabricated by using the spin coating method. Investigation of the frequency dependent conductance-voltage (G-V-f) and capacitance-voltage (C-V-f) characteristics of the ITO/PTAA/Al MOM type diode were carried out in the frequency range from 12 Hz to 100 kHz using an LCR meter at room temperature. The frequency and bias voltage dependent electrical response were determined by admittance-based measured method in terms of an equivalent circuit model of the parallel combination of resistance and capacitance (RC circuit). Investigation revealed that the conductance is frequency and a bias voltage dependent in which conductance continuous increase as the increasing frequency, respectively. Meanwhile, the capacitance is dependent on frequency up to a certain value of frequency (100 Hz) but decreases at high frequency (1 - 10 kHz). The interface state density in the Schottky diode was determined from G-V and C-V characteristics. The interface state density has values almost constant of 2.8 x 1012 eV-1cm-2 with slightly decrease by increasing frequencies. Consequently, both series resistance and interface trap density were found to decrease with increasing frequency. The frequency dependence of the electrical responses is attributed the distribution density of interface states that could follow the alternating current (AC) signal.

  17. Frequency and voltage dependent electrical responses of poly(triarylamine thin film-based organic Schottky diode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Khairul Anuar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A metal-organic-metal (MOM type Schottky diode based on poly (triarylamine (PTAA thin films has been fabricated by using the spin coating method. Investigation of the frequency dependent conductance-voltage (G-V-f and capacitance-voltage (C-V-f characteristics of the ITO/PTAA/Al MOM type diode were carried out in the frequency range from 12 Hz to 100 kHz using an LCR meter at room temperature. The frequency and bias voltage dependent electrical response were determined by admittance-based measured method in terms of an equivalent circuit model of the parallel combination of resistance and capacitance (RC circuit. Investigation revealed that the conductance is frequency and a bias voltage dependent in which conductance continuous increase as the increasing frequency, respectively. Meanwhile, the capacitance is dependent on frequency up to a certain value of frequency (100 Hz but decreases at high frequency (1 – 10 kHz. The interface state density in the Schottky diode was determined from G-V and C-V characteristics. The interface state density has values almost constant of 2.8 x 1012 eV−1cm−2 with slightly decrease by increasing frequencies. Consequently, both series resistance and interface trap density were found to decrease with increasing frequency. The frequency dependence of the electrical responses is attributed the distribution density of interface states that could follow the alternating current (AC signal.

  18. Probing the Jet Turnover Frequency Dependence on Mass and Mass Accretion Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerstein, Erica; Gültekin, Kayhan; King, Ashley

    2018-01-01

    We have examined a sample of 15 sub-Eddington supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in a variety of galaxy classifications to further understand the proposed fundamental plane of black hole activity and scaling relations between black hole masses and their radio and X-ray luminosities. This plane describes black holes from stellar-mass to supermassive. The physics probed by these sub-Eddington systems is thought to be a radiatively inefficient, jet-dominated accretion flow. By studying black holes in this regime, we can learn important information on the disk-jet connection for accreting black holes.A key factor in studying the fundamental plane is the turnover frequency — the frequency at which emission transitions from optically thick at lower frequencies to optically thin at higher frequencies. This turnover point can be measured by observing the source in both radio and X-ray. Our project aims to test the dependence of the turnover frequency on mass and mass accretion rate.Radio observations of the sample were obtained using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in the range of 5-40 GHz across four different frequency bands in A configuration to give the highest spatial resolution to focus on the core emission. Our carefully chosen sample of SMBHs with dynamically measured masses consists of two sub-samples: those with approximately constant mass accretion rate (LX/LEdd ~ 10‑7) and those with approximately constant mass (MBH ~ 108 Msun). X-ray data were obtained from archival Chandra observations. To find the turnover frequency, we used Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to fit two power laws to the radio data and the archival X-ray data. The intersection of the radio and X-ray fits is the turnover frequency.We present the results for both subsamples of SMBHs and their relationship between the turnover frequency and X-ray luminosity, which we take to scale with mass accretion rate, and jet power derived from both radio and X-ray properties.

  19. Stress-dependent elastic properties of shales—laboratory experiments at seismic and ultrasonic frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Dawid; Bauer, Andreas; Holt, Rune M.

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge about the stress sensitivity of elastic properties and velocities of shales is important for the interpretation of seismic time-lapse data taken as part of reservoir and caprock surveillance of both unconventional and conventional oil and gas fields (e.g. during 4-D monitoring of CO2 storage). Rock physics models are often developed based on laboratory measurements at ultrasonic frequencies. However, as shown previously, shales exhibit large seismic dispersion, and it is possible that stress sensitivities of velocities are also frequency dependent. In this work, we report on a series of seismic and ultrasonic laboratory tests in which the stress sensitivity of elastic properties of Mancos shale and Pierre shale I were investigated. The shales were tested at different water saturations. Dynamic rock engineering parameters and elastic wave velocities were examined on core plugs exposed to isotropic loading. Experiments were carried out in an apparatus allowing for static-compaction and dynamic measurements at seismic and ultrasonic frequencies within single test. For both shale types, we present and discuss experimental results that demonstrate dispersion and stress sensitivity of the rock stiffness, as well as P- and S-wave velocities, and stiffness anisotropy. Our experimental results show that the stress-sensitivity of shales is different at seismic and ultrasonic frequencies, which can be linked with simultaneously occurring changes in the dispersion with applied stress. Measured stress sensitivity of elastic properties for relatively dry samples was higher at seismic frequencies however, the increasing saturation of shales decreases the difference between seismic and ultrasonic stress-sensitivities, and for moist samples stress-sensitivity is higher at ultrasonic frequencies. Simultaneously, the increased saturation highly increases the dispersion in shales. We have also found that the stress-sensitivity is highly anisotropic in both shales and that in

  20. Research surface resistance of copper normal and abnormal skin-effects depending on the frequency of electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutovyi, V.A.; Komir, A.I.

    2013-01-01

    The results of the frequency dependence of surface resistance of copper in diffuse and specular reflection of electrons from the conductive surface of the high-frequency resonance of the system depending on the frequency of the electromagnetic field in the normal and anomalous skin effect. Found, the surface resistance of copper is reduced by more than 10 times at the temperature of liquid helium, as compared with a surface resistivity at room temperature, at frequencies f ≤ 173 MHz, for diffuse reflection of conduction electrons from the surface of the conductive layer, and the specular reflection - at frequencies f ≤ 346 MHz

  1. Frequency Dependencies of the Exchange Spin Wave Reflection Coefficient on a One-Dimensional Magnon Crystal with Complex Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhii O. Reshetniak

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions. It is shown that the frequency dependencies are periodic, points of full transmission and areas, full of reflection. Decreasing exchange parameter value in interface causes the increase of reflectance coefficient. Changing the material parameters we get the necessary intensity value of the reflection coefficient depending on the frequency at a constant value of the external magnetic field.

  2. Experimental determination of the frequency and field dependence of Specific Loss Power in Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobianchi, M.; Guerrini, A.; Avolio, M.; Innocenti, C.; Corti, M.; Arosio, P.; Orsini, F.; Sangregorio, C.; Lascialfari, A.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are promising systems for biomedical applications and in particular for Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia, a therapy that utilizes the heat released by such systems to damage tumor cells. We present an experimental study of the physical properties that influences the capability of heat release, i.e. the Specific Loss Power, SLP, of three biocompatible ferrofluid samples having a magnetic core of maghemite with different diameter d = 10.2, 14.6 and 19.7 nm. The SLP was measured as a function of frequency f and intensity H of the applied alternating magnetic field, and it turned out to depend on the core diameter, as expected. The results allowed us to highlight experimentally that the physical mechanism responsible for the heating is size-dependent and to establish, at applied constant frequency, the phenomenological functional relationship SLP = c·Hx, with 2 ≤ xmagnetic hyperthermia devices. For the smallest sample, the effective relaxation time τeff ≈ 19.5 ns obtained from SLP data is in agreement with the value estimated from magnetization data, thus confirming the validity of the Linear Response Theory model for this system at properly chosen field intensity and frequency.

  3. Human Commercial Models' Eye Colour Shows Negative Frequency-Dependent Selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Rodrigues Nogueira Forti

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the eye colour of human commercial models registered in the UK (400 female and 400 male and Brazil (400 female and 400 male to test the hypothesis that model eye colour frequency was the result of negative frequency-dependent selection. The eye colours of the models were classified as: blue, brown or intermediate. Chi-square analyses of data for countries separated by sex showed that in the United Kingdom brown eyes and intermediate colours were significantly more frequent than expected in comparison to the general United Kingdom population (P<0.001. In Brazil, the most frequent eye colour brown was significantly less frequent than expected in comparison to the general Brazilian population. These results support the hypothesis that model eye colour is the result of negative frequency-dependent selection. This could be the result of people using eye colour as a marker of genetic diversity and finding rarer eye colours more attractive because of the potential advantage more genetically diverse offspring that could result from such a choice. Eye colour may be important because in comparison to many other physical traits (e.g., hair colour it is hard to modify, hide or disguise, and it is highly polymorphic.

  4. Combining Acceleration and Displacement Dependent Modal Frequency Responses Using an MSC/NASTRAN DMAP Alter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Alan R.; Widrick, Timothy W.; Ludwiczak, Damian R.

    1996-01-01

    Solving for dynamic responses of free-free launch vehicle/spacecraft systems acted upon by buffeting winds is commonly performed throughout the aerospace industry. Due to the unpredictable nature of this wind loading event, these problems are typically solved using frequency response random analysis techniques. To generate dynamic responses for spacecraft with statically-indeterminate interfaces, spacecraft contractors prefer to develop models which have response transformation matrices developed for mode acceleration data recovery. This method transforms spacecraft boundary accelerations and displacements into internal responses. Unfortunately, standard MSC/NASTRAN modal frequency response solution sequences cannot be used to combine acceleration- and displacement-dependent responses required for spacecraft mode acceleration data recovery. External user-written computer codes can be used with MSC/NASTRAN output to perform such combinations, but these methods can be labor and computer resource intensive. Taking advantage of the analytical and computer resource efficiencies inherent within MS C/NASTRAN, a DMAP Alter has been developed to combine acceleration- and displacement-dependent modal frequency responses for performing spacecraft mode acceleration data recovery. The Alter has been used successfully to efficiently solve a common aerospace buffeting wind analysis.

  5. Models of frequency-dependent selection with mutation from parental alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Meredith V; Spencer, Hamish G

    2013-09-01

    Frequency-dependent selection (FDS) remains a common heuristic explanation for the maintenance of genetic variation in natural populations. The pairwise-interaction model (PIM) is a well-studied general model of frequency-dependent selection, which assumes that a genotype's fitness is a function of within-population intergenotypic interactions. Previous theoretical work indicated that this type of model is able to sustain large numbers of alleles at a single locus when it incorporates recurrent mutation. These studies, however, have ignored the impact of the distribution of fitness effects of new mutations on the dynamics and end results of polymorphism construction. We suggest that a natural way to model mutation would be to assume mutant fitness is related to the fitness of the parental allele, i.e., the existing allele from which the mutant arose. Here we examine the numbers and distributions of fitnesses and alleles produced by construction under the PIM with mutation from parental alleles and the impacts on such measures due to different methods of generating mutant fitnesses. We find that, in comparison with previous results, generating mutants from existing alleles lowers the average number of alleles likely to be observed in a system subject to FDS, but produces polymorphisms that are highly stable and have realistic allele-frequency distributions.

  6. Human Commercial Models' Eye Colour Shows Negative Frequency-Dependent Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forti, Isabela Rodrigues Nogueira; Young, Robert John

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the eye colour of human commercial models registered in the UK (400 female and 400 male) and Brazil (400 female and 400 male) to test the hypothesis that model eye colour frequency was the result of negative frequency-dependent selection. The eye colours of the models were classified as: blue, brown or intermediate. Chi-square analyses of data for countries separated by sex showed that in the United Kingdom brown eyes and intermediate colours were significantly more frequent than expected in comparison to the general United Kingdom population (PBrazilian population. These results support the hypothesis that model eye colour is the result of negative frequency-dependent selection. This could be the result of people using eye colour as a marker of genetic diversity and finding rarer eye colours more attractive because of the potential advantage more genetically diverse offspring that could result from such a choice. Eye colour may be important because in comparison to many other physical traits (e.g., hair colour) it is hard to modify, hide or disguise, and it is highly polymorphic.

  7. Pulse frequency dependency of photobiomodulation on the bioenergetic functions of human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Bae; Baik, Ku Youn; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2017-11-21

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy contributes to pain relief, wound healing, and tissue regeneration. The pulsed wave (PW) mode has been reported to be more effective than the continuous wave (CW) mode when applying PBM to many biological systems. However, the reason for the higher effectiveness of PW-PBM is poorly understood. Herein, we suggest using delayed luminescence (DL) as a reporter of mitochondrial activity after PBM treatment. DL originates mainly from mitochondrial electron transport chain systems, which produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The decay time of DL depends on the pulse frequencies of applied light, which correlate with the biological responses of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Using a low-power light whose wavelength is 810 nm and energy density is 38 mJ/cm 2 , we find that a 300-Hz pulse frequency prolonged the DL pattern and enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity. In addition, we analyze mitochondrial morphological changes and their volume density and find evidence supporting mitochondrial physiological changes from PBM treatment. Our data suggest a new methodology for determining the effectiveness of PBM and the specific pulse frequency dependency of PBM in the differentiation of hDPSCs.

  8. Effects of frequency- and direction-dependent elastic materials on linearly elastic MRE image reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perreard, I M; Weaver, J B; Paulsen, K D; Pattison, A J; McGarry, M D J; Doyley, M; Barani, Z; Van Houten, E E

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical model commonly used in magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is linear elasticity. However, soft tissue may exhibit frequency- and direction-dependent (FDD) shear moduli in response to an induced excitation causing a purely linear elastic model to provide an inaccurate image reconstruction of its mechanical properties. The goal of this study was to characterize the effects of reconstructing FDD data using a linear elastic inversion (LEI) algorithm. Linear and FDD phantoms were manufactured and LEI images were obtained from time-harmonic MRE acquisitions with variations in frequency and driving signal amplitude. LEI responses to artificially imposed uniform phase shifts in the displacement data from both purely linear elastic and FDD phantoms were also evaluated. Of the variety of FDD phantoms considered, LEI appeared to tolerate viscoelastic data-model mismatch better than deviations caused by poroelastic and anisotropic mechanical properties in terms of visual image contrast. However, the estimated shear modulus values were substantially incorrect relative to independent mechanical measurements even in the successful viscoelastic cases and the variations in mean values with changes in experimental conditions associated with uniform phase shifts, driving signal frequency and amplitude were unpredictable. Overall, use of LEI to reconstruct data acquired in phantoms with FDD material properties provided biased results under the best conditions and significant artifacts in the worst cases. These findings suggest that the success with which LEI is applied to MRE data in tissue will depend on the underlying mechanical characteristics of the tissues and/or organs systems of clinical interest.

  9. Tuning of gravity-dependent and gravity-independent vertical angular VOR gain changes by frequency of adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushin, Sergei B

    2012-06-01

    The gain of the vertical angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) was adaptively increased and decreased in a side-down head orientation for 4 h in two cynomolgus monkeys. Adaptation was performed at 0.25, 1, 2, or 4 Hz. The gravity-dependent and -independent gain changes were determined over a range of head orientations from left-side-down to right-side-down at frequencies from 0.25 to 10 Hz, before and after adaptation. Gain changes vs. frequency data were fit with a Gaussian to determine the frequency at which the peak gain change occurred, as well as the tuning width. The frequency at which the peak gravity-dependent gain change occurred was approximately equal to the frequency of adaptation, and the width increased monotonically with increases in the frequency of adaptation. The gravity-independent component was tuned to the adaptive frequency of 0.25 Hz but was uniformly distributed over all frequencies when the adaptation frequency was 1-4 Hz. The amplitude of the gravity-independent gain changes was larger after the aVOR gain decrease than after the gain increase across all tested frequencies. For the aVOR gain decrease, the phase lagged about 4° for frequencies below the adaptation frequency and led for frequencies above the adaptation frequency. For gain increases, the phase relationship as a function of frequency was inverted. This study demonstrates that the previously described dependence of aVOR gain adaptation on frequency is a property of the gravity-dependent component of the aVOR only. The gravity-independent component of the aVOR had a substantial tuning curve only at an adaptation frequency of 0.25 Hz.

  10. Frequency dependence of dielectric characteristics of seawater ionic solution under static magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shaoshuai; Peng, Yufeng; Han, Xueyun; Li, Jiangting

    2017-09-01

    In order to study the electromagnetic wave transmission characteristics in seawater under external physical effects, we present a study of seawater ionic solution and perform a theoretical basis of magnetic field on water molecules and ionic motion to investigate the variation of dielectric properties with frequency under static magnetic field (0.38 T). Seawater is a naturally multi-component electrolyte solution, the main ingredients in seawater are inorganic salts, such as NaCl, MgSO4, MgCl2, CaCl2, KCl, NaHCO3, etc. The dielectric properties of these electrolyte solutions with different salinity values (0.01-5%) were measured in frequencies ranging from 40 to 5 MHz at 12∘C. The results show that the dielectric constant decreases with increasing frequencies no matter with magnetic field or without it. Frequency dependence of the dielectric constant of NaCl solution increases under magnetic field at measure concentrations. In a solution of MgCl2 ṡ 6H2O, KCl and NaHCO3 are consistent with NaCl solution, while CaCl2 ṡ 2H2O solution is in contrast with it. We also find that dielectric loss plays a major role in complex permittivity. With the effect of magnetic field, the proportion of dielectric loss is reducing in complex permittivity. On this basis it was concluded that the magnetic field influences the orientation of dipoles and the variation is different in salt aqueous solution.

  11. Advancement in the Understanding of the Field and Frequency Dependent Microwave Surface Resistance of Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinello, M. [Fermilab; Aderhold, S. [Fermilab; Chandrasekaran, S. K. [Fermilab; Checchin, M. [Fermilab; Grassellino, A. [Fermilab; Melnychuk, O. [Fermilab; Posen, S. [Fermilab; Romanenko, A. [Fermilab; Sergatskov, D. A. [Fermilab

    2017-07-24

    The radio-frequency surface resistance of niobium resonators is incredibly reduced when nitrogen impurities are dissolved as interstitial in the material, conferring ultra-high Q-factors at medium values of accelerating field. This effect has been observed in both high and low temperature nitrogen treatments. As a matter of fact, the peculiar anti Q-slope observed in nitrogen doped cavities, i.e. the decreasing of the Q-factor with the increasing of the radio-frequency field, come from the decreasing of the BCS surface resistance component as a function of the field. Such peculiar behavior has been considered consequence of the interstitial nitrogen present in the niobium lattice after the doping treatment. The study here presented show the field dependence of the BCS surface resistance of cavities with different resonant frequencies, such as: 650 MHz, 1.3 GHz, 2.6 GHz and 3.9 GHz, and processed with different state-of-the-art surface treatments. These findings show for the first time that the anti Q-slope might be seen at high frequency even for clean Niobium cavities, revealing useful suggestion on the physics underneath the anti Q-slope effect.

  12. Geometry dependence of temperature coefficient of resonant frequency in highly sensitive resonant thermal sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Naoki; Ono, Takahito

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the geometry dependence of the temperature coefficient of resonant frequency (TCRF) is investigated and compared with a theoretical thermal stress change using Si mechanical microresonators. The used resonators have Y, T, I (conventional double-supported type) and arrow shapes, and in each shape the resonant frequency change of the resonator is measured in relation to changes in the amount of heat input to the resonator. The change trend in the experimental resonant frequency and the theoretical thermal stress in changing the temperature are consist. The TCRF in each resonator is Y: -653, T: -162, I: -417, and the arrow is 174 ppm/K. These absolute values are much higher than those of conventional cantilevered Si resonators (-34.9 ppm/K). In addition, the frequency fluctuations based on Allan deviation are experimentally evaluated considering the theoretical thermal fluctuation noise. It is considered that use of this technique to improve the TCRF of resonators by changing the geometry has the possibility of creating a sensor with highly sensitive thermal detection.

  13. Evolution of frequency-dependent mate choice: keeping up with fashion trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokko, Hanna; Jennions, Michael D; Houde, Anne

    2007-05-22

    The diversity of sexual traits favoured by females is enormous and, curiously, includes preferences for males with rare or novel phenotypes. We modelled the evolution of a preference for rarity that yielded two surprising results. First, a Fisherian 'sexy son' effect can boost female preferences to a frequency well above that predicted by mutation-selection balance, even if there are significant mortality costs for females. Preferences do not reach fixation, however, as they are subject to frequency-dependent selection: if choosy females are too common, then rare genotypes in one generation become common, and thus unattractive, in the offspring generation. Nevertheless, even at relatively low frequency, preferences maintain polymorphism in male traits. The second unexpected result is that the preferences can evolve to much higher frequencies if choice is hindered, such that females cannot always express their preferences. Our results emphasize the need to consider feedback where preferences determine the dynamics of male genotypes and vice versa. They also highlight the similarity between the arbitrariness of behavioural norms in models of social evolution with punishment (the so-called 'folk theorem') and the diversity of sexual traits that can be preferred simply because deviating from the norm produces unattractive offspring and is, in this sense, 'punished'.

  14. Frequency dependence of magnetic shielding performance of HTS plates in mixed states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamitani, Atsushi; Yokono, Takafumi [Yamagata Univ., Yonezawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Yokono, Takafumi [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Information Sciences and Electronics

    2000-06-01

    The magnetic shielding performance of the high-Tc superconducting (HTS) plate is investigated numerically. The behavior of the shielding current density in the HTS plate is expressed as the integral-differential equation with a normal component of the current vector potential as a dependent variable. The numerical code for solving the equation has been developed by using the combination of the Newton-Raphson method and the successive substitution method and, by use of the code, damping coefficients and shielding factors are evaluated for the various values of the frequency {omega}. The results of computations show that the HTS plate has a possibility of shielding the high-frequency magnetic field with {omega} > or approx. 1 kHz. (author)

  15. Frequency-dependent responses in third generation gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Evans, Matthew

    2017-10-01

    Interferometric gravitational-wave detectors are dynamic instruments. Changing gravitational-wave strains influence the trajectories of null geodesics and therefore modify the interferometric response. These effects will be important when the associated frequencies are comparable to the round-trip light travel time down the detector arms. The arms of advanced detectors currently in operation are short enough that the strain can be approximated as static, but planned 3rd generation detectors, with arms an order of magnitude longer, will need to account for these effects. We investigate the impact of neglecting the frequency-dependent detector response for compact binary coalescences and show that it can introduce large systematic biases in localization, larger than the statistical uncertainty for 1.4 -1.4 M⊙ neutron star coalescences at z ≲1.7 . Analysis of 3rd generation detectors therefore must account for these effects.

  16. Effect of frequency on amplitude-dependent internal friction in niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ide, Naoki [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: ide@nitech.ac.jp; Atsumi, Tomohiro [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nishino, Yoichi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2006-12-20

    Amplitude-dependent internal friction (ADIF) was measured in a polycrystalline niobium using four modes of flexural vibration from the fundamental to the third-order resonance at room temperature. The ADIF was detected in each vibration mode. The internal-friction versus strain-amplitude curve of the ADIF shifted to a larger strain-amplitude range as frequency increased. The stress-strain curves were derived from the ADIF data, and the microplastic flow stress defined as the stress required to produce a plastic strain of 1 x 10{sup -9} was read from the stress-strain curves. It was found that the microplastic flow stress was proportional to the frequency.

  17. Dependence of exponents on text length versus finite-size scaling for word-frequency distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Álvaro; Font-Clos, Francesc

    2017-08-01

    Some authors have recently argued that a finite-size scaling law for the text-length dependence of word-frequency distributions cannot be conceptually valid. Here we give solid quantitative evidence for the validity of this scaling law, using both careful statistical tests and analytical arguments based on the generalized central-limit theorem applied to the moments of the distribution (and obtaining a novel derivation of Heaps' law as a by-product). We also find that the picture of word-frequency distributions with power-law exponents that decrease with text length [X. Yan and P. Minnhagen, Physica A 444, 828 (2016), 10.1016/j.physa.2015.10.082] does not stand with rigorous statistical analysis. Instead, we show that the distributions are perfectly described by power-law tails with stable exponents, whose values are close to 2, in agreement with the classical Zipf's law. Some misconceptions about scaling are also clarified.

  18. Frequency dependence of magnetic shielding performance of HTS plates in mixed states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamitani, Atsushi; Yokono, Takafumi; Yokono, Takafumi

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic shielding performance of the high-Tc superconducting (HTS) plate is investigated numerically. The behavior of the shielding current density in the HTS plate is expressed as the integral-differential equation with a normal component of the current vector potential as a dependent variable. The numerical code for solving the equation has been developed by using the combination of the Newton-Raphson method and the successive substitution method and, by use of the code, damping coefficients and shielding factors are evaluated for the various values of the frequency ω. The results of computations show that the HTS plate has a possibility of shielding the high-frequency magnetic field with ω > or approx. 1 kHz. (author)

  19. Frequency-Dependent Multi-Well Cardiotoxicity Screening Enabled by Optogenetic Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Rehnelt

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Side effects on cardiac ion channels causing lethal arrhythmias are one major reason for drug withdrawals from the market. Field potential (FP recording from cardiomyocytes, is a well-suited tool to assess such cardiotoxic effects of drug candidates in preclinical drug development, but it is currently limited to the spontaneous beating of the cardiomyocytes and manual analysis. Herein, we present a novel optogenetic cardiotoxicity screening system suited for the parallel automated frequency-dependent analysis of drug effects on FP recorded from human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. For the expression of the light-sensitive cation channel Channelrhodopsin-2, we optimised protocols using virus transduction or transient mRNA transfection. Optical stimulation was performed with a new light-emitting diode lid for a 96-well FP recording system. This enabled reliable pacing at physiologically relevant heart rates and robust recording of FP. Thereby we detected rate-dependent effects of drugs on Na+, Ca2+ and K+ channel function indicated by FP prolongation, FP shortening and the slowing of the FP downstroke component, as well as generation of afterdepolarisations. Taken together, we present a scalable approach for preclinical frequency-dependent screening of drug effects on cardiac electrophysiology. Importantly, we show that the recording and analysis can be fully automated and the technology is readily available using commercial products.

  20. Sine wave electropermeabilization reveals the frequency-dependent response of the biological membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, Tomás; Merla, Caterina; Fontaine, Jessica; Muscat, Adeline; Mir, Lluis M

    2018-02-02

    The permeabilization of biological membranes by electric fields, known as electroporation, has been traditionally performed with square electric pulses. These signals distribute the energy applied to cells in a wide frequency band. This paper investigates the use of sine waves, which are narrow band signals, to provoke electropermeabilization and the frequency dependence of this phenomenon. Single bursts of sine waves at different frequencies in the range from 8 kHz-130 kHz were applied to cells in vitro. Electroporation was studied in the plasma membrane and the internal organelles membrane using calcium as a permeabilization marker. Additionally, a double-shell electrical model was simulated to give a theoretical framework to our results. The electroporation efficiency shows a low pass filter frequency dependence for both the plasma membrane and the internal organelles membrane. The mismatch between the theoretical response and the observed behavior for the internal organelles membrane is explained by a two-step permeabilization process: first the permeabilization of the external membrane and afterwards that of the internal membranes. The simulations in the model confirm this two-step hypothesis when a variable plasma membrane conductivity is considered in the analysis. This study demonstrates how the use of narrow-band signals as sine waves is a suitable method to perform electroporation in a controlled manner. We suggest that the use of this type of signals could bring a simplification in the investigations of the very complex phenomenon of electroporation, thus representing an interesting option in future fundamental studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Phase-dependent interference between frequency doubled comb lines in a χ(2) phase-matched aluminum nitride microring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hojoong; Guo, Xiang; Zhu, Na; Papp, Scott B; Diddams, Scott A; Tang, Hong X

    2016-08-15

    Nonlinear optical conversion with frequency combs is important for self-referencing and for generating shorter wavelength combs. Here we demonstrate efficient frequency comb doubling through the combination of second-harmonic generation (SHG) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) of an input comb with a high Q, phase-matched χ(2) microring resonator. Phase coherence of the SHG and SFG nonlinear conversion processes is confirmed by sinusoidal phase-dependent interference between frequency doubled comb lines.

  2. A survey of strong high-frequency sea level oscillations along the US East Coast between 2006 and 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pasquet

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A systematic survey of high-frequency sea level oscillations (<6 h measured between 2006 and 2011 along the US East Coast is performed. Raw 1-min resolution sea level data is used. After performing a data quality check, the nine most intense events, with maximum recorded wave heights ranging from 40 to 100 cm, are identified. Focusing on three of these events enables us to recognize two different generation mechanisms: (i topographically-trapped edge waves which are found to be a significant contributor to the strongest observed oscillations, and (ii standing waves, which occur over enclosed shallow waters and may result in significant wave heights of up to 100 cm. A reproduction of the observed oscillations is a part of a future work, which will include an assessment of a generating force in the atmosphere, allowing for a better prevention of potential flooding along the US East Coast.

  3. Fitness Effects of Chlorpyrifos in the Damselfly Enallagma cyathigerum Strongly Depend upon Temperature and Food Level and Can Bridge Metamorphosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizanne Janssens

    Full Text Available Interactions between pollutants and suboptimal environmental conditions can have severe consequences for the toxicity of pollutants, yet are still poorly understood. To identify patterns across environmental conditions and across fitness-related variables we exposed Enallagma cyathigerum damselfly larvae to the pesticide chlorpyrifos at two food levels or at two temperatures and quantified four fitness-related variables (larval survival, development time, mass at emergence and adult cold resistance. Food level and temperature did not affect survival in the absence of the pesticide, yet the pesticide reduced survival only at the high temperature. Animals reacted to the pesticide by accelerating their development but only at the high food level and at the low temperature; at the low food level, however, pesticide exposure resulted in a slower development. Chlorpyrifos exposure resulted in smaller adults except in animals reared at the high food level. Animals reared at the low food level and at the low temperature had a higher cold resistance which was not affected by the pesticide. In summary our study highlight that combined effects of exposure to chlorpyrifos and the two environmental conditions (i were mostly interactive and sometimes even reversed in comparison with the effect of the environmental condition in isolation, (ii strongly differed depending on the fitness-related variable under study, (iii were not always predictable based on the effect of the environmental condition in isolation, and (iv bridged metamorphosis depending on which environmental condition was combined with the pesticide thereby potentially carrying over from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems. These findings are relevant when extrapolating results of laboratory tests done under ideal environmental conditions to natural communities.

  4. Mycolactone-Dependent Depletion of Endothelial Cell Thrombomodulin Is Strongly Associated with Fibrin Deposition in Buruli Ulcer Lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Ogbechi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A well-known histopathological feature of diseased skin in Buruli ulcer (BU is coagulative necrosis caused by the Mycobacterium ulcerans macrolide exotoxin mycolactone. Since the underlying mechanism is not known, we have investigated the effect of mycolactone on endothelial cells, focussing on the expression of surface anticoagulant molecules involved in the protein C anticoagulant pathway. Congenital deficiencies in this natural anticoagulant pathway are known to induce thrombotic complications such as purpura fulimans and spontaneous necrosis. Mycolactone profoundly decreased thrombomodulin (TM expression on the surface of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVEC at doses as low as 2 ng/ml and as early as 8 hrs after exposure. TM activates protein C by altering thrombin's substrate specificity, and exposure of HDMVEC to mycolactone for 24 hours resulted in an almost complete loss of the cells' ability to produce activated protein C. Loss of TM was shown to be due to a previously described mechanism involving mycolactone-dependent blockade of Sec61 translocation that results in proteasome-dependent degradation of newly synthesised ER-transiting proteins. Indeed, depletion from cells determined by live-cell imaging of cells stably expressing a recombinant TM-GFP fusion protein occurred at the known turnover rate. In order to determine the relevance of these findings to BU disease, immunohistochemistry of punch biopsies from 40 BU lesions (31 ulcers, nine plaques was performed. TM abundance was profoundly reduced in the subcutis of 78% of biopsies. Furthermore, it was confirmed that fibrin deposition is a common feature of BU lesions, particularly in the necrotic areas. These findings indicate that there is decreased ability to control thrombin generation in BU skin. Mycolactone's effects on normal endothelial cell function, including its ability to activate the protein C anticoagulant pathway are strongly associated with this

  5. Long-term evolution of polygenic traits under frequency-dependent intraspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kristan A

    2007-05-01

    We analytically investigate the long-term evolution of a continuously varying quantitative character in a diploid population that is determined additively by a finite number of loci. The trait is under a mixture of frequency-dependent disruptive selection induced by intraspecific competition and frequency-independent stabilizing selection. Moreover, the trait is restricted to a finite range by constraints on the particular loci. Our investigations are based on explicit analytical results (provided by Bürger [2005. A multilocus analysis of intraspecific competition and stabilizing selection on a quantitative trait. J. Math. Biol. 50, 355-396]; Schneider [2006. A multilocus-multiallele analysis of frequency-dependent selection induced by intraspecific competition. J. Math. Biol. 52, 483-523]) on the short-term dynamics under the assumption of linkage equilibrium. We show that the population always reaches a long-term equilibrium (LTE), i.e., an equilibrium that is resistant against perturbations of mutations of sufficiently small effect. In general, several LTEs can coexist. They can be calculated explicitly, and we provide necessary and sufficient conditions for their existence. In the case that more than one LTE exists, we exemplify numerically that the evolutionary outcome depends crucially on the initial genetic architecture, on the joint distribution of mutational effects across loci, and on the particular realization of the mutation process. Therefore, long-term evolution cannot be predicted from the ecology alone. We further show that a partial order exists for the LTEs. The set of LTEs has a 'largest' element, an LTE which is reached during long-term evolution if the effects of the occurring mutant alleles are sufficiently large.

  6. Frequency dependence of CA3 spike phase response arising from h-current properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melodie eBorel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The phase of firing of hippocampal neurons during theta oscillations encodes spatial information. Moreover, the spike phase response to synaptic inputs in individual cells depends on the expression of the hyperpolarisation-activated mixed cation current (Ih, which differs between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons. Here, we compared the phase response of these two cell types, as well as their intrinsic membrane properties. We found that both CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons show a voltage sag in response to negative current steps but that this voltage sag is significantly smaller in CA3 cells. Moreover, CA3 pyramidal neurons have less prominent resonance properties compared to CA1 pyramidal neurons. This is consistent with differential expression of Ih by the two cell types. Despite their distinct intrinsic membrane properties, both CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons displayed bidirectional spike phase control by excitatory conductance inputs during theta oscillations. In particular, excitatory inputs delivered at the descending phase of a dynamic clamp-induced membrane potential oscillation delayed the subsequent spike by nearly 50 mrad. The effect was shown to be mediated by Ih and was counteracted by increasing inhibitory conductance driving the membrane potential oscillation. Using our experimental data to feed a computational model, we showed that differences in Ih between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons could predict frequency-dependent differences in phase response properties between these cell types. We confirmed experimentally such frequency-dependent spike phase control in CA3 neurons. Therefore, a decrease in theta frequency, which is observed in intact animals during novelty, might switch the CA3 spike phase response from unidirectional to bidirectional and thereby promote encoding of the new context.

  7. Time and frequency-dependent modulation of local field potential synchronization by deep brain stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clinton B McCracken

    Full Text Available High-frequency electrical stimulation of specific brain structures, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS, is an effective treatment for movement disorders, but mechanisms of action remain unclear. We examined the time-dependent effects of DBS applied to the entopeduncular nucleus (EP, the rat homolog of the internal globus pallidus, a target used for treatment of both dystonia and Parkinson's disease (PD. We performed simultaneous multi-site local field potential (LFP recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats to assess the effects of high-frequency (HF, 130 Hz; clinically effective, low-frequency (LF, 15 Hz; ineffective and sham DBS delivered to EP. LFP activity was recorded from dorsal striatum (STR, ventroanterior thalamus (VA, primary motor cortex (M1, and the stimulation site in EP. Spontaneous and acute stimulation-induced LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed at baseline, and after 30, 60, and 90 minutes of stimulation. HF EP DBS produced widespread alterations in spontaneous and stimulus-induced LFP oscillations, with some effects similar across regions and others occurring in a region- and frequency band-specific manner. Many of these changes evolved over time. HF EP DBS produced an initial transient reduction in power in the low beta band in M1 and STR; however, phase synchronization between these regions in the low beta band was markedly suppressed at all time points. DBS also enhanced low gamma synchronization throughout the circuit. With sustained stimulation, there were significant reductions in low beta synchronization between M1-VA and STR-VA, and increases in power within regions in the faster frequency bands. HF DBS also suppressed the ability of acute EP stimulation to induce beta oscillations in all regions along the circuit. This dynamic pattern of synchronizing and desynchronizing effects of EP DBS suggests a complex modulation of activity along cortico-BG-thalamic circuits underlying the therapeutic

  8. Frequency Dependent Polarization Analysis of Ambient Seismic Noise Recorded at Broadband Seismometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koper, K.; Hawley, V.

    2010-12-01

    Analysis of ambient seismic noise is becoming increasingly relevant to modern seismology. Advances in computational speed and storage have made it feasible to analyze years and even decades of continuous seismic data in short amounts of time. Therefore, it is now possible to perform longitudinal studies of station performance in order to identify degradation or mis-installation of seismic equipment. Long-term noise analysis also provides insight into the evolution of the ocean wave climate, specifically whether the frequency and intensity of storms have changed as global temperatures have changed. Here we present a new approach to polarization analysis of seismic noise recorded by three-component seismometers. Essentially, eigen-decomposition of the 3-by-3 Hermitian spectral matrix associated with a sliding window of data is applied to yield various polarization attributes as a function of time and frequency. This in turn yields fundamental information about the composition of seismic noise, such as the extent to which it is polarized, its mode of propagation, and the direction from which it arrives at the seismometer. The polarization attributes can be viewed as function of time or binned over 2D frequency-time space to deduce regularities in the ambient noise that are unbiased by transient signals from earthquakes and explosions. We applied the algorithm to continuous data recorded in 2009 by the seismic station SLM, located in central North America. A rich variety of noise sources was observed. At low frequencies (3 Hz), Rayleigh-type energy was again dominant, in the form of Rg waves created by nearby cultural activities. Analysis of the time dependence of noise power shows that a frequency range of at least 0.02-1.0 Hz (much larger than the microseism band) is sensitive to annual, meteorologically induced sources of noise. We are currently applying our technique to selected seismometers from USArray and the University of Utah Seismic Network.

  9. Experiments on Frequency Dependence of the Deflection of Light in Yang-Mills Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In Yang-Mills gravity based on flat space-time, the eikonal equation for a light ray is derived from the modified Maxwell’s wave equations in the geometric-optics limit. One obtains a Hamilton-Jacobi type equation, GLµv∂µΨ∂vΨ = 0 with an effective Riemannian metric tensor GLµv. According to Yang-Mills gravity, light rays (and macroscopic objects move as if they were in an effective curved space-time with a metric tensor. The deflection angle of a light ray by the sun is about 1.53″ for experiments with optical frequencies ≈ 1014Hz. It is roughly 12% smaller than the usual value 1.75″. However, the experimental data in the past 100 years for the deflection of light by the sun in optical frequencies have uncertainties of (10-20% due to large systematic errors. If one does not take the geometric-optics limit, one has the equation, GLµv[∂µΨ∂vΨcosΨ+ (∂µ∂vΨsinΨ] = 0, which suggests that the deflection angle could be frequency-dependent, according to Yang-Mills gravity. Nowadays, one has very accurate data in the radio frequencies ≈ 109Hz with uncertainties less than 0.1%. Thus, one can test this suggestion by using frequencies ≈ 1012 Hz, which could have a small uncertainty 0.1% due to the absence of systematic errors in the very long baseline interferometry.

  10. Comparing the epidermal growth factor interaction with four different cell lines: intriguing effects imply strong dependency of cellular context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Björkelund

    Full Text Available The interaction of the epidermal growth factor (EGF with its receptor (EGFR is known to be complex, and the common over-expression of EGF receptor family members in a multitude of tumors makes it important to decipher this interaction and the following signaling pathways. We have investigated the affinity and kinetics of (125I-EGF binding to EGFR in four human tumor cell lines, each using four culturing conditions, in real time by use of LigandTracer®.Highly repeatable and precise measurements show that the overall apparent affinity of the (125I-EGF - EGFR interaction is greatly dependent on cell line at normal culturing conditions, ranging from K(D ≈ 200 pM on SKBR3 cells to K(D≈8 nM on A431 cells. The (125I-EGF - EGFR binding curves (irrespective of cell line have strong signs of multiple simultaneous interactions. Furthermore, for the cell lines A431 and SKOV3, gefitinib treatment increases the (125I-EGF - EGFR affinity, in particular when the cells are starved. The (125I-EGF - EGFR interaction on cell line U343 is sensitive to starvation while as on SKBR3 it is insensitive to gefitinib and starvation.The intriguing pattern of the binding characteristics proves that the cellular context is important when deciphering how EGF interacts with EGFR. From a general perspective, care is advisable when generalizing ligand-receptor interaction results across multiple cell-lines.

  11. Strong Dependence of U.S. Summertime Air Quality on the Decadal Variability of Atlantic Sea Surface Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lu; Mickley, Loretta J.; Leibensperger, Eric M.; Li, Mingwei

    2017-12-01

    We find that summertime air quality in the eastern U.S. displays strong dependence on North Atlantic sea surface temperatures, resulting from large-scale ocean-atmosphere interactions. Using observations, reanalysis data sets, and climate model simulations, we further identify a multidecadal variability in surface air quality driven by the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). In one-half cycle ( 35 years) of the AMO from cold to warm phase, summertime maximum daily 8 h ozone concentrations increase by 1-4 ppbv and PM2.5 concentrations increase by 0.3-1.0 μg m-3 over much of the east. These air quality changes are related to warmer, drier, and more stagnant weather in the AMO warm phase, together with anomalous circulation patterns at the surface and aloft. If the AMO shifts to the cold phase in future years, it could partly offset the climate penalty on U.S. air quality brought by global warming, an effect which should be considered in long-term air quality planning.

  12. Magnetic-field dependence of strongly anisotropic spin reorientation transition in NdFeO3: a terahertz study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Junjie; Song, Gaibei; Wang, Dongyang; Jin, Zuanming; Tian, Zhen; Lin, Xian; Han, Jiaguang; Ma, Guohong; Cao, Shixun; Cheng, Zhenxiang

    2016-03-23

    One of the biggest challenges in spintronics is finding how to switch the magnetization of a material. One way of the spin switching is the spin reorientation transition (SRT), a switching of macroscopic magnetization rotated by 90°. The macroscopic magnetization in a NdFeO3 single crystal rotates from Γ4 to Γ2 via Γ24 as the temperature is decreased from 170 to 100 K, while it can be switched back to Γ4 again by increasing the temperature. However, the precise roles of the magnetic-field induced SRT are still unclear. By using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), here, we show that the magnetic-field induced SRT between Γ4 and Γ2 is strongly anisotropic, depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field. Our experimental results are well interpreted by the anisotropy of rare-earth Nd(3+) ion. Furthermore, we find that the critical magnetic-field required for SRT can be modified by changing the temperature. Our study suggests that the anisotropic SRT in NdFeO3 single crystal provides a platform to facilitate the potential applications in robust spin memory devices.

  13. Anisotropy of human muscle via non invasive impedance measurements. Frequency dependence of the impedance changes during isometric contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashuri, Hektor

    In this thesis we present non invasive muscle impedance measurements using rotatable probes extending the work done by Aaron et al. (1997) by measuring not only the real part of the impedance but the imaginary part as well. The results reveal orientations of underlying muscle fibers via minima in resistance and reactance versus angle curves, suggesting this method as potentially useful for studying muscle properties in clinical and physiological research. Calculations of the current distribution for a slab of material with anisotropic conductivity show that the current distribution depends strongly on the separation of two current electrodes and as well as on its conducting anisotropy. Forearm muscle impedance measurements at 50 kHz done by Shiffman et al. (2003) had shown that both resistance (R) and reactance (X) increase during isometric contraction. We have extended these measurements in the 3 to 100 kHz range and we found that resistance (R) and reactance (X) both increase and their changes increased or decreased at frequency dependent rates. Analysis based on circuit models of changes in R and X during the short contraction pulses showed that the extra cellular fluid resistance increased by 3.9 +/- 1.4 %, while the capacitance increased by 5.6 +/- 2 %. For long contraction pulses at very low frequencies: (1) there was practically no change in R during contraction, which implies that these changes are due to cellular membrane or intracellular effects with the extra cellular water component not participating, and (2) in post contraction stage there were no morphological changes which means that drifts in R can only be due to physiological changes. Following Shiffman et al. (2003) we measured impedance changes of R and X during a triangular shaped pulse of force generated via isometric forearm muscle contraction at 50 kHz. We measured these changes in 3-100 kHz frequency range for a stair case pulse of forces and the results showed that they are frequency

  14. RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF THE FREQUENCY BREAK BETWEEN FLUID AND KINETIC SCALES IN THE SOLAR WIND FLUCTUATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, R.; Trenchi, L., E-mail: roberto.bruno@iaps.inaf.it [INAF-IAPS Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the radial dependence of the spectral break separating the inertial from the dissipation range in power density spectra of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations, between 0.42 and 5.3 AU, during radial alignments between MESSENGER and WIND for the inner heliosphere and between WIND and ULYSSES for the outer heliosphere. We found that the spectral break moves to higher and higher frequencies as the heliocentric distance decreases. The radial dependence of the corresponding wavenumber is of the kind κ {sub b} ∼ R {sup –1.08}, in good agreement with that of the wavenumber derived from the linear resonance condition for proton cyclotron damping. These results support conclusions from previous studies which suggest that a cyclotron-resonant dissipation mechanism must participate in the spectral cascade together with other possible kinetic noncyclotron-resonant mechanisms.

  15. Fractional Laplacian time-space models for linear and nonlinear lossy media exhibiting arbitrary frequency power-law dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Holm, S.

    2004-04-01

    Frequency-dependent attenuation typically obeys an empirical power law with an exponent ranging from 0 to 2. The standard time-domain partial differential equation models can describe merely two extreme cases of frequency-independent and frequency-squared dependent attenuations. The otherwise nonzero and nonsquare frequency dependency occurring in many cases of practical interest is thus often called the anomalous attenuation. In this study, a linear integro-differential equation wave model was developed for the anomalous attenuation by using the space-fractional Laplacian operation, and the strategy is then extended to the nonlinear Burgers equation. A new definition of the fractional Laplacian is also introduced which naturally includes the boundary conditions and has inherent regularization to ease the hypersingularity in the conventional fractional Laplacian. Under the Szabo's smallness approximation, where attenuation is assumed to be much smaller than the wave number, the linear model is found consistent with arbitrary frequency power-law dependency.

  16. A General Model of Negative Frequency Dependent Selection Explains Global Patterns of Human ABO Polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanea, Fernando A.; Safi, Kristin N.; Busch, Jeremiah W.

    2015-01-01

    The ABO locus in humans is characterized by elevated heterozygosity and very similar allele frequencies among populations scattered across the globe. Using knowledge of ABO protein function, we generated a simple model of asymmetric negative frequency dependent selection and genetic drift to explain the maintenance of ABO polymorphism and its loss in human populations. In our models, regardless of the strength of selection, models with large effective population sizes result in ABO allele frequencies that closely match those observed in most continental populations. Populations must be moderately small to fall out of equilibrium and lose either the A or B allele (Ne ≤ 50) and much smaller (Ne ≤ 25) for the complete loss of diversity, which nearly always involved the fixation of the O allele. A pattern of low heterozygosity at the ABO locus where loss of polymorphism occurs in our model is consistent with small populations, such as Native American populations. This study provides a general evolutionary model to explain the observed global patterns of polymorphism at the ABO locus and the pattern of allele loss in small populations. Moreover, these results inform the range of population sizes associated with the recent human colonization of the Americas. PMID:25946124

  17. A General Model of Negative Frequency Dependent Selection Explains Global Patterns of Human ABO Polymorphism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando A Villanea

    Full Text Available The ABO locus in humans is characterized by elevated heterozygosity and very similar allele frequencies among populations scattered across the globe. Using knowledge of ABO protein function, we generated a simple model of asymmetric negative frequency dependent selection and genetic drift to explain the maintenance of ABO polymorphism and its loss in human populations. In our models, regardless of the strength of selection, models with large effective population sizes result in ABO allele frequencies that closely match those observed in most continental populations. Populations must be moderately small to fall out of equilibrium and lose either the A or B allele (N(e ≤ 50 and much smaller (N(e ≤ 25 for the complete loss of diversity, which nearly always involved the fixation of the O allele. A pattern of low heterozygosity at the ABO locus where loss of polymorphism occurs in our model is consistent with small populations, such as Native American populations. This study provides a general evolutionary model to explain the observed global patterns of polymorphism at the ABO locus and the pattern of allele loss in small populations. Moreover, these results inform the range of population sizes associated with the recent human colonization of the Americas.

  18. Magnetic field dependence of spatial frequency encoding NMR as probed on an oligosaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitoux, D; Hu, Z; Plainchont, B; Merlet, D; Farjon, J; Bonnaffé, D; Giraud, N

    2015-10-01

    The magnetic field dependence of spatial frequency encoding NMR techniques is addressed through a detailed analysis of (1)H NMR spectra acquired under spatial frequency encoding on an oligomeric saccharide sample. In particular, the influence of the strength of the static magnetic field on spectral and spatial resolutions that are key features of this method is investigated. For this purpose, we report the acquisition of correlation experiments implementing broadband homodecoupling or J-edited spin evolutions, and we discuss the resolution enhancements that are provided by these techniques at two different magnetic fields. We show that performing these experiments at higher field improves the performance of high resolution NMR techniques based on a spatial frequency encoding. The significant resolution enhancements observed on the correlation spectra acquired at very high field make them valuable analytical tools that are suitable for the assignment of (1)H chemical shifts and scalar couplings in molecules with highly crowded spectrum such as carbohydrates. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Frequency-Dependent Streaming Potential of Porous Media—Part 1: Experimental Approaches and Apparatus Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. W. J. Glover

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrokinetic phenomena link fluid flow and electrical flow in porous and fractured media such that a hydraulic flow will generate an electrical current and vice versa. Such a link is likely to be extremely useful, especially in the development of the electroseismic method. However, surprisingly few experimental measurements have been carried out, particularly as a function of frequency because of their difficulty. Here we have considered six different approaches to make laboratory determinations of the frequency-dependent streaming potential coefficient. In each case, we have analyzed the mechanical, electrical, and other technical difficulties involved in each method. We conclude that the electromagnetic drive is currently the only approach that is practicable, while the piezoelectric drive may be useful for low permeability samples and at specified high frequencies. We have used the electro-magnetic drive approach to design, build, and test an apparatus for measuring the streaming potential coefficient of unconsolidated and disaggregated samples such as sands, gravels, and soils with a diameter of 25.4 mm and lengths between 50 mm and 300 mm.

  20. Frequency-Dependent Streaming Potential of Porous Media—Part 2: Experimental Measurement of Unconsolidated Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. W. J. Glover

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequency-dependent streaming potential coefficient measurements have been made upon Ottawa sand and glass bead packs using a new apparatus that is based on an electromagnetic drive. The apparatus operates in the range 1 Hz to 1 kHz with samples of 25.4 mm diameter up to 150 mm long. The results have been analysed using theoretical models that are either (i based upon vibrational mechanics, (ii treat the geological material as a bundle of capillary tubes, or (iii treat the material as a porous medium. The best fit was provided by the Pride model and its simplification, which is satisfying as this model was conceived for porous media rather than capillary tube bundles. Values for the transition frequency were derived from each of the models for each sample and were found to be in good agreement with those expected from the independently measured effective pore radius of each material. The fit to the Pride model for all four samples was also found to be consistent with the independently measured steady-state permeability, while the value of the streaming potential coefficient in the low-frequency limit was found to be in good agreement with other steady-state streaming potential coefficient data.

  1. Frequency-dependent electrodeformation of giant phospholipid vesicles in AC electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterlin, Primož

    2010-09-01

    A model of vesicle electrodeformation is described which obtains a parametrized vesicle shape by minimizing the sum of the membrane bending energy and the energy due to the electric field. Both the vesicle membrane and the aqueous media inside and outside the vesicle are treated as leaky dielectrics, and the vesicle itself is modeled as a nearly spherical shape enclosed within a thin membrane. It is demonstrated (a) that the model achieves a good quantitative agreement with the experimentally determined prolate-to-oblate transition frequencies in the kilohertz range and (b) that the model can explain a phase diagram of shapes of giant phospholipid vesicles with respect to two parameters: the frequency of the applied alternating current electric field and the ratio of the electrical conductivities of the aqueous media inside and outside the vesicle, explored in a recent paper (S. Aranda et al., Biophys J 95:L19-L21, 2008). A possible use of the frequency-dependent shape transitions of phospholipid vesicles in conductometry of microliter samples is discussed.

  2. About angular dependence of intensity of absent-minded radiation in approach of the strong dissipation of colliding ionic-sound waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solikhov, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    Present article is devoted to angular dependence of intensity of absent-minded radiation in approach of the strong dissipation of colliding ionic-sound waves. The operation angular dependence of dimensionless of intensity of absent-minded radiation in two-dimensional field of localisation of a wave of a rating in approach of the strong dissipation of passers is ionic-sound waves is viewed. (author)

  3. Fracture characterization using frequency-dependent shear wave anisotropy analysis of microseismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harrasi, O. H.; Kendall, J.-M.; Chapman, M.

    2011-05-01

    The presence of fractures in hydrocarbon reservoirs can enhance porosity and permeability, and consequently increase production. The use of seismic anisotropy to characterize fracture systems has gained much interest in the last two decades. However, estimating fracture sizes from observations of seismic anisotropy has not been possible. Recent work has shown that frequency-dependent anisotropy (FDA) is very sensitive to the length-scale of the causative mechanism for the anisotropy. In this study, we observe FDA in a microseismic data set acquired from a carbonate gas field in Oman. The frequency-dependent shear wave anisotropy observations are modelled using a poroelastic model, which considers fluid communication between grain size pore spaces and larger scale fractures. A grid search is performed over fracture parameters (radius, density and strike) to find the model that best fits the real data. The results show that fracture size varies from the microscale within the shale cap rocks, to the metre-scale within the gas reservoir, to the centimetre-scale within the non-producing part of the carbonate formation. The lateral variation in fracture density agrees with previous conclusions from ordinary shear wave splitting (SWS) analysis. Cumulatively, the results show the potential for characterizing fracture systems using observations of FDA.

  4. Implementation of the frequency dependent line model in a real-time power system simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Iracheta-Cortez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is described the implementation of the frequency-dependent line model (FD-Line in a real-time digital power system simulator. The main goal with such development is to describe a general procedure to incorporate new realistic models of power system components in modern real-time simulators based on the Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP. In this procedure are described, firstly, the steps to obtain the time domain solution of the differential equations that models the electromagnetic behavior in multi-phase transmission lines with frequency dependent parameters. After, the algorithmic solution of the FD-Line model is implemented in Simulink environment, through an S-function programmed in C language, for running off-line simulations of electromagnetic transients. This implementation allows the free assembling of the FD Line model with any element of the Power System Blockset library and also, it can be used to build any network topology. The main advantage of having a power network built in Simulink is that can be executed in real-time by means of the commercial eMEGAsim simulator. Finally, several simulation cases are presented to validate the accuracy and the real-time performance of the FD-Line model.

  5. Frequency dependent power fluctuations: a feature of the ESR system or physical?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ogawa

    Full Text Available The k-dependence of the received power in high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR conditions, occurring for naturally enhanced ion-acoustic lines (NEIALs and for real satellites, is investigated by using the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR, where the data are recorded in eight separate channels using different frequencies. For the real satellites we find large variations of the relative powers from event to event, which is probably due to a different number of pulses catching the satellite over the integration period. However, the large power difference remains unexpected in one case. Over short time scale (< 10 s the relative power difference seems to be highly stable. For most NEIAL events the differences between channels are within noise level. In a few cases variations of the relative power well above both the estimated and expected 1-sigma level occur over a signal preintegrated profile. We thus suggest that the frequency dependence of the power in NEIAL events has its origin in the scattering medium itself as the most plausible explanation.

    Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; plasma waves and instabilities; instruments and techniques

  6. Frequency dependent power fluctuations: a feature of the ESR system or physical?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ogawa

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The k-dependence of the received power in high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR conditions, occurring for naturally enhanced ion-acoustic lines (NEIALs and for real satellites, is investigated by using the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR, where the data are recorded in eight separate channels using different frequencies. For the real satellites we find large variations of the relative powers from event to event, which is probably due to a different number of pulses catching the satellite over the integration period. However, the large power difference remains unexpected in one case. Over short time scale (< 10 s the relative power difference seems to be highly stable. For most NEIAL events the differences between channels are within noise level. In a few cases variations of the relative power well above both the estimated and expected 1-sigma level occur over a signal preintegrated profile. We thus suggest that the frequency dependence of the power in NEIAL events has its origin in the scattering medium itself as the most plausible explanation.Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; plasma waves and instabilities; instruments and techniques

  7. Tidal dissipation in the Moon. Learning from the "incorrect" frequency dependence measured by the LLR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efroimsky, M.

    2012-09-01

    It was demonstrated back in 2001 that fitting of the LLR data results in the quality factor Q of the Moon scaling as the frequency ξ to a negative power [8]: Q ˜ ξp , where p = -0.19 . (1) At the same time, numerous measurements by various seismological teams agree on the exponent being positive, not negative [4]. The positive sign of the exponent stems also from geodetic measurements [1], and it finds its explanation within the theory of friction in minerals [5]. On all these grounds, the aforementioned finding by the LLR team appears to be implausible and to disagree with the conventional wisdom of solid state mechanics and seismology. A later reexamination in [9] rendered a less upsetting value, p = -0.09 , which was still negative and still seemed to contradict our knowledge of microphysical processes in solids. The authors later wrote [10]: "There is a weak dependence of tidal specific dissipation Q on period. The Q increases from ˜ 30 at a month to ˜ 35 at one year. Q for rock is expected to have a weak dependence on tidal period, but it is expected to decrease with period rather than increase. The frequency dependence of Q deserves further attention and should be improved." A possible explanation of this paradox comes from the observation that the LLR measurements provided information on the tidal and not seismic dissipation. The difference between these two processes comes from self-gravitation of the celestial body. To address the problem accurately, one has to calculate the tidal factors kl sin ɛl showing up in the Darwin-Kaula expansion for the tidal torque or force. Here kl is the degree-l Love number, while ɛl is the appropriate tidal lag. Sometimes sin ɛl is denoted with 1/Q , which is not recommended, because this notation does not distinguish between the tidal reaction appropriate to harmonics of different degree. This notation also puts one at risk of confusing the tidal damping with the seismic damping, two process that have much in common

  8. Salicylate-induced hyperacusis in rats: Dose- and frequency-dependent effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziwon, Kelly; Holfoth, David; Lindner, Julia; Kaier-Green, Zoe; Bowler, Rachael; Urban, Maxwell; Salvi, Richard

    2017-07-01

    The use of auditory reaction time is a reliable measure of loudness perception in both animals and humans with reaction times (RT) decreasing with increasing stimulus intensity. Since abnormal loudness perception is a common feature of hyperacusis, a potentially debilitating auditory disorder in which moderate-intensity sounds are perceived as uncomfortable or painfully loud, we used RT measures to assess rats for salicylate-induced hyperacusis. A previous study using an operant conditioning RT procedure found that high-dose sodium salicylate (SS) induced hyperacusis-like behavior, i.e., faster than normal RTs to moderate and high level sounds, when rats were tested with broadband noise stimuli. However, it was not clear from that study if salicylate induces hyperacusis-like behavior in a dose- or frequency-dependent manner. Therefore, the goals of the current study were to determine how RT-intensity functions were altered by different doses of salicylate, and, using tone bursts, to determine if salicylate induces hyperacusis-like behavior across the entire frequency spectrum or only at certain frequencies. Similar to previous physiological studies, we began to see faster than normal RTs for sounds 60 dB SPL and greater with salicylate doses of 150 mg/kg and higher; indicating the rats were experiencing hyperacusis at high salicylate doses. In addition, high-dose salicylate significantly reduced RTs across all stimulus frequencies tested which suggests that a central neural excitability mechanism may be a potential driver of salicylate-induced changes in loudness perception and hyperacusis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Disentangling the roles of frequency-vs. state-dependence in generating individual differences in behavioural plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathot, Kimberley J; van den Hout, Piet J; Piersma, Theunis; Kempenaers, Bart; Réale, Denis; Dingemanse, Niels J

    2011-12-01

    Theoretical work suggests that both negative frequency-dependent payoffs and state-dependent payoffs can lead to individual variation in behavioural plasticity. We investigated the roles of both frequency- and state-dependence on the occurrence of individual variation in behavioural plasticity in a series of experiments where we manipulated perceived predation danger for red knots (Calidris canutus islandica). We found individual variation in plasticity in a trait with negative frequency-dependent payoffs (vigilance), but not in a trait with positive frequency-dependent payoffs (escape flights). Furthermore, there was no correlation between the average level of vigilance under low predation danger and the magnitude of response to increased predation danger, as would be expected under state-dependence. Thus, our results provide support for the hypothesis that negative-frequency dependence favours individual variation in plasticity. However, negative-frequency dependence alone cannot explain why plasticity would be consistent within individuals, and future studies should address the factors that might favour individual consistency. 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  10. Frequency and amplitude dependences of molding accuracy in ultrasonic nanoimprint technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekaru, Harutaka; Takahashi, Masaharu

    2009-01-01

    We use neither a heater nor ultraviolet lights, and are researching and developing an ultrasonic nanoimprint as a new nano-patterning technology. In our ultrasonic nanoimprint technology, ultrasonic vibration is not used as a heat generator instead of the heater. A mold is connected with an ultrasonic generator, and mold patterns are pushed down and pulled up at a high speed into a thermoplastic. Frictional heat is generated by ultrasonic vibration between mold patterns and thermoplastic patterns formed by an initial contact force. However, because frictional heat occurs locally, the whole mold is not heated. Therefore, a molding material can be comprehensively processed at room temperature. A magnetostriction actuator was built into our ultrasonic nanoimprint system as an ultrasonic generator, and the frequency and amplitude can be changed between dc–10 kHz and 0–4 µm, respectively. First, the ultrasonic nanoimprint was experimented by using this system on polyethylene terephthalate (PET, T g = 69 °C), whose the glass transition temperature (T g ) is comparatively low in engineering plastics, and it was ascertained that the most suitable elastic material for this technique was an ethyl urethane rubber. In addition, we used a changeable frequency of the magnetostriction actuator, and nano-patterns in an electroformed-Ni mold were transferred to a 0.5 mm thick sheet of PET, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polycarbonate (PC), which are typical engineering plastics, under variable molding conditions. The frequency and amplitude dependence of ultrasonic vibration to the molding accuracy were investigated by measuring depth and width of imprinted patterns. As a result, regardless of the molding material, the imprinted depth was changed drastically when the frequency exceeded 5 kHz. On the other hand, when the amplitude of ultrasonic vibration grew, the imprinted depth gradually deepened. Influence of the frequency and amplitude of ultrasonic vibration was not

  11. Frequency and amplitude dependences of molding accuracy in ultrasonic nanoimprint technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekaru, Harutaka; Takahashi, Masaharu

    2009-12-01

    We use neither a heater nor ultraviolet lights, and are researching and developing an ultrasonic nanoimprint as a new nano-patterning technology. In our ultrasonic nanoimprint technology, ultrasonic vibration is not used as a heat generator instead of the heater. A mold is connected with an ultrasonic generator, and mold patterns are pushed down and pulled up at a high speed into a thermoplastic. Frictional heat is generated by ultrasonic vibration between mold patterns and thermoplastic patterns formed by an initial contact force. However, because frictional heat occurs locally, the whole mold is not heated. Therefore, a molding material can be comprehensively processed at room temperature. A magnetostriction actuator was built into our ultrasonic nanoimprint system as an ultrasonic generator, and the frequency and amplitude can be changed between dc-10 kHz and 0-4 µm, respectively. First, the ultrasonic nanoimprint was experimented by using this system on polyethylene terephthalate (PET, Tg = 69 °C), whose the glass transition temperature (Tg) is comparatively low in engineering plastics, and it was ascertained that the most suitable elastic material for this technique was an ethyl urethane rubber. In addition, we used a changeable frequency of the magnetostriction actuator, and nano-patterns in an electroformed-Ni mold were transferred to a 0.5 mm thick sheet of PET, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polycarbonate (PC), which are typical engineering plastics, under variable molding conditions. The frequency and amplitude dependence of ultrasonic vibration to the molding accuracy were investigated by measuring depth and width of imprinted patterns. As a result, regardless of the molding material, the imprinted depth was changed drastically when the frequency exceeded 5 kHz. On the other hand, when the amplitude of ultrasonic vibration grew, the imprinted depth gradually deepened. Influence of the frequency and amplitude of ultrasonic vibration was not observed

  12. Critical bands and mixed-frequency scaling: sequential dependencies, equal-loudness contours, and power function exponents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, L M

    1990-06-01

    Stimuli of random intensities and various but predictable frequencies were presented for repeated magnitude estimations on the same scale (mixed-frequency scaling). The frequencies for a particular judgment session were selected so that they lay either inside each other's critical bands or outside them. Contrastive dependencies of current magnitude estimation responses on previous stimuli of a different frequency were significantly affected by whether the two frequencies were inside or outside each other's critical bands, while assimilative dependencies were not. This reinforces the idea that such dependencies are sensory in nature and arise from a different mechanism than do the assimilative dependencies. Mixed-frequency scaling of loudness also gives rise to cross-frequency matching functions from which equal-loudness contours can be calculated. These contours calculated from the present judgments are similar to those produced from other methods, even when they are extrapolated to untested intensities. Power function exponents for loudness scaled in this way are larger for lower frequencies, as has been found in previous studies, and are consistent with the flattening of the calculated equal-loudness contours for low frequencies as intensity increases.

  13. Assessment of breadmaking performance of wheat flour dough by means of frequency dependent ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, D; Peressini, D; Page, J H; Strybulevych, A; Scanlon, M G

    2012-01-01

    Technological performance of wheat flour varies among different wheat varieties. Gluten plays a key role within the solid phase of dough in the formation and the retention of gas bubbles during breadmaking. Rheological tests are usually performed to predict breadmaking potential. The aim here was to investigate the ability of ultrasound to discriminate wheat doughs based on breadmaking qualities. The ultimate goal is the development of an online quality control system currently unavailable in the baked goods industry, rendering this work innovative. Samples were prepared from a strong wheat flour, with one control sample and one added with inulin and distilled monoglycerides, producing doughs of distinct breadmaking quality. Doughs were subjected to density determination, elongation tests, and ultrasound analysis. The ultrasound tests were performed in the frequency range of 300 kHz – 6 MHz. Ultrasonic phase velocity increased with increasing frequency to about 2 MHz, becoming constant and then decreasing from 3 MHz for the control sample. Distinct differences in attenuation coefficient between the fibre-enriched and control doughs were observed. Ultrasound can potentially add to a better understanding of dough quality and can discriminate between doughs of contrasting properties.

  14. Estimation of strong ground motion in broad-frequency band based on a seismic source scaling model and an empirical Green's function technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kamae

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a generalized method for simulating strong ground motion from large earthquakes by summing subevent records to follow the ?2 law. The original idea of the method is based on a constant stress parameter between the target event and the subevent. It is applicable to a case where both events have a different stress drop after some manipulation. However, the simulation for a very large earthquake from a small event with this method has inevitably some deficiencies of spectral amplitudes in the intermediate frequency range deviating f`rom the ?2 model, although the high and low frequency motions match the scaling. We improve the simulation algorithm so as not to make spectral sags, introducing self-similar distribution of subfaults with different sizes in the fault plane, so-called fractal composite faulting model. We show successful simulations for intermediate-sized earthquakes (MJMA = 5.0, 6.0 and 6.1, the large aftershocks of the 1983 Akita-Oki earthquake. using the records of smaller aftershocks (MJMA = 3.9 and 5.0 as an empirical Green's function. Further, we attempted to estimate strong ground motion for the 1946 Nankai earthquake with Mw 8.2, using the records of a MJMA 5.1 earthquake occurring near the source region of the mainshock. We found that strong ground motions simulated for the fractal composite faulting model with two asperities radiating significantly high frequency motions matched well the observed data such as the near-field displacement record, the source spectrum estimated from the teleseismic record, and the seismic intensity distribution during the 1946 Nankai earthquake.

  15. Frequency dependent detection in a STED microscope using modulated excitation light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzitti, Emiliano; Harke, Benjamin; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-14

    We present a novel concept adaptable to any kind of STED microscope in order to expand the limited number of compatible dyes for performing super resolution imaging. The approach is based on an intensity modulated excitation beam in combination with a frequency dependent detection in the form of a standard lock-in amplifier. This enables to unmix fluorescence signal originated by the excitation beam from the fluorescence caused by the STED beam. The benefit of this concept is demonstrated by imaging biological samples as well as fluorescent spheres, whose spectrum does not allow STED imaging in the conventional way. Our concept is suitable with CW or pulsed STED microscope and can thereby be seen as a general improvement adaptable to any existing setup.

  16. Strain-dependent partial slip on rock fractures under seismic-frequency torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltiel, Seth; Bonner, Brian P.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.

    2017-05-01

    Measurements of nonlinear modulus and attenuation of fractures provide the opportunity to probe their mechanical state. We have adapted a low-frequency torsional apparatus to explore the seismic signature of fractures under low normal stress, simulating low effective stress environments such as shallow or high pore pressure reservoirs. We report strain-dependent modulus and attenuation for fractured samples of Duperow dolomite (a carbon sequestration target reservoir in Montana), Blue Canyon Dome rhyolite (a geothermal analog reservoir in New Mexico), and Montello granite (a deep basement disposal analog from Wisconsin). We use a simple single effective asperity partial slip model to fit our measured stress-strain curves and solve for the friction coefficient, contact radius, and full slip condition. These observations have the potential to develop into new field techniques for measuring differences in frictional properties during reservoir engineering manipulations and estimate the stress conditions where reservoir fractures and faults begin to fully slip.

  17. Sibling genes as environment: Sibling dopamine genotypes and adolescent health support frequency dependent selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Emily; Conley, Dalton; Siegal, Mark L

    2015-11-01

    While research consistently suggests siblings matter for individual outcomes, it remains unclear why. At the same time, studies of genetic effects on health typically correlate variants of a gene with the average level of behavioral or health measures, ignoring more complicated genetic dynamics. Using National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health data, we investigate whether sibling genes moderate individual genetic expression. We compare twin variation in health-related absences and self-rated health by genetic differences at three locations related to dopamine regulation and transport to test sibship-level cross-person gene-gene interactions. Results suggest effects of variation at these genetic locations are moderated by sibling genes. Although the mechanism remains unclear, this evidence is consistent with frequency dependent selection and suggests much genetic research may violate the stable unit treatment value assumption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Temperature dependence of Brillouin frequency shift in polymers controlled by plasticization effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakawa, Kazunari; Koike, Kotaro; Du, Qiming; Hayashi, Neisei; Koike, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2015-04-01

    The temperature-dependence coefficient of Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) in perfluorinated graded-index polymer optical fibers is known to change drastically, because of the glass transition, at a certain critical temperature (Tc), above which the BFS becomes more sensitive to temperature. In this paper, we demonstrate that the Tc value can be adjusted by varying the dopant concentration, which is originally used to form the graded-index profile in the core region. Furthermore, we show that the temperature sensitivity of the BFS is enhanced in the presence of dopant probably because the temperature sensitivity of Young's modulus is increased. The results indicate a big potential of the temperature sensors based on Brillouin scattering with an extremely high sensitivity in a specific desired temperature range.

  19. Frequency-dependent dielectric contribution of flexoelectricity allowing control of state switching in helicoidal liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outram, B I; Elston, S J

    2013-07-01

    The contribution of flexoelectric polarization to the dielectric susceptibility in helicoidal liquid crystals is formulated for the static equilibrium case, and further in the case of a time-varying field. A dispersion of the dielectric permittivity due to the frequency response of flexoelectric switching is described. The special case of a negative dielectric-anisotropy nematic material is considered and experimentally shown to agree with the analytical theory. It is further demonstrated how relaxation of the flexoelectric contribution to the dielectric tensor in this special case can be exploited to switch between states in cholesteric liquid crystal structures by altering the applied time-dependent field amplitude, if Δε-Δεε(0). Consequentially, a versatile mechanism for driving between states in liquid crystal systems has been demonstrated and its implications for technology are suggested, and include dual-mode, bistable, and transflective displays.

  20. Frequency-dependent dielectric contribution of flexoelectricity allowing control of state switching in helicoidal liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outram, B. I.; Elston, S. J.

    2013-07-01

    The contribution of flexoelectric polarization to the dielectric susceptibility in helicoidal liquid crystals is formulated for the static equilibrium case, and further in the case of a time-varying field. A dispersion of the dielectric permittivity due to the frequency response of flexoelectric switching is described. The special case of a negative dielectric-anisotropy nematic material is considered and experimentally shown to agree with the analytical theory. It is further demonstrated how relaxation of the flexoelectric contribution to the dielectric tensor in this special case can be exploited to switch between states in cholesteric liquid crystal structures by altering the applied time-dependent field amplitude, if Δɛ-Δɛɛ0. Consequentially, a versatile mechanism for driving between states in liquid crystal systems has been demonstrated and its implications for technology are suggested, and include dual-mode, bistable, and transflective displays.

  1. Evaluation of frequency-dependent ultrasound attenuation in transparent medium using focused shadowgraph technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Yukina; Kudo, Nobuki

    2017-07-01

    Acoustic fields of a short-pulsed ultrasound propagating through a transparent medium with ultrasound attenuation were visualized by the focused shadowgraph technique. A brightness waveform and its spatial integrations were derived from a visualized field image and compared with a pressure waveform measured by a membrane hydrophone. The experimental results showed that first-order integration of the brightness wave has good agreement with the pressure waveforms. Frequency-dependent attenuation of the pulse propagating through castor oil was derived from brightness and pressure waveforms, and attenuation coefficients determined from focused shadowgraphy and hydrophone techniques showed good agreement. The results suggest the usefulness of the shadowgraph technique not only for the visualization of ultrasound fields but also for noncontact estimation of rough pressure waveforms and correct ultrasound attenuation.

  2. Ultrasound-enhanced penetration through sclera depends on frequency of sonication and size of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Ying; Suen, Wai Leung Langston; Tse, Ho Yan; Wong, Hoi Sang

    2017-03-30

    We previously employed ultrasound as a needleless approach to deliver macromolecules via the transscleral route to the back of the eye in live animals (Suen et al., 2013). Here, we investigated the nature of the ultrasound-enhanced transport through sclera, the outermost barrier in the transscleral route. Thus, the possible role of cavitation from ultrasound was explored; its effect during and after sonication on scleral penetration was measured; and the dependence on the size of macromolecules was determined. We applied ultrasound frequency from 40kHz to 3MHz at I SATA (spatial-average-temporal-average intensity) of 0.05W/cm 2 to fresh rabbit sclera ex vivo. Fluorescent dextran of size 20kDa to 150kDa was used as macromolecular probes. We measured the distance of penetration of the probes through the sclera over 30s during sonication and over 15min after sonication from cryosectioned tissue images. Deeper penetration in the sclera was observed with decreasing frequency. The presence of stable cavitation was further verified by passive acoustic detection. The effect during sonication increased penetration distance up to 20 fold and was limited to macromolecular probes ≤70kDa. The effect post sonication increased penetration distance up to 3 fold and attributed to the improved intrasscleral transport of macromolecules ≥70kDa. Post-sonication enhancement diminished gradually in 3h. As the extent of cavitation increased with decreasing frequency, the trend observed supports the contribution of (stable) cavitation to enhancing transport through sclera. Effect during sonication was attributed to flow associated with acoustic microstreaming. Effect post sonication was attributed to the temporary increase in scleral permeability. Flow-associated effect was more pronounced but only applied to smaller macromolecules. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Mesoscale Mapping of Mouse Cortex Reveals Frequency-Dependent Cycling between Distinct Macroscale Functional Modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanni, Matthieu P; Chan, Allen W; Balbi, Matilde; Silasi, Gergely; Murphy, Timothy H

    2017-08-02

    Connectivity mapping based on resting-state activity in mice has revealed functional motifs of correlated activity. However, the rules by which motifs organize into larger functional modules that lead to hemisphere wide spatial-temporal activity sequences is not clear. We explore cortical activity parcellation in head-fixed, quiet awake GCaMP6 mice from both sexes by using mesoscopic calcium imaging. Spectral decomposition of spontaneous cortical activity revealed the presence of two dominant frequency modes (domain such as intrahemispheric reflections of sensory and motor cortices. In contrast, higher frequency activity >1 Hz yielded two larger clusters of coactivated areas with an enlarged default mode network-like posterior region. We suggest that the apparent constrained structure for intra-areal cortical activity flow could be exploited in future efforts to normalize activity in diseases of the nervous system. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Increasingly, functional connectivity mapping of spontaneous activity is being used to reveal the organization of the brain. However, because the brain operates across multiple space and time domains a more detailed understanding of this organization is necessary. We used in vivo wide-field calcium imaging of the indicator GCaMP6 in head-fixed, awake mice to characterize the organization of spontaneous cortical activity at different spatiotemporal scales. Correlation analysis defines the presence of two to three superclusters of activity that span traditionally defined functional territories and were frequency dependent. This work helps define the rules for how different cortical areas interact in time and space. We provide a framework necessary for future studies that explore functional reorganization of brain circuits in disease models. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/377513-21$15.00/0.

  4. Auto-correlation of velocity-fluctuations and frequency-dependent diffusion constant for hot electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, M.D.; Nag, B.R.

    1981-01-01

    A method has been developed for determining the auto-correlation functions of the fluctuations in the transverse and the parallel components of hot carrier-velocity in a semiconductor by Monte Carlo simulation. The functions for electrons in InSb are determined by this method for applied electric fields of 50 V/cm, 75 V/cm, and 100 V/cm. With increasing value of the time interval the transverse auto-correlation function fall nearly exponentially to zero, but the parallel function falls sharply to a negative peak, then rises to positive values and finally becomes zero. The interval beyond which the auto-correlation function is zero and the correlation time are also evaluated. The correlation time is found to be approximately 1.6 times the relaxation time calculated from the chord mobility. The effect of the flight sampling time on the value of variance of the displacement, is investigated in terms of the low frequency diffusion constants, determined from the variation of the correlation functions. It is found that the diffusion constants become independent of the sampling time if it is of the order of one hundred times the relaxation time. The frequency-dependent diffusion constants are calculated from the correlation functions. The transverse diffusion constant falls monotonically with frequency for all the field strengths studied. The parallel diffusion constant has similar variation for the lower fields (50 V/cm and 75 V/cm) but it has a peak at about 44 GHz for the field of 100 V/cm. (orig.)

  5. Long range dependence in the high frequency USD/INR exchange rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dilip

    2014-02-01

    Using high frequency data, this paper examines the long memory property in the unconditional and conditional volatility of the USD/INR exchange rate at different time scales using the Local Whittle (LW), the Exact Local Whittle (ELW) and the FIAPARCH models. Results indicate that the long memory property remains quite stable across different time scales for both unconditional and conditional volatility measures. Results from the non-overlapping moving window approach indicate that the extreme events (such as the subprime crisis and the European debt crisis) resulted in highly persistent behavior of the USD/INR exchange rate and thus lead to market inefficiency. This paper also examines the long memory property in the realized volatility based on different time scale data. Results indicate that the realized volatility measures based on different scales of the high frequency data exhibit a consistent and stable long memory property. However, the realized volatility measures based on daily data exhibit lower degree of long-range dependence. This study has implications for traders and investors (with different trading horizons) and can be helpful in predicting expected future volatility and in designing and implementing trading strategies at different time scales.

  6. Frequency-dependent photothermal measurement of transverse thermal diffusivity of organic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brill, J. W.; Shahi, Maryam; Yao, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Payne, Marcia M.; Anthony, J. E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Edberg, Jesper; Crispin, Xavier [Department of Science and Technology, Organic Electronics, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping (Sweden)

    2015-12-21

    We have used a photothermal technique, in which chopped light heats the front surface of a small (∼1 mm{sup 2}) sample and the chopping frequency dependence of thermal radiation from the back surface is measured with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled infrared detector. In our system, the sample is placed directly in front of the detector within its dewar. Because the detector is also sensitive to some of the incident light, which leaks around or through the sample, measurements are made for the detector signal that is in quadrature with the chopped light. Results are presented for layered crystals of semiconducting 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-pn) and for papers of cellulose nanofibrils coated with semiconducting poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) (NFC-PEDOT). For NFC-PEDOT, we have found that the transverse diffusivity, smaller than the in-plane value, varies inversely with thickness, suggesting that texturing of the papers varies with thickness. For TIPS-pn, we have found that the interlayer diffusivity is an order of magnitude larger than the in-plane value, consistent with previous estimates, suggesting that low-frequency optical phonons, presumably associated with librations in the TIPS side groups, carry most of the heat.

  7. Importance of frequency dependent magnetoresistance measurements in analysing the intrinsicality of magnetodielectric effect: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Hari Mohan; Saxena, Shailendra K.; Mishra, Vikash; Kumar, Rajesh; Sagdeo, P. R.

    2017-08-01

    Magnetodielectric (MD) materials have attracted considerable attention due to their intriguing physics and potential future applications. However, the intrinsicality of the MD effect is always a major concern in such materials as the MD effect may arise also due to the MR (magnetoresistance) effect. In the present case study, we report an experimental approach to analyse and separate the intrinsic and MR dominated contributions of the MD phenomenon. For this purpose, polycrystalline samples of LaGa1-xAxO3 (A = Mn/Fe) have been prepared by solid state reaction method. The purity of their structural phase (orthorhombic) has been validated by refining the X-ray diffraction data. The RTMD (room temperature MD) response has been recorded over a frequency range of 20 Hz to 10 MHz. In order to analyse the intrinsicality of the MD effect, FDMR (frequency dependent MR) by means of IS (impedance spectroscopy) and dc MR measurements in four probe geometry have been carried out at RT. A significant RTMD effect has been observed in selected Mn/Fe doped LaGaO3 (LGO) compositions. The mechanism of MR free/intrinsic MD effect, observed in Mn/Fe doped LGO, has been understood speculatively in terms of modified cell volume associated with the reorientation/retransformation of spin-coupled Mn/Fe orbitals due to the application of magnetic field. The present analysis suggests that in order to justify the intrinsic/resistive origin of the MD phenomenon, FDMR measurements are more useful than measuring only dc MR or analysing the trends of magnetic field dependent change in the dielectric constant and tanδ. On the basis of the present case study, we propose that IS (FDMR) alone can be used as an effective experimental tool to detect and analyse the resistive and intrinsic parts contributing to the MD phenomenon.

  8. Frequency dependent rectifier memristor bridge used as a programmable synaptic membrane voltage generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Pabst

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Reasoned by its dynamical behavior, the memristor enables a lot of new applications in analog circuit design. Since some realizations have been shown (e.g. 2007 by Hewlett Packard, the development of applications with memristors becomes more and more interesting. Besides applications in neural networks and storage devices, analog memristive circuits also promise further applications. Therefore, this article proposes a frequency dependent rectifier memristor bridge for different purposes, for example, using as a programmable synaptic membrane voltage generator for Spike-Time-Dependent-Plasticity and describes the circuit theory. In this context it is shown that the Picard Iteration is one possibility to analytically solve the system of nonlinear state equations of memristor circuits. An intuitive picture of how a memristor works in a network in general is given as well and in this context some research on the dynamical behavior of a HP memristor should be done. After all it is suggested to use the memristor bridge as a neuron.

  9. Radio frequency self-resonant coil for contactless AC-conductivity in 100 T class ultra-strong pulse magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, D.; Altarawneh, M. M.; Takeyama, S.

    2018-03-01

    A contactless measurement system of electrical conductivity was developed for application under pulsed high magnetic fields over 100 T by using a self-resonant-type, high-frequency circuit. Electromagnetic fields in the circuit were numerically analysed by the finite element method, to show how the resonant power spectra of the circuit depends on the electrical conductivity of a sample set on the probe-coil. The performance was examined using a high-temperature cuprate superconductor, La2-x Sr x CuO4, in magnetic fields up to 102 T with a high frequency of close to 800 MHz. As a result, the upper critical field could be determined with a good signal-to-noise ratio.

  10. The Frequency Spectral Properties of Electrode-Skin Contact Impedance on Human Head and Its Frequency-Dependent Effects on Frequency-Difference EIT in Stroke Detection from 10Hz to 1MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Dai, Meng; Xu, Canhua; Zhang, Ge; Li, Weichen; Fu, Feng; Shi, Xuetao; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2017-01-01

    Frequency-difference electrical impedance tomography (fdEIT) reconstructs frequency-dependent changes of a complex impedance distribution. It has a potential application in acute stroke detection because there are significant differences in impedance spectra between stroke lesions and normal brain tissues. However, fdEIT suffers from the influences of electrode-skin contact impedance since contact impedance varies greatly with frequency. When using fdEIT to detect stroke, it is critical to know the degree of measurement errors or image artifacts caused by contact impedance. To our knowledge, no study has systematically investigated the frequency spectral properties of electrode-skin contact impedance on human head and its frequency-dependent effects on fdEIT used in stroke detection within a wide frequency band (10 Hz-1 MHz). In this study, we first measured and analyzed the frequency spectral properties of electrode-skin contact impedance on 47 human subjects' heads within 10 Hz-1 MHz. Then, we quantified the frequency-dependent effects of contact impedance on fdEIT in stroke detection in terms of the current distribution beneath the electrodes and the contact impedance imbalance between two measuring electrodes. The results showed that the contact impedance at high frequencies (>100 kHz) significantly changed the current distribution beneath the electrode, leading to nonnegligible errors in boundary voltages and artifacts in reconstructed images. The contact impedance imbalance at low frequencies (impedance has critical frequency-dependent influences on fdEIT and further studies on reducing such influences are necessary to improve the application of fdEIT in stroke detection.

  11. The dependence of bar frequency on galaxy mass, colour, and gas content - and angular resolution - in the local universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Peter

    2018-03-01

    I use distance- and mass-limited subsamples of the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) to investigate how the presence of bars in spiral galaxies depends on mass, colour, and gas content and whether large, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-based investigations of bar frequencies agree with local data. Bar frequency reaches a maximum of fbar ≈ 0.70 at M⋆ ˜ 109.7M⊙, declining to both lower and higher masses. It is roughly constant over a wide range of colours (g - r ≈ 0.1-0.8) and atomic gas fractions (log (M_{H I}/ M_{\\star }) ≈ -2.5 to 1). Bars are thus as common in blue, gas-rich galaxies are they are in red, gas-poor galaxies. This is in sharp contrast to many SDSS-based studies of z ˜ 0.01-0.1 galaxies, which report fbar increasing strongly to higher masses (from M⋆ ˜ 1010 to 1011M⊙), redder colours, and lower gas fractions. The contradiction can be explained if SDSS-based studies preferentially miss bars in, and underestimate the bar fraction for, lower mass (bluer, gas-rich) galaxies due to poor spatial resolution and the correlation between bar size and stellar mass. Simulations of SDSS-style observations using the S4G galaxies as a parent sample, and assuming that bars below a threshold angular size of twice the point spread function full width at half-maximum cannot be identified, successfully reproduce typical SDSS fbar trends for stellar mass and gas mass ratio. Similar considerations may affect high-redshift studies, especially if bars grow in length over cosmic time; simulations suggest that high-redshift bar fractions may thus be systematically underestimated.

  12. Ellipticity dependence of the near-threshold harmonics of H2 in an elliptical strong laser field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua; Liu, Peng; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-11-18

    We study the ellipticity dependence of the near-threshold (NT) harmonics of pre-aligned H2 molecules using the time-dependent density functional theory. The anomalous maximum appearing at a non-zero ellipticity for the generated NT harmonics can be attributed to multiphoton effects of the orthogonally polarized component of the elliptical driving laser field. Our calculation also shows that the structure of the bound-state, such as molecular alignment and bond length, can be sensitively reflected on the ellipticity dependence of the near-threshold harmonics.

  13. Gas phase emitter effect of thulium within ceramic metal halide lamps in dependence on frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhrmann, C.; Depta, M.; Bergner, A.; Hoebing, T.; Mentel, J.; Awakowicz, P. [Ruhr University Bochum, Electrical Engineering and Plasma Technology, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Denissen, C.; Suijker, J. [Philips Lighting, Category Prof. Lamps, PO Box 80020, NL-5600JM Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    The gas phase emitter effect within ceramic metal halide (CMH) lamps reduces the effective work function of the electrode material and, therewith, the electrode temperature. An investigation of the gas phase emitter effect of thulium (Tm) within CMH lamps seeded with Tm iodide (TmI3) is carried out. For this purpose, phase resolved images of the arc attachment and measurements of the electrode temperature, Tm atom and ion densities are performed in dependence on operating frequency by pyrometry and optical emission spectroscopy. Additionally, the influence of a sodium iodide (NaI) admixture is studied. The emitter effect is generated by means of a monolayer of Tm atoms on the electrode surface generated by a Tm ion current within the cathodic phase. It overlaps onto the anodic phase at higher frequencies of some hundreds of hertz. The reason is the finite life time of the monolayer, which is determined by the adsorption energy of Tm on the tungsten surface. Due to the low electric field strength in front of the anode and the mass inertia, the emitter ions and atoms remain in front of the anode. They retard the decay of the monolayer and with it the increase of the work function. Moreover, a comparison of a lamp seeded with TmI3 and sodium iodide (NaI) with a lamp seeded only with TmI3 illustrates a slight reduction of the electrode tip temperature caused by a higher Tm saturation vapour pressure and a higher Tm amount within the lamp filling. The influence of Na appears to be quite low. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Dependence of Boiling Histotripsy Treatment Efficiency on HIFU Frequency and Focal Pressure Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Haider, Yasser A; Maxwell, Adam D; Kreider, Wayne; Bailey, Michael R; Khokhlova, Vera A

    2017-09-01

    Boiling histotripsy (BH) is a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-based method of mechanical tissue fractionation that utilizes millisecond-long bursts of HIFU shock waves to cause boiling at the focus in milliseconds. The subsequent interaction of the incoming shocks with the vapor bubble mechanically lyses surrounding tissue and cells. The acoustic parameter space for BH has been investigated previously and an inverse dependence between the HIFU frequency and the dimensions of a BH lesion has been observed. The primary goal of the present study was to investigate in more detail the ablation rate and reliability of BH in the frequency range relevant to treatment of deep abdominal tissue targets (1-2 MHz). The second goal was to investigate the effect of focal peak pressure levels and shock amplitude on BH lesion formation, given a constant duty factor, a constant ratio of the pulse duration to the time to reach boiling and a constant number of BH pulses. A custom-built 12-element sector array HIFU transducer with F-number = 1.05 was used in all experiments. BH pulses at 5 different frequencies (1, 1.2, 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9 MHz) were delivered to optically transparent polyacrylamide gel phantoms and ex vivo bovine liver and myocardium tissue to observe cavitation and boiling bubble activity with high-speed photography and B-mode ultrasound imaging, correspondingly. In gel phantoms, a cavitation bubble cloud was shown to form prefocally and to shield the focus in all exposures at 1 and 1.2 MHz and in the highest amplitude exposures at 1.5-1.7 MHz; shielding was not observed at 1.9 MHz. In ex vivo tissue, this shielding effect was observed in 25% of exposures when peak negative in situ pressure exceeded 10.2 MPa at 1 MHz and 14.5 MPa at 1.5 MHz. When shielding occurred, the exposures resulted in mild tissue disruption in the prefocal region, but not liquefaction. The dimensions of liquefied lesions followed the inverse proportionality trend with

  15. Fundamental x-ray interaction limits in diagnostic imaging detectors: frequency-dependent Swank noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdok, G; Battista, J J; Cunningham, I A

    2008-07-01

    A frequency-dependent x-ray Swank factor based on the "x-ray interaction" modulation transfer function and normalized noise power spectrum is determined from a Monte Carlo analysis. This factor was calculated in four converter materials: amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium (a-Se), cesium iodide (CsI), and lead iodide (PbI2) for incident photon energies between 10 and 150 keV and various converter thicknesses. When scaled by the quantum efficiency, the x-ray Swank factor describes the best possible detective quantum efficiency (DQE) a detector can have. As such, this x-ray interaction DQE provides a target performance benchmark. It is expressed as a function of (Fourier-based) spatial frequency and takes into consideration signal and noise correlations introduced by reabsorption of Compton scatter and photoelectric characteristic emissions. It is shown that the x-ray Swank factor is largely insensitive to converter thickness for quantum efficiency values greater than 0.5. Thus, while most of the tabulated values correspond to thick converters with a quantum efficiency of 0.99, they are appropriate to use for many detectors in current use. A simple expression for the x-ray interaction DQE of digital detectors (including noise aliasing) is derived in terms of the quantum efficiency, x-ray Swank factor, detector element size, and fill factor. Good agreement is shown with DQE curves published by other investigators for each converter material, and the conditions required to achieve this ideal performance are discussed. For high-resolution imaging applications, the x-ray Swank factor indicates: (i) a-Si should only be used at low-energy (e.g., mammography); (ii) a-Se has the most promise for any application below 100 keV; and (iii) while quantum efficiency may be increased at energies just above the K edge in CsI and PbI2, this benefit is offset by a substantial drop in the x-ray Swank factor, particularly at high spatial frequencies.

  16. Evolution of learned strategy choice in a frequency-dependent game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsnelson, Edith; Motro, Uzi; Feldman, Marcus W; Lotem, Arnon

    2012-03-22

    In frequency-dependent games, strategy choice may be innate or learned. While experimental evidence in the producer-scrounger game suggests that learned strategy choice may be common, a recent theoretical analysis demonstrated that learning by only some individuals prevents learning from evolving in others. Here, however, we model learning explicitly, and demonstrate that learning can easily evolve in the whole population. We used an agent-based evolutionary simulation of the producer-scrounger game to test the success of two general learning rules for strategy choice. We found that learning was eventually acquired by all individuals under a sufficient degree of environmental fluctuation, and when players were phenotypically asymmetric. In the absence of sufficient environmental change or phenotypic asymmetries, the correct target for learning seems to be confounded by game dynamics, and innate strategy choice is likely to be fixed in the population. The results demonstrate that under biologically plausible conditions, learning can easily evolve in the whole population and that phenotypic asymmetry is important for the evolution of learned strategy choice, especially in a stable or mildly changing environment.

  17. Perceptron learning rule derived from spike-frequency adaptation and spike-time-dependent plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Prashanth; Liu, Shih-Chii; Hahnloser, Richard H R

    2010-03-09

    It is widely believed that sensory and motor processing in the brain is based on simple computational primitives rooted in cellular and synaptic physiology. However, many gaps remain in our understanding of the connections between neural computations and biophysical properties of neurons. Here, we show that synaptic spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP) combined with spike-frequency adaptation (SFA) in a single neuron together approximate the well-known perceptron learning rule. Our calculations and integrate-and-fire simulations reveal that delayed inputs to a neuron endowed with STDP and SFA precisely instruct neural responses to earlier arriving inputs. We demonstrate this mechanism on a developmental example of auditory map formation guided by visual inputs, as observed in the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX) of barn owls. The interplay of SFA and STDP in model ICX neurons precisely transfers the tuning curve from the visual modality onto the auditory modality, demonstrating a useful computation for multimodal and sensory-guided processing.

  18. The Protective Effect of Conditioning on Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Is Frequency-Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Pourbakht

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We compared the extent of temporary threshold shift (TTS and hair cell loss following high level 4 kHz noise exposure with those preconditioned with moderate level 1 and 4 kHz octave band noise. Fifteen Male albino guinea pigs (300- 350 g in weight were randomly allocated into three groups: those exposed to 4 kHz octave band noise at 102 dB SPL (group 1, n=5; those conditioned with 1 kHz octave band noise at 85 dB SPL, 6 hours per day for 5 days, then exposed to noise (group 2, n=5; those conditioned with 4 kHz octave band noise at 85 dB SPL, then exposed to noise (group 3, n=5. An hour and one week after noise exposure, threshold shifts were evaluated by auditory-evoked brainstem response (ABR and then animals were euthanized for histological evaluation. We found that TTS and cochlear damage caused by noise exposure were significantly reduced by 1 kHz and 4 kHz conditioning (P<0.001. We also showed that 4 kHz protocol attenuates noise- induced TTS but no significant TTS reduction occurred by 1 kHz conditioning. Both protocol protected noise-induced cochlear damage. We concluded that lower tone conditioning could not protect against higher tone temporary noise-induced hearing loss, thus conditioning is a local acting and frequency-dependent phenomenon.

  19. Evolution of learned strategy choice in a frequency-dependent game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsnelson, Edith; Motro, Uzi; Feldman, Marcus W.; Lotem, Arnon

    2012-01-01

    In frequency-dependent games, strategy choice may be innate or learned. While experimental evidence in the producer–scrounger game suggests that learned strategy choice may be common, a recent theoretical analysis demonstrated that learning by only some individuals prevents learning from evolving in others. Here, however, we model learning explicitly, and demonstrate that learning can easily evolve in the whole population. We used an agent-based evolutionary simulation of the producer–scrounger game to test the success of two general learning rules for strategy choice. We found that learning was eventually acquired by all individuals under a sufficient degree of environmental fluctuation, and when players were phenotypically asymmetric. In the absence of sufficient environmental change or phenotypic asymmetries, the correct target for learning seems to be confounded by game dynamics, and innate strategy choice is likely to be fixed in the population. The results demonstrate that under biologically plausible conditions, learning can easily evolve in the whole population and that phenotypic asymmetry is important for the evolution of learned strategy choice, especially in a stable or mildly changing environment. PMID:21937494

  20. Plant–soil feedbacks promote negative frequency dependence in the coexistence of two aridland grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudgers, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of species coexistence is key to predicting patterns of species diversity. Historically, the ecological paradigm has been that species coexist by partitioning resources: as a species increases in abundance, self-limitation kicks in, because species-specific resources decline. However, determining coexistence mechanisms has been a particular puzzle for sedentary organisms with high overlap in their resource requirements, such as plants. Recent evidence suggests that plant-associated microbes could generate the stabilizing self-limitation (negative frequency dependence) that is required for species coexistence. Here, we test the key assumption that plant–microbe feedbacks cause such self-limitation. We used competition experiments and modelling to evaluate how two common groups of soil microbes (rhizospheric microbes and biological soil crusts) influenced the self-limitation of two competing desert grass species. Negative feedbacks between the dominant plant competitor and its rhizospheric microbes magnified self-limitation, whereas beneficial interactions between both plant species and biological soil crusts partly counteracted this stabilizing effect. Plant–microbe interactions have received relatively little attention as drivers of vegetation dynamics in dry land ecosystems. Our results suggest that microbial mechanisms can contribute to patterns of plant coexistence in arid grasslands. PMID:27466448

  1. Time-dependent effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on changes in spinal excitability are dependent on stimulation frequency: a preliminary study in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Soichiro; Tanabe, Shigeo; Ishikawa, Takuma; Itoh, Syunpei; Kubota, Shinji; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Kanada, Yoshikiyo

    2014-12-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) can be used as treatment for spasticity. The present study examined differences in time-dependent effects of NMES depending on stimulation frequency. Forty healthy subjects were separated into four groups (no-stim, NMES of 50, 100, and 200 Hz). The un-conditioned H-reflex amplitude and the H-reflex conditioning-test paradigm were used to measure the effectiveness on monosynaptic Ia excitation of motoneurons in the soleus (SOL) muscle, disynaptic reciprocal Ia inhibition from tibialis anterior (TA) to SOL, and presynaptic inhibition of SOL Ia afferents. Each trial consisted of a 30-min period of NMES applied to the deep peroneal nerve followed by a 30-min period with no stimulation to measure prolonged effects. Measurements were performed periodically. Stimulation applied at all frequencies produced a significant reduction in monosynaptic Ia excitation of motoneurons in the SOL muscle, however, only stimulation with 50 Hz showed prolonged reduction after NMES. NMES frequency did not affect the amount of disynaptic reciprocal Ia inhibition and presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferents. The results show a frequency-dependent effect of NMES on the monosynaptic Ia excitation of motoneurons. This result has implications for selecting the optimal NMES frequency for treatment in patients with spasticity.

  2. LINE SHAPES OF DOPPLER-FREE RESONANCE IN SRFM: STRONG ATOM-WALL INTERACTION AND PRESSURE EFFECT ON THE FREQUENCY SHIFT OF AN ALKALI VAPOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B BOUHAFS

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The attractive potential energy between the atoms of rubidium vapor and a dielectric wall has been investigated by monitoring the reflection light at the interface. The atom- wall interaction potential of the form V(z = - C /z3 (z: atom-wall allows to predict experimental results only for weak regime, i.e., where C<< 0.2 kHzmm3. In the strong interaction case, the dispersive line shape is turned into an absorption-type line shape. The influence of atomic density on the shift of  the selective reflection resonance  relatively to the frequency of unperturbed atomic transition is found to be red with a negative slope. This technique opens the way to characterize the windows made of different materials thin films.

  3. On the model dependence of the determination of the strong coupling constant in second order QCD from e+e--annihilation into hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achterberg, O.; D'Agostini, G.; Apel, W.D.; Engler, J.; Fluegge, G.; Forstbauer, B.; Fries, D.C.; Fues, W.; Gamerdinger, K.; Henkes, T.; Hopp, G.; Krueger, M.; Kuester, H.; Mueller, H.; Randoll, H.; Schmidt, G.; Schneider, H.; Boer, W. de; Buschhorn, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grosse-Wiesmann, P.; Gunderson, B.; Kiesling, C.; Kotthaus, R.; Kruse, U.; Lierl, H.; Lueers, D.; Oberlack, H.; Schacht, P.; Bonneaud, G.; Colas, P.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Fournier, D.; Grivaz, J.F.; Haissinski, J.; Journe, V.; Laplanche, F.; Le Diberder, F.; Mallik, U.; Ros, E.; Veillet, J.J.; Behrend, H.J.; Fenner, H.; Schachter, M.J.; Schroeder, V.; Sindt, H.

    1983-12-01

    Hadronic events obtained with the CELLO detector at PETRA are compared with second order QCD predictions using different models for the fragmentation of quarks and gluons into hadrons. We find that the model dependence in the determination of the strong coupling constant persists when going from first to second order QCD calculations. (orig.)

  4. Meningitis Caused by Toscana Virus Is Associated with Strong Antiviral Response in the CNS and Altered Frequency of Blood Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varani, Stefania; Gelsomino, Francesco; Bartoletti, Michele; Viale, Pierluigi; Mastroianni, Antonio; Briganti, Elisabetta; Ortolani, Patrizia; Albertini, Francesco; Calzetti, Carlo; Prati, Francesca; Cenni, Patrizia; Castellani, Gastone; Morini, Silvia; Rossini, Giada; Landini, Maria Paola; Sambri, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Toscana virus (TOSV) is a Phlebotomus-transmitted RNA virus and a frequent cause of human meningitis and meningoencephalitis in Southern Europe during the summer season. While evidence for TOSV-related central nervous system (CNS) cases is increasing, little is known about the host defenses against TOSV. We evaluated innate immune response to TOSV by analyzing frequency and activation of blood antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and cytokine levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with TOSV neuroinvasive infection and controls. An altered frequency of different blood APC subsets was observed in TOSV-infected patients, with signs of monocytic deactivation. Nevertheless, a proper or even increased responsiveness of toll-like receptor 3 and 7/8 was observed in blood APCs of these patients as compared to healthy controls. Systemic levels of cytokines remained low in TOSV-infected patients, while levels of anti-inflammatory and antiviral mediators were significantly higher in CSF from TOSV-infected patients as compared to patients with other infectious and noninfectious neurological diseases. Thus, the early host response to TOSV appears effective for viral clearance, by proper response to TLR3 and TLR7/8 agonists in peripheral blood and by a strong and selective antiviral and anti-inflammatory response in the CNS. PMID:26569288

  5. Meningitis Caused by Toscana Virus Is Associated with Strong Antiviral Response in the CNS and Altered Frequency of Blood Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Varani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Toscana virus (TOSV is a Phlebotomus-transmitted RNA virus and a frequent cause of human meningitis and meningoencephalitis in Southern Europe during the summer season. While evidence for TOSV-related central nervous system (CNS cases is increasing, little is known about the host defenses against TOSV. We evaluated innate immune response to TOSV by analyzing frequency and activation of blood antigen-presenting cells (APCs and cytokine levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients with TOSV neuroinvasive infection and controls. An altered frequency of different blood APC subsets was observed in TOSV-infected patients, with signs of monocytic deactivation. Nevertheless, a proper or even increased responsiveness of toll-like receptor 3 and 7/8 was observed in blood APCs of these patients as compared to healthy controls. Systemic levels of cytokines remained low in TOSV-infected patients, while levels of anti-inflammatory and antiviral mediators were significantly higher in CSF from TOSV-infected patients as compared to patients with other infectious and noninfectious neurological diseases. Thus, the early host response to TOSV appears effective for viral clearance, by proper response to TLR3 and TLR7/8 agonists in peripheral blood and by a strong and selective antiviral and anti-inflammatory response in the CNS.

  6. Influence of Gaussian white noise on the frequency-dependent first nonlinear polarizability of doped quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganguly, Jayanta [Department of Chemistry, Brahmankhanda Basapara High School, Basapara, Birbhum 731215, West Bengal (India); Ghosh, Manas, E-mail: pcmg77@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India)

    2014-05-07

    We investigate the profiles of diagonal components of frequency-dependent first nonlinear (β{sub xxx} and β{sub yyy}) optical response of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots. We have assumed a Gaussian function to represent the dopant impurity potential. This study primarily addresses the role of noise on the polarizability components. We have invoked Gaussian white noise consisting of additive and multiplicative characteristics (in Stratonovich sense). The doped system has been subjected to an oscillating electric field of given intensity, and the frequency-dependent first nonlinear polarizabilities are computed. The noise characteristics are manifested in an interesting way in the nonlinear polarizability components. In case of additive noise, the noise strength remains practically ineffective in influencing the optical responses. The situation completely changes with the replacement of additive noise by its multiplicative analog. The replacement enhances the nonlinear optical response dramatically and also causes their maximization at some typical value of noise strength that depends on oscillation frequency.

  7. Strong dependence of rain-induced lidar depolarization on the illumination angle: experimental evidence and geometrical-optics interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, G; Bissonnette, L R

    2001-09-20

    Backscatter and depolarization lidar measurements from clouds and precipitation are reported as functions of the elevation angle of the pointing lidar direction. We recorded the data by scanning the lidar beam (Nd:YAG) at a constant angular speed of ~3.5 degrees /s while operating at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. We show that in rain there is an evident and at times spectacular dependence on the elevation angle. That dependence appears to be sensitive to raindrop size. We have developed a three-dimensional polarization-dependent ray-tracing algorithm to calculate the backscatter and the depolarization ratio by large nonspherical droplets. We have applied it to raindrop shapes derived from existing static and dynamic (oscillating) models. We show that many of the observed complex backscatter and depolarization features can be interpreted to a good extent by geometrical optics. These results suggest that there is a definite need for more extensive calculations of the scattering phase matrix elements for large deformed raindrops as functions of the direction of illumination. Obvious applications are retrieval of information on the liquid-solid phase of precipitation and on the size and the vibration state of raindrops.

  8. Effect of oxygen on neuronal excitability measured by critical flicker fusion frequency is dose dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kot, Jacek; Winklewski, Pawel J; Sicko, Zdzislaw; Tkachenko, Yurii

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are involved in the functional changes necessary for synaptic plasticity, memory, and cognitive function. It is far from clear whether the increased excitability, and which forms of neuronal excitability, should be considered a part of the learning process or, rather, cellular manifestation of neuronal oxygen poisoning. It is yet to be elucidated whether oxygen (O2)-induced learning and poisoning use the same or distinct cellular pathways. We hypothesized that O2-induced neuronal excitability might use the same or an intertwined signaling cascade as the poisoning cellular pathway. Eighty-one healthy, young males, mean age 27.7 ± 4.1 (SD) years, were exposed in the hyperbaric chamber to 0.7 atmosphere absolute (ATA) O2, 1.4 ATA O2, and 2.8 ATA O2. The critical flicker fusion frequency (CFFF), oxyhemoglobin saturation (SiO2), and heart rate (HR) were measured before exposure, after 30 min of oxygen breathing while still at pressure and then after exposure. Normobaric (0.7 ATA) O2 exposure did not affect CFFF and HR. Medium hyperbaric O2 exposure (1.4 ATA) decreased CFFF but HR remained unchanged. High hyperbaric O2 exposure (2.8 ATA) increased CFFF and diminished HR. SiO2 was similar in all investigated groups. A correlation between CFFF, HR, and SiO2 was observed only at low oxygen (0.7 ATA). The effect of O2 on neuronal excitability measured by CFFF in young healthy men was dose dependent: 0.7 ATA O2 did not affect CFFF; CFFF were significantly jeopardized at 1.4 ATA O2, while CFFF recovered at 2.8 ATA. With 2.8 ATA O2, the CFFF and oxygen poisoning transduction pathways seemed to be intertwined.

  9. miRNA independent hepacivirus variants suggest a strong evolutionary pressure to maintain miR-122 dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Yingpu; Scheel, Troels K.H.; Luna, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) requires the liver specific micro-RNA (miRNA), miR-122, to replicate. This was considered unique among RNA viruses until recent discoveries of HCV-related hepaciviruses prompting the question of a more general miR-122 dependence. Among hepaciviruses, the closest known HCV...... generated infectious NPHV/HCV chimeric viruses with the 5’ end of NPHV replacing orthologous HCV sequences. These chimeras were viable even in cells lacking miR-122, although miR-122 presence enhanced virus production. No other miRNAs bound this region. By random mutagenesis, we isolated HCV variants...... partially dependent on miR-122 as well as robustly replicating NPHV/HCV variants completely independent of any miRNAs. These miRNA independent variants even replicate and produce infectious particles in non-hepatic cells after exogenous delivery of apolipoprotein E (ApoE). Our findings suggest that miR-122...

  10. Unitary Dynamics of Strongly Interacting Bose Gases with the Time-Dependent Variational Monte Carlo Method in Continuous Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carleo, Giuseppe; Cevolani, Lorenzo; Sanchez-Palencia, Laurent; Holzmann, Markus

    2017-07-01

    We introduce the time-dependent variational Monte Carlo method for continuous-space Bose gases. Our approach is based on the systematic expansion of the many-body wave function in terms of multibody correlations and is essentially exact up to adaptive truncation. The method is benchmarked by comparison to an exact Bethe ansatz or existing numerical results for the integrable Lieb-Liniger model. We first show that the many-body wave function achieves high precision for ground-state properties, including energy and first-order as well as second-order correlation functions. Then, we study the out-of-equilibrium, unitary dynamics induced by a quantum quench in the interaction strength. Our time-dependent variational Monte Carlo results are benchmarked by comparison to exact Bethe ansatz results available for a small number of particles, and are also compared to quench action results available for noninteracting initial states. Moreover, our approach allows us to study large particle numbers and general quench protocols, previously inaccessible beyond the mean-field level. Our results suggest that it is possible to find correlated initial states for which the long-term dynamics of local density fluctuations is close to the predictions of a simple Boltzmann ensemble.

  11. Frequency dependence of the temperature profile of a copper vapor laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrouzinia, S; Khorasani, K

    2016-01-01

    The gas temperature of a copper vapor laser was measured by a semi-experimental method. Moreover the temperature profiles were obtained at various frequencies. It was shown that the temperature profile has most uniformity among the cross section of the laser tube at optimum frequency. (paper)

  12. Stimulus Ratio and Level Dependence of Low- and Mid-Frequency Distortion-Product Otoacoustic Emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Tornvig; Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    Active amplifiers within the cochlea generate, as a by-product of their function, distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) in response to carefully chosen two-tone stimuli. Focus has been on invoking emissions in a mid-frequency range from 500 to 4000 Hz. Below 500 Hz, physiological noise...... from heartbeating, breathing and swallowing contaminates the measurement. Above 4000 Hz, calibration of the equipment involved is challenging, if not impossible, to do reliably. Here, we investigate alternative measurement parameters to see if the DPOAE is limited to frequencies above 500 Hz. Few...... examples of low-frequency DPOAEs exist in the literature. Overcoming the decreasing response level and increasing noise level with decreasing frequency may provide a non-invasive window into the inner-ear mechanics of low-frequency hearing. Eighteen out of 21 young human adults screened (19-30 years) had...

  13. The extent to which ATP demand controls the glycolytic flux depends strongly on the organism and conditions for growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købmann, Brian Jensen; Westerhoff, H.V.; Snoep, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Using molecular genetics we have introduced uncoupled ATPase activity in two different bacterial species, Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis, and determined the elasticities of the growth rate and glycolytic flux towards the intracellular [ATP]/[ADP] ratio. During balanced growth in batch...... cultures of E. coli the ATP demand was found to have almost full control on the glycolytic flux (FCC=0.96) and the flux could be stimulated by 70%. In contrast to this, in L. lactis the control by ATP demand on the glycolytic flux was close to zero. However, when we used non-growing cells of L. lactis...... (which have a low glycolytic flux) the ATP demand had a high flux control and the flux could be stimulated more than two fold. We suggest that the extent to which ATP demand controls the glycolytic flux depends on how much excess capacity of glycolysis is present in the cells....

  14. Action Potential Broadening in Capsaicin-Sensitive DRG Neurons from Frequency-Dependent Reduction of Kv3 Current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pin W; Blair, Nathaniel T; Bean, Bruce P

    2017-10-04

    Action potential (AP) shape is a key determinant of cellular electrophysiological behavior. We found that in small-diameter, capsaicin-sensitive dorsal root ganglia neurons corresponding to nociceptors (from rats of either sex), stimulation at frequencies as low as 1 Hz produced progressive broadening of the APs. Stimulation at 10 Hz for 3 s resulted in an increase in AP width by an average of 76 ± 7% at 22°C and by 38 ± 3% at 35°C. AP clamp experiments showed that spike broadening results from frequency-dependent reduction of potassium current during spike repolarization. The major current responsible for frequency-dependent reduction of overall spike-repolarizing potassium current was identified as Kv3 current by its sensitivity to low concentrations of 4-aminopyridine (IC 50 action potentials of small-diameter rat DRG neurons showed spike broadening at frequencies as low as 1 Hz and that spike broadening resulted predominantly from frequency-dependent inactivation of Kv3 channels. Spike width helps to control transmitter release, conduction velocity, and firing patterns and understanding the role of particular potassium channels can help to guide new pharmacological strategies for targeting pain-sensing neurons selectively. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/379705-10$15.00/0.

  15. Is the colour dimorphism in Dactylorhiza sambucina maintained by differential seed viability instead of frequency-dependent selection?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jersáková, Jana; Kindlmann, Pavel; Renner, S.S.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 41, - (2006), s. 61-76 ISSN 0015-5551 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB6141302 Keywords : Dactylorhiza * flower colour polymorphism * frequency-dependent selection * pollinator discrimination * rewardless flowers * seed viability Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.033, year: 2005

  16. 38 CFR 3.30 - Frequency of payment of improved pension and parents' dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Frequency of payment of improved pension and parents' dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC). 3.30 Section 3.30 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and...

  17. SU-C-304-07: Are Small Field Detector Correction Factors Strongly Dependent On Machine-Specific Characteristics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, D; Tanny, S; Parsai, E; Sperling, N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The current small field dosimetry formalism utilizes quality correction factors to compensate for the difference in detector response relative to dose deposited in water. The correction factors are defined on a machine-specific basis for each beam quality and detector combination. Some research has suggested that the correction factors may only be weakly dependent on machine-to-machine variations, allowing for determinations of class-specific correction factors for various accelerator models. This research examines the differences in small field correction factors for three detectors across two Varian Truebeam accelerators to determine the correction factor dependence on machine-specific characteristics. Methods: Output factors were measured on two Varian Truebeam accelerators for equivalently tuned 6 MV and 6 FFF beams. Measurements were obtained using a commercial plastic scintillation detector (PSD), two ion chambers, and a diode detector. Measurements were made at a depth of 10 cm with an SSD of 100 cm for jaw-defined field sizes ranging from 3×3 cm 2 to 0.6×0.6 cm 2 , normalized to values at 5×5cm 2 . Correction factors for each field on each machine were calculated as the ratio of the detector response to the PSD response. Percent change of correction factors for the chambers are presented relative to the primary machine. Results: The Exradin A26 demonstrates a difference of 9% for 6×6mm 2 fields in both the 6FFF and 6MV beams. The A16 chamber demonstrates a 5%, and 3% difference in 6FFF and 6MV fields at the same field size respectively. The Edge diode exhibits less than 1.5% difference across both evaluated energies. Field sizes larger than 1.4×1.4cm2 demonstrated less than 1% difference for all detectors. Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest that class-specific correction may not be appropriate for micro-ionization chamber. For diode systems, the correction factor was substantially similar and may be useful for class-specific reference

  18. The frequency dependence of the discharge properties in a capacitively coupled oxygen discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Snorrason, D. I.; Hannesdottir, H.

    2018-02-01

    We use the one-dimensional object-oriented particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision code oopd1 to explore the evolution of the charged particle density profiles, electron heating mechanism, the electron energy probability function (EEPF), and the ion energy distribution in a single frequency capacitively coupled oxygen discharge, with driving frequency in the range 12–100 MHz. At a low driving frequency and low pressure (5 and 10 mTorr), a combination of stochastic (α-mode) and drift ambipolar (DA) heating in the bulk plasma (the electronegative core) is observed and the DA-mode dominates the time averaged electron heating. As the driving frequency or pressure are increased, the heating mode transitions into a pure α-mode, where electron heating in the sheath region dominates. At low pressure (5 and 10 mTorr), this transition coincides with a sharp decrease in electronegativity. At low pressure and low driving frequency, the EEPF is concave. As the driving frequency is increased, the number of low energy electrons increases and the relative number of higher energy electrons (>10 eV) increases. At high driving frequency, the EEPF develops a convex shape or becomes bi-Maxwellian.

  19. Frequency sweep rate dependence on the dielectrophoretic response of polystyrene beads and red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, T N G; Leonard, K M; Minerick, A R

    2013-01-01

    Alternating current (AC) dielectrophoresis (DEP) experiments for biological particles in microdevices are typically done at a fixed frequency. Reconstructing the DEP response curve from static frequency experiments is laborious, but essential to ascertain differences in dielectric properties of biological particles. Our lab explored the concept of sweeping the frequency as a function of time to rapidly determine the DEP response curve from fewer experiments. For the purpose of determining an ideal sweep rate, homogeneous 6.08 μm polystyrene (PS) beads were used as a model system. Translatability of the sweep rate approach to ∼7 μm red blood cells (RBC) was then verified. An Au/Ti quadrapole electrode microfluidic device was used to separately subject particles and cells to 10Vpp AC electric fields at frequencies ranging from 0.010 to 2.0 MHz over sweep rates from 0.00080 to 0.17 MHz/s. PS beads exhibited negative DEP assembly over the frequencies explored due to Maxwell-Wagner interfacial polarizations. Results demonstrate that frequency sweep rates must be slower than particle polarization timescales to achieve reliable incremental polarizations; sweep rates near 0.00080 MHz/s yielded DEP behaviors very consistent with static frequency DEP responses for both PS beads and RBCs.

  20. Frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD): a resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanming; Liu, Chen; Yin, Xuntao; Yang, Jun; Gui, Li; Wei, Luqing; Wang, Jian

    2014-11-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) allowed researchers to detect intrinsic brain activity during rest and has been considered an analytical tool for evaluation of dementia. Previously, subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD) has been found decreased amplitude low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) in a widely frequency range (0.01-0.08Hz) in the bilateral precuneus and increased ALFF values in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), left insula and hippocampus, which showed significant correlations with the cognitive performance. In this study we analyzed the ALFF of 30 patients with SIVD in two different frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01-0.027Hz; slow-4: 0.027-0.073Hz). In the slow-5 band, SIVD patients compared with controls exhibited significant higher ALFF in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, right putamen and right supplementary motor area, while lower ALFF in the right precuneus and right angular gyrus. A close correlation was found between the ALFF value of the right angular gyrus and ADL scores. In the slow-4 band, SIVD patients only exhibited increased ALFF in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, right putamen, left fusiform gyrus, and no correlation with cognitive scores was found. Our data demonstrate that SIVD patients have widespread abnormal intrinsic neural oscillations, which are dependent on specific frequency bands. ALFF of right angular gyrus at slow-5 band is more specific for SIVD and may be a useful tool to help SIVD diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Quark matter and quark stars in strong magnetic fields at finite temperature within the confined-isospin-density-dependent mass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Peng-Cheng; Li, Xiao-Hua; Ma, Hong-Yang; Wang, Bin; Dong, Yu-Min; Zhang, Xiao-Min

    2018-03-01

    We study the properties of strange quark matter (SQM) and quark stars (QSs) in strong magnetic fields within the extended confined isospin-density-dependent mass (CIDDM) model including the temperature dependence of the equivalent mass for quarks. The quark symmetry energy, quark symmetry free energy, and the equation of state (EOS) of SQM in constant magnetic fields at finite temperature are investigated, and it is found that including the temperature dependence in CIDDM model and considering strong magnetic fields can both significantly influence the properties of the SQM and the maximum mass of quark stars. Using the density-dependent magnetic field and assuming two extreme cases for the magnetic field orientation in QSs (the radial orientation in which the local magnetic fields are along the radial direction and the transverse orientation in which the local magnetic fields are randomly oriented but perpendicular to the radial orientation), we analyze the mass-radius relations for different stages of the protoquark stars (PQSs) along the star evolution. Our results indicate that the maximum mass of magnetized PQSs may depend on not only the strength distribution and the orientation of the magnetic fields inside the PQSs, but also the heating process and the cooling process in the star evolution.

  2. Inter-relationships Linking Probability of Becoming a Case of Nicotine Dependence With Frequency of Tobacco Cigarette Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vsevolozhskaya, Olga A; Anthony, James C

    2016-12-01

    Once smoking starts, some tobacco cigarette smokers (TCS) can make very rapid transitions into tobacco dependence syndromes (TCD). With adjustment for smoking frequency, we posit female excess risk for this rapid-onset TCD. In a novel application of functional analysis for tobacco research, we estimate four Hill function parameters and plot TCD risk against a gradient of smoking frequency, as observed quite soon after smoking onset. In aggregate, the National Surveys of Drug Use and Health, 2004-2013, identified 1546 newly incident TCS in cross-sectional research, each with standardized TCD assessment. Hill function estimates contradict our apparently over-simplistic hypothesis. Among newly incident TCS males with only 1-3 recent smoking days, an estimated 1%-3% had become rapid-onset TCD cases; non-overlapping confidence intervals show lower TCD risk for females. In contrast, among daily smokers, closer to 50% of female TCS showed rapid-onset TCD, versus under 20% of male TCS, but a larger sample will be needed to confirm the apparent female excess risk at the daily smoking frequency level. Smoking frequency and TCD onset become inter-dependent quite soon after TCS onset. Feedback loops are expected, and might explain a potential reversal of male-female differences across smoking frequency gradients. These novel epidemiological estimates prompt new thinking and questions about interventions. In this large sample epidemiological study, with a nationally representative sample of newly incident TCS assessed cross-sectionally, we see a quite rapid onset of tobacco dependence, with an early male excess that fades out at higher levels of smoking frequency. Next steps include development of outreach and intervention for this very rapid-onset tobacco dependence. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. The formation of quiescent glomerular endothelial cell monolayer in vitro is strongly dependent on the choice of extracellular matrix coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajęcka, Kamilla, E-mail: kpaj@novonordisk.com [Global Research, Novo Nordisk A/S, Måløv (Denmark); Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Nielsen, Malik Nygaard [Global Research, Novo Nordisk A/S, Måløv (Denmark); Hansen, Troels Krarup [Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Williams, Julie M. [Global Research, Novo Nordisk A/S, Måløv (Denmark)

    2017-04-01

    Background and aims: Nephropathy involves pathophysiological changes to the glomerulus. The primary glomerular endothelial cells (GEnCs) have emerged as an important tool for studying glomerulosclerotic mechanisms and in the screening process for drug-candidates. The success of the studies is dependent on the quality of the cell model. Therefore, we set out to establish an easy, reproducible model of the quiescent endothelial monolayer with the use of commercially available extracellular matrices (ECMs). Methods: Primary hGEnCs were seeded on various ECMs. Cell adhesion was monitored by an impedance sensing system. The localization of junctional proteins was assessed by immunofluorescence and the barrier function by passage of fluorescent dextrans and magnitude of VEGF response. Results: All ECM matrices except recombinant human laminin 111 (rhLN111) supported comparable cell proliferation. Culturing hGEnCs on rhLN521, rhLN511 or fibronectin resulted in a physiologically relevant barrier to 70 kDa dextrans which was 82% tighter than that formed on collagen type IV. Furthermore, only hGEnCs cultured on rhLN521 or rhLN511 showed plasma-membrane localized zonula occludens-1 and vascular endothelial cadherin indicative of proper tight and adherens junctions (AJ). Conclusion: We recommend culturing hGEnCs on the mature glomerular basement membrane laminin - rhLN521 – which, as the only commercially available ECM, promotes all of the characteristics of the quiescent hGEnC monolayer: cobblestone morphology, well-defined AJs and physiological perm-selectivity. - Highlights: • rhLN521, rhLN511 and hFN assure physiologically relevant permeability. • rhLN521 and rhLN511 ensure best cell morphology and adherens junction formation. • Collagen IV and I based coating results in disorganized hGEnC monolayer. • Physiologically relevant ECM may lead to down-regulation of self-produced matrices.

  4. The formation of quiescent glomerular endothelial cell monolayer in vitro is strongly dependent on the choice of extracellular matrix coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajęcka, Kamilla; Nielsen, Malik Nygaard; Hansen, Troels Krarup; Williams, Julie M.

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Nephropathy involves pathophysiological changes to the glomerulus. The primary glomerular endothelial cells (GEnCs) have emerged as an important tool for studying glomerulosclerotic mechanisms and in the screening process for drug-candidates. The success of the studies is dependent on the quality of the cell model. Therefore, we set out to establish an easy, reproducible model of the quiescent endothelial monolayer with the use of commercially available extracellular matrices (ECMs). Methods: Primary hGEnCs were seeded on various ECMs. Cell adhesion was monitored by an impedance sensing system. The localization of junctional proteins was assessed by immunofluorescence and the barrier function by passage of fluorescent dextrans and magnitude of VEGF response. Results: All ECM matrices except recombinant human laminin 111 (rhLN111) supported comparable cell proliferation. Culturing hGEnCs on rhLN521, rhLN511 or fibronectin resulted in a physiologically relevant barrier to 70 kDa dextrans which was 82% tighter than that formed on collagen type IV. Furthermore, only hGEnCs cultured on rhLN521 or rhLN511 showed plasma-membrane localized zonula occludens-1 and vascular endothelial cadherin indicative of proper tight and adherens junctions (AJ). Conclusion: We recommend culturing hGEnCs on the mature glomerular basement membrane laminin - rhLN521 – which, as the only commercially available ECM, promotes all of the characteristics of the quiescent hGEnC monolayer: cobblestone morphology, well-defined AJs and physiological perm-selectivity. - Highlights: • rhLN521, rhLN511 and hFN assure physiologically relevant permeability. • rhLN521 and rhLN511 ensure best cell morphology and adherens junction formation. • Collagen IV and I based coating results in disorganized hGEnC monolayer. • Physiologically relevant ECM may lead to down-regulation of self-produced matrices.

  5. Frequency Dependence of Helioseismic Measurements of the Center-to-Limb Effect and Flow-induced Travel-time Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruizhu; Zhao, Junwei

    2018-02-01

    Time–distance helioseismology measures acoustic travel times to infer the structure and flow field of the solar interior; however, both the mean travel times and the travel-time shifts suffer systematic center-to-limb variations, which complicate the interpretation and inversions of the time–distance measurements. In particular, the center-to-limb variation in travel-time shifts (CtoL effect) has a significant impact on the inference of the Sun’s meridional circulation, and needs to be removed from the helioseismic measurements, although the observational properties and the physical cause of the CtoL effect have yet to be investigated. In this study, we measure the CtoL effect in the frequency domain using Doppler-velocity data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, and study its properties as a function of disk-centric distance, travel distance, and frequency of acoustic waves. It is found that the CtoL effect has a significant frequency dependence—it reverses sign at a frequency around 5.4 mHz and reaches maximum at around 4.0 mHz before the sign reversal. The tendency of frequency dependence varies with disk-centric distance in a way that both the sign-reversal frequency and the maximum-value frequency decrease closer to the limb. The variation tendency does not change with travel distance, but the variation magnitude is approximately proportional to travel distance. For comparison, the flow-induced travel-time shifts show little frequency dependence. These observational properties provide more clues on the nature of the CtoL effect, and also possibly lead to new ways of effect-removal for a more robust determination of the deep meridional flow.

  6. On the frequency dependent negative dielectric constant behavior in Al/Co-doped (PVC+TCNQ)/p-Si structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücedağ, I.; Kaya, A.; Altındal, Ş.

    2014-06-01

    The dielectric properties, electric modulus and ac electrical conductivity (σac) of Al/Co-doped (PVC+TCNQ)/p-Si structures have been investigated in the wide frequency and voltage range of 0.5 kHz-3 MHz and (-4 V)-(9 V), respectively, using the capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G/ω-V) measurements at room temperature. The real and imaginary parts of dielectric constant (ɛ‧, ɛ″), loss tangent (tan δ), σac and the real and imaginary parts of electric modulus (M‧, M″) were found strongly function of frequency and applied voltage especially at low frequencies. The ɛ‧-V plot shows an anomalous peak in the forward bias region due to the series resistance (Rs), surface states (Nss) and interfacial layer (PVC+TCNQ) effects for each frequency and then it goes to negative values known as negative dielectric constant (NDC) at low frequencies (f ≤ 70 kHz). Such observation of NDC is important result because it implies that an increment of bias voltage produces a decrease in the charge on the electrodes. The amount of negativity ɛ‧ value increases with decreasing frequency and this decrement in the NDC corresponds to the increment in the ɛ″.

  7. Exercise-induced changes in EEG alpha power depend on frequency band definition mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, Boris; Hülsdünker, Thorben; Mierau, Julia; Strüder, Heiko K; Mierau, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    In the majority of studies investigating cortical alpha oscillations the alpha frequency is defined as a fixed band thus, neglecting recommendations in the EEG literature to adjust the alpha band according to the individual alpha peak frequency (iAPF). Based on our previous findings indicating exhaustive exercise induces an increase of the post-exercise iAPF, we scrutinized the influence of exercise on post-exercise alpha power by comparing fixed and iAPF-adjusted alpha frequency bands. Resting EEG was recorded from 13 scalp locations in nine subjects before, immediately after as well as ten minutes following an exhaustive exercise protocol on a cycle ergometer. Lower and upper band alpha power was calculated for fixed and iAPF-adjusted frequency bands. Post-exercise lower alpha power increased in both fixed and individually defined bands while a higher upper alpha power was only observed in the fixed frequency band condition. Further, the increase in iAPF was positively related to the changes in fixed-band upper alpha power. It is concluded that lower alpha power is significantly increased following exhaustive exercise whereas the results for upper alpha power are substantially influenced by the method of frequency band definition. Therefore, caution is indicated when analyzing and interpreting exercise-induced changes in alpha power. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Strongly correlating liquids and their isomorphs

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Ulf R.; Gnan, Nicoletta; Bailey, Nicholas P.; Schröder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the properties of strongly correlating liquids, i.e., liquids with strong correlations between virial and potential energy equilibrium fluctuations at constant volume. We proceed to focus on the experimental predictions for strongly correlating glass-forming liquids. These predictions include i) density scaling, ii) isochronal superposition, iii) that there is a single function from which all frequency-dependent viscoelastic response functions may be calculated, iv) that...

  9. Frequency-Dependent Amplitude Panning for the Stereophonic Image Enhancement of Audio Recorded Using Two Closely Spaced Microphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Jun Chun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new frequency-dependent amplitude panning method for stereophonic image enhancement applied to a sound source recorded using two closely spaced omni-directional microphones. The ability to detect the direction of such a sound source is limited due to weak spatial information, such as the inter-channel time difference (ICTD and inter-channel level difference (ICLD. Moreover, when sound sources are recorded in a convolutive or a real room environment, the detection of sources is affected by reverberation effects. Thus, the proposed method first tries to estimate the source direction depending on the frequency using azimuth-frequency analysis. Then, a frequency-dependent amplitude panning technique is proposed to enhance the stereophonic image by modifying the stereophonic law of sines. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method, we compare its performance with that of a conventional method based on the beamforming technique in terms of directivity pattern, perceived direction, and quality degradation under three different recording conditions (anechoic, convolutive, and real reverberant. The comparison shows that the proposed method gives us better stereophonic images in a stereo loudspeaker reproduction than the conventional method without any annoying effects.

  10. Self-perception and dissatisfaction with weight does not depend on the frequency of physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araújo Denise Sardinha Mendes Soares de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the level of satisfaction with body weight and the self-perception of the weight/height ratio and to verify the influence of the frequency of present and past physical activity on these variables. METHODS: Using questionnaires or interviews, we obtained height data, reported and desired weight, self-perception of the weight/height ratio, and the frequency of current physical activity in 844 adults (489 women. Of these, evaluated the frequency of physical activity during high school of 193 individuals,and we measured their height and weight. RESULTS: Less than 2/3 of the individuals had body mass index between 20 and 24.9 kg/m2. A tendency existed to overestimate height by less than 1 cm and to underestimate weight by less than 1kg. Desired weight was less than that reported (p<0.001, and only 20% were satisfied with their current weight. Only 42% of men and 25% of women exercised regularly. No association was found between the frequency of physical activity and the variables height, weight, and body mass index, and the level of satisfaction with current weight. CONCLUSION: Height and weight reported seem to be valid for epidemological studies, and great dissatisfaction with body weight and a distorted self-perception of height/weight ratio exists, especially in women, regardless of the frequency of physical activity.

  11. Temperature-dependent Mollow triplet spectra from a single quantum dot: Rabi frequency renormalization and sideband linewidth insensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yu-Jia; He, Yu; He, Yu-Ming; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; McCutcheon, Dara P S; Nazir, Ahsan

    2014-08-29

    We investigate temperature-dependent resonance fluorescence spectra obtained from a single self-assembled quantum dot. A decrease of the Mollow triplet sideband splitting is observed with increasing temperature, an effect we attribute to a phonon-induced renormalization of the driven dot Rabi frequency. We also present first evidence for a nonperturbative regime of phonon coupling, in which the expected linear increase in sideband linewidth as a function of temperature is canceled by the corresponding reduction in Rabi frequency. These results indicate that dephasing in semiconductor quantum dots may be less sensitive to changes in temperature than expected from a standard weak-coupling analysis of phonon effects.

  12. Temperature-Dependent Mollow Triplet Spectra from a Single Quantum Dot: Rabi Frequency Renormalization and Sideband Linewidth Insensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Yu-Jia; He, Yu; He, Yu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    We investigate temperature-dependent resonance fluorescence spectra obtained from a single self- assembled quantum dot. A decrease of the Mollow triplet sideband splitting is observed with increasing temperature, an effect we attribute to a phonon-induced renormalization of the driven dot Rabi...... frequency. We also present first evidence for a nonperturbative regime of phonon coupling, in which the expected linear increase in sideband linewidth as a function of temperature is canceled by the corresponding reduction in Rabi frequency. These results indicate that dephasing in semiconductor quantum...

  13. Estimation of the Frequency of Instantaneous Voltage Drops Dependent on Arrangement of Line Surge Arresters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Hironao; Kozuka, Masahiro; Itamoto, Naoki; Shinjo, Kazuo; Ishii, Masaru

    Lightning faults on transmission lines often cause instantaneous voltage drops in power systems. Influences of instantaneous voltage drops become increasingly serious in high technology industries etc. As countermeasures of instantaneous voltage drops, uninterruptible power supplies (UPS) are employed. On the other hand, line surge arresters are installed on transmission lines increasingly as one of the effective countermeasures of double-circuit faults caused by lightning strokes. Additionally, the arresters are effective as one of the reduction methods for the frequency of instantaneous voltage drops. In this paper, the frequency of instantaneous voltage drops reduced by installation of line surge arresters on transmission lines is estimated by employing EMTP analysis. Also, the accuracy of the method in estimating the frequency of instantaneous voltage drops in power systems is evaluated through comparison with experience.

  14. Dependence of in-situ Bose condensate size on final frequency of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report the results of i n − s i t u characterization of 87 Rb atom cloud in a quadrupole Ioffe configuration (QUIC) magnetic trap after a radio-frequency (RF) evaporative cooling of the trapped atom cloud. The i n − s i t u absorption images of the atom cloud have shown clear bimodal optical density (OD) profiles which ...

  15. Frequency-dependent modulation of KCNQ1 and HERG1 potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diness, Thomas Goldin; Hansen, Rie Schultz; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2006-01-01

    of the beta-subunits KCNE1 and KCNE2. In addition, the functional role of HERG1 in native guinea pig cardiac myocytes was demonstrated at different pacing frequencies by application of 10microM of the new HERG1 activator, NS1643. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that HERG1 and hKCNQ1 channels are inversely...

  16. Frequency Dependency Analysis of SHF Band Directional Propagation Channel in Indoor Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kentaro, Saito; Hanpinitsak, Panawit; Takada, Jun-ichi

    2018-01-01

    In the fifth-generation mobile communication system (5G), the millimeter wave band wireless communication is highly expected that it increases the network capacity drastically. Author's research group has conducted channel measurements in several super high frequency (SHF) bands and investigated ...

  17. Ethyl benzene-induced ototoxicity in rats : a dose-dependent mild-frequency hearing loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappaert, N.L.M.; Klis, S.F.L.; Baretta, A.B.; Muijser, H.; Smoorenburg, G.F.

    2000-01-01

    Rats were exposed to ethyl benzene at 0, 300, 400 and 550 ppm for 8 hours/day for 5 consecutive days. Three to six weeks after the exposure, auditory function was tested by measuring compound action potentials (CAP) in the frequency range of 1-24 kHz and 2f1-f2 distortion product otoacoustic

  18. Evolution of frequency-dependent mate choice: keeping up with fashion trends

    OpenAIRE

    Kokko, Hanna; Jennions, Michael D; Houde, Anne

    2007-01-01

    The diversity of sexual traits favoured by females is enormous and, curiously, includes preferences for males with rare or novel phenotypes. We modelled the evolution of a preference for rarity that yielded two surprising results. First, a Fisherian ‘sexy son’ effect can boost female preferences to a frequency well above that predicted by mutation–selection balance, even if there...

  19. Dependence of in-situ Bose condensate size on final frequency of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-03-08

    Mar 8, 2017 ... transition in the evaporatively cooled atom cloud, and sizes of the condensate and the thermal clouds are found to vary with the final frequency of RF field applied for evaporative cooling. Finally, we present the conclusions of this work in §5. 2. Experimental set-up. 2.1 Vacuum system. The schematic of our ...

  20. Input-dependent frequency modulation of cortical gamma oscillations shapes spatial synchronization and enables phase coding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowet, E.P.; Roberts, M.J.; Hadjipapas, A.; Peter, A.; Eerden, J. van der; Weerd, P. de

    2015-01-01

    Fine-scale temporal organization of cortical activity in the gamma range ( approximately 25-80Hz) may play a significant role in information processing, for example by neural grouping ('binding') and phase coding. Recent experimental studies have shown that the precise frequency of gamma

  1. Fast iterative technique for the calculation of frequency dependent gain in excimer laser amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    The motivation in initiating these calculations is to allow us to observe the frequency evolution of a laser pulse as it propagates through an amplifier and then through a sequence of amplifiers. The question we seek to answer is what pulse shape do we need to produce out of a front-end oscillator so that after it propagates through the whole Aurora KrF fusion amplifier chain will result in high energy, broad-band laser fields of a given bandwidth that can be focussed onto a fusion target. The propagation of a single frequency source through an amplifier with distributed loss was considered by Rigrod and was significantly expanded by Hunter and Hunter. The latter included amplified spontaneous emission [ASE] considerations both in the direction of and transverse to the coherent field. Analytic solutions that include forward and backward prapagating fields and ASE were derived which were transcendental in nature but allowed for fairly easy computer calculations. Transverse ASE were calculated using the unsaturated gain resulting from longitudinal fields and were used to compare this with the longitudinal field equations. Large computer programs are now available at LANL which include the influence of transverse ASE on the longitudinal fields. However, none of these considerations have worried about the changes in the frequency characteristics of the propagating field or of how each of the frequency field components contributes to the saturation of the gain. The inclusion of full frequency characteristics to the analytic solutions of Hunter and Hunter proved impossible at least for this author and a new calculational technique was developed and is the subject of this talk

  2. Quantum fluid dynamics based current-density functional study of a helium atom in a strong time-dependent magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikas, Hash(0x125f4490)

    2011-02-01

    Evolution of the helium atom in a strong time-dependent (TD) magnetic field ( B) of strength up to 1011 G is investigated through a quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) based current-density functional theory (CDFT). The TD-QFD-CDFT computations are performed through numerical solution of a single generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation employing vector exchange-correlation potentials and scalar exchange-correlation density functionals that depend both on the electronic charge-density and the current-density. The results are compared with that obtained from a B-TD-QFD-DFT approach (based on conventional TD-DFT) under similar numerical constraints but employing only scalar exchange-correlation potential dependent on electronic charge-density only. The B-TD-QFD-DFT approach, at a particular TD magnetic field-strength, yields electronic charge- and current-densities as well as exchange-correlation potential resembling with that obtained from the time-independent studies involving static (time-independent) magnetic fields. However, TD-QFD-CDFT electronic charge- and current-densities along with the exchange-correlation potential and energy differ significantly from that obtained using B-TD-QFD-DFT approach, particularly at field-strengths >109 G, representing dynamical effects of a TD field. The work concludes that when a helium atom is subjected to a strong TD magnetic field of order >109 G, the conventional TD-DFT based approach differs "dynamically" from the CDFT based approach under similar computational constraints.

  3. Quantum fluid dynamics based current-density functional study of a helium atom in a strong time-dependent magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikas

    2011-01-01

    Evolution of the helium atom in a strong time-dependent (TD) magnetic field (B) of strength up to 10 11 G is investigated through a quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) based current-density functional theory (CDFT). The TD-QFD-CDFT computations are performed through numerical solution of a single generalized nonlinear Schroedinger equation employing vector exchange-correlation potentials and scalar exchange-correlation density functionals that depend both on the electronic charge-density and the current-density. The results are compared with that obtained from a B-TD-QFD-DFT approach (based on conventional TD-DFT) under similar numerical constraints but employing only scalar exchange-correlation potential dependent on electronic charge-density only. The B-TD-QFD-DFT approach, at a particular TD magnetic field-strength, yields electronic charge- and current-densities as well as exchange-correlation potential resembling with that obtained from the time-independent studies involving static (time-independent) magnetic fields. However, TD-QFD-CDFT electronic charge- and current-densities along with the exchange-correlation potential and energy differ significantly from that obtained using B-TD-QFD-DFT approach, particularly at field-strengths >10 9 G, representing dynamical effects of a TD field. The work concludes that when a helium atom is subjected to a strong TD magnetic field of order >10 9 G, the conventional TD-DFT based approach differs 'dynamically' from the CDFT based approach under similar computational constraints. (author)

  4. Magnetic field dependence of the lowest-frequency edge-localized spin wave mode in a magnetic nanotriangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C S; Lim, H S; Wang, Z K; Ng, S C; Kuok, M H; Adeyeye, A O

    2011-03-01

    An understanding of the spin dynamics of nanoscale magnetic elements is important for their applications in magnetic sensing and storage. Inhomogeneity of the demagnetizing field in a non-ellipsoidal magnetic element results in localization of spin waves near the edge of the element. However, relative little work has been carried out to investigate the effect of the applied magnetic fields on the nature of such localized modes. In this study, micromagnetic simulations are performed on an equilateral triangular nanomagnet to investigate the magnetic field dependence of the mode profiles of the lowest-frequency spin wave. Our findings reveal that the lowest-frequency mode is localized at the base edge of the equilateral triangle. The characteristics of its mode profile change with the ground state magnetization configuration of the nanotriangle, which, in turn, depends on the magnitude of the in-plane applied magnetic field.

  5. Wavevector- and frequency-dependent shear viscosity of water: the modified collective mode approach and molecular dynamics calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.P.Omelyan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The transverse momentum time autocorrelation functions and wavevector- and frequency-dependent shear viscosity are calculated for an interaction site model of water using a modified collective mode approach and molecular dynamics simulations. The modified mode approach is based on a formulation which consistently takes into account non-Markovian effects into the kinetic memory kernels. As is demonstrated by comparing the theory results with the molecular dynamics data, the entire frequency dependence of the shear viscosity can be reproduced quantitatively over the whole wavelength range in terms of six generalized collective modes employing the kinetic memory kernel in the non-Markovian approximation of the third order. It is also shown that the results corresponding to the exact atomic and abbreviated molecular descriptions may differ considerably. In the infinite wavevector regime the dynamic correlations are completely determined by a single free motion of the molecules.

  6. The neural code for auditory space depends on sound frequency and head size in an optimal manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicol S Harper

    Full Text Available A major cue to the location of a sound source is the interaural time difference (ITD-the difference in sound arrival time at the two ears. The neural representation of this auditory cue is unresolved. The classic model of ITD coding, dominant for a half-century, posits that the distribution of best ITDs (the ITD evoking a neuron's maximal response is unimodal and largely within the range of ITDs permitted by head-size. This is often interpreted as a place code for source location. An alternative model, based on neurophysiology in small mammals, posits a bimodal distribution of best ITDs with exquisite sensitivity to ITDs generated by means of relative firing rates between the distributions. Recently, an optimal-coding model was proposed, unifying the disparate features of these two models under the framework of efficient coding by neural populations. The optimal-coding model predicts that distributions of best ITDs depend on head size and sound frequency: for high frequencies and large heads it resembles the classic model, for low frequencies and small head sizes it resembles the bimodal model. The optimal-coding model makes key, yet unobserved, predictions: for many species, including humans, both forms of neural representation are employed, depending on sound frequency. Furthermore, novel representations are predicted for intermediate frequencies. Here, we examine these predictions in neurophysiological data from five mammalian species: macaque, guinea pig, cat, gerbil and kangaroo rat. We present the first evidence supporting these untested predictions, and demonstrate that different representations appear to be employed at different sound frequencies in the same species.

  7. Inverse identification of the frequency-dependent mechanical parameters of viscoelastic materials based on the measured FRFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Wang, Zhuo; Yan, Xianfei; Zhu, Mingwei

    2018-01-01

    The mechanical parameters of viscoelastic materials, such as storage modulus and loss factor, have frequency-dependent characteristic and the combination of different polymers usually exhibits various mechanical characteristics, which make the identification of the mechanical parameters of viscoelastic materials become a routine and challenging task. In this study, based on the measured resonance frequencies and frequency response functions (FRFs) of a viscoelastic damping plate, an inverse approach was developed to identify the aforementioned parameters with frequency-dependent characteristic. An analysis model was established with both the viscoelastic material damping and the remaining equivalent viscous damping considered. A response surface method was provided to achieve the matching calculation, which can identify the storage modulus and loss factor simultaneously. A cantilever plate attached with ZN_1 viscoelastic material was chosen to demonstrate the proposed method and the measured and the predicted FRFs were compared with the purpose of assessing the rationality of identification results. The results show that the loss factor of viscoelastic materials would be overestimated if only the material damping was included in the analysis model.

  8. Frequency-dependent hopping conductivity in a static electric field in a random one-dimensional lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyo, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    The frequency-dependent electrical conductivity is studied in a nearest-neighbor-hopping linear lattice with disordered site energies and barrier heights in the presence of a uniform static electric field, allowing for detailed balance between random rates. Exact expressions are obtained for the conductivity for both high and low frequencies. The results reduce to those obtained by previous authors in the absence of site-energy disorder. However, the latter is found to alter the character of the frequency dependence of the conductivity significantly at low frequencies. In this case the conductivity is expanded as sigma(ω) = sigma 0 +isigma 1 ω-sigma 2 ω 2 -isigma 3 ω 3 +.... We find that sigma 1 is nonvanishing only if both site energies and barrier heights are disordered and that sigma 2 is positive when the fluctuations in site energies are small compared with the thermal energy but becomes negative in the opposite regime. The ac response is found to vanish [i.e., sigma(ω) = 0 for ωnot =0] in the absence of disorder in barrier heights

  9. Influence of frequency-dependent soil electrical parameters on the evaluation of lightning electromagnetic fields in air and underground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfino, Federico; Procopio, Renato; Rossi, Mansueto; Rachidi, Farhad

    2009-06-01

    This paper is aimed at analyzing the influence of the frequency-dependent behavior of the ground electrical parameters (conductivity and ground permittivity) on the electromagnetic field radiated by a cloud-to-ground lightning return stroke. Both radiation in air (over the conducting ground plane) and underground are considered in the analysis. The adopted method is based on the classical Sommerfeld's theory and takes advantage of an efficient ad hoc numerical procedure to face with the slow converging Sommerfeld's integrals. This feature allows the electromagnetic field to be computed without any sort of mathematical approximation and, since it is carried out in the frequency domain, can be used either if the ground permittivity and conductivity are considered constant or if they vary with the working frequency with any functional law. Simulations have been performed to identify the cases in which the approximation of constant ground permittivity and conductivity leads to satisfactory results. It is shown that for soils with water contents of 2% to 10% (ground conductivities in the order of 0.001 to 0.01 S/m), the assumption of constant electrical parameters appears to be reasonable. However, for either very poorly conducting soils (10-4 S/m or so) or highly conducting soils (10-1 S/m), the electromagnetic field components appear to be significantly affected by the frequency dependence of the ground electrical parameters.

  10. Frequency-dependent local field factors in dielectric liquids by a polarizable force field and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davari, Nazanin; Haghdani, Shokouh; Åstrand, Per-Olof

    2015-01-01

    A force field model for calculating local field factors, i.e. the linear response of the local electric field for example at a nucleus in a molecule with respect to an applied electric field, is discussed. It is based on a combined charge-transfer and point-dipole interaction model for the polarizability, and thereby it includes two physically distinct terms for describing electronic polarization: changes in atomic charges arising from transfer of charge between the atoms and atomic induced dipole moments. A time dependence is included both for the atomic charges and the atomic dipole moments and if they are assumed to oscillate with the same frequency as the applied electric field, a model for frequency-dependent properties are obtained. Furthermore, if a life-time of excited states are included, a model for the complex frequency-dependent polariability is obtained including also information about excited states and the absorption spectrum. We thus present a model for the frequency-dependent local field factors through the first molecular excitation energy. It is combined with molecular dynamics simulations of liquids where a large set of configurations are sampled and for which local field factors are calculated. We are normally not interested in the average of the local field factor but rather in configurations where it is as high as possible. In electrical insulation, we would like to avoid high local field factors to reduce the risk for electrical breakdown, whereas for example in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, high local field factors are desired to give dramatically increased intensities

  11. Range-separated time-dependent density-functional theory with a frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebolini, Elisa, E-mail: elisa.rebolini@kjemi.uio.no; Toulouse, Julien, E-mail: julien.toulouse@upmc.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2016-03-07

    We present a range-separated linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) which combines a density-functional approximation for the short-range response kernel and a frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter approximation for the long-range response kernel. This approach goes beyond the adiabatic approximation usually used in linear-response TDDFT and aims at improving the accuracy of calculations of electronic excitation energies of molecular systems. A detailed derivation of the frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel is given using many-body Green-function theory. Preliminary tests of this range-separated TDDFT method are presented for the calculation of excitation energies of the He and Be atoms and small molecules (H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}CO, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}). The results suggest that the addition of the long-range second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel overall slightly improves the excitation energies.

  12. Time-domain representation of frequency dependent inertial forces on offshore structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2013-01-01

    to the 'phase lag' obtained for the response of discrete mechanical systems. Two options are explored: introducing a corresponding phase lag in the components of the wave kinematics, or compensating the phase lag by combining a stable complex frequency with its complex conjugate. In the latter case the time...... section are uncoupled, and they are easily integrated with e.g. a central difference scheme for the state-space variables. © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, London....

  13. Frequency and Temperature Dependence of Fabrication Parameters in Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystal Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Juan C.; Vergaz, Ricardo; Barrios, David; Sánchez-Pena, José Manuel; Viñuales, Ana; Grande, Hans Jürgen; Cabañero, Germán

    2014-01-01

    A series of polymer dispersed liquid crystal devices using glass substrates have been fabricated and investigated focusing on their electrical properties. The devices have been studied in terms of impedance as a function of frequency. An electric equivalent circuit has been proposed, including the influence of the temperature on the elements into it. In addition, a relevant effect of temperature on electrical measurements has been observed. PMID:28788632

  14. Frequency and Temperature Dependence of Fabrication Parameters in Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystal Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Torres

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of polymer dispersed liquid crystal devices using glass substrates have been fabricated and investigated focusing on their electrical properties. The devices have been studied in terms of impedance as a function of frequency. An electric equivalent circuit has been proposed, including the influence of the temperature on the elements into it. In addition, a relevant effect of temperature on electrical measurements has been observed.

  15. Frequency-Dependent Characteristics of Regional Seismic Phases: Propagation of Pn in Western China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    Nabelek) (Nabelek et al., 2005). Seism ic data from this experim ent can be directly obtained from the IRIS Data Management Center at www.iris.edu...investigated trade-offs between velo city structure and attenuation in Tibet. Of more than 30 high-quality, regional seism ic profiles that have been...include seism ic attenuation. A constant Q attenuation with frequency is provided in the spectral elem ent code, and given that the data and the

  16. Analysis of frequency- and temperature-dependent interface states in PtSi/p-Si Schottky diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellai, A. [Physics Department, P.O. Box 36, Sultan Qaboos University 123, Muscat (Oman)], E-mail: asellai@squ.edu.om; Ouennoughi, Z. [Laboratoire Optoelectronique et Composants, Departement de Physique UFAS Setif Algerie (Algeria)

    2008-12-05

    To yield quantitative information about their interface states, PtSi/p-Si Schottky structures have been studied using conductance and capacitance measurements over a wide range of frequencies (1 kHz to 1 MHz) and at several temperatures (80-140 K). The increase in capacitance at lower frequencies is seen as a signature of interface states, the densities of which are evaluated to be of the order of {approx}10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The presence of interface states is also evidenced as a peak in the conductance-frequency characteristics that increases in magnitude with decreasing temperatures. The variations of interface conductance are best described by an analytical equation derived assuming an energy-dependent cross-section of these interface states. The conductance data is subsequently used to extract the relaxation times of interface states and their energy distribution with respect to the top of the valence band. Relaxation times, in particular, while temperature dependent with an average value of {approx}4 {mu}s, show a noticeably weak dependence on bias.

  17. Testicular development in Siberian hamsters depends on frequency and pattern of melatonin signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, A K; Freeman, D A; Zucker, I; Prendergast, B J

    2000-10-01

    We investigated the impact of frequency and pattern of melatonin signals on reproductive development in Siberian hamsters. Juvenile males gestated in short day lengths and housed in constant illumination to suppress melatonin secretion were infused with melatonin for 5 h either once or twice per day for 20 days. Melatonin infusions at either frequency produced equivalent increases in testes and body weights that exceeded those of animals infused with saline but were indistinguishable from those of hamsters transferred to long day lengths. The reproductive system appears to be maximally stimulated by a single short melatonin signal each day. Other animals kept from birth in a short photoperiod were treated 6 h after onset of darkness with the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist DL-propranolol to shorten melatonin secretion on the night of injection but not on subsequent nights. This permitted interpolation of short nightly melatonin signals of 4-5 h duration against a background of long melatonin signals of 10-12 h duration on other nights. Treatment regimes that maintained a 1:1 ratio of short to long melatonin signals for 8 wk stimulated reproductive development; a 1:2 signal ratio, in each of three different patterns, was uniformly ineffective. The number of successive short melatonin signals had little influence on the interval across which successive melatonin signals were summated to influence photoperiodic traits. The neuroendocrine axis appears more responsive to short melatonin signal frequency than pattern for development of the summer phenotype.

  18. Efficient three-photon luminescence with strong polarization dependence from a scintillating silicate glass co-doped with Gd3+ and Tb3+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang-Can; Zhang, Cheng-Yun; Deng, Hai-Dong; Liu, Guang-Yin; Lan, Sheng; Qian, Qi-; Yang, Zhong-Min; Gopal, Achanta Venu

    2013-03-11

    Efficient three-photon luminescence (3PL) from a scintillating silicate glass co-doped with Gd(3+) and Tb(3+) was generated by using a focused femtosecond laser beam at 800 nm. Four emission bands centered at 496, 541, 583, and 620 nm were identified as the electronic transitions between the energy levels of Tb(3+) followed by three-photon absorption (3PA) in Gd(3+) and Tb(3+) and the resonant energy transfer from Gd(3+) to Tb(3+). More interestingly, a strong polarization dependence of the 3PL was observed and it is ascribed to the polarization dependent 3PA in Gd(3+) and Tb(3+) and/or the angular distribution of photogenerated electrons in the glass.

  19. Time-Dependent Coupled Perturbed Hartree-Fock and Density-Functional-Theory Approach for Calculating Frequency-Dependent (Hyper)Polarizabilities with Nonorthogonal Localized Molecular Orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Daoling; Li, Shaopeng; Peng, Liang; Gu, Feng Long; Yang, Weitao

    2017-09-12

    The time-dependent coupled perturbed Hartree-Fock/density-functional-theory (TDHF/TDDFT) approach has been reformulated based on nonorthogonal localized molecular orbitals (NOLMOs). Based on the NOLMO Fock equation, we have derived the corresponding NOLMO-TDHF/TDDFT equations up to the third order, and the formula for the frequency-dependent (hyper)polarizabilities has been given. Our approach has been applied to calculate both static and dynamic (hyper)polarizabilities of molecules varying from small molecules to large molecules. The NOLMO-TDHF/TDDFT approach can reproduce the reference canonical molecular orbital (CMO) results for all of our testing calculations. With the help of ongoing development of optimized local virtual molecular orbitals, the NOLMO-TDHF/TDDFT approach would be a very efficient method for large system calculations and tp achieve linear scaling.

  20. Frequency doubling in LiNbO3 using temperature dependent QPM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belmonte, Michele; Skettrup, Torben; Pedersen, Christian

    1999-01-01

    We report the application of temperature-dependent quasi-phase matching (QPM) for second harmonic generation of green light using periodically field poled LiNbO3. In contrast to the usual QPM devices, here the fundamental and second harmonic waves are polarized orthogonally so that the second...

  1. Resistance to Change and Frequency of Response-Dependent Stimuli Uncorrelated with Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina; Ward, Ryan D.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2009-01-01

    Stimuli uncorrelated with reinforcement have been shown to enhance response rates and resistance to disruption; however, the effects of different rates of stimulus presentations have not been assessed. In two experiments, we assessed the effects of adding different rates of response-dependent brief stimuli uncorrelated with primary reinforcement…

  2. Dependence of synergy current driven by lower hybrid wave and electron cyclotron wave on the frequency and parallel refractive index of electron cyclotron wave for Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.; Chen, S. Y.; Tang, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    The physical mechanism of the synergy current driven by lower hybrid wave (LHW) and electron cyclotron wave (ECW) in tokamaks is investigated using theoretical analysis and simulation methods in the present paper. Research shows that the synergy relationship between the two waves in velocity space strongly depends on the frequency ω and parallel refractive index N // of ECW. For a given spectrum of LHW, the parameter range of ECW, in which the synergy current exists, can be predicted by theoretical analysis, and these results are consistent with the simulation results. It is shown that the synergy effect is mainly caused by the electrons accelerated by both ECW and LHW, and the acceleration of these electrons requires that there is overlap of the resonance regions of the two waves in velocity space

  3. Frequency-dependent stability of CNT Joule heaters in ionizable media and desalination processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudchenko, Alexander V.; Chen, Chuxiao; Cardenas, Alexis; Rolf, Julianne; Jassby, David

    2017-07-01

    Water shortages and brine waste management are increasing challenges for coastal and inland regions, with high-salinity brines presenting a particularly challenging problem. These high-salinity waters require the use of thermally driven treatment processes, such as membrane distillation, which suffer from high complexity and cost. Here, we demonstrate how controlling the frequency of an applied alternating current at high potentials (20 Vpp) to a porous thin-film carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer composite Joule heating element can prevent CNT degradation in ionizable environments such as high-salinity brines. By operating at sufficiently high frequencies, these porous thin-films can be directly immersed in highly ionizable environments and used as flow-through heating elements. We demonstrate that porous CNT/polymer composites can be used as self-heating membranes to directly heat high-salinity brines at the water/vapour interface of the membrane distillation element, achieving high single-pass recoveries that approach 100%, far exceeding standard membrane distillation recovery limits.

  4. The frequency of diagnostic errors in radiologic reports depends on the patient's age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Sandra; Ekberg, Olle

    2010-01-01

    Background: Patients who undergo treatment may suffer preventable medical errors. Some of these errors are due to diagnostic imaging procedures. Purpose: To compare the frequency of diagnostic errors in different age groups in an urban European population. Material and Methods: A total of 19 129 reported radiologic examinations were included. During a 6-month period, the analyzed age groups were: children (aged 0-9 years), adults (40-49 years), and elderly (86-95 years). Results: The frequency of radiologic examinations per year was 0.3 in children, 0.6 in adults, and 1.1 in elderly. Significant errors were significantly more frequent in the elderly (1.7%) and children (1.4%) compared with adults (0.8%). There were 60 false-positive reports and 232 false-negative reports. Most errors were made by staff radiologists after hours when they reported on examinations outside their area of expertise. Conclusion: Diagnostic errors are more frequent in children and the elderly compared with middle-aged adults

  5. Simplified frequency-dependent formulae for series-impedance matrices of single-core HVAC cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da

    2015-01-01

    The installation of HVAC underground cables became more common in recent years, a trend expected to continue in the future. Underground cables are more complex than overhead lines and the calculation of their resistance and reactance can be challenging and time consuming for frequencies that are ......The installation of HVAC underground cables became more common in recent years, a trend expected to continue in the future. Underground cables are more complex than overhead lines and the calculation of their resistance and reactance can be challenging and time consuming for frequencies...... formula using Bessel equations exist, but they still have some complexity, e.g., hyperbolic cotangents and hyperbolic cosecants are used. Moreover, the series impedance matrix that is designed with these equations and used to estimate the resistance and reactance, requires the summation of at least eight...... different terms, all calculated in a different way. This paper simplifies the equations used in the loop method, by means of expansions in Taylor series, with other further simplifications that can be made for typical cable thicknesses and materials....

  6. The Frequency of Nonmotor Symptoms among Advanced Parkinson Patients May Depend on Instrument Used for Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Hwynn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nonmotor symptoms (NMS of Parkinson's disease (PD may be more debilitating than motor symptoms. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and corecognition of NMS among our advanced PD cohort (patients considered for deep brain stimulation (DBS and caregivers. Methods. NMS-Questionnaire (NMS-Q, a self-administered screening questionnaire, and NMS Assessment-Scale (NMS-S, a clinician-administered scale, were administered to PD patients and caregivers. Results. We enrolled 33 PD patients (23 males, 10 females and caregivers. The most frequent NMS among patients using NMS-Q were gastrointestinal (87.9%, sleep (84.9%, and urinary (72.7%, while the most frequent symptoms using NMS-S were sleep (90.9%, gastrointestinal (75.8%, and mood (75.8%. Patient/caregiver scoring correlations for NMS-Q and NMS-S were 0.670 (<0.0001 and 0.527 (=0.0016, respectively. Conclusion The frequency of NMS among advanced PD patients and correlation between patients and caregivers varied with the instrument used. The overall correlation between patient and caregiver was greater with NMS-Q than NMS-S.

  7. Electron Tunneling in Lithium Ammonia Solutions Probed by Frequency-Dependent Electron-Spin Relaxation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T.J.; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H.; Edwards, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multi-exponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1–10)×10−12 s over a temperature range 230–290K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a timescale of ca. 10−13 s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great potential

  8. Emotion regulation and substance use frequency in women with substance dependence and borderline personality disorder receiving dialectical behavior therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Seth R; Perepletchikova, Francheska; Holtzman, Kevin; Sinha, Rajita

    2011-01-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) identifies emotion dysregulation as central to the dangerous impulsivity of borderline personality disorder (BPD) including substance use disorders, and DBT targets improved emotion regulation as a primary mechanism of change. However, improved emotion regulation with DBT and associations between such improvement and behavioral outcomes such as substance use has not been previously reported. Thus, the goal of this study was to assess for improvement in emotion regulation and to examine the relationship between improvements in the emotion regulation and substance use problems following DBT treatment. Emotion regulation as assessed by the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, depressed mood as assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory, and their associations with substance use frequency were investigated in 27 women with substance dependence and BPD receiving 20 weeks of DBT in an academic community outpatient substance abuse treatment program. Results indicated improved emotion regulation, improved mood, and decreased substance use frequency. Further, emotion regulation improvement, but not improved mood, explained the variance of decreased substance use frequency. This is the first study to demonstrate improved emotion regulation in BPD patients treated with DBT and to show that improved emotion regulation can account for increased behavioral control in BPD patients. SIGNIFICANCE AND FUTURE RESEARCH: Emotion regulation assessment is recommended for future studies to further clarify the etiology and maintenance of disorders associated with emotional dysregulation such as BPD and substance dependence and to further explore emotion regulation as a potential mechanism of change for clinical interventions.

  9. Frequency dependence of complex moduli of brain tissue using a fractional Zener model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohandel, M; Sivaloganathan, S; Tenti, G; Darvish, K

    2005-01-01

    Brain tissue exhibits viscoelastic behaviour. If loading times are substantially short, static tests are not sufficient to determine the complete viscoelastic behaviour of the material, and dynamic test methods are more appropriate. The concept of complex modulus of elasticity is a powerful tool for characterizing the frequency domain behaviour of viscoelastic materials. On the other hand, it is well known that classical viscoelastic models can be generalized by means of fractional calculus to describe more complex viscoelastic behaviour of materials. In this paper, the fractional Zener model is investigated in order to describe the dynamic behaviour of brain tissue. The model is fitted to experimental data of oscillatory shear tests of bovine brain tissue to verify its behaviour and to obtain the material parameters

  10. Mapping of permafrost surface and active layer properties using GPR: a comparison of frequency dependencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gacitua, Guisella; Uribe, José Andrés; Tamstorf, Mikkel Peter

    2011-01-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) was used to detect internal features and conditions in the active layer of Zackenberg valley in North-East Greenland. For about 16 years there has been a monitoring programme that registers the physical and biological processes in the ecosystem.We aim to improve...... the monitoring accuracy of the active layer development and estimated soil water content. We used two different GPR frequencies to study their performance in High-Arctic cryoturbated soils. Here we present the analysis of the signal received by quantifying the power of the signal that is reflected from the top...... are suitable to measure thickness and to detect features in the active layer, the 400 MHz gives a better impression of the influence of the dielectric contrast effect from top of the permafrost zone which can be used to quantify the soil water content....

  11. Frequency-Dependent Seismic Waves in Fluid-Saturated Fractured Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneev, V. A.; Goloshubin, G.

    2015-12-01

    Fractures are the natural and essential elements of rock. Fracture systems are the most important features that define rock permeability and strength, as well as their anisotropy properties. Recent advancement in induced fracturing is a core part of the gas/oil shale technology, where fracture monitoring and control became a special topic of interest. Krauklis wave (K-wave) is the result of interaction between a fluid mass and elasticity of fracture walls, and it propagates primarily along the fracture systems in the fluid. At the fracture tips and fracture intersections it partially converts into the body waves. It is quite clear that incorporation of K-waves in a theory of wave propagation in fractured rock is one of the most important problems to solve for understanding of their seismic properties. One of the most fundamental properties of fractured rock is a fractal fracture distribution and it is rarely, if ever, taken into account in existing wave propagation theories. However, this property exists on a widest variety of scales and in particular reveals itself in a form of Gutenberg-Richter Law experimentally proven, starting from laboratory measurements and up to the global seismicity. We computed P and S-wave velocities of the rock containing fluid (and proppant) filled fractures, considering the effect of extremely slow and dispersive wave propagation within individual fractures. This was made possible by introducing the concept of "effective fracture-wave volume," and by evaluating the elastic constants of rock containing a complex, fractal network of fractures. These velocities were used to compute seismic waves reflected normally from a fractured reservoir. We demonstrate that by taking into account the Krauklis wave phenomenon for the fractally distributed fluid-filled fractures, it is possible to explain the observed low-frequency anomalies above the underground natural reservoirs. These anomalies include increase of amplitude and a phase delay of

  12. Digital timing: sampling frequency, anti-aliasing filter and signal interpolation filter dependence on timing resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sanghee; Grazioso, Ron; Zhang Nan; Aykac, Mehmet; Schmand, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    The main focus of our study is to investigate how the performance of digital timing methods is affected by sampling rate, anti-aliasing and signal interpolation filters. We used the Nyquist sampling theorem to address some basic questions such as what will be the minimum sampling frequencies? How accurate will the signal interpolation be? How do we validate the timing measurements? The preferred sampling rate would be as low as possible, considering the high cost and power consumption of high-speed analog-to-digital converters. However, when the sampling rate is too low, due to the aliasing effect, some artifacts are produced in the timing resolution estimations; the shape of the timing profile is distorted and the FWHM values of the profile fluctuate as the source location changes. Anti-aliasing filters are required in this case to avoid the artifacts, but the timing is degraded as a result. When the sampling rate is marginally over the Nyquist rate, a proper signal interpolation is important. A sharp roll-off (higher order) filter is required to separate the baseband signal from its replicates to avoid the aliasing, but in return the computation will be higher. We demonstrated the analysis through a digital timing study using fast LSO scintillation crystals as used in time-of-flight PET scanners. From the study, we observed that there is no significant timing resolution degradation down to 1.3 Ghz sampling frequency, and the computation requirement for the signal interpolation is reasonably low. A so-called sliding test is proposed as a validation tool checking constant timing resolution behavior of a given timing pick-off method regardless of the source location change. Lastly, the performance comparison for several digital timing methods is also shown.

  13. Quantum fluid dynamics based current-density functional study of a helium atom in a strong time-dependent magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikas [Quantum Chemistry Group, Department of Chemistry and Centre of Advanced Studies in Chemistry, Panjab University, 160014 Chandigrah (India)

    2011-02-15

    Evolution of the helium atom in a strong time-dependent (TD) magnetic field (B) of strength up to 10{sup 11} G is investigated through a quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) based current-density functional theory (CDFT). The TD-QFD-CDFT computations are performed through numerical solution of a single generalized nonlinear Schroedinger equation employing vector exchange-correlation potentials and scalar exchange-correlation density functionals that depend both on the electronic charge-density and the current-density. The results are compared with that obtained from a B-TD-QFD-DFT approach (based on conventional TD-DFT) under similar numerical constraints but employing only scalar exchange-correlation potential dependent on electronic charge-density only. The B-TD-QFD-DFT approach, at a particular TD magnetic field-strength, yields electronic charge- and current-densities as well as exchange-correlation potential resembling with that obtained from the time-independent studies involving static (time-independent) magnetic fields. However, TD-QFD-CDFT electronic charge- and current-densities along with the exchange-correlation potential and energy differ significantly from that obtained using B-TD-QFD-DFT approach, particularly at field-strengths >10{sup 9} G, representing dynamical effects of a TD field. The work concludes that when a helium atom is subjected to a strong TD magnetic field of order >10{sup 9} G, the conventional TD-DFT based approach differs 'dynamically' from the CDFT based approach under similar computational constraints. (author)

  14. Temperature and frequency dependence of negative differential capacitance in a planar GaN-based p-i-n photodetector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Xichang; Xu, Jintong; Li, Chao; Qiao, Hui; Zhang, Yan; Li, Xiangyang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Planar GaN-based p-i-n photodetector was prepared by ion implantation. •A novel negative differential capacitance (NDC) effect is observed in the photodetector. •The NDC effect is due to the carrier confinement of the deep level centers formed by ion implantation. -- Abstract: In this work, back-illuminated planar GaN-based p-i-n photodetectors were fabricated by Si implantation into GaN-based p-i-n structure grown by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The dark current density of the photodetector is 1.03 nA/cm 2 under zero bias. The unbiased responsivity is 0.122 A/W at 360 nm, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of 42%. Temperature and frequency dependence of capacitance versus voltage characteristics of the photodetectors are also investigated respectively. A novel negative differential capacitance (NDC) effect observed in the photodetector at room temperature under the frequency of 120 kHz or at low temperature under relative high frequency (such as 200 kHz). The NDC effect becomes much more obvious with the temperature or frequency decreased. This novel phenomenon is mainly due to the carrier confinement of the deep level centers in the detector, which mainly include lattice defects formed by high dose ion implantation and subsequent annealing

  15. Frequency-dependent alternating-current scanning electrochemical microscopy (4D AC-SECM) for local visualisation of corrosion sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhard, Kathrin; Erichsen, Thomas; Stratmann, Martin; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    For a better understanding of the initiation of localised corrosion, there is a need for analytical tools that are capable of imaging corrosion pits and precursor sites with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. The lateral electrochemical contrast in alternating-current scanning electrochemical microscopy (AC-SECM) has been found to be highly dependent on the frequency of the applied alternating voltage. In order to be able to obtain data with optimum contrast and high resolution, the AC frequency is swept in a full spectrum at each point in space instead of performing spatially resolved measurements at one fixed perturbation frequency. In doing so, four-dimensional data sets are acquired (4D AC-SECM). Here, we describe the instrument set-up and modus operandi, along with the first results from the imaging of corroding surfaces. Corrosion precursor sites and local defects in protective organic coatings, as well as an actively corroding pit on 304 stainless steel, have been successfully visualised. Since the lateral electrochemical contrast in these images varies with the perturbation frequency, the proposed approach constitutes an indispensable tool for obtaining optimum electrochemical contrast.

  16. Frequency-dependent changes in the paired-pulse index in the hippocampus of the freely moving adult male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorns, W R; Blaise, J H; Bronzino, J D

    2004-03-01

    The paired-pulse index (PPI) has been widely used as a measure of modulation of cellular excitability in the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit. This paper presents a quantification of the changes in this measure of neuronal modulation as a result of the application of pulse trains having six different train frequencies (0.1, 1, 5, 8, 15, and 30 Hz) to one of the major efferent pathways to the dentate gyrus, the medial perforant path (MPP). Our findings indicate that the modulation of the first leg of the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit is dependent on the frequency of the "burst train" applied to the perforant pathway. This methodological finding is of importance to all investigators studying hippocampal plasticity via LTP or LTD approaches. The different synaptic mechanisms implicated in being responsible for the changes in the PPI are also discussed.

  17. Thickness Dependence of Magnetic Relaxation and E-J Characteristics in Superconducting (Gd-Y)-Ba-Cu-O Films with Strong Vortex Pinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polat, Ozgur [ORNL; Sinclair IV, John W [ORNL; Zuev, Yuri L [ORNL; Thompson, James R [ORNL; Christen, David K [ORNL; Cook, Sylvester W [ORNL; Kumar, Dhananjay [ORNL; Chen, Y [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; Selvamanickam, V. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York

    2011-01-01

    The dependence of the critical current density Jc on temperature, magnetic field, and film thickness has been investigated in (Gd-Y)BaCu-oxide materials of 0.7, 1.4, and 2.8 m thickness. Generally, the Jc decreases with film thickness at investigated temperatures and magnetic fields. The nature and strength of the pinning centers for vortices have been identified through angular and temperature measurements, respectively. These films do not exhibit c-axis correlated vortex pinning, but do have correlated defects oriented near the ab-planes. For all film thicknesses studied, strong pinning dominates at most temperatures. The vortex dynamics were investigated through magnetic relaxation studies in the temperature range of 5 77 K in 1 T and 3 T applied magnetic fields, H || surface-normal. The creep rate S is thickness dependent at high temperatures, implying that the pinning energy is also thickness dependent. Maley analyses of the relaxation data show an inverse power law variation for the effective pinning energy Ueff ~ (J0/J) . Finally, the electric field-current density (E-J) characteristics were determined over a wide range of dissipation by combining experimental results from transport, swept field magnetometry (VSM), and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometry. We develop a self-consistent model of the combined experimental results, leading to an estimation of the critical current density Jc0(T) in the absence of flux creep.

  18. Oscillation frequency dependence of nonclassical rotation inertia of solid 4He.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Y; Graves, J C; Kojima, H

    2007-07-06

    The nonclassical rotational inertia fraction of the identical cylindrical solid 4He below 300 mK is studied at 496 and 1173 Hz by a double resonance torsional oscillator. Below 35 mK, the fractions are the same at sufficiently low rim velocities. Above 35 mK, the fraction is greater for the higher than the lower mode. The dissipation peak of the lower mode occurs at a temperature approximately 4 mK lower than that of the higher mode. The drive dependence of the two modes shows that the reduction of the fraction is characterized by critical velocity, not amplitude or acceleration.

  19. Electron tunneling in lithium-ammonia solutions probed by frequency-dependent electron spin relaxation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T J; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H; Edwards, Peter P

    2012-06-06

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T(1)) and spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multiexponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1-10) × 10(-12) s over a temperature range 230-290 K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a time scale of ∼10(-13) s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great

  20. Structural, magnetic characterization (dependencies of coercivity and loss with the frequency) of magnetic cores based in Finemet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinalde, M.; Infante, P.; Domínguez, L.; Blanco, J. M.; del Val, J. J.; Chizhik, A.; González, J.

    2017-12-01

    We report changes of coercivity, induced magnetic anisotropy, magneto-optical domain structure and frequency dependencies of coercivity and energy loss (up to 10 MHz) associated with the structural modifications produced by thermal treatments under applied magnetic field (field annealing) in toroidal wound cores of Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si15.5B7 amorphous alloy. The thermal treatment (535 °C, 1 h) leads to the typical nanocrystalline structure of α-Fe(Si) nanograins (60-65% relative volume, 10-20 nm average grain size embedded in a residual amorphous matrix, while the magnetic field with the possibility to be applied in two directions to the toroidal core axis, that is in transverse (which is equivalent to the transverse direction of the ribbon) or longitudinal (equivalent to the longitudinal direction of the ribbon), develops a macroscopic uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in the transverse (around 245 J/m3) or longitudinal (around 85 J/m3) direction of the ribbon, respectively. It is remarkable the quasi-unhysteretic character of the cores with these two kinds of field annealing as comparing with that of the as-quenched one. Magneto-optical study by Kerr-effect of the ribbons provides useful information on the domain structure of the surface in agreement with the direction and intensity of the induced magnetic anisotropy. This induced uniaxial magnetic anisotropy plays a very important role on the Hc(f) and EL(f) curves, (f: frequency), being drastic the presence and direction of the induced magnetic anisotropy. In addition, these frequency dependencies show a significant change at the frequency around 100 Hz.

  1. Maturation trajectories of cortical resting-state networks depend on the mediating frequency band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sheraz; Hashmi, Javeria A; Mamashli, Fahimeh; Michmizos, Konstantinos; Kitzbichler, Manfred G; Bharadwaj, Hari; Bekhti, Yousra; Ganesan, Santosh; Garel, Keri-Lee A; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Gollub, Randy L; Kong, Jian; Vaina, Lucia M; Rana, Kunjan D; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Kenet, Tal

    2018-02-17

    The functional significance of resting state networks and their abnormal manifestations in psychiatric disorders are firmly established, as is the importance of the cortical rhythms in mediating these networks. Resting state networks are known to undergo substantial reorganization from childhood to adulthood, but whether distinct cortical rhythms, which are generated by separable neural mechanisms and are often manifested abnormally in psychiatric conditions, mediate maturation differentially, remains unknown. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG) to map frequency band specific maturation of resting state networks from age 7 to 29 in 162 participants (31 independent), we found significant changes with age in networks mediated by the beta (13-30 Hz) and gamma (31-80 Hz) bands. More specifically, gamma band mediated networks followed an expected asymptotic trajectory, but beta band mediated networks followed a linear trajectory. Network integration increased with age in gamma band mediated networks, while local segregation increased with age in beta band mediated networks. Spatially, the hubs that changed in importance with age in the beta band mediated networks had relatively little overlap with those that showed the greatest changes in the gamma band mediated networks. These findings are relevant for our understanding of the neural mechanisms of cortical maturation, in both typical and atypical development. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Everyday memory problems in alcohol abuse and dependence: Frequency, patterns and patient-proxy agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Liang; Yang, Chung-Yuan; Chen, Shaw-Ji; Chen, Yen-Cheng; Su, Chwen-Yng

    2018-03-01

    Using self-report to assess everyday memory in alcoholics presents challenges given the presence of both memory and metamemory deficits. Accordingly, evaluation of the reliability and validity of proxy ratings as well as the frequency of these memory lapses are of clinical importance. In the present study, 180 patient-proxy dyads completed the Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PRMQ). 31.7% of proxy-rated versus 2.8% of patient-rated prospective memory scores fell in the impaired to below average range. 15% of proxy-rated retrospective memory scores were below average, whereas none of the patients reported problems in this regard. Longer delays between intention formation and action yielded better prospective memory performance, while the opposite was true for retrospective memory. Agreement between patients and proxies was generally poor to fair across severity levels and the magnitude of observed differences was large (standardized response mean > 0.8). For all PRMQ items, exact agreement occurred in 45.3% of the cases. Larger patient-proxy discrepancy was associated with older age, less education and greater disease severity. Proxy ratings were internally consistent, significantly correlated with objective memory performance, and were sensitive to differences in overall PRMQ performance between severity groups. Caution should be used in the interpretations of patients' reports. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Frequency-Dependent Enhancement of Fluid Intelligence Induced by Transcranial Oscillatory Potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santarnecchi, Emiliano [Univ. of Siena (Italy). Dept. of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience; Polizzotto, Nicola Riccardo [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry; Godone, Marco [Univ. of Siena (Italy). Dept. of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience; Giovannelli, Fabio [San Giovanni di Dio Hospital, Florence (Italy). Complex Unit of Neurology; Feurra, Matteo [Univ. of Siena (Italy). Dept. of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience; Matzen, Laura [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rossi, Alessandro [Univ. of Siena (Italy). Dept. of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience; Rossi, Simone [Univ. of Siena (Italy). Dept. of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience

    2013-08-05

    Everyday problem solving requires the ability to go beyond experience by efficiently encoding and manipulating new information, i.e., fluid intelligence (Gf) [1]. Performance in tasks involving Gf, such as logical and abstract reasoning, has been shown to rely on distributed neural networks, with a crucial role played by prefrontal regions [2]. Synchronization of neuronal activity in the gamma band is a ubiquitous phenomenon within the brain; however, no evidence of its causal involvement in cognition exists to date [3]. Here, we show an enhancement of Gf ability in a cognitive task induced by exogenous rhythmic stimulation within the gamma band. Imperceptible alternating current [4] delivered through the scalp over the left middle frontal gyrus resulted in a frequency-specific shortening of the time required to find the correct solution in a visuospatial abstract reasoning task classically employed to measure Gf abilities (i.e., Raven’s matrices) [5]. Crucially, gamma-band stimulation (γ-tACS) selectively enhanced performance only on more complex trials involving conditional/logical reasoning. The finding presented here supports a direct involvement of gamma oscillatory activity in the mechanisms underlying higher-order human cognition.

  4. Structure, temperature and frequency dependent electrical conductivity of oxidized and reduced electrochemically exfoliated graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoń, Adrian; Włodarczyk, Patryk; Łukowiec, Dariusz

    2018-05-01

    The article presents the influence of reduction by hydrogen in statu nascendi and modification by hydrogen peroxide on the structure and electrical conductivity of electrochemically exfoliated graphite. It was confirmed that the electrochemical exfoliation can be used to produce oxidized nanographite with an average number of 25 graphene layers. The modified electrochemical exfoliated graphite and reduced electrochemical exfoliated graphite were characterized by high thermal stability, what was associated with removing of labile oxygen-containing groups. The presence of oxygen-containing groups was confirmed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Influence of chemical modification by hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide on the electrical conductivity was determined in wide frequency (0.1 Hz-10 kHz) and temperature range (-50 °C-100 °C). Material modified by hydrogen peroxide (0.29 mS/cm at 0 °C) had the lowest electrical conductivity. This can be associated with oxidation of unstable functional groups and was also confirmed by analysis of Raman spectra. The removal of oxygen-containing functional groups by hydrogen in statu nascendi resulted in a 1000-fold increase in the electrical conductivity compared to the electrochemical exfoliated graphite.

  5. Cell Type-Dependent RNA Recombination Frequency in the Japanese Encephalitis Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Wei Chiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV is one of approximately 70 flaviviruses, frequently causing symptoms involving the central nervous system. Mutations of its genomic RNA frequently occur during viral replication, which is believed to be a force contributing to viral evolution. Nevertheless, accumulating evidences show that some JEV strains may have actually arisen from RNA recombination between genetically different populations of the virus. We have demonstrated that RNA recombination in JEV occurs unequally in different cell types. In the present study, viral RNA fragments transfected into as well as viral RNAs synthesized in mosquito cells were shown not to be stable, especially in the early phase of infection possibly via cleavage by exoribonuclease. Such cleaved small RNA fragments may be further degraded through an RNA interference pathway triggered by viral double-stranded RNA during replication in mosquito cells, resulting in a lower frequency of RNA recombination in mosquito cells compared to that which occurs in mammalian cells. In fact, adjustment of viral RNA to an appropriately lower level in mosquito cells prevents overgrowth of the virus and is beneficial for cells to survive the infection. Our findings may also account for the slower evolution of arboviruses as reported previously.

  6. Ferrule material dependence of axial force sensitivity of a tunable optical frequency filter made of fiber fabry-perot etalon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateda, Mitsuhiro; Dong, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Fiber Fabry-Perot etalon (FFPE) is a device designed as an optical frequency filter, and its transmission characteristics change depending on force and temperature. In this paper, axial force sensitivity of three types of FFPE is investigated, whose ferrule materials have different Young's modulus. Force sensitivity of an FFPE whose ferrule material is borosilicate glass was found to be 2.7 GHz/N, while those of FFPEs with glass ceramics and zirconium oxide ferrules were 1.7 and 0.8 GHz/N, respectively. Thus, the theoretical expectation is confirmed experimentally that the axial force sensitivity of FFPE is inversely proportional to Young's modulus of the ferrule material.

  7. Monitoring Voltage-Dependent Charge Displacement of Shaker B-IR K+ Ion Channels Using Radio Frequency Interrogation

    OpenAIRE

    Dharia, Sameera; Rabbitt, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Here we introduce a new technique that probes voltage-dependent charge displacements of excitable membrane-bound proteins using extracellularly applied radio frequency (RF, 500 kHz) electric fields. Xenopus oocytes were used as a model cell for these experiments, and were injected with cRNA encoding Shaker B-IR (ShB-IR) K(+) ion channels to express large densities of this protein in the oocyte membranes. Two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC) was applied to command whole-cell membrane potential a...

  8. Frequency dependence of the radiative decay rate of excitons in self-assembled quantum dots: Experiment and theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stobbe, Søren; Johansen, Jeppe; Kristensen, Philip Trøst

    2009-01-01

    We analyze time-resolved spontaneous emission from excitons confined in self-assembled InAs quantum dots placed at various distances to a semiconductor-air interface. The modification of the local density of optical states due to the proximity of the interface enables unambiguous determination...... furthermore discuss three models of quantum dot strain and compare the measured wave-function overlap to these models. The observed frequency dependence of the wave-function overlap can be understood qualitatively in terms of the different compressibility of electrons and holes originating from...

  9. Modulation of spinal inhibitory reflexes depends on the frequency of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in spastic stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Soichiro; Tanabe, Shigeo; Takeda, Kazuya; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Kanada, Yoshikiyo

    2016-03-01

    Neurophysiological studies in healthy subjects suggest that increased spinal inhibitory reflexes from the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle to the soleus (SOL) muscle might contribute to decreased spasticity. While 50 Hz is an effective frequency for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in healthy subjects, in stroke survivors, the effects of TENS on spinal reflex circuits and its appropriate frequency are not well known. We examined the effects of different frequencies of TENS on spinal inhibitory reflexes from the TA to SOL muscle in stroke survivors. Twenty chronic stroke survivors with ankle plantar flexor spasticity received 50-, 100-, or 200-Hz TENS over the deep peroneal nerve (DPN) of the affected lower limb for 30 min. Before and immediately after TENS, reciprocal Ia inhibition (RI) and presynaptic inhibition of the SOL alpha motor neuron (D1 inhibition) were assessed by adjusting the unconditioned H-reflex amplitude. Furthermore, during TENS, the time courses of spinal excitability and spinal inhibitory reflexes were assessed via the H-reflex, RI, and D1 inhibition. None of the TENS protocols affected mean RI, whereas D1 inhibition improved significantly following 200-Hz TENS. In a time-series comparison during TENS, repeated stimulation did not produce significant changes in the H-reflex, RI, or D1 inhibition regardless of frequency. These results suggest that the frequency-dependent effect of TENS on spinal reflexes only becomes apparent when RI and D1 inhibition are measured by adjusting the amplitude of the unconditioned H-reflex. However, 200-Hz TENS led to plasticity of synaptic transmission from the antagonist to spastic muscles in stroke survivors.

  10. Frequency-dependent cannabinoid receptor-independent modulation of glycine receptors by endocannabinoid 2-AG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia eLozovaya

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Endocannabinoids are known as retrograde messengers, being released from the postsynaptic neuron and acting on specific presynaptic G-protein-coupled cannabinoid (CB receptors to decrease neurotransmitter release. Also, at physiologically relevant concentrations cannabinoids can directly modulate the function of voltage-gated and receptor-operated ion channels. Using patch-clamp recording we analyzed the consequences of the direct action of an endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG, on the functional properties of glycine receptor channels (GlyRs and ionic currents in glycinergic synapses. At physiologically relevant concentrations (0.1-1 µM, 2-AG directly affected the functions of recombinant homomeric alpha1H GlyR: it inhibited peak amplitude and dramatically enhanced desensitization. The action of 2-AG on GlyR-mediated currents developed rapidly, within ~300 milliseconds. Addition of 1 µM 2-AG strongly facilitated the depression of glycine-induced currents during repetitive (4-10 Hz application of short (2-ms duration pulses of glycine to outside-out patches. In brainstem slices from CB1 receptor-knockout mice, 2-AG significantly decreased the extent of facilitation of synaptic currents in hypoglossal motoneurons during repetitive (10-20 Hz stimulation. These observations suggest that endocannabinoids can modulate postsynaptic metaplasticity of glycinergic synaptic currents in a CB1 receptor-independent manner.

  11. Fractional amplitude analysis of low frequency fluctuation in alcohol dependent individuals: a resting state functional MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Dingfang; Cheng Jun; Wu Hanbin; Xu Liangzhou; Liu Jinhuan; Zhao Yilin; Lin Xue; Liu Changsheng; Qiu Li

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore brain activity features during the resting state in alcohol dependent individuals, and study the relationship between the brain activity features and alcohol dependent individuals' clinical symptoms. Methods: Twenty-four alcohol dependent individuals and 22 healthy control subjects, well matched in gender, age, education and handedness, were enrolled as the alcohol dependent group and control group respectively. A GE 3.0 T MR scanner was used to acquire all the subjects' resting state data. DPARSF software was used to process resting functional MRI data, and then the whole brain fractional amplitudes of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF) data were acquired. Two-sample t test statistical analysis was made to access fALFF difference between the two groups. Results: In comparison with the control group, the alcohol dependent group showed reduced fALFF in bilateral medial prefrontal gyrus, right inferior occipital gyrus, left precuneus,left inferior temporal gyrus, and left posterior lobe of cerebellum (0.64-1.69 vs. 0.87-1.78, t=-4.23- -2.79, P<0.05). fALFF was increased in the alcohol dependent group at the anterior cingulate,bilateral inferior frontal gyrus,right middle frontal gyrus,bilateral insular lobe,bilateral dorsal thalamus (0.86-1.82 vs. 0.76-1.58, t=3.56-3.96, P<0.05). Conclusion: Alcohol dependent individuals had abnormal activity at the bilateral prefrontal lobe,anterior cingulate, bilateral dorsal thalamus, bilateral insular lobe, left posterior lobe of cerebellum et al, during the resting state, and these abnormal activities might be related with clinical manifestation and pathophysiology. (authors)

  12. Strongly Nonlinear Dependence of Energy Transfer Rate on sp(2) Carbon Content in Reduced Graphene Oxide-Quantum Dot Hybrid Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yitong; Son, Dong Hee

    2015-01-02

    The dependence of the energy transfer rate on the content of sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms in the hybrid structures of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and Mn-doped quantum dot (QD(Mn)) was investigated. Taking advantage of the sensitivity of QD(Mn)'s dopant luminescence lifetime only to the energy transfer process without interference from the charge transfer process, the correlation between the sp(2) carbon content in RGO and the rate of energy transfer from QD(Mn) to RGO was obtained. The rate of energy transfer showed a strongly superlinear increase with increasing sp(2) carbon content in RGO, suggesting the possible cooperative behavior of sp(2) carbon domains in the energy transfer process as the sp(2) carbon content increases.

  13. Verification test problems for the calculation of probability of loss of assured safety in temperature-dependent systems with multiple weak and strong links.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jay Dean (ProStat, Mesa, AZ); Oberkampf, William Louis; Helton, Jon Craig (Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ)

    2006-06-01

    Four verification test problems are presented for checking the conceptual development and computational implementation of calculations to determine the probability of loss of assured safety (PLOAS) in temperature-dependent systems with multiple weak links (WLs) and strong links (SLs). The problems are designed to test results obtained with the following definitions of loss of assured safety: (1) Failure of all SLs before failure of any WL, (2) Failure of any SL before failure of any WL, (3) Failure of all SLs before failure of all WLs, and (4) Failure of any SL before failure of all WLs. The test problems are based on assuming the same failure properties for all links, which results in problems that have the desirable properties of fully exercising the numerical integration procedures required in the evaluation of PLOAS and also possessing simple algebraic representations for PLOAS that can be used for verification of the analysis.

  14. Characterization of Fibre-Direction Dependent Damping of Glass-Fibre Composites at Low Temperatures and Low Frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kliem, Mathias; Høgsberg, Jan Becker; Dannemann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the characterization of the fibre-direction dependent damping capability of glass fibre reinforced plastics (GFRP) to be used in electrical power transmission pylons. A fibre-direction dependent damping analysis of unidirectional (UD) GFRP samples was carried out using...... a Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) for five different fibre orientations (0˚ | 30˚ | 45˚ | 60˚ and 90˚) and two different matrix systems (epoxy and a vinyl ester resin). Based on the dynamic characteristics the damping performance of the various composite materials was studied at three temperatures (-10˚C......, 0˚C and 10˚C) and three vibration frequencies (1 Hz, 10 Hz and 30 Hz). It was observed that the loss factor of Glass Fibre Reinforced Vinyl-Ester (GF-VE) was in general slightly higher compared to the Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy (GF-EP). The loss factor increased slightly with temperature, while...

  15. Active elimination of radio frequency interference for improved signal-to-noise ratio for in-situ NMR experiments in strong magnetic field gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, M.; Pardi, C. I.; Brown, T. W. C.; McDonald, P. J.

    2018-02-01

    Improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) systems may be achieved either by increasing the signal amplitude or by decreasing the noise. The noise has multiple origins - not all of which are strictly "noise": incoherent thermal noise originating in the probe and pre-amplifiers, probe ring down or acoustic noise and coherent externally broadcast radio frequency transmissions. The last cannot always be shielded in open access experiments. In this paper, we show that pulsed, low radio-frequency data communications are a significant source of broadcast interference. We explore two signal processing methods of de-noising short T2∗ NMR experiments corrupted by these communications: Linear Predictive Coding (LPC) and the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Results are shown for numerical simulations and experiments conducted under controlled conditions with pseudo radio frequency interference. We show that both the LPC and DWT methods have merit.

  16. Finite frequency traveltime sensitivity kernels for acoustic anisotropic media: Angle dependent bananas

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, Ramzi

    2013-08-19

    Anisotropy is an inherent character of the Earth subsurface. It should be considered for modeling and inversion. The acoustic VTI wave equation approximates the wave behavior in anisotropic media, and especially it\\'s kinematic characteristics. To analyze which parts of the model would affect the traveltime for anisotropic traveltime inversion methods, especially for wave equation tomography (WET), we drive the sensitivity kernels for anisotropic media using the VTI acoustic wave equation. A Born scattering approximation is first derived using the Fourier domain acoustic wave equation as a function of perturbations in three anisotropy parameters. Using the instantaneous traveltime, which unwraps the phase, we compute the kernels. These kernels resemble those for isotropic media, with the η kernel directionally dependent. They also have a maximum sensitivity along the geometrical ray, which is more realistic compared to the cross-correlation based kernels. Focusing on diving waves, which is used more often, especially recently in waveform inversion, we show sensitivity kernels in anisotropic media for this case.

  17. Towards a frequency-dependent discrete maximum principle for the implicit Monte Carlo equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollaber, Allan B.; Larsen, Edward W.; Densmore, Jeffery D.

    2011-01-01

    It has long been known that temperature solutions of the Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) equations can exceed the external boundary temperatures, a so-called violation of the 'maximum principle'. Previous attempts at prescribing a maximum value of the time-step size Δ t that is sufficient to eliminate these violations have recommended a Δ t that is typically too small to be used in practice and that appeared to be much too conservative when compared to numerical solutions of the IMC equations for practical problems. In this paper, we derive a new estimator for the maximum time-step size that includes the spatial-grid size Δ x . This explicitly demonstrates that the effect of coarsening Δ x is to reduce the limitation on Δ t , which helps explain the overly conservative nature of the earlier, grid-independent results. We demonstrate that our new time-step restriction is a much more accurate means of predicting violations of the maximum principle. We discuss how the implications of the new, grid-dependent time-step restriction can impact IMC solution algorithms. (author)

  18. A DTI-based model for TMS using the independent impedance method with frequency-dependent tissue parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geeter, N.; Crevecoeur, G.; Dupré, L.; Van Hecke, W.; Leemans, A.

    2012-04-01

    Accurate simulations on detailed realistic head models are necessary to gain a better understanding of the response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Hitherto, head models with simplified geometries and constant isotropic material properties are often used, whereas some biological tissues have anisotropic characteristics which vary naturally with frequency. Moreover, most computational methods do not take the tissue permittivity into account. Therefore, we calculate the electromagnetic behaviour due to TMS in a head model with realistic geometry and where realistic dispersive anisotropic tissue properties are incorporated, based on T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images. This paper studies the impact of tissue anisotropy, permittivity and frequency dependence, using the anisotropic independent impedance method. The results show that anisotropy yields differences up to 32% and 19% of the maximum induced currents and electric field, respectively. Neglecting the permittivity values leads to a decrease of about 72% and 24% of the maximum currents and field, respectively. Implementing the dispersive effects of biological tissues results in a difference of 6% of the maximum currents. The cerebral voxels show limited sensitivity of the induced electric field to changes in conductivity and permittivity, whereas the field varies approximately linearly with frequency. These findings illustrate the importance of including each of the above parameters in the model and confirm the need for accuracy in the applied patient-specific method, which can be used in computer-assisted TMS.

  19. Compressive sensing of the Tohoku-Oki Mw9.0 Earthquake: Frequency-dependent Rupture Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstoft, P.; Yao, H.; Shearer, P. M.; Mecklenbrauker, C. F.

    2011-12-01

    For this complex earthquake rupture, we seek a sparse set of spatio-temporal source locations consistent with the measurements. Compressive sensing (CS) is a technique for finding sparse signal representations to underdetermined linear measurement equations. We use CS to locate seismic sources during the rupture of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Mw9.0 earthquake in Japan from teleseismic P waves recorded by an array of stations in the US. The seismic sources are located by minimizing the L2-norm of the difference between the observed and modeled waveforms penalized by the L1-norm of the seismic source vector. The resulting minimization problem is convex and can be solved efficiently. Our results show clear frequency-dependent rupture modes with high-frequency energy radiation dominant in the down-dip region and low-frequency radiation in the up-dip region, which may be caused by differences in rupture behavior (more intermittently or continuously) at the slab interface due to heterogeneous frictional properties.

  20. Modelling transient pipe flow with cavitation and frequency dependent friction. Part II. Friction and numerical-experimental validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Urbanowicz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Modelling of time-depended hydraulic friction is not an easy issue. As numerous studies have shown, wall shear stress in the pipe can be determined as a sum of the quasi-steady and time-dependent expressions. Time-depended expression is an convolution integral of the local acceleration of the liquid and a weighting function. The weighting function, in general, makes allowance for relation of historic velocity changes and unsteady component of wall shear stress. The original weighting function has usually a very complicated structure, and what is more it makes impossible to do an efficient simulation of dynamical runs. In this paper, in order to enable efficient calculation of unsteady component wall shear stress, new weighting functions are presented as a sum of exponential components. To aim this goal in case of turbulent flow, the scaling procedure proposed by Vitkovsky et al. is used. This method makes very easy the estimation of any new turbulent weighting function. Presented approximated weighting functions are compared with the original counterparts, known from literature in case of laminar and turbulent flows. Using the previously discussed models of cavitation flow CSM, CSMG, CSMA, and the BCM with implemented effective weighting function a series of simulation studies has been made, which showed that the introduced changes in models of unsteady flow with cavitation greatly improve the degree of simulation fit in comparison with experimental results.[b]Keywords[/b]: numerical fluid mechanics, transient flow, cavitation, frequency-dependent friction losses, pipeline, waterhammer

  1. Exploring Moho sharpness in Northeastern North China Craton with frequency-dependence analysis of Ps receiver function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.; Yao, H.; Chen, L.; WANG, X.; Fang, L.

    2017-12-01

    The North China Craton (NCC), one of the oldest cratons in the world, has attracted wide attention in Earth Science for decades because of the unusual Mesozoic destruction of its cratonic lithosphere. Understanding the deep processes and mechanism of this craton destruction demands detailed knowledge about the deep structure of this region. In this study, we calculate P-wave receiver functions (RFs) with two-year teleseismic records from the North China Seismic Array ( 200 stations) deployed in the northeastern NCC. We observe both diffused and concentered PpPs signals from the Moho in RF waveforms, which indicates heterogeneous Moho sharpness variations in the study region. Synthetic Ps phases generated from broad positive velocity gradients at the depth of the Moho (referred as Pms) show a clear frequency dependence nature, which in turn is required to constrain the sharpness of the velocity gradient. Practically, characterizing such a frequency dependence feature in real data is challenging, because of low signal-to-noise ratio, contaminations by multiples generated from shallow structure, distorted signal stacking especially in double-peak Pms signals, etc. We attempt to address these issues by, firstly, utilizing a high-resolution Moho depth model of this region to predict theoretical delay times of Pms that facilitate more accurate Pms identifications. The Moho depth model is derived by wave-equation based poststack depth migration on both Ps phase and surface-reflected multiples in RFs in our previous study (Zhang et al., submitted to JGR). Second, we select data from a major back azimuth range of 100° - 220° that includes 70% teleseismic events due to the uneven data coverage and to avoid azimuthal influence as well. Finally, we apply an adaptive cross-correlation stacking of Pms signals in RFs for each station within different frequency bands. High-quality Pms signals at different frequencies will be selected after careful visual inspection and adaptive

  2. Sub-populations of alcohol-dependent patients: differences in psychological functioning between high- and low-frequency alcohol consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltunen, A J; Koechling, U M; Voltaire-Carlsson, A; Borg, S

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the processes underlying relapse to drinking using objective biological validation of self-reported recent alcohol consumption, using the ratio of 5-hydroxytryptophol to 5-hydroxyindol-3-ylacetic acid (5-HTOL/5-HIAA), a new biological marker to detect single episodes of drinking, in a sample of 38 male alcohol-dependent patients (DSM-III-R) who were assessed prospectively in terms of their clinical symptomatology over a 6-month treatment period. Results showed that nearly all patients obtained positive 5-HTOL/5-HIAA samples during the course of treatment. However, upon closer inspection, results revealed a bimodal distribution for alcohol intake with high and low frequency of consumption episodes. Results showed that high frequency consumers obtained higher ratings of clinical symptoms as measured by the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale (CPRS) and by the St Göran's Semi-structured Interview (SGSI) compared to low frequency alcohol consumers on symptoms of inner tension, lack of initiative, risk of relapse (as rated by therapists and as rated by patients themselves), dysphoria, negative craving for alcohol, and positive craving for alcohol. The present results provided evidence for the existence of two sub-populations of alcoholics, those who have frequent lapses and those who have low frequency of sporadic lapses. Further, these two sub-populations were shown to differ with respect to overall psychological functioning, and craving for alcohol. In conclusion, the present findings have important treatment implications in that reliable identification of patients' consumption patterns using biological markers would allow for the design of individually tailored treatment needs.

  3. THE ENERGY DEPENDENCE OF THE CENTROID FREQUENCY AND PHASE LAG OF THE QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN GRS 1915+105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, J. L.; Lu, F. J.; Lu, Y.; Song, L. M.; Zhang, S.; Wang, J. M.; Ding, G. Q.

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of the centroid frequencies and phase lags of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) as functions of photon energy for GRS 1915+105. It is found that the centroid frequencies of the 0.5-10 Hz QPOs and their phase lags are both energy dependent, and there exists an anticorrelation between the QPO frequency and phase lag. These new results challenge the popular QPO models, because none of them can fully explain the observed properties. We suggest that the observed QPO phase lags are partially due to the variation of the QPO frequency with energy, especially for those with frequency higher than 3.5 Hz.

  4. Monitoring voltage-dependent charge displacement of Shaker B-IR K+ ion channels using radio frequency interrogation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameera Dharia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Here we introduce a new technique that probes voltage-dependent charge displacements of excitable membrane-bound proteins using extracellularly applied radio frequency (RF, 500 kHz electric fields. Xenopus oocytes were used as a model cell for these experiments, and were injected with cRNA encoding Shaker B-IR (ShB-IR K(+ ion channels to express large densities of this protein in the oocyte membranes. Two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC was applied to command whole-cell membrane potential and to measure channel-dependent membrane currents. Simultaneously, RF electric fields were applied to perturb the membrane potential about the TEVC level and to measure voltage-dependent RF displacement currents. ShB-IR expressing oocytes showed significantly larger changes in RF displacement currents upon membrane depolarization than control oocytes. Voltage-dependent changes in RF displacement currents further increased in ShB-IR expressing oocytes after ∼120 µM Cu(2+ addition to the external bath. Cu(2+ is known to bind to the ShB-IR ion channel and inhibit Shaker K(+ conductance, indicating that changes in the RF displacement current reported here were associated with RF vibration of the Cu(2+-linked mobile domain of the ShB-IR protein. Results demonstrate the use of extracellular RF electrodes to interrogate voltage-dependent movement of charged mobile protein domains--capabilities that might enable detection of small changes in charge distribution associated with integral membrane protein conformation and/or drug-protein interactions.

  5. Monitoring voltage-dependent charge displacement of Shaker B-IR K+ ion channels using radio frequency interrogation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharia, Sameera; Rabbitt, Richard D

    2011-02-28

    Here we introduce a new technique that probes voltage-dependent charge displacements of excitable membrane-bound proteins using extracellularly applied radio frequency (RF, 500 kHz) electric fields. Xenopus oocytes were used as a model cell for these experiments, and were injected with cRNA encoding Shaker B-IR (ShB-IR) K(+) ion channels to express large densities of this protein in the oocyte membranes. Two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC) was applied to command whole-cell membrane potential and to measure channel-dependent membrane currents. Simultaneously, RF electric fields were applied to perturb the membrane potential about the TEVC level and to measure voltage-dependent RF displacement currents. ShB-IR expressing oocytes showed significantly larger changes in RF displacement currents upon membrane depolarization than control oocytes. Voltage-dependent changes in RF displacement currents further increased in ShB-IR expressing oocytes after ∼120 µM Cu(2+) addition to the external bath. Cu(2+) is known to bind to the ShB-IR ion channel and inhibit Shaker K(+) conductance, indicating that changes in the RF displacement current reported here were associated with RF vibration of the Cu(2+)-linked mobile domain of the ShB-IR protein. Results demonstrate the use of extracellular RF electrodes to interrogate voltage-dependent movement of charged mobile protein domains--capabilities that might enable detection of small changes in charge distribution associated with integral membrane protein conformation and/or drug-protein interactions.

  6. KIR-HLA profiling shows presence of higher frequencies of strong inhibitory KIR-ligands among prognostically poor risk AML patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Meixin; Linn, Yeh-Ching; Ren, Ee-Chee

    2016-02-01

    The expression and interaction between killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and HLA are known to be associated with pathogenesis of diseases, including hematological malignancies. Presence of B haplotype KIR in donors is associated with a lower relapse risk for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT). However, the association of KIR and HLA repertoire with disease development and other clinical features is not well studied for AML. In this study, 206 Chinese patients with AML were analyzed for their FAB subtypes, risk groups, and chemo-responsiveness to assess possible association with their KIR and HLA profile. The results revealed that a B-content score of 2 was significantly more prevalent in AML patients when compared to normal controls. Notably, there is also a differential frequency in the distribution of B haplotype KIR across distinct FAB subtypes, where the M3 subtype had significantly lower frequencies of B haplotype KIR compared to the M5 subtype (p KIR ligands HLA-C2 and HLA-Bw4-80I were present in significantly higher frequencies in the prognostically "poor" risk group compared to those with "favourable" risk (p KIR-HLA repertoire in the development and biological behavior of AML.

  7. Carbon dots with strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards pH. Application as nanosensors for a broad range of pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barati, Ali [Faculty of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamsipur, Mojtaba, E-mail: mshamsipur@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Hamid, E-mail: abd@iasbs.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-10

    In this study, preparation of novel pH-sensitive N-doped carbon dots (NCDs) using glucose and urea is reported. The prepared NCDs present strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards the pH that is a new behavior from these nanomaterials. By taking advantage of this unique behavior, two separated ratiometric pH sensors using emission spectra of the NCDs for both acidic (pH 2.0 to 8.0) and basic (pH 7.0 to 14.0) ranges of pH are constructed. Additionally, by considering the entire Excitation–Emission Matrix (EEM) of NCDs as analytical signal and using a suitable multivariate calibration method, a broad range of pH from 2.0 to 14.0 was well calibrated. The multivariate calibration method was independent from the concentration of NCDs and resulted in a very low average prediction error of 0.067 pH units. No changes in the predicted pH under UV irradiation (for 3 h) and at high ionic strength (up to 2 M NaCl) indicated the high stability of this pH nanosensor. The practicality of this pH nanosensor for pH determination in real water samples was validated with good accuracy and repeatability. - Highlights: • Novel pH-sensitive carbon dots with strong FL changes towards pH are reported. • Ratiometric FL pH-sensors for both acidic and basic ranges of pH are constructed. • Multivariate calibration methods were used to calibrate a broad range of pH. • Using EEM of carbon dots and ANN, pH from 2.0 to 14.0 was well calibrated. • The pH prediction is stable even at high ionic strength up to 2 M NaCl.

  8. Dose dependency of the frequency of micronucleated binucleated clone cells and of division related median clone sizes difference. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, G,; Kreczik, A.; Treichel, M.

    1996-01-01

    Following irradiation of the progenitor cells the clone growth of CHO cells decreases as a result of cell losses. Lethally acting expressions of micronuclei are produced by heritable lethal mutations. The dependency of the frequency of micronucleated binucleated clone cells and of the median clone sizes difference on the radiation dose was measured and compared to non-irradiated controls. Using the cytokinesis-block-micronucleus-method binucleated cells with micronuclei were counted as ratio of all binucleated cells within a clone size distribution. This ratio (shortened: micronucleus yield) was determined for all clone size distributions, which had been exposed to different irradiation doses and incubation times. The micronucleus yields were compared to the corresponding median clone sizes differences. The micronucleus yield is linearly dependent on the dose and is independent of the incubation time. The same holds true for the division related median clone sizes difference, which as a result is also linearly dependent on the micronucleus yield. Due to the inevitably errors of the cell count of micronucleated binucleated cells, an automatic measurement of the median clone sizes differences is the preferred method for evaluation of cellular radiation sensitivity for heritable lethal mutations. This value should always be determined in addition, if clone survival fractions are used as predictive test because it allows for an estimation of the remission probability of surviving cells. (orig.) [de

  9. Excision Efficiency Is Not Strongly Coupled to Transgenic Rate: Cell Type-Dependent Transposition Efficiency of Sleeping Beauty and piggyBac DNA Transposons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolacsek, Orsolya; Erdei, Zsuzsa; Apáti, Ágota; Sándor, Sára; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Sleeping Beauty (SB) and piggyBac (PB) DNA transposons represent an emerging new gene delivery technology, potentially suitable for human gene therapy applications. Previous studies pointed to important differences between these transposon systems, depending on the cell types examined and the methodologies applied. However, efficiencies cannot always be compared because of differences in applications. In addition, “overproduction inhibition,” a phenomenon believed to be a characteristic of DNA transposons, can remarkably reduce the overall transgenic rate, emphasizing the importance of transposase dose applied. Therefore, because of lack of comprehensive analysis, researchers are forced to optimize the technology for their own “in-house” platforms. In this study, we investigated the transposition of several SB (SB11, SB32, SB100X) and PB (mPB and hyPB) variants in various cell types at three levels: comparing the excision efficiency of the reaction by real-time PCR, testing the overall transgenic rate by detecting cells with stable integrations, and determining the average copy number when using different transposon systems and conditions. We concluded that high excision activity is not always followed by a higher transgenic rate, as exemplified by the hyperactive transposases, indicating that the excision and the integration steps of transposition are not strongly coupled as previously thought. In general, all levels of transposition show remarkable differences depending on the transposase used and cell lines examined, being the least efficient in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). In spite of the comparably low activity in those special cell types, the hyperactive SB100X and hyPB systems could be used in hESCs with similar transgenic efficiency and with reasonably low (2–3) transgene copy numbers, indicating their potential applicability for gene therapy purposes in the future. PMID:25045962

  10. Cardiac baroreflex gain is frequency dependent: insights from repeated sit-to-stand maneuvers and the modified Oxford method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsman, Helen M; Peebles, Karen C; Galletly, Duncan C; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh

    2013-07-01

    Cardiac baroreflex gain is usually quantified as the reflex alteration in heart rate during changes in blood pressure without considering the effect of the rate of change in blood pressure on the estimated gain. This study sought to (i) characterize baroreflex gain as a function of blood pressure oscillation frequencies using a repeat sit-to-stand method and (ii) compare baroreflex gain values obtained using the sit-to-stand method against the modified Oxford method. Fifteen healthy individuals underwent the repeated sit-to-stand method in which blood pressure oscillations were driven at 0.03, 0.05, 0.07, and 0.1 Hz. Sixteen healthy participants underwent the sit-to-stand and modified Oxford methods to examine their agreement. Sit-to-stand baroreflex gain was highest at 0.05 Hz (8.8 ± 3.2 ms·mm Hg(-1)) and lowest at 0.1 Hz (5.8 ± 3.0 ms·mm Hg(-1)). Baroreflex gains at 0.03 Hz (7.7 ± 3.0 ms·mm Hg(-1)) and 0.07 Hz (7.5 ± 3.3 ms·mm Hg(-1)) were not different from the baroreflex gain at 0.05 Hz. There was moderate correlation between phenylephrine gain and sit-to-stand gain (r values ranged from 0.52 to 0.75; all frequencies, p baroreflex gains derived from these 2 methods cannot be used interchangeably. Furthermore, cardiac baroreflex gain is frequency dependent between 0.03 Hz and 0.1 Hz, which challenges the conventional practice of summarizing baroreflex gain as a single number.

  11. Experimental evidence for dynamic friction on rock fractures from frequency-dependent nonlinear hysteresis and harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltiel, Seth; Bonner, Brian P.; Mittal, Tushar; Delbridge, Brent; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.

    2017-07-01

    Frictional properties affect the propagation of high-amplitude seismic waves across rock fractures and faults. Laboratory evidence suggests that these properties can be measured in active seismic surveys, potentially offering a route to characterizing friction in situ. We present experimental results from a subresonance torsional modulus and attenuation apparatus that utilizes micron-scale sinusoidal oscillations to probe the nonlinear stress-strain relation at a range of strain amplitudes and rates. Nonlinear effects are further quantified using harmonic distortion; however, time series data best illuminate underlying physical processes. The low-frequency stress-strain hysteretic loops show stiffening at the sinusoid's static ends, but stiffening is reduced above a threshold frequency. This shape is determined by harmonic generation in the strain; the stress signal has no harmonics, confirming that the fractured sample is the source of the nonlinearity. These qualitative observations suggest the presence of rate-dependent friction and are consistent between fractures in three different rock types. We propose that static friction at the low strain rate part of the cycle, when given sufficient "healing" time at low oscillation frequencies, causes this stiffening cusp shape in the hysteresis loop. While rate-and-state friction is commonly used to represent dynamic friction, it cannot capture static friction or negative slip velocities. So we implement another dynamic friction model, based on the work of Dahl, which describes this process and produces similar results. Since the two models have a similar form, parameterizations of field data could constraint fault model inputs, such as specific location velocity strengthening or weakening properties.

  12. Carbon dots with strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards pH. Application as nanosensors for a broad range of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati, Ali; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2016-08-10

    In this study, preparation of novel pH-sensitive N-doped carbon dots (NCDs) using glucose and urea is reported. The prepared NCDs present strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards the pH that is a new behavior from these nanomaterials. By taking advantage of this unique behavior, two separated ratiometric pH sensors using emission spectra of the NCDs for both acidic (pH 2.0 to 8.0) and basic (pH 7.0 to 14.0) ranges of pH are constructed. Additionally, by considering the entire Excitation-Emission Matrix (EEM) of NCDs as analytical signal and using a suitable multivariate calibration method, a broad range of pH from 2.0 to 14.0 was well calibrated. The multivariate calibration method was independent from the concentration of NCDs and resulted in a very low average prediction error of 0.067 pH units. No changes in the predicted pH under UV irradiation (for 3 h) and at high ionic strength (up to 2 M NaCl) indicated the high stability of this pH nanosensor. The practicality of this pH nanosensor for pH determination in real water samples was validated with good accuracy and repeatability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hormonal regulation of gluconeogenesis in cereal aleurone is strongly cultivar-dependent and gibberellin action involves SLENDER1 but not GAMYB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastmond, Peter J; Jones, Russell L

    2005-11-01

    Storage oil is a major constituent in the cereal aleurone layer. The aim of this study was to investigate how gibberellin (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) regulate conversion of oil to sugar in barley aleurone. The activity of the glyoxylate cycle enzyme isocitrate lyase (ICL) was surveyed in eight barley cultivars. Surprisingly, some cultivars do not require GA for the induction of ICL (e.g. Himalaya), whereas some do (e.g. Golden Promise). Furthermore, in Golden Promise, GA also stimulates triacylglycerol breakdown and enhances the net flux of carbon from acetate to sugar. In contrast, ABA strongly represses ICL activity and the flux of carbon from oil to sugar in both Golden Promise and Himalaya. Biolistics using a promoter reporter showed that GA and ABA regulate ICL at the level of transcription. Studies using barley and rice mutants and pharmacological agents show that GA-dependent induction of ICL activity is mediated by SLENDER1 and requires cGMP, but does not involve the transcription factor GAMYB. Gibberellin and ABA therefore act antagonistically to regulate gluconeogenesis in the aleurone layer as well as controlling the production and secretion of hydrolases into the starchy endosperm. We suggest that the variation between different barley cultivars might be a result of selective breeding to alter seed dormancy.

  14. Effect of delayed link failure on probability of loss of assured safety in temperature-dependent systems with multiple weak and strong links.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J. D. (ProStat, Mesa, AZ); Oberkampf, William Louis; Helton, Jon Craig (Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ)

    2007-05-01

    Weak link (WL)/strong link (SL) systems constitute important parts of the overall operational design of high consequence systems, with the SL system designed to permit operation of the system only under intended conditions and the WL system designed to prevent the unintended operation of the system under accident conditions. Degradation of the system under accident conditions into a state in which the WLs have not deactivated the system and the SLs have failed in the sense that they are in a configuration that could permit operation of the system is referred to as loss of assured safety. The probability of such degradation conditional on a specific set of accident conditions is referred to as probability of loss of assured safety (PLOAS). Previous work has developed computational procedures for the calculation of PLOAS under fire conditions for a system involving multiple WLs and SLs and with the assumption that a link fails instantly when it reaches its failure temperature. Extensions of these procedures are obtained for systems in which there is a temperature-dependent delay between the time at which a link reaches its failure temperature and the time at which that link actually fails.

  15. Trade-offs between microbial growth phases lead to frequency-dependent and non-transitive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhart, Michael; Adkar, Bharat V; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2018-02-14

    Mutations in a microbial population can increase the frequency of a genotype not only by increasing its exponential growth rate, but also by decreasing its lag time or adjusting the yield (resource efficiency). The contribution of multiple life-history traits to selection is a critical question for evolutionary biology as we seek to predict the evolutionary fates of mutations. Here we use a model of microbial growth to show that there are two distinct components of selection corresponding to the growth and lag phases, while the yield modulates their relative importance. The model predicts rich population dynamics when there are trade-offs between phases: multiple strains can coexist or exhibit bistability due to frequency-dependent selection, and strains can engage in rock-paper-scissors interactions due to non-transitive selection. We characterize the environmental conditions and patterns of traits necessary to realize these phenomena, which we show to be readily accessible to experiments. Our results provide a theoretical framework for analysing high-throughput measurements of microbial growth traits, especially interpreting the pleiotropy and correlations between traits across mutants. This work also highlights the need for more comprehensive measurements of selection in simple microbial systems, where the concept of an ordinary fitness landscape breaks down. © 2018 The Author(s).

  16. The nitrogen acceptor in 2H-Polytype synthetic MoS2. Frequency and temperature dependent ESR analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenaers, Ben; Stesmans, Andre; Afanas'ev, Valery V.

    2017-01-01

    In extending on recent electron spin resonance (ESR) work which has revealed the N acceptor (N substituting for S site) in 2H-polytype bulk synthetic MoS 2 , the dopant is extensively analyzed in terms of its frequency, temperature (T), and magnetic field B angular dependent ESR spectral characteristics. For B parallel c-axis, the multi-frequency analysis confirms the ESR spectrum as being composed of a 14 N hyperfine (hf) triplet with hf splitting constant A parallel = 14.7 ± 0.2 G (B parallel c-axis) and making up ∼74% of the total spectrum intensity, superimposed on a central line centered at about equal g-value [g parallel = 2.032(2)]. The presence of the latter signal, points to some non-uniformity in dopant distribution, that is, clustering, with about ∼26% of the total N response not originating from N incorporated in the preferred ''isolated'' dopant configuration. Angular dependent measurements reveal distinct anisotropy of the hf matrix, whereas ESR probing over a wide T-range exposes drastic signal broadening with increasing T above ∼150 K. Detailed study of the N acceptor signal intensity versus T at Q-band reveals an activation energy E a = 50 ± 10 meV, herewith consolidating the value reported initially. Besides unveiling the S-site substitutional N impurity as an appropriate p-type dopant for MoS 2 , the total of the ESR work establishes a basic frame of the N acceptor ESR characteristics, giving way for further in-depth theoretical perusal. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Induction of a:T mutations is dependent on cellular environment but independent of mutation frequency and target gene location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukai, Akiko; Ishimaru, Konomi; Ouchida, Rika; Mori, Hiromi; Kano, Chie; Moritan, Toshiyuki; Wang, Ji-Yang

    2008-12-01

    Based on its substrate specificity, activation-induced cytidine deaminase can directly induce C:G mutations in Ig genes. However the origin of A:T mutations, which occur in a similar proportion in germinal center (GC) B cells, is unclear. Genetic evidence suggests that the induction of A:T mutations requires the components of the mismatch repair system and DNA polymerase eta (POLH). We found that fibroblasts and GC B cells expressed similar levels of the mismatch repair components, but nonetheless the fibroblasts failed to generate a significant proportion of A:T mutations in a GFP reporter gene even after POLH overexpression. To investigate whether the ability to generate A:T mutations is dependent on the cellular environment (i.e., GC B cell or fibroblast) or the target gene (i.e., Ig or GFP), we developed a mutation detection system in a human GC-like cell line. We introduced a GFP gene with a premature stop codon into Ramos cells and compared the activation-induced cytidine deaminase-induced mutations in the endogenous V(H) and the transgenic GFP genes. Remarkably, a high proportion of A:T mutations was induced in both genes. Ectopic expression of POLH did not further increase the proportion of A:T mutations but diminished the strand bias of these mutations that is normally observed in V(H) genes. Intriguingly, the total mutation frequency in the GFP gene was consistently one-fifth of that in the V(H) gene. These results demonstrate that the ability to generate A:T mutations is dependent on the GC B cell environment but independent of the mutation frequency and target gene location.

  18. Forskolin suppresses delayed-rectifier K+ currents and enhances spike frequency-dependent adaptation of sympathetic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis I Angel-Chavez

    Full Text Available In signal transduction research natural or synthetic molecules are commonly used to target a great variety of signaling proteins. For instance, forskolin, a diterpene activator of adenylate cyclase, has been widely used in cellular preparations to increase the intracellular cAMP level. However, it has been shown that forskolin directly inhibits some cloned K+ channels, which in excitable cells set up the resting membrane potential, the shape of action potential and regulate repetitive firing. Despite the growing evidence indicating that K+ channels are blocked by forskolin, there are no studies yet assessing the impact of this mechanism of action on neuron excitability and firing patterns. In sympathetic neurons, we find that forskolin and its derivative 1,9-Dideoxyforskolin, reversibly suppress the delayed rectifier K+ current (IKV. Besides, forskolin reduced the spike afterhyperpolarization and enhanced the spike frequency-dependent adaptation. Given that IKV is mostly generated by Kv2.1 channels, HEK-293 cells were transfected with cDNA encoding for the Kv2.1 α subunit, to characterize the mechanism of forskolin action. Both drugs reversible suppressed the Kv2.1-mediated K+ currents. Forskolin inhibited Kv2.1 currents and IKV with an IC50 of ~32 μM and ~24 µM, respectively. Besides, the drug induced an apparent current inactivation and slowed-down current deactivation. We suggest that forskolin reduces the excitability of sympathetic neurons by enhancing the spike frequency-dependent adaptation, partially through a direct block of their native Kv2.1 channels.

  19. Information content in frequency-dependent, multi-offset GPR data for layered media reconstruction using full-wave inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coster, Albéric; Phuong Tran, Anh; Lambot, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    Water lost through leaks can represent high percentages of the total production in water supply systems and constitutes an important issue. Leak detection can be tackled with various techniques such as the ground-penetrating radar (GPR). Based on this technology, various procedures have been elaborated to characterize a leak and its evolution. In this study, we focus on a new full-wave radar modelling approach for near-field conditions, which takes into account the antenna effects as well as the interactions between the antenna(s) and the medium through frequency-dependent global transmission and reflection coefficients. This approach is applied to layered media for which 3-D Green's functions can be calculated. The model allows for a quantitative estimation of the properties of multilayered media by using full-wave inversion. This method, however, proves to be limited to provide users with an on-demand assessment as it is generally computationally demanding and time consuming, depending on the medium configuration as well as the number of unknown parameters to retrieve. In that respect, we propose two leads in order to enhance the parameter retrieval step. The first one consists in analyzing the impact of the reduction of the number of frequencies on the information content. For both numerical and laboratory experiments, this operation has been achieved by investigating the response surface topography of objective functions arising from the comparison between measured and modelled data. The second one involves the numerical implementation of multistatic antenna configurations with constant and variable offsets in the model. These two kinds of analyses are then combined in numerical experiments to observe the conjugated effect of the number of frequencies and the offset configuration. To perform the numerical analyses, synthetic Green's functions were simulated for different multilayered medium configurations. The results show that an antenna offset increase leads

  20. A differential algebraic approach for the modeling of polycrystalline ferromagnetic hysteresis with minor loops and frequency dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Linxiang; Melnik, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    In the current paper, a nonlinear differential algebraic approach is proposed for the modeling of hysteretic dynamics of polycrystalline ferromagnetic materials. The model is constructed by employing a phenomenological theory to the magnetization orientation switching. For the modeling of hysteresis in polycrystalline ferromagnetic materials, the single crystal model is applied to each magnetic domain along its own principal axis. The overall dynamics of the polycrystalline materials is obtained by taking a weighted combination of the dynamics of all magnetic domains. The weight function for the combination is taken as the distribution function of the principal axes. Numerical simulations are performed and comparisons with its experimental counterparts are presented. The hysteretic dynamics caused by orientation switching processes is accurately captured by the proposed model. Minor hysteresis loops associated with partial-amplitude loadings are also captured. Rate dependence of the hysteresis loops are inherently incorporated into the model due to its differential nature. - Highlights: • Predict the polycrystalline hysteresis effectively. • Sub hysteresis loop can be captured. • Frequency dependence is naturally included.

  1. A differential algebraic approach for the modeling of polycrystalline ferromagnetic hysteresis with minor loops and frequency dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dan [State Key Laboratory of Fluid Power and Mechatronic Systems, Zhejiang University, 310027 Hangzhou (China); Wang, Linxiang, E-mail: wanglx236@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fluid Power and Mechatronic Systems, Zhejiang University, 310027 Hangzhou (China); Melnik, Roderick [MS2Discovery Interdisciplinary Research Institute, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3L5 (Canada)

    2016-07-15

    In the current paper, a nonlinear differential algebraic approach is proposed for the modeling of hysteretic dynamics of polycrystalline ferromagnetic materials. The model is constructed by employing a phenomenological theory to the magnetization orientation switching. For the modeling of hysteresis in polycrystalline ferromagnetic materials, the single crystal model is applied to each magnetic domain along its own principal axis. The overall dynamics of the polycrystalline materials is obtained by taking a weighted combination of the dynamics of all magnetic domains. The weight function for the combination is taken as the distribution function of the principal axes. Numerical simulations are performed and comparisons with its experimental counterparts are presented. The hysteretic dynamics caused by orientation switching processes is accurately captured by the proposed model. Minor hysteresis loops associated with partial-amplitude loadings are also captured. Rate dependence of the hysteresis loops are inherently incorporated into the model due to its differential nature. - Highlights: • Predict the polycrystalline hysteresis effectively. • Sub hysteresis loop can be captured. • Frequency dependence is naturally included.

  2. Dependence of the atomic level Green-Kubo stress correlation function on wavevector and frequency: molecular dynamics results from a model liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, V A

    2014-09-28

    We report on a further investigation of a new method that can be used to address vibrational dynamics and propagation of stress waves in liquids. The method is based on the decomposition of the macroscopic Green-Kubo stress correlation function into the atomic level stress correlation functions. This decomposition, as was demonstrated previously for a model liquid studied in molecular dynamics simulations, reveals the presence of stress waves propagating over large distances and a structure that resembles the pair density function. In this paper, by performing the Fourier transforms of the atomic level stress correlation functions, we elucidate how the lifetimes of the stress waves and the ranges of their propagation depend on their frequency, wavevector, and temperature. These results relate frequency and wavevector dependence of the generalized viscosity to the character of propagation of the shear stress waves. In particular, the results suggest that an increase in the value of the frequency dependent viscosity at low frequencies with decrease of temperature is related to the increase in the ranges of propagation of the stress waves of the corresponding low frequencies. We found that the ranges of propagation of the shear stress waves of frequencies less than half of the Einstein frequency extend well beyond the nearest neighbor shell even above the melting temperature. The results also show that the crossover from quasilocalized to propagating behavior occurs at frequencies usually associated with the Boson peak.

  3. Two models of the sound-signal frequency dependence on the animal body size as exemplified by the ground squirrels of Eurasia (mammalia, rodentia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikol'skii, A A

    2017-11-01

    Dependence of the sound-signal frequency on the animal body length was studied in 14 ground squirrel species (genus Spermophilus) of Eurasia. Regression analysis of the total sample yielded a low determination coefficient (R 2 = 26%), because the total sample proved to be heterogeneous in terms of signal frequency within the dimension classes of animals. When the total sample was divided into two groups according to signal frequency, two statistically significant models (regression equations) were obtained in which signal frequency depended on the body size at high determination coefficients (R 2 = 73 and 94% versus 26% for the total sample). Thus, the problem of correlation between animal body size and the frequency of their vocal signals does not have a unique solution.

  4. Endogenous proteolytic cleavage of disease-associated prion protein to produce C2 fragments is strongly cell- and tissue-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, Michel; Moudjou, Mohammed; Chapuis, Jérôme; Salamat, Muhammad Khalid Farooq; Bernard, Julie; Cronier, Sabrina; Langevin, Christelle; Laude, Hubert

    2010-04-02

    The abnormally folded form of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)) accumulating in nervous and lymphoid tissues of prion-infected individuals can be naturally cleaved to generate a N-terminal-truncated fragment called C2. Information about the identity of the cellular proteases involved in this process and its possible role in prion biology has remained limited and controversial. We investigated PrP(Sc) N-terminal trimming in different cell lines and primary cultured nerve cells, and in the brain and spleen tissue from transgenic mice infected by ovine and mouse prions. We found the following: (i) the full-length to C2 ratio varies considerably depending on the infected cell or tissue. Thus, in primary neurons and brain tissue, PrP(Sc) accumulated predominantly as untrimmed species, whereas efficient trimming occurred in Rov and MovS cells, and in spleen tissue. (ii) Although C2 is generally considered to be the counterpart of the PrP(Sc) proteinase K-resistant core, the N termini of the fragments cleaved in vivo and in vitro can actually differ, as evidenced by a different reactivity toward the Pc248 anti-octarepeat antibody. (iii) In lysosome-impaired cells, the ratio of full-length versus C2 species dramatically increased, yet efficient prion propagation could occur. Moreover, cathepsin but not calpain inhibitors markedly inhibited C2 formation, and in vitro cleavage by cathepsins B and L produced PrP(Sc) fragments lacking the Pc248 epitope, strongly arguing for the primary involvement of acidic hydrolases of the endolysosomal compartment. These findings have implications on the molecular analysis of PrP(Sc) and cell pathogenesis of prion infection.

  5. Endogenous Proteolytic Cleavage of Disease-associated Prion Protein to Produce C2 Fragments Is Strongly Cell- and Tissue-dependent*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, Michel; Moudjou, Mohammed; Chapuis, Jérôme; Salamat, Muhammad Khalid Farooq; Bernard, Julie; Cronier, Sabrina; Langevin, Christelle; Laude, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    The abnormally folded form of the prion protein (PrPSc) accumulating in nervous and lymphoid tissues of prion-infected individuals can be naturally cleaved to generate a N-terminal-truncated fragment called C2. Information about the identity of the cellular proteases involved in this process and its possible role in prion biology has remained limited and controversial. We investigated PrPSc N-terminal trimming in different cell lines and primary cultured nerve cells, and in the brain and spleen tissue from transgenic mice infected by ovine and mouse prions. We found the following: (i) the full-length to C2 ratio varies considerably depending on the infected cell or tissue. Thus, in primary neurons and brain tissue, PrPSc accumulated predominantly as untrimmed species, whereas efficient trimming occurred in Rov and MovS cells, and in spleen tissue. (ii) Although C2 is generally considered to be the counterpart of the PrPSc proteinase K-resistant core, the N termini of the fragments cleaved in vivo and in vitro can actually differ, as evidenced by a different reactivity toward the Pc248 anti-octarepeat antibody. (iii) In lysosome-impaired cells, the ratio of full-length versus C2 species dramatically increased, yet efficient prion propagation could occur. Moreover, cathepsin but not calpain inhibitors markedly inhibited C2 formation, and in vitro cleavage by cathepsins B and L produced PrPSc fragments lacking the Pc248 epitope, strongly arguing for the primary involvement of acidic hydrolases of the endolysosomal compartment. These findings have implications on the molecular analysis of PrPSc and cell pathogenesis of prion infection. PMID:20154089

  6. Sensitivity of Helicobacter pylori detection by Giemsa staining is poor in comparison with immunohistochemistry and fluorescent in situ hybridization and strongly depends on inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsmár, Éva; Szirtes, Ildikó; Kramer, Zsófia; Szijártó, Attila; Bene, László; Buzás, György Miklós; Kenessey, István; Bronsert, Peter; Csanadi, Agnes; Lutz, Lisa; Werner, Martin; Wellner, Ulrich Friedrich; Kiss, András; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Lotz, Gábor

    2017-08-01

    Conventional stainings (including H&E and special stains like Giemsa) are the most widely applied histopathologic detection methods of Helicobacter pylori (HP). We aimed to compare the diagnostic performance of Giemsa staining with immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on a monocentric cohort of 2896 gastric biopsies and relate results to histologic alterations in order to find such histopathologic subgroups in which these methods underperform. All cases were categorized regarding presence or absence of chronic gastritis, inflammatory activity, and mucosal structural alterations. Giemsa revealed 687 cases (23.7%), IHC 795 cases (27.5%), and FISH 788 cases (27.2%) as being HP positive. Giemsa showed significantly lower overall sensitivity (83.3%) compared to IHC (98.8%) and FISH (98.0%). Moreover, the sensitivity of Giemsa dramatically dropped to 33.6% in the nonactive cases. We found that sensitivity of Giemsa strongly depends on HP density and, accordingly, on the presence of activity. Structural alterations (intestinal metaplasia, atrophy, etc.) had only no or weak effect on sensitivity of the three stainings. Both IHC and FISH proved to be equally reliable HP detecting techniques whose diagnostic performance is minimally influenced by mucosal inflammatory and structural alterations contrary to conventional stainings. We highly recommend immunohistochemistry for clinically susceptible, nonactive chronic gastritis cases, if the conventional stain-based HP detection is negative. Moreover, we recommend to use IHC more widely as basic HP stain. Helicobacter pylori FISH technique is primarily recommended to determine bacterial clarithromycin resistance. Furthermore, it is another accurate diagnostic tool for HP. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Anti-HIV-1 B cell responses are dependent on B cell precursor frequency and antigen-binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosenovic, Pia; Kara, Ervin E; Pettersson, Anna-Klara; McGuire, Andrew T; Gray, Matthew; Hartweger, Harald; Thientosapol, Eddy S; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2018-04-16

    The discovery that humans can produce potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to several different epitopes on the HIV-1 spike has reinvigorated efforts to develop an antibody-based HIV-1 vaccine. Antibody cloning from single cells revealed that nearly all bNAbs show unusual features that could help explain why it has not been possible to elicit them by traditional vaccination and instead would require a sequence of different immunogens. This idea is supported by experiments with genetically modified immunoglobulin (Ig) knock-in mice. Sequential immunization with a series of specifically designed immunogens was required to shepherd the development of bNAbs. However, knock-in mice contain superphysiologic numbers of bNAb precursor-expressing B cells, and therefore how these results can be translated to a more physiologic setting remains to be determined. Here we make use of adoptive transfer experiments using knock-in B cells that carry a synthetic intermediate in the pathway to anti-HIV-1 bNAb development to examine how the relationship between B cell receptor affinity and precursor frequency affects germinal center (GC) B cell recruitment and clonal expansion. Immunization with soluble HIV-1 antigens can recruit bNAb precursor B cells to the GC when there are as few as 10 such cells per mouse. However, at low precursor frequencies, the extent of clonal expansion is directly proportional to the affinity of the antigen for the B cell receptor, and recruitment to GCs is variable and dependent on recirculation.

  8. On the Frequency and Voltage-Dependent Profiles of the Surface States and Series Resistance of Au/ZnO/n-Si Structures in a Wide Range of Frequency and Voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikravan, Afsoun; Badali, Yosef; Altındal, Şemsettin; Uslu, İbrahim; Orak, İkram

    2017-10-01

    In order to interpret the electrical characteristics of fabricated Au/ZnO/n-Si structures as a function of frequency and voltage well, their capacitance-voltage ( C- V) and conductance-voltage ( G/ ω- V) measurements were carried out in a wide range of frequencies (0.7 kHz-2 MHz) and voltages (± 6 V) by 50 mV steps at room temperature. Both the C- V and G/ ω- V plots have reverse, depletion, and accumulation regions such as a metal-insulator/oxide semiconductor (MIS or MOS) structures. The values of doped-donor atoms ( N D), Fermi energy level ( E F), barrier height (ΦB), and series resistance ( R s) of the structure were obtained as a function of frequency and voltage. While the value of N D decreases with increasing frequency almost as exponentially, the value of depletion width ( W D) increases. The values of C and G/ ω increase with decreasing frequency because the surface states ( N ss) are able to follow the alternating current (AC) signal, resulting in excess capacitance ( C ex) and conductance ( G ex/ ω), which depends on their relaxation time and the frequency of the AC signal. The voltage-dependent profiles of N ss were obtained from both the high-low frequency capacitance and Hill-Colleman methods. The other important parameter R s of the structure was also obtained from the Nicollian and Brews methods as a function of voltage.

  9. Application of the parametric proper generalized decomposition to the frequency-dependent calculation of the impedance of an AC line with rectangular conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancarlos-González, Abel; Pineda-Sanchez, Manuel; Puche-Panadero, Ruben; Sapena-Bano, Angel; Riera-Guasp, Martin; Martinez-Roman, Javier; Perez-Cruz, Juan; Roger-Folch, Jose

    2017-12-01

    AC lines of industrial busbar systems are usually built using conductors with rectangular cross sections, where each phase can have several parallel conductors to carry high currents. The current density in a rectangular conductor, under sinusoidal conditions, is not uniform. It depends on the frequency, on the conductor shape, and on the distance between conductors, due to the skin effect and to proximity effects. Contrary to circular conductors, there are not closed analytical formulas for obtaining the frequency-dependent impedance of conductors with rectangular cross-section. It is necessary to resort to numerical simulations to obtain the resistance and the inductance of the phases, one for each desired frequency and also for each distance between the phases' conductors. On the contrary, the use of the parametric proper generalized decomposition (PGD) allows to obtain the frequency-dependent impedance of an AC line for a wide range of frequencies and distances between the phases' conductors by solving a single simulation in a 4D domain (spatial coordinates x and y, the frequency and the separation between conductors). In this way, a general "virtual chart" solution is obtained, which contains the solution for any frequency and for any separation of the conductors, and stores it in a compact separated representations form, which can be easily embedded on a more general software for the design of electrical installations. The approach presented in this work for rectangular conductors can be easily extended to conductors with an arbitrary shape.

  10. Application of the parametric proper generalized decomposition to the frequency-dependent calculation of the impedance of an AC line with rectangular conductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sancarlos-González Abel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AC lines of industrial busbar systems are usually built using conductors with rectangular cross sections, where each phase can have several parallel conductors to carry high currents. The current density in a rectangular conductor, under sinusoidal conditions, is not uniform. It depends on the frequency, on the conductor shape, and on the distance between conductors, due to the skin effect and to proximity effects. Contrary to circular conductors, there are not closed analytical formulas for obtaining the frequency-dependent impedance of conductors with rectangular cross-section. It is necessary to resort to numerical simulations to obtain the resistance and the inductance of the phases, one for each desired frequency and also for each distance between the phases’ conductors. On the contrary, the use of the parametric proper generalized decomposition (PGD allows to obtain the frequency-dependent impedance of an AC line for a wide range of frequencies and distances between the phases’ conductors by solving a single simulation in a 4D domain (spatial coordinates x and y, the frequency and the separation between conductors. In this way, a general “virtual chart” solution is obtained, which contains the solution for any frequency and for any separation of the conductors, and stores it in a compact separated representations form, which can be easily embedded on a more general software for the design of electrical installations. The approach presented in this work for rectangular conductors can be easily extended to conductors with an arbitrary shape.

  11. Unconventional superconductivity in cuprates, cobaltates and graphene. What is universal and what is material-dependent in strongly versus weakly correlated materials?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiesel, Maximilian Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    A general theory for all classes of unconventional superconductors is still one of the unsolved key issues in condensed-matter physics. Actually, it is not yet fully settled if there is a common underlying pairing mechanism. Instead, it might be possible that several distinct sources for unconventional (not phonon-mediated) superconductivity have to be considered, or an electron-phonon interaction is not negligible. The focus of this thesis is on the most probable mechanism for the formation of Cooper pairs in unconventional superconductors, namely a strictly electronic one where spin fluctuations are the mediators. Studying different superconductors in this thesis, the emphasis is put on material-independent features of the pairing mechanism. In addition, the investigation of the phase diagrams enables a view on the vicinity of superconductivity. Thus, it is possible to clarify which competing quantum fluctuations enhance or weaken the propensity for a superconducting state. The broad range of superconducting materials requires the use of more than one numerical technique to study an appropriate microscopic description. This is not a problem but a big advantage because this facilitates the approach-independent description of common underlying physics. For this evaluation, the strongly correlated cuprates are simulated with the variational cluster approach. Especially the question of a pairing glue is taken into consideration. Furthermore, it is possible to distinguish between retarded and non-retarded contributions to the gap function. The cuprates are confronted with the cobaltate Na x CoO 2 and graphene. These weakly correlated materials are investigated with the functional renormalization group (fRG) and reveal a comprehensive phase diagram, including a d+id-wave superconductivity, which breaks time-reversal symmetry. The corresponding gap function is nodeless, but for NaCoO, it features a doping-dependent anisotropy. In addition, some general considerations on

  12. Unconventional superconductivity in cuprates, cobaltates and graphene. What is universal and what is material-dependent in strongly versus weakly correlated materials?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiesel, Maximilian Ludwig

    2013-02-08

    A general theory for all classes of unconventional superconductors is still one of the unsolved key issues in condensed-matter physics. Actually, it is not yet fully settled if there is a common underlying pairing mechanism. Instead, it might be possible that several distinct sources for unconventional (not phonon-mediated) superconductivity have to be considered, or an electron-phonon interaction is not negligible. The focus of this thesis is on the most probable mechanism for the formation of Cooper pairs in unconventional superconductors, namely a strictly electronic one where spin fluctuations are the mediators. Studying different superconductors in this thesis, the emphasis is put on material-independent features of the pairing mechanism. In addition, the investigation of the phase diagrams enables a view on the vicinity of superconductivity. Thus, it is possible to clarify which competing quantum fluctuations enhance or weaken the propensity for a superconducting state. The broad range of superconducting materials requires the use of more than one numerical technique to study an appropriate microscopic description. This is not a problem but a big advantage because this facilitates the approach-independent description of common underlying physics. For this evaluation, the strongly correlated cuprates are simulated with the variational cluster approach. Especially the question of a pairing glue is taken into consideration. Furthermore, it is possible to distinguish between retarded and non-retarded contributions to the gap function. The cuprates are confronted with the cobaltate Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} and graphene. These weakly correlated materials are investigated with the functional renormalization group (fRG) and reveal a comprehensive phase diagram, including a d+id-wave superconductivity, which breaks time-reversal symmetry. The corresponding gap function is nodeless, but for NaCoO, it features a doping-dependent anisotropy. In addition, some general

  13. Hawkes process model with a time-dependent background rate and its application to high-frequency financial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omi, Takahiro; Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2017-07-01

    A Hawkes process model with a time-varying background rate is developed for analyzing the high-frequency financial data. In our model, the logarithm of the background rate is modeled by a linear model with a relatively large number of variable-width basis functions, and the parameters are estimated by a Bayesian method. Our model can capture not only the slow time variation, such as in the intraday seasonality, but also the rapid one, which follows a macroeconomic news announcement. By analyzing the tick data of the Nikkei 225 mini, we find that (i) our model is better fitted to the data than the Hawkes models with a constant background rate or a slowly varying background rate, which have been commonly used in the field of quantitative finance; (ii) the improvement in the goodness-of-fit to the data by our model is significant especially for sessions where considerable fluctuation of the background rate is present; and (iii) our model is statistically consistent with the data. The branching ratio, which quantifies the level of the endogeneity of markets, estimated by our model is 0.41, suggesting the relative importance of exogenous factors in the market dynamics. We also demonstrate that it is critically important to appropriately model the time-dependent background rate for the branching ratio estimation.

  14. Radio-Frequency-Based NH3-Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst Control: Studies on Temperature Dependency and Humidity Influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Dietrich

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The upcoming more stringent automotive emission legislations and current developments have promoted new technologies for more precise and reliable catalyst control. For this purpose, radio-frequency-based (RF catalyst state determination offers the only approach for directly measuring the NH3 loading on selective catalytic reduction (SCR catalysts and the state of other catalysts and filter systems. Recently, the ability of this technique to directly control the urea dosing on a current NH3 storing zeolite catalyst has been demonstrated on an engine dynamometer for the first time and this paper continues that work. Therefore, a well-known serial-type and zeolite-based SCR catalyst (Cu-SSZ-13 was investigated under deliberately chosen high space velocities. At first, the full functionality of the RF system with Cu-SSZ-13 as sample was tested successfully. By direct RF-based NH3 storage control, the influence of the storage degree on the catalyst performance, i.e., on NOx conversion and NH3 slip, was investigated in a temperature range between 250 and 400 °C. For each operation point, an ideal and a critical NH3 storage degree was found and analyzed in the whole temperature range. Based on the data of all experimental runs, temperature dependent calibration functions were developed as a basis for upcoming tests under transient conditions. Additionally, the influence of exhaust humidity was observed with special focus on cold start water and its effects to the RF signals.

  15. How does male-male competition generate negative frequency-dependent selection and disruptive selection during speciation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Peter D; Border, Shana E

    2018-02-01

    Natural selection has been shown to drive population differentiation and speciation. The role of sexual selection in this process is controversial; however, most of the work has centered on mate choice while the role of male-male competition in speciation is relatively understudied. Here, we outline how male-male competition can be a source of diversifying selection on male competitive phenotypes, and how this can contribute to the evolution of reproductive isolation. We highlight how negative frequency-dependent selection (advantage of rare phenotype arising from stronger male-male competition between similar male phenotypes compared with dissimilar male phenotypes) and disruptive selection (advantage of extreme phenotypes) drives the evolution of diversity in competitive traits such as weapon size, nuptial coloration, or aggressiveness. We underscore that male-male competition interacts with other life-history functions and that variable male competitive phenotypes may represent alternative adaptive options. In addition to competition for mates, aggressive interference competition for ecological resources can exert selection on competitor signals. We call for a better integration of male-male competition with ecological interference competition since both can influence the process of speciation via comparable but distinct mechanisms. Altogether, we present a more comprehensive framework for studying the role of male-male competition in speciation, and emphasize the need for better integration of insights gained from other fields studying the evolutionary, behavioral, and physiological consequences of agonistic interactions.

  16. How does male–male competition generate negative frequency-dependent selection and disruptive selection during speciation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Border, Shana E

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Natural selection has been shown to drive population differentiation and speciation. The role of sexual selection in this process is controversial; however, most of the work has centered on mate choice while the role of male–male competition in speciation is relatively understudied. Here, we outline how male–male competition can be a source of diversifying selection on male competitive phenotypes, and how this can contribute to the evolution of reproductive isolation. We highlight how negative frequency-dependent selection (advantage of rare phenotype arising from stronger male–male competition between similar male phenotypes compared with dissimilar male phenotypes) and disruptive selection (advantage of extreme phenotypes) drives the evolution of diversity in competitive traits such as weapon size, nuptial coloration, or aggressiveness. We underscore that male–male competition interacts with other life-history functions and that variable male competitive phenotypes may represent alternative adaptive options. In addition to competition for mates, aggressive interference competition for ecological resources can exert selection on competitor signals. We call for a better integration of male–male competition with ecological interference competition since both can influence the process of speciation via comparable but distinct mechanisms. Altogether, we present a more comprehensive framework for studying the role of male–male competition in speciation, and emphasize the need for better integration of insights gained from other fields studying the evolutionary, behavioral, and physiological consequences of agonistic interactions. PMID:29492042

  17. Hawkes process model with a time-dependent background rate and its application to high-frequency financial data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omi, Takahiro; Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2017-07-01

    A Hawkes process model with a time-varying background rate is developed for analyzing the high-frequency financial data. In our model, the logarithm of the background rate is modeled by a linear model with a relatively large number of variable-width basis functions, and the parameters are estimated by a Bayesian method. Our model can capture not only the slow time variation, such as in the intraday seasonality, but also the rapid one, which follows a macroeconomic news announcement. By analyzing the tick data of the Nikkei 225 mini, we find that (i) our model is better fitted to the data than the Hawkes models with a constant background rate or a slowly varying background rate, which have been commonly used in the field of quantitative finance; (ii) the improvement in the goodness-of-fit to the data by our model is significant especially for sessions where considerable fluctuation of the background rate is present; and (iii) our model is statistically consistent with the data. The branching ratio, which quantifies the level of the endogeneity of markets, estimated by our model is 0.41, suggesting the relative importance of exogenous factors in the market dynamics. We also demonstrate that it is critically important to appropriately model the time-dependent background rate for the branching ratio estimation.

  18. Learning to be different: Acquired skills, social learning, frequency dependence, and environmental variation can cause behaviourally mediated foraging specializations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, M.T.; Mangel, M.; Estes, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    ) Offspring can learn foraging skills from their mothers (matrilineal social learning). (6) Food abundance is limited, such that average individual energy reserves are low Additionally, the following factors increase the likelihood of alternative specializations co-occurring in a predator population: (1) The predator exerts effective top-down control of prey abundance, resulting in frequency-dependent dynamics. (2) There is stochastic Variation in prey population dynamics, but this Variation is neither too extreme in magnitude nor too 'slow' with respect to the time required for an individual forager to learn new foraging skills. For a given predator population, we deduce that the degree of specialization will be highest for those prey types requiring complex capture or handling skills, while prey species that are both profitable and easy to capture and handle will be included in the diet of all individuals. Frequency-dependent benefits of selecting alternative prey types, combined with the ability of foragers to improve their foraging skills by learning, and transmit learned skills to offspring, can result in behaviourally mediated foraging specialization, and also lead to the co-existence of alternative specializations. The extent of such specialization is predicted to be a variable trait, increasing in locations or years when intra-specific competition is high relative to inter-specific competition. ?? 2009 M. Tim Tinker.

  19. Temperature and frequency dependence of transport phenomena in co-doped rare earth oxides nanoparticles for ITSOFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, A. [Applied Thermal Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); School of Science and Technology, University of Management and Technology, Sialkot Campus, Shahabpura Road, Sialkot 51310 (Pakistan); Saleemi, A.S. [Applied Thermal Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Anis-ur-Rehman, M., E-mail: marehman@comsats.edu.pk [Applied Thermal Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • Phase pure ceria (Gd–La and Gd–Nd co-doped) as electrolytes for fuel cells. • Facile synthesis is done with composite mediated hydrothermal method. • Significant variation in transport properties with doping concentration is observed. • The Raman spectra confirmed the targeted doping and increase of vacancy sites. • Maximum conductivity achieved was 1.78 S cm{sup −1} for Ce{sub 0.5}Gd{sub 0.25}Nd{sub 0.25}O{sub δ} at 600 °C. - Abstract: The present study is focused on the conductivity enhancement of the doped ceria. Composite mediated hydrothermal method (CMHM) was employed to produce the material. X-ray diffraction was used to determine phase of nanocrystalline Ce{sub 1−2x}Gd{sub x}La{sub x}O{sub δ} and Ce{sub 1−2x}Gd{sub x}Nd{sub x}O{sub δ} (x = 0.1, 0.25). Conduction mechanism (dc conductivity and ac conductivity) in prepared samples was observed as a function of temperature and frequency. DC conductivity was measured in temperature range 300–700 °C. AC conductivity was measured in frequency range 1 kHz to 3 MHz at temperatures 300, 400, 500, 600, and 700 °C. The enhancement in conductivity was observed due to availability of oxygen vacancy sites which was dependent on composition. The Raman measurements supported the electrical conductivity results and more vacancy sites were observed in Raman spectrum in samples which showed maximum conductivities. The maximum conductivity achieved was 1.78 S cm{sup −1} (at 600 °C) for Ce{sub 0.5}Gd{sub 0.25}Nd{sub 0.25}O{sub δ}, which is quite a higher value in these compounds. This made this material a potential candidate for its use as an electrolyte material for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (ITSOFCs)

  20. Stiffness of sphere–plate contacts at MHz frequencies: dependence on normal load, oscillation amplitude, and ambient medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Vlachová

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The stiffness of micron-sized sphere–plate contacts was studied by employing high frequency, tangential excitation of variable amplitude (0–20 nm. The contacts were established between glass spheres and the surface of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM, where the resonator surface had been coated with either sputtered SiO2 or a spin-cast layer of poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA. The results from experiments undertaken in the dry state and in water are compared. Building on the shifts in the resonance frequency and resonance bandwidth, the instrument determines the real and the imaginary part of the contact stiffness, where the imaginary part quantifies dissipative processes. The method is closely analogous to related procedures in AFM-based metrology. The real part of the contact stiffness as a function of normal load can be fitted with the Johnson–Kendall–Roberts (JKR model. The contact stiffness was found to increase in the presence of liquid water. This finding is tentatively explained by the rocking motion of the spheres, which couples to a squeeze flow of the water close to the contact. The loss tangent of the contact stiffness is on the order of 0.1, where the energy losses are associated with interfacial processes. At high amplitudes partial slip was found to occur. The apparent contact stiffness at large amplitude depends linearly on the amplitude, as predicted by the Cattaneo–Mindlin model. This finding is remarkable insofar, as the Cattaneo–Mindlin model assumes Coulomb friction inside the sliding region. Coulomb friction is typically viewed as a macroscopic concept, related to surface roughness. An alternative model (formulated by Savkoor, which assumes a constant frictional stress in the sliding zone independent of the normal pressure, is inconsistent with the experimental data. The apparent friction coefficients slightly increase with normal force, which can be explained by nanoroughness. In other words, contact splitting

  1. Frequency-dependent linear and non-linear response properties of single carrier quantum dots: Role of effective mass and anharmonicity in the confinement potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Parikshit [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India); Ghosh, Manas [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India)], E-mail: pcmg77@rediffmail.com

    2008-09-01

    We explore the pattern of frequency-dependent linear and non-linear optical (NLO) response of one electron quantum dots harmonically confined in two dimensions. For some fixed values of transverse magnetic field strength ({omega}{sub c}), and harmonic confinement potential ({omega}{sub 0}), the influence of effective mass (m*) of the system and the symmetry breaking anharmonic interaction on the frequency-dependent linear ({alpha}), and the first ({beta}), and second ({gamma}) NLO responses of the dot is computed through linear variational route. The investigation reveals interesting roles played by the anharmonic interaction and effective mass in modulating the response properties.

  2. Mitigating artifacts in back-projection source imaging with implications for frequency-dependent properties of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingsen; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Luo, Yingdi; Wu, Wenbo; Ni, Sidao

    2012-12-01

    Comparing teleseismic array back-projection source images of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake with results from static and kinematic finite source inversions has revealed little overlap between the regions of high- and low-frequency slip. Motivated by this interesting observation, back-projection studies extended to intermediate frequencies, down to about 0.1 Hz, have suggested that a progressive transition of rupture properties as a function of frequency is observable. Here, by adapting the concept of array response function to non-stationary signals, we demonstrate that the "swimming artifact", a systematic drift resulting from signal non-stationarity, induces significant bias on beamforming back-projection at low frequencies. We introduce a "reference window strategy" into the multitaper-MUSIC back-projection technique and significantly mitigate the "swimming artifact" at high frequencies (1 s to 4 s). At lower frequencies, this modification yields notable, but significantly smaller, artifacts than time-domain stacking. We perform extensive synthetic tests that include a 3D regional velocity model for Japan. We analyze the recordings of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake at the USArray and at the European array at periods from 1 s to 16 s. The migration of the source location as a function of period, regardless of the back-projection methods, has characteristics that are consistent with the expected effect of the "swimming artifact". In particular, the apparent up-dip migration as a function of frequency obtained with the USArray can be explained by the "swimming artifact". This indicates that the most substantial frequency-dependence of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake source occurs at periods longer than 16 s. Thus, low-frequency back-projection needs to be further tested and validated in order to contribute to the characterization of frequency-dependent rupture properties.

  3. Frequency and voltage dependence dielectric properties, ac electrical conductivity and electric modulus profiles in Al/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}-PVA/p-Si structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilkan, Çiğdem, E-mail: cigdembilkan@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, The University of Çankırı Karatekin, 18100 Çankırı (Turkey); Azizian-Kalandaragh, Yashar [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, The University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Altındal, Şemsettin [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, The University of Gazi, 06500 Ankara (Turkey); Shokrani-Havigh, Roya [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, The University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    In this research a simple microwave-assisted method have been used for preparation of cobalt oxide nanostructures. The as-prepared sample has been investigated by UV–vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM). On the other hand, frequency and voltage dependence of both the real and imaginary parts of dielectric constants (ε′, ε″) and electric modulus (M′ and M″), loss tangent (tanδ), and ac electrical conductivity (σ{sub ac}) values of Al/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}-PVA/p-Si structures were obtained in the wide range of frequency and voltage using capacitance (C) and conductance (G/ω) data at room temperature. The values of ε′, ε″ and tanδ were found to decrease with increasing frequency almost for each applied bias voltage, but the changes in these parameters become more effective in the depletion region at low frequencies due to the charges at surface states and their relaxation time and polarization effect. While the value of σ is almost constant at low frequency, increases almost as exponentially at high frequency which are corresponding to σ{sub dc} and σ{sub ac}, respectively. The M′ and M″ have low values at low frequencies region and then an increase with frequency due to short-range mobility of charge carriers. While the value of M′ increase with increasing frequency, the value of M″ shows two peak and the peaks positions shifts to higher frequency with increasing applied voltage due to the decrease of the polarization and N{sub ss} effects with increasing frequency.

  4. Power-Smoothing Scheme of a DFIG Using the Adaptive Gain Depending on the Rotor Speed and Frequency Deviation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Hyewon; Hwang, Min; Muljadi, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    In an electric power grid that has a high penetration level of wind, the power fluctuation of a large-scale wind power plant (WPP) caused by varying wind speeds deteriorates the system frequency regulation. This paper proposes a power-smoothing scheme of a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG...... demonstrate that the proposed scheme significantly lessens the output power fluctuation of a WPP under various scenarios by modifying the gain with the rotor speed and frequency deviation, and thereby it can regulate the frequency deviation within a narrow range.......) that significantly mitigates the system frequency fluctuation while preventing over-deceleration of the rotor speed. The proposed scheme employs an additional control loop relying on the system frequency deviation that operates in combination with the maximum power point tracking control loop. To improve the power...

  5. Common and Low Frequency Variants in MERTK Are Independently Associated with Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility with Discordant Association Dependent upon HLA-DRB1*15:01 Status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele D Binder

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The risk of developing MS is strongly influenced by genetic predisposition, and over 100 loci have been established as associated with susceptibility. However, the biologically relevant variants underlying disease risk have not been defined for the vast majority of these loci, limiting the power of these genetic studies to define new avenues of research for the development of MS therapeutics. It is therefore crucial that candidate MS susceptibility loci are carefully investigated to identify the biological mechanism linking genetic polymorphism at a given gene to the increased chance of developing MS. MERTK has been established as an MS susceptibility gene and is part of a family of receptor tyrosine kinases known to be involved in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease. In this study we have refined the association of MERTK with MS risk to independent signals from both common and low frequency variants. One of the associated variants was also found to be linked with increased expression of MERTK in monocytes and higher expression of MERTK was associated with either increased or decreased risk of developing MS, dependent upon HLA-DRB1*15:01 status. This discordant association potentially extended beyond MS susceptibility to alterations in disease course in established MS. This study provides clear evidence that distinct polymorphisms within MERTK are associated with MS susceptibility, one of which has the potential to alter MERTK transcription, which in turn can alter both susceptibility and disease course in MS patients.

  6. Power-Smoothing Scheme of a DFIG Using the Adaptive Gain Depending on the Rotor Speed and Frequency Deviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyewon Lee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In an electric power grid that has a high penetration level of wind, the power fluctuation of a large-scale wind power plant (WPP caused by varying wind speeds deteriorates the system frequency regulation. This paper proposes a power-smoothing scheme of a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG that significantly mitigates the system frequency fluctuation while preventing over-deceleration of the rotor speed. The proposed scheme employs an additional control loop relying on the system frequency deviation that operates in combination with the maximum power point tracking control loop. To improve the power-smoothing capability while preventing over-deceleration of the rotor speed, the gain of the additional loop is modified with the rotor speed and frequency deviation. The gain is set to be high if the rotor speed and/or frequency deviation is large. The simulation results based on the IEEE 14-bus system clearly demonstrate that the proposed scheme significantly lessens the output power fluctuation of a WPP under various scenarios by modifying the gain with the rotor speed and frequency deviation, and thereby it can regulate the frequency deviation within a narrow range.

  7. The grain size dependency of vesicular particle shapes strongly affects the drag of particles. First results from microtomography investigations of Campi Flegrei fallout deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Daniela; Dioguardi, Fabio

    2018-03-01

    Acknowledging the grain size dependency of shape is important in volcanology, in particular when dealing with tephra produced and emplaced during and after explosive volcanic eruptions. A systematic measurement of the tridimensional shape of vesicular pyroclasts of Campi Flegrei fallout deposits (Agnano-Monte Spina, Astroni 6 and Averno 2 eruptions) varying in size from 8.00 to 0.016 mm has been carried out by means of X-Ray Microtomography. Data show that particle shape changes with size, especially for juvenile vesicular clasts, since it is dependent on the distribution and size of vesicles that contour the external clast outline. Two drag laws that include sphericity in the formula were used for estimating the dependency of settling velocity on shape. Results demonstrate that it is not appropriate to assume a size-independent shape for vesicular particles, in contrast with the approach commonly employed when simulating the ash dispersion in the atmosphere.

  8. Frequency and temperature dependences of capacitance-voltage characteristics of InGaN/GaN light-emitting structures with multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltanovich, O. A.; Shmidt, N. M.; Yakimov, E. B.

    2011-01-01

    A frequency dependence of capacitance-voltage (C–V) characteristics in multiple quantum well InGaN/GaN heterostructures in the range of 60 Hz-5 MHz is investigated at temperatures from 77 to 300 K. It is found that temperature lowering and test frequency increase lead to the similar changes in obtained apparent carrier distributions. It is shown that commonly used conditions for capacitance-voltage profiling of InGaN/GaN LEDs correspond to an intermediate case between low- and high-frequency capacitance approximations. At all temperatures investigated, the edge low-frequency capacitance-voltage profiles are experimentally reached and found to be identical. The process of attainment of equilibrium of the charges in the active region is most likely determined by tunneling of the carriers through the barriers.

  9. Outcome of Treatment of Human HeLa Cervical Cancer Cells With Roscovitine Strongly Depends on the Dosage and Cell Cycle Status Prior to the Treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wesierska-Gadek, J.; Borza, A.; Walzi, E.; Kryštof, Vladimír; Maurer, M.; Komina, O.; Wandl, S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 5 (2009), s. 937-955 ISSN 0730-2312 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : APOPTOSIS * CELL CYCLE ARREST * CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.935, year: 2009

  10. Admittance–voltage profiling of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN heterostructures: Frequency dependence of capacitance and conductance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köhler, K.; Pletschen, W.; Godejohann, B.; Müller, S.; Menner, H. P.; Ambacher, O. [Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Tullastraße 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany)

    2015-11-28

    Admittance–voltage profiling of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN heterostructures was used to determine the frequency dependent capacitance and conductance of FET devices in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 1 MHz. The nominally undoped low pressure metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy structures were grown with an Al-content of 30%. An additional 1 nm thick AlN interlayer was placed in one structure before the Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}N layer growth. For frequencies below 10{sup 8} Hz it is convenient to use equivalent circuits to represent electric or dielectric properties of a material, a method widely used, for example, in impedance spectroscopy. We want to emphasize the relation between frequency dependent admittance–voltage profiling and the corresponding equivalent circuits to the complex dielectric function. Debye and Drude models are used for the description of the frequency dependent admittance profiles in a range of depletion onset of the two-dimensional electron gas. Capacitance- and conductance-frequency profiles are fitted in the entire measured range by combining both models. Based on our results, we see contributions to the two-dimensional electron gas for our samples from surface states (80%) as well as from background doping in the Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}N barriers (20%). The specific resistance of the layers below the gate is above 10{sup 5} Ω cm for both samples and increases with increasing negative bias, i.e., the layers below the gate are essentially depleted. We propose that the resistance due to free charge carriers, determined by the Drude model, is located between gate and drain and, because of the AlN interlayer, the resistance is lowered by a factor of about 30 if compared to the sample without an AlN layer.

  11. Fermi resonance and solvent dependence of the vC=O frequency shifts of Raman spectra: cyclohexanone and 2-cyclohexene-1-one

    CERN Document Server

    Nam, S I; Lee, M S; Jung, Y M

    2001-01-01

    The carbonyl stretching vibration, vC=O of 2-cyclohexene-1-one , is in Fermi resonance with a combination tone. The amount of Fermi resonance interaction between these two modes is dependent upon the amount of solute/solvent interaction due to hydrogen bonding between the carbonyl oxygen and the solvent proton. The corrected vC=O frequency of 2-cyclohexene-1-one occurs at a lower frequency than the observed vC=O mode of cyclohexanone, possibly caused by expanded conjugation effects. The carbonyl stretching modes of cyclic ketones were also affected by interaction with the ROH/CCl sub 4 mixed solvent system.

  12. The Accuracy of the Digital imaging system and the frequency dependent type apex locator in root canal length measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byoung Rib; Park, Chang Seo

    1998-01-01

    In order to achieve a successful endodontic treatment, root canals must be obturated three-dimensionally without causing any damage to apical tissues. Accurate length determination of the root canal is critical in this case. For this reason, I've used the conventional periapical radiography, Digora (digital imaging system) and Root ZX (the frequency dependent type apex locator) to measure the length of the canal and compare it with the true length obtained by cutting the tooth in half and measuring the length between the occlusal surface and the apical foramen. From the information obtained by these measurements, I was able to evaluate the accuracy and clinical usefulness of each systems, whether the thickness of files used in endodontic therapy has any effect on the measuring systems was also evaluated in an effort to simplify the treatment planning phase of endodontic treatment. 29 canals of 29 sound premolars were measured with no 15, no 20, no 25 files by 3 different dentists each using the periapical radiography, Digora and Root ZX. The measurements were then compared with the true length. The results were as follows ; 1. In comparing mean discrepancies between measurements obtained by using periapical radiography (mean error : -0.449 ± 0.444 mm), Digora (mean error : -0.417 ± 0.415 mm) and Root ZX (mean error : 0.123 ± 0.458 mm) with true length, periapical radiography and Digora system had statistically significant differences (p 0.05). 2. By subtracting values obtained by using periapical radiography, Digora and Root ZX from the true length and making a distribution table of their absolute values, the following analysis was possible. In the case of periapical film, 140 out of 261 (53.6%) were clinically acceptable satisfying the margin of error of less than 0.5 mm, 151 out of 261 (53,6%) were acceptable in the Digora system while Root ZX had 197 out of 261 (75.5%) within the limits of 0.5 mm margin of error. 3. In determining whether the thickness of

  13. The Accuracy of the Digital imaging system and the frequency dependent type apex locator in root canal length measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byoung Rib; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Dental Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yensei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-15

    In order to achieve a successful endodontic treatment, root canals must be obturated three-dimensionally without causing any damage to apical tissues. Accurate length determination of the root canal is critical in this case. For this reason, I've used the conventional periapical radiography, Digora (digital imaging system) and Root ZX (the frequency dependent type apex locator) to measure the length of the canal and compare it with the true length obtained by cutting the tooth in half and measuring the length between the occlusal surface and the apical foramen. From the information obtained by these measurements, I was able to evaluate the accuracy and clinical usefulness of each systems, whether the thickness of files used in endodontic therapy has any effect on the measuring systems was also evaluated in an effort to simplify the treatment planning phase of endodontic treatment. 29 canals of 29 sound premolars were measured with no 15, no 20, no 25 files by 3 different dentists each using the periapical radiography, Digora and Root ZX. The measurements were then compared with the true length. The results were as follows; 1. In comparing mean discrepancies between measurements obtained by using periapical radiography (mean error : -0.449 {+-} 0.444 mm), Digora (mean error : -0.417 {+-} 0.415 mm) and Root ZX (mean error : 0.123 {+-} 0.458 mm) with true length, periapical radiography and Digora system had statistically significant differences (p<0.05) in most cases while root zx showed none (p>0.05). 2. By subtracting values obtained by using periapical radiography, Digora and Root ZX from the true length and making a distribution table of their absolute values, the following analysis was possible. In the case of periapical film, 140 out of 261 (53.6%) were clinically acceptable satisfying the margin of error of less than 0.5 mm, 151 out of 261 (53,6%) were acceptable in the Digora system while Root ZX had 197 out of 261 (75.5%) within the limits of 0.5 mm

  14. Stress depended changes in activityof gp red blood cells receptors and its correction by therahertz waves at nitric oxide frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirichuk V.F.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of electromagnetic radiation in the terahertz range frequencies of molecular spectrum of emission and absorption of nitric oxide 150.176–150.664 GHz for the restoration of the impaired carbohydrate component and functional activity glikoproteid receptors of erythrocytes of white rats in a state of acute imm obilization stress. Shown that exposure to electromagnetic waves at these frequencies is the normalization of the increased content of b-D-galactose in the carbohydrate component and the restoration of the impaired activity of the receptors glikoproteid erythrocytes

  15. Dye concentration dependence of spectral triplet in one-dimensional photonic crystal with cyanine dye J-aggregate in strong coupling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Makoto; Sakata, Tomohiro; Takenobu, Ryouya; Uemura, Shinobu; Miyagawa, Hayato; Nakanishi, Shunsuke; Tsurumachi, Noriaki

    2017-10-01

    We report on the dye concentration dependence of nonlinear transmission properties of one-dimensional photonic crystal microcavities containing cyanine dye J-aggregates. Using femtosecond nonlinear transmission spectroscopy, we observed a transition from a polariton doublet state to a spectral triplet state over the whole tested concentration range, even at room temperature. In these samples, changes in the dye concentration affected the Rabi splitting energy in the linear transmission measurements; however, we found that changes in the concentration did not greatly affect the triplet formation.

  16. Strong dependence of a pioneer shrub on seed dispersal services provided by an endemic endangered lizard in a Mediterranean island ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neghme, Constanza; Santamaría, Luís; Calviño-Cancela, María

    2017-01-01

    The accelerating rate of vertebrate extinctions and population declines threatens to disrupt important ecological interactions, altering key ecosystem processes such as animal seed dispersal. The study of highly specialized mutualistic interactions is crucial to predict the consequences of population declines and extinctions. Islands offer unique opportunities to study highly specialized interactions, as they often have naturally depauperated faunas and are experiencing high rates of human-driven extinctions. In this study, we assess the effect of seed dispersal on seedling recruitment of Ephedra fragilis (Ephedraceae) on a Mediterranean island ecosystem. We used field data and stochastic simulation modeling to estimate seed fate and recruitment patterns of this pioneer shrub typical of arid and semiarid areas, and to estimate the dependence of recruitment on the lizard Podarcis lilfordi (Lacertidae), its only known seed disperser. Ephedra fragilis recruitment highly depended on lizards: lizards produced 3.8 times more newly-emerged seedlings than non-dispersed seeds and no seedlings from undispersed seeds survived the study period. Seed dispersal by lizards was mostly to open sites, which was key for the increased success observed, while undispersed seeds, falling under mother plants, suffered higher predation and lower seedling emergence and survival. The ability of this pioneer shrub to get established in open ground is crucial for vegetation colonization and restoration, especially on degraded lands affected by desertification, where they act as nurse plants for other species. Lizards are key in this process, which has important consequences for community structure and ecosystem functioning.

  17. Unitary Dynamics of Strongly Interacting Bose Gases with the Time-Dependent Variational Monte Carlo Method in Continuous Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Carleo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the time-dependent variational Monte Carlo method for continuous-space Bose gases. Our approach is based on the systematic expansion of the many-body wave function in terms of multibody correlations and is essentially exact up to adaptive truncation. The method is benchmarked by comparison to an exact Bethe ansatz or existing numerical results for the integrable Lieb-Liniger model. We first show that the many-body wave function achieves high precision for ground-state properties, including energy and first-order as well as second-order correlation functions. Then, we study the out-of-equilibrium, unitary dynamics induced by a quantum quench in the interaction strength. Our time-dependent variational Monte Carlo results are benchmarked by comparison to exact Bethe ansatz results available for a small number of particles, and are also compared to quench action results available for noninteracting initial states. Moreover, our approach allows us to study large particle numbers and general quench protocols, previously inaccessible beyond the mean-field level. Our results suggest that it is possible to find correlated initial states for which the long-term dynamics of local density fluctuations is close to the predictions of a simple Boltzmann ensemble.

  18. Crystal Growth of High-Quality Protein Crystals under the Presence of an Alternant Electric Field in Pulse-Wave Mode, and a Strong Magnetic Field with Radio Frequency Pulses Characterized by X-ray Diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Rodríguez-Romero

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The first part of this research was devoted to investigating the effect of alternate current (AC using four different types of wave modes (pulse-wave at 2 Hz on the crystal growth of lysozyme in solution. The best results, in terms of size and crystal quality, were obtained when protein crystals were grown under the influence of electric fields in a very specific wave mode (“breathing” wave, giving the highest resolution up to 1.34 Å in X-ray diffraction analysis compared with controls and with those crystals grown in gel. In the second part, we evaluated the effect of a strong magnetic field of 16.5 Tesla combined with radiofrequency pulses of 0.43 μs on the crystal growth in gels of tetragonal hen egg white (HEW lysozyme. The lysozyme crystals grown, both in solution applying breathing-wave and in gel under the influence of this strong magnetic field with pulses of radio frequencies, produced the larger-in-size crystals and the highest resolution structures. Data processing and refinement statistics are very good in terms of the resolution, mosaicity and Wilson B factor obtained for each crystal. Besides, electron density maps show well-defined and distinctly separated atoms at several selected tryptophan residues for the crystal grown using the “breathing wave pulses”.

  19. Frequency-dependent changes in the regional amplitude and synchronization of resting-state functional MRI in stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfang Zhu

    Full Text Available Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI has been intensively used to assess alterations of inter-regional functional connectivity in patients with stroke, but the regional properties of brain activity in stroke have not yet been fully investigated. Additionally, no study has examined a frequency effect on such regional properties in stroke patients, although this effect has been shown to play important roles in both normal brain functioning and functional abnormalities. Here we utilized R-fMRI to measure the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF and regional homogeneity (ReHo, two major methods for characterizing the regional properties of R-fMRI, in three different frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01-0.027 Hz; slow-4: 0.027-0.73 Hz; and typical band: 0.01-0.1 Hz in 19 stroke patients and 15 healthy controls. Both the ALFF and ReHo analyses revealed changes in brain activity in a number of brain regions, particularly the parietal cortex, in stroke patients compared with healthy controls. Remarkably, the regions with changed activity as detected by the slow-5 band data were more extensive, and this finding was true for both the ALFF and ReHo analyses. These results not only confirm previous studies showing abnormality in the parietal cortex in patients with stroke, but also suggest that R-fMRI studies of stroke should take frequency effects into account when measuring intrinsic brain activity.

  20. It Depends: Conditional Correlation between Frequency of Storybook Reading and Emergent Literacy Skills in Children with Language Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrill, Stephen A.; Logan, Jessica A. R.; Sawyer, Brook E.; Justice, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined the association between frequency of storybook reading and emergent literacy in 212 children at risk for language impairment, assessed during the fall semester of kindergarten. Measures included parent-reported storybook reading, as well as direct assessments of print knowledge, letter awareness, and expressive…

  1. Statistical frequency-dependent analysis of trial-to-trial variability in single time series by recurrence plots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara eTosic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For decades, research in neuroscience has supported the hypothesis that brain dynamics exhibits recurrent metastable states connected by transients, which together encode fundamental neural information processing. To understand the system’s dynamics it is important to detect such recurrence domains, but it is challenging to extract them from experimental neuroscience datasets due to the large trial-to-trial variability. The proposed methodology extracts recurrent metastable states in univariate time series by transforming datasets into their time-frequency representations and computing recurrence plots based on instantaneous spectral power values in various frequency bands. Additionally, a new statistical inference analysis compares different trial recurrence plots with corresponding surrogates to obtain statistically significant recurrent structures. This combination of methods is validated by applying it to two artificial datasets. In a final study of visually-evoked Local Field Potentials in partially anesthetized ferrets, the methodology is able to reveal recurrence structures of neural responses with trial-to-trial variability. Focusing on different frequency bands, the delta-band activity is much less recurrent than alpha-band activity. Moreover, alpha-activity is susceptible to pre-stimuli, while delta-activity is much less sensitive to pre-stimuli. This difference in recurrence structures in different frequency bands indicates diverse underlying information processing steps in the brain.

  2. Hydrogen-dependent low frequency noise and its physical mechanism of HfO2 resistance change random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. Q.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.; Peng, C.; Fang, W. X.; En, Y. F.; Huang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of hydrogen on low frequency noise characteristics of HfO2 resistance change random access memories (RRAMs) was investigated in this paper. The experimental results show that HfO2 RRAMs after hydrogen treatment take on the better uniformity of switch characteristics and the conduction enhancement behavior. Furthermore, it was found that the low frequency noise characteristics of the HfO2 RRAMs was significantly impacted by the hydrogen treatment, and at three kinds of typical resistance states, the low frequency noises of the HfO2 RRAMs after hydrogen treatment are larger than those of the fresh HfO2 RRAMs. The mechanism could be attributed to H induced oxygen vacancies, which serve as the additional traps for conduction due to the trap-assisted tunneling process. This will result in more random trap/detrap processes in the conducting filament, which gives rise to the larger low frequency noise in the HfO2 RRAMs. The results of this study may be useful in the design and application of HfO2 RRAMs.

  3. Nanocrystal Size-Dependent Efficiency of Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells in the Strongly Coupled CdSe Nanocrystals/TiO2 System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hyeong Jin; Paik, Taejong; Diroll, Benjamin; Edley, Michael E; Baxter, Jason B; Murray, Christopher B

    2016-06-15

    Light absorption and electron injection are important criteria determining solar energy conversion efficiency. In this research, monodisperse CdSe quantum dots (QDs) are synthesized with five different diameters, and the size-dependent solar energy conversion efficiency of CdSe quantum dot sensitized solar cell (QDSSCs) is investigated by employing the atomic inorganic ligand, S(2-). Absorbance measurements and transmission electron microscopy show that the diameters of the uniform CdSe QDs are 2.5, 3.2, 4.2, 6.4, and 7.8 nm. Larger CdSe QDs generate a larger amount of charge under the irradiation of long wavelength photons, as verified by the absorbance results and the measurements of the external quantum efficiencies. However, the smaller QDs exhibit faster electron injection kinetics from CdSe QDs to TiO2 because of the high energy level of CBCdSe, as verified by time-resolved photoluminescence and internal quantum efficiency results. Importantly, the S(2-) ligand significantly enhances the electronic coupling between the CdSe QDs and TiO2, yielding an enhancement of the charge transfer rate at the interfacial region. As a result, the S(2-) ligand helps improve the new size-dependent solar energy conversion efficiency, showing best performance with 4.2-nm CdSe QDs, whereas conventional ligand, mercaptopropionic acid, does not show any differences in efficiency according to the size of the CdSe QDs. The findings reported herein suggest that the atomic inorganic ligand reinforces the influence of quantum confinement on the solar energy conversion efficiency of QDSSCs.

  4. A New Possibility for Production of Sub-picosecond X-ray Pulses using a Time Dependent Radio Frequency Orbit Deflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zholents, A. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-01

    It is shown that two radio frequency deflecting cavities with slightly different frequencies can be used to produce time-dependent orbit deflection to a few special electron bunches while keeping the majority of the electron bunches unaffected. These special bunches produce an x-ray pulse in which transverse position or angle, or both, are correlated with time. The x-ray pulses are then shortened, either with an asymmetrically cut crystal that acts as a pulse compressor, or with an angular aperture such as a narrow slit positioned downstream. The implementation of this technique creates a highly flexible environment for synchrotrons in which users of most beamlines will be able to easily select between the x-rays originated by the standard electron bunches and the short x-ray pulses originated by the special electron bunches carrying a time-dependent transverse correlation.

  5. Passenger arrival and waiting time distributions dependent on train service frequency and station characteristics: A smart card data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvardson, Jesper Bláfoss; Nielsen, Otto Anker; Raveau, Sebastián

    2018-01-01

    Waiting time at public transport stops is perceived by passengers to be more onerous than in-vehicle time, hence it strongly influences the attractiveness and use of public transport. Transport models traditionally assume that average waiting times are half the service headway by assuming random ...

  6. Experimental and numerical study of frequency-dependent transport loss in YBa2Cu3O7-δ coated conductors with ferromagnetic substrate and copper stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guole; Zhang, Guomin; Yu, Hui; Jing, Liwei; Ai, Liwang; Liu, Qi

    2017-06-01

    Although AC transport losses of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) coated conductors (CCs) have been studied extensively, the frequency dependence of transport losses still needs more investigations. This paper presents a study on the frequency dependence (in the range of 50-1000 Hz) of the transport losses in YBCO CCs with ferromagnetic substrate and copper stabilizer by the use of both experimental and finite element methods (FEMs). The finite element model (FEM) is based on H-formulation and E-J power law, and calculated AC transport losses accord with the experimental ones. The contributions of ferromagnetic (Ni-5at.%W substrate), eddy current (conventional metal), and hysteresis (superconducting YBCO) losses are extracted. It is shown that the AC transport loss per cycle increases with the frequency due to the growing contribution of eddy current loss. More than 80% of eddy current loss comes from the copper stabilizer adjacent to the ferromagnetic substrate. The influence of magnetic substrate on AC loss is also studied, and it is found that YBCO CCs with non-magnetic substrates are more suitable for high-frequency applications.

  7. High night temperature strongly impacts TCA cycle, amino acid and polyamine biosynthetic pathways in rice in a sensitivity-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaubitz, Ulrike; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Hincha, Dirk K; Zuther, Ellen

    2015-10-01

    Global climate change combined with asymmetric warming can have detrimental effects on the yield of crop plants such as rice (Oryza sativa L.). Little is known about metabolic responses of rice to high night temperature (HNT) conditions. Twelve cultivars with different HNT sensitivity were used to investigate metabolic changes in the vegetative stage under HNT compared to control conditions. Central metabolism, especially TCA cycle and amino acid biosynthesis, were strongly affected particularly in sensitive cultivars. Levels of several metabolites were correlated with HNT sensitivity. Furthermore, pool sizes of some metabolites negatively correlated with HNT sensitivity under control conditions, indicating metabolic pre-adaptation in tolerant cultivars. The polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine showed increased abundance in sensitive cultivars under HNT conditions. Correlations between the content of polyamines and 75 other metabolites indicated metabolic shifts from correlations with sugar-phosphates and 1-kestose under control to correlations with sugars and amino and organic acids under HNT conditions. Increased expression levels of ADC2 and ODC1, genes encoding enzymes catalysing the first committed steps of putrescine biosynthesis, were restricted to sensitive cultivars under HNT. Additionally, transcript levels of eight polyamine biosynthesis genes were correlated with HNT sensitivity. Responses to HNT in the vegetative stage result in distinct differences between differently responding cultivars with a dysregulation of central metabolism and an increase of polyamine biosynthesis restricted to sensitive cultivars under HNT conditions and a pre-adaptation of tolerant cultivars already under control conditions with higher levels of potentially protective compatible solutes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. Decrypting Strong and Weak Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Interactions with Mitochondrial Voltage-Dependent Anion Channels Using Molecular Docking and Perturbation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Durruthy, Michael; Werhli, Adriano V; Seus, Vinicius; Machado, Karina S; Pazos, Alejandro; Munteanu, Cristian R; González-Díaz, Humberto; Monserrat, José M

    2017-10-16

    The current molecular docking study provided the Free Energy of Binding (FEB) for the interaction (nanotoxicity) between VDAC mitochondrial channels of three species (VDAC1-Mus musculus, VDAC1-Homo sapiens, VDAC2-Danio rerio) with SWCNT-H, SWCNT-OH, SWCNT-COOH carbon nanotubes. The general results showed that the FEB values were statistically more negative (p  (SWCNT-VDAC1-Mus musculus) > (SWCNT-VDAC1-Homo sapiens) > (ATP-VDAC). More negative FEB values for SWCNT-COOH and OH were found in VDAC2-Danio rerio when compared with VDAC1-Mus musculus and VDAC1-Homo sapiens (p  r 2  > 0.97) was observed between n-Hamada index and VDAC nanotoxicity (or FEB) for the zigzag topologies of SWCNT-COOH and SWCNT-OH. Predictive Nanoparticles-Quantitative-Structure Binding-Relationship models (nano-QSBR) for strong and weak SWCNT-VDAC docking interactions were performed using Perturbation Theory, regression and classification models. Thus, 405 SWCNT-VDAC interactions were predicted using a nano-PT-QSBR classifications model with high accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity (73-98%) in training and validation series, and a maximum AUROC value of 0.978. In addition, the best regression model was obtained with Random Forest (R 2 of 0.833, RMSE of 0.0844), suggesting an excellent potential to predict SWCNT-VDAC channel nanotoxicity. All study data are available at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.4802320.v2 .

  9. Frequency- and axial-field-dependent circular magnetization reversal in a stress-annealed Fe-based nanocrystalline wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.F.; Vazquez, M.; Yin, S.Z.

    2009-01-01

    Absract: After suitable annealing under a tensile stress, Fe 73.5 Cu 1 Nb 3 Si 13.5 B 9 amorphous wire becomes the nano-structured material together with a transverse anisotropy field H k =-3.2 kA/m. Its circular permeability, μ=μ'-jμ'', was determined from the measurements of the impedance, as a function of the frequency (f=333-33,333 Hz) and amplitude (I AC =0.1-100 mA) of AC current and the axially applied DC field (H=0-89 kA/m). We found that the circular technical magnetization of this sample carried out by the spontaneous domain nucleation process. The influences of the AC current frequency and the axial DC field on the circular magnetization have been studied

  10. Distortion of the activation energy of high temperature internal friction background due to temperature dependence frequency variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambri, O.; Povolo, F.; Molinas, B.

    1991-01-01

    In this work, a study is made of how the variation of frequency with temperature affects an activation enthalpy. This effect is usually neglected, but in some cases like Cu-Au or Zry-4 (an alloy of nuclear interest base or Zr alloyed with Sn, Fe and Cr) such variation can rise up to as much as 16%/4/ and 37%/5/. (Author) [es

  11. Modeling of the frequency dependent C-V characteristics of neutron irradiated p+-n silicon detectors after the type inversion in the space charge region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.

    1994-01-01

    The modeling of the frequency dependent C-V characteristics of neutron irradiated p + -n silicon detectors is extended to the case of high neutron fluences (Φ > 8 x 10 12 n/cm 2 ) where the effective doping concentration N eff in the space charge region (SCR) exhibits a net acceptor state (or ''p'' type), while the resistivity in the electrical neutral bulk (ENB) approaches intrinsic due to the perfect compensation of all deep levels in the condition of no band bending (or no field) and therefore no Fermi level crossing for any deep levels. The C-V characteristics are still frequency dependent, but the deep level that is responsible for it may be different from the one before the type inversion in the SCR. N eff in the SCR may be dominated by an acceptor level, such as V-V - , whose concentration is proportional to the neutron fluence. The contribution of the high resistivity ENB to the frequency dependence have also been discussed

  12. Calculations of near-field emissions in frequency-domain into time-dependent data with arbitrary wave form transient perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted on the application of the computational method for calculating the transient electromagnetic (EM near-field (NF radiated by electronic structures from the frequency-dependent data for the arbitrary wave form perturbations i(t. The method proposed is based on the fast Fourier transform (FFT. The different steps illustrating the principle of the method is described. It is composed of three successive steps: the synchronization of the input excitation spectrum I(f and the given frequency data H0(f, the convolution of the two inputs data and then, the determination of the time-domain emissions H(t. The feasibility of the method is verified with standard EM 3D simulations. In addition to this method, an extraction technique of the time-dependent z-transversal EM NF component Xz(t from the frequency-dependent x- and y- longitudinal components Hx(f and Hy(f is also presented. This technique is based on the conjugation of the plane wave spectrum (PWS transform and FFT. The feasibility of the method is verified with a set of dipole radiations. The method introduced in this paper is particularly useful for the investigation of time-domain emissions for EMC applications by considering transient EM interferences (EMIs.

  13. Light- and pH-dependent conformational changes in protein structure induce strong bending of purple membranes--active membranes studied by cryo-SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhinow, Daniel; Hampp, Norbert A

    2008-10-16

    Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) undergoes a conformational change during the photocycle and the proton transport through the membrane. For the first time, we could demonstrate by direct imaging of freely suspended native purple membranes (PMs) that the flat disk-like shape of PMs changes dramatically as soon as most of the BRs are in a state characterized by a deprotonated Schiff base. Light-induced shape changes are easily observed with mutated BRs of the BR-D96N type, i.e., all variants which show an increased M 2 lifetime. On the other hand, large-scale shape changes are induced by pH changes with PM containing mutated BRs of the BR-D85T type, where Asp85 is replaced for a neutral amino acid. In such PMs, all BRs are titrated simultaneously and the resulting shape of the membranes depends on the initial shape only. As the majority of PMs in the "flat" state are more or less round disks, the bent membranes often comprise bowl-like and tube-like bent structures. The method presented here enables one to derive size changes of membrane-embedded BRs on the single molecule level from "macroscopic", easily accessible data like the curvature radii observed in cryo-SEM. The potential of BR as a pH-controlled and/or light-controlled microscaled biological actuator needs further consideration.

  14. Turbulence growth and its dependency of wake vortices on excitation frequency by local body-force around two-dimensional hump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakeno, Aiko; Abe, Yoshiaki; Nonomura, Taku; Kawai, Soshi; Fujii, Kozo

    2017-11-01

    We investigated details of wake vortex dynamics to cause turbulence increase and early flow-reattachment under excitation forcing by a plasma actuator setting around a 2D hump numerically. The local body-force was homogeneous in the spanwise direction and bursting temporally. That actuation generates two-dimensional roll vortices and other turbulence motions such like three-dimensional rib structure in downstream. These dynamics depended on the excitation frequency. We tried to discuss multi-scaled vortices separately with considering the temporal phaseaveraged statistics of the excitation frequency and others, those are related to roll vortices and others with rib structure between rolls. It was found that the maximum value of non-periodic fluctuation in downstream correlated with flow-reattachment performance more than that of periodic fluctuation of roll vortices. The amplitude becomes large around separation position in early reattachment cases. The spacial growth rates of peak values in the wall-normal direction are same for high frequency cases, K-H instability modes, however not true for low frequency cases. In high frequency cases, amplitude in the early state of separation plays a significant rule to increase it in downstream. Strategic Programs for Innovative Research of the High Performance Computing Initiative (No. hp120296,hp130001,hp140207, hp150219) Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research(B) (No. 15K21677) by the MEXT.

  15. Intra- and inter-individual variability of Aspergillus fumigatus reactive T-cell frequencies in healthy volunteers in dependency of mould exposure in residential and working environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Sebastian; Weis, Philipp; Page, Lukas; Helm, Johanna; Lazariotou, Maria; Einsele, Hermann; Ullmann, Andrew J

    2017-10-01

    Invasive aspergillosis remains a deadly disease in immunocompromised patients, whereas the combination of an exaggerated immune response and continuous exposure lead to various hyperinflammatory diseases. This pilot study aimed to gain an overview of the intra- and inter-individual variability in Aspergillus fumigatus reactive T-helper cells in healthy adults and the correlation with environmental mould exposure. In this flow cytometric study, the frequencies of CD154 + A. fumigatus reactive T cells were evaluated in 70 healthy volunteers. All subjects completed a standardised questionnaire addressing their mould exposure. Subjects with intensive mould exposure in their professional or residential surrounding demonstrated considerably higher mean frequencies of A. fumigatus reactive T-helper and T-memory cells. Comparative evaluation of multiple measurements over time demonstrated relatively conserved reactive T-cell frequencies in the absence of major changes to the exposure profile, whereas those frequently exposed in professional environment or with changes to their risk score demonstrated a marked dependency of antigen reactive T-cell frequencies on recent mould exposure. This pilot study was the first to provide data on the intra-individual variability in A. fumigatus reactive T-cell frequencies and its linkage to mould encounter. Fungus reactive T cells are to be considered a valued tool for the assessment of environmental mould exposure. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Strong negative terahertz photoconductivity in photoexcited graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Maixia; Wang, Xinke; Ye, Jiasheng; Feng, Shengfei; Sun, Wenfeng; Han, Peng; Zhang, Yan

    2018-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) response of a chemical vapor deposited graphene on a quartz substrate has been investigated by using an ultrafast optical-pump THz-probe spectroscopy. Without photoexcitation, the frequency-dependence optical conductivity shows a strong carrier response owing to the intrinsically doped graphene. Upon photoexcitation, an enhancement in THz transmission is observed and the transmission increases nonlinearly with the increase of pump power, which is rooted in a reduction of intrinsic conductivity arising from the strong enhancement of carrier scattering rather than THz emission occurrence. The modulation depth of 18.8% was experimentally achieved, which is more than four times greater than that of the previous reported. The photoinduced response here highlights the variety of response possible in graphene depending on the sample quality, carrier mobility and doping level. The graphene provides promising applications in high-performance THz modulators and THz photoelectric devices.

  17. HER2 signaling pathway activation and response of breast cancer cells to HER2-targeting agents is dependent strongly on the 3D microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigelt, Britta; Lo, Alvin T; Park, Catherine C; Gray, Joe W; Bissell, Mina J

    2009-07-27

    Development of effective and durable breast cancer treatment strategies requires a mechanistic understanding of the influence of the microenvironment on response. Previous work has shown that cellular signaling pathways and cell morphology are dramatically influenced by three-dimensional (3D) cultures as opposed to traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayers. Here, we compared 2D and 3D culture models to determine the impact of 3D architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM) on HER2 signaling and on the response of HER2-amplified breast cancer cell lines to the HER2-targeting agents Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab and Lapatinib. We show that the response of the HER2-amplified AU565, SKBR3 and HCC1569 cells to these anti-HER2 agents was highly dependent on whether the cells were cultured in 2D monolayer or 3D laminin-rich ECM gels. Inhibition of {beta}1 integrin, a major cell-ECM receptor subunit, significantly increased the sensitivity of the HER2-amplified breast cancer cell lines to the humanized monoclonal antibodies Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab when grown in a 3D environment. Finally, in the absence of inhibitors, 3D cultures had substantial impact on HER2 downstream signaling and induced a switch between PI3K-AKT- and RAS-MAPKpathway activation in all cell lines studied, including cells lacking HER2 amplification and overexpression. Our data provide direct evidence that breast cancer cells are able to rapidly adapt to different environments and signaling cues by activating alternative pathways that regulate proliferation and cell survival, events that may play a significant role in the acquisition of resistance to targeted therapies.

  18. HER2 signaling pathway activation and response of breast cancer cells to HER2-targeting agents is dependent strongly on the 3D microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigelt, Britta; Lo, Alvin T; Park, Catherine C; Gray, Joe W; Bissell, Mina J

    2010-07-01

    Development of effective and durable breast cancer treatment strategies requires a mechanistic understanding of the influence of the microenvironment on response. Previous work has shown that cellular signaling pathways and cell morphology are dramatically influenced by three-dimensional (3D) cultures as opposed to traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayers. Here, we compared 2D and 3D culture models to determine the impact of 3D architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM) on HER2 signaling and on the response of HER2-amplified breast cancer cell lines to the HER2-targeting agents Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab and Lapatinib. We show that the response of the HER2-amplified AU565, SKBR3 and HCC1569 cells to these anti-HER2 agents was highly dependent on whether the cells were cultured in 2D monolayer or 3D laminin-rich ECM gels. Inhibition of beta1 integrin, a major cell-ECM receptor subunit, significantly increased the sensitivity of the HER2-amplified breast cancer cell lines to the humanized monoclonal antibodies Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab when grown in a 3D environment. Finally, in the absence of inhibitors, 3D cultures had substantial impact on HER2 downstream signaling and induced a switch between PI3K-AKT- and RAS-MAPK-pathway activation in all cell lines studied, including cells lacking HER2 amplification and overexpression. Our data provide direct evidence that breast cancer cells are able to rapidly adapt to different environments and signaling cues by activating alternative pathways that regulate proliferation and cell survival, events that may play a significant role in the acquisition of resistance to targeted therapies.

  19. Overexpression of KIR inhibitory ligands (HLA-I) determines that immunosurveillance of myeloma depends on diverse and strong NK cell licensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, María V; Periago, Adela; Legaz, Isabel; Gimeno, Lourdes; Mrowiec, Anna; Montes-Barqueros, Natividad R; Campillo, José A; Bolarin, José M; Bernardo, María V; López-Álvarez, María R; González, Consuelo; García-Garay, María C; Muro, Manuel; Cabañas-Perianes, Valentin; Fuster, Jose L; García-Alonso, Ana M; Moraleda, José M; Álvarez-Lopez, María R; Minguela, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    -missing-self cancers, e.g., myeloma, mainly depends on NKc licensing.

  20. Frequency-dependent transition from homogeneous to constricted shape in surface dielectric barrier discharge and its impact on biological target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazukin, A. V.; Serdukov, Y. A.; Pinchuk, M. E.; Stepanova, O. M.; Krivov, S. A.; Grabelnykh, O. I.

    2018-01-01

    The results of an experimental research of influence the surface dielectric discharge products excited by alternating sinusoidal voltage with RMS of 3.5 kV across the barrier of aluminum nitride with frequency of 50 Hz–100 kHz on a germination of soft winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are presented. The stimulation effect on seedling morphological characteristics (sprout length and total length of roots) was observed but its reproducibility with combining the same processing conditions and subsequent germination is insignificant.

  1. Performance Study of Acoustophoretic Microfluidic Silicon-Glass Devices by Characterization of Material- and Geometry-Dependent Frequency Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garofalo, Fabio; Laurell, Thomas; Bruus, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical response of acoustophoretic microfluidic devices attached to an ac-voltage-driven piezoelectric transducer is studied by means of numerical simulations. The governing equations are formulated in a variational framework that, introducing Lagrangian and Hamiltonian...... of the hard-to-measure mechanical indicators is correlated to that of the easy-to-measure electrical indicators, and, by introducing optimality criteria, it is clarified to which extent the latter suffices to identify optimal driving frequencies as the geometric configuration and the material parameters vary....... The latter have been varied by considering both Pyrex and aluminium nitroxide top-lid materials....

  2. Multispectral Fitting Validation of the Speed Dependent Voigt Profile at up to 1300K in Water Vapor with a Dual Frequency Comb Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Paul James; Cich, Matthew J.; Yang, Jinyu; Drouin, Brian; Rieker, Greg B.

    2017-06-01

    Using broadband, high resolution dual frequency comb spectroscopy, we test the power law temperature scaling relationship with Voigt, Rautian, and quadratic speed dependent Voigt profiles over a temperature range of 296-1300K for pure water vapor. The instrument covers the spectral range from 6800 cm^{-1} to 7200 cm^{-1} and samples the (101)-(000), (200)-(000), (021)-(000), (111)-(010), (210)-(010), and (031)-(010) vibrational bands of water. The data is sampled with a point spacing of 0.0033 cm^{-1} and absolute frequency accuracy of gas temperature within coal gasifiers and other high temperature systems. In order to extract water concentration and temperature, an extended range of lineshape parameters are needed. Lineshape parameters for pure and argon broadened water are obtained for 278 transitions using the multispectral fitting program Labfit, including self-broadening coefficients, power law temperature scaling exponents, and speed dependence coefficients. The extended temperature range of the data provides valuable insight into the application of the speed-dependence corrections of the line profiles, which are shown to have more reasonable line broadening temperature dependencies.

  3. Thickness-dependent coherent phonon frequency in ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO3 films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shuolong [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Sobota, Jonathan A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Leuenberger, Dominik [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Kemper, Alexander F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lee, James J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Schmitt, Felix T. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Li, Wei [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Moore, Rob G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Kirchmann, Patrick S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Shen, Zhi -Xun [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Ultrathin FeSe films grown on SrTiO3 substrates are a recent milestone in atomic material engineering due to their important role in understanding unconventional superconductivity in Fe-based materials. By using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, we study phonon frequencies in ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO3 films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. After optical excitation, we observe periodic modulations of the photoelectron spectrum as a function of pump–probe delay for 1-unit-cell, 3-unit-cell, and 60-unit-cell thick FeSe films. The frequencies of the coherent intensity oscillations increase from 5.00 ± 0.02 to 5.25 ± 0.02 THz with increasing film thickness. By comparing with previous works, we attribute this mode to the Se A1g phonon. The dominant mechanism for the phonon softening in 1-unit-cell thick FeSe films is a substrate-induced lattice strain. Results demonstrate an abrupt phonon renormalization due to a lattice mismatch between the ultrathin film and the substrate.

  4. Research of dependence of charges of electric power from frequency of rotation of working organs module for a grade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юрий Иванович Токолов

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available By experimental researches of the ragged process of growing shallow of grain of wheat in the production of wheat flour on the roller crushing module pilot plant with infinitely variable rotor speed of the motor installed power losses dependence and consumption of motor speed of working bodies, the gap between them and the number of contact points of grain-growing material with fluted shallow rollers.

  5. Fabricating off-diagonal components of frequency-dependent linear and nonlinear polarizabilities of doped quantum dots by Gaussian white noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Surajit [Department of Chemistry, Bishnupur Ramananda College, Bishnupur, Bankura 722122, West Bengal (India); Ganguly, Jayanta [Department of Chemistry, Brahmankhanda Basapara High School, Basapara, Birbhum 731215, West Bengal (India); Ghosh, Manas, E-mail: pcmg77@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India)

    2015-07-15

    We make a rigorous exploration of the profiles of off-diagonal components of frequency-dependent linear (α{sub xy}, α{sub yx}), first nonlinear (β{sub xyy}, β{sub yxx}), and second nonlinear (γ{sub xxyy}, γ{sub yyxx}) polarizabilities of quantum dots driven by Gaussian white noise. The quantum dot is doped with repulsive Gaussian impurity. Noise has been applied additively and multiplicatively to the system. An external oscillatory electric field has also been applied to the system. Gradual variations of external frequency, dopant location, and noise strength give rise to interesting features of polarizability components. The observations reveal intricate interplay between noise strength and dopant location which designs the polarizability profiles. Moreover, the mode of application of noise also modulates the polarizability components. Interestingly, in case of additive noise the noise strength has no role on polarizabilities whereas multiplicative noise invites greater delicacy in them. The said interplay provides a rather involved framework to attain stable, enhanced, and often maximized output of linear and nonlinear polarizabilities. - Highlights: • Linear and nonlinear polarizabilities of quantum dot are studied. • The polarizability components are off-diagonal and frequency-dependent. • Quantum dot is doped with a repulsive impurity. • Doped system is subject to Gaussian white noise. • Mode of noise application affects polarizabilities.

  6. Comprehensive analysis of structure and temperature, frequency and concentration-dependent dielectric properties of lithium-substituted cobalt ferrites (Li x Co1- x Fe2O4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Safia; Nisa, Mehru; Sabah, Aneeqa; Rafique, M. S.; Zia, Rehana

    2017-08-01

    This paper has been dedicated to the synthesis and characterization of a series of lithium-substituted cobalt ferrites Li x Co1- x Fe2O4 ( x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1). These samples have been prepared using simple ball milling machine through powder metallurgy route. The structural analysis is carried out using X-ray diffractometer and their 3D vitalization is simulated using diamond software. The frequency and temperature-dependent dielectric properties of prepared samples have been measured using inductor capacitor resistor (LCR) meter. The structural analysis confirms that all the prepared samples have inverse cubic spinel structure. It is also revealed that the crystallite size and lattice parameter decrease with the increasing concentration of lithium (Li+1) ions, it is due to the smaller ionic radii of lithium ions. The comprehensive analysis of frequency, concentration and temperature-dependent dielectric properties of prepared samples is described in this paper. It is observed that the dielectric constant and tangent loss have decreased and conductivity increased as the frequency increases. It is also revealed that the dielectric constant, tangent loss and AC conductivity increase as the concentration of lithium increases due to its lower electronegativity value. Temperature plays a vital role in enhancing the dielectric constant, tangent loss and AC conductivity because the mobility of ions increases as the temperature increases.

  7. Characterization of Fibre-Direction Dependent Damping of Glass-Fibre Composites at Low Temperatures and Low Frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kliem, Mathias; Høgsberg, Jan Becker; Dannemann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    a Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) for five different fibre orientations (0˚ | 30˚ | 45˚ | 60˚ and 90˚) and two different matrix systems (epoxy and a vinyl ester resin). Based on the dynamic characteristics the damping performance of the various composite materials was studied at three temperatures (-10˚C......, 0˚C and 10˚C) and three vibration frequencies (1 Hz, 10 Hz and 30 Hz). It was observed that the loss factor of Glass Fibre Reinforced Vinyl-Ester (GF-VE) was in general slightly higher compared to the Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy (GF-EP). The loss factor increased slightly with temperature, while...

  8. How to fully exploit frequency-dependent S-wave travel times for refining the Earth's mantle imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaroli, C.; Nolet, G.; Charlety, J.; Debayle, E.; Sambridge, M.

    2011-12-01

    To better constrain the structure of the Earth's interior, new theoretical developments on seismic wave propagation have emerged in recent years, and received increasing attention in global tomography. A recent focus has been to take into account the "Finite-Frequency" (FF) behaviour of seismic waves (e.g. wavefront-healing). We have chosen to use the FF approach by Dahlen et al. (2000) in multiple frequency bands, based on a ray-Born approximation, also known as Multiple-Frequency Tomography (MFT). The principle of MFT is to invert delay times measured in several frequency bands, using 3-D FF sensitivity kernels for modeling single-scattering phenomena undergone by seismic waves. Such FF effects are intrinsically always present in delay times measured by waveform cross-correlation (as opposed to onset measurements in ray theory). In this study, we pose the question how much MFT really contributes to improving the 3-D imaging of the deep Earth structure? We investigate the role of the model parameterization and regularization when using MFT, in our ability/unability to map the structural dispersion present in the data into a tomographic model. Our data consist of 274 066 globally distributed S, ScS and SS time residuals measured at 10, 15, 22 and 34 s period (Zaroli et al., 2010). Two ways of parameterizing the Earth's mantle, and their implications on the model obtained using MFT, are presented. One is based on irregularly spaced spherical triangular prisms, with nodes spacing ranging from 200 to 900 km, i.e. a "coarse" parameterization. The other is based on a "cubed Earth", that consists of cubic cells of 70 km size near the top, down to 35 km near the base of the mantle, i.e. a "fine" parameterization. We also investigate how the model regularization (i.e. choice of the damping parameter in the inversion) may prevent us from fully exploiting the extra information, on the 3-D structure, present in our multi-band dataset. We present a comparison of a multi

  9. The frequency-dependent AC photoresistance behavior of ZnO thin films grown on different sapphire substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholula-Díaz, Jorge L; Barzola-Quiquia, José; Videa, Marcelo; Yin, Chunhai; Esquinazi, Pablo

    2017-09-13

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films were grown by pulsed layer deposition under an N 2 atmosphere at low pressures on a- and r-plane sapphire substrates. Structural studies using X-ray diffraction confirmed that all films had a wurtzite phase. ZnO thin films on a- and r-plane sapphire have grown with orientations along the [0002] and [112[combining macron]0] directions, respectively. Room temperature photoluminescence measurements indicate that the presence of native point defects (interstitial zinc, oxygen vacancies, oxygen antisites and zinc vacancies) is more preponderant for ZnO thin films grown on the r-plane sapphire substrate than the sample grown on the a-plane sapphire substrate. Room temperature impedance spectroscopy measurements were performed in an alternating current frequency range from 40 to 10 5 Hz in the dark and under normal light. An unusual positive photoresistance effect is observed at frequencies above 100 kHz, which we suggest to be due to intrinsic defects present in the ZnO thin films. Furthermore, an analysis of the optical time response revealed that the film grown on the r-plane sapphire substrate responds faster (characteristic relaxation times for τ 1 , τ 2 and τ 3 of 0.05, 0.26 and 6.00 min, respectively) than the film grown on the a-plane sapphire substrate (characteristic relaxation times for τ 1 , τ 2 and τ 3 of 0.10, 0.73 and 4.02 min, respectively).

  10. Spontaneous magnetic alignment by yearling snapping turtles: rapid association of radio frequency dependent pattern of magnetic input with novel surroundings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landler, Lukas; Painter, Michael S; Youmans, Paul W; Hopkins, William A; Phillips, John B

    2015-01-01

    We investigated spontaneous magnetic alignment (SMA) by juvenile snapping turtles using exposure to low-level radio frequency (RF) fields at the Larmor frequency to help characterize the underlying sensory mechanism. Turtles, first introduced to the testing environment without the presence of RF aligned consistently towards magnetic north when subsequent magnetic testing conditions were also free of RF ('RF off → RF off'), but were disoriented when subsequently exposed to RF ('RF off → RF on'). In contrast, animals initially introduced to the testing environment with RF present were disoriented when tested without RF ('RF on → RF off'), but aligned towards magnetic south when tested with RF ('RF on → RF on'). Sensitivity of the SMA response of yearling turtles to RF is consistent with the involvement of a radical pair mechanism. Furthermore, the effect of RF appears to result from a change in the pattern of magnetic input, rather than elimination of magnetic input altogether, as proposed to explain similar effects in other systems/organisms. The findings show that turtles first exposed to a novel environment form a lasting association between the pattern of magnetic input and their surroundings. However, under natural conditions turtles would never experience a change in the pattern of magnetic input. Therefore, if turtles form a similar association of magnetic cues with the surroundings each time they encounter unfamiliar habitat, as seems likely, the same pattern of magnetic input would be associated with multiple sites/localities. This would be expected from a sensory input that functions as a global reference frame, helping to place multiple locales (i.e., multiple local landmark arrays) into register to form a global map of familiar space.

  11. Expression of Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs in Aged Skeletal Muscles Depends on the Frequency and Duration of Exercise Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Seok Kim, Young-Hee Lee, Do-Yourl Choi, Ho-Keun Yi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The skeletal muscle in aged rats adapts rapidly following a period of exercise. This adaptation includes structural remodeling and biochemical changes such as an up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes, content of stress and heat shock proteins (HSPs. However, the associated molecular mechanisms mediating different types of exercise training-induced adaptations are not yet completely understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of duration and frequency exercise on the expression of HSPs, antioxidant enzymes, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs in the skeletal muscles of aged rats. Young (3-month-old and aged (20-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to 6 groups and extensor digitorum longus (EDL; fast twitch muscle fiber and soleus (SOL; slow twitch muscle fiber skeletal muscles were collected immediately. The expression pattern of HSPs in skeletal muscles was decreased in old groups compared with young groups. Especially, HSPs showed lower expression in SOL than EDL muscle. Interestingly, HSPs in aged rats was increased significantly after S1 (single long-duration; 1×30 min, 5 days/week for 6 weeks and M1 types (multiple short-duration; 3×10 min·day−1, 5 days·week−1 for 6 weeks than S2 (single long-duration; 1×30 min, 3 days/week for 6 weeks and M2 (multiple short-duration; 3×10 min·day−1, 3 days·week−1 for 6 weeks types of exercise training. Also, superoxide dismutase (SODs showed similar expression as HSP did. On the contrary, the p-ERK and p-JNK were down regulated. In addition, p-p38 level in the SOL muscle was activated markedly in all exercise groups. These results demonstrate that increasing of HSP expression through duration and frequency exercise can lead to protection and training-induced adaptation against aging-induced structural weakness in skeletal muscles.

  12. Microstructural, electrical and frequency-dependent properties of Au/p-Cu2ZnSnS4/n-GaN heterojunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal Reddy, V; Janardhanam, V; Won, Jonghan; Choi, Chel-Jong

    2017-08-01

    An Au/Cu 2 ZnSnS 4 (CZTS)/n-GaN heterojunction (HJ) is fabricated with a CZTS interlayer and probed its chemical states, structural, electrical and frequency-dependent characteristics by XPS, TEM, I-V and C-V measurements. XPS and TEM results confirmed that the CZTS films are formed on the n-GaN surface. The band gap of deposited CZTS film is found to be 1.55eV. The electrical properties of HJ correlated with the Au/n-GaN Schottky junction (SJ). The Au/CZTS/n-GaN HJ reveals a good rectification nature with high barrier height (0.82eV) compared to the Au/n-GaN SJ (0.69eV), which suggests the barrier height is influenced by the CZTS interlayer. The barrier height values assessed by I-V, Cheung's and Norde functions are closely matched with one other, thus the methods used here are reliable and valid. The extracted interface state density (N SS ) of Au/CZTS/n-GaN HJ is lower compared to the Au/n-GaN SJ that suggests the CZTS interlayer plays an important role in the reduction of N SS . Moreover, the capacitance-frequency (C-f) and conductance-frequency (G-f) characteristics of SJ and HJ are measured in the range of 1kHz-1MHz, and found that the capacitance and conductance strappingly dependent on frequency. It is found that the N SS estimated from C-f and G-f characteristics is lower compared to those estimated from I-V characteristics. Analysis confirmed that Poole-Frenkel emission dominates the reverse leakage current in both SJ and HJ, probably related to the structural defects and trap levels in the CZTS interlayer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Frequency dependence of electrical properties of polyvinylidene fluoride/graphite electrode waste/natural carbon black composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insiyanda, D. R.; Indayaningsih, N.; Prihandoko, B.; Subhan, A.; Khaerudini, D. S.; Widodo, H.; Destyorini, F.; Chaer, A.

    2018-03-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVdF) is a semi-crystalline thermoplastic material with remarkably high piezoelectric coefficient and an attractive polymer matrix for micro-composite with superior mechanical and electrical properties. The conductive filler is obtained from Graphite Electrode Waste (GEW) and Natural Carbon Black (NCB). The variation of composite content (%) of PVdF/NCB/GEW were 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 95/0/5, 95/2.5/2.5. This experiment employed dry dispersion method for material mixing. The materials were then moulded using hot press machine with compression parameters of P = 5.5 MPa, T = 150 °C, t = 60 minutes, A = 5×5×(0.2 - 0.4) cm3. The electrical conductivity properties of pure PVdF, as well as PVdF/GEW, PVdF/NCB, and PVdF/NCB/GEW composites were investigated in a frequency range of 100 to 100000 Hz. The PVdF/GEW sample obtained the highest electrical conductivity. It is concluded that GEW and NCB can be incorporated into PVdF as a conductive filler to increase the conductivity of conductive material composite without solvent.

  14. Statistical analysis of whole-body absorption depending on anatomical human characteristics at a frequency of 2.1 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Habachi, A.; Conil, E.; Hadjem, A.; Vazquez, E.; Wong, M. F.; Gati, A.; Fleury, G.; Wiart, J.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we propose identification of the morphological factors that may impact the whole-body averaged specific absorption rate (WBSAR). This study is conducted for the case of exposure to a front plane wave at a 2100 MHz frequency carrier. This study is based on the development of different regression models for estimating the WBSAR as a function of morphological factors. For this purpose, a database of 12 anatomical human models (phantoms) has been considered. Also, 18 supplementary phantoms obtained using the morphing technique were generated to build the required relation. This paper presents three models based on external morphological factors such as the body surface area, the body mass index or the body mass. These models show good results in estimating the WBSAR (stresses the importance of the internal morphological factors such as muscle and fat proportions in characterization of the WBSAR. The regression models are then improved using internal morphological factors with an estimation error of approximately 10% on the WBSAR. Finally, this study is suitable for establishing the statistical distribution of the WBSAR for a given population characterized by its morphology.

  15. Frequency-dependent depression of excitatory synaptic transmission is independent of activation of MCPG-sensitive presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, R; Cummings, D D; Dichter, M A

    1995-10-01

    1. A paired-pulse paradigm, and a high-frequency train followed by a test pulse, were used to investigate the possible role of presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in frequency-dependent modulation of the amplitude of excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs). Paired whole cell patch-clamp recordings from monosynaptically connected hippocampal neurons maintained in very low-density cultures were performed, using the mGluR antagonist (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG, 500 microM) and the mGluR agonist (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid [(1S,3R)-ACPD, 100 microM]. 2. Paired-pulse depression (PPD) was observed in all the excitatory pairs recorded. The average PPD ratio (amplitude of the 2nd EPSC divided by the amplitude of the 1st EPSC) was 0.80 +/- 0.1 (SD) (n = 8). Application of the mGluR antagonist MCPG had no effect on the amplitude of the EPSCs and did not affect the ratio of the two EPSCs (PPD ratio 0.79 +/- 0.2). 3. The amplitudes of 10 successive EPSCs stimulated at a high frequency (20 Hz) decremented on average in both 4 mM extracellular Ca2+ (n = 5) and in 1 mM extracellular Ca2+ (n = 6). In all pairs tested, posttetanic depression (PTD) was observed (PTD ratio 0.7 +/- 0.2). Bath application of MCPG (500 microM) did not affect the amplitudes of the EPSCs during the train; MCPG also did not affect PTD. 4. The mGluR agonist (1S,3R)-ACPD depressed the amplitudes of the EPSCs in both the paired-pulse (1st EPSC, 35 +/- 9%; 2nd EPSC, 36 +/- 10%) and posttetanic pulse (1 and 4 mM extracellular Ca2+) paradigms. The amount of depression observed, both PPD and PTD, remained unaffected by application of (1S,3R)-ACPD. Coapplication of the antagonist MCPG (500 microM) blocked the effects of (1S,3R)-ACPD (100 microM). 5. We conclude that frequency-dependent depression of EPSC amplitudes occurs independent of endogenous activation of MCPG-sensitive mGluRs in cultured hippocampal neurons. Moreover, we demonstrate that exogenous

  16. Theory of photostructural changes in glasses with negative-U centers: dependencies of steady-state photodarkening on gap-light intensity and frequency, pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinger, M.I.

    2004-01-01

    A theory is presented of a mechanism for the photostructural changes observed in semiconducting glasses. The theory takes into account that in these materials negative-U centers are the basic charge carriers, and gap-light generated excited states of such centers are accompanied by metastable 'defects' in the original structure, which can be identified as the photostructural changes. The theory gives rise to a consistent interpretation, and some predictions, of dependencies of the steady-state photodarkening on gap-light intensity and frequency, pressure and temperature

  17. Frequency-dependent dynamic magnetic properties of the Ising bilayer system consisting of spin-3/2 and spin-5/2 spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Mustafa; Ertaş, Mehmet

    2018-04-01

    Dynamic magnetic properties of the Ising bilayer system consisting of the mixed (3/2, 5/2) Ising spins with a crystal-field interaction in an oscillating field on a two-layer square lattice is studied by the use of dynamic mean-field theory based on the Glauber-type stochastic. Dynamic phase transition temperatures are obtained and dynamic phase diagrams are presented in three different planes. The frequency dependence of dynamic hysteresis loops is also investigated in detail. We compare the results with some available theoretical and experimental works and observe a quantitatively good agreement with some theoretical and experimental results.

  18. Microstructure and frequency dependent electrical properties of lead-free Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3 perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praharaj, S.; Kumari, S.; Subramanian, V.; Rout, D.

    2017-05-01

    Single phase Pb-free Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3 ceramics are synthesized with rhombohedral structure. Cold isostatic pressing of NBT green pellets at 200 MPa ensured better sinterability that is reflected in the dense micrograph and uni-modal grain size distribution. Grain, grain boundary and space charge effect contributions towards electrical properties are distinctly observed from the impedance study at different temperature range. Frequency dependence of real Z*, Im Z* and ac conductivity studies provides useful information about relaxation and conduction mechanism.

  19. Light-dependent and -independent behavioral effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields in a land snail are consistent with a parametric resonance mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato, F.S.; Thomas, A.W. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada)]|[St. Joseph`s Health Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Kavaliers, M. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Cullen, A.P. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). School of Optometry

    1997-05-01

    Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields has been shown to attenuate endogenous opioid peptide mediated antinociception or analgesia in the terrestrial pulmonate snail, Cepaea nemoralis. Here the authors examine the roles of light in determining this effect and address the mechanisms associated with mediating the effects of the ELF magnetic fields in both the presence and absence of light. Specifically, they consider whether the magnetic field effects involve an indirect induced electric current mechanism or a direct effect such as a parametric resonance mechanism (PRM). They exposed snails in both the presence and absence of light at three different frequencies (30, 60, and 120 Hz) with static field values (B{sub DC}) and ELF magnetic field amplitude (peak) and direction (B{sub AC}) set according to the predictions of the PRM for Ca{sup 2+}. Analgesia was induced in snails by injecting them with an enkephalinase inhibitor, which augments endogenous opioid (enkephalin) activity. They found that the magnetic field exposure reduced this opioid-induced analgesia significantly more if the exposure occurred in the presence rather than the absence of light. However, the percentage reduction in analgesia in both the presence and absence of light was not dependent on the ELF frequency. This finding suggests that in both the presence and the absence of light the effect of the ELF magnetic field was mediated by a direct magnetic field detection mechanism such as the PRM rather than an induced current mechanism.

  20. Frequency Dependent Non- Thermal Effects of Oscillating Electric Fields in the Microwave Region on the Properties of a Solvated Lysozyme System: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelios Floros

    Full Text Available The use of microwaves in every day's applications raises issues regarding the non thermal biological effects of microwaves. In this work we employ molecular dynamics simulations to advance further the dielectric studies of protein solutions in the case of lysozyme, taking into consideration possible frequency dependent changes in the structural and dynamic properties of the system upon application of electric field in the microwave region. The obtained dielectric spectra are identical with those derived in our previous work using the Fröhlich-Kirkwood approach in the framework of the linear response theory. Noticeable structural changes in the protein have been observed only at frequencies near its absorption maximum. Concerning Cα position fluctuations, different frequencies affected different regions of the protein sequence. Furthermore, the influence of the field on the kinetics of protein-water as well as on the water-water hydrogen bonds in the first hydration shell has been studied; an extension of the Luzar-Chandler kinetic model was deemed necessary for a better fit of the applied field results and for the estimation of more accurate hydrogen bond lifetime values.

  1. Impurity strength and impurity domain modulated frequency-dependent linear and second non-linear response properties of doped quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Nirmal Kumar [Department of Physics, Suri Vidyasagar College, Suri, Birbhum 731 101, West Bengal (India); Ghosh, Manas [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India)

    2011-08-15

    We explore the pattern of frequency-dependent linear and second non-linear optical responses of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots harmonically confined in two dimensions. The dopant impurity potential chosen assumes a Gaussian form and it is doped into an on-center location. The quantum dot is subject to a periodically oscillating external electric field. For some fixed values of transverse magnetic field strength ({omega}{sub c}) and harmonic confinement potential ({omega}{sub 0}), the influence of impurity strength (V{sub 0}) and impurity domain ({xi}) on the diagonal components of the frequency-dependent linear ({alpha}{sub xx} and {alpha}{sub yy}) and second non-linear ({gamma}{sub xxxx} and {gamma}{sub yyyy}) responses of the dot are computed through a linear variational route. The investigations reveal that the optical responses undergo enhancement with increase in both V{sub 0} and {xi} values. However, in the limitingly small dopant strength regime one observes a drop in the optical responses with increase in V{sub 0}. A time-average rate of energy transfer to the system is often invoked to support the findings. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Frequency-dependent friction and its significance for liquid pipeline simulation; Influencia do fator de atrito com dependencia da frequencia na simulacao de transientes em oleodutos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tepedino, Alexandre F. [TRANSPETRO - PETROBRAS Transporte S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rachid, Felipe B. Freitas [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Transporte de Liquidos e Gases

    2008-07-01

    Unsteady liquid flow in pipelines is usually described by using one-dimensional models and, in a procedure referred to as quasi-steady approximation, friction losses are estimated by formulae derived for steady state flow conditions. The assumption is that the friction loss during transient flow conditions can be approximated by the friction loss obtained for a steady flow with the same average velocity. However, during unsteady flow conditions the velocity profile can be considerably different from the steady flow. The shear stress at the pipe wall and the mean velocity are not in phase. Therefore, friction losses computed according to the quasi-steady approximation are inaccurate. To overcome this, the concept of frequency-dependent friction was proposed, including the time history of the mean flow velocity and acceleration, resulting in better correlation to experimental data. This work presents an investigation of situations in which the use of a frequency-dependent friction model could bring additional improvement for the petroleum and products pipeline simulation. To do so, through computer simulations, the predictions of both quasi-steady and unsteady friction models, for short and long lines, operating under a range of Reynolds numbers, are compared and the significance of the friction model is evaluated. (author)

  3. Frequency-dependent brain regional homogeneity alterations in patients with mild cognitive impairment during working memory state relative to resting state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengyun eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported working memory deficits in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI. However, previous studies investigating the neural mechanisms of MCI have primarily focused on brain activity alterations during working memory tasks. No study to date has compared brain network alterations in the working memory state between MCI patients and normal control subjects. Therefore, using the index of regional homogeneity (ReHo, we explored brain network impairments in MCI patients during a working memory task relative to the resting state, and identified frequency-dependent effects in separate frequency bands.Our results indicate that, in MCI patients, ReHo is altered in the posterior cingulate cortex in the slow-3 band (0.073–0.198 Hz, and in the bottom of the right occipital lobe and part of the right cerebellum, the right thalamus, a diffusing region in the bilateral prefrontal cortex, the left and right parietal-occipital regions, and the right angular gyrus in the slow-5 band (0.01–0.027 Hz. Furthermore, in normal controls, the value of ReHo in clusters belonging to the default mode network decreased, while the value of ReHo in clusters belonging to the attentional network increased during the task state. However, this pattern was reversed in MCI patients, and was associated with decreased working memory performance. In addition, we identified altered functional connectivity of the abovementioned regions with other parts of the brain in MCI patients.This is the first study to compare frequency-dependent alterations of ReHo in MCI patients between resting and working memory states. The results provide a new perspective regarding the neural mechanisms of working memory deficits in MCI patients, and extend our knowledge of altered brain patterns in resting and task-evoked states.

  4. Electrodynamics of a hydrogenlike atom in a strong electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovarskij, V.A.; Perel'man, N.F.

    1974-01-01

    The quasienergy spectrum of the hydrogen atom in strong electromagnetic radiation is studied, the luminescence of the atom under these conditions is considered. It is shown that in a strong field the atom, being even in the ground state, radiates a spectrum of frequencies corresponding to transitions from the ground state into excited states, the strong field photons being involved. The intensity of such a luminescence is basically a non-linear function of the strong field. The exposure of the atom to two strong electromagnetic fields Ω and ω (Ω>>ω) is considered, the Ω coinciding with one of the natural frquencies of the atom. The effct of modulation of the resonance shift for an atomic level by the ω-field strength is predicted. The dependence of Ω-absorption in the ω-field on the statistic properties of the latter is investigated. (author)

  5. Soluble ICAM-5, a product of activity dependent proteolysis, increases mEPSC frequency and dendritic expression of GluA1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Lonskaya

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are zinc dependent endopeptidases that can be released from neurons in an activity dependent manner to play a role in varied forms of learning and memory. MMP inhibitors impair hippocampal long term potentiation (LTP, spatial memory, and behavioral correlates of drug addiction. Since MMPs are thought to influence LTP through a β1 integrin dependent mechanism, it has been suggested that these enzymes cleave specific substrates to generate integrin binding ligands. In previously published work, we have shown that neuronal activity stimulates rapid MMP dependent shedding of intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5, a synaptic adhesion molecule expressed on dendrites of the telencephalon. We have also shown that the ICAM-5 ectodomain can interact with β1 integrins to stimulate integrin dependent phosphorylation of cofilin, an event that occurs with dendritic spine maturation and LTP. In the current study, we investigate the potential for the ICAM-5 ectodomain to stimulate changes in α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptor (AMPAR dependent glutamatergic transmission. Single cell recordings show that the ICAM-5 ectodomain stimulates an increase in the frequency, but not the amplitude, of AMPA mini excitatory post synaptic currents (mEPSCs. With biotinylation and precipitation assays, we also show that the ICAM-5 ectodomain stimulates an increase in membrane levels of GluA1, but not GluA2, AMPAR subunits. In addition, we observe an ICAM-5 associated increase in GluA1 phosphorylation at serine 845. Concomitantly, ICAM-5 affects an increase in GluA1 surface staining along dendrites without affecting an increase in dendritic spine number. Together these data are consistent with the possibility that soluble ICAM-5 increases glutamatergic transmission and that post-synaptic changes, including increased phosphorylation and dendritic insertion of GluA1, could contribute. We suggest that future studies

  6. Frequency-Dependent Social Transmission and the Interethnic Transfer of Female Genital Modification in the African Diaspora and Indigenous Populations of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Cody T; Campiño, Patricia Joyas; Winterhalder, Bruce

    2015-12-01

    We present a quantitative account based on ethnographic and documentary research of the prevalence of female genital modification (FGMo) in the African diaspora and indigenous populations of Colombia. We use these data to test hypotheses concerning the cultural evolutionary drivers of costly trait persistence, attenuation, and intergroup transmission. The uptake of FGMo by indigenous populations in Colombia is consistent with frequency-dependent hypotheses for the social transmission of the FGMo trait from the African diaspora population in the period following the era of slavery in Colombia. The prevalence and severity of practices related to FGMo decline with level of sociocultural integration into mainstream Colombian culture. Our results provide empirical support for the cultural evolutionary models proposed by Ross et al. (2015) to describe the transmission dynamics of FGMo and other costly traits. Analysis of costly trait dynamics contributes knowledge useful to applied anthropology and may be of interest in policy design and human rights monitoring in Colombia and elsewhere.

  7. Age dependence of dielectric properties of bovine brain and ocular tissues in the frequency range of 400 MHz to 18 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, Gernot; Ueberbacher, Richard

    2005-01-01

    In order to identify possible age-dependent dielectric properties of brain and eye tissues in the frequency range of 400 MHz to 18 GHz, measurements on bovine grey and white matter as well as on cornea, lens (cortical) and the vitreous body were performed using a commercially available open-ended coaxial probe and a computer-controlled vector network analyser. Freshly excised tissues of 52 animals of two age groups (42 adult animals, i.e. 16-24 month old and 10 young animals, i.e. 4-6 month old calves) were examined within 8 min (brain tissue) and 15 min (eye tissue), respectively, of the animals' death. Tissue temperatures for the measurements were 32 ± 1 0 C and 25 ± 1 0 C for brain and eye tissues, respectively. Statistical analysis of the measured data revealed significant differences in the dielectric properties of white matter and cortical lens tissue between the adult and the young group. In the case of white matter the mean values of conductivity and permittivity of young tissue were 15%-22% and 12%-15%, respectively, higher compared to the adult tissue in the considered frequency range. Similarly, young cortical lens tissue was 25%-76% higher in conductivity and 27%-39% higher in permittivity than adult cortical lens tissue

  8. Computer simulation and experiments to investigate the effects of frequency-dependent attenuation and dispersion on speed-of-sound estimates in cancellous bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, Keith A.

    2001-05-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that time-domain speed-of- sound (SOS) measurement sin calcaneus are predictive of osteoporotic fracture risk. However there is a lack of standardization for this measurement. Consequently, different investigators using different measurement systems and analysis algorithms obtain disparate quantitative values for calcaneal SOS, impairing and often precluding meaningful comparison and/or pooling of measurements. A numerical method has been developed to model the effects of frequency- dependent attenuation and dispersion on transit-time-based SOS estimates. The numerical technique is based on a previously developed linear system analytic model for Gaussian pulses propagating through linearly attenuating, weakly dispersive media. The numerical approach is somewhat more general in that it can be used to predict the effects of arbitrary pulse shapes and dispersion relationships. The numerical technique however utilizes several additional assumptions (compared with the analytic model) which would be required for the practical task of correcting existing clinical databases. These include a single dispersion relationship for all calcaneus samples, a simple linear model relating phase velocity to broadband ultrasonic attenuation, and a constant calcaneal thickness. Measurements on a polycarbonate plate and thirty human calcaneus samples were in good quantitative agreement with numerical predictions. In addition, the numerical approach predicts that in cancellous bone, frequency-dependent attenuation tends to be a greater contributor to variations in transit-time-based SOS estimates than dispersion. This approach may be used to adjust previously acquired individual measurements so that SOS data recorded with different devices using different algorithms may be compared in a meaningful fashion.

  9. Enhanced thermal photon and dilepton production in strongly coupled = 4 SYM plasma in strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, Kiminad A.

    2013-08-01

    We calculate the DC conductivity tensor of strongly coupled = 4 super-Yang-Mills (SYM) plasma in a presence of a strong external magnetic field B ≫ T 2 by using its gravity dual and employing both the RG flow approach and membrane paradigm which give the same results. We find that, since the magnetic field B induces anisotropy in the plasma, different components of the DC conductivity tensor have different magnitudes depending on whether its components are in the direction of the magnetic field B. In particular, we find that a component of the DC conductivity tensor in the direction of the magnetic field B increases linearly with B while the other components (which are not in the direction of the magnetic field B) are independent of it. These results are consistent with the lattice computations of the DC conductivity tensor of the QCD plasma in an external magnetic field B. Using the DC conductivity tensor, we calculate the soft or low-frequency thermal photon and dilepton production rates of the strongly coupled = 4 SYM plasma in the presence of the strong external magnetic field B ≫ T 2. We find that the strong magnetic field B enhances both the thermal photon and dilepton production rates of the strongly coupled = 4 SYM plasma in a qualitative agreement with the experimentally observed enhancements at the heavy-ion collision experiments.

  10. Hyperosmotic stress strongly potentiates serum response factor (SRF)-dependent transcriptional activity in ehrlich lettré ascites cells through a mechanism involving p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbatenko, Andrej; Wiwel, Maria; Klingberg, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    ) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) are differentially regulated in ELA cells. SRF Ser103 phosphorylation and SRF-dependent transcriptional activity were strongly augmented 5–30¿min and 24¿h, respectively, after hyperosmotic stress (50% increase in extracellular ionic strength), in a p38...... is transiently inhibited while p38 MAPK is activated, in turn impacting on cell survival (Pedersen et al., 2007, Cell Physiol Biochem 20: 735–750). Here, we show that downstream of these kinases, two transcription factors with major roles in control of cell proliferation and death, serum response factor (SRF......Long-term osmotic stress results in altered gene transcription, however, with the exception of the TonE/TonEBP system, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We previously showed that upon osmotic shrinkage of Ehrlich Lettré Ascites (ELA) fibroblasts, the MEK1-ERK1/2 pathway...

  11. Towards TDDFT for Strongly Correlated Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shree Ram Acharya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present some details of our recently-proposed Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory (TDDFT for strongly-correlated materials in which the exchange-correlation (XC kernel is derived from the charge susceptibility obtained using Dynamical Mean-Field Theory (the TDDFT + DMFT approach. We proceed with deriving the expression for the XC kernel for the one-band Hubbard model by solving DMFT equations via two approaches, the Hirsch–Fye Quantum Monte Carlo (HF-QMC and an approximate low-cost perturbation theory approach, and demonstrate that the latter gives results that are comparable to the exact HF-QMC solution. Furthermore, through a variety of applications, we propose a simple analytical formula for the XC kernel. Additionally, we use the exact and approximate kernels to examine the nonhomogeneous ultrafast response of two systems: a one-band Hubbard model and a Mott insulator YTiO3. We show that the frequency dependence of the kernel, i.e., memory effects, is important for dynamics at the femtosecond timescale. We also conclude that strong correlations lead to the presence of beats in the time-dependent electric conductivity in YTiO3, a feature that could be tested experimentally and that could help validate the few approximations used in our formulation. We conclude by proposing an algorithm for the generalization of the theory to non-linear response.

  12. Coherence and quasistable states in a strong infrared field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Changchun; Robicheaux, F.

    2016-03-01

    We study the quasistability of UV-pulse-train-excited H atoms in a strong infrared (IR) laser as a function of the phase delay of the UV pulse train relative to the IR laser. The UV pulse train contains two frequency components. When the two components have frequencies separated by two IR photons, the population of surviving electrons is modulated by up to ten percent. When electrons are excited to right above or below the threshold, the survival probabilities have inverted phase delay dependence, which can be explained classically. When the two frequencies are one IR photon apart, the angular symmetry of the quasistable electrons is broken, and the asymmetry is also controlled by the phase delay. The asymmetrical distribution can be observed while the IR is on and smoothly evolves to a nonzero asymmetry that only weakly depends on the duration of the IR field.

  13. Analysis of temperature dependence of {sup 35}Cl-NQR frequency in 2,4-D herbicide (2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid); Analiza temperaturowej zaleznosci czestosci {sup 35}Cl-NQR w herbicydzie 2,4-D (kwas dichlorofenoksyoctowy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurek, P.; Ostafin, M.; Kasprzak, J.; Nogaj, B. [Inst. Fizyki, Uniwersytet A. Mickiewicza, Poznan (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Biological activity of herbicide depends on electronic structure and molecule dynamics. The former parameter has been investigated by means of NQR spectra on {sup 35}Cl nuclei of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid. The analysis of temperature dependency of observed frequency has been done. 12 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab.

  14. Quantum theory of strong-field frustrated tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popruzhenko, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    We show how the strong-field approximation, widely used for description of multiphoton and tunneling ionization, can be extended to analyse the excitation of bound states in intense low-frequency laser pulses. The proposed theory is based on the formalism of quantum trajectories and fills the gap between the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation and classical simulations. In particular, it allows identifying non-adiabatic and interference effects in strong-field excitation of Rydberg states.

  15. Electric field dependence of optical phonon frequencies in wurtzite GaN observed in GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnall, Kevin R.; Dreyer, Cyrus E.; Vanderbilt, David; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2016-10-01

    the IPE-induced stress from the temperature rise in the ON state and suggests that the IPE-induced stress in the GaN buffer is an order of magnitude smaller than previously believed. Our analysis and experimental results support previous theoretical studies discussing the electric field dependence of optical phonon frequencies apart from the IPE effect and suggest that this is a general phenomenon occurring in all wurtzite and zincblende crystals. The total electric field dependence of the optical phonon frequencies in piezoelectric crystals is a critical consideration in accurately characterizing the stress, strain, electric field, and temperature distributions in microelectronic devices via micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  16. Stimulated Superconductivity at Strong Coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Ning; Dong, Xi; Silverstein, Eva; Torroba, Gonzalo; /Stanford U., ITP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    Stimulating a system with time dependent sources can enhance instabilities, thus increasing the critical temperature at which the system transitions to interesting low-temperature phases such as superconductivity or superfluidity. After reviewing this phenomenon in non-equilibrium BCS theory (and its marginal fermi liquid generalization) we analyze the effect in holographic superconductors. We exhibit a simple regime in which the transition temperature increases parametrically as we increase the frequency of the time-dependent source.

  17. Stirring Strongly Coupled Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir; Rajagopal, Krishna; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2009-01-01

    We determine the energy it takes to move a test quark along a circle of radius L with angular frequency w through the strongly coupled plasma of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory. We find that for most values of L and w the energy deposited by stirring the plasma in this way is governed either by the drag force acting on a test quark moving through the plasma in a straight line with speed v=Lw or by the energy radiated by a quark in circular motion in the absence of any plasma, whichever is larger. There is a continuous crossover from the drag-dominated regime to the radiation-dominated regime. In the crossover regime we find evidence for significant destructive interference between energy loss due to drag and that due to radiation as if in vacuum. The rotating quark thus serves as a model system in which the relative strength of, and interplay between, two different mechanisms of parton energy loss is accessible via a controlled classical gravity calculation. We close by speculating on the implicati...

  18. The frequency-dependent elements in the code SASSI: A bridge between civil engineers and the soil-structure interaction specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyapin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    After four decades of the intensive studies of the soil-structure interaction (SSI) effects in the field of the NPP seismic analysis there is a certain gap between the SSI specialists and civil engineers. The results obtained using the advanced SSI codes like SASSI are often rather far from the results obtained using general codes (though match the experimental and field data). The reasons for the discrepancies are not clear because none of the parties can recall the results of the 'other party' and investigate the influence of various factors causing the difference step by step. As a result, civil engineers neither feel the SSI effects, nor control them. The author believes that the SSI specialists should do the first step forward (a) recalling 'viscous' damping in the structures versus the 'material' one and (b) convoluting all the SSI wave effects into the format of 'soil springs and dashpots', more or less clear for civil engineers. The tool for both tasks could be a special finite element with frequency-dependent stiffness developed by the author for the code SASSI. This element can represent both soil and structure in the SSI model and help to split various factors influencing seismic response. In the paper the theory and some practical issues concerning the new element are presented

  19. Effective implementation of time-frequency matched filter with adapted pre and postprocessing for data-dependent detection of newborn seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlif, M S; Colditz, P B; Boashash, B

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal EEG seizures often manifest as nonstationary and multicomponent signals, necessitating analysis in the time-frequency (TF) domain. This paper presents a novel neonatal seizure detector based on effective implementation of the TF matched filter. In the detection process, the TF signatures of EEG seizure are extracted to construct the TF templates used by the matched filter. Matching pursuit (MP) decomposition and narrowband filtering are proposed for the reduction of artifacts prior to seizure detection. Geometrical correlation is used to consolidate the multichannel detections and to reduce the number of false detections due to remnant artifacts. A data-dependent threshold is defined for the classification of EEG. Using 30 newborn EEG records with seizures, the classification process yielded an overall detection accuracy of 92.4% with good detection rate (GDR) of 84.8% and false detection rate of 0.36FD/h. Better detection performance (accuracy >95%) was recorded for relatively long EEG records with short seizure events. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The design of delay-dependent wide-area DOFC with prescribed degree of stability α for damping inter-area low-frequency oscillations in power system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Miaoping; Nian, Xiaohong; Dai, Liqiong; Guo, Hua

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the delay-dependent wide-area dynamic output feedback controller (DOFC) with prescribed degree of stability is proposed for interconnected power system to damp inter-area low-frequency oscillations. Here, the prescribed degree of stability α is used to maintain all the poles on the left of s=-α in the s-plane. Firstly, residue approach is adopted to select input-output control signals and the schur balanced truncation model reduction method is utilized to obtain the reduced power system model. Secondly, based on Lyapunov stability theory and transformation operation in complex plane, the sufficient condition of asymptotic stability for closed-loop power system with prescribed degree of stability α is derived. Then, a novel method based on linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) is presented to obtain the parameters of DOFC and calculate delay margin of the closed-loop system considering the prescribed degree of stability α. Finally, case studies are carried out on the two-area four-machine system, which is controlled by classical wide-area power system stabilizer (WAPSS) in reported reference and our proposed DOFC respectively. The effectiveness and advantages of the proposed method are verified by the simulation results under different operating conditions. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.