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Sample records for strong fluctuation theory

  1. Testing strong interaction theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses possible tests of the current theories of the strong interaction, in particular, quantum chromodynamics. High energy e + e - interactions should provide an excellent means of studying the strong force. (W.D.L.)

  2. Calculation of effective electromagnetic parameters of multi-needle zinc oxide whisker based on equivalent spherical particle and strong fluctuation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu-Chen; Liu, Jiang-Fan; Song, Zhong-Guo; Xi, Xiao-Li

    2014-12-01

    Multi-needle zinc oxide whisker (M-ZnOw) includes tetrapod-needle ZnOw (T-ZnOw), flower-shaped ZnOw, and other similar ZnOw architectures. The unique three-dimensional (3D) and multi-needle-shaped structures give the special performance of M-ZnOw, but make it difficult to calculate the effective electromagnetic parameters of M-ZnOw composites. In this paper, based on the equivalent spherical particle and the strong fluctuation theory, three different closed-form expressions are presented to calculate the effective electromagnetic parameters of M-ZnOw composites. To start with, because of the macroscopic isotropic nature of M-ZnOw composites and lossy properties of M-ZnOw itself, an equivalent spherical particle is introduced in the scheme to simplify the unique microscopic structures of M-ZnOw, and the possible limitations of the presented equivalent spherical particle are discussed qualitatively. In addition, different closed-form expressions to calculate the effective electromagnetic parameter are obtained by means of representing the physical situations of conductive network as different correlation functions in the strong fluctuation theory. Finally, the effective permeability of a T-ZnOw/Fe - paraffin composite is calculated by these three expressions in 2-18 GHz frequency range. Very good agreement between the calculated and experimental results on one hand verifies the rationality of presented expressions, and on the other hand indicates that the correlation function plays an important role in improving the performance of the presented expression.

  3. Evolutionary dynamics with fluctuating population sizes and strong mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David R

    2015-08-01

    Game theory ideas provide a useful framework for studying evolutionary dynamics in a well-mixed environment. This approach, however, typically enforces a strictly fixed overall population size, deemphasizing natural growth processes. We study a competitive Lotka-Volterra model, with number fluctuations, that accounts for natural population growth and encompasses interaction scenarios typical of evolutionary games. We show that, in an appropriate limit, the model describes standard evolutionary games with both genetic drift and overall population size fluctuations. However, there are also regimes where a varying population size can strongly influence the evolutionary dynamics. We focus on the strong mutualism scenario and demonstrate that standard evolutionary game theory fails to describe our simulation results. We then analytically and numerically determine fixation probabilities as well as mean fixation times using matched asymptotic expansions, taking into account the population size degree of freedom. These results elucidate the interplay between population dynamics and evolutionary dynamics in well-mixed systems.

  4. Evolutionary dynamics with fluctuating population sizes and strong mutualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David R.

    2015-08-01

    Game theory ideas provide a useful framework for studying evolutionary dynamics in a well-mixed environment. This approach, however, typically enforces a strictly fixed overall population size, deemphasizing natural growth processes. We study a competitive Lotka-Volterra model, with number fluctuations, that accounts for natural population growth and encompasses interaction scenarios typical of evolutionary games. We show that, in an appropriate limit, the model describes standard evolutionary games with both genetic drift and overall population size fluctuations. However, there are also regimes where a varying population size can strongly influence the evolutionary dynamics. We focus on the strong mutualism scenario and demonstrate that standard evolutionary game theory fails to describe our simulation results. We then analytically and numerically determine fixation probabilities as well as mean fixation times using matched asymptotic expansions, taking into account the population size degree of freedom. These results elucidate the interplay between population dynamics and evolutionary dynamics in well-mixed systems.

  5. Anomalous transport phenomena in Fermi liquids with strong magnetic fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontani, Hiroshi [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2008-02-15

    In this paper, we present recent developments in the theory of transport phenomena based on the Fermi liquid theory. In conventional metals, various transport coefficients are scaled according to the quasiparticles relaxation time, {tau}, which implies that the relaxation time approximation (RTA) holds well. However, such a simple scaling does not hold in many strongly correlated electron systems. The most famous example would be high-T{sub c} superconductors (HTSCs), where almost all the transport coefficients exhibit a significant deviation from the RTA results. This issue has been one of the most significant unresolved problems in HTSCs for a long time. Similar anomalous transport phenomena have been observed in metals near their antiferromagnetic (AF) quantum critical point (QCP). The main goal of this study is to demonstrate whether the anomalous transport phenomena in HTSC is evidence of a non-Fermi liquid ground state, or just RTA violation in strongly correlated Fermi liquids. Another goal is to establish a unified theory of anomalous transport phenomena in metals with strong magnetic fluctuations. For these purposes, we develop a method for calculating various transport coefficients beyond the RTA by employing field theoretical techniques. In a Fermi liquid, an excited quasiparticle induces other excited quasiparticles by collision, and current due to these excitations is called a current vertex correction (CVC). Landau noticed the existence of CVC first, which is indispensable for calculating transport coefficients in accord with the conservation laws. Here, we develop a transport theory involving resistivity and the Hall coefficient on the basis of the microscopic Fermi liquid theory, by considering the CVC. In nearly AF Fermi liquids, we find that the strong backward scattering due to AF fluctuations induces the CVC with prominent momentum dependence. This feature of the CVC can account for the significant enhancement in the Hall coefficient

  6. Anomalous transport phenomena in Fermi liquids with strong magnetic fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontani, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present recent developments in the theory of transport phenomena based on the Fermi liquid theory. In conventional metals, various transport coefficients are scaled according to the quasiparticles relaxation time, τ, which implies that the relaxation time approximation (RTA) holds well. However, such a simple scaling does not hold in many strongly correlated electron systems. The most famous example would be high-T c superconductors (HTSCs), where almost all the transport coefficients exhibit a significant deviation from the RTA results. This issue has been one of the most significant unresolved problems in HTSCs for a long time. Similar anomalous transport phenomena have been observed in metals near their antiferromagnetic (AF) quantum critical point (QCP). The main goal of this study is to demonstrate whether the anomalous transport phenomena in HTSC is evidence of a non-Fermi liquid ground state, or just RTA violation in strongly correlated Fermi liquids. Another goal is to establish a unified theory of anomalous transport phenomena in metals with strong magnetic fluctuations. For these purposes, we develop a method for calculating various transport coefficients beyond the RTA by employing field theoretical techniques. In a Fermi liquid, an excited quasiparticle induces other excited quasiparticles by collision, and current due to these excitations is called a current vertex correction (CVC). Landau noticed the existence of CVC first, which is indispensable for calculating transport coefficients in accord with the conservation laws. Here, we develop a transport theory involving resistivity and the Hall coefficient on the basis of the microscopic Fermi liquid theory, by considering the CVC. In nearly AF Fermi liquids, we find that the strong backward scattering due to AF fluctuations induces the CVC with prominent momentum dependence. This feature of the CVC can account for the significant enhancement in the Hall coefficient, magnetoresistance

  7. Scalar strong interaction hadron theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hoh, Fang Chao

    2015-01-01

    The scalar strong interaction hadron theory, SSI, is a first principles' and nonlocal theory at quantum mechanical level that provides an alternative to low energy QCD and Higgs related part of the standard model. The quark-quark interaction is scalar rather than color-vectorial. A set of equations of motion for mesons and another set for baryons have been constructed. This book provides an account of the present state of a theory supposedly still at its early stage of development. This work will facilitate researchers interested in entering into this field and serve as a basis for possible future development of this theory.

  8. Quantum fluctuations within the fragmentation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruhn, J.A.; Hahn, J.; Lustig, H.J.; Zeigenhain, K.H.; Greiner, W.

    1980-01-01

    The measured spread of the fragment mass distributions in heavy ion collisions may be due to two quite different physical mechanisms: the quantum-mechanical uncertainty associated with collective motion in the mass asymmetry degree of freedom, and the spread caused by thermal excitation of the nuclear system. The fluctuations in physical observables induced in these ways are referred to as quantum fluctuations and statistical fluctuations. In this lecture quantum fluctuations are studied within the fragmentation theory. Mass distributions for spontaneous fission and low energy heavy ion collisions are investigated. (author)

  9. Riemannian geometry in thermodynamic fluctuation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruppeiner, G.

    1995-01-01

    Although thermodynamic fluctuation theory originated from statistical mechanics, it may be put on a completely thermodynamic basis, in no essential need of any microscopic foundation. This review views the theory from the macroscopic perspective, emphasizing, in particular, notions of covariance and consistency, expressed naturally using the language of Riemannian geometry. Coupled with these concepts is an extension of the basic structure of thermodynamic fluctuation theory beyond the classical one of a subsystem in contact with an infinite uniform reservoir. Used here is a hierarchy of concentric subsystems, each of which samples only the thermodynamic state of the subsystem immediately larger than it. The result is a covariant thermodynamic fluctuation theory which is plausible beyond the standard second-order entropy expansion. It includes the conservation laws and is mathematically consistent when applied to fluctuations inside subsystems. Tests on known models show improvements. Perhaps most significantly, the covariant theory offers a qualitatively new tool for the study of fluctuation phenomena: the Riemannian thermodynamic curvature. The thermodynamic curvature gives, for any given thermodynamic state, a lower bound for the length scale where the classical thermodynamic fluctuation theory based on a uniform environment could conceivably hold. Straightforward computation near the critical point reveals that the curvature equals the correlation volume, a physically appealing finding. The combination of the interpretation of curvature with a well-known proportionality between the free energy and the inverse of the correlation volume yields a purely thermodynamic theory of the critical point. The scaled equation of state follows from the values of the critical exponents. The thermodynamic Riemannian metric may be put into the broader context of information theory

  10. Weak point disorder in strongly fluctuating flux-line liquids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We consider the effect of weak uncorrelated quenched disorder (point defects) on a strongly fluctuating flux-line liquid. We use a hydrodynamic model which is based on mapping the flux-line system onto a quantum liquid of relativistic charged bosons in 2 + 1 dimensions [P Benetatos and M C Marchetti, Phys. Rev. B64 ...

  11. Weak point disorder in strongly fluctuating flux-line liquids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We consider the effect of weak uncorrelated quenched disorder (point defects) on a strongly fluctuating flux-line liquid. We use a hydrodynamic model which is based on mapping the flux-line system onto a quantum liquid of relativistic charged bosons in 2 + 1 dimensions [P Benetatos and M C Marchetti, Phys. Rev.

  12. Pulsed Neutron Scattering Studies of Strongly Fluctuating solids, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin Broholm

    2006-06-22

    The conventional description of a solid is based on a static atomic structure with small amplitude so-called harmonic fluctuations about it. This is a final technical report for a project that has explored materials where fluctuations are sufficiently strong to severely challenge this approach and lead to unexpected and potentially useful materials properties. Fluctuations are enhanced when a large number of configurations share the same energy. We used pulsed spallation source neutron scattering to obtain detailed microscopic information about structure and fluctuations in such materials. The results enhance our understanding of strongly fluctuating solids and their potential for technical applications. Because new materials require new experimental techniques, the project has also developed new techniques for probing strongly fluctuating solids. Examples of material that were studied are ZrW2O8 with large amplitude molecular motion that leads to negative thermal expansion, NiGa2S4 where competing interactions lead to an anomalous short range ordered magnet, Pr1- xBixRu2O7 where a partially filled electron shell (Pr) in a weakly disordered environment produces anomalous metallic properties, and TbMnO3 where competing interactions lead to a magneto-electric phase. The experiments on TbMnO3 exemplify the relationship between research funded by this project and future applications. Magneto-electric materials may produce a magnetic field when an electric field is applied or vise versa. Our experiments have clarified the reason why electric and magnetic polarization is coupled in TbMnO3. While this knowledge does not render TbMnO3 useful for applications it will focus the search for a practical room temperature magneto-electric for applications.

  13. Molecular thermodynamics using fluctuation solution theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Martin Dela

    Properties of chemicals and their mutual phase equilibria are critical variables in process design. Reliable estimates of relevant equilibrium properties, from thermodynamic models, can form the basis of good decision making in the development phase of a process design, especially when access...... to relevant experimental data is limited. This thesis addresses the issue of generating and using simple thermodynamic models within a rigorous statistical mechanical framework, the so-called fluctuation solution theory, from which relations connecting properties and phase equilibria can be obtained....... The framework relates thermodynamic variables to molecular pair correlation functions of liquid mixtures. In this thesis, application of the framework is illustrated using two approaches: 1. Solubilities of solid solutes in mixed solvent systems are determined from fluctuation solution theory application...

  14. Effect of random charge fluctuation on strongly coupled dusty Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issaad, M.; Rouiguia, L.; Djebli, M.

    2008-09-01

    Modeling the interaction between particles is an open issue in dusty plasma. We dealt with strongly coupled dust particles in two dimensional confined system. For small number of clusters, we investigate the effect of random charge fluctuation on background configuration. The study is conducted for a short rang as well as a long rang potential interaction. Numerical simulation is performed using Monte-Carlo simulation in the presence of parabolic confinement and at low temperature. We have studied the background configurations for a dust particles with constant charge and in the presence of random charge fluctuation due to the discrete nature of charge carriers. The latter is studied for a positively charged dust when the dominant charging process is due to photo-emission from the dust surface. It is found, for small classical cluster consisting of small number of particles, short rang potential gives the same result as long rang one. It is also found that the random charge fluctuation affect the background configurations.

  15. Fluctuation Solution Theory Properties from Molecular Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildskov, Jens; Wedberg, R.; O’Connell, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties obtained in the Fluctuation Solution Theory are based on spatial integrals of molecular TCFs between component pairs in the mixture. Molecular simulation, via either MD or MC calculations, can yield these correlation functions for model inter- and intramolecular...... potential functions. However, system-size limitations and statistical noise cause uncertainties in the functions at long range, and thus uncertainties or errors in the integrals. A number of methods such as truncation, distance shifting, long-range modeling, transforms, DCF matching, finite-size scaling...

  16. Queues and Lévy fluctuation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Dębicki, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    The book provides an extensive introduction to queueing models driven by Lévy-processes as well as a systematic account of the literature on Lévy-driven queues. The objective is to make the reader familiar with the wide set of probabilistic techniques that have been developed over the past decades, including transform-based techniques, martingales, rate-conservation arguments, change-of-measure, importance sampling, and large deviations. On the application side, it demonstrates how Lévy traffic models arise when modelling current queueing-type systems (as communication networks) and includes applications to finance. Queues and Lévy Fluctuation Theory will appeal to graduate/postgraduate students and researchers in mathematics, computer science, and electrical engineering. Basic prerequisites are probability theory and stochastic processes.

  17. Thermodynamic properties of fluids from Fluctuation Solution Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Fluctuation Theory develops exact relations between integrals of molecular correlation functions and concentration derivatives of pressure and chemical potential. These quantities can be usefully correlated, particularly for mechanical and thermal properties of pure and mixed dense fluids and for activities of strongly nonideal liquid solutions. The expressions yield unique formulae for the desirable thermodynamic properties of activity and density. The molecular theory origins of the flucuation properties, their behavior for systems of technical interest and some of their successful correlations will be described. Suggestions for fruitful directions will be suggested

  18. Renormalized theory of low-frequency hydrodynamic fluctuations in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitenko, A.G.; Sosenko, P.P.

    1989-01-01

    The basic statement of the renormalized statistical theory of low-frequency hydrogynamic fluctuations in magnetized plasmas are formulated. Stationary fluctuation spectra are calculated with account for the nonlinear interaction of fluctuations within the context of the theory developed for the general case of electromagnetic interaction. It is demonstrated that electromagnetic effects may influence essentially the spectral characteristics of the convective fluctuations and the relevant anomalous transport in plasmas. 82 refs

  19. A theory of the strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    The most promising candidate for a fundamental microscopic theory of the strong interactions is a gauge theory of colored quarks-Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). There are many excellent reasons for believing in this theory. It embodies the broken symmetries, SU(3) and chiral SU(3)xSU(3), of the strong interactions and reflects the success of (albeit crude) quark models in explaining the spectrum of the observed hadrons. The hidden quantum number of color, necessary to account for the quantum numbers of the low lying hadrons, plays a fundamental role in this theory as the SU(3) color gauge vector 'gluons' are the mediators of the strong interactions. The absence of physical quark states can be 'explained' by the hypothesis of color confinement i.e. that hadrons are permanently bound in color singlet bound states. Finally this theory is unique in being asymptotically free, thus accounting for the almost free field theory behvior of quarks observed at short distances. (Auth.)

  20. Renormalization in theories with strong vector forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocic, A.

    1991-01-01

    There are not many field theories in four dimensions that have sensible ultraviolet and interesting (non-trivial) infrared behavior. At present, asymptotically free theories seem to have deserved their legitimacy and there is a strong prejudice that they might be the only ones to have such a distinction. This belief stems mostly from the fact that most of the knowledge of field theory in four dimensions comes from perturbation theory. However, nonperturbative studies of the lower dimensional theories reveal a host of interesting phenomena that are perturbative studies of the lower dimensional theories reveal a host of interesting phenomena that perturbatively inaccessible. The lack of asymptotic freedom implies that the coupling constant grows at short distances and perturbation theory breaks down. Thus, in such theories, ultraviolet behavior requires nonperturbative treatment. Recently, the interest in strongly coupled gauge theories has been revived. In particularly, four dimensional quantum electrodynamics has received considerable attention. This was motivated by the discovery of an ultraviolet stable fixed point at strong couplings. If this fixed point would turn out to be non-gaussian, then QED would be the first nontrivial nonasymptotically free theory in four dimensions. The importance of such a result would be twofold. First, the old question of the existence of QED could be settled. Of course, this would be the case provided that the low energy limit of the theory actually describes photons and electrons; apriori, there is no reason to assume this. Second, the discovery of a nontrivial nonasymptotically free theory would be of great paradigmatic value. The theories which quenched QED resembles the most are nonabelian gauge theories with many flavors with beta-function positive or vanishing at weak couplings. These theories are at present considered as viable candidates for technicolor unification schemes

  1. Correlated Fluctuations in Strongly Coupled Binary Networks Beyond Equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Dahmen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Randomly coupled Ising spins constitute the classical model of collective phenomena in disordered systems, with applications covering glassy magnetism and frustration, combinatorial optimization, protein folding, stock market dynamics, and social dynamics. The phase diagram of these systems is obtained in the thermodynamic limit by averaging over the quenched randomness of the couplings. However, many applications require the statistics of activity for a single realization of the possibly asymmetric couplings in finite-sized networks. Examples include reconstruction of couplings from the observed dynamics, representation of probability distributions for sampling-based inference, and learning in the central nervous system based on the dynamic and correlation-dependent modification of synaptic connections. The systematic cumulant expansion for kinetic binary (Ising threshold units with strong, random, and asymmetric couplings presented here goes beyond mean-field theory and is applicable outside thermodynamic equilibrium; a system of approximate nonlinear equations predicts average activities and pairwise covariances in quantitative agreement with full simulations down to hundreds of units. The linearized theory yields an expansion of the correlation and response functions in collective eigenmodes, leads to an efficient algorithm solving the inverse problem, and shows that correlations are invariant under scaling of the interaction strengths.

  2. Reappraising Einstein's 1909 application of fluctuation theory to Planckian radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, F. E.

    2004-08-01

    Einstein's 1909 application of fluctuation theory to Planckian radiation is challenged by the fact that radiation within a completely reflecting cavity is not in thermal equilibrium and therefore should not qualify as a candidate for analysis by Einstein's theory. We offer an alternative interpretation wherein Planck's function, to which Einstein applied his theory, represents the source function in the wall material surrounding a real, partially reflecting cavity. The source function experiences thermal fluctuations and radiation within the cavity (which originates in the wall material and has an intensity equal to the source function) fluctuates in concert. That is, blackbody radiation within a real cavity exhibits the thermal fluctuations predicted by Einstein, but the fluctuations have their origin in the wall material and are not intrinsic to radiation.

  3. On the theory of non-equilibrium hydrodynamic fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peletminskij, S.V.; Plokhov, S.S.; Prikhod'ko, V.I.

    1981-01-01

    Using the method of abbreviated description a microscopic theory of non-equilibrium fluctuations with a great radius of correlations, which permits to study fluctuation kinetics at t>>tausub(r)(tausub(r) is relaxation time) is built. General formula, describing the degree character of approximation to the state of statistical equilibrium of mean values of arbitrary quasilocal operators, are obtained [ru

  4. Bulk viscosity from hydrodynamic fluctuations with relativistic hydrokinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Yukinao; Mazeliauskas, Aleksas; Teaney, Derek

    2018-02-01

    Hydrokinetic theory of thermal fluctuations is applied to a nonconformal relativistic fluid. Solving the hydrokinetic equations for an isotropically expanding background we find that hydrodynamic fluctuations give ultraviolet divergent contributions to the energy-momentum tensor. After shifting the temperature to account for the energy of nonequilibrium modes, the remaining divergences are renormalized into local parameters, e.g., pressure and bulk viscosity. We also confirm that the renormalization of the pressure and bulk viscosity is universal by computing them for a Bjorken expansion. The fluctuation-induced bulk viscosity reflects the nonconformal nature of the equation of state and is modestly enhanced near the QCD deconfinement temperature.

  5. The Dark Side of Strongly Coupled Theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouvaris, Christoforos

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the constraints of dark matter search experiments on the different candidates emerging from the minimal quasi-conformal strong coupling theory with fermions in the adjoint representation. For one candidate, the current limits of CDMS exclude a tiny window of masses around 120 GeV. We...... also investigate under what circumstances the newly proposed candidate composed of a -2 negatively charged particle and a $^4He^{+2}$ can explain the discrepancy between the results of the CDMS and DAMA experiments. We found that this type of dark matter should give negative results in CDMS, while...

  6. Generalized theory of spin fluctuations in itinerant electron magnets: Crucial role of spin anharmonicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solontsov, A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper critically overviews the recent developments of the theory of spatially dispersive spin fluctuations (SF) in itinerant electron magnetism with particular emphasis on spin-fluctuation coupling or spin anharmonicity. It is argued that the conventional self-consistent renormalized (SCR) theory of spin fluctuations is usually used aside of the range of its applicability actually defined by the constraint of weak spin anharmonicity based on the random phase approximation (RPA) arguments. An essential step in understanding SF in itinerant magnets beyond RPA-like arguments was made recently within the soft-mode theory of SF accounting for strong spin anharmonicity caused by zero-point SF. In the present paper we generalize it to apply for a wider range of temperatures and regimes of SF and show it to lead to qualitatively new results caused by zero-point effects. - Highlights: • We review the spin-fluctuation theory of itinerant electron magnets with account of zero-point effects. • We generalize the existing theory to account for different regimes of spin fluctuations. • We show that zero-point spin fluctuations play a crucial role in both low- and high-temperature properties of metallic magnets. • We argue that a new scheme of calculation of ground state properties of magnets is needed including zero-point effects

  7. Extended dynamic spin-fluctuation theory of metallic magnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, N B [Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Reser, B I; Grebennikov, V I, E-mail: melnikov@cs.msu.su, E-mail: reser@imp.uran.ru, E-mail: greben@imp.uran.ru [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-13

    A dynamic spin-fluctuation theory that directly takes into account nonlocality of thermal spin fluctuations and their mode-mode interactions is developed. The Gaussian approximation in the theory is improved by a self-consistent renormalization of the mean field and spin susceptibility due to the third- and fourth-order terms of the free energy, respectively. This eliminates the fictitious first-order phase transition, which is typical for the Gaussian approximation, and yields a proper second-order phase transition. The effect of nonlocal spin correlations is enhanced by taking into account uniform fluctuations in the single-site mean Green function. Explicit computational formulae for basic magnetic characteristics are obtained. The extended theory is applied to the calculation of magnetic properties of Fe-Ni Invar. Almost full agreement with experiment is achieved for the magnetization, Curie temperature, and local and effective magnetic moments.

  8. General Linearized Theory of Quantum Fluctuations around Arbitrary Limit Cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos; Weiss, Talitha; Walter, Stefan; de Valcárcel, Germán J

    2017-09-29

    The theory of Gaussian quantum fluctuations around classical steady states in nonlinear quantum-optical systems (also known as standard linearization) is a cornerstone for the analysis of such systems. Its simplicity, together with its accuracy far from critical points or situations where the nonlinearity reaches the strong coupling regime, has turned it into a widespread technique, being the first method of choice in most works on the subject. However, such a technique finds strong practical and conceptual complications when one tries to apply it to situations in which the classical long-time solution is time dependent, a most prominent example being spontaneous limit-cycle formation. Here, we introduce a linearization scheme adapted to such situations, using the driven Van der Pol oscillator as a test bed for the method, which allows us to compare it with full numerical simulations. On a conceptual level, the scheme relies on the connection between the emergence of limit cycles and the spontaneous breaking of the symmetry under temporal translations. On the practical side, the method keeps the simplicity and linear scaling with the size of the problem (number of modes) characteristic of standard linearization, making it applicable to large (many-body) systems.

  9. Strong Coupling Gauge Theories in LHC ERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, H.; Harada, M.; Tanabashi, M.; Yamawaki, K.

    2011-01-01

    Higgs, or techni-dilaton - composite Higgs near conformality / Koichi Yamawaki -- Phase diagram of strongly interacting theories / Francesco Sannino -- Resizing conformal windows / O. Antipin and K. Tuominen -- Nearly conformal gauge theories on the lattice / Zoltan Fodor ... [et al.] -- Going beyond QCD in lattice gauge theory / G. T. Fleming -- Phases of QCD from small to large N[symbol]: (some) lattice results / A. Deuzeman, E. Pallante and M. P. Lombardo -- Lattice gauge theory and (quasi)-conformal technicolor / D. K. Sinclair and J. B. Kogut -- Study of the running coupling constant in 10-flavor QCD with the Schrodinger functional method / N. Yamada ... [et al.] -- Study of the running coupling in twisted Polyakov scheme / T. Aoyama ... [et al.].Running coupling in strong gauge theories via the lattice / Zoltan Fodor ... [et al.] -- Higgsinoless supersymmetry and hidden gravity / Michael L. Graesser, Ryuichiro Kitano and Masafumi Kurachi -- The latest status of LHC and the EWSB physics / S. Asai -- Continuum superpartners from supersymmetric unparticles / Hsin-Chia Cheng -- Review of minimal flavor constraints for technicolor / Hidenori S. Fukano and Francesco Sannino -- Standard model and high energy Lorentz violation / Damiano Anselmi -- Dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking and fourth family / Michio Hashimoto -- Holmorphic supersymmetric Nambu-Jona-Lasino model and dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking / Dong-Won Jung, Otto C. W. Kong and Jae Sik Lee -- Ratchet model of Baryogenesis / Tatsu Takeuchi, Azusa Minamizaki and Akio Sugamoto -- Classical solutions of field equations in Einstein Gauss-Bonnet gravity / P. Suranyi, C. Vaz and L. C. R. Wijewardhana -- Black holes constitute all dark matter / Paul H. Frampton -- Electroweak precision test and Z [symbol] in the three site Higgsless model / Tomohiro Abe -- Chiral symmetry and BRST symmetry breaking, quaternion reality and the lattice simulation / Sadataka Furui -- Holographic techni-dilaton, or

  10. Symmetry breaking due to quantum fluctuations in massless field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghose, P.; Datta, A.

    1977-10-01

    It is shown that quantum fluctuations can act as the driving mechanism for the spontaneous breakdown of both scale and the discrete phi→-phi symmetries in a lamdaphi 4 theory which is massless and scale invariant in the tree approximation. Consequently dimensional transformation occurs and the dimensionless and only parameter lambda in the theory is fixed and replaced by the vacuum expectation value of the field. These results are shown to be consistent with the appropriate renormalization group equation for the theory. A scalar electrodynamics which is massless and scale invariant in the tree approximation is also considered, and it is shown that the Higgs meson in such a theory is much heavier than the vector meson for small values of the gauge coupling constant e. Another interesting consequence of such a theory is that it possesses vortex-line solutions only when quantum fluctuations are taken into account

  11. Kinetic theory for strongly coupled Coulomb systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufty, James; Wrighton, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    The calculation of dynamical properties for matter under extreme conditions is a challenging task. The popular Kubo-Greenwood model exploits elements from equilibrium density-functional theory (DFT) that allow a detailed treatment of electron correlations, but its origin is largely phenomenological; traditional kinetic theories have a more secure foundation but are limited to weak ion-electron interactions. The objective here is to show how a combination of the two evolves naturally from the short-time limit for the generator of the effective single-electron dynamics governing time correlation functions without such limitations. This provides a theoretical context for the current DFT-related approach, the Kubo-Greenwood model, while showing the nature of its corrections. The method is to calculate the short-time dynamics in the single-electron subspace for a given configuration of the ions. This differs from the usual kinetic theory approach in which an average over the ions is performed as well. In this way the effective ion-electron interaction includes strong Coulomb coupling and is shown to be determined from DFT. The correlation functions have the form of the random-phase approximation for an inhomogeneous system but with renormalized ion-electron and electron-electron potentials. The dynamic structure function, density response function, and electrical conductivity are calculated as examples. The static local field corrections in the dielectric function are identified in this way. The current analysis is limited to semiclassical electrons (quantum statistical potentials), so important quantum conditions are excluded. However, a quantization of the kinetic theory is identified for broader application while awaiting its detailed derivation.

  12. On effective cross section fluctuations in unitary theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyuboshits, V.L.; Podgoretskij, M.I.

    1975-01-01

    In the framework of a single-channel theory of overlapping resonances, satisfying the unitarity condition, there were studied the fluctuations of the effective cross sections and the structure of the correlation coefficients for the amplitudes and cross sections. It is shown that at a high overlapping of the resonance levels the characteristic correlation period is determined by an average distance between the levels, but not by the width. The obtained results differ from the conclusions of the statistical Erikson theory

  13. Thermodynamic Models from Fluctuation Solution Theory Analysis of Molecular Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steen; Peters, Günther H.j.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2007-01-01

    Fluctuation solution theory (FST) is employed to analyze results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid mixtures. The objective is to generate parameters for macroscopic GE-models, here the modified Margules model. We present a strategy for choosing the number of parameters included...

  14. Statistical theory of subcritically-excited strong turbulence in inhomogeneous plasmas. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Sanae-I.; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2000-01-01

    A statistical theory of nonlinear-nonequilibrium plasma state with strongly developed turbulence and with strong inhomogeneity of the system has been developed. A unified theory for both the thermally excited fluctuations and the strongly turbulent fluctuations is presented. With respect to the turbulent fluctuations, the coherent part to a certain test mode is renormalized as the drag to the test mode, and the rest, the incoherent part, is considered to be a random noise. The renormalized operator includes the effect of nonlinear destabilization as well as the decorrelation by turbulent fluctuations. Formulation is presented by deriving an Fokker-Planck equation for the probability distribution function. Equilibrium distribution function of fluctuations is obtained. Transition from the thermal fluctuations, that is governed by the Boltzmann distribution, to the turbulent fluctuation is clarified. The distribution function for the turbulent fluctuation has tail component and the width of which is in the same order as the mean fluctuation level itself. The Lyapunov function is constructed for the strongly turbulent plasma, and it is shown that an approach to a certain equilibrium distribution is assured. The result for the most probable state is expressed in terms of 'minimum renormalized dissipation rate', which is given by the ratio of the nonlinear decorrelation rate of fluctuation energy and the random excitation rate which includes both the thermal noise and turbulent self-noise effects. Application is made for example to the current-diffusive interchange mode turbulence in inhomogeneous plasmas. The applicability of this method covers plasma turbulences in much wider circumstance as well as neutral fluid turbulence. This method of analyzing strong turbulence has successfully extended the principles of statistical physics, i.e., Kubo-formula, Prigogine's principle of minimum entropy production rate. The condition for the turbulence transition is analogous to

  15. On the phase-correlation and phase-fluctuation dynamics of a strongly excited Bose gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakhel, Roger R., E-mail: rogersakhel@yahoo.com [Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Information Technology, Isra University, Amman 11622 (Jordan); The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34151 (Italy); Sakhel, Asaad R. [Department of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Engineering Technology, Balqa Applied University, Amman 11134 (Jordan); The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34151 (Italy); Ghassib, Humam B. [Department of Physics, The University of Jordan, Amman 11942 (Jordan)

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of a Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) is explored in the wake of a violent excitation caused by a strong time-dependent deformation of a trapping potential under the action of an intense stirring laser. The system is a two-dimensional BEC confined to a power-law trap with hard-wall boundaries. The stirring agent is a moving red-detuned laser potential. The time-dependent Gross–Pitaevskii equation is solved numerically by the split-step Crank–Nicolson method in real time. The phase correlations and phase fluctuations are examined as functions of time to demonstrate the evolving properties of a strongly-excited BEC. Of special significance is the occurrence of spatial fluctuations while the condensate is being excited. These oscillations arise from stirrer-induced density fluctuations. While the stirrer is inside the trap, a reduction in phase coherence occurs, which is attributed to phase fluctuations.

  16. Hot nuclei -- Landau theory, thermal fluctuations and dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alhassid, Y.

    1990-12-31

    The basic ideas and theoretical methods used in the description of hot nuclei are reviewed. In particular, a macroscopic approach to shape transitions is discussed in the framework of the Landau theory in which the quadrupole shape degrees of freedom play the role of the order parameters. This theory describes the universal features of the nuclear shape evolution with temperature and spin. A unified description of fluctuations in all five quadrupole degrees of freedom is introduced and plays an important role in the calculation of physical observables. A macroscopic approach to the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in hot nuclei is developed. With all parameters fixed by the zero temperature nuclear properties, the theory predicts both the GDR cross-section and angular anisotropy of the {gamma}-rays in very good agreement with recent experiments. The intrinsic shape fluctuations are the main cause for the resonance broadening at higher temperatures, while the orientation fluctuations are responsible for the observed attenuation in the angular anisotropy. Dissipation at finite temperature is discussed in the framework of a Langevin-like equation describing the time-dependent shape fluctuations. Non-adiabatic effects may cause motional narrowing of the resonance.

  17. Hot nuclei -- Landau theory, thermal fluctuations and dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhassid, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The basic ideas and theoretical methods used in the description of hot nuclei are reviewed. In particular, a macroscopic approach to shape transitions is discussed in the framework of the Landau theory in which the quadrupole shape degrees of freedom play the role of the order parameters. This theory describes the universal features of the nuclear shape evolution with temperature and spin. A unified description of fluctuations in all five quadrupole degrees of freedom is introduced and plays an important role in the calculation of physical observables. A macroscopic approach to the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in hot nuclei is developed. With all parameters fixed by the zero temperature nuclear properties, the theory predicts both the GDR cross-section and angular anisotropy of the γ-rays in very good agreement with recent experiments. The intrinsic shape fluctuations are the main cause for the resonance broadening at higher temperatures, while the orientation fluctuations are responsible for the observed attenuation in the angular anisotropy. Dissipation at finite temperature is discussed in the framework of a Langevin-like equation describing the time-dependent shape fluctuations. Non-adiabatic effects may cause motional narrowing of the resonance

  18. Hot nuclei -- Landau theory, thermal fluctuations and dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alhassid, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The basic ideas and theoretical methods used in the description of hot nuclei are reviewed. In particular, a macroscopic approach to shape transitions is discussed in the framework of the Landau theory in which the quadrupole shape degrees of freedom play the role of the order parameters. This theory describes the universal features of the nuclear shape evolution with temperature and spin. A unified description of fluctuations in all five quadrupole degrees of freedom is introduced and plays an important role in the calculation of physical observables. A macroscopic approach to the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in hot nuclei is developed. With all parameters fixed by the zero temperature nuclear properties, the theory predicts both the GDR cross-section and angular anisotropy of the {gamma}-rays in very good agreement with recent experiments. The intrinsic shape fluctuations are the main cause for the resonance broadening at higher temperatures, while the orientation fluctuations are responsible for the observed attenuation in the angular anisotropy. Dissipation at finite temperature is discussed in the framework of a Langevin-like equation describing the time-dependent shape fluctuations. Non-adiabatic effects may cause motional narrowing of the resonance.

  19. General framework for fluctuating dynamic density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Yatsyshin, Peter; Goddard, Benjamin D.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2017-12-01

    We introduce a versatile bottom-up derivation of a formal theoretical framework to describe (passive) soft-matter systems out of equilibrium subject to fluctuations. We provide a unique connection between the constituent-particle dynamics of real systems and the time evolution equation of their measurable (coarse-grained) quantities, such as local density and velocity. The starting point is the full Hamiltonian description of a system of colloidal particles immersed in a fluid of identical bath particles. Then, we average out the bath via Zwanzig’s projection-operator techniques and obtain the stochastic Langevin equations governing the colloidal-particle dynamics. Introducing the appropriate definition of the local number and momentum density fields yields a generalisation of the Dean-Kawasaki (DK) model, which resembles the stochastic Navier-Stokes description of a fluid. Nevertheless, the DK equation still contains all the microscopic information and, for that reason, does not represent the dynamical law of observable quantities. We address this controversial feature of the DK description by carrying out a nonequilibrium ensemble average. Adopting a natural decomposition into local-equilibrium and nonequilibrium contribution, where the former is related to a generalised version of the canonical distribution, we finally obtain the fluctuating-hydrodynamic equation governing the time-evolution of the mesoscopic density and momentum fields. Along the way, we outline the connection between the ad hoc energy functional introduced in previous DK derivations and the free-energy functional from classical density-functional theory. The resultant equation has the structure of a dynamical density-functional theory (DDFT) with an additional fluctuating force coming from the random interactions with the bath. We show that our fluctuating DDFT formalism corresponds to a particular version of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations, originally derived by Landau and Lifshitz

  20. Exchange and spin-fluctuation superconducting pairing in the strong correlation limit of the Hubbard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plakida, N. M.; Anton, L.; Adam, S. . Department of Theoretical Physics, Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, PO Box MG-6, RO-76900 Bucharest - Magurele; RO); Adam, Gh. . Department of Theoretical Physics, Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, PO Box MG-6, RO-76900 Bucharest - Magurele; RO)

    2001-01-01

    A microscopical theory of superconductivity in the two-band singlet-hole Hubbard model, in the strong coupling limit in a paramagnetic state, is developed. The model Hamiltonian is obtained by projecting the p-d model to an asymmetric Hubbard model with the lower Hubbard subband occupied by one-hole Cu d-like states and the upper Hubbard subband occupied by two-hole p-d singlet states. The model requires two microscopical parameters only, the p-d hybridization parameter t and the charge-transfer gap Δ. It was previously shown to secure an appropriate description of the normal state properties of the high -T c cuprates. To treat rigorously the strong correlations, the Hubbard operator technique within the projection method for the Green function is used. The Dyson equation is derived. In the molecular field approximation, d-wave superconducting pairing of conventional hole (electron) pairs in one Hubbard subband is found, which is mediated by the exchange interaction given by the interband hopping, J ij = 4 (t ij ) 2 / Δ. The normal and anomalous components of the self-energy matrix are calculated in the self-consistent Born approximation for the electron-spin-fluctuation scattering mediated by kinematic interaction of the second order of the intraband hopping. The derived numerical and analytical solutions predict the occurrence of singlet d x 2 -y 2 -wave pairing both in the d-hole and singlet Hubbard subbands. The gap functions and T c are calculated for different hole concentrations. The exchange interaction is shown to be the most important pairing interaction in the Hubbard model in the strong correlation limit, while the spin-fluctuation coupling results only in a moderate enhancement of T c . The smaller weight of the latter comes from two specific features: its vanishing inside the Brillouin zone (BZ) along the lines, |k x | + |k y |=π pointing towards the hot spots and the existence of a small energy shell within which the pairing is effective. By

  1. Large N baryons, strong coupling theory, quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakita, B.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that in QCD the large N limit is the same as the static strong coupling limit. By using the static strong coupling techniques some of the results of large N baryons are derived. The results are consistent with the large N SU(6) static quark model. (author)

  2. Higher order mode laser beam intensity fluctuations in strong oceanic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykal, Yahya

    2017-05-01

    Intensity fluctuations of the higher order mode laser beams are evaluated when these beams propagate in a medium exhibiting strong oceanic turbulence. Our formulation involves the modified Rytov solution that extends the Rytov solution to cover strong turbulence as well, and our recently reported expression that relates the atmospheric turbulence structure constant to the oceanic turbulence parameters and oceanic wireless optical communication link parameters. The variations of the intensity fluctuations are reported against the changes of the ratio of temperature to salinity contributions to the refractive index spectrum, rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid, rate of dissipation of mean-squared temperature, viscosity and the source size of the higher order mode laser beam. Our results indicate that under any oceanic turbulence parameters, it is advantageous to employ higher order laser modes in reducing the scintillation noise in wireless optical communication links operating in a strongly turbulent ocean.

  3. Fluctuations in electron-positron plasmas: Linear theory and implications for turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, S. Peter; Karimabadi, Homa

    2009-01-01

    Linear kinetic theory of electromagnetic fluctuations in a homogeneous, magnetized, collisionless electron-positron plasma predicts two lightly damped modes propagate at relatively long wavelengths: an Alfven-like mode with dispersion ω r =k || v-tilde A and a magnetosonic-like mode with dispersion ω r ≅kv-tilde A if β e A is the Alfven speed in an electron-positron plasma and || refers to the direction relative to the background magnetic field B o . Both modes have phase speeds ω r /k which monotonically decrease with increasing wavenumber. The Alfven-like fluctuations are almost incompressible, but the magnetosonic-like fluctuations become strongly compressible at short wavelengths and propagation sufficiently oblique to B o . Using the linear dispersion properties of these modes, scaling relations are derived which predict that turbulence of both modes should be relatively anisotropic, with fluctuating magnetic energy preferentially cascading in directions perpendicular to B o . Turbulent spectra in the solar wind show two distinct power-law regimes separated by a distinct breakpoint in observed frequency; this characteristic should not be present in electron-positron turbulence because of the absence of whistler-like dispersion. Linear theory properties of the cyclotron and mirror instabilities driven by either electron or positron temperature anisotropies are generally analogous to those of the corresponding instabilities in electron-proton plasmas.

  4. Alternative theories of atmospheric telecommunications and low-frequency fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Jorgen S.; Webster, Peter J.

    1988-08-01

    Observational studies have revealed a rich low-frequency structure in the atmosphere. A review of the theories, observations, and model studies of this low-frequency atmospheric variability is presented. On time scales of weeks or longer the atmosphere appears to possess distinct oscillatory behavior in well-defined and persistent "centers of action." This behavior is also an endemic feature of surrogate atmospheric data sets emerging from experiments with complicated climate models. Many theories have attempted to determine the dominant physical processes responsible for the low-frequency variance but have usually failed when compared carefully with observations. For example, simple linear steady state and Rossby wave dispersion theories have been used in an attempt to explain the observed global response to low-latitude perturbation. However, the observed structures of mature anomalies are often quite distinct from the vertical structures of disturbances predicted in these theories. Also, in general circulation and model studies, the sign of the nonlinear response is not simply related to the sign of the forcing as predicted by linear steady state theories. It is argued that the theories fail because either the full three-dimensional complexity of the basic state is not considered or its inherent instability structure is not recognized or is, in fact, ignored. It is shown that three-dimensional instability theory provides a natural generalization and marriage of the zonally averaged instability theory of Charney and Eady and the Rossby wave dispersion theory of Rossby and Yeh. As such, it provides a formalism which may be used to understand a wide variety of atmospheric fluctuations including the locations of eddy flux covariance maxima and storm tracks in both the tropics and extratropics and the generation of blocking, teleconnection patterns, and other quasi-stationary anomaly features. Attention is focused on two particular mechanisms within this formalism

  5. Theory of electromagnetic fluctuations for magnetized multi-species plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Roberto E., E-mail: roberto.navarro@ug.uchile.cl; Muñoz, Víctor [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Araneda, Jaime [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción 4070386 (Chile); Moya, Pablo S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, D. C. 20064 (United States); Viñas, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Valdivia, Juan A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Estudios Interdisciplinarios Básicos y Aplicados en Complejidad, CEIBA complejidad, Bogotá (Colombia)

    2014-09-15

    Analysis of electromagnetic fluctuations in plasma provides relevant information about the plasma state and its macroscopic properties. In particular, the solar wind persistently sustains a small but detectable level of magnetic fluctuation power even near thermal equilibrium. These fluctuations may be related to spontaneous electromagnetic fluctuations arising from the discreteness of charged particles. Here, we derive general expressions for the plasma fluctuations in a multi-species plasma following arbitrary distribution functions. This formalism, which generalizes and includes previous works on the subject, is then applied to the generation of electromagnetic fluctuations propagating along a background magnetic field in a plasma of two proton populations described by drifting bi-Maxwellians.

  6. Stochastic cooling of bunched beams from fluctuation and kinetic theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1982-09-01

    A theoretical formalism for stochastic phase-space cooling of bunched beams in storage rings is developed on the dual basis of classical fluctuation theory and kinetic theory of many-body systems in phase-space. The physics is that of a collection of three-dimensional oscillators coupled via retarded nonconservative interactions determined by an electronic feedback loop. At the heart of the formulation is the existence of several disparate time-scales characterizing the cooling process. Both theoretical approaches describe the cooling process in the form of a Fokker-Planck transport equation in phase-space valid up to second order in the strength and first order in the auto-correlation of the cooling signal. With neglect of the collective correlations induced by the feedback loop, identical expressions are obtained in both cases for the coherent damping and Schottky noise diffusion coefficients. These are expressed in terms of Fourier coefficients in a harmonic decomposition in angle of the generalized nonconservative cooling force written in canonical action-angle variables of the particles in six-dimensional phase-space. Comparison of analytic results to a numerical simulation study with 90 pseudo-particles in a model cooling system is presented.

  7. Stochastic cooling of bunched beams from fluctuation and kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1982-09-01

    A theoretical formalism for stochastic phase-space cooling of bunched beams in storage rings is developed on the dual basis of classical fluctuation theory and kinetic theory of many-body systems in phase-space. The physics is that of a collection of three-dimensional oscillators coupled via retarded nonconservative interactions determined by an electronic feedback loop. At the heart of the formulation is the existence of several disparate time-scales characterizing the cooling process. Both theoretical approaches describe the cooling process in the form of a Fokker-Planck transport equation in phase-space valid up to second order in the strength and first order in the auto-correlation of the cooling signal. With neglect of the collective correlations induced by the feedback loop, identical expressions are obtained in both cases for the coherent damping and Schottky noise diffusion coefficients. These are expressed in terms of Fourier coefficients in a harmonic decomposition in angle of the generalized nonconservative cooling force written in canonical action-angle variables of the particles in six-dimensional phase-space. Comparison of analytic results to a numerical simulation study with 90 pseudo-particles in a model cooling system is presented

  8. Jet quenching parameters in strongly coupled nonconformal gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchel, Alex

    2006-01-01

    Recently Liu, Rajagopal, and Wiedemann (LRW) [H. Liu, K. Rajagopal, and U. A. Wiedemann, hep-ph/0605178.] proposed a first principle, nonperturbative quantum field theoretic definition of 'jet quenching parameter' q-circumflex used in models of medium-induced radiative parton energy loss in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC. Relating q-circumflex to a short-distance behavior of a certain lightlike Wilson loop, they used gauge theory-string theory correspondence to evaluate q-circumflex for the strongly coupled N=4 SU(N c ) gauge theory plasma. We generalize analysis of LRW to strongly coupled nonconformal gauge theory plasma. We find that a jet quenching parameter is gauge theory specific (not universal). Furthermore, it appears its value increases as the number of effective adjoint degrees of freedom of a gauge theory plasma increases

  9. Fluctuations of nuclear cross sections in the region of strong overlapping resonances and at large number of open channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, S.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of the symmetrized Simonius representation of the S matrix statistical properties of its fluctuating component in the presence of direct reactions are investigated. The case is considered where the resonance levels are strongly overlapping and there is a lot of open channels, assuming that compound-nucleus cross sections which couple different channels are equal. It is shown that using the averaged unitarity condition on the real energy axis one can eliminate both resonance-resonance and channel-channel correlations from partial r transition amplitudes. As a result, we derive the basic points of the Epicson fluctuation theory of nuclear cross sections, independently of the relation between the resonance overlapping and the number of open channels, and the validity of the Hauser-Feshbach model is established. If the number of open channels is large, the time of uniform population of compound-nucleus configurations, for an open excited nuclear system, is much smaller than the Poincare time. The life time of compound nucleus is discussed

  10. Hydrodynamics of strongly coupled gauge theories from gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benincasa, P.

    2007-01-01

    In this talk we review some recent developments in the analysis of gauge theories from a holographic perspective. We focus on the transport properties of strongly coupled gauge theories. In particular, we discuss the results for two specific non-conformal models: the N=2* supersymmetric SU(N c ) Yang-Mills theory and the Sakai-Sugimoto model. Finally, we discuss the hydrodynamic picture for the N=4SU(N c ) SYM theory when the leading correction in the inverse 't Hooft coupling is taken into account

  11. Evidence for selection maintaining MHC diversity in a rodent species despite strong density fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Andrea C; Herde, Antje; Mazzoni, Camila J; Eccard, Jana A; Sommer, Simone

    2016-07-01

    Strong spatiotemporal variation in population size often leads to reduced genetic diversity limiting the adaptive potential of individual populations. Key genes of adaptive variation are encoded by the immune genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) playing an essential role in parasite resistance. How MHC variation persists in rodent populations that regularly experience population bottlenecks remains an important topic in evolutionary genetics. We analysed the consequences of strong population fluctuations on MHC class II DRB exon 2 diversity in two distant common vole (Microtus arvalis) populations in three consecutive years using a high-throughput sequencing approach. In 143 individuals, we detected 25 nucleotide alleles translating into 14 unique amino acid MHC alleles belonging to at least three loci. Thus, the overall allelic diversity and amino acid distance among the remaining MHC alleles, used as a surrogate for the range of pathogenic antigens that can be presented to T-cells, are still remarkably high. Both study populations did not show significant population differentiation between years, but significant differences were found between sites. We concluded that selection processes seem to be strong enough to maintain moderate levels of MHC diversity in our study populations outcompeting genetic drift, as the same MHC alleles were conserved between years. Differences in allele frequencies between populations might be the outcome of different local parasite pressures and/or genetic drift. Further understanding of how pathogens vary across space and time will be crucial to further elucidate the mechanisms maintaining MHC diversity in cyclic populations.

  12. QCD : the theory of strong interactions Conference MT17

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The theory of strong interactions,Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), predicts that the strong interaction is transmitted by the exchange of particles called gluons. Unlike the messengers of electromagnetism photons, which are electrically neutral - gluons carry a strong charge associated with the interaction they mediate. QCD predicts that the strength of the interaction between quarks and gluons becomes weaker at higher energies. LEP has measured the evolution of the strong coupling constant up to energies of 200 GeV and has confirmed this prediction.

  13. QCD : the theory of strong interactions Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The theory of strong interactions,Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD),predicts that the strong interac- tion is transmitted by the exchange of particles called glu- ons.Unlike the messengers of electromagnetism -pho- tons,which are electrically neutral -gluons carry a strong charge associated with the interaction they mediate. QCD predicts that the strength of the interaction between quarks and gluons becomes weaker at higher energies.LEP has measured the evolution of the strong coupling constant up to energies of 200 GeV and has confirmed this prediction.

  14. Quantitative theory of thermal fluctuations and disorder in the vortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ence the vortex matter in high Tc superconductors. For example, in some cases, thermal fluctuations will effectively reduce the effects of disorder and melt the vor- tex lattice. As a result the H–T phase diagram of the high Tc superconductors is very complex due to the competition between thermal fluctuations and disorder,.

  15. Synchrotron radiation in strongly coupled conformal field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Christiana; Chesler, Paul M.; Liu, Hong; Nickel, Dominik; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2010-06-01

    Using gauge/gravity duality, we compute the energy density and angular distribution of the power radiated by a quark undergoing circular motion in strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. We compare the strong coupling results to those at weak coupling, finding them to be very similar. In both regimes, the angular distribution of the radiated power is in fact similar to that of synchrotron radiation produced by an electron in circular motion in classical electrodynamics: the quark emits radiation in a narrow beam along its velocity vector with a characteristic opening angle α˜1/γ. To an observer far away from the quark, the emitted radiation appears as a short periodic burst, just like the light from a lighthouse does to a ship at sea. Our strong coupling results are valid for any strongly coupled conformal field theory with a dual classical gravity description.

  16. Synchrotron radiation in strongly coupled conformal field theories

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasiou, Christiana; Chesler, Paul M.; Liu, Hong; Nickel, Dominik; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2010-01-01

    Using gauge/gravity duality, we compute the energy density and angular distribution of the power radiated by a quark undergoing circular motion in strongly coupled ${\\cal N}=4$ supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory. We compare the strong coupling results to those at weak coupling, and find the same angular distribution of radiated power, up to an overall prefactor. In both regimes, the angular distribution is in fact similar to that of synchrotron radiation produced by an electron in circula...

  17. A strongly coupled open system with a non-linear bath: fluctuation-dissipation and Langevin dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadra, Chitrak

    2018-03-01

    The study of Langevin dynamics and fluctuation-dissipation relation (FDR) for a generic probe system (represented by a mass M ), bilinearly coupled to a bath of harmonic oscillators, has been a standard paradigm for the microscopic theory of stochastic processes for several decades. The question that we probe in this paper is, how robust the structure of the classical FDR is, when one replaces the harmonic bath by an anharmonic one in the limit of strong system-bath coupling? Such a picture carries the signature of the probe system in the zeroth order through a nonlocal time kernel. We observe that the two-time noise correlations hold a rich structure from which the usual FDR emerges only in the leading order of perturbation. Beyond this order, multiple time scales and nontrivial dependence on the temperature starts to manifest. These new aspects conspire to break the time-translational invariance of the noise-correlations. Several other interesting features show up and we discuss them methodically through rigorous calculations order-by-order in perturbation. This formalistic derivation along with a specific example of non-linearity can be easily applied to a huge range of processes and statistical observables that fall under the purview of a system-reservoir theory.

  18. Theory and Fluid Simulations of Boundary Plasma Fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, R H; LaBombard, B; LoDestro, L L; Rognlien, T D; Ryutov, D D; Terry, J L; Umansky, M V; Xu, X Q; Zweben, S

    2007-01-09

    Theoretical and computational investigations are presented of boundary plasma microturbulence that take into account important effects of the geometry of diverted tokamaks--in particular, the effect of x-point magnetic shear and the termination of field lines on divertor plates. We first generalize our previous 'heuristic boundary condition' which describes, in a lumped model, the closure of currents in the vicinity of the x-point region to encompass three current-closure mechanisms. We then use this boundary condition to derive the dispersion relation for low-beta flute-like modes in the divertor-leg region under the combined drives of curvature, sheath impedance, and divertor tilt effects. The results indicate the possibility of strongly growing instabilities, driven by sheath boundary conditions, and localized in either the private or common flux region of the divertor leg depending on the radial tilt of divertor plates. We re-visit the issue of x-point effects on blobs, examining the transition from blobs terminated by x-point shear to blobs that extend over both the main SOL and divertor legs. We find that, for a main-SOL blob, this transition occurs without a free-acceleration period as previously thought, with x-point termination conditions applying until the blob has expanded to reach the divertor plate. We also derive propagation speeds for divertor-leg blobs. Finally, we present fluid simulations of the C-Mod tokamak from the BOUT edge fluid turbulence code, which show main-SOL blob structures with similar spatial characteristics to those observed in the experiment, and also simulations which illustrate the possibility of fluctuations confined to divertor legs.

  19. Discriminative deep inelastic tests of strong interaction field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glueck, M.; Reya, E.

    1979-02-01

    It is demonstrated that recent measurements of ∫ 0 1 F 2 (x, Q 2 )dx eliminate already all strong interaction field theories except QCD. A detailed study of scaling violations of F 2 (x, Q 2 ) in QCD shows their insensitivity to the gluon content of the hadron at presently measured values of Q 2 . (orig.) [de

  20. Theory of Spin Waves in Strongly Anisotropic Magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Cooke, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    A new infinite-order perturbation approach to the theory of spin waves in strongly anisotropic magnets is introduced. The system is transformed into one with effective two-ion anisotropy and considerably reduced ground-state corrections. A general expression for the spin-wave energy, valid to any...

  1. Thermalization and confinement in strongly coupled gauge theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishii Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum field theories of strongly interacting matter sometimes have a useful holographic description in terms of the variables of a gravitational theory in higher dimensions. This duality maps time dependent physics in the gauge theory to time dependent solutions of the Einstein equations in the gravity theory. In order to better understand the process by which “real world” theories such as QCD behave out of thermodynamic equilibrium, we study time dependent perturbations to states in a model of a confining, strongly coupled gauge theory via holography. Operationally, this involves solving a set of non-linear Einstein equations supplemented with specific time dependent boundary conditions. The resulting solutions allow one to comment on the timescale by which the perturbed states thermalize, as well as to quantify the properties of the final state as a function of the perturbation parameters. We comment on the influence of the dual gauge theory’s confinement scale on these results, as well as the appearance of a previously anticipated universal scaling regime in the “abrupt quench” limit.

  2. Structures of alkyl benzoate binary mixtures. A Kirkwood-Buff fluctuation theory study using UNIFAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde, Rafael; Aparicio, Santiago; García, Begoña; Leal, José M

    2005-10-27

    The structure of the alkyl benzoate + n-alkane, and + alkan-1-ol binary mixtures were analyzed according to the Kirkwood-Buff fluctuation theory on the basis of both the mixture properties measured over a wide temperature range and the activity coefficients calculated with the modified UNIFAC (Dortmund) model as well. Application of this model reveals that both the microheterogeneous structure and the clustering effects are strongly dependent on the chain length of the n-alkane and alkan-1-ol cosolvents. Knowledge of the local composition around each type of molecule is drawn from the Kirkwood-Buff integrals and the excess (or deficit) molecules aggregated around a central one. The rather high values of the integrals evaluated for some of these systems provide first-hand evidence for phase splitting. The conclusions drawn support previous analyses and confirm the adequacy of the methodology put forward for studying liquid mixtures at microscopic level; easily measurable experimental properties can advantageously be used with the fluctuation theory.

  3. Transport Theory for Plasmas that are Strongly Magnetized and Strongly Coupled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalrud, Scott; Daligault, Jerome

    2016-10-01

    Plasmas with components that are magnetized, strongly coupled, or both arise in a variety of frontier plasma physics experiments including magnetized dusty plasmas, nonneutral plasmas, magnetized ICF concepts, as well as from self-generated fields in ICF. Here, a species is considered strongly magnetized if the gyroradius is smaller than the spatial scale over which Coulomb interactions occur. A theory for transport properties is described that treats a wide range of both coupling and magnetization strengths. The approach is based on an extension of the recent effective potential transport theory to include a strong magnetic field. The underlying kinetic theory is based on an extension of the Boltzmann equation to include a strong magnetic field in the dynamics of binary scattering events. Corresponding magnetohydrodynamic equations are derived by solving the kinetic equation using a Chapman-Enskog like spectral method. Results are compared with classical molecular dynamics simulations of self-diffusion of the one component plasmas, and with simulations of parallel to perpendicular temperature equilibration of an initially anisotropic distribution. This material is based upon work supported by AFOSR Award FA9550-16-1-0221 and DOE OFES Award DE-SC0016159.

  4. Fluctuation theory of solutions applications in chemistry, chemical engineering, and biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Paul E

    2013-01-01

    There are essentially two theories of solutions that can be considered exact: the McMillan-Mayer theory and Fluctuation Solution Theory (FST). The first is mostly limited to solutes at low concentrations, while FST has no such issue. It is an exact theory that can be applied to any stable solution regardless of the number of components and their concentrations, and the types of molecules and their sizes. Fluctuation Theory of Solutions: Applications in Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, and Biophysics outlines the general concepts and theoretical basis of FST and provides a range of applications

  5. Parallel-beam correlation technique for measuring density fluctuations in plasmas with strong magnetic shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, A.R.

    1981-04-01

    A laser diagnostic scheme is described which facilitates localization of density fluctuations along the line of sight. The method exploits both the generally observed anisotropy of density fluctuations in low-beta plasmas, as well as the twisting of the magnetic field which occurs across the minor diameter of reversed-field pinches, spheromaks, etc. Both interferometric and schlieren variations are discussed

  6. Axions and the strong CP problem in M theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, K.

    1997-01-01

    We examine the possibility that the strong CP problem is solved by string-theoretic axions in the strong-coupling limit of the E 8 xE 8 ' heterotic string theory (M theory). We first discuss some generic features of gauge kinetic functions in compactified M theory, and examine in detail the axion potential induced by the explicit breakings other than the QCD anomaly of the nonlinear U(1) PQ symmetries of string-theoretic axions. It is argued based on supersymmetry and discrete gauge symmetries that if the compactification radius is large enough, there can be a U(1) PQ symmetry whose breaking other than the QCD anomaly, whatever its microscopic origin is, is suppressed enough for the axion mechanism to work. Phenomenological viability of such a large radius crucially depends upon the quantized coefficients in gauge kinetic functions. We note that the large radius required for the axion mechanism is viable only in a limited class of models. For instance, for compactifications on a smooth Calabi-Yau manifold with a vanishing E 8 ' field strength, it is viable only when the quantized flux of the antisymmetric tensor field in M theory has a minimal nonzero value. It is also stressed that this large compactification radius allows the QCD axion in M theory to be cosmologically viable in the presence of a late time entropy production. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  7. Gauge-invariant metric fluctuations from NKK theory of gravity: de Sitter expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, Jose Edgar Madriz; Anabitarte, Mariano; Bellini, Mauricio

    2006-01-01

    In this Letter we study gauge-invariant metric fluctuations from a noncompact Kaluza-Klein (NKK) theory of gravity in de Sitter expansion. We recover the well-known result δρ/ρ∼2Φ, obtained from the standard 4D semiclassical approach to inflation. The spectrum for these fluctuations should be dependent of the fifth (spatial-like) coordinate

  8. QCD and strongly coupled gauge theories: challenges and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambilla, N.; Vairo, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department, Garching (Germany); Eidelman, S. [SB RAS, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Foka, P. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Gardner, S. [University of Kentucky, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lexington, KY (United States); Kronfeld, A.S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Theoretical Physics Department, Batavia, IL (United States); Alford, M.G.; Schwenzer, K. [Washington University, Department of Physics, St Louis, MO (United States); Alkofer, R. [University of Graz, Graz (Austria); Butenschoen, M. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Wien (Austria); Cohen, T.D. [University of Maryland, Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics and Department of Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Erdmenger, J. [Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Fabbietti, L. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Excellence Cluster ' ' Origin and Structure of the Universe' ' , Garching (Germany); Faber, M.; Hoellwieser, R. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Atominstitut, Vienna (Austria); Goity, J.L. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Jefferson Laboratory, Newport News, VA (United States); Ketzer, B. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department, Garching (Germany); Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Lin, H.W. [University of Washington, Department of Physics, Seattle, WA (United States); Llanes-Estrada, F.J. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Department Fisica Teorica I, Madrid (Spain); Meyer, H.B.; Wittig, H.; Hippel, G.M. von [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Institut fuer Kernphysik and Helmholtz Institut Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Pakhlov, P.; Polikarpov, M.I. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Pallante, E.; Papadodimas, K. [University of Groningen, Centre for Theoretical Physics, Groningen (Netherlands); Sazdjian, H. [Universite Paris-Sud, Institut de Physique Nucleaire CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Schmitt, A. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Vienna (Austria); Snow, W.M. [Indiana University, Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter and Department of Physics, Bloomington, IN (United States); Vogt, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Physics Division, Livermore, CA (United States); University of California, Physics Department, Davis, CA (United States); Vuorinen, A. [University of Helsinki, Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Arnold, P. [University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Christakoglou, P. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Di Nezza, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Frascati (Italy); Fodor, Z. [Wuppertal University, Wuppertal (Germany); Eoetvoes University, Budapest (Hungary); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Garcia i Tormo, X. [Universitaet Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Bern (Switzerland); Janik, M.A. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Kalweit, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Keane, D. [Kent State University, Department of Physics, Kent, OH (United States); Kiritsis, E. [University of Crete, Crete Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Heraklion (Greece); Universite Paris Diderot, Laboratoire APC, Sorbonne Paris-Cite (France); CERN, Theory Group, Physics Department, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Mischke, A. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Utrecht (Netherlands); Mizuk, R. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Physical Engineering Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Odyniec, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Pich, A. [Universitat de Valencia, CSIC, IFIC, Valencia (Spain); Pittau, R. [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos y CAFPE, Granada (Spain); Qiu, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook University, C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Ricciardi, G. [Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Napoli (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy); Salgado, C.A. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Fisica de Particulas y IGFAE, Galicia (ES); Stefanis, N.G. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Bochum (DE); Zakharov, V.I. [Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (DE); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (RU); Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (RU); Far Eastern Federal University, School of Biomedicine, Vladivostok (RU)

    2014-10-15

    We highlight the progress, current status, and open challenges of QCD-driven physics, in theory and in experiment. We discuss how the strong interaction is intimately connected to a broad sweep of physical problems, in settings ranging from astrophysics and cosmology to strongly coupled, complex systems in particle and condensed-matter physics, as well as to searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. We also discuss how success in describing the strong interaction impacts other fields, and, in turn, how such subjects can impact studies of the strong interaction. In the course of the work we offer a perspective on the many research streams which flow into and out of QCD, as well as a vision for future developments. (orig.)

  9. Quantitative theory of thermal fluctuations and disorder in the vortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A metastable supercooled homogeneous vortex liquid state exists down to zero fluctuation temperature in systems of mutually repelling objects. The zero- temperature liquid state therefore serves as a (pseudo) 'fixed point' controlling the prop- erties of vortex liquid below and even around the melting point.

  10. Quantum theory of strong-field frustrated tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popruzhenko, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    We show how the strong-field approximation, widely used for description of multiphoton and tunneling ionization, can be extended to analyse the excitation of bound states in intense low-frequency laser pulses. The proposed theory is based on the formalism of quantum trajectories and fills the gap between the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation and classical simulations. In particular, it allows identifying non-adiabatic and interference effects in strong-field excitation of Rydberg states.

  11. Statistical theory of subcritically-excited strong turbulence in inhomogeneous plasmas (IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, S.I.; Itoh, K.

    1999-08-01

    A statistical theory of nonlinear-nonequilibrium plasma state with strongly developed turbulence and with strong inhomogeneity of the system has been developed. A Fokker-Planck equation for the probability distribution function of the magnitude of turbulence is deduced. In the statistical description, both the contributions of thermal excitation and turbulence are kept. From the Fokker-Planck equation, the transition probability between the thermal fluctuation and turbulent fluctuation is derived. With respect to the turbulent fluctuations, the coherent part to a certain test mode is renormalized as the drag to the test mode, and the rest, the incoherent part, is considered to be a random noise. The renormalized operator includes the effect of nonlinear destabilization as well as the decorrelation by turbulent fluctuations. The equilibrium distribution function describes the thermal fluctuation, self-sustained turbulence and the hysteresis between them as a function of the plasma gradient. The plasma inhomogeneity is the controlling parameter that governs the turbulence. The formula of transition probability recovers the Arrhenius law in the thermodynamical equilibrium limit. In the presence of self-noise, the transition probability deviates form the exponential law and provides a power law. Application is made to the submarginal interchange mode turbulence, being induced by the turbulent current-diffusivity, in inhomogeneous plasmas. The power law dependence of the transition probability is obtained on the distance between the pressure gradient and the critical gradient for linear instability. Thus a new type of critical exponent is explicitly deduced in the phenomena of subcritical excitation of turbulence. The method provides an extension of the nonequilibrium statistical physics to the far-nonequilibrium states. (orig.)

  12. Statistical theory of nuclear cross section fluctuations with account s-matrix unitarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, S.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    Statistical properties of the S-matrix fluctuating part delta S=S- sub(T) in the T/D>>1, N>>1 Ericoson fluctuations mode are investigated. A unitary representation is used for the investigation of statistical properties of the S-matrix. The problem on correlation of fluctuating elements of the S-matrix is discussed. The S-matrix unitary representation allows one to strictly substantiates the assumptions of the Ericson fluctuations theory: a) the real and imaginary parts of the deltaS-matrix have identical dispersions, do not correlate and are distributed according to the normal law; 2) various deltaS-matrix elements do not correlate

  13. Beyond Gaussian approximation in the spin-fluctuation theory of metallic ferromagnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reser, B I; Grebennikov, V I [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Melnikov, N B, E-mail: reser@imp.uran.r [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-01-15

    A characteristic feature of the Gaussian spin-fluctuation theory is the jump transition into the paramagnetic state. We eliminate the jump and obtain a continuous second-order phase transition by taking into account the high-order terms of the free energy of electrons in the fluctuating exchange field. The third-order term of the free energy yields a renormalization of the mean field, and fourth-order term, responsible for the interaction of the fluctuations, gives a renormalization of the spin susceptibility. The extended theory is applied to the calculation of magnetic properties of Fe-Ni Invar.

  14. Theory of overdispersion in counting statistics caused by fluctuating probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semkow, Thomas M.

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that the random Lexis fluctuations of probabilities such as probability of decay or detection cause the counting statistics to be overdispersed with respect to the classical binomial, Poisson, or Gaussian distributions. The generating and the distribution functions for the overdispersed counting statistics are derived. Applications to radioactive decay with detection and more complex experiments are given, as well as distinguishing between the source and background, in the presence of overdispersion. Monte-Carlo verifications are provided

  15. Density functional theory and dynamical mean-field theory. A way to model strongly correlated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backes, Steffen

    2017-04-01

    The study of the electronic properties of correlated systems is a very diverse field and has lead to valuable insight into the physics of real materials. In these systems, the decisive factor that governs the physical properties is the ratio between the electronic kinetic energy, which promotes delocalization over the lattice, and the Coulomb interaction, which instead favours localized electronic states. Due to this competition, correlated electronic systems can show unique and interesting properties like the Metal-Insulator transition, diverse phase diagrams, strong temperature dependence and in general a high sensitivity to the environmental conditions. A theoretical description of these systems is not an easy task, since perturbative approaches that do not preserve the competition between the kinetic and interaction terms can only be applied in special limiting cases. One of the most famous approaches to obtain the electronic properties of a real material is the ab initio density functional theory (DFT) method. It allows one to obtain the ground state density of the system under investigation by mapping onto an effective non-interacting system that has to be found self-consistently. While being an exact theory, in practical implementations certain approximations have to be made to the exchange-correlation potential. The local density approximation (LDA), which approximates the exchange-correlation contribution to the total energy by that of a homogeneous electron gas with the corresponding density, has proven quite successful in many cases. Though, this approximation in general leads to an underestimation of electronic correlations and is not able to describe a metal-insulator transition due to electronic localization in the presence of strong Coulomb interaction. A different approach to the interacting electronic problem is the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT), which is non-perturbative in the kinetic and interaction term but neglects all non

  16. Density functional theory and dynamical mean-field theory. A way to model strongly correlated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backes, Steffen

    2017-04-15

    The study of the electronic properties of correlated systems is a very diverse field and has lead to valuable insight into the physics of real materials. In these systems, the decisive factor that governs the physical properties is the ratio between the electronic kinetic energy, which promotes delocalization over the lattice, and the Coulomb interaction, which instead favours localized electronic states. Due to this competition, correlated electronic systems can show unique and interesting properties like the Metal-Insulator transition, diverse phase diagrams, strong temperature dependence and in general a high sensitivity to the environmental conditions. A theoretical description of these systems is not an easy task, since perturbative approaches that do not preserve the competition between the kinetic and interaction terms can only be applied in special limiting cases. One of the most famous approaches to obtain the electronic properties of a real material is the ab initio density functional theory (DFT) method. It allows one to obtain the ground state density of the system under investigation by mapping onto an effective non-interacting system that has to be found self-consistently. While being an exact theory, in practical implementations certain approximations have to be made to the exchange-correlation potential. The local density approximation (LDA), which approximates the exchange-correlation contribution to the total energy by that of a homogeneous electron gas with the corresponding density, has proven quite successful in many cases. Though, this approximation in general leads to an underestimation of electronic correlations and is not able to describe a metal-insulator transition due to electronic localization in the presence of strong Coulomb interaction. A different approach to the interacting electronic problem is the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT), which is non-perturbative in the kinetic and interaction term but neglects all non

  17. State-Space Geometry, Statistical Fluctuations, and Black Holes in String Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Bellucci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the state-space geometry of various extremal and nonextremal black holes in string theory. From the notion of the intrinsic geometry, we offer a state-space perspective to the black hole vacuum fluctuations. For a given black hole entropy, we explicate the intrinsic geometric meaning of the statistical fluctuations, local and global stability conditions, and long range statistical correlations. We provide a set of physical motivations pertaining to the extremal and nonextremal black holes, namely, the meaning of the chemical geometry and physics of correlation. We illustrate the state-space configurations for general charge extremal black holes. In sequel, we extend our analysis for various possible charge and anticharge nonextremal black holes. From the perspective of statistical fluctuation theory, we offer general remarks, future directions, and open issues towards the intrinsic geometric understanding of the vacuum fluctuations and black holes in string theory.

  18. State-space Geometry, Statistical Fluctuations and Black Holes in String Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bellucci, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    We study the state-space geometry of various extremal and nonextremal black holes in string theory. From the notion of the intrinsic geometry, we offer a new perspective of black hole vacuum fluctuations. For a given black hole entropy, we explicate the intrinsic state-space geometric meaning of the statistical fluctuations, local and global stability conditions and long range statistical correlations. We provide a set of physical motivations pertaining to the extremal and nonextremal black holes, \\textit{viz.}, the meaning of the chemical geometry and physics of correlation. We illustrate the state-space configurations for general charge extremal black holes. In sequel, we extend our analysis for various possible charge and anticharge nonextremal black holes. From the perspective of statistical fluctuation theory, we offer general remarks, future directions and open issues towards the intrinsic geometric understanding of the vacuum fluctuations and black holes in string theory. Keywords: Intrinsic Geometry; ...

  19. Theory and simulation of strong correlations in quantum Coulomb systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonitz, M.; Semkat, D.; Filinov, A.; Golubnychyi, V.; Kremp, D.; Gericke, D. O.; Murillo, M. S.; Filinov, V.; Fortov, V.; Hoyer, W.; Koch, S. W.

    2003-06-01

    Strong correlations in quantum Coulomb systems (QCS) are attracting increasing interest in many fields ranging from dense plasmas and semiconductors to metal clusters and ultracold trapped ions. Examples are bound states in dense plasmas (atoms, molecules, clusters) and semiconductors (excitons, trions, biexcitons) or Coulomb crystals. We present first-principle simulation results of these systems including path integral Monte Carlo simulations of the equilibrium behaviour of dense hydrogen and electron-hole plasmas and molecular dynamics and quantum kinetic theory simulations of the nonequilibrium properties of QCS. Finally, we critically assess potential and limitations of the various methods in their application to Coulomb systems.

  20. Semiclassical theory of strong localization for quantum thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khripkov, Christine; Vardi, Amichay; Cohen, Doron

    2018-02-01

    We introduce a semiclassical theory for strong localization that may arise in the context of many-body thermalization. As a minimal model for thermalization we consider a few-site Bose-Hubbard model consisting of two weakly interacting subsystems that can exchange particles. The occupation of a subsystem (x ) satisfies in the classical treatment a Fokker-Planck equation with a diffusion coefficient D (x ) . We demonstrate that it is possible to deduce from the classical description a quantum breaktime t* and, hence, the manifestations of a strong localization effect. For this purpose it is essential to take the geometry of the energy shell into account and to make a distinction between different notions of phase-space exploration.

  1. Weak and strong coupling equilibration in nonabelian gauge theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keegan, Liam [Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN,CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Kurkela, Aleksi [Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN,CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Stavanger,4036 Stavanger (Norway); Romatschke, Paul [Department of Physics, 390 UCB, University of Colorado at Boulder,Boulder, CO (United States); Center for Theory of Quantum Matter, University of Colorado,Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Schee, Wilke van der [Center for Theoretical Physics, MIT,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Zhu, Yan [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskyla, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics,P.O. Box 64, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2016-04-06

    We present a direct comparison studying equilibration through kinetic theory at weak coupling and through holography at strong coupling in the same set-up. The set-up starts with a homogeneous thermal state, which then smoothly transitions through an out-of-equilibrium phase to an expanding system undergoing boost-invariant flow. This first apples-to-apples comparison of equilibration provides a benchmark for similar equilibration processes in heavy-ion collisions, where the equilibration mechanism is still under debate. We find that results at weak and strong coupling can be smoothly connected by simple, empirical power-laws for the viscosity, equilibration time and entropy production of the system.

  2. Weak and strong coupling equilibration in nonabelian gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Keegan, Liam; Romatschke, Paul; van der Schee, Wilke; Zhu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We present a direct comparison studying equilibration through kinetic theory at weak coupling and through holography at strong coupling in the same set-up. The set-up starts with a homogeneous thermal state, which then smoothly transitions through an out-of-equilibrium phase to an expanding system undergoing boost-invariant flow. This first apples-to-apples comparison of equilibration provides a benchmark for similar equilibration processes in heavy-ion collisions, where the equilibration mechanism is still under debate. We find that results at weak and strong coupling can be smoothly connected by simple, empirical power-laws for the viscosity, equilibration time and entropy production of the system.

  3. Work fluctuation theorems and free energy from kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brey, J. Javier; Ruiz-Montero, M. J.; Domínguez, Álvaro

    2018-01-01

    The formulation of the first and second principles of thermodynamics for a particle in contact with a heat bath and submitted to an external force is analyzed, by means of the Boltzmann-Lorentz kinetic equation. The possible definitions of the thermodynamic quantities are discussed in the light of the H theorem verified by the distribution of the particle. The work fluctuation relations formulated by Bochkov and Kuzovlev, and by Jarzynski, respectively, are derived from the kinetic equation. In addition, particle simulations using both the direct simulation Monte Carlo method and molecular dynamics, are used to investigate the practical accuracy of the results. Work distributions are also measured, and they turn out to be rather complex. On the other hand, they seem to depend very little, if any, on the interaction potential between the intruder and the bath.

  4. Strong Generative Capacity and the Empirical Base of Linguistic Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Ott

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This Perspective traces the evolution of certain central notions in the theory of Generative Grammar (GG. The founding documents of the field suggested a relation between the grammar, construed as recursively enumerating an infinite set of sentences, and the idealized native speaker that was essentially equivalent to the relation between a formal language (a set of well-formed formulas and an automaton that recognizes strings as belonging to the language or not. But this early view was later abandoned, when the focus of the field shifted to the grammar's strong generative capacity as recursive generation of hierarchically structured objects as opposed to strings. The grammar is now no longer seen as specifying a set of well-formed expressions and in fact necessarily constructs expressions of any degree of intuitive “acceptability.” The field of GG, however, has not sufficiently acknowledged the significance of this shift in perspective, as evidenced by the fact that (informal and experimentally-controlled observations about string acceptability continue to be treated as bona fide data and generalizations for the theory of GG. The focus on strong generative capacity, it is argued, requires a new discussion of what constitutes valid empirical evidence for GG beyond observations pertaining to weak generation.

  5. Emil Lederer’s Theory of Economic Fluctuations and the Role of Financial Institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Vouldis, Angelos; Michaelides, Panayotis G.; Milios, John G.

    2008-01-01

    Emil Lederer was characterized as the “leading academic socialist of Germany in the 1920’s” by Joseph Schumpeter and was a highly respected economist of his time. However, most aspects of his work remain totally unexplored. This paper focuses on Emil Lederer’s theory of economic fluctuations. It defends the thesis that certain aspects of Lederer’s conceptualization of economic fluctuations underwent considerable modifications when his 1925 article Konjunktur und Krisen is compared with his 19...

  6. Quantum theory of dynamic multiple light scattering in fluctuating disordered media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skipetrov, S. E.

    2007-01-01

    We formulate a quantum theory of dynamic multiple light scattering in fluctuating disordered media and calculate the fluctuation and the autocorrelation function of the photon number operator for light transmitted through a disordered slab. The effect of disorder on the information capacity of a quantum communication channel operating in a disordered environment is estimated, and the use of squeezed light in diffusing-wave spectroscopy is discussed

  7. Semi-classical theory of fluctuations in nuclear matter; Theorie semi-classique des fluctuations dans la matiere nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhassine, B. [Nantes Univ., 44 (France)

    1994-01-14

    At intermediate energies the heavy ion collisions can be studied within the framework of a semi-classical approach based on the Vlasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (VUU) equation. Such an approach reduces the N-body problem to its description in terms of the one-body distribution function and constitutes the basis of several successful simulation models. Our aim in this work is to extend these average approaches to treat fluctuations. Within the framework of a linear approximation, we derived a Fokker-Planck transport equation in the one-body phase space. When it is reduced to its first moments, one recovers the VUU equation for the average dynamics together with the time evolution equation for the correlations. The collective transport coefficients are then obtained by projection on the one-body collective space. Independently, using a projection method introduced by Van Kampen, based on the constants of motion, we deduce the stationary expressions for the covariance matrix in phase space. We extract then, the equilibrium dispersions of one-body observables in a homogeneous case and in a spherical symmetric one. These results are compared with two types of simulation models in a relaxation time approximation. In the first one which is of Lagrangian type, the collective transport coefficients are directly extracted from the simulation and consequently the numerical fluctuations are washed out. The second model, due to its Eulerian character, allows us to make a microscopical comparison. (author) 58 refs.

  8. Quantitative theory of thermal fluctuations and disorder in the vortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Based on this picture, a quantitative theory of vortex melting and glass transition in Type II superconductors in the framework of Ginzburg-Landau approach is presented. The melting line location is determined and magnetization and specific heat jumps are calculated. The point-like disorder shifts the line downwards and ...

  9. Towards a large deviation theory for strongly correlated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Guiomar, E-mail: guiomar.ruiz@upm.es [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas and National Institute of Science and Technology for Complex Systems, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Departamento de Matemática Aplicada y Estadística, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Pza. Cardenal Cisneros s.n., 28040 Madrid (Spain); Tsallis, Constantino, E-mail: tsallis@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas and National Institute of Science and Technology for Complex Systems, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santa Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501 (United States)

    2012-07-23

    A large-deviation connection of statistical mechanics is provided by N independent binary variables, the (N→∞) limit yielding Gaussian distributions. The probability of n≠N/2 out of N throws is governed by e{sup −Nr}, r related to the entropy. Large deviations for a strong correlated model characterized by indices (Q,γ) are studied, the (N→∞) limit yielding Q-Gaussians (Q→1 recovers a Gaussian). Its large deviations are governed by e{sub q}{sup −Nr{sub q}} (∝1/N{sup 1/(q−1)}, q>1), q=(Q−1)/(γ[3−Q])+1. This illustration opens the door towards a large-deviation foundation of nonextensive statistical mechanics. -- Highlights: ► We introduce the formalism of relative entropy for a single random binary variable and its q-generalization. ► We study a model of N strongly correlated binary random variables and their large-deviation probabilities. ► Large-deviation probability of strongly correlated model exhibits a q-exponential decay whose argument is proportional to N, as extensivity requires. ► Our results point to a q-generalized large deviation theory and suggest a large-deviation foundation of nonextensive statistical mechanics.

  10. Towards strong field tests of beyond Horndeski gravity theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakstein, Jeremy; Babichev, Eugeny; Koyama, Kazuya; Langlois, David; Saito, Ryo

    2017-03-01

    Theories of gravity in the beyond Horndeski class encompass a wide range of scalar-tensor theories that will be tested on cosmological scales over the coming decade. In this work, we investigate the possibility of testing them in the strong field regime by looking at the properties of compact objects—neutron, hyperon, and quark stars—embedded in an asymptotically de Sitter space-time, for a specific subclass of theories. We extend previous works to include slow rotation and find a relation between the dimensionless moment of inertia (I ¯ =I c2/GNM3 ) and the compactness C =GNM /R c2 (an I ¯-C relation), independent of the equation of state, that is reminiscent of but distinct from the general relativity prediction. Several of our equations of state contain hyperons and free quarks, allowing us to revisit the hyperon puzzle. We find that the maximum mass of hyperon stars can be larger than 2 M⊙ for small values of the beyond Horndeski parameter, thus providing a resolution of the hyperon puzzle based on modified gravity. Moreover, stable quark stars exist when hyperonic stars are unstable, which means that the phase transition from hyperon to quark stars is predicted just as in general relativity (GR), albeit with larger quark star masses. Two important and potentially observable consequences of some of the theories we consider are the existence of neutron stars in a range of masses significantly higher than in GR and I ¯-C relations that differ from their GR counterparts. In the former case, we find objects that, if observed, could not be accounted for in GR because they violate the usual GR causality condition. We end by discussing several difficult technical issues that remain to be addressed in order to reach more realistic predictions that may be tested using gravitational wave searches or neutron star observations.

  11. A New Synergistic Forecasting Method for Short-Term Traffic Flow with Event-Triggered Strong Fluctuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darong Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Directing against the shortcoming of low accuracy in short-term traffic flow prediction caused by strong traffic flow fluctuation, a novel method for short-term traffic forecasting based on the combination of improved grey Verhulst prediction algorithm and first-order difference exponential smoothing is proposed. Firstly, we constructed an improved grey Verhulst prediction model by introducing the Markov chain to its traditional version. Then, based on an introduced dynamic weighting factor, the improved grey Verhulst prediction method, and the first-order difference exponential smoothing technique, the new method for short-term traffic forecasting is completed in an efficient way. Finally, experiment and analysis are carried out in the light of actual data gathered from strong fluctuation environment to verify the effectiveness and rationality of our proposed scheme.

  12. Molecular Thermodynamic Modeling of Fluctuation Solution Theory Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O’Connell, John P.; Abildskov, Jens

    2013-01-01

    for densities and gas solubilities, including ionic liquids and complex mixtures such as coal liquids. The approach is especially useful in systems with strong nonidealities. This chapter describes successful application of such modeling to a wide variety of systems treated over several decades and suggests how...

  13. Strongly correlated electron materials. I. Theory of the quasiparticle structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Aguilar, F.; Costa-Quintana, J.; Puig-Puig, L. (Departamento de Fisica, Grupo de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain))

    1993-07-01

    In this paper we give a method for analyzing the renormalized electronic structure of the Hubbard systems. The first step is the determination of effective interactions from the random-phase approximation (RPA) and from an extended RPA (ERPA) that introduces vertex effects within the bubble polarization. The second step is the determination of the density of states deduced from the spectral functions. Its analysis leads us to conclude that these systems can exhibit three types of resonances in their electronic structures: the lower-, middle-, and upper-energy resonances. Furthermore, we analyze the conditions for which there is only one type of resonance and the causes that lead to the disappearance of the heavy-fermion state. We finally introduce the RPA and ERPA effective interactions within the strong-coupling theory and we give the conditions for obtaining coupling and superconductivity.

  14. Towards a unified gauge theory of gravitational and strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hehl, F.W.; Sijacki, D.

    1980-01-01

    The space-time properties of leptons and hadrons is studied and it is found necessary to extend general relativity to the gauge theory based on the four-dimensional affine group. This group translates and deforms the tetrads of the locally Minkowskian space-time. Its conserved currents, momentum, and hypermomentum, act as sources in the two field equations of gravity. A Lagrangian quadratic in torsion and curvature allows for the propagation of two independent gauge fields: translational e-gravity mediated by the tetrad coefficients, and deformational GAMMA-gravity mediated by the connection coefficients. For macroscopic matter e-gravity coincides with general relativity up to the post-Newtonian approximation of fourth order. For microscopic matter GAMMA-gravity represents a strong Yang-Mills type interaction. In the linear approximation, for a static source, a confinement potential is found. (author)

  15. On the flavor problem in strongly coupled theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Martin

    2012-11-28

    This thesis is on the flavor problem of Randall Sundrum models and their strongly coupled dual theories. These models are particularly well motivated extensions of the Standard Model, because they simultaneously address the gauge hierarchy problem and the hierarchies in the quark masses and mixings. In order to put this into context, special attention is given to concepts underlying the theories which can explain the hierarchy problem and the flavor structure of the Standard Model (SM). The AdS/CFT duality is introduced and its implications for the Randall Sundrum model with fermions in the bulk and general bulk gauge groups is investigated. It is shown that the different terms in the general 5D propagator of a bulk gauge field can be related to the corresponding diagrams of the strongly coupled dual, which allows for a deeper understanding of the origin of flavor changing neutral currents generated by the exchange of the Kaluza Klein excitations of these bulk fields. In the numerical analysis, different observables which are sensitive to corrections from the tree-level exchange of these resonances will be presented on the basis of updated experimental data from the Tevatron and LHC experiments. This includes electroweak precision observables, namely corrections to the S and T parameters followed by corrections to the Zb anti b vertex, flavor changing observables with flavor changes at one vertex, viz. B(B{sub d}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) and B(B{sub s}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}), and two vertices, viz. S{sub {psi}{phi}} and vertical stroke {epsilon}{sub K} vertical stroke, as well as bounds from direct detection experiments. The analysis will show that all of these bounds can be brought in agreement with a new physics scale {Lambda}{sub NP} in the TeV range, except for the CP violating quantity vertical stroke {epsilon}{sub K} vertical stroke, which requires {Lambda}{sub NP}=O(10) TeV in the absence of fine-tuning. The numerous modifications of the

  16. Particle production in field theories coupled to strong external sources, I: Formalism and main results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelis, Francois; Venugopalan, Raju

    2006-01-01

    We develop a formalism for particle production in a field theory coupled to a strong time-dependent external source. An example of such a theory is the color glass condensate. We derive a formula, in terms of cut vacuum-vacuum Feynman graphs, for the probability of producing a given number of particles. This formula is valid to all orders in the coupling constant. The distribution of multiplicities is non-Poissonian, even in the classical approximation. We investigate an alternative method of calculating the mean multiplicity. At leading order, the average multiplicity can be expressed in terms of retarded solutions of classical equations of motion. We demonstrate that the average multiplicity at next-to-leading order can be formulated as an initial value problem by solving equations of motion for small fluctuation fields with retarded boundary conditions. The variance of the distribution can be calculated in a similar fashion. Our formalism therefore provides a framework to compute from first principles particle production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions beyond leading order in the coupling constant and to all orders in the source density. We also provide a transparent interpretation (in conventional field theory language) of the well-known Abramovsky-Gribov-Kancheli (AGK) cancellations. Explicit connections are made between the framework for multi-particle production developed here and the framework of reggeon field theory

  17. Evaluation of diffusion coefficients in multicomponent mixtures by means of the fluctuation theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    We derive general expressions for diffusion coefficients in multicomponent non-ideal gas or liquid mixtures. The derivation is based on the general statistical theory of fluctuations around an equilibrium state. The matrix of diffusion coefficients is expressed in terms of the equilibrium...... characteristics. We demonstrate on several examples that the developed theory is in agreement with the established experimental facts and dependencies for the diffusion coefficients. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  18. Strongly coupled gauge theories: What can lattice calculations teach us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenfratz, A.; Brower, R. C.; Rebbi, C.; Weinberg, E.; Witzel, O.

    2017-12-01

    The dynamical origin of electroweak symmetry breaking is an open question with many possible theoretical explanations. Strongly coupled systems predicting the Higgs boson as a bound state of a new gauge-fermion interaction form one class of candidate models. Due to increased statistics, LHC run II will further constrain the phenomenologically viable models in the near future. In the meanwhile it is important to understand the general properties and specific features of the different competing models. In this work we discuss many-flavor gauge-fermion systems that contain both massless (light) and massive fermions. The former provide Goldstone bosons and trigger electroweak symmetry breaking, while the latter indirectly influence the infrared dynamics. Numerical results reveal that such systems can exhibit a light 0++ isosinglet scalar, well separated from the rest of the spectrum. Further, when we set the scale via the vev of electroweak symmetry breaking, we predict a 2 TeV vector resonance which could be a generic feature of SU(3) gauge theories.

  19. Nonequilibrium Gyrokinetic Fluctuation Theory and Sampling Noise in Gyrokinetic Particle-in-cell Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The present state of the theory of fluctuations in gyrokinetic (GK) plasmas and especially its application to sampling noise in GK particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations is reviewed. Topics addressed include the Δf method, the fluctuation-dissipation theorem for both classical and GK many-body plasmas, the Klimontovich formalism, sampling noise in PIC simulations, statistical closure for partial differential equations, the theoretical foundations of spectral balance in the presence of arbitrary noise sources, and the derivation of Kadomtsev-type equations from the general formalism

  20. Strong Coupling of Microwave Photons to Antiferromagnetic Fluctuations in an Organic Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergenthaler, Matthias; Liu, Junjie; Le Roy, Jennifer J.; Ares, Natalia; Thompson, Amber L.; Bogani, Lapo; Luis, Fernando; Blundell, Stephen J.; Lancaster, Tom; Ardavan, Arzhang; Briggs, G. Andrew D.; Leek, Peter J.; Laird, Edward A.

    2017-10-01

    Coupling between a crystal of di(phenyl)-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)iminoazanium radicals and a superconducting microwave resonator is investigated in a circuit quantum electrodynamics (circuit QED) architecture. The crystal exhibits paramagnetic behavior above 4 K, with antiferromagnetic correlations appearing below this temperature, and we demonstrate strong coupling at base temperature. The magnetic resonance acquires a field angle dependence as the crystal is cooled down, indicating anisotropy of the exchange interactions. These results show that multispin modes in organic crystals are suitable for circuit QED, offering a platform for their coherent manipulation. They also utilize the circuit QED architecture as a way to probe spin correlations at low temperature.

  1. Seismic wave attenuation and dispersion due to wave-induced fluid flow in rocks with strong permeability fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germán Rubino, J; Monachesi, Leonardo B; Müller, Tobias M; Guarracino, Luis; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    Oscillatory fluid movements in heterogeneous porous rocks induced by seismic waves cause dissipation of wave field energy. The resulting seismic signature depends not only on the rock compressibility distribution, but also on a statistically averaged permeability. This so-called equivalent seismic permeability does not, however, coincide with the respective equivalent flow permeability. While this issue has been analyzed for one-dimensional (1D) media, the corresponding two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cases remain unexplored. In this work, this topic is analyzed for 2D random medium realizations having strong permeability fluctuations. With this objective, oscillatory compressibility simulations based on the quasi-static poroelasticity equations are performed. Numerical analysis shows that strong permeability fluctuations diminish the magnitude of attenuation and velocity dispersion due to fluid flow, while the frequency range where these effects are significant gets broader. By comparing the acoustic responses obtained using different permeability averages, it is also shown that at very low frequencies the equivalent seismic permeability is similar to the equivalent flow permeability, while for very high frequencies this parameter approaches the arithmetic average of the permeability field. These seemingly generic findings have potentially important implications with regard to the estimation of equivalent flow permeability from seismic data.

  2. Long Range Order and Spin-Fluctuations in Strongly Correlated Electron System with Valence Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, P. A.; Menushenkov, A. P.; Mignot, J.-M.; Nemkovski, K. S.; Yaroslavtsev, A. A.; Kozlenko, D. P.

    Rare-earth based strongly correlated electron systems (SCES) exhibit a large variety of different ground states, ranging from the simple paramagnetism of crystal-field-split f-electron multiplets to highly unconventional Kondo-insulator states with a combination of charge gap, spin gap and valence instability, in which long-range magnetic order can eventually arise from an initially singlet state. The physical background for these properties of the electron subsystem may be clarified by performing detailed neutron scattering experiments, namely magnetic neutron scattering spectroscopy and diffraction. This report reviews the results of the previous and new experimental studies on a number of rare-earth intermetallic compounds, which shed light on peculiar features of those unusual ground states.

  3. Effective Field Theories and Strong Interactions. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, Sean

    2011-01-01

    The framework of Effective Field Theories (EFTs) allows us to describe strong interactions in terms of degrees of freedom relevant to the energy regimes of interest, in the most general way consistent with the symmetries of QCD. Observables are expanded systematically in powers of M lo /M hi , where M lo (M hi ) denotes a low-(high-)energy scale. This organizational principle is referred to as 'power counting'. Terms of increasing powers in the expansion parameter are referred to as leading order (LO), next-to-leading order (NLO), etc. Details of the QCD dynamics not included explicitly are encoded in interaction parameters, or 'low-energy constants' (LECs), which can in principle be calculated from an explicit solution of QCD - for example via lattice simulations- but can also be determined directly from experimental data. QCD has an intrinsic scale M QCD ≅ 1 GeV, at which the QCD coupling constant α s (M QCD ) becomes large and the dynamics becomes non-perturbative. As a consequence M QCD sets the scale for the masses of most hadrons, such as the nucleon mass m N ≅ 940 MeV. EFTs can roughly be divided into two categories: those that can be matched onto QCD in perturbation theory, which we call high-energy EFTs, and those that cannot be matched perturbatively, which we call low-energy EFTs. In high-energy EFTs, M QCD typically sets the low-energy scale, and all the dynamics associated with this scale reside in matrix elements of EFT operators. These non-perturbative matrix elements are the LECs and are also referred to as long-distance contributions. Each matrix element is multiplied by a short-distance coefficient, which contains the dynamics from the high scale M hi . Since M hi >> M QCD , α s (M hi ) hi ∼ M Q , the heavy-quark mass, and in addition to M QCD there are low scales associated with the typical relative momentum ∼ M Q v and energy ∼ M Q v 2 of the heavy quarks. Depending on the sizes of M Q and the heavy-quark velocity v these scales can

  4. String Theory, Strongly Correlated Systems, and Duality Twists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Chicon, Nesty Ray

    In the first part of this dissertation (Chapter 1), I present a construction of a six dimensional (2,0)-theory model that describes the dynamics of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect (FQHE). The FQHE appears as part of the low energy description of the Coulomb branch of the A1 (2,0)-theory formulated on a geometry (S 1 x R2)/Zk. At low-energy, the configuration is described in terms of a 4+1D supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory on a cone (R2/Z k) with additional 2+1D degrees of freedom at the tip of the cone that include fractionally charged particles. These fractionally charged "quasi-particles" are BPS strings of the (2,0)-theory wrapped on short cycles. In this framework, a W-boson can be modeled as a bound state of k quasi-particles, which can be used to understand the dynamics of the FQHE. In the second part of this dissertation (Chapters 2-3), I investigate the N=4 SYM theory compactified on a circle, with a varying coupling constant (Janus configuration) and an S-duality twist. I relate this setup to a three dimensional topological theory and to a dual string theory. The equality of these descriptions is exhibited by matching the operator algebra, and the dimensions of the Hilbert space. Additionally, this dissertation addresses a classic result in number theory, called quadratic reciprocity, using string theory language. I present a proof that quadratic reciprocity is a direct consequence of T-duality of Type-II string theory. This is demonstrated by analyzing a partition function of abelian N=4 SYM theory on a certain supersymmetry-preserving four-manifold with variable coupling constant and a SL(2,Z)-duality twist.

  5. Fluctuations in an electron-positron plasma: linear theory and implications for turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary, S Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Karimabadi, Homa [UCSD

    2009-01-01

    Linear kinetic theory of electromagnetic fluctuations in a homogeneous, magnetized, collisionless electron-positron plasma predicts two lightly damped modes propagate at relatively long wavelengths: an Alfven-like mode with dispersion {omega}{sub r} = k{sub {parallel}}{bar {nu}}{sub A} and a magnetosonic-like mode with dispersion {omega}{sub r} {approx_equal} k{bar {nu}}{sub A} if {beta}{sub e} << 1. Here {bar {nu}}{sub A} is the Alfven speed in an electron-positron plasma and {parallel} refers to the direction relative to the background magnetic field B{sub 0}. Alfven-like fluctuations are incompressible, but the magnetosoniclike fluctuations become compressible at propagation oblique to B{sub 0}. The onset of cyclotron damping of both modes moves to smaller k{sub {parallel}}c/{omega}{sub e} as {beta}{sub {parallel}e} increases. Using the linear dispersion properties of these modes, scaling relations are derived which predict that turbulence of both modes should be relatively anisotropic, with fluctuating magnetic energy preferentially cascading in directions relatively perpendicular to B{sub 0}. But two-regime turbulence with a distinct breakpoint in wavenumber space observed in the solar wind should not be present in electron-positron plasmas because of the absence of whistler-like dispersion. Linear theory properties of the cyclotron and mirror instabilities driven by either electron or positron temperature anisotropies are generally analogous to the corresponding instabilities in electron-proton plasmas.

  6. Itinerant ferromagnetism in actinide 5 f -electron systems: Phenomenological analysis with spin fluctuation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateiwa, Naoyuki; Pospíšil, Jiří; Haga, Yoshinori; Sakai, Hironori; Matsuda, Tatsuma D.; Yamamoto, Etsuji

    2017-07-01

    We have carried out an analysis of magnetic data in 69 uranium, 7 neptunium, and 4 plutonium ferromagnets with the spin fluctuation theory developed by Takahashi [Y. Takahashi, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 55, 3553 (1986), 10.1143/JPSJ.55.3553]. The basic and spin fluctuation parameters of the actinide ferromagnets are determined and the applicability of the spin fluctuation theory to actinide 5 f system has been discussed. Itinerant ferromagnets of the 3 d transition metals and their intermetallics follow a generalized Rhodes-Wohlfarth relation between peff/ps and TC/T0 , viz., peff/ps∝(TC/T0) -3 /2 . Here, ps, peff, TC, and T0 are the spontaneous and effective magnetic moments, the Curie temperature, and the width of spin fluctuation spectrum in energy space, respectively. The same relation is satisfied for TC/T0uranium and neptunium ferromagnets below (TC/T0)kink=0.32 ±0.02 , where a kink structure appears in relation between the two quantities. ps increases more weakly above (TC/T0)kink. A possible interpretation with the TC/T0 dependence of ps is given.

  7. [Realistic theories of heavy electron and other strongly correlated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Research on the following topics is summarized: non-perturbative treatments of multi-channel Kondo models, non-perturbative treatments of multi-band models for the quadrupolar fluctuation model of the cuprates, extension of the two-channel Kondo model to other materials and treatment of the infinite-dimensional Hubbard model within the Non-crossing approximation. Data on the specific heat of Y 0.8 U 0.2 Pd 3 and the c-axis susceptibility and specific heat of U in ThRu 2 Si are shown. 5 figs., 84 refs

  8. [Realistic theories of heavy electron and other strongly correlated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    Research on the following topics is summarized: non-perturbative treatments of multi-channel Kondo models, non-perturbative treatments of multi-band models for the quadrupolar fluctuation model of the cuprates, extension of the two-channel Kondo model to other materials and treatment of the infinite-dimensional Hubbard model within the Non-crossing approximation. Data on the specific heat of Y{sub 0.8}U{sub 0.2}Pd{sub 3} and the c-axis susceptibility and specific heat of U in ThRu{sub 2}Si are shown. 5 figs., 84 refs.

  9. Protein Signaling Networks from Single Cell Fluctuations and Information Theory Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young Shik; Remacle, F.; Fan, Rong; Hwang, Kiwook; Wei, Wei; Ahmad, Habib; Levine, R.D.; Heath, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein signaling networks among cells play critical roles in a host of pathophysiological processes, from inflammation to tumorigenesis. We report on an approach that integrates microfluidic cell handling, in situ protein secretion profiling, and information theory to determine an extracellular protein-signaling network and the role of perturbations. We assayed 12 proteins secreted from human macrophages that were subjected to lipopolysaccharide challenge, which emulates the macrophage-based innate immune responses against Gram-negative bacteria. We characterize the fluctuations in protein secretion of single cells, and of small cell colonies (n = 2, 3,···), as a function of colony size. Measuring the fluctuations permits a validation of the conditions required for the application of a quantitative version of the Le Chatelier's principle, as derived using information theory. This principle provides a quantitative prediction of the role of perturbations and allows a characterization of a protein-protein interaction network. PMID:21575571

  10. Gauge theories of weak, electromagnetic and strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, M.; Joos, H.

    1978-05-01

    This 10 lectures are devided into the chapters: Phenomenological basis of the quantum chromodynamics, phenomenology of weak interactions, quantum electrodynamics and gauge invariance, from the fermimodel to the quantum flavor dynamics, on the quantum theory of yang-mills-fields, spontaneous symmetry breaking - the Higgs-Kibble-mechanism, the Salam-Weinberg-model, asymptotic freedom, quark confinement and charmonium. (WL) [de

  11. Scattering on a nonrelativistic particle in strong coupling theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razumov, A.V.

    1977-01-01

    Interaction of a nonrelativistic particle with a scalar quantum field has been studied in one-dimensional space in the framework of the Bogolyubov's method. An energy spectrum and scattering amplitude on a dressed particle have been obtained for the case of strong coupling up to the zero order over the coupling constant

  12. Linking niche theory to ecological impacts of successful invaders: insights from resource fluctuation-specialist herbivore interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidoin, Cindy; Roques, Lionel; Boivin, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Theories of species coexistence and invasion ecology are fundamentally connected and provide a common theoretical framework for studying the mechanisms underlying successful invasions and their ecological impacts. Temporal fluctuations in resource availability and differences in life-history traits between invasive and resident species are considered as likely drivers of the dynamics of invaded communities. Current critical issues in invasion ecology thus relate to the extent to which such mechanisms influence coexistence between invasive and resident species and to the ability of resident species to persist in an invasive-dominated ecosystem. We tested how a fluctuating resource, and species trait differences may explain and help predict long-term impacts of biological invasions in forest specialist insect communities. We used a simple invasion system comprising closely related invasive and resident seed-specialized wasps (Hymenoptera: Torymidae) competing for a well-known fluctuating resource and displaying divergent diapause, reproductive and phenological traits. Based on extensive long-term field observations (1977-2010), we developed a combination of mechanistic and statistical models aiming to (i) obtain a realistic description of the population dynamics of these interacting species over time, and (ii) clarify the respective contributions of fluctuation-dependent and fluctuation-independent mechanisms to long-term impact of invasion on the population dynamics of the resident wasp species. We showed that a fluctuation-dependent mechanism was unable to promote coexistence of the resident and invasive species. Earlier phenology of the invasive species was the main driver of invasion success, enabling the invader to exploit an empty niche. Phenology also had the greatest power to explain the long-term negative impact of the invasive on the resident species, through resource pre-emption. This study provides strong support for the critical role of species

  13. Strongly coupled gauge theories: What can lattice calculations teach us?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Electroweak symmetry breaking and the dynamical origin of the Higgs boson are central questions today. Strongly coupled systems predicting the Higgs boson as a bound state of a new gauge-fermion interaction are candidates to describe beyond Standard Model physics. The phenomenologically viable models are strongly coupled, near the conformal boundary, requiring non-perturbative studies to reveal their properties. Lattice studies show that many of the beyond-Standard Model candidates have a relatively light isosinglet scalar state that is well separated from the rest of the spectrum. When the scale is set via the vev of electroweak symmetry breaking, a 2 TeV vector resonance appears to be a general feature of many of these models with several other resonances that are not much heavier.

  14. Emergence of fluctuating traveling front solutions in macroscopic theory of noisy invasion fronts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerson, Baruch; Vilenkin, Arkady; Sasorov, Pavel V

    2013-01-01

    The position of an invasion front, propagating into an unstable state, fluctuates because of the shot noise coming from the discreteness of reacting particles and stochastic character of the reactions and diffusion. A recent macroscopic theory [Meerson and Sasorov, Phys. Rev. E 84, 030101(R) (2011)] yields the probability of observing, during a long time, an unusually slow front. The theory is formulated as an effective Hamiltonian mechanics which operates with the density field and the conjugate "momentum" field. Further, the theory assumes that the most probable density field history of an unusually slow front represents, up to small corrections, a traveling front solution of the Hamilton equations. Here we verify this assumption by solving the Hamilton equations numerically for models belonging to the directed percolation universality class.

  15. Fluctuation theory for transport properties in multicomponent mixtures: thermodiffusion and heat conductivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The theory of transport properties in multicomponent gas and liquid mixtures, which was previously developed for diffusion coefficients, is extended onto thermodiffusion coefficients and heat conductivities. The derivation of the expressions for transport properties is based on the general statis...... of the heat conductivity coefficient for ideal gas. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......The theory of transport properties in multicomponent gas and liquid mixtures, which was previously developed for diffusion coefficients, is extended onto thermodiffusion coefficients and heat conductivities. The derivation of the expressions for transport properties is based on the general...... statistical theory of fluctuations around an equilibrium state. The Onsager matrix of phenomenological coefficients is expressed in terms of the penetration lengths, including the newly introduced penetration length for the energy transfer. As an example, this penetration length is found from the known value...

  16. A non-linear theory of strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skyrme, T.H.R.

    1994-01-01

    A non-linear theory of mesons, nucleons and hyperons is proposed. The three independent fields of the usual symmetrical pseudo-scalar pion field are replaced by the three directions of a four-component field vector of constant length, conceived in an Euclidean four-dimensional isotopic spin space. This length provides the universal scaling factor, all other constants being dimensionless; the mass of the meson field is generated by a φ 4 term; this destroys the continuous rotation group in the iso-space, leaving a 'cubic' symmetry group. Classification of states by this group introduces quantum numbers corresponding to isotopic spin and to 'strangeness'; one consequences is that, at least in elementary interactions, charge is only conserved module 4. Furthermore, particle states have not a well-defined parity, but parity is effectively conserved for meson-nucleon interactions. A simplified model, using only two dimensions of space and iso-space, is considered further; the non-linear meson field has solutions with particle character, and an indication is given of the way in which the particle field variables might be introduced as collective co-ordinates describing the dynamics of these particular solutions of the meson field equations, suggesting a unified theory based on the meson field alone. (author). 7 refs

  17. Black hole thermodynamics from calculations in strongly coupled gauge theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, D; Lifschytz, G; Lowe, D A

    2001-02-19

    We develop an approximation scheme for the quantum mechanics of N D0-branes at finite temperature in the 't Hooft large- N limit. The entropy of the quantum mechanics calculated using this approximation agrees well with the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of a ten-dimensional nonextremal black hole with 0-brane charge. This result is in accordance with the duality conjectured by Itzhaki, Maldacena, Sonnenschein, and Yankielowicz [Phys. Rev. D 58, 046004 (1998)]. Our approximation scheme provides a model for the density matrix which describes a black hole in the strongly coupled quantum mechanics.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of the penetration lengths: application within the fluctuation theory for diffusion coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galliero, Guillaume; Medvedev, Oleg; Shapiro, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    A 322 (2004) 151). In the current study, a fast molecular dynamics scheme has been developed to determine the values of the penetration lengths in Lennard-Jones binary systems. Results deduced from computations provide a new insight into the concept of penetration lengths. It is shown for four different...... binary liquid mixtures of non-polar components that computed penetration lengths, for various temperatures and compositions, are consistent with those deduced from experiments in the framework of the formalism of the fluctuation theory. Moreover, the mutual diffusion coefficients obtained from a coupled...

  19. Virtual detector theory for strong-field atomic ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Tian, Justin; Eberly, J. H.

    2018-04-01

    A virtual detector (VD) is an imaginary device located at a fixed position in space that extracts information from the wave packet passing through it. By recording the particle momentum and the corresponding probability current at each time, the VDs can accumulate and build the differential momentum distribution of the particle, in a way that resembles real experiments. A mathematical proof is given for the equivalence of the differential momentum distribution obtained by the VD method and by Fourier transforming the wave function. In addition to being a tool for reducing the computational load, VDs have also been found useful in interpreting the ultrafast strong-field ionization process, especially the controversial quantum tunneling process.

  20. <strong>Self-consistent many-body perturbation theory in range-separated density-functional theory>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromager, Emmanuel; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2008-01-01

    In many cases, density-functional theory (DFT) with current standard approximate functionals offers a relatively accurate and computationally cheap description of the short-range dynamic electron correlation effects. However, in general, standard DFT does not treat the dispersion interaction......-consistency problem" and provide computable orbital-based expressions for any order of perturbation, a general one-electron reduced-density-matrix-based formalism is proposed. Two applications of our general formalism are presented: The derivation of a hybrid second-order Møller-Plesset-DFT model and the formulation...

  1. Electrohydrodynamics of drops in strong electric fields: Simulations and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saintillan, David; Das, Debasish

    2016-11-01

    Weakly conducting dielectric liquid drops suspended in another dielectric liquid exhibit a wide range of dynamical behaviors when subject to an applied uniform electric field contingent on field strength and material properties. These phenomena are best described by the much celebrated Maylor-Taylor leaky dielectric model that hypothesizes charge accumulation on the drop-fluid interface and prescribes a balance between charge relaxation, the jump in Ohmic currents and charge convection by the interfacial fluid flow. Most previous numerical simulations based on this model have either neglected interfacial charge convection or restricted themselves to axisymmetric drops. In this work, we develop a three-dimensional boundary element method for the complete leaky dielectric model to systematically study the deformation and dynamics of liquid drops in electric fields. The inclusion of charge convection in our simulation permits us to investigate drops in the Quincke regime, in which experiments have demonstrated symmetry-breaking bifurcations leading to steady electrorotation. Our simulation results show excellent agreement with existing experimental data and small deformation theories. ACSPRF Grant 53240-ND9.

  2. Theory of strong-field attosecond transient absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Mengxi; Chen, Shaohao; Camp, Seth; Schafer, Kenneth J; Gaarde, Mette B

    2016-01-01

    Attosecond transient absorption is one of the promising new techniques being developed to exploit the availability of sub-femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses to study the dynamics of the electron on its natural time scale. The temporal resolution in a transient absorption setup comes from the control of the relative delay and coherence between pump and probe pulses, while the spectral resolution comes from the characteristic width of the features that are being probed. In this review we focus on transient absorption scenarios where an attosecond pulse of XUV radiation creates a broadband excitation that is subsequently probed by a few cycle infrared (IR) laser. Because the attosecond XUV pulses are locked to the IR field cycle, the exchange of energy in the laser–matter interaction can be studied with unprecedented precision. We focus on the transient absorption by helium atoms of XUV radiation around the first ionization threshold, where we can simultaneoulsy solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the single atom response and the Maxwell wave equation for the collective response of the nonlinear medium. We use a time-domain method that allows us to treat on an equal footing all the different linear and nonlinear processes by which the medium can exchange energy with the fields. We present several simple models, based on a few-level system interacting with a strong IR field, to explain many of the novel features found in attosecond transient absorption spectrograms. These include the presence of light-induced states, which demonstrate the ability to probe the dressed states of the atom. We also present a time-domain interpretation of the resonant pulse propagation features that appear in absorption spectra in dense, macroscopic media. We close by reviewing several recent experimental results that can be explained in terms of the models we discuss. Our aim is to present a road map for understanding future attosecond transient absorption

  3. Pressure dependence of critical temperature of bulk FeSe from spin fluctuation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Peter; Kreisel, Andreas; Wang, Yan; Tomic, Milan; Jeschke, Harald; Jacko, Anthony; Valenti, Roser; Maier, Thomas; Scalapino, Douglas

    2013-03-01

    The critical temperature of the 8K superconductor FeSe is extremely sensitive to pressure, rising to a maximum of 40K at about 10GPa. We test the ability of the current generation of fluctuation exchange pairing theories to account for this effect, by downfolding the density functional theory electronic structure for each pressure to a tight binding model. The Fermi surface found in such a procedure is then used with fixed Hubbard parameters to determine the pairing strength using the random phase approximation for the spin singlet pairing vertex. We find that the evolution of the Fermi surface captured by such an approach is alone not sufficient to explain the observed pressure dependence, and discuss alternative approaches. PJH, YW, AK were supported by DOE DE-FG02-05ER46236, the financial support of MT, HJ, and RV from the DFG Schwerpunktprogramm 1458 is kindly acknowledged.

  4. Advanced first-principles theory of superconductivity including both lattice vibrations and spin fluctuations: The case of FeB4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekaert, J.; Aperis, A.; Partoens, B.; Oppeneer, P. M.; Milošević, M. V.

    2018-01-01

    We present an advanced method to study spin fluctuations in superconductors quantitatively and entirely from first principles. This method can be generally applied to materials where electron-phonon coupling and spin fluctuations coexist. We employ it here to examine the recently synthesized superconductor iron tetraboride (FeB4) with experimental Tc˜2.4 K [H. Gou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 157002 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.157002]. We prove that FeB4 is particularly prone to ferromagnetic spin fluctuations due to the presence of iron, resulting in a large Stoner interaction strength, I =1.5 eV, as calculated from first principles. The other important factor is its Fermi surface that consists of three separate sheets, among which two are nested ellipsoids. The resulting susceptibility has a ferromagnetic peak around q =0 , from which we calculated the repulsive interaction between Cooper pair electrons using the random phase approximation. Subsequently, we combined the electron-phonon interaction calculated from first principles with the spin fluctuation interaction in fully anisotropic Eliashberg theory calculations. We show that the resulting superconducting gap spectrum is conventional, yet very strongly depleted due to coupling to the spin fluctuations. The critical temperature decreases from Tc=41 K, if they are not taken into account, to Tc=1.7 K, in good agreement with the experimental value.

  5. Theory of small-scale density and electric field fluctuations in the nightside Venus ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huba, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Recently, it has been reported that small-scale (lambda about 0.1-2 km) density irregularities occur during 100-Hz electric field bursts in the nightside ionosphere of Venus. This paper provides a detailed analysis of the lower-hybrid-drift instability as a mechanism to generate the observed irregularities. A fully electromagnetic theory is developed that is relevant to the finite beta plasma in Venus's ionosphere and includes collisional effects (e.g., electron-ion, electron-neutral, and ion-neutral collisions). The key features of the analysis that favor this instability are the following: (1) it is a flute mode and propagates orthogonal to the ambient magnetic field; (2) it is a relatively short wavelength mode and the Doppler-shifted frequency can be greater than about 100 Hz; (3) it can produce both electric field and density fluctuations, as well as magnetic field fluctuations in a finite beta plasma; and (4) it is most unstable in low-beta plasmas so that it is likely to occur in the low-density, high-magnetic-field ionospheric holes. These features are consistent with observational results.

  6. Microscopic theory for a ferromagnetic nanowire/superconductor heterostructure: Transport, fluctuations, and topological superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galitski, Victor; Takei, So; Condensed Matter Theory Center; Joint Quantum Institute Team

    2013-03-01

    Motivated by the recent experiment of Wang et al. [Nat. Phys. 6, 389 (2010)], who observed a highly unusual transport behavior of ferromagnetic cobalt nanowires proximity-coupled to superconducting electrodes, we study the proximity effect and temperature-dependent transport in such a mesoscopic hybrid structure. It is assumed that the asymmetry in the tunneling barrier gives rise to the Rashba spin-orbit coupling in the barrier that enables induced p-wave superconductivity in the ferromagnet to exist. We first develop a microscopic theory of Andreev scattering at the spin-orbit-coupled interface, derive a set of self-consistent boundary conditions, and find an expression for the p-wave minigap in terms of the microscopic parameters of the contact. Second, we study the temperature dependence of the resistance near the superconducting transition, and we find that it should generally feature a fluctuation-induced peak. The upturn in resistance is related to the suppression of the single-particle density of states due to the formation of fluctuating pairs, whose tunneling is suppressed. In conclusion, we discuss this and related setups involving ferromagnetic nanowires in the context of one-dimensional topological superconductors. Funding support: DOE-BES (DESC0001911).

  7. Bridging the gap between event-by-event fluctuation measurements and theory predictions in relativistic nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun-Munzinger, P.; Rustamov, A.; Stachel, J.

    2017-04-01

    We develop methods to deal with non-dynamical contributions to event-by-event fluctuation measurements of net-particle numbers in relativistic nuclear collisions. These contributions arise from impact parameter fluctuations and from the requirement of overall net-baryon number or net-charge conservation and may mask the dynamical fluctuations of interest, such as those due to critical endpoints in the QCD phase diagram. Within a model of independent particle sources we derive formulae for net-particle fluctuations and develop a rigorous approach to take into account contributions from participant fluctuations in realistic experimental environments and at any cumulant order. Interestingly, contributions from participant fluctuations to the second and third cumulants of net-baryon distributions are found to vanish at mid-rapidity for LHC energies while higher cumulants of even order are non-zero even when the net-baryon number at mid-rapidity is zero. At lower beam energies the effect of participant fluctuations increases and induces spurious higher moments. The necessary corrections become large and need to be carefully taken into account before comparison to theory. We also provide a procedure for selecting the optimal phase-space coverage of particles for fluctuation analyses and discuss quantitatively the necessary correction due to global charge conservation.

  8. Approximation of the theory of stochastic perturbations of angular correlations for fluctuating distributions of electric quadrupole interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forker, M. (Inst. fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Univ. Bonn (Germany)); Herz, W. (Inst. fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Univ. Bonn (Germany)); Simon, D. (Inst. fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Univ. Bonn (Germany))

    1994-01-01

    The perturbation of angular correlations by a fluctuating distribution of electric quadrupole interactions has been calculated with Blume's stochastic theory for an ensemble of 10 states differing in magnitude and orientation of an electric field gradient as a function of the fluctuation rate w for different values of the fluctuating and the static components of the distribution. By fits to the calculated spectra it was shown that for fast fluctuations, w [>=] 5 [omega][sub 0]/2[pi], the relaxation effects caused by a fluctuating distribution can be well approximated by a single relaxation parameter [lambda], independent of the relative magnitude of the fluctuating component. For slow fluctuations, w < [omega][sub 0]/2[pi], a single relaxation parameter is a reasonable approximation only if the fluctuating component of the interaction exceeds the ensemble average. Otherwise the jump rates and activation energies are seriously underestimated. These conclusions are supported by a [sup 111]Cd PAC study of the hydrogen dynamics in HfV[sub 2]H[sub 1.78]. (orig.)

  9. Color fluctuation approximation for multiple interactions in leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vadim Guzey, Mark Strikman

    2010-04-01

    The leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing predicts nuclear parton distributions in the small $x$ shadowing region by connecting them to the leading twist hard diffraction in electron-nucleon scattering. The uncertainties of the predictions are related to the shadowing effects resulting from the interaction of the hard probe with $N \\ge 3$ nucleons. We argue that the pattern of hard diffraction observed at HERA allows one to reduce these uncertainties, and we develop a new approach to the treatment of these multiple collisions. It is based on the concept of the color fluctuations and accounts for the presence of both point-like and hadron-like configurations in the virtual photon. Using the developed framework, we update our predictions for the effect of the leading twist nuclear shadowing in nuclear parton distributions of heavy nuclei at small $x$.

  10. The ecological effects of water level fluctuation and phosphate enrichment in mesotrophic peatlands are strongly mediated by soil chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mettrop, I.S.; Rutte, M.D.; Kooijman, A.M.; Lamers, L.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the re-establishment of a more natural water regime is considered by water management in wetlands with artificially stable water levels, the biogeochemical and ecological effects of water level fluctuation with different nutrient loads should be investigated. This is particularly important for

  11. Density nonlinearities in field theories for a toy model of fluctuating nonlinear hydrodynamics of supercooled liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Joonhyun

    2009-11-01

    We study a zero-dimensional version of the fluctuating nonlinear hydrodynamics (FNH) of supercooled liquids originally investigated by Das and Mazenko (DM) [Shankar P. Das and Gene F. Mazenko Phys. Rev. A 34, 2265 (1986)]. The time-dependent density-like and momentum-like variables are introduced with no spatial degrees of freedom in this toy model. The structure of nonlinearities takes the similar form to the original FNH, which allows one to study in a simpler setting the issues raised recently regarding the field theoretical approaches to glass forming liquids. We study the effects of density nonlinearities on the time evolution of correlation and response functions by developing field theoretic formulations in two different ways: first by following the original prescription of DM and then by constructing a dynamical action which possesses a linear time-reversal symmetry as proposed recently. We show explicitly that, at the one-loop order of the perturbation theory, the DM-type field theory does not support a sharp ergodic-nonergodic transition, while the other admits one. The simple nature of the toy model in the DM formulation allows us to develop numerical solutions to a complete set of coupled dynamical equations for the correlation and response functions at the one-loop order.

  12. Short-range order above the Curie temperature in the dynamic spin-fluctuation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnikov, N.B.; Reser, B.I.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the dynamic spin-fluctuation theory, we study the spin-density correlations in the ferromagnetic metals. We obtain computational formulae for the correlation function and correlation radius in different approximations of the theory. Using these formulae, we calculate the magnetic short-range order above the Curie temperature in bcc Fe. Results of the calculation confirm our theoretical prediction that the inverse correlation radius increases linearly with temperature for T sufficiently large. The calculated short-range order is small but sufficient to correctly describe neutron scattering experiments. A considerable amount of the short-range order is shown to persist up to temperatures much higher than the Curie temperature. - Highlights: • We study the spin correlations in ferromagnetic metals above the Curie temperature. • We derive computational formulae for the spin correlator and correlation radius. • The correlation radius decreases inversely with temperature over a wide interval. • The calculated short-range order in Fe is small, in agreement with experiment. • A considerable amount of short-range order in Fe persists up to high temperatures.

  13. Strongly γ -Deformed N =4 Supersymmetric Yang-Mills Theory as an Integrable Conformal Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabner, David; Gromov, Nikolay; Kazakov, Vladimir; Korchemsky, Gregory

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate by explicit multiloop calculation that γ -deformed planar N =4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory, supplemented with a set of double-trace counterterms, has two nontrivial fixed points in the recently proposed double scaling limit, combining vanishing 't Hooft coupling and large imaginary deformation parameter. We provide evidence that, at the fixed points, the theory is described by an integrable nonunitary four-dimensional conformal field theory. We find a closed expression for the four-point correlation function of the simplest protected operators and use it to compute the exact conformal data of operators with arbitrary Lorentz spin. We conjecture that both conformal symmetry and integrability should survive in γ -deformed planar N =4 SYM theory for arbitrary values of the deformation parameters.

  14. Gross domestic product growth rates as confined Lévy flights: Towards a unifying theory of economic growth rate fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lera, Sandro Claudio; Sornette, Didier

    2018-01-01

    A model that combines economic growth rate fluctuations at the microscopic and macroscopic levels is presented. At the microscopic level, firms are growing at different rates while also being exposed to idiosyncratic shocks at the firm and sector levels. We describe such fluctuations as independent Lévy-stable fluctuations, varying over multiple orders of magnitude. These fluctuations are aggregated and measured at the macroscopic level in averaged economic output quantities such as GDP. A fundamental question is thereby to what extent individual firm size fluctuations can have a noticeable impact on the overall economy. We argue that this question can be answered by considering the Lévy fluctuations as embedded in a steep confining potential well, ensuring nonlinear mean-reversal behavior, without having to rely on microscopic details of the system. The steepness of the potential well directly controls the extent to which idiosyncratic shocks to firms and sectors are damped at the level of the economy. Additionally, the theory naturally accounts for business cycles, represented in terms of a bimodal economic output distribution and thus connects two so far unrelated fields in economics. By analyzing 200 years of U.S. gross domestic product growth rates, we find that the model is in good agreement with the data.

  15. Theory of spin-fluctuation induced superconductivity in iron-based superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Junhua

    2011-01-01

    In this dissertation we focus on the investigation of the pairing mechanism in the recently discovered high-temperature superconductor, iron pnictides. Due to the proximity to magnetic instability of the system, we considered short-range spin fluctuations as the major mediating source to induce superconductivity. Our calculation supports the magnetic fluctuations as a strong candidate that drives Cooper-pair formation in this material. We find the corresponding order parameter to be of the so-called ss-wave type and show its evolution with temperature as well as the capability of supporting high transition temperature up to several tens of Kelvin. On the other hand, our itinerant model calculation shows pronounced spin correlation at the observed antiferromagnetic ordering wave vector, indicating the underlying electronic structure in favor of antiferromagnetic state. Therefore, the electronic degrees of freedom could participate both in the magnetic and in the superconducting properties. Our work shows that the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity plays an important role to the understanding of the rich physics in this material. The magnetic-excitation spectrum carries important information on the nature of magnetism and the characteristics of superconductivity. We analyze the spin excitation spectrum in the normal and superconducting states of iron pnictides in the magnetic scenario. As a consequence of the sign-reversed gap structure obtained in the above, a spin resonance mode appears below the superconducting transition temperature. The calculated resonance energy, scaled with the gap magnitude and the magnetic correlation length, agrees well with the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements. More interestingly, we find a common feature of those short-range spin fluctuations that are capable of inducing a fully gapped ss state is the momentum anisotropy with elongated span along the direction transverse to the antiferromagnetic momentum

  16. Strong/weak coupling duality relations for non-supersymmetric string theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, J.D.; Dienes, K.R.

    1998-01-01

    Both the supersymmetric SO(32) and E 8 x E 8 heterotic strings in ten dimensions have known strong-coupling duals. However, it has not been known whether there also exist strong-coupling duals for the non-supersymmetric heterotic strings in ten dimensions. In this paper, we construct explicit open-string duals for the circle compactifications of several of these non-supersymmetric theories, among them the tachyon-free SO(16) x SO(16) string. Our method involves the construction of heterotic and open-string interpolating models that continuously connect non-supersymmetric strings to supersymmetric strings. We find that our non-supersymmetric dual theories have exactly the same massless spectra as their heterotic counterparts within a certain range of our interpolations. We also develop a novel method for analyzing the solitons of non-supersymmetric open-string theories, and find that the solitons of our dual theories also agree with their heterotic counterparts. These are therefore the first known examples of strong/weak coupling duality relations between non-supersymmetric, tachyon-free string theories. Finally, the existence of these strong-coupling duals allows us to examine the non-perturbative stability of these strings, and we propose a phase diagram for the behavior of these strings as a function of coupling and radius. (orig.)

  17. Theory of heavy-fermion compounds theory of strongly correlated Fermi-systems

    CERN Document Server

    Amusia, Miron Ya; Shaginyan, Vasily R; Stephanovich, Vladimir A

    2015-01-01

    This book explains modern and interesting physics in heavy-fermion (HF) compounds to graduate students and researchers in condensed matter physics. It presents a theory of heavy-fermion (HF) compounds such as HF metals, quantum spin liquids, quasicrystals and two-dimensional Fermi systems. The basic low-temperature properties and the scaling behavior of the compounds are described within the framework of the theory of fermion condensation quantum phase transition (FCQPT). Upon reading the book, the reader finds that HF compounds with quite different microscopic nature exhibit the same non-Fermi liquid behavior, while the data collected on very different HF systems have a universal scaling behavior, and these compounds are unexpectedly uniform despite their diversity. For the reader's convenience, the analysis of compounds is carried out in the context of salient experimental results. The numerous calculations of the non-Fermi liquid behavior, thermodynamic, relaxation and transport properties, being in good...

  18. Prediction and discovery of extremely strong hydrodynamic instabilities due to a velocity jump: theory and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridman, A M

    2008-01-01

    The theory and the experimental discovery of extremely strong hydrodynamic instabilities are described, viz. the Kelvin-Helmholtz, centrifugal, and superreflection instabilities. The discovery of the last two instabilities was predicted and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in real systems was revised by us. (reviews of topical problems)

  19. Density functional theory for strongly-interacting electrons: Perspectives for Physics and Chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gori Giorgi, P.; Seidl, M.

    2010-01-01

    Improving the accuracy and thus broadening the applicability of electronic density functional theory (DFT) is crucial to many research areas, from material science, to theoretical chemistry, biophysics and biochemistry. In the last three years, the mathematical structure of the strong-interaction

  20. Cusp anomalous dimension in maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, B; Korchemsky, G P; Kotański, J

    2008-03-07

    We construct an analytical solution to the integral equation which is believed to describe logarithmic growth of the anomalous dimensions of high-spin operators in planar N=4 super Yang-Mills theory and use it to determine the strong coupling expansion of the cusp anomalous dimension.

  1. Description of meson strong and electromagnetic interactions in quantum chiral theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, M.K.; Pervushin, V.N.

    1978-01-01

    Strong and electromagnetic interactions of mesons in the framework of the chiral theory are considered. The pion-pion scattering phases, the pion electromagnetic form factor, the mean squared radius of a K-meson, and the electric and magnetic polarizabilities of pions are calculated using the superpropagator method. The rho-meson mass, Msub(rho)=800 MeV, is calculated too

  2. Sakata Memorial KMI Workshop on Origin of Mass and Strong Coupling Gauge Theories

    CERN Document Server

    ‎Maskawa, Toshihide; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Tanabashi, Masaharu; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2018-01-01

    This volume contains contributions to the workshop, which was largely focused on the strong coupling gauge theories in search for theories beyond the standard model, particularly, the LHC experiments and lattice studies of conformal fixed point. The main topics include walking technicolor and the role of conformality in view of the 125 GeV Higgs as a light composite Higgs (technidilaton, and other composite Higgs, etc.). Nonperturbative studies like lattice simulations and stringy/holographic approaches are extensively discussed in close relation to the phenomenological studies. After the discovery of 125 GeV Higgs at LHC, the central issue of particle physics is now to reveal the dynamical origin of the Higgs itself. One of the possibilities would be the composite Higgs based on the strong coupling gauge theory in the TeV region, such as the technidilaton predicted in walking technicolor with infrared conformality. The volume contains, among others, many of the latest important reports on walking technicolo...

  3. Dynamic pathways to mediate reactions buried in thermal fluctuations. I. Time-dependent normal form theory for multidimensional Langevin equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shinnosuke; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2009-12-14

    We present a novel theory which enables us to explore the mechanism of reaction selectivity and robust functions in complex systems persisting under thermal fluctuation. The theory constructs a nonlinear coordinate transformation so that the equation of motion for the new reaction coordinate is independent of the other nonreactive coordinates in the presence of thermal fluctuation. In this article we suppose that reacting systems subject to thermal noise are described by a multidimensional Langevin equation without a priori assumption for the form of potential. The reaction coordinate is composed not only of all the coordinates and velocities associated with the system (solute) but also of the random force exerted by the environment (solvent) with friction constants. The sign of the reaction coordinate at any instantaneous moment in the region of a saddle determines the fate of the reaction, i.e., whether the reaction will proceed through to the products or go back to the reactants. By assuming the statistical properties of the random force, one can know a priori a well-defined boundary of the reaction which separates the full position-velocity space in the saddle region into mainly reactive and mainly nonreactive regions even under thermal fluctuation. The analytical expression of the reaction coordinate provides the firm foundation on the mechanism of how and why reaction proceeds in thermal fluctuating environments.

  4. Thermal fluctuation levels of magnetic and electric fields in unmagnetized plasma: The rigorous relativistic kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, P. H.; Schlickeiser, R.; Kolberg, U.

    2014-01-01

    Any fully ionized collisionless plasma with finite random particle velocities contains electric and magnetic field fluctuations. The fluctuations can be of three different types: weakly damped, weakly propagating, or aperiodic. The kinetics of these fluctuations in general unmagnetized plasmas, governed by the competition of spontaneous emission, absorption, and stimulated emission processes, is investigated, extending the well-known results for weakly damped fluctuations. The generalized Kirchhoff radiation law for both collective and noncollective fluctuations is derived, which in stationary plasmas provides the equilibrium energy densities of electromagnetic fluctuations by the ratio of the respective spontaneous emission coefficient and the true absorption coefficient. As an illustrative example, the equilibrium energy densities of aperiodic transverse collective electric and magnetic fluctuations in an isotropic thermal electron-proton plasmas of density n e are calculated as |δB|=√((δB) 2 )=2.8(n e m e c 2 ) 1/2 g 1/2 β e 7/4 and |δE|=√((δE) 2 )=3.2(n e m e c 2 ) 1/2 g 1/3 β e 2 , where g and β e denote the plasma parameter and the thermal electron velocity in units of the speed of light, respectively. For densities and temperatures of the reionized early intergalactic medium, |δB|=6·10 −18 G and |δE|=2·10 −16 G result

  5. Description of meson strong weak and electromagnetic interactions in quantum chiral theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, M.K.; Ehbert, D.

    1979-01-01

    The picture of all the principal meson decays of the basic octet has been obtained in the framework of the SU(3)xSU(3) symmetric chiral model of the field theory. An attempt is made to generalize the nonlinear chiral model for the case of charmed hadrons, i.e., a transition from the SU(3)xSU(3) group to the SU(4)xSU(4) group. The authors have succeeded in elucidating unambiguously the role of the Kabibbo angle both in weak and strong interactions (it defines the structure of weak hadron currents and hadron mass splitting in isotopic multiplets). Proceeding from decays of the basic octet mesons it has been shown that the nonlinear chiral SU(3)xSU(3) symmetric theory may be considered as the quantum field theory, which satisfactorily describes the low-energy meson physics in two first orders of the perturbation theory (tree and single-loop approximations)

  6. Anomalous metallic state with strong charge fluctuations in BaxTi8O16 +δ revealed by hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, S.; Kajita, T.; Okawa, M.; Saitoh, T.; Ikenaga, E.; Saini, N. L.; Katsufuji, T.; Mizokawa, T.

    2018-04-01

    We have studied a charge-orbital driven metal-insulator transition (MIT) in hollandite-type BaxTi8O16 +δ by means of hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES). The Ti 2 p HAXPES indicates strong Ti3 +/Ti4 + charge fluctuation in the metallic phase above the MIT temperature. The metallic phase is characterized by a power-law spectral function near the Fermi level which would be a signature of bad metal with non-Drude polaronic behavior. The power-law spectral shape is associated with the large Seebeck coefficient of the metallic phase in BaxTi8O16 +δ .

  7. Renormalization theory of stationary homogeneous strong turbulence in a collisionless plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.Z.

    1984-01-01

    A renormalization procedure for the perturbation expansion of the Vlasov-Poisson equation is presented to describe stationary homogeneous turbulence. By using the diagramatic scheme the theory is shown to be renormalizable to any order. The expressions for the renormalized propagator, the renormalized dielectric function, and the intrinsically incoherent source are given. The renormalization leads to a complete separation of the fluctuating distribution function f/sub k/ into two parts, the coherent part, which is proved to represent the dielectric effect of the medium, and the intrinsically incoherent part, which represents the effect of nonlinear source. The turbulent collisional operator in the transport equation is proved equal to GAMMA 0 , the frequency broadening when k = 0

  8. On Yang--Mills Theories with Chiral Matter at Strong Coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shifman, M.; /Minnesota U., Theor. Phys. Inst. /Saclay, SPhT; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-08-20

    Strong coupling dynamics of Yang-Mills theories with chiral fermion content remained largely elusive despite much effort over the years. In this work, we propose a dynamical framework in which we can address non-perturbative properties of chiral, non-supersymmetric gauge theories, in particular, chiral quiver theories on S{sub 1} x R{sub 3}. Double-trace deformations are used to stabilize the center-symmetric vacuum. This allows one to smoothly connect smaller(S{sub 1}) to larger(S{sub 1}) physics (R{sub 4} is the limiting case) where the double-trace deformations are switched off. In particular, occurrence of the mass gap in the gauge sector and linear confinement due to bions are analytically demonstrated. We find the pattern of the chiral symmetry realization which depends on the structure of the ring operators, a novel class of topological excitations. The deformed chiral theory, unlike the undeformed one, satisfies volume independence down to arbitrarily small volumes (a working Eguchi-Kawai reduction) in the large N limit. This equivalence, may open new perspectives on strong coupling chiral gauge theories on R{sub 4}.

  9. Viscosity in strongly interacting quantum field theories from black hole physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtun, P K; Son, D T; Starinets, A O

    2005-03-25

    The ratio of shear viscosity to volume density of entropy can be used to characterize how close a given fluid is to being perfect. Using string theory methods, we show that this ratio is equal to a universal value of variant Planck's over 2pi/4pik(B) for a large class of strongly interacting quantum field theories whose dual description involves black holes in anti-de Sitter space. We provide evidence that this value may serve as a lower bound for a wide class of systems, thus suggesting that black hole horizons are dual to the most ideal fluids.

  10. The Bethe roots of Regge cuts in strongly coupled N=4 SYM theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, J.; Schomerus, V.; Sprenger, M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a general algorithm for the computation of the remainder function for n-gluon scattering in multi-Regge kinematics for strongly coupled planar N=4 super Yang-Mills theory. This regime is accessible through the infrared physics of an auxiliary quantum integrable system describing strings in AdS 5 ×S 5 . Explicit formulas are presented for n=6 and n=7 external gluons. Our results are consistent with expectations from perturbative gauge theory. This paper comprises the technical details for the results announced in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP10(2014)067.

  11. Equivalence of meson scattering amplitudes in strong coupling lattice and flat space string theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armoni, Adi; Ireson, Edwin; Vadacchino, Davide

    2018-03-01

    We consider meson scattering in the framework of the lattice strong coupling expansion. In particular we derive an expression for the 4-point function of meson operators in the planar limit of scalar Chromodynamics. Interestingly, in the naive continuum limit the expression coincides with an independently known result, that of the worldline formalism. Moreover, it was argued by Makeenko and Olesen that (assuming confinement) the resulting scattering amplitude in momentum space is the celebrated expression proposed by Veneziano several decades ago. This motivates us to also use holography in order to argue that the continuum expression for the scattering amplitude is related to the result obtained from flat space string theory. Our results hint that at strong coupling and large-Nc the naive continuum limit of the lattice formalism can be related to a flat space string theory.

  12. Equivalence of meson scattering amplitudes in strong coupling lattice and flat space string theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Armoni

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We consider meson scattering in the framework of the lattice strong coupling expansion. In particular we derive an expression for the 4-point function of meson operators in the planar limit of scalar Chromodynamics. Interestingly, in the naive continuum limit the expression coincides with an independently known result, that of the worldline formalism. Moreover, it was argued by Makeenko and Olesen that (assuming confinement the resulting scattering amplitude in momentum space is the celebrated expression proposed by Veneziano several decades ago. This motivates us to also use holography in order to argue that the continuum expression for the scattering amplitude is related to the result obtained from flat space string theory. Our results hint that at strong coupling and large-Nc the naive continuum limit of the lattice formalism can be related to a flat space string theory.

  13. Perturbation theory of strongly correlated electrons with and without slave boson technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Hieu; Ha Vinh Tan; Nguyen Toan Thang; Nguyen Ai Viet.

    1988-10-01

    The Green functions of the electrons in the two-band Hubbard model with the strong on-site Coulomb repulsion were calculated by means of the perturbation theory with respect to the hopping term of the Hamiltonian. It was shown that in the slave boson technique we obtain the expressions different from the results of the calculations involving directly electron operators without using slave bosons. The physical meaning of this discrepancy was discussed. (author)

  14. A theory of power-law distributions in financial market fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabaix, Xavier; Gopikrishnan, Parameswaran; Plerou, Vasiliki; Stanley, H Eugene

    2003-05-15

    Insights into the dynamics of a complex system are often gained by focusing on large fluctuations. For the financial system, huge databases now exist that facilitate the analysis of large fluctuations and the characterization of their statistical behaviour. Power laws appear to describe histograms of relevant financial fluctuations, such as fluctuations in stock price, trading volume and the number of trades. Surprisingly, the exponents that characterize these power laws are similar for different types and sizes of markets, for different market trends and even for different countries--suggesting that a generic theoretical basis may underlie these phenomena. Here we propose a model, based on a plausible set of assumptions, which provides an explanation for these empirical power laws. Our model is based on the hypothesis that large movements in stock market activity arise from the trades of large participants. Starting from an empirical characterization of the size distribution of those large market participants (mutual funds), we show that the power laws observed in financial data arise when the trading behaviour is performed in an optimal way. Our model additionally explains certain striking empirical regularities that describe the relationship between large fluctuations in prices, trading volume and the number of trades.

  15. An analysis of the fluctuation potential in the modified Poisson-Boltzmann theory for restricted primitive model electrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.O. Ulloa-Dávila

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An approximate analytical solution to the fluctuation potential problem in the modified Poisson-Boltzmann theory of electrolyte solutions in the restricted primitive model is presented. The solution is valid for all inter-ionic distances, including contact values. The fluctuation potential solution is implemented in the theory to describe the structure of the electrolyte in terms of the radial distribution functions, and to calculate some aspects of thermodynamics, viz., configurational reduced energies, and osmotic coefficients. The calculations have been made for symmetric valence 1:1 systems at the physical parameters of ionic diameter 4.25·10^{-10} m, relative permittivity 78.5, absolute temperature 298 K, and molar concentrations 0.1038, 0.425, 1.00, and 1.968. Radial distribution functions are compared with the corresponding results from the symmetric Poisson-Boltzmann, and the conventional and modified Poisson-Boltzmann theories. Comparisons have also been done for the contact values of the radial distributions, reduced configurational energies, and osmotic coefficients as functions of electrolyte concentration. Some Monte Carlo simulation data from the literature are also included in the assessment of the thermodynamic predictions. Results show a very good agreement with the Monte Carlo results and some improvement for osmotic coefficients and radial distribution functions contact values relative to these theories. The reduced energy curve shows excellent agreement with Monte Carlo data for molarities up to 1 mol/dm^3.

  16. Sphalerons, small fluctuations, and baryon-number violation in electroweak theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, P.; McLerran, L.

    1987-01-01

    We study the formalism of the sphaleron approximation to baryon-number violation in the standard model at temperatures near 1 TeV. We investigate small fluctuations of the sphaleron, the competition of large-scale sphalerons with thermal fluctuations, and the damping of the transition rate in the plasma. We find a suppression of the rate due to Landau damping and due to factors arising from zero modes. Our approximations are valid in the regime 2M/sub W/(T) 2 . We find that the rate of baryon-number violation is still significantly larger than the expansion rate of the Universe

  17. The Bekenstein bound in strongly coupled O(N) scalar field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, T. Santos; Svaiter, N.F.; Menezes, G.

    2009-09-01

    We discuss the O(N) self-interacting scalar field theory, in the strong-coupling regime and also in the limit of large N. Considering that the system is in thermal equilibrium with a reservoir at temperature β -1 , we assume the presence of macroscopic boundaries conning the field in a hypercube of side L. Using the strong-coupling perturbative expansion, we generalize previous results, i.e., we obtain the renormalized mean energy E and entropy S for the system in rst order of the strong-coupling perturbative expansion, presenting an analytical proof that the specific entropy also satisfies in some situations a quantum bound. When considering the low temperature behavior of the specific entropy, the sign of the renormalized zero-point energy can invalidate this quantum bound. If the renormalized zero point-energy is a positive quantity, at intermediate temperatures and in the low temperature limit, there is a quantum bound. (author)

  18. Strong coupling in F-theory and geometrically non-Higgsable seven-branes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Halverson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Geometrically non-Higgsable seven-branes carry gauge sectors that cannot be broken by complex structure deformation, and there is growing evidence that such configurations are typical in F-theory. We study strongly coupled physics associated with these branes. Axiodilaton profiles are computed using Ramanujan's theories of elliptic functions to alternative bases, showing explicitly that the string coupling is O(1 in the vicinity of the brane; that it sources nilpotent SL(2,Z monodromy and therefore the associated brane charges are modular; and that essentially all F-theory compactifications have regions with order one string coupling. It is shown that non-perturbative SU(3 and SU(2 seven-branes are related to weakly coupled counterparts with D7-branes via deformation-induced Hanany–Witten moves on (p,q string junctions that turn them into fundamental open strings; only the former may exist for generic complex structure. D3-brane near these and the Kodaira type II seven-branes probe Argyres–Douglas theories. The BPS states of slightly deformed theories are shown to be dyonic string junctions.

  19. Coexistence of insect species competing for a pulsed resource: toward a unified theory of biodiversity in fluctuating environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venner, Samuel; Pélisson, Pierre-François; Bel-Venner, Marie-Claude; Débias, François; Rajon, Etienne; Menu, Frédéric

    2011-03-21

    One major challenge in understanding how biodiversity is organized is finding out whether communities of competing species are shaped exclusively by species-level differences in ecological traits (niche theory), exclusively by random processes (neutral theory of biodiversity), or by both processes simultaneously. Communities of species competing for a pulsed resource are a suitable system for testing these theories: due to marked fluctuations in resource availability, the theories yield very different predictions about the timing of resource use and the synchronization of the population dynamics between the competing species. Accordingly, we explored mechanisms that might promote the local coexistence of phytophagous insects (four sister species of the genus Curculio) competing for oak acorns, a pulsed resource. We analyzed the time partitioning of the exploitation of oak acorns by the four weevil species in two independent communities, and we assessed the level of synchronization in their population dynamics. In accordance with the niche theory, overall these species exhibited marked time partitioning of resource use, both within a given year and between different years owing to different dormancy strategies between species, as well as distinct demographic patterns. Two of the four weevil species, however, consistently exploited the resource during the same period of the year, exhibited a similar dormancy pattern, and did not show any significant difference in their population dynamics. The marked time partitioning of the resource use appears as a keystone of the coexistence of these competing insect species, except for two of them which are demographically nearly equivalent. Communities of consumers of pulsed resources thus seem to offer a promising avenue for developing a unifying theory of biodiversity in fluctuating environments which might predict the co-occurrence, within the same community, of species that are ecologically either very similar, or very

  20. Coexistence of insect species competing for a pulsed resource: toward a unified theory of biodiversity in fluctuating environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Venner

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available One major challenge in understanding how biodiversity is organized is finding out whether communities of competing species are shaped exclusively by species-level differences in ecological traits (niche theory, exclusively by random processes (neutral theory of biodiversity, or by both processes simultaneously. Communities of species competing for a pulsed resource are a suitable system for testing these theories: due to marked fluctuations in resource availability, the theories yield very different predictions about the timing of resource use and the synchronization of the population dynamics between the competing species. Accordingly, we explored mechanisms that might promote the local coexistence of phytophagous insects (four sister species of the genus Curculio competing for oak acorns, a pulsed resource.We analyzed the time partitioning of the exploitation of oak acorns by the four weevil species in two independent communities, and we assessed the level of synchronization in their population dynamics. In accordance with the niche theory, overall these species exhibited marked time partitioning of resource use, both within a given year and between different years owing to different dormancy strategies between species, as well as distinct demographic patterns. Two of the four weevil species, however, consistently exploited the resource during the same period of the year, exhibited a similar dormancy pattern, and did not show any significant difference in their population dynamics.The marked time partitioning of the resource use appears as a keystone of the coexistence of these competing insect species, except for two of them which are demographically nearly equivalent. Communities of consumers of pulsed resources thus seem to offer a promising avenue for developing a unifying theory of biodiversity in fluctuating environments which might predict the co-occurrence, within the same community, of species that are ecologically either very similar

  1. Describing nonequilibrium behavior in strongly correlated materials via dynamical mean-field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freericks, James

    2010-03-01

    Dynamical mean-field theory was introduced in 1989 and has become one of the most successful methods for solving models of strongly correlated electrons in equilibrium (it becomes exact in the infinite-dimensional limit). In this talk, I show how to generalize dynamical mean-field theory to nonequilibrium situations. For transient response, one discretizes the Kadanoff-Baym-Keldysh contour then solves the discrete problem directly. For steady-state response, one can formulate a theory directly in the long-time limit for the retarded Green's functions. These techniques are applied to the problem of the quenching of Bloch oscillations due to electron-electron interactions and to the problem of time-resolved pump/probe photoemission spectroscopy of strongly correlated electrons when a system is driven to a nonequilibrium steady state and cannot be described by the quasiequilibrium approximation with an effective temperature. This work was completed in collaboration with Tom Devereaux, Sasha Joura, Hulikal Krishnamurthy, Brian Moritz, Thomas Pruschke, Volodomyr Turkowski, and Velko Zlati'c. Recent references include: J. K. Freericks, V. M. Turkowski, and V. Zlati'c, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 266408 (2006); J. K. Freericks, Phys. Rev. B 77, 075109 (2008); A. V.Joura, J. K. Freericks, and Th. Pruschke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 196401 (2008); J. K. Freericks, H. R. Krishnamurthy and Th. Pruschke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 136401 (2009); and B. Moritz, T. P. Devereaux, and J. K. Freericks, arXiv:0908.1807.

  2. Lagrangian formulation for a gauge theory of strong and electromagnetic interactions defined on a Cartan bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drechsler, W.

    1977-01-01

    A Lagrangian formalism invariant under the gauge group U 1 xUSpsub(2.2) is set up in terms of spinor fields defined on a fiber bundle with Cartan connexion. The fiber of the Cartan bundle over space-time associated with strong interactions is characterized by an elementary length parameter R related to the range of the strong forces, and the structural group USpsub(2.2) of the bundle (being the covering group of the SOsub(4.1) de Sitter group) implies a gauge description of strong interactions based on the noncompact gauge group USpsub(2.2). The U 1 factor in the total gauge group corresponds to the usual gauge formulation for the electromagnetic interactions. The positivity of the energy associated with stable extended one-particle states in this dualistic description of charged hadronic matter immersed in the fiber geometry (this dualism is called strong fiber dynamics (SFD)) requires hadrons to be assigned to representations of the compact subgroup SU 2 xSU 2 of the strong-interaction gauge group USpsub(2.2). A brief discussion of the point-particle limit R→O is given by linking the presented SFD formalism for extended hadrons to an idealized description in terms of operators in a local quantum field theory

  3. Relation of extended Van Hove singularities to high-temperature superconductivity within strong-coupling theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, R.J.; Norman, M.R.

    1994-01-01

    Recent angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) experiments have indicated that the electronic dispersion in some of the cuprates possesses an extended saddle point near the Fermi level which gives rise to a density of states that diverges like a power law instead of the weaker logarithmic divergence usually considered. We investigate whether this strong singularity can give rise to high transition temperatures by computing the critical temperature T c and isotope effect coefficient α within a strong-coupling Eliashberg theory which accounts for the full energy variation of the density of states. Using band structures extracted from ARPES measurements, we demonstrate that, while the weak-coupling solutions suggest a strong influence of the strength of the Van Hove singularity on T c and α, strong-coupling solutions show less sensitivity to the singularity strength and do not support the hypothesis that band-structure effects alone can account for either the large T c 's or the different T c 's within the copper oxide family. This conclusion is supported when our results are plotted as a function of the physically relevant self-consistent coupling constant, which shows universal behavior at very strong coupling

  4. Introduction to gauge theories of the strong, weak, and electromagnetic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, C.

    1980-07-01

    The plan of these notes is as follows. Chapter 1 is devoted to a brief evocative review of current beliefs and prejudices that form the context for the discussion to follow. The idea of Gauge Invariance is introduced in Chapter 2, and the connection between conservation laws and symmetries of the Lagrangian is recalled. Non-Abelian gauge field theories are constructed in Chapter 3, by analogy with the familiar case of electromagnetism. The Yang-Mills theory based upon isospin symmetry is constructed explicitly, and the generalization is made to other gauge groups. Chapter 4 is concerned with spontaneous symmetry breaking and the phenomena that occur in the presence or absence of local gauge symmetries. The existence of massless scalar fields (Goldstone particles) and their metamorphosis by means of the Higgs mechanism are illustrated by simple examples. The Weinberg-Salam model is presented in Chapter 5, and a brief resume of applications to experiment is given. Quantum Chromodynamics, the gauge theory of colored quarks and gluons, is developed in Chapter 6. Asymptotic freedom is derived schematically, and a few simple applications of perturbative QCD ae exhibited. Details of the conjectured confinement mechanism are omitted. The strategy of grand unified theories of the strong, weak, and electromagnetic interactions is laid out in Chapter 7. Some properties and consequences of the minimal unifying group SU(5) are presented, and the gauge hierarchy problem is introduced in passing. The final chapter contains an essay on the current outlook: aspirations, unanswered questions, and bold scenarios

  5. Portfolio theory of optimal isometric force production: Variability predictions and nonequilibrium fluctuation dissipation theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, T. D.; Patanarapeelert, K.; Beek, P. J.

    2008-05-01

    We derive a fundamental relationship between the mean and the variability of isometric force. The relationship arises from an optimal collection of active motor units such that the force variability assumes a minimum (optimal isometric force). The relationship is shown to be independent of the explicit motor unit properties and of the dynamical features of isometric force production. A constant coefficient of variation in the asymptotic regime and a nonequilibrium fluctuation-dissipation theorem for optimal isometric force are predicted.

  6. Portfolio theory of optimal isometric force production: Variability predictions and nonequilibrium fluctuation-dissipation theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, T.D.; Patanarapeelert, K.; Beek, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    We derive a fundamental relationship between the mean and the variability of isometric force. The relationship arises from an optimal collection of active motor units such that the force variability assumes a minimum (optimal isometric force). The relationship is shown to be independent of the explicit motor unit properties and of the dynamical features of isometric force production. A constant coefficient of variation in the asymptotic regime and a nonequilibrium fluctuation-dissipation theorem for optimal isometric force are predicted

  7. Thermal fluctuations in resonant motion of fluxons on a Josephson transmission line: Theory and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, E.; Koshelets, V. P.; Monaco, Roberto

    1982-01-01

    The radiation emission from long and narrow Josephson tunnel junctions dc-current biased on zero-field steps has been ascribed to resonant motion of fluxons on the transmission line. Within this dynamic model a theoretical expression for the radiation linewidth is derived from a full statistical ...... treatment of thermal fluctuations in the fluxon velocity. The result appears to be very general and is corroborated by experimental determination of linewidth and frequency of radiation emitted from overlap Nb-I-Pb junctions....

  8. Radiation of a circulating quark in strongly coupled N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Christiana; Chesler, Paul M.; Liu, Hong; Nickel, Dominik; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2010-12-01

    The energy density and angular distribution of power radiated by a quark undergoing circular motion in strongly coupled N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory is computed using gauge/gravity duality. The results are qualitatively similar to that of synchrotron radiation produced by an electron in circular motion in classical electrodynamics: At large velocities the quark emits radiation in a narrow beam along its velocity vector with a characteristic opening angle α˜1/γ and radial thickness scaling like ˜1/γ3.

  9. Linear theory of a cold relativistic beam in a strongly magnetized finite-geometry plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, R.R.J.; Shoucri, M.M.

    1976-01-01

    The linear theory of a finite-geometry cold relativistic beam propagating in a cold homogeneous finite-geometry plasma, is investigated in the case of a strongly magnetized plasma. The beam is assumed to propagate parallel to the external magnetic field. It is shown that the instability which takes place at the Cherenkov resonance ωapprox. =k/subz/v/subb/ is of the convective type. The effect of the finite geometry on the instability growth rate is studied and is shown to decrease the growth rate, with respect to the infinite geometry, by a factor depending on the ratio of the beam-to-plasma radius

  10. Numerical Detector Theory for the Longitudinal Momentum Distribution of the Electron in Strong Field Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Justin; Wang, Xu; Eberly, J. H.

    2017-05-01

    The lack of analytical solutions for the exit momentum in the laser-driven tunneling theory is a well-recognized problem in strong field physics. Theoretical studies of electron momentum distributions in the neighborhood of the tunneling exit depend heavily on ad hoc assumptions. In this Letter, we apply a new numerical method to study the exiting electron's longitudinal momentum distribution under intense short-pulse laser excitation. We present the first realizations of the dynamic behavior of an electron near the so-called tunneling exit region without adopting a tunneling approximation.

  11. Instability, rupture and fluctuations in thin liquid films: Theory and computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvalani, Rishabh; Duran-Olivencia, Miguel; Kalliadasis, Serafim; Pavliotis, Grigorios

    2017-11-01

    Thin liquid films are ubiquitous in natural phenomena and technological applications. They are commonly studied via deterministic hydrodynamic equations, but thermal fluctuations often play a crucial role that still needs to be understood. An example of this is dewetting, which involves the rupture of a thin liquid film and the formation of droplets. Such a process is thermally activated and requires fluctuations to be taken into account self-consistently. Here we present an analytical and numerical study of a stochastic thin-film equation derived from first principles. We scrutinise the behaviour of the stochastic thin film equation in the limit of perfectly correlated noise along the wall-normal direction. We also perform Monte Carlo simulations of the stochastic equation by adopting a numerical scheme based on a spectral collocation method. The numerical scheme allows us to explore the fluctuating dynamics of the thin film and the behaviour of the system's free energy close to rupture. Finally, we also study the effect of the noise intensity on the rupture time, which is in good agreement with previous works. Imperial College London (ICL) President's PhD Scholarship; European Research Council Advanced Grant No. 247031; EPSRC Grants EP/L025159, EP/L020564, EP/P031587, EP/L024926, and EP/L016230/1.

  12. Fermionic Statistics in the Strongly Correlated Limit of Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Exact pieces of information on the adiabatic connection integrand, Wλ[ρ], which allows evaluation of the exchange-correlation energy of Kohn–Sham density functional theory, can be extracted from the leading terms in the strong coupling limit (λ → ∞, where λ is the strength of the electron–electron interaction). In this work, we first compare the theoretical prediction for the two leading terms in the strong coupling limit with data obtained via numerical implementation of the exact Levy functional in the simple case of two electrons confined in one dimension, confirming the asymptotic exactness of these two terms. We then carry out a first study on the incorporation of the Fermionic statistics at large coupling λ, both numerical and theoretical, confirming that spin effects enter at orders ∼e–√λ. PMID:29111724

  13. Punishment as a Means of Competition: Implications for Strong Reciprocity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paál, Tünde; Bereczkei, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Strong negative reciprocity, that is, sanctions imposed on norm violators at the punisher’s own expense, has powerful cooperation-enhancing effects in both real-life and experimental game situations. However, it is plausible that punishment may obtain alternative roles depending on social context and the personality characteristics of participants. We examined the occurrence of punishing behavior among 80 subjects in a strongly competitive Public Goods game setting. Despite the punishment condition, the amount of the contributions decreased steadily during the game. The amount of contributions had no significant effect on received and imposed punishments. The results indicate that certain social contexts (in this case, intensive competition) exert modifying effects on the role that punishment takes on. Subjects punished each other in order to achieve a higher rank and a financially better outcome. Punishment primarily functioned as a means of rivalry, instead of as a way of second-order cooperation, as strong reciprocity suggests. These results indicate the need for the possible modification of the social conditions of punishment mechanisms described by the strong reciprocity theory as an evolutionary explanation of human cooperation. PMID:25811464

  14. Impact of economic fluctuations on suicide mortality in Canada (1926-2008): Testing the Durkheim, Ginsberg, and Henry and Short theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Lise; Lachaud, James

    2016-01-01

    Three theories have been proposed to explain the relationship between suicide and economic fluctuations, including the Durkheim (nonlinear), Ginsberg (procyclical), and Henry and Short (countercyclical) theories. This study tested the effect of economic fluctuations, measured by unemployment rate, on suicide rates in Canada from 1926 to 2008. Autoregressive integrated moving average time-series models were used. The results showed a significant relationship between suicide and economic fluctuation; this association was positive during the contraction period (1926-1950) and negative in the period of economic expansion (1951-1973). Males and females showed differential effects in the period of moderate unemployment (1974-2008). In addition, the suicide rate of mid-adults (45-64) was most impacted by economic fluctuations. Our study tends to support Durkheim's theory and suggests the need for public health responses in times of economic contraction and expansion.

  15. Adiabatic theory of strong-field photoelectron momentum distributions near a backward rescattering caustic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Toru; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.

    2017-11-01

    We present a comprehensive treatise on the derivation of the factorization formula describing strong-field photoelectron momentum distributions near the outermost backward rescattering caustic within the adiabatic theory and its validation by calculations. The formula derived holds for ionization by linearly polarized laser pulses of sufficiently low frequency and becomes exact as the frequency tends to zero for a fixed pulse amplitude. The convergence of the results obtained from the formula to accurate photoelectron momentum distributions obtained by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is demonstrated. The formula is shown to work quantitatively in both tunneling and over-the-barrier regimes of ionization for finite-range potentials as well as potentials with a Coulomb tail. This paves the way for future applications of the present theory in strong-field physics. In particular, the explicit analytical form of the returning photoelectron wave packet given here enables one to extract differential cross sections for elastic scattering of a photoelectron on the parent ion from experimental photoelectron momentum distributions.

  16. Sound Attenuation in Quark Matter Due to Pairing Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerbikov Boris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The sound wave in dense quark matter is subject to strong absorption due to diquark field fluctuations above Tc. The result is another facet of Mandelshtam-Leontovich slow relaxation time theory.

  17. Fluctuations of the baryonic flux-tube junction from effective string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeuffer, Melanie; Bali, Gunnar S.; Panero, Marco

    2009-01-01

    In quenched QCD, where the dynamic creation of quark-antiquark pairs out of the vacuum is neglected, a confined baryonic system composed of three static quarks exhibits stringlike behavior at large interquark separation, with the formation of flux tubes characterized by the geometry of the so-called Y ansatz. We study the fluctuations of the junction of the three flux tubes, assuming the dynamics to be governed by an effective bosonic string model. We show that the asymptotic behavior of the effective width of the junction grows logarithmically with the distance between the sources, with the coefficient depending on the number of joining strings, on the dimension of spacetime and on the string tension.

  18. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory: A New Way To Treat Strongly Correlated Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Laura; Truhlar, Donald G; Li Manni, Giovanni; Carlson, Rebecca K; Hoyer, Chad E; Bao, Junwei Lucas

    2017-01-17

    The electronic energy of a system provides the Born-Oppenheimer potential energy for internuclear motion and thus determines molecular structure and spectra, bond energies, conformational energies, reaction barrier heights, and vibrational frequencies. The development of more efficient and more accurate ways to calculate the electronic energy of systems with inherently multiconfigurational electronic structure is essential for many applications, including transition metal and actinide chemistry, systems with partially broken bonds, many transition states, and most electronically excited states. Inherently multiconfigurational systems are called strongly correlated systems or multireference systems, where the latter name refers to the need for using more than one ("multiple") configuration state function to provide a good zero-order reference wave function. This Account describes multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which was developed as a way to combine the advantages of wave function theory (WFT) and density functional theory (DFT) to provide a better treatment of strongly correlated systems. First we review background material: the widely used Kohn-Sham DFT (which uses only a single Slater determinant as reference wave function), multiconfiguration WFT methods that treat inherently multiconfigurational systems based on an active space, and previous attempts to combine multiconfiguration WFT with DFT. Then we review the formulation of MC-PDFT. It is a generalization of Kohn-Sham DFT in that the electron kinetic energy and classical electrostatic energy are calculated from a reference wave function, while the rest of the energy is obtained from a density functional. However, there are two main differences with respent to Kohn-Sham DFT: (i) The reference wave function is multiconfigurational rather than being a single Slater determinant. (ii) The density functional is a function of the total density and the on-top pair density rather than

  19. Microscopic theory of photon-correlation spectroscopy in strong-coupling semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneebeli, Lukas

    2009-11-27

    would be a great contribution in the growing field of quantum optics in semiconductors. The efforts in QD systems are again driven by the atomic systems which not only have shown the vacuum Rabi splitting, but also the second rung, e.g. via direct spectroscopy and via photon-correlation measurements. In this thesis, it is shown that spectrally resolved photon-statistics measurements of the resonance fluorescence from realistic semiconductor quantum-dot systems allow for high contrast identification of the two-photon strong-coupling states. Using a microscopic theory, the second-rung resonance of Jaynes-Cummings ladder is analyzed and optimum excitation conditions are determined. The computed photon-statistics spectrum displays gigantic, experimentally robust resonances at the energetic positions of the second-rung emission. The resonance fluorescence equations are derived and solved for strong-coupling semiconductor quantum-dot systems using a fully quantized multimode theory and a cluster-expansion approach. A reduced model is developed to explain the origin of auto- and cross-correlation resonances in the two-photon emission spectrum of the fluorescent light. These resonances are traced back to the two-photon strong-coupling states of Jaynes-Cummings ladder. The accuracy of the reduced model is verified via numerical solution of the resonance fluorescence equations. The analysis reveals the direct relation between the squeezed-light emission and the strong-coupling states in optically excited semiconductor systems. (orig.)

  20. Israel L. Bershtein (1908-2000 — the Founder of the Theory of Fluctuations in Self-Oscillating Systems (In Commemorating the 100th Birthday Anniversary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malykin G. B.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Israel L. Bershtein (1908–2000 was one of the famous radio physicists in the world. He had constructed the theory of amplitude and frequency fluctuations for the electromag- netic wave generators working in the radio and optical scales. He also had developed numerous methods for precise measurement of the fluctuations, which also can be ap- plied to ultimate small mechanical displacements. Besides these he was the first person among the scientists, who had registered the Sagnac effect at radiowaves.

  1. Israel L. Bershtein (1908-2000 — the Founder of the Theory of Fluctuations in Self-Oscillating Systems (In Commemorating the 100th Birthday Anniversary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malykin G. B.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Israel L. Bershtein (1908-2000 was one of the famous radio physicists in the world. He had constructed the theory of amplitude and frequency fluctuations for the electromagnetic wave generators working in the radio and optical scales. He also had developed numerous methods for precise measurement of the fluctuations, which also can be applied to ultimate small mechanical displacements. Besides these he was the first person among the scientists, who had registered the Sagnac effect at radiowaves.

  2. Cosmological Inflation with Multiple Fields and the Theory of Density Fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tent, B.J.W. van

    2002-01-01

    Inflation is a stage of extremely rapid expansion in the very early universe. It was proposed to solve a number of problems in the standard Big Bang theory. In particular it others an explanation for the origin of structures like (clusters of) galaxies on the one hand (by generating small density

  3. Theory and phenomenology of strong and weak interaction high energy physics: Progress report, May 1, 1987-April 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carruthers, P.; Thews, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper contains progress information on the following topics in High Energy Physics: strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions; aspects of quark-gluon models for hadronic interactions, decays, and structure; the dynamical generation of a mass gap and the role and truthfulness of perturbation theory; statistical and dynamical aspects of hadronic multiparticle production; and realization of chiral symmetry and temperature effects in supersymmetric theories

  4. Effective field theory of an anomalous Hall metal from interband quantum fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Victor; Assawasunthonnet, Wathid; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2017-07-01

    We construct an effective field theory, a two-dimensional two-component metallic system described by a model with two Fermi surfaces ("pockets"). This model describes a translationally invariant metallic system with two types of fermions, each with its own Fermi surface, with forward scattering interactions. This model, in addition to the O (2 ) rotational invariance, has a U (1 )×U (1 ) symmetry of separate charge conservation for each Fermi surface. For sufficiently attractive interactions in the d -wave (quadrupolar) channel, this model has an interesting phase diagram that includes a spontaneously generated anomalous Hall metal phase. We derive the Landau-Ginzburg effective action of quadrupolar order parameter fields which enjoys an O (2 )×U (1 ) global symmetry associated to spatial isotropy and the internal U (1 ) relative phase symmetries, respectively. We show that the order parameter theory is dynamically local with a dynamical scaling of z =2 and perform a one-loop renormalization group analysis of the Landau-Ginzburg theory. The electronic liquid crystal phases that result from spontaneous symmetry breaking are studied and we show the presence of Landau damped Nambu-Goldstone modes at low momenta that is a signature of non-Fermi-liquid behavior. Electromagnetic linear response is also analyzed in both the normal and symmetry broken phases from the point of view of the order parameter theory. The nature of the coupling of electromagnetism to the order parameter fields in the normal phase is non-minimal and decidedly contains a precursor to the anomalous Hall response in the form of a order-parameter-dependent Chern-Simons term in the effective action.

  5. The Halo Mass Function from Excursion Set Theory. III. Non-Gaussian Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Maggiore, Michele

    2010-01-01

    We compute the effect of primordial non-Gaussianity on the halo mass function, using excursion set theory. In the presence of non-Gaussianity the stochastic evolution of the smoothed density field, as a function of the smoothing scale, is non-markovian and beside "local" terms that generalize Press-Schechter (PS) theory, there are also "memory" terms, whose effect on the mass function can be computed using the formalism developed in the first paper of this series. We find that, when computing the effect of the three-point correlator on the mass function, a PS-like approach which consists in neglecting the cloud-in-cloud problem and in multiplying the final result by a fudge factor close to 2, is in principle not justified. When computed correctly in the framework of excursion set theory, in fact, the "local" contribution vanishes (for all odd-point correlators the contribution of the image gaussian cancels the Press-Schechter contribution rather than adding up), and the result comes entirely from non-trivial ...

  6. Yielding in a strongly aggregated colloidal gel: 2D simulations and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Saikat; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the micro-structural details and the mechanical response under uniaxial compression of the strongly aggregating gel starting from low to high packing fraction.The numerical simulations account for short-range inter-particle attractions, normal and tangential deformation at particle contacts,sliding and rolling friction, and preparation history. It is observed that in the absence of rolling resistance(RR),the average coordination number varies only slightly with compaction whereas it is significant in the presence of RR. The particle contact distribution is isotropic throughout the consolidation process. In both cases, the yield strain is constant with the volume fraction. The modulus values are very similar at different attraction, and with and without RR implying that the elastic modulus does not scale with attraction.The modulus was found to be a weak function of the preparation history. The increase in yield stress with volume fraction is a consequence of the increased elastic modulus of the network. However, the yield stress scales similarly both with and without RR. The power law exponent of 5.4 is in good agreement with previous simulation results. A micromechanical theory is also proposed to describe the stress versus strain relation for the gelled network.

  7. Galactic Dynamos and Density Wave Theory - Part Two - an Alternative Treatment for Strong Non-Axisymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, K.; Mestel, L.

    1993-12-01

    A steady density wave in a disc-like galaxy could lead to a spiral form for the crucial α-effect term in standard dynamo theory. We had earlier studied this problem under the thin-disc approximation and by effecting an approximate separation of variables between the z-dependence and the r, φ-dependences of the magnetic field. We return to this problem by making an alternative approximation of our equations, which allows a better treatment of the case of strong departures from axisymmetry, albeit with a cruder treatment of the z-dependence. The numerical solution of the equations reveals, as in our earlier work, the existence of rapidly growing, global, bisymmetric magnetic modes, corotating with the density wave. The modes extend several kiloparsecs around the radius r_c_ where the wave corotates with the gas. The magnetic spiral is closely aligned with the density wave in regions where it has maximum strength; leading within r_c_ and trailing outside. These results are remarkably similar to that obtained in our earlier work, under a very different approximation scheme, encouraging belief in the robustness of the results obtained in both papers.

  8. Using density functional theory to describe slowly varying fluctuations at finite temperatures: local magnetic moments in Gd and the 'not so local' moments of Ni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Julie B; Marmodoro, Alberto; Ernst, Arthur

    2014-07-09

    We briefly describe the density functional theory (DFT)-based 'disordered local moment' (DLM) picture for magnetism at finite temperatures. It shows how relatively slowly fluctuating local moments can emerge from the interacting electrons of many materials. Such entities have rigid magnitudes and fluctuate their orientations from atomic site to atomic site on a timescale long compared to other electronic times. We illustrate this theory with calculations of the magnetocaloric effect in Gd where we find excellent agreement with experiments. Fluctuating moments do not appear to establish naturally over such small regions for some other materials. We show how the DFT-DLM theory can be extended to these materials with the use of the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker nonlocal coherent potential approximation (KKR-NLCPA) to allow for more extensive, slow magnetic fluctuations. We present the first application of this approach by revisiting the description of the magnetic fluctuations prevalent in the paramagnetic state of nickel. We find that local moments can emerge above Tc and that these form coherently over small clumps of atomic sites (4-8 sites).

  9. Using density functional theory to describe slowly varying fluctuations at finite temperatures: local magnetic moments in Gd and the ‘not so local’ moments of Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Julie B.; Marmodoro, Alberto; Ernst, Arthur

    2014-07-01

    We briefly describe the density functional theory (DFT)-based ‘disordered local moment’ (DLM) picture for magnetism at finite temperatures. It shows how relatively slowly fluctuating local moments can emerge from the interacting electrons of many materials. Such entities have rigid magnitudes and fluctuate their orientations from atomic site to atomic site on a timescale long compared to other electronic times. We illustrate this theory with calculations of the magnetocaloric effect in Gd where we find excellent agreement with experiments. Fluctuating moments do not appear to establish naturally over such small regions for some other materials. We show how the DFT-DLM theory can be extended to these materials with the use of the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker nonlocal coherent potential approximation (KKR-NLCPA) to allow for more extensive, slow magnetic fluctuations. We present the first application of this approach by revisiting the description of the magnetic fluctuations prevalent in the paramagnetic state of nickel. We find that local moments can emerge above Tc and that these form coherently over small clumps of atomic sites (4-8 sites).

  10. New Insight into Short-Wavelength Solar Wind Fluctuations from Vlasov Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraoui, Fouad; Belmont, G.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    The nature of solar wind (SW) turbulence below the proton gyroscale is a topic that is being investigated extensively nowadays, both theoretically and observationally. Although recent observations gave evidence of the dominance of kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) at sub-ion scales with omega omega (sub ci)) is more relevant. Here, we study key properties of the short-wavelength plasma modes under limited, but realistic, SW conditions, Typically Beta(sub i) approx. > Beta (sub e) 1 and for high oblique angles of propagation 80 deg theory, we discuss the relevance of each plasma mode (fast, Bernstein, KAW, whistler) in carrying the energy cascade down to electron scales. We show, in particular, that the shear Alfven mode (known in the magnetohydrodynamic limit) extends at scales kappa rho (sub i) approx. > 1 to frequencies either larger or smaller than omega (sub ci), depending on the anisotropy kappa (parallel )/ kappa(perpendicular). This extension into small scales is more readily called whistler (omega > omega (sub ci)) or KAW (omega < omega (sub ci)) although the mode is essentially the same. This contrasts with the well-accepted idea that the whistler branch always develops as a continuation at high frequencies of the fast magnetosonic mode. We show, furthermore, that the whistler branch is more damped than the KAW one, which makes the latter the more relevant candidate to carry the energy cascade down to electron scales. We discuss how these new findings may facilitate resolution of the controversy concerning the nature of the small-scale turbulence, and we discuss the implications for present and future spacecraft wave measurements in the SW.

  11. Theory of atoms in strong, pulsed electromagnetic fields: 2, A free electron and a harmonically bound electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple scale methods are used to treat several ingredients of the theory of atoms in strong electromagnetic fields. First, a focused electromagnetic field is expanded. Second, a classical electron is described giving the ponderomotive potential. Third, the quantum electron is treated in the WKB approximation. Fourth, the one dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator is solved; and last the one dimensional square well, showing the low intensity limit of the theory

  12. A Unified Theory of Interaction: Gravitation, Electrodynamics and the Strong Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagener P.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A unified model of gravitation and electromagnetism is extended to derive the Yukawa potential for the strong force. The model satisfies the fundamental characteristics of the strong force and calculates the mass of the pion.

  13. Strong coupling expansion for scattering phases in hamiltonian lattice field theories. Pt. 1. The (d+1)-dimensional Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahmen, Bernd

    1994-01-01

    A systematic method to obtain strong coupling expansions for scattering quantities in hamiltonian lattice field theories is presented. I develop the conceptual ideas for the case of the hamiltonian field theory analogue of the Ising model, in d space and one time dimension. The main result is a convergent series representation for the scattering states and the transition matrix. To be explicit, the special cases of d=1 and d=3 spatial dimensions are discussed in detail. I compute the next-to-leading order approximation for the phase shifts. The application of the method to investigate low-energy scattering phenomena in lattice gauge theory and QCD is proposed. ((orig.))

  14. Scattering from extended targets in range-dependent fluctuating ocean-waveguides with clutter from theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Srinivasan; Küsel, Elizabeth T; Ratilal, Purnima; Makris, Nicholas C

    2012-08-01

    Bistatic, long-range measurements of acoustic scattered returns from vertically extended, air-filled tubular targets were made during three distinct field experiments in fluctuating continental shelf waveguides. It is shown that Sonar Equation estimates of mean target-scattered intensity lead to large errors, differing by an order of magnitude from both the measurements and waveguide scattering theory. The use of the Ingenito scattering model is also shown to lead to significant errors in estimating mean target-scattered intensity in the field experiments because they were conducted in range-dependent ocean environments with large variations in sound speed structure over the depth of the targets, scenarios that violate basic assumptions of the Ingenito model. Green's theorem based full-field modeling that describes scattering from vertically extended tubular targets in range-dependent ocean waveguides by taking into account nonuniform sound speed structure over the target's depth extent is shown to accurately describe the statistics of the targets' scattered field in all three field experiments. Returns from the man-made targets are also shown to have a very different spectral dependence from the natural target-like clutter of the dominant fish schools observed, suggesting that judicious multi-frequency sensing may often provide a useful means of distinguishing fish from man-made targets.

  15. Strong coupling effects in non-commutative spaces from OM theory and supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, J.G.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M.M.

    2000-11-01

    We show that a four-parameter class of 3+1 dimensional NCOS theories can be obtained by dimensional reduction on a general 2-torus from OM theory. Compactifying two spatial directions of NCOS theory on a 2-torus, we study the transformation properties under the SO(2,2; Z) T-duality group. We then discuss non-perturbative configurations of non-commutative super Yang-Mills theory. In particular, we calculate the tension for magnetic monopoles and (p,q) dyons and exhibit their six-dimensional origin, and construct a supergravity solution representing an instanton in the gauge theory. We also compute the potential for a monopole-antimonopole in the supergravity approximation. (author)

  16. New Integrable 4D Quantum Field Theories from Strongly Deformed Planar N=4 Supersymmetric Yang-Mills Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürdoğan, Ömer; Kazakov, Vladimir

    2016-11-11

    We introduce a family of new integrable quantum field theories in four dimensions by considering the γ-deformed N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory in the double scaling limit of large imaginary twists and small coupling. This limit discards the gauge fields and retains only certain Yukawa and scalar interactions with three arbitrary effective couplings. In the 't Hooft limit, these 4D theories are integrable, and contain a wealth of conformal correlators such that the whole arsenal of AdS/CFT integrability remains applicable. As a special case of these models, we obtain a quantum field theory of two complex scalars with a chiral, quartic interaction. The Berenstein-Maldacena-Nastase vacuum anomalous dimension is dominated in each loop order by a single "wheel" graph, whose bulk represents an integrable "fishnet" graph. This explicitly demonstrates the all-loop integrability of gamma-deformed planar N=4 SYM theory, at least in our limit. Using this feature and integrability results we provide an explicit conjecture for the periods of double-wheel graphs with an arbitrary number of spokes in terms of multiple zeta values of limited depth.

  17. The VAK of vacuum fluctuation, Spontaneous self-organization and complexity theory interpretation of high energy particle physics and the mass spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naschie, M.S.

    2003-01-01

    The paper is a rather informal introduction to the concepts and results of the E-infinity Cantorian theory of quantum physics. The fundamental tools of complexity theory and non-linear dynamics (Hausdorff dimensions, fat fractals, etc.) are used to give what we think to be a new interpretation of high energy physics and to determine the corresponding mass-spectrum. Particular attention is paid to the role played by the VAK, KAM theorem, Arnold diffusion, Newhaus sinks and knot theory in determining the stability of an elementary 'particle-wave' which emerges in self-organizatory manner out of sizzling vacuum fluctuation

  18. Thermal spectral functions of strongly coupled N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtun, Pavel; Starinets, Andrei

    2006-04-07

    We use the gauge-gravity duality conjecture to compute spectral functions of the stress-energy tensor in finite-temperature N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory in the limit of large N(c) and large 't Hooft coupling. The spectral functions exhibit peaks characteristic of hydrodynamic modes at small frequency, and oscillations at intermediate frequency. The nonperturbative spectral functions differ qualitatively from those obtained in perturbation theory. The results may prove useful for lattice studies of transport processes in thermal gauge theories.

  19. An algorithm for high order strong coupling expansions: The mass gap in 3d pure Z2 lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, K.; Hamburg Univ.

    1985-12-01

    An efficient description of all clusters contributing to the strong coupling expansion of the mass gap in three-dimensional pure Z 2 lattice gauge theory is presented. This description is correct to all orders in the strong coupling expansion and is chosen in such a way that it remains valid in four dimensions for gauge group Z 2 . Relying on this description an algorithm has been constructed which generates and processes all the contributing graphs to the exact strong coupling expansion of the mass gap in the three-dimensional model in a fully automatic fashion. A major component of this algorithm can also be used to generate exact strong coupling expansions for the free energy logZ. The algorithm is correct to any order; thus the order of these expansions is only limited by the available computing power. The presentation of the algorithm is such that it can serve as a guide-line for the construction of a generalized one which would also generate exact strong coupling expansions for the masses of low-lying excited states of four-dimensional pure Yang-Mills theories. (orig.)

  20. Renormalization group functions of the φ4 theory in the strong coupling limit: Analytical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suslov, I. M.

    2008-01-01

    The previous attempts of reconstructing the Gell-Mann-Low function β(g) of the φ 4 theory by summing perturbation series give the asymptotic behavior β(g) = β ∞ g in the limit g → ∞, where α = 1 for the space dimensions d = 2, 3, 4. It can be hypothesized that the asymptotic behavior is β(g) ∼ g for all d values. The consideration of the zero-dimensional case supports this hypothesis and reveals the mechanism of its appearance: it is associated with vanishing of one of the functional integrals. The generalization of the analysis confirms the asymptotic behavior β(g) ∼ g in the general d-dimensional case. The asymptotic behaviors of other renormalization group functions are constant. The connection with the zero-charge problem and triviality of the φ 4 theory is discussed

  1. To the theory of fluctuations in a non-equilibrium plasma with taking into account the particle collisional interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puchkov, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    A method for calculation of non-equilibrium fluctuations in a totally ionized stable plasma with taking into account the particle collisions is proposed. The spectrum of high-frequency fluctuations of the electric field is calculated by the developed method. The formula obtained for the spectrum takes into consideration both the Coulomb collisions and influence of collective effects on the collisions and is applicable for stable arbitrary distributions of electrons and ions

  2. Generalized-active-space pair-density functional theory: an efficient method to study large, strongly correlated, conjugated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Cramer, Christopher J; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2017-04-01

    Predicting ground- and excited-state properties of open-shell organic molecules by electronic structure theory can be challenging because an accurate treatment has to correctly describe both static and dynamic electron correlation. Strongly correlated systems, i.e. , systems with near-degeneracy correlation effects, are particularly troublesome. Multiconfigurational wave function methods based on an active space are adequate in principle, but it is impractical to capture most of the dynamic correlation in these methods for systems characterized by many active electrons. We recently developed a new method called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), that combines the advantages of wave function theory and density functional theory to provide a more practical treatment of strongly correlated systems. Here we present calculations of the singlet-triplet gaps in oligoacenes ranging from naphthalene to dodecacene. Calculations were performed for unprecedently large orbitally optimized active spaces of 50 electrons in 50 orbitals, and we test a range of active spaces and active space partitions, including four kinds of frontier orbital partitions. We show that MC-PDFT can predict the singlet-triplet splittings for oligoacenes consistent with the best available and much more expensive methods, and indeed MC-PDFT may constitute the benchmark against which those other models should be compared, given the absence of experimental data.

  3. Comparison theorems and strong oscillation in the half-linear discrete oscillation theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řehák, Pavel

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 1 (2003), s. 333-352 ISSN 0035-7596 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/98/0677; GA ČR GA201/99/0295 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905; CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : half-linear difference equation * comparison theorems * strong oscillation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.187, year: 2003

  4. Quantum-orbit theory of high-order atomic processes in strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, D.B.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Atoms submitted to strong laser fields can emit electrons and photons of very high energies. These processes find a highly intuitive and also quantitative explanation in terms of Feynman's path integral and the concept of quantum orbits. The quantum-orbit formalism is particularly useful for high-order atomic processes in strong laser fields. For such multi-step processes there is an intermediate step during which the electron is approximately under the influence of the laser field only and can absorb energy from the field. This leads to the appearance of the plateau structures in the emitted electron or photon spectra. Usual examples of such processes are high-order harmonic generation (HHG) and high-order above threshold ionization (HATI). These structures were also observed in high-order above-threshold detachment, laser-assisted x-ray-atom scattering, laser-assisted electron-ion recombination, and electron-atom scattering. We will present high-order strong-field approximation (SFA) and show how the quantum-orbit formalism follows from it. This will be done for various above-mentioned processes. For HHG a classification of quantum orbits will be given [10) and generalized to the presence of a static field. The low-energy part of the HHG spectra and the enhancement of HHG near the channel closings can be explained taking into account a large number of quantum orbits. For HATI we will concentrate on the case of few-cycle laser pulse. The influence of the carrier-envelope relative phase on the HATI spectrum can easily be explained in terms of quantum orbits. The SFA and the quantum-orbit results will be compared with the results obtained by Dieter Bauer using ab initio solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. It will be shown that the Coulomb effects are important for low-energy electron spectra. Refs. 11 (author)

  5. Study of the Higgs-Yukawa theory in the strong-Yukawa coupling regime

    CERN Document Server

    Bulava, John; Hou, George W.S.; Jansen, Karl; Knippschild, Bastian; Lin, C.J.David; Nagai, Kei-Ichi; Nagy, Attila; Ogawa, Kenji; Smigielski, Brian

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we present an ongoing lattice study of the Higgs-Yukawa model, in the regime of strong-Yukawa coupling, using overlap fermions. We investigated the phase structure in this regime by computing the Higgs vacuum expectation value, and by exploring the finite-size scaling behaviour of the susceptibility corresponding to the magnetisation. Our preliminary results indicate the existence of a second-order phase transition when the Yukawa coupling becomes large enough, at which the Higgs vacuum expectation value vanishes and the susceptibility diverges.

  6. Bogolubov–Hartree–Fock Theory for Strongly Interacting Fermions in the Low Density Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bräunlich, Gerhard [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Institute for Mathematics (Germany); Hainzl, Christian [University of Tübingen, Mathematical Institute (Germany); Seiringer, Robert, E-mail: robert.seiringer@ist.ac.at [Institute of Science and Technology Austria (Austria)

    2016-06-15

    We consider the Bogolubov–Hartree–Fock functional for a fermionic many-body system with two-body interactions. For suitable interaction potentials that have a strong enough attractive tail in order to allow for two-body bound states, but are otherwise sufficiently repulsive to guarantee stability of the system, we show that in the low-density limit the ground state of this model consists of a Bose–Einstein condensate of fermion pairs. The latter can be described by means of the Gross–Pitaevskii energy functional.

  7. Theory of single bunch stability and dynamics in linacs with strong wakefields and misalignments

    CERN Document Server

    Guignard, Gilbert

    1999-01-01

    The basic method we propose in order to solve analytically the equation of motion of a relativistic single-bunch travelling in a linac, in the presence of wakefields, has been summarised in a preceding report [1]. The extended treatment presented here includes the quadrupole transverse displacements, the chromatic variation of the magnetic focusing, the energy spread along the bunch and possible microwave quadrupoles. It deals with a Gaussian distribution of charge, linear variation of the wakefields within the bunch and smooth focusing. The energy is assumed to be constant in linac sectors, but increases from one sector to the next to simulate acceleration. The longitudinal and transverse equations of motion are solved,the second by using the perturbation method with partial expansions developed for this theory. The localised nature of the misalignment kicks and their superposition property are preserved by using thin lenses. The causality of the downstream oscillations due to these kicks is introduced via H...

  8. Dynamical mean-field theory and path integral renormalisation group calculations of strongly correlated electronic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmann, D.B.

    2007-02-01

    The two-plane HUBBARD model, which is a model for some electronic properties of undoped YBCO superconductors as well as displays a MOTT metal-to-insulator transition and a metal-to-band insulator transition, is studied within Dynamical Mean-Field Theory using HIRSCH-FYE Monte Carlo. In order to find the different transitions and distinguish the types of insulator, we calculate the single-particle spectral densities, the self-energies and the optical conductivities. We conclude that there is a continuous transition from MOTT to band insulator. In the second part, ground state properties of a diagonally disordered HUBBARD model is studied using a generalisation of Path Integral Renormalisation Group, a variational method which can also determine low-lying excitations. In particular, the distribution of antiferromagnetic properties is investigated. We conclude that antiferromagnetism breaks down in a percolation-type transition at a critical disorder, which is not changed appreciably by the inclusion of correlation effects, when compared to earlier studies. Electronic and excitation properties at the system sizes considered turn out to primarily depend on the geometry. (orig.)

  9. Dynamical mean-field theory and path integral renormalisation group calculations of strongly correlated electronic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilmann, D.B.

    2007-02-15

    The two-plane HUBBARD model, which is a model for some electronic properties of undoped YBCO superconductors as well as displays a MOTT metal-to-insulator transition and a metal-to-band insulator transition, is studied within Dynamical Mean-Field Theory using HIRSCH-FYE Monte Carlo. In order to find the different transitions and distinguish the types of insulator, we calculate the single-particle spectral densities, the self-energies and the optical conductivities. We conclude that there is a continuous transition from MOTT to band insulator. In the second part, ground state properties of a diagonally disordered HUBBARD model is studied using a generalisation of Path Integral Renormalisation Group, a variational method which can also determine low-lying excitations. In particular, the distribution of antiferromagnetic properties is investigated. We conclude that antiferromagnetism breaks down in a percolation-type transition at a critical disorder, which is not changed appreciably by the inclusion of correlation effects, when compared to earlier studies. Electronic and excitation properties at the system sizes considered turn out to primarily depend on the geometry. (orig.)

  10. Strong lensing probability in TeVeS (tensor-vector-scalar) theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Daming, E-mail: cdm@bao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2008-01-15

    We recalculate the strong lensing probability as a function of the image separation in TeVeS (tensor-vector-scalar) cosmology, which is a relativistic version of MOND (MOdified Newtonian Dynamics). The lens is modeled by the Hernquist profile. We assume an open cosmology with {Omega}{sub b} = 0.04 and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.5 and three different kinds of interpolating functions. Two different galaxy stellar mass functions (GSMF) are adopted: PHJ (Panter, Heavens and Jimenez 2004 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 355 764) determined from SDSS data release 1 and Fontana (Fontana et al 2006 Astron. Astrophys. 459 745) from GOODS-MUSIC catalog. We compare our results with both the predicted probabilities for lenses from singular isothermal sphere galaxy halos in LCDM (Lambda cold dark matter) with a Schechter-fit velocity function, and the observational results for the well defined combined sample of the Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey (CLASS) and Jodrell Bank/Very Large Array Astrometric Survey (JVAS). It turns out that the interpolating function {mu}(x) = x/(1+x) combined with Fontana GSMF matches the results from CLASS/JVAS quite well.

  11. Strong lensing probability in TeVeS (tensor–vector–scalar) theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daming

    2008-01-01

    We recalculate the strong lensing probability as a function of the image separation in TeVeS (tensor–vector–scalar) cosmology, which is a relativistic version of MOND (MOdified Newtonian Dynamics). The lens is modeled by the Hernquist profile. We assume an open cosmology with Ω b = 0.04 and Ω Λ = 0.5 and three different kinds of interpolating functions. Two different galaxy stellar mass functions (GSMF) are adopted: PHJ (Panter, Heavens and Jimenez 2004 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 355 764) determined from SDSS data release 1 and Fontana (Fontana et al 2006 Astron. Astrophys. 459 745) from GOODS-MUSIC catalog. We compare our results with both the predicted probabilities for lenses from singular isothermal sphere galaxy halos in LCDM (Lambda cold dark matter) with a Schechter-fit velocity function, and the observational results for the well defined combined sample of the Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey (CLASS) and Jodrell Bank/Very Large Array Astrometric Survey (JVAS). It turns out that the interpolating function μ(x) = x/(1+x) combined with Fontana GSMF matches the results from CLASS/JVAS quite well

  12. The strong specific effect of coions on micellar growth from molecular-thermodynamic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroleva, S V; Victorov, A I

    2014-09-07

    Viscoelastic solutions of ionic surfactants with an added salt exhibit a surprisingly strong dependence of their behavior on the nature of the added coion. We apply a recently proposed molecular-thermodynamic model to elucidate the effect of a coion's specificity on the aggregation of cationic and anionic surfactants. We show that micellar growth and branching are opposed by penetration of coions inside a micelle's corona leading to an increase of the aggregate's preferential curvature. These effects result from hydration/dehydration and dispersion attraction of coions and are only important at high salinity where electrostatic repulsion of coions from the micelle is screened and where branching of micelles and viscosity maxima are observed. At low and medium salinity, the coion plays a minor role; its effect on critical micelle concentration and sphere-to-rod transitions is insignificant. Our molecular-thermodynamic approach describes the specific effects of both counterions and coions and their different roles at different salinity levels based on a unified physical picture.

  13. Derivation and assessment of strong coupling core-particle model from the Kerman-Klein-Doenau-Frauendorf theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protopapas, P.; Klein, A.

    1997-01-01

    We review briefly the fundamental equations of a semimicroscopic core-particle coupling method that makes no reference to an intrinsic system of coordinates. We then demonstrate how an intrinsic system can be introduced in the strong coupling limit so as to yield a completely equivalent formulation. It is emphasized that the conventional core-particle coupling calculation introduces a further approximation that avoids what has hitherto been the most time-consuming feature of the full theory, and that this approximation can be introduced either in the intrinsic system, the usual case, or in the laboratory system, our preference. A new algorithm is described for the full theory that largely removes the difference in complexity between the two types of calculation. Comparison of the full and approximate theories for some representative cases provides a basis for the assessment of the accuracy of the traditional approach. We find that for well-deformed nuclei, e.g., 157 Gd and 157 Tb, the core-coupling method and the full theory give similar results. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  14. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-09-07

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  15. A new scalar resonance at 750 GeV: towards a proof of concept in favor of strongly interacting theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Minho; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    We interpret the recently observed excess in the diphoton invariant mass as a new spin-0 resonant particle. On theoretical grounds, an interesting question is whether this new scalar resonance belongs to a strongly coupled sector or a well-defined weakly coupled theory. A possible UV-completion that has been widely considered in literature is based on the existence of new vector-like fermions whose loop contributions — Yukawa-coupled to the new resonance — explain the observed signal rate. The large total width preliminarily suggested by data seems to favor a large Yukawa coupling, at the border of a healthy perturbative definition. This potential problem can be fixed by introducing multiple vector-like fermions or large electric charges, bringing back the theory to a weakly coupled regime. However, this solution risks to be only a low-energy mirage: large multiplicity or electric charge can dangerously reintroduce the strong regime by modifying the renormalization group running of the dimensionless couplings. This issue is also tightly related to the (in)stability of the scalar potential. First, we study — in the theoretical setup described above — the parametric behavior of the diphoton signal rate, total width, and one-loop β functions. Then, we numerically solve the renormalization group equations, taking into account the observed diphoton signal rate and total width, to investigate the fate of the weakly coupled theory. We find that — with the only exception of few fine-tuned directions — weakly coupled interpretations of the excess are brought back to a strongly coupled regime if the running is taken into account.

  16. Establishing a Consistent Theory of Transport in Strongly Correlated Fermi Superfluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyack, Rufus M.

    A diagrammatic method of obtaining exact gauge-invariant response functions in strongly correlated Fermi superfluids is implemented for several example condensed matter systems of current interest. These include: topological superfluids, high temperature superconductors, and superfluids with finite center-of-mass momentum pairing known as Fulde-Ferrell superfluids. Much of the literature on these systems has focused on single-particle properties or alternatively has invoked simple approximations to treat response functions. The goal is to show that, for this wide class of topical problems, one can compute exact response functions. This enables assessment of the validity of different physical scenarios and allows a very broad class of experiments to be addressed. The method developed is based on deriving the full electromagnetic vertex, which satisfies the Ward-Takahashi identity, and determining the collective modes in a manner compatible with the self-consistent gap equation. In the condensed phase of a superfluid and a superconductor, where gauge invariance is spontaneously broken, it is crucial to determine the collective modes from the gap equation in a manner which restores gauge invariance. Our diagrammatic framework provides a very general and powerful method for obtaining these collective modes in a variety of strongly correlated Fermi superfluids. We show that a full electromagnetic vertex satisfying the Ward-Takahashi identity ensures the f-sum rule is satisfied and thus charge is conserved. This diagrammatic method is implemented for both normal and superfluid phases. While there are no collective modes in the normal phase, the Ward-Takahashi identity plays a similarly important role. In particular, for the normal phase we study Rashba spin-orbit coupled Fermi gases with intrinsic pairing in the absence and presence of a magnetic field. Exact density and spin response functions are obtained, even in the absence of a spin conservation law, providing

  17. Fluctuating hydrodynamics for ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaridis, Konstantinos [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Washington State University, Pullman, 99163 (United States); Wickham, Logan [Department of Computer Science, Washington State University, Richland, 99354 (United States); Voulgarakis, Nikolaos, E-mail: n.voulgarakis@wsu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Washington State University, Pullman, 99163 (United States)

    2017-04-25

    We present a mean-field fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) method for studying the structural and transport properties of ionic liquids in bulk and near electrified surfaces. The free energy of the system consists of two competing terms: (1) a Landau–Lifshitz functional that models the spontaneous separation of the ionic groups, and (2) the standard mean-field electrostatic interaction between the ions in the liquid. The numerical approach used to solve the resulting FHD-Poisson equations is very efficient and models thermal fluctuations with remarkable accuracy. Such density fluctuations are sufficiently strong to excite the experimentally observed spontaneous formation of liquid nano-domains. Statistical analysis of our simulations provides quantitative information about the properties of ionic liquids, such as the mixing quality, stability, and the size of the nano-domains. Our model, thus, can be adequately parameterized by directly comparing our prediction with experimental measurements and all-atom simulations. Conclusively, this work can serve as a practical mathematical tool for testing various theories and designing more efficient mixtures of ionic liquids. - Highlights: • A new fluctuating hydrodynamics method for ionic liquids. • Description of ionic liquid morphology in bulk and near electrified surfaces. • Direct comparison with experimental measurements.

  18. A grounded theory study of 'turning into a strong nurse': Earthquake experiences and perspectives on disaster nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Turale, Sue; Stone, Teresa E; Petrini, Marcia

    2015-09-01

    While Asia has the dubious distinction of being the world's most natural disaster-prone area, disaster nursing education and training are sparse in many Asian countries, especially China where this study took place. To explore the earthquake disaster experiences of Chinese nurses and develop a substantive theory of earthquake disaster nursing that will help inform future development of disaster nursing education. A qualitative study employing grounded theory, informed by symbolic interactionism. Fifteen Chinese registered nurses from five hospitals in Jiangxi Province who undertook relief efforts after the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake. Data were collected in 2012-2013 in digitally-recorded, semi-structured, in-depth interviews and reflective field notes, and analyzed using Glaser's grounded theory method. Participants were unprepared educationally and psychologically for their disaster work. Supporting the emergent theory of "working in that terrible environment", was the core category of "turning into a strong nurse", a process of three stages: "going to the disaster"; "immersing in the disaster"; and "trying to let disaster experiences fade away". The participants found themselves thrust in "terrible" scenes of destruction, experienced personal dangers and ethical dilemmas, and tried the best they could to help survivors, communities and themselves, with limited resources and confronting professional work. Our rich findings confirm those of other studies in China and elsewhere, that attention must be paid to disaster education and training for nurses, as well as the mental health of nurses who work in disaster areas. Emergent theory helps to inform nurse educators, researchers, leaders and policy makers in China, and elsewhere in developing strategies to better prepare nurses for future disasters, and assist communities to prepare for and recover after earthquake disasters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Communication: The description of strong correlation within self-consistent Green's function second-order perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Jordan J.; Zgid, Dominika

    2014-01-01

    We report an implementation of self-consistent Green's function many-body theory within a second-order approximation (GF2) for application with molecular systems. This is done by iterative solution of the Dyson equation expressed in matrix form in an atomic orbital basis, where the Green's function and self-energy are built on the imaginary frequency and imaginary time domain, respectively, and fast Fourier transform is used to efficiently transform these quantities as needed. We apply this method to several archetypical examples of strong correlation, such as a H 32 finite lattice that displays a highly multireference electronic ground state even at equilibrium lattice spacing. In all cases, GF2 gives a physically meaningful description of the metal to insulator transition in these systems, without resorting to spin-symmetry breaking. Our results show that self-consistent Green's function many-body theory offers a viable route to describing strong correlations while remaining within a computationally tractable single-particle formalism

  20. Progress on The GEMS (Gravity Electro-Magnetism-Strong) Theory of Field Unification and Its Application to Space Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandenburg, J. E.

    2008-01-01

    Progress on the GEMS (Gravity Electro-Magnetism-Strong), theory is presented as well as its application to space problems. The GEMS theory is now validated through the Standard Model of physics. Derivation of the value of the Gravitation constant based on the observed variation of α with energy: results in the formula G congruent with (ℎ/2π)c/M ηc 2 exp(-1/(1.61α)), where α is the fine structure constant,(ℎ/2π), is Planck's constant, c, is the speed of light, and M ηc is the mass of the η cc Charmonium meson that is shown to be identical to that derived from the GEM postulates. Covariant formulation of the GEM theory is now possible through definition of the spacetime metric tensor as a portion of the EM stress tensor normalized by its own trace: g ab = 4(F c a F cb )/(F ab F ab ), it is found that this results in a massless ground state vacuum and a Newtonian gravitation potential φ = 1/2 E 2 /B 2 . It is also found that a Lorentz or flat-space metric is recovered in the limit of a full spectrum ZPF

  1. Investigating short-range magnetism in strongly correlated materials via magnetic pair distribution function analysis and ab initio theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Benjamin; Page, Katharine; Brunelli, Michela; Staunton, Julie; Billinge, Simon

    Short-range magnetic correlations are known to exist in a variety of strongly correlated electron systems, but our understanding of the role they play is challenged by the difficulty of experimentally probing such correlations. Magnetic pair distribution function (mPDF) analysis is a newly developed neutron total scattering method that can reveal short-range magnetic correlations directly in real space, and may therefore help ameliorate this difficulty. We present temperature-dependent mPDF measurements of the short-range magnetic correlations in the paramagnetic phase of antiferromagnetic MnO, an archetypal strongly correlated transition-metal oxide. We observe significant correlations on a ~1 nm length scale that differ substantially from the low-temperature long-range-ordered spin arrangement. With no free parameters, ab initio calculations using the self-interaction-corrected local spin density approximation of density functional theory quantitatively reproduce the magnetic correlations to a high degree of accuracy. These results yield valuable insight into the magnetic exchange in MnO and showcase the utility of the mPDF technique for studying magnetic properties of strongly correlated electron systems.

  2. A Proof of the Geroch-Horowitz-Penrose Formulation of the Strong Cosmic Censor Conjecture Motivated by Computability Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etesi, Gábor

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we present a proof of a mathematical version of the strong cosmic censor conjecture attributed to Geroch-Horowitz and Penrose but formulated explicitly by Wald. The proof is based on the existence of future-inextendible causal curves in causal pasts of events on the future Cauchy horizon in a non-globally hyperbolic space-time. By examining explicit non-globally hyperbolic space-times we find that in case of several physically relevant solutions these future-inextendible curves have in fact infinite length. This way we recognize a close relationship between asymptotically flat or anti-de Sitter, physically relevant extendible space-times and the so-called Malament-Hogarth space-times which play a central role in recent investigations in the theory of "gravitational computers". This motivates us to exhibit a more sharp, more geometric formulation of the strong cosmic censor conjecture, namely "all physically relevant, asymptotically flat or anti-de Sitter but non-globally hyperbolic space-times are Malament-Hogarth ones". Our observations may indicate a natural but hidden connection between the strong cosmic censorship scenario and the Church-Turing thesis revealing an unexpected conceptual depth beneath both conjectures.

  3. Variation of the critical slab thickness with the degree of strongly anisotropic scattering in one-speed neutron transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildiz, C.

    1998-01-01

    The critical slab problem is studied in one-speed neutron transport theory using a linearly anisotropic kernel which combines forward and backward scattering. It is shown that, the recently observed non-monotonic variation of the thickness also exists in this strongly anisotropic case. In addition, the influence of the linear anisotropy on the critical thickness is analysed in detail. Numerical analysis for the critical thickness are performed using the spherical harmonics method and results are tabulated for selected illustrative cases as a function of different degrees of anisotropic scattering. Finally, some results are discussed and compared with those already obtained by other methods, the agreement is satisfactory. The spherical harmonic method gives generally accurate results in one dimensional geometry, and it is very suitable for the numerical solution of the neutron transport equation with linearly anisotropic scattering

  4. Fluctuation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews sources of noise in Josephson junctions, and the limits they impose on the sensitivity of dc and rf SQUIDS. The results are strictly valid only for a resistively shunted junction (RSJ) with zero capacitance, but should be applicable to point contact junctions and microbridges in so far as these devices can be approximated by the RSJ model. Fluctuations arising from Nyquist noise in the resistive shunt of a single junction are discussed in the limit eI/sub o/R/k/sub B/T << 1 in which a classical treatment is appropriate, and then extend the treatment to the limit eI/sub o/R/k/sub B/T greater than or equal to 1 in which quantum effects become important. The Nyquist limit theory is used to calculate the noise in a dc SQUID, and the results are compared with a number of practical devices. The quantum limit is briefly considered. Results for the predicted sensitivity of rf SQUIDS are presented, and also compared with a number of practical devices. Finally, the importance of l/f noise (f is the frequency) in limiting the low frequency performance of SQUIDS is discussed

  5. Valence and Spin fluctuations in Mn-doped ferroelectric BaTiO3

    OpenAIRE

    Mandal, Subhasish; Cohen, R. E.; Haule, K.

    2018-01-01

    We study Mn substitution for Ti in BaTiO$_3$ with and without compensating oxygen vacancies using density functional theory (DFT) in combination with dynamical mean field theory (DMFT). We find strong charge and spin fluctuations. Without compensating oxygen vacancies, the ground state is found to be a quantum superposition of two distinct atomic valences, 3{\\it d}$^4$ and 3{\\it d}$^5$. Introducing a compensating oxygen vacancy at a neighboring site reduces both charge and spin fluctuations d...

  6. Gauge/gravity duality, jets in strongly coupled plasma, and far-from-equilibrium dynamics in conformal field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesler, Paul M.

    We study dynamics in conformal field theories with gravitational duals. Attention is focused on heavy and light quark jets as well as far-from-equilibrium dynamics. The stress-energy tensor of a heavy quark moving through a strongly coupled N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma is evaluated using gauge/gravity duality. The accuracy with which the resulting wake, in position space, is reproduced by hydrodynamics is examined. Remarkable agreement is found between hydrodynamics and the complete result down to distances less than 2/ T away from the quark. We also compute the penetration depth of a light quark moving through a N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma using a combination of analytic and numerical techniques. We find that the maximum distance a quark with energy E can travel through a plasma is given by Dxmax E= C/T E/Tl 1/3 with C ≈ 0.5. For the study of dynamics far-from-equilibrium, we consider the creation and evolution of boost invariant anisotropic, strongly coupled conformal plasma. In the dual gravitational description, this corresponds to horizon formation in a geometry driven to be anisotropic by a time-dependent change in boundary conditions.

  7. Nonequilibrium self-energy functional theory. Accessing the real-time dynamics of strongly correlated fermionic lattice systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Felix

    2016-07-05

    The self-energy functional theory (SFT) is extended to the nonequilibrium case and applied to the real-time dynamics of strongly correlated lattice-fermions. Exploiting the basic structure of the well established equilibrium theory the entire formalism is reformulated in the language of Keldysh-Matsubara Green's functions. To this end, a functional of general nonequilibrium self-energies is constructed which is stationary at the physical point where it moreover yields the physical grand potential of the initial thermal state. Nonperturbative approximations to the full self-energy can be constructed by reducing the original lattice problem to smaller reference systems and varying the functional on the space of the respective trial self-energies, which are parametrized by the reference system's one-particle parameters. Approximations constructed in this way can be shown to respect the macroscopic conservation laws related to the underlying symmetries of the original lattice model. Assuming thermal equilibrium, the original SFT is recovered from the extended formalism. However, in the general case, the nonequilibrium variational principle comprises functional derivatives off the physical parameter space. These can be carried out analytically to derive inherently causal conditional equations for the optimal physical parameters of the reference system and a computationally realizable propagation scheme is set up. As a benchmark for the numerical implementation the variational cluster approach is applied to the dynamics of a dimerized Hubbard model after fast ramps of its hopping parameters. Finally, the time-evolution of a homogeneous Hubbard model after sudden quenches and ramps of the interaction parameter is studied by means of a dynamical impurity approximation with a single bath site. Sharply separated by a critical interaction at which fast relaxation to a thermal final state is observed, two differing response regimes can be distinguished, where the

  8. Altered Daytime Fluctuation Pattern of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 in Type 2 Diabetes Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Strong Association with Persistently Elevated Plasma Insulin, Increased Insulin Resistance, and Abdominal Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Lalić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at investigating daily fluctuation of PAI-1 levels in relation to insulin resistance (IR and daily profile of plasma insulin and glucose levels in 26 type 2 diabetic (T2D patients with coronary artery disease (CAD (group A, 10 T2D patients without CAD (group B, 12 nondiabetics with CAD (group C, and 12 healthy controls (group D. The percentage of PAI-1 decrease was lower in group A versus group B (4.4 ± 2.7 versus 35.0 ± 5.4%; P<0.05 and in C versus D (14.0 ± 5.8 versus 44.7 ± 3.1%; P<0.001. HOMA-IR was higher in group A versus group B (P<0.05 and in C versus D (P<0.01. Simultaneously, AUCs of PAI-1 and insulin were higher in group A versus group B (P<0.05 and in C versus D (P<0.01, while AUC of glucose did not differ between groups. In multiple regression analysis waist-to-hip ratio and AUC of insulin were independent determinants of decrease in PAI-1. The altered diurnal fluctuation of PAI-1, especially in T2D with CAD, might be strongly influenced by a prolonged exposure to hyperinsulinemia in the settings of increased IR and abdominal obesity, facilitating altogether an accelerated atherosclerosis.

  9. Fluctuation-enhanced electric conductivity in electrolyte solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péraud, Jean-Philippe; Nonaka, Andrew J; Bell, John B; Donev, Aleksandar; Garcia, Alejandro L

    2017-10-10

    We analyze the effects of an externally applied electric field on thermal fluctuations for a binary electrolyte fluid. We show that the fluctuating Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations for charged multispecies diffusion coupled with the fluctuating fluid momentum equation result in enhanced charge transport via a mechanism distinct from the well-known enhancement of mass transport that accompanies giant fluctuations. Although the mass and charge transport occurs by advection by thermal velocity fluctuations, it can macroscopically be represented as electrodiffusion with renormalized electric conductivity and a nonzero cation-anion diffusion coefficient. Specifically, we predict a nonzero cation-anion Maxwell-Stefan coefficient proportional to the square root of the salt concentration, a prediction that agrees quantitatively with experimental measurements. The renormalized or effective macroscopic equations are different from the starting PNP equations, which contain no cross-diffusion terms, even for rather dilute binary electrolytes. At the same time, for infinitely dilute solutions the renormalized electric conductivity and renormalized diffusion coefficients are consistent and the classical PNP equations with renormalized coefficients are recovered, demonstrating the self-consistency of the fluctuating hydrodynamics equations. Our calculations show that the fluctuating hydrodynamics approach recovers the electrophoretic and relaxation corrections obtained by Debye-Huckel-Onsager theory, while elucidating the physical origins of these corrections and generalizing straightforwardly to more complex multispecies electrolytes. Finally, we show that strong applied electric fields result in anisotropically enhanced "giant" velocity fluctuations and reduced fluctuations of salt concentration.

  10. Suppressing Quantum Fluctuations in Classicalization

    CERN Document Server

    Vikman, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We study vacuum quantum fluctuations of simple Nambu-Goldstone bosons - derivatively coupled single scalar-field theories possessing shift-symmetry in field space. We argue that quantum fluctuations of the interacting field can be drastically suppressed with respect to the free-field case. Moreover, the power-spectrum of these fluctuations can soften to become red for sufficiently small scales. In quasiclassical approximation, we demonstrate that this suppression can only occur for those theories that admit such classical static backgrounds around which small perturbations propagate faster than light. Thus a quasiclassical softening of quantum fluctuations is only possible for theories which classicalize instead of having a usual Lorentz invariant and local Wilsonian UV- completion. We illustrate our analysis by estimating the quantum fluctuations for the DBI-like theories.

  11. Fluctuating hydrodynamics for ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Wickham, Logan; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos

    2017-04-01

    We present a mean-field fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) method for studying the structural and transport properties of ionic liquids in bulk and near electrified surfaces. The free energy of the system consists of two competing terms: (1) a Landau-Lifshitz functional that models the spontaneous separation of the ionic groups, and (2) the standard mean-field electrostatic interaction between the ions in the liquid. The numerical approach used to solve the resulting FHD-Poisson equations is very efficient and models thermal fluctuations with remarkable accuracy. Such density fluctuations are sufficiently strong to excite the experimentally observed spontaneous formation of liquid nano-domains. Statistical analysis of our simulations provides quantitative information about the properties of ionic liquids, such as the mixing quality, stability, and the size of the nano-domains. Our model, thus, can be adequately parameterized by directly comparing our prediction with experimental measurements and all-atom simulations. Conclusively, this work can serve as a practical mathematical tool for testing various theories and designing more efficient mixtures of ionic liquids.

  12. A dynamical theory of nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsko, James F.

    2013-05-01

    A dynamical theory of nucleation based on fluctuating hydrodynamics is described. It is developed in detail for the case of diffusion-limited nucleation appropriate to colloids and macro-molecules in solution. By incorporating fluctuations, realistic fluid-transport and realistic free energy models the theory is able to give a unified treatment of both the pre-critical development of fluctuations leading to a critical cluster as well as of post-critical growth. Standard results from classical nucleation theory are shown to follow in the weak noise limit while the generality of the theory allows for many extensions including the description of very high supersaturations (small clusters), multiple order parameters and strong-noise effects to name a few. The theory is applied to homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation of a model globular protein in a confined volume and it is found that nucleation depends critically on the existence of long-wavelength, small-amplitude density fluctuations.

  13. Primordial fluctuations from nonlinear couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calzetta, E.A.; Gonorazky, S.

    1997-01-01

    We study the spectrum of primordial fluctuations in theories where the inflaton field is nonlinearly coupled to massless fields and/or to itself. Conformally invariant theories generically predict a scale-invariant spectrum. Scales entering the theory through infrared divergences cause logarithmic corrections to the spectrum, tilting it towards the blue. We discuss in some detail whether these fluctuations are quantum or classical in nature. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  14. Theory and phenomenology of strong and weak interaction high energy physics. Technical progress report, May 1, 1985-April 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thews, R.L.; Scadron, M.D.; Patrascioiu, A.; Sucipto, E.

    1986-01-01

    Progress is reported in these areas: dynamical quark mass in QCD; quark s-d self energy in QFD; theory of nonleptonic weak decays; decays of heavy-quark mesons; quarks in nuclei; nonperturbative effects in non-abelian quantum field theory; whether perturbation theory is the asymptotic expansion in lattice gauge theories; and expanding in the gradient at weak coupling. 16 refs

  15. Current-density functional theory study of the H2 molecule evolving under a strong ultrashort magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikas, Hash(0xb7f6e60)

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen molecule in a strong ultrashort magnetic field is investigated through a current-density functional theory (CDFT) and quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) based approach employing current-density dependent vector exchange-correlation potential and energy density functional derived with a vorticity variable. The numerical computations through the CDFT based approach are performed for the H2 molecule, starting initially from its field-free ground state, in a parallel internuclear axis and magnetic field-axis configuration with the internuclear separation R ranging from 0.1 a.u. to 14.0 a.u., and the strength of the time-dependent (TD) magnetic field varying between 0-1011 G over a few femtoseconds. The numerical results are compared with that obtained using an approach based on the current-density independent approximation under similar computational constraints but employing only scalar exchange-correlation potential dependent on the electronic charge-density alone. The current-density based approach yields exchange- and correlation energy as well as electronic charge-density of the H2 molecule drastically different from that obtained using current-independent approach, in particular, at TD magnetic field-strengths >109 G during a typical time-period of the field when the magnetic-field had attained maximum applied field-strength and is switched to a decreasing ramp function. This nonadiabatic behavior of the TD electronic charge-density is traced to the TD vorticity-dependent vector exchange-correlation potential of the CDFT based approach. The interesting electron dynamics of the H2 molecule in strong TD magnetic field is further elucidated by treating electronic charge-density as an `electron-fluid'. The present work also reveals interesting real-time dynamics on the attosecond time-scale in the electronic charge-density distribution of the hydrogen molecule.

  16. Big Bang or vacuum fluctuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zel'dovich, Ya.B.

    1980-01-01

    Some general properties of vacuum fluctuations in quantum field theory are described. The connection between the ''energy dominance'' of the energy density of vacuum fluctuations in curved space-time and the presence of singularity is discussed. It is pointed out that a de-Sitter space-time (with the energy density of the vacuum fluctuations in the Einstein equations) that matches the expanding Friedman solution may describe the history of the Universe before the Big Bang. (P.L.)

  17. Probability densities in strong turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhot, Victor

    2006-03-01

    In this work we, using Mellin’s transform combined with the Gaussian large-scale boundary condition, calculate probability densities (PDFs) of velocity increments P(δu,r), velocity derivatives P(u,r) and the PDF of the fluctuating dissipation scales Q(η,Re), where Re is the large-scale Reynolds number. The resulting expressions strongly deviate from the Log-normal PDF P(δu,r) often quoted in the literature. It is shown that the probability density of the small-scale velocity fluctuations includes information about the large (integral) scale dynamics which is responsible for the deviation of P(δu,r) from P(δu,r). An expression for the function D(h) of the multifractal theory, free from spurious logarithms recently discussed in [U. Frisch, M. Martins Afonso, A. Mazzino, V. Yakhot, J. Fluid Mech. 542 (2005) 97] is also obtained.

  18. Helmholtz international Summer school quantum field theory at the limits. From strong fields to heavy quarks (HQ 2016). Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed; Blaschke, David; Issadykov, Aidos; Ivanov, Mikhail (eds.)

    2017-04-15

    The Helmholtz International Summer School (HISS) entitled ''Quantum Field Theory at the Limits: from Strong Fields to Heavy Quarks (SF→HQ)'', was held in the period July 18-30, 2016 at the Bogolyubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics (BLTP) of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia, as part of the activities of the Dubna International Advanced School of Theoretical Physics (DIAS-TH). It was co-organized by Ahmed Ali (DESY Hamburg), David Blaschke (JINR Dubna, MEPhI and Univ. Wroclaw), Holger Gies (HI Jena), and Mikhail Ivanov (JINR Dubna), and was attended by 82 participants (faculty+students), not counting the JINR physicists who attended some lectures as non-registered participants. The school (SF→HQ) continued the workshops and schools of the HISS series held earlier in Dubna (1993, 1996, 2000, 2005, 2008, 2013), Bad Honnef (1994) and Rostock (1997). The scientific program of the school consisted of five regular (one-hour long) lectures in the morning and afternoon sessions, with typically two contributed talks given by younger participants (students and postdocs), each half-hour long, in the late afternoons. Altogether, we had sixty lectures by the faculty and participants. In addition, black-board exercises were held in the post-lunch periods on selected aspects of strong fields and field theory. The HISS series of schools has played an important role in bringing together an international faculty and young physicists (Ph.D. and postdocs), mostly from Russia and Germany, but increasingly also from other countries, including those affiliated to JINR Dubna. They participate in two-week long intense scientific discourse, mainly dedicated lectures on selected topics covering the foundation and the frontiers of high energy physics and cosmology. The novelty of this year's school was its bifocal interest, which brought together two different physical science communities - particle and laser physicists. There were

  19. Helmholtz international Summer school quantum field theory at the limits. From strong fields to heavy quarks (HQ 2016). Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Ahmed; Blaschke, David; Issadykov, Aidos; Ivanov, Mikhail

    2017-04-01

    The Helmholtz International Summer School (HISS) entitled ''Quantum Field Theory at the Limits: from Strong Fields to Heavy Quarks (SF→HQ)'', was held in the period July 18-30, 2016 at the Bogolyubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics (BLTP) of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia, as part of the activities of the Dubna International Advanced School of Theoretical Physics (DIAS-TH). It was co-organized by Ahmed Ali (DESY Hamburg), David Blaschke (JINR Dubna, MEPhI and Univ. Wroclaw), Holger Gies (HI Jena), and Mikhail Ivanov (JINR Dubna), and was attended by 82 participants (faculty+students), not counting the JINR physicists who attended some lectures as non-registered participants. The school (SF→HQ) continued the workshops and schools of the HISS series held earlier in Dubna (1993, 1996, 2000, 2005, 2008, 2013), Bad Honnef (1994) and Rostock (1997). The scientific program of the school consisted of five regular (one-hour long) lectures in the morning and afternoon sessions, with typically two contributed talks given by younger participants (students and postdocs), each half-hour long, in the late afternoons. Altogether, we had sixty lectures by the faculty and participants. In addition, black-board exercises were held in the post-lunch periods on selected aspects of strong fields and field theory. The HISS series of schools has played an important role in bringing together an international faculty and young physicists (Ph.D. and postdocs), mostly from Russia and Germany, but increasingly also from other countries, including those affiliated to JINR Dubna. They participate in two-week long intense scientific discourse, mainly dedicated lectures on selected topics covering the foundation and the frontiers of high energy physics and cosmology. The novelty of this year's school was its bifocal interest, which brought together two different physical science communities - particle and laser physicists. There were

  20. Electromotive force in strongly compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, N.

    2017-12-01

    Variable density fluid turbulence is ubiquitous in geo-fluids, not to mention in astrophysics. Depending on the source of density variation, variable density fluid turbulence may be divided into two categories: the weak compressible (entropy mode) turbulence for slow flow and the strong compressible (acoustic mode) turbulence for fast flow. In the strong compressible turbulence, the pressure fluctuation induces a strong density fluctuation ρ ', which is represented by the density variance ( denotes the ensemble average). The turbulent effect on the large-scale magnetic-field B induction is represented by the turbulent electromotive force (EMF) (u': velocity fluctuation, b': magnetic-field fluctuation). In the usual treatment in the dynamo theory, the expression for the EMF has been obtained in the framework of incompressible or weak compressible turbulence, where only the variation of the mean density , if any, is taken into account. We see from the equation of the density fluctuation ρ', the density variance is generated by the large mean density variation ∂ coupled with the turbulent mass flux . This means that in the region where the mean density steeply changes, the density variance effect becomes relevant for the magnetic field evolution. This situation is typically the case for phenomena associated with shocks and compositional discontinuities. With the aid of the analytical theory of inhomogeneous compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, the expression for the turbulent electromotive force is investigated. It is shown that, among others, an obliqueness (misalignment) between the mean density gradient ∂ and the mean magnetic field B may contribute to the EMF as ≈χ B×∂ with the turbulent transport coefficient χ proportional to the density variance (χ ). This density variance effect is expected to strongly affect the EMF near the interface, and changes the transport properties of turbulence. In the case of an interface under the MHD slow

  1. Universal mesoscopic conductance fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evangelou, S.N.

    1992-01-01

    The theory of conductance fluctuations in disordered metallic systems with size large compared to the mean free path of the electron but small compared to localization length is considered. It is demonstrates that fluctuations have an universal character and are due to repulsion between levels and spectral rigidity. The basic fluctuation measures for the energy spectrum in the mesoscopic regime of disordered systems are consistent with the Gaussian random matrix ensemble predictions. Although our disordered electron random matrix ensemble does not belong to the Gaussian ensemble the two ensembles turn out to be essentially similar. The level repulsion and the spectral rigidity found in nuclear spectra should also be observed in the metallic regime of Anderson localization. 7 refs. (orig.)

  2. Quantum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaud, S.; Giacobino, S.; Zinn-Justin, J.

    1997-01-01

    This course is dedicated to present in a pedagogical manner the recent developments in peculiar fields concerned by quantum fluctuations: quantum noise in optics, light propagation through dielectric media, sub-Poissonian light generated by lasers and masers, quantum non-demolition measurements, quantum electrodynamics applied to cavities and electrical circuits involving superconducting tunnel junctions. (A.C.)

  3. An Evaluation of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 Using Item Response Theory: Which Items Are Most Strongly Related to Psychological Distress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Rob R.; de Vries, Rivka M.; van Bruggen, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    The psychometric structure of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18; Derogatis, 2001) was investigated using Mokken scaling and parametric item response theory. Data of 487 outpatients, 266 students, and 207 prisoners were analyzed. Results of the Mokken analysis indicated that the BSI-18 formed a strong Mokken scale for outpatients and…

  4. Continuum strong-coupling expansion of Yang-Mills theory: quark confinement and infra-red slavery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansfield, P. (Dept. of Mathematical Sciences, Univ. of Durham (United Kingdom))

    1994-04-25

    We solve Schroedinger's equation for the ground-state of four-dimensional Yang-Mills theory as an expansion in inverse powers of the coupling. Expectation values computed with the leading-order approximation are reduced to a calculation in two-dimensional Yang-Mills theory which is known to confine. Consequently the Wilson loop in the four-dimensional theory obeys an area law to leading order and the coupling becomes infinite as the mass scale goes to zero. (orig.)

  5. Continuum strong-coupling expansion of Yang-Mills theory: quark confinement and infra-red slavery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Paul

    1994-04-01

    We solve Schrödinger's equation for the ground-state of four-dimensional Yang-Mills theory as an expansion in inverse powers of the coupling. Expectation values computed with the leading-order approximation are reduced to a calculation in two-dimensional Yang-Mills theory which is known to confine. Consequently the Wilson loop in the four-dimensional theory obeys an area law to leading order and the coupling becomes infinite as the mass scale goes to zero.

  6. Information theory explanation of the fluctuation theorem, maximum entropy production and self-organized criticality in non-equilibrium stationary states

    CERN Document Server

    Dewar, R

    2003-01-01

    Jaynes' information theory formalism of statistical mechanics is applied to the stationary states of open, non-equilibrium systems. First, it is shown that the probability distribution p subGAMMA of the underlying microscopic phase space trajectories GAMMA over a time interval of length tau satisfies p subGAMMA propor to exp(tau sigma subGAMMA/2k sub B) where sigma subGAMMA is the time-averaged rate of entropy production of GAMMA. Three consequences of this result are then derived: (1) the fluctuation theorem, which describes the exponentially declining probability of deviations from the second law of thermodynamics as tau -> infinity; (2) the selection principle of maximum entropy production for non-equilibrium stationary states, empirical support for which has been found in studies of phenomena as diverse as the Earth's climate and crystal growth morphology; and (3) the emergence of self-organized criticality for flux-driven systems in the slowly-driven limit. The explanation of these results on general inf...

  7. The fluctuating gap model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Xiaobin

    2011-01-01

    -particle peak broadens and splits into two bands, which indicates a break down of the Fermi liquid picture. The comparison between our results and those obtained using the second-order Born approximation shows that the perturbation theory is unreliable near the Fermi surface. Also with our non-Gaussian fluctuations, our calculation of spectral functions can explain the experimental angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data in a reasonable way. At last, the optical conductivity calculation confirms a zero dc conductivity in our model, and suggests that a finite dc conductivity obtained in a former calculation is just an artifact of the perturbation theory. (orig.)

  8. The fluctuating gap model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xiaobin

    2011-01-15

    quasi-particle peak broadens and splits into two bands, which indicates a break down of the Fermi liquid picture. The comparison between our results and those obtained using the second-order Born approximation shows that the perturbation theory is unreliable near the Fermi surface. Also with our non-Gaussian fluctuations, our calculation of spectral functions can explain the experimental angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data in a reasonable way. At last, the optical conductivity calculation confirms a zero dc conductivity in our model, and suggests that a finite dc conductivity obtained in a former calculation is just an artifact of the perturbation theory. (orig.)

  9. Quantum corrections in classicalon theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asimakis, P.; Brouzakis, N., E-mail: nbruzak@phys.uoa.gr; Katsis, A.; Tetradis, N.

    2015-04-09

    We use the heat kernel in order to compute the one-loop effective action on a classicalon background. We find that the UV divergences are suppressed relative to the predictions of standard perturbation theory in the interior of the classicalon. There is a strong analogy with the suppression of quantum fluctuations in Galileon theories, within the regions where the Vainshtein mechanism operates (discussed in (arXiv:1401.2775)). Both classicalon and Galileon theories display reduced UV sensitivity on certain backgrounds.

  10. Generalized Møller-Plesset Multiconfiguration Perturbation Theory Applied to an Open-Shell Antisymmetric Product of Strongly Orthogonal Geminals Reference Wave Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarumi, Moto; Kobayashi, Masato; Nakai, Hiromi

    2012-11-13

    The antisymmetric product of strongly orthogonal geminals (APSG) method is a wave function theory that can effectively treat the static electron correlation. Recently, we proposed the open-shell APSG method using one-electron orbitals for open-shell parts. In this paper, we have extended the perturbation correction to the open-shell APSG calculations through Møller-Plesset-type multiconfiguration perturbation theory (MP-MCPT). Numerical applications demonstrate that the present open-shell MP-MCPT can reasonably reproduce the dissociation energies or equilibrium distances for open-shell systems.

  11. Smoothed solutions in the kinetic theory of e+e- vacuum pair creation in strong laser fields. Linear polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyansky, S. A.; Prozorkevich, A. V.; Dmitriev, V. V.; Tarakanov, A. V.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the dynamical Schwinger effect of vacuum creation of electron-positron pairs driven by an intense laser pulse is studied on the basis of correct quantum kinetic theory. In the general case, the numerical solutions of corresponding system of kinetic equations exhibit complex time dependence which makes the analysis of the physical processes complicated. In particular, the question of secondary effects, such as creation of annihilation photons from the focus spot of the colliding laser beams, remains an important open problem. In our previous work [S. A. Smolyansky, M. Bonitz and A. V. Prozorkevich, Contrib. Plasma Phys.53 (2013) 788], we presented a perturbation theory which is able to capture the dominant time dependence of the produced electron-positron pair distribution during the pulse (quasiparticle excitations). In the present work, we develop appreciably this approximation scheme. We demonstrate effectiveness of the proposed method for solution of such kind nonstationary problems in the simplest models of the laser field. However, this approach opens perspective for search of the relevant approximate solutions in kinetic theory of the e+e- quasiparticle plasma for the more realistic field models (arbitrary polarization, space inhomogeneous, etc).

  12. Global solutions of restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock theory from semidefinite programming with applications to strongly correlated quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraraghavan, Srikant; Mazziotti, David A

    2014-03-28

    We present a density matrix approach for computing global solutions of restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock theory, based on semidefinite programming (SDP), that gives upper and lower bounds on the Hartree-Fock energy of quantum systems. While wave function approaches to Hartree-Fock theory yield an upper bound to the Hartree-Fock energy, we derive a semidefinite relaxation of Hartree-Fock theory that yields a rigorous lower bound on the Hartree-Fock energy. We also develop an upper-bound algorithm in which Hartree-Fock theory is cast as a SDP with a nonconvex constraint on the rank of the matrix variable. Equality of the upper- and lower-bound energies guarantees that the computed solution is the globally optimal solution of Hartree-Fock theory. The work extends a previously presented method for closed-shell systems [S. Veeraraghavan and D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. A 89, 010502-R (2014)]. For strongly correlated systems the SDP approach provides an alternative to the locally optimized Hartree-Fock energies and densities with a certificate of global optimality. Applications are made to the potential energy curves of C2, CN, Cr2, and NO2.

  13. On the theory of stationary charged particle ensembles in strongly non-homogeneous azimuthally symmetric magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auluck, S.K.H.

    1982-01-01

    A method of treating problems involving strongly nonadiabatic particle orbits in a magnetic field is described for the case when the system is long-lived on the collisional time scale. A canonical distribution P=Z -1 exp-β(H+Ωpsub(theta)) results from maximization of entropy subject to conservation of the Hamiltonian H and canonical angular momentum psub(theta) for an azimuthally symmetric system. By taking the MIGMA problem as an example, the method of determining the constants β,Ω,Z from the average energy, average angular momentum and the total number of particles is illustrated. Associated physical effects are discussed. (author)

  14. Searching for Physics Beyond the Standard Model: Strongly-Coupled Field Theories at the Intensity and Energy Frontiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Richard C. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Physics and ECE Depts.

    2016-11-08

    This proposal is to develop the software and algorithmic infrastructure needed for the numerical study of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), and of theories that have been proposed to describe physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM) of high energy physics, on current and future computers. This infrastructure will enable users (1) to improve the accuracy of QCD calculations to the point where they no longer limit what can be learned from high-precision experiments that seek to test the Standard Model, and (2) to determine the predictions of BSM theories in order to understand which of them are consistent with the data that will soon be available from the LHC. Work will include the extension and optimizations of community codes for the next generation of leadership class computers, the IBM Blue Gene/Q and the Cray XE/XK, and for the dedicated hardware funded for our field by the Department of Energy. Members of our collaboration at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Columbia University worked on the design of the Blue Gene/Q, and have begun to develop software for it. Under this grant we will build upon their experience to produce high-efficiency production codes for this machine. Cray XE/XK computers with many thousands of GPU accelerators will soon be available, and the dedicated commodity clusters we obtain with DOE funding include growing numbers of GPUs. We will work with our partners in NVIDIA's Emerging Technology group to scale our existing software to thousands of GPUs, and to produce highly efficient production codes for these machines. Work under this grant will also include the development of new algorithms for the effective use of heterogeneous computers, and their integration into our codes. It will include improvements of Krylov solvers and the development of new multigrid methods in collaboration with members of the FASTMath SciDAC Institute, using their HYPRE framework, as well as work on improved symplectic integrators.

  15. Searching for Physics Beyond the Standard Model: Strongly-Coupled Field Theories at the Intensity and Energy Frontiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brower, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    This proposal is to develop the software and algorithmic infrastructure needed for the numerical study of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), and of theories that have been proposed to describe physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM) of high energy physics, on current and future computers. This infrastructure will enable users (1) to improve the accuracy of QCD calculations to the point where they no longer limit what can be learned from high-precision experiments that seek to test the Standard Model, and (2) to determine the predictions of BSM theories in order to understand which of them are consistent with the data that will soon be available from the LHC. Work will include the extension and optimizations of community codes for the next generation of leadership class computers, the IBM Blue Gene/Q and the Cray XE/XK, and for the dedicated hardware funded for our field by the Department of Energy. Members of our collaboration at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Columbia University worked on the design of the Blue Gene/Q, and have begun to develop software for it. Under this grant we will build upon their experience to produce high-efficiency production codes for this machine. Cray XE/XK computers with many thousands of GPU accelerators will soon be available, and the dedicated commodity clusters we obtain with DOE funding include growing numbers of GPUs. We will work with our partners in NVIDIA's Emerging Technology group to scale our existing software to thousands of GPUs, and to produce highly efficient production codes for these machines. Work under this grant will also include the development of new algorithms for the effective use of heterogeneous computers, and their integration into our codes. It will include improvements of Krylov solvers and the development of new multigrid methods in collaboration with members of the FASTMath SciDAC Institute, using their HYPRE framework, as well as work on improved symplectic integrators.

  16. Spin-flip configuration interaction singles with exact spin-projection: Theory and applications to strongly correlated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi

    2015-10-14

    Spin-flip approaches capture static correlation with the same computational scaling as the ordinary single reference methods. Here, we extend spin-flip configuration interaction singles (SFCIS) by projecting out intrinsic spin-contamination to make it spin-complete, rather than by explicitly complementing it with spin-coupled configurations. We give a general formalism of spin-projection for SFCIS, applicable to any spin states. The proposed method is viewed as a natural unification of SFCIS and spin-projected CIS to achieve a better qualitative accuracy at a low computational cost. While our wave function ansatz is more compact than previously proposed spin-complete SF approaches, it successfully offers more general static correlation beyond biradicals without sacrificing good quantum numbers. It is also shown that our method is invariant with respect to open-shell orbital rotations, due to the uniqueness of spin-projection. We will report benchmark calculations to demonstrate its qualitative performance on strongly correlated systems, including conical intersections that appear both in ground-excited and excited-excited degeneracies.

  17. Fluctuation spectroscopy: From Rayleigh-Jeans waves to Abrikosov vortex clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlamov, A. A.; Galda, A.; Glatz, A.

    2018-01-01

    Superconducting (SC) fluctuations, discovered in the late 1960s, have constituted an important research area in superconductivity as they are manifest in a variety of phenomena. Indeed, the underlying physics of SC fluctuations makes it possible to elucidate the fundamental properties of the superconducting state. The interest in SC fluctuation phenomena was further enhanced with the discovery of cuprate high-temperature superconductors (HTSs). In these materials, superconducting fluctuations appear over a wide range of temperatures due to the superconductors extremely short coherence lengths and low effective dimensionality of the electron systems. These strong fluctuations lead to anomalous properties of the normal state in some HTS materials. Within the framework of the phenomenological Ginzburg-Landau theory, and more extensively in the diagrammatic microscopic approach based on BCS theory, SC fluctuations as well as other quantum contributions (weak localization, etc.) enabled a new way to investigate and characterize disordered electron systems, granular metals, Josephson structures, artificial superlattices, and others. The characteristic feature of SC fluctuations is its strong dependence on temperature and magnetic field in the vicinity of the superconducting phase transition. This dependence allows the separation of fluctuation effects from other contributions and provides information about the microscopic parameters of a material, in particular, the critical temperature and the zero-temperature critical magnetic field. As such, SC fluctuations are very sensitive to the relaxation processes that break phase coherence and can be used as a versatile characterization instrument for SCs: Fluctuation spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the properties of superconducting systems on a quantitative level. Here the physics of SC fluctuations is reviewed, commencing from a qualitative description of thermodynamic fluctuations close to the

  18. Understanding the implementation and adoption of an information technology intervention to support medicine optimisation in primary care: qualitative study using strong structuration theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Mark; Phipps, Denham; Howard, Rachel L; Avery, Anthony; Rodgers, Sarah; Ashcroft, Darren

    2017-05-10

    Using strong structuration theory, we aimed to understand the adoption and implementation of an electronic clinical audit and feedback tool to support medicine optimisation for patients in primary care. This is a qualitative study informed by strong structuration theory. The analysis was thematic, using a template approach. An a priori set of thematic codes, based on strong structuration theory, was developed from the literature and applied to the transcripts. The coding template was then modified through successive readings of the data. Clinical commissioning group in the south of England. Four focus groups and five semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 participants purposively sampled from a range of stakeholder groups (general practitioners, pharmacists, patients and commissioners). Using the system could lead to improved medication safety, but use was determined by broad institutional contexts; by the perceptions, dispositions and skills of users; and by the structures embedded within the technology. These included perceptions of the system as new and requiring technical competence and skill; the adoption of the system for information gathering; and interactions and relationships that involved individual, shared or collective use. The dynamics between these external, internal and technological structures affected the adoption and implementation of the system. Successful implementation of information technology interventions for medicine optimisation will depend on a combination of the infrastructure within primary care, social structures embedded in the technology and the conventions, norms and dispositions of those utilising it. Future interventions, using electronic audit and feedback tools to improve medication safety, should consider the complexity of the social and organisational contexts and how internal and external structures can affect the use of the technology in order to support effective implementation. © Article author(s) (or their

  19. A theology of matter. The strong interaction at strong resonance at the meeting point of I and not-I. Conjectures about oscillating strings and fluctuating vacuum energy; Eine Theologie der Materie. Die starke Wechselwirkung bei starker Resonanz am Begegnungs-Ort von Ich und Nicht-Ich. Mutmassungen ueber oszillierende Strings und fluktuierende Vakuum-Energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boes, Roderick H.

    2011-07-01

    This book shows that matter and consciousness are intertwined and mutually produce. Quantum vacuum fluctuations ensure that the latent energy of each event is present as zero-point energy simultaneously at all points of the cosmos.

  20. Molecular evolution under fitness fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustonen, Ville; Lässig, Michael

    2008-03-14

    Molecular evolution is a stochastic process governed by fitness, mutations, and reproductive fluctuations in a population. Here, we study evolution where fitness itself is stochastic, with random switches in the direction of selection at individual genomic loci. As the correlation time of these fluctuations becomes larger than the diffusion time of mutations within the population, fitness changes from an annealed to a quenched random variable. We show that the rate of evolution has its maximum in the crossover regime, where both time scales are comparable. Adaptive evolution emerges in the quenched fitness regime (evidence for such fitness fluctuations has recently been found in genomic data). The joint statistical theory of reproductive and fitness fluctuations establishes a conceptual connection between evolutionary genetics and statistical physics of disordered systems.

  1. La teoría fuerte de los derechos sociales: reconstrucción y crítica | The Strong Theory of Social Rights: Reconstruction and Criticism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Peña Freire

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN. En este artículo es objeto de análisis la teoría fuerte de los derechos sociales, que es presentada como una teoría unificadora del fundamento, la estructura normativa y los procedimientos de garantía de los diversos tipos de derechos y, en particular, de derechos sociales y de libertad. La teoría es objeto de una serie de consideraciones críticas que apuntan a algunos de sus presupuestos éticos, a sus consecuencias político-constitucionales, a sus problemáticos efectos económicos, al modo en que reconstruye la estructura normativa de los derechos que se considera deficiente y al modelo de garantía judicial propuesto para los derechos sociales que se reputa contraproducente.   ABSTRACT. The topic of this article is the strong theory of social rights, which is described as an unifying theory on the grounds, the normative structure and the procedures for protecting different types of rights and, in particular, social rights and liberty rights. Some aspects of that theory are criticized, namely, some of its moral assumptions, its political and constitutional consequences, its troublesome economic effects, the way it presents the normative structure of rights which is considered flawed, and the model of judicial guarantee proposed for social rights which it is said to be counterproductive.

  2. Kondo effect and mesoscopic fluctuations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Slave boson/fermion mean-field approach. A complete solution of this problem would presumably involve developing a Fermi liquid theory 'à la Nozières' [15] taking properly into account the mesoscopic fluctuations. A first step in this direction is to use a mean-field treatment based on the slave boson/fermion technique [1] ...

  3. Neighborhood-resources for the development of a strong SOC and the importance of understanding why and how resources work: a grounded theory approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruca Maass

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Providing individuals with psychosocial resources such as sense of coherence (SOC seems a beneficial strategy for health promotion in the neighborhood. In order to become a supporting theory for health promotion, Salutogenesis should renew its focus on resources for health, and explore how the development of a strong SOC can be facilitated. Methods Relevant issues were explored using a Grounded Theory- approach. Three focus-group-sessions and three in-depth interviews were conducted with strategically sampled participants. The transcripts of the focus groups were initially analyzed line-by-line to ensure that insights emerged from the data. We then applied focused and systemic analyses to achieve axial coding, and to include insights into how social interactions during focus groups may reveal social processes in real-life-neighborhoods. The data from the in-depth interviews were used to validate and fill emerging categories, as well as to ensure data-saturation. Results Findings indicate the importance of repeated experiences with resources and every-day-challenges to develop a strong SOC. Active engagement with resources is a favorable condition for significant experiences, which enhance the internalization of resources. Core experiences are characterized by a re-organization of resources. Participation in intellectual meaning-making through equal power dialogue seems to broaden perspectives and promote the strengthening of SOC. A strong SOC can also be described as a deeper understanding of how and why resources work, which allows for a more flexible use of resources, including replacing missing resources. Conclusion A new understanding of SOC as an intuitive understanding of how, why and under which circumstances resources work, as well as a new focus on everyday life and repeated experiences might facilitate new approaches to a purposeful strengthening of SOC through the planning and implementation of public measures.

  4. Aperture averaging in strong oceanic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe, Muhsin Caner; Baykal, Yahya

    2018-04-01

    Receiver aperture averaging technique is employed in underwater wireless optical communication (UWOC) systems to mitigate the effects of oceanic turbulence, thus to improve the system performance. The irradiance flux variance is a measure of the intensity fluctuations on a lens of the receiver aperture. Using the modified Rytov theory which uses the small-scale and large-scale spatial filters, and our previously presented expression that shows the atmospheric structure constant in terms of oceanic turbulence parameters, we evaluate the irradiance flux variance and the aperture averaging factor of a spherical wave in strong oceanic turbulence. Irradiance flux variance variations are examined versus the oceanic turbulence parameters and the receiver aperture diameter are examined in strong oceanic turbulence. Also, the effect of the receiver aperture diameter on the aperture averaging factor is presented in strong oceanic turbulence.

  5. Fluctuations in quantum chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casati, G.; Chirikov, B.V.

    1996-01-01

    Various fluctuations in quantum systems with discrete spectrum are discussed, including recent unpublished results. Open questions and unexplained peculiarities of quantum fluctuations are formulated [ru

  6. Fluctuations in Cerebral Hemodynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Latka, Miroslaw

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate that the scaling properties of intracranial pressure (ICP) fluctuations and fluctuations of blood flow velocity in middle cerebral arteries are characterized by two scaling exponents...

  7. Ericson fluctuations, detailed balance and time-reversal invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harney, H.L.; Huepper, A.; Richter, A.

    1990-01-01

    Precise detailed balance experiments of fluctuating nuclear reaction cross sections in the Ericson regime provide stringent tests of time reversal invariance in the strong interaction. The interpretation of these experiments requires a statistical theory that describes the interplay of experimental errors and a possible time reversal symmetry breaking amplitude. Such a theory is developed here under the assumption of gaussian probability distributions for both of them. The theory is applied to reanalyze the two detailed balance experiments using the reactions 24 Mg+α↔ 27 Al+p at different energies. The theory allows a combined analysis of both experiments. One finds that the relative strength of a possible time reversal symmetry breaking amplitude is ξ -3 with 80% confidence. (orig.)

  8. An analytic solution of the non-linear equation ∇2λ(r=f(λ and its application to the ion-atmosphere theory of strong electrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Bagchi

    1981-01-01

    directly into the distribution functions, had been proved to be mathematically consistent. It also yielded reliable physical results for both thermodynamic and transport properties of electrolytic solutions. Further, it has already been proved by the author from theoretical considerations (cf. Bagchi [4]as well as from a posteriori verification (see refs. [1] [2] that the concept of ion-atmosphere and the use of PB equation retain their validities generally. Now during the past 30 years, for convenice of calculations, various simplified versions of the original Dutta-Bagchi distribution function (Dutta & Bagchi [5]had been used successfully in modified DH theory of solutions of strong electrolytes. The primary object of this extensive study, (carried out by the author during 1968-73, was to decide a posteriori by using the exact analytic solution of the relevant PB equation about the most suitable, yet theoretically consistent, form of the distribution function. A critical analysis of these results eventually led to the formulation of a new approach to the statistical mechanics of classical systems, (see Bagchi [2], In view of the uncertainties inherent in the nature of the system to be discussed below, it is believed that this voluminous work, (containing 35 tables and 120 graphs, in spite of its legitimate simplifying assumptions, would be of great assistance to those who are interested in studying the properties of ionic solutions from the standpoint of a physically and mathematically consistent theory.

  9. Strong scintillations during atmospheric occultations Theoretical intensity spectra. [radio scattering during spacecraft occultations by planetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, D. P.

    1986-01-01

    Each of the two Voyager spacecraft launched in 1977 has completed a reconnaissance of the Jovian and Saturnian systems. In connection with occultation experiments, strong scintillations were observed. Further theoretical work is required before these scintillations can be interpreted. The present study is, therefore, concerned with the derivation of a theory for strong scattering during atmospheric occultation experiments, taking into account as fundamental quantity of interest the spatial spectrum (or spectral density) of intensity fluctuations. Attention is given to a theory for intensity spectra, and numerical calculations. The new formula derived for Phi-i accounts for strong scattering of electromagnetic waves during atmospheric occultations.

  10. The Impact of Environmental Fluctuations on Evolutionary Fitness Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melbinger, Anna; Vergassola, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The concept of fitness as a measure for a species’ success in natural selection is central to the theory of evolution. We here investigate how reproduction rates which are not constant but vary in response to environmental fluctuations, influence a species’ prosperity and thereby its fitness. Interestingly, we find that not only larger growth rates but also reduced sensitivities to environmental changes substantially increase the fitness. Thereby, depending on the noise level of the environment, it might be an evolutionary successful strategy to minimize this sensitivity rather than to optimize the reproduction speed. Also for neutral evolution, where species with exactly the same properties compete, variability in the growth rates plays a crucial role. The time for one species to fixate is strongly reduced in the presence of environmental noise. Hence, environmental fluctuations constitute a possible explanation for effective population sizes inferred from genetic data that often are much smaller than the census population size. PMID:26477392

  11. Spin fluctuations and low temperature features of thermal coefficient of linear expansion of iron monosilicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, A.G.; Kortov, S.V.; Povzner, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    The low temperature measurements of thermal coefficient of linear expansion of strong paramagnet FeSi are carried out. The results obtained are discussed with in the framework of spin-fluctuation theory. It is shown that electronic part of the thermal coefficient of linear expansion is negative in the range of temperatures lower that of the semiconductor-metal phase transition. In metal phase it becomes positive. This specific features of the thermal coefficient is explained by the spin-fluctuation renormalization of d-electronic states density

  12. Interplanetary Alfvenic fluctuations: A stochastic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, A.

    1981-01-01

    The strong alignment of the average directions of minimum magnetic variance and mean magnetic field in interplanetary Alfvenic fluctuations is inconsistent with the usual wave-propagation models. We investigate the concept of minimum variance for nonplanar Alfvenic fluctuations in which the field direction varies stochastically. It is found that the tendency of the minimum variance and mean field directions to be aligned may be purely a consequence of the randomness of the field direction. In particular, a well-defined direction of minimum variance does not imply that the fluctuations are necessarily planar. The fluctuation power spectrum is a power law for frequencies much higher than the inverse of the correlation time. The probability distribution of directions a randomly fluctuating field of constant magnitude is calculated. A new approach for observational studies of interplanetary fluctuations is suggested

  13. Simulation of inhomogeneous distributions of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice via a massively parallel implementation of nonequilibrium strong-coupling perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Andreas; Mikelsons, Karlis; Krishnamurthy, H R; Freericks, James K

    2014-02-01

    We present a nonequilibrium strong-coupling approach to inhomogeneous systems of ultracold atoms in optical lattices. We demonstrate its application to the Mott-insulating phase of a two-dimensional Fermi-Hubbard model in the presence of a trap potential. Since the theory is formulated self-consistently, the numerical implementation relies on a massively parallel evaluation of the self-energy and the Green's function at each lattice site, employing thousands of CPUs. While the computation of the self-energy is straightforward to parallelize, the evaluation of the Green's function requires the inversion of a large sparse 10(d) × 10(d) matrix, with d > 6. As a crucial ingredient, our solution heavily relies on the smallness of the hopping as compared to the interaction strength and yields a widely scalable realization of a rapidly converging iterative algorithm which evaluates all elements of the Green's function. Results are validated by comparing with the homogeneous case via the local-density approximation. These calculations also show that the local-density approximation is valid in nonequilibrium setups without mass transport.

  14. Fluctuations in LC Oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Ondracek

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the phase and amplitude fluctuations in oscillators with simple resonant circuit is presented. Negative feedback is used to minimize effect of the inherent noise produced by bipolar transistor on fluctuation characteristics.

  15. Quantum corrections in classicalon theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Asimakis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We use the heat kernel in order to compute the one-loop effective action on a classicalon background. We find that the UV divergences are suppressed relative to the predictions of standard perturbation theory in the interior of the classicalon. There is a strong analogy with the suppression of quantum fluctuations in Galileon theories, within the regions where the Vainshtein mechanism operates (discussed in arXiv:1401.2775. Both classicalon and Galileon theories display reduced UV sensitivity on certain backgrounds.

  16. Quantum corrections in classicalon theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimakis, P.; Brouzakis, N.; Katsis, A.; Tetradis, N.

    2015-04-01

    We use the heat kernel in order to compute the one-loop effective action on a classicalon background. We find that the UV divergences are suppressed relative to the predictions of standard perturbation theory in the interior of the classicalon. There is a strong analogy with the suppression of quantum fluctuations in Galileon theories, within the regions where the Vainshtein mechanism operates (discussed in arxiv:arXiv:1401.2775). Both classicalon and Galileon theories display reduced UV sensitivity on certain backgrounds.

  17. Effect of thermal fluctuations on a charged dilatonic black Saturn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourhassan, Behnam, E-mail: b.pourhassan@du.ac.ir [School of Physics, Damghan University, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faizal, Mir, E-mail: f2mir@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4 (Canada)

    2016-04-10

    In this paper, we will analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a charged dilatonic black Saturn. These thermal fluctuations will correct the thermodynamics of the charged dilatonic black Saturn. We will analyze the corrections to the thermodynamics of this system by first relating the fluctuations in the entropy to the fluctuations in the energy. Then, we will use the relation between entropy and a conformal field theory to analyze the fluctuations in the entropy. We will demonstrate that similar physical results are obtained from both these approaches. We will also study the effect of thermal fluctuations on the phase transition in this charged dilatonic black Saturn.

  18. Effect of thermal fluctuations on a charged dilatonic black Saturn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Pourhassan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a charged dilatonic black Saturn. These thermal fluctuations will correct the thermodynamics of the charged dilatonic black Saturn. We will analyze the corrections to the thermodynamics of this system by first relating the fluctuations in the entropy to the fluctuations in the energy. Then, we will use the relation between entropy and a conformal field theory to analyze the fluctuations in the entropy. We will demonstrate that similar physical results are obtained from both these approaches. We will also study the effect of thermal fluctuations on the phase transition in this charged dilatonic black Saturn.

  19. Hydrodynamical fluctuations in smooth shear flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagelishvili, G.D.; Khujadze, G.R.; Lominadze, J.G.

    1999-11-01

    Background of hydrodynamical fluctuations in a intrinsically/stochastically forced, laminar, uniform shear flow is studied. The employment of so-called nonmodal mathematical analysis makes it possible to represent the background of fluctuations in a new light and to get more insight into the physics of its formation. The basic physical processes responsible for the formation of vortex and acoustic wave fluctuation backgrounds are analyzed. Interplay of the processes at low and moderate shear rates is described. Three-dimensional vortex fluctuations around a given macroscopic state are numerically calculated. The correlation functions of the fluctuations of physical quantities are analyzed. It is shown that there exists subspace D k in the wave-number space (k-space) that is limited externally by spherical surface with radius k ν ≡ A/ν (where A is the velocity shear parameter, ν - the kinematic viscosity) in the nonequilibrium open system under study. The spatial Fourier harmonics of vortex as well as acoustic wave fluctuations are strongly subjected by flow shear (by the open character of the system) at wave-numbers satisfying the condition k ν . Specifically it is shown that in D k : The fluctuations are non-Markovian; the spatial spectral density of energy of the vortex fluctuations by far exceeds the white-noise; the term of a new type associated to the hydrodynamical fluctuation of velocity appears in the correlation function of pressure; the fluctuation background of the acoustic waves is completely different at low and moderate shear rates (at low shear rates it is reduced in D k in comparison to the uniform (non-shear) flow; at moderate shear rates it it comparable to the background of the vortex fluctuations). The fluctuation background of both the vortex and the acoustic wave modes is anisotropic. The possible significance of the fluctuation background of vortices for the subcritical transition to turbulence and Brownian motion of small macroscopic

  20. Decrypting Strong and Weak Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Interactions with Mitochondrial Voltage-Dependent Anion Channels Using Molecular Docking and Perturbation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Durruthy, Michael; Werhli, Adriano V; Seus, Vinicius; Machado, Karina S; Pazos, Alejandro; Munteanu, Cristian R; González-Díaz, Humberto; Monserrat, José M

    2017-10-16

    The current molecular docking study provided the Free Energy of Binding (FEB) for the interaction (nanotoxicity) between VDAC mitochondrial channels of three species (VDAC1-Mus musculus, VDAC1-Homo sapiens, VDAC2-Danio rerio) with SWCNT-H, SWCNT-OH, SWCNT-COOH carbon nanotubes. The general results showed that the FEB values were statistically more negative (p  (SWCNT-VDAC1-Mus musculus) > (SWCNT-VDAC1-Homo sapiens) > (ATP-VDAC). More negative FEB values for SWCNT-COOH and OH were found in VDAC2-Danio rerio when compared with VDAC1-Mus musculus and VDAC1-Homo sapiens (p  r 2  > 0.97) was observed between n-Hamada index and VDAC nanotoxicity (or FEB) for the zigzag topologies of SWCNT-COOH and SWCNT-OH. Predictive Nanoparticles-Quantitative-Structure Binding-Relationship models (nano-QSBR) for strong and weak SWCNT-VDAC docking interactions were performed using Perturbation Theory, regression and classification models. Thus, 405 SWCNT-VDAC interactions were predicted using a nano-PT-QSBR classifications model with high accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity (73-98%) in training and validation series, and a maximum AUROC value of 0.978. In addition, the best regression model was obtained with Random Forest (R 2 of 0.833, RMSE of 0.0844), suggesting an excellent potential to predict SWCNT-VDAC channel nanotoxicity. All study data are available at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.4802320.v2 .

  1. Population Genetics with Fluctuating Population Sizes

    OpenAIRE

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Standard neutral population genetics theory with a strictly fixed population size has important limitations. An alternative model that allows independently fluctuating population sizes and reproduces the standard neutral evolution is reviewed. We then study a situation such that the competing species are neutral at the equilibrium population size but population size fluctuations nevertheless favor fixation of one species over the other. In this case, a separation of timescales emerges natural...

  2. Inverse scattering problem in turbulent magnetic fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We apply a particular form of the inverse scattering theory to turbulent magnetic fluctuations in a plasma. In the present note we develop the theory, formulate the magnetic fluctuation problem in terms of its electrodynamic turbulent response function, and reduce it to the solution of a special form of the famous Gelfand–Levitan–Marchenko equation of quantum mechanical scattering theory. The last of these applies to transmission and reflection in an active medium. The theory of turbulent magnetic fluctuations does not refer to such quantities. It requires a somewhat different formulation. We reduce the theory to the measurement of the low-frequency electromagnetic fluctuation spectrum, which is not the turbulent spectral energy density. The inverse theory in this form enables obtaining information about the turbulent response function of the medium. The dynamic causes of the electromagnetic fluctuations are implicit to it. Thus, it is of vital interest in low-frequency magnetic turbulence. The theory is developed until presentation of the equations in applicable form to observations of turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations as input from measurements. Solution of the final integral equation should be done by standard numerical methods based on iteration. We point to the possibility of treating power law fluctuation spectra as an example. Formulation of the problem to include observations of spectral power densities in turbulence is not attempted. This leads to severe mathematical problems and requires a reformulation of inverse scattering theory. One particular aspect of the present inverse theory of turbulent fluctuations is that its structure naturally leads to spatial information which is obtained from the temporal information that is inherent to the observation of time series. The Taylor assumption is not needed here. This is a consequence of Maxwell's equations, which couple space and time evolution. The inversion procedure takes

  3. Superconductivity by charge and spin fluctuations in strongly correlated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa-Quintana, J. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Grup d`Electromagnetisme; Gonzalez-Leon, E. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Grup d`Electromagnetisme; Lopez Aguilar, F. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Grup d`Electromagnetisme; Puig-Puig, L. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Grup d`Electromagnetisme; Sanchez-Lopez, M.M. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Grup d`Electromagnetisme

    1995-02-01

    We obtain the effective potential from a screened coulombian interaction considering separately the interaction between fermions with parallel and antiparallel spins. In both cases we analyze the possibility of obtaining superconductivity. ((orig.)).

  4. Weak point disorder in strongly fluctuating flux-line liquids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Potential techno- logical applications of high-temperature superconductors rely on the pinning of the vortices in order to eliminate dissipative losses from their motion. In addition, ..... (11) where i, j = (x, y), PL ij(q⊥) = q⊥iq⊥j/q2. ⊥ and PT ij (q⊥) = δij − PL ij(q⊥) are longitu- dinal and transverse projection operators and.

  5. Stability and fluctuations in black hole thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruppeiner, George

    2007-01-01

    I examine thermodynamic fluctuations for a Kerr-Newman black hole in an extensive, infinite environment. This problem is not strictly solvable because full equilibrium with such an environment cannot be achieved by any black hole with mass M, angular momentum J, and charge Q. However, if we consider one (or two) of M, J, or Q to vary so slowly compared with the others that we can regard it as fixed, instances of stability occur, and thermodynamic fluctuation theory could plausibly apply. I examine seven cases with one, two, or three independent fluctuating variables. No knowledge about the thermodynamic behavior of the environment is needed. The thermodynamics of the black hole is sufficient. Let the fluctuation moment for a thermodynamic quantity X be √( 2 >). Fluctuations at fixed M are stable for all thermodynamic states, including that of a nonrotating and uncharged environment, corresponding to average values J=Q=0. Here, the fluctuation moments for J and Q take on maximum values. That for J is proportional to M. For the Planck mass it is 0.3990(ℎ/2π). That for Q is 3.301e, independent of M. In all cases, fluctuation moments for M, J, and Q go to zero at the limit of the physical regime, where the temperature goes to zero. With M fluctuating there are no stable cases for average J=Q=0. But, there are transitions to stability marked by infinite fluctuations. For purely M fluctuations, this coincides with a curve which Davies identified as a phase transition

  6. Strong paramagnon scattering in single atom Pd contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schendel, V.; Barreteau, Cyrille; Brandbyge, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Among all transition metals, palladium (Pd) has the highest density of states at the Fermi energy at low temperatures yet does not fulfill the Stoner criterion for ferromagnetism. However, close proximity to magnetism renders it a nearly ferromagnetic metal, which hosts paramagnons, strongly damp...... adatoms locally induce magnetic order, and transport through single cobalt atoms remains unaffected by paramagnon scattering, consistent with theory....... spin fluctuations. Here we compare the total and the differential conductance of monoatomic contacts consisting of single Pd and cobalt (Co) atoms between Pd electrodes. Transport measurements reveal a conductance for Co of 1G(0), while for Pd we obtain 2G(0). The differential conductance of monoatomic...

  7. Origin of density fluctuations in extended inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, E.W.; Salopek, D.S.; Turner, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    We calculate both the curvature and isocurvature density fluctuations that arise due to quantum fluctuations in a simple model of extended inflation based upon the Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory. The curvature fluctuations that arise due to quantum fluctuations in the Brans-Dicke field in general have a non-scale-invariant spectrum and an amplitude that is cosmologically acceptable and interesting without having to tune any coupling constant to a very small value. The curvature perturbations that arise due to the Higgs field are subdominant. If there are other massless fields in the theory, e.g., an axion or an ilion, then isocurvature fluctuations arise in these fields too. Production of gravitational waves and the massless particles associated with excitations of the Brans-Dicke field are also discussed. Several attempts at more realistic models of extended inflation are also analyzed. The importance of the Einstein conformal frame in calculating curvature fluctuations is emphasized. When viewed in this frame, extended inflation closely resembles slow-rollover inflation with an exponential potential, and the usual formula for the amplitude of curvature perturbations applies directly

  8. Origin of density fluctuations in extended inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, E.W.; Salopek, D.S.; Turner, M.S.

    1990-05-01

    The density fluctuations (both curvature and isocurvature) that arise due to quantum fluctuations in a simple model of extended inflation based upon the Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory are calculated. Curvature fluctuations arise due to quantum fluctuations in the Brans-Dicke field, in general have a nonscale-invariant spectrum, and can have an amplitude that is cosmologically acceptable and interesting without having to tune any coupling constant to a very small value. The density perturbations that arise due to the inflation field are subdominant. If there are other massless fields in the theory, e.g., an axion or an ilion, then isocurvature fluctuations arise in these fields too. Production of gravitational waves and the massless particles associated with excitations of the Brans-Dicke field are also discussed. Several attempts at more realistic models of extended inflation are also analyzed. The importance of the Einstein conformal frame in calculating curvature fluctuations is emphasized. When viewed in this frame, extended inflation closely resembles slow-rollover inflation with an exponential potential and the usual formula for the amplitude of curvature perturbations applies

  9. Disorder and pseudogap in strongly correlated systems: Phase diagram in the DMFT + Σ approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuleeva, N. A.; Kuchinskii, E. Z.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of disorder and pseudogap fluctuations on the Mott insulator-metal transition in strongly correlated systems has been studied in the framework of the generalized dynamic mean field theory (DMFT + Σ approach). Using the results of investigations of the density of states (DOS) and optical conductivity, a phase diagram (disorder-Hubbard interaction-temperature) is constructed for the paramagnetic Anderson-Hubbard model, which allows both the effects of strong electron correlations and the influence of strong disorder to be considered. Strong correlations are described using the DMFT, while a strong disorder is described using a generalized self-consistent theory of localization. The DOS and optical conductivity of the paramagnetic Hubbard model have been studied in a pseudogap state caused by antiferromagnetic spin (or charge) short-range order fluctuations with a finite correlation length, which have been modeled by a static Gaussian random field. The effect of a pseudogap on the Mott insulator-metal transition has been studied. It is established that, in both cases, the static Gaussian random field (related to the disorder or pseudogap fluctuations) leads to suppression of the Mott transition, broadening of the coexistence region of the insulator and metal phases, and an increase in the critical temperature at which the coexistence region disappears

  10. Event-by-Event Identified Particle Ratio Fluctuations in Pb–Pb Collisions with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00245664

    ALICE is the dedicated heavy-ion experiment among the experiments at the LHC at CERN. It is, in particular, designed to exploit the physics of strongly interacting matter. The theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), predicts that at sufficiently high energy densities nuclear matter transforms into a deconfined state of quarks and gluons. One of the possible signatures of a transition between hadronic and partonic phases is the enhancement of fluctuations of the number of particles in the hadronic final state of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. \\\\ \\\\ The observable $\

  11. Scalar field fluctuations in the early universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enqvist, K.; Ng, K.W.; Olive, K.A.

    1988-01-01

    We compute the quantum fluctuations of a non-self-interacting but unstable scalar field of arbitrary mass during the period of inflation. Instead of treating the scalar field in a static De Sitter space, we begin with a scalar field in the Friedmann universe just before the start of inflation, and work out the dynamics of the growing quantum fluctuation of the field after it has entered into the inflationary epoch. We use the physically sensible method of Vilenkin to regularize the theory. We find that in all but two special cases the fluctuations produced are different from those in a static De Sitter space, and the effect of the finite width of the scalar field limits the growth of fluctuations. (orig.)

  12. An evaluation of the brief symptom inventory-18 using item response theory: which items are most strongly related to psychological distress?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R.R.; de Vries, Rivka M.; van Bruggen, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    The psychometric structure of the Brief Symptom Inventory–18 (BSI-18; Derogatis, 2001) was investigated using Mokken scaling and parametric item response theory. Data of 487 outpatients, 266 students, and 207 prisoners were analyzed. Results of the Mokken analysis indicated that the BSI-18 formed a

  13. An Evaluation of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 Using Item Response Theory : Which Items Are Most Strongly Related to Psychological Distress?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Rob R.; de Vries, Rivka M.; van Bruggen, Vincent

    The psychometric structure of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18; Derogatis, 2001) was investigated using Mokken scaling and parametric item response theory. Data of 487 outpatients, 266 students, and 207 prisoners were analyzed. Results of the Mokken analysis indicated that the BSI-18 formed a

  14. Theory and phenomenology of strong and weak interaction high energy physics: [Technical progress report, 5/1/86-4/30/87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thews, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The research reported includes: low energy quark-hadron dynamics; quark-gluon models for hadronic interactions, decays and structure; mathematical and physical properties of nonlinear sigma models, Yang-Mills theories, and Coulomb gases, which are of interest in both particle physics and condensed matter physics; statistical and dynamical aspects of hadronic multiparticle production. 28 refs

  15. An item response theory analysis of Harter's Self-Perception Profile for Children or why strong clinical scales should be distrusted

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egberink, Iris J. L.; Meijer, Rob R.

    The authors investigated the psychometric properties of the subscales of the Self-Perception Profile for Children with item response theory (IRT) models using a sample of 611 children. Results from a nonparametric Mokken analysis and a parametric IRT approach for boys (n = 268) and girls (n = 343)

  16. An item response theory analysis of Harter’s self-perception profile for children or why strong clinical scales should be distrusted

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egberink, I.J.L.; Meijer, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the psychometric properties of the subscales of the Self-Perception Profile for Children with item response theory (IRT) models using a sample of 611 children. Results from a nonparametric Mokken analysis and a parametric IRT approach for boys (n = 268) and girls (n = 343)

  17. Quantum fluctuations and inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, J.M.; Bublik, G.J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors study the effect of quantum fluctuations on the roll-down rate of the inflation field in a semiclassical approximation; this is done by treating the inflation field as a classical random field. The quantum fluctuations are simulated by a noise term in the equation of motion. Two different inflationary scenarios (new and chaotic inflation) are considered and it is found that the roll-down rate of the median value of the inflation field is increased by the quantum fluctuations. Non-linear effects may become important in the later stages of the inflationary regime. (author)

  18. Electron quantum interferences and universal conductance fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, A.; Pichard, J.L.

    1988-05-01

    Quantum interferences yield corrections to the classical ohmic behaviour predicted by Boltzmann theory in electronic transport: for instance the well-known ''weak localization'' effects. Furthermore, very recently, quantum interference effects have been proved to be responsible for statistically different phenomena, associated with Universal Conductance Fluctuations and observed on very small devices [fr

  19. Surface Fluctuation Scattering using Grating Heterodyne Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, R. V.; Sirohi, R. S.; Mann, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Heterodyne photon spectroscopy is used for the study of the viscoelastic properties of the liquid interface by studying light scattered from thermally generated surface fluctuations. A theory of a heterodyne apparatus based on a grating is presented, and the heterodyne condition is given in terms...

  20. Fully Quantum Fluctuation Theorems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åberg, Johan

    2018-02-01

    Systems that are driven out of thermal equilibrium typically dissipate random quantities of energy on microscopic scales. Crooks fluctuation theorem relates the distribution of these random work costs to the corresponding distribution for the reverse process. By an analysis that explicitly incorporates the energy reservoir that donates the energy and the control system that implements the dynamic, we obtain a quantum generalization of Crooks theorem that not only includes the energy changes in the reservoir but also the full description of its evolution, including coherences. Moreover, this approach opens up the possibility for generalizations of the concept of fluctuation relations. Here, we introduce "conditional" fluctuation relations that are applicable to nonequilibrium systems, as well as approximate fluctuation relations that allow for the analysis of autonomous evolution generated by global time-independent Hamiltonians. We furthermore extend these notions to Markovian master equations, implicitly modeling the influence of the heat bath.

  1. Fully Quantum Fluctuation Theorems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Åberg

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Systems that are driven out of thermal equilibrium typically dissipate random quantities of energy on microscopic scales. Crooks fluctuation theorem relates the distribution of these random work costs to the corresponding distribution for the reverse process. By an analysis that explicitly incorporates the energy reservoir that donates the energy and the control system that implements the dynamic, we obtain a quantum generalization of Crooks theorem that not only includes the energy changes in the reservoir but also the full description of its evolution, including coherences. Moreover, this approach opens up the possibility for generalizations of the concept of fluctuation relations. Here, we introduce “conditional” fluctuation relations that are applicable to nonequilibrium systems, as well as approximate fluctuation relations that allow for the analysis of autonomous evolution generated by global time-independent Hamiltonians. We furthermore extend these notions to Markovian master equations, implicitly modeling the influence of the heat bath.

  2. Fishing and stock fluctuations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Laevastu, Taivo; Favorite, F

    1988-01-01

    .... Scarcely publicized are the multitude of causes of fish stock fluctuations. This book attempts to summarize the available knowledge on the subject and includes original work of the authors on a matter vital to the fisheries industries of the world...

  3. Scaling metabolic rate fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Labra, Fabio A.; Marquet, Pablo A.; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Complex ecological and economic systems show fluctuations in macroscopic quantities such as exchange rates, size of companies or populations that follow non-Gaussian tent-shaped probability distributions of growth rates with power-law decay, which suggests that fluctuations in complex systems may be governed by universal mechanisms, independent of particular details and idiosyncrasies. We propose here that metabolic rate within individual organisms may be considered as an example of an emerge...

  4. Enhanced quantum spin fluctuations in a binary Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisset, R. N.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Ticknor, C.

    2018-02-01

    For quantum fluids, the role of quantum fluctuations may be significant in several regimes such as when the dimensionality is low, the density is high, the interactions are strong, or for low particle numbers. In this paper, we propose a fundamentally different regime for enhanced quantum fluctuations without being restricted by any of the above conditions. Instead, our scheme relies on the engineering of an effective attractive interaction in a dilute, two-component Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) consisting of thousands of atoms. In such a regime, the quantum spin fluctuations are significantly enhanced (atom bunching with respect to the noninteracting limit) since they act to reduce the interaction energy, a remarkable property given that spin fluctuations are normally suppressed (antibunching) at zero temperature. In contrast to the case of true attractive interactions, our approach is not vulnerable to BEC collapse. We numerically demonstrate that these quantum fluctuations are experimentally accessible by either spin or single-component Bragg spectroscopy, offering a useful platform on which to test beyond-mean-field theories. We also develop a variational model and use it to analytically predict the shift of the immiscibility critical point, finding good agreement with our numerics.

  5. First in-situ observations of neutral and plasma density fluctuations within a PMSE layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubken, Franz-Josef; Lehmacher, Gerald; Blix, Tom; Hoppe, Ulf-Peter; Thrane, Eivind; Cho, John; Swartz, Wesley

    1993-01-01

    The NLC-91 rocket and radar campaign provided the first opportunity for high resolution neutral and plasma turbulence measurements with simultaneous observations of PMSE (Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes). During the flight of the TURBO payload on August 1, 1991, Cornell University Portable Radar Interferometer (CUPRI) and European Incoherent Scattter facility (EISCAT) observed double PMSE layers located at 86 and 88 km altitude, respectively. Strong neutral density fluctuations were observed in the upper layer but not in the lower layer. The fluctuation spectra of the ions and neutrals within the upper layer are consistent with standard turbulence theories. However, we show that there is no neutral turbulence present in the lower layer and that something else must have been operating here to create the plasma fluctuations and hence the radar echoes. Although the in situ measurements of the electron density fluctuations are much stronger in the lower layer, the higher absolute electron density of the upper layer more than compensated for the weaker fluctuations yielding comparable radar echo powers.

  6. Stochastic level-set variational implicit-solvent approach to solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shenggao, E-mail: sgzhou@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: bli@math.ucsd.edu [Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Center for Interdiscipline Research, Soochow University, 1 Shizi Street, Jiangsu, Suzhou 215006 (China); Sun, Hui; Cheng, Li-Tien [Department of Mathematics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0112 (United States); Dzubiella, Joachim [Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, 14109 Berlin, Germany and Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Li, Bo, E-mail: sgzhou@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: bli@math.ucsd.edu [Department of Mathematics and Quantitative Biology Graduate Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0112 (United States); McCammon, J. Andrew [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Department of Pharmacology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0365 (United States)

    2016-08-07

    Recent years have seen the initial success of a variational implicit-solvent model (VISM), implemented with a robust level-set method, in capturing efficiently different hydration states and providing quantitatively good estimation of solvation free energies of biomolecules. The level-set minimization of the VISM solvation free-energy functional of all possible solute-solvent interfaces or dielectric boundaries predicts an equilibrium biomolecular conformation that is often close to an initial guess. In this work, we develop a theory in the form of Langevin geometrical flow to incorporate solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations into the VISM. Such fluctuations are crucial to biomolecular conformational changes and binding process. We also develop a stochastic level-set method to numerically implement such a theory. We describe the interfacial fluctuation through the “normal velocity” that is the solute-solvent interfacial force, derive the corresponding stochastic level-set equation in the sense of Stratonovich so that the surface representation is independent of the choice of implicit function, and develop numerical techniques for solving such an equation and processing the numerical data. We apply our computational method to study the dewetting transition in the system of two hydrophobic plates and a hydrophobic cavity of a synthetic host molecule cucurbit[7]uril. Numerical simulations demonstrate that our approach can describe an underlying system jumping out of a local minimum of the free-energy functional and can capture dewetting transitions of hydrophobic systems. In the case of two hydrophobic plates, we find that the wavelength of interfacial fluctuations has a strong influence to the dewetting transition. In addition, we find that the estimated energy barrier of the dewetting transition scales quadratically with the inter-plate distance, agreeing well with existing studies of molecular dynamics simulations. Our work is a first step toward the

  7. Anisotropic magnetoresistance and thermodynamic fluctuations in high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heine, G.

    1999-05-01

    Measurements of the in-plane and out-of-plane resistivity and the transverse and longitudinal in-plane and out-of-plane magnetoresistance above T, are reported in the high-temperature superconductors Bi2Sr2CaCu208+' and YBa2CU307 b . The carrier concentration of the Bi2Sr2CaCu208+' single crystals covers a broad range of the phase diagram from the slightly under doped to the moderately over doped region. The doping concentration of the thin films ranges from strongly under doped to optimally doped. The in-plane resistivities obey a metallic-like temperature dependence with a positive magnetoresistance in the transverse and the longitudinal orientation of the magnetic field. The out-of-plane resistivities show an activated behavior above T, with a metallic region at higher temperatures and negative magnetoresistance. The data were analyzed in the framework of a model for superconducting order parameter fluctuations. The positive in-plane magnetoresistance of the highly anisotropic Bi2Sr2CaCu208+x single crystals is interpreted as the suppression of the fluctuation-conductivity enhancement including orbital and spin contributions, whereas the negative magnetoresistance arises from the reduction of the fluctuation-induced pseudogap in the single-electron density-of-states by the magnetic field. For higher temperatures a transition to the normal-state magnetoresistance occurs for the in-plane transport. In the less anisotropic YBa2CU307 b thin films the positive out-of-plane magnetoresistance near T, changes sign to a negative magnetoresistance at higher temperatures. This behavior is also consistent with predictions from the theory of thermodynamic order-parameter fluctuations. The agreement of the fluctuation theory with the experimental findings is excellent for samples from the over doped side of the phase diagram, but deteriorate with decreasing carrier concentration. This behavior is interpreted by the dominating d-wave symmetry of the superconducting order

  8. Strong Interactive Massive Particles from a Strong Coupled Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu. Khlopov, Maxim; Kouvaris, Christoforos

    2008-01-01

    (-2). These excessive techniparticles are all captured by $^4He$, creating \\emph{techni-O-helium} $tOHe$ ``atoms'', as soon as $^4He$ is formed in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. The interaction of techni-O-helium with nuclei opens new paths to the creation of heavy nuclei in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. Due...

  9. Squeezing of thermal and quantum fluctuations: Universal features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik; Flensberg, Karsten

    1993-01-01

    We study the classical and quantum fluctuations of a general damped forced oscillator close to a bifurcation instability. Near the instability point, the fluctuations are strongly phase correlated and are squeezed. In the limit of low damping, it is shown that the system has universal features when...... scaled with the damping. The same scaling law applies to the classical and to the quantum regimes. We furthermore show that the coupling to the environment is crucial in the generation of squeezed fluctuations....

  10. Quantum electrodynamics of strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, W.

    1983-01-01

    Quantum Electrodynamics of Strong Fields provides a broad survey of the theoretical and experimental work accomplished, presenting papers by a group of international researchers who have made significant contributions to this developing area. Exploring the quantum theory of strong fields, the volume focuses on the phase transition to a charged vacuum in strong electric fields. The contributors also discuss such related topics as QED at short distances, precision tests of QED, nonperturbative QCD and confinement, pion condensation, and strong gravitational fields In addition, the volume features a historical paper on the roots of quantum field theory in the history of quantum physics by noted researcher Friedrich Hund

  11. Spin fluctuations and the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Loktev

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the spectral properties of a phenomenological model for a weakly doped two-dimensional antiferromagnet, in which the carriers move within one of the two sublattices where they were introduced. Such a constraint results in the free carrier spectra with the maxima at k=(± π/2 , ± π/2 observed in some cuprates. We consider the spectral properties of the model by taking into account fluctuations of the spins in the antiferromagnetic background. We show that such fluctuations lead to a non-pole-like structure of the single-hole Green's function and these fluctuations can be responsible for some anomalous "strange metal" properties of underdoped cuprates in the nonsuperconducting regime.

  12. Spontaneous emission of Alfvénic fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, P. H.; López, R. A.; Vafin, S.; Kim, S.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2017-09-01

    Low-frequency fluctuations are pervasively observed in the solar wind. The present paper theoretically calculates the steady state spectra of low-frequency electromagnetic (EM) fluctuations of the Alfvénic type for thermal equilibrium plasma. The analysis is based upon a recently formulated theory of spontaneously emitted EM fluctuations in magnetized thermal plasmas. It is found that the fluctuations in the magnetosonic mode branch is constant, while the kinetic Alfvénic mode spectrum is dependent on a form factor that is a function of perpendicular wave number. Potential applicability of the present work in the wider context of heliospheric research is also discussed.

  13. Spatiotemporal Self-Organization of Fluctuating Bacterial Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafke, Tobias; Cates, Michael E.; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2017-11-01

    We model an enclosed system of bacteria, whose motility-induced phase separation is coupled to slow population dynamics. Without noise, the system shows both static phase separation and a limit cycle, in which a rising global population causes a dense bacterial colony to form, which then declines by local cell death, before dispersing to reinitiate the cycle. Adding fluctuations, we find that static colonies are now metastable, moving between spatial locations via rare and strongly nonequilibrium pathways, whereas the limit cycle becomes almost periodic such that after each redispersion event the next colony forms in a random location. These results, which hint at some aspects of the biofilm-planktonic life cycle, can be explained by combining tools from large deviation theory with a bifurcation analysis in which the global population density plays the role of control parameter.

  14. Coupled cluster valence bond theory for open-shell systems with application to very long range strong correlation in a polycarbene dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, David W; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2017-07-14

    The Coupled Cluster Valence Bond (CCVB) method, previously presented for closed-shell (CS) systems, is extended to open-shell (OS) systems. The theoretical development is based on embedding the basic OS CCVB wavefunction in a fictitious singlet super-system. This approach reveals that the OS CCVB amplitude equations are quite similar to those of CS CCVB, and thus that OS CCVB requires the same level of computational effort as CS CCVB, which is an inexpensive method. We present qualitatively correct CCVB potential energy curves for all low-lying spin states of P 2 and Mn 2 + . CCVB is successfully applied to the low-lying spin states of some model linear polycarbenes, systems that appear to be a hindrance to standard density functionals. We examine an octa-carbene dimer in a side-by-side orientation, which, in the monomer dissociation limit, exhibits maximal strong correlation over the length of the polycarbene.

  15. Solvent fluctuations at hydrophobic, hydrophilic, and electrochemical interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Adam Phillip

    Using both coarse grained and atomistic models we study the behavior of water at the hydrophobic, hydrophilic and electrochemical interface. We show that the structural and fluxional properties of the water-solute interface are much different for small hydrophobic solutes than for large hydrophobic solutes. In the former case the solute is accommodated within the bulk hydrogen bonding network and interfacial properties are governed by the preservation of this network. In the latter case the solute-solvent interface forms what is akin to an ordinary water-vapor interface which is reflected in the interfacial properties. We examine the effect of introducing dispersive-like solute-solvent attractive interactions and find that the interface of a small hydrophobic solute is only slightly susceptible to the magnitude of solute-solvent attractions. We find that although the fluctuations of the large hydrophobic solute-solvent interface depend strongly on the magnitude of the solute-solvent attraction, the inherent structure of the liquid-vapor-like interface is insensitive to the magnitude of the solute-solvent attraction. In a separate analysis we use coarse-grained models to investigate the behavior of water adjacent to an extended hydrophobic surface peppered with various fractions of hydrophilic patches of different sizes. We study the spatial dependence of the mean interface height, the solvent density fluctuations related to drying the patchy substrate, and the spatial dependence of interfacial fluctuations. We find that adding small uniform attractive interactions between the substrate and solvent cause the mean position of the interface to be very close to the substrate. Nevertheless, the interfacial fluctuations are large and spatially heterogeneous in response to the underlying patchy substrate. We discuss the implications of these findings for the assembly of heterogeneous surfaces. We also use a coarse-grained solvent model to study the self-assembly of two

  16. Quantum horizon fluctuations of an evaporating black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roura, Albert

    2007-01-01

    The quantum fluctuations of a black hole spacetime are studied within a low-energy effective field theory approach to quantum gravity. Our approach accounts for both intrinsic metric fluctuations and those induced by matter fields interacting with the gravitational field. Here we will concentrate on spherically symmetric fluctuations of the black hole horizon. Our results suggest that for a sufficiently massive evaporating black hole, fluctuations can accumulate over time and become significant well before reaching Planckian scales. In addition, we provide the sketch of a proof that the symmetrized two-point function of the stress-tensor operator smeared over a null hypersurface is actually divergent and discuss the implications for the analysis of horizon fluctuations. Finally, a natural way to probe quantum metric fluctuations near the horizon is briefly described

  17. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Harms

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^–23 Hz^–1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our

  18. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10-23 Hz-1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  19. Microscopic Theory of Transconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Jauho

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of momentum transfer between two closely spaced mesoscopic electronic systems, which couple via Coulomb interaction but where tunneling is inhibited, have proven to be a fruitful method of extracting information about interactions in mesoscopic systems. We report a fully microscopic theory for transconductivity σ12, or, equivalently, momentum transfer rate between the system constituents. Our main formal result expresses the transconductivity in terms of two fluctuation diagrams, which are topologically related, but not equivalent to, the Azlamazov-Larkin and Maki-Thompson diagrams known for superconductivity. In the present paper the magnetic field dependence of σ12 is discussed, and we find that σ12(B is strongly enhanced over its zero field value, and it displays strong features, which can be understood in terms of a competition between density-of-states and screening effects.

  20. Magnetic properties of strongly asymmetric nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, M.; Wojcik, W.

    1988-01-01

    We investigate stability of neutron matter containing a small proton admixture with respect to spin fluctuations. We establish conditions under which strongly asymmetric nuclear matter could acquire a permanent magnetization. It is shown that if the protons are localized, the system becomes unstable to spin fluctuations for arbitrarily weak proton-neutron spin interactions. For non-localized protons there exists a threshold value of the spin interaction above which the system can develop a spontaneous polarization. 12 refs., 2 figs. (author)

  1. Strong Coupling Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2009-01-01

    We show that whenever a 4-dimensional theory with N particle species emerges as a consistent low energy description of a 3-brane embedded in an asymptotically-flat (4+d)-dimensional space, the holographic scale of high-dimensional gravity sets the strong coupling scale of the 4D theory. This connection persists in the limit in which gravity can be consistently decoupled. We demonstrate this effect for orbifold planes, as well as for the solitonic branes and string theoretic D-branes. In all cases the emergence of a 4D strong coupling scale from bulk holography is a persistent phenomenon. The effect turns out to be insensitive even to such extreme deformations of the brane action that seemingly shield 4D theory from the bulk gravity effects. A well understood example of such deformation is given by large 4D Einstein term in the 3-brane action, which is known to suppress the strength of 5D gravity at short distances and change the 5D Newton's law into the four-dimensional one. Nevertheless, we observe that the ...

  2. Studies of Fluctuation Processes in Nuclear Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayik, Sakir [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-04-14

    The standard one-body transport approaches have been extensively applied to investigate heavy-ion collision dynamics at low and intermediate energies. At low energies the approach is the mean-field description of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory. At intermediate energies the approach is extended by including a collision term, and its application has been carried out mostly in the semi-classical framework of the Boltzmann-Uhling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) model. The standard transport models provide a good understanding of the average properties of the collision dynamics in terms of the effective interactions in both low and intermediate energies. However, the standard models are inadequate for describing the fluctuation dynamics of collective motion at low energies and disassembling of the nuclear system into fragments at intermediate energies resulting from the growth of density fluctuations in the spinodal region. Our tasks have been to improve the standard transport approaches by incorporating fluctuation mechanisms into the description. There are mainly two different mechanisms for fluctuations: (i) Collisional fluctuations generated by binary nucleon collisions, which provide the dominant mechanism at intermediate energies, and (ii) One-body mechanism or mean-field fluctuations, which is the dominant mechanism at low energies. In the first part of our project, the PI extended the standard transport model at intermediate energies by incorporating collisional mechanism according to the “Generalized Langevin Description” of Mori formalism. The PI and his collaborators carried out a number of applications for describing dynamical mechanism of nuclear multi fragmentations, and nuclear collective response in the semi-classical framework of the approach, which is known as the Boltzmann-Langevin model. In the second part of the project, we considered dynamical description at low energies. Because of the effective Pauli blocking, the collisional dissipation and

  3. Fluctuation traits of Litchi wholesale price in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, F. F.; Qi, W. E.; Ouyang, X.

    2017-07-01

    This paper chose the wholesale price of litchi as research object based on the daily data of 11 main sales markets in China -- Beijing, Chengdu, Guangzhou, Hefei, Jiaxing, Nanjing, Shanghai, Shenyang, Changsha, Zhengzhou and Chongqing from April 1, 2012 to September 30, 2016. After analyzing the fluctuation characteristics with BP filter method and H-P filter method, and the fluctuation trends of litchi wholesale price in China obtained by BP filter are roughly consistent with the trends obtained by H-P filter. The main conclusions are as follows: there is strong cyclicality in the fluctuation of litchi wholesale price; the period of fluctuations of litchi wholesale prices are not repeatable; litchi wholesale price fluctuates asymmetrically in one fluctuation cycle.

  4. Shot-to-shot fluctuations in the directed superradiant emission from extended atomic samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemens, J P; Horvath, L; Sanders, B C; Carmichael, H J

    2004-01-01

    We study collective spontaneous emission from arbitrary distributions of N two-state atoms using quantum trajectory theory and without an a priori single-mode assumption. Assuming a fully excited initial state, we calculate the angular distribution of the average intensity, focusing on pencil- and disc-shaped samples. The formalism is developed around an unravelling of the master equation in terms of source mode quantum jumps. A modified boson approximation is made to treat the many-atom case, where it is found that strong directional superradiance with shot-to-shot fluctuations occurs for a few hundred to a few thousand atoms

  5. Quantum fluctuations and thermal dissipation in higher derivative gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibakar Roychowdhury

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, based on the AdS2/CFT1 prescription, we explore the low frequency behavior of quantum two point functions for a special class of strongly coupled CFTs in one dimension whose dual gravitational counterpart consists of extremal black hole solutions in higher derivative theories of gravity defined over an asymptotically AdS spacetime. The quantum critical points thus described are supposed to correspond to a very large value of the dynamic exponent (z→∞. In our analysis, we find that quantum fluctuations are enhanced due to the higher derivative corrections in the bulk which in turn increases the possibility of quantum phase transition near the critical point. On the field theory side, such higher derivative effects would stand for the corrections appearing due to the finite coupling in the gauge theory. Finally, we compute the coefficient of thermal diffusion at finite coupling corresponding to Gauss Bonnet corrected charged Lifshitz black holes in the bulk. We observe an important crossover corresponding to z=5 fixed point.

  6. Complementary views on electron spectra: From fluctuation diagnostics to real-space correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, O.; Merino, J.; Schäfer, T.; Sangiovanni, G.; Rohringer, G.; Toschi, A.

    2018-03-01

    We study the relation between the microscopic properties of a many-body system and the electron spectra, experimentally accessible by photoemission. In a recent paper [O. Gunnarsson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 236402 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.236402], we introduced the "fluctuation diagnostics" approach to extract the dominant wave-vector-dependent bosonic fluctuations from the electronic self-energy. Here, we first reformulate the theory in terms of fermionic modes to render its connection with resonance valence bond (RVB) fluctuations more transparent. Second, by using a large-U expansion, where U is the Coulomb interaction, we relate the fluctuations to real-space correlations. Therefore, it becomes possible to study how electron spectra are related to charge, spin, superconductivity, and RVB-like real-space correlations, broadening the analysis of an earlier work [J. Merino and O. Gunnarsson, Phys. Rev. B 89, 245130 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.245130]. This formalism is applied to the pseudogap physics of the two-dimensional Hubbard model, studied in the dynamical cluster approximation. We perform calculations for embedded clusters with up to 32 sites, having three inequivalent K points at the Fermi surface. We find that as U is increased, correlation functions gradually attain values consistent with an RVB state. This first happens for correlation functions involving the antinodal point and gradually spreads to the nodal point along the Fermi surface. Simultaneously, a pseudogap opens up along the Fermi surface. We relate this to a crossover from a Kondo-type state to an RVB-like localized cluster state and to the presence of RVB and spin fluctuations. These changes are caused by a strong momentum dependence in the cluster bath couplings along the Fermi surface. We also show, from a more algorithmic perspective, how the time-consuming calculations in fluctuation diagnostics can be drastically simplified.

  7. Impact of neutral density fluctuations on gas puff imaging diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wersal, C.; Ricci, P.

    2017-11-01

    A three-dimensional turbulence simulation of the SOL and edge regions of a toroidally limited tokamak is carried out. The simulation couples self-consistently the drift-reduced two-fluid Braginskii equations to a kinetic equation for neutral atoms. A diagnostic neutral gas puff on the low-field side midplane is included and the impact of neutral density fluctuations on D_α light emission investigated. We find that neutral density fluctuations affect the D_α emission. In particular, at a radial distance from the gas puff smaller than the neutral mean free path, neutral density fluctuations are anti-correlated with plasma density, electron temperature, and D_α fluctuations. It follows that the neutral fluctuations reduce the D_α emission in most of the observed region and, therefore, have to be taken into account when interpreting the amplitude of the D_α emission. On the other hand, higher order statistical moments (skewness, kurtosis) and turbulence characteristics (such as correlation length, or the autocorrelation time) are not significantly affected by the neutral fluctuations. At distances from the gas puff larger than the neutral mean free path, a non-local shadowing effect influences the neutral density fluctuations. There, the D_α fluctuations are correlated with the neutral density fluctuations, and the high-order statistical moments and measurements of other turbulence properties are strongly affected by the neutral density fluctuations.

  8. General description of magnetic fluctuations in TEXT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.J.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetic fluctuations in TEXT (R = 1m, a = 0.26m, ohmically heated tokamak with a full poloidal limiter) have been extensively measured with magnetic probes in the shadow of the limiter with an instrumental range of f -1 (m rms p (f > 50kHz) at the limiter radius is found to be of order 10 -5 T, which is too small to produce significant transport directly. Over the range of discharge parameters in TEXT, the B rms p (f > 50kHz) is observed to have a strong q a dependence (q a -2.2 ) and also a density dependence (n eo -0.8 ). Furthermore, the magnetic fluctuations show a significant correlation with edge electrostatic density fluctuations measured by Langmiur probe inside the limiter radius, and extending along magnetic field lines. Phase variation of the correlated components suggests k double-prime/k perpendicular ∼ 0.005. The B p rms (f >50kHz) is also found to be little dependent on parallel electric field E double-prime. Magnetic fluctuations in both low and high frequency ranges have been characterized by their response to gas puffing, pellet injection, impurity injection, and the effect of an ergodic magnetic limiter. The behavior of magnetic fluctuations with electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) has been also investigated in detail

  9. Fluctuations in quantum devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.Haken

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Logical gates can be formalized by Boolean algebra whose elementary operations can be realized by devices that employ the interactions of macroscopic numbers of elementary excitations such as electrons, holes, photons etc. With increasing miniaturization to the nano scale and below, quantum fluctuations become important and can no longer be ignored. Based on Heisenberg equations of motion for the creation and annihilation operators of elementary excitations, I determine the noise sources of composite quantum systems.

  10. Physics of fashion fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donangelo, R.; Hansen, A.; Sneppen, K.; Souza, S. R.

    2000-12-01

    We consider a market where many agents trade different types of products with each other. We model development of collective modes in this market, and quantify these by fluctuations that scale with time with a Hurst exponent of about 0.7. We demonstrate that individual products in the model occasionally become globally accepted means of exchange, and simultaneously become very actively traded. Thus collective features similar to money spontaneously emerge, without any a priori reason.

  11. Localization of waves in a fluctuating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escande, D.F.; Souillard, B.

    1984-01-01

    We present the first application of localization theory to plasma physics: Density fluctuations induce exponential localization of longitudinal and transverse electron plasma waves, i.e., the eigenmodes have an amplitude decreasing exponentially for large distances without any dissipative mechanism in the plasma. This introduces a new mechanism for converting a convective instability into an absolute one. Localization should be observable in clear-cut experiments

  12. Strong-coupling approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, R.B.

    1984-03-01

    Standard path-integral techniques such as instanton calculations give good answers for weak-coupling problems, but become unreliable for strong-coupling. Here we consider a method of replacing the original potential by a suitably chosen harmonic oscillator potential. Physically this is motivated by the fact that potential barriers below the level of the ground-state energy of a quantum-mechanical system have little effect. Numerically, results are good, both for quantum-mechanical problems and for massive phi 4 field theory in 1 + 1 dimensions. 9 references, 6 figures

  13. Fluctuations in high-energy particle collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronqvist, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    We study fluctuations that are omnipresent in high-energy particle collisions. These fluctuations can be either of either classical or quantum origin and we will study both. Firstly, we consider the type of quantum fluctuations that arise in proton-proton collisions. These are computable perturbatively in quantum field theory and we will focus on a specific class of diagrams in this set-up. Secondly, we will consider the fluctuations that are present in collisions between nuclei that can be heavier than protons. These are the quantum laws of nature that describe the positions of nucleons within a nucleus, but also the hydrodynamic fluctuations of classical, thermal origin that affect the evolution of the medium produced in heavy-ion collisions. The fluctuations arising in proton-proton collisions can be computed analytically up to a certain order in perturbative quantum field theory. We will focus on one-loop diagrams of a fixed topology. Loop diagrams give rise to integrals that typically are hard to evaluate. We show how modern mathematical methods can be used to ease their computation. We will study the relations among unitarity cuts of a diagram, the discontinuity across the corresponding branch cut and the coproduct. We show how the original integral corresponding to a given diagram can be reconstructed from the information contained in the coproduct. We expect that these methods can be applied to solve more complicated topologies and help in the computation of new amplitudes in the future. Finally, we study the two types of fluctuations arising in heavy-ion collisions. These are related either to the initial state or the intermediate state of matter produced in such collisions. The initial state fluctuations are experimentally observed to give rise to non-Gaussianities in the final-state spectra. We show how these non-Gaussianities can be explained by the random position and interaction energy of 'sources' in the colliding nuclei. Furthermore, we

  14. Strongly correlating liquids and their isomorphs

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Ulf R.; Gnan, Nicoletta; Bailey, Nicholas P.; Schröder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the properties of strongly correlating liquids, i.e., liquids with strong correlations between virial and potential energy equilibrium fluctuations at constant volume. We proceed to focus on the experimental predictions for strongly correlating glass-forming liquids. These predictions include i) density scaling, ii) isochronal superposition, iii) that there is a single function from which all frequency-dependent viscoelastic response functions may be calculated, iv) that...

  15. Universal fluctuations the phenomenology of hadronic matter

    CERN Document Server

    Botet, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this book is to present, in a comprehensive and progressive way, the appearance of universal limit probability laws in physics, and their connection with the recently developed scaling theory of fluctuations. Arising from the probability theory and renormalization group methods, this novel approach has been proved recently to provide efficient investigative tools for the collective features that occur in any finite system. The mathematical background is self-contained and is formulated in terms which are easy to apply to the physical context. After illustrating the problem

  16. Dynamics of Shape Fluctuations of Quasi-spherical Vesicles Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miao, L.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen; Kleis, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamics of spontaneous shape fluctuations of a single, giant quasi-spherical vesicle formed from a single lipid species is revisited theoretically. A coherent physical theory for the dynamics is developed based on a number of fundamental principles and considerations, and a sy......In this paper, the dynamics of spontaneous shape fluctuations of a single, giant quasi-spherical vesicle formed from a single lipid species is revisited theoretically. A coherent physical theory for the dynamics is developed based on a number of fundamental principles and considerations......, and a systematic formulation of the theory is also established. From-the systematic theoretical formulation, an analytical description of the dynamics of shape fluctuations of quasi-spherical vesicles is derived. In particular, in developing the theory we have made a new interpretation of some...

  17. Strain fluctuations and elastic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1982-03-01

    It is shown that the elastic strain fluctuations are a direct measure of elastic compliances in a general anisotropic medium; depending on the ensemble in which the fluctuation is measured either the isothermal or the adiabatic compliances are obtained. These fluctuations can now be calculated in a constant enthalpy and pressure, and hence, constant entropy, ensemble due to recent develpments in the molecular dynamics techniques. A calculation for a Ni single crystal under uniform uniaxial 100 tensile or compressive load is presented as an illustration of the relationships derived between various strain fluctuations and the elastic modulii. The Born stability criteria and the behavior of strain fluctuations are shown to be related.

  18. Strong-interaction nonuniversality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkas, R.R.; Foot, R.; He, X.; Joshi, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    The universal QCD color theory is extended to an SU(3) 1 direct product SU(3) 2 direct product SU(3) 3 gauge theory, where quarks of the ith generation transform as triplets under SU(3)/sub i/ and singlets under the other two factors. The usual color group is then identified with the diagonal subgroup, which remains exact after symmetry breaking. The gauge bosons associated with the 16 broken generators then form two massive octets under ordinary color. The interactions between quarks and these heavy gluonlike particles are explicitly nonuniversal and thus an exploration of their physical implications allows us to shed light on the fundamental issue of strong-interaction universality. Nonuniversality and weak flavor mixing are shown to generate heavy-gluon-induced flavor-changing neutral currents. The phenomenology of these processes is studied, as they provide the major experimental constraint on the extended theory. Three symmetry-breaking scenarios are presented. The first has color breaking occurring at the weak scale, while the second and third divorce the two scales. The third model has the interesting feature of radiatively induced off-diagonal Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements

  19. Temporal structure of aggregate power fluctuations in large-eddy simulations of extended wind-farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Richard Johannes Antonius Maria; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuations represent a major challenge for the incorporation of electric power from large wind-farms into power grids. Wind-farm power output fluctuates strongly in time, over various time scales. Understanding these fluctuations, especially their spatio-temporal characteristics, is particularly

  20. Gambling with Superconducting Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltyn, Marek; Zgirski, Maciej

    2015-08-01

    Josephson junctions and superconducting nanowires, when biased close to superconducting critical current, can switch to a nonzero voltage state by thermal or quantum fluctuations. The process is understood as an escape of a Brownian particle from a metastable state. Since this effect is fully stochastic, we propose to use it for generating random numbers. We present protocol for obtaining random numbers and test the experimentally harvested data for their fidelity. Our work is prerequisite for using the Josephson junction as a tool for stochastic (probabilistic) determination of physical parameters such as magnetic flux, temperature, and current.

  1. <strong>Robert Aumannstrong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg

    2007-01-01

    In this interview Nobel Prize Winner Robert Aumann talks about how he was initially drawn into game theory, when he came to think of formalizing the folk-theorem, the proper role of game theory in relation to other disciplines and why behavioral game theory probably won't last long.......In this interview Nobel Prize Winner Robert Aumann talks about how he was initially drawn into game theory, when he came to think of formalizing the folk-theorem, the proper role of game theory in relation to other disciplines and why behavioral game theory probably won't last long....

  2. Motion of Euglena gracilis: Active fluctuations and velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanczuk, P.; Romensky, M.; Scholz, D.; Lobaskin, V.; Schimansky-Geier, L.

    2015-07-01

    We study the velocity distribution of unicellular swimming algae Euglena gracilis using optical microscopy and active Brownian particle theory. To characterize a peculiar feature of the experimentally observed distribution at small velocities we use the concept of active fluctuations, which was recently proposed for the description of stochastically self-propelled particles [Romanczuk, P. and Schimansky-Geier, L., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 230601 (2011)]. In this concept, the fluctuating forces arise due to internal random performance of the propulsive motor. The fluctuating forces are directed in parallel to the heading direction, in which the propulsion acts. In the theory, we introduce the active motion via the depot model [Schweitzer, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80(23), 5044 (1998)]. We demonstrate that the theoretical predictions based on the depot model with active fluctuations are consistent with the experimentally observed velocity distributions. In addition to the model with additive active noise, we obtain theoretical results for a constant propulsion with multiplicative noise.

  3. Theory of multiferroics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaosa, Naoto

    2009-01-01

    Theories of multiferroics are reviewed with a stress on the role of relativistic spin-orbit interaction and spin current. Ground state electric polarization induced by the non-collinear spin structures, and its dynamical fluctuation, i.e., electro-magnon are discussed. Treatments of the non-perturbative large amplitude thermal and quantum fluctuations are also described. (author)

  4. Effects of quantum discreetness and flicker fluctuations of tunnel conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzovlev, Yu.E.; Medvedev, Yu.V.; Grishin, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Using a tunnel contact as an example one shows that interaction of single-electron processes in multielectron system may serve as a source of non-scale flicker low-frequency fluctuations of its conductivity. Interaction implies that quantum probability of electron transition depends on spontaneous changes of situation during the transition. Theory relates flicker fluctuations of tunnel conductivity with discreteness of spectrum of electron states and explains nonlinearity of noise-ampere characteristic observed in nanocomposite [ru

  5. <strong>Sergiu Hartstrong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg

    2007-01-01

    In this interview Sergiu Hart, President of the Game Theory Society talks about how Robert Aumann got him into doing game theory, chracterizes good game theoretic research, the sure-thing principle of Savage, the limits of rationality and the most important problems in game theory today....

  6. Diffusion by Infragravity Stokes Drift Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, P.; Janssen, T. T.; Herbers, T. H. C.; Kirshner, Z.

    2016-02-01

    The group-scale variability of ocean waves variability drives infragravity Stokes drift fluctuations, which are important for small-scale diffusion of passive tracers (to the order of a few kilometers), and can thus be important for the break-up and dispersion of e.g. oil spills or sewage outflow, and coastal transport in general. The implications of this were first considered theoretically by Herterich and Hasselmann (1982, JPO), who demonstrated that on small scales, wave diffusion can compete with other upper ocean diffusive processes, but their theory has thus far not been extensively validated with field observations. To investigate drift fluctuations and wave-induced diffusion, we consider the wave-induced dispersion of a cluster of O(10) buoys. The experiment, conducted offshore of San Francisco, uses a cluster of Lagrangian drifters equipped with fast-sampling GPS sensor packages, to accurately resolve both the surface wave motions, and directly measure the Lagrangian dynamics, including surface drift fluctuations. We revisit the Herterich and Hasselmann theory, expand it to include shallow water and variable wave conditions, and compare the theoretical predictions with the new observations.

  7. Low thermal fluctuations in a system heated out of equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geitner, Mickael; Aguilar Sandoval, Felipe; Bertin, Eric; Bellon, Ludovic

    2017-03-01

    We study the mechanical fluctuations of a micrometer sized silicon cantilever subjected to a strong heat flow, thus having a highly nonuniform local temperature. In this nonequilibrium steady state, we show that fluctuations are equivalent to the thermal noise of a cantilever at equilibrium around room temperature, while its mean local temperature is several hundred degrees higher. Changing the mechanical dissipation by adding a coating to the cantilever, we recover the expected rise of fluctuations with the mean temperature. Our work demonstrates that inhomogeneous dissipation mechanisms can decouple the amplitude of thermal fluctuations from the average temperature. This property could be useful to understand out-of-equilibrium fluctuating systems, or to engineer low noise instruments.

  8. Extreme fluctuations in stochastic network coordination with time delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, D.; Molnár, F.; Szymanski, B. K.; Korniss, G.

    2015-12-01

    We study the effects of uniform time delays on the extreme fluctuations in stochastic synchronization and coordination problems with linear couplings in complex networks. We obtain the average size of the fluctuations at the nodes from the behavior of the underlying modes of the network. We then obtain the scaling behavior of the extreme fluctuations with system size, as well as the distribution of the extremes on complex networks, and compare them to those on regular one-dimensional lattices. For large complex networks, when the delay is not too close to the critical one, fluctuations at the nodes effectively decouple, and the limit distributions converge to the Fisher-Tippett-Gumbel density. In contrast, fluctuations in low-dimensional spatial graphs are strongly correlated, and the limit distribution of the extremes is the Airy density. Finally, we also explore the effects of nonlinear couplings on the stability and on the extremes of the synchronization landscapes.

  9. Comments on "Superconducting fluctuation and transport phenomena in a quasi-2D electronic system"

    CERN Document Server

    Kosuge, Y; Matsuura, T; Kuroda, Y

    2003-01-01

    Sato and the present authors have developed a theory where effects of the 2D superconducting fluctuations in a weak coupling case on the Cooper pairing susceptibility chi(q, omega) and the single particle Green's function are examined by taking account of the most divergent contributions to those. It has been shown that chi(0, 0) diverges as T sup ( sup - sup T sup F sup / sup 2 sup T sup ) /log|T sub F -T| at T -> 0, where T and T sub F are temperature and the Fermi temperature, respectively. In the present study, we extend the theory to be applied to strong coupling cases and examine roles of the weak three dimensionality leading to a finite value of superconducting transition temperature T sub c. We show that T sub c is more strongly suppressed in a stronger coupling case. We also examine effects of 2D superconducting fluctuations on the electrical conductivity and show that both of self-energy corrections leading to the pseudogap and vertex corrections such as the Aslamasov-Larkin and the Maki-Thompson te...

  10. Ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosuga, Y., E-mail: kosuga@riam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Institute for Advanced Study, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, S.-I. [Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Diamond, P. H. [CASS and CMTFO, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Itoh, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu (Japan); Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Lesur, M. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    A theory to describe basic characterization of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance is presented. The role of trapped ion granulations, clusters of trapped ions correlated by precession resonance, is the focus. Microscopically, the presence of trapped ion granulations leads to a sharp (logarithmic) divergence of two point phase space density correlation at small scales. Macroscopically, trapped ion granulations excite potential fluctuations that do not satisfy dispersion relation and so broaden frequency spectrum. The line width from emission due only to trapped ion granulations is calculated. The result shows that the line width depends on ion free energy and electron dissipation, which implies that non-adiabatic electrons are essential to recover non-trivial dynamics of trapped ion granulations. Relevant testable predictions are summarized.

  11. Fluctuations in email size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Yoshitsugu; Musashi, Yasuo

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to explain fluctuations in email size. We have previously investigated the long-term correlations between email send requests and data flow in the system log of the primary staff email server at a university campus, finding that email size frequency follows a power-law distribution with two inflection points, and that the power-law property weakens the correlation of the data flow. However, the mechanism underlying this fluctuation is not completely understood. We collected new log data from both staff and students over six academic years and analyzed the frequency distribution thereof, focusing on the type of content contained in the emails. Furthermore, we obtained permission to collect "Content-Type" log data from the email headers. We therefore collected the staff log data from May 1, 2015 to July 31, 2015, creating two subdistributions. In this paper, we propose a model to explain these subdistributions, which follow log-normal-like distributions. In the log-normal-like model, email senders -consciously or unconsciously- regulate the size of new email sentences according to a normal distribution. The fitting of the model is acceptable for these subdistributions, and the model demonstrates power-law properties for large email sizes. An analysis of the length of new email sentences would be required for further discussion of our model; however, to protect user privacy at the participating organization, we left this analysis for future work. This study provides new knowledge on the properties of email sizes, and our model is expected to contribute to the decision on whether to establish upper size limits in the design of email services.

  12. Theory of non-Gaussianity in warm inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastero-Gil, Mar [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Granada-18071 (Spain); Berera, Arjun [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Moss, Ian G. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Ramos, Rudnei O., E-mail: mbg@ugr.es, E-mail: ab@ph.ed.ac.uk, E-mail: ian.moss@ncl.ac.uk, E-mail: rudnei@uerj.br [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-12-01

    The theory and methodology is developed to compute the bispectrum in warm inflation, leading to results for the non-linearity parameter and the shape of the bispectrum. Particular attention is paid to the study of the bispectrum in the regime of weak dissipation and how stochastic fluctuations affect the bispectrum. It is shown that, in contrast to the strong dissipative regime, the amplitude of non-Gaussianity is strongly dependent on the parameters governing the microscopic physics in the intermediate and weak dissipation warm inflation regimes. The most important results concern the shape of the bispectrum, which has two different, but distinct, forms in the weak and strong dissipative regimes.

  13. Quantum criticality and emergence of the T/B scaling in strongly correlated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shinji; Miyake, Kazumasa

    2016-01-01

    A new type of scaling observed in heavy-electron metal β-YbAlB 4 , where the magnetic susceptibility is expressed as a single scaling function of the ratio of temperature T and magnetic field B over four decades, is examined theoretically. We develop the mode-coupling theory for critical Yb-valence fluctuations under a magnetic field, verifying that the T/B scaling behavior appears near the QCP of the valence transition. Emergence of the T/B scaling indicates the presence of the small characteristic temperature of the critical Yb-valence fluctuation due to the strong local correlation effect. It is discussed that the T/B scaling as well as the unconventional criticality is explained from the viewpoint of the quantum valence criticality in a unified way.

  14. Chiral soliton lattice and charged pion condensation in strong magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauner, Tomáš [Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Stavanger,N-4036 Stavanger (Norway); Yamamoto, Naoki [Department of Physics, Keio University,Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2017-04-21

    The Chiral Soliton Lattice (CSL) is a state with a periodic array of topological solitons that spontaneously breaks parity and translational symmetries. Such a state is known to appear in chiral magnets. We show that CSL also appears as a ground state of quantum chromodynamics at nonzero chemical potential in a magnetic field. By analyzing the fluctuations of the CSL, we furthermore demonstrate that in strong but achievable magnetic fields, charged pions undergo Bose-Einstein condensation. Our results, based on a systematic low-energy effective theory, are model-independent and fully analytic.

  15. Strong interaction at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We review two methods discussed in the literature to determine the effective parameters of strongly interacting particles as they move through a heat bath. The first one is the general method of chiral perturbation theory, which may be readily applied to this problem. The other is the method of thermal QCD sum rules ...

  16. Magnetic fluctuations associated with density fluctuations in the tokamak edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.J.; Gentle, K.W.; Ritz, C.P.; Rhodes, T.L.; Bengtson, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Electrostatic density and potential fluctuations occurring with high amplitude near the edge of a tokamak are correlated with components of the fluctuating magnetic field measured outside the limiter radius. It has been established that this turbulence is associated with fluctuations in current as well as density and potential. The correlation extends for substantial toroidal distances, but only if the probes are displaced approximately along field lines, consistent with the short coherence lengths poloidally but long coherence lengths parallel to the field which are characteristic for this turbulence. Furthermore, the correlation can be found only with density fluctuations measured inside the limiter radius; density fluctuations behind the limiter have no detectable magnetic concomitant for the toroidally spaced probes used here. (author). Letter-to-the-editor. 12 refs, 3 figs

  17. Fluctuations of pT from initial size fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chojnacki, M.; Broniowski, W.; Obara, L.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the initial transverse size of the source, which comes directly from the Glauber treatment of the earliest stage of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. After the hydrodynamic evolution stage the fluctuations in the transverse velocity flow at the hadronic freeze-out are transformed into the even-by-event fluctuations of the average transverse momentum. The Glauber phase is simulated by GLISSANDO and followed by a realistic hydrodynamic evolution stage. The statistical hadronization is performed by the THERMINATOR. We describe the pT fluctuations at RHIC, in particular the magnitude of the effect, its centrality dependence, and the weak dependence on the incident energy. The results show that the observed event-by-event p T fluctuations are mainly caused by the initial source size fluctuations. (author)

  18. Intermittent character of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, Roberto; Carbone, Vincenzo; Chapman, Sandra; Hnat, Bogdan; Noullez, Alain; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca

    2007-01-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field magnitude fluctuations are notoriously more intermittent than velocity fluctuations in both fast and slow wind. This behavior has been interpreted in terms of the anomalous scaling observed in passive scalars in fully developed hydrodynamic turbulence. In this paper, the strong intermittent nature of the interplanetary magnetic field is briefly discussed comparing results performed during different phases of the solar cycle. The scaling properties of the interplanetary magnetic field magnitude show solar cycle variation that can be distinguished in the scaling exponents revealed by structure functions. The scaling exponents observed around the solar maximum coincide, within the errors, to those measured for passive scalars in hydrodynamic turbulence. However, it is also found that the values are not universal in the sense that the solar cycle variation may be reflected in dependence on the structure of the velocity field

  19. Detecting quantum critical points using bipartite fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel, Stephan; Laflorencie, Nicolas; Song, H Francis; Le Hur, Karyn

    2012-03-16

    We show that the concept of bipartite fluctuations F provides a very efficient tool to detect quantum phase transitions in strongly correlated systems. Using state-of-the-art numerical techniques complemented with analytical arguments, we investigate paradigmatic examples for both quantum spins and bosons. As compared to the von Neumann entanglement entropy, we observe that F allows us to find quantum critical points with much better accuracy in one dimension. We further demonstrate that F can be successfully applied to the detection of quantum criticality in higher dimensions with no prior knowledge of the universality class of the transition. Promising approaches to experimentally access fluctuations are discussed for quantum antiferromagnets and cold gases.

  20. Memory versus fluctuations in heavy ion fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chushnyakova, M. V.; Gontchar, I. I.

    2013-09-01

    We model collisions of complex nuclei leading to capture using the Langevin equations, with white and colored noises and with instant and retarding friction, respectively. The friction force is supposed to be proportional to the squared derivative of the strong nucleus-nucleus interaction potential (SnnP). The SnnP is calculated within the framework of the double folding model with the density-dependent M3Y NN-forces possessing the finite range exchange term. Comparing results obtained in the presence and in the absence of fluctuations, we found that the fluctuations influence the capture cross sections weakly, typically within 5%. In contradistinction, the influence of the memory effects is found to be about 20%.

  1. Nonequilibrium electron-vibration coupling and conductance fluctuations in a C60 junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulstrup, Søren; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2012-01-01

    displacement. Combined with a vibrational heating mechanism we construct a model from our results that explain the polarity-dependent two-level conductance fluctuations observed in recent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments [N. Ne´el et al., Nano Lett. 11, 3593 (2011)]. These findings highlight......We investigate chemical bond formation and conductance in a molecular C60 junction under finite bias voltage using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's functions (DFT-NEGF). At the point of contact formation we identify a remarkably strong...... coupling between the C60 motion and the molecular electronic structure. This is only seen for positive sample bias, although the conductance itself is not strongly polarity dependent. The nonequilibrium effect is traced back to a sudden shift in the position of the voltage drop with a small C60...

  2. Strong coupling phase in QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Ken-ichi

    1988-01-01

    Existence of a strong coupling phase in QED has been suggested in solutions of the Schwinger-Dyson equation and in Monte Carlo simulation of lattice QED. In this article we recapitulate the previous arguments, and formulate the problem in the modern framework of the renormalization theory, Wilsonian renormalization. This scheme of renormalization gives the best understanding of the basic structure of a field theory especially when it has a multi-phase structure. We resolve some misleading arguments in the previous literature. Then we set up a strategy to attack the strong phase, if any. We describe a trial; a coupled Schwinger-Dyson equation. Possible picture of the strong coupling phase QED is presented. (author)

  3. Biomolecules: Fluctuations and relaxations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parak, F.; Ostermann, A.; Gassmann, A.; Scherk, C.; Chong, S.-H.; Kidera, A.; Go, N.

    1999-10-01

    The normal-mode refinement of X-ray crystallographic data opened a new possibility to analyze the mean-square displacements in a protein molecule. A comparison of the X-ray structure of myoglobin at several temperatures with Mössbauer data is performed. In the low-temperature regime below 180 K the iron mean-square displacements obtained by Mössbauer spectroscopy are in good agreement with a normal-mode analysis. The X-ray mean-square displacements at the position of the iron, after the motion originated from the external degrees of freedom are subtracted, have practically the same temperature dependence as those from Mössbauer spectroscopy. The difference between the X-ray mean-square displacements and those predicted by normal-mode analysis measures the distribution of molecules into conformational substates. Above 180 K the Mössbauer effect indicates fluctuations between conformational substates. The relaxation from a Fe(III) conformation to a Fe(II) conformation is shown for superoxide dismutase of Propionibacterium shermanii.

  4. Fluctuations and Linear Response in Supercooled Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Johannes K.

    Fluctuation dissipation theorems are derived for thermodynamic properties like frequency dependent specific heat and compressibility. First the case where a systems dynamics are restricted by constant volume and energy is considered. The dynamic linear response to a heat pulse and a volume change...... of the theory in the field of supercooled liquids are showed. First the full frequency dependent thermodynamic response matrix is extracted from simulations of a binary Lennard Jones liquid. Secondly some simple stochastic models of supercooled liquids are analysed in the framework of linear thermodynamic...

  5. Chaotic Maps Dynamics, Fractals, and Rapid Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Goong

    2011-01-01

    This book consists of lecture notes for a semester-long introductory graduate course on dynamical systems and chaos taught by the authors at Texas A&M University and Zhongshan University, China. There are ten chapters in the main body of the book, covering an elementary theory of chaotic maps in finite-dimensional spaces. The topics include one-dimensional dynamical systems (interval maps), bifurcations, general topological, symbolic dynamical systems, fractals and a class of infinite-dimensional dynamical systems which are induced by interval maps, plus rapid fluctuations of chaotic maps as a

  6. Quantum tunnelling fluctuations in anharmonic potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopoulos, G.J.; Hadjiagapiou, I.A.

    1993-01-01

    A nonlinear perturbation theory is developed for the logarithm of the wavefunction. It is then used developing a long range time perturbation series for the wavefunction of the Schroedinger equation in the case of a cubic potential exhibiting a valley and a hump. Starting with a low energy Gaussian wavefunction centred at the bottom of the valley the profiles of the probability and current densities are obtained at different times, thus providing an idea of their evolution. While the probability density is slightly displaced the current density, starting from zero, fluctuates vividly. (author). 4 refs, 4 figs

  7. Nonequilibrium fluctuations in a resistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, N; Ciliberto, S

    2005-06-01

    In small systems where relevant energies are comparable to thermal agitation, fluctuations are of the order of average values. In systems in thermodynamical equilibrium, the variance of these fluctuations can be related to the dissipation constant in the system, exploiting the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. In nonequilibrium steady systems, fluctuations theorems (FT) additionally describe symmetry properties of the probability density functions (PDFs) of the fluctuations of injected and dissipated energies. We experimentally probe a model system: an electrical dipole driven out of equilibrium by a small constant current I, and show that FT are experimentally accessible and valid. Furthermore, we stress that FT can be used to measure the dissipated power P = R I2 in the system by just studying the PDFs' symmetries.

  8. Gravitons and light cone fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, L.H.

    1995-01-01

    Gravitons in a squeezed vacuum state, the natural result of quantum creation in the early Universe or by black holes, will introduce metric fluctuations. These metric fluctuations will introduce fluctuations of the light cone. It is shown that when the various two-point functions of a quantized field are averaged over the metric fluctuations, the light cone singularity disappears for distinct points. The metric-averaged functions remain singular in the limit of coincident points. The metric-averaged retarded Green's function for a massless field becomes a Gaussian which is nonzero both inside and outside of the classical light cone. This implies some photons propagate faster than the classical light speed, whereas others propagate slower. The possible effects of metric fluctuations upon one-loop quantum processes are discussed and illustrated by the calculation of the one-loop electron self-energy

  9. Socioeconomic Status Is Not Related with Facial Fluctuating Asymmetry: Evidence from Latin-American Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Cintas, Celia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio Cesar; Ramallo, Virginia; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Adhikari, Kaustubh; Castillo, Lucía; Gomez-Valdés, Jorge; Everardo, Paola; De Avila, Francisco; Hünemeier, Tábita; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, Williams; Fuentes, Macarena; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovani; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rosique, Javier; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; González-José, Rolando

    2017-01-01

    The expression of facial asymmetries has been recurrently related with poverty and/or disadvantaged socioeconomic status. Departing from the developmental instability theory, previous approaches attempted to test the statistical relationship between the stress experienced by individuals grown in poor conditions and an increase in facial and corporal asymmetry. Here we aim to further evaluate such hypothesis on a large sample of admixed Latin Americans individuals by exploring if low socioeconomic status individuals tend to exhibit greater facial fluctuating asymmetry values. To do so, we implement Procrustes analysis of variance and Hierarchical Linear Modelling (HLM) to estimate potential associations between facial fluctuating asymmetry values and socioeconomic status. We report significant relationships between facial fluctuating asymmetry values and age, sex, and genetic ancestry, while socioeconomic status failed to exhibit any strong statistical relationship with facial asymmetry. These results are persistent after the effect of heterozygosity (a proxy for genetic ancestry) is controlled in the model. Our results indicate that, at least on the studied sample, there is no relationship between socioeconomic stress (as intended as low socioeconomic status) and facial asymmetries.

  10. Quantum fluctuations from thermal fluctuations in Jacobson formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faizal, Mir [University of British Columbia-Okanagan, Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, Kelowna, BC (Canada); University of Lethbridge, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lethbridge, AB (Canada); Ashour, Amani; Alcheikh, Mohammad [Damascus University, Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Alasfar, Lina [Universite Clermont Auvergne, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de Clermont-Ferrand, Aubiere (France); Alsaleh, Salwa; Mahroussah, Ahmed [King Saud University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-09-15

    In the Jacobson formalism general relativity is obtained from thermodynamics. This is done by using the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy-area relation. However, as a black hole gets smaller, its temperature will increase. This will cause the thermal fluctuations to also increase, and these will in turn correct the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy-area relation. Furthermore, with the reduction in the size of the black hole, quantum effects will also start to dominate. Just as the general relativity can be obtained from thermodynamics in the Jacobson formalism, we propose that the quantum fluctuations to the geometry can be obtained from thermal fluctuations. (orig.)

  11. Large fluctuations and fixation in evolutionary games

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assaf, Michael; Mobilia, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    We study large fluctuations in evolutionary games belonging to the coordination and anti-coordination classes. The dynamics of these games, modeling cooperation dilemmas, is characterized by a coexistence fixed point separating two absorbing states. We are particularly interested in the problem of fixation that refers to the possibility that a few mutants take over the entire population. Here, the fixation phenomenon is induced by large fluctuations and is investigated by a semiclassical WKB (Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin) theory generalized to treat stochastic systems possessing multiple absorbing states. Importantly, this method allows us to analyze the combined influence of selection and random fluctuations on the evolutionary dynamics beyond the weak selection limit often considered in previous works. We accurately compute, including pre-exponential factors, the probability distribution function in the long-lived coexistence state and the mean fixation time necessary for a few mutants to take over the entire population in anti-coordination games, and also the fixation probability in the coordination class. Our analytical results compare excellently with extensive numerical simulations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our treatment is superior to the Fokker–Planck approximation when the selection intensity is finite

  12. Local polar fluctuations in lead halide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liang; Yaffe, Omer; Guo, Yinsheng; Brus, Louis; Rappe, Andrew; Egger, David; Kronik, Leeor

    The lead halide perovskites have recently attracted much attention because of their large and growing photovoltaic power conversion efficiencies. However, questions remain regarding the temporal and spatial correlations of the structural fluctuations, their atomistic nature, and how they affect electronic and photovoltaic properties. To address these questions, we have performed a combined ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) and density functional theory (DFT) study on CsPbBr3. We have observed prevalent anharmonic motion in our MD trajectories, with local polar fluctuations involving head-to-head motion of A-site Cs cations coupled with Br window opening. We calculate Raman spectra from the polarizability auto-correlation functions obtained from these trajectories and show that anharmonic A-site cation motion manifests as a broad central peak in the Raman spectrum, which increases in intensity with temperature. A comparison of the experimental Raman spectrum of hybrid organometallic MAPbBr3 and fully inorganic CsPbBr3 suggests that structural fluctuations in lead-halide perovskites is more general than rotation of polar organic cations and is intimately coupled to the inorganic framework.

  13. Fluctuation microscopy: a probe of medium range order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treacy, M M J; Gibson, J M; Fan, L; Paterson, D J; McNulty, I

    2005-01-01

    Fluctuation microscopy is a hybrid diffraction-imaging technique that detects medium range order in amorphous materials by examining spatial fluctuations in coherent scattering. These fluctuations appear as speckle in images and diffraction patterns. The volume of material contributing to the speckle is determined by the point-spread function (the resolution) of the imaging optics and the sample thickness. The spatial periodicities being probed are related to the diffraction vector. Statistical analysis of the speckle allows the random and non-random (ordered) contributions to be discriminated. The image resolution that gives the maximum speckle contrast, as determined by the normalized variance of the image intensity, is determined by the characteristic length scale of the ordering. Because medium range ordering length scales can extend out to about the tenth coordination shell, fluctuation microscopy tends to be a low image resolution technique. This review presents the kinematical scattering theory underpinning fluctuation microscopy and a description of fluctuation electron microscopy as it has been employed in the transmission electron microscope for studying amorphous materials. Recent results using soft x-rays for studying nanoscale materials are also presented. We summarize outstanding issues and point to possible future directions for fluctuation microscopy as a technique

  14. Enhancement of large fluctuations to extinction in adaptive networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindes, Jason; Schwartz, Ira B.; Shaw, Leah B.

    2018-01-01

    During an epidemic, individual nodes in a network may adapt their connections to reduce the chance of infection. A common form of adaption is avoidance rewiring, where a noninfected node breaks a connection to an infected neighbor and forms a new connection to another noninfected node. Here we explore the effects of such adaptivity on stochastic fluctuations in the susceptible-infected-susceptible model, focusing on the largest fluctuations that result in extinction of infection. Using techniques from large-deviation theory, combined with a measurement of heterogeneity in the susceptible degree distribution at the endemic state, we are able to predict and analyze large fluctuations and extinction in adaptive networks. We find that in the limit of small rewiring there is a sharp exponential reduction in mean extinction times compared to the case of zero adaption. Furthermore, we find an exponential enhancement in the probability of large fluctuations with increased rewiring rate, even when holding the average number of infected nodes constant.

  15. Thermal and active fluctuations of a compressible bilayer vesicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachin Krishnan, T. V.; Yasuda, Kento; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Komura, Shigeyuki

    2018-05-01

    We discuss thermal and active fluctuations of a compressible bilayer vesicle by using the results of hydrodynamic theory for vesicles. Coupled Langevin equations for the membrane deformation and the density fields are employed to calculate the power spectral density matrix of membrane fluctuations. Thermal contribution is obtained by means of the fluctuation dissipation theorem, whereas active contribution is calculated from exponentially decaying time correlation functions of active random forces. We obtain the total power spectral density as a sum of thermal and active contributions. An apparent response function is further calculated in order to compare with the recent microrheology experiment on red blood cells. An enhanced response is predicted in the low-frequency regime for non-thermal active fluctuations.

  16. Short Wavelength Fluctuations and Electron Transport in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.L. Wong; K. Itoh; S.-I. Itoh; A. Fukuyama; M. Yagi

    2000-09-08

    Correlation between electron heat diffusivity and short wavelength (kri {approximately} 5) fluctuation amplitude was observed in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) tokamak in the core of enhanced reversed shear (ERS) plasmas [1]. These fluctuations propagate in the ion diamagnetic drift direction with wave number comparable to wpe/c. Further analysis of these data yields the ratios ce/ci and ce/De, and their values are consistent with the picture that the electron transport is mainly induced by the short wavelength fluctuations in the plasma core where the long wavelength (kri {approximately} 1) fluctuations are absent. Although there is not enough information to identify these short wavelength modes, the values of ce is found to be comparable to theoretical predictions based on the current diffusive ballooning mode theory [2].

  17. Strong Turbulence in Low-beta Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchen, C. M.; Pécseli, Hans; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    1980-01-01

    An investigation of the spectral structure of turbulence in a plasma confined by a strong homogeneous magnetic field was made by means of a fluid description. The turbulent spectrum is divided into subranges. Mean gradients of velocity and density excite turbulent motions, and govern the production...... subrange. The spectra of velocity and potential fluctuations interact in the coupling subrange, and the energy is transferred along the spectrum in the inertia subrange. Applying the method of cascade decomposition, the spectral laws k-3, k-3, k-2 are obtained for the velocity fluctuations, and k-3, k-5, k......-3/2 for the potential fluctuations in the production, coupling and inertia subranges, respectively. The coefficient of Bohm diffusion is reproduced, and its role in electrostatic coupling is derived. Comparison is made with measured power laws reported in the literature, from Q-devices, hot...

  18. Superconducting fluctuations in molybdenum nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, R.; Thanikai Arasu, A. V.; Amaladass, E. P.; Vaidhyanathan, L. S.; Baisnab, D. K.

    2018-02-01

    MoN thin films have been deposited using reactive sputtering. The change in resistance near superconducting transition temperature at various magnetic fields has been analyzed based on superconducting fluctuations in the system. The Aslamazov and Larkin scaling theory has been utilized to analyze the conductance change. The results indicate that most of the measurements show two dimensional (2D) nature and exhibit scaling behavior at lower magnetic fields (7T). We have also analyzed our data based on the model in which there is no explicit dependence of Tc. These analyses also substantiate a crossover from a 2D nature to a 3D at larger fields. Analysis using lowest Landau level scaling theory for a 2D system exhibit scaling behavior and substantiate our observations. The broadening at low resistance part has been explained based on thermally activated flux flow model and show universal behavior. The dependence of Uo on magnetic field indicates both single and collective vortex behavior.

  19. Spectral fluctuations and zeta functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balazs, N.L.; Schmit, C.; Voros, A.

    1987-01-01

    The study theoretically and numerically the role of the fluctuations of eigenvalue spectra {μ/sub n} in a particular analytical continuation process applied to the (generalized) zeta function Z(s) = Σ/sub n/μ/sub n//sup -s/ for s large and positive. A particularly interesting example is the spectrum of the Laplacian on a triangular domain which tessellates a compact surface of constant negative curvature (of genus two). The authors indeed find that the fluctuations restrict the abscissa of convergence, and also affect the rate of convergence. This then initiates a new approach to the exploration of spectral fluctuations through the convergence of analytical continuation processes

  20. Fluctuation theorem: A critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek Mansour, M.; Baras, F.

    2017-10-01

    Fluctuation theorem for entropy production is revisited in the framework of stochastic processes. The applicability of the fluctuation theorem to physico-chemical systems and the resulting stochastic thermodynamics were analyzed. Some unexpected limitations are highlighted in the context of jump Markov processes. We have shown that these limitations handicap the ability of the resulting stochastic thermodynamics to correctly describe the state of non-equilibrium systems in terms of the thermodynamic properties of individual processes therein. Finally, we considered the case of diffusion processes and proved that the fluctuation theorem for entropy production becomes irrelevant at the stationary state in the case of one variable systems.

  1. Lake level fluctuations boost toxic cyanobacterial "oligotrophic blooms".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Callieri

    Full Text Available Global warming has been shown to strongly influence inland water systems, producing noticeable increases in water temperatures. Rising temperatures, especially when combined with widespread nutrient pollution, directly favour the growth of toxic cyanobacteria. Climate changes have also altered natural water level fluctuations increasing the probability of extreme events as dry periods followed by heavy rains. The massive appearance of Dolichospermum lemmermannii ( = planktonic Anabaena, a toxic species absent from the pelagic zone of the subalpine oligotrophic Lake Maggiore before 2005, could be a consequence of the unusual fluctuations of lake level in recent years. We hypothesized that these fluctuations may favour the cyanobacterium as result of nutrient pulses from the biofilms formed in the littoral zone when the lake level is high. To help verify this, we exposed artificial substrates in the lake, and evaluated their nutrient enrichment and release after desiccation, together with measurements of fluctuations in lake level, precipitation and D. lemmermannii population. The highest percentage of P release and the lowest C:P molar ratio of released nutrients coincided with the summer appearance of the D. lemmermannii bloom. The P pulse indicates that fluctuations in level counteract nutrient limitation in this lake and it is suggested that this may apply more widely to other oligotrophic lakes. In view of the predicted increase in water level fluctuations due to climate change, it is important to try to minimize such fluctuations in order to mitigate the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms.

  2. Single-molecule theory of enzymatic inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Tal; Reuveni, Shlomi; Urbakh, Michael

    2018-02-22

    The classical theory of enzymatic inhibition takes a deterministic, bulk based approach to quantitatively describe how inhibitors affect the progression of enzymatic reactions. Catalysis at the single-enzyme level is, however, inherently stochastic which could lead to strong deviations from classical predictions. To explore this, we take the single-enzyme perspective and rebuild the theory of enzymatic inhibition from the bottom up. We find that accounting for multi-conformational enzyme structure and intrinsic randomness should strongly change our view on the uncompetitive and mixed modes of inhibition. There, stochastic fluctuations at the single-enzyme level could make inhibitors act as activators; and we state-in terms of experimentally measurable quantities-a mathematical condition for the emergence of this surprising phenomenon. Our findings could explain why certain molecules that inhibit enzymatic activity when substrate concentrations are high, elicit a non-monotonic dose response when substrate concentrations are low.

  3. Stirring Strongly Coupled Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir; Rajagopal, Krishna; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2009-01-01

    We determine the energy it takes to move a test quark along a circle of radius L with angular frequency w through the strongly coupled plasma of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory. We find that for most values of L and w the energy deposited by stirring the plasma in this way is governed either by the drag force acting on a test quark moving through the plasma in a straight line with speed v=Lw or by the energy radiated by a quark in circular motion in the absence of any plasma, whichever is larger. There is a continuous crossover from the drag-dominated regime to the radiation-dominated regime. In the crossover regime we find evidence for significant destructive interference between energy loss due to drag and that due to radiation as if in vacuum. The rotating quark thus serves as a model system in which the relative strength of, and interplay between, two different mechanisms of parton energy loss is accessible via a controlled classical gravity calculation. We close by speculating on the implicati...

  4. Local polar fluctuations in lead halide perovskite crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaffe, Omer; Guo, Yinsheng; Tan, Liang Z.; Egger, David A.; Hull, Trevor

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid lead-halide perovskites have emerged as an excellent class of photovoltaic materials. Recent reports suggest that the organic molecular cation is responsible for local polar fluctuations that inhibit carrier recombination. We combine low-frequency Raman scattering with first-principles molecular dynamics (MD) to study the fundamental nature of these local polar fluctuations. Our observations of a strong central peak in the cubic phase of both hybrid (CH 3 NH 3 PbBr 3 ) and all-inorganic (CsPbBr 3 ) lead-halide perovskites show that anharmonic, local polar fluctuations are intrinsic to the general lead-halide perovskite structure, and not unique to the dipolar organic cation. Furthermore, MD simulations indicate that head-to-head Cs motion coupled to Br face expansion, occurring on a few hundred femtosecond time scale, drives the local polar fluctuations in CsPbBr 3 .

  5. Local Polar Fluctuations in Lead Halide Perovskite Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Omer; Guo, Yinsheng; Tan, Liang Z.; Egger, David A.; Hull, Trevor; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Zheng, Fan; Heinz, Tony F.; Kronik, Leeor; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Owen, Jonathan S.; Rappe, Andrew M.; Pimenta, Marcos A.; Brus, Louis E.

    2017-03-01

    Hybrid lead-halide perovskites have emerged as an excellent class of photovoltaic materials. Recent reports suggest that the organic molecular cation is responsible for local polar fluctuations that inhibit carrier recombination. We combine low-frequency Raman scattering with first-principles molecular dynamics (MD) to study the fundamental nature of these local polar fluctuations. Our observations of a strong central peak in the cubic phase of both hybrid (CH3 NH3 PbBr3 ) and all-inorganic (CsPbBr3 ) lead-halide perovskites show that anharmonic, local polar fluctuations are intrinsic to the general lead-halide perovskite structure, and not unique to the dipolar organic cation. MD simulations indicate that head-to-head Cs motion coupled to Br face expansion, occurring on a few hundred femtosecond time scale, drives the local polar fluctuations in CsPbBr3 .

  6. Local Polar Fluctuations in Lead Halide Perovskite Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaffe, Omer; Guo, Yinsheng; Tan, Liang Z.; Egger, David A.; Hull, Trevor; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Zheng, Fan; Heinz, Tony F.; Kronik, Leeor; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Owen, Jonathan S.; Rappe, Andrew M.; Pimenta, Marcos A.; Brus, Louis E.

    2017-03-01

    Hybrid lead-halide perovskites have emerged as an excellent class of photovoltaic materials. Recent reports suggest that the organic molecular cation is responsible for local polar fluctuations that inhibit carrier recombination. We combine low-frequency Raman scattering with first-principles molecular dynamics (MD) to study the fundamental nature of these local polar fluctuations. Our observations of a strong central peak in the cubic phase of both hybrid (CH3NH3PbBr3) and all-inorganic (CsPbBr3) leadhalide perovskites show that anharmonic, local polar fluctuations are intrinsic to the general lead-halide perovskite structure, and not unique to the dipolar organic cation. MD simulations indicate that head-tohead Cs motion coupled to Br face expansion, occurring on a few hundred femtosecond time scale, drives the local polar fluctuations in CsPbBr3.

  7. Canonical structure of dynamical fluctuations in mesoscopic nonequilibrium steady states

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maes, C.; Netočný, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 3 (2008), 30003/1-30003/6 ISSN 0295-5075 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC202/07/J051 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : nonequilibrium fluctuations * steady state * Onsager- Machlup theory Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 2.203, year: 2008

  8. The Fluctuation Niche in Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terradas, J.; Penuelas, J.; Lloret, F.; Penuelas, J.

    2009-01-01

    Classical approaches to niche in coexisting plants have undervalued temporal fluctuations. We propose that fluctuation niche is an important dimension of the total niche and interacts with habitat and life-history niches to provide a better understanding of the multidimensional niche space where ecological interactions occur. To scale a fluctuation niche, it is necessary to relate environmental constrictions or species performance not only to the absolute values of the usual environmental and eco physiological variables but also to their variances or other measures of variability. We use Mediterranean plant communities as examples, because they present characteristic large seasonal and inter annual fluctuations in water and nutrient availabilities, along an episodic-constant gradient, and because the plant responses include a number of syndromes coupled to this gradient.

  9. The Fluctuation Niche in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Terradas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical approaches to niche in coexisting plants have undervalued temporal fluctuations. We propose that fluctuation niche is an important dimension of the total niche and interacts with habitat and life-history niches to provide a better understanding of the multidimensional niche space where ecological interactions occur. To scale a fluctuation niche, it is necessary to relate environmental constrictions or species performance not only to the absolute values of the usual environmental and ecophysiological variables but also to their variances or other measures of variability. We use Mediterranean plant communities as examples, because they present characteristic large seasonal and interannual fluctuations in water and nutrient availabilities, along an episodic-constant gradient, and because the plant responses include a number of syndromes coupled to this gradient.

  10. Fluctuating attention in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrfelt, Randi; Aarsland, Dag; Janvin, Carmen

    2001-01-01

    great variability in performance in reactiontime tasks. Aiming to investigate fluctuation of attention in PD, we re- analysed data from a cue-target reactiontime task, specifically searching for differences in variability between patients and controls. The subjects included were a representative group...... a significant difference (pattention might be fluctuating on a moment to moment basis in PD. Some of the PD patients have also been tested with a choice reaction time...... task, shown by Walker et al. (2000) to be sensi- tive to fluctuation of cognition in DLB patients. Preliminary data-analysis indicate that PD patients also show considerable intra-individual variation in performance on this test. These findings suggest that fluctuating attention and cogni- tion...

  11. Fluctuations and Instability in Sedimentation

    KAUST Repository

    Guazzelli, Élisabeth

    2011-01-21

    This review concentrates on the fluctuations of the velocities of sedimenting spheres, and on the structural instability of a suspension of settling fibers. For many years, theoretical estimates and numerical simulations predicted the fluctuations of the velocities of spheres to increase with the size of the container, whereas experiments found no such variation. Two ideas have increased our understanding. First, the correlation length of the velocity fluctuations was found experimentally to be 20 interparticle separations. Second, in dilute suspensions, a vertical variation in the concentration due to the spreading of the front with the clear fluid can inhibit the velocity fluctuations. In a very dilute regime, a homogeneous suspension of fibers suffers a spontaneous instability in which fast descending fiber-rich columns are separated by rising fiber-sparse columns. In a semidilute regime, the settling is hindered, more so than for spheres. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  12. Nonequilibrium quantum fluctuations of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, A E

    2014-09-01

    The concept of work is basic for statistical thermodynamics. To gain a fuller understanding of work and its (quantum) features, it needs to be represented as an average of a fluctuating quantity. Here I focus on the work done between two moments of time for a thermally isolated quantum system driven by a time-dependent Hamiltonian. I formulate two natural conditions needed for the fluctuating work to be physically meaningful for a system that starts its evolution from a nonequilibrium state. The existing definitions do not satisfy these conditions due to issues that are traced back to noncommutativity. I propose a definition of fluctuating work that is free of previous drawbacks and that applies for a wide class of nonequilibrium initial states. It allows the deduction of a generalized work-fluctuation theorem that applies for an arbitrary (out-of-equilibrium) initial state.

  13. Nonlinear damping of drift waves by strong flow curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidikman, K.L.; Carreras, B.A.; Garcia, L.; Diamond, P.H.

    1993-01-01

    A single-equation model has been used to study the effect of a fixed poloidal flow (V 0 ) on turbulent drift waves. The electron dynamics come from a laminar kinetic equation in the dissipative trapped-electron regime. In the past, the authors have assumed that the mode frequency is close to the drift-wave frequency. Trapped-electron density fluctuations are then related to potential fluctuations by an open-quotes iδclose quotes term. Flow shear (V 0 ') and curvature (V 0 double-prime) both have a stabilizing effect on linear modes for this open-quotes iδclose quotes model. However, in the nonlinear regime, single-helicity effects inhibit the flow damping. Neither V 0 ' nor V 0 double-prime produces a nonlinear damping effect. The above assumption on the frequency can be relaxed by including the electron time-response in the linear part of the evolution. In this time-dependent model, instability drive due to trapped electrons is reduced when mode frequency is greater than drift-wave frequency. Since V 0 double-prime produces such a frequency shift, its linear effect is enhanced. There is also nonlinear damping, since single-helicity effects do not eliminate the shift. Renormalized theory for this model predicts nonlinear stability for sufficiently large curvature. Single-helicity calculations have already shown nonlinear damping, and this strong V 0 double-prime regime is being explored. In the theory, the Gaussian shape of the nonlinear diffusivity is expanded to obtain a quadratic potential. The implications of this assumption will be tested by solving the full renormalized equation using a shooting method

  14. Thermodynamic Green functions in theory of superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M.Plakida

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A general theory of superconductivity is formulated within the thermodynamic Green function method for various types of pairing mediated by phonons, spin fluctuations, and strong Coulomb correlations in the Hubbard and t-J models. A rigorous Dyson equation for matrix Green functions is derived in terms of a self-energy as a many-particle Green function. By applying the noncrossing approximation for the self-energy, a closed self-consistent system of equations is obtained, similar to the conventional Eliashberg equations. A brief discussion of superconductivity mediated by kinematic interaction with an estimation of a superconducting transition temperature in the Hubbard model is given.

  15. <strong>Confusion on tonguesstrong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Katrine Egede; Gammelgård, Judy

    2010-01-01

    followed by theories that have the infant's development as their object. The concept of attachment and the empirical research tradition has created a new focus for the studies of the infant that seems to block our vision of the sexual. Following a short historical outline from Balint's concept of primary...... love to Bowlby's concept of attachment we examine the theories that, inspired by Laplanche, once more have taken up the discussion of infantile sexuality. In the light of these discussions and through clinical examples we argue that the concept of infantile sexuality could be clarified by combining......  What is the origin and character of infantile sexuality? At the time of its announcement, Freud's theory of infantile sexuality was a scandal. Not only did it shock by its claim that the small child sucking at the mother's breast experiences a kind of pleasure that Freud without hesitation named...

  16. <strong>Confusion on tonguesstrong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Katrine Egede; Gammelgård, Judy

    2010-01-01

      What is the origin and character of infantile sexuality? At the time of its announcement, Freud's theory of infantile sexuality was a scandal. Not only did it shock by its claim that the small child sucking at the mother's breast experiences a kind of pleasure that Freud without hesitation named...... sexual. The theory also turned the common understanding of human sexuality upside-down by lifting the definition of sexuality out of a limited biological frame of understanding and placing it on the boundary between the somatic and the psychical. However, Freud's epoch-making discovery has not been...... followed by theories that have the infant's development as their object. The concept of attachment and the empirical research tradition has created a new focus for the studies of the infant that seems to block our vision of the sexual. Following a short historical outline from Balint's concept of primary...

  17. Thermodynamic prediction of glass formation tendency, cluster-in-jellium model for metallic glasses, ab initio tight-binding calculations, and new density functional theory development for systems with strong electron correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Yongxin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    also plays an important role, as it may directly track the movement of every atom. Simulation time is a major limit for molecular dynamics, not only because of “slow” computer speed, but also because of the accumulation error in the numerical treatment of the motion equations. There is also a great concern about the reliability of the emperical potentials if using classical molecular dynamics. Ab initio methods based on density functional theory(DFT) do not have this problem, however, it suffers from small simulation cells and is more demanding computationally. When crystal phase is involved, size effect of the simulation cell is more pronounced since long-range elastic energy would be established. Simulation methods which are more efficient in computation but yet have similar reliability as the ab initio methods, like tight-binding method, are highly desirable. While the complexity of metallic glasses comes from the atomistic level, there is also a large field which deals with the complexity from electronic level. The only “ab initio” method applicable to solid state systems is density functional theory with local density approximation( LDA) or generalized gradient approximation(GGA) for the exchange-correlation energy. It is very successful for simple sp element, where it reaches an high accuracy for determining the surface reconstruction. However, there is a large class of materials with strong electron correlation, where DFT based on LDA or GGA fails in a fundamental way. An “ab initio” method which can generally apply to correlated materials, as LDA for simple sp element, is still to be developed. The thesis is prepared to address some of the above problems.

  18. Flavour Democracy in Strong Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Abel, S A; Abel, Steven; King, Steven

    1998-01-01

    We show that the fermion mass spectrum may naturally be understood in terms of flavour democratic fixed points in supersymmetric theories which have a large domain of attraction in the presence of "strong unification". Our approach provides an alternative to the approximate Yukawa texture zeroes of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. We discuss a particular model based on a broken gauged $SU(3)_L\\times SU(3)_R$ family symmetry which illustrates our approach.

  19. From Brownian motion to power of fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Berche

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The year 2012 marks the 140th birth anniversary of Marian Smoluchowski (28.05.1872-5.09.1917, a man who "made ground-breaking contribution to the theory of Brownian motion, the theory of sedimentation, the statistical nature of the Second Law, the theory and practice of density fluctuations (critical opalescence. During his final years of scientific creativity his pioneering theory of coagulation and diffusion-limited reaction rate appeared. These outstanding achievements present true gems which dominate the description of soft matter physics and chemical physics as well as the related areas up till now!" This quotation was taken from the lecture by Peter Hanggi given at international conference Statistical Physics: Modern Trends and Applications that took place in Lviv, Ukraine on July 3-6, 2012 (see conference web-page for more details and was dedicated to the commemoration of Smoluchowski's work. This and forthcoming issues of the Condensed Matter Physics contain papers presented at this conference.

  20. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Resarch Center Workshop: Fluctuations, Correlations and RHIC Low Energy Runs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsch, F.; Kojo, T.; Mukherjee, S.; Stephanov, M.; Xu, N.

    2011-10-27

    Most of our visible universe is made up of hadronic matter. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the theory of strong interaction that describes the hadronic matter. However, QCD predicts that at high enough temperatures and/or densities ordinary hadronic matter ceases to exist and a new form of matter is created, the so-called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Non-perturbative lattice QCD simulations shows that for high temperature and small densities the transition from the hadronic to the QCD matter is not an actual phase transition, rather it takes place via a rapid crossover. On the other hand, it is generally believed that at zero temperature and high densities such a transition is an actual first order phase transition. Thus, in the temperature-density phase diagram of QCD, the first order phase transition line emanating from the zero temperature high density region ends at some higher temperature where the transition becomes a crossover. The point at which the first order transition line turns into a crossover is a second order phase transition point belonging to three dimensional Ising universality class. This point is known as the QCD Critical End Point (CEP). For the last couple of years the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been performing experiments at lower energies in search of the elusive QCD CEP. In general critical behaviors are manifested through appearance of long range correlations and increasing fluctuations associated with the presence of mass-less modes in the vicinity of a second order phase transition. Experimental signatures of the CEP are likely to be found in observables related to fluctuations and correlations. Thus, one of the major focuses of the RHIC low energy scan program is to measure various experimental observables connected to fluctuations and correlations. On the other hand, with the start of the RHIC low energy scan program, a flurry of activities are taking place to provide solid theoretical

  1. Transient fluctuation relations for time-dependent particle transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altland, Alexander; de Martino, Alessandro; Egger, Reinhold; Narozhny, Boris

    2010-09-01

    We consider particle transport under the influence of time-varying driving forces, where fluctuation relations connect the statistics of pairs of time-reversed evolutions of physical observables. In many “mesoscopic” transport processes, the effective many-particle dynamics is dominantly classical while the microscopic rates governing particle motion are of quantum-mechanical origin. We here employ the stochastic path-integral approach as an optimal tool to probe the fluctuation statistics in such applications. Describing the classical limit of the Keldysh quantum nonequilibrium field theory, the stochastic path integral encapsulates the quantum origin of microscopic particle exchange rates. Dynamically, it is equivalent to a transport master equation which is a formalism general enough to describe many applications of practical interest. We apply the stochastic path integral to derive general functional fluctuation relations for current flow induced by time-varying forces. We show that the successive measurement processes implied by this setup do not put the derivation of quantum fluctuation relations in jeopardy. While in many cases the fluctuation relation for a full time-dependent current profile may contain excessive information, we formulate a number of reduced relations, and demonstrate their application to mesoscopic transport. Examples include the distribution of transmitted charge, where we show that the derivation of a fluctuation relation requires the combined monitoring of the statistics of charge and work.

  2. Strong-force theorists scoop Noble Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Durrani, Matin

    2004-01-01

    Three US theorists have shared the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics "for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction". Their theoretical work explains why quarks behave almost as free particles at high energies (½ page)

  3. Fluctuations in Supercooled Fluids and Ionic Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Dayton Gray

    An overview of five studies is presented in two parts. The first part presents two studies of supercooled fluids. The second part presents three studies of water and aqueous solutions. Each study seeks a minimal model of a condensed matter system. In the first study, kinetically constrained models (KCM's) are compared to alternative theories of the glass transition in high dimensions. Dimensionality is used as a parameter to tune the connectivity of a lattice, where a higher dimensional model has more interactions between neighboring sites. This study finds that KCM's outperform alternative theories in high dimensions. The second study explores the possibility that bacteria have evolved to exploit the glass transition to enter a dormant state when environmental conditions are unfavorable. Although the available evidence shows that the bacterial cytoplasm does not meet the strict definition of a fragile glass former, much of its behavior is similar to and can be described using close analogies with the glass transition. In the second part, the third study describes the molecular mechanisms that gives rise to large electric field fluctuations, which in turn cause autoionization and ion dissociation. The fourth study analyzes several candidate order parameters as the basis for a Gaussian field theory of ion solvation. Finally, the fifth study discusses the most popular current explanation for observed charge asymmetry at liquid-vapor interfaces. This explanation, based on linear response of the surface polarization to the presence of an ion, is incorrect. Instead, the surface polarization responds non-linearly to the presence of an ion. Incorporating these non-linear fluctuations is essential to predict solvation free energies.

  4. Algebra of strong and electroweak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolokhov, S.V.; Vladimirov, Yu.S.

    2004-01-01

    The algebraic approach to describing the electroweak and strong interactions is considered within the frames of the binary geometrophysics, based on the principles of the Fokker-Feynman direct interparticle interaction theories of the Kaluza-Klein multidimensional geometrical models and the physical structures theory. It is shown that in this approach the electroweak and strong elementary particles interaction through the intermediate vector bosons, are characterized by the subtypes of the algebraic classification of the complex 3 x 3-matrices [ru

  5. Heat Flux and Entropy Produced by Thermal Fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciliberto, S.; Imparato, Alberto; Naert, A.

    2013-01-01

    , and a conservation law for the fluctuating entropy, which we justify theoretically. The system is ruled by the same equations as two Brownian particles kept at different temperatures and coupled by an elastic force. Our results set strong constraints on the energy exchanged between coupled nanosystems held...

  6. Random-matrix physics: spectrum and strength fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brody, T.A.; Flores, J.; French, J.B.; Mello, P.A.; Pandey, A.; Wong, S.S.M.

    1981-01-01

    It now appears that the general nature of the deviations from uniformity in the spectrum of a complicated nucleus is essentially the same in all regions of the spectrum and over the entire Periodic Table. This behavior, moreover, is describable in terms of standard Hamiltonian ensembles which could be generated on the basis of simple information-theory concepts, and which give also a good account of fluctuation phenomena of other kinds and, apparently, in other many-body systems besides nuclei. The main departures from simple behavior are ascribable to the moderation of the level repulsion by effects due to symmetries and collectivities, for the description of which more complicated ensembles are called for. One purpose of this review is to give a self-contained account of the theory, using methods: sometimes approximate: which are consonant with the usual theory of stochastic processes. Another purpose is to give a proper foundation for the use of ensemble theory, to make clear the origin of the simplicities in the observable fluctuations, and to derive other general fluctuation results. In comparing theory and experiment, the authors give an analysis of much of the nuclear-energy-level data, as well as an extended discussion of observable effects in nuclear transitions and reactions and in the low-temperature thermodynamics of aggregates of small metallic particles

  7. Zero sound and spin fluctuations in liquid helium-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrich, C.H. III; Pethick, C.J.; Pines, D.

    1976-01-01

    The density fluctuation spectrum of 3 He is calculated using a generalized polarization potential approach and shown to yield both zero sound and quasiparticle spectra in good agreement with the recent neutron scattering experiments. Landau Fermi-liquid theory is used to calculate the spin density fluctuation spectrum; and sum-rule arguments are presented which enable us to establish the qualitative nature of this spectrum at larger wave vectors with results in good qualitative agreement with the recent experiment of Skold et al

  8. A GDP fluctuation model based on interacting firms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Honggang; Gao, Yan

    2008-09-01

    A distinctive feature of the market economies is the short-run fluctuations in output around the trend of long-run growth over time, and we regard this feature is internal to complex economic systems composed of interacting heterogeneous units. To explore such internal mechanisms of macroeconomic fluctuations, we present a multi-agent Keynesian theory-based model, which can provide a good approximation to the key empirical features of the western business cycles in the 20th Century, such as the structure of the autocorrelation function of overall output growth, correlations between the output growth of individual agents over time, the distribution of recessions, etc.

  9. Mercury exposure may influence fluctuating asymmetry in waterbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Ackerman, Joshua T.

    2017-01-01

    Variation in avian bilateral symmetry can be an indicator of developmental instability in response to a variety of stressors, including environmental contaminants. The authors used composite measures of fluctuating asymmetry to examine the influence of mercury concentrations in 2 tissues on fluctuating asymmetry within 4 waterbird species. Fluctuating asymmetry increased with mercury concentrations in whole blood and breast feathers of Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri), a species with elevated mercury concentrations. Specifically, fluctuating asymmetry in rectrix feather 1 was the most strongly correlated structural variable of those tested (wing chord, tarsus, primary feather 10, rectrix feather 6) with mercury concentrations in Forster's terns. However, for American avocets (Recurvirostra americana), black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus), and Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia), the authors found no relationship between fluctuating asymmetry and either whole-blood or breast feather mercury concentrations, even though these species had moderate to elevated mercury exposure. The results indicate that mercury contamination may act as an environmental stressor during development and feather growth and contribute to fluctuating asymmetry of some species of highly contaminated waterbirds.

  10. Mercury exposure may influence fluctuating asymmetry in waterbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Ackerman, Joshua T

    2017-06-01

    Variation in avian bilateral symmetry can be an indicator of developmental instability in response to a variety of stressors, including environmental contaminants. The authors used composite measures of fluctuating asymmetry to examine the influence of mercury concentrations in 2 tissues on fluctuating asymmetry within 4 waterbird species. Fluctuating asymmetry increased with mercury concentrations in whole blood and breast feathers of Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri), a species with elevated mercury concentrations. Specifically, fluctuating asymmetry in rectrix feather 1 was the most strongly correlated structural variable of those tested (wing chord, tarsus, primary feather 10, rectrix feather 6) with mercury concentrations in Forster's terns. However, for American avocets (Recurvirostra americana), black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus), and Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia), the authors found no relationship between fluctuating asymmetry and either whole-blood or breast feather mercury concentrations, even though these species had moderate to elevated mercury exposure. The results indicate that mercury contamination may act as an environmental stressor during development and feather growth and contribute to fluctuating asymmetry of some species of highly contaminated waterbirds. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1599-1605. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  11. Effects of Strong Correlations on the Disorder-Induced Zero Bias Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, William; Song, Yun; Bulut, Sinan; Wortis, Rachel

    2009-03-01

    In conventional metals and semiconductors, density of states anomalies result from the interplay between disorder and interactions. Motivated by a number of experiments that find zero bias anomalies (ZBA) in transition metal oxides, we have performed calculations to determine the effect of strong correlations on the ZBA in disordered interacting systems. We use a self-consistent mean-field theory that incorporates strong correlations and treats spatial fluctuations of the disorder potential exactly. We discuss both the Anderson-Hubbard model and the extended Anderson-Hubbard model. We find that, even for a zero-range interaction, nonlocal self-energy corrections lead to the formation of an Altshuler-Aronov-like ZBA. In the extended Anderson-Hubbard model, Efros-Shklovskii-like physics dominates at large disorder.

  12. Modeling fluctuations in scattered waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jakeman, E

    2006-01-01

    Fluctuations in scattered waves limit the performance of imaging and remote sensing systems that operate on all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. To better understand these fluctuations, Modeling Fluctuations in Scattered Waves provides a practical guide to the phenomenology, mathematics, and simulation of non-Gaussian noise models and discusses how they can be used to characterize the statistics of scattered waves.Through their discussion of mathematical models, the authors demonstrate the development of new sensing techniques as well as offer intelligent choices that can be made for system analysis. Using experimental results and numerical simulation, the book illustrates the properties and applications of these models. The first two chapters introduce statistical tools and the properties of Gaussian noise, including results on phase statistics. The following chapters describe Gaussian processes and the random walk model, address multiple scattering effects and propagation through an extended med...

  13. Fluctuations in the multiparticle dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, P.; Ploszajczak, M.

    1993-01-01

    The appearance and properties of intermittent fluctuations in physical systems, in particular the formation of rare structures in transport phenomena are discussed. The distribution of fluctuations approaches a limiting log-normal statistical distribution. The log-normal distribution is introduced as a simple parametrization of the energy fluctuations leading to the subthreshold production of particles in nuclear collisions, and it is shown that it fits all available data both for total π 0 production cross section as well as the π 0 kinetic energy spectra for E/A < 90 MeV. It is suggested that the same universal distribution should also describe the subthreshold production of other hadrons like η and K. (author) 36 refs., 11 figs

  14. Small-scale fluctuations in the microwave background radiation and multiple gravitational lensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashlinsky, A.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that multiple gravitational lensing of the microwave background radiation (MBR) by static compact objects significantly attenuates small-scale fluctuations in the MBR. Gravitational lensing, by altering trajectories of MBR photons reaching an observer, leads to (phase) mixing of photons from regions with different initial fluctuations. As a result of this diffusion process the original fluctuations are damped on scales up to several arcmin. An equation that describes this process and its general solution are given. It is concluded that the present upper limits on the amplitude of the MBR fluctuations on small scales cannot constrain theories of galaxy formation. 25 references

  15. Origin of cosmological density fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, B.J.

    1984-11-01

    The density fluctuations required to explain the large-scale cosmological structure may have arisen spontaneously as a result of a phase transition in the early Universe. There are several ways in which such fluctuations may have ben produced, and they could have a variety of spectra, so one should not necessarily expect all features of the large-scale structure to derive from a simple power law spectrum. Some features may even result from astrophysical amplification mechanisms rather than gravitational instability. 128 references

  16. Use of the Strong Collision Model to Calculate Spin Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Chow, K. H.; Smadella, M.; Hossain, M. D.; MacFarlane, W. A.; Morris, G. D.; Ofer, O.; Morenzoni, E.; Salman, Z.; Saadaoui, H.; Song, Q.; Kiefl, R. F.

    The strong collision model is used to calculate spin relaxation of a muon or polarized radioactive nucleus in contact with a fluctuating environment. We show that on a time scale much longer than the mean time between collisions (fluctuations) the longitudinal polarization decays exponentially with a relaxation rate equal to a sum of Lorentzians-one for each frequency component in the static polarization function ps(t).

  17. Onset of magnetic order in strongly-correlated systems from ab initio electronic structure calculations: application to transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, I. D.; Däne, M.; Ernst, A.; Hergert, W.; Lüders, M.; Staunton, J. B.; Szotek, Z.; Temmerman, W. M.

    2008-06-01

    We describe an ab initio theory of finite temperature magnetism in strongly-correlated electron systems. The formalism is based on spin density functional theory, with a self-interaction corrected local spin density approximation (SIC-LSDA). The self-interaction correction is implemented locally, within the Kohn-Korringa-Rostoker (KKR) multiple-scattering method. Thermally induced magnetic fluctuations are treated using a mean-field 'disordered local moment' (DLM) approach and at no stage is there a fitting to an effective Heisenberg model. We apply the theory to the 3d transition metal oxides, where our calculations reproduce the experimental ordering tendencies, as well as the qualitative trend in ordering temperatures. We find a large insulating gap in the paramagnetic state which hardly changes with the onset of magnetic order.

  18. Turbulent Spot Pressure Fluctuation Wave Packet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Wave packet analysis provides a connection between linear small disturbance theory and subsequent nonlinear turbulent spot flow behavior. The traditional association between linear stability analysis and nonlinear wave form is developed via the method of stationary phase whereby asymptotic (simplified) mean flow solutions are used to estimate dispersion behavior and stationary phase approximation are used to invert the associated Fourier transform. The resulting process typically requires nonlinear algebraic equations inversions that can be best performed numerically, which partially mitigates the value of the approximation as compared to a more complete, e.g. DNS or linear/nonlinear adjoint methods. To obtain a simpler, closed-form analytical result, the complete packet solution is modeled via approximate amplitude (linear convected kinematic wave initial value problem) and local sinusoidal (wave equation) expressions. Significantly, the initial value for the kinematic wave transport expression follows from a separable variable coefficient approximation to the linearized pressure fluctuation Poisson expression. The resulting amplitude solution, while approximate in nature, nonetheless, appears to mimic many of the global features, e.g. transitional flow intermittency and pressure fluctuation magnitude behavior. A low wave number wave packet models also recover meaningful auto-correlation and low frequency spectral behaviors.

  19. Neutrino flavour evolution through fluctuating matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Kneller, J. P.

    2018-04-01

    A neutrino propagating through fluctuating matter can experience large amplitude transitions between its states. Such transitions occur in supernovae and compact object mergers due to turbulent matter profiles and neutrino self-interactions. In this paper we study, both numerically and analytically, three-flavour neutrino transformation through fluctuating matter built from two and three Fourier modes (FMs). We find flavour transformation effects which cannot occur with just two flavours. For the case of two FMs we observe the equivalent of ‘induced transparency’ from quantum optics whereby transitions between a given pair of states are suppressed due to the presence of a resonant mode between another pair. When we add a third FM we find a new effect whereby the third mode can manipulate the transition probabilities of the two mode case so as to force complete transparency or, alternatively, restore ‘opacity’ meaning the perturbative Hamiltonian regains its ability to induce neutrino flavour transitions. In both applications we find analytic solutions are able to match the amplitude and wavenumber of the numerical results to within a few percent. We then consider a case of turbulence and show how the theory can be used to understand the very different response of a neutrino to what appears to be two, almost identical, instances of turbulence.

  20. Edge transport and fluctuation induced turbulence characteristics in early SST-1 plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakati, B., E-mail: bharat.kakati@ipr.res.in; Pradhan, S., E-mail: pradhan@ipr.res.in; Dhongde, J.; Semwal, P.; Yohan, K.; Banaudha, M.

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Anomalous particle transport during the high MHD activity at SST-1. • Electrostatic turbulence is modulated by MHD activity at SST-1 tokamak. • Edge floating potential fluctuations shows poloidal long-range cross correlation. - Abstract: Plasma edge transport characteristics are known to be heavily influenced by the edge fluctuation induced turbulences. These characteristics play a critical role towards the confinement of plasma column in a Tokamak. The edge magnetic fluctuations and its subsequent effect on electrostatic fluctuations have been experimentally investigated for the first time at the edge of the SST-1 plasma column. This paper reports the correlations that exist and is experimentally been observed between the edge densities and floating potential fluctuations with the magnetic fluctuations. The edge density and floating potential fluctuations have been measured with the help of poloidally separated Langmuir probes, whereas the magnetic fluctuations have been measured with poloidally spaced Mirnov coils. Increase in magnetic fluctuations associated with enhanced MHD activities has been found to increase the floating potential and ion saturation current. These observations indicate electrostatic turbulence getting influenced with the MHD activities and reveal the edge anomalous particle transport during SST-1 tokamak discharge. Large-scale coherent structures have been observed in the floating potential fluctuations, indicating long-distance cross correlation in the poloidal directions. From bispectral analysis, a strong nonlinear coupling among the floating potential fluctuations is observed in the low-frequency range about 0–15 kHz.

  1. Strong ideal convergence in probabilistic metric spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sequence and strong ideal Cauchy sequence in a probabilistic metric (PM) space endowed with the strong topology, and ... also important applications in nonlinear analysis [2]. The theory was brought to ..... for each t > 0 since each set on the right-hand side of the relation (3.1) belongs to I. Thus, by Definition 2.11 and the ...

  2. Effects of vole fluctuations on the population dynamics of the barn owl Tyto alba

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, T.C.; Roos, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Many predator species feed on prey that fluctuates in abundance from year to year. Birds of prey can face large fluctuations in food abundance i.e. small mammals, especially voles. These annual changes in prey abundance strongly affect the reproductive success and mortality of the individual

  3. Ordering and Fluctuation of Quantum Multipoles in CeB6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, R.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of multipolar fluctuations on the quadrupolar phase transition in CeB 6 is investigated theoretically. It is shown that the fluctuations become strong and field-dependent, reflecting the competition of coupled multipolar interactions. Some unusual phenomena around the transition in CeB 6 are shown to be reasonably explained within the RKKY model. (author)

  4. Density fluctuations in the de Sitter universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, N.; Mallik, S.

    1991-01-01

    The de Sitter space-time appears to be the most widely chosen manifold to study quantum field theories on curved space-time. The reason is, of course, its high symmetry and the related fact that the mode functions can be obtained exactly in terms of known functions. Thus the different problems of quantization on curved space-time, like the non-uniqueness of the vacuum, regularization and renormalization of the stress tensor, have all been studied extensively in this model. The other reason of interest in the de Sitter geometry is related to the inflationary scenario of the early universe. For a brief period, the energy density of the false (symmetric) vacuum may dominate the total energy density, giving rise to de Sitter space-time. The resulting inflation may solve a number of outstanding problems of cosmology and particle physics. The properties of a Higgs-type scalar field theory is of central importance in the investigation of such a scenario. In this paper, a scalar Higgs field theory in de Sitter space-time has been investigated using the real time formulation of Semenoff and Weiss. The authors calculate the two-point function at late times and use it to obtain a general expression for the amplitude of fluctuation in energy density on scales which come out of the de Sitter horizon

  5. Including virtual photons in strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusetsky, A.

    2003-01-01

    In the perturbative field-theoretical models we investigate the inclusion of the electromagnetic interactions into the purely strong theory that describes hadronic processes. In particular, we study the convention for splitting electromagnetic and strong interactions and the ambiguity of such a splitting. The issue of the interpretation of the parameters of the low-energy effective field theory in the presence of electromagnetic interactions is addressed, as well as the scale and gauge dependence of the effective theory couplings. We hope, that the results of these studies are relevant for the electromagnetic sector of ChPT. (orig.)

  6. De Sitter vacua of strongly interacting QFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchel, Alex [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario,London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario,London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, Ontario N2J 2W9 (Canada); Karapetyan, Aleksandr [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario,London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2017-03-22

    We use holographic correspondence to argue that Euclidean (Bunch-Davies) vacuum is a late-time attractor of the dynamical evolution of quantum gauge theories at strong coupling. The Bunch-Davies vacuum is not an adiabatic state, if the gauge theory is non-conformal — the comoving entropy production rate is nonzero. Using the N=2{sup ∗} gauge theory holography, we explore prospects of explaining current accelerated expansion of the Universe as due to the vacuum energy of a strongly coupled QFT.

  7. Gluon Green functions free of quantum fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Athenodorou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This letter reports on how the Wilson flow technique can efficaciously kill the short-distance quantum fluctuations of 2- and 3-gluon Green functions, remove the ΛQCD scale and destroy the transition from the confining non-perturbative to the asymptotically-free perturbative sector. After the Wilson flow, the behavior of the Green functions with momenta can be described in terms of the quasi-classical instanton background. The same behavior also occurs, before the Wilson flow, at low-momenta. This last result permits applications as, for instance, the detection of instanton phenomenological properties or a determination of the lattice spacing only from the gauge sector of the theory.

  8. Computational characterization of ignition regimes in a syngas/air mixture with temperature fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Pal, Pinaki

    2016-07-27

    Auto-ignition characteristics of compositionally homogeneous reactant mixtures in the presence of thermal non-uniformities and turbulent velocity fluctuations were computationally investigated. The main objectives were to quantify the observed ignition characteristics and numerically validate the theory of the turbulent ignition regime diagram recently proposed by Im et al. 2015 [29] that provides a framework to predict ignition behavior . a priori based on the thermo-chemical properties of the reactant mixture and initial flow and scalar field conditions. Ignition regimes were classified into three categories: . weak (where deflagration is the dominant mode of fuel consumption), . reaction-dominant strong, and . mixing-dominant strong (where volumetric ignition is the dominant mode of fuel consumption). Two-dimensional (2D) direct numerical simulations (DNS) of auto-ignition in a lean syngas/air mixture with uniform mixture composition at high-pressure, low-temperature conditions were performed in a fixed volume. The initial conditions considered two-dimensional isotropic velocity spectrums, temperature fluctuations and localized thermal hot spots. A number of parametric test cases, by varying the characteristic turbulent Damköhler and Reynolds numbers, were investigated. The evolution of the auto-ignition phenomena, pressure rise, and heat release rate were analyzed. In addition, combustion mode analysis based on front propagation speed and computational singular perturbation (CSP) was applied to characterize the auto-ignition phenomena. All results supported that the observed ignition behaviors were consistent with the expected ignition regimes predicted by the theory of the regime diagram. This work provides new high-fidelity data on syngas ignition characteristics over a broad range of conditions and demonstrates that the regime diagram serves as a predictive guidance in the understanding of various physical and chemical mechanisms controlling auto

  9. Fluctuation Theorem for Many-Body Pure Quantum States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyoda, Eiki; Kaneko, Kazuya; Sagawa, Takahiro

    2017-09-01

    We prove the second law of thermodynamics and the nonequilibrium fluctuation theorem for pure quantum states. The entire system obeys reversible unitary dynamics, where the initial state of the heat bath is not the canonical distribution but is a single energy eigenstate that satisfies the eigenstate-thermalization hypothesis. Our result is mathematically rigorous and based on the Lieb-Robinson bound, which gives the upper bound of the velocity of information propagation in many-body quantum systems. The entanglement entropy of a subsystem is shown connected to thermodynamic heat, highlighting the foundation of the information-thermodynamics link. We confirmed our theory by numerical simulation of hard-core bosons, and observed dynamical crossover from thermal fluctuations to bare quantum fluctuations. Our result reveals a universal scenario that the second law emerges from quantum mechanics, and can be experimentally tested by artificial isolated quantum systems such as ultracold atoms.

  10. Measurement of fluctuations in the plasma edge (Particularly on ATF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, C.

    1992-01-01

    The observed energy losses in tokamaks and stellarator are larger than those predicted by the neoclassical theory (i.e. the transport is anomalous). Making progress in understanding the basic mechanisms causing the experimentally observed anomalous transport is one of the key issues currently confronting fusion research. Turbulence studies performed in the edge region of many devices has shown that fluctuations are large enough to explain anomalous transport in the edge plasma region. The study of edge fluctuations provides a good chance to identify the instabilities and the energy source of the turbulence. By comparing the structure of the edge turbulence in devices with different sizes and magnetic structures (tokamaks and stellarators) additional experimental criteria to test theoretical models may be provided. The characteristics of the edge turbulence are described, with emphasis in the structure of the fluctuations in the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). (Author)

  11. Fluctuation relations with intermittent non-Gaussian variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budini, Adrián A

    2011-12-01

    Nonequilibrium stationary fluctuations may exhibit a special symmetry called fluctuation relations (FRs). Here, we show that this property is always satisfied by the subtraction of two random and independent variables related by a thermodynamiclike change of measure. Taking one of them as a modulated Poisson process, it is demonstrated that intermittence and FRs are compatible properties that may coexist naturally. Strong non-Gaussian features characterize the probability distribution and its generating function. Their associated large deviation functions develop a "kink" at the origin and a plateau regime respectively. Application of this model in different stationary nonequilibrium situations is discussed.

  12. Science in the Sandbox: Fluctuations, Friction and Instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behringer, R.B.; Clement, Eric; Geng, Junfei

    2001-01-01

    phases. However, the presence of strong dissipation through friction and inelasticity places these systems well outside the usual class of systems that can be explained by equilibrium thermodynamics. Thus, there are important challenges to create new kinds of statistical physics and new analytical...... descriptions for the mean and fluctuating behavior of these materials. We explore recent work that focuses on several important issues. These include force propagation and fluctuations in static and driven systems. It is well known that forces propagate through granular structures along networks-force chains...

  13. Universal fluctuations in orbital diamagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, P. S.; Saha, Arnab; Jayannavar, A. M.

    2018-03-01

    Bohr-van Leuween theorem has attracted the notice of physicists for more than 100 years. The theorem states about the absence of magnetisation in classical systems in thermal equilibrium. In this paper, we discuss about fluctuations of magnetic moment in classical systems. In recent years, this topic has been investigated intensively and it is not free from controversy. We have considered a system consisting of a single particle moving in a plane. A magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the plane. The system is in contact with a thermal bath. We have considered three cases: (a) particle moving in a homogeneous medium, (b) particle moving in a medium with space-dependent friction and (c) particle moving in a medium with space-dependent temperature. For all the three cases, the average magnetic moment and fluctuations in magnetic moment have been calculated. Average magnetic moment saturates to a finite value in the case of free particle but goes to zero when the particle is confined by a 2D harmonic potential. Fluctuations in magnetic moment shows universal features in the presence of arbitrary friction inhomogeneity. For this case, the system reaches equilibrium asymptotically. In the case of space-dependent temperature profile, the stationary distribution is non-Gibbsian and fluctuations deviate from universal value for the bounded system only.

  14. Universal fluctuations in orbital diamagnetism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P S Pal

    2018-01-31

    Jan 31, 2018 ... Indian Academy of Sciences https://doi.org/10.1007/s12043-018-1521-5. Universal fluctuations ... dissertation almost a century ago. They had shown that in the presence of constant magnetic field ..... Ph.D. Thesis (Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru,. 1982). [7] N Kumar and K Vijay Kumar, Europhys. Lett.

  15. Fluctuation relation for heat engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinitsyn, N A

    2011-01-01

    We derive the exact equality, referred to as the fluctuation relation for heat engines (FRHE), that relates statistics of heat extracted from one of the two heat baths and the work per one cycle of a heat engine operation. Carnot's inequality of classical thermodynamics follows as a direct consequence of the FRHE. (paper)

  16. Reaction rates when barriers fluctuate

    OpenAIRE

    Reimann, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Reaction rates when barriers fluctuate : a path integral approach / P. Hänggi and P. Reimann. - In: International Conference on Path Integrals from peV to TeV : Proceedings of the ... / eds.: R. Casalbuoni ... - Singapore u.a. : World Scientific, 1999. - S. 407-409

  17. Fluctuation conductivity in cuprate superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    model to be inadequate to describe the fluctuation conductivity in these materials. The modification ... shown by various models which consider several conducting layers per unit cell, with ei- ther interlayer or ..... Pomer et al [6] have observed a large discrepancy of their data measured at 1 tesla from the prediction of eq. (1).

  18. Impurity screening in strongly coupled plasma systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kyrkos, S

    2003-01-01

    We present an overview of the problem of screening of an impurity in a strongly coupled one-component plasma within the framework of the linear response (LR) theory. We consider 3D, 2D and quasi-2D layered systems. For a strongly coupled plasma the LR can be determined by way of the known S(k) structure functions. In general, an oscillating screening potential with local overscreening and antiscreening regions emerges. In the case of the bilayer, this phenomenon becomes global, as overscreening develops in the layer of the impurity and antiscreening in the adjacent layer. We comment on the limitations of the LR theory in the strong coupling situation.

  19. Nonlinear dynamical effects on reaction rates in thermally fluctuating environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shinnosuke; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2010-07-21

    A framework to calculate the rate constants of condensed phase chemical reactions of manybody systems is presented without relying on the concept of transition state. The theory is based on a framework we developed recently adopting a multidimensional underdamped Langevin equation in the region of a rank-one saddle. The theory provides a reaction coordinate expressed as an analytical nonlinear functional of the position coordinates and velocities of the system (solute), the friction constants, and the random force of the environment (solvent). Up to moderately high temperature, the sign of the reaction coordinate can determine the final destination of the reaction in a thermally fluctuating media, irrespective of what values the other (nonreactive) coordinates may take. In this paper, it is shown that the reaction probability is analytically derived as the probability of the reaction coordinate being positive, and that the integration with the Boltzmann distribution of the initial conditions leads to the exact reaction rate constant when the local equilibrium holds and the quantum effect is negligible. Because of analytical nature of the theory taking into account all nonlinear effects and their combination with fluctuation and dissipation, the theory naturally provides us with the firm mathematical foundation of the origin of the reactivity of the reaction in a fluctuating media.

  20. Effects of temporal fluctuations on mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Maria; Dentz, Marco; Post, Vincent E. A.; Simmons, Craig T.

    2016-04-01

    Mixing and dispersion in coastal aquifers are strongly influenced by periodic temporal flow fluctuations on multiple time-scales ranging from days (tides), seasons (pumping and recharge) to glacial cycles (regression and transgressions). Transient forcing effects lead to a complex space- ant time-dependent flow response which induces enhanced spreading and mixing of a dissolved substance. We study effective mixing and solute transport in temporally fluctuating one-dimensional flow for a stable stratification of two fluids of different density. We derive explicit expressions for the concentration distribution and variance to identify the controls and obtain realistic predictions of the coupling between mixing and oscillatory transient flow. We find that the magnitude of transient-driven mixing is mainly controlled by the hydraulic diffusivity, the period and the initial interface location. We also find a spatial dependence of the effective dispersion coefficient which at long times causes the concentration profile to become asymmetric. Sand column experiments under well-controlled laboratory conditions are presented to validate the theoretical effective model defined. The proposed formulation is found to provide very good predictions and correctly reproduces the experimental mixing dynamics.

  1. Why fishing magnifies fluctuations in fish abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christian N K; Hsieh, Chih-hao; Sandin, Stuart A; Hewitt, Roger; Hollowed, Anne; Beddington, John; May, Robert M; Sugihara, George

    2008-04-17

    It is now clear that fished populations can fluctuate more than unharvested stocks. However, it is not clear why. Here we distinguish among three major competing mechanisms for this phenomenon, by using the 50-year California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) larval fish record. First, variable fishing pressure directly increases variability in exploited populations. Second, commercial fishing can decrease the average body size and age of a stock, causing the truncated population to track environmental fluctuations directly. Third, age-truncated or juvenescent populations have increasingly unstable population dynamics because of changing demographic parameters such as intrinsic growth rates. We find no evidence for the first hypothesis, limited evidence for the second and strong evidence for the third. Therefore, in California Current fisheries, increased temporal variability in the population does not arise from variable exploitation, nor does it reflect direct environmental tracking. More fundamentally, it arises from increased instability in dynamics. This finding has implications for resource management as an empirical example of how selective harvesting can alter the basic dynamics of exploited populations, and lead to unstable booms and busts that can precede systematic declines in stock levels.

  2. Electrostatic fluctuation in Low-β plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krane, B

    1997-11-01

    The thesis gives an overview, which by no means is complete, to two dimensional plasma flows. The plasma is taken to be strongly magnetized such that magnetic fields generated by internal currents are small compared to the background magnetic field. This requires that the magnetic pressure exerted by the ambient magnetic field is large compared to the pressure due to thermal fluctuations, i.e. low-β plasma. The author also assume low frequency electrostatic fluctuations with ω c i where ω c i is the ion gyro frequency. A brief introduction to nonlinear phenomena in two dimensional plasma flows has been presented. Particular attention was given to simple models describing flute and drift modes. Although the derivations of the model equations are based on different assumptions regarding the plasma conditions, the resulting equations exhibit similar behavior in some respects. For instance, both the simple guiding center model and the Hasegawa-Mima model have stable dipolar structures. The inverse cascade was also found in both models. However, it is evident that there are significant differences, first of all the Hasegawa-Mima model assumes a background density gradient which makes it an inhomogeneous model. Secondly, in this model the electrons respond instantaneously to variations in the ion density by moving along the magnetic field, thereby introducing Debye shielding

  3. Investigations of fluctuation phenomena in the excitation functions of the cross-section by means of polarized particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henneck, R.

    1976-01-01

    The present work concerns theoretical and experimental investigations of fluctuation phenomena, which appear in the excitation functions of the diff. cross-section and of the analyzing power, when bombarding nuclei with polarized particles in the energy range of strongly overlapping levels. We could show theoretically that model-dependent calculations (or assumptions), necessary for the determination of the relative amount of direct interaction contribution within the statistical model of Ericson, are not necessary for the elastic scattering of polarized spin-1/2- particles from spin-zero-target nuclei, if the additional observable analyzing power is included in the analysis. The proposed, new method hence presents an independent test for the consistency of the Hauser-Feshbach theory and its validity in the domain of strongly overlapping levels. (orig./WL) [de

  4. Radiative Transfer Theory and Diffusion of Light in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Stark, Holger

    1997-01-01

    In nematic liquid crystals light is strongly scattered from director fluctuations. We are interested in the limit where the incoming light wave is scattered many times. Then, the light transport can be described by a diffusion equation for the energy density of light with diffusion constants $D_{\\|}$ and $D_{\\perp}$, respectively, parallel and perpendicular to the director. We start from a radiative transfer theory, connect the diffusion constants to the dynamic structure factor of director f...

  5. Calculation and analysis of thermal–hydraulics fluctuations in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmir, Hessam; Vosoughi, Naser

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Single-phase thermal–hydraulics noise equations are originally derived in the frequency domain. • The fluctuations of all the coolant parameters are calculated, without any simplifying assumptions. • The radial distribution of the temperature fluctuations in the fuel, gap and cladding are taken into account. • The closed-loop calculations are performed by means of the point kinetics noise theory. • Both the space- and frequency-dependence of the thermal–hydraulics fluctuations are analyzed. - Abstract: Analysis of thermal–hydraulics fluctuations in pressurized water reactors (e.g., local and global temperature or density fluctuations, as well as primary and charging pumps fluctuations) has various applications in calculation or measurement of the core dynamical parameters (temperature or density reactivity coefficients) in addition to thermal–hydraulics surveillance and diagnostics. In this paper, the thermal–hydraulics fluctuations in PWRs are investigated. At first, the single-phase thermal–hydraulics noise equations (in the frequency domain) are originally derived, without any simplifying assumptions. The fluctuations of all the coolant parameters, as well as the radial distribution of the temperature fluctuations in the fuel, gap and cladding are taken into account. Then, the derived governing equations are discretized using the finite volume method (FVM). Based on the discretized equations and the proposed algorithm of solving, a single heated channel noise calculation code (SHC-Noise) is developed, by which the steady-state and fluctuating parameters of PWR fuel assemblies can be calculated. The noise sources include the inlet coolant temperature and velocity fluctuations, in addition to the power density noises. The developed SHC-Noise code is benchmarked in different cases and scenarios. Furthermore, to show the effects of the power feedbacks, the closed-loop calculations are performed by means of the point kinetics noise

  6. Graviton fluctuations erase the cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterich, C.

    2017-10-01

    Graviton fluctuations induce strong non-perturbative infrared renormalization effects for the cosmological constant. The functional renormalization flow drives a positive cosmological constant towards zero, solving the cosmological constant problem without the need to tune parameters. We propose a simple computation of the graviton contribution to the flow of the effective potential for scalar fields. Within variable gravity, with effective Planck mass proportional to the scalar field, we find that the potential increases asymptotically at most quadratically with the scalar field. The solutions of the derived cosmological equations lead to an asymptotically vanishing cosmological ;constant; in the infinite future, providing for dynamical dark energy in the present cosmological epoch. Beyond a solution of the cosmological constant problem, our simplified computation also entails a sizeable positive graviton-induced anomalous dimension for the quartic Higgs coupling in the ultraviolet regime, substantiating the successful prediction of the Higgs boson mass within the asymptotic safety scenario for quantum gravity.

  7. Radial Velocity Fluctuations of RZ Psc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potravnov, I. S.; Gorynya, N. A.; Grinin, V. P.; Minikulov, N. Kh.

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of the radial velocity of the UX Ori type star RZ Psc is studied. The existence of an inner cavity with a radius of about 0.7 a.u. in the circumstellar disk of this star allows to suggest the presence of a companion. A study of the radial velocity of RZ Psc based on our own measurements and published data yields no periodic component in its variability. The two most accurate measurements of V r , based on high resolution spectra obtained over a period of three months, show that the radial velocity is constant over this time interval to within 0.5 km/s. This imposes a limit of M p ≤10 M Jup on the mass of the hypothetical companion. Possible reasons for the observed strong fluctuations in the radial velocity of this star are discussed.

  8. Tunneling probe of fluctuating superconductivity in disordered thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentelski, David; Frydman, Aviad; Shimshoni, Efrat; Dalla Torre, Emanuele G.

    2018-03-01

    Disordered thin films close to the superconductor-insulator phase transition (SIT) hold the key to understanding quantum phase transition in strongly correlated materials. The SIT is governed by superconducting quantum fluctuations, which can be revealed, for example, by tunneling measurements. These experiments detect a spectral gap, accompanied by suppressed coherence peaks, on both sides of the transition. Here we describe the insulating side in terms of a fluctuating superconducting field with finite-range correlations. We perform a controlled diagrammatic resummation and derive analytic expressions for the tunneling differential conductance. We find that short-range superconducting fluctuations suppress the coherence peaks even in the presence of long-range correlations. Our approach offers a quantitative description of existing measurements on disordered thin films and accounts for tunneling spectra with suppressed coherence peaks.

  9. Fluctuation diamagnetism near surfaces and twinning planes in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burmistrov, S.N.; Dubovskii, L.B.

    1984-01-01

    Fluctuations of the magnetic moment and of the specific heat near surfaces and twinning planes in superconductors are studied. Fluctuations near a surface yield an additional contribution to the effect of the usual bulk fluctuations on the diamagnetic moment. Such an additional contribution has a singularity near a temperature T/sub c/3(H), which is higher than the bulk superconducting transition temperature in a magnetic field T/sub c/2(H). Depending on the strength of the magnetic field, the singularity of the additional contribution to the magnetic moment can be either logarithmic (strong fields) or of square-root type (weak fields). Experiments which could reveal the aforementioned anomalous behavior are discussed in detail

  10. Conserved number fluctuations in a hadron resonance gas model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, P.; Mishra, D.K.; Netrakanti, P.K.; Mohanty, B.; Mohanty, A.K.; Singh, B.K.; Xu, N.

    2013-01-01

    Net-baryon, net-charge and net-strangeness number fluctuations in high energy heavy-ion collisions are discussed within the framework of a hadron resonance gas (HRG) model. Ratios of the conserved number susceptibilities calculated in HRG are being compared to the corresponding experimental measurements to extract information about the freeze-out condition and the phase structure of systems with strong interactions. We emphasize the importance of considering the actual experimental acceptances in terms of kinematics (pseudorapidity (η) and transverse momentum (p T )), the detected charge state, effect of collective motion of particles in the system and the resonance decay contributions before comparisons are made to the theoretical calculations. In this work, based on HRG model, we report that the net-baryon number fluctuations are least affected by experimental acceptances compared to the net-charge and net-strangeness number fluctuations

  11. Isomorphism Between Estes’ Stimulus Fluctuation Model and a Physical- Chemical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Yamaguchi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although Estes’ Stimulus Sampling Theory has almost completely lost its influence, its theoretical framework has not been disproved. Particularly, one theory in that framework, Stimulus Fluctuation Model, is still important because it explains spontaneous recovery. In this short note, the process of the theory is shown to be isomorphic to the diffusion of solution between compartments. Envisioning the theory as diffusion will make it appear less artificial and suggest natural extensions.

  12. Linearized Jastrow-style fluctuations on spin-projected Hartree-Fock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Thomas M; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2013-12-21

    The accurate and efficient description of strong electronic correlations remains an important objective in electronic structure theory. Projected Hartree-Fock theory, where symmetries of the Hamiltonian are deliberately broken and projectively restored, all with a mean-field computational scaling, shows considerable promise in this regard. However, the method is neither size extensive nor size consistent; in other words, the correlation energy per particle beyond broken-symmetry mean field vanishes in the thermodynamic limit, and the dissociation limit of a molecule is not the sum of the fragment energies. These two problems are closely related. Recently, Neuscamman [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 203001 (2012)] has proposed a method to cure the lack of size consistency in the context of the antisymmetrized geminal power wave function (equivalent to number-projected Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov) by using a Jastrow-type correlator in Hilbert space. Here, we apply the basic idea in the context of projected Hartree-Fock theory, linearizing the correlator for computational simplicity but extending it to include spin fluctuations. Results are presented for the Hubbard Hamiltonian and for some simple molecular systems.

  13. Linearized Jastrow-style fluctuations on spin-projected Hartree-Fock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2013-01-01

    The accurate and efficient description of strong electronic correlations remains an important objective in electronic structure theory. Projected Hartree-Fock theory, where symmetries of the Hamiltonian are deliberately broken and projectively restored, all with a mean-field computational scaling, shows considerable promise in this regard. However, the method is neither size extensive nor size consistent; in other words, the correlation energy per particle beyond broken-symmetry mean field vanishes in the thermodynamic limit, and the dissociation limit of a molecule is not the sum of the fragment energies. These two problems are closely related. Recently, Neuscamman [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 203001 (2012)] has proposed a method to cure the lack of size consistency in the context of the antisymmetrized geminal power wave function (equivalent to number-projected Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov) by using a Jastrow-type correlator in Hilbert space. Here, we apply the basic idea in the context of projected Hartree-Fock theory, linearizing the correlator for computational simplicity but extending it to include spin fluctuations. Results are presented for the Hubbard Hamiltonian and for some simple molecular systems

  14. Beyond mean field theory: statistical field theory for neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buice, Michael A; Chow, Carson C

    2013-03-01

    Mean field theories have been a stalwart for studying the dynamics of networks of coupled neurons. They are convenient because they are relatively simple and possible to analyze. However, classical mean field theory neglects the effects of fluctuations and correlations due to single neuron effects. Here, we consider various possible approaches for going beyond mean field theory and incorporating correlation effects. Statistical field theory methods, in particular the Doi-Peliti-Janssen formalism, are particularly useful in this regard.

  15. Fluctuation, stationarity, and ergodic properties of random-matrix ensembles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, A.

    1979-01-01

    The properties of random-matrix ensembles and the application of such ensembles to energy-level fluctuations and strength fluctuations are discussed. The two-point correlation function for complex spectra described by the three standard Gaussian ensembles is calculated, and its essential simplicity, displayed by an elementary procedure that derives from the dominance of binary correlations. The resultant function is exact for the unitary case and a very good approximation to the orthogonal and symplectic cases. The same procedure yields the spectrum for a Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) deformed by a pairing interaction. Several extensions are given and relationships to other problems of current interest are discussed. The standard fluctuation measures are rederived for the GOE, and their extensions to the unitary and symplectic cases are given. The measures are shown to derive, for the most part, from the two-point function, and new relationships between them are established, answering some long-standing questions. Some comparisons with experimental values are also made. All the cluster functions, and therefore the fluctuation measures, are shown to be stationary and strongly ergodic, thus justifying the use of random matrices for individual spectra. Strength fluctuations in the orthogonal ensemble are also considered. The Porter-Thomas distribution in its various forms is rederived and its ergodicity is established

  16. Generalized fluctuation relation for power-law distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budini, Adrián A

    2012-07-01

    Strong violations of existing fluctuation theorems may arise in nonequilibrium steady states characterized by distributions with power-law tails. The ratio of the probabilities of positive and negative fluctuations of equal magnitude behaves in an anomalous nonmonotonic way [H. Touchette and E. G. D. Cohen, Phys. Rev. E 76, 020101(R) (2007)]. Here, we propose an alternative definition of fluctuation relation (FR) symmetry that, in the power-law regime, is characterized by a monotonic linear behavior. The proposal is consistent with a large deviationlike principle. As an example, we study the fluctuations of the work done on a dragged particle immersed in a complex environment able to induce power-law tails. When the environment is characterized by spatiotemporal temperature fluctuations, distributions arising in nonextensive statistical mechanics define the work statistics. In that situation, we find that the FR symmetry is solely defined by the average bath temperature. The case of a dragged particle subjected to a Lévy noise is also analyzed in detail.

  17. Fluctuation conductivity in cuprate superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We have measured the in-plane resistivity of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and Tl2Ba2. CaCu2O8+δ single crystals in the temperature range 70–300 K. The thermodynamic fluctuations in the conductivity of both the samples start around ∼ 125 K. We find the Lawrence and Doniach [1] model to be inadequate to describe the ...

  18. Random numbers from vacuum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yicheng; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Chng, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    We implement a quantum random number generator based on a balanced homodyne measurement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The digitized signal is directly processed with a fast randomness extraction scheme based on a linear feedback shift register. The random bit stream is continuously read in a computer at a rate of about 480 Mbit/s and passes an extended test suite for random numbers.

  19. Fluctuations and large deviations in non-equilibrium systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    systems. Keywords. Non-equilibrium systems; large deviations; current fluctuations. PACS Nos 02.50.-r; 05.40.-a; 05.70.Ln; 82.20.-w. 1. Introduction. The goal of this .... The model is defined as a one-dimensional lattice of L sites with open bound- .... In [2] a perturbation theory was developed to calculate µ(λ) in powers of λ.

  20. Essays on Labor Market Frictions, Technological Change and Macroeconomic Fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Vanhala, Juuso

    2007-01-01

    The dissertation consists of an introductory chapter and three essays that apply search-matching theory to study the interaction of labor market frictions, technological change and macroeconomic fluctuations. The first essay studies the impact of capital-embodied growth on equilibrium unemployment by extending a vintage capital/search model to incorporate vintage human capital. In addition to the capital obsolescence (or creative destruction) effect that tends to raise unemployment, vint...

  1. Short Necklace States, Logarithm Transmission Fluctuation and Localization Length

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Xunya; Chen, Liang

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the widely-existing short necklace states in random systems. It is found that their peak width and relative height in lnT spectra keep almost constant when the system length increases, which is explained by the coupled-resonator theory with intrinsic parameters. This property makes them special in contribution of lnT fluctuation. Further, short necklace states can help us to deeply understand the physical meaning of localization length and the delocalized effectin localized reg...

  2. Pre-critical phenomena of two-flavor color superconductivity in heated quark matter. Diquark-pair fluctuations and non-Fermi liquid behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo; Kunihiro, Teiji; Koide, Tomoi; Nemoto, Yukio

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the fluctuations of the diquark-pair field and their effects on observables above the critical temperature T c in two-flavor color superconductivity (CSC) at moderate density using a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type effective model of QCD. Because of the strong-coupling nature of the dynamics, the fluctuations of the pair field develop a collective mode, which has a prominent strength even well above T c . We show that the collective mode is actually the soft mode of CSC. We examine the effects of the pair fluctuations on the specific heat and the quark spectrum for T above but close to T c . We find that the specific heat exhibits singular behavior because of the pair fluctuations, in accordance with the general theory of second-order phase transitions. The quarks display a typical non-Fermi liquid behavior, owing to the coupling with the soft mode, leading to a pseudo-gap in the density of states of the quarks in the vicinity of the critical point. Some experimental implications of the precursory phenomena are also discussed. (author)

  3. Exchange-correlation energy from pairing matrix fluctuation and the particle-particle random phase approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggelen, Helen van; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao

    2014-01-01

    Despite their unmatched success for many applications, commonly used local, semi-local, and hybrid density functionals still face challenges when it comes to describing long-range interactions, static correlation, and electron delocalization. Density functionals of both the occupied and virtual orbitals are able to address these problems. The particle-hole (ph-) Random Phase Approximation (RPA), a functional of occupied and virtual orbitals, has recently known a revival within the density functional theory community. Following up on an idea introduced in our recent communication [H. van Aggelen, Y. Yang, and W. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 030501 (2013)], we formulate more general adiabatic connections for the correlation energy in terms of pairing matrix fluctuations described by the particle-particle (pp-) propagator. With numerical examples of the pp-RPA, the lowest-order approximation to the pp-propagator, we illustrate the potential of density functional approximations based on pairing matrix fluctuations. The pp-RPA is size-extensive, self-interaction free, fully anti-symmetric, describes the strong static correlation limit in H 2 , and eliminates delocalization errors in H 2 + and other single-bond systems. It gives surprisingly good non-bonded interaction energies – competitive with the ph-RPA – with the correct R −6 asymptotic decay as a function of the separation R, which we argue is mainly attributable to its correct second-order energy term. While the pp-RPA tends to underestimate absolute correlation energies, it gives good relative energies: much better atomization energies than the ph-RPA, as it has no tendency to underbind, and reaction energies of similar quality. The adiabatic connection in terms of pairing matrix fluctuation paves the way for promising new density functional approximations

  4. Exchange-correlation energy from pairing matrix fluctuation and the particle-particle random phase approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aggelen, Helen; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao

    2014-05-14

    Despite their unmatched success for many applications, commonly used local, semi-local, and hybrid density functionals still face challenges when it comes to describing long-range interactions, static correlation, and electron delocalization. Density functionals of both the occupied and virtual orbitals are able to address these problems. The particle-hole (ph-) Random Phase Approximation (RPA), a functional of occupied and virtual orbitals, has recently known a revival within the density functional theory community. Following up on an idea introduced in our recent communication [H. van Aggelen, Y. Yang, and W. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 030501 (2013)], we formulate more general adiabatic connections for the correlation energy in terms of pairing matrix fluctuations described by the particle-particle (pp-) propagator. With numerical examples of the pp-RPA, the lowest-order approximation to the pp-propagator, we illustrate the potential of density functional approximations based on pairing matrix fluctuations. The pp-RPA is size-extensive, self-interaction free, fully anti-symmetric, describes the strong static correlation limit in H2, and eliminates delocalization errors in H2(+) and other single-bond systems. It gives surprisingly good non-bonded interaction energies--competitive with the ph-RPA--with the correct R(-6) asymptotic decay as a function of the separation R, which we argue is mainly attributable to its correct second-order energy term. While the pp-RPA tends to underestimate absolute correlation energies, it gives good relative energies: much better atomization energies than the ph-RPA, as it has no tendency to underbind, and reaction energies of similar quality. The adiabatic connection in terms of pairing matrix fluctuation paves the way for promising new density functional approximations.

  5. Heat fluctuations and initial ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangmoo; Kwon, Chulan; Park, Hyunggyu

    2014-09-01

    Time-integrated quantities such as work and heat increase incessantly in time during nonequilibrium processes near steady states. In the long-time limit, the average values of work and heat become asymptotically equivalent to each other, since they only differ by a finite energy change in average. However, the fluctuation theorem (FT) for the heat is found not to hold with the equilibrium initial ensemble, while the FT for the work holds. This reveals an intriguing effect of everlasting initial memory stored in rare events. We revisit the problem of a Brownian particle in a harmonic potential dragged with a constant velocity, which is in contact with a thermal reservoir. The heat and work fluctuations are investigated with initial Boltzmann ensembles at temperatures generally different from the reservoir temperature. We find that, in the infinite-time limit, the FT for the work is fully recovered for arbitrary initial temperatures, while the heat fluctuations significantly deviate from the FT characteristics except for the infinite initial-temperature limit (a uniform initial ensemble). Furthermore, we succeed in calculating finite-time corrections to the heat and work distributions analytically, using the modified saddle point integral method recently developed by us. Interestingly, we find noncommutativity between the infinite-time limit and the infinite-initial-temperature limit for the probability distribution function (PDF) of the heat.

  6. Primordial fluctuations without scalar fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magueijo, João; Noller, Johannes

    2010-02-01

    We revisit the question of whether fluctuations in hydrodynamical, adiabatical matter could explain the observed structures in our Universe. We consider matter with variable equation of state w=p0/ɛ0 and a concomitant (under the adiabatic assumption) density dependent speed of sound, cs. We find a limited range of possibilities for a setup when modes start inside the Hubble radius, then leaving it and freezing out. For expanding universes, power-law w(ɛ0) models are ruled out (except when cs2∝w≪1, requiring post-stretching the seeded fluctuations); but sharper profiles in cs do solve the horizon problem. Among these, a phase transition in cs is notable for leading to scale-invariant fluctuations if the initial conditions are thermal. For contracting universes all power-law w(ɛ0) solve the horizon problem, but only one leads to scale-invariance: w∝ɛ02 and cs∝ɛ0. This model bypasses a number of problems with single scalar field cyclic models (for which w is large but constant).

  7. Collaborative project: research on strongly coupled plasmas. Final technical report for period July 15, 1998--July 14, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golden, Kenneth I.

    2002-09-16

    The main research accomplishments/findings of the project were the following: (1) Publication of an in-depth review article in Physics of Plasmas on the quasilocalized charge approximation (QLCA) in strongly coupled plasma physics and its application to a variety of Coulomb systems: the model one-component plasma in three and two dimensions, binary ionic mixtures, charged particle bilayers, and laboratory dusty plasmas. (2) In the strongly coupled Coulomb liquid phase, the physical basis of the QLCA, namely, the caging of particles trapped in slowly fluctuating local potential minima, is supported by molecular dynamics simulation of the classical three-dimensional one-component plasma. (3) The QLCA theory, when applied to the analysis of the collective modes in strongly coupled charged particle bilayers, predicts the existence of a remarkable long-wavelength energy gap in the out-of-phase excitation spectrum. More recent theoretical calculations based on the three principal frequency-moment sum rules reveal that the gap persists for arbitrary coupling strengths and over the entire classical to quantum domain all the way down to zero temperature. The existence of the energy gap has now been confirmed in a molecular dynamics simulation of the charged particle bilayer. (4) New compressibility and third-frequency-moment sum rules for multilayer plasmas were formulated and applied to the analysis of the dynamical structure function of charged particle bilayers and superlattices. (5) An equivalent of the Debye-Huckel weak coupling equilibrium theory for classical charged particle bilayer and superlattice plasmas was formulated. (6) The quadratic fluctuation-dissipation theorem (QFDT) for layered classical plasmas was formulated. (7) The QFDT was applied to a powerful kinetic theory-based description of the density-density response function and long-wavelength plasma mode behavior in strongly coupled two-dimensional Coulomb fluids in the weakly degenerate quantum domain.

  8. Alfvénic fluctuations in "newborn"' polar solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bavassano

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The 3-D structure of the solar wind is strongly dependent upon the Sun's activity cycle. At low solar activity a bimodal structure is dominant, with a fast and uniform flow at the high latitudes, and slow and variable flows at low latitudes. Around solar maximum, in sharp contrast, variable flows are observed at all latitudes. This last kind of pattern, however, is a relatively short-lived feature, and quite soon after solar maximum the polar wind tends to regain its role. The plasma parameter distributions for these newborn polar flows appear very similar to those typically observed in polar wind at low solar activity. The point addressed here is about polar wind fluctuations. As is well known, the low-solar-activity polar wind is characterized by a strong flow of Alfvénic fluctuations. Does this hold for the new polar flows too? An answer to this question is given here through a comparative statistical analysis on parameters such as total energy, cross helicity, and residual energy, that are of general use to describe the Alfvénic character of fluctuations. Our results indicate that the main features of the Alfvénic fluctuations observed in low-solar-activity polar wind have been quickly recovered in the new polar flows developed shortly after solar maximum. Keywords. Interplanetary physics (MHD waves and turbulence; Sources of the solar wind – Space plasma physics (Turbulence

  9. Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-03

    Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators In the past year, the grant was used for work in the field of topological phases, with emphasis on finding...surface of topological insulators. In the past 3 years, we have started a new direction, that of fractional topological insulators. These are materials...in which a topologically nontrivial quasi-flat band is fractionally filled and then subject to strong interactions. The views, opinions and/or

  10. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation induced energy transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiksel, G.; Prager, S.C.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.

    1993-11-01

    The local electron energy flux produced by magnetic fluctuations has been measured directly in the MST reversed field pinch (over the radial range r/a > 0.75). The flux, produced by electrons traveling parallel to a fluctuating magnetic field, is obtained from correlation between the fluctuations in the parallel heat flux and the radial magnetic field. The fluctuation induced flux is large (100 kW/cm 2 ) in the ''core'' (r/a 2 ) in the edge

  11. Superconducting fluctuations in systems with Rashba-spin-orbit coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyl, Stefan [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany); Orth, Peter P.; Scheurer, Mathias; Schmalian, Joerg [Institut fuer Theorie der Kondensierten Materie, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the BEC-BCS crossover in a two-dimensional system with Rashba-spin-orbit coupling. To include the effects of phase and amplitude fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter we perform a loop expansion of the effective field theory. We analyze in particular the probability of a low density superconducting quantum phase transition. The theory is relevant to LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces and two-dimensional cold atom systems with synthetic gauge fields.

  12. Strong Cosmic Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, James

    2017-01-01

    The Hawking-Penrose theorems tell us that solutions of Einstein's equations are generally singular, in the sense of the incompleteness of causal geodesics (the paths of physical observers). These singularities might be marked by the blowup of curvature and therefore crushing tidal forces, or by the breakdown of physical determinism. Penrose has conjectured (in his `Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture`) that it is generically unbounded curvature that causes singularities, rather than causal breakdown. The verification that ``AVTD behavior'' (marked by the domination of time derivatives over space derivatives) is generically present in a family of solutions has proven to be a useful tool for studying model versions of Strong Cosmic Censorship in that family. I discuss some of the history of Strong Cosmic Censorship, and then discuss what is known about AVTD behavior and Strong Cosmic Censorship in families of solutions defined by varying degrees of isometry, and discuss recent results which we believe will extend this knowledge and provide new support for Strong Cosmic Censorship. I also comment on some of the recent work on ``Weak Null Singularities'', and how this relates to Strong Cosmic Censorship.

  13. Wall pressure fluctuations in rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, S.V.

    1990-01-01

    Microphones and hot wires were applied for the measurement of wall pressure fluctuations and velocity fluctuations in rod bundles with several aspect ratios. By means of auto and cross spectral density functions their interdependence was investigated. Results show that the pressure fluctuations in rod bundles are mainly associated with the phenomenon of quasi-periodic flow pulsations between subchannels. (author)

  14. Frequency averaging of fluctuations in the cross-correlation reception of noiselike signals reflected from a rough sea surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, V. F.; Gerasimova, T. I.; Gulin, É. P.

    2007-04-01

    For noiselike signals reflected from a rough sea surface and received by a correlation receiver, the effect achieved at the receiver output as a result of frequency averaging of signal fluctuations is considered. Expressions characterizing the effect of frequency averaging are derived by using the generalized two-scale model describing the frequency correlation of strong fluctuations of the transfer function. Results of numerical calculations for the variance of fluctuations at the output of the correlation receiver are presented for different relative values of the frequency bandwidth of noiselike signals and the frequency correlation scales for the cases of both weak and strong fluctuations.

  15. Memory improves precision of cell sensing in fluctuating environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Gerardo; Tweedy, Luke; Heinrich, Doris; Endres, Robert G.

    2014-07-01

    Biological cells are often found to sense their chemical environment near the single-molecule detection limit. Surprisingly, this precision is higher than simple estimates of the fundamental physical limit, hinting towards active sensing strategies. In this work, we analyse the effect of cell memory, e.g. from slow biochemical processes, on the precision of sensing by cell-surface receptors. We derive analytical formulas, which show that memory significantly improves sensing in weakly fluctuating environments. However, surprisingly when memory is adjusted dynamically, the precision is always improved, even in strongly fluctuating environments. In support of this prediction we quantify the directional biases in chemotactic Dictyostelium discoideum cells in a flow chamber with alternating chemical gradients. The strong similarities between cell sensing and control engineering suggest universal problem-solving strategies of living matter.

  16. Experimental investigation of strong field trident production

    CERN Document Server

    Esberg, J; Knudsen, H; Thomsen, H D; Uggerhøj, E; Uggerhøj, U I; Sona, P; Mangiarotti, A; Ketel, T J; Dizdar, A; Dalton, M M; Ballestrero, S; Connell, S H

    2010-01-01

    We show by experiment that an electron impinging on an electric field that is of critical magnitude in its rest frame, may produce an electron-positron pair. Our measurements address higher-order QED, using the strong electric fields obtainable along particular crystallographic directions in single crystals. For the amorphous material our data are in good agreement with theory, whereas a discrepancy with theory on the magnitude of the trident enhancement is found in the precisely aligned case where the strong electric field acts.

  17. Kinetic instabilities in plasmas: from electromagnetic fluctuations to collisionless shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruyer, Charles

    2014-01-01

    -in-cell (PIC) simulations of the ion Weibel instability in uniform geometries, as well as shock-relevant non-uniform configurations. Moreover, they are found in correct agreement with a recent laser-driven plasma collision experiment. Along with this comparison, we pinpoint the important role of electron screening on the ion-Weibel dynamics, which may affect the results of simulations with artificially high electron mass. We subsequently address the shock propagation resulting from the magnetic Weibel turbulence generated in the upstream region. Generalizing the previous symmetric-beam model to the upstream region of the shock, the role of the magnetic turbulence in the shock-front has been analytically and self-consistently characterized. Comparison with simulations validates the model. The interaction of high-energy, ultra-high intensity lasers with dense plasmas is known to produce copious amounts of suprathermal particles. Their acceleration and subsequent transport trigger a variety of Weibel-like electromagnetic instabilities, acting as additional sources of slowing down and scattering. Their understanding is important for the many applications based upon the energy deposition and/or field generation of laser-driven particles. We investigate the ability of relativistic-intensity laser pulses to induce Weibel instability-mediated shocks in overdense plasma targets, as first proposed by Fiuza in 2012. By means of both linear theory and 2D PIC simulations, we demonstrated that in contrast to the standard astrophysical scenario previously addressed, the early-time magnetic fluctuations (Weibel instability) generated by the suprathermal electrons (and not ions) are strong enough to isotropize the target ions and, therefore, induce a collisionless electromagnetic shock. (author) [fr

  18. Finding quantum effects in strong classical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegelich, B. Manuel; Labun, Lance; Labun, Ou Z.

    2017-06-01

    The long-standing challenge to describing charged particle dynamics in strong classical electromagnetic fields is how to incorporate classical radiation, classical radiation reaction and quantized photon emission into a consistent unified framework. The current, semiclassical methods to describe the dynamics of quantum particles in strong classical fields also provide the theoretical framework for fundamental questions in gravity and hadron-hadron collisions, including Hawking radiation, cosmological particle production and thermalization of particles created in heavy-ion collisions. However, as we show, these methods break down for highly relativistic particles propagating in strong fields. They must therefore be improved and adapted for the description of laser-plasma experiments that typically involve the acceleration of electrons. Theory developed from quantum electrodynamics, together with dedicated experimental efforts, offer the best controllable context to establish a robust, experimentally validated foundation for the fundamental theory of quantum effects in strong classical potentials.

  19. Critical swelling of fluctuating capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Haim; Haleva, Emir

    2009-03-01

    In many natural transport processes the solute molecules to be transported are encapsulated in semipermeable, flexible membrane vesicles of micron size. We study the swelling of such fluctuating capsules, as the number of encapsulated particles is increased, or the concentration of the outer solution is decreased. The approach to the maximum volume-to-area ratio and the associated buildup of membrane tension involve a continuous phase transition and follow universal scaling laws. The criticality and its features are model-independent, arising solely from the interplay between volume and surface degrees of freedom.ootnotetextE. Haleva and H. Diamant, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 078104 (2008).

  20. Noise and fluctuations an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    MacDonald, D K C

    2006-01-01

    An understanding of fluctuations and their role is both useful and fundamental to the study of physics. This concise study of random processes offers graduate students and research physicists a survey that encompasses both the relationship of Brownian Movement with statistical mechanics and the problem of irreversible processes. It outlines the basics of the physics involved, without the strictures of mathematical rigor.The three-part treatment starts with a general survey of Brownian Movement, including electrical Brownian Movement and ""shot-noise,"" Part two explores correlation, frequency

  1. Fluctuations in Overlapping Generations Economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede, Mich

    In the present paper stationary pure-exchange overlapping generations economies with l  goods per date and m consumers per generation are considered. It is shown that for an open and dense set of utility functions there exist endowment vectors such that n-cycles exist for n = l +1 and l  = m....... The approach to existence of endogenous fluctuations is basic in the sense that the prime ingredients are the implicit function theorem and linear algebra. Moreover the approach is applied to show that for an open and dense set of utility functions there exist endowment vectors such that sunspot equilibria...

  2. Strong Arcwise Connectedness

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza, Benjamin; Gartside, Paul; Kovan-Bakan, Merve; Mamatelashvili, Ana

    2012-01-01

    A space is `n-strong arc connected' (n-sac) if for any n points in the space there is an arc in the space visiting them in order. A space is omega-strong arc connected (omega-sac) if it is n-sac for all n. We study these properties in finite graphs, regular continua, and rational continua. There are no 4-sac graphs, but there are 3-sac graphs and graphs which are 2-sac but not 3-sac. For every n there is an n-sac regular continuum, but no regular continuum is omega-sac. There is an omega-sac ...

  3. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally......'s scenarios have some valuable future or admitted that killing them is not seriously morally wrong. Finally, if "valuable future" is interpreted as referring to objective standards, one ends up with implausible and unpalatable moral claims....

  4. An Objective Fluctuation Score for Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Malcolm K.; McGregor, Sarah; Bergquist, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Establishing the presence and severity of fluctuations is important in managing Parkinson’s Disease yet there is no reliable, objective means of doing this. In this study we have evaluated a Fluctuation Score derived from variations in dyskinesia and bradykinesia scores produced by an accelerometry based system. Methods The Fluctuation Score was produced by summing the interquartile range of bradykinesia scores and dyskinesia scores produced every 2 minutes between 0900-1800 for at least 6 days by the accelerometry based system and expressing it as an algorithm. Results This Score could distinguish between fluctuating and non-fluctuating patients with high sensitivity and selectivity and was significant lower following activation of deep brain stimulators. The scores following deep brain stimulation lay in a band just above the score separating fluctuators from non-fluctuators, suggesting a range representing adequate motor control. When compared with control subjects the score of newly diagnosed patients show a loss of fluctuation with onset of PD. The score was calculated in subjects whose duration of disease was known and this showed that newly diagnosed patients soon develop higher scores which either fall under or within the range representing adequate motor control or instead go on to develop more severe fluctuations. Conclusion The Fluctuation Score described here promises to be a useful tool for identifying patients whose fluctuations are progressing and may require therapeutic changes. It also shows promise as a useful research tool. Further studies are required to more accurately identify therapeutic targets and ranges. PMID:25928634

  5. Fluctuations and correlations of emission from random lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Jason W.; Cao, Hui; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2016-02-01

    When light travels through strongly scattering media with optical gain, the synergy between diffusive transport and stimulated emission can lead to lasing action. Below the threshold pump power, the emission spectrum is smooth and does not change from shot to shot. Above the lasing threshold, the spectrum of emitted light becomes spiky and shows strong fluctuations from shot to shot. Recent experiments have reported that emitted intensity resembles a power-law distribution (i.e., Lévy statistics). To separate intrinsic intensity fluctuations from the motion of scatterers, we compare the statistics of samples with stationary or freely diffusing scatterers. Consistent with previous reports, we observe Lévy-like statistics when intensity data are pooled across an ensemble of scatterer configurations. For fixed scatterers, we find exponential intensity distributions for individual lasing modes whose mean intensities vary widely from mode to mode. Lévy-like statistics reemerges when data are combined across many lasing modes. Additionally, we find strong correlations of intensity fluctuations of lasing modes across wavelengths. A simple mean-field statistical model captures the observed one- and two-point statistics, where correlations in emission intensity arise from competition among all lasing modes for limited gain.

  6. Quantum electrodynamics in strong external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, B.; Rafelski, J.; Kirsch, J.

    1981-05-01

    We review the theoretical description of quantum electrodynamics in the presence of strong and supercritical fields. In particular, the process of the spontaneous vacuum decay accompanied by the observable positron emission in heavy ion collisions is described. Emphasis is put on the proper formulation of many-body aspects in the framework of quantum field theory. The extension of the theory to the description of Bose fields and many-body effects is presented, and the Klein paradox is resolved. Some implications of the theoretical methods developed here are presented concerning non-abelian gauge theories and the quark confinement puzzle. (orig.)

  7. Statistical theory and transition in multiple-scale-lengths turbulence in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Sanae-I.; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2001-06-01

    The statistical theory of strong turbulence in inhomogeneous plasmas is developed for the cases where fluctuations with different scale-lengths coexist. Nonlinear interactions in the same kind of fluctuations as well as nonlinear interplay between different classes of fluctuations are kept in the analysis. Nonlinear interactions are modelled as turbulent drag, nonlinear noise and nonlinear drive, and a set of Langevin equations is formulated. With the help of an Ansatz of a large number of degrees of freedom with positive Lyapunov number, Langevin equations are solved and the fluctuation dissipation theorem in the presence of strong plasma turbulence has been derived. A case where two driving mechanisms (one for micro mode and the other for semi-micro mode) coexist is investigated. It is found that there are several states of fluctuations: in one state, the micro mode is excited and the semi-micro mode is quenched; in the other state, the semi-micro mode is excited, and the micro mode remains at finite but suppressed level. New type of turbulence transition is obtained, and a cusp type catastrophe is revealed. A phase diagram is drawn for turbulence which is composed of multiple classes of fluctuations. Influence of the inhomogeneous global radial electric field is discussed. A new insight is given for the physics of internal transport barrier. Finally, the nonlocal heat transport due to the long-wave-length fluctuations, which are noise-pumped by shorter-wave-length ones, is analyzed and the impact on transient transport problems is discussed. (author)

  8. Short-term fluctuations in motivation to quit smoking in a sample of smokers in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Thaddeus; Pokhrel, Pallav; Kawamoto, Crissy T

    2015-01-01

    Despite its potential for usefulness in informing the development of smoking cessation interventions, short-term fluctuations in motivation to quit is a relatively understudied topic. To assess the prevalence of smokers' day-to-day fluctuations in motivation to quit, and to assess associations of day-to-day fluctuations in motivation to quit with several established cessation-related variables. A cross-sectional survey was administered to smokers in Hawaii (N = 1,567). To assess short-term fluctuations in motivation to quit smoking, participants were asked to respond "True" or "False" to the statement: "My motivation to quit smoking changes from one day to the next." Other items measured desire to quit smoking, intention to quit, confidence in quitting, cigarette dependence, and other cessation-related variables. "My motivation to quit smoking changes from one day to the next" was endorsed as true by 64.7% of smokers, and false by 35.3%. Analyses revealed that smokers who indicated fluctuating motivation were significantly more interested in quitting as compared to smokers without fluctuations. Fluctuations in motivation to quit also were associated with greater confidence in quitting, lesser cigarette dependence, and more recent quitting activity (all p < .01). Day-to-day fluctuations in motivation to quit are common. Day-to-day fluctuations in motivation to quit are strongly associated with higher motivation to quit, greater confidence in future quitting, and other positive cessation-relevant trends.

  9. Absorption-Fluctuation Theorem for Nuclear Reactions: Brink-Axel, Incomplete Fusion and All That

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M. S.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the connection between absorption, averages and fluctuations in nuclear reactions. The fluctuations in the entrance channel result in the compound-nucleus Hauser-Feshbach cross section, and the fluctuations in the intermediate channels result in modifications of multistep reaction cross sections, while the fluctuations in the final channel result in hybrid cross sections that can be used to describe incomplete fusion reactions. We discuss the latter in detail and comment on the validity of the assumptions used in the development of the Surrogate method. We also discuss the theory of multistep reactions with regards to intermediate state fluctuations and the energy dependence and non-locality of the intermediate-channel optical potentials

  10. A strong comeback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marier, D.

    1992-01-01

    This article presents the results of a financial rankings survey which show a strong economic activity in the independent energy industry. The topics of the article include advisor turnover, overseas banks, and the increase in public offerings. The article identifies the top project finance investors for new projects and restructurings and rankings for lenders

  11. Fluctuations in work motivation: tasks do not matter!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Jose; Curioso, Fernando; Gomes, Duarte; Arrieta, Carlos; Cortes, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that work motivation fluctuates considerably and in a nonlinear way over time. In the present research, we are interested in studying if the task at hand does or does not influence the presence of these fluctuations. We gathered daily registers from 69 workers during 21 consecutive working days (7036 registers) of task developed and levels of motivation, self-efficacy beliefs and instrumentalities perception. These registers were then categorized into a list of labor activities in main tasks and subtasks by means of three judges with a high level of agreement (97.47% for tasks, and 98.64% for subtasks). Taking the MSSD statistic (mean squared successive difference) of the average of motivation, self-efficacy and instrumentality, and using hierarchical regression analysis we have found that tasks (beta = .03; p = .188) and subtasks (beta = .10; p = .268) do not affect the presence of fluctuations in motivation. These results reveal instability in work motivation independently from the tasks and subtasks that the workers do. We proceed to find that fluctuations in work motivation show a fractal structure across the different tasks we do in a working day. Implications of these results to motivational theory will be discussed as well as possible explanations (e.g. the influence of affect in work motivation) and directions for future research are provided.

  12. Entropic fluctuations in DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanos, Dimitrios; Li, Wentian; Provata, Astero

    2018-03-01

    The Local Shannon Entropy (LSE) in blocks is used as a complexity measure to study the information fluctuations along DNA sequences. The LSE of a DNA block maps the local base arrangement information to a single numerical value. It is shown that despite this reduction of information, LSE allows to extract meaningful information related to the detection of repetitive sequences in whole chromosomes and is useful in finding evolutionary differences between organisms. More specifically, large regions of tandem repeats, such as centromeres, can be detected based on their low LSE fluctuations along the chromosome. Furthermore, an empirical investigation of the appropriate block sizes is provided and the relationship of LSE properties with the structure of the underlying repetitive units is revealed by using both computational and mathematical methods. Sequence similarity between the genomic DNA of closely related species also leads to similar LSE values at the orthologous regions. As an application, the LSE covariance function is used to measure the evolutionary distance between several primate genomes.

  13. New aspects of plasma sheet dynamics - MHD and kinetic theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wiechen

    Full Text Available Magnetic reconnection is a process of fundamental importance for the dynamics of the Earth's plasma sheet. In this context, the development of thin current sheets in the near-Earth plasma sheet is a topic of special interest because they could be a possible cause of microscopic fluctuations acting as collective non-idealness from a macroscopic point of view. Simulations of the near-Earth plasma sheet including boundary perturbations due to localized inflow through the northern (or southern plasma sheet boundary show developing thin current sheets in the near-Earth plasma sheet about 810 RE tailwards of the Earth. This location is largely independent from the localization of the perturbation. The second part of the paper deals with the problem of the macroscopic non-ideal consequences of microscopic fluctuations. A new model is presented that allows the quantitative calculation of macroscopic non-idealness without considering details of microscopic instabilities or turbulence. This model is only based on the assumption of a strongly fluctuating, mixing dynamics on microscopic scales in phase space. The result of this approach is an expression for anomalous non-idealness formally similar to the Krook resistivity but now describing the macroscopic consequences of collective microscopic fluctuations, not of collisions.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma sheet · Space plasma physics (kinetic and MHD theory; magnetic reconnection

  14. Correlated effective field theory in transition metal compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhasis; Chatterjee, Ibha

    2004-01-01

    Mean field theory is good enough to study the physical properties at higher temperatures and in higher dimensions. It explains the critical phenomena in a restricted sense. Near the critical temperatures, when fluctuations become important, it may not give the correct results. Similarly in low dimensions, the correlations become important and the mean field theory seems to be inadequate to explain the physical phenomena. At low-temperatures too, the quantum correlations become important and these effects are to be treated in an appropriate way. In 1974, Prof. M.E. Lines of Bell Laboratories, developed a theory which goes beyond the mean field theory and is known as the correlated effective field (CEF) theory. It takes into account the fluctuations in a semiempirical way. Lines and his collaborators used this theory to explain the short-range correlations and their anisotropy in the paramagnetic phase. Later Suzuki et al., Chatterjee and Desai, Mukhopadhyay and Chatterjee applied this theory to the magnetically ordered phase and a tremendous success of the theory has been found in real systems. The success of the CEF theory is discussed in this review. In order to highlight the success of this theory, earlier effective field theories and their improvements over mean field theories e.g., Bethe-Peierls-Weiss method, reaction field approximation, etc., are also discussed in this review for completeness. The beauty of the CEF theory is that it is mean field-like, but captures the essential physics of real systems to a great extent. However, this is a weak correlated theory and as a result is inappropriate for the metallic phase when strong correlations become important. In recent times, transition metal oxides become important due to the discovery of the high-temperature superconductivity and the colossal magnetoresistance phenomena. These oxides seem to be Mott insulators and undergo an insulator to metal transition by applying magnetic field, pressure and by changing

  15. Resistance scaling function for two-dimensional superconductors and Monte Carlo vortex-fluctuation simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minnhagen, P.; Weber, H.

    1985-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of the Ginsburg-Landau Coulomb-gas model for vortex fluctuations is described and compared to the measured resistance scaling function for two-dimensional superconductors. This constitutes a new, more direct way of confirming the vortex-fluctuation explanation for the resistive tail of high-sheet-resistance superconducting films. The Monte Carlo data obtained indicate a striking accordance between theory and experiments

  16. Effects of droplet fluctuations on the scattering of neutrons and light by microemulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Lisy, V.; Brutovsky, B.

    2000-01-01

    Beginning from the first neutron spin-echo study of the shape fluctuations of microemulsion droplets [J.S. Huang, S.T. Milner, B. Farago, and D. Richter, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 2600 (1987)] these experiments are incorrectly interpreted in the literature. This is due to an inappropriate account for the fluctuations and the erroneous application of the original theory to the experiments (see [V. Lisy and B. Brutovsky, Czech. J. Phys. 50, 239 (2000)]). In the presented work both these shortcomings...

  17. Pressure fluctuations induced by fluid flow in singular points of industrial circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, R.J.; Villard, B.

    1977-01-01

    Flow singularities (enlargements, bards, valves, tees,...) generate in the circuits of industrial plants wall pressure fluctuations which are the main cause of vibration. Two types of pressure fluctuations can be considered. - 'Local ' fluctuations: They are associated to the unsteadiness downstream from the singularity. These fluctuations may be characterized by frequency spectra, correlation length and phase lags. These parameters are used to calculate forces on the walls of the circuit. - 'Acoustic' fluctuations: The singularity acts as an acoustical source; its frequency spectrum and the acoustical transfer function of the circuit are needed to evaluate the acoustical level at any point. A methodical study of the most current singularities has been performed at C.E.A./D.E.M.T.: - On one hand a theory of noise generation by unsteady flow in internal acoustics has been developed. This theory uses the basic idea initiated by LIGHTILL. As a result it is shown that the plane wave propagation is a valid assumption and that a singularity can be acoustically modelled by a pressure and a mass-flow-rate discontinuities. Both are random functions of time, the spectra of which are determined from the local fluctuations characteristics. - On the other hand, characteristics of several singularities have been measured: (i) Intercorrelation spectra of local pressure fluctuations. (ii) Autocorrelation spectra of associated acoustical sources (the measure of the acoustical pressures in the experimental circuit are interpreted by using the D.E.M.T. computer code VIBRAPHONE which gives the acoustical response of a complex circuit). (Auth.)

  18. Analysis of electron-correlation effects in strongly correlated systems (N2 and N2+ ) by applying the density-matrix renormalization-group method and quantum information theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemmle, Christian; Paulus, Beate; Legeza, Örs

    2018-02-01

    The dissociation of N2 and N2 + has been studied by using the ab initio density-matrix renormalization-group (DMRG) method. Accurate potential energy surfaces (PESs) have been obtained for the electronic ground states of N2 (X1 Σg+ ) and N2+ (X2 Σg+ ) as well as for the N2+ excited state B2 Σu+ . Inherent to the DMRG approach, the eigenvalues of the reduced density matrix (ρ ) and their correlation functions are at hand. Thus we can apply quantum information theory directly and investigate how the wave function changes along the PES and depict differences between the different states. Moreover, by characterizing quantum entanglement between different pairs of orbitals and analyzing the reduced density matrix, we achieved a better understanding of the multireference character featured by these systems.

  19. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Models of spontaneous breaking of electroweak symmetry by a strong interaction do not have fine tuning/hierarchy problem. They are conceptually elegant and use the only mechanism of spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry that is known to occur in nature. The simplest model, minimal technicolor with extended technicolor interactions, is appealing because one can calculate by scaling up from QCD. But it is ruled out on many counts: inappropriately low quark and lepton masses (or excessive FCNC), bad electroweak data fits, light scalar and vector states, etc. However, nature may not choose the minimal model and then we are stuck: except possibly through lattice simulations, we are unable to compute and test the models. In the LHC era it therefore makes sense to abandon specific models (of strong EW breaking) and concentrate on generic features that may indicate discovery. The Technicolor Straw Man is not a model but a parametrized search strategy inspired by a remarkable generic feature of walking technicolor,...

  20. Plasmons in strong superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldo, M.; Ducoin, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the possible plasmon excitations that can occur in systems where strong superconductivity is present. In these systems the plasmon energy is comparable to or smaller than the pairing gap. As a prototype of these systems we consider the proton component of Neutron Star matter just below the crust when electron screening is not taken into account. For the realistic case we consider in detail the different aspects of the elementary excitations when the proton, electron components are considered within the Random-Phase Approximation generalized to the superfluid case, while the influence of the neutron component is considered only at qualitative level. Electron screening plays a major role in modifying the proton spectrum and spectral function. At the same time the electron plasmon is strongly modified and damped by the indirect coupling with the superfluid proton component, even at moderately low values of the gap. The excitation spectrum shows the interplay of the different components and their relevance for each excitation modes. The results are relevant for neutrino physics and thermodynamical processes in neutron stars. If electron screening is neglected, the spectral properties of the proton component show some resemblance with the physical situation in high-T c superconductors, and we briefly discuss similarities and differences in this connection. In a general prospect, the results of the study emphasize the role of Coulomb interaction in strong superconductors.