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Sample records for strong cosmic censorship

  1. Strong Cosmic Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, James

    2017-01-01

    The Hawking-Penrose theorems tell us that solutions of Einstein's equations are generally singular, in the sense of the incompleteness of causal geodesics (the paths of physical observers). These singularities might be marked by the blowup of curvature and therefore crushing tidal forces, or by the breakdown of physical determinism. Penrose has conjectured (in his `Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture`) that it is generically unbounded curvature that causes singularities, rather than causal breakdown. The verification that ``AVTD behavior'' (marked by the domination of time derivatives over space derivatives) is generically present in a family of solutions has proven to be a useful tool for studying model versions of Strong Cosmic Censorship in that family. I discuss some of the history of Strong Cosmic Censorship, and then discuss what is known about AVTD behavior and Strong Cosmic Censorship in families of solutions defined by varying degrees of isometry, and discuss recent results which we believe will extend this knowledge and provide new support for Strong Cosmic Censorship. I also comment on some of the recent work on ``Weak Null Singularities'', and how this relates to Strong Cosmic Censorship.

  2. Weak cosmic censorship: as strong as ever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hod, Shahar

    2008-03-28

    Spacetime singularities that arise in gravitational collapse are always hidden inside of black holes. This is the essence of the weak cosmic censorship conjecture. The hypothesis, put forward by Penrose 40 years ago, is still one of the most important open questions in general relativity. In this Letter, we reanalyze extreme situations which have been considered as counterexamples to the weak cosmic censorship conjecture. In particular, we consider the absorption of scalar particles with large angular momentum by a black hole. Ignoring back reaction effects may lead one to conclude that the incident wave may overspin the black hole, thereby exposing its inner singularity to distant observers. However, we show that when back reaction effects are properly taken into account, the stability of the black-hole event horizon is irrefutable. We therefore conclude that cosmic censorship is actually respected in this type of gedanken experiments.

  3. Quasinormal Modes and Strong Cosmic Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Costa, João L.; Destounis, Kyriakos; Hintz, Peter; Jansen, Aron

    2018-01-01

    The fate of Cauchy horizons, such as those found inside charged black holes, is intrinsically connected to the decay of small perturbations exterior to the event horizon. As such, the validity of the strong cosmic censorship (SCC) conjecture is tied to how effectively the exterior damps fluctuations. Here, we study massless scalar fields in the exterior of Reissner-Nordström-de Sitter black holes. Their decay rates are governed by quasinormal modes of the black hole. We identify three families of modes in these spacetimes: one directly linked to the photon sphere, well described by standard WKB-type tools; another family whose existence and time scale is closely related to the de Sitter horizon; finally, a third family which dominates for near-extremally charged black holes and which is also present in asymptotically flat spacetimes. The last two families of modes seem to have gone unnoticed in the literature. We give a detailed description of linear scalar perturbations of such black holes, and conjecture that SCC is violated in the near extremal regime.

  4. Strong cosmic censorship for solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell field equations with polarized Gowdy symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nungesser, Ernesto; Rendall, Alan D [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2009-05-21

    A proof of strong cosmic censorship is presented for a class of solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations, those with polarized Gowdy symmetry. A key element of the argument is the observation that by means of a suitable choice of variables the central equations in this problem can be written in a form where they are identical to the central equations for general (i.e. non-polarized) vacuum Gowdy spacetimes. Using this, it is seen that the deep results of Ringstroem on strong cosmic censorship in the vacuum case have implications for the Einstein-Maxwell case. Working out the geometrical meaning of these analytical results leads to the main conclusion.

  5. Cosmic Censorship for Gowdy Spacetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringström, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Due to the complexity of Einstein's equations, it is often natural to study a question of interest in the framework of a restricted class of solutions. One way to impose a restriction is to consider solutions satisfying a given symmetry condition. There are many possible choices, but the present article is concerned with one particular choice, which we shall refer to as Gowdy symmetry. We begin by explaining the origin and meaning of this symmetry type, which has been used as a simplifying assumption in various contexts, some of which we shall mention. Nevertheless, the subject of interest here is strong cosmic censorship. Consequently, after having described what the Gowdy class of spacetimes is, we describe, as seen from the perspective of a mathematician, what is meant by strong cosmic censorship. The existing results on cosmic censorship are based on a detailed analysis of the asymptotic behavior of solutions. This analysis is in part motivated by conjectures, such as the BKL conjecture, which we shall therefore briefly describe. However, the emphasis of the article is on the mathematical analysis of the asymptotics, due to its central importance in the proof and in the hope that it might be of relevance more generally. The article ends with a description of the results that have been obtained concerning strong cosmic censorship in the class of Gowdy spacetimes.

  6. Strong cosmic censorship in the case of T{sup 3}-Gowdy vacuum spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringstroem, Hans [Department of Mathematics, KTH, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-06-07

    In 1952, Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat demonstrated that it makes sense to consider Einstein's vacuum equations from an initial value point of view; given initial data, there is a globally hyperbolic development. Since there are many developments, one does, however, not obtain uniqueness. This was remedied in 1969 when Choquet-Bruhat and Robert Geroch demonstrated that there is a unique maximal globally hyperbolic development (MGHD). Unfortunately, there are examples of initial data for which the MGHD is extendible, and, what is worse, extendible in inequivalent ways. Thus it is not possible to predict what spacetime one is in simply by looking at initial data and, in this sense, Einstein's equations are not deterministic. Since the examples exhibiting this behaviour are rather special, it is natural to conjecture that for generic initial data, the MGHD is inextendible. This conjecture is referred to as the strong cosmic censorship conjecture and is of central importance in mathematical relativity. In this paper, we shall describe this conjecture in detail, as well as its resolution in the special case of T{sup 3}-Gowdy spacetimes.

  7. Testing the weak gravity-cosmic censorship connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisford, Toby; Horowitz, Gary T.; Santos, Jorge E.

    2018-03-01

    A surprising connection between the weak gravity conjecture and cosmic censorship has recently been proposed. In particular, it was argued that a promising class of counterexamples to cosmic censorship in four-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Λ theory would be removed if charged particles (with sufficient charge) were present. We test this idea and find that indeed if the weak gravity conjecture is true, one cannot violate cosmic censorship this way. Remarkably, the minimum value of charge required to preserve cosmic censorship appears to agree precisely with that proposed by the weak gravity conjecture.

  8. Transplanckian censorship and global cosmic strings

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    Dolan, Matthew J. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale,School of Physics, University of Melbourne,Melbourne, 3010 (Australia); Draper, Patrick; Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Patel, Hiren [Amherst Center for Fundamental Interactions, Department of Physics,University of Massachusetts,Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2017-04-21

    Large field excursions are required in a number of axion models of inflation. These models also possess global cosmic strings, around which the axion follows a path mirroring the inflationary trajectory. Cosmic strings are thus an interesting theoretical laboratory for the study of transplanckian field excursions. We describe connections between various effective field theory models of axion monodromy and study the classical spacetimes around their supercritical cosmic strings. For small decay constants fM{sub p}/f, the EFT is under control and the string cores undergo topological inflation, which may be either of exponential or power-law type. We show that the exterior spacetime is nonsingular and equivalent to a decompactifying cigar geometry, with the radion rolling in a potential generated by axion flux. Signals are able to circumnavigate infinite straight strings in finite but exponentially long time, t∼e{sup Δa/M{sub p}}. For finite loops of supercritical string in asymptotically flat space, we argue that if topological inflation occurs, then topological censorship implies transplanckian censorship, or that external observers are forbidden from threading the loop and observing the full excursion of the axion.

  9. Transplanckian censorship and global cosmic strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Matthew J.; Draper, Patrick; Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Patel, Hiren

    2017-04-01

    Large field excursions are required in a number of axion models of inflation. These models also possess global cosmic strings, around which the axion follows a path mirroring the inflationary trajectory. Cosmic strings are thus an interesting theoretical laboratory for the study of transplanckian field excursions. We describe connections be-tween various effective field theory models of axion monodromy and study the classical spacetimes around their supercritical cosmic strings. For small decay constants f M p /f , the EFT is under control and the string cores undergo topological inflation, which may be either of exponential or power-law type. We show that the exterior spacetime is nonsingular and equivalent to a decompactifying cigar geometry, with the radion rolling in a potential generated by axion flux. Signals are able to circumnavigate infinite straight strings in finite but exponentially long time, t ˜ e Δ a/ M p . For finite loops of supercritical string in asymptotically flat space, we argue that if topological inflation occurs, then topological censorship implies transplanckian censorship, or that external observers are forbidden from threading the loop and observing the full excursion of the axion.

  10. Cosmic censorship of rotating Anti-de Sitter black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwak, Bogeun; Lee, Bum-Hoon, E-mail: rasenis@sogang.ac.kr, E-mail: bhl@sogang.ac.kr [Center for Quantum Spacetime, Sogang University, Seoul 04107 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-01

    We test the validity of cosmic censorship in the rotating anti-de Sitter black hole. For this purpose, we investigate whether the extremal black hole can be overspun by the particle absorption. The particle absorption will change the mass and angular momentum of the black hole, which is analyzed using the Hamilton-Jacobi equations consistent with the laws of thermodynamics. We have found that the mass of the extremal black hole increases more than the angular momentum. Therefore, the outer horizon of the black hole still exists, and cosmic censorship is valid.

  11. Can we observationally test the weak cosmic censorship conjecture?

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    Kong, Lingyao; Malafarina, Daniele; Bambi, Cosimo [Fudan University, Department of Physics, Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Shanghai (China)

    2014-08-15

    In general relativity, gravitational collapse of matter fields ends with the formation of a spacetime singularity, where the matter density becomes infinite and standard physics breaks down. According to the weak cosmic censorship conjecture, singularities produced in the gravitational collapse cannot be seen by distant observers and must be hidden within black holes. The validity of this conjecture is still controversial and at present we cannot exclude that naked singularities can be created in our Universe from regular initial data. In this paper, we study the radiation emitted by a collapsing cloud of dust and check whether it is possible to distinguish the birth of a black hole from the one of a naked singularity. In our simple dust model, we find that the properties of the radiation emitted in the two scenarios is qualitatively similar. That suggests that observational tests of the cosmic censorship conjecture may be very difficult, even in principle. (orig.)

  12. Horizon wave-function and the quantum cosmic censorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Casadio

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the Cosmic Censorship Conjecture by means of the horizon wave-function (HWF formalism. We consider a charged massive particle whose quantum mechanical state is represented by a spherically symmetric Gaussian wave-function, and restrict our attention to the superextremal case (with charge-to-mass ratio α>1, which is the prototype of a naked singularity in the classical theory. We find that one can still obtain a normalisable HWF for α22, and the uncertainty in the location of the horizon blows up at α2=2, signalling that such an object is no more well-defined. This perhaps implies that a quantum Cosmic Censorship might be conjectured by stating that no black holes with charge-to-mass ratio greater than a critical value (of the order of 2 can exist.

  13. Excluding black hole firewalls with extreme cosmic censorship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, Don N., E-mail: profdonpage@gmail.com [Department of Physics, 4-183 CCIS, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    The AMPS argument for black hole firewalls seems to arise not only from the assumption of local effective field theory outside the stretched horizon but also from an overcounting of internal black hole states that include states that are singular in the past. Here I propose to exclude such singular states by Extreme Cosmic Censorship (the conjectured principle that the universe is entirely nonsingular, except for transient singularities inside black and/or white holes). I argue that the remaining set of nonsingular realistic states do not have firewalls but yet preserve information in Hawking radiation from black holes that form from nonsingular initial states.

  14. Thermodynamics inducing massive particles' tunneling and cosmic censorship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Baocheng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonances and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Wuhan (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Cai, Qing-yu [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonances and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Wuhan (China); Zhan, Ming-sheng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonances and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Wuhan (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Center for Cold Atom Physics, Wuhan (China)

    2010-08-15

    By calculating the change of entropy, we prove that the first law of black hole thermodynamics leads to the tunneling probability of massive particles through the horizon, including the tunneling probability of massive charged particles from the Reissner-Nordstroem black hole and the Kerr-Newman black hole. Novelly, we find the trajectories of massive particles are close to that of massless particles near the horizon, although the trajectories of massive charged particles may be affected by electromagnetic forces. We show that Hawking radiation as massive particles tunneling does not lead to violation of the weak cosmic-censorship conjecture. (orig.)

  15. Cosmic censorship conjecture in Kerr-Sen black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Bogeun

    2017-06-01

    The validity of the cosmic censorship conjecture for the Kerr-Sen black hole, which is a solution to the low-energy effective field theory for four-dimensional heterotic string theory, is investigated using charged particle absorption. When the black hole absorbs the particle, the charge on it changes owing to the conserved quantities of the particle. Changes in the black hole are constrained to the equation for the motion of the particle and are consistent with the laws of thermodynamics. Particle absorption increases the mass of the Kerr-Sen black hole to more than that of the absorbed charges such as angular momentum and electric charge; hence, the black hole cannot be overcharged. In the near-extremal black hole, we observe a violation of the cosmic censorship conjecture for the angular momentum in the first order of expansion and the electric charge in the second order. However, considering an adiabatic process carrying the conserved quantities as those of the black hole, we prove the stability of the black hole horizon. Thus, we resolve the violation. This is consistent with the third law of thermodynamics.

  16. Cosmic censorship in Lorentz-violating theories of gravity

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    Meiers, Michael; Saravani, Mehdi; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2016-05-01

    Is cosmic censorship special to general relativity, or can it survive a violation of local Lorentz invariance? Recent studies have shown that singularities in Lorentz -violating Einstein-Aether (or Horava-Lifshitz) theories can lie behind a universal horizon in simple black hole spacetimes. Even infinitely fast signals cannot escape these universal horizons. We extend this result, for an incompressible aether, to 3 +1 d dynamical or spinning spacetimes which possess inner Killing horizons, and show that a universal horizon always forms in between the outer and (would-be) inner horizons. This finding suggests a notion of cosmic censorship, given that geometry in these theories never evolves beyond the universal horizon (avoiding potentially singular inner Killing horizons). A surprising result is that there are 3 distinct possible stationary universal horizons for a spinning black hole, only one of which matches the dynamical spherical solution. This motivates dynamical studies of collapse in Einstein-Aether theories beyond spherical symmetry, which may reveal instabilities around the spherical solution.

  17. Black strings, low viscosity fluids, and violation of cosmic censorship.

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    Lehner, Luis; Pretorius, Frans

    2010-09-03

    We describe the behavior of 5-dimensional black strings, subject to the Gregory-Laflamme instability. Beyond the linear level, the evolving strings exhibit a rich dynamics, where at intermediate stages the horizon can be described as a sequence of 3-dimensional spherical black holes joined by black string segments. These segments are themselves subject to a Gregory-Laflamme instability, resulting in a self-similar cascade, where ever-smaller satellite black holes form connected by ever-thinner string segments. This behavior is akin to satellite formation in low-viscosity fluid streams subject to the Rayleigh-Plateau instability. The simulation results imply that the string segments will reach zero radius in finite asymptotic time, whence the classical space-time terminates in a naked singularity. Since no fine-tuning is required to excite the instability, this constitutes a generic violation of cosmic censorship.

  18. Cosmic censorship conjecture in some matching spherical collapsing metrics

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    Lapiedra, Ramon; Morales-Lladosa, Juan Antonio

    2017-03-01

    A physically plausible Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi collapse in the marginally bound case is considered. By "physically plausible," we mean that the corresponding metric is C1 matched at the collapsing star surface and further that its intrinsic energy is, as due, stationary and finite. It is proved for this Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi collapse, for some parameter values, that its intrinsic central singularity is globally naked, thus violating the cosmic censorship conjecture with, for each direction, one photon, or perhaps a pencil of photons, leaving the singularity and reaching the null infinity. Our result is discussed in relation to some other cases in the current literature on the subject in which some of the central singularities are globally naked, too.

  19. Comments on Cosmic Censorship in AdS/CFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubeny, V.

    2004-04-06

    Recently Hertog, Horowitz, and Maeda (HHM) (hep-th/0310054) have proposed that cosmic censorship can be violated in the AdS/CFT context. They argue that for certain initial data there is insufficient energy available to make a black hole whose horizon is big enough to cloak the singularity that forms. We have investigated this proposal in the models HHM discuss and have thus far been unable to find initial data that provably satisfy this criterion, despite our development of an improved lower bound on the size of the singular region. This is consistent with recent numerical results (hep-th/0402109). For certain initial data, the energies of our configurations are not far above the lower bound on the requisite black hole mass, and so it is possible that in the exact time development naked singularities do form. We go on to argue that the finite radius cut-off AdS5 situation discussed by HHM displays instabilities when the full 10D theory is considered. We propose an AdS3 example that may well be free of this instability.

  20. Comments on Cosmic Censorship in AdS/CFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubeny, Veronika E.; Liu, Xiao; Rangamani, Mukund; Shenker, Stephen

    2004-03-21

    Recently Hertog, Horowitz, and Maeda (HHM) (hep-th/0310054) have proposed that cosmic censorship can be violated in the AdS/CFT context. They argue that for certain initial data there is insufficient energy available to make a black hole whose horizon is big enough to cloak the singularity that forms. We have investigated this proposal in the models HHM discuss and have thus far been unable to find initial data that provably satisfy this criterion, despite our development of an improved lower bound on the size of the singular region. This is consistent with recent numerical results (hep-th/0402109). For certain initial data, the energies of our configurations are not far above the lower bound on the requisite black hole mass, and so it is possible that in the exact time development naked singularities do form. We go on to argue that the finite radius cut-off AdS_5 situation discussed by HHM displays instabilities when the full 10D theory is considered. We propose an AdS_3 example that may well be free of this instability.

  1. Generic cosmic-censorship violation in anti-de Sitter space.

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    Hertog, Thomas; Horowitz, Gary T; Maeda, Kengo

    2004-04-02

    We consider (four-dimensional) gravity coupled to a scalar field with potential V(phi). The potential satisfies the positive energy theorem for solutions that asymptotically tend to a negative local minimum. We show that for a large class of such potentials, there is an open set of smooth initial data that evolve to naked singularities. Hence cosmic censorship does not hold for certain reasonable matter theories in asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetimes. The asymptotically flat case is more subtle. We suspect that potentials with a local Minkowski minimum may similarly lead to violations of cosmic censorship in asymptotically flat spacetimes, but we do not have definite results.

  2. Censorship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilde, M.; Gibbons, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    Censorship is the suppression or changing of speech or writing that is considered to be harmful to the public good. The concept derives from the Latin censor, an office that was established in Rome in 443 bce. The censor was responsible for conducting the census, that is, counting and registering

  3. End Point of the Ultraspinning Instability and Violation of Cosmic Censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueras, Pau; Kunesch, Markus; Lehner, Luis; Tunyasuvunakool, Saran

    2017-04-14

    We determine the end point of the axisymmetric ultraspinning instability of asymptotically flat Myers-Perry black holes in D=6 spacetime dimensions. In the nonlinear regime, this instability gives rise to a sequence of concentric rings connected by segments of black membrane on the rotation plane. The latter become thinner over time, resulting in the formation of a naked singularity in finite asymptotic time and hence a violation of the weak cosmic censorship conjecture in asymptotically flat higher-dimensional spaces.

  4. End Point of the Ultraspinning Instability and Violation of Cosmic Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueras, Pau; Kunesch, Markus; Lehner, Luis; Tunyasuvunakool, Saran

    2017-04-01

    We determine the end point of the axisymmetric ultraspinning instability of asymptotically flat Myers-Perry black holes in D =6 spacetime dimensions. In the nonlinear regime, this instability gives rise to a sequence of concentric rings connected by segments of black membrane on the rotation plane. The latter become thinner over time, resulting in the formation of a naked singularity in finite asymptotic time and hence a violation of the weak cosmic censorship conjecture in asymptotically flat higher-dimensional spaces.

  5. Violating the Weak Cosmic Censorship Conjecture in Four-Dimensional Anti-de Sitter Space

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    Crisford, Toby; Santos, Jorge E.

    2017-05-01

    We consider time-dependent solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations using anti-de Sitter (AdS) boundary conditions, and provide the first counterexample to the weak cosmic censorship conjecture in four spacetime dimensions. Our counterexample is entirely formulated in the Poincaré patch of AdS. We claim that our results have important consequences for quantum gravity, most notably to the weak gravity conjecture.

  6. A Little Quantum Help for Cosmic Censorship and a Step Beyond All That

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Pappas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis of cosmic censorship (CCH plays a crucial role in classical general relativity, namely, to ensure that naked singularities would never emerge, since it predicts that whenever a singularity is formed an event horizon would always develop around it as well, to prevent the former from interacting directly with the rest of the Universe. Should this not be so, naked singularities could eventually form, in which case phenomena beyond our understanding and ability to predict could occur, since at the vicinity of the singularity both predictability and determinism break down even at the classical (e.g., nonquantum level. More than 40 years after it was proposed, the validity of the hypothesis remains an open question. We reconsider CCH in both its weak and strong versions, concerning point-like singularities, with respect to the provisions of Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle. We argue that the shielding of the singularities from observers at infinity by an event horizon is also quantum mechanically favored, but ultimately it seems more appropriate to accept that singularities never actually form in the usual sense; thus no naked singularity danger exists in the first place.

  7. Note on a reformulation of the strong cosmic censor conjecture based on computability

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    Etesi, Gábor

    2002-12-01

    In this Letter we provide a reformulation of the strong cosmic censor conjecture taking into account recent results on Malament-Hogarth space-times. We claim that the strong version of the cosmic censor conjecture can be formulated by postulating that a physically reasonable space-time is either globally hyperbolic or possesses the Malament-Hogarth property. But it is known that a Malament-Hogarth space-time in principle is capable for performing non-Turing computations such as checking consistency of ZFC set theory. In this way we get an intimate conjectured link between the cosmic censorship scenario and computability theory.

  8. Note on a reformulation of the strong cosmic censor conjecture based on computability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etesi, Gabor

    2002-12-12

    In this Letter we provide a reformulation of the strong cosmic censor conjecture taking into account recent results on Malament-Hogarth space-times. We claim that the strong version of the cosmic censor conjecture can be formulated by postulating that a physically reasonable space-time is either globally hyperbolic or possesses the Malament-Hogarth property. But it is known that a Malament-Hogarth space-time in principle is capable for performing non-Turing computations such as checking consistency of ZFC set theory. In this way we get an intimate conjectured link between the cosmic censorship scenario and computability theory.

  9. End Point of Black Ring Instabilities and the Weak Cosmic Censorship Conjecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueras, Pau; Kunesch, Markus; Tunyasuvunakool, Saran

    2016-02-19

    We produce the first concrete evidence that violation of the weak cosmic censorship conjecture can occur in asymptotically flat spaces of five dimensions by numerically evolving perturbed black rings. For certain thin rings, we identify a new, elastic-type instability dominating the evolution, causing the system to settle to a spherical black hole. However, for sufficiently thin rings the Gregory-Laflamme mode is dominant, and the instability unfolds similarly to that of black strings, where the horizon develops a structure of bulges connected by necks which become ever thinner over time.

  10. Massless charged particles: Cosmic censorship, and the third law of black hole mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairoos, C.; Ghosh, Avirup; Sarkar, Sudipta

    2017-10-01

    The formulation of the laws of Black hole mechanics assumes the stability of black holes under perturbations in accordance with the "cosmic censorship hypothesis" (CCH). CCH prohibits the formation of a naked singularity by a physical process from a regular black hole solution with an event horizon. Earlier studies show that naked singularities can indeed be formed leading to the violation of CCH if a near-extremal black hole is injected with massive charged particles and the backreaction effects are neglected. We investigate the validity of CCH by considering the infall of charged massless particles as well as a charged null shell. We also discuss the issue of the third law of Black hole mechanics in the presence of null charged particles by considering various possibilities.

  11. Charged Matter Tests of Cosmic Censorship for Extremal and Nearly-Extremal Black Holes

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    Sorce, Jonathan; Wald, Robert

    2017-01-01

    We investigate scenarios in which adding electrically charged matter to a black hole may cause it to become over-extremal, violating cosmic censorship. It has previously been shown that when the matter is localized as a point particle, no violation occurs for extremal black holes to lowest nonvanishing order in the particle's charge and mass. However, recent work has suggested that violations may be possible when the black hole deviates from extremality. We show that these potential violations always occur above lowest nonvanishing order, and conclude that no lowest-order violation can occur in the nearly-extremal case unless a violation also occurs in the extremal case. We also extend the previous results on point particles to show that no violations occur to second order in charge when an arbitrary charged matter configuration is added to an extremal Kerr black hole, provided only that the matter satisfies the null energy condition.

  12. Radiating black holes in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory and cosmic censorship violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aniceto, Pedro [CENTRA, Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa,Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049 Lisboa (Portugal); Pani, Paolo [Dipartimento di Fisica, “Sapienza” Università di Roma & Sezione INFN Roma 1,Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); CENTRA, Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa,Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049 Lisboa (Portugal); Rocha, Jorge V. [Departament de Física Fonamental, Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB),Universitat de Barcelona,Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-05-19

    We construct exact, time-dependent, black hole solutions of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with arbitrary dilaton coupling, a. For a=1 this theory arises as the four-dimensional low-energy effective description of heterotic string theory. These solutions represent electrically charged, spherically symmetric black holes emitting or absorbing charged null fluids and generalize the Vaidya and Bonnor-Vaidya solutions of general relativity and of Einstein-Maxwell theory, respectively. The a=1 case stands out as special, in the sense that it is the only choice of the coupling that allows for a time-dependent dilaton field in this class of solutions. As a by-product, when a=1 we show that an electrically charged black hole in this theory can be overcharged by bombarding it with a stream of electrically charged null fluid, resulting in the formation of a naked singularity. This provides an example of cosmic censorship violation in an exact dynamical solution to low-energy effective string theory and in a case in which the total stress-energy tensor satisfies all energy conditions. When a≠1, our solutions necessarily have a time-independent scalar field and consequently cannot be overcharged.

  13. Radiating black holes in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory and cosmic censorship violation

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    Aniceto, Pedro; Pani, Paolo; Rocha, Jorge V.

    2016-05-01

    We construct exact, time-dependent, black hole solutions of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with arbitrary dilaton coupling, a. For a = 1 this theory arises as the four-dimensional low-energy effective description of heterotic string theory. These solutions represent electrically charged, spherically symmetric black holes emitting or absorbing charged null fluids and generalize the Vaidya and Bonnor-Vaidya solutions of general relativity and of Einstein-Maxwell theory, respectively. The a = 1 case stands out as special, in the sense that it is the only choice of the coupling that allows for a time-dependent dilaton field in this class of solutions. As a by-product, when a = 1 we show that an electrically charged black hole in this theory can be overcharged by bombarding it with a stream of electrically charged null fluid, resulting in the formation of a naked singularity. This provides an example of cosmic censorship violation in an exact dynamical solution to low-energy effective string theory and in a case in which the total stress-energy tensor satisfies all energy conditions. When a ≠ 1, our solutions necessarily have a time-independent scalar field and consequently cannot be overcharged.

  14. Rotating elastic string loops in flat and black hole spacetimes: stability, cosmic censorship and the Penrose process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natário, José; Queimada, Leonel; Vicente, Rodrigo

    2018-04-01

    We rederive the equations of motion for relativistic strings, that is, one-dimensional elastic bodies whose internal energy depends only on their stretching, and use them to study circular string loops rotating in the equatorial plane of flat and black hole spacetimes. We start by obtaining the conditions for equilibrium, and find that: (i) if the string’s longitudinal speed of sound does not exceed the speed of light then its radius when rotating in Minkowski’s spacetime is always larger than its radius when at rest; (ii) in Minkowski’s spacetime, equilibria are linearly stable for rotation speeds below a certain threshold, higher than the string’s longitudinal speed of sound, and linearly unstable for some rotation speeds above it; (iii) equilibria are always linearly unstable in Schwarzschild’s spacetime. Moreover, we study interactions of a rotating string loop with a Kerr black hole, namely in the context of the weak cosmic censorship conjecture and the Penrose process. We find that: (i) elastic string loops that satisfy the null energy condition cannot overspin extremal black holes; (ii) elastic string loops that satisfy the dominant energy condition cannot increase the maximum efficiency of the usual particle Penrose process; (iii) if the dominant energy condition (but not the weak energy condition) is violated then the efficiency can be increased. This last result hints at the interesting possibility that the dominant energy condition may underlie the well known upper bounds for the efficiencies of energy extraction processes (including, for example, superradiance).

  15. A Proof of the Geroch-Horowitz-Penrose Formulation of the Strong Cosmic Censor Conjecture Motivated by Computability Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etesi, Gábor

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we present a proof of a mathematical version of the strong cosmic censor conjecture attributed to Geroch-Horowitz and Penrose but formulated explicitly by Wald. The proof is based on the existence of future-inextendible causal curves in causal pasts of events on the future Cauchy horizon in a non-globally hyperbolic space-time. By examining explicit non-globally hyperbolic space-times we find that in case of several physically relevant solutions these future-inextendible curves have in fact infinite length. This way we recognize a close relationship between asymptotically flat or anti-de Sitter, physically relevant extendible space-times and the so-called Malament-Hogarth space-times which play a central role in recent investigations in the theory of "gravitational computers". This motivates us to exhibit a more sharp, more geometric formulation of the strong cosmic censor conjecture, namely "all physically relevant, asymptotically flat or anti-de Sitter but non-globally hyperbolic space-times are Malament-Hogarth ones". Our observations may indicate a natural but hidden connection between the strong cosmic censorship scenario and the Church-Turing thesis revealing an unexpected conceptual depth beneath both conjectures.

  16. Supersymmetry and cosmic censorship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortin, T. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Facultad de Ciencias C-XVI, C. U. Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-05-15

    We show that requiring unbroken supersymmetry everywhere in black-hole-type solutions of N=2, d=4 supergravity coupled to vector supermultiplets ensures in most cases absence of naked singularities. We show that the requirement of global supersymmetry implies the absence of sources for NUT charge, angular momentum, scalar hair and negative energy, for which there is no microscopic interpretation in String Theory. These conditions exclude, for instance, singular solutions such as the Kerr-Newman with M= vertical stroke q vertical stroke, which fails to be everywhere supersymmetric. There are, nevertheless, everywhere supersymmetric solutions with global angular momentum and non-trivial scalar fields. We also present similar preliminary results in N=1, d=5 supergravity coupled to vector multiplets. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Spillover Censorship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steen Kaargaard; Krogh, Mads

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses how current practices of corporate self-censorship within the US record industry, originating in a local legal and political context and moral climate, spill over into foreign markets as a side effect of the global operations of dominant multinational entertainment and media...... conglomerates. A specific case, the dissemination of D12’s “Purple Pills” in various versions on the Danish market since its release in 2001, illustrates the release policies and practices of national or regional divisions of transnational record companies and other commercial agents and leads to reflection...

  18. Supersymmetry, attractors and cosmic censorship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellorin, Jorge [Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Facultad de Ciencias C-XVI, C.U. Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: jorge.bellorin@uam.es; Meessen, Patrick [Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Facultad de Ciencias C-XVI, C.U. Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: patrick.meessen@cern.ch; Ortin, Tomas [Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Facultad de Ciencias C-XVI, C.U. Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: tomas.ortin@cern.ch

    2007-01-29

    We show that requiring unbroken supersymmetry everywhere in black-hole-type solutions of N=2, d=4 supergravity coupled to vector supermultiplets ensures in most cases absence of naked singularities. We formulate three specific conditions which we argue are equivalent to the requirement of global supersymmetry. These three conditions can be related to the absence of sources for NUT charge, angular momentum, scalar hair and negative energy, although the solutions can still have globally defined angular momentum and non-trivial scalar fields, as we show in an explicit example. Furthermore, only the solutions satisfying these requirements seem to have a microscopic interpretation in string theory since only they have supersymmetric sources. These conditions exclude, for instance, singular solutions such as the Kerr-Newman with M=|q|, which fails to be everywhere supersymmetric. We also present a re-derivation of several results concerning attractors in N=2, d=4 theories based on the explicit knowledge of the most general solutions in the timelike class.

  19. The State of Censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Eileen

    1996-01-01

    The Public Library Association's 1995 survey reported that while public librarians overwhelmingly support intellectual freedom, not all of them are absolutists. Librarians do take community censorship requests seriously and engage in practical self-censorship. Other topics include censorship demographics, the role of the library board, and…

  20. Note on a reformulation of the strong cosmic censor conjceture based on computability

    OpenAIRE

    Etesi, Gabor

    2002-01-01

    In this letter we provide a reformulation of the strong cosmic censor conjecture taking into account recent results on Malament--Hogarth space-times. We claim that the strong version of the cosmic censor conjecture can be formulated by postulating that a physically relevant space-time is either globally hyperbolic or possesses the Malament--Hogarth property. But it is known that a Malament--Hogarth space-time in principle is capable for performing non-Turing computations such as checking cons...

  1. Strong Stellar-driven Outflows Shape the Evolution of Galaxies at Cosmic Dawn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontanot, Fabio; De Lucia, Gabriella; Hirschmann, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    We study galaxy mass assembly and cosmic star formation rate (SFR) at high redshift (z ≳ 4), by comparing data from multiwavelength surveys with predictions from the GAlaxy Evolution and Assembly (gaea) model. gaea implements a stellar feedback scheme partially based on cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, which features strong stellar-driven outflows and mass-dependent timescales for the re-accretion of ejected gas. In previous work, we have shown that this scheme is able to correctly reproduce the evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) up to z ∼ 3. We contrast model predictions with both rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) and optical luminosity functions (LFs), which are mostly sensitive to the SFR and stellar mass, respectively. We show that gaea is able to reproduce the shape and redshift evolution of both sets of LFs. We study the impact of dust on the predicted LFs, and we find that the required level of dust attenuation is in qualitative agreement with recent estimates based on the UV continuum slope. The consistency between data and model predictions holds for the redshift evolution of the physical quantities well beyond the redshift range considered for the calibration of the original model. In particular, we show that gaea is able to recover the evolution of the GSMF up to z ∼ 7 and the cosmic SFR density up to z ∼ 10.

  2. Strongly lensed gravitational waves and electromagnetic signals as powerful cosmic rulers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jun-Jie; Wu, Xue-Feng

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss the possibility of using strongly lensed gravitational waves (GWs) and their electromagnetic (EM) counterparts as powerful cosmic rulers. In the EM domain, it has been suggested that joint observations of the time delay (Δτ) between lensed quasar images and the velocity dispersion (σ) of the lensing galaxy (i.e. the combination Δτ/σ2) are able to constrain the cosmological parameters more strongly than Δτ or σ2 separately. Here, for the first time, we propose that this Δτ/σ2 method can be applied to the strongly lensed systems observed in both GW and EM windows. Combining the redshifts, images and σ observed in the EM domain with the very precise Δτ derived from lensed GW signals, we expect that accurate multimessenger cosmology can be achieved in the era of third-generation GW detectors. Comparing with the constraints from the Δτ method, we prove that using Δτ/σ2 can improve the discrimination between cosmological models. Furthermore, we demonstrate that with ∼50 strongly lensed GW-EM systems, we can reach a constraint on the dark energy equation of state w comparable to the 580 Union2.1 Type Ia supernovae data. Much more stringent constraints on w can be obtained when combining the Δτ and Δτ/σ2 methods.

  3. Censorship in Children's Literature: What Every Educator Should Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalongo, Mary Renck; Creany, Anne Drolett

    1991-01-01

    Defines censorship and differentiates censorship from selection. Reviews the history of censorship and recent research trends. Describes typical censorable content and the consequences of censorship for libraries, books, and authors. Suggests strategies educators can use in dealing with censorship. (BC)

  4. Not Your Father's Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Harry

    2009-01-01

    Documents from the Army during World War II arrived with the censor's approval stamp, certifying that no harm would come to the nation if those depictions of life at the front fell into enemy hands. That was the censorship of another time. Everyone understood why it was important and knew that the government needed to control the communication…

  5. Censorship and the Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, Daniel Morgan

    This review of current legal practices with respect to censorship in the areas of obscenity and pornography contains a history of anti-obscenity legislation; a review of the efforts of the United States Supreme Court and lower courts to define obscenity; a discussion of publisher Larry Flynt's battle against the "community standards"…

  6. Probing the cosmic distance duality with strong gravitational lensing and supernovae Ia data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holanda, R.F.L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, 58429-500, Campina Grande PB (Brazil); Busti, V.C. [Departamento de Física Matemática, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, CEP 05508-090, São Paulo SP (Brazil); Alcaniz, J.S., E-mail: holanda@uepb.edu.br, E-mail: vcbusti@astro.iag.usp.br, E-mail: alcaniz@on.br [Departamento de Astronomia, Observatório Nacional, 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro RJ (Brazil)

    2016-02-01

    We propose and perform a new test of the cosmic distance-duality relation (CDDR), D{sub L}(z) / D{sub A}(z) (1 + z){sup 2} = 1, where D{sub A} is the angular diameter distance and D{sub L} is the luminosity distance to a given source at redshift z, using strong gravitational lensing (SGL) and type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) data. We show that the ratio D=D{sub A{sub 1{sub 2}}}/D{sub A{sub 2}} and D{sup *}=D{sub L{sub 1{sub 2}}}/D{sub L{sub 2}}, where the subscripts 1 and 2 correspond, respectively, to redshifts z{sub 1} and z{sub 2}, are linked by D/D{sup *}=(1+z{sub 1}){sup 2} if the CDDR is valid. We allow departures from the CDDR by defining two functions for η(z{sub 1}), which equals unity when the CDDR is valid. We find that combination of SGL and SNe Ia data favours no violation of the CDDR at 1σ confidence level (η(z) ≅ 1), in complete agreement with other tests and reinforcing the theoretical pillars of the CDDR.

  7. Fighting Censorship with Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdian, Mohammad

    In countries such as China or Iran where Internet censorship is prevalent, users usually rely on proxies or anonymizers to freely access the web. The obvious difficulty with this approach is that once the address of a proxy or an anonymizer is announced for use to the public, the authorities can easily filter all traffic to that address. This poses a challenge as to how proxy addresses can be announced to users without leaking too much information to the censorship authorities. In this paper, we formulate this question as an interesting algorithmic problem. We study this problem in a static and a dynamic model, and give almost tight bounds on the number of proxy servers required to give access to n people k of whom are adversaries. We will also discuss how trust networks can be used in this context.

  8. Celebrate Democracy! Teach about Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Lisa K.

    2005-01-01

    An English teacher believes that it is necessary for students to know how and why censorship operates in school libraries and classrooms to help them have the tools to speak for themselves. Free-choice reading, mock trails, and writing assignments are used to teach students about the censorship of books that are used in the schools.

  9. Commentary: Censorship in Three Metaphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Fenice B.; Bailey, Nancy M.

    2009-01-01

    Censorship is about restriction and control of intellectual development, and the danger when educators fail to investigate what censorship truly means--for example, by attaching it to metaphors with abundant entailments--is that people will merely "shrug off" the removal of books from libraries and classrooms and fail to see challenges…

  10. Cosmic censorship in quantum Einstein gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, A.; Koch, B.; Platania, A.

    2017-05-01

    We study the quantum gravity modification of the Kuroda-Papapetrou model induced by the running of the Newton’s constant at high energy in quantum Einstein gravity. We argue that although the antiscreening character of the gravitational interaction favours the formation of a naked singularity, quantum gravity effects turn the classical singularity into a ‘whimper’ singularity which remains naked for a finite amount of advanced time.

  11. The Problem of Self-Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Self-censorship, not to be confused with actual censorship, is the most complicated, but least understood form of censorship. In most cases of actual censorship, objections to a book are based on offensive language, sexual content, or unsuitability by age, and a complaint is filed to suppress the book. Often an internal review is undertaken, and a…

  12. The strong interaction at the collider and cosmic-rays frontiers

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David; Pierog, Tanguy; Ostapchenko, Sergey; Werner, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    First data on inclusive particle production measured in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are compared to predictions of various hadron-interaction Monte Carlos (QGSJET, EPOS and SIBYLL) used commonly in high-energy cosmic-ray physics. While reasonable overall agreement is found for some of the models, none of them reproduces consistently the sqrt(s) evolution of all the measured observables. We discuss the implications of the new LHC data for the modeling of the non-perturbative and semihard parton dynamics in hadron-hadron and cosmic-rays interactions at the highest energies studied today.

  13. Strong Hydrogen Absorption at Cosmic Dawn: The Signature of a Baryonic Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaugh, Stacy S.

    2018-03-01

    The recently reported detection of redshifted 21cm absorption at $z \\approx 17$ is a significant advance in the exploration of the cosmic dark ages. The observed signal ($T_{\\mathrm{21}} \\approx -0.5$ K with the limit $T_{\\mathrm{21}} universe.

  14. Internet censorship in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Akgül

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Turkey passed an internet censorship law in 2007 with the declared objective of protecting families and minors (Akdeniz, 2010. It established a unit within the regulator BTK (Information and Communication Technologies Authority responsible for imposing bans and blocks on websites based on nine catalogue crimes defined by other national laws (Akgül 2008, 2009a, 2009b. As of May 2015, 80,000 websites were banned based on civil code related complaints and intellectual property rights violations, reports the independent website Engelliweb. Blocking decisions rendered by penal courts are enforced even when they are based on grounds other that the nine catalogue crimes - such as terrorism, organised crime and crime against the state. Passed in parliament while ignoring the pleas of NGOs and of the internet sector, the Internet Law No. 5651 has since been used to temporarily ban popular platforms such as Blogger, Last.fm, Vimeo, Wordpress and YouTube. At the same time, some blocking decisions by the courts (e.g., Google and Facebook were not enforced by the authorities. Since its introduction, the European Court of Human Rights has ruled that Law No. 5651 (Council of Europe, 2011 is against the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR, 2013. This article provides an overview of internet censorship and its social background in Turkey.

  15. HAWC Observations Strongly Favor Pulsar Interpretations of the Cosmic-Ray Positron Excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan [Fermilab; Cholis, Ilias [Johns Hopkins U.; Linden, Tim [Ohio State U., CCAPP; Fang, Ke [Maryland U.

    2017-11-17

    Recent measurements of the Geminga and B0656+14 pulsars by the gamma-ray telescope HAWC (along with earlier measurements by Milagro) indicate that these objects generate significant fluxes of very high-energy electrons. In this paper, we use the very high-energy gamma-ray intensity and spectrum of these pulsars to calculate and constrain their expected contributions to the local cosmic-ray positron spectrum. Among models that are capable of reproducing the observed characteristics of the gamma-ray emission, we find that pulsars invariably produce a flux of high-energy positrons that is similar in spectrum and magnitude to the positron fraction measured by PAMELA and AMS-02. In light of this result, we conclude that it is very likely that pulsars provide the dominant contribution to the long perplexing cosmic-ray positron excess.

  16. HAWC observations strongly favor pulsar interpretations of the cosmic-ray positron excess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Dan; Cholis, Ilias; Linden, Tim; Fang, Ke

    2017-11-01

    Recent measurements of the Geminga and B 0656 +14 pulsars by the gamma-ray telescope HAWC (along with earlier measurements by Milagro) indicate that these objects generate significant fluxes of very high-energy electrons. In this paper, we use the very high-energy gamma-ray intensity and spectrum of these pulsars to calculate and constrain their expected contributions to the local cosmic-ray positron spectrum. Among models that are capable of reproducing the observed characteristics of the gamma-ray emission, we find that pulsars invariably produce a flux of high-energy positrons that is similar in spectrum and magnitude to the positron fraction measured by PAMELA and AMS-02. In light of this result, we conclude that it is very likely that pulsars provide the dominant contribution to the long perplexing cosmic-ray positron excess.

  17. Self Censorship among Icelandic Journalists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgir Guðmundsson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The discussion on media self-censorship has flourished in Iceland after the attacks on the Charlie Hebdo editorial offices in January 2015 and after some dramatic changes in the top management and owner-groups of some of the media firms. But what is this experience that journalists describe as self censorship? This paper attempts to answer two main research questions. On the one hand the question how journalists understand the concept of selfcensorship. On the other hand the question: what is the experience of Icelandic journalist of self-censorship? The approach is the one of a qualitative research and is based on interviews with six experienced journalists. The main findings suggest important influence of the social discourse on news and news values of journalists and their tendency for self-censorship. This discourse is partly directed by politicians and influential bloggers and also by a massive discussion by active social media users. Furthermore the findings suggest, that ownership and the location of the particular medium where a journalist works in the lineup of different commercial-political blocks in the media market, is important for self-censorship. Finally it seems that journalists understand the concept selfcensorship in a different manner and that it is important to define the term carefully if it is to be used as an analytical tool.

  18. A cosmic-ray nuclear event with an anomalously strong concentration of energy and particles in the central region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, N.M.; Arata, N.; Maldonado, R.H.C.

    1986-01-01

    A cosmic-ray induced nuclear event detected in the emulsion chamber is described. The event consists of 217 shower cores with ΣEγ = 1,275 TeV. In log scale, energy and particles are emitted most densely at the small lateral distance corresponding to 0.5 mm; 77 % of the total energy and 61 % of the total multiplicity are inside the radius of 0.65 cm. The shower cores in the central region show exponential-type energy distribution and non-isotropic azimuthal distribution. This event indicates a possibility that phenomena of large transverse momentum could happen to produce a strong concentration of energy and particles in the very forward direction. (Authors) [pt

  19. "Not Censorship but Selection": Censorship and/as Prizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    This essay calls for a fresh critical approach to the topic of censorship, suggesting that anticensorship efforts, while important and necessary, function much like literary prizing. The analysis draws especially on James English's recent study "The Economy of Prestige." There are two central arguments: first, that the librarian ethic of…

  20. Literary Censorship: The Changing Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Al-Sharqi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Censorship is a double-edged sword that has bred legal, political, and moral wrangling across the globe. The basic controversy, which harkens back to ancient times, stems from the motivation and intention of the censoring authority. The censoring authority controls literary and informational contents, based on the promulgated political, moral, religious, and cultural values of the land. Historically, the politicians, judiciary, clergymen, powerful groups, and the public at large were involved in guarding public morals and rooting out obscenity. The obscenity laws outlawed the selling, purchasing, printing, importing, and mailing of obscene items. However, in today's day and age, the Internet has made it difficult to control the circulation of what was once considered obscene. Censorship has evolved to monitor and control online content to keep abreast with the changing times; nevertheless, it does not always effectively control the questionable content. Moreover, in the past, cultural values and demography played a vital role in deciding what needed to be censored. Internet, as an electronic global village, has redefined demography; therefore, the global as well as indigenous standards upon which literature were once analyzed for censorship is now blurred. The promise of free speech has given power to the people that live in mature democracies. However, there should be a self-imposed code of conduct so that the right of free speech does not infringe on others' right of existence. This paper reviews censorship, tracing its historical path and evolution over the years, its changing standards, and its pros and cons. Lastly, the paper discusses the need to conjoin freedom of speech with the responsibility to protect the diverse cultures, religions, races, sects, genders, and especially the young generation.

  1. Quantum censorship in two dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pangon, V. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Universitaet Frankfurt, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Planckstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Nagy, S. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Polonyi, J., E-mail: polonyi@ires.in2p3.f [Strasbourg University, CNRS-IPHC, BP28 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Sailer, K. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2010-10-25

    It is pointed out that increasingly attractive interactions, represented by partially concave local potential in the Lagrangian, may lead to the degeneracy of the blocked, renormalized action at the gliding cutoff scale by tree-level renormalization. A quantum counterpart of this mechanism is presented in the two-dimensional sine-Gordon model. The presence of Quantum Censorship is conjectured which makes the loop contributions pile up during the renormalization and thereby realize an approximate semiclassical effect.

  2. Covert Censorship in Libraries: A Discussion Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Kim

    2005-01-01

    Librarians, through their professional associations, have long been committed to the social justice principle embedded in the concept of "free access to information". External censorship challenges to library collections threaten this principle overtly. However, censorship can also occur in libraries in various covert and often unconscious ways.…

  3. Censorship and Intellectual Freedom in the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, Edna; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes seven articles that discuss censorship and intellectual freedom in junior and senior high schools. Highlights include access to appropriate information; library material selection; dealing with complaints; a list of potentially controversial titles and topics; a history of book burning; the censorship of fiction; weeding versus…

  4. Intellectual Freedom and Censorship in the Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jessica L.

    2010-01-01

    The article gives a brief description of intellectual freedom and censorship in order to set a foundation for looking into the library community's role in advocating for intellectual freedom and combating censorship. Focus is given to the unique challenges of school libraries in fulfilling the larger library community's expectations in these two…

  5. Correlations Between Secondary Cosmic Ray Ratesand Strong Electric Fields at Lomnický štít

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kudela, Karel; Chum, Jaroslav; Kollárik, M.; Langer, R.; Strhárský, I.; Baše, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 20 (2017), s. 10700-10710 ISSN 2169-897X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC15-07281J; GA MŠk EF15_003/0000481 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) BAS-17-04 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68378289 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : cosmic rays * thunderstorms * electric field Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (UFA-U) OBOR OECD: Meteorology and atmospheric sciences; Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) (UFA-U) Impact factor: 3.454, year: 2016

  6. Cars & Censorship: How Advertising Pressure Can Corrupt a Free Press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Ronald K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses "private censorship" as it relates to car dealers and television advertising. Defines "private censorship" as that which occurs when a broadcaster suppresses or alters a news story that affects commercial clients (advertisers). Makes recommendations for a freer press. (JOW)

  7. The Fear of the Word: Censorship and Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oboler, Eli M.

    This book discusses censorship and sex through the ages. The 15 chapters focus on the following topics: (1) the bases of censorship; (2) the concept of taboo; (3) the role of words in the control of people's thought; (4) Hellenism, stoicism, and censorship; (5) the Judeo-Christian influence; (6) the puritan and the censor; (7) religion and…

  8. Self-censorship on Internal Social Media:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Vibeke Thøis; Verhoeven, Joost W.M.

    2016-01-01

    Internal social media (ISM) or social intranets provide organizations with a communication arena in which coworkers can actively contribute to organizational communication. Coworkers are, however, far from impulsive and spontaneous when they communicate on ISM. A case study in a Danish bank found...... only positive comments. Through these seven self-censorship strategies, coworkers retain the quality of communication on ISM and prevent conflict or relational damage. Future research should explore the self-regulation strategies underlying self-censorship in order to improve understanding...

  9. The Uses and Abuses of Censorship: God, Ireland and the Battle to Extend Censorship Post 1929

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Keating

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The passage of the 1929 Censorship of Publications Act marked a significant development for the inclusion of Irish Catholic teaching into the Free State’s legal system. Notwithstanding this, many on the fundamentalist wing of Irish Catholicism felt let down by the scope of the Act. Censorship, under the Act, was limited to issues of sex, sexual morality, contraception and abortion and excluded attacks on the Catholic faith and the denial of God, all of which were viewed as blasphemy, and therefore the legitimate focus of censorship, by many of those who had lobbied for the extension of censorship. The Catholic Truth Society of Ireland (CTSI was in the vanguard of lobbying for the introduction of the 1929 Act and played the leading role in its policing. The CTSI was unstinting in its efforts to officially and surreptitiously extend censorship. This article traces the correspondence of the CTSI with politicians, the Catholic hierarchy and a leading print distributor, in order to demonstrate how the organization sought to extend literary censorship to encompass blasphemy, through the application of moral, economic and political pressure. A campaign that had at its heart the desire to control the actions and thoughts of the Irish people.

  10. Self-Censorship in Course Diaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Timothy; Brooks, Peggy

    2004-01-01

    Ample evidence supports the notion that keeping a course-related diary improves students' writing, knowledge of material, and awareness of psychological processes. Scant evidence supports the authenticity and completeness of diary entries. A questionnaire was developed to assess students' perceptions of self-censorship and pedagogical value of…

  11. The Role of Censorship in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petress, Ken

    2005-01-01

    School authorities face great complexities and inevitable challenges when deciding to make or not to make censorship decisions in schools. Matters of educational content, age level, acceptability by parents and communities, and appropriateness in the school setting are among the decisions having to be made. When school official decisions result in…

  12. Internet Censorship in Turkey: University Students' Opinions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Hasan; Arikan, Arda

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study university students' opinions toward online censorship with references to their socio-political and economic variables. Considering the upwards trend and the increasing number of online restrictions in Turkey, the opinions of university students (n=138) are thought to give significant findings. The questionnaire…

  13. Libraries and the Ethics of Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews a selection of literature pertaining to the subject of censorship in modern libraries. It interrogates the literature in terms of the ethical debates informing much of the contemporary academic writing on this subject. A multi-pronged approach to the subject is adopted. The review includes evaluations of the relevant aspects of…

  14. Teacher Perspective on Internet Censorship in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktay, Sayim

    2018-01-01

    There has been a rapid increase both in the number of users and the number of websites providing data since the invention of Internet; it has become the richest and most used source of information. However, several countries, including Turkey, resort to censorship owing to the fact that anybody can publish on the Internet with sometimes…

  15. Banned Books: A Study of Censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossuck, Jennifer

    1997-01-01

    Describes how a course on censorship taught at an all-girls high school in Tacoma, Washington, drew on current event controversies to initiate discussion. Outlines the course's four units and uses Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451" to frame course questions. (TB)

  16. Probing strong-field general relativity near black holes

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís

    2005-01-01

    Nature has sprinkled black holes of various sizes throughout the universe, from stellar mass black holes in X-ray sources to supermassive black holes of billions of solar masses in quasars. Astronomers today are probing the spacetime near black holes using X-rays, and gravitational waves will open a different view in the near future. These tools give us an unprecedented opportunity to test ultra-strong-field general relativity, including the fundamental theorem of the uniqueness of the Kerr metric and Roger Penrose's cosmic censorship conjecture. Already, fascinating studies of spectral lines are showing the extreme gravitational lensing effects near black holes and allowing crude measurements of black hole spin. When the ESA-NASA gravitational wave detector LISA begins its observations in about 10 years, it will make measurements of dynamical spacetimes near black holes with an accuracy greater even than that which theoreticians can reach with their computations today. Most importantly, when gravitational wa...

  17. Return of the quantum cosmic censor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hod, Shahar [Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer 40250 (Israel); Hadassah Institute, Jerusalem 91010 (Israel)], E-mail: shaharhod@gmail.com

    2008-10-16

    The influential theorems of Hawking and Penrose demonstrate that spacetime singularities are ubiquitous features of general relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity. The utility of classical general relativity in describing gravitational phenomena is maintained by the cosmic censorship principle. This conjecture, whose validity is still one of the most important open questions in general relativity, asserts that the undesirable spacetime singularities are always hidden inside of black holes. In this Letter we reanalyze extreme situations which have been considered as counterexamples to the cosmic censorship hypothesis. In particular, we consider the absorption of fermion particles by a spinning black hole. Ignoring quantum effects may lead one to conclude that an incident fermion wave may over spin the black hole, thereby exposing its inner singularity to distant observers. However, we show that when quantum effects are properly taken into account, the integrity of the black-hole event horizon is irrefutable. This observation suggests that the cosmic censorship principle is intrinsically a quantum phenomena.

  18. Limits on cosmological variation of strong interaction and quark masses from big bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic, laboratory and Oklo data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flambaum, V.V.; Shuryak, E.V.

    2002-01-01

    Recent data on the cosmological variation of the electromagnetic fine structure constant from distant quasar (QSO) absorption spectra have inspired a more general discussion of the possible variation of other constants. We discuss the variation of strong scale and quark masses. We derive limits on their relative change from (i) primordial big bang nucleosynthesis, (ii) the Oklo natural nuclear reactor, (iii) quasar absorption spectra, and (iv) laboratory measurements of hyperfine intervals

  19. “A War Between Buffoons”? Censorship and Self-Censorship in Postcolonial Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Mari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Deeply entangled as they are, censorship and self-censorship affect many postcolonial literary texts, from different periods and locations. Due to the great variety of case studies, an investigation of censorship and self-censorship in postcolonial literature might take advantage of multiple comparative approaches. In fact, whereas the censoring effects of colonial discourse on race, class and gender issues concerning the colonized populations produced a transnational phenomenon known as “the postcolonial exotic” (Huggan 2001, the necessity of a comparative analysis might be assessed also in the case of state-imposed and/or religious censorship. This allows to take into account the specificities of each national and cultural context, while considering, at the same time, the existence of shared political, cultural and literary elements. As for the theoretical grounds upon which this comparison might be built, they often involve the general patterns of postcolonial nation building, as well as its relationship with postcolonial allegory (Jameson 1986, Slemon 1988. The struggle against censorship, in fact, implies the joint reinstatement and deconstruction of the stereotyped Orientalist dichotomy (Said 1978 between European liberalism and Oriental despotism – resulting in a situation of political relativity and ambiguity or, as Rushdie writes, in “a war between buffoons” (1990: 179. The paper will focus on two specific case studies – Rushdie’s Haroun and the Sea of Stories (1990 and Shalimar the Clown (2005, as well as Nuruddin Farah’s trilogy “Variations on the Theme of an African Dictatorship” (1979-1983 – where the authors both represent and challenge censorship and self-censorship. Their thematic investment in the figures of the madman and the buffoon, on the double threshold of truth/falsity and speech/silence, will be thus considered as a crucial point in both authors’ attempts to reconsider postcolonial censorship as

  20. Automated Discovery of Internet Censorship by Web Crawling

    OpenAIRE

    Darer, Alexander; Farnan, Oliver; Wright, Joss

    2018-01-01

    Censorship of the Internet is widespread around the world. As access to the web becomes increasingly ubiquitous, filtering of this resource becomes more pervasive. Transparency about specific content that citizens are denied access to is atypical. To counter this, numerous techniques for maintaining URL filter lists have been proposed by various individuals and organisations that aim to empirical data on censorship for benefit of the public and wider censorship research community. We present ...

  1. The Role of Imprisonment and Censorship in the International Success of Pramoedya Ananta Toer’s Buru Quartet Novels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Susanti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Imprisonment and censorship that is meant to silence Pramoedya Ananta Toer and his books did not succeed. On the contrary, they only help popularize Pramoedya Ananta Toer’s Buru Quartet novels in the international market. Through some library researches, this article analyzed the purpose of imprisonment, the impacts it has on Pramoedya Ananta Toer’s career in the literary world and related them to Pierre Bourdieu’s concept of capital. It is concluded that this triumph over imprisonment and censorship owes its success to Pramoedya Ananta Toer’s strong connections with the people that matter in his lifetime.

  2. Case Studies in Censorship: Censoring "The Merchant of Venice."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews censorship of "The Merchant of Venice," which has been based on its portrayal of the Jewish character Shylock. Background information is followed by an annotated bibliography which includes 15 citations dealing with Shylock, 22 citations to articles that address the censorship of the play, and 64 works of literature that have…

  3. Adding Insult to Imagery? Art Education and Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeny, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    The "Adding Insult to Imagery? Artistic Responses to Censorship and Mass-Media" exhibition opened in January 16, 2006, Kipp Gallery on the Indiana University of Pennsylvania campus. Eleven gallery-based works, 9 videos, and 10 web-based artworks comprised the show; each dealt with the relationship between censorship and mass mediated…

  4. Censorship becomes Way of Life for High School Journalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopenhaver, Lillian Lodge

    1995-01-01

    Censorship has become routine for many student media operations at high schools nationwide, with First Amendment rights of student editors and staff members violated daily. After a brief history of American freedom of the press and censorship, the paper discusses responsibilities of administrators and advisors to student free expression. (SM)

  5. Censorship Challenges to Books in Scottish Public Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kelly; McMenemy, David

    2013-01-01

    Censorship challenges to books in UK public libraries have received renewed attention recently. This study sought to establish the incidence of censorship challenges to books in Scottish public libraries in the years 2005-2009 and the actions taken in response to these challenges. It was found that eight local authorities in Scotland had received…

  6. Threat modeling and circumvention of Internet censorship

    OpenAIRE

    Fifield, David

    2017-01-01

    Research on Internet censorship is hampered by poor models of censor behavior. Censor models guide the development of circumvention systems, so it is important to get them right. A censor model should be understood not just as a set of capabilities—such as the ability to monitor network traffic—but as a set of priorities constrained by resource limitations.My research addresses the twin themes of modeling and circumvention. With a grounding in empirical research, I build up an abstract model ...

  7. Censorship in All Seasons: Considering the Fiction of the Past, the Present, and the Future to Help Students Understanding the Concept of Censorship in Our World Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreen, Jean

    A curriculum that asks students to consider the implications of censorship would include not only "Fahrenheit 451" but also other works of adolescent literature, Holocaust literature, and science fiction. Works written about the Holocaust, which can be considered a type of absolute censorship, help students to consider censorship's…

  8. Employee motivations for self-censorship on social media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhoeven, Joost W.M.; Voogt, Brendon; Madsen, Vibeke Thøis

    While social media enable employee voice and stakeholder dialogue, sometimes self-censorship silences employees, because they feel it is too risky to speak up. This survey study among employees aims to unveil why employees employ self-censorship strategies when they communicate about work on social...... media such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. First, based on factor analysis, we found that on external social media four, rather than the predicted seven self-censorship strategies can be distinguished: (1) critically reviewing content before publication, (2) tailoring content to imagined audiences...... review social media content before publication to deal with the risk of harming the quality of conversations. This suggests that altruistic as well as egoistic motives underly self-censorship in work-related social media use....

  9. Employee motivations for self-censorship on social media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhoeven, Joost W.H.; Voogt, Brendon; Madsen, Vibeke Thøis

    While social media enable employee voice and stakeholder dialogue, sometimes self-censorship silences employees, because they feel it is too risky to speak up. This survey study among employees aims to unveil why employees employ self-censorship strategies when they communicate about work on social......, (3) omission of controversial content, and (4) consultation of peers. Secondly, we found that employees omit controversial content from their messages (i.e., the more narrow traditional understanding of self-censorship) to protect personal and corporate reputations. At the same time, they critically...... review social media content before publication to deal with the risk of harming the quality of conversations. This suggests that altruistic as well as egoistic motives underly self-censorship in work-related social media use....

  10. Censorship and the reading practices of political prisoners in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990. A Dick. Abstract. Political prisoners undermined censorship in apartheid jails. The jail diaries, authorised biographies, autobiographies, prison memoirs, interviews and prison letters of more than fifty political prisoners and two prison ...

  11. Parteilisest tsensuurist Nõukogude Eestis. Party Censorship in Soviet Estonia

    OpenAIRE

    Tiiu Kreegipuu

    2012-01-01

    During the years of imposed Soviet rule in Estonia from 1940 to its collapse in 1991, Estonian culture and the written word were subject to Soviet censorship which due to its perseverance, extent and rigidity constrained creativity and self-expression. At the same time, archival documents and memories testify that considerable shifting could take place within this censorship which on the surface appeared strict and regulated, depending on the general ideological stance and the officials and p...

  12. Mailet: Instant Social Networking under Censorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shuai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Social media websites are blocked in many regimes where Internet censorship is applied. In this paper, we introduce Mailet, an unobservable transport proxy which enables the users to access social websites by email applications. Without assuming the Mailet servers are trustworthy, Mailet can support the services requiring privileges without having the complete credential. Particularly, the credential is split and distributed in two Mailet servers, and neither of them can recover the credential alone. To recover the credential in a TLS record message, we propose a highly efficient Galois/ Counter Mode(GCM based secure computation, which can enable the two servers to conceal their separate credential copies in the computation. We implemented a prototype for Twitter.com to demonstrate the usability and security of Mailet.

  13. Cosmic strings and cosmic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, A.; Brandenberger, R.; Turok, N.

    1987-01-01

    The paper concerns the application of the theory of cosmic strings to explain the structure of the Universe. The formation of cosmic strings in the early Universe is outlined, along with the Big Bang theory, Grand Unified theories, and the first three minutes after the Big Bang. A description is given of the shaping of the Universe by cosmic strings, including the evolution of the string. The possibility for direct observation of cosmic strings is discussed. (U.K.)

  14. Censorship in Young Adult Fiction: What's Out There and What Should Be.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Suzann

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of censorship of young adult books focuses on works of fiction that deal with censorship. Includes 14 annotated bibliographies; discusses stereotyped views of censors; and considers types of materials that have not been discussed in novels regarding censorship, including music and Internet filters. (LRW)

  15. Nobody Says No: Student Self-Censorship in a Collaborative Knowledge Building Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Alan; Nason, Rod

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores student self-censorship within an online learning environment. Self-censorship in group activity can be seen as a two-edged sword. While it can be advantageous that a student censor personal frustration and angst when working with others, if the self-censorship impacts on the cognitive contribution a student makes then this may…

  16. Can quantum mechanics fool the cosmic censor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsas, G. E. A.; Silva, A. R. R. da; Richartz, M.; Saa, A.; Vanzella, D. A. T.

    2009-01-01

    We revisit the mechanism for violating the weak cosmic-censorship conjecture (WCCC) by overspinning a nearly-extreme charged black hole. The mechanism consists of an incoming massless neutral scalar particle, with low energy and large angular momentum, tunneling into the hole. We investigate the effect of the large angular momentum of the incoming particle on the background geometry and address recent claims that such a backreaction would invalidate the mechanism. We show that the large angular momentum of the incident particle does not constitute an obvious impediment to the success of the overspinning quantum mechanism, although the induced backreaction turns out to be essential to restoring the validity of the WCCC in the classical regime. These results seem to endorse the view that the 'cosmic censor' may be oblivious to processes involving quantum effects.

  17. Arguments completed in suit over Internet censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-05-31

    Closing remarks on the Communications Decency Act, requiring Internet providers to censor materials that may be unsuitable for minors, were heard on May 10, 1996. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is leading the challenge to the law. Because information about HIV necessarily must deal with sexual practices, HIV/AIDS service providers would be forced to either avoid talking about the subject or find ways to prevent minors from accessing the information. During the oral arguments, U.S. Justice Department attorney Anthony Coppolino tried to show that the Internet is more like a broadcast medium such as television or radio and is different from newspapers, which enjoy a constitutional protection against government censorship. ACLU attorney Christopher Hansen disagreed, saying the reverse is true. The ACLU said parental control mechanisms such as SurfWatch, Net Nanny, and Cyberpatrol are commercially available to parents who wish to restrict their children's Internet access and are more effective than the government's proposal. The court is expected to rule on the lawsuit in several weeks. An appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court is expected, regardless of the outcome.

  18. AIDS groups challenge Federal Internet censorship law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-05-03

    The Communications Decency Act (CDA), a section of the 1996 telecommunications reform law, bans indecent and patently offensive expression from all online systems available to those under the age of 18. AIDS organizations and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) filed suit in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, PA,to challenge the law. The ACLU contends that the CDA law is unconstitutional because it criminalizes expression that is protected by the First Amendment, and violates constitutional rights to privacy. The CDA also would impede dissemination of HIV prevention information, according to AIDS online services. Operators of these electronic information systems state that providing explicit language about safe sexual practices is essential if teenagers are to understand how to prevent HIV infection. Additionally, content providers argue that it is almost impossible to know what text or images must be censored in order to avoid government prosecution. Expert witnesses testifying for the U.S. Government stated that there are means available to purge Internet sites of materials that might be regarded as indecent. The ACLU recommends utilizing a software package that would enable parents to control their children's Internet access without requiring broad censorship.

  19. Cosmic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritszh, Harald; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Muenchen

    1986-01-01

    The paper on 'Cosmic particles' was presented at the conference on 'The early universe and its evolution', Erice, Italy 1986. The link between ideas in cosmology and in elementary particle physics is examined. The subject is discussed under the following topic headings: cosmic kinetics, cosmic dynamics and general relativity, dynamics of the dust universe, particle physics, unity of quarks and leptons, the hot universe and standard particle physics, creation of matter, and the inflation of the universe. (U.K.)

  20. Parteilisest tsensuurist Nõukogude Eestis. Party Censorship in Soviet Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiiu Kreegipuu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available During the years of imposed Soviet rule in Estonia from 1940 to its collapse in 1991, Estonian culture and the written word were subject to Soviet censorship which due to its perseverance, extent and rigidity constrained creativity and self-expression. At the same time, archival documents and memories testify that considerable shifting could take place within this censorship which on the surface appeared strict and regulated, depending on the general ideological stance and the officials and party functionaries in place at the time. Soviet censorship is usually studied and described with the activities of the censorship office Glavlit as the focal point. However, for a more complete overview, it would be wise to keep in mind that a whole row of other institutions and authorities with the Communist Party in front also were involved in censorship matters. When it came to censorship, it was the party that had the final word – as it did with everything else – and if needed, it also acted as punisher. Apart from the role of censor, the Communist Party, its departments (with the Department for Propaganda and Agitation or Ideology in front and its officials also took part in hands-on censorship work, both in terms of decision-making and in dealing with concrete incidents (breach of censorship rules and censor mistakes but also in the search for and pointing out of ideological flaws. One area in which the party’s censorship activities manifested itself in a rather vivid manner was the leadership and control of the Soviet press. When analysing materials from the bureau of the Communist Party of Estonia’s Central Committee, it becomes clear that the party’s governing organs were constantly active in this area. The manifestation of problems and discussion of flaws here point to the circumstance that journalists and editors did not accept the censorship rules, but rather tried to find possibilities and means through which to modify or ignore them

  1. Self-censorship in Massimo Bontempelli’s Magical Realism

    OpenAIRE

    Wissia Fiorucci

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to investigate the interplay between censorship, self-censorship and the narrative strategies of magical realism in Il figlio di due madri by Italian author Massimo Bontempelli (1878–1960). Having been head of the National Fascist Writers Union from the mid- to late-1920s, critics have noted that Bontempelli’s detachment from the Fascist credo emerges in his work from the mid- to late-1930s. I intend to problematise this perspective, by recognising the significance of Il...

  2. Cosmic impacts, cosmic catastrophes. I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Clark R.; Morrison, David

    1989-01-01

    The discovery of cosmic impacts and their effects on the earth's surface are discussed. The manner in which the object impacts with the earth is described. The formation of crytovolcanic structures by craters is examined. Examples of cosmic debris collisions with earth, in particular the Tunguska explosion of 1908 and the Meteor Crater in Arizona, are provided.

  3. Notes about Censorship and Self-Censorship in the Biography of the Prophet Muḥammad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lecker, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of the medieval literary output about Muḥammad’s life should go hand in hand with the study of his history, for which we have rich evidence in a variety of sources. Ibn Isḥāq’s biography of Muḥammad and its epitome by Ibn Hishām were products of their time. A case of self-censorship applied by one of Ibn Isḥāq’s informants and two cases of censorship applied by Ibn Hishām, who omitted many of his predecessor’s materials, contribute to a better understanding of the social and political context of the biography.El estudio de la producción literaria medieval sobre la vida de Muḥammad debe ir de la mano del estudio de su historia, empresa para la que disponemos de rica información en una variedad de fuentes. La biografía de Muḥammad por Ibn Isḥāq y su epítome por Ibn Hišām fueron productos de su época. Un caso de auto-censura aplicado por uno de los informantes de Ibn Isḥāq y dos casos de censura aplicados por Ibn Hišām, quien omitió muchos de los materiales de su predecesor, contribuyen a una mejor comprensión del contexto social y político de la biografía del Profeta.

  4. What's Stopping You? Classroom Censorship for Better or Worse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Nancy C.

    2010-01-01

    Censorship is a complex question. Studies show a number of reasons teachers refrain from teaching controversial issues. These include: (1) The general "chilling effects" in school and community contexts, characterized by fear of reprisal; (2) Standards and high stakes testing; (3) Insufficient teacher preparation to teach about…

  5. Embodied Censorship: Academic Writing Rituals and the Production of Belief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Edward

    2014-01-01

    As compositionists have constructed a critical discourse on whiteness, they have tacitly theorized how students' bodies can stifle efforts to both reflect on unfamiliar beliefs and critique their own beliefs. While Composition's latent theories of "embodied censorship" challenge the notion that rationality or empathy can enable…

  6. True Stories of Censorship Battles in America's Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Valerie, Ed.; Barco, Kathy, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Intellectual freedom is a core value of librarianship, but fighting to keep controversial materials on the shelves can sometimes feel like a lonely battle. And not all censorship controversies involve the public objecting to a book in the collection--libraries are venues for displays and meetings, and sometimes library staff themselves are tempted…

  7. OpenNet Initiative - Asia : Digital Censorship and Surveillance ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    OpenNet Initiative - Asia (ONI-Asia) seeks to understand the technical and social aspects of digital censorship and surveillance across different countries in South and Southeast Asia. This grant will allow ONI-Asia to network a group of research teams exploring the social, cultural, political and technical aspects of digital ...

  8. Internet Freedom in Asia: Case of Internet Censorship in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAINUDDIN MUDA Z. MONGGILO

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Internet can develop the communication and information freedom on society but unfortunately in some nations, especially in Asia, it cannot be fully accessed because of government censorship. This report explains the relationship between the practice of Internet censorship imposed by the Chinese government and the freedom of its citizens (in the internet surfing experience as the realization of human rights in the freedom of expression and opinion (seek, receive-use, and communicate information which is traced through the relevant literature study. China is a unique case since the internet censorship regulation contributes to its status as the country with the least internet freedom yet at the same time it is credited as having the most internet users globally. In addition, China known as the communist country that began opening up to globalization and information of technology, but the government’s control over it is still so tight and binding, not only in the press, or the traditional media, but also in new media with the internet censorship. The control over this information may have a clear objective to maintain a climate of information in the community, but on the other hand, such control is tantamount to restricting the right of citizens to make, use, and distribute information, and more fatal as a violation of human rights.

  9. Offensive Speech in Educational Materials: Changing Words without Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, Sarah M.

    2007-01-01

    Background/Context: Diane Ravitch has focused on the extensive censorship occurring within the publication of school textbook and testing materials in her book, "The Language Police" (2003). This book, indicative of conservative frustrations with minority special interest groups, raises several key issues echoed throughout the larger educational…

  10. Focus: Popular Culture, Censorship, Religion in the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Donald, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    This issue of "Kansas English" contains four articles related to popular culture, censorship, and religion. "Popular Culture Studies: A Complement to the Humanities" by Michael Marsden, focuses on the relationship between popular culture studies and the humanities, including English. "Popular Couture: La Vie En Blue" by Richard Martin, examines…

  11. Self-censorship in Massimo Bontempelli’s Magical Realism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissia Fiorucci

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to investigate the interplay between censorship, self-censorship and the narrative strategies of magical realism in Il figlio di due madri by Italian author Massimo Bontempelli (1878–1960. Having been head of the National Fascist Writers Union from the mid- to late-1920s, critics have noted that Bontempelli’s detachment from the Fascist credo emerges in his work from the mid- to late-1930s. I intend to problematise this perspective, by recognising the significance of Il figlio di due madri (1929 in the development of Bontempelli’s anti-Fascist sentiment. This work preceded (by several years Bontempelli’s official break with Fascism in 1936, when he published an article against the political control of the arts and caesarianism in La gazzetta del popolo. An anti-Fascist sentiment had, however, in my view already been expressed in Bontempelli’s works of magical realism Il figlio di due madri (1929 and Vita e morte di Adria e dei suoi figli (1930. These two novels deal with controversial topics that, I would claim, refute some of Fascism’s foremost principles, an appraisal that was disguised through deliberate acts of self-censorship. More precisely, it is through his deconstruction of mimetic writing that Bontempelli’s critique of the regime comes into existence, as the narrative strategies I deem instrumental to his self-censorship (e.g. authorial reticence, metaphor, mythopoiesis reflect the poetics of magical realism in «its inherent transgressive and subversive qualities» (Bowers 2004: 63. By conveying a rejection of the systematised understanding of literature that Bontempelli associates with literary realisms, at the same time he conveys his ideological refusal of dogmatic views of reality. Thus, in his mystifying realism, magic acts as both a tool for concealing his ideology—a tool for self-censorship, that is—and as the very means by which this ideology can be generated.

  12. Heterotic cosmic strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Katrin; Becker, Melanie; Krause, Axel

    2006-01-01

    We show that all three conditions for the cosmological relevance of heterotic cosmic strings, the right tension, stability and a production mechanism at the end of inflation, can be met in the strongly coupled M-theory regime. Whereas cosmic strings generated from weakly coupled heterotic strings have the well-known problems posed by Witten in 1985, we show that strings arising from M5-branes wrapped around 4-cycles (divisors) of a Calabi-Yau in heterotic M-theory compactifications solve these problems in an elegant fashion

  13. On cosmic censor in high-energy particle collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Umpei, E-mail: umpei@rikkyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Rikkyo University, Tokyo 171-8501 (Japan)

    2011-09-22

    In the context of large extra-dimension or TeV-scale gravity scenarios, miniature black holes might be produced in collider experiments. In many works the validity of the cosmic censorship hypothesis has been assumed, which means that there is no chance to observe trans-Planckian phenomena in the experiments since such phenomena are veiled behind the horizons. Here, we argue that 'visible borders of spacetime' (as effective naked singularities) would be produced, even dominantly over the black holes, in the collider experiments. Such phenomena will provide us an arena of quantum gravity.

  14. [Public interactions, private censorship: the case of Facebook].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Sergio Amadeu da

    2015-12-01

    Facebook is examined as a transnational online social networking platform where public discussions and interactions take place. The study surveys the private control of cultural and political expressions exercised by the platform's managers, which can be defined as private censorship. Cases of removal of content are presented and Facebook's political control policies discussed. The article also shows how Facebook rules display highly discretionary components and an aesthetic that can be portrayed as a kind of biopolitics of the information-age society.

  15. Concentration and self-censorship in commercial media

    OpenAIRE

    Germano, Fabrizio; Meier, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Within a simple model of non-localized, Hotelling-type competition among arbitrary numbers of media outlets we characterize quality and content of media under different ownership structures. Assuming advertising-sponsored, profit-maximizing outlets, we show that (i) topics sensitive to advertisers can be underreported (self-censored) by all outlets in the market, (ii) self-censorship increases with the concentration of ownership, (iii) adding outlets, while keeping the number of owners fixed,...

  16. Simultaneous confidence bands for Cox regression from semiparametric random censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Shoubhik; Subramanian, Sundarraman

    2016-01-01

    Cox regression is combined with semiparametric random censorship models to construct simultaneous confidence bands (SCBs) for subject-specific survival curves. Simulation results are presented to compare the performance of the proposed SCBs with the SCBs that are based only on standard Cox. The new SCBs provide correct empirical coverage and are more informative. The proposed SCBs are illustrated with two real examples. An extension to handle missing censoring indicators is also outlined.

  17. 75 FR 43797 - Delegation of Certain Functions Under Section 1264 of the Victims of Iranian Censorship Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... Victims of Iranian Censorship Act (Public Law 111-84, Subtitle D of the National Defense Authorization Act... President by section 1264 of the Victims of Iranian Censorship Act (Public Law 111-84, subtitle D) to make...

  18. A Case Study of the Selection/Censorship Problem and the Educational Value of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Deanne

    1988-01-01

    A rebellion against a work of literature in a course on women's literature and feminist criticism appeared to be censorship. Questions are raised about several topics. They are the following: (1) censorship and the selection of literature; (2) the literary versus the stock response; and (3) humanistic assumptions underlying the educational value…

  19. Cosmic Rays at Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieder, P. K. F.

    In 1912 Victor Franz Hess made the revolutionary discovery that ionizing radiation is incident upon the Earth from outer space. He showed with ground-based and balloon-borne detectors that the intensity of the radiation did not change significantly between day and night. Consequently, the sun could not be regarded as the sources of this radiation and the question of its origin remained unanswered. Today, almost one hundred years later the question of the origin of the cosmic radiation still remains a mystery. Hess' discovery has given an enormous impetus to large areas of science, in particular to physics, and has played a major role in the formation of our current understanding of universal evolution. For example, the development of new fields of research such as elementary particle physics, modern astrophysics and cosmology are direct consequences of this discovery. Over the years the field of cosmic ray research has evolved in various directions: Firstly, the field of particle physics that was initiated by the discovery of many so-called elementary particles in the cosmic radiation. There is a strong trend from the accelerator physics community to reenter the field of cosmic ray physics, now under the name of astroparticle physics. Secondly, an important branch of cosmic ray physics that has rapidly evolved in conjunction with space exploration concerns the low energy portion of the cosmic ray spectrum. Thirdly, the branch of research that is concerned with the origin, acceleration and propagation of the cosmic radiation represents a great challenge for astrophysics, astronomy and cosmology. Presently very popular fields of research have rapidly evolved, such as high-energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy. In addition, high-energy neutrino astronomy may soon initiate as a likely spin-off neutrino tomography of the Earth and thus open a unique new branch of geophysical research of the interior of the Earth. Finally, of considerable interest are the biological

  20. Cosmic impacts, cosmic catastrophes. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Clark R.; Morrison, David

    1990-01-01

    The role of extraterrestrial impacts in shaping the earth's history is discussed, arguing that cosmic impacts represent just one example of a general shift in thinking that has made the idea of catastrophes respectable in science. The origins of this view are presented and current catastrophic theory is discussed in the context of modern debate on the geological formation of the earth. Various conflicting theories are reviewed and prominent participants in the ongoing scientific controversy concerning catastrophism are introduced.

  1. CovertCast: Using Live Streaming to Evade Internet Censorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McPherson Richard

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We design, implement, and evaluate CovertCast, a censorship circumvention system that broadcasts the content of popular websites in real-time, encrypted video streams on common live-streaming services such as YouTube. CovertCast does not require any modifications to the streaming service and employs the same protocols, servers, and streaming software as any other user of the service. Therefore, CovertCast cannot be distinguished from other live streams by IP address filtering or protocol fingerprinting, raising the bar for censors.

  2. Cosmic Rays in Thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitink, Stijn; Scholten, Olaf; van den Berg, Ad; Ebert, Ute

    2013-04-01

    Cosmic Rays in Thunderstorms Cosmic rays are protons and heavier nuclei that constantly bombard the Earth's atmosphere with energies spanning a vast range from 109 to 1021 eV. At typical altitudes up to 10-20 km they initiate large particle cascades, called extensive air showers, that contain millions to billions of secondary particles depending on their initial energy. These particles include electrons, positrons, hadrons and muons, and are concentrated in a compact particle front that propagates at relativistic speed. In addition, the shower leaves behind a trail of lower energy electrons from ionization of air molecules. Under thunderstorm conditions these electrons contribute to the electrical and ionization processes in the cloud. When the local electric field is strong enough the secondary electrons can create relativistic electron run-away avalanches [1] or even non-relativistic avalanches. Cosmic rays could even trigger lightning inception. Conversely, strong electric fields also influence the development of the air shower [2]. Extensive air showers emit a short (tens of nanoseconds) radio pulse due to deflection of the shower particles in the Earth's magnetic field [3]. Antenna arrays, such as AERA, LOFAR and LOPES detect these pulses in a frequency window of roughly 10-100 MHz. These systems are also sensitive to the radiation from discharges associated to thunderstorms, and provide a means to study the interaction of cosmic ray air showers and the electrical processes in thunderstorms [4]. In this presentation we discuss the involved radiation mechanisms and present analyses of thunderstorm data from air shower arrays [1] A. Gurevich et al., Phys. Lett. A 165, 463 (1992) [2] S. Buitink et al., Astropart. Phys. 33, 1 (2010) [3] H. Falcke et al., Nature 435, 313 (2005) [4] S. Buitink et al., Astron. & Astrophys. 467, 385 (2007)

  3. Is patience a virtue? Cosmic censorship of infrared effects in de Sitter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Z.; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S.

    2017-01-01

    While the accumulation of long wavelength modes during inflation wreaks havoc on the large scale structure of spacetime, the question of even observability of their presence by any local observer has lead to considerable confusion. Though, it is commonly agreed that infrared effects are not visib...

  4. Internet Censorship Circumvention Tools: Escaping the Control of the Syrian Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Al-Saqaf

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that authoritarian regimes tend to censor the media to limit potential threats to the status quo. While such censorship practices were traditionally aimed at broadcast and print media, the emergence of the Internet and social media in particular, prompted some authoritarian regimes, such as the Assad regime in Syria, to try and exert a similar level of censorship on the Internet as well. During the Arab Spring, the Syrian regime blocked hundreds of websites that provided social networking, news, and other services. Taking Syria as a case study, this paper examines whether Internet censorship succeeded in preventing Internet users from reaching censored online content during 2010−2012. By analyzing the use of Alkasir, a censorship circumvention tool created by the author, the paper provides empirical evidence demonstrating that users were in fact able to bypass censorship and access blocked websites. The findings demonstrate that censorship circumvention tools constituted a threat to the information control systems of authoritarian regimes, highlighting the potential of such tools to promote online freedom of expression in countries where Internet censorship is prevalent.

  5. Low-energy cosmic rays in the Orion region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.

    1998-01-01

    The recently observed nuclear gamma-ray line emission from the Orion complex implies a high flux of low-energy cosmic rays (LECR) with unusual abundance. This cosmic ray component would dominate the energy density, pressure, and ionising power of cosmic rays, and thus would have a strong impact...

  6. Objectivity as (self-)censorship: against the dogmatisation of professional ethics in journalism:

    OpenAIRE

    Pöttker, Horst

    2004-01-01

    The task of journalism in a democracy is to create publicness in the sense of unrestricted social communication. A broad and open interpretation of censorship means the creation of barriers to public communication not only by the state, but also by economic, social, and cultural conditions. This essay addresses professional principles of journalism - the separation of editorial and advertising sections, documentation and fiction, and facts and opinion - as means of self-censorship in a democr...

  7. AIDS web sites face censorship under new rating schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-08-22

    The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) issued a position paper regarding the software industry's proposed rating standards that will block and rate information judged unsuitable for minors. Following the U.S. Supreme Court's overturning of the Communications Decency Act, a ruling that maintains a high level of free speech protection over the Internet, the software industry began examining mechanisms to rate online content. Legislators are considering criminal penalties for those who misrate a web page. These moves are seen as damaging to HIV/AIDS prevention and safe sex information web sites that utilize jargon, street language, and explicit diagrams to teach safe sex practices to a wide audience. It is noted that related ratings and censorships do not apply to print material.

  8. The two-sample problem with induced dependent censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y

    1999-12-01

    Induced dependent censorship is a general phenomenon in health service evaluation studies in which a measure such as quality-adjusted survival time or lifetime medical cost is of interest. We investigate the two-sample problem and propose two classes of nonparametric tests. Based on consistent estimation of the survival function for each sample, the two classes of test statistics examine the cumulative weighted difference in hazard functions and in survival functions. We derive a unified asymptotic null distribution theory and inference procedure. The tests are applied to trial V of the International Breast Cancer Study Group and show that long duration chemotherapy significantly improves time without symptoms of disease and toxicity of treatment as compared with the short duration treatment. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed tests, with a wide range of weight choices, perform well under moderate sample sizes.

  9. Aerosols Produced by Cosmic Rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker

    mechanism linking cosmic rays to clouds and climate is currently speculative, there have been various suggestions of the role atmospheric ions may play; these involve any one of a number of processes from the nucleation of aerosols up to the collection processes of cloud droplets. We have chosen to start......Satellite observations have shown that the Earth’s cloud cover is strongly correlated with the galactic cosmic ray flux. While this correlation is indicative of a possible physical connection, there is currently no confirmation that a physical mechanism exists. We are therefore setting up...... an experiment in order to investigate the underlying microphysical processes. The results of this experiment will help to understand whether ionization from cosmic rays, and by implication the related processes in the universe, has a direct influence on Earth’s atmosphere and climate. Since any physical...

  10. Cosmic rays, clouds, and climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.; Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    cloud radiative properties. Thus, a moderate influence on atmospheric aerosol distributions from cosmic ray ionisation would have a strong influence on the Earth's radiation budget. Historical evidence over the past 1000 years indicates that changes in climate have occurred in accord with variability......A correlation between a global average of low cloud cover and the flux of cosmic rays incident in the atmosphere has been observed during the last solar cycle. The ionising potential of Earth bound cosmic rays are modulated by the state of the heliosphere, while clouds play an important role...... in the Earth's radiation budget through trapping outgoing radiation and reflecting incoming radiation. If a physical link between these two features can be established, it would provide a mechanism linking solar activity and Earth's climate. Recent satellite observations have further revealed a correlation...

  11. Cosmic rays, clouds, and climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.; Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    between cosmic ray flux and low cloud top temperature. The temperature of a cloud depends on the radiation properties determined by its droplet distribution. Low clouds are warm (> 273 K) and therefore consist of liquid water droplets. At typical atmospheric supersaturations (similar to1%) a liquid cloud...... that a mechanism to explain the cosmic ray-cloud link might be found through the role of atmospheric ionisation in aerosol production and/or growth. Observations of local aerosol increases in low cloud due to ship exhaust indicate that a small perturbation in atmospheric aerosol can have a major impact on low...... cloud radiative properties. Thus, a moderate influence on atmospheric aerosol distributions from cosmic ray ionisation would have a strong influence on the Earth's radiation budget. Historical evidence over the past 1000 years indicates that changes in climate have occurred in accord with variability...

  12. Cosmic odyssey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidmann, J.

    1989-01-01

    The immensity of the cosmos, the richness of the universe, the limits of space and time: these are the themes of Cosmic Odyssey, which takes the reader on imaginary journeys through the past, present and future of our universe. After a first look at the starry night sky, the enigmas posed since ancient times by the universe are reviewed. There then follows a broadbrush view of the universe as we understand it today. Following this, a trio of chapters take us to ultimate questions about its nature. The author explores in turn the relativistic universe, the quantum universe and the inflationary universe. Finally the journey returns to questions that touch on our own presence in the universe. Cosmology, the science of understanding the nature of the universe as a whole, has gone through an extraordinary revolution in its approach. This book explains in detail the link between particle physics and cosmology, the very early universe, the significance of Grand Unified Theory and superstrings, the magical qualities of the inflationary universe, and the seemingly bleak scenarios for the farthest future. (author)

  13. Cosmic Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwit, Martin

    1984-04-01

    In the remarkable opening section of this book, a well-known Cornell astronomer gives precise thumbnail histories of the 43 basic cosmic discoveries - stars, planets, novae, pulsars, comets, gamma-ray bursts, and the like - that form the core of our knowledge of the universe. Many of them, he points out, were made accidentally and outside the mainstream of astronomical research and funding. This observation leads him to speculate on how many more major phenomena there might be and how they might be most effectively sought out in afield now dominated by large instruments and complex investigative modes and observational conditions. The book also examines discovery in terms of its political, financial, and sociological context - the role of new technologies and of industry and the military in revealing new knowledge; and methods of funding, of peer review, and of allotting time on our largest telescopes. It concludes with specific recommendations for organizing astronomy in ways that will best lead to the discovery of the many - at least sixty - phenomena that Harwit estimates are still waiting to be found.

  14. Cosmic Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    An image based on data taken with ESO's Very Large Telescope reveals a triplet of galaxies intertwined in a cosmic dance. ESO PR Photo 02/08 ESO PR Photo 02/08 NGC 7173, 7174, and 7176 The three galaxies, catalogued as NGC 7173 (top), 7174 (bottom right) and 7176 (bottom left), are located 106 million light-years away towards the constellation of Piscis Austrinus (the 'Southern Fish'). NGC 7173 and 7176 are elliptical galaxies, while NGC 7174 is a spiral galaxy with quite disturbed dust lanes and a long, twisted tail. This seems to indicate that the two bottom galaxies - whose combined shape bears some resemblance to that of a sleeping baby - are currently interacting, with NGC 7176 providing fresh material to NGC 7174. Matter present in great quantity around the triplet's members also points to the fact that NGC 7176 and NGC 7173 have interacted in the past. Astronomers have suggested that the three galaxies will finally merge into a giant 'island universe', tens to hundreds of times as massive as our own Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 02/08 ESO PR Photo 02b/08 NGC 7173, 7174, and 7176 The triplet is part of a so-called 'Compact Group', as compiled by Canadian astronomer Paul Hickson in the early 1980s. The group, which is the 90th entry in the catalogue and is therefore known as HCG 90, actually contains four major members. One of them - NGC 7192 - lies above the trio, outside of this image, and is another peculiar spiral galaxy. Compact groups are small, relatively isolated, systems of typically four to ten galaxies in close proximity to one another. Another striking example is Robert's Quartet. Compact groups are excellent laboratories for the study of galaxy interactions and their effects, in particular the formation of stars. As the striking image reveals, there are many other galaxies in the field. Some are distant ones, while others seem to be part of the family. Studies made with other telescopes have indeed revealed that the HCG 90 group contains 16 members

  15. ALICE Cosmic Ray Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Fernandez Tellez, A; Martinez Hernandez, M; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M

    2013-01-01

    The ALICE underground cavern provides an ideal place for the detection of high energy atmospheric muons coming from cosmic ray showers. ACORDE detects cosmic ray showers by triggering the arrival of muons to the top of the ALICE magnet.

  16. Blacked-out spaces: Freud, censorship and the re-territorialization of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galison, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Freud's analogies were legion: hydraulic pipes, military recruitment, magic writing pads. These and some three hundred others took features of the mind and bound them to far-off scenes--the id only very partially resembles an uncontrollable horse, as Freud took pains to note. But there was one relation between psychic and public act that Freud did not delimit in this way: censorship, the process that checked memories and dreams on their way to the conscious. (Freud dubbed the relation between internal and external censorship a 'parallel' rather than a limited analogy.) At first, Freud likened this suppression to the blacking out of texts at the Russian frontier. During the First World War, he suffered, and spoke of suffering under, Viennese postal and newspaper censorship--Freud was forced to leave his envelopes unsealed, and to recode or delete content. Over and over, he registered the power of both internal and public censorship in shared form: distortion, anticipatory deletion, softenings, even revision to hide suppression. Political censorship left its mark as the conflict reshaped his view of the psyche into a society on a war footing, with homunculus-like border guards sifting messages as they made their way--or did not--across a topography of mind.

  17. Film Censorship Policy During Park Chung Hee’s Military Regime (1960–1979 and Hostess Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Hyo Kim

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Park Chung-hee’s military government (1960-1979 purportedly used film censorship to distract the public from political consciousness by controlling political materials in films while condoning censorship control on sexual content. As a result, the production of soft-core adult films soared and became popular among Korean audiences. One such film genre that thrived during this period, so-called hostess films (prostitute films, is worthy of attention for the films’ foregrounding issues of class, poverty and other social issues that the state censorship board heavily regulated. In viewing such dynamics between state censorship and film, this article aims to unravel the questions of how the state was willing to turn a blind eye to the explicit sexualization of women in hostess films when film censorship was at its peak and why the social and political aspects of this group of films about female sexual workers were not considered socially relevant by the censorship board, through scrutinizing the interplay between Park’s state censorship and hostess films. Furthermore, it offers an analysis of a hostess film, The Rose that Swallowed Thorn (Cheong, 1979, as a case study to show how it strategically orchestrates visual and thematic elements to circumvent censorship enforcement.

  18. How to Defuse Censorship: Implementing 404.2 of the Standards for Accreditation of Montana Schools, 4th Ed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, Brian; And Others

    To help defuse censorship efforts, this booklet identifies issues and strategies for handling censorship efforts and provides the instructional materials selection policies of two Montana school districts. The booklet also includes sample forms for a citizen requesting reconsideration of materials and for a school media committee's reconsideration…

  19. Cosmic Visions Dark Energy: Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodelson, Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Slosar, Anze [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Heitmann, Katrin [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hirata, Chris [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Honscheid, Klaus [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roodman, Aaron [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Seljak, Uros [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-05-02

    A strong instrumentation and detector R&D program has enabled the current generation of cosmic frontier surveys. A small investment in R&D will continue to pay dividends and enable new probes to investigate the accelerated expansion of the universe. Instrumentation and detector R&D provide critical training opportunities for future generations of experimentalists, skills that are important across the entire DOE HEP program.

  20. Cosmic Visions Dark Energy: Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodelson, Scott [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Heitmann, Katrin [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hirata, Chris [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Honscheid, Klaus [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Roodman, Aaron [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Seljak, Uroš [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Slosar, Anže [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Trodden, Mark [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-04-26

    A strong instrumentation and detector R&D program has enabled the current generation of cosmic frontier surveys. A small investment in R&D will continue to pay dividends and enable new probes to investigate the accelerated expansion of the universe. Instrumentation and detector R&D provide critical training opportunities for future generations of experimentalists, skills that are important across the entire Department of Energy High Energy Physics program.

  1. Stop the Press: Why Censorship Has Made Headline News (AGAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Mills

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent publication of proposed amendments to the Films and Publications Act 65 of 1996 drew some sharp criticism from the media. Some organizations described these amendments as, inter alia, unconstitutional, outrageous and as part of the erosion of freedom of speech, while the Department of Home Affairs defended the amendments as an attempt to protect children from potentially harmful and age-inappropriate material. This discussion briefly examines the historical development of censorship as well as the current classification process in South Africa, followed by a discussion of the proposed amendments as well as the reaction thereto. The conclusion is that the media maybe has overreacted with regard to some of the amendments and may not understand the effect of the current classification process, while some of their concerns with regard to some of the other amendments may be justified. The true challenge will be that all stakeholders have an honest discussion with each other and would have to try and strike a balance between the important right of the child to dignity as well as his right to not be exploited, and that of the freedom of speech. The printed media also will have to realise that it is the duty of all members of society to protect the rights of the child and there can be no reason as to why newspapers may be excluded from this duty.

  2. Cosmic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  3. Online Contribution Practices in Countries That Engage in Internet Blocking and Censorship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shklovski, Irina; Kotamraju, Nalini Panchita

    2011-01-01

    In this article we describe people’s online contribution practices in contexts in which the government actively blocks access to or censors the Internet. We argue that people experience blocking as confusing, as a motivation for self-censorship online, as a cause of impoverishment of available...... content and as a real threat of personal persecution. Challenging ideas of blocking as a monolithic, abstract policy, we discuss five strategies with which Internet users navigate blocking: self-censorship, cultivating technical savvy, reliance on social ties to relay blocked content, use of already...... in which all Internet users contribute to the Internet and social media....

  4. Lightning Discharges, Cosmic Rays and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Siingh, Devendraa; Singh, R. P.; Singh, A. K.; Kamra, A. K.

    2018-03-01

    The entirety of the Earth's climate system is continuously bombarded by cosmic rays and exhibits about 2000 thunderstorms active at any time of the day all over the globe. Any linkage among these vast systems should have global consequences. Numerous studies done in the past deal with partial links between some selected aspects of this grand linkage. Results of these studies vary from weakly to strongly significant and are not yet complete enough to justify the physical mechanism proposed to explain such links. This review is aimed at presenting the current understanding, based on the past studies on the link between cosmic ray, lightning and climate. The deficiencies in some proposed links are pointed out. Impacts of cosmic rays on engineering systems and the possible effects of cosmic rays on human health are also briefly discussed. Also enumerated are some problems for future work which may help in developing the grand linkage among these three vast systems.

  5. High energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Stanev, Todor

    2010-01-01

    Offers an accessible text and reference (a cosmic-ray manual) for graduate students entering the field and high-energy astrophysicists will find this an accessible cosmic-ray manual Easy to read for the general astronomer, the first part describes the standard model of cosmic rays based on our understanding of modern particle physics. Presents the acceleration scenario in some detail in supernovae explosions as well as in the passage of cosmic rays through the Galaxy. Compares experimental data in the atmosphere as well as underground are compared with theoretical models

  6. Cosmic Accelerators: An Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanbach, Gottfried

    2005-01-01

    High energy, relativistic, particles are an essential component of the Universe and play a major role in astrophysics. In a few years we will reach the centennial of the discovery of cosmic rays; all through this century the properties, origin, and effects of this radiation have intrigued researchers in astrophysics and elementary particles alike. We briefly review the history, current status, and future perspectives of cosmic ray research. Emphasis will be placed on the multitude of cosmic accelerators, direct observations of these objects, and the effects of cosmic rays in the Galaxy and beyond

  7. Drawing a Line in Water: Constructing the School Censorship Frame in Popular Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Alexis Anja

    2015-01-01

    The apparent ideological tensions between popular musics and formal school contexts raise significant issues regarding teachers' popular repertoire selection processes. Such decision-making may be seen to take place within a school censorship frame, through which certain musics and their accompanying values are promoted, whilst others are…

  8. Censorship and Book Supply in the Bohemian lands, 1790-1800

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wögerbauer, Michael; Madl, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2011, č. 7 (2011), s. 69-88 ISSN 0435-2866 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP406/10/2127 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90560517 Keywords : Czech literature * censorship * book market Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision

  9. Censorship and Printing in the Caucasus at the end of XIX – early XX centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel N. Biriukov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issues of censorship and printing in the Caucasus at the end of XIX – early XX centuries. The special attention is given to censorship during the First Russian revolution (1905-1907 years. Among the materials are the archival documents from the national archives of Georgia, as well as materials of pre-revolutionary periodicals and legislation dedicated to this issue. The scientific publications are important too. The authors come to the conclusion that in the late of XIX – early XX centuries in the Caucasus, as in the whole of the territory of the Russian Empire, there was a sharp rise of printing and publishing periodicals – magazines. With the growth of revolutionary events there was a need in the institute of censorship to control over the printed word. Especially the role of this institution was high during the First Russian revolution. Despite the small number of states and different problems, the censorship has contributed to the stabilization of the political and crime situation in the territory of the Caucasian viceroyalty.

  10. Sonic resistance: Diaspora, marginality and censorship in Cuban and Brazilian popular music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijpers, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this study I argue that popular music can testify to experiences of censorship, marginality and diaspora in spite of the difficulties that giving account of these experiences imply. I focus primarily on Cuba in the late 1980s and Brazil in the early 1970s, where censors obliged musicians to

  11. School Censorship: It Comes in a Variety of Forms, Not All Overt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Publicity concerning school censorship too often centers on the clumsy, heavy-handed, and overt efforts of school administrators or other impact parties to control student speech or publications. In this article, the author contends that such obvious and oftentimes inept attempts at controlling student communication represent only the tip of the…

  12. Aced Out: Censorship of Qualitative Research in the Age of "Scientifically Based Research"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceglowski, Deborah; Bacigalupa, Chiara; Peck, Emery

    2011-01-01

    In this manuscript, we examine three layers of censorship related to the publication of qualitative research studies: (a) the global level of federal legislation and the definition of the "gold standard" of educational research, (b) the decline in the number of qualitative studies published in a top-tiered early childhood educational…

  13. Censorship Now: Revisiting "The Students' Right to Read." A Policy Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council of Teachers of English, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "The Students' Right to Read," published in 1961, revised in 1981, and reaffirmed by the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Executive Committee in 2012, responds to censorship or attempts to restrict or deny students access to materials deemed objectionable by some individual or group. Despite this position statement and the…

  14. Systems-theory of psychosis--the relevance of "internal censorship".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, H M; Leweke, F M; Schneider, U

    2006-02-01

    The different aspects of the neurobiology of psychotic disorders are presently discussed under the perspective of Arvid Calssons neurochemical theory of mesolimbic/cortico-thalamic loops. In this regard the question as to whether--neuropsychologically--a "filter-defect" or a disturbance of "internal censorship" is causative for psychoses. This topic is discussed in the present paper.

  15. A Framework for the Game-theoretic Analysis of Censorship Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahi Tariq

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a game-theoretic analysis of optimal solutions for interactions between censors and censorship resistance systems (CRSs by focusing on the data channel used by the CRS to smuggle clients’ data past the censors. This analysis leverages the inherent errors (false positives and negatives made by the censor when trying to classify traffic as either non-circumvention traffic or as CRS traffic, as well as the underlying rate of CRS traffic. We identify Nash equilibrium solutions for several simple censorship scenarios and then extend those findings to more complex scenarios where we find that the deployment of a censorship apparatus does not qualitatively change the equilibrium solutions, but rather only affects the amount of traffic a CRS can support before being blocked. By leveraging these findings, we describe a general framework for exploring and identifying optimal strategies for the censorship circumventor, in order to maximize the amount of CRS traffic not blocked by the censor. We use this framework to analyze several scenarios with multiple data-channel protocols used as cover for the CRS. We show that it is possible to gain insights through this framework even without perfect knowledge of the censor’s (secret values for the parameters in their utility function.

  16. Joseph Pulitzer II and Advertising Censorship, 1929-1939. Journalism Monographs Number Seventy-seven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Daniel W.

    In an age of little or no consumer protection, the St. Louis "Post-Dispatch," under the guidance of Joseph Pulitzer II, was the first and most successful practitioner of self-imposed censorship of advertising, a practice that continues to this day. Beginning on May 1, 1929, the "Post-Dispatch" announced an aggressive program of…

  17. Censorship and Authority in Sex Education: Three Court Cases from 1970's America

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGenio, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    The cases analyzed in this essay exemplify both the influence of the sexual revolution and the conservative backlash against it. Topics that were once considered obscene were now seen as educational. Without this greater openness, none of these court cases would have been possible. In fact, people fighting against censorship and repression…

  18. Teacher and Institutional Self-Censorship of English Texts in NSW Protestant Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, David

    2017-01-01

    Australian Protestant schools have often been depicted as sites that restrict knowledge. This paper presents the findings of a 2010-2013 field study of 137 teachers, exploring the nature and extent of Protestant School English teacher self-censorship when excluding and selecting texts to teach. In both survey and interview data, I find that the…

  19. The Censorship of "Maude": A Case Study in the Social Construction of Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihevc, Nancy T.; And Others

    The concept of reality held by individuals and societies can be explored by examining reactions to the censorship of the two-part television show in the "Maude" series that dealt with abortion and vasectomy. The station managements of WMBD in Peoria, Illinois, and of WCIA in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, chose not to broadcast the two…

  20. Good Dreams/Bad Dreams: Text Selection and Censorship in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doecke, Brenton; Hayes, Terry

    1999-01-01

    Aims to conceptualize issues of text selection and censorship in different terms from those in which it has been constructed by Australian media. Asks how texts get used in classrooms and about the nature of classrooms as sites for negotiating issues of meaning and value. Argues for a culturally inclusive curriculum that is responsive to students'…

  1. Maria Montessori's Cosmic Vision, Cosmic Plan, and Cosmic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazzini, Camillo

    2013-01-01

    This classic position of the breadth of Cosmic Education begins with a way of seeing the human's interaction with the world, continues on to the grandeur in scale of time and space of that vision, then brings the interdependency of life where each growing human becomes a participating adult. Mr. Grazzini confronts the laws of human nature in…

  2. Final Report for NA-22/DTRA Cosmic Ray Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurtz, Ron E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chapline, George F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glenn, Andrew M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nakae, Les F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pawelczak, Iwona A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sheets, Steven A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-21

    The primary objective of this project was to better understand the time-correlations between the muons and neutrons produced as a result of high energy primary cosmic ray particles hitting the atmosphere, and investigate whether these time correlations might be useful in connection with the detection of special nuclear materials. During the course of this project we did observe weak correlations between secondary cosmic ray muons and cosmic ray induced fast neutrons. We also observed strong correlations between tertiary neutrons produced in a Pb pile by secondary cosmic rays and minimum ionizing particles produced in association with the tertiary neutrons.

  3. Spaced-based Cosmic Ray Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Eun-Suk

    2016-03-01

    The bulk of cosmic ray data has been obtained with great success by balloon-borne instruments, particularly with NASA's long duration flights over Antarctica. More recently, PAMELA on a Russian Satellite and AMS-02 on the International Space Station (ISS) started providing exciting measurements of particles and anti-particles with unprecedented precision upto TeV energies. In order to address open questions in cosmic ray astrophysics, future missions require spaceflight exposures for rare species, such as isotopes, ultra-heavy elements, and high (the ``knee'' and above) energies. Isotopic composition measurements up to about 10 GeV/nucleon that are critical for understanding interstellar propagation and origin of the elements are still to be accomplished. The cosmic ray composition in the knee (PeV) region holds a key to understanding the origin of cosmic rays. Just last year, the JAXA-led CALET ISS mission, and the DAMPE Chinese Satellite were launched. NASA's ISS-CREAM completed its final verification at GSFC, and was delivered to KSC to await launch on SpaceX. In addition, a EUSO-like mission for ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and an HNX-like mission for ultraheavy nuclei could accomplish a vision for a cosmic ray observatory in space. Strong support of NASA's Explorer Program category of payloads would be needed for completion of these missions over the next decade.

  4. Interactions of cosmic superstrings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Mark G.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    We develop methods by which cosmic superstring interactions can be studied in detail. These include the reconnection probability and emission of radiation such as gravitons or small string loops. Loop corrections to these are discussed, as well as relationships to (p; q)-strings. These tools should allow a phenomenological study of string models in anticipation of upcoming experiments sensitive to cosmic string radiation.

  5. Deepening Cosmic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    This article is a special blend of research, theory, and practice, with clear insight into the origins of Cosmic Education and cosmic task, while recalling memories of student explorations in botany, in particular, episodes from Mr. Leonard's teaching. Mr. Leonard speaks of a storytelling curriculum that eloquently puts perspective into dimensions…

  6. Our Cosmic Insignificance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahane, Guy

    2014-01-01

    The universe that surrounds us is vast, and we are so very small. When we reflect on the vastness of the universe, our humdrum cosmic location, and the inevitable future demise of humanity, our lives can seem utterly insignificant. Many philosophers assume that such worries about our significance reflect a banal metaethical confusion. They dismiss the very idea of cosmic significance. This, I argue, is a mistake. Worries about cosmic insignificance do not express metaethical worries about objectivity or nihilism, and we can make good sense of the idea of cosmic significance and its absence. It is also possible to explain why the vastness of the universe can make us feel insignificant. This impression does turn out to be mistaken, but not for the reasons typically assumed. In fact, we might be of immense cosmic significance—though we cannot, at this point, tell whether this is the case. PMID:25729095

  7. The place of the Local Group in the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero-Romero, Jaime E.; González, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    We use the Bolshoi Simulation to find the most probable location of the Local Group (LG) in the cosmic web. Our LG simulacra are pairs of halos with isolation and kinematic properties consistent with observations. The cosmic web is defined using a tidal tensor approach. We find that the LG's preferred location is regions with a dark matter overdensity close to the cosmic average. This makes filaments and sheets the preferred environment. We also find a strong alignment between the LG and the cosmic web. The orbital angular momentum is preferentially perpendicular to the smallest tidal eigenvector, while the vector connecting the two halos is strongly aligned along the the smallest tidal eigenvector and perpendicular to the largest tidal eigenvector; the pair lies and moves along filaments and sheets. We do not find any evidence for an alignment between the spin of each halo in the pair and the cosmic web.

  8. 11. European cosmic ray symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The biannual Symposium includes all aspects of cosmic ray research. The scientific programme was organized under three main headings: Cosmic rays in the heliosphere, Cosmic rays in the interstellar and extragalactic space, Properties of high-energy interactions as studied by cosmic rays. Seven invited talks were indexed seprately for the INIS database. (R.P.)

  9. Light scattering by cosmic particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovenier, J.W.; Min, M.

    2008-01-01

    We define cosmic particles as particles outside the Earth. Two types of cosmic particles can be distinguished, namely liquid and solid particles. The solid particles are often called grains or cosmic dust particles. Cosmic particles occur in a great variety of astronomical objects and environments.

  10. Cosmic x ray physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  11. Cosmic Dust Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Since May 1981, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used aircraft to collect cosmic dust (CD) particles from Earth's stratosphere. Specially...

  12. A COSMIC VARIANCE COOKBOOK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moster, Benjamin P.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Somerville, Rachel S.; Newman, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Deep pencil beam surveys ( 2 ) are of fundamental importance for studying the high-redshift universe. However, inferences about galaxy population properties (e.g., the abundance of objects) are in practice limited by 'cosmic variance'. This is the uncertainty in observational estimates of the number density of galaxies arising from the underlying large-scale density fluctuations. This source of uncertainty can be significant, especially for surveys which cover only small areas and for massive high-redshift galaxies. Cosmic variance for a given galaxy population can be determined using predictions from cold dark matter theory and the galaxy bias. In this paper, we provide tools for experiment design and interpretation. For a given survey geometry, we present the cosmic variance of dark matter as a function of mean redshift z-bar and redshift bin size Δz. Using a halo occupation model to predict galaxy clustering, we derive the galaxy bias as a function of mean redshift for galaxy samples of a given stellar mass range. In the linear regime, the cosmic variance of these galaxy samples is the product of the galaxy bias and the dark matter cosmic variance. We present a simple recipe using a fitting function to compute cosmic variance as a function of the angular dimensions of the field, z-bar , Δz, and stellar mass m * . We also provide tabulated values and a software tool. The accuracy of the resulting cosmic variance estimates (δσ v /σ v ) is shown to be better than 20%. We find that for GOODS at z-bar =2 and with Δz = 0.5, the relative cosmic variance of galaxies with m * >10 11 M sun is ∼38%, while it is ∼27% for GEMS and ∼12% for COSMOS. For galaxies of m * ∼ 10 10 M sun , the relative cosmic variance is ∼19% for GOODS, ∼13% for GEMS, and ∼6% for COSMOS. This implies that cosmic variance is a significant source of uncertainty at z-bar =2 for small fields and massive galaxies, while for larger fields and intermediate mass galaxies, cosmic

  13. Understanding the organisational context for adverse events in the health services: the role of cultural censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, E; Hazelgrove, J

    2001-12-01

    This paper responds to the current emphasis on organisational learning in the NHS as a means of improving healthcare systems and making hospitals safer places for patients. Conspiracies of silence have been identified as obstacles to organisational learning, covering error and hampering communication. In this paper we question the usefulness of the term and suggest that "cultural censorship", a concept developed by the anthropologist Robin Sherriff, provides a much needed insight into cultures of silence within the NHS. Drawing on a number of illustrations, but in particular the Ritchie inquiry into the disgraced gynaecologist Rodney Ledward, we show how the defining characteristics of cultural censorship can help us to understand how adverse events get pushed underground, only to flourish in the underside of organisational life.

  14. Protecting the Innocence of Youth: Moral Sanctity Values Underlie Censorship From Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rajen A; Masicampo, E J

    2017-11-01

    Three studies examined the relationship between people's moral values (drawing on moral foundations theory) and their willingness to censor immoral acts from children. Results revealed that diverse moral values did not predict censorship judgments. It was not the case that participants who valued loyalty and authority, respectively, sought to censor depictions of disloyal and disobedient acts. Rather, censorship intentions were predicted by a single moral value-sanctity. The more people valued sanctity, the more willing they were to censor from children, regardless of the types of violations depicted (impurity, disloyalty, disobedience, etc.). Furthermore, people who valued sanctity objected to indecent exposure only to apparently innocent and pure children-those who were relatively young and who had not been previously exposed to immoral acts. These data suggest that sanctity, purity, and the preservation of innocence underlie intentions to censor from young children.

  15. Political science. Reverse-engineering censorship in China: randomized experimentation and participant observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gary; Pan, Jennifer; Roberts, Margaret E

    2014-08-22

    Existing research on the extensive Chinese censorship organization uses observational methods with well-known limitations. We conducted the first large-scale experimental study of censorship by creating accounts on numerous social media sites, randomly submitting different texts, and observing from a worldwide network of computers which texts were censored and which were not. We also supplemented interviews with confidential sources by creating our own social media site, contracting with Chinese firms to install the same censoring technologies as existing sites, and--with their software, documentation, and even customer support--reverse-engineering how it all works. Our results offer rigorous support for the recent hypothesis that criticisms of the state, its leaders, and their policies are published, whereas posts about real-world events with collective action potential are censored. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Immoral Obscenity: Censorship of Folklore Manuscript Collections in Late Stalinist Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaisa Kulasalu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The history of folkloristics contains many cases of obscene materials that were excluded from field notes, books and archives. The Estonian Folklore Archives (founded in 1927 did incorporate dirty jokes, riddles and songs in its collection. Soviet occupation changed the topics of folklore scholarship and archival practices. Between the years 1945 and 1952, the Folklore Archives’ manuscript collections, catalogues and photographs were censored. Anti-Soviet texts were cut out or made unreadable. In the first years after the incorporation of the Republic of Estonia into the Soviet Union, anti-Soviet mainly meant politically sensitive materials such as jokes about Stalin, very patriotic texts or the names of some people. During the beginning of the 1950s, stricter rules were applied and obscene texts were also censored. In this article, I will focus on the censorship of obscene words and motifs and the political dimension of moralistic censorship in a totalitarian state.

  17. Measuring anisotropies in the cosmic neutrino background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Safdi, Benjamin R.; Tully, Christopher G.

    2014-10-01

    Neutrino capture on tritium has emerged as a promising method for detecting the cosmic neutrino background (C ν B ). We show that relic neutrinos are captured most readily when their spin vectors are antialigned with the polarization axis of the tritium nuclei and when they approach along the direction of polarization. As a result, C ν B observatories may measure anisotropies in the cosmic neutrino velocity and spin distributions by polarizing the tritium targets. A small dipole anisotropy in the C ν B is expected due to the peculiar velocity of the lab frame with respect to the cosmic frame and due to late-time gravitational effects. The PTOLEMY experiment, a tritium observatory currently under construction, should observe a nearly isotropic background. This would serve as a strong test of the cosmological origin of a potential signal. The polarized-target measurements may also constrain nonstandard neutrino interactions that would induce larger anisotropies and help discriminate between Majorana versus Dirac neutrinos.

  18. Testing the cosmic censorship conjecture with point particles: The effect of radiation reaction and the self-force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barausse, Enrico; Cardoso, Vitor; Khanna, Gaurav

    2011-11-01

    A classical thought-experiment to destroy black holes was envisaged by Wald in 1974: it consists of throwing particles with large angular momentum into an extremal black hole, checking whether their capture can overspin the black hole past the extremal limit and create a naked singularity. Wald showed that in the test-particle limit, particles that would be otherwise capable of producing naked singularities are simply scattered. Recently, Jacobson and Sotiriou showed that if one considers instead a black hole that is almost, but not exactly extremal, then in the absence of backreaction effects particle capture could indeed overspin the spacetime above the Kerr limit. Here we analyze backreaction effects and show that for some of the trajectories giving rise to naked singularities, radiative effects can be neglected. However, for these orbits the conservative self-force is important, and seems to have the right sign to prevent the formation of naked singularities.

  19. Testing the cosmic censorship conjecture with point particles: The effect of radiation reaction and the self-force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barausse, Enrico; Cardoso, Vitor; Khanna, Gaurav

    2011-01-01

    A classical thought-experiment to destroy black holes was envisaged by Wald in 1974: it consists of throwing particles with large angular momentum into an extremal black hole, checking whether their capture can overspin the black hole past the extremal limit and create a naked singularity. Wald showed that in the test-particle limit, particles that would be otherwise capable of producing naked singularities are simply scattered. Recently, Jacobson and Sotiriou showed that if one considers instead a black hole that is almost, but not exactly extremal, then in the absence of backreaction effects particle capture could indeed overspin the spacetime above the Kerr limit. Here we analyze backreaction effects and show that for some of the trajectories giving rise to naked singularities, radiative effects can be neglected. However, for these orbits the conservative self-force is important, and seems to have the right sign to prevent the formation of naked singularities.

  20. Cosmic rays in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujitaka, Kazunobu

    2005-01-01

    Cosmos is a mysterious space by which many researchers are fascinated for many years. But, going into space means that we will receive extra exposure due to existence of cosmic rays. Cosmic rays are mainly composed of highly energetic protons. It was born in the last stage of stellar life. Understanding of cosmos will certainly bring right understanding of radiation energy, or energy itself. As no one could see the very early stage of cosmic rays, there is only a speculation. But it is better to speculate something based on certain side evidences, than to give up the whole. Such attitude shall be welcomed in the space researches. Anyway, cosmic rays were born in the last explosion of a star, which is called as Super Nova. After cosmic rays are emitted from the Super Nova, it will reach to the human surroundings. To indicate its intensity, special unit of ''dose rate'' is used. When a man climbs a mountain, cosmic ray intensity surely increases. It doubles as he goes up every 1500m elevation. It was ascertained by our own measurements. Then what happens when the goes up more? At aviation altitude, where airplanes fly, the dose rate will be increased up to 100times the high mountain cases. And what is expected when he goes up further more, up to space orbit altitude? In this case, the dose rate increases up to 10times the airplane cases. Geomagnetism affects the dose rate very much. As primary cosmic ray particles are charged particles, they cannot do well with existence of the magnetic field. In effect, cosmic rays can penetrate into the polar atmosphere along geomagnetic lines of forces which stand almost vertical, but penetration of low energy cosmic rays will be banned when they intend to penetrate crossing the geomagnetic lines of forces in equatorial region. Therefore, exposure due to cosmic rays will become large in polar region, while it remains small in equatorial region. In effect, airplanes which fly over the equator. Only, we have to know that the cosmos

  1. Cosmic questions: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, J R; Abrams, N E

    2001-12-01

    This introductory talk at the Cosmic Questions conference sponsored by the AAAS summarizes some earlier pictures of the universe and some pictures based on modern physics and cosmology. The uroboros (snake swallowing its tail) is an example of a traditional picture. The Biblical flat-earth picture was very different from the Greek spherical earth-centered picture, which was the standard view until the end of the Middle Ages. Many people incorrectly assume that the Newtonian picture of stars scattered through otherwise empty space is still the prevailing view. Seeing Earth from space shows the power of a new picture. The Hubble Space Telescope can see all the bright galaxies, all the way to the cosmic Dark Ages. We are at the center of cosmic spheres of time: looking outward is looking backward in time. All the matter and energy in the universe can be represented as a cosmic density pyramid. The laws of physics only allow the material objects in the universe to occupy a wedge-shaped region on a diagram of mass versus size. All sizes--from the smallest size scale, the Planck scale, to the entire visible universe--can be represented on the Cosmic Uroboros. There are interesting connections across this diagram, and the human scale lies in the middle.

  2. Cosmic Rays and Climate

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2007-01-01

    Among the most puzzling questions in climate change is that of solar-climate variability, which has attracted the attention of scientists for more than two centuries. Until recently, even the existence of solar-climate variability has been controversial—perhaps because the observations had largely involved correlations between climate and the sunspot cycle that had persisted for only a few decades. Over the last few years, however, diverse reconstructions of past climate change have revealed clear associations with cosmic ray variations recorded in cosmogenic isotope archives, providing persuasive evidence for solar or cosmic ray forcing of the climate. However, despite the increasing evidence of its importance, solar-climate variability is likely to remain controversial until a physical mechanism is established. Although this remains a mystery, observations suggest that cloud cover may be influenced by cosmic rays, which are modulated by the solar wind and, on longer time scales, by the geomagnetic fiel...

  3. Cosmic Sum Rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Frandsen, Mads; Masina, Isabella; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We introduce new sum rules allowing to determine universal properties of the unknown component of the cosmic rays and show how it can be used to predict the positron fraction at energies not yet explored by current experiments and to constrain specific models.......We introduce new sum rules allowing to determine universal properties of the unknown component of the cosmic rays and show how it can be used to predict the positron fraction at energies not yet explored by current experiments and to constrain specific models....

  4. Cosmic ray: Studying the origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabelski, J.

    1997-01-01

    Investigations of the origin of cosmic rays are presented. Different methods are discussed: studies of cosmic gamma rays of energy from 30 MeV to about 10 15 eV (since photons point to their places of origin), studies of the mass composition of cosmic rays (because it reflects source morphology), and studies of cosmic rays with energy above 1O 19 eV (for these are the highest energies observed in nature). (author)

  5. Galactic propagation of cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarsky, C.J.

    1982-09-01

    After introducing various phenomenological models of cosmic ray propagation in the galaxy, we examine how some of them fare when compared to the data. We show that a model based on resonant diffusion of cosmic rays off an interstellar spectrum of hydromagnetic waves can account for the presently available evidence on cosmic rays and the interstellar medium

  6. Constraints on cosmic superstrings from Kaluza-Klein emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufaux, Jean-François

    2012-07-06

    Cosmic superstrings interact generically with a tower of light and/or strongly coupled Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes associated with the geometry of the internal space. We study the production of KK particles by cosmic superstring loops, and show that it is constrained by big bang nucleosynthesis. We study the resulting constraints in the parameter space of the underlying string theory model and highlight their complementarity with the regions that can be probed by current and upcoming gravitational wave experiments.

  7. Cosmic ray antimatter: Is it primary or secondary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.; Protheroe, R. J.; Kazanas, D.

    1981-01-01

    The relative merits and difficulties of the primary and secondary origin hypotheses for the observed cosmic ray antiprotons, including the low energy measurement of Buffington, were examined. It is concluded that the cosmic ray antiproton data may be strong evidence for antimatter galaxies and baryon symmetric cosmology. The present antiproton data are consistent with a primary extragalactic component having antiproton/proton approximately equal to .0032 + or - 0.7.

  8. Simulating Cosmic Reionisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawlik, Andreas Heinz

    2009-01-01

    The first stars formed a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, when the Universe was only a small fraction of its present age. Their radiation transformed the previously cold and neutral hydrogen that filled intergalactic space into the hot and ionised cosmic plasma that is observed today.

  9. Cosmic rays and climate

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Inside the new chamber the CLOUD team will be able to recreate the conditions of any part of the atmosphere, from the polar stratosphere to the low level tropics (top). The new chamber safely in position in the East hall. Once carefully cleaned the chamber will be turned sideways onto its legs ready for the beam of 'cosmic rays' (bottom).

  10. Structure formation cosmic rays: Identifying observational constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prodanović T.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Shocks that arise from baryonic in-fall and merger events during the structure formation are believed to be a source of cosmic rays. These "structure formation cosmic rays" (SFCRs would essentially be primordial in composition, namely, mostly made of protons and alpha particles. However, very little is known about this population of cosmic rays. One way to test the level of its presence is to look at the products of hadronic reactions between SFCRs and the ISM. A perfect probe of these reactions would be Li. The rare isotope Li is produced only by cosmic rays, dominantly in αα → 6Li fusion reactions with the ISM helium. Consequently, this nuclide provides a unique diagnostic of the history of cosmic rays. Exactly because of this unique property is Li affected most by the presence of an additional cosmic ray population. In turn, this could have profound consequences for the Big-Bang nucleosynthesis: cosmic rays created during cosmic structure formation would lead to pre-Galactic Li production, which would act as a "contaminant" to the primordial 7Li content of metalpoor halo stars. Given the already existing problem of establishing the concordance between Li observed in halo stars and primordial 7Li as predicted by the WMAP, it is crucial to set limits to the level of this "contamination". However, the history of SFCRs is not very well known. Thus we propose a few model-independent ways of testing the SFCR species and their history, as well as the existing lithium problem: 1 we establish the connection between gamma-ray and Li production, which enables us to place constraints on the SFCR-made lithium by using the observed Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Background (EGRB; 2 we propose a new site for testing the primordial and SFCR-made lithium, namely, low-metalicity High-Velocity Clouds (HVCs, which retain the pre-Galactic composition without any significant depletion. Although using one method alone may not give us strong constraints, using them in

  11. Tracing the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libeskind, Noam I.; van de Weygaert, Rien; Cautun, Marius; Falck, Bridget; Tempel, Elmo; Abel, Tom; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Forero-Romero, Jaime E.; Gonzalez, Roberto; Gottlöber, Stefan; Hahn, Oliver; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Hoffman, Yehuda; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Kitaura, Francisco; Knebe, Alexander; Manti, Serena; Neyrinck, Mark; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Padilla, Nelson; Platen, Erwin; Ramachandra, Nesar; Robotham, Aaron; Saar, Enn; Shandarin, Sergei; Steinmetz, Matthias; Stoica, Radu S.; Sousbie, Thierry; Yepes, Gustavo

    2018-01-01

    The cosmic web is one of the most striking features of the distribution of galaxies and dark matter on the largest scales in the Universe. It is composed of dense regions packed full of galaxies, long filamentary bridges, flattened sheets and vast low-density voids. The study of the cosmic web has focused primarily on the identification of such features, and on understanding the environmental effects on galaxy formation and halo assembly. As such, a variety of different methods have been devised to classify the cosmic web - depending on the data at hand, be it numerical simulations, large sky surveys or other. In this paper, we bring 12 of these methods together and apply them to the same data set in order to understand how they compare. In general, these cosmic-web classifiers have been designed with different cosmological goals in mind, and to study different questions. Therefore, one would not a priori expect agreement between different techniques; however, many of these methods do converge on the identification of specific features. In this paper, we study the agreements and disparities of the different methods. For example, each method finds that knots inhabit higher density regions than filaments, etc. and that voids have the lowest densities. For a given web environment, we find a substantial overlap in the density range assigned by each web classification scheme. We also compare classifications on a halo-by-halo basis; for example, we find that 9 of 12 methods classify around a third of group-mass haloes (i.e. Mhalo ∼ 1013.5 h-1 M⊙) as being in filaments. Lastly, so that any future cosmic-web classification scheme can be compared to the 12 methods used here, we have made all the data used in this paper public.

  12. TRANSLATORS’ CENSORSHIP IN ENGLISH-INDONESIAN TRANSLATION OF DONALD DUCK COMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issy Yuliasri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Not all aspects of Western culture, reflected in the language used in Walt Disney’s Donald Duck comics, are acceptable in Indonesia. So, in translating the comics, the translators have to manipulate the text for it to be acceptable by the target readers and parents. This research aims at finding out censorship through the translation techniques used by the translators in translating the English humorous texts in the Walt Disney’s Donald Duck comics into Indonesian and the reasons underlying the translators’ choice of the translation techniques. It also aims at analysing whether or not the choice of the translation techniques affects the rendering of meaning, maintenance of humour, and acceptability of the translation. For these purposes a qualitative method was employed with content analysis technique and reader response analysis. Content analysis was used in comparing the source text (ST and target text (TT to find out the translation techniques used as a means of censorship and to find out the translators’ reasons for choosing the techniques. Reader-response analysis was done to find out the readers’ response to the rendering of meaning and maintenance of humour in the translation. The research findings discovered that the translators performed censorship through the dominant use of reduction and generalisation techniques so as to reduce sarcasm and insults. The interview with the publisher’s Senior Editor also revealed that “decency” was the first priority in the translation decision making, followed by clarity of meaning and maintenance of humour.  Further research to investigate other elements censored, and compared with other translated comics is recommended.

  13. On the Censorship of Karachay National Book During the Period of Cultural Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurmanseitova Aminat Kh.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article on the basis of previously unknown documents, learned by the author from the State archive of the Stavropol region, the State archive of the contemporary history of the Stavropol region, the State archive of Karachay-Cherkess Republic, the branch of the State archive of Karachay-Cherkess Republic “The Centre of documentation of contemporary history”, the Central State archive of Republic of Dagestan, the author studies the Institute of censorship in Karachay Autonomous Region during the years of cultural construction. For the first time in the historiography she examines censorship in national book in Karachay regional national Publishing House. The author found that during the formation of the State regional Litho special attention was paid to social origin for censor, as it must have been a member or a candidate for VKP(b, komsomol and proletarian. The formation of the Institute of political control of books began in the 1930s, however, and at the beginning of the 1940s the State of Karachay Regional national publishing house has not been strengthened. Karachay regional Litho widely used normative documents Glavlit and North Caucasus Regional Litho. Archival documents testify to arrests of authors, compilers and interpreters of educational-methodological and socio-political literature that stood at the origins of the formation of the Karachay books. The holdings of libraries, bookstores and warehouses carried out regular withdrawal of books in the karachay language. On the basis of the analysis of the extensive archival material involved into scientific circulation for the first time, the author comes to the conclusion that the formation of the institution of censorship in Karachay autonomous region, which was started in 1930, continued till 1940. The political control of books and manuscripts was established in the publishing house. The author concludes that Karachay national book was under total control of censors

  14. Estimation and model selection of semiparametric multivariate survival functions under general censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohong; Fan, Yanqin; Pouzo, Demian; Ying, Zhiliang

    2010-07-01

    We study estimation and model selection of semiparametric models of multivariate survival functions for censored data, which are characterized by possibly misspecified parametric copulas and nonparametric marginal survivals. We obtain the consistency and root- n asymptotic normality of a two-step copula estimator to the pseudo-true copula parameter value according to KLIC, and provide a simple consistent estimator of its asymptotic variance, allowing for a first-step nonparametric estimation of the marginal survivals. We establish the asymptotic distribution of the penalized pseudo-likelihood ratio statistic for comparing multiple semiparametric multivariate survival functions subject to copula misspecification and general censorship. An empirical application is provided.

  15. Dark cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Ping-Kai, E-mail: pingkai.hu@physics.ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Kusenko, Alexander, E-mail: kusenko@ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Takhistov, Volodymyr, E-mail: vtakhist@physics.ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States)

    2017-05-10

    If dark matter particles have an electric charge, as in models of millicharged dark matter, such particles should be accelerated in the same astrophysical accelerators that produce ordinary cosmic rays, and their spectra should have a predictable rigidity dependence. Depending on the charge, the resulting “dark cosmic rays” can be detected as muon-like or neutrino-like events in Super-Kamiokande, IceCube, and other detectors. We present new limits and propose several new analyses, in particular, for the Super-Kamiokande experiment, which can probe a previously unexplored portion of the millicharged dark matter parameter space. Most of our results are fairly general and apply to a broad class of dark matter models.

  16. Dark cosmic rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Kai Hu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available If dark matter particles have an electric charge, as in models of millicharged dark matter, such particles should be accelerated in the same astrophysical accelerators that produce ordinary cosmic rays, and their spectra should have a predictable rigidity dependence. Depending on the charge, the resulting “dark cosmic rays” can be detected as muon-like or neutrino-like events in Super-Kamiokande, IceCube, and other detectors. We present new limits and propose several new analyses, in particular, for the Super-Kamiokande experiment, which can probe a previously unexplored portion of the millicharged dark matter parameter space. Most of our results are fairly general and apply to a broad class of dark matter models.

  17. Cosmic rays and climate

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    The current understanding of climate change in the industrial age is that it is predominantly caused by anthropogenic greenhouse gases, with relatively small natural contributions due to solar irradiance and volcanoes. However, palaeoclimatic reconstructions show that the climate has frequently varied on 100-year time scales during the Holocene (last 10 kyr) by amounts comparable to the present warming - and yet the mechanism or mechanisms are not understood. Some of these reconstructions show clear associations with solar variability, which is recorded in the light radio-isotope archives that measure past variations of cosmic ray intensity. However, despite the increasing evidence of its importance, solar-climate variability is likely to remain controversial until a physical mechanism is established. Estimated changes of solar irradiance on these time scales appear to be too small to account for the climate observations. This raises the question of whether cosmic rays may directly affect the climate, provi...

  18. Carl Sagan's Cosmic Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Carl; Agel, Jerome

    2000-08-01

    Foreword Freeman Dyson; Personal reflections Ann Druyan; Preface; Part I. Cosmic Perspective: 1. A transitional animal; 2. The Unicorn of Cetus; 3. A message from earth; 4. A message to earth; 5. Experiments in utopias; 6. Chauvinism; 7. Space exploration as a human enterprise I. The scientific interest; 8. Space exploration as a human enterprise II. The public interest; 9. Space exploration as a human enterprise III. The historical interest; Part II. The Solar System: 10. On teaching the first grade; 11. 'The ancient and legendary Gods of old'; 12. The Venus detective story; 13. Venus is hell; 14. Science and 'intelligence'; 15. The moons of Barsoom; 16. The mountains of Mars I. Observations from earth; 17. The mountains of Mars II. Observations from space; 18. The canals of Mars; 19. The lost pictures of Mars; 20. The Ice Age and the cauldron; 21. Beginnings and ends of the Earth; 22. Terraforming the plants; 23. The exploration and utlization of the solar system; Part III. Beyond the Solar System: 24. Some of my best friends are dolphins; 25. 'Hello, central casting? Send me twenty extraterrestrials'; 26. The cosmic connection; 27. Extraterrestrial life: an idea whose time has come; 28. Has the Earth been visited?; 29. A search strategy for detecting extraterrestrial intelligence; 30. If we succeed 31. Cables, drums, and seashells; 32. The night freight to the stars; 33. Astroengineering; 34. Twenty questions: a classification of cosmic civilisations; 35. Galactic cultural exchanges; 36. A passage to elsewhere; 37. Starfolk I. A Fable; 38. Starfolk II. A future; 39. Starfolk III. The cosmic Cheshire cats; Epilog David Morrison; Index.

  19. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The cosmic censorship conjecture has provided strong motivation for research in this field. In the absence of a general proof for censorship, many examples ... Author Affiliations. Tomohiro Harada1. Astronomy Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, UK ...

  20. Gravitational collapse and naked singularities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Gravitational collapse is one of the most striking phenomena in gravitational physics. The cosmic censorship conjecture has provided strong motivation for research in this field. In the absence of a general proof for censorship, many examples have been proposed, in which naked singularity is the outcome of ...

  1. Cosmic transparency and acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, R. F. L.; Pereira, S. H.; Jain, Deepak

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, by considering an absorption probability independent of photon wavelength, we show that current type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and gamma-ray burst (GRB) observations plus high-redshift measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation temperature support cosmic acceleration regardless of the transparent-universe assumption. Two flat scenarios are considered in our analyses: the Λ CDM model and a kinematic model. We consider τ (z )=2 ln (1 +z )ɛ, where τ (z ) denotes the opacity between an observer at z =0 and a source at z . This choice is equivalent to deforming the cosmic distance duality relation as DLDA-1=(1 +z )2+ɛ and, if the absorption probability is independent of photon wavelength, the CMB temperature evolution law is TCMB(z )=T0(1 +z )1+2 ɛ /3. By marginalizing on the ɛ parameter, our analyses rule out a decelerating universe at 99.99% C.L. for all scenarios considered. Interestingly, by considering only SNe Ia and GRBs observations, we obtain that a decelerated universe—indicated by ΩΛ≤0.33 and q0>0 —is ruled out around 1.5 σ C.L. and 2 σ C.L., respectively, regardless of the transparent-universe assumption.

  2. 'A promessa' and other films: censorship in Marcello Caetano’s Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Bela Ramos Conceição Morais

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Through the study of the censorship report from the film A promessa (1972, directed by António de Macedo, and of other reports of the same period, as well as the Atas da Comissão de Censura, I intend to study the way how these filmes were censored and, in what A promessa is concerned, all the relationship established between the director, the distibutor and the Comissão de Censura.Through the analysis of some of the censored Portuguese filmography in Marcello Caetano’s time, I intend to help to understand the way how the Comissão de Censura operated in relation to the Portuguese films of that period what, by the way, may lead to a broader understanding of mentalities in Portuguese history.The present investigation is based on a study of the archives of the Secretaria de Estado da Informação e Turismo (SEIT. All the information produced by the Comissão de Exame e Classificação de Espectáculos under the Estado Novo is to be found in the relevant section of the Arquivo Nacional da Torre do Tombo (ANTT, in Lisbon. As well as looking at the handling of the censorship of films, this investigation is also based on the study of the Atas da Comissão de Censura corresponding to the period from 1971 to 25 April 1974.

  3. Fantasy and Censorship: Dino Buzzati’s correspondence from Italian colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Schiavon

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of my contribution is to study the role and influence of Fascist censorship in the journalistic articles that Dino Buzzati wrote from tha Italian colonies for the Corriere della Sera between 1933 and 1940. The articles are collected in the volume L’Africa di Buzzati. By placing Buzzati’s work in a precise historical framework and discussing the problem of his ‘orientalism’, the article demonstrates that Buzzati’s work from Africa can be read as a document of Italian colonialism and that it confirmed, in terms of stereotypes and prejudices, not only the attitude of ‘the West’ towards North African peoples, but also his bias against cultural and social realities which were distant from the ones he was familiar with. In terms of politics and ideology, the texts of Il Buttafuoco are difficult to decipher, especially with reference to the problem of racism. Buzzati’s narrative was determined not only by the influence of Fascist censorship but also by his aesthetic choices. In particular, the role of space played by the desert, the preference for anti-heroic figures and the diffuse use of imagination show the complexity of the relationship between Buzzati and political power, but also the originality in the way Buzzati used these figures to build a symbolism around the represented reality.

  4. Cosmic Convergence: Art and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Elizabeth A.; Zisholtz, E.; Hilton, H.

    2010-01-01

    The I.P. Stanback Museum and Planetarium is a major educational and teaching resource for South Carolina State University, K-12 schools, other universities and the community of Orangeburg and well beyond. The concept of creating a museum with a planetarium on the campus of SC State was ahead of its time. Today scholars are writing about the unity of creative disciplines. Through its integration of the arts, humanities and sciences, the Stanback, the only art museum with a planetarium at any of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities and one of the few in the nation, stands in the forefront of modern thinking. Cosmic Convergence: Art and Science, opening at the I.P. Stanback Museum and Planetarium in February 2010, will feature the works of Mildred Thompson (1936-2003), a prominent African American artist who worked in the media of painting, drawing, print making, sculpture, and photography. Thompson’s artwork shows the strong influences of her interest in physics, astronomy, and metaphysics as well as music and spiritualism. “My work in the visual arts is, and has always been, a continuous search for understanding. It is an expression of purpose and reflects a personal interpretation of the Universe.” Cosmic Convergence will explore the meeting of Art and Science through Mildred Thompson's work and the scientific basis of that work. The paintings and sculptures of the exhibit will be combined with astronomical images showing both the reality and interpretation of the surrounding Universe. Support for this work was provided by the NSF PAARE program to South Carolina State University under award AST-0750814.

  5. The Holy Office Against Fascism: Book Censorship and the Political Independence of the Church (1928–1931)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brera, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Studies into the activity of the Congregation of the Index and of the Holy Office have examined extensively the history of Vatican’s practices of book censorship. While up until the sixteenth century the Church imposed substantial modifications to literary texts, mainly in order to moralise them, in

  6. B Is for "Burqa," C Is for Censorship: The Miseducative Effects of Censoring Muslim Girls and Women's Sartorial Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruitenberg, Claudia W.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I add a discursive analysis to the discussion about Muslim girls and women's dress in non-Muslim educational contexts. I argue that a law or policy that prohibits the wearing of "khimar," "burqa," "chador," "niqab," "hijab," or "jilbab" in the context of public schools is a form of censorship in educational contexts. This…

  7. Suicide in Films: The Impact of Suicide Portrayals on Nonsuicidal Viewers' Well-Being and the Effectiveness of Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Benedikt; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas; Herberth, Arno; Vitouch, Peter; Sonneck, Gernot

    2010-01-01

    The effects of suicide films on recipients' emotional and mental state, as well as the influence of censorship, was studied. Nonsuicidal subjects watched the original or a censored version of a suicide film or a drama without suicide. Data were collected by questionnaires. The viewing led to a deterioration of mood and an increase in inner tension…

  8. Information Censorship: A Comparative Analysis of Newspaper Coverage of the "Jyllands-Posten" Editorial Caricatures in Cross-Cultural Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Julie George

    2010-01-01

    The identification and examination of cultural information strategies and censorship patterns used to propagate the controversial issue of the caricatures in two separate cultural contexts was the aim of this dissertation. It explored discourse used for the coverage of this topic by one newspaper in a restrictive information context and two…

  9. Propaganda, Censorship, and Civic Education in Rural Missouri Schools during World War I: The Benton County Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, William I.

    This study describes the patriotic public rituals, the propaganda materials, and the censorship activities that were part of the school experience in Missouri during World War I. It also examines the apparent responses of two rural Benton County communities to those rituals, materials and activities. Benton County is a rural area of central…

  10. The glacial cycles and cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper; Müller, R A

    2004-01-01

    The cause of the glacial cycles remains a mystery. The origin is widely accepted to be astronomical since paleoclimatic archives contain strong spectral components that match the frequencies of Earth's orbital modulation. Milankovitch insolation theory contains similar frequencies and has become established as the standard model of the glacial cycles. However, high precision paleoclimatic data have revealed serious discrepancies with the Milankovitch model that fundamentally challenge its validity and re-open the question of what causes the glacial cycles. We propose here that the ice ages are initially driven not by insolation cycles but by cosmic ray changes, probably through their effect on clouds. This conclusion is based on a wide range of evidence, including results presented here on speleothem growth in caves in Austria and Oman, and on a record of cosmic ray flux over the past 220 kyr obtained from the 10Be composition of deep-ocean sediments.

  11. Global properties of locally rotational symmetric Bianchi I spacetimes in the Einstein-Yang-Mills-dilaton system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, Makoto [Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan University, 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2006-12-21

    We discuss the strong cosmic censorship conjecture for cosmological spacetimes in the Einstein-Yang-Mills-dilaton system. Locally rotational symmetric Bianchi I spacetimes are considered. We show local and global existence theorems for the system. Asymptotic behaviour for the spacetimes is also investigated. The curvature invariant is blowup at the initial singularities and the spacetimes are future geodesic complete. Thus, the strong cosmic censorship conjecture for the spacetimes holds.

  12. Cosmic Education: Formation of a Planetary and Cosmic Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazaluk Oleg

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The major stages of development of cosmic pedagogy have been researched. Based on the achievements of the modern neurosciences as well as of psychology, cosmology, and philosophy, the authors provide their reasoning for the cosmic education and its outlooks for the educational systems of the world. Through the studies of how important human mind is for the Earth and the cosmos and by researching the evolution of human mind within the structure of the Universe, the authors create a more advanced scientific and philosophic basis for the cosmic education where the subject is a comprehensive process of formation and directed progress of both an individual mind and a conglomerate of minds called the "psychospace". The cosmic education researches the permanent progress of the intelligent matter of the Earth. The purpose of the cosmic education has been determined as formation of a planetary and cosmic personality. According to the authors, a planetary and cosmic personality is a harmony of mind, soul, and body, and such harmony is directed to use the internal creative potential of mind to the benefit of the intelligent matter of the entire Earth and the cosmos. The properties of such a planetary and cosmic personality are being improved continuously; they are a sample (the ideal of the cosmic pedagogy and the image of a human being of the future. Through the usage of the entire potential and art of upbringing and educating, the cosmic pedagogy is called to embody the major properties of the image of a human being of the future in the new generations of minds and to form a planetary and cosmic personality capable of self-actualization to the benefit of the permanent progress of the intelligent matter.

  13. Cosmic ray: Studying the origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabelski, J. [Cosmic Ray Laboratory, Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Lodz (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Investigations of the origin of cosmic rays are presented. Different methods are discussed: studies of cosmic gamma rays of energy from 30 MeV to about 10{sup 15} eV (since photons point to their places of origin), studies of the mass composition of cosmic rays (because it reflects source morphology), and studies of cosmic rays with energy above 1O{sup 19} eV (for these are the highest energies observed in nature). (author) 101 refs, 19 figs, 7 tabs

  14. THE LOCAL GROUP IN THE COSMIC WEB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forero-Romero, J. E.; González, R.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the characteristics of the cosmic web around Local-Group (LG)-like pairs using a cosmological simulation in the ΛCDM cosmology. We use the Hessian of the gravitational potential to classify regions on scales of ∼2 Mpc as a peak, sheet, filament, or void. The sample of LG counterparts is represented by two samples of halo pairs. The first is a general sample composed of pairs with similar masses and isolation criteria as observed for the LG. The second is a subset with additional observed kinematic constraints such as relative pair velocity and separation. We find that the pairs in the LG sample with all constraints are: (1) preferentially located in filaments and sheets, (2) located in a narrow range of local overdensity 0 < δ < 2, web ellipticity 0.1 < e < 1.0, and prolateness –0.4 < p < 0.4, (3) strongly aligned with the cosmic web. The alignments are such that the pair orbital angular momentum tends to be perpendicular to the smallest tidal eigenvector, e-hat 3 , which lies along the filament direction or the sheet plane. A stronger alignment is present for the vector linking the two halos with the vector e-hat 3 . Additionally, we fail to find a strong correlation between the spin of each halo in the pair with the cosmic web. All of these trends are expected to a great extent from the selection of LG total mass in the general sample. Applied to the observed LG, there is a potential conflict between the alignments of the different satellite planes and the numerical evidence for satellite accretion along filaments; the direction defined by e-hat 3 . This highlights the relevance of achieving a precise characterization for the location of the LG in the cosmic web in the cosmological context provided by ΛCDM

  15. Studies in cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bemalkhedkar, M.M.

    1974-03-01

    The investigation of the diurnal variation in the cosmic ray intensity on individual days has revealed a new class of diurnal variation showing a maximum around 09 hour direction in the interplanetary space. It is shown to occur during the recovery phase of Forbush decreases as well as during quiet periods. The rigidity spectrum of the anomalous diurnal variation has an exponent around zero, the same as that for the average diurnal variation exhibiting maximum around 18 hours in the interplanetary space. It is shown that the Forbush decreases associated with the diurnal variation exhibiting morning maximum, are 27 day recurrent in nature and are preceded by east limb solar flares on most of the occasions. A qualitative model of the transient modulation by solar corotating corpuscular streams of enhanced solar wind velocity, emanating from the active regions on the solar disc, is proposed to explain the anomalous diurnal anisotropy in the recovery phase of 27 day recurrent Forbush decreases. From this model, the cosmic ray diffusion coefficients, parallel and perpendicular to the interplanetary magnetic field inside the corotating stream, are derived and compared with the average values. To investigate the possibility of determining the energy spectra of cosmic ray intensity variations from a single station, a continuous record of neutron multiplicity spectrum has been obtained for the period October, 1967 - October, 1971, using the Gulmarg neutron monitor. The average multiplicity spectrum in the Gulmarg neutron monitor shows a mean multiplicity approximately equal to 1.4 for 12 Boron-tri-fluoride counters and is an increasing function of the number of counters used. The mean multiplicity measured in various other neutron monitors, when normalized to the cutoff rigidity of Gulmurg (11.91 GV), shows a systematic increase with the altitude of the station. (author)

  16. Solution for a local straight cosmic string in the braneworld gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdalla, M.C.B.; Carlesso, P.F. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bloco II, Barra-Funda, Caixa Postal 70532-2, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hoff da Silva, J.M. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    In this work we deal with the spacetime shaped by a straight cosmic string, emerging from local gauge theories, in the braneworld gravity context. We search for physical consequences of string features due to the modified gravitational scenario encoded in the projected gravitational equations. It is shown that cosmic strings in braneworld gravity may present significant differences when compared to the general relativity predictions, since its linear density is modified and the deficit angle produced by the cosmic string is attenuated. Furthermore, the existence of cosmic strings in that scenario requires a strong restriction to the braneworld tension: λ ≥ 3 x 10{sup -17}, in Planck units. (orig.)

  17. Garden of cosmic speculation

    CERN Document Server

    Jencks, Charles

    2005-01-01

    This book tells the story of one of the most important gardens in Europe, created by the architectural critic and designer Charles Jencks and his late wife, the landscape architect and author Maggie Keswick. The Garden of Cosmic Speculation is a landscape that celebrates the new sciences of complexity and chaos theory and consists of a series of metaphors exploring the origins, the destiny and the substance of the Universe. The book is illustrated with year-round photography, bringing the garden's many dimensions vividly to life.

  18. Discovery of cosmic fractals

    CERN Document Server

    Baryshev, Yuri

    2002-01-01

    This is the first book to present the fascinating new results on the largest fractal structures in the universe. It guides the reader, in a simple way, to the frontiers of astronomy, explaining how fractals appear in cosmic physics, from our solar system to the megafractals in deep space. It also offers a personal view of the history of the idea of self-similarity and of cosmological principles, from Plato's ideal architecture of the heavens to Mandelbrot's fractals in the modern physical cosmos. In addition, this invaluable book presents the great fractal debate in astronomy (after Luciano Pi

  19. The Cosmic Background Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulkis, Samuel; Lubin, Philip M.; Meyer, Stephan S.; Silverberg, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (CBE), NASA's cosmological satellite which will observe a radiative relic of the big bang, is discussed. The major questions connected to the big bang theory which may be clarified using the CBE are reviewed. The satellite instruments and experiments are described, including the Differential Microwave Radiometer, which measures the difference between microwave radiation emitted from two points on the sky, the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer, which compares the spectrum of radiation from the sky at wavelengths from 100 microns to one cm with that from an internal blackbody, and the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment, which searches for the radiation from the earliest generation of stars.

  20. Cosmic strings and inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishniac, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    We examine the compatibility of inflation with the cosmic string theory for galaxy formation. There is a general conflict between having sufficient string tension to effect galaxy formation, and reheating after inflation to a high enough temperature that strings may form in a thermal phase transition. To escape this conflict, we propose a class of models where the inflation is coupled to the string-producing field. The strings are formed late in inflation as the inflaton rolls towards its zero-temperature value. A large subset of these models have a novel large-scale distribution of galaxies that is fractal, displays biasing without dynamics or feedback mechanisms, and contains voids. (orig.)

  1. The Creative Subject and the Law of Reality (Self-censorship in the Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Giusti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available If an unbreakable law exists for the Subject, it is the limits that Reality sets for his expansion and for his creativity, unless he alienates himself from reality to enter the realm of folly. Literary creation realizes itself in the space between the direct experience of the world, the event in its pure happening, and the unity of sense as an object of desire. The subject with his understanding abilities, therefore, must react to the stimulus given by the event willingly or unwillingly experienced and he must venture out to the eventful journey of interpretation led by the intentionality of his desire. As Petrarch’s canzone 360 demonstrates, the trial-pattern can be used as a literary form and a cognitive model in order to show the inner reasoning and moral debate, to define the rules of the specific literary genre, to explicate a truth that finally depends on the literary genre. On this journey the desire of sense can suffer limits and frustrations imposed by the law of Reality: obstacles, obligations, censorship and self-censorship (as introjected censorship principles. This law both makes hard and leads the journey, obstructs it but also makes it shareable: facing a Reality similar for all the human beings (even if differently perceived, shareable reactions and interpretations are developed.  My article intends to explore these issues in some revealing and foundational texts of modern lyric poetry (mostly from Petrarch’s Canzoniere, having in mind the idea that poetry, as a personal voice of a subject, utters this journey of research more than it reveals some acquired general truths. In European lyric tradition, woman and nature can be considered as functional objects that activate and set a limit to the subject; they embody the law to obey, to which to conform or to rebel. In order to exercise himself in the text-space, to construct himself as a subject, the lyric-I has to create the limits within which to act and the laws of this

  2. L3 + Cosmics Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %RE4 %title\\\\ \\\\The L3+C experiment takes advantage of the unique properties of the L3 muon spectrometer to get an accurate measurement of cosmic ray muons 30 m underground. A new muon trigger, readout and DAQ system have been installed, as well as a scintillator array covering the upper surfaces of the L3 magnet for timing purposes. The acceptance amounts to 200 $m^2 sr$. The data are collected independently in parallel with L3 running. In spring 2000 a scintillator array will be installed on the roof of the SX hall in order to estimate the primary energy of air showers associated with events observed in L3+C.\\\\ \\\\The cosmic ray muon momentum spectrum, the zenith angular dependence and the charge ratio are measured with high accuracy between 20 and 2000 GeV/c. The results will provide new information about the primary composition, the shower development in the atmosphere, and the inclusive pion and kaon (production-) cross sections (specifically the "$\\pi$/K ratio") at high energies. These data will also hel...

  3. COSMIC monthly progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of May 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are summarized. Nine articles were prepared for publication in the NASA Tech Brief Journal. These articles (included in this report) describe the following software items: (1) WFI - Windowing System for Test and Simulation; (2) HZETRN - A Free Space Radiation Transport and Shielding Program; (3) COMGEN-BEM - Composite Model Generation-Boundary Element Method; (4) IDDS - Interactive Data Display System; (5) CET93/PC - Chemical Equilibrium with Transport Properties, 1993; (6) SDVIC - Sub-pixel Digital Video Image Correlation; (7) TRASYS - Thermal Radiation Analyzer System (HP9000 Series 700/800 Version without NASADIG); (8) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (VAX VMS Version); and (9) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (UNIX Version). Activities in the areas of marketing, customer service, benefits identification, maintenance and support, and dissemination are also described along with a budget summary.

  4. Testing Cosmic Inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, David

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) has provided a wealth of information about the history and physics of the early Universe. Much progress has been made on uncovering the emerging Standard Model of Cosmology by such experiments as COBE and WMAP, and ESA's Planck Surveyor will likely increase our knowledge even more. Despite the success of this model, mysteries remain. Currently understood physics does not offer a compelling explanation for the homogeneity, flatness, and the origin of structure in the Universe. Cosmic Inflation, a brief epoch of exponential expansion, has been posted to explain these observations. If inflation is a reality, it is expected to produce a background spectrum of gravitational waves that will leave a small polarized imprint on the CMB. Discovery of this signal would give the first direct evidence for inflation and provide a window into physics at scales beyond those accessible to terrestrial particle accelerators. I will briefly review aspects of the Standard Model of Cosmology and discuss our current efforts to design and deploy experiments to measure the polarization of the CMB with the precision required to test inflation.

  5. George's cosmic treasure hunt

    CERN Document Server

    Hawking, Lucy; Parsons, Gary

    2009-01-01

    George and Annie explore the galaxy in this cosmic adventure from Stephen Hawking and Lucy Hawking, complete with essays from Professor Hawking about the latest in space travel. George is heartbroken when he learns that his friend Annie and her father are moving to the US. Eric has a new job working for the space program, looking for signs of life in the Universe. Eric leaves George with a gift—a book called The User’s Guide to the Universe. But Annie and Eric haven’t been gone for very long when Annie believes that she is being contacted by aliens, who have a terrible warning for her. George joins her in the US to help her with her quest—and before he knows it, he, Annie, Cosmos, and Annie’s annoying cousin Emmett have been swept up in a cosmic treasure hunt, spanning the whole galaxy and beyond. Lucy Hawking's own experiences in zero-gravity flight and interviews with astronauts at Cape Kennedy and the Johnson Space Center lend the book a sense of realism and excitement that is sure to fire up ima...

  6. Cosmic rays and global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlykin, A.D. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sloan, T. [Lancaster University (United Kingdom); Wolfendale, A.W. [Durham University (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    The possible effects of cosmic rays on clouds could contribute to global warming. The argument is that the observed increased solar activity during the last century caused a decrease in the ionization due to cosmic rays since the lower energy cosmic particles are deflected by the magnetic field created by the increasing solar wind. This would lead to a decrease in cloud cover allowing more heating of the earth by the sun. Meteorological data combined to solar activity observations and simulations show that any effect of solar activity on clouds and the climate is likely to be through irradiance rather than cosmic rays. Since solar irradiance transfers 8 orders of magnitude more energy to the atmosphere than cosmic rays it is more plausible that this can produce a real effect. The total contribution of variable solar activity to global warming is shown to be less than 14% of the total temperature rise. (A.C.)

  7. Supernova origin of cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, C. L.; Houston, B. P.

    Evidence has recently been presented from gamma-ray observations for the acceleration of cosmic rays in the Loop I supernova remnant. The cosmic ray intensity thus inferred is in agreement with the predictions of the shock acceleration model of Blandford and Cowie (1980). Here, this model is examined further, specifically by comparing its predictions with the presently available information on the cosmic-ray pre-history as well as with the cosmic ray anisotropy measurements in the energy range 10 to the 9th to 10 to the 15th eV. A cosmic ray conversion efficiency of 10-20 percent is found sufficient to exlain the observations. The present study leads also to the interesting suggestion that the bump observed in the primary energy spectrum at 10 to the 14th to 10 to the 15th eV may be due to an excess contribution from local supernovae.

  8. Textbook Inspection and Censorship in Korea during the Protectorate Period: A Study of Inspection Copies of Textbooks Compiled by the Young Korean Academy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyoung Kim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Established during the Japanese protectorate period, the censorship system lasted throughout the colonial period as well. Therefore it is necessary to examine such censorship system as part of Japan’s colonization policy and shed light on the historical and current significance of the censorship system as well as its effects. Recently, copies of textbook provided to the Ministry of Education (Hakbu for inspection in the protectorate period were newly discovered. Materials that have been inspected by the Japanese Residency-General of Korea—inspection copies of textbooks from the Young Korean Academy (Heungsadan—were included in the “Collection of new materials related to Yu Kilchun”. Using these newly discovered copies of textbooks that had been subject to inspection, this study is the first in a series of research that attempted to examine actual cases of textbook inspection and censorship during the protectorate period and shed light on the historical significance of such activities. This study therefore review legislations on inspection and censorship in this period and studied the early stages in the establishment process of a censorship system in modern Korea. Secondly, this study attempted to provide a bibliographical analysis of the inspection copies of textbooks from the protectorate period, as these are new documents that had never been analyzed or used in research.

  9. An estimator of the survival function based on the semi-Markov model under dependent censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Yeoun; Tsai, Wei-Yann

    2005-06-01

    Lee and Wolfe (Biometrics vol. 54 pp. 1176-1178, 1998) proposed the two-stage sampling design for testing the assumption of independent censoring, which involves further follow-up of a subset of lost-to-follow-up censored subjects. They also proposed an adjusted estimator for the survivor function for a proportional hazards model under the dependent censoring model. In this paper, a new estimator for the survivor function is proposed for the semi-Markov model under the dependent censorship on the basis of the two-stage sampling data. The consistency and the asymptotic distribution of the proposed estimator are derived. The estimation procedure is illustrated with an example of lung cancer clinical trial and simulation results are reported of the mean squared errors of estimators under a proportional hazards and two different nonproportional hazards models.

  10. DeltaShaper: Enabling Unobservable Censorship-resistant TCP Tunneling over Videoconferencing Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barradas Diogo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the possibility of using the encrypted video channel of widely used videoconferencing applications, such as Skype, as a carrier for unobservable covert TCP/IP communications. We propose and evaluate different alternatives to encode information in the video stream in order to increase available throughput while preserving the packet-level characteristics of the video stream. We have built a censorship-resistant system, named DeltaShaper, which offers a data-link interface and supports TCP/IP applications that tolerate low throughput / high latency links. Our results show that it is possible to run standard protocols such as FTP, SMTP, or HTTP over Skype video streams.

  11. [Programa de saúde: a case of book censorship during the Brazilian military dictatorship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimão, Sandra

    2013-11-30

    Some documents produced by the government during the Brazilian military dictatorship have been made available for reference, including censors' reports on television and radio programs, plays, films, songs, advertisements and printed matter. Of the 500 or so reports on books, there is one that vetoes Programa de saúde: projetos e temas de higiene e saúde, an educational work that proposed actions to help students understand their sanitary conditions and acquire knowledge about health and health-promoting habits in this area. The argument for vetoing it was that the information could fall into the hands of poorly trained teachers, who could distort its content, causing serious damage to Brazilian youth. In this report we see evidence of the obscurantist, elitist posture adopted by the Department of Censorship of Public Entertainment, which aimed to restrict the circulation of information and curb debate.

  12. Cosmic Visions Dark Energy. Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodelson, Scott [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Heitmann, Katrin [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hirata, Chris [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Honscheid, Klaus [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Roodman, Aaron [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Seljak, Uroš [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Slosar, Anže [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Trodden, Mark [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-04-26

    Cosmic surveys provide crucial information about high energy physics including strong evidence for dark energy, dark matter, and inflation. Ongoing and upcoming surveys will start to identify the underlying physics of these new phenomena, including tight constraints on the equation of state of dark energy, the viability of modified gravity, the existence of extra light species, the masses of the neutrinos, and the potential of the field that drove inflation. Even after the Stage IV experiments, DESI and LSST, complete their surveys, there will still be much information left in the sky. This additional information will enable us to understand the physics underlying the dark universe at an even deeper level and, in case Stage IV surveys find hints for physics beyond the current Standard Model of Cosmology, to revolutionize our current view of the universe. There are many ideas for how best to supplement and aid DESI and LSST in order to access some of this remaining information and how surveys beyond Stage IV can fully exploit this regime. These ideas flow to potential projects that could start construction in the 2020's.

  13. Cosmic Visions Dark Energy: Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodelson, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Slosar, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Heitmann, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hirata, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Honscheid, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roodman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Seljak, U. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trodden, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-26

    Cosmic surveys provide crucial information about high energy physics including strong evidence for dark energy, dark matter, and inflation. Ongoing and upcoming surveys will start to identify the underlying physics of these new phenomena, including tight constraints on the equation of state of dark energy, the viability of modified gravity, the existence of extra light species, the masses of the neutrinos, and the potential of the field that drove inflation. Even after the Stage IV experiments, DESI and LSST, complete their surveys, there will still be much information left in the sky. This additional information will enable us to understand the physics underlying the dark universe at an even deeper level and, in case Stage IV surveys find hints for physics beyond the current Standard Model of Cosmology, to revolutionize our current view of the universe. There are many ideas for how best to supplement and aid DESI and LSST in order to access some of this remaining information and how surveys beyond Stage IV can fully exploit this regime. These ideas flow to potential projects that could start construction in the 2020's.

  14. Cosmic mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Barger, Vernon; Weiler, Thomas J.

    2018-03-01

    We argue that if ultrahigh-energy (E ≳1010GeV) cosmic rays are heavy nuclei (as indicated by existing data), then the pointing of cosmic rays to their nearest extragalactic sources is expected for 1010.6 ≲ E /GeV ≲1011. This is because for a nucleus of charge Ze and baryon number A, the bending of the cosmic ray decreases as Z / E with rising energy, so that pointing to nearby sources becomes possible in this particular energy range. In addition, the maximum energy of acceleration capability of the sources grows linearly in Z, while the energy loss per distance traveled decreases with increasing A. Each of these two points tend to favor heavy nuclei at the highest energies. The traditional bi-dimensional analyses, which simultaneously reproduce Auger data on the spectrum and nuclear composition, may not be capable of incorporating the relative importance of all these phenomena. In this paper we propose a multi-dimensional reconstruction of the individual emission spectra (in E, direction, and cross-correlation with nearby putative sources) to study the hypothesis that primaries are heavy nuclei subject to GZK photo-disintegration, and to determine the nature of the extragalactic sources. More specifically, we propose to combine information on nuclear composition and arrival direction to associate a potential clustering of events with a 3-dimensional position in the sky. Actually, both the source distance and maximum emission energy can be obtained through a multi-parameter likelihood analysis to accommodate the observed nuclear composition of each individual event in the cluster. We show that one can track the level of GZK interactions on an statistical basis by comparing the maximum energy at the source of each cluster. We also show that nucleus-emitting-sources exhibit a cepa stratis structure on Earth which could be pealed off by future space-missions, such as POEMMA. Finally, we demonstrate that metal-rich starburst galaxies are highly-plausible candidate

  15. Professional Censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Some time ago, I was invited to present a lecture on cancer and sexuality to survivors sponsored by a faith-based institution. This is not the first time I have given such a lecture, and I always enjoy interacting with survivors and their partners. Just a couple of months before, I gave a similar talk to an audience of breast cancer survivors at a beautiful conference center in the countryside, owned and operated by a faith-based organization. I talked openly with the women in the audience about vibrators and lubricants, about alternatives to intercourse, and about open communication with one's sexual partner and one's oncology care providers. The women laughed, some cried, and no one seemed offended by the images on the slides.
.

  16. Our cosmic habitat

    CERN Document Server

    Rees, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Our universe seems strangely 'biophilic,' or hospitable to life. Is this providence or coincidence? According to Martin Rees, the answer depends on the answer to another question, the one posed by Einstein's famous remark: 'What interests me most is whether God could have made the world differently.' This highly engaging book centres on the fascinating consequences of the answer being 'yes'. Rees explores the notion that our universe is just part of a vast 'multiverse,' or ensemble of universes, in which most of the other universes are lifeless. What we call the laws of nature would then be local by laws, imposed in the aftermath of our own Big Bang. In this scenario, our cosmic habitat would be a special, possibly unique universe where the prevailing laws of physics allowed life to emerge.

  17. Cosmic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez Almeida, Jorge

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic fields pervade the universe and play an important role in many astrophysical processes. However, they require specialised observational tools, and are challenging to model and understand. This volume provides a unified view of magnetic fields across astrophysical and cosmological contexts, drawing together disparate topics that are rarely covered together. Written by the lecturers of the XXV Canary Islands Winter School, it offers a self-contained introduction to cosmic magnetic fields on a range of scales. The connections between the behaviours of magnetic fields in these varying contexts are particularly emphasised, from the relatively small and close ranges of the Sun, planets and stars, to galaxies and clusters of galaxies, as well as on cosmological scales. Aimed at young researchers and graduate students, this up-to-date review uniquely brings together a subject often tackled by disconnected communities, conveying the latest advances as well as highlighting the limits of our current understandi...

  18. Cosmic ray synergies

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    In laboratories, cosmic rays have been the subject of scientific research for many years. A more recent development is their appearance in schools, as educational tools. A recent workshop at CERN, organised by ASPERA in collaboration with EPPOG and EPPCN, had the goal of bringing together ideas and initiatives with a view to setting up a future common project.   Presentation at the workshop on 15 October. In research, as in education, you can sometimes get things done more rapidly and easily by joining forces. For roughly the past decade, physicists have been taking their particle detectors to secondary schools. “The challenge now is to bring all of these existing projects together in a network,” says Arnaud Marsollier, in charge of communication for the ASPERA network and organiser of the workshop. The workshop held on Friday, 15 October was attended by representatives of major European educational projects and members of the European Particle Physics Communication Network...

  19. The Cosmic Microwave Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Aled

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a brief review of current theory and observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB. New predictions for cosmological defect theories and an overview of the inflationary theory are discussed. Recent results from various observations of the anisotropies of the microwave background are described and a summary of the proposed experiments is presented. A new analysis technique based on Bayesian statistics that can be used to reconstruct the underlying sky fluctuations is summarised. Current CMB data is used to set some preliminary constraints on the values of fundamental cosmological parameters $Omega$ and $H_circ$ using the maximum likelihood technique. In addition, secondary anisotropies due to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are described.

  20. Microphysics of cosmic plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, Andrei; Cargill, Peter; Dendy, Richard; Wit, Thierry; Raymond, John

    2014-01-01

    This title presents a review of the detailed aspects of the physical processes that underlie the observed properties, structures and dynamics of cosmic plasmas. An assessment of the status of understanding of microscale processes in all astrophysical collisionless plasmas is provided. The topics discussed include  turbulence in astrophysical and solar system plasmas as a phenomenological description of their dynamic properties on all scales; observational, theoretical and modelling aspects of collisionless magnetic reconnection; the formation and dynamics of shock waves; and a review and assessment of microprocesses, such as the hierarchy of plasma instabilities, non-local and non-diffusive transport processes and ionisation and radiation processes.  In addition, some of the lessons that have been learned from the extensive existing knowledge of laboratory plasmas as applied to astrophysical problems are also covered.   This volume is aimed at graduate students and researchers active in the areas of cosmi...

  1. Overproduction of cosmic superstrings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnaby, Neil; Berndsen, Aaron; Cline, James M.; Stoica, Horace

    2005-01-01

    We show that the naive application of the Kibble mechanism seriously underestimates the initial density of cosmic superstrings that can be formed during the annihilation of D-branes in the early universe, as in models of brane-antibrane inflation. We study the formation of defects in effective field theories of the string theory tachyon both analytically, by solving the equation of motion of the tachyon field near the core of the defect, and numerically, by evolving the tachyon field on a lattice. We find that defects generically form with correlation lengths of order M s -1 rather than H -1 . Hence, defects localized in extra dimensions may be formed at the end of inflation. This implies that brane-antibrane inflation models where inflation is driven by branes which wrap the compact manifold may have problems with overclosure by cosmological relics, such as domain walls and monopoles

  2. Cosmic Ray Antimatter

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, space-born experiments have delivered new measurements of high energy cosmic-ray (CR) antiprotons and positrons, opening new frontiers in energy reach and precision. While being a promising discovery tool for new physics or exotic astrophysical phenomena, an irreducible background of antimatter comes from CR collisions with interstellar matter in the Galaxy. Understanding this irreducible source or constraining it from first principles is an interesting challenge: a game of hide-and-seek where the objective is to identify the laws of basic particle physics among the forest of astrophysical uncertainties. I describe an attempt to obtain such understanding, combining information from a zoo of CR species including massive nuclei and relativistic radioisotopes. I show that: (i) CR antiprotons most likely come from CR-gas collisions; (ii) positron data is consistent with, and suggestive of the same astrophysical production mechanism responsible for antiprotons and dominated by proton-proton c...

  3. Cosmic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kronberg, Philipp P

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are important in the Universe and their effects contain the key to many astrophysical phenomena that are otherwise impossible to understand. This book presents an up-to-date overview of this fast-growing topic and its interconnections to plasma processes, astroparticle physics, high energy astrophysics, and cosmic evolution. The phenomenology and impact of magnetic fields are described in diverse astrophysical contexts within the Universe, from galaxies to the filaments and voids of the intergalactic medium, and out to the largest redshifts. The presentation of mathematical formulae is accessible and is designed to add insight into the broad range of topics discussed. Written for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics and related disciplines, this volume will inspire readers to devise new ways of thinking about magnetic fields in space on galaxy scales and beyond.

  4. What is cosmic radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The earth was indeed receiving ionizing radiations from the heavens. This cosmic radiation consists of particles travelling near the speed of light. It consists of two components, the first of which is permanent and of galactic origin, while the other is more sporadic, depending on the sun's activities. Natural land-based sources expose each of us to an average total dose of 2.4 mSv per year (source UNSCEAR). In addition, the human activities using ionizing radiation contribute to an average annual exposure of 1.4 mSv, originating primarily with medical activities ( radiodiagnostic and radiation therapy). Members of flights crew are subject to exposure. The total dose of cosmic radiation received is is directly proportional with the duration of exposure, and thus with the duration of the flight. Measurement taken on board aircraft during the 1990's showed that flight personnel (on long haul flights) receive an average dose of approximately the same magnitude as the one due to exposure to natural radioactivity in France. The damage caused by ionizing radiation depends on the quantity of energy released by radiation into the cells of each organ or tissue of the human body(exposure dose). For a given quantity of absorbed energy (dose expressed in Gray), the damage will vary according to the nature of the radiation and the affected organ. These effects are of two types: acute effects and deferred effects. Two measurements are essential for radiation protection: the measurements of the dose of radiation absorbed by the body and the assessment of the risk associated with the absorbed dose. Two units were thus created: the gray and the sievert. (N.C.)

  5. THE COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, James C.; Michael Shull, J.; Snow, Theodore P.; Stocke, John [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 391-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steve; Beland, Stephane; Burgh, Eric B.; Danforth, Charles; France, Kevin [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Ebbets, Dennis [Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp., 1600 Commerce Street, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Heap, Sara H. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 681, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Leitherer, Claus; Sembach, Kenneth [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey L. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States); Savage, Blair D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Siegmund, Oswald H. W. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Spencer, John; Alan Stern, S. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Welsh, Barry [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2012-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2009 May, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F{sub {lambda}} Almost-Equal-To 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} A{sup -1}, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph echelle modes) in 1%-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (2009 September-2011 June) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is nine times than sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of 2011 June. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Ly{alpha} absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the He II reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.

  6. Primary cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, H.R.

    1972-01-01

    The term cosmic radiation means the charged particle flux that reaches the earth from outside its magnetosphere with energies above the solar wind energy of a few keV. There are two sources of flux. Sporadically the sun produces such particles, generally within the energy range 1--200 MeV, and these solar cosmic rays arrive at the earth for a period ranging from hours to days. There may be a small, rather constant flux from the sun also, but the bulk of the steady flux originates outside the earth's orbit. Although some have conjectured that part of this latter flux may be accelerated in the outer portions of the solar system where the outward flowing interplanetary medium meets the interstellar medium, it is generally thought that most or all of it arises in unique systems such as supernovae, and is distributed throughout the galaxy. These galactic particles range in energy from a few MeV to at least 10 13 MeV and consist primarily of protons with significant numbers of heavier nuclei, positrons and electrons. They are supposed to fill our galaxy, or at least the disc, more or less uniformly. However, the flux with energies below a few GeV that reaches earth's orbit is modulated by the interplanetary medium so that the number at earth varies inversely with solar activity and is always somewhat below the interstellar flux. A discussion is presented of primary galactic radiation at earth, its modulation by solar activity, and its interaction with the geomagnetic field. (U.S.)

  7. The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James C.; Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steve; Ebbets, Dennis; Heap, Sara H.; Leitherer, Claus; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, Kenneth; Shull, J. Michael; a style="text-decoration: none; " href="javascript:void(0); " onClick="displayelement('author_20120013029'); toggleEditAbsImage('author_20120013029_show'); toggleEditAbsImage('author_20120013029_hide'); "> hide

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F(sub lambda) approximates 1.0 X 10(exp -14) ergs/s/cm2/Angstrom, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to STIS echelle modes) in 1-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (September 2009 - June 2011) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is 9 times that sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of June 2011. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Lya absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the HeII reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.

  8. The Dubbing of Gay-themed TV Series in Italy: Corpus-based Evidence of Manipulation and Censorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Sandrelli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The manipulation and censorship of taboo and sensitive references in AVT has attracted the interest of several scholars over the last few years, but systematic studies of the impact of such practices on different genres in different countries are still needed. The paper analyses the Italian dubbing of three gay-themed TV series, Queer as Folk, Queer as Folk (US remake, and The L Word. Gay-themed series are less mainstream on Italian TV channels than in the UK and the USA, and gayspeak as a linguistic phenomenon is not well-known to Italian audiences. Consequently, the Italian dubbed dialogues are the product of different degrees of manipulation and even censorship. The paper finds empirical evidence of such alterations in data from the DubTalk corpus and attempts a tentative evaluation of the impact of such practices on the Italian versions of the above-mentioned series.

  9. Test particle trajectories near cosmic strings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present a detailed analysis of the motion of test particle in the gravitational field of cosmic strings in different situations using the Hamilton–Jacobi (H–J) formalism. We have discussed the trajectories near static cosmic string, cosmic string in Brans–Dicke theory and cosmic string in dilaton gravity.

  10. Interaction of cosmic strings with gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, V.P.; Garfinkle, D.

    1990-01-01

    We find solutions of Einstein's equation representing a gravitational wave interacting with a cosmic-string traveling wave. The motion of test cosmic strings in the gravitational field of a cosmic-string traveling wave is also examined. A solution representing traveling waves on several parallel cosmic strings is also found

  11. Spherical Orbifolds for Cosmic Topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Harmonic analysis is a tool to infer cosmic topology from the measured astrophysical cosmic microwave background CMB radiation. For overall positive curvature, Platonic spherical manifolds are candidates for this analysis. We combine the specific point symmetry of the Platonic manifolds with their deck transformations. This analysis in topology leads from manifolds to orbifolds. We discuss the deck transformations of the orbifolds and give eigenmodes for the harmonic analysis as linear combinations of Wigner polynomials on the 3-sphere. These provide new tools for detecting cosmic topology from the CMB radiation.

  12. Self-Censorship Regulatory Structure: Can We Control Political of Hates, Violence & Sex in Children Computer & Video Games?

    OpenAIRE

    Zanuddin, Hasmah

    2008-01-01

    This article examines some of the extreme negative content available to teenagers and young children in the market. Extreme negative values such as political of hates, violence and sex in some of the children computer and video games were made possible due to several factors such as lacking in regulatory structure, week policy implementation, rampant of illegal and uncensored materials. Computer and video games have been the subject of frequent controversy and censorship, due to the depiction...

  13. ΛGR Centennial: Cosmic Web in Dark Energy Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernin, A. D.

    The basic building blocks of the Cosmic Web are groups and clusters of galaxies, super-clusters (pancakes) and filaments embedded in the universal dark energy background. The background produces antigravity, and the antigravity effect is strong in groups, clusters and superclusters. Antigravity is very weak in filaments where matter (dark matter and baryons) produces gravity dominating in the filament internal dynamics. Gravity-antigravity interplay on the large scales is a grandiose phenomenon predicted by ΛGR theory and seen in modern observations of the Cosmic Web.

  14. Experimental aspects of cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Sommers, P

    2006-01-01

    High-energy cosmic rays are detected as extensive air showers, and properties of the primary cosmic rays are deduced from measurements of those air showers. The physics of air showers is reviewed here in order to explain how the measurement techniques work. The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory (near this school in Malargue) is used to illustrate the experimental methods. The Auger Observatory combines a surface array of water Cherenkov detectors with atmospheric uorescence detectors. This `hybrid' measurement technique provides high resolution and measurement cross-checks. In conjunction with a complementary site in the northern hemisphere, the Auger Observatory expects to map the arrival directions over the full sky as well as measuring the cosmic-ray energy spectrum and statistical properties of the mass distribution.

  15. Cosmic rays, clouds, and climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carslaw, K S; Harrison, R G; Kirkby, J

    2002-11-29

    It has been proposed that Earth's climate could be affected by changes in cloudiness caused by variations in the intensity of galactic cosmic rays in the atmosphere. This proposal stems from an observed correlation between cosmic ray intensity and Earth's average cloud cover over the course of one solar cycle. Some scientists question the reliability of the observations, whereas others, who accept them as reliable, suggest that the correlation may be caused by other physical phenomena with decadal periods or by a response to volcanic activity or El Niño. Nevertheless, the observation has raised the intriguing possibility that a cosmic ray-cloud interaction may help explain how a relatively small change in solar output can produce much larger changes in Earth's climate. Physical mechanisms have been proposed to explain how cosmic rays could affect clouds, but they need to be investigated further if the observation is to become more than just another correlation among geophysical variables.

  16. Cosmic microwave background, where next?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    Ground-based, balloon-borne and space-based experiments will observe the Cosmic Microwave Background in greater details to address open questions about the origin and the evolution of the Universe. In particular, detailed observations the polarization pattern of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation have the potential to directly probe physics at the GUT scale and illuminate aspects of the physics of the very early Universe.

  17. Cosmic rays and Earth's climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    During the last solar cycle the Earth's cloud cover underwent a modulation in phase with the cosmic ray flux. Assuming that there is a causal relationship between the two, it is expected and found that the Earth's temperature follows more closely decade variations in cosmic ray flux than other...... solar activity parameters. If the relationship is real the state of the Heliosphere affects the Earth's climate....

  18. Experimental Investigation of Aerosols Produced by Cosmic Rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Marsh, N.D.

    mechanism linking cosmic rays to clouds and climate is currently speculative, there have been various suggestions of the role atmospheric ions may play; these involve any one of a number of processes from the nucleation of aerosols up to the collection processes of cloud droplets.We have chosen to start our......Satellite observations have shown that the Earth’s cloud cover is strongly correlated with the galactic cosmic ray flux. While this correlation is indicative of a possible physical connection, there is currently no confirmation that a physical mechanism exists. We are therefore setting up...... an experiment in order to investigate the underlying microphysical processes. The results of this experiment will help to understand whether ionisation from cosmic rays, and by implication the related processes in the universe, has a direct influence on Earth’s atmosphere and climate. Since any physical...

  19. PAMELA mission: heralding a new era in cosmic ray physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricciarini S. B.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available After seven years of data taking in space, the experiment PAMELA is showing very interesting features in cosmic rays, namely in the fluxes of protons, helium, electrons, that might change our basic vision of the mechanisms of production, acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays in the galaxy. In addition, PAMELA measurements of cosmic antiproton and positron fluxes are setting strong constraints to the nature of Dark Matter. The continuous particle detection is allowing a constant monitoring of the solar activity and detailed study of the solar modulation for a long period, giving important improvements to the comprehension of the heliosphere mechanisms. PAMELA is also measuring the radiation environment around the Earth, and has recently discovered an antiproton radiation belt.

  20. The Cosmic Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longair, Malcolm S.

    2013-04-01

    Part I. Stars and Stellar Evolution up to the Second World War: 1. The legacy of the nineteenth century; 2. The classification of stellar spectra; 3. Stellar structure and evolution; 4. The end points of stellar evolution; Part II. The Large-Scale Structure of the Universe, 1900-1939: 5. The Galaxy and the nature of spiral nebulae; 6. The origins of astrophysical cosmology; Part III. The Opening up of the Electromagnetic Spectrum: 7. The opening up of the electromagnetic spectrum and the new astronomies; Part IV. The Astrophysics of Stars and Galaxies since 1945: 8. Stars and stellar evolution; 9. The physics of the interstellar medium; 10. The physics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies; 11. High-energy astrophysics; Part V. Astrophysical Cosmology since 1945: 12. Astrophysical cosmology; 13. The determination of cosmological parameters; 14. The evolution of galaxies and active galaxies with cosmic epoch; 15. The origin of galaxies and the large-scale structure of the Universe; 16. The very early Universe; References; Name index; Object index; Subject index.

  1. Nonthermal cosmic neutrino background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Ratz, Michael; Trautner, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We point out that, for Dirac neutrinos, in addition to the standard thermal cosmic neutrino background (C ν B ), there could also exist a nonthermal neutrino background with comparable number density. As the right-handed components are essentially decoupled from the thermal bath of standard model particles, relic neutrinos with a nonthermal distribution may exist until today. The relic density of the nonthermal (nt) background can be constrained by the usual observational bounds on the effective number of massless degrees of freedom Neff and can be as large as nν nt≲0.5 nγ. In particular, Neff can be larger than 3.046 in the absence of any exotic states. Nonthermal relic neutrinos constitute an irreducible contribution to the detection of the C ν B and, hence, may be discovered by future experiments such as PTOLEMY. We also present a scenario of chaotic inflation in which a nonthermal background can naturally be generated by inflationary preheating. The nonthermal relic neutrinos, thus, may constitute a novel window into the very early Universe.

  2. Illustrated cosmic monopole

    CERN Document Server

    Seagrave, Wyken

    2015-01-01

    Truly bizarre, utterly unique I've never read a novel quite like this before. The author takes you on an exciting adventure full of unforgettable and vivid imagery. Solidly written with each character's personality shining through. If you find physics fascinating you will not be disappointed by the author's keen intellect and clear understanding of this most challenging (for me anyway) scientific subject. This is not a novel I will forget anytime soon, I would highly recommend it. Andrewly Very imaginative tale Anybody interested in a very imaginative and engrossing sci fi story needs to check this one out. I have been reading sci fi for decades and this story has elements that surprise me which is very unusual considering the number of novels and stories I have over the years. ric freeman Summary of the story The cosmic monopole has been wandering the Universe since it was created in the Big Bang. Its existence is fundamental to the way the Universe works. It is finally trapped by the powerful magnetic f...

  3. Nearest Cosmic Mirage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Discovery of quadruply lensed quasar with Einstein ring Summary Using the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla (Chile), an international team of astronomers [1] has discovered a complex cosmic mirage in the southern constellation Crater (The Cup). This "gravitational lens" system consists of (at least) four images of the same quasar as well as a ring-shaped image of the galaxy in which the quasar resides - known as an "Einstein ring". The more nearby lensing galaxy that causes this intriguing optical illusion is also well visible. The team obtained spectra of these objects with the new EMMI camera mounted on the ESO 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT), also at the La Silla observatory. They find that the lensed quasar [2] is located at a distance of 6,300 million light-years (its "redshift" is z = 0.66 [3]) while the lensing elliptical galaxy is rougly halfway between the quasar and us, at a distance of 3,500 million light-years (z = 0.3). The system has been designated RXS J1131-1231 - it is the closest gravitationally lensed quasar discovered so far . PR Photo 20a/03 : Image of the gravitational lens system RXS J1131-1231 (ESO 3.6m Telescope). PR Photo 20b/03 : Spectra of two lensed images of the source quasar and the lensing galaxy. Cosmic mirages The physical principle behind a "gravitational lens" (also known as a "cosmic mirage") has been known since 1916 as a consequence of Albert Einstein's Theory of General Relativity . The gravitational field of a massive object curves the local geometry of the Universe, so light rays passing close to the object are bent (like a "straight line" on the surface of the Earth is necessarily curved because of the curvature of the Earth's surface). This effect was first observed by astronomers in 1919 during a total solar eclipse. Accurate positional measurements of stars seen in the dark sky near the eclipsed Sun indicated an apparent displacement in the direction opposite to the Sun, about as much as predicted by Einstein

  4. Cosmic Dawn Intensity Mapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooray, Asantha

    2018-01-01

    Cosmic Dawn Intensity Mapper (CDIM) is a 1.0m-class infrared telescope capable of three-dimensional spectro-imaging observations over the wavelength range of 0.75 to 7.5 microns, at a spectral resolving power at or better than 300. This will be achieved with linear variablefilters (LVFs) and a large field-of-view (FoV). The survey strategy using spacecraft operations following a shift and stare mode will result in more than 1300 independent narrow-band spectral images of the sky at a given location. Currently prioritized science programs, taking over three-years of a five-year mission, will be accomplished with a two-tiered wedding-cake survey with the shallowest spanning close to 300 sq. degrees and the deepest tier of about 25 sq. degrees.The remaining two-years could be used for additional survey programs (the wide tier can be expanded to 1000 sq. degrees) or for use by the astronomical community through a General Observing (GO) campaign. CDIM survey data will allow us to (i) establish the initial mass function of stars in galaxies present during reionization, (ii) definitively address AGN/quasar contribution to the reionization photon budget; (iii) establish the environmental dependence of star-formation during reionization through clustering and other environmental measurements; (iv) establish the metal abundance of first-light galaxies during reionization over two decades of stellar mass; (v) measure 3D intensity fluctuations during reionization in both Ly-alpha and H-alpha; and (vi) combine intensity fluctuations with 21-cm data to establish the topology of reionization bubbles.

  5. Copernicus's Publication Strategy in the Contexts of Imperial and Papal Censorship and of Warmian Diplomatic Precedents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Geoffrey

    2016-06-01

    Argument The main thesis of this paper is that Copernicus's avoidance of all admission that scripture was contravened in De revolutionibus and his composition of its new Preface in 1542, as well as the non-publication of Rheticus's Treatise on Holy Scripture and the Motion of the Earth, were influenced by the early information they received on the failure of the 1541 Regensburg Protestant-Catholic colloquy, among the major consequences of which were significant increases in the problems concerning publishing works which contravened scripture. This is supported by examining Rheticus's first letter to Paul Eber in conjunction with the documents on the Regensburg colloquy and on censorship in Nuremberg, as well as with the existing literature on Copernicus and his context. In view of the main thesis, Copernicus's apparent dedication of the work to the Pope merits additional explanation, and the second thesis is that components of explanations for several aspects of those parts of the Preface that relate to the Papacy and to theologians can be provided via comparisons with previous diplomacy between Warmia and the Papacy which occurred or was being referred to during Copernicus's time. This is supported by examining these parts of the Preface in the light of a selection of the relevant documents.

  6. Between censorship and business: the industry of narcocorrido and the new Mexican regional music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igael González Sánchez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This text offers a study about different positions and media reactions around the growing popularity of drug traffic and violence music. The so called narcocorrido, with roots in the musical cultures of the border region between Mexico and the United States, becomes a evidence of the violence associated with criminal activities. But, taking advantage of its contents with lucrative opportunity, get inserted into the transnational record industry regardless of censorship and accusations of conservative moral and other ethical discourses. Findings presented here precedes examination of newspaper articles and interviews with promoters and musicians of regional music bands. Retaking the postulates of Howard S. Becker, the musical production of narcocorrido will be characterized as an Art world, an activity subject to conventions into logical marketing and distribution spaces where its use and enjoyment passes over any prohibition based in social control mechanisms. The authorities however much they try, they face a problem cannot be resolved in any way: narcocorridos are the visible and glamorous part of a more complex political, social and transnational economic dynamics. 

  7. ERROR: ESSAY NOT FOUND COMPARING CENSORSHIP IN CHINA AND SOUTH KOREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quynh-Dan Nguyen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing use of Internet all over the world has made world’s communication borderless. While such condition might benefited most people, however, it invites greater risks of misinformation and opportunities for detrimental self-expression. State’s control has various degree of manners in controlling a massive flow of information. This paper will examine the current methods of internet control utilized by the governments of China and Korea, and analyze the extent to which these respective regimes impinge on the human right to freedom of opinion and expression. It begins with an overview on the international standards for freedom of expression, and the limited permissible restrictions upon the right. Furthermore, the examination of the existing legislation and regimes implemented in China and Korea, respectively, and a comparison of features such as legal grounds and practical effectiveness will be undertaken. Finally, it will discuss whether the censorship regimes implemented in China and Korea constitute legitimate restrictions upon, or impermissibly violate, the right to freedom of expression.

  8. The Difficulty of Saying "I": Translation and Censorship of Christa Wolf's Der geteilte Himmel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina von Ankum

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available The end of the GDR in 1990 triggered a vivid literary debate in Germany which focused on the interrelationship of politics, literature, and criticism. In this context, the work of Christa Wolf was attacked as primary example of self-censorship and collaboration. In my article, I argue that Wolf became the target of literary criticism largely because of her attempt to express female subjectivity in her texts. In my contrastive analysis of Der geteilte Himmel (1963 and its English translation (1965, I read Wolf's text as an initial attempt at a "socialist modernism." The continued value of this and subsequent works by Wolf lies in the accuracy and complexity with which she probes human behavior under adverse historical circumstances. Even a text like Der geteilte Himmel , which on a surface level reads merely like a political vote for socialism in the GDR as well as the writer's support for the division of Germany, eludes the binary opposition of East/West, them/us that critics have used to categorize Wolf's work. The hybrid nature of the text serves as example of Wolf's sincerity as a writer, evidence of her personal integrity, as well as her relentless commitment to a social alternative.

  9. Cosmic logic: a computational model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanchurin, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    We initiate a formal study of logical inferences in context of the measure problem in cosmology or what we call cosmic logic. We describe a simple computational model of cosmic logic suitable for analysis of, for example, discretized cosmological systems. The construction is based on a particular model of computation, developed by Alan Turing, with cosmic observers (CO), cosmic measures (CM) and cosmic symmetries (CS) described by Turing machines. CO machines always start with a blank tape and CM machines take CO's Turing number (also known as description number or Gödel number) as input and output the corresponding probability. Similarly, CS machines take CO's Turing number as input, but output either one if the CO machines are in the same equivalence class or zero otherwise. We argue that CS machines are more fundamental than CM machines and, thus, should be used as building blocks in constructing CM machines. We prove the non-computability of a CS machine which discriminates between two classes of CO machines: mortal that halts in finite time and immortal that runs forever. In context of eternal inflation this result implies that it is impossible to construct CM machines to compute probabilities on the set of all CO machines using cut-off prescriptions. The cut-off measures can still be used if the set is reduced to include only machines which halt after a finite and predetermined number of steps

  10. Revealing the Cosmic Web-dependent Halo Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohu; Zhang, Youcai; Lu, Tianhuan; Wang, Huiyuan; Shi, Feng; Tweed, Dylan; Li, Shijie; Luo, Wentao; Lu, Yi; Yang, Lei

    2017-10-01

    Halo bias is the one of the key ingredients of the halo models. It was shown at a given redshift to be only dependent, to the first order, on the halo mass. In this study, four types of cosmic web environments—clusters, filaments, sheets, and voids—are defined within a state-of-the-art high-resolution N-body simulation. Within these environments, we use both halo-dark matter cross correlation and halo-halo autocorrelation functions to probe the clustering properties of halos. The nature of the halo bias differs strongly between the four different cosmic web environments described here. With respect to the overall population, halos in clusters have significantly lower biases in the {10}11.0˜ {10}13.5 {h}-1 {M}⊙ mass range. In other environments, however, halos show extremely enhanced biases up to a factor 10 in voids for halos of mass ˜ {10}12.0 {h}-1 {M}⊙ . Such a strong cosmic web environment dependence in the halo bias may play an important role in future cosmological and galaxy formation studies. Within this cosmic web framework, the age dependency of halo bias is found to be only significant in clusters and filaments for relatively small halos ≲ {10}12.5 {h}-1 {M}⊙ .

  11. Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass

    CERN Multimedia

    Baylon cardiel, J L; Wallace, K C; Anderson, T B; Copley, M

    The cosmic-ray energetics and mass (CREAM) investigation is designed to measure cosmic-ray composition to the supernova energy scale of 10$^{15}$ eV in a series of ultra long duration balloon (ULDB) flights. The first flight is planned to be launched from Antarctica in December 2004. The goal is to observe cosmic-ray spectral features and/or abundance changes that might signify a limit to supernova acceleration. The particle ($\\{Z}$) measurements will be made with a timing-based charge detector and a pixelated silicon charge detector to minimize the effect of backscatter from the calorimeter. The particle energy measurements will be made with a transition radiation detector (TRD) for $\\{Z}$ > 3 and a sampling tungsten/scintillator calorimeter for $\\{Z}$ $\\geq$1 particles, allowing inflight cross calibration of the two detectors. The status of the payload construction and flight preparation are reported in this paper.

  12. Cosmic rays and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, Thomas K; Resconi, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Fully updated for the second edition, this book introduces the growing and dynamic field of particle astrophysics. It provides an overview of high-energy nuclei, photons and neutrinos, including their origins, their propagation in the cosmos, their detection on Earth and their relation to each other. Coverage is expanded to include new content on high energy physics, the propagation of protons and nuclei in cosmic background radiation, neutrino astronomy, high-energy and ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, sources and acceleration mechanisms, and atmospheric muons and neutrinos. Readers are able to master the fundamentals of particle astrophysics within the context of the most recent developments in the field. This book will benefit graduate students and established researchers alike, equipping them with the knowledge and tools needed to design and interpret their own experiments and, ultimately, to address a number of questions concerning the nature and origins of cosmic particles that have arisen in recent resea...

  13. A Study of the Link between Cosmic Rays and Clouds with a Cloud Chamber at the CERN PS

    CERN Multimedia

    Laakso, L K; Lehtipalo, K; Miettinen, P K; Duarte branco da silva santos, F; Stojkov, Y; Jud, W; Wurm, F; Pinterich, T; Dommen, J; Curtius, J; Kreissl, F C; Minginette, P; Azeredo lima, J M; Kulmala, M T; Petaja, T T; Volkamer, R M; Schafer, M; Rodrigues tome, A; Viisanen, Y A; Onnela, A T O; Kristic, R; Ehrhart, S K; Amorim, A J; Maksumov, O; Kupc, A; Sitals, R P; Dunne, E M; Riipinen, I A; Downard, A J; Virtanen, A; Tsagkogeorgas, G; Schuchmann, S; Kvashnin, A; Hansel, A; Vrtala, A; Schallhart, S; Yan, C; Stratmann, F; Pinto mogo, S I; Makhmutov, V; Riccobono, F; Weingartner, E P; Kurten, C A; Rondo, L; Ruuskanen, T M; Finkenzeller, H F; Laaksonen, A J; De menezes, L; Hauser, D; Kajos, M K; Schmitt, T M; Mathot, S; Wasem, A; Guida, R; Metzger, A E; Baltensperger, U; Kirkby, J; Duplissy, J; Franchin, A; Flagan, R C; Wex, H D

    2002-01-01

    Three recent independent observations suggest that galactic cosmic rays may exert a significant influence on the climate. Firstly, satellite data suggest a positive correlation between variations of cosmic ray intensity and the fraction of Earth covered by low clouds. Secondly, palaeoclimatic data provide extensive evidence for an association between cosmic ray intensity and climate over the last 10 kyr and at earlier times. Finally, the presence of ion-induced nucleation of new aerosol in the atmosphere is supported by recent observations. If cosmic rays do indeed enhance aerosol production and low cloud formation, this could exert a strong cooling influence on the radiative energy balance of Earth. Physical mechanisms by which cosmic rays may affect aerosol and clouds have been proposed and modelled, but definitive experiments are lacking. The aim of CLOUD is to investigate the nature and significance of cosmic ray-aerosol-cloud mechanisms under controlled laboratory conditions using the T11 beam at the CER...

  14. The Cosmic Shoreline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin J.; Catling, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    in 2004 when there were just two transiting exoplanets to consider. The trend was well-defined by late 2007. Figure 1 shows how matters stood in Dec 2012 with approx.240 exoplanets. The figure shows that the boundary between planets with and without active volatiles - the cosmic shoreline, as it were - is both well-defined and follows a power law.

  15. BOOK REVIEW: The Cosmic Microwave Background The Cosmic Microwave Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Peter

    2009-08-01

    With the successful launch of the European Space Agency's Planck satellite earlier this year the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is once again the centre of attention for cosmologists around the globe. Since its accidental discovery in 1964 by Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, this relic of the Big Bang has been subjected to intense scrutiny by generation after generation of experiments and has gradually yielded up answers to the deepest questions about the origin of our Universe. Most recently, the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) has made a full-sky analysis of the pattern of temperature and polarization variations that helped establish a new standard cosmological model, confirmed the existence of dark matter and dark energy, and provided strong evidence that there was an epoch of primordial inflation. Ruth Durrer's book reflects the importance of the CMB for future developments in this field. Aimed at graduate students and established researchers, it consists of a basic introduction to cosmology and the theory of primordial perturbations followed by a detailed explanation of how these manifest themselves as measurable variations in the present-day radiation field. It then focuses on the statistical methods needed to obtain accurate estimates of the parameters of the standard cosmological model, and finishes with a discussion of the effect of gravitational lensing on the CMB and on the evolution of its spectrum. The book apparently grew out of various lecture notes on CMB anisotropies for graduate courses given by the author. Its level and scope are well matched to the needs of such an audience and the presentation is clear and well-organized. I am sure that this book will be a useful reference for more senior scientists too. If I have a criticism, it is not about what is in the book but what is omitted. In my view, one of the most exciting possibilities for future CMB missions, including Planck, is the possibility that they might discover physics

  16. Cosmic rays and stochastic magnetic reconnection in the heliotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Desiati

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Galactic cosmic rays are believed to be generated by diffusive shock acceleration processes in Supernova Remnants, and the arrival direction is likely determined by the distribution of their sources throughout the Galaxy, in particular by the nearest and youngest ones. Transport to Earth through the interstellar medium is expected to affect the cosmic ray properties as well. However, the observed anisotropy of TeV cosmic rays and its energy dependence cannot be explained with diffusion models of particle propagation in the Galaxy. Within a distance of a few parsec, diffusion regime is not valid and particles with energy below about 100 TeV must be influenced by the heliosphere and its elongated tail. The observation of a highly significant localized excess region of cosmic rays from the apparent direction of the downstream interstellar flow at 1–10 TeV energies might provide the first experimental evidence that the heliotail can affect the transport of energetic particles. In particular, TeV cosmic rays propagating through the heliotail interact with the 100–300 AU wide magnetic field polarity domains generated by the 11 yr cycles. Since the strength of non-linear convective processes is expected to be larger than viscous damping, the plasma in the heliotail is turbulent. Where magnetic field domains converge on each other due to solar wind gradient, stochastic magnetic reconnection likely occurs. Such processes may be efficient enough to re-accelerate a fraction of TeV particles as long as scattering processes are not strong. Therefore, the fractional excess of TeV cosmic rays from the narrow region toward the heliotail direction traces sightlines with the lowest smearing scattering effects, that can also explain the observation of a harder than average energy spectrum.

  17. Cosmic Humanity: Utopia, Realities, Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Krichevsky

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The philosophical foundations of the theory and practice of the creation of cosmic humanity as a process of the evolution of human civilization, the emergence into space, with the prospect of resettlement outside the Earth are considered. There is a connection between myths, fantasies, ideas, concepts and projects aimed at the exploration of outer space, the creation of cosmic humanity. A new and voluminous definition of cosmic humanity in the evolutionary paradigm is given. Cosmic humanity is (essence and 4 stages of evolution: 1. Humanity living on Earth, sensing, knowing, understanding its cosmic origin, relationship with the cosmos and cosmic destiny. 2. Humanity living on Earth, leading aerospace activity for the purposes of exploration and use of aerospace space (Heaven, Space for survival and development. 3. Humanity living on Earth and outside the Earth — in the solar system, preserving the Earth and mastering the Cosmos for survival and development. 4. Humanity, settled and living in the Cosmos. Now humanity is in the process of transition from the second to the third stage. In the process of this evolution, a complex transformation of man and society takes place. The problem-semantic field of cosmic humanity is described and its general model is presented. The meta-goal-setting is the justification of cosmic humanity with the application of the anthropic principle and its “active” super (post anthropic supplement: “Cosmic humanity has an evolutionary purpose to actively manage evolution: change man, humanity and the universe.” The evolution of the “cosmic dream”, goals and technologies of space activities is formalized in the form of a conceptual model. Challenges and negative trends are considered in connection with the crisis of space activity, criticism and attempts to limit the flights of people into space. The prototype of cosmic humanity, its basis and acting model is the cosmonauts’ community. The main

  18. The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Bock, James; Battle, John; Cooray, Asantha; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Keating, Brian; Lange, Andrew; Lee, Dae-Hea; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Pak, Soojong; Renbarger, Tom; Sullivan, Ian; Tsumura, Kohji; Wada, Takehiko; Watabe, Toyoki

    2005-01-01

    We are developing a rocket-borne instrument (the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment, or CIBER) to search for signatures of primordial galaxy formation in the cosmic near-infrared extra-galactic background. CIBER consists of a wide-field two-color camera, a low-resolution absolute spectrometer, and a high-resolution narrow-band imaging spectrometer. The cameras will search for spatial fluctuations in the background on angular scales from 7 arcseconds to 2 degrees over a range of angular sca...

  19. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Sloan, T.; Wolfendale, A W

    2007-01-01

    It has been claimed by others that observed temporal correlations of terrestrial cloud cover with `the cosmic ray intensity' are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim to look for evidence to corroborate it. So far we have not found any and so our tentative conclusions are to doubt it. Such correlations as appear are more likely to be due to the small variatio...

  20. Evolution of cosmic string networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, A.; Turok, N.; Princeton Univ., NJ

    1989-06-01

    We summarize our new results on cosmic strings. These results include: the application of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics to cosmic string evolution, a simple ''one scale'' model for the long strings which has a great deal of predictive power, results from large scale numerical simulations, and a discussion of the observational consequences of our results. An upper bond on Gμ of approximately 10 -7 emerges from the millisecond pulsar gravity wave bound. We discuss how numerical uncertainties affect this. Any changes which weaken the bound would probably also give the long strings the dominant role in producing observational consequences. 22 refs

  1. Cosmic string in gravity's rainbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Davood; Upadhyay, Sudhaker; Myrzakulov, Yerlan; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we study the various cylindrical solutions (cosmic strings) in gravity's rainbow scenario. In particular, we calculate the gravitational field equations corresponding to energy-dependent background. Further, we discuss the possible Kasner, quasi-Kasner and non-Kasner exact solutions of the field equations. In this framework, we find that quasi-Kasner solutions cannot be realized in gravity's rainbow. Assuming only time-dependent metric functions, we also analyse the time-dependent vacuum cosmic strings in gravity's rainbow, which are completely different than the other GR solutions.

  2. Dust in cosmic plasma environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendis, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    Cosmic dust is invariably immersed in a plasma and a radiative environment. Consequently, it is charged to some electrostatic potential which depends on the properties of the environment as well as the nature of the dust. This charging affects the physical and dynamical properties of the dust. In this paper the basic aspects of this dust-plasma interaction in several cosmic environments - including planetary magnetospheres, the heliosphere and the interstellar medium - are discussed. The physical and dynamical consequences of the interaction, as well as the pertinent observational evidence, are reviewed. Finally, the importance of the surface charge during the condensation process in plasma environments is stressed. (Auth.)

  3. Closing CMS to hunt cosmic rays

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2006-01-01

    Every second the Earth is bombarded by billions of cosmic rays and occasionally one of these cosmic particles will collide with the Earth's atmosphere generating a shower of particles known as an 'air shower'. This is similiar to the collisions and subsequent particle showers observed in accelerators such as the LHC. Here the CMS detector is closed so that systems can be tested using muon cosmic rays in the 'Cosmic Challenge'.

  4. Chandra Discovers Cosmic Cannonball

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    One of the fastest moving stars ever seen has been discovered with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This cosmic cannonball is challenging theories to explain its blistering speed. Astronomers used Chandra to observe a neutron star, known as RX J0822-4300, over a period of about five years. During that span, three Chandra observations clearly show the neutron star moving away from the center of the Puppis A supernova remnant. This remnant is the stellar debris field created during the same explosion in which the neutron star was created about 3700 years ago. Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A By combining how far it has moved across the sky with its distance from Earth, astronomers determined the neutron star is moving at over 3 million miles per hour. At this rate, RX J0822-4300 is destined to escape from the Milky Way after millions of years, even though it has only traveled about 20 light years so far. "This star is moving at 3 million miles an hour, but it's so far away that the apparent motion we see in five years is less than the height of the numerals in the date on a penny, seen from the length of a football field," said Frank Winkler of Middlebury College in Vermont. "It's remarkable, and a real testament to the power of Chandra, that such a tiny motion can be measured." Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A "Just after it was born, this neutron star got a one-way ticket out of the Galaxy," said co-author Robert Petre of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "Astronomers have seen other stars being flung out of the Milky Way, but few as fast as this." So-called hypervelocity stars have been previously discovered shooting out of the Milky Way with speeds around one million miles per hour. One key difference between RX J0822-4300 and these other reported galactic escapees is the source of their speed. The hypervelocity stars are

  5. Voids and the Cosmic Web: cosmic depression & spatial complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Weygaert, Rien; Shandarin, S.; Saar, E.; Einasto, J.

    2016-01-01

    Voids form a prominent aspect of the Megaparsec distribution of galaxies and matter. Not only do theyrepresent a key constituent of the Cosmic Web, they also are one of the cleanest probesand measures of global cosmological parameters. The shape and evolution of voids are highly sensitive tothe

  6. The Holy Office Against Fascism: Book Censorship and the Political Independence of the Church (1928–1931

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Brera

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies into the activity of the Congregation of the Index and of the Holy Office have examined extensively the history of Vatican’s practices of book censorship. While up until the sixteenth century the Church imposed substantial modifications to literary texts, mainly in order to moralise them, in the seventeenth and eighteenth century it used book censorship to preserve ecclesiastical doctrine and its own power. In the nineteenth century the Roman Inquisition aimed to discredit noxious literature – and the dangerous ideas it contained – through its inclusion in the Index of Prohibited Books. In the twentieth century, when the Church’s secular power was fading, the Holy Office reacted against modernism thus intensifying its campaign against pernicious literature, seen as the main medium through which modernist ideas could infiltrate public opinion. During the papacy of Pius XI, in particular, the policies of the Holy Office mainly aimed to support the interventionism of the Holy See and its attempts to ‘catholicise’ public opinion and society. The Italian case renders a clear picture of a transformed Roman Inquisition: analysing the proceedings against Gabriele d’Annunzio (Opera omnia, 1928 and Mario Missiroli (Date a Cesare, 1929 this paper will demonstrate how the Roman Index and literary censorship stood out as the core of the Church’s relentless attempt to forge a ‘catholicised’ society between the two wars and to regain – through the forbiddance of authors and books closely linked to fascism – the political and social influence that Mussolini threatened to take-over before and in the aftermath of the Concordate of 1929.

  7. The Spine of the Cosmic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Platen, Erwin; Weygaert, Rien van de; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2008-01-01

    We present a new concept, the Spine of the Cosmic Web, for the topological analysis of the Cosmic Web and the identification of its filaments and walls. Based on the watershed segmentation of the cosmic density field, the method invokes the local properties of the regions adjacent to the critical

  8. A Demonstration Device for Cosmic Rays Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Salvatore

    2018-01-01

    We describe a hands-on accurate demonstrator for cosmic rays realized by six high school students. The main aim is to show the relevance and the functioning of the principal parts of a cosmic ray telescope (muon detector), with the help of two large sized wooden artefacts. The first one points out how cosmic rays can be tracked in a muon…

  9. Cosmic curvature tested directly from observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denissenya, Mikhail; Linder, Eric V.; Shafieloo, Arman

    2018-03-01

    Cosmic spatial curvature is a fundamental geometric quantity of the Universe. We investigate a model independent, geometric approach to measure spatial curvature directly from observations, without any derivatives of data. This employs strong lensing time delays and supernova distance measurements to measure the curvature itself, rather than just testing consistency with flatness. We define two curvature estimators, with differing error propagation characteristics, that can crosscheck each other, and also show how they can be used to map the curvature in redshift slices, to test constancy of curvature as required by the Robertson-Walker metric. Simulating realizations of redshift distributions and distance measurements of lenses and sources, we estimate uncertainties on the curvature enabled by next generation measurements. The results indicate that the model independent methods, using only geometry without assuming forms for the energy density constituents, can determine the curvature at the ~6×10‑3 level.

  10. Pairing in the cosmic neutrino background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, V.; Paredes, R.

    1981-07-01

    We extend the discussion of the possible superfluidity of the cosmic background of neutrinos beyond the arguments based on the gap equation, originally given by Ginzburg and Zharkov. We show how to develop a simple Ginzburg-Landau liquid model, in analogy with superconductivity. We use it to show how an analysis of the energy spectrum of the universe can be formulated to include general relativistic effects on the superfluid neutrinos. Finally, in view of the Hawking and Collins careful discussion on the rotation and distortion of a spatially homogeneous and isotropic universe, we discuss the vortex dynamics that might be generated on the superfluid by rotations (allowed by the almost isotropy of the microwave background of photons) of up to 2 x 10 -14 second of arc/century, but conclude that rotations of this order of magnitude would be sufficiently strong to deter the existence of the superfluid state. (author)

  11. Cosmology with the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero-Romero, J. E.

    2017-07-01

    This talk summarizes different algorithms that can be used to trace the cosmic web both in simulations and observations. We present different applications in galaxy formation and cosmology. To finalize, we show how the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) could be a good place to apply these techniques.

  12. Davis Meeting on Cosmic Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Kaloper, N; Knox, L; Cosmic Inflation

    2003-01-01

    The Davis Meeting on Cosmic Inflation marked an exciting milestone on the road to precision cosmology. This is the index page for the proceedings of the conference. Individual proceedings contributions, when they appear on this archive, are linked from this page.

  13. Meteors, meteorites and cosmic dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedinets, V.N.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of meteorite origin and meteorite composition is discussed. Nowadays, most scientists suppose that the giant Oort cloud consisting of ice comet nuclei is the sourse of the meteor matter. A principle unity of the matter of meteorites falling to the Earth and cosmic dust is noted as well as that of meteorite bodies evaporating in the atmosphere and bearing meteors and bodies

  14. Art and the Cosmic Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Whitney H.; Aiello, Monica Petty; Macdonald, Reeves; Asplund, Shari

    2014-01-01

    The interdisciplinary unit described in this article utilizes "Art and the Cosmic Connection," a free program conceived of by artists Monica and Tyler Aiello and developed by the artists, scientists, and educators through NASA's Discovery and New Frontiers Programs, to inspire learners to explore mysterious worlds in our solar…

  15. Evolution of the cosmic web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cautun, Marius; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Frenk, Carlos S.

    The cosmic web is the largest scale manifestation of the anisotropic gravitational collapse of matter. It represents the transitional stage between linear and non-linear structures and contains easily accessible information about the early phases of structure formation processes. Here we investigate

  16. Cosmic rays intensity and atmosphere humidity at near earth surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskomov, V. V.; Sedov, A. N.; Saduyev, N. O.; Kalikulov, O. A.; Naurzbayeva, A. Zh; Alimgazinova, N. Sh; Kenzhina, I. E.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental studies of estimation the mutual influence of humidity and flux of cosmic rays in first approximation were carried out. Normalized cross-correlation function of time series of neutron monitors count rate and level of relative atmosphere humidity near cosmic rays registration point is studied. Corrected and uncorrected on pressure minute and hour data of 6NM64 neutron monitor count rate were used for the study. Neutron monitor is located in Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, at an altitude of 850 m above sea level. Also, data from NM64 neutron monitor of Tien Shan mountain research station of Institute of Ionosphere, located at an altitude of 3340 m above sea level were used. Uncorrected on pressure cosmic rays intensity better reflects the changes in relative atmosphere humidity. Average and sometimes strong relationship is often observed by time changes of atmosphere humidity near the point of cosmic rays detection and their intensity: the value of normalized cross-correlation function of respective signals, even in case of their long duration and a large number of data (eg, for minute changes at intervals of up to several months) covers 0.5 - 0.75 range, sometimes falling to ∼⃒ 0.4.

  17. Films that Pervert or Lift: Practices and Discourses of Film Censorship. The Case of Cali, Colombia, 1945-1955

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Fernanda Arias Osorio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Through various documentary sources, especially newspaper Relator, this article considers film-related practices and discourses between 1945 and 1955 in Cali (Colombia. The constitution and transformation of the censorship committees, the types of issues associated to them, and their relations to the reconfiguration of age groups, social classes and genders are analyzed here. The undermining of the practical and symbolic power of traditional institutions and the emergence of new ones created struggles among different social groups that, in symbolic and factual ways, tried to readjust to the new political and cultural circumstances. As a modern and democratic means of expression, which rearranged the ways of citizens live and depict themselves in public arenas, cinema symbolized both the desires and fears that these transformations created in the ways different social groups looked at themselves and others. In this context, censorship was a particular arena involving the tensions in the ways a peripheral city tried to face the modernity that cinema represented.

  18. Regulating cinematic stories about reproduction: pregnancy, childbirth, abortion and movie censorship in the US, 1930-1958.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, David A

    2017-09-01

    In the mid-twentieth century film studios sent their screenplays to Hollywood's official censorship body, the Production Code Administration (PCA), and to the Catholic Church's Legion of Decency for approval and recommendations for revision. This article examines the negotiations between filmmakers and censorship groups in order to show the stories that censors did, and did not, want told about pregnancy, childbirth and abortion, as well as how studios fought to tell their own stories about human reproduction. I find that censors considered pregnancy to be a state of grace and a holy obligation that was restricted to married women. For censors, human reproduction was not only a private matter, it was also an unpleasant biological process whose entertainment value was questionable. They worried that realistic portrayals of pregnancy and childbirth would scare young women away from pursuing motherhood. In addition, I demonstrate how filmmakers overcame censors' strict prohibitions against abortion by utilizing ambiguity in their storytelling. Ultimately, I argue that censors believed that pregnancy and childbirth should be celebrated but not seen. But if pregnancy and childbirth were required then censors preferred mythic versions of motherhood instead of what they believed to be the sacred but horrific biological reality of human reproduction.

  19. Censorship: What Do School Library Specialists Really Know? A Consideration of Students' Rights, the Law and Implications for a New Education Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukenbill, W. Bernard; Lukenbill, James F.

    2007-01-01

    Censorship of school library collections has risen significantly in the last few decades, and such attacks are increasing. American courts have ruled that students in schools have First Amendment rights and some degree of freedom of speech. Courts also have ruled that students have the right to information and to learn and discuss issues of…

  20. Are gamma-ray bursts the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baerwald, Philipp

    2014-07-01

    We reconsider the possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) within the internal shock model, assuming a pure proton composition of the UHECRs. For the first time, we combine the information from gamma-rays, cosmic rays, prompt neutrinos, and cosmogenic neutrinos quantitatively in a joint cosmic ray production and propagation model, and we show that the information on the cosmic energy budget can be obtained as a consequence. In addition to the neutron model, we consider alternative scenarios for the cosmic ray escape from the GRBs, i.e., that cosmic rays can leak from the sources. We find that the dip model, which describes the ankle in UHECR observations by the pair production dip, is strongly disfavored in combination with the internal shock model because (a) unrealistically high baryonic loadings (energy in protons versus energy in electrons/gamma-rays) are needed for the individual GRBs and (b) the prompt neutrino flux easily overshoots the corresponding neutrino bound. On the other hand, GRBs may account for the UHECRs in the ankle transition model if cosmic rays leak out from the source at the highest energies. In that case, we demonstrate that future neutrino observations can efficiently test most of the parameter space - unless the baryonic loading is much larger than previously anticipated.

  1. Cosmic Ballet or Devil's Mask?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Stars like our Sun are members of galaxies, and most galaxies are themselves members of clusters of galaxies. In these, they move around among each other in a mostly slow and graceful ballet. But every now and then, two or more of the members may get too close for comfort - the movements become hectic, sometimes indeed dramatic, as when galaxies end up colliding. ESO PR Photo 12/04 shows an example of such a cosmic tango. This is the superb triple system NGC 6769-71, located in the southern Pavo constellation (the Peacock) at a distance of 190 million light-years. This composite image was obtained on April 1, 2004, the day of the Fifth Anniversary of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). It was taken in the imaging mode of the VIsible Multi-Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) on Melipal, one of the four 8.2-m Unit Telescopes of the VLT at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). The two upper galaxies, NGC 6769 (upper right) and NGC 6770 (upper left), are of equal brightness and size, while NGC 6771 (below) is about half as bright and slightly smaller. All three galaxies possess a central bulge of similar brightness. They consist of elderly, reddish stars and that of NGC 6771 is remarkable for its "boxy" shape, a rare occurrence among galaxies. Gravitational interaction in a small galaxy group NGC 6769 is a spiral galaxy with very tightly wound spiral arms, while NGC 6770 has two major spiral arms, one of which is rather straight and points towards the outer disc of NGC 6769. NGC 6770 is also peculiar in that it presents two comparatively straight dark lanes and a fainter arc that curves towards the third galaxy, NGC 6771 (below). It is also obvious from this new VLT photo that stars and gas have been stripped off NGC 6769 and NGC 6770, starting to form a common envelope around them, in the shape of a Devil's Mask. There is also a weak hint of a tenuous bridge between NGC 6769 and NGC 6771. All of these features testify to strong gravitational interaction between the three galaxies

  2. Evolution of the Cosmic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einasto, J.

    2017-07-01

    In the evolution of the cosmic web dark energy plays an important role. To understand the role of dark energy we investigate the evolution of superclusters in four cosmological models: standard model SCDM, conventional model LCDM, open model OCDM, and a hyper-dark-energy model HCDM. Numerical simulations of the evolution are performed in a box of size 1024 Mpc/h. Model superclusters are compared with superclusters found for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Superclusters are searched using density fields. LCDM superclusters have properties, very close to properties of observed SDSS superclusters. Standard model SCDM has about 2 times more superclusters than other models, but SCDM superclusters are smaller and have lower luminosities. Superclusters as principal structural elements of the cosmic web are present at all cosmological epochs.

  3. Cosmic Revelation: Making Astroparticles Visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, T. O.; Haungs, A.; Schieler, H.; Weindl, A.

    2010-06-01

    Cosmic Revelation is a prime example of a successful art and science project connecting art and astroparticle physics. One of the main reasons for its success might be that the collaboration between the KArlsruhe Shower Core and Array DEtector (KASCADE) experiment and Tim Otto Roth is both a minimalist light art project and a scientific experiment. In a field of 16 flashing mirror sculptures connected to the KASCADE detector field at KIT (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany) the impact of high energy cosmic rays on Earth can be experienced directly. In just one year the project has developed from the initial concept to its first presentation in a public space in autumn 2008. We explain how the project developed, and also highlight the practical and conceptual conditions for its realisation.

  4. Vector superconductivity in cosmic strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvali, G.R.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1992-03-01

    We argue that in most realistic cases, the usual Witten-type bosonic superconductivity of the cosmic string is automatically (independent of the existence of superconducting currents) accompanied by the condensation of charged gauge vector bosons in the core giving rise to a new vector type superconductivity. The value of the charged vector condensate is related with the charged scalar expectation value, and vanishes only if the latter goes to zero. The mechanism for the proposed vector superconductivity, differing fundamentally from those in the literature, is delineated using the simplest realistic example of the two Higgs doublet standard model interacting with the extra cosmic string. It is shown that for a wide range of parameters, for which the string becomes scalarly superconducting, W boson condensates (the sources of vector superconductivity) are necessarily excited. (author). 14 refs

  5. Model-independent Constraints on Cosmic Curvature and Opacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Jian; Wei, Jun-Jie; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Xia, Jun-Qing; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we propose to estimate the spatial curvature of the universe and the cosmic opacity in a model-independent way with expansion rate measurements, H(z), and type Ia supernova (SNe Ia). On the one hand, using a nonparametric smoothing method Gaussian process, we reconstruct a function H(z) from opacity-free expansion rate measurements. Then, we integrate the H(z) to obtain distance modulus μ H, which is dependent on the cosmic curvature. On the other hand, distances of SNe Ia can be determined by their photometric observations and thus are opacity-dependent. In our analysis, by confronting distance moduli μ H with those obtained from SNe Ia, we achieve estimations for both the spatial curvature and the cosmic opacity without any assumptions for the cosmological model. Here, it should be noted that light curve fitting parameters, accounting for the distance estimation of SNe Ia, are determined in a global fit together with the cosmic opacity and spatial curvature to get rid of the dependence of these parameters on cosmology. In addition, we also investigate whether the inclusion of different priors for the present expansion rate (H 0: global estimation, 67.74 ± 0.46 km s-1 Mpc-1, and local measurement, 73.24 ± 1.74 km s-1 Mpc-1) exert influence on the reconstructed H(z) and the following estimations of the spatial curvature and cosmic opacity. Results show that, in general, a spatially flat and transparent universe is preferred by the observations. Moreover, it is suggested that priors for H 0 matter a lot. Finally, we find that there is a strong degeneracy between the curvature and the opacity.

  6. Charged Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachelrieß, M.

    2013-04-15

    High-energy neutrino astronomy has grown up, with IceCube as one of its main experiments having sufficient sensitivity to test “vanilla” models of astrophysical neutrinos. I review predictions of neutrino fluxes as well as the status of cosmic ray physics. I comment also briefly on an improvement of the Fermi-LAT limit for cosmogenic neutrinos and on the two neutrino events presented by IceCube first at “Neutrino 2012”.

  7. The origin of cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichler, D.

    1986-01-01

    Enormous progress has been made in understanding the origin of cosmic rays within the past decade. The success of equation in accounting for the observed properties of cosmic rays at both the general and the detailed level is a striking illustration that nature can do marvelous things with simple equations. This paper illustrates the important role of detailed, systematic spacecraft observations in the heliosphere in testing theories of relevance to the distant mysterious phenomena that pique the curiosity of astronomers. Tracing the origin of cosmic rays back to collisionless shocks has reminded plasma astrophysicists of how much remains to be understood about the physics of such shocks, which account for much of the radiation that high energy astrophysics is based upon. The X-ray emission from shock-heated electrons, for example, cannot be fully interpreted until the physics of the shocks is understood. It is hoped that plasma simulations of shocks combined with intensive studies of the relevant microphysics will eventually lead us to such an understanding

  8. Elemental composition of cosmic ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagida, Shohei

    1987-01-01

    The report first summarizes some data that have been obtained so far from observation of isotopes and elements in cosmic rays in the low energy region. Then, objectives of studies planned to be carried out with Astromag are outlined and the number of incident particles expected to be measured by baloon observation is estimated. Heavy elements with atomic numbers of greater than 30 are considered to be formed through neutron absorption reactions by the s- or r-process. Observations show that products of the r-process is abundant in cosmic ray sources. The escape length depends on energy. In relation to this, it has been reported that the ratios Ar-Fe and Ca-Fe increase above 200 GeV-n while such a tendency is not observed for K, Sc, Ti or V. Thus, no satisfactory models are available at present which can fully explain the changes in the escape length. The ratio 3 He- 4 He in the range of 5 - 10 GeV-n is inconsistent with the general theory that interprets the escape length of heavy elements. Some models, including the supermetallicity model and Wolf Rayet theory, have been proposed to explain unusual ratios of isotopes in cosmic rays, but more measurements are required to verify them. It is expected that Astromag can serve to make observations that can clarify these points. (Nogami, K.)

  9. Studying Cosmic Dawn with WFIRST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, James; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Jansen, Rolf A.; Windhorst, Rogier; Tilvi, Vithal; Finkelstein, Steven; Wold, Isak; Papovich, Casey; Fan, Xiaohui; Mellema, Garrelt; Zackrisson, Erik; Jensen, Hannes; T

    2018-01-01

    Our understanding of Cosmic Dawn can be revolutionized using WFIRST's combination of wide-field, sensitive, high resolution near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy. Guest investigator studies of WFIRST's high latitude imaging survey and supernova search fields will yield orders of magnitude increases in our samples of Lyman break galaxies from z=7 to z>12. The high latitude spectrsocopic survey will enable an unprecedented search for z>7 quasars. Guest observer deep fields can extend these studies to flux levels of Hubble's deepest fields, over regions measured in square degrees. The resulting census of luminous objects in the Cosmic Dawn will provide key insights into the sources of the ultraviolet photons that powered reionization. Moreover, because WFIRST has a wide field (slitless) spectroscopic capability, it can be used to search for Lyman alpha emitting galaxies over the full history of reionization. By comparing the Lyman alpha galaxy statistics to those of continuum sources, we can directly probe the transparency of the intergalactic gas and chart reionization history.Our team is planning for both Guest Investigator and Guest Observer applications of WFIRST to studying Cosmic Dawn, and welcomes dialog with other interested members of the community.

  10. Cosmic Radiation Detection and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez Chavez, Juan; Troncoso, Maria

    Cosmic rays consist of high-energy particles accelerated from remote supernova remnant explosions and travel vast distances throughout the universe. Upon arriving at earth, the majority of these particles ionize gases in the upper atmosphere, while others interact with gas molecules in the troposphere and producing secondary cosmic rays, which are the main focus of this research. To observe these secondary cosmic rays, a detector telescope was designed and equipped with two silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Each SiPM is coupled to a bundle of 4 wavelength shifting optical fibers that are embedded inside a plastic scintillator sheet. The SiPM signals were amplified using a fast preamplifier with coincidence between detectors established using a binary logic gate. The coincidence events were recorded with two devices; a digital counter and an Arduino micro-controller. For detailed analysis of the SiPM waveforms, a DRS4 sensory digitizer captured the waveforms for offline analysis with the CERN software package Physics Analysis Workstation in a Linux environment. Results from our experiments would be presented. Hartnell College STEM Internship Program.

  11. Hidden Cosmic-Ray Accelerators as an Origin of TeV-PeV Cosmic Neutrinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kohta; Guetta, Dafne; Ahlers, Markus

    2016-02-19

    The latest IceCube data suggest that the all-flavor cosmic neutrino flux may be as large as 10^{-7}  GeV cm^{-2} s^{-1} sr^{-1} around 30 TeV. We show that, if sources of the TeV-PeV neutrinos are transparent to γ rays with respect to two-photon annihilation, strong tensions with the isotropic diffuse γ-ray background measured by Fermi are unavoidable, independently of the production mechanism. We further show that, if the IceCube neutrinos have a photohadronic (pγ) origin, the sources are expected to be opaque to 1-100 GeV γ rays. With these general multimessenger arguments, we find that the latest data suggest a population of cosmic-ray accelerators hidden in GeV-TeV γ rays as a neutrino origin. Searches for x-ray and MeV γ-ray counterparts are encouraged, and TeV-PeV neutrinos themselves will serve as special probes of dense source environments.

  12. Cosmology of a FLRW 3-brane, late-time cosmic acceleration, and the cosmic coincidence

    CERN Document Server

    Doolin, Ciaran

    2013-01-01

    A late epoch cosmic acceleration may be naturally entangled with cosmic coincidence - the observation that at the onset of acceleration the vacuum energy density fraction nearly coincides with the matter density fraction. In this letter we show that this is indeed the case with the cosmology of a Friedmann-Lama\\^itre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) 3-brane in a 5-dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. We derive the 4-dimensional effective action on a FLRW 3-brane, which helps define a general reduction formula, namely $M_P^{2}=\\rho_{b}/|\\Lambda_5|$, where $M_{P}$ is the effective Planck mass, $\\Lambda_5$ is the 5-dimensional cosmological constant and $\\rho_b$ is the sum of the 3-brane tension $V$ and the matter density $\\rho$. The behavior of the background solution is consistent with the results based on the form of the 4D effective potential. Although the range of variation in $\\rho_{b}$ is strongly constrained, the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis bound on the time variation of the renormalised Newton constant $G_N = (8\\pi...

  13. Cosmic ray physics goes to school

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    With the help of a CERN physicist, German Schools bring the Largest Cosmic Ray Detector in Europe one step closer to reality   Eric Berthier and Robert Porret (CERN, ST/HM), Frej Torp and Christian Antfolk from the Polytechnics Arcada in Finland, and Karsten Eggert, physicist at CERN who initiated this project, during the installation of cosmic ray detectors in the Pays de Gex, at point 4. Niina Patrikainen and Frej Torp, Finnish students from Rovaniemi and Arcada Polytechnics, installing cosmic ray counters at the Fachhochschule in Duesseldorf. The science of cosmic ray detection is growing, literally. Cosmic rays, energetic particles from space, strike our planet all the time. They collide with the air molecules in our upper atmosphere and initiate large showers of elementary particles (mainly electrons, photons, hadrons and muons) which rain down upon the earth. The shower size and the particle density in the showers reflect the initial energy of the cosmic ray particle, a detail which makes d...

  14. Cosmic Connections:. from Cosmic Rays to Gamma Rays, Cosmic Backgrounds and Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusenko, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Combined data from gamma-ray telescopes and cosmic-ray detectors have produced some new surprising insights regarding intergalactic and galactic magnetic fields, as well as extragalactic background light. We review some recent advances, including a theory explaining the hard spectra of distant blazars and the measurements of intergalactic magnetic fields based on the spectra of distant sources. Furthermore, we discuss the possible contribution of transient galactic sources, such as past gamma-ray bursts and hypernova explosions in the Milky Way, to the observed ux of ultrahigh-energy cosmicrays nuclei. The need for a holistic treatment of gamma rays, cosmic rays, and magnetic fields serves as a unifying theme for these seemingly unrelated phenomena.

  15. Cosmic Flasher Reveals All!

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    one type of their predicted activity previously, and now we've seen a completely different piece of evidence that says this is, in fact, a magnetar. That's exciting." Kulkarni said. The new discovery, the scientists say, will allow them to decipher further details about magnetars and their outbursts. SGR 1900+14 VLA Images of SGR 1900+14, with its short-lived radio emission turned off, left, and on, right. The radio emission comes from the interaction of subatomic particles with the magnetar's powerful magnetic field. The circles indicate the area from within which the X-ray emission of SGR 1900+14 comes. Magnetars were proposed in 1992 as a theoretical explanation for objects that repeatedly emit bursts of gamma-rays. These objects, called "soft gamma-ray repeaters," or SGRs, were identified in 1986. There still are only four of these known. They are believed to be rotating, superdense neutron stars, like pulsars, but with much stronger magnetic fields. Neutron stars are the remains of massive stars that explode as a supernova at the end of their normal lifetime. They are so dense that a thimbleful of neutron-star material would weigh 100 million tons. An ordinary pulsar emits "lighthouse beams" of radio waves that rotate with the star. When the star is oriented so that these beams sweep across the Earth, radio telescopes detect regularly-timed pulses. A magnetar is a neutron star with an extremely strong magnetic field, strong enough to rip atoms apart. In the units used by physicists, the strength of a magnetar's magnetic field is about a million billion Gauss; a refrigerator magnet has a field of about 100 Gauss. This superstrong magnetic field produces effects that distinguish magnetars from other neutron stars. First, the magnetic field is thought to act as a brake, slowing the star's rotation. The earlier discovery of pulsations several seconds apart in three SGRs indicated rotation rates slowed just as predicted by magnetar theory. Next, the magnetic field is

  16. Inverse Flux versus Pressure of Muons from Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago, D.; Armendariz, R.

    2017-12-01

    When an incoming cosmic ray proton or atom collides with particles in earth's atmosphere a shower of secondary muons is created. Cosmic ray muon flux was measured at the Queensborough Community College using a QuarkNet detector consisting of three stacked scintillator muon counters and a three-fold coincidence trigger. Data was recorded during a three-day period during a severe weather storm that occurred from March 13-17, 2017. A computer program was created in Python to read the muon flux rate and atmospheric pressure sensor readings from the detector's data acquisition board. The program converts the data from hexadecimal to decimal, re-bins the data in a more suitable format, creates and overlays plots of muon flux with atmospheric pressure. Results thus far show a strong correlation between muon flux and atmospheric pressure. More data analysis will be done to verify the above conclusion.

  17. Effects of cosmic ray decreases on cloud microphysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, J.; Enghoff, M. B.; Svensmark, H.

    2012-01-01

    the minimum in atmospheric ionization and less significant responses for effective radius and cloud condensation nuclei (total significance...... of the signal of 3.1 sigma. We also see a correlation between total solar irradiance and strong Forbush decreases but a clear mechanism connecting this to cloud properties is lacking. There is no signal in the UV radiation. The responses of the parameters correlate linearly with the reduction in the cosmic ray......Using cloud data from MODIS we investigate the response of cloud microphysics to sudden decreases in galactic cosmic radiation – Forbush decreases – and find responses in effective emissivity, cloud fraction, liquid water content, and optical thickness above the 2–3 sigma level 6–9 days after...

  18. Study of cosmic ray semidiurnal variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krymsky, G F; Krivoshapkin, P A; Gerasimova, S K; Gololobov, P Yu

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of long-term registration of cosmic rays with the muon spectrograph at Yakutsk (62°01'N, 129°43'E) and multidirectional muon telescope at Nagoya (35°10'N, 136°58'E) the cosmic ray semidiurnal variation seasonal change and the change of cosmic ray semiduirnal variation with the solar activity level has been found. The modeling of the seasonal change has been made.

  19. ACORDE - A Cosmic Ray Detector for ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00247175; Pagliarone, C.

    2006-01-01

    ACORDE, the ALICE COsmic Ray DEtector is one of the ALICE detectors, presently under construction. It consists of an array of plastic scintillator counters placed on the three upper faces of the ALICE magnet. This array will act as Level 0 cosmic ray trigger and, together with other ALICE sub-detectors, will provide precise information on cosmic rays with primary energies around $10^{15-17}$ eV. In this paper we will describe the ACORDE detector, trigger design and electronics.

  20. Cosmic radiation exposure to airline flight passenger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momose, Mitsuhiro

    2000-01-01

    At the high altitudes, airline flight passengers can be exposed to some levels of cosmic radiation. The purpose of this study was to quantify this radiation exposure. Cosmic radiation was measured during 5 flights using a personal dosimeter (PDM-102, Aloka). Cosmic radiation equivalent dose rates ranged from 0.7 to 1.43 microsieverts per hour, the average rate was 1.08. For the passenger who travels only occasionally, the cosmic radiation levels are well below occupational limits, and the risks are extremely small. (author)

  1. Cosmic radiation exposure to airline flight passenger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Mitsuhiro [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-08-01

    At the high altitudes, airline flight passengers can be exposed to some levels of cosmic radiation. The purpose of this study was to quantify this radiation exposure. Cosmic radiation was measured during 5 flights using a personal dosimeter (PDM-102, Aloka). Cosmic radiation equivalent dose rates ranged from 0.7 to 1.43 microsieverts per hour, the average rate was 1.08. For the passenger who travels only occasionally, the cosmic radiation levels are well below occupational limits, and the risks are extremely small. (author)

  2. High Energy Cosmic Electrons: Messengers from Nearby Cosmic Ray Sources or Dark Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the recent discoveries by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope in reference to high energy cosmic electrons, and whether their source is cosmic rays or dark matter. Specific interest is devoted to Cosmic Ray electrons anisotropy,

  3. Wilhelm Reich's self-censorship after his arrest as an enemy alien: the chilling effect of an illegal imprisonment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Philip W

    2014-04-01

    After discussing Wilhelm Reich's place in psychoanalysis, the article explores his arrest as an 'enemy alien' in December 1941. Reich's emotional responses to his imprisonment (which was illegal and which lasted nearly a month) are explored. A number of scholars have suggested that many European radical psychoanalysts refrained from sharing their former political ideas once they emigrated to the United States. Following a brief discussion of this pattern of 'silencing,' it is argued that Reich's withholding certain documents from publication was due to a self-imposed censorship, motivated in part by the fear of further governmental interference with his life and work. This fear, however, did not extend to his discussion of his newly developed theory of orgone energy. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  4. Cosmic Star-Formation History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madau, Piero; Dickinson, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Over the past two decades, an avalanche of new data from multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopic surveys has revolutionized our view of galaxy formation and evolution. Here we review the range of complementary techniques and theoretical tools that allow astronomers to map the cosmic history of star formation, heavy element production, and reionization of the Universe from the cosmic “dark ages” to the present epoch. A consistent picture is emerging, whereby the star-formation rate density peaked approximately 3.5 Gyr after the Big Bang, at z≈1.9, and declined exponentially at later times, with an e-folding timescale of 3.9 Gyr. Half of the stellar mass observed today was formed before a redshift z = 1.3. About 25% formed before the peak of the cosmic star-formation rate density, and another 25% formed after z = 0.7. Less than ˜1% of today's stars formed during the epoch of reionization. Under the assumption of a universal initial mass function, the global stellar mass density inferred at any epoch matches reasonably well the time integral of all the preceding star-formation activity. The comoving rates of star formation and central black hole accretion follow a similar rise and fall, offering evidence for coevolution of black holes and their host galaxies. The rise of the mean metallicity of the Universe to about 0.001 solar by z = 6, one Gyr after the Big Bang, appears to have been accompanied by the production of fewer than ten hydrogen Lyman-continuum photons per baryon, a rather tight budget for cosmological reionization.

  5. International Conference on Cosmic Rays

    CERN Multimedia

    W.O. LOCK

    1964-01-01

    Towards the end of last year the 8th International conference on cosmic rays, held under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (I.U.P.A.P.) and the Department of Atomic Energy of the Government of India, was held at Jaipur, India. Among the participants was W.O. Lock, head of CERN's Emulsion Group, who gave an invited talk on recent work in the field of what is normally known as high-energy physics — though in the context of this conference such energies seem quite low. In this article, Dr. Lock gives a general review of the conference and of the subjects discussed.

  6. Ground level cosmic ray observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, S.A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements); Grimani, C.; Brunetti, M.T.; Codino, A. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); Papini, P.; Massimo Brancaccio, F.; Piccardi, S. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Basini, G.; Bongiorno, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Golden, R.L. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.; Hof, M. [Siegen Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich Physik

    1995-09-01

    Cosmic rays at ground level have been collected using the NMSU/Wizard - MASS2 instrument. The 17-hr observation run was made on September 9. 1991 in Fort Sumner, New Mexico, Usa. Fort Sumner is located at 1270 meters a.s.l., corresponding to an atmospheric depth of about 887 g/cm{sup 2}. The geomagnetic cutoff is 4.5 GV/c. The charge ratio of positive and negative muons and the proton to muon ratio have been determined. These observations will also be compared with data collected at a higher latitude using the same basic apparatus.

  7. Cosmic polarimetry in magnetoactive plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    Polarimetry of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) represents one of the possible diagnostics aimed at testing large-scale magnetism at the epoch of the photon decoupling. The propagation of electromagnetic disturbances in a magnetized plasma leads naturally to a B-mode polarization whose angular power spectrum is hereby computed both analytically and numerically. Combined analyses of all the publicly available data on the B-mode polarization are presented, for the first time, in the light of the magnetized $\\Lambda$CDM scenario. Novel constraints on pre-equality magnetism are also derived in view of the current and expected sensitivities to the B-mode polarization.

  8. The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, J. N.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Argiro, S.; Arisaka, K.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A.; Barenthien, N.; Barkhausen, M.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertaina, M. E.; Biermann, P. L.; Bilhaut, R.; Billoir, P.; Blaes, S. G.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Bolz, H.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifaz, C.; Bonino, R.; Boratav, M.; Borodai, N.; Bracci, F.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Camin, D.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Castera, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chiosso, M.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clark, P. D. J.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Colombo, E.; Colonges, S.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Courty, B.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, C.; Dolron, P.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Epele, L. N.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fulgione, W.; Fujii, T.; Garcia, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Geenen, H.; Gemmeke, H.; Genolini, B.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Gibbs, K.; Giller, M.; Giudice, N.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gora, D.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gotink, W.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Grygar, J.; Guardone, N.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Guglielmi, L.; Habraken, R.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hoerandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Horvat, M.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Hucker, H.; Huege, T.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Kopmann, A.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Casado, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martina, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez, N.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Mello, V. B. B.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Mueller, S.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Nicotra, D.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Ohnuki, T.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Pacheco, N.; PakkSelmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Porter, T.; Pouryamout, J.; Pouthas, J.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Pryke, C. L.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Randriatoamanana, R.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenua, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Robbins, S.; Roberts, M.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schreuder, F.; Schroeder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schuessler, F.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Sequeiros, G.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Smith, A. G. K.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Speelman, R.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Sutter, M.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Trung, T. N.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Tusi, E.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varnav, D. M.; Varner, G.; Vasquez, R.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verkooijen, H.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vitali, G.; Vlcek, B.; Vorenholt, H.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walker, P.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Widom, A.; Wiebusch, C.; Wiencke, L.; Wijnen, T.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wild, N.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Woerner, G.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Silva, M. Zimbres; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located on a vast, high plain in western Argentina, is the world's largest cosmic ray observatory. The objectives of the Observatory are to probe the origin and characteristics of cosmic rays above 10(17) eV and to study the interactions of these, the most energetic

  9. From cosmic string to superconducting string

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, H C; Lee, B K

    1999-01-01

    We consider the dynamical symmetry breaking of a chirally-invariant Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the background gravity of a local cosmic string. By analyzing the one-loop effective action, we show how a cosmic string at a very high energy scale forms a global superconducting string to the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking at a low energy.

  10. NEXUS: tracing the cosmic web connection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cautun, Marius; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the NEXUS algorithm for the identification of cosmic web environments: clusters, filaments, walls and voids. This is a multiscale and automatic morphological analysis tool that identifies all the cosmic structures in a scale free way, without preference for a certain size or shape. We

  11. Maximum entropy analysis of cosmic ray composition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nosek, D.; Ebr, Jan; Vícha, Jakub; Trávníček, Petr; Nosková, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 76, Mar (2016), s. 9-18 ISSN 0927-6505 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-17501S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ultra-high energy cosmic rays * extensive air showers * cosmic ray composition Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 3.257, year: 2016

  12. The Spine of the Cosmic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Platen, Erwin; van de Weijgaert, Rien; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2010-01-01

    We present the SpineWeb framework for the topological analysis of the Cosmic Web and the identification of its walls, filaments, and cluster nodes. Based on the watershed segmentation of the cosmic density field, the SpineWeb method invokes the local adjacency properties of the boundaries between

  13. Sealed drift tube cosmic ray veto counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, R., E-mail: rrios@lanl.go [Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States); Tatar, E. [Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States); Bacon, J.D.; Bowles, T.J.; Hill, R.; Green, J.A.; Hogan, G.E.; Ito, T.M.; Makela, M.; Morris, C.L.; Mortenson, R.; Pasukanics, F.E.; Ramsey, J.; Saunders, A.; Seestrom, S.J.; Sondheim, W.E.; Teasdale, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Saltus, M. [Sloan Enterprises, NC (United States); Back, H.O.; Cottrell, C.R. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2011-05-01

    We describe a simple drift tube counter that has been used as a cosmic ray veto for the UCNA experiment, a first-ever measurement of the neutron beta-asymmetry using ultra-cold neutrons. These detectors provide an inexpensive alternative to more conventional scintillation detectors for large area cosmic ray anticoincidence detectors.

  14. Cosmogenic photons strongly constrain UHECR source models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Vliet Arjen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the newest version of our Monte Carlo code for ultra-high-energy cosmic ray (UHECR propagation, CRPropa 3, the flux of neutrinos and photons due to interactions of UHECRs with extragalactic background light can be predicted. Together with the recently updated data for the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background (IGRB by Fermi LAT, it is now possible to severely constrain UHECR source models. The evolution of the UHECR sources especially plays an important role in the determination of the expected secondary photon spectrum. Pure proton UHECR models are already strongly constrained, primarily by the highest energy bins of Fermi LAT’s IGRB, as long as their number density is not strongly peaked at recent times.

  15. Cosmic perspectives in space physics

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Sukumar

    2000-01-01

    In the early years of the twentieth century, Victor Hess of Germany flew instruments in balloons and so discovered in 1912 that an extra-~errestial radiation of unknown origin is incident on the earth with an almost constant intensity at all times. These penetrating non­ solar radiations which were called Cosmic Rays by Millikan, USA, opened the new frontier of space physics and many leading scientists were attracted to it. At the end of World War II a number of space vehicles, e.g. stratospheric balloons, rockets and satellites were developed. In 1950 and onwards, these vehicles enabled spectacular advances in space physics and space astrophysics. New horizons were opened in the explorations of cosmic rays, the earth's magnetosphere, the Sun and the heliosphere, the moon and the planets. Using space-borne instruments, exciting discoveries were made of stars, and galaxies in the infra-red, ultra violet, x-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. In this text book these fascinating new findings are presented in depth a...

  16. Cosmic evolution, life and man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oro, J.

    1995-01-01

    Among the most basic problems confronting science are those regarding the origin of the universe, the origin of life and the origin of man. This general overview starts (1) with a brief introduction addressed primarily to the Cyril Ponnamperuma Memorial. Then, the thesis is presented that the appearance of life and intelligence on our planet can be understood as the result of a number of cosmic and biological evolutionary processes, including (2) the stellar thermonuclear synthesis of the biogenic elements other than hydrogen (C, N, O, P and S), their dispersal into space, and their combination into circumstellar and interstellar molecules. (3) The formation of the Solar System and the Earth-Moon System. (4) The role of comets and carbonaceous chondrites in contributing organic matter to the primitive Earth. (5) The prebiotics synthesis of amino acids, purines, pyrimidines, fatty acids, and other biochemical monomers. (6) The prebiotic condensation reactions leading to the synthesis of oligomers such as oligonucleotides and oligopeptides, with replicative and catalytic activities. (7) The synthesis of amphiphilic lipids, and their self-assembly into liposomes with bi-layered membranes. (8) The formation of protocellular structures. (9) The activation of protocells into a functioning Darwin's ancestral cell. (10) Early evolution of life. (11) The K-T boundary event and the disappearance of dinosaurs. (12) Evolution of hominids leading to Homo sapiens. (13) The rapid development of civilization. (14) The exploration of the Solar System. (15) Life beyond our planetary system. (16) Epilogue. Peace from cosmic evolution? (Abstract only)

  17. Cosmic Feast of the Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisset, C.; Delgado-Inglada, G.; García-Rojas, J.

    2017-11-01

    In the past few decades most of our understanding of the history and chemical evolution of galaxies has been guided by the study of their stars and gaseous nebulae. Nebulae, thanks to their bright emission lines, are especially useful tracers of chemical elements from the very center to the outskirts of galaxies. In order to pin down the chemical abundances in nebulae, we must rely on careful analysis of emission lines combined with detailed models of the microscopic physical processes inside nebulae and state-of-the-art atomic data. Another important piece of the puzzle is the interplay between galaxy evolution and the activity of their central engines either as optical AGNs or radio jets. Last but not least, let us not forget the huge population of lineless, retired galaxies ionized by hot low-mass evolved stars: after nuclear and star formation activity quiets down, retired galaxies are the natural consequence of galaxy evolution. Grażyna Stasińska has made important contributions to each and every one of those aspects. This conference is to honor her work. We invite you to take part and share the latest news on this cosmic feast that transmutes chemical species, the onward journey of elements inside and outside galaxies either as lonely atoms or gregarious molecules and crystals, and their recycling in stars, which starts the cosmic feast all over again.

  18. Cosmic rays and the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfendale, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    It is inevitable that there is a close connection between cosmic rays and the ISM insofar as the propagation of cosmic rays is conditioned by the magnetic field in the ISM and the cosmic rays interact with the gas (and photon fluxes) in this medium. This paper deals with both topics. Propagation effects manifest themselves as an anisotropy in arrival directions and a review is given of anisotropy measurements and their interpretation. The status of studies of cosmic ray interactions is examined whit particular reference to the information about the ISM itself which comes from observations of the flux of secondary γ-rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with gas, the situation regarding molecular as in the Inner Galaxy being of particular concern

  19. High energy physics in cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Lawrence W. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-02-07

    In the first half-century of cosmic ray physics, the primary research focus was on elementary particles; the positron, pi-mesons, mu-mesons, and hyperons were discovered in cosmic rays. Much of this research was carried out at mountain elevations; Pic du Midi in the Pyrenees, Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia, and Mt. Evans/Echo Lake in Colorado, among other sites. In the 1960s, claims of the observation of free quarks, and satellite measurements of a significant rise in p-p cross sections, plus the delay in initiating accelerator construction programs for energies above 100 GeV, motivated the Michigan-Wisconsin group to undertake a serious cosmic ray program at Echo Lake. Subsequently, with the succession of higher energy accelerators and colliders at CERN and Fermilab, cosmic ray research has increasingly focused on cosmology and astrophysics, although some groups continue to study cosmic ray particle interactions in emulsion chambers.

  20. Cosmic Ray Physics with ACORDE at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Pagliarone, C.

    2008-01-01

    The use of large underground high-energy physics experiments, for comic ray studies, have been used, in the past, at CERN, in order to measure, precisely, the inclusive cosmic ray flux in the energy range from 2x10^10 - 2x10^12 eV. ACORDE, ALICE Cosmic Rays DEtector, will act as Level 0 cosmic ray trigger and, together with other ALICE apparatus, will provide precise information on cosmic rays with primary energies around 10^15 - 10^17 eV. This paper reviews the main detector features, the present status, commissioning and integration with other apparatus. Finally, we discuss the ACORDE-ALICE cosmic ray physics program.

  1. Cosmic ray physics with ACORDE at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagliarone, C [Universita degli Studi di Cassino and INFN Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo, 3 - Pisa (Italy); Fernandez-Tellez, A [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (BUAP), Puebla (Mexico)], E-mail: pagliarone@fnal.gov

    2008-05-15

    The use of large underground high-energy physics experiments, for comic ray studies, have been used, in the past, at CERN, in order to measure, precisely, the inclusive cosmic ray flux in the energy range from 2{center_dot}10{sup 10} to 2{center_dot} 10{sup 12} eV. ACORDE, ALICE Cosmic Rays DEtector, will act as Level 0 cosmic ray trigger and, together with other ALICE apparatus, will provide precise information on cosmic rays with primary energies around 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 17} eV. This paper reviews the main detector features, the present status, commissioning and integration with other apparatus. Finally, we discuss the ACORDE-ALICE cosmic ray physics program.

  2. Cosmic ray physics with ACORDE at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagliarone, C; Fernandez-Tellez, A

    2008-01-01

    The use of large underground high-energy physics experiments, for comic ray studies, have been used, in the past, at CERN, in order to measure, precisely, the inclusive cosmic ray flux in the energy range from 2·10 10 to 2· 10 12 eV. ACORDE, ALICE Cosmic Rays DEtector, will act as Level 0 cosmic ray trigger and, together with other ALICE apparatus, will provide precise information on cosmic rays with primary energies around 10 15 to 10 17 eV. This paper reviews the main detector features, the present status, commissioning and integration with other apparatus. Finally, we discuss the ACORDE-ALICE cosmic ray physics program

  3. SOME CONSIDERATIONS CONCERNING THE ROLE OF COSMIC ENVIRONMENT IN SOIL GENESIS AND EVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Munteanu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present day concept of soil is strongly connected to the terrestrial environment. Among the cosmic factors of soil genesis the energy (as light and heat provided by the Sun is by far the most important. The other outer space possible agents e.g. meteorites, comets, cosmic radiation and cosmic dust, are usually neglected or scarcely mentioned. The advancing of cosmic exploration spurred soil scientists to extend their interest upon the extraterrestrial regoliths of Earth-like planets (Mars, Venus and Moon. The concept of “Universal soil” in whose genesis the biotic factor and water are not mandatory, has been recently advanced. The first papers about “lunar soils” are already quoted in soil science literature; some also speak about “Martian soil” or “Venusian soil”. Although these seem to be mere regoliths quite different from the “terrestrial soil” (by absence of life and water one believes that they may give information about impact upon lithological material of severe environment of these planets. This paper tries to outline the cosmic destiny of the soil, to enlarge its meaning and to reveal the hidden connections that the soil has with some planetary and cosmic parameters. In cosmic vision the “soil” – either “lunar”, “martian”, or “terrestrial” – can be viewed as the interface of energy and matter exchange between the land masses of these celestial body and their cosmic environment. The role of the solar activity, extragalactic events, distance from the Sun, obliquity (tilt of Earth’s rotation axis and Earth’s orbit circularity are analyzed in connection with Quaternary glaciations and their influences upon the development of terrestrial soils. The influence of Moon is emphasized as being very important in shaping the zonal geography of the terrestrial soils.

  4. Lorentz invariance violation in the neutrino sector: a joint analysis from big bang nucleosynthesis and the cosmic microwave background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Wei-Ming; Cai, Rong-Gen [Chinese Academy of Sciences, CAS Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, School of Physical Sciences, Beijing (China); Guo, Zong-Kuan [Chinese Academy of Sciences, CAS Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, School of Astronomy and Space Science, Beijing (China); Zhang, Yuan-Zhong [Chinese Academy of Sciences, CAS Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing (China)

    2017-06-15

    We investigate constraints on Lorentz invariance violation in the neutrino sector from a joint analysis of big bang nucleosynthesis and the cosmic microwave background. The effect of Lorentz invariance violation during the epoch of big bang nucleosynthesis changes the predicted helium-4 abundance, which influences the power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background at the recombination epoch. In combination with the latest measurement of the primordial helium-4 abundance, the Planck 2015 data of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies give a strong constraint on the deformation parameter since adding the primordial helium measurement breaks the degeneracy between the deformation parameter and the physical dark matter density. (orig.)

  5. Testing strong interaction theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses possible tests of the current theories of the strong interaction, in particular, quantum chromodynamics. High energy e + e - interactions should provide an excellent means of studying the strong force. (W.D.L.)

  6. Quantum cosmology and Eddington's large cosmic numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Borzeszkowski, H.-H.; Treder, H.-J.

    1994-07-01

    A theory that contains three fundamental constants from which one can build length, time, and mass (or force) etalons satisfies with that a necessary criterion of a “universal unified field theory.” In order to interpret such a theory physically, one has to translate it into the Galilei-Newtonian language. This leads to classical “pictures” whose compatibility is ensured by introducing appropriate measurement-theoretical principles which imply corresponding uncertainty relations. In this paper we compare different (mainly gravitational) theories from the point of view of the fundamental constants underlying each case, and of the respective uncertainty relations. Assuming Eddington's hypothesis of large cosmic numbers, it is argued in particular that in quantized general relativity one arrives at less stringent limitations on cosmology than in other conceivable approaches satisfying the principle of minimal coupling. These limitations, however, are in all cases strong enough to bar the way to quantum cosmology. Instead one is led to a Diophantean concept.

  7. Testing cosmology with cosmic sound waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corasaniti, Pier Stefano; Melchiorri, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) observations have accurately determined the position of the first two peaks and dips in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature power spectrum. These encode information on the ratio of the distance to the last scattering surface to the sound horizon at decoupling. However prerecombination processes can contaminate this distance information. In order to assess the amplitude of these effects, we use the WMAP data and evaluate the relative differences of the CMB peak and dip multipoles. We find that the position of the first peak is largely displaced with respect to the expected position of the sound horizon scale at decoupling. In contrast, the relative spacings of the higher extrema are statistically consistent with those expected from perfect harmonic oscillations. This provides evidence for a scale dependent phase shift of the CMB oscillations which is caused by gravitational driving forces affecting the propagation of sound waves before recombination. By accounting for these effects we have performed a Markov Chain Monte Carlo likelihood analysis of the location of WMAP extrema to constrain, in combination with recent BAO data, a constant dark energy equation of state parameter w. For a flat universe we find a strong 2σ upper limit w a of the acoustic horizon at decoupling for several cosmologies, to test their dependence on model assumptions. Although the analysis of the full CMB spectra should always be preferred, using the position of the CMB peaks and dips provides a simple and consistent method for combining CMB constraints with other data sets

  8. A censura e o uso dos prazeres: comunicação sob constrição Censorship and the use of pleasures: communication under constriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Rodrigues Gomes

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo traz reflexões sobre os resultados parciais do trabalho de pesquisa desenvolvido em relação às expressões censuradas em peças teatrais, a partir do arquivo Miroel Silveira, que contém os processos de censura ao teatro, de 1925 a 1968. No presente estágio da pesquisa, foi possível constatar que a censura privilegiou termos relacionados à condução do corpo — exposição, gestos, trajes, sexualidade —, de um ponto de vista moral. Tornou-se necessário, portanto, um esforço para abarcar motivos e implicações desse tipo de intervenção, esforço aqui apresentado. Censorship and the use of pleasures: communication under constriction — This paper ponders upon the partial results of a research work concerning censored expressions in stage plays, based on the Miroel Silveira Archives, which contain the theater censorship processes dating from 1925 to 1968. At this point in our investigation, we have found that censorship concentrated on expressions relating to body postures — exposure, gestures, costumes, sexuality —, in short, a moral point of view. This finding led to an endeavor to understand the motives and implications of this kind of intervention, an undertaking that is presented herein.

  9. Space Weather Observations by GNSS Radio Occultation: From FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC to FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xinan; Schreiner, William S; Pedatella, Nicholas; Anthes, Richard A; Mannucci, Anthony J; Straus, Paul R; Liu, Jann-Yenq

    2014-11-01

    The joint Taiwan-United States FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate) mission, hereafter called COSMIC, is the first satellite constellation dedicated to remotely sense Earth's atmosphere and ionosphere using a technique called Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO). The occultations yield abundant information about neutral atmospheric temperature and moisture as well as space weather estimates of slant total electron content, electron density profiles, and an amplitude scintillation index, S4. With the success of COSMIC, the United States and Taiwan are moving forward with a follow-on RO mission named FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 (COSMIC-2), which will ultimately place 12 satellites in orbit with two launches in 2016 and 2019. COSMIC-2 satellites will carry an advanced Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) RO receiver that will track both GPS and Russian Global Navigation Satellite System signals, with capability for eventually tracking other GNSS signals from the Chinese BeiDou and European Galileo system, as well as secondary space weather payloads to measure low-latitude plasma drifts and scintillation at multiple frequencies. COSMIC-2 will provide 4-6 times (10-15X in the low latitudes) the number of atmospheric and ionospheric observations that were tracked with COSMIC and will also improve the quality of the observations. In this article we focus on COSMIC/COSMIC-2 measurements of key ionospheric parameters.

  10. Dark energy and the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodelson, S.; Knox, L.

    2000-01-01

    We find that current cosmic microwave background anisotropy data strongly constrain the mean spatial curvature of the Universe to be near zero, or, equivalently, the total energy density to be near critical-as predicted by inflation. This result is robust to editing of data sets, and variation of other cosmological parameters (totaling seven, including a cosmological constant). Other lines of argument indicate that the energy density of nonrelativistic matter is much less than critical. Together, these results are evidence, independent of supernovae data, for dark energy in the Universe.

  11. Escape of Cosmic Rays from their Acceleration Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkov, Mikhail; Sagdeev, Roald; Diamond, Patrick

    2012-07-01

    The escape of cosmic rays (CR) from sites of their acceleration, such as supernova remnants (SNR), is calculated self-consistently with the CR transport suppression by self-excited Alfvén waves. The treatment uniformly applies both to the accelerator's nearby zone where intense CRs drive strong turbulence efficiently reducing their escape, and far zone where the CRs rapidly diffuse as test particles. To demonstrate the inseparability of the two zones in calculating the escape flux, an exact solution is obtained for the nonlinear spreading of a sharply localized CR cloud.

  12. Cosmic Ray Production in Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, A. M.; Ellison, D. C.; Marcowith, A.; Osipov, S. M.

    2018-02-01

    We give a brief review of the origin and acceleration of cosmic rays (CRs), emphasizing the production of CRs at different stages of supernova evolution by the first-order Fermi shock acceleration mechanism. We suggest that supernovae with trans-relativistic outflows, despite being rather rare, may accelerate CRs to energies above 10^{18} eV over the first year of their evolution. Supernovae in young compact clusters of massive stars, and interaction powered superluminous supernovae, may accelerate CRs well above the PeV regime. We discuss the acceleration of the bulk of the galactic CRs in isolated supernova remnants and re-acceleration of escaped CRs by the multiple shocks present in superbubbles produced by associations of OB stars. The effects of magnetic field amplification by CR driven instabilities, as well as superdiffusive CR transport, are discussed for nonthermal radiation produced by nonlinear shocks of all speeds including trans-relativistic ones.

  13. Cerenkov radiation from cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turver, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    It is almost 40 years since it was suggested that Cerenkov radiations may be produced in the atmosphere by the passage of the cosmic radiation and account for a small part of the night sky brightness. The first detection of this visible Cerenkov radiation followed within a few years and by the 1960s the atmospheric Cerenkov radiation technique was established as a tool in high energy astrophysics. An exciting new field of astronomy, high energy gamma ray astronomy, has developed which relies on the atmospheric Cerenkov light. We here review the mechanism for the production of Cerenkov light in the atmosphere and summarize the contributions to high energy astrophysics made using the technique. (author)

  14. Cosmic setting for chondrule formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.J.; Scott, E.R.D.; Keil, K.

    1983-01-01

    Chondrules are igneous-textured, millimeter-sized, spherical to irregularly-shaped silicate objects which constitute the major component of most chondrites. There is agreement that chondrules were once molten. Models for chondrule origin can be divided into two categories. One involves a planetary setting, which envisages chondrules forming on the surfaces of parent bodies. Melting mechanisms include impact and volcanism. The other category is concerned with a cosmic setting in the solar nebula, prior to nebula formation. Aspects regarding the impact on planetary surfaces are considered, taking into account chondrule abundances, the abundancy of agglutinates on the moon, comminution, hypervelocity impact pits, questions of age, and chondrule compositions. Attention is also given to collisions during accretion, collisions between molten planetesimals, volcanism, and virtues of a nebular setting. 101 references

  15. Statistical Physics for Cosmic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielli, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    The physics of scale-invariant and complex systems is a novel interdisciplinary field. Its ideas allow us to look at natural phenomena in a radically new and original way, eventually leading to unifying concepts independent of the detailed structure of the systems. The objective is the study of complex, scale-invariant, and more general stochastic structures that appear both in space and time in a vast variety of natural phenomena, which exhibit new types of collective behaviors, and the fostering of their understanding. This book has been conceived as a methodological monograph in which the main methods of modern statistical physics for cosmological structures and density fields (galaxies, Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation, etc.) are presented in detail. The main purpose is to present clearly, to a workable level, these methods, with a certain mathematical accuracy, providing also some paradigmatic examples of applications. This should result in a new and more general framework for the statistical analys...

  16. RELICS of the Cosmic Dawn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradac, Marusa; Coe, Dan; Huang, Kuang-Han; Salmon, Brett; Hoag, Austin; Bradley, Larry; Ryan, Russell; Dawson, Will; Zitrin, Adi; Jones, Christine; Sharon, Keren; Trentu, Michele; Stark, Daniel; Bouwens, Rychard; Oesch, Pascal; Lam, Daniel; Patricia Carasco Nunez, Daniela; Paterno-Mahler, Rachel; Strait, Victoria

    2017-10-01

    When did galaxies start forming stars? What is the role of distant galaxies in galaxy formation models and epoch of reionization? Recent observations indicate at least two critical puzzles in these studies. (1) First galaxies might have started forming stars earlier than previously thought (still unclear what is their star formation history and whether these galaxies can reionize the Universe. Accurate knowledge of stellar masses, ages, and star formation rates at this epoch requires measuring both rest-frame UV and optical light, which only Spitzer and HST can probe at z 6-11 for a large enough sample of typical galaxies. To address this cosmic puzzle, we propose Spitzer imaging of the fields behind the most powerful cosmic telescopes selected using HST, Spitzer, and Planck data from the RELICS and SRELICS programs (Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey; 41 clusters, 190 HST orbits, 550 Spitzer hours). This proposal will be a valuable Legacy complement to the existing IRAC deep surveys, and it will open up a new parameter space by probing the ordinary yet magnified population with much improved sample variance. The program will allow us to study stellar properties of a large number, 20 galaxies at z 6-11. Deep Spitzer data will be crucial to unambiguously measure their stellar properties (age, SFR, M*). Finally this proposal is a unique opportunity to establish the presence (or absence) of an unusually early established stellar population, as was recently observed in MACS1149JD at z 9. If confirmed, this result will require a paradigm shift in our understanding of the earliest star formation.

  17. Symbols of a cosmic order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjid, F. Hadi; Myers, John M.

    2016-10-01

    The world runs on networks over which signals communicate sequences of symbols, e.g. numerals. Examining both engineered and natural communications networks reveals an unsuspected order that depends on contact with an unpredictable entity. This order has three roots. The first is a proof within quantum theory that no evidence can ever determine its explanation, so that an agent choosing an explanation must do so unpredictably. The second root is the showing that clocks that step computers do not "tell time" but serve as self-adjusting symbol-handling agents that regulate "logically synchronized" motion in response to unpredictable disturbances. Such a clock-agent has a certain independence as well as the capacity to communicate via unpredictable symbols with other clock-agents and to adjust its own tick rate in response to that communication. The third root is the noticing of unpredictable symbol exchange in natural systems, including the transmission of symbols found in molecular biology. We introduce a symbol-handling agent as a role played in some cases by a person, for example a physicist who chooses an explanation of given experimental outcomes, and in other cases by some other biological entity, and in still other cases by an inanimate device, such as a computer-based detector used in physical measurements. While we forbear to try to explain the propensity of agents at all levels from cells to civilizations to form and operate networks of logically synchronized symbol-handling agents, we point to this propensity as an overlooked cosmic order, an order structured by the unpredictability ensuing from the proof. Appreciating the cosmic order leads to a conception of agency that replaces volition by unpredictability and reconceives the notion of objectivity in a way that makes a place for agency in the world as described by physics. Some specific implications for physics are outlined.

  18. High-energy cosmic-ray acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, M; de Paula, W; Duarte Chavez, J A; Gago, A M; Hakobyan, H; Jez, P; Monroy Montañez, J A; Ortiz Velasquez, A; Padilla Cabal, F; Pino Rozas, M; Rodriguez Patarroyo, D J; Romeo, G L; Saldaña-Salazar , U J; Velasquez, M; von Steinkirch, M

    2010-01-01

    We briefly review the basics of ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray acceleration. The Hillas criterion is introduced as a geometrical criterion that must be fulfilled by potential acceleration sites, and energy losses are taken into account in order to obtain a more realistic scenario. The different available acceleration mechanisms are presented, with special emphasis on Fermi shock acceleration and its prediction of a power-law cosmic-ray energy spectrum. We conclude that first-order Fermi acceleration, though not entirely satisfactory, is the most promising mechanism for explaining the ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray flux.

  19. Cosmic growth history and expansion history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linder, Eric V.

    2005-01-01

    The cosmic expansion history tests the dynamics of the global evolution of the universe and its energy density contents, while the cosmic growth history tests the evolution of the inhomogeneous part of the energy density. Precision comparison of the two histories can distinguish the nature of the physics responsible for the accelerating cosmic expansion: an additional smooth component--dark energy--or a modification of the gravitational field equations. With the aid of a new fitting formula for linear perturbation growth accurate to 0.05%-0.2%, we separate out the growth dependence on the expansion history and introduce a new growth index parameter γ that quantifies the gravitational modification

  20. Consistency relation for cosmic magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, R. K.; Sloth, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    If cosmic magnetic fields are indeed produced during inflation, they are likely to be correlated with the scalar metric perturbations that are responsible for the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and large scale structure. Within an archetypical model of inflationary magnetogenesis, we show...... to be extremely useful to test some recent calculations in the literature. Apart from primordial non-Gaussianity induced by the curvature perturbations, such a cross correlation might provide a new observational probe of inflation and can in principle reveal the primordial nature of cosmic magnetic fields. DOI...

  1. High energy cosmic rays: sources and fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanev, Todor; Gaisser, Thomas K.; Tilav, Serap

    2014-04-01

    We discuss the production of a unique energy spectrum of the high energy cosmic rays detected with air showers by shifting the energy estimates of different detectors. After such a spectrum is generated we fit the spectrum with three or four populations of cosmic rays that might be accelerated at different cosmic ray sources. We also present the chemical composition that the fits of the spectrum generates and discuss some new data sets presented this summer at the ICRC in Rio de Janeiro that may require new global fits.

  2. 2004 Election Implications of Censorship of Disproof Of Big Bang Cosmology (BBC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Robert

    2004-05-01

    I discover BBC is falsified because it predicts a CBR value differing vastly from 2.7K (CERN-EXT 2003-022). This result confirms my earlier ten-paper-disproof of BBC and discovery of the Cosmic Center Universe (CCU) model that explains the Hubble relation, 2.7K CBR, and six other observations. For 3 years LANL, NSF, and Cornell have perpetuated a Watergate-type activity suppressing release of these papers on the LANL/NSF/Cornell arXiv (www.orionfdn.org). I ask liberty-conscious Congressmen to investigate this blatant denial of First Amendment rights and NAS's 1984 Freedom of Inquiry mandate to protect scientists who challenge accepted dogma. I also ask Christian Congressmen to investigate religious discrimination exercised against my discoveries by evolutionists who greatly fear retribution when Christians in Congress and elsewhere learn the new CCU model and my other discoveries (www.halos.com) match the Fourth of the Ten Commandments (TCs) claim that "In six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea and all that in them is, and rested the 7th day." (Ex. 20:11) Such inquiry will insure the TCs will be an explosive focal issue in the 2004 Presidential race.

  3. Cosmic Rays in Intermittent Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukurov, Anvar; Seta, Amit; Bushby, Paul J.; Wood, Toby S. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Snodin, Andrew P., E-mail: a.seta1@ncl.ac.uk, E-mail: amitseta90@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Applied Science, King Mongkut’s University of Technology North Bangkok, Bangkok 10800 (Thailand)

    2017-04-10

    The propagation of cosmic rays in turbulent magnetic fields is a diffusive process driven by the scattering of the charged particles by random magnetic fluctuations. Such fields are usually highly intermittent, consisting of intense magnetic filaments and ribbons surrounded by weaker, unstructured fluctuations. Studies of cosmic-ray propagation have largely overlooked intermittency, instead adopting Gaussian random magnetic fields. Using test particle simulations, we calculate cosmic-ray diffusivity in intermittent, dynamo-generated magnetic fields. The results are compared with those obtained from non-intermittent magnetic fields having identical power spectra. The presence of magnetic intermittency significantly enhances cosmic-ray diffusion over a wide range of particle energies. We demonstrate that the results can be interpreted in terms of a correlated random walk.

  4. Knotlike cosmic strings in the early universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yi-shi; Liu, Xin

    2004-02-01

    In this paper, the knotlike cosmic strings in the Riemann-Cartan space-time of the early universe are discussed. It has been revealed that the cosmic strings can just originate from the zero points of the complex scalar quintessence field. In these strings we mainly study the knotlike configurations. Based on the integral of Chern-Simons 3-form a topological invariant for knotlike cosmic strings is constructed, and it is shown that this invariant is just the total sum of all the self-linking and linking numbers of the knots family. Furthermore, it is also pointed out that this invariant is preserved in the branch processes during the evolution of cosmic strings.

  5. Satellite observation of cosmic ray air showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, Robert; Linsley, John

    1981-01-01

    The arrival trajectories of cosmic rays with energies greater than 10 19 eV afford the possibility of being traced backwards for distances comparable to the size of the Galaxy. They provide a means of testing models of the Galactic magnetic field as well as models of the origin of extra-Galactic cosmic rays. The large air showers produced by such cosmic rays can be observed by means of the atmospheric scintillation light they produce. It is shown here that a satellite-based system consisting of a single large mirror with an array of photon sensors at its focus would have outstanding advantages for the study of the highest energy cosmic rays

  6. Topics on Cosmic Rays. v.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellandi Filho, J.; Pemmaraju, A.

    1984-01-01

    Some theoretical and experimental results concerning with cosmic radiation works or with related ones, mainly of the Brazil-Japan Collaboration, are presented in honor of the 60th aniversary of C.M.G. Lattes. (L.C.) [pt

  7. Cosmic ray antimatter and baryon symmetric cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.; Protheroe, R. J.; Kazanas, D.

    1982-01-01

    The relative merits and difficulties of the primary and secondary origin hypotheses for the observed cosmic-ray antiprotons, including the new low-energy measurement of Buffington, et al. We conclude that the cosmic-ray antiproton data may be evidence for antimatter galaxies and baryon symmetric cosmology. The present bar P data are consistent with a primary extragalactic component having /p=/equiv 1+/- 3.2/0.7x10 = to the -4 independent of energy. We propose that the primary extragalactic cosmic ray antiprotons are most likely from active galaxies and that expected disintegration of bar alpha/alpha ban alpha/alpha. We further predict a value for ban alpha/alpha =/equiv 10 to the -5, within range of future cosmic ray detectors.

  8. Comparing cosmic web classifiers using information theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq, Florent; Lavaux, Guilhem; Wandelt, Benjamin; Jasche, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a decision scheme for optimally choosing a classifier, which segments the cosmic web into different structure types (voids, sheets, filaments, and clusters). Our framework, based on information theory, accounts for the design aims of different classes of possible applications: (i) parameter inference, (ii) model selection, and (iii) prediction of new observations. As an illustration, we use cosmographic maps of web-types in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to assess the relative performance of the classifiers T-WEB, DIVA and ORIGAMI for: (i) analyzing the morphology of the cosmic web, (ii) discriminating dark energy models, and (iii) predicting galaxy colors. Our study substantiates a data-supported connection between cosmic web analysis and information theory, and paves the path towards principled design of analysis procedures for the next generation of galaxy surveys. We have made the cosmic web maps, galaxy catalog, and analysis scripts used in this work publicly available.

  9. Energy estimates of cosmic ray events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dar, A.; Otterlund, I.; Stenlund, E.

    1978-12-01

    We propose new methods for estimating the energy of the incident particles in high energy cosmic ray collisions. We demonstrate their validity in emulsion experiments at laboratory accelerators. (author)

  10. Development of the cosmic ray techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, B.

    1982-01-01

    It has been found that most advances of cosmic-ray physics have been directly related to the development of observational techniques. The history of observational techniques is discussed, taking into account ionization chambers, refinements applied to ionization chambers to make them suitable for an effective use in the study of cosmic radiation, the Wulf-type electrometer, the electrometer designed by Millikan and Neher, the Geiger-Mueller counter, the experiment of Bothe and Kolhoerster, the coincidence circuit, and a cosmic-ray telescope. Attention is given to a magnetic lens for cosmic rays, a triangular arrangement of Geiger-Mueller counters used to demonstrate the production of a secondary radiation, a stereoscopic cloud-chamber photograph of showers, the cloud-chamber picture which provided the first evidence of the positive electron, and arrangements for studying photon components, mu-mesons, and air showers. 34 references

  11. Does the cosmic no-hair conjecture in brane scenarios follow from general relativity?

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, S

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we examine the cosmic no-hair conjecture (CNHC) in braneworld scenarios. For the validity of this conjecture, in addition to the strong- and weak-energy conditions for the matter field, a similar type of assumption is made on the quadratic correction term and there is a restriction on the non-local term. It is shown using examples with realistic fluid models that strong- and weak-energy conditions are sufficient for the CNHC in braneworld scenarios.

  12. Critical decisions on Cosmic Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Eddington had two aims, both remarkable and very pertinent to front-line astronomical interests. The first was to look for Earth-like planets outside our solar system - one of the key goals in the search to understand how life came to be, how it is that we live where we do in the universe and whether there are other potential life-supporting environments 'out there'. At the same time it was going to follow the path that the ESA-NASA mission SOHO had taken with the Sun of using astroseismology to look 'inside' stars. In the longer term, the loss of this one mission will not stop ESA and the scientific community pursuing the grand quests to which it would have contributed. The loss of the BepiColombo lander is also hard to take scientifically. ESA, in conjunction with the Japanese space agency, JAXA, will still put two orbiters around Mercury but the ‘ground truth’ provided by the lander is a big loss. However, to land on a planet so near the Sun is no small matter and was a bridge too far in present circumstances, and this chance for Europe to be first has probably been lost. The origins of the problems were recognised at the ESA Council meeting held in June. Several sudden demands on finance occurred in the spring, the most obvious and public being the unforeseen Ariane 5 grounding in January, delaying the launches of Rosetta and Smart-1. A temporary loan of EUR 100 million was granted, but must be paid back out of present resources by the end of 2006. ESA's SPC was therefore caught in a vice. Immediate mission starts had to be severely limited and the overall envelope of the programme contained. With this week’s decisions, the SPC has brought the scope of the Cosmic Vision programme down to a level that necessarily reflects the financial conditions rather than the ambitions of the scientific community. A long and painful discussion during the SPC meeting resulted in the conclusion that only one new mission can be started at this time, namely LISA Pathfinder

  13. MCNP6 Cosmic-Source Option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinney, Gregg W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Armstrong, Hirotatsu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; James, Michael R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clem, John [University of Delaware, BRI; Goldhagen, Paul [DHS, National Urban Security Technology Laboratory

    2012-06-19

    MCNP is a Monte Carlo radiation transport code that has been under development for over half a century. Over the last decade, the development team of a high-energy offshoot of MCNP, called MCNPX, has implemented several physics and algorithm improvements important for modeling galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) interactions with matter. In this presentation, we discuss the latest of these improvements, a new Cosmic-Source option, that has been implemented in MCNP6.

  14. Geometry and groups for cosmic topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background is measured by satellite observation with great precision. It offers insight into its origin in early states of the universe. Unexpected low multipole amplitudes of the incoming CMB radiation may be due to a multiply connected topology of cosmic 3-space. We present and analyze the geometry and homotopy for the family of Platonic spherical 3-manifolds, provide their harmonic analysis, and formulate topological selection rules.

  15. ACORDE a cosmic ray detector for ALICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, A.; Gamez, E.; Herrera, G.; Lopez, R.; Leon-Monzon, I.; Martinez, M.I.; Pagliarone, C.; Paic, G.; Roman, S.; Tejeda, G.; Vargas, M.A.; Vergara, S.; Villasenor, L.; Zepeda, A.

    2007-01-01

    ACORDE is one of the ALICE detectors, presently under construction at CERN. It consists of an array of plastic scintillator counters placed on the three upper faces of the ALICE magnet. It will act as a cosmic ray trigger, and, together with other ALICE sub-detectors, will provide precise information on cosmic rays with primary energies around 10 15 -10 17 eV. Here we describe the design of ACORDE along with the present status and integration into ALICE

  16. Cosmic statistics on linear scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papai, Peter

    We use the formalism of Szapudi (2004) to derive full explicit expressions for the linear two-point correlation function, including redshift space distortions and large angle effects. We take into account a non-perturbative geometric term in the Jacobian, which is still linear in terms of the dynamics. This term had been identified previously (Kaiser, 1987; Hamilton and Culhane, 1996), but has been neglected in all subsequent explicit calculations of the linear redshift space two-point correlation function. Our results represent a significant correction to previous explicit expressions and608are in excellent agreement with our measurements in the Hubble Volume Simulation. We measure the matter probability distribution function (PDF) via counts in cells in a volume limited subsample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Luminous Red Galaxy Catalog on scales from 30 h-1 Mpc to 150 h-1Mpc and estimate the linear integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect produced by supervoids and superclusters in the tail of the PDF. We characterize the PDF by the variance, S3, and S4, and study in simulations the systematic effects due to finite volume, survey shape and redshift distortion. We compare our measurement to the prediction of ΛCDM with linear bias and find a good agreement. We use the moments to approximate the tail of the PDF with analytic functions. A simple Gaussian model for the superstructures appears to be consistent with the claim by Granett et al. (2008) that density fluctuations on 100 h-1Mpc scales produce hot and cold spots with DeltaT ≈ 10mu K on the cosmic microwave background. We calculate the full density and ISW profiles of spherical superstructures. We find that the Gaussian assumptions capable of describing N-body simulations and simulated ISW maps remarkably well on large scales. We construct an ISW map based on locations of superstructures identified previously in the SDSS Luminous Red Galaxy sample. A matched filter analysis of the cosmic microwave

  17. Reminiscences of cosmic ray research in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Peraza, Jorge

    2009-11-01

    Cosmic ray research in Mexico dates from the early 1930s with the work of the pioneering physicist, Manuel Sandoval Vallarta and his students from Mexico. Several experiments of international significance were carried out during that period in Mexico: they dealt with the geomagnetic latitude effect, the north-south and west-east asymmetry of cosmic ray intensity, and the sign of the charge of cosmic rays. The international cosmic ray community has met twice in Mexico for the International Cosmic Ray Conferences (ICRC): the fourth was held in Guanajuato in 1955, and the 30th took place in Mérida, in 2007. In addition, an international meeting on the Pierre Auger Collaboration was held in Morelia in 1999, and the International Workshop on Observing UHE Cosmic Rays took place in Metepec in 2000. A wide range of research topics has been developed, from low-energy Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) to the UHE. Instrumentation has evolved since the early 1950s, from a Simpson type neutron monitor installed in Mexico City (2300 m asl) to a solar neutron telescope and an EAS Cherenkov array, (within the framework of the Auger International Collaboration), both at present operating on Mt. Sierra La Negra in the state of Puebla (4580 m asl). Research collaboration has been undertaken with many countries; in particular, the long-term collaboration with Russian scientists has been very fruitful.

  18. Dosimetry of environmental radiations (cosmic ray)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Keizo

    1978-01-01

    Cosmic ray is dominant as environmental radiation, though the experimental determination made on cosmic ray doses is few in Japan. The free air ionization intensity at sea level due to cosmic ray has been estimated in the Bay of Wakasa, Japan, at middle geomagnetic latitude (25 deg. N), in October 1977. The ionization chambers used were two air and one argon types. Where the responses to cosmic and terrestrial gamma rays were equal, the ionization intensity due to cosmic ray was obtained by subtracting the ionization intensity due to terrestrial gamma ray from the total ionization intensity. As the terrestrial gamma ray, (1) U-238 series, Th-232 series, and K-40 in seawater, (2) K-40 in the material of a wooden ship, and (3) Rn-222 and its daughter products in the atmosphere were considered. The result of free air ionization due to cosmic ray with the argon chamber was slightly smaller than those with the other two air chambers; however, both were in good agreement within standard errors. (JPN.)

  19. Cosmology with cosmic shear observations: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbinger, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Cosmic shear is the distortion of images of distant galaxies due to weak gravitational lensing by the large-scale structure in the Universe. Such images are coherently deformed by the tidal field of matter inhomogeneities along the line of sight. By measuring galaxy shape correlations, we can study the properties and evolution of structure on large scales as well as the geometry of the Universe. Thus, cosmic shear has become a powerful probe into the nature of dark matter and the origin of the current accelerated expansion of the Universe. Over the last years, cosmic shear has evolved into a reliable and robust cosmological probe, providing measurements of the expansion history of the Universe and the growth of its structure. We review here the principles of weak gravitational lensing and show how cosmic shear is interpreted in a cosmological context. Then we give an overview of weak-lensing measurements, and present the main observational cosmic-shear results since it was discovered 15 years ago, as well as the implications for cosmology. We then conclude with an outlook on the various future surveys and missions, for which cosmic shear is one of the main science drivers, and discuss promising new weak cosmological lensing techniques for future observations.

  20. Recent developments in cosmic ray physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasi, P. [INAF/Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi, 5 50125 Firenze (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute (INFN), Viale F. Crispi 6, 60100 L' Aquila (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    The search for a theory of the origin of cosmic rays that may be considered as a standard, agreeable model is still ongoing. On one hand, much circumstantial evidence exists of the fact that supernovae in our Galaxy play a crucial role in producing the bulk of cosmic rays observed on Earth. On the other hand, important questions about their ability to accelerate particles up to the knee remain unanswered. The common interpretation of the knee as a feature coinciding with the maximum energy of the light component of cosmic rays and a transition to a gradually heavier mass composition is mainly based on KASCADE results. Some recent data appear to question this finding: YAC1 – Tibet Array and ARGO-YBJ find a flux reduction in the light component at ∼ 700 TeV, appreciably below the knee. Whether the maximum energy of light nuclei is as high as 3000 TeV or rather as low as a few hundred TeV has very important consequences on the supernova remnant paradigm for the origin of cosmic rays, as well on the crucial issue of the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays. In such a complex phenomenological situation, it is important to have a clear picture of what is really known and what is not. Here I will discuss some solid and less solid aspects of the theory (or theories) for the origin of cosmic rays and the implications for future searches in this field.

  1. COSMOGENIC NEUTRINOS CHALLENGE THE COSMIC-RAY PROTON DIP MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinze, Jonas; Boncioli, Denise; Winter, Walter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Bustamante, Mauricio, E-mail: jonas.heinze@desy.de, E-mail: denise.boncioli@desy.de, E-mail: walter.winter@desy.de, E-mail: bustamanteramirez.1@osu.edu [Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP), The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2016-07-10

    The origin and composition of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) remain a mystery. The proton dip model describes their spectral shape in the energy range above 10{sup 9} GeV by pair production and photohadronic interactions with the cosmic microwave background. The photohadronic interactions also produce cosmogenic neutrinos peaking around 10{sup 9} GeV. We test whether this model is still viable in light of recent UHECR spectrum measurements from the Telescope Array experiment and upper limits on the cosmogenic neutrino flux from IceCube. While two-parameter fits have been already presented, we perform a full scan of the three main physical model parameters: source redshift evolution, injected proton maximal energy, and spectral index. We find qualitatively different conclusions compared to earlier two-parameter fits in the literature: a mild preference for a maximal energy cutoff at the sources instead of the Greisen–Zatsepin–Kuzmin cutoff, hard injection spectra, and strong source evolution. The predicted cosmogenic neutrino flux exceeds the IceCube limit for any parameter combination. As a result, the proton dip model is challenged at more than 95% C.L. This is strong evidence against this model independent of mass composition measurements.

  2. Cosmogenic Neutrinos Challenge the Cosmic-ray Proton Dip Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Jonas; Boncioli, Denise; Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter

    2016-07-01

    The origin and composition of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) remain a mystery. The proton dip model describes their spectral shape in the energy range above 109 GeV by pair production and photohadronic interactions with the cosmic microwave background. The photohadronic interactions also produce cosmogenic neutrinos peaking around 109 GeV. We test whether this model is still viable in light of recent UHECR spectrum measurements from the Telescope Array experiment and upper limits on the cosmogenic neutrino flux from IceCube. While two-parameter fits have been already presented, we perform a full scan of the three main physical model parameters: source redshift evolution, injected proton maximal energy, and spectral index. We find qualitatively different conclusions compared to earlier two-parameter fits in the literature: a mild preference for a maximal energy cutoff at the sources instead of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cutoff, hard injection spectra, and strong source evolution. The predicted cosmogenic neutrino flux exceeds the IceCube limit for any parameter combination. As a result, the proton dip model is challenged at more than 95% C.L. This is strong evidence against this model independent of mass composition measurements.

  3. Radio-controlled xenon flashers for atmospheric monitoring at the HiRes cosmic ray observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Wiencke, L R; Al-Seady, M; Belov, K; Bird, D J; Boyer, J; Chen, G F; Clay, R W; Dai, H Y; Dawson, B R; Denholm, P; Gloyn, J; He, D; Ho, Y; Huang, M A; Jui, C C H; Kidd, M J; Kieda, D B; Knapp, B; Ko, S; Larson, K; Loh, E C; Mannel, E J; Matthews, J N; Meyer, J R; Salman, A; Simpson, K M; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Steenblik, D; Tang, J K K; Taylor, S; Thomas, S B; Wilkinson, C R

    1999-01-01

    Stable, robust ultraviolet light sources for atmospheric monitoring and calibration pose a challenge for experiments that measure air fluorescence from cosmic ray air showers. One type of light source in use at the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) cosmic ray observatory features a xenon flashbulb at the focal point of a spherical mirror to produce a 1 mu s pulse of collimated light that includes a strong UV component. A computer-controlled touch tone radio system provides remote operation of bulb triggering and window heating. These devices, dubbed 'flashers', feature stand-alone operation, +-5% shot-to-shot stability, weather proof construction and are well suited for long-term field use. This paper describes the flashers, the radio control system, and a 12-unit array in operation at the HiRes cosmic ray observatory

  4. Cosmic-ray antiproton flux: an upper limit near that predicted for secondary production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badhwar, G.D.; Daniel, R.R.; Cleghorn, T.; Golden, R.L.; Lacy, J.L.; Stephens, S.A.; Zipse, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Data gathered from the 1976 September 16 balloon flight of the Johnson Space Center superconducting magnet spectrometer have been examined for the presence of cosmic-ray antiprotons. The ratio of antiprotons to protons, p-bar/p, in cosmic rays was found to be (0.03 +- 3.3) x 10 -4 in the rigidity interval 4.2 to 12.5 GV. The 95% confidence level upper limit for p-bar/p is thus 6.6 x 10 -4 . This upper limit is in strong contradiction to the prediction of the closed-galaxy model of Rasmussen and Peters, but is not inconsistent with the prediction of the modified closed-galaxy model of Peters and Westergaard. It is nearly equal to the predictions of conventional propagation models. This result provides an independent confirmation of the absence of primary antimatter in the cosmic rays at a level of approximately a few times 10 -4

  5. The cosmic merger rate of stellar black hole binaries from the Illustris simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapelli, Michela; Giacobbo, Nicola; Ripamonti, Emanuele; Spera, Mario

    2017-12-01

    The cosmic merger rate density of black hole binaries (BHBs) can give us an essential clue to constraining the formation channels of BHBs, in light of current and forthcoming gravitational wave detections. Following a Monte Carlo approach, we couple new population-synthesis models of BHBs with the Illustris cosmological simulation, to study the cosmic history of BHB mergers. We explore six population-synthesis models, varying the prescriptions for supernovae, common envelope and natal kicks. In most considered models, the cosmic BHB merger rate follows the same trend as the cosmic star formation rate. The normalization of the cosmic BHB merger rate strongly depends on the treatment of common envelope and on the distribution of natal kicks. We find that most BHBs merging within LIGO's instrumental horizon come from relatively metal-poor progenitors (history, from progenitors with a broad range of metallicities. Future detections will be crucial to put constraints on common envelope, on natal kicks, and on the BHB mass function.

  6. Probability distribution and statistical properties of spherically compensated cosmic regions in ΛCDM cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimi, Jean-Michel; de Fromont, Paul

    2018-04-01

    The statistical properties of cosmic structures are well known to be strong probes for cosmology. In particular, several studies tried to use the cosmic void counting number to obtain tight constrains on dark energy. In this paper, we model the statistical properties of these regions using the CoSphere formalism (de Fromont & Alimi) in both primordial and non-linearly evolved Universe in the standard Λ cold dark matter model. This formalism applies similarly for minima (voids) and maxima (such as DM haloes), which are here considered symmetrically. We first derive the full joint Gaussian distribution of CoSphere's parameters in the Gaussian random field. We recover the results of Bardeen et al. only in the limit where the compensation radius becomes very large, i.e. when the central extremum decouples from its cosmic environment. We compute the probability distribution of the compensation size in this primordial field. We show that this distribution is redshift independent and can be used to model cosmic voids size distribution. We also derive the statistical distribution of the peak parameters introduced by Bardeen et al. and discuss their correlation with the cosmic environment. We show that small central extrema with low density are associated with narrow compensation regions with deep compensation density, while higher central extrema are preferentially located in larger but smoother over/under massive regions.

  7. Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-03

    Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators In the past year, the grant was used for work in the field of topological phases, with emphasis on finding...surface of topological insulators. In the past 3 years, we have started a new direction, that of fractional topological insulators. These are materials...in which a topologically nontrivial quasi-flat band is fractionally filled and then subject to strong interactions. The views, opinions and/or

  8. When did cosmic acceleration start?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Pandolfi, Stefania

    2007-01-01

    A precise determination, and comparison, of the epoch of the onset of cosmic acceleration, at redshift z acc , and of dark energy domination, at z eq , provides an interesting measure with which to parametrize dark energy models. By combining several cosmological data sets, we place constraints on the redshift and age of cosmological acceleration. For a ΛCDM model, we find the constraint z acc =0.76±0.10 at 95% C.L., occurring 6.7±0.4 Gyr ago. Allowing a constant equation of state but different from -1 changes the constraint to z acc =0.81±0.12 (6.9±0.5 Gyr ago), while dynamical models markedly increase the error on the constraint z acc =0.81±0.30 (6.8±1.4 Gyr ago). Unified dark energy models such as silent quartessence yield z acc =0.8±0.16 (6.8±0.6 Gyr ago). Interestingly, we find that the best fit z acc and z eq are remarkably insensitive to both the cosmological data sets and theoretical dark energy models considered

  9. A theory of Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Dar, Arnon; Dar, Arnon; Rújula, Alvaro De

    2008-01-01

    We present a theory of non-solar cosmic rays (CRs) based on a single type of CR source at all energies. The total luminosity of the Galaxy, the broken power-law spectra with their observed slopes, the position of the `knee(s)' and `ankle', and the CR composition and its variation with energy are all predicted in terms of very simple and completely `standard' physics. The source of CRs is extremely `economical': it has only one parameter to be fitted to the ensemble of all of the mentioned data. All other inputs are `priors', that is, theoretical or observational items of information independent of the properties of the source of CRs, and chosen to lie in their pre-established ranges. The theory is part of a `unified view of high-energy astrophysics' --based on the `Cannonball' model of the relativistic ejecta of accreting black holes and neutron stars. If correct, this model is only lacking a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the `cannon' that emits the cannonballs in catastrophic processes of accreti...

  10. Cosmic Dark Radiation and Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Archidiacono

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available New measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB by the Planck mission have greatly increased our knowledge about the universe. Dark radiation, a weakly interacting component of radiation, is one of the important ingredients in our cosmological model which is testable by Planck and other observational probes. At the moment, the possible existence of dark radiation is an unsolved question. For instance, the discrepancy between the value of the Hubble constant, H0, inferred from the Planck data and local measurements of H0 can to some extent be alleviated by enlarging the minimal ΛCDM model to include additional relativistic degrees of freedom. From a fundamental physics point of view, dark radiation is no less interesting. Indeed, it could well be one of the most accessible windows to physics beyond the standard model, for example, sterile neutrinos. Here, we review the most recent cosmological results including a complete investigation of the dark radiation sector in order to provide an overview of models that are still compatible with new cosmological observations. Furthermore, we update the cosmological constraints on neutrino physics and dark radiation properties focusing on tensions between data sets and degeneracies among parameters that can degrade our information or mimic the existence of extra species.

  11. Anatomy of a cosmic jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanipe, J.

    1988-01-01

    Cosmic jets are thought to arise from a supermassive, compact object at the center of a galaxy or quasar - probably a rotating black hole with a mass of several billion suns. According to current theory, gas spiraling in toward the black hole becomes compressed and superheated. Much of the gas falls into the black hole, but the rest is discharged along the poles of the hole, either squirted out by radiation pressure in the disk or caught up in magnetic field lines issuing from the black hole. These whirling magnetic field lines act like eggbeaters, churning out gas at very high velocities. Among well-observed ratio galaxies and quasars, jets are not uncommon features: hundreds have been cataloged in a variety of configurations. What distinguishes the M87 jet from all other jets, however, is its proximity to our Galaxy. Lying only 55 million light-years away, the M87 jet is the nearest known jet observable from the Northern Hemisphere. This makes it the most accessible for detailed study. One of the most important results learned from the VLA observations is that the interior of the jet may be hollow. Instead of being filled with hot, rapidly flowing material, the jet may be a nonradiating conduit for high-energy electrons rushing out of the galaxy's nucleus. Optical and radio emission would be produced when the electrons encountered the boundary between the jet and the denser interstellar medium

  12. Cosmic-ray Positrons from Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, C.; Kopp, A.; Harding, A. K.; Gonthier, P. L.; Büsching, I.

    2015-07-01

    Observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope of γ-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP) light curves imply copious pair production in their magnetospheres, and not exclusively in those of younger pulsars. Such pair cascades may be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons, contributing to the observed enhancement in positron flux above ∼10 GeV. Fermi has also uncovered many new MSPs, impacting Galactic stellar population models. We investigate the contribution of Galactic MSPs to the flux of terrestrial cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. Our population synthesis code predicts the source properties of present-day MSPs. We simulate their pair spectra invoking an offset-dipole magnetic field. We also consider positrons and electrons that have been further accelerated to energies of several TeV by strong intrabinary shocks in black widow (BW) and redback (RB) systems. Since MSPs are not surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae or supernova shells, we assume that the pairs freely escape and undergo losses only in the intergalactic medium. We compute the transported pair spectra at Earth, following their diffusion and energy loss through the Galaxy. The predicted particle flux increases for non-zero offsets of the magnetic polar caps. Pair cascades from the magnetospheres of MSPs are only modest contributors around a few tens of GeV to the lepton fluxes measured by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, PAMELA, and Fermi, after which this component cuts off. The contribution by BWs and RBs may, however, reach levels of a few tens of percent at tens of TeV, depending on model parameters.

  13. COSMIC-RAY POSITRONS FROM MILLISECOND PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venter, C.; Kopp, A.; Büsching, I. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Harding, A. K. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gonthier, P. L. [Hope College, Department of Physics, Holland, MI (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope of γ-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP) light curves imply copious pair production in their magnetospheres, and not exclusively in those of younger pulsars. Such pair cascades may be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons, contributing to the observed enhancement in positron flux above ∼10 GeV. Fermi has also uncovered many new MSPs, impacting Galactic stellar population models. We investigate the contribution of Galactic MSPs to the flux of terrestrial cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. Our population synthesis code predicts the source properties of present-day MSPs. We simulate their pair spectra invoking an offset-dipole magnetic field. We also consider positrons and electrons that have been further accelerated to energies of several TeV by strong intrabinary shocks in black widow (BW) and redback (RB) systems. Since MSPs are not surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae or supernova shells, we assume that the pairs freely escape and undergo losses only in the intergalactic medium. We compute the transported pair spectra at Earth, following their diffusion and energy loss through the Galaxy. The predicted particle flux increases for non-zero offsets of the magnetic polar caps. Pair cascades from the magnetospheres of MSPs are only modest contributors around a few tens of GeV to the lepton fluxes measured by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, PAMELA, and Fermi, after which this component cuts off. The contribution by BWs and RBs may, however, reach levels of a few tens of percent at tens of TeV, depending on model parameters.

  14. Occupational cosmic radiation exposure and cancer in airline cabin crew

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojo, K.

    2013-03-01

    indicators, such as number of work years for occupational exposure, were used. When selecting the approach for further studies, the feasibility issues of the study affect the decision, i.e., can the flight history data of the cabin crew be collected by a survey or are the historical flight timetables available from the flight company. In the follow-up of more than 10,000 Nordic cabin crew members, the standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of all cancers was 1.16 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-1.25) for women and 1.39 (95% CI: 1.17-1.62) for men. These results confirm the evidence for an elevated overall cancer risk among cabin crew compared to the general population. Of specific cancer types, the significant risks were observed for breast cancer, cutaneous malignant melanoma, non-melanoma skin cancer, leukaemia, Kaposi sarcoma, laryngeal and pharyngeal cancer. This thesis cannot not provide an explanation for the elevated breast or skin cancer risk among aircraft cabin crew. Breast cancer is previously known to be strongly related to reproductive and hormonal factors - including endogenous hormone levels and exogenous hormone use. Thus, these factors may present the plausible explanation for the increased risk of breast cancer also among cabin crew. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the most likely explanation for the increased risk of skin cancers, but there was no evidence on cabin crew excess exposure to UVR compared to general population in this work. Finding a cause for the increased incidence of cancer among cabin crew warrants further studies. This work found no relation between estimated occupational cosmic radiation exposure and cancer risk. The current exposure limitations of radiation to cabin crew need not be altered. (orig.)

  15. Occupational cosmic radiation exposure and cancer in airline cabin crew.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojo, K.

    2013-03-15

    indicators, such as number of work years for occupational exposure, were used. When selecting the approach for further studies, the feasibility issues of the study affect the decision, i.e., can the flight history data of the cabin crew be collected by a survey or are the historical flight timetables available from the flight company. In the follow-up of more than 10,000 Nordic cabin crew members, the standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of all cancers was 1.16 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-1.25) for women and 1.39 (95% CI: 1.17-1.62) for men. These results confirm the evidence for an elevated overall cancer risk among cabin crew compared to the general population. Of specific cancer types, the significant risks were observed for breast cancer, cutaneous malignant melanoma, non-melanoma skin cancer, leukaemia, Kaposi sarcoma, laryngeal and pharyngeal cancer. This thesis cannot not provide an explanation for the elevated breast or skin cancer risk among aircraft cabin crew. Breast cancer is previously known to be strongly related to reproductive and hormonal factors - including endogenous hormone levels and exogenous hormone use. Thus, these factors may present the plausible explanation for the increased risk of breast cancer also among cabin crew. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the most likely explanation for the increased risk of skin cancers, but there was no evidence on cabin crew excess exposure to UVR compared to general population in this work. Finding a cause for the increased incidence of cancer among cabin crew warrants further studies. This work found no relation between estimated occupational cosmic radiation exposure and cancer risk. The current exposure limitations of radiation to cabin crew need not be altered. (orig.)

  16. One century of cosmic rays – A particle physicist's view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutton Christine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments on cosmic rays and the elementary particles share a common history that dates back to the 19th century. Following the discovery of radioactivity in the 1890s, the paths of the two fields intertwined, especially during the decades after the discovery of cosmic rays. Experiments demonstrated that the primary cosmic rays are positively charged particles, while other studies of cosmic rays revealed various new sub-atomic particles, including the first antiparticle. Techniques developed in common led to the birth of neutrino astronomy in 1987 and the first observation of a cosmic γ-ray source by a ground-based cosmic-ray telescope in 1989.

  17. The cosmic infrared background experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James; Battle, John; Cooray, Asantha; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Keating, Brian; Lange, Andrew; Lee, Dae-Hea; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Pak, Soojong; Renbarger, Tom; Sullivan, Ian; Tsumura, Kohji; Wada, Takehiko; Watabe, Toyoki

    2006-03-01

    The extragalactic background, based on absolute measurements reported by DIRBE and IRTS at 1.2 and 2.2 μm, exceeds the brightness derived from galaxy counts by up to a factor 5. Furthermore, both DIRBE and the IRTS report fluctuations in the near-infrared sky brightness that appear to have an extra-galactic origin, but are larger than expected from local ( z = 1-3) galaxies. These observations have led to speculation that a new class of high-mass stars or mini-quasars may dominate primordial star formation at high-redshift ( z ˜ 10-20), which, in order to explain the excess in the near-infrared background, must be highly luminous but produce a limited amount of metals and X-ray photons. Regardless of the nature of the sources, if a significant component of the near-infrared background comes from first-light galaxies, theoretical models generically predict a prominent near-infrared spectral feature from the redshifted Lyman cutoff, and a distinctive fluctuation power spectrum. We are developing a rocket-borne instrument (the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment, or CIBER) to search for signatures of primordial galaxy formation in the cosmic near-infrared extra-galactic background. CIBER consists of a wide-field two-color camera, a low-resolution absolute spectrometer, and a high-resolution narrow-band imaging spectrometer. The cameras will search for spatial fluctuations in the background on angular scales from 7″ to 2°, where a first-light galaxy signature is expected to peak, over a range of angular scales poorly covered by previous experiments. CIBER will determine if the fluctuations reported by the IRTS arise from first-light galaxies or have a local origin. In a short rocket flight CIBER has sensitivity to probe fluctuations 100× fainter than IRTS/DIRBE, with sufficient resolution to remove local-galaxy correlations. By jointly observing regions of the sky studied by Spitzer and ASTRO-F, CIBER will build a multi-color view of the near

  18. Strong Arcwise Connectedness

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza, Benjamin; Gartside, Paul; Kovan-Bakan, Merve; Mamatelashvili, Ana

    2012-01-01

    A space is `n-strong arc connected' (n-sac) if for any n points in the space there is an arc in the space visiting them in order. A space is omega-strong arc connected (omega-sac) if it is n-sac for all n. We study these properties in finite graphs, regular continua, and rational continua. There are no 4-sac graphs, but there are 3-sac graphs and graphs which are 2-sac but not 3-sac. For every n there is an n-sac regular continuum, but no regular continuum is omega-sac. There is an omega-sac ...

  19. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally......'s scenarios have some valuable future or admitted that killing them is not seriously morally wrong. Finally, if "valuable future" is interpreted as referring to objective standards, one ends up with implausible and unpalatable moral claims....

  20. Cosmographic Constraints and Cosmic Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Capozziello

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of reproducing dark energy effects is reviewed here with particular interest devoted to cosmography. We summarize some of the most relevant cosmological models, based on the assumption that the corresponding barotropic equations of state evolve as the universe expands, giving rise to the accelerated expansion. We describe in detail the ΛCDM (Λ-Cold Dark Matter and ωCDM models, considering also some specific examples, e.g., Chevallier–Polarsky–Linder, the Chaplygin gas and the Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati cosmological model. Finally, we consider the cosmological consequences of f(R and f(T gravities and their impact on the framework of cosmography. Keeping these considerations in mind, we point out the model-independent procedure related to cosmography, showing how to match the series of cosmological observables to the free parameters of each model. We critically discuss the role played by cosmography, as a selection criterion to check whether a particular model passes or does not present cosmological constraints. In so doing, we find out cosmological bounds by fitting the luminosity distance expansion of the redshift, z, adopting the recent Union 2.1 dataset of supernovae, combined with the baryonic acoustic oscillation and the cosmic microwave background measurements. We perform cosmographic analyses, imposing different priors on the Hubble rate present value. In addition, we compare our results with recent PLANCK limits, showing that the ΛCDM and ωCDM models seem to be the favorite with respect to other dark energy models. However, we show that cosmographic constraints on f(R and f(T cannot discriminate between extensions of General Relativity and dark energy models, leading to a disadvantageous degeneracy problem.

  1. The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James; Battle, J.; Cooray, A.; Hristov, V.; Kawada, M.; Keating, B.; Lee, D.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Nam, U.; Renbarger, T.; Sullivan, I.; Tsumura, K.; Wada, T.; Zemcov, M.

    2009-01-01

    We are developing the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER) to search for signatures of first-light galaxy emission in the extragalactic background. The first generation of stars produce characteristic signatures in the near-infrared extragalactic background, including a redshifted Ly-cutoff feature and a characteristic fluctuation power spectrum, that may be detectable with a specialized instrument. CIBER consists of two wide-field cameras to measure the fluctuation power spectrum, and a low-resolution and a narrow-band spectrometer to measure the absolute background. The cameras will search for fluctuations on angular scales from 7 arcseconds to 2 degrees, where the first-light galaxy spatial power spectrum peaks. The cameras have the necessary combination of sensitivity, wide field of view, spatial resolution, and multiple bands to make a definitive measurement. CIBER will determine if the fluctuations reported by Spitzer arise from first-light galaxies. The cameras observe in a single wide field of view, eliminating systematic errors associated with mosaicing. Two bands are chosen to maximize the first-light signal contrast, at 1.6 um near the expected spectral maximum, and at 1.0 um; the combination is a powerful discriminant against fluctuations arising from local sources. We will observe regions of the sky surveyed by Spitzer and Akari. The low-resolution spectrometer will search for the redshifted Lyman cutoff feature in the 0.7 - 1.8 um spectral region. The narrow-band spectrometer will measure the absolute Zodiacal brightness using the scattered 854.2 nm Ca II Fraunhofer line. The spectrometers will test if reports of a diffuse extragalactic background in the 1 - 2 um band continues into the optical, or is caused by an under estimation of the Zodiacal foreground. We report performance of the assembled and tested instrument as we prepare for a first sounding rocket flight in early 2009. CIBER is funded by the NASA/APRA sub-orbital program.

  2. Cosmology Quantized in Cosmic Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, M

    2004-06-03

    This paper discusses the problem of inflation in the context of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Cosmology. We show how, after a simple change of variables, to quantize the problem in a way which parallels the classical discussion. The result is that two of the Einstein equations arise as exact equations of motion and one of the usual Einstein equations (suitably quantized) survives as a constraint equation to be imposed on the space of physical states. However, the Friedmann equation, which is also a constraint equation and which is the basis of the Wheeler-deWitt equation, acquires a welcome quantum correction that becomes significant for small scale factors. We discuss the extension of this result to a full quantum mechanical derivation of the anisotropy ({delta} {rho}/{rho}) in the cosmic microwave background radiation, and the possibility that the extra term in the Friedmann equation could have observable consequences. To clarify the general formalism and explicitly show why we choose to weaken the statement of the Wheeler-deWitt equation, we apply the general formalism to de Sitter space. After exactly solving the relevant Heisenberg equations of motion we give a detailed discussion of the subtleties associated with defining physical states and the emergence of the classical theory. This computation provides the striking result that quantum corrections to this long wavelength limit of gravity eliminate the problem of the big crunch. We also show that the same corrections lead to possibly measurable effects on the CMB radiation. For the sake of completeness, we discuss the special case, {lambda} = 0, and its relation to Minkowski space. Finally, we suggest interesting ways in which these techniques can be generalized to cast light on the question of chaotic or eternal inflation. In particular, we suggest one can put an experimental lower bound on the distance to a universe with a scale factor very different from our own, by looking at its effects on our CMB

  3. Constraints on particle dark matter from cosmic-ray antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornengo, N.; Vittino, A.; Maccione, L.

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic-ray antiprotons represent an important channel for dark matter indirect-detection studies. Current measurements of the antiproton flux at the top of the atmosphere and theoretical determinations of the secondary antiproton production in the Galaxy are in good agreement, with no manifest deviation which could point to an exotic contribution in this channel. Therefore, antiprotons can be used as a powerful tool for constraining particle dark matter properties. By using the spectrum of PAMELA data from 50 MV to 180 GV in rigidity, we derive bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross section (or decay rate, for decaying dark matter) for the whole spectrum of dark matter annihilation (decay) channels and under different hypotheses of cosmic-rays transport in the Galaxy and in the heliosphere. For typical models of galactic propagation, the constraints are strong, setting a lower bound on the dark matter mass of a ''thermal'' relic at about 40–80 GeV for hadronic annihilation channels. These bounds are enhanced to about 150 GeV on the dark matter mass, when large cosmic-rays confinement volumes in the Galaxy are considered, and are reduced to 3–4 GeV for annihilation to light quarks (no bound for heavy-quark production) when the confinement volume is small. Bounds for dark matter lighter than few tens of GeV are due to the low energy part of the PAMELA spectrum, an energy region where solar modulation is relevant: to this aim, we have implemented a detailed solution of the transport equation in the heliosphere, which allowed us not only to extend bounds to light dark matter, but also to determine the uncertainty on the constraints arising from solar modulation modelling. Finally, we estimate the impact of soon-to-come AMS-02 data on the antiproton constraints

  4. Cosmic Blasts Much More Common, Astronomers Discover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    explosions is that the blasts that produce gamma rays and X-rays have disks of material rotating rapidly about the central object," Soderberg said. The powerful gamma ray bursts tap the tremendous gravitational energy of their black hole to produce strong beams of energetic radiation, while less-energetic X-ray bursts like the Feburary event tap energy from the strong magnetic field of the magnetar, the scientists speculated. "This discovery means that the 'zoo' of cosmic explosions has just gotten more numerous and more diverse. It also means that our understanding of how the cores of massive stars collapse to produce this variety of explosions is less complete than we had thought," Frail added. Multiwavelength follow-up observations were required by the team to measure the total energy release of the explosion. In particular, Soderberg adds that "Radio observations with the Very Large Array were additionally required to determine the geometry of the ejecta. We find that unlike typical GRBs which produce pencil-beam jets, this object more resembles a spherical explosion." In addition to Soderberg and Frail, the research team includes Shri Kulkarni. Ehud Nakar, Edo Berger, Brian Cameron, Avishay Gal-Yam, Re'em Sari, Mansi Kasiwal, Eran Ofek, Arne Rau, Brad Cenko, Eric Persson and Dae-Sik Moon of Caltech, Derrick Fox and Dave Burrows of Pennsylvania State University, Roger Chevalier of the University of Virginia, Tsvi Piran of the Hebrew University, Paul Price of the University of Hawaii, Brian Schmidt of Mount Stromlo Observatory in Australia, Guy Pooley of the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory in the UK, Bryan Penprase of Pomona College, and Neil Gehrels of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  5. On the origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulsrud, Russell M.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    2008-04-01

    We review the extensive and controversial literature concerning how the cosmic magnetic fields pervading nearly all galaxies and clusters of galaxies actually got started. Some observational evidence supports a hypothesis that the field is already moderately strong at the beginning of the life of a galaxy and its disc. One argument involves the chemical abundance of the light elements Be and B, while a second one is based on the detection of strong magnetic fields in very young high red shift galaxies. Since this problem of initial amplification of cosmic magnetic fields involves important plasma problems it is obvious that one must know the plasma in which the amplification occurs. Most of this review is devoted to this basic problem and for this it is necessary to devote ourselves to reviewing studies that take place in environments in which the plasma properties are most clearly understood. For this reason the authors have chosen to restrict themselves almost completely to studies of dynamos in our Galaxy. It is true that one can get a much better idea of the grand scope of galactic fields in extragalactic systems. However, most mature galaxies share the same dilemma as ours of overcoming important plasma problems. Since the authors are both trained in plasma physics we may be biased in pursuing this approach, but we feel it is justified by the above argument. In addition we feel we can produce a better review by staying close to that which we know best. In addition we have chosen not to consider the saturation problem of the galactic magnetic field since if the original dynamo amplification fails the saturation question does not arise. It is generally accepted that seed fields, whose strength is of order 10-20 G, easily spring up in the era preceding galaxy formation. Several mechanisms have been proposed to amplify these seed magnetic fields to a coherent structure with the microgauss strengths of the currently observed galactic magnetic fields. The standard

  6. On the origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulsrud, Russell M; Zweibel, Ellen G

    2008-01-01

    We review the extensive and controversial literature concerning how the cosmic magnetic fields pervading nearly all galaxies and clusters of galaxies actually got started. Some observational evidence supports a hypothesis that the field is already moderately strong at the beginning of the life of a galaxy and its disc. One argument involves the chemical abundance of the light elements Be and B, while a second one is based on the detection of strong magnetic fields in very young high red shift galaxies. Since this problem of initial amplification of cosmic magnetic fields involves important plasma problems it is obvious that one must know the plasma in which the amplification occurs. Most of this review is devoted to this basic problem and for this it is necessary to devote ourselves to reviewing studies that take place in environments in which the plasma properties are most clearly understood. For this reason the authors have chosen to restrict themselves almost completely to studies of dynamos in our Galaxy. It is true that one can get a much better idea of the grand scope of galactic fields in extragalactic systems. However, most mature galaxies share the same dilemma as ours of overcoming important plasma problems. Since the authors are both trained in plasma physics we may be biased in pursuing this approach, but we feel it is justified by the above argument. In addition we feel we can produce a better review by staying close to that which we know best. In addition we have chosen not to consider the saturation problem of the galactic magnetic field since if the original dynamo amplification fails the saturation question does not arise. It is generally accepted that seed fields, whose strength is of order 10 -20 G, easily spring up in the era preceding galaxy formation. Several mechanisms have been proposed to amplify these seed magnetic fields to a coherent structure with the microgauss strengths of the currently observed galactic magnetic fields. The standard

  7. A COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND LENSING MASS MAP AND ITS CORRELATION WITH THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holder, G. P.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Viero, M. P.; Bock, J. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Zahn, O. [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, University of California, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Aird, K. A. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Benson, B. A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Brodwin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Cho, H-M. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); George, E. M. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Halverson, N. W. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); and others

    2013-07-01

    We use a temperature map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) obtained using the South Pole Telescope at 150 GHz to construct a map of the gravitational convergence to z {approx} 1100, revealing the fluctuations in the projected mass density. This map shows individual features that are significant at the {approx}4{sigma} level, providing the first image of CMB lensing convergence. We cross-correlate this map with Herschel/SPIRE maps covering 90 deg{sup 2} at wavelengths of 500, 350, and 250 {mu}m. We show that these submillimeter (submm) wavelength maps are strongly correlated with the lensing convergence map, with detection significances in each of the three submm bands ranging from 6.7{sigma} to 8.8{sigma}. We fit the measurement of the cross power spectrum assuming a simple constant bias model and infer bias factors of b = 1.3-1.8, with a statistical uncertainty of 15%, depending on the assumed model for the redshift distribution of the dusty galaxies that are contributing to the Herschel/SPIRE maps.

  8. LHCf sheds new light on cosmic rays

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectrum of the single photon obtained using data from the LHCf experiment has turned out to be very different from that predicted by the theoretical models used until now to describe the interactions between very high-energy cosmic rays and the earth's atmosphere. The consequences of this discrepancy for cosmic ray studies could be significant.   Artistic impression of cosmic rays entering Earth's atmosphere. (Credit: Asimmetrie/Infn). It took physicists by surprise when analysis of the data collected by the two LHCf calorimeters in 2010 showed that high-energy cosmic rays don't interact with the atmosphere in the manner predicted by theory. The LHCf detectors, set up 140 metres either side of the ATLAS interaction point, are dedicated to the study of the secondary particles emitted at very small angles during proton-proton collisions in the LHC, with energies comparable to cosmic rays entering the earth's atmosphere at 2.5x1016 eV. The aim of the experiment is to r...

  9. A demonstration device for cosmic rays telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Salvatore

    2018-01-01

    We describe a hands-on accurate demonstrator for cosmic rays realized by six high school students. The main aim is to show the relevance and the functioning of the principal parts of a cosmic ray telescope (muon detector), with the help of two large sized wooden artefacts. The first one points out how cosmic rays can be tracked in a muon telescope, while the other one shows the key avalanche process of electronic ionization that effectively allows muon detection through a photomultiplier. Incoming cosmic rays are visualized in terms of laser beams, whose 3D trajectory is highlighted by turning on LEDs on two orthogonal matrices. Instead the avalanche ionization process is demonstrated through the avalanche falling off glass marbles on an inclined plane, finally turning on a LED. A pictured poster accompanying the demonstrator is as effective in assisting cosmic ray demonstration and its detection. The success of the demonstrator has been fully proven by the general public during a science festival, in which the corresponding project won the Honorable Mention in a dedicated competition.

  10. Current constraints on the cosmic growth history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bean, Rachel; Tangmatitham, Matipon

    2010-01-01

    We present constraints on the cosmic growth history with recent cosmological data, allowing for deviations from ΛCDM as might arise if cosmic acceleration is due to modifications to general relativity or inhomogeneous dark energy. We combine measures of the cosmic expansion history, from Type 1a supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, and the cosmic microwave background (CMB), with constraints on the growth of structure from recent galaxy, CMB, and weak lensing surveys along with integated Sachs Wolfe-galaxy cross correlations. Deviations from ΛCDM are parameterized by phenomenological modifications to the Poisson equation and the relationship between the two Newtonian potentials. We find modifications that are present at the time the CMB is formed are tightly constrained through their impact on the well-measured CMB acoustic peaks. By contrast, constraints on late-time modifications to the growth history, as might arise if modifications are related to the onset of cosmic acceleration, are far weaker, but remain consistent with ΛCDM at the 95% confidence level. For these late-time modifications we find that differences in the evolution on large and small scales could provide an interesting signature by which to search for modified growth histories with future wide angular coverage, large scale structure surveys.

  11. Xenia: A Probe of Cosmic Chemical Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Piro, L.; Xenia Collaboration

    2008-03-01

    Xenia is a concept study for a medium-size astrophysical cosmology mission addressing the Cosmic Origins key objective of NASA's Science Plan. The fundamental goal of this objective is to understand the formation and evolution of structures on various scales from the early Universe to the present time (stars, galaxies and the cosmic web). Xenia will use X-and γ-ray monitoring and wide field X-ray imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy to collect essential information from three major tracers of these cosmic structures: the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM), Galaxy Clusters and Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). Our goal is to trace the chemo-dynamical history of the ubiquitous warm hot diffuse baryon component in the Universe residing in cosmic filaments and clusters of galaxies up to its formation epoch (at z =0-2) and to map star formation and galaxy metal enrichment into the re-ionization era beyond z 6. The concept of Xenia (Greek for "hospitality") evolved in parallel with the Explorer of Diffuse Emission and GRB Explosions (EDGE), a mission proposed by a multinational collaboration to the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015. Xenia incorporates the European and Japanese collaborators into a U.S. led mission that builds on the scientific objectives and technological readiness of EDGE.

  12. Xenia: A Probe of Cosmic Chemical Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Piro, L.

    2008-01-01

    Xenia is a concept study for a medium-size astrophysical cosmology mission addressing the Cosmic Origins key objective of NASA's Science Plan. The fundamental goal of this objective is to understand the formation and evolution of structures on various scales from the early Universe to the present time (stars, galaxies and the cosmic web). Xenia will use X-and y-ray monitoring and wide field X-ray imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy to collect essential information from three major tracers of these cosmic structures: the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM), Galaxy Clusters and Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). Our goal is to trace the chemo-dynamical history of the ubiquitous warm hot diffuse baryon component in the Universe residing in cosmic filaments and clusters of galaxies up to its formation epoch (at z =0-2) and to map star formation and galaxy metal enrichment into the re-ionization era beyond z 6. The concept of Xenia (Greek for "hospitality") evolved in parallel with the Explorer of Diffuse Emission and GRB Explosions (EDGE), a mission proposed by a multinational collaboration to the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015. Xenia incorporates the European and Japanese collaborators into a U.S. led mission that builds on the scientific objectives and technological readiness of EDGE.

  13. Cosmic rays and tests of fundamental principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Mestres, Luis

    2011-03-01

    It is now widely acknowledged that cosmic rays experiments can test possible new physics directly generated at the Planck scale or at some other fundamental scale. By studying particle properties at energies far beyond the reach of any man-made accelerator, they can yield unique checks of basic principles. A well-known example is provided by possible tests of special relativity at the highest cosmic-ray energies. But other essential ingredients of standard theories can in principle be tested: quantum mechanics, uncertainty principle, energy and momentum conservation, effective space-time dimensions, hamiltonian and lagrangian formalisms, postulates of cosmology, vacuum dynamics and particle propagation, quark and gluon confinement, elementariness of particles…Standard particle physics or string-like patterns may have a composite origin able to manifest itself through specific cosmic-ray signatures. Ultra-high energy cosmic rays, but also cosmic rays at lower energies, are probes of both "conventional" and new Physics. Status, prospects, new ideas, and open questions in the field are discussed.

  14. Cosmic rays and tests of fundamental principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Mestres, Luis

    2011-01-01

    It is now widely acknowledged that cosmic rays experiments can test possible new physics directly generated at the Planck scale or at some other fundamental scale. By studying particle properties at energies far beyond the reach of any man-made accelerator, they can yield unique checks of basic principles. A well-known example is provided by possible tests of special relativity at the highest cosmic-ray energies. But other essential ingredients of standard theories can in principle be tested: quantum mechanics, uncertainty principle, energy and momentum conservation, effective space-time dimensions, hamiltonian and lagrangian formalisms, postulates of cosmology, vacuum dynamics and particle propagation, quark and gluon confinement, elementariness of particles... Standard particle physics or string-like patterns may have a composite origin able to manifest itself through specific cosmic-ray signatures. Ultra-high energy cosmic rays, but also cosmic rays at lower energies, are probes of both 'conventional' and new Physics. Status, prospects, new ideas, and open questions in the field are discussed.

  15. Cosmic Ray Interactions in Shielding Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ankney, Austin S.; Orrell, John L.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Troy, Meredith D.

    2011-09-08

    This document provides a detailed study of materials used to shield against the hadronic particles from cosmic ray showers at Earth’s surface. This work was motivated by the need for a shield that minimizes activation of the enriched germanium during transport for the MAJORANA collaboration. The materials suitable for cosmic-ray shield design are materials such as lead and iron that will stop the primary protons, and materials like polyethylene, borated polyethylene, concrete and water that will stop the induced neutrons. The interaction of the different cosmic-ray components at ground level (protons, neutrons, muons) with their wide energy range (from kilo-electron volts to giga-electron volts) is a complex calculation. Monte Carlo calculations have proven to be a suitable tool for the simulation of nucleon transport, including hadron interactions and radioactive isotope production. The industry standard Monte Carlo simulation tool, Geant4, was used for this study. The result of this study is the assertion that activation at Earth’s surface is a result of the neutronic and protonic components of the cosmic-ray shower. The best material to shield against these cosmic-ray components is iron, which has the best combination of primary shielding and minimal secondary neutron production.

  16. A strong comeback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marier, D.

    1992-01-01

    This article presents the results of a financial rankings survey which show a strong economic activity in the independent energy industry. The topics of the article include advisor turnover, overseas banks, and the increase in public offerings. The article identifies the top project finance investors for new projects and restructurings and rankings for lenders

  17. Cosmic ray measurements with the AMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bertucci, B

    2001-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) was flown in June 1998 on board of the shuttle DISCOVERY during its STS91 mission. During 10 days, AMS recorded about 100 Million triggers along a 51.7 inclined orbit at altitudes ranging from 320 to 390 Km. We report on the AMS measurement of the cosmic proton spectrum in the kinetic energy range 0.2 to 200 GeV and of the cosmic helium spectrum in the kinetic energy range 0.1 to 100 GeV/nucleon. The good accuracy of these measurements provides better constraints in the modelling of the primary cosmic ray fluxes, first ingredient for a correct calculation of the atmospheric nu fluxes.

  18. The propagation of galactic cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, A.N.

    1981-01-01

    Large scale (approximately 15 pc) turbulence in the interstellar medium (ISM) causes the firehose and mirror instabilities to occur. These produce small scale (approximately 10 -7 pc) magnetic irregularities, which scatter cosmic rays. We use pulsar scintillation data, and a model of the origin of these scintillations, to construct a slab model of the turbulent ISM. Then we find the amplitudes and wavelengths of the magnetic irregularities that arise, and we calculate the coefficients for the diffusion of cosmic rays along the interstellar magnetic fields. We incorporate this diffusion into our model of the turbulent ISM, and show that it can account naturally for both the lifetime of low energy cosmic rays, and the variation of their mean pathlength with energy. Our model has no galactic halo, and contains no scattering by Alfven waves. (author)

  19. Cosmic-Ray Observations with HAWC30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is a TeV gamma-ray and cosmic-ray detector currently under construction at an altitude of 4100 meters on the slope of Volc'an Sierra Negra near Puebla, Mexico. HAWC is an extensive air-shower array comprising 300 optically-isolated water Cherenkov detectors. Each detector contains 200,000 liters of filtered water and four upward-facing photomultiplier tubes. Since September 2012, 30 water Cherenkov detectors have been instrumented and operated in data acquisition. With 10 percent of the detector complete and six months of operation, the event statistics are already sufficient to perform detailed studies of cosmic rays observed at the site. We will report on cosmic-ray observations with HAWC30, in particular the detection and study of the shadow of the moon. From these observations, we infer the pointing accuracy of the detector and our angular resolution of the detector reconstruction.

  20. The Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanany, Shaul; Inflation Probe Mission Study Team

    2018-01-01

    The Probe of Inflation and Cosmic Origins will map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background over the entire sky with unprecedented sensitivity. It will search for gravity wave signals from the inflationary epoch, thus probing quantum gravity and constraining the energy scale of inflation; it will test the standard model of particle physics by measuring the number of light particles in the Universe and the mass of the neutrino; it will elucidate the nature of dark matter and search for new forms of matter in the early Universe; it will constrain star formation history over cosmic time; and it will determine the mechanisms of structure formation from galaxy cluster to stellar scales. I will review the status of design of this probe-scale mission.

  1. Cosmic evolution in a cyclic universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhardt, Paul J.; Turok, Neil

    2002-01-01

    Based on concepts drawn from the ekpyrotic scenario and M theory, we elaborate our recent proposal of a cyclic model of the universe. In this model, the universe undergoes an endless sequence of cosmic epochs which begin with the universe expanding from a 'big bang' and end with the universe contracting to a 'big crunch'. Matching from 'big crunch' to 'big bang' is performed according to the prescription recently proposed with Khoury, Ovrut and Seiberg. The expansion part of the cycle includes a period of radiation and matter domination followed by an extended period of cosmic acceleration at low energies. The cosmic acceleration is crucial in establishing the flat and vacuous initial conditions required for ekpyrosis and for removing the entropy, black holes, and other debris produced in the preceding cycle. By restoring the universe to the same vacuum state before each big crunch, the acceleration ensures that the cycle can repeat and that the cyclic solution is an attractor

  2. Consistency relation for cosmic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Sloth, Martin S.

    2012-12-01

    If cosmic magnetic fields are indeed produced during inflation, they are likely to be correlated with the scalar metric perturbations that are responsible for the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and large scale structure. Within an archetypical model of inflationary magnetogenesis, we show that there exists a new simple consistency relation for the non-Gaussian cross correlation function of the scalar metric perturbation with two powers of the magnetic field in the squeezed limit where the momentum of the metric perturbation vanishes. We emphasize that such a consistency relation turns out to be extremely useful to test some recent calculations in the literature. Apart from primordial non-Gaussianity induced by the curvature perturbations, such a cross correlation might provide a new observational probe of inflation and can in principle reveal the primordial nature of cosmic magnetic fields.

  3. Handbook of cosmic hazards and planetary defense

    CERN Document Server

    Allahdadi, Firooz

    2015-01-01

    Covers in a comprehensive fashion all aspects of cosmic hazards and possible strategies for contending with these threats through a comprehensive planetary defense strategy. This handbook brings together in a single reference work a rich blend of information about the various types of cosmic threats that are posed to human civilization by asteroids, comets, bolides, meteors, solar flares and coronal mass ejections, cosmic radiation and other types of threats that are only recently beginning to be understood and studied, such as investigation of the “cracks” in the protective shield provided by the Van Allen belts and the geomagnetosphere, of matter-antimatter collisions, orbital debris and radiological or biological contamination. Some areas that are addressed involve areas about which there is a good deal of information that has been collected for many decades by multiple space missions run by many different space agencies, observatories and scientific researchers. Other areas involving research and ...

  4. Does electromagnetic radiation accelerate galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The 'reactor' theories of Tsytovich and collaborators (1973) of cosmic-ray acceleration by electromagnetic radiation are examined in the context of galactic cosmic rays. It is shown that any isotropic synchrotron or Compton reactors with reasonable astrophysical parameters can yield particles with a maximum relativistic factor of only about 10,000. If they are to produce particles with higher relativistic factors, the losses due to inverse Compton scattering of the electromagnetic radiation in them outweigh the acceleration, and this violates the assumptions of the theory. This is a critical restriction in the context of galactic cosmic rays, which have a power-law spectrum extending up to a relativistic factor of 1 million.

  5. Cosmic rays and radiations from the cosmos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parizot, E.

    2005-12-01

    This document gathers a lot of recent information concerning cosmic radiations, it is divided into 4 parts. Part I: energy, mass and angular spectra of cosmic rays. Part II: general phenomenology of cosmic rays, this part deals with the standard model, the maximal energy of protons inside supernova remnants, nucleosynthesis of light elements, and super-bubbles. Part III: radiations from the cosmos, this part deals with high energy gamma rays, non-thermal radiation of super-bubbles, positron transport, and the Compton trail of gamma-ray bursts. Part IV: the Pierre Auger observatory (OPA), this part deals with the detection of gamma ray bursts at OPA, the measurement of anisotropy, and top-down models. (A.C.)

  6. Anomalous isotopic composition of cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1980-06-20

    Recent measurements of nonsolar isotopic patterns for the elements neon and (perhaps) magnesium in cosmic rays are interpreted within current models of stellar nucleosynthesis. One possible explanation is that the stars currently responsible for cosmic-ray synthesis in the Galaxy are typically super-metal-rich by a factor of two to three. Other possibilities include the selective acceleration of certain zones or masses of supernovas or the enhancement of /sup 22/Ne in the interstellar medium by mass loss from red giant stars and planetary nebulas. Measurements of critical isotopic ratios are suggested to aid in distinguishing among the various possibilities. Some of these explanations place significant constraints on the fraction of cosmic ray nuclei that must be fresh supernova debris and the masses of the supernovas involved. 1 figure, 3 tables.

  7. PRECISE COSMIC RAYS MEASUREMENTS WITH PAMELA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bruno

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The PAMELA experiment was launched on board the Resurs-DK1 satellite on June 15th 2006. The apparatus was designed to conduct precision studies of charged cosmic radiation over a wide energy range, from tens of MeV up to several hundred GeV, with unprecedented statistics. In five years of continuous data taking in space, PAMELA accurately measured the energy spectra of cosmic ray antiprotons and positrons, as well as protons, electrons and light nuclei, sometimes providing data in unexplored energetic regions. These important results have shed new light in several astrophysical fields like: an indirect search for Dark Matter, a search for cosmological antimatter (anti-Helium, and the validation of acceleration, transport and secondary production models of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Some of the most important items of Solar and Magnetospheric physics were also investigated. Here we present the most recent results obtained by the PAMELA experiment.

  8. Constraining pre big-bang-nucleosynthesis expansion using cosmic antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelke, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Catena, R. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Fornengo, N. [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Teorica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Masiero, A. [Pavoa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy); Pietroni, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy)

    2006-06-15

    A host of dark energy models and non-standard cosmologies predict an enhanced Hubble rate in the early Universe: perfectly viable models, which satisfy Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), cosmic microwave background and general relativity tests, may nevertheless lead to enhancements of the Hubble rate up to many orders of magnitude. In this paper we show that strong bounds on the pre-BBN evolution of the Universe may be derived, under the assumption that dark matter is a thermal relic, by combining the dark matter relic density bound with constraints coming from the production of cosmic-ray antiprotons by dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy. The limits we derive can be sizable and apply to the Hubble rate around the temperature of dark matter decoupling. For dark matter masses lighter than 100 GeV, the bound on the Hubble-rate enhancement ranges from a factor of a few to a factor of 30, depending on the actual cosmological model, while for a mass of 500 GeV the bound falls in the range 50-500. Uncertainties in the derivation of the bounds and situations where the bounds become looser are discussed. We finally discuss how these limits apply to some specific realizations of non-standard cosmologies: a scalar-tensor gravity model, kination models and a Randall-Sundrum D-brane model. (Orig.)

  9. Quantum stabilization of a hedgehog type of cosmic string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quandt, M.; Graham, N.; Weigel, H.

    2017-10-01

    Within a slightly simplified version of the electroweak standard model we investigate the stabilization of cosmic strings by fermion quantum fluctuations. Previous studies of quantum energies considered variants of the Nielsen-Olesen profile embedded in the electroweak gauge group and showed that configurations are favored for which the Higgs vacuum expectation value drops near the string core and the gauge field is suppressed. This work found that the strongest binding was obtained from strings that differ significantly from Nielsen-Olesen configurations, deforming essentially only the Higgs field in order to generate a strong attraction without inducing large gradients. Extending this analysis, we consider the leading quantum correction to the energy per unit length of a hedgehog type string, which, in contrast to the Nielsen-Olesen configuration, contains a pseudoscalar field. To employ the spectral method we develop the scattering and bound state problems for fermions in the background of a hedgehog string. Explicit occupation of bound state levels leads to strings that carry the quantum numbers of the bound fermions. We discuss the parameter space for which stable, hedgehog type cosmic strings emerge and reflect on phenomenological consequences of these findings.

  10. Conflicts of interests, confidentiality and censorship in health risk assessment: the example of an herbicide and a GMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Mesnage, Robin; Defarge, Nicolas; Spiroux de Vendômois, Joël

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the long-term toxicity of a Roundup-tolerant GM maize (NK603) and a whole Roundup pesticide formulation at environmentally relevant levels from 0.1 ppb. Our study was first published in Food and Chemical Toxicology (FCT) on 19 September, 2012. The first wave of criticisms arrived within a week, mostly from plant biologists without experience in toxicology. We answered all these criticisms. The debate then encompassed scientific arguments and a wave of ad hominem and potentially libellous comments appeared in different journals by authors having serious yet undisclosed conflicts of interests. At the same time, FCT acquired as its new assistant editor for biotechnology a former employee of Monsanto after he sent a letter to FCT to complain about our study. This is in particular why FCT asked for a post-hoc analysis of our raw data. On 19 November, 2013, the editor-in-chief requested the retraction of our study while recognizing that the data were not incorrect and that there was no misconduct and no fraud or intentional misinterpretation in our complete raw data - an unusual or even unprecedented action in scientific publishing. The editor argued that no conclusions could be drawn because we studied 10 rats per group over 2 years, because they were Sprague Dawley rats, and because the data were inconclusive on cancer. Yet this was known at the time of submission of our study. Our study was however never attended to be a carcinogenicity study. We never used the word 'cancer' in our paper. The present opinion is a summary of the debate resulting in this retraction, as it is a historic example of conflicts of interest in the scientific assessments of products commercialized worldwide. We also show that the decision to retract cannot be rationalized on any discernible scientific or ethical grounds. Censorship of research into health risks undermines the value and the credibility of science; thus, we republish our paper.

  11. Ideological Manipulation in the Form of Official Censorship: Audiovisual Tie-ins of Bestselling Novels in Spain under Franco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Gómez Castro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Whereas technical manipulation in the form of necessary “textual dislocations” (Diaz-Cintas 2012: 284 may be seen as a common object of study in audiovisual translation (AVT, ideological manipulation or a deliberate change from what is said (or shown in the original (ibid still seems to be under developed in the discipline. However, power plays have a lot to say in AVT, as can be illustrated with the repressive forces of censorship at certain times and periods. In the case of Franco’s dictatorship in Spain (1939-1975 and beyond the control of every cultural product which entered the country, both in written or audiovisual form, functioned as an ideological gatekeeper. The last years, however, were marked by a progressive weakening both of the regime and of its censoring mechanism. By then, the massive importation of North American best- selling novels took place, novels which were either commonly filmed afterwards or turned into a TV series, making them famous worldwide. This nurturing from literature of the film industry in the form of tie-ins was a very common synergy at the time, denounced and considered by some as commercial manipulation and social alienation (Carrero Eras 1977. In the present article, the effects of the censoring mechanism on some North American best-selling novels and their film counterparts will be examined, trying to reveal the manoeuvrings at stake and thus contribute to increase the research on the matter and, at the same time see if, the solitary act of reading versus the public broadcasting of a film had a say in the harshness applied to a product derived from the same root.

  12. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Models of spontaneous breaking of electroweak symmetry by a strong interaction do not have fine tuning/hierarchy problem. They are conceptually elegant and use the only mechanism of spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry that is known to occur in nature. The simplest model, minimal technicolor with extended technicolor interactions, is appealing because one can calculate by scaling up from QCD. But it is ruled out on many counts: inappropriately low quark and lepton masses (or excessive FCNC), bad electroweak data fits, light scalar and vector states, etc. However, nature may not choose the minimal model and then we are stuck: except possibly through lattice simulations, we are unable to compute and test the models. In the LHC era it therefore makes sense to abandon specific models (of strong EW breaking) and concentrate on generic features that may indicate discovery. The Technicolor Straw Man is not a model but a parametrized search strategy inspired by a remarkable generic feature of walking technicolor,...

  13. Preliminary Results of High-Energy Cosmic Ray Muons as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    quasi-periodicity. 1. Introduction. Cosmic ray studies are linked to many branches of physics and astrophysics. Cosmic ray experiments allow high-energy physics researchers to extend their interaction models to super-accelerator energies, lead-.

  14. Plasmons in strong superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldo, M.; Ducoin, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the possible plasmon excitations that can occur in systems where strong superconductivity is present. In these systems the plasmon energy is comparable to or smaller than the pairing gap. As a prototype of these systems we consider the proton component of Neutron Star matter just below the crust when electron screening is not taken into account. For the realistic case we consider in detail the different aspects of the elementary excitations when the proton, electron components are considered within the Random-Phase Approximation generalized to the superfluid case, while the influence of the neutron component is considered only at qualitative level. Electron screening plays a major role in modifying the proton spectrum and spectral function. At the same time the electron plasmon is strongly modified and damped by the indirect coupling with the superfluid proton component, even at moderately low values of the gap. The excitation spectrum shows the interplay of the different components and their relevance for each excitation modes. The results are relevant for neutrino physics and thermodynamical processes in neutron stars. If electron screening is neglected, the spectral properties of the proton component show some resemblance with the physical situation in high-T c superconductors, and we briefly discuss similarities and differences in this connection. In a general prospect, the results of the study emphasize the role of Coulomb interaction in strong superconductors.

  15. On horizons and the Cosmic Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, George F. R.

    2006-07-01

    Susskind claims in his recent book The Cosmic Landscape that evidence for the existence and nature of ‘pocket universes’ in a multiverse would be available in the detailed nature of the Cosmic Blackbody Background Radiation that constantly bathes all parts of our observable universe. I point out that acceptance of the complex chain of argument involved does not imply possible experimental verification of multiverses at the present time. Rather this claim relates only to theoretically possible observations in the very far future of the universe.

  16. Gravitational Lensing Signatures of Long Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    De Laix, A A; Vachaspati, T; Laix, Andrew A. de; Krauss, Lawrence M.; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    1997-01-01

    The gravitational lensing by long, wiggly cosmic strings is shown to produce a large number of lensed images of a background source. In addition to pairs of images on either side of the string, a number of small images outline the string due to small-scale structure on the string. This image pattern could provide a highly distinctive signature of cosmic strings. Since the optical depth for multiple imaging of distant quasar sources by long strings may be comparable to that by galaxies, these image patterns should be clearly observable in the next generation of redshift surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  17. Cosmic Origins Program Annual Technology Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Bruce Thai; Neff, Susan Gale

    2016-01-01

    What is the Cosmic Origins (COR) Program? From ancient times, humans have looked up at the night sky and wondered: Are we alone? How did the universe come to be? How does the universe work? COR focuses on the second question. Scientists investigating this broad theme seek to understand the origin and evolution of the universe from the Big Bang to the present day, determining how the expanding universe grew into a grand cosmic web of dark matter enmeshed with galaxies and pristine gas, forming, merging, and evolving over time.

  18. Thin shells joining local cosmic string geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eiroa, Ernesto F. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria Pabellon I, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (IAFE, CONICET-UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rubin de Celis, Emilio; Simeone, Claudio [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria Pabellon I, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ciudad Universitaria Pabellon I, IFIBA-CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-10-15

    In this article we present a theoretical construction of spacetimes with a thin shell that joins two different local cosmic string geometries. We study two types of global manifolds, one representing spacetimes with a thin shell surrounding a cosmic string or an empty region with Minkowski metric, and the other corresponding to wormholes which are not symmetric across the throat located at the shell. We analyze the stability of the static configurations under perturbations preserving the cylindrical symmetry. For both types of geometries we find that the static configurations can be stable for suitable values of the parameters. (orig.)

  19. Cosmic strings: A problem or a solution?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.P.; Bouchet, F.R.

    1987-10-01

    The most fundamental issue in the theory of cosmic strings is addressed by means of Numerical Simulations: the existence of a scaling solution. The resolution of this question will determine whether cosmic strings can form the basis of an attractive theory of galaxy formation or prove to be a cosmological disaster like magnetic monopoles or domain walls. After a brief discussion of our numerical technique, results are presented which, though still preliminary, offer the best support to date of this scaling hypothesis. 6 refs., 2 figs

  20. Search for Antihelium in the Cosmic Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Streitmatter, R.E.; Barbier, L.M.; Christian, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    The balloon-borne Isotope Matter-Antimatter Experiment (IMAX) was flown from Lynn Lake, Manitoba Canada on July 16-17, 1992. Sixteen hours of data were taken. Measurements of multiple dE/dX, rigidity, and time of flight were used to search for antihelium in the cosmic radiation. A report on the r......The balloon-borne Isotope Matter-Antimatter Experiment (IMAX) was flown from Lynn Lake, Manitoba Canada on July 16-17, 1992. Sixteen hours of data were taken. Measurements of multiple dE/dX, rigidity, and time of flight were used to search for antihelium in the cosmic radiation. A report...

  1. COSMIC RAYS: From knee to ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Despite the advent of TeV machines providing energies of 10 12 electronvolts, the highest particle energies by far are still provided by cosmic rays, where a sprinkling of particles from outer space go beyond 10 17 electronvolts, a hundred thousand times up on the highest laboratory levels. New results from the 'Fly's Eye' cosmic ray detector in Utah provide new hints on the energy spectrum of these particles. Included in the sample is an event at 3 x 10 20 eV, the highest energy interaction ever recorded

  2. Cosmic Rays Astrophysics: The Discipline, Its Scope, and Its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation gives an overview of the discipline surrounding cosmic ray astrophysics. It includes information on recent assertions surrounding cosmic rays, exposure levels, and a short history with specific information on the origin, acceleration, transport, and modulation of cosmic rays.

  3. Strong-coupling approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, R.B.

    1984-03-01

    Standard path-integral techniques such as instanton calculations give good answers for weak-coupling problems, but become unreliable for strong-coupling. Here we consider a method of replacing the original potential by a suitably chosen harmonic oscillator potential. Physically this is motivated by the fact that potential barriers below the level of the ground-state energy of a quantum-mechanical system have little effect. Numerically, results are good, both for quantum-mechanical problems and for massive phi 4 field theory in 1 + 1 dimensions. 9 references, 6 figures

  4. Strong interaction and QFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, T.

    1981-01-01

    With an assumed weak multiplet structure for bosonic hadrons, which is consistent with the ΔI = 1/2 rule, it is shown that the strong interaction effective hamiltonian is compatible with the weak SU(2) x U(1) gauge transformation. Especially the rho-meson transforms as a triplet under SU(2)sub(w), and this is the origin of the rho-photon analogy. It is also shown that the existence of the non-vanishing Cabibbo angle is a necessary condition for the absence of the exotic hadrons. (orig.)

  5. Postal censorship of Bosnian public health institutions during the Second World War: The Independent State of Croatia versus Dr. Stanko Sielski.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalas, John A; Tahirović, Husref

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to present evidence of censorship during World War II by the Independent State of Croatia of one of its public health officials, Dr. Stanko Sielski who was a physician trained in epidemiology and public health. During World War II, he directed the Institute for Combating Endemic Syphilis in the Bosnian town Banja Luka. The staff under his direction consisted solely of Jewish physicians. We analyzed two groups of envelopes either sent by or to Dr. Stanko Sielski during the War and found evidence of censorship only in communications with a Jewish physician dated towards the end of the War. Dr. Stanko Sielski would be posthumously recognized for his efforts to shield his Jewish colleagues. The newly available, but still limited data, which we present indicates efforts to censor Dr. Stanko Sielski's postal communications towards the War's end. The censors targeted specifically Dr. Stanko Sielski's correspondences with the Jewish physicians he was protecting. This material highlights the many challenges his public health service experienced during the time of armed conflict. Copyright © 2016 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  6. Postal censorship of Bosnian public health institutions during the Second World War: The Independent State of Croatia versus Dr. Stanko Sielski

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Papalas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to present evidence of censorship during World War II by the Independent State of Croatia of one of its public health officials, Dr. Stanko Sielski who was a physician trained in epidemiology and public health. During World War II, he directed the Institute for Combating Endemic Syphilis in the Bosnian town Banja Luka. The staff under his direction consisted solely of Jewish physicians. We analyzed two groups of envelopes either sent by or to Dr. Stanko Sielski during the War and found evidence of censorship only in communications with a Jewish physician dated towards the end of the War. Dr. Stanko Sielski would be posthumously recognized for his efforts to shield his Jewish colleagues. Conclusion. The newly available, but still limited data, which we present indicates efforts to censor Dr. Stanko Sielski’s postal communications towards the War’s end. The censors targeted specifically Dr. Stanko Sielski’s correspondences with the Jewish physicians he was protecting. This material highlights the many challenges his public health service experienced during the time of armed conflict.

  7. Estimation of a monotone percentile residual life function under random censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Pereira, Alba M; de Uña-Álvarez, Jacobo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new estimator of a percentile residual life function with censored data under a monotonicity constraint. Specifically, it is assumed that the percentile residual life is a decreasing function. This assumption is useful when estimating the percentile residual life of units, which degenerate with age. We establish a law of the iterated logarithm for the proposed estimator, and its n-equivalence to the unrestricted estimator. The asymptotic normal distribution of the estimator and its strong approximation to a Gaussian process are also established. We investigate the finite sample performance of the monotone estimator in an extensive simulation study. Finally, data from a clinical trial in primary biliary cirrhosis of the liver are analyzed with the proposed methods. One of the conclusions of our work is that the restricted estimator may be much more efficient than the unrestricted one. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Empirical model for the Earth's cosmic ray shadow at 400 KM: prohibited cosmic ray access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humble, J.E.; Smart, D.F.; Shea, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility of constructing a unit sphere of access that describes the cosmic radiation allowed to an Earth-orbiting spacecraft is discussed. It is found that it is possible to model the occluded portion of the cosmic ray sphere of access as a circular projection with a diameter bounded by the satellite-Earth horizon. Maintaining tangency at the eastern edge of the spacecraft-Earth horizon, this optically occluded area is projected downward by an angle beta which is a function of the magnetic field inclination and cosmic ray arrival direction. This projected plane, corresponding to the forbidden area of cosmic ray access, is bounded by the spacecraft-Earth horizon in easterly directions, and is rotated around the vertical axis by an angle alpha from the eastern direction, where the angle alpha is a function of the offset dipole latitude of the spacecraft

  9. Strong Coupling Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2009-01-01

    We show that whenever a 4-dimensional theory with N particle species emerges as a consistent low energy description of a 3-brane embedded in an asymptotically-flat (4+d)-dimensional space, the holographic scale of high-dimensional gravity sets the strong coupling scale of the 4D theory. This connection persists in the limit in which gravity can be consistently decoupled. We demonstrate this effect for orbifold planes, as well as for the solitonic branes and string theoretic D-branes. In all cases the emergence of a 4D strong coupling scale from bulk holography is a persistent phenomenon. The effect turns out to be insensitive even to such extreme deformations of the brane action that seemingly shield 4D theory from the bulk gravity effects. A well understood example of such deformation is given by large 4D Einstein term in the 3-brane action, which is known to suppress the strength of 5D gravity at short distances and change the 5D Newton's law into the four-dimensional one. Nevertheless, we observe that the ...

  10. Confinement and Isotropization of Galactic Cosmic Rays by Molecular-Cloud Magnetic Mirrors When Turbulent Scattering Is Weak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretical studies of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and observations of solar wind fluctuations suggest that MHD turbulence in the interstellar medium is anisotropic at small scales, with smooth variations along the background magnetic field and sharp variations perpendicular to the background field. Turbulence with this anisotropy is inefficient at scattering cosmic rays, and thus the scattering rate ν may be smaller than has been traditionally assumed in diffusion models of Galactic cosmic-ray propagation, at least for cosmic-ray energies E above 1011-1012 eV at which self-confinement is not possible. In this paper, it is shown that Galactic cosmic rays can be effectively confined through magnetic reflection by molecular clouds, even when turbulent scattering is weak. Elmegreen's quasi-fractal model of molecular-cloud structure is used to argue that a typical magnetic field line passes through a molecular cloud complex once every ∼300 pc. Once inside the complex, the field line will in most cases be focused into one or more dense clumps in which the magnetic field can be much stronger than the average field in the intercloud medium (ICM). Cosmic rays following field lines into cloud complexes are most often magnetically reflected back into the ICM, since strong-field regions act as magnetic mirrors. For a broad range of cosmic-ray energies, a cosmic ray initially following some particular field line separates from that field line sufficiently slowly that the cosmic ray can be trapped between neighboring cloud complexes for long periods of time. The suppression of cosmic-ray diffusion due to magnetic trapping is calculated in this paper with the use of phenomenological arguments, asymptotic analysis, and Monte Carlo particle simulations. Formulas for the coefficient of diffusion perpendicular to the Galactic disk are derived for several different parameter regimes within the E-ν plane. In one of these parameter regimes in which scattering is weak, it

  11. Inflation Fossils in Cosmic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamionkowski, Marc

    The agreement of the predictions of inflation with increasingly precise cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large-scale-structure (LSS) data is remarkable. The notion that such a simple early-Universe scenario, based on still-mysterious ultra-high-energy physics, can explain such a wealth of precise data is simply amazing. An active ongoing program of research is afoot to seek the CMB polarization signatures of inflationary gravitational waves and measure the primordial bispectrum in order to learn about inflation. Still, there is far more that can be done to probe inflationary physics, and no stone should be left unturned in this quest. Here we propose a multi-component program of theoretical research that includes model building, new CMB/LSS tests, a potentially powerful new survey strategy, and the investigation of a new observational avenue for large-scale structure. We propose to broaden the circle of ideas to empirically probe inflation. To begin, the hemispherical power asymmetry seen in WMAP and Planck is truly striking. While it may simply be an unusual statistical fluke, a more tantalizing possibility is that it is a remnant of the pre-inflationary Universe. We propose to develop and study several physical models for this asymmetry and work out other testable predictions of these models. Only by pursuing other signatures of whatever new physics may be responsible for this asymmetry will we be able to infer if it is truly a window to new physics. We also plan to develop departures from statistical isotropy (SI) as a test of inflationary models. We have recently shown that single-field slow-roll inflation generically predicts a quadrupolar departure from SI in primordial perturbations, albeit a very small one. The power quadrupole is expected, however, to be significantly larger in more general inflationary models. We propose to calculate these power quadrupoles so that new constraints to the power quadrupole from CMB and LSS data can be applied to test

  12. ‘Excess’ of primary cosmic ray electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the accurate cosmic ray (CR electron and positron spectra (denoted as Φe− and Φe+, respectively measured by AMS-02 Collaboration, the difference between the electron and positron fluxes (i.e., ΔΦ=Φe−−Φe+, dominated by the propagated primary electrons, can be reliably inferred. In the standard model, the spectrum of propagated primary CR electrons at energies ≥30GeV softens with the increase of energy. The absence of any evidence for such a continuous spectral softening in ΔΦ strongly suggests a significant ‘excess’ of primary CR electrons and at energies of 100–400GeV the identified excess component has a flux comparable to that of the observed positron excess. Middle-age but ‘nearby’ supernova remnants (e.g., Monogem and Geminga are favored sources for such an excess.

  13. Smooth halos in the cosmic web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaite, José

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter halos can be defined as smooth distributions of dark matter placed in a non-smooth cosmic web structure. This definition of halos demands a precise definition of smoothness and a characterization of the manner in which the transition from smooth halos to the cosmic web takes place. We introduce entropic measures of smoothness, related to measures of inequality previously used in economy and with the advantage of being connected with standard methods of multifractal analysis already used for characterizing the cosmic web structure in cold dark matter N-body simulations. These entropic measures provide us with a quantitative description of the transition from the small scales portrayed as a distribution of halos to the larger scales portrayed as a cosmic web and, therefore, allow us to assign definite sizes to halos. However, these ''smoothness sizes'' have no direct relation to the virial radii. Finally, we discuss the influence of N-body discreteness parameters on smoothness

  14. Actinides and the sources of cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, B.; Kratz, K.-L.; Lingenfelter, R. E.; Higdon, J. C.

    2004-02-01

    The abundances of the actinide elements in the cosmic rays can provide critical constraints on the major sites of their acceleration. Using recent calculations of the r-process yields in core-collapse supernovae (SNe), we have determined the actinide abundances averaged over various assumed time intervals for their supernovae generation and their cosmic-ray acceleration. Using standard Galactic chemical evolution models, we have also determined the expected actinide abundances in the present interstellar medium. From these two components, we have calculated the U/Th and other actinide abundances expected in the SN-active cores of superbubbles, as a function of their ages and mean metallicity. We calculate the expected actinide abundances in cosmic-rays accelerated by Galactic SNe. We find that the current measurements of actinide/Pt-group and preliminary estimates of the UPuCM/Th ratio in cosmic rays are all consistent with the expected values if superbubble cores have mean metallicities of around three times solar. Future measurements of the abundance ratios will help to solve these questions. First results of experiments performed on the MIR space station (ECCO) and with balloon flights (TIGER) are promising.

  15. Cosmic Rays Accelerated at Cosmological Shock Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Based on hydrodynamic numerical simulations and diffusive shock acceleration model, we calculated the ratio of cosmic ray (CR) to thermal energy. We found that the CR fraction can be less than ∼ 0.1 in the intracluster medium, while it would be of order unity in the warm-hot intergalactic medium.

  16. The hunt for cosmic accelerators. Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resconi, Elisa [TUM, Munich (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The recent discovery of high energy cosmic neutrinos from the IceCube Neutrino Observatory opens new opportunities for particle and astrophysics. We report here the IceCube observation of a diffuse neutrino background and the on-going searches for counterparts.

  17. Test particle trajectories near cosmic strings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Phase transitions of quantum fields in the early universe produced very thin tubes of false vacuum, known as cosmic strings [1]. These are topological defects which can form when either a local or a global symmetry is spontaneously broken in a phase transition. The first one is called gauge string and the latter is called ...

  18. Cosmic Shear With ACS Pure Parallels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Jason

    2002-07-01

    Small distortions in the shapes of background galaxies by foreground mass provide a powerful method of directly measuring the amount and distribution of dark matter. Several groups have recently detected this weak lensing by large-scale structure, also called cosmic shear. The high resolution and sensitivity of HST/ACS provide a unique opportunity to measure cosmic shear accurately on small scales. Using 260 parallel orbits in Sloan textiti {F775W} we will measure for the first time: beginlistosetlength sep0cm setlengthemsep0cm setlengthopsep0cm em the cosmic shear variance on scales Omega_m^0.5, with signal-to-noise {s/n} 20, and the mass density Omega_m with s/n=4. They will be done at small angular scales where non-linear effects dominate the power spectrum, providing a test of the gravitational instability paradigm for structure formation. Measurements on these scales are not possible from the ground, because of the systematic effects induced by PSF smearing from seeing. Having many independent lines of sight reduces the uncertainty due to cosmic variance, making parallel observations ideal.

  19. Could the cosmic acceleration be transient?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Antonio C.C.; Lima, J.A.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IAG/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The possibility of a transient cosmic acceleration appears in several theoretical scenarios and is theoretically interesting because it solves some difficulties inherent to eternally accelerating universes (like {Lambda}CDM). On the observational side, some authors, using a dynamical Ansatz for the dark energy equation of state, have suggested that the cosmic acceleration have already peaked and that we are currently witnessing its slowing down. Here, a possible slowing down of the cosmic expansion is investigated through a cosmographic approach. By expanding the luminous distance to fourth order and fitting the SNe Ia data from the most recent compilations (Union, Constitution and Union 2), the marginal likelihood distribution for the deceleration parameter today indicates that there is a considerable probability for q{sub 0} > 0. Also in contrast to the prediction of the {Lambda}CDM model, the cosmographic q(z) reconstruction suggests that the cosmic acceleration could already have peaked and be presently slowing down, what would imply that the recent accelerated expansion of the Universe is a transient phenomenon. It is also shown that to describe a transient acceleration the luminous distance needs to be expanded at least to fourth order. The present cosmographic results depend neither on the validity of general relativity nor on the matter-energy contents of the Universe. (author)

  20. Compact source origin of cosmic ray antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermer, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The flux of cosmic ray antiprotons with kinetic energies between /approximately/1 and 15 GeV is /approximately/5 times greater than the flux predicted on the basis of the leaky-box model. This excess is attributed to secondary antineutron production in compact sources. Because the antineutrons are not confined by the magnetic field of the compact source, they leave the interaction site, decay in interstellar space and account for the apparent excess cosmic ray antiproton flux. The escape and decay of neutrons produced in association with the antineutrons is a source of cosmic ray protons. Observations of the angular variation of the intensity and spectral shape of 100 MeV γ-rays produced by neutron-decay protons in the reaction p + p → π 0 → 2γ could reveal compact-source cosmic ray production sites. COS-B observations of spectral hardening near point sources, and future high-resolution observations of galactic point sources by Gamma-1 and the Egret telescope onboard the Gamma Ray Observatory may provide supporting evidence for this model. 12 refs., 2 figs

  1. Constraints on Cosmological Models from Cosmic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, M. J.; Smith, R. J.; Lucey, J. R.; Schlegel, D. J.; Davies, R. L.

    Cosmic flows are the only probe of the large-scale mass power spectrum available at low redshift. An important statistic is the bulk flow of a peculiar velocity sample with respect to the Cosmic Microwave background. We compare the bulk flow of the SMAC cluster sample to the predictions of popular cosmological models and to other recent large-scale peculiar velocity surveys. Both analyses account for aliasing of small-scale power due to the sparse and non-uniform sampling of the surveys. We conclude that the SMAC bulk flow is in marginal conflict with flat COBE-normalized ΛCDM models which fit the cluster abundance constraint. However, power spectra which are steeper shortward of the peak are consistent with all of the above constraints. When recent large-scale peculiar velocity surveys are compared, we conclude that all measured bulk flows (with the possible exception of that of Lauer & Postman) are consistent with each other given the errors, provided the latter allow for ``cosmic covariance''. A rough estimate of the mean bulk flow of all surveys (except Lauer & Postman) is ˜400 km/s with respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background.

  2. Height dependence of secondary cosmic ray variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, A.V.; Dorman, L.I.; Sirotina, I.V.

    1986-01-01

    Altitude dependences of coupling coefficients and secondary cosmic ray variations are investigated. The partial and variational barometric coefficients are calculated according to data on coupling coefficients of a neutron component. Application of data on altitude dependence of variations for calculation of barometric coefficient changes and for determination of a rigidity primary variation spectrum is discussed

  3. Neutron stars as cosmic neutron matter laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pines, D.

    1986-01-01

    Recent developments which have radically changed our understanding of the dynamics of neutron star superfluids and the free precession of neutron stars are summarized, and the extent to which neutron stars are cosmic neutron matter laboratories is discussed. 17 refs., 1 tab

  4. Low cloud properties influenced by cosmic rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Nigel; Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    The influence of solar variability on climate is currently uncertain. Recent observations have indicated a possible mechanism via the influence of solar modulated cosmic rays on global cloud cover. Surprisingly the influence of solar variability is strongest in low clouds (less than or equal to3 km...

  5. Bogomol'nyi bounds for cosmic strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comtet, A.; Gibbons, G.W.; Cambridge Univ.

    1987-09-01

    We establish Bogomol'nyi inequalities for the deficit angle of some cylindrically symmetric asymptotically local flat (CALF) spacetimes containing cosmic strings. These results prove the stability against arbitrary cylindrical deformations of those configurations which saturate the bound. Such configurations satisfy first order equations which can, in some cases, be solved exactly

  6. Goldstone bosons as fractional cosmic neutrinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Steven

    2013-06-14

    It is suggested that Goldstone bosons may be masquerading as fractional cosmic neutrinos, contributing about 0.39 to what is reported as the effective number of neutrino types in the era before recombination. The broken symmetry associated with these Goldstone bosons is further speculated to be the conservation of the particles of dark matter.

  7. Alpha Shape Topology of the Cosmic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weygaert, Rien van de; Platen, Erwin; Vegter, Gert; Eldering, Bob; Kruithof, Nico

    2010-01-01

    We study the topology of the Megaparsec Cosmic Web on the basis of the Alpha Shapes of the galaxy distribution. The simplicial complexes of the alpha shapes are used to determine the set of Betti numbers (βk, k = 1, . . . , D), which represent a complete characterization of the topology of a

  8. Multiscale phenomenology of the cosmic web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2010-01-01

    We analyse the structure and connectivity of the distinct morphologies that define the cosmic web. With the help of our multiscale morphology filter (MMF), we dissect the matter distribution of a cosmological Lambda cold dark matter N-body computer simulation into cluster, filaments and walls. The

  9. Radiation Exposure of Passengers to Cosmic Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salah El-Din, T.; Gomaa, M.A.; Sallah, N.

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of the present study is to review exposure of Egyptian passengers and occupational workers to cosmic radiation during their work. Computed effective dose of passengers by computer code CARI-6 using during either short route, medium route or long route as well as recommended allowed number of flights per year

  10. Cosmic ray propagation with CRPropa 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, R Alves; Evoli, C; Sigl, G; Van Vliet, A; Erdmann, M; Kuempel, D; Mueller, G; Walz, D; Kampert, K-H; Winchen, T

    2015-01-01

    Solving the question of the origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) requires the development of detailed simulation tools in order to interpret the experimental data and draw conclusions on the UHECR universe. CRPropa is a public Monte Carlo code for the galactic and extragalactic propagation of cosmic ray nuclei above ∼ 10 17 eV, as well as their photon and neutrino secondaries. In this contribution the new algorithms and features of CRPropa 3, the next major release, are presented. CRPropa 3 introduces time-dependent scenarios to include cosmic evolution in the presence of cosmic ray deflections in magnetic fields. The usage of high resolution magnetic fields is facilitated by shared memory parallelism, modulated fields and fields with heterogeneous resolution. Galactic propagation is enabled through the implementation of galactic magnetic field models, as well as an efficient forward propagation technique through transformation matrices. To make use of the large Python ecosystem in astrophysics CRPropa 3 can be steered and extended in Python. (paper)

  11. ACCESS - Another Step in NASA's Cosmic Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas; Wefel, John

    2000-10-01

    ACCESS (Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for Space Station) is a new mission payload concept planned for the International Space Station (ISS) as part of NASA's Cosmic Journeys initiative [1,2]. Currently manifested for launch in 2007, ACCESS will address several basic questions regarding cosmic rays - their origin, composition, and acceleration mechanisms. These science goals take advantage of the ISS as an observational platform capable of handling large massive payloads for long-duration measurements in orbit above the Earth's atmosphere at the threshold of space. ACCESS combines well-established techniques of charged-particle identification in a 5.5-metric-ton instrument with approximately 6-m^2 aperature and a three- or four-year stay on-orbit. This will allow ACCESS to go far beyond the results of balloon-borne detectors. The ACCESS instrument, consisting primarily of a transition radiation detector and a calorimeter, should make valuable measurements of nuclei throughout the periodic table at spectral energies up to the "knee" in the neighborhood of 10^15 eV. [1] ACCESS, A Cosmic Journey, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (2000). [2] Wilson, T., & Wefel, J., eds., ACCESS Accommodation Study Report, NASA TP-1999-209202 (1999).

  12. Catching Cosmic Rays with a DSLR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbernsen, Kendra

    2010-01-01

    Cosmic rays are high-energy particles from outer space that continually strike the Earth's atmosphere and produce cascades of secondary particles, which reach the surface of the Earth, mainly in the form of muons. These particles can be detected with scintillator detectors, Geiger counters, cloud chambers, and also can be recorded with commonly…

  13. Current Status of Astrophysics of Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalenko, Igor

    2016-03-01

    I will review the current instrumentation and recent results. I will discuss which measurements have to be done in the near future to significantly advance our knowledge about the phenomenon of cosmic rays, their sources, and their interactions with the interstellar medium. A support from NASA APRA Grant No. NNX13AC47G is greatly acknowledged.

  14. Cosmic ray propagation with CRPropa 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves Batista, R.; Erdmann, M.; Evoli, C.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kuempel, D.; Mueller, G.; Sigl, G.; Van Vliet, A.; Walz, D.; Winchen, T.

    2015-05-01

    Solving the question of the origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) requires the development of detailed simulation tools in order to interpret the experimental data and draw conclusions on the UHECR universe. CRPropa is a public Monte Carlo code for the galactic and extragalactic propagation of cosmic ray nuclei above ∼ 1017 eV, as well as their photon and neutrino secondaries. In this contribution the new algorithms and features of CRPropa 3, the next major release, are presented. CRPropa 3 introduces time-dependent scenarios to include cosmic evolution in the presence of cosmic ray deflections in magnetic fields. The usage of high resolution magnetic fields is facilitated by shared memory parallelism, modulated fields and fields with heterogeneous resolution. Galactic propagation is enabled through the implementation of galactic magnetic field models, as well as an efficient forward propagation technique through transformation matrices. To make use of the large Python ecosystem in astrophysics CRPropa 3 can be steered and extended in Python.

  15. Cosmic R-string in thermal history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, Kohei [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kobayashi, Tatsuo [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Ohashi, Keisuke [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mathematics and Physics; Ookouchi, Yutaka [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Kyoto Univ. (Japan). The Hakubi Center for Advanced Research

    2013-03-15

    We study stabilization of an unstable cosmic string associated with spontaneously broken U(1){sub R} symmetry, which otherwise causes a dangerous roll-over process. We demonstrate that in a gauge mediation model, messengers can receive enough corrections from the thermal plasma of the supersymmetric standard model particles to stabilize the unstable modes of the string.

  16. A database of charged cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurin, D.; Melot, F.; Taillet, R.

    2014-09-01

    Aims: This paper gives a description of a new online database and associated online tools (data selection, data export, plots, etc.) for charged cosmic-ray measurements. The experimental setups (type, flight dates, techniques) from which the data originate are included in the database, along with the references to all relevant publications. Methods: The database relies on the MySQL5 engine. The web pages and queries are based on PHP, AJAX and the jquery, jquery.cluetip, jquery-ui, and table-sorter third-party libraries. Results: In this first release, we restrict ourselves to Galactic cosmic rays with Z ≤ 30 and a kinetic energy per nucleon up to a few tens of TeV/n. This corresponds to more than 200 different sub-experiments (i.e., different experiments, or data from the same experiment flying at different times) in as many publications. Conclusions: We set up a cosmic-ray database (CRDB) and provide tools to sort and visualise the data. New data can be submitted, providing the community with a collaborative tool to archive past and future cosmic-ray measurements. http://lpsc.in2p3.fr/crdb; Contact: crdatabase@lpsc.in2p3.fr

  17. BIBLICAL METAPHOR: THE COSMIC GARDEN HERITAGE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    garden estate, found throughout biblical texts – and trust learning can be transferred. Pentateuchal .... agents are appointed to wreak devastation, and the dwelling place becomes bereft of fruitfulness and joy. .... ourselves living – on commodity real estate or in the cosmic garden – and it will affect our behavior. The role of ...

  18. Anomalies of the Cosmic Microwave Background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Anders Kirstejn

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is the faint afterglow of the extreme conditions that existed shortly after Big Bang. The temperature of the CMB radiation across the sky is extremely uniform, yet tiny anisotropies are present, and have with recent satellite missions been mapped to very high...

  19. Tracking performance with cosmic rays in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Cerati, G B

    2008-01-01

    The CMS Tracker is the biggest all-silicon detector in the world and is designed to be extremely efficient and accurate even in a very hostile environment such as that close to the CMS collision point. It consists of an inner pixel detector, made of three barrel layers (48M pixels) and four forward disks (16M pixels), and an outer micro-strip detector, divided in two barrel sub-detectors, TIB and TOB, and two endcap sub-detectors, TID and TEC, for a total of 9.6M strips. The commissioning of the CMS Tracker detector has been initially carried out at the Tracker Integration Facility at CERN (TIF), where cosmic ray data were collected for the strip detector only, and is still ongoing at the CMS site (LHC Point 5). Here the Strip and Pixel detectors have been installed in the experiment and are taking part to the cosmic global-runs. After an overview of the tracking algorithms for cosmic-ray data reconstruction, the resulting tracking performance on cosmic data both at TIF and at P5 are presented. The excellent ...

  20. Quasar Mass Functions Across Cosmic Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    I present mass functions of actively accreting black holes detected in different quasar surveys which in concert cover a wide range of cosmic history. I briefly address what we learn from these mass functions. I summarize the motivation for such a study and the methods by which we determine black...... hole masses....

  1. The Sticky Geometry of the Cosmic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidding, Johan; Weygaert, Rien van de; Vegter, Gert; Jones, Bernard J.T.; Teillaud, Monique

    2012-01-01

    In this video we highlight the application of Computational Geometry to our understanding of the formation and dynamics of the Cosmic Web. The emergence of this intricate and pervasive weblike structure of the Universe on Megaparsec scales can be approximated by a well-known equation from fluid

  2. Probing Cosmic Accelerators Using VHE Gamma Rays and UHE Cosmic Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levinson, Amir

    2009-01-01

    The γ-ray emission observed in several classes of Galactic and extragalactic astrophysical sources appears to be linked to accreting black holes and rotational powered neutron stars. These systems are prodigious cosmic accelerators, and are also potential sources of the UHE cosmic rays detected by several experiments and VHE neutrinos. We review a recent progress in our understanding of these objects, and demonstrate how recent and future observations can be employed to probe the conditions in the sources.

  3. LIGO: The strong belief

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years of designing, building and testing a number of innovative technologies, with the strong belief that the endeavour would lead to a historic breakthrough. The Bulletin publishes an abstract of the Courier’s interview with Barry Barish, one of the founding fathers of LIGO.   The plots show the signals of gravitational waves detected by the twin LIGO observatories at Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington. (Image: Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab) On 11 February, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo collaborations published a historic paper in which they showed a gravitational signal emitted by the merger of two black holes. These results come after 20 years of hard work by a large collaboration of scientists operating the two LIGO observatories in the US. Barry Barish, Linde Professor of Physics, Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology and former Director of the Global Design Effort for the Internat...

  4. The intergalactic propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab; Sarkar, Subir; /Oxford U., Theor. Phys.; Taylor, Andrew M.; /Oxford U.

    2006-08-01

    We investigate the propagation of ultra-high energy cosmic ray nuclei (A = 1-56) from cosmologically distant sources through the cosmic radiation backgrounds. Various models for the injected composition and spectrum and of the cosmic infrared background are studied using updated photodisintegration cross-sections. The observational data on the spectrum and the composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays are jointly consistent with a model where all of the injected primary cosmic rays are iron nuclei (or a mixture of heavy and light nuclei).

  5. Proceedings of the 21. European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiraly, P.; Kudela, K.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2008-09-01

    Scientific symposium deals with problems of cosmic ray. The Symposium included the following sessions: (1): Relationship of cosmic rays to the environment; (2) Energetic particles and the magnetosphere of the Earth; (3) Energetic particles in the heliosphere; (4) Solar-terrestrial effects on different time scales; (5) Cosmic rays below the knee; (6) Cosmic rays above the knee (7) High energy interactions; (8) GeV and TeV gamma ray astronomy; (9) European projects related to cosmic rays; Future perspectives. Proceedings contains 122 papers dealing with the scope of INIS.

  6. Gravitational collapse in higher-dimensional charged-Vaidya space ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We analyze here the gravitational collapse of higher-dimensional charged-Vaidya space- time. We show that singularities arising in a charged null fluid in higher dimension are always naked violating at least strong cosmic censorship hypothesis (CCH), though not necessarily weak CCH. We show that earlier ...

  7. Gravitational collapse in higher-dimensional charged-Vaidya space ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vaidya space-time. We show that singularities arising in a charged null fluid in higher dimension are always naked violating at least strong cosmic censorship hypothesis (CCH), though not necessarily weak CCH. We show that earlier conclusions ...

  8. Quantum Indeterminacy of Cosmic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Craig J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-12-30

    It is shown that quantum uncertainty of motion in systems controlled mainly by gravity generally grows with orbital timescale $H^{-1}$, and dominates classical motion for trajectories separated by distances less than $\\approx H^{-3/5}$ in Planck units. For example, the cosmological metric today becomes indeterminate at macroscopic separations, $H_0^{-3/5}\\approx 60$ meters. Estimates suggest that entangled non-localized quantum states of geometry and matter may significantly affect fluctuations during inflation, and connect the scale of dark energy to that of strong interactions.

  9. Impact of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the Earth’s ionosphere and atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateev Lachezar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A brief review of the study during COST Action ES0803 of effects due to cosmic rays (CR and solar energetic particles (SEP in the ionosphere and atmosphere is presented. Models CORIMIA (COsmic Ray Ionization Model for Ionosphere and Atmosphere and application of CORSIKA (COsmic Ray SImulations for KAscade code are considered. They are capable to compute the cosmic ray ionization profiles at a given location, time, solar and geomagnetic activity. Intercomparison of the models, as well as comparison with direct measurements of the atmospheric ionization, validates their applicability for the entire atmosphere and for the different levels of the solar activity. The effects of CR and SEP can be very strong locally in the polar cap regions, affecting the physical-chemical and electrical properties of the ionosphere and atmosphere. Contributions here were also made by the anomalous CR, whose ionization is significant at high geomagnetic latitudes (above 65°–70°. Several recent achievements and application of CR ionization models are briefly presented. This work is the output from the SG 1.1 of the COST ES0803 action (2008–2012 and the emphasis is given on the progress achieved by European scientists involved in this collaboration.

  10. Muon reconstruction performance using cosmic rays in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Calderon, Alicia

    2009-01-01

    After the incident with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in September 2008, the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) collaboration invested a considerable effort in further refining the understanding of the detector using cosmic muon data. About 300 million cosmic events were recorded with the CMS detector fully operational and the central solenoid switched on at the nominal value of 3.8 Tesla. The resulting data set provides ample statistics to study in great detail the detector performance and allows to analyze properties of cosmic rays. We present recent results on detector performance from the cosmic muon analysis activities and compare cosmic data to dedicated cosmic Monte Carlo samples. These results demonstrate the readiness of the CMS detector to do physics analysis with muons, and the study of cosmic muon properties provides interesting links to astrophysics.

  11. Exploring cosmic origins with CORE: Extragalactic sources in cosmic microwave background maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Zotti, G.; González-Nuevo, J.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Negrello, M.; Greenslade, J.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Delabrouille, J.; Cai, Z.-Y.; Bonato, M.; Achúcarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Bersanelli, M.; Biesiada, M.; Bilicki, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Calvo, M.; Carvalho, C. S.; Castellano, M. G.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clements, D. L.; Clesse, S.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; Diego, J. M.; Di Valentino, E.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S. M.; Fernández-Cobos, R.; Ferraro, S.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Grandis, S.; Hagstotz, S.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Le Brun, A.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Luzzi, G.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; McCarthy, D.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Natoli, P.; Notari, A.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, R. B.; Patanchon, G.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Roman, M.; Rossi, G.; Roukema, B. F.; Rubiño-Martín, J.-A.; Salvati, L.; Scott, D.; Serjeant, S.; Tartari, A.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trappe, N.; Triqueneaux, S.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tucker, C.; Väliviita, J.; van de Weygaert, R.; Van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.

    2018-04-01

    We discuss the potential of a next generation space-borne Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiment for studies of extragalactic sources. Our analysis has particular bearing on the definition of the future space project, CORE, that has been submitted in response to ESA's call for a Medium-size mission opportunity as the successor of the Planck satellite. Even though the effective telescope size will be somewhat smaller than that of Planck, CORE will have a considerably better angular resolution at its highest frequencies, since, in contrast with Planck, it will be diffraction limited at all frequencies. The improved resolution implies a considerable decrease of the source confusion, i.e. substantially fainter detection limits. In particular, CORE will detect thousands of strongly lensed high-z galaxies distributed over the full sky. The extreme brightness of these galaxies will make it possible to study them, via follow-up observations, in extraordinary detail. Also, the CORE resolution matches the typical sizes of high-z galaxy proto-clusters much better than the Planck resolution, resulting in a much higher detection efficiency; these objects will be caught in an evolutionary phase beyond the reach of surveys in other wavebands. Furthermore, CORE will provide unique information on the evolution of the star formation in virialized groups and clusters of galaxies up to the highest possible redshifts. Finally, thanks to its very high sensitivity, CORE will detect the polarized emission of thousands of radio sources and, for the first time, of dusty galaxies, at mm and sub-mm wavelengths, respectively.

  12. John Strong (1941 - 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    Wickens, F

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on Monday 31st July, a few days before his 65th birthday John started his career working with a group from Westfield College, under the leadership of Ted Bellamy. He obtained his PhD and spent the early part of his career on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), but after the early 1970s his research was focussed on experiments in CERN. Over the years he made a number of notable contributions to experiments in CERN: The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras to record the sparks in the spark chambers; He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems; He was responsible for the second level trigger system for the ALEPH detector and spent five years leading a team that designed and built the system, which ran for twelve years with only minor interventions. Following ALEPH he tur...

  13. Stirring Strongly Coupled Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir; Rajagopal, Krishna; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2009-01-01

    We determine the energy it takes to move a test quark along a circle of radius L with angular frequency w through the strongly coupled plasma of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory. We find that for most values of L and w the energy deposited by stirring the plasma in this way is governed either by the drag force acting on a test quark moving through the plasma in a straight line with speed v=Lw or by the energy radiated by a quark in circular motion in the absence of any plasma, whichever is larger. There is a continuous crossover from the drag-dominated regime to the radiation-dominated regime. In the crossover regime we find evidence for significant destructive interference between energy loss due to drag and that due to radiation as if in vacuum. The rotating quark thus serves as a model system in which the relative strength of, and interplay between, two different mechanisms of parton energy loss is accessible via a controlled classical gravity calculation. We close by speculating on the implicati...

  14. Strong-interaction nonuniversality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkas, R.R.; Foot, R.; He, X.; Joshi, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    The universal QCD color theory is extended to an SU(3) 1 direct product SU(3) 2 direct product SU(3) 3 gauge theory, where quarks of the ith generation transform as triplets under SU(3)/sub i/ and singlets under the other two factors. The usual color group is then identified with the diagonal subgroup, which remains exact after symmetry breaking. The gauge bosons associated with the 16 broken generators then form two massive octets under ordinary color. The interactions between quarks and these heavy gluonlike particles are explicitly nonuniversal and thus an exploration of their physical implications allows us to shed light on the fundamental issue of strong-interaction universality. Nonuniversality and weak flavor mixing are shown to generate heavy-gluon-induced flavor-changing neutral currents. The phenomenology of these processes is studied, as they provide the major experimental constraint on the extended theory. Three symmetry-breaking scenarios are presented. The first has color breaking occurring at the weak scale, while the second and third divorce the two scales. The third model has the interesting feature of radiatively induced off-diagonal Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements

  15. Cosmic Ray Self-Confinement, Escape and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkov, Mikhail

    2014-10-01

    Propagation of cosmic rays (CR) in a self-confinement regime is discussed. A self-similar solution for a CR-cloud expansion along the magnetic field strongly deviates from test-particle results. The normalized CR partial pressure is close to P (p , z , t) = 2 [ | z |5/3 +zdif5 / 3 (p , t) ]- 3 / 5 exp [ -z2 / 4DB (p) t ] , where p is the momentum of CR and z is directed along the field. The core of the cloud expands as zdif ~√{DNL p t } and decays in time as P ~ 2zdif- 1 (t) . The diffusion coefficient DNL is strongly suppressed compared to its background value DB: DNL ~DB exp - Π > 1 , the CRs drive Alfven waves efficiently enough to build a transport barrier (P ~ 2 / | z | -``pedestal'') that strongly reduces the leakage. The solution has a spectral break in momentum spectrum at p =pbr , where pbr satisfies the following equation DNLpbr ~=z2 / t . Magnetic focusing effects in CR transport are briefly discussed. Partially supported by NASA through ATP NNX14AH36G.

  16. The Pierre Auger Observatory scaler mode for the study of solar activity modulation of galactic cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, LIFEP /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin Observ. /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Balseiro Inst., San Carlos de Bariloche; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples; Aminaei, A.; /Nijmegen U., IMAPP; Anchordoqui, L.; /Wisconsin U., Milwaukee /Lisbon, LIFEP /Lisbon, IST

    2011-01-01

    Since data-taking began in January 2004, the Pierre Auger Observatory has been recording the count rates of low energy secondary cosmic ray particles for the self-calibration of the ground detectors of its surface detector array. After correcting for atmospheric effects, modulations of galactic cosmic rays due to solar activity and transient events are observed. Temporal variations related with the activity of the heliosphere can be determined with high accuracy due to the high total count rates. In this study, the available data are presented together with an analysis focused on the observation of Forbush decreases, where a strong correlation with neutron monitor data is found.

  17. The Physics of the Cosmic Microwave Background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peacock, John [Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-07

    The award of the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physics is a reminder to non-specialists that the cosmic microwave background (CMB) has yielded astonishing advances in our understanding of cosmology. Mather and Smoot received their prize for work done with NASA's COBE satellite in the early 1990s, but the subject has if anything accelerated since then. The results from NASA's WMAP satellite, reported in 2003 and 2006, have proved COBE's equal in importance and have generated huge worldwide interest. There could therefore hardly be a better time to be writing a detailed textbook to explain what the fuss is all about to a new generation of research students. A comprehensive treatment of the physics of the CMB is not easy to achieve, because it is connected to so much else in cosmology. A student must have a background knowledge of the geometry and dynamics of an expanding universe, plus a deep exposure to the physics of quantum fields, in order to understand the modern 'inflationary' view in which the universe was set expanding by the tension of the vacuum, and was seeded with small inhomogeneities as a result of quantum fluctuations. Although the theory of inflation is not yet verified, the CMB has the potential to accomplish this; testing inflation is undoubtedly one of the principal aims of cosmology over the next decade. Even with this preparation, understanding the properties of the CMB is quite hard at the professional level, requiring the perturbation expansion of the relativistic Boltzmann equation. These technical difficulties are particularly strong in the frontier area of CMB polarization. Naselsky and his collaborators have allocated themselves a relatively brief 255 pages in which to meet these challenges, so some compromise is inevitable. Although the preface is not explicit about the assumed prior knowledge, no systematic material on background cosmology or on inflation is to be found. The former is reasonable in a graduate-level text

  18. Cosmic-Ray Extremely Distributed Observatory: a global cosmic ray detection framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushchov, O.; Homola, P.; Dhital, N.; Bratek, Ł.; Poznański, P.; Wibig, T.; Zamora-Saa, J.; Almeida Cheminant, K.; Alvarez Castillo, D.; Góra, D.; Jagoda, P.; Jałocha, J.; Jarvis, J. F.; Kasztelan, M.; Kopański, K.; Krupiński, M.; Michałek, M.; Nazari, V.; Smelcerz, K.; Smolek, K.; Stasielak, J.; Sułek, M.

    2017-12-01

    The main objective of the Cosmic-Ray Extremely Distributed Observatory (CREDO) is the detection and analysis of extended cosmic ray phenomena, so-called super-preshowers (SPS), using existing as well as new infrastructure (cosmic-ray observatories, educational detectors, single detectors etc.). The search for ensembles of cosmic ray events initiated by SPS is yet an untouched ground, in contrast to the current state-of-the-art analysis, which is focused on the detection of single cosmic ray events. Theoretical explanation of SPS could be given either within classical (e.g., photon-photon interaction) or exotic (e.g., Super Heavy Dark Matter decay or annihilation) scenarios, thus detection of SPS would provide a better understanding of particle physics, high energy astrophysics and cosmology. The ensembles of cosmic rays can be classified based on the spatial and temporal extent of particles constituting the ensemble. Some classes of SPS are predicted to have huge spatial distribution, a unique signature detectable only with a facility of the global size. Since development and commissioning of a completely new facility with such requirements is economically unwarranted and time-consuming, the global analysis goals are achievable when all types of existing detectors are merged into a worldwide network. The idea to use the instruments in operation is based on a novel trigger algorithm: in parallel to looking for neighbour surface detectors receiving the signal simultaneously, one should also look for spatially isolated stations clustered in a small time window. On the other hand, CREDO strategy is also aimed at an active engagement of a large number of participants, who will contribute to the project by using common electronic devices (e.g., smartphones), capable of detecting cosmic rays. It will help not only in expanding the geographical spread of CREDO, but also in managing a large manpower necessary for a more efficient crowd-sourced pattern recognition scheme to

  19. The COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Interaction Code (COSMIC for use in data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Shuttleworth

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture status in land surface models (LSMs can be updated by assimilating cosmic-ray neutron intensity measured in air above the surface. This requires a fast and accurate model to calculate the neutron intensity from the profiles of soil moisture modeled by the LSM. The existing Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX model is sufficiently accurate but too slow to be practical in the context of data assimilation. Consequently an alternative and efficient model is needed which can be calibrated accurately to reproduce the calculations made by MCNPX and used to substitute for MCNPX during data assimilation. This paper describes the construction and calibration of such a model, COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Interaction Code (COSMIC, which is simple, physically based and analytic, and which, because it runs at least 50 000 times faster than MCNPX, is appropriate in data assimilation applications. The model includes simple descriptions of (a degradation of the incoming high-energy neutron flux with soil depth, (b creation of fast neutrons at each depth in the soil, and (c scattering of the resulting fast neutrons before they reach the soil surface, all of which processes may have parameterized dependency on the chemistry and moisture content of the soil. The site-to-site variability in the parameters used in COSMIC is explored for 42 sample sites in the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS, and the comparative performance of COSMIC relative to MCNPX when applied to represent interactions between cosmic-ray neutrons and moist soil is explored. At an example site in Arizona, fast-neutron counts calculated by COSMIC from the average soil moisture profile given by an independent network of point measurements in the COSMOS probe footprint are similar to the fast-neutron intensity measured by the COSMOS probe. It was demonstrated that, when used within a data assimilation framework to assimilate COSMOS probe counts into the Noah land surface

  20. Cosmic Ray Signatures of Decaying Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Astrophysical and cosmological observations do not require the dark matter particles to be absolutely stable. If they are indeed unstable, their decay into Standard Model particles might occur at a sufficiently large rate to allow the indirect detection of dark matter through an anomalous contribution to the high energy cosmic ray fluxes. We analyze the implications of the excess in the total electron plus positron flux and the positron fraction reported by the Fermi and PAMELA collaborations, respectively, for the scenario of decaying dark matter. We also discuss the constraints on this scenario from measurements of other cosmic ray species and the predictions for the diffuse gamma ray flux and the neutrino flux. In particular, we expect a sizable dipole-like anisotropy which may be observed in the near future by the Fermi-LAT.