WorldWideScience

Sample records for strong chromospheric resonance

  1. Oscillatory response of the solar chromosphere to a strong downflow event above a sunspot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Hannah; Chae, Jongchul; Song, Donguk [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeon-Han; Lim, Eun-Kyung [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Madjarska, Maria S. [Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh BT61 9DG (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-20

    We report three-minute oscillations in the solar chromosphere driven by a strong downflow event in a sunspot. We used the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). The strong downflow event is identified in the chromospheric and transition region lines above the sunspot umbra. After the event, oscillations occur at the same region. The amplitude of the Doppler velocity oscillations is 2 km s{sup −1} and gradually decreases with time. In addition, the period of the oscillations gradually increases from 2.7 to 3.3 minutes. In the IRIS 1330 Å slit-jaw images, we identify a transient brightening near the footpoint of the downflow detected in the H α +0.5 Å image. The characteristics of the downflowing material are consistent with those of sunspot plumes. Based on our findings, we suggest that the gravitationally stratified atmosphere came to oscillate with a three-minute period in response to the impulsive downflow event as was theoretically investigated by Chae and Goode.

  2. Strong decays of nucleon and delta resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijker, R.; Leviatan, A.

    1996-01-01

    We study the strong couplings of the nucleon and delta resonances in a collective model. In the ensuing algebraic treatment we derive closed expressions for decay widths which are used to analyze the experimental data for strong decays into the pion and eta channels. (Author)

  3. Chromospheric seismology above sunspot umbrae

    OpenAIRE

    Snow, B.; Botha, G. J. J.; Regnier, S.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The acoustic resonator is an important model for explaining the three-minute oscillations in the chromosphere above sunspot umbrae. The steep temperature gradients at the photosphere and transition region provide the cavity for the acoustic resonator, which allows waves to be both partially transmitted and partially reflected.\\ud \\ud Aims: In this paper, a new method of estimating the size and temperature profile of the chromospheric cavity above a sunspot umbra is developed.\\ud \\ud ...

  4. Magnetoacoustic heating of the solar chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Joseph M.; Chitre, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    Long-period acoustic waves generated in the solar convection zone can propagate radially outward through the overlying atmosphere and get resonantly absorbed in the magnetic arches of the low-lying chromospheric canopy. The resulting Poynting and acoustic flux that enters the magnetic canopy in the network regions is demonstrated to be adequate to account for the observed chromospheric emission.

  5. Resonances of the helium atom in a strong magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Al-Hujaj, Omar-Alexander; Schmelcher, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We present an investigation of the resonances of a doubly excited helium atom in a strong magnetic field covering the regime B=0–100  a.u. A full-interaction approach which is based on an anisotropic Gaussian basis set of one-particle functions being nonlinearly optimized for each field strength...

  6. Integrating out resonances in strongly-coupled electroweak scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosell Ignasi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Accepting that there is a mass gap above the electroweak scale, the Electroweak Effective Theory (EWET is an appropriate tool to describe this situation. Since the EWET couplings contain information on the unknown high-energy dynamics, we consider a generic strongly-coupled scenario of electroweak symmetry breaking, where the known particle fields are coupled to heavier states. Then, and by integrating out these heavy fields, we study the tracks of the lightest resonances into the couplings. The determination of the low-energy couplings (LECs in terms of resonance parameters can be made more precise by considering a proper short-distance behaviour on the Lagrangian with heavy states, since the number of resonance couplings is then reduced. Notice that we adopt a generic non-linear realization of the electroweak symmetry breaking with a singlet Higgs.

  7. Ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosuga, Y., E-mail: kosuga@riam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Institute for Advanced Study, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, S.-I. [Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Diamond, P. H. [CASS and CMTFO, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Itoh, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu (Japan); Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Lesur, M. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    A theory to describe basic characterization of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance is presented. The role of trapped ion granulations, clusters of trapped ions correlated by precession resonance, is the focus. Microscopically, the presence of trapped ion granulations leads to a sharp (logarithmic) divergence of two point phase space density correlation at small scales. Macroscopically, trapped ion granulations excite potential fluctuations that do not satisfy dispersion relation and so broaden frequency spectrum. The line width from emission due only to trapped ion granulations is calculated. The result shows that the line width depends on ion free energy and electron dissipation, which implies that non-adiabatic electrons are essential to recover non-trivial dynamics of trapped ion granulations. Relevant testable predictions are summarized.

  8. Stellar Chromospheric Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Jeffrey C.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The Sun, stars similar to it, and many rather dissimilar to it, have chromospheres, regions classically viewed as lying above the brilliant photosphere and characterized by a positive temperature gradient and a marked departure from radiative equilibrium. Stellar chromospheres exhibit a wide range of phenomena collectively called activity, stemming largely from the time evolution of their magnetic fields and the mass flux and transfer of radiation through the complex magnetic topology and the increasingly optically thin plasma of the outer stellar atmosphere. In this review, I will (1 outline the development of our understanding of chromospheric structure from 1960 to the present, (2 discuss the major observational programs and theoretical lines of inquiry, (3 review the origin and nature of both solar and stellar chromospheric activity and its relationship to, and effect on, stellar parameters including total energy output, and (4 summarize the outstanding problems today.

  9. Mismeasurement and the resonance of strong confounders: uncorrelated errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J R; Hastrup, J L

    1996-05-15

    Greenland first documented (Am J Epidemiol 1980; 112:564-9) that error in the measurement of a confounder could resonate--that it could bias estimates of other study variables, and that the bias could persist even with statistical adjustment for the confounder as measured. An important question is raised by this finding: can such bias be more than trivial within the bounds of realistic data configurations? The authors examine several situations involving dichotomous and continuous data in which a confounder and a null variable are measured with error, and they assess the extent of resultant bias in estimates of the effect of the null variable. They show that, with continuous variables, measurement error amounting to 40% of observed variance in the confounder could cause the observed impact of the null study variable to appear to alter risk by as much as 30%. Similarly, they show, with dichotomous independent variables, that 15% measurement error in the form of misclassification could lead the null study variable to appear to alter risk by as much as 50%. Such bias would result only from strong confounding. Measurement error would obscure the evidence that strong confounding is a likely problem. These results support the need for every epidemiologic inquiry to include evaluations of measurement error in each variable considered.

  10. Strong overtones and combination bands in ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efremov, E.V.; Ariese, F.; Mank, A.J.G.; Gooijer, C.

    2006-01-01

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy is carried out using a continuous wave frequency-doubled argon ion laser operated at 229, 244, and 257 nm in order to characterize the overtones and combination bands for several classes of organic compounds in liquid solutions. Contrary to what is generally

  11. The chromospheric structure of cool carbon stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luttermoser, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    The temperature-density structure of the outer atmospheres of the N-type carbon stars are investigated through computer generated synthetic spectra from model atmospheres. The synthetic spectra are compared to spectra obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spacecraft and ground-based photometry. The nature of the severe violet flux falloff seen in cool carbon stars is investigated through photospheric synthetic flux calculations with the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). A new candidate for the unknown opacity source that causes this flux falloff is proposed-a preponderance of neutral metal bound-bound and bound-free transitions from low energy states. The chromospheric structure of these stars is also investigated through a semi-empirical modeling technique. Such a technique involves attaching a chromospheric temperature rise to a radiative equilibrium model photosphere and generating a synthetic spectrum of chromospheric spectral lines using non-LTE radiative transfer. The chromospheric temperature-density structure is then altered until the synthetic spectrum matches the IUE observations of the singly ionized magnesium resonance lines and the intercombination lines of singly ionized carbon. Through the above mentioned non-LTE analysis of the atmospheric structure of these stars, the excitation and ionization equilibria are investigated. The excited levels of H I, C I, Na I, Mg I, and Ca I are over-populated with respect to LTE in the middle and upper photosphere of these stars, and all are over-ionized with respect to LTE. Photons from the chromosphere greatly influence the excitation and ionization of H I, C I, and Mg I

  12. Resonance fluorescence spectrum of two atoms, coherently driven by a strong resonant laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficek, Z.; Tanas, R.; Kielich, S.

    1981-01-01

    In Lehmberg's approach, we consider the resonance fluorescence spectrum of two radiatively interacting atoms. In the strong field limit we have obtained analytical solutions for the spectrum of the symmetric and antisymmetric modes without decoupling approximation. Our solutions are valid for all values of the distance r 12 separating the atoms. The spectrum of the symmetric modes contains additional sidebands in 2Ω (Ω is the Rabi frequency) with amplitude dependent on (a/Ω) 2 , where a is a parameter dependent on r 12 . The antisymmetric part of the spectrum has no additional sidebands in 2Ω. For small distances r 12 (a = 1) our results for the symmetric modes are identical with those of Agarwal et al. apart from the so-called scaling factor. For large distance r 12 (a = 0) the spectra of the symmetric and antisymmetric modes are identical with the well-known one-atom spectrum. (orig.)

  13. Chromospheres of Luminous Cool Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, A. K.

    Direct ultraviolet imaging and spectroscopy of Alpha Orionis (Betelgeuse) reveals variable chromospheric structures and mass motions. Spectroscopy also demonstrates the changes of wind opacity, speeds, and mass loss in luminous stars. Cool stars have complex chromospheres that need to be considered in construction of stellar atmospheric models and subsequent spectral analyses.

  14. Mismeasurement and the resonance of strong confounders: correlated errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J R; Hastrup, J L; Ross, J S

    1999-07-01

    Confounding in epidemiology, and the limits of standard methods of control for an imperfectly measured confounder, have been understood for some time. However, most treatments of this problem are based on the assumption that errors of measurement in confounding and confounded variables are independent. This paper considers the situation in which a strong risk factor (confounder) and an inconsequential but suspected risk factor (confounded) are each measured with errors that are correlated; the situation appears especially likely to occur in the field of nutritional epidemiology. Error correlation appears to add little to measurement error as a source of bias in estimating the impact of a strong risk factor: it can add to, diminish, or reverse the bias induced by measurement error in estimating the impact of the inconsequential risk factor. Correlation of measurement errors can add to the difficulty involved in evaluating structures in which confounding and measurement error are present. In its presence, observed correlations among risk factors can be greater than, less than, or even opposite to the true correlations. Interpretation of multivariate epidemiologic structures in which confounding is likely requires evaluation of measurement error structures, including correlations among measurement errors.

  15. Experimental demonstration of the equivalence of inductive and strongly coupled magnetic resonance wireless power transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, David S.; Chabalko, Matthew J.; Hillenius, Andrew

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we show experimentally that wireless power transfer (WPT) using strongly coupled magnetic resonance (SCMR) and traditional induction are equivalent. We demonstrate that for a given coil separation, and to within 4%, strongly coupled magnetic resonance and traditional induction produce the same theoretical efficiency of wireless power transfer versus distance. Moreover, we show that the difference between traditional induction and strongly coupled magnetic resonance is in the implementation of the impedance matching network where strongly coupled magnetic resonance uses the mini-loop impedance match. The mini-loop impedance mach provides a low-loss, high-ratio impedance transformation that makes it desirable for longer distance wireless power transfer, where large impedance transformations are needed to maximize power transfer.

  16. Simple model of a Feshbach resonance in the strong-coupling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasak, T.; Krych, M.; Idziaszek, Z.; Trippenbach, M.; Avishai, Y.; Band, Y. B.

    2014-11-01

    We use the dressed potentials obtained in the adiabatic representation of two coupled channels to calculate s -wave Feshbach resonances in a three-dimensional spherically symmetric potential with an open channel interacting with a closed channel. Analytic expressions for the s -wave scattering length a and number of resonances are obtained for a piecewise constant model with a piecewise constant interaction of the open and closed channels near the origin. We show analytically and numerically that, for strong enough coupling strength, Feshbach resonances can exist even when the closed channel does not have a bound state.

  17. Self-induced steps in a small Josephson junction strongly coupled to a multimode resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, A.; Jensen, H. Dalsgaard; Mygind, Jesper

    1991-01-01

    coupled systems. Based on a single-resonator model, we explain the exceptional size of the steps by the large content of higher harmonics of the Josephson oscillation sustained by the multiple modes of the resonator. The parameters of the junction and the loaded resonator—measured in situ by using......An equally spaced series of very large and nearly constant-voltage self-induced singularities has been observed in the dc I-V characteristics of a small Josephson tunnel junction strongly coupled to a resonant section of a superconducting transmission line. The system allows extremely high values...... of the coupling parameter. The current steps are due to subharmonic parametric excitation of the fundamental mode of the resonator loaded by the junction admittance. Using an applied magnetic field to vary the coupling parameter, we traced out half-integer steps as well as the mode steps known from more weakly...

  18. A Three-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of the Formation of Solar Chromospheric Jets with Twisted Magnetic Field Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, H. [Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University, Furocho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-0814 Japan (Japan); Yokoyama, T., E-mail: h.iijima@isee.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2017-10-10

    This paper presents a three-dimensional simulation of chromospheric jets with twisted magnetic field lines. Detailed treatments of the photospheric radiative transfer and the equations of state allow us to model realistic thermal convection near the solar surface, which excites various MHD waves and produces chromospheric jets in the simulation. A tall chromospheric jet with a maximum height of 10–11 Mm and lifetime of 8–10 minutes is formed above a strong magnetic field concentration. The magnetic field lines are strongly entangled in the chromosphere, which helps the chromospheric jet to be driven by the Lorentz force. The jet exhibits oscillatory motion as a natural consequence of its generation mechanism. We also find that the produced chromospheric jet forms a cluster with a diameter of several Mm with finer strands. These results imply a close relationship between the simulated jet and solar spicules.

  19. A static model of chromospheric heating in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricchiazzi, P. J.; Canfield, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the solar chromosphere to flare processes, namely nonthermal electrons, thermal conduction, and coronal pressure, is modeled. Finite difference methods employing linearization and iteration are used in obtaining simultaneous solutions to the equations of steady-state energy balance, hydrostatic equilibrium, radiative transfer, and atomic statistical equilibrium. The atmospheric response is assumed to be confined to one dimension by a strong vertical magnetic field. A solution is obtained to the radiative transfer equation for the most important optically thick transitions of hydrogen, magnesium, and calcium. The theoretical atmospheres discussed here are seen as elucidating the role of various physical processes in establishing the structure of flare chromospheres. At low coronal pressures, conduction is found to be more important than nonthermal electrons in establishing the position of the transition region. Only thermal conduction can adequately account for the chromospheric evaporation in compact flares. Of the mechanisms considered, only nonthermal electrons bring about significant heating below the flare transition region.

  20. Chromospheric Inversions of a Micro-flaring Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, A.; Henriques, V.; Mathioudakis, M. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Doyle, J. G. [Armagh Observatory and Planetarium, College Hill, Armagh, BT61 9DG (United Kingdom); Ray, T., E-mail: aaron.reid@qub.ac.uk [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2017-08-20

    We use spectropolarimetric observations of the Ca ii 8542 Å line, taken from the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope, in an attempt to recover dynamic activity in a micro-flaring region near a sunspot via inversions. These inversions show localized mean temperature enhancements of ∼1000 K in the chromosphere and upper photosphere, along with co-spatial bi-directional Doppler shifting of 5–10 km s{sup −1}. This heating also extends along a nearby chromospheric fibril, which is co-spatial to 10–15 km s{sup −1} downflows. Strong magnetic flux cancellation is also apparent in one of the footpoints, and is concentrated in the chromosphere. This event more closely resembles that of an Ellerman Bomb, though placed slightly higher in the atmosphere than what is typically observed.

  1. Magnetic and resonant X-ray scattering investigations of strongly correlated electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paolasini, L.; Bergevin, F. de

    2008-01-01

    Resonant X-ray scattering is a method which combines high-Q resolution X-ray elastic diffraction and atomic core-hole spectroscopy for investigating electronic and magnetic long-range ordered structures in condensed matter. During recent years the development of theoretical models to describe resonant X-ray scattering amplitudes and the evolution of experimental techniques, which include the control and analysis of linear photon polarization and the introduction of extreme environment conditions such as low temperatures, high magnetic field and high pressures, have opened a new field of investigation in the domain of strongly correlated electron systems. (authors)

  2. Resonant excitation and the decay of autoionization states in a strong electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andryushin, A.I.; Kazakov, A.E.; Fedorov, M.V.

    1985-01-01

    Photoionization of atoms involving resonant excitation of the auto-ionization state is studied. The evolution of the total ionization probability, its dependence on the frequency of the resonance radiation and also the photoelectron energy spectrum are investigated. It is shown that the energy of the final state of the system may be localized either in the vicinity of E approximately Esub(α), where Esub(α) is the auto-ionization energy, or in the vicinity of E approximately Esub(α)+h/2πω where h/2πω is the quantum energy of the resonance radiation. The photoelectron specturum in the region E approximately Esub(α)+h/2πω as a whole is similar to the electron spectrum on photoionization of atoms involving resonance excitation of the bound state. A strong effect on the photoelectron spectrum in the region E approximately Esub(α) is exerted by interference of various decay channels of the ground state in the resonance field which leads to the appearance in the spectrum of a characteristic structure of the Fano type. Interence also affects the widths of the two spectral curves, the relatve amount of electrons in the two energy ranges and also other characteristics of the ionization process. It is shown that the presence of a noninterfering photoionization channel of the autoionization state ensures the finiteness of the swidths and heights of the spectral curves and the absence of complete ''coherency merging''

  3. Heating the Chromosphere in the Quiet Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-04-01

    The best-studied star the Sun still harbors mysteries for scientists to puzzle over. A new study has now explored the role of tiny magnetic-field hiccups in an effort to explain the strangely high temperatures of the Suns upper atmosphere.Schematic illustrating the temperatures in different layers of the Sun. [ESA]Strange Temperature RiseSince the Suns energy is produced in its core, the temperature is hottest here. As expected, the temperature decreases further from the Suns core up until just above its surface, where it oddly begins to rise again. While the Suns surface is 6,000 K, the temperature is higher above this: 10,000 K in the outer chromosphere.So how is the chromosphere of the Sun heated? Its possible that the explanation can be found not amid high solar activity, but in quiet-Sun regions.In a new study led by Milan Goi (Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Bay Area Environmental Research Institute), a team of scientists has examined a process that quietly happens in the background: the cancellation of magnetic field lines in the quiet Sun.Activity in a SupergranuleTop left: SDO AIA image of part of the solar disk. The next three panels are a zoom of the particular quiet-Sun region that the authors studied, all taken with IRIS at varying wavelengths: 1400 (top right), 2796 (bottom left), and 2832 (bottom right). [Goi et al. 2018]The Sun is threaded by strong magnetic field lines that divide it into supergranules measuring 30 million meters across (more than double the diameter of Earth!). Supergranules may seem quiet inside, but looks can be deceiving: the interiors of supergranules contain smaller, transient internetwork fields that move about, often resulting in magnetic elements of opposite polarity encountering and canceling each other.For those internetwork flux cancellations that occur above the Suns surface, a small amount of energy could be released that locally heats the chromosphere. But though each individual event has a small

  4. Multiphoton-resonance-induced fluorescence of a strongly driven two-level system under frequency modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yiying; Lü, Zhiguo; Luo, JunYan; Zheng, Hang

    2018-03-01

    We study the fluorescence spectrum of a strongly driven two-level system (TLS) with modulated transition frequency, which is a bichromatically driven TLS and has multiple resonance frequencies. We are aiming to provide a reliable description of the fluorescence in a regime that is difficult to tackle with perturbation theory and the rotating-wave approximation (RWA), and illustrate the spectral features of the fluorescence under off- and multiphoton-resonance conditions. To go beyond the RWA, we use a semianalytical counter-rotating-hybridized rotating-wave method that combines a unitary transformation and Floquet theory to calculate the two-mode Floquet states and quasienergies for the bichromatically driven TLS. We then solve the master equation accounting for the spontaneous decay in the bases of the two-mode Floquet states, and derive a physically transparent fluorescence spectrum. In comparison with the numerically exact spectrum from the generalized Floquet-Liouville approach, the present spectrum is found to be applicable in a wide range of the parameters where the RWA and the secular approximation may break down. We find that the counter-rotating (CR) terms of the transverse field omitted in the RWA have non-negligible contributions to the spectrum under certain conditions. Particularly, at the multiphoton resonance the width of which is comparable with the Bloch-Siegert shift, the RWA and non-RWA spectra markedly differ from each other because of the CR-induced shift. We also analyze the symmetry of the spectrum in terms of the transition matrix elements between the two-mode Floquet states. We show that the strict symmetry of the spectrum cannot be expected without the RWA but the almost symmetric spectrum can be obtained at the single-photon resonance that takes the Bloch-Siegert shift into account if the driving is moderately strong and at the multiphoton resonance with a sufficiently weak transverse field.

  5. Resonance enhancement of two photon absorption by magnetically trapped atoms in strong rf-fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, A.; Mishra, S. R.

    2018-01-01

    Applying a many mode Floquet formalism for magnetically trapped atoms interacting with a polychromatic rf-field, we predict a large two photon transition probability in the atomic system of cold 87Rb atoms. The physical origin of this enormous increase in the two photon transition probability is due to the formation of avoided crossings between eigen-energy levels originating from different Floquet sub-manifolds and redistribution of population in the resonant intermediate levels to give rise to the resonance enhancement effect. Other exquisite features of the studied atom-field composite system include the splitting of the generated avoided crossings at the strong field strength limit and a periodic variation of the single and two photon transition probabilities with the mode separation frequency of the polychromatic rf-field. This work can find applications to characterize properties of cold atom clouds in the magnetic traps using rf-spectroscopy techniques.

  6. Chromospheric structure of cool carbon stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttermoser, Donald G.; Johnson, Hollis R.; Avrett, Eugene H.; Loeser, Rudolf

    1989-01-01

    A semiempirical chromospheric model is proposed for TX Psc which is a prototype for the N-type carbon stars. Observational data imply that the chromospheric temperature rise must begin at a low density, that the temperature gradient in the lower chromosphere must be steep, that partial redistribution must be employed in the Mg II calculation, and that the lower chromosphere is expanding away from the photosphere with a velocity of close to 50 km/s. The present model also shows that the microturbulent velocity is about 7 km/s at the temperature minimum region, dropping to 5 km/s in the chromosphere, and that the Lyman lines are optically thick in the chromosphere.

  7. Chromospheric heating during flux emergence in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaarts, Jorrit; de la Cruz Rodríguez, Jaime; Danilovic, Sanja; Scharmer, Göran; Carlsson, Mats

    2018-04-01

    Context. The radiative losses in the solar chromosphere vary from 4 kW m-2 in the quiet Sun, to 20 kW m-2 in active regions. The mechanisms that transport non-thermal energy to and deposit it in the chromosphere are still not understood. Aim. We aim to investigate the atmospheric structure and heating of the solar chromosphere in an emerging flux region. Methods: We have used observations taken with the CHROMIS and CRISP instruments on the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope in the Ca II K , Ca II 854.2 nm, Hα, and Fe I 630.1 nm and 630.2 nm lines. We analysed the various line profiles and in addition perform multi-line, multi-species, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) inversions to estimate the spatial and temporal variation of the chromospheric structure. Results: We investigate which spectral features of Ca II K contribute to the frequency-integrated Ca II K brightness, which we use as a tracer of chromospheric radiative losses. The majority of the radiative losses are not associated with localised high-Ca II K-brightness events, but instead with a more gentle, spatially extended, and persistent heating. The frequency-integrated Ca II K brightness correlates strongly with the total linear polarization in the Ca II 854.2 nm, while the Ca II K profile shapes indicate that the bulk of the radiative losses occur in the lower chromosphere. Non-LTE inversions indicate a transition from heating concentrated around photospheric magnetic elements below log τ500 = -3 to a more space-filling and time-persistent heating above log τ500 = -4. The inferred gas temperature at log τ500 = -3.8 correlates strongly with the total linear polarization in the Ca II 854.2 nm line, suggesting that that the heating rate correlates with the strength of the horizontal magnetic field in the low chromosphere. Movies attached to Figs. 1 and 4 are available at http://https://www.aanda.org/

  8. Strong quantum memory at resonant Fermi edges revealed by shot noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubbelohde, N; Roszak, K; Hohls, F; Maire, N; Haug, R J; Novotný, T

    2012-01-01

    Studies of non-equilibrium current fluctuations enable assessing correlations involved in quantum transport through nanoscale conductors. They provide additional information to the mean current on charge statistics and the presence of coherence, dissipation, disorder, or entanglement. Shot noise, being a temporal integral of the current autocorrelation function, reveals dynamical information. In particular, it detects presence of non-Markovian dynamics, i.e., memory, within open systems, which has been subject of many current theoretical studies. We report on low-temperature shot noise measurements of electronic transport through InAs quantum dots in the Fermi-edge singularity regime and show that it exhibits strong memory effects caused by quantum correlations between the dot and fermionic reservoirs. Our work, apart from addressing noise in archetypical strongly correlated system of prime interest, discloses generic quantum dynamical mechanism occurring at interacting resonant Fermi edges.

  9. Highly tunable hybrid metamaterials employing split-ring resonators strongly coupled to graphene surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peter Q.; Luxmoore, Isaac J.; Mikhailov, Sergey A.; Savostianova, Nadja A.; Valmorra, Federico; Faist, Jérôme; Nash, Geoffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials and plasmonics are powerful tools for unconventional manipulation and harnessing of light. Metamaterials can be engineered to possess intriguing properties lacking in natural materials, such as negative refractive index. Plasmonics offers capabilities of confining light in subwavelength dimensions and enhancing light–matter interactions. Recently, the technological potential of graphene-based plasmonics has been recognized as the latter features large tunability, higher field-confinement and lower loss compared with metal-based plasmonics. Here, we introduce hybrid structures comprising graphene plasmonic resonators coupled to conventional split-ring resonators, thus demonstrating a type of highly tunable metamaterial, where the interaction between the two resonances reaches the strong-coupling regime. Such hybrid metamaterials are employed as high-speed THz modulators, exhibiting ∼60% transmission modulation and operating speed in excess of 40 MHz. This device concept also provides a platform for exploring cavity-enhanced light–matter interactions and optical processes in graphene plasmonic structures for applications including sensing, photo-detection and nonlinear frequency generation. PMID:26584781

  10. Highly tunable hybrid metamaterials employing split-ring resonators strongly coupled to graphene surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peter Q.; Luxmoore, Isaac J.; Mikhailov, Sergey A.; Savostianova, Nadja A.; Valmorra, Federico; Faist, Jérôme; Nash, Geoffrey R.

    2015-11-01

    Metamaterials and plasmonics are powerful tools for unconventional manipulation and harnessing of light. Metamaterials can be engineered to possess intriguing properties lacking in natural materials, such as negative refractive index. Plasmonics offers capabilities of confining light in subwavelength dimensions and enhancing light-matter interactions. Recently, the technological potential of graphene-based plasmonics has been recognized as the latter features large tunability, higher field-confinement and lower loss compared with metal-based plasmonics. Here, we introduce hybrid structures comprising graphene plasmonic resonators coupled to conventional split-ring resonators, thus demonstrating a type of highly tunable metamaterial, where the interaction between the two resonances reaches the strong-coupling regime. Such hybrid metamaterials are employed as high-speed THz modulators, exhibiting ~60% transmission modulation and operating speed in excess of 40 MHz. This device concept also provides a platform for exploring cavity-enhanced light-matter interactions and optical processes in graphene plasmonic structures for applications including sensing, photo-detection and nonlinear frequency generation.

  11. Autler-Townes effect in a strongly driven electromagnetically induced transparency resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lijun; Zhang Lianshui; Li Xiaoli; Han Li; Fu Guangsheng; Manson, Neil B.; Suter, Dieter; Wei Changjiang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we study the nonlinear behavior of an electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) resonance subject to a coherent driving field. The EIT is associated with a Λ three-level system where two hyperfine levels within an electronic ground state are coupled to a common excited state level by a coupling field and a probe field. In addition there is an radio-frequency (rf) field driving a hyperfine transition within the ground state. The paper contrasts two different situations. In one case the rf-driven transition shares a common level with the probed transition and in the second case it shares a common level with the coupled transition. In both cases the EIT resonance is split into a doublet and the characteristics of the EIT doublet are determined by the strength and frequency of the rf-driving field. The doublet splitting originates from the rf-field induced dynamic Stark effect and has close analogy with the Autler-Townes effect observed in three-level pump-probe spectroscopy study. The situation changes when the rf field is strong and the two cases are very different. One is analogous to two Λ three-level systems with EIT resonance associated with each. The other corresponds to a doubly driven three-level system with rf-field-induced electromagnetically induced absorption resonance. The two situations are modeled using numerical solutions of the relevant equation of motion of density matrix. In addition a physical account of their behaviors is given in terms of a dressed state picture

  12. Electron spin resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance of sodium macrostructures in strongly irradiated NaCl-K crystals: Manifestation of quasi-one-dimensional behavior of electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cherkasov, FG; Mustafin, RG; L'vov, SG; Denisenko, GA; den Hartog, HW; Vainshtein, D. I.

    1998-01-01

    Data from an investigation of electron spin resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance of NaCl-K (similar to 1 mole%) crystals strongly irradiated with electrons imply the observation of a metal-insulator transition with decreasing temperature and the manifestation of quasi-one-dimensional electron

  13. Coronal heating in coupled photosphere-chromosphere-coronal systems: turbulence and leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdini, A.; Grappin, R.; Velli, M.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Coronal loops act as resonant cavities for low-frequency fluctuations that are transmitted from the deeper layers of the solar atmosphere. These fluctuations are amplified in the corona and lead to the development of turbulence that in turn is able to dissipate the accumulated energy, thus heating the corona. However, trapping is not perfect, because some energy leaks down to the chromosphere on a long timescale, limiting the turbulent heating. Aims: We consider the combined effects of turbulence and energy leakage from the corona to the photosphere in determining the turbulent energy level and associated heating rate in models of coronal loops, which include the chromosphere and transition region. Methods: We use a piece-wise constant model for the Alfvén speed in loops and a reduced MHD-shell model to describe the interplay between turbulent dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the mean field and propagation along the field. Turbulence is sustained by incoming fluctuations that are equivalent, in the line-tied case, to forcing by the photospheric shear flows. While varying the turbulence strength, we systematically compare the average coronal energy level and dissipation in three models with increasing complexity: the classical closed model, the open corona, and the open corona including chromosphere (or three-layer model), with the last two models allowing energy leakage. Results: We find that (i) leakage always plays a role. Even for strong turbulence, the dissipation time never becomes much lower than the leakage time, at least in the three-layer model; therefore, both the energy and the dissipation levels are systematically lower than in the line-tied model; (ii) in all models, the energy level is close to the resonant prediction, i.e., assuming an effective turbulent correlation time longer than the Alfvén coronal crossing time; (iii) the heating rate is close to the value given by the ratio of photospheric energy divided by the Alfv

  14. Structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijger, Johannes Mattheus

    2002-01-01

    The thesis "Structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere" of J.M. Krijger is a study on the behavior of the solar chromosphere, the thin layer just above the solar surface (photosphere) visible in purple red light during a total solar eclipse. The most important result of this thesis is that the

  15. The limits on the strong Higgs sector parameters in the presence of new vector resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gintner, Mikulas [University of Zilina, Physics Department, Zilina (Slovakia); Czech Technical University in Prague, Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Juran, Josef [Czech Technical University in Prague, Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Silesian University in Opava, Institute of Physics, Opava (Czech Republic)

    2016-12-15

    In this paper, we investigate how the LHC data limit the Higgs-related couplings in the effective description of a strongly interacting extension of the Standard model. The Higgs boson is introduced as a scalar composite state and it is followed in the mass hierarchy by an SU(2) triplet of vector composites. The limits are calculated from the constraints obtained in the recent ATLAS+CMS combined analysis of the data from 2011 and 2012. We find that the data prefer the scenario where the Higgs couplings to the electroweak gauge bosons differ from its couplings to the vector triplet. We also investigate the unitarity limits of the studied effective model for the experimentally preferred values of the Higgs couplings. We find from the ππ → ππ scattering amplitudes that for the vector resonance masses between one and two TeV significant portions of the experimentally allowed regions are well below the unitarity limit. We also evaluate how the existing ATLAS and CMS Run-2 data restrict our model with the upper bounds on the resonance production cross section times its branching ratio for various decay channels. The masses in the range 1 TeV ≤ M{sub ρ} ≤ 2 TeV are not excluded in parts or even full parameter space of our theory. (orig.)

  16. Collective strong coupling with homogeneous Rabi frequencies using a 3D lumped element microwave resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angerer, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.angerer@tuwien.ac.at; Astner, Thomas; Wirtitsch, Daniel; Majer, Johannes, E-mail: johannes.majer@tuwien.ac.at [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Atominstitut, TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Sumiya, Hitoshi [Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd., Itami 664-001 (Japan); Onoda, Shinobu [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Isoya, Junichi [Research Centre for Knowledge Communities, University of Tsukuba, 1-2 Kasuga, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8550 (Japan); Putz, Stefan [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Atominstitut, TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2016-07-18

    We design and implement 3D-lumped element microwave cavities that spatially focus magnetic fields to a small mode volume. They allow coherent and uniform coupling to electron spins hosted by nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond. We achieve large homogeneous single spin coupling rates, with an enhancement of more than one order of magnitude compared to standard 3D cavities with a fundamental resonance at 3 GHz. Finite element simulations confirm that the magnetic field distribution is homogeneous throughout the entire sample volume, with a root mean square deviation of 1.54%. With a sample containing 10{sup 17} nitrogen vacancy electron spins, we achieve a collective coupling strength of Ω = 12 MHz, a cooperativity factor C = 27, and clearly enter the strong coupling regime. This allows to interface a macroscopic spin ensemble with microwave circuits, and the homogeneous Rabi frequency paves the way to manipulate the full ensemble population in a coherent way.

  17. The magnetic field configuration in solar and stellar chromospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzer, U.; Galloway, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the inhomogeneous magnetic field structure above a stellar photosphere which has magnetic flux tubes located at the downdraughts of its supergranulation pattern. Regions can be delineated where the ambient magnetic energy density is large or small compared with the thermal energy density derived from a model atmosphere. This enables the relative importance of magnetic versus non-magnetic heating mechanisms to be assessed. For the quiet Sun, over half the chromospheric emission must be supplied non-magnetically, whilst the network and active regions require a magnetic supply. For other late-type stars, a simple working rule suggests that when the magnetic field is strong enough to be directly observable, the chromosphere will be magnetically dominated. (Auth.)

  18. ASYMMETRIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN WEAKLY IONIZED CHROMOSPHERIC PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Nicholas A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lukin, Vyacheslav S., E-mail: namurphy@cfa.harvard.edu [National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 22230 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Realistic models of magnetic reconnection in the solar chromosphere must take into account that the plasma is partially ionized and that plasma conditions within any two magnetic flux bundles undergoing reconnection may not be the same. Asymmetric reconnection in the chromosphere may occur when newly emerged flux interacts with pre-existing, overlying flux. We present 2.5D simulations of asymmetric reconnection in weakly ionized, reacting plasmas where the magnetic field strengths, ion and neutral densities, and temperatures are different in each upstream region. The plasma and neutral components are evolved separately to allow non-equilibrium ionization. As in previous simulations of chromospheric reconnection, the current sheet thins to the scale of the neutral–ion mean free path and the ion and neutral outflows are strongly coupled. However, the ion and neutral inflows are asymmetrically decoupled. In cases with magnetic asymmetry, a net flow of neutrals through the current sheet from the weak-field (high-density) upstream region into the strong-field upstream region results from a neutral pressure gradient. Consequently, neutrals dragged along with the outflow are more likely to originate from the weak-field region. The Hall effect leads to the development of a characteristic quadrupole magnetic field modified by asymmetry, but the X-point geometry expected during Hall reconnection does not occur. All simulations show the development of plasmoids after an initial laminar phase.

  19. A Model of the Solar Chromosphere: Structure and Internal Circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, P.

    2017-01-01

    A model of the solar chromosphere that consists of two fundamentally different regions, a lower region and an upper region, is proposed. The lower region is covered mostly by weak locally closed magnetic field and small network areas of extremely strong, locally open field. The field in the upper region is relatively uniform and locally open, connecting to the corona. The chromosphere is heated by strong collisional damping of Alfvén waves, which are driven by turbulent motions below the photosphere. The heating rate depends on the field strength, wave power from the photosphere, and altitude in the chromosphere. The waves in the internetwork area are mostly damped in the lower region, supporting radiation in the lower chromosphere. The waves in the network area, carrying more Poynting flux, are only weakly damped in the lower region. They propagate into the upper region. As the thermal pressure decreases with height, the network field expands to form the magnetic canopy where the damping of the waves from the network area supports radiation in the whole upper region. Because of the vertical stratification and horizontally nonuniform distribution of the magnetic field and heating, one circulation cell is formed in each of the upper and lower regions. The two circulation cells distort the magnetic field and reinforce the funnel-canopy-shaped magnetic geometry. The model is based on classical processes and is semi-quantitative. The estimates are constrained according to observational knowledge. No anomalous process is invoked or needed. Overall, the heating mechanism is able to damp 50% of the total wave energy.

  20. A Model of the Solar Chromosphere: Structure and Internal Circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, P. [Space Science Laboratory and Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell (United States)

    2017-09-10

    A model of the solar chromosphere that consists of two fundamentally different regions, a lower region and an upper region, is proposed. The lower region is covered mostly by weak locally closed magnetic field and small network areas of extremely strong, locally open field. The field in the upper region is relatively uniform and locally open, connecting to the corona. The chromosphere is heated by strong collisional damping of Alfvén waves, which are driven by turbulent motions below the photosphere. The heating rate depends on the field strength, wave power from the photosphere, and altitude in the chromosphere. The waves in the internetwork area are mostly damped in the lower region, supporting radiation in the lower chromosphere. The waves in the network area, carrying more Poynting flux, are only weakly damped in the lower region. They propagate into the upper region. As the thermal pressure decreases with height, the network field expands to form the magnetic canopy where the damping of the waves from the network area supports radiation in the whole upper region. Because of the vertical stratification and horizontally nonuniform distribution of the magnetic field and heating, one circulation cell is formed in each of the upper and lower regions. The two circulation cells distort the magnetic field and reinforce the funnel-canopy-shaped magnetic geometry. The model is based on classical processes and is semi-quantitative. The estimates are constrained according to observational knowledge. No anomalous process is invoked or needed. Overall, the heating mechanism is able to damp 50% of the total wave energy.

  1. Sporadic plasma heating in the lower chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, V. V.

    2014-12-01

    It is usually assumed that heating of the chromosphere is caused by the precipitation of energetic particles (electrons and protons) accelerated in the solar corona, namely, at flare arc tops. On the other hand, recently obtained observational data show that the chromospheric footpoints of compact magnetic loops are directly heated to ≥106 K, and hot plasma erupted from the footpoints of such loops. The plasma mechanism of the THz emission of flares may also indicate that deep chromospheric layers with densities up to n ≈ 1015 cm-3 can be heated to about 105-106 K. It has been shown that electrons can be accelerated and plasma can be heated in the lower chromosphere when the Rayleigh-Taylor instability develops at magnetic loop chromo-spheric footpoints. This instability results in the penetration of the upper chromospheric plasma into a loop and induces an electric field that effectively accelerates electrons and leads to in situ heating of the chromo-sphere.

  2. Computational time-resolved and resonant x-ray scattering of strongly correlated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansil, Arun [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-11-09

    Basic-Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (BES/DOE) has made large investments in x-ray sources in the U.S. (NSLS-II, LCLS, NGLS, ALS, APS) as powerful enabling tools for opening up unprecedented new opportunities for exploring properties of matter at various length and time scales. The coming online of the pulsed photon source, literally allows us to see and follow the dynamics of processes in materials at their natural timescales. There is an urgent need therefore to develop theoretical methodologies and computational models for understanding how x-rays interact with matter and the related spectroscopies of materials. The present project addressed aspects of this grand challenge of x-ray science. In particular, our Collaborative Research Team (CRT) focused on developing viable computational schemes for modeling x-ray scattering and photoemission spectra of strongly correlated materials in the time-domain. The vast arsenal of formal/numerical techniques and approaches encompassed by the members of our CRT were brought to bear through appropriate generalizations and extensions to model the pumped state and the dynamics of this non-equilibrium state, and how it can be probed via x-ray absorption (XAS), emission (XES), resonant and non-resonant x-ray scattering, and photoemission processes. We explored the conceptual connections between the time-domain problems and other second-order spectroscopies, such as resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) because RIXS may be effectively thought of as a pump-probe experiment in which the incoming photon acts as the pump, and the fluorescent decay is the probe. Alternatively, when the core-valence interactions are strong, one can view K-edge RIXS for example, as the dynamic response of the material to the transient presence of a strong core-hole potential. Unlike an actual pump-probe experiment, here there is no mechanism for adjusting the time-delay between the pump and the probe. However, the core hole

  3. Chromospheric counterparts of solar transition region unresolved fine structure loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Tiago M. D.; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc; Hansteen, Viggo H.; De Pontieu, Bart

    2018-04-01

    Low-lying loops have been discovered at the solar limb in transition region temperatures by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). They do not appear to reach coronal temperatures, and it has been suggested that they are the long-predicted unresolved fine structures (UFS). These loops are dynamic and believed to be visible during both heating and cooling phases. Making use of coordinated observations between IRIS and the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope, we study how these loops impact the solar chromosphere. We show for the first time that there is indeed a chromospheric signal of these loops, seen mostly in the form of strong Doppler shifts and a conspicuous lack of chromospheric heating. In addition, we find that several instances have a inverse Y-shaped jet just above the loop, suggesting that magnetic reconnection is driving these events. Our observations add several puzzling details to the current knowledge of these newly discovered structures; this new information must be considered in theoretical models. Two movies associated to Fig. 1 are available at http://https://www.aanda.org

  4. Computational code in atomic and nuclear quantum optics: Advanced computing multiphoton resonance parameters for atoms in a strong laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkov, A. V.; Gurskaya, M. Yu; Ignatenko, A. V.; Smirnov, A. V.; Serga, I. N.; Svinarenko, A. A.; Ternovsky, E. V.

    2017-10-01

    The consistent relativistic energy approach to the finite Fermi-systems (atoms and nuclei) in a strong realistic laser field is presented and applied to computing the multiphoton resonances parameters in some atoms and nuclei. The approach is based on the Gell-Mann and Low S-matrix formalism, multiphoton resonance lines moments technique and advanced Ivanov-Ivanova algorithm of calculating the Green’s function of the Dirac equation. The data for multiphoton resonance width and shift for the Cs atom and the 57Fe nucleus in dependence upon the laser intensity are listed.

  5. On the nature of the solar chromosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    DOT high-resolution imagery suggests that only internetwork-spanning Hα “mottles” constitute the quiet-Sun chromosphere, whereas more upright network “straws” in “hedge rows” reflect transition-region conditions

  6. Inert two-Higgs-doublet model strongly coupled to a non-Abelian vector resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Abatte, Felipe; Mora, Maria Luisa; Urbina, Jose; Zerwekh, Alfonso R.

    2017-11-01

    We study the possibility of a dark matter candidate having its origin in an extended Higgs sector which, at least partially, is related to a new strongly interacting sector. More concretely, we consider an i2HDM (i.e., a Type-I two Higgs doublet model supplemented with a Z2 under which the nonstandard scalar doublet is odd) based on the gauge group S U (2 )1×S U (2 )2×U (1 )Y . We assume that one of the scalar doublets and the standard fermion transform nontrivially under S U (2 )1 while the second doublet transforms under S U (2 )2. Our main hypothesis is that standard sector is weakly coupled while the gauge interactions associated to the second group is characterized by a large coupling constant. We explore the consequences of this construction for the phenomenology of the dark matter candidate and we show that the presence of the new vector resonance reduces the relic density saturation region, compared to the usual i2DHM, in the high dark matter mass range. In the collider side, we argue that the mono-Z production is the channel which offers the best chances to manifest the presence of the new vector field. We study the departures from the usual i2HDM predictions and show that the discovery of the heavy vector at the LHC is challenging even in the mono-Z channel since the typical cross sections are of the order of 10-2 fb .

  7. Strong interaction between graphene layer and Fano resonance in terahertz metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shuyuan; Wang, Tao; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Yan, Xicheng; Cheng, Le; Wang, Boyun; Xu, Chen

    2017-05-01

    Graphene has emerged as a promising building block in modern optics and optoelectronics due to its novel optical and electrical properties. In the mid-infrared and terahertz (THz) regime, graphene behaves like metals and supports surface plasmon resonances (SPRs). Moreover, the continuously tunable conductivity of graphene enables active SPRs and gives rise to a range of active applications. However, the interaction between graphene and metal-based resonant metamaterials has not been fully understood. In this work, a simulation investigation on the interaction between the graphene layer and THz resonances supported by the two-gap split ring metamaterials is systematically conducted. The simulation results show that the graphene layer can substantially reduce the Fano resonance and even switch it off, while leaving the dipole resonance nearly unaffected, which is well explained with the high conductivity of graphene. With the manipulation of graphene conductivity via altering its Fermi energy or layer number, the amplitude of the Fano resonance can be modulated. The tunable Fano resonance here together with the underlying physical mechanism can be strategically important in designing active metal-graphene hybrid metamaterials. In addition, the ‘sensitivity’ to the graphene layer of the Fano resonance is also highly appreciated in the field of ultrasensitive sensing, where the novel physical mechanism can be employed in sensing other graphene-like two-dimensional materials or biomolecules with the high conductivity.

  8. ON THE SPATIAL SCALES OF WAVE HEATING IN THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler, Roberto; Ballester, Jose Luis; Carbonell, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Dissipation of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave energy has been proposed as a viable heating mechanism in the solar chromospheric plasma. Here, we use a simplified one-dimensional model of the chromosphere to theoretically investigate the physical processes and spatial scales that are required for the efficient dissipation of Alfvén waves and slow magnetoacoustic waves. We consider the governing equations for a partially ionized hydrogen-helium plasma in the single-fluid MHD approximation and include realistic wave damping mechanisms that may operate in the chromosphere, namely, Ohmic and ambipolar magnetic diffusion, viscosity, thermal conduction, and radiative losses. We perform an analytic local study in the limit of small amplitudes to approximately derive the lengthscales for critical damping and efficient dissipation of MHD wave energy. We find that the critical dissipation lengthscale for Alfvén waves depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and ranges from 10 m to 1 km for realistic field strengths. The damping of Alfvén waves is dominated by Ohmic diffusion for weak magnetic field and low heights in the chromosphere, and by ambipolar diffusion for strong magnetic field and medium/large heights in the chromosphere. Conversely, the damping of slow magnetoacoustic waves is less efficient, and spatial scales shorter than 10 m are required for critical damping. Thermal conduction and viscosity govern the damping of slow magnetoacoustic waves and play an equally important role at all heights. These results indicate that the spatial scales at which strong wave heating may work in the chromosphere are currently unresolved by observations

  9. ON THE SPATIAL SCALES OF WAVE HEATING IN THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, Roberto; Ballester, Jose Luis [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Carbonell, Marc, E-mail: roberto.soler@uib.es [Institute of Applied Computing and Community Code (IAC), Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122, Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2015-09-10

    Dissipation of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave energy has been proposed as a viable heating mechanism in the solar chromospheric plasma. Here, we use a simplified one-dimensional model of the chromosphere to theoretically investigate the physical processes and spatial scales that are required for the efficient dissipation of Alfvén waves and slow magnetoacoustic waves. We consider the governing equations for a partially ionized hydrogen-helium plasma in the single-fluid MHD approximation and include realistic wave damping mechanisms that may operate in the chromosphere, namely, Ohmic and ambipolar magnetic diffusion, viscosity, thermal conduction, and radiative losses. We perform an analytic local study in the limit of small amplitudes to approximately derive the lengthscales for critical damping and efficient dissipation of MHD wave energy. We find that the critical dissipation lengthscale for Alfvén waves depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and ranges from 10 m to 1 km for realistic field strengths. The damping of Alfvén waves is dominated by Ohmic diffusion for weak magnetic field and low heights in the chromosphere, and by ambipolar diffusion for strong magnetic field and medium/large heights in the chromosphere. Conversely, the damping of slow magnetoacoustic waves is less efficient, and spatial scales shorter than 10 m are required for critical damping. Thermal conduction and viscosity govern the damping of slow magnetoacoustic waves and play an equally important role at all heights. These results indicate that the spatial scales at which strong wave heating may work in the chromosphere are currently unresolved by observations.

  10. Magnetic Reconnection in the Solar Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Vyacheslav S.; Ni, Lei; Murphy, Nicholas Arnold

    2017-08-01

    We report on the most recent efforts to accurately and self-consistently model magnetic reconnection processes in the context of the solar chromosphere. The solar chromosphere is a notoriously complex and highly dynamic boundary layer of the solar atmosphere where local variations in the plasma parameters can be of the order of the mean values. At the same time, the interdependence of the physical processes such as magnetic field evolution, local and global energy transfer between internal and electromagnetic plasma energy, radiation transport, plasma reactivity, and dissipation mechanisms make it a particularly difficult system to self-consistently model and understand. Several recent studies have focused on the micro-physics of multi-fluid magnetic reconnection at magnetic nulls in the weakly ionized plasma environment of the lower chromosphere[1-3]. Here, we extend the previous work by considering a range of spatial scales and magnetic field strengths in a configuration with component magnetic reconnection, i.e., for magnetic reconnection with a guide field. We show that in all cases the non-equilibrium reactivity of the plasma and the dynamic interaction among the plasma processes play important roles in determining the structure of the reconnection region. We also speculate as to the possible observables of chromospheric magnetic reconnection and the likely plasma conditions required for generation of Ellerman and IRIS bombs.[1] Leake, Lukin, Linton, and Meier, “Multi-fluid simulations of chromospheric magnetic reconnection in a weakly ionized reacting plasma,” ApJ 760 (2012).[2] Leake, Lukin, and Linton, “Magnetic reconnection in a weakly ionized plasma,” PoP 20 (2013).[3] Murphy and Lukin, “Asymmetric magnetic reconnection in weakly ionized chromospheric plasmas,” ApJ 805 (2015).[*Any opinion, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National

  11. Stability condition of a strongly interacting boson-fermion mixture across an interspecies Feshbach resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zengqiang; Zhai Hui; Zhang Shizhong

    2011-01-01

    We study the properties of dilute bosons immersed in a single-component Fermi sea across a broad boson-fermion Feshbach resonance. The stability of the mixture requires that the bare interaction between bosons exceeds a critical value, which is a universal function of the boson-fermion scattering length, and exhibits a maximum in the unitary region. We calculate the quantum depletion, momentum distribution, and the boson contact parameter across the resonance. The transition from condensate to molecular Fermi gas is also discussed.

  12. The heating of the solar chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    1991-01-01

    The solar atmosphere associated with magnetic fields is brighter in characteristic field emitters than the magnetic field-free portion of the atmosphere. The chromosphere can accordingly be identified with the atmosphere within such magnetic elements as flux tubes. Attention is presently given to bright points associated with the intranetwork magnetic fields, which are heated by large-amplitude compressive waves whose periods approximate the 3-min acoustic cutoff period. Relevant line and continuum radiation observations are studied; it is concluded that energy dissipated by the 3-min waves may suffice to heat the low and middle chromosphere, in the bright points, to the temperatures observed.

  13. Strong Coupling Cavity QED with Gate-Defined Double Quantum Dots Enabled by a High Impedance Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stockklauser

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The strong coupling limit of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED implies the capability of a matterlike quantum system to coherently transform an individual excitation into a single photon within a resonant structure. This not only enables essential processes required for quantum information processing but also allows for fundamental studies of matter-light interaction. In this work, we demonstrate strong coupling between the charge degree of freedom in a gate-defined GaAs double quantum dot (DQD and a frequency-tunable high impedance resonator realized using an array of superconducting quantum interference devices. In the resonant regime, we resolve the vacuum Rabi mode splitting of size 2g/2π=238  MHz at a resonator linewidth κ/2π=12  MHz and a DQD charge qubit decoherence rate of γ_{2}/2π=40  MHz extracted independently from microwave spectroscopy in the dispersive regime. Our measurements indicate a viable path towards using circuit-based cavity QED for quantum information processing in semiconductor nanostructures.

  14. Performance and analysis of wireless power charging system from room temperature to HTS magnet via strong resonance coupling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Y. D.; Lee, S. Y.; Lee, T. W.; Kim, J. S. [Suwon Science College, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, C. Y. [Korea Railroad Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The technology of supplying the electric power by wireless power transfer (WPT) is expected for the next generation power feeding system since it can supply the power to portable devices without any connectors through large air gap. As such a technology based on strongly coupled electromagnetic resonators is possible to deliver the large power and recharge them seamlessly; it has been considered as a noble option to wireless power charging system in the various power applications. Recently, various HTS wires have now been manufactured for demonstrations of transmission cables, motors, MAGLEV, and other electrical power components. However, since the HTS magnets have a lower index n value intrinsically, they are required to be charged from external power system through leads or internal power system. The portable area is limited as well as the cryogen system is bulkier. Thus, we proposed a novel design of wireless power charging system for superconducting HTS magnet (WPC4SM) based on resonance coupling method. As the novel system makes possible a wireless power charging using copper resonance coupled coils, it enables to portable charging conveniently in the superconducting applications. This paper presented the conceptual design and operating characteristics of WPC4SM using different shapes' copper resonance coil. The proposed system consists of four components; RF generator of 370 kHz, copper resonance coupling coils, impedance matching (IM) subsystem and HTS magnet including rectifier system.

  15. The Vlasov equation with strong magnetic field and oscillating electric field as a model for isotop resonant separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Frenod

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the qualitative behavior of solutions to the Vlasov equation with strong external magnetic field and oscillating electric field. This model is relevant to the understanding of isotop resonant separation. We show that the effective equation is a kinetic equation with a memory term. This memory term involves a pseudo-differential operator whose kernel is characterized by an integral equation involving Bessel functions. The kernel is explicitly given in some particular cases.

  16. Fe II emission lines. I - Chromospheric spectra of red giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, P. G.; Jordan, C.

    1991-01-01

    A 'difference filtering' algorithm developed by Ayers (1979) is used to construct high-quality high-dispersion long-wavelength IUE spectra of three giant stars. Measurements of all the emission lines seen between 2230 and 3100 A are tabulated. The emission spectrum of Fe II is discussed in comparison with other lines whose formation mechanisms are well understood. Systematic changes in the Fe II spectrum are related to the different physical conditions in the three stars, and examples are given of line profiles and ratios which can be used to determine conditions in the outer atomspheres of giants. It is concluded that most of the Fe II emission results from collisional excitation and/or absorption of photospheric photons at optical wavelengths, but some lines are formed by fluorescence, being photoexcited by other strong chromospheric lines. Between 10 and 20 percent of the radiative losses of Fe II arise from 10 eV levels radiatively excited by the strong chromospheric H Ly-alpha line.

  17. Photospheric, Chromospheric and Helioseismic Signatures of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2003-10-26

    Oct 26, 2003 ... since the beginning of routine TSI measurements in 1978 (Woods et al. 2004). We have selected this flare for detailed analysis of its photospheric, chromospheric and helioseismic signatures due to the favourable location of the active region near the. CMP which minimizes the projection effects. 2.

  18. Hybrid simulations of chromospheric HXR flare sources

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravec, Z.; Varady, Michal; Kašparová, Jana; Kramoliš, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 337, č. 10 (2016), s. 1020-1023 ISSN 0004-6337. [Dynamic Sun - Exploring the Many Facets of Solar Eruptive Events. Potsdam, 26.10.2015-29.10.2015] Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Sun * chromosphere * flares Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.916, year: 2016

  19. Wave Heating of the Solar Chromosphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... In the magnetic network on the boundary of supergranulation cells, on the other hand, the small filling factor of the magnetic field in the photosphere implies that only a small fraction of the wave flux that travels upward to heat the chromosphere can be channeled by the magnetic field. Hence, while some of ...

  20. Survey of Strong Normal-Internal k : ℓ Resonances in Quasi-Periodically Driven Oscillators for ℓ = 1,2,3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broer, H. W.; van Dijk, R.; Vitolo, R.

    Recently, semi-global results have been reported by Wagener6 for the k : ℓ resonance where ℓ = 1, 2. In this work we add the ℓ = 3 strong resonance case and give an overview for ℓ = 1,2,3. For an introduction to the topic, as well as results on the non-resonant and weakly-resonant cases, see Refs. 1,2,6.

  1. Nonlinear dispersion of resonance extraordinary wave in a plasma with strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasovitskiy, V. B.; Turikov, V. A.; Sotnikov, V. I.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the efficiency of electron acceleration by a short, powerful laser pulse propagating across an external magnetic field is investigated. Conditions for the decay of a laser pulse with frequency close to the upper hybrid resonance frequency are analyzed. It is also shown that a laser pulse propagating as an extraordinary wave in cold, magnetized, low-density plasma takes the form of a nonlinear wave with the modulated amplitude (envelope soliton). Finally, simulation results on the interaction of an electromagnetic pulse with a semi-infinite plasma, obtained with the help of an electromagnetic relativistic PIC code, are discussed and a comparison with the obtained theoretical results is presented

  2. Fluctuations of nuclear cross sections in the region of strong overlapping resonances and at large number of open channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, S.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of the symmetrized Simonius representation of the S matrix statistical properties of its fluctuating component in the presence of direct reactions are investigated. The case is considered where the resonance levels are strongly overlapping and there is a lot of open channels, assuming that compound-nucleus cross sections which couple different channels are equal. It is shown that using the averaged unitarity condition on the real energy axis one can eliminate both resonance-resonance and channel-channel correlations from partial r transition amplitudes. As a result, we derive the basic points of the Epicson fluctuation theory of nuclear cross sections, independently of the relation between the resonance overlapping and the number of open channels, and the validity of the Hauser-Feshbach model is established. If the number of open channels is large, the time of uniform population of compound-nucleus configurations, for an open excited nuclear system, is much smaller than the Poincare time. The life time of compound nucleus is discussed

  3. Intervalence-resonant Raman spectroscopy of strongly coupled mixed-valence cluster dimers of ruthenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Reginaldo C; Brown, Mac G; Londergan, Casey H; Salsman, J Catherine; Kubiak, Clifford P; Shreve, Andrew P

    2005-10-13

    Resonance Raman spectroelectrochemistry (RR-SEC) at -20 degrees C has been performed on the pyrazine-bridged dimer of mu-oxo-centered trinuclear ruthenium-acetate "clusters"--[(dmap)(CO)(mu-OAc)6(mu3-O)Ru3(mu-L(b))Ru3(mu3-O)(mu-OAc)6(CO)(dmap)]n (where dmap = 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine and L(b) = pyrazine-h4 and pyrazine-d4)-in three oxidation states: n = 0, -1, and -2. In the one-electron reduced, "mixed-valent" state (overall -1 charge and a single odd electron; formal oxidation states [II, II, III]-[III, III, II] on the metal centers), the Raman excitation at 800 nm is resonant with a cluster-to-cluster intervalence charge-transfer (IVCT) band. Under these conditions, scattering enhancement is observed for all four totally symmetric vibrational modes of the bridging pyrazine ligand (nu8a, nu9a, nu1, and nu6a) in the investigated spectral range (100-2000 cm(-1)), and there is no evidence of activity in non-totally symmetric vibrations. Resonantly enhanced Raman peaks related to peripheral pyridyl (dmap) ligand modes and low-frequency features arising from the trigonal Ru3O cluster core and the cluster[Ru]-[N]ligand vibrations were also observed in the spectra of the intermediate-valence (n = -1) cluster dimer. The vibrational assignments and interpretations proposed in this work were reinforced by observation of characteristic isotopic frequency shifts accompanying deuteration of the bridging pyrazine. The results reveal that the fully symmetric (A(g)) vibrational motions of the organic bridge are coupled to the nominally metal cluster-to-metal cluster fast intramolecular electron transfer (ET) and provide validation of the near-delocalized description according to a predicted three-site/three-state (e.g., metal-bridge-metal) vibronic coupling model, in which the important role of the bridging ligand in mediating electronic communication and delocalization between charge centers is explicitly considered. Further compelling evidence supporting an extended five

  4. Elastic removal self-shielding factors for light and medium nuclides with strong-resonance scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Masayuki; Ishiguro, Yukio; Tokuno, Yukio.

    1978-01-01

    The self-shielding factors for elastic removal cross sections of light and medium weight nuclides were calculated for the parameter, σ 0 within the conventional concept of the group constant sets. The numerical study were performed for obtaining a simple and accurate method. The present results were compared with the exact values and the conventional ones, and shown to be remarkably improved. It became apparent that the anisotropy of the elastic scattering did not affect to the self-shielding factors though it did to the infinite dilution cross sections. With use of the present revised set, the neutron flux were calculated in an iron medium and in a prototype FBR and compared with those by the fine spectrum calculations and the conventional set. The present set showed the considerable improvement in the vicinity of the large resonance regions of sodium, iron and oxygen. (auth.)

  5. A new scalar resonance at 750 GeV: towards a proof of concept in favor of strongly interacting theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Minho; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    We interpret the recently observed excess in the diphoton invariant mass as a new spin-0 resonant particle. On theoretical grounds, an interesting question is whether this new scalar resonance belongs to a strongly coupled sector or a well-defined weakly coupled theory. A possible UV-completion that has been widely considered in literature is based on the existence of new vector-like fermions whose loop contributions — Yukawa-coupled to the new resonance — explain the observed signal rate. The large total width preliminarily suggested by data seems to favor a large Yukawa coupling, at the border of a healthy perturbative definition. This potential problem can be fixed by introducing multiple vector-like fermions or large electric charges, bringing back the theory to a weakly coupled regime. However, this solution risks to be only a low-energy mirage: large multiplicity or electric charge can dangerously reintroduce the strong regime by modifying the renormalization group running of the dimensionless couplings. This issue is also tightly related to the (in)stability of the scalar potential. First, we study — in the theoretical setup described above — the parametric behavior of the diphoton signal rate, total width, and one-loop β functions. Then, we numerically solve the renormalization group equations, taking into account the observed diphoton signal rate and total width, to investigate the fate of the weakly coupled theory. We find that — with the only exception of few fine-tuned directions — weakly coupled interpretations of the excess are brought back to a strongly coupled regime if the running is taken into account.

  6. Spin-orbit-induced strong coupling of a single spin to a nanomechanical resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pályi, András; Struck, P R; Rudner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the deflection-induced coupling of an electron spin to vibrational motion due to spin-orbit coupling in suspended carbon nanotube quantum dots. Our estimates indicate that, with current capabilities, a quantum dot with an odd number of electrons can serve....... The strong intrinsic spin-mechanical coupling allows for detection, as well as manipulation of the spin qubit, and may yield enhanced performance of nanotubes in sensing applications....

  7. Helium emission in the middle chromosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livshits, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    Slitless spectrograms obtained during the eclipse of 10 June 1972 have been analyzed to determine the height distribution of the D 3 He line intensity. For undisturbed regions the maximum of D 3 line intensity is confirmed to exist at about 1700 km above the limb. Besides the above mentioned maximum, in plages a considerable intensity may be observed at low heights (h 1000 km has been carried out within the low temperature mechanism of triplet helium emission taking into account the helium ionization by XUV radiation. The density dependence of the 2 3 S level population at different XUV flux values has been calculated. The observations give Nsub(e) approximately 2x10 10 cm -3 in the chromosphere at h = 2000 km. The probable coincidence of the H and He emission small filaments in the middle chromosphere is discussed. (Auth.)

  8. Building a Unified Computational Model for the Resonant X-Ray Scattering of Strongly Correlated Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansil, Arun [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Basic-Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (BES/DOE) has made large investments in x-ray sources in the U.S. (NSLS-II, LCLS, NGLS, ALS, APS) as powerful enabling tools for opening up unprecedented new opportunities for exploring properties of matter at various length and time scales. The coming online of the pulsed photon source literally allows us to see and follow the dynamics of processes in materials at their natural timescales. There is an urgent need therefore to develop theoretical methodologies and computational models for understanding how x-rays interact with matter and the related spectroscopies of materials. The present project addressed aspects of this grand challenge of X-ray science. In particular, our Collaborative Research Team (CRT) focused on understanding and modeling of elastic and inelastic resonant X-ray scattering processes. We worked to unify the three different computational approaches currently used for modeling X-ray scattering—density functional theory, dynamical mean-field theory, and small-cluster exact diagonalization—to achieve a more realistic material-specific picture of the interaction between X-rays and complex matter. To achieve a convergence in the interpretation and to maximize complementary aspects of different theoretical methods, we concentrated on the cuprates, where most experiments have been performed. Our team included both US and international researchers, and it fostered new collaborations between researchers currently working with different approaches. In addition, we developed close relationships with experimental groups working in the area at various synchrotron facilities in the US. Our CRT thus helped toward enabling the US to assume a leadership role in the theoretical development of the field, and to create a global network and community of scholars dedicated to X-ray scattering research.

  9. Dust and Chromospheres in M warfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessell, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    Whilst impressive work has gone into modelling the spectra of M dwarfs over the past 10 years, there remain significant differences between the best model spectra and observations that indicate serious shortcomings in our understanding of M dwarf atmospheres. This contribution outlines the major observational differences and discusses the likelihood of dust opacity in the coolest M dwarfs and chromospheres in all M dwarfs as being explanations for the outstanding differences.

  10. Relationships Between Sequential Chromospheric Brightening and the Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, M. S.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Jackiewicz, J.; Gilbert, H. R.

    2017-10-01

    The chromosphere is a complex region that acts as an intermediary between the magnetic flux emergence in the photosphere and the magnetic features seen in the corona. Large eruptions in the chromosphere of flares and filaments are often accompanied by ejections of coronal mass off the sun. Several studies have observed fast-moving progressive trains of compact bright points (called Sequential Chromospheric Brightenings or SCBs) streaming away from chromospheric flares that also produce a coronal mass ejection (CME). In this work, we review studies of SCBs and search for commonalties between them. We place these findings into a larger context with contemporary chromospheric and coronal observations. SCBs are fleeting indicators of the solar atmospheric environment as it existed before their associated eruption. Since they appear at the very outset of a flare eruption, SCBs are good early indication of a CME measured in the chromosphere.

  11. The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Kano, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N..; Ishikawa, R.; Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Hara, H.; hide

    2014-01-01

    To Understand energy release process in the Sun including solar flares, it is essentially important to measure the magnetic field of the atmosphere of the Sun. Magnetic field measurement of the upper layers (upper chromosphere and above) was technically difficult and not well investigated yet. Upper chromosphere and transition region magnetic field measurement by Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) sounding rocket to be launched in 2015. The proposal is already selected and developments of the flight components are going.

  12. Chromospheric impact of an exploding solar granule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, C. E.; Bello González, N.; Rezaei, R.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Observations of multi-wavelength and therefore height-dependent information following events throughout the solar atmosphere and unambiguously assigning a relation between these rapidly evolving layers are rare and difficult to obtain. Yet, they are crucial for our understanding of the physical processes that couple the different regimes in the solar atmosphere. Aims: We characterize the exploding granule event with simultaneous observations of Hinode spectroplarimetric data in the solar photosphere and Hinode broadband Ca II H images combined with Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) slit spectra. We follow the evolution of an exploding granule and its connectivity throughout the atmosphere and analyze the dynamics of a magnetic element that has been affected by the abnormal granule. Methods: In addition to magnetic flux maps we use a local correlation tracking method to infer the horizontal velocity flows in the photosphere and apply a wavelet analysis on several IRIS chromospheric emission features such as Mg II k2v and Mg II k3 to detect oscillatory phenomena indicating wave propagation. Results: During the vigorous expansion of the abnormal granule we detect radially outward horizontal flows, causing, together with the horizontal flows from the surrounding granules, the magnetic elements in the bordering intergranular lanes to be squeezed and elongated. In reaction to the squeezing, we detect a chromospheric intensity and velocity oscillation pulse which we identify as an upward traveling hot shock front propagating clearly through the IRIS spectral line diagnostics of Mg II h&k. Conclusions: Exploding granules can trigger upward-propagating shock fronts that dissipate in the chromosphere. Movies associated to Figs. A.1 and A.2 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. The quiet chromosphere : old wisdom, new insights, future needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    The introduction to this review summarizes chromosphere observation with two figures. The first part showcases the historical emphasis on the eclipse chromosphere in the development of NLTE line formation theory and criticizes 1D modeling. The second part advertises recent breakthroughs after many

  14. Strong quadrupole interaction in electron paramagnetic resonance. Study of the indium hexacyanide (III) in KCl irradiated with electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vugman, N.V.

    1973-08-01

    The radiation effects in ]Ir III (CN) 6 ] 3- diamagnetic complexe inserted in the KCl lattice and irradiated with electrons of 2MeV by electron spin resonance (ESR) are analysed. Formulas for g and A tensors in the ligand field approximation, are derivated to calculate non coupling electron density in the metal. The X polarization field of inner shells is positive, indicating a 6s function mixture in the non coupling electron molecular orbital. The observed hyperfine structure is assigned to 4 equivalent nitrogen and one non equivalent nitrogen. This hypothesis is verified by experience of isotope substitution with 15 N. The s and p spin density in ligands are calculated and discussed in terms of molecular obitals. The effects of strong quadrupole interaction into the EPR spectra of ]Ir II (CN) 5 ] 3- complex are analysed by MAGNSPEC computer program to diagonalize the Spin Hamiltonian of the system. Empiric rules for EPR espectrum interpretation with strong quadrupole interaction. A review of EPR technique and a review of main concepts of crystal-field and ligand field theories, are also presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  15. Fabricating a Homogeneously Alloyed AuAg Shell on Au Nanorods to Achieve Strong, Stable, and Tunable Surface Plasmon Resonances

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-08-13

    Colloidal metal nanocrystals with strong, stable, and tunable localized surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) can be useful in a corrosive environment for many applications including field-enhanced spectroscopies, plasmon-mediated catalysis, etc. Here, a new synthetic strategy is reported that enables the epitaxial growth of a homogeneously alloyed AuAg shell on Au nanorod seeds, circumventing the phase segregation of Au and Ag encountered in conventional synthesis. The resulting core–shell structured bimetallic nanorods (AuNR@AuAg) have well-mixed Au and Ag atoms in their shell without discernible domains. This degree of mixing allows AuNR@AuAg to combine the high stability of Au with the superior plasmonic activity of Ag, thus outperforming seemingly similar nanostructures with monometallic shells (e.g., Ag-coated Au NRs (AuNR@Ag) and Au-coated Au NRs (AuNR@Au)). AuNR@AuAg is comparable to AuNR@Ag in plasmonic activity, but that it is markedly more stable toward oxidative treatment. Specifically, AuNR@AuAg and AuNR@Ag exhibit similarly strong signals in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy that are some 30-fold higher than that of AuNR@Au. When incubated with a H2O2 solution (0.5 m), the plasmonic activity of AuNR@Ag immediately and severely decayed, whereas AuNR@AuAg retained its activity intact. Moreover, the longitudinal SPR frequency of AuNR@AuAg can be tuned throughout the red wavelengths (≈620–690 nm) by controlling the thickness of the AuAg alloy shell. The synthetic strategy is versatile to fabricate AuAg alloyed shells on different shaped Au, with prospects for new possibilities in the synthesis and application of plasmonic nanocrystals.

  16. A qubit strongly coupled to a resonant cavity: asymmetry of the spontaneous emission spectrum beyond the rotating wave approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, X [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China); You, J Q; Nori, F [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); Zheng, H, E-mail: xfcao@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2011-07-15

    We investigate the spontaneous emission (SE) spectrum of a qubit in a lossy resonant cavity. We use neither the rotating-wave approximation nor the Markov approximation. For the weak-coupling case, the SE spectrum of the qubit is a single peak, with its location depending on the spectral density of the qubit environment. Then, the asymmetry (of the location and heights of the two peaks) of the two SE peaks (which are related to the vacuum Rabi splitting) changes as the qubit-cavity coupling increases. Explicitly, for a qubit in a low-frequency intrinsic bath, the height asymmetry of the splitting peaks is enhanced as the qubit-cavity coupling strength increases. However, for a qubit in an Ohmic bath, the height asymmetry of the spectral peaks is inverted compared to the low-frequency bath case. With further increasing the qubit-cavity coupling to the ultra-strong regime, the height asymmetry of the left and right peaks is slightly inverted, which is consistent with the corresponding case of a low-frequency bath. This inversion of the asymmetry arises from the competition between the Ohmic bath and the cavity bath. Therefore, after considering the anti-rotating terms, our results explicitly show how the height asymmetry in the SE spectrum peaks depends on the qubit-cavity coupling and the type of intrinsic noise experienced by the qubit.

  17. Structure of sunspot light bridges in the chromosphere and transition region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, R.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Light bridges (LBs) are elongated structures with enhanced intensity embedded in sunspot umbra and pores. Aims: We studied the properties of a sample of 60 LBs observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Methods: Using IRIS near- and far-ultraviolet spectra, we measured the line intensity, width, and Doppler shift; followed traces of LBs in the chromosphere and transition region (TR); and compared LB parameters with umbra and quiet Sun. Results: There is a systematic emission enhancement in LBs compared to nearby umbra from the photosphere up to the TR. Light bridges are systematically displaced toward the solar limb at higher layers: the amount of the displacement at one solar radius compares well with the typical height of the chromosphere and TR. The intensity of the LB sample compared to the umbra sample peaks at the middle/upper chromosphere where they are almost permanently bright. Spectral lines emerging from the LBs are broader than the nearby umbra. The systematic redshift of the Si IV line in the LB sample is reduced compared to the quiet Sun sample. We found a significant correlation between the line width of ions arising at temperatures from 3 × 104 to 1.5 × 105 K as there is also a strong spatial correlation among the line and continuum intensities. In addition, the intensity-line width relation holds for all spectral lines in this study. The correlations indicate that the cool and hot plasma in LBs are coupled. Conclusions: Light bridges comprise multi-temperature and multi-disciplinary structures extending up to the TR. Diverse heating sources supply the energy and momentum to different layers, resulting in distinct dynamics in the photosphere, chromosphere, and TR.

  18. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, Manfred

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights.

  19. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuntz, M. (Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics, Boulder, CO (USA) Heidelberg Universitaet (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights. 74 refs.

  20. CLASP2: The Chromospheric LAyer Spectro-Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmeler, Laurel; E McKenzie, David; Ishikawa, Ryohko; Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Auchère, Frédéric; Kobayashi, Ken; Winebarger, Amy; Bethge, Christian; Kano, Ryouhei; Kubo, Masahito; Song, Donguk; Narukage, Noriyuki; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Yoshida, Masaki; Belluzzi, Luca; Stepan, Jiri; del Pino Alemná, Tanausú; Ballester, Ernest Alsina; Asensio Ramos, Andres

    2017-08-01

    We present the instrument, science case, and timeline of the CLASP2 sounding rocket mission. The successful CLASP (Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter) sounding rocket flight in 2015 resulted in the first-ever linear polarization measurements of solar hydrogen Lyman-alpha line, which is sensitive to the Hanle effect and can be used to constrain the magnetic field and geometric complexity of the upper chromosphere. Ly-alpha is one of several upper chromospheric lines that contain magnetic information. In the spring of 2019, we will re-fly the modified CLASP telescope to measure the full Stokes profile of Mg II h & k near 280 nm. This set of lines is sensitive to the upper chromospheric magnetic field via both the Hanle and the Zeeman effects.

  1. Towards strong light-matter coupling at the single-resonator level with sub-wavelength mid-infrared nano-antennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malerba, M.; De Angelis, F., E-mail: francesco.deangelis@iit.it [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego, 30, I-16163 Genova (Italy); Ongarello, T.; Paulillo, B.; Manceau, J.-M.; Beaudoin, G.; Sagnes, I.; Colombelli, R., E-mail: raffaele.colombelli@u-psud.fr [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (C2N Orsay), CNRS UMR9001, Univ. Paris Sud, Univ. Paris Saclay, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2016-07-11

    We report a crucial step towards single-object cavity electrodynamics in the mid-infrared spectral range using resonators that borrow functionalities from antennas. Room-temperature strong light-matter coupling is demonstrated in the mid-infrared between an intersubband transition and an extremely reduced number of sub-wavelength resonators. By exploiting 3D plasmonic nano-antennas featuring an out-of-plane geometry, we observed strong light-matter coupling in a very low number of resonators: only 16, more than 100 times better than what reported to date in this spectral range. The modal volume addressed by each nano-antenna is sub-wavelength-sized and it encompasses only ≈4400 electrons.

  2. Particle Acceleration and Plasma Heating in the Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new mechanism of electron acceleration and plasma heating in the solar chromosphere, based on the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The instability develops at the chromospheric footpoints of a flare loop and deforms the local magnetic field. As a result, the electric current in the loop varies, and a resulting inductive electric field appears. A pulse of the induced electric field, together with the pulse of the electric current, propagates along the loop with the Alfvén velocity and begins to accelerate electrons up to an energy of about 1 MeV. Accelerated particles are thermalized in the dense layers of the chromosphere with the plasma density n ≈10^{14} - 10^{15} cm^{-3}, heating them to a temperature of about several million degrees. Joule dissipation of the electric current pulse heats the chromosphere at heights that correspond to densities n ≤10^{11} - 10^{13} cm^{-3}. Observations with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory indicate that chromospheric footpoints of coronal loops might be heated to coronal temperatures and that hot plasma might be injected upwards, which brightens ultra-fine loops from the photosphere to the base of the corona. Thereby, recent observations of the Sun and the model we propose stimulate a déjà vu - they are reminiscent of the concept of the chromospheric flare.

  3. Magnetic and resonant X-ray scattering investigations of strongly correlated electron systems; Etude de systemes electroniques fortement correles par diffusion magnetique et resonnante des rayons X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paolasini, L.; Bergevin, F. de [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2008-06-15

    Resonant X-ray scattering is a method which combines high-Q resolution X-ray elastic diffraction and atomic core-hole spectroscopy for investigating electronic and magnetic long-range ordered structures in condensed matter. During recent years the development of theoretical models to describe resonant X-ray scattering amplitudes and the evolution of experimental techniques, which include the control and analysis of linear photon polarization and the introduction of extreme environment conditions such as low temperatures, high magnetic field and high pressures, have opened a new field of investigation in the domain of strongly correlated electron systems. (authors)

  4. Circuit-QED: How strong can the coupling between a Josephson junction atom and a transmission line resonator be?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devoret, M.H. [College de France, 75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); Girvin, Steven; Schoelkopf, Robert [Applied Physics Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8284 (United States)

    2007-10-15

    After reviewing the limitation by the fine structure constant {alpha} of the dimensionless coupling constant of an hydrogenic atom with a mode of the electromagnetic field in a cavity, we show that the situation presents itself differently for an artificial Josephson atom coupled to a transmission line resonator. Whereas the coupling constant for the case where such an atom is placed inside the dielectric of the resonator is proportional to {alpha}{sup 1/2}, the coupling of the Josephson atom when it is placed in series with the conducting elements of the resonator is proportional to {alpha}{sup -1/2} and can reach values greater than 1. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Inducing Strong Non-Linearities in a Phonon Trapping Quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonator Coupled to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Goryachev

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave resonator is designed to coherently trap phonons in such a way that they are well confined and immune to suspension losses so they exhibit extremely high acoustic Q-factors at low temperature, with Q × f products of order 10 18 Hz. In this work we couple such a resonator to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID amplifier and investigate effects in the strong signal regime. Both parallel and series connection topologies of the system are investigated. The study reveals significant non-Duffing response that is associated with the nonlinear characteristics of Josephson junctions. The nonlinearity provides quasi-periodic structure of the spectrum in both incident power and frequency. The result gives an insight into the open loop behaviour of a future Cryogenic Quartz Oscillator in the strong signal regime.

  6. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  7. Turbulent Structure in the Upper Chromospheres of Cool Supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, R. E.

    2013-05-01

    Although the contribution of a chromosphere to the total flux may be small, it plays a vital role as the interface between the star and interstellar space, as it is where the stellar wind originates. The very outermost layers of a star are expected to be turbulent. Images of the solar chromosphere and corona reveal both small-scale inhomogeneities (prominences and spaces) and large-scale variability (polar plumes near sunspot minima, streamers near sunspot maxima), and something similar but more exaggerated can be expected in cool supergiants. Samplings of the high chromosphere in late-K supergiants show extreme variability in both density and velocity, and can be thought of as analogues of the solar case. Series of chromospheric-eclipse spectra of the Ca ii K line in 31 Cyg, 32 Cyg and ζAur demonstrate (a) the presence in the high chromosphere of discrete, rapidly-moving clumps of gas, (b) that structures are not stable or symmetrical, either from eclipse to eclipse or from ingress to egress in the same eclipse, (c) plenty of empty space, and (d) huge differences between one late-K supergiant and another. What information can this evidence offer as regards the outer structure and wind of Betelgeuse?

  8. Chromospheric Heating due to Cancellation of Quiet Sun Internetwork Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gošić, M.; de la Cruz Rodríguez, J.; De Pontieu, B.; Bellot Rubio, L. R.; Carlsson, M.; Esteban Pozuelo, S.; Ortiz, A.; Polito, V.

    2018-04-01

    The heating of the solar chromosphere remains one of the most important questions in solar physics. Our current understanding is that small-scale internetwork (IN) magnetic fields play an important role as a heating agent. Indeed, cancellations of IN magnetic elements in the photosphere can produce transient brightenings in the chromosphere and transition region. These bright structures might be the signature of energy release and plasma heating, probably driven by the magnetic reconnection of IN field lines. Although single events are not expected to release large amounts of energy, their global contribution to the chromosphere may be significant due to their ubiquitous presence in quiet Sun regions. In this paper, we study cancellations of IN elements and analyze their impact on the energetics and dynamics of the quiet Sun atmosphere. We use high-resolution, multiwavelength, coordinated observations obtained with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope (SST) to identify cancellations of IN magnetic flux patches and follow their evolution. We find that, on average, these events live for ∼3 minutes in the photosphere and ∼12 minutes in the chromosphere and/or transition region. Employing multi-line inversions of the Mg II h and k lines, we show that cancellations produce clear signatures of heating in the upper atmospheric layers. However, at the resolution and sensitivity accessible to the SST, their number density still seems to be one order of magnitude too low to explain the global chromospheric heating.

  9. FAST MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE MEDIATED BY THE PLASMOID INSTABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Lei; Kliem, Bernhard; Lin, Jun [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Wu, Ning, E-mail: leini@ynao.ac.cn [School of Tourism and Geography, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming 650031 (China)

    2015-01-20

    Magnetic reconnection in the partially ionized solar chromosphere is studied in 2.5 dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations including radiative cooling and ambipolar diffusion. A Harris current sheet with and without a guide field is considered. Characteristic values of the parameters in the middle chromosphere imply a high magnetic Reynolds number of ∼10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} in the present simulations. Fast magnetic reconnection then develops as a consequence of the plasmoid instability without the need to invoke anomalous resistivity enhancements. Multiple levels of the instability are followed as it cascades to smaller scales, which approach the ion inertial length. The reconnection rate, normalized to the asymptotic values of magnetic field and Alfvén velocity in the inflow region, reaches values in the range ∼0.01-0.03 throughout the cascading plasmoid formation and for zero as well as for strong guide field. The outflow velocity reaches ≈40 km s{sup –1}. Slow-mode shocks extend from the X-points, heating the plasmoids up to ∼8 × 10{sup 4} K. In the case of zero guide field, the inclusion of both ambipolar diffusion and radiative cooling causes a rapid thinning of the current sheet (down to ∼30 m) and early formation of secondary islands. Both of these processes have very little effect on the plasmoid instability for a strong guide field. The reconnection rates, temperature enhancements, and upward outflow velocities from the vertical current sheet correspond well to their characteristic values in chromospheric jets.

  10. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...... theoretical consciousness through historical narrative ‘in practice’, by discussing selected historical topics from Western cultural history, within the disciplines of history, literature, visual arts, musicology, archaeology, philosophy, and theology. The title Resonances indicates the overall perspective...... of the book: how connotations of past meanings may resonate through time, in new contexts, assuming new meanings without surrendering the old....

  11. Multi-wavelength analysis from tomography study on solar chromosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumpuni, Emanuel Sungging; Herdiwijaya, Dhani; Djamal, Mitra

    2015-01-01

    The Sun as the most important star for scientific laboratory in astrophysics as well as encompassing all living aspect on Earth, still holds scientific mystery. As the established model that the Sun’s energy fueled by the nuclear reaction, along with transport process to the typical Solar surface on around 6000-K temperature, many aspects still left as an open questions, such as how the chromosphere responded to the photospheric dynamics. In this preliminary work, we try to analyze the Solar chromosphere respond to the Photospheric dynamics using tomography study implementing multi-wavelength analysis observation obtained from Dutch Open Telescope. Using the Hydrogen-alpha Doppler signal as the primary diagnostic tool, we try to investigate the inter-relation between the magnetic and gas pressure dynamics that occur in the chromosphere

  12. On the convective instability of finitely conducting viscous model chromosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankhla, V.D.; Bhatia, P.K.

    1980-01-01

    The convective stability of a simple model chromosphere, consisting of protons, electrons and hydrogen atoms in the ground state, has been studied in the presence of a vertically upward uniform magnetic field to include the effects of FLR, Hall-currents, finite conductivity and ionization. The ionization in the chromosphere is collisional and the recombination is radiative. It is found that the Schwarzchild criterion should necessarily be satisfied for the stability together with the condition that v > 2 v 0 , where v is kinematic viscosity and v 0 is gyroviscosity. Some special cases have also been investigated. (orig.)

  13. CHROMOSPHERIC POLARIZATION IN THE PHOTOSPHERIC SOLAR OXYGEN INFRARED TRIPLET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Pino Alemán, Tanausú; Trujillo Bueno, Javier [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-07-20

    We present multilevel radiative transfer modeling of the scattering polarization observed in the solar O i infrared triplet around 777 nm. We demonstrate that the scattering polarization pattern observed on the solar disk forms in the chromosphere, far above the photospheric region where the bulk of the emergent intensity profiles originate. We investigate the sensitivity of the polarization pattern to the thermal structure of the solar atmosphere and to the presence of weak magnetic fields (10{sup −2}–100 G) through the Hanle effect, showing that the scattering polarization signals of the oxygen infrared triplet encode information on the magnetism of the solar chromosphere.

  14. Strong excitation of surface and bulk spin waves in yttrium iron garnet placed in a split ring resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Z. J.; Soh, W. T.; Ong, C. K.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) in a bilayer consisting of a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and platinum (Pt) loaded on a metamaterial split ring resonator (SRR). The system is excited by a microstrip feed line which generates both surface and bulk spin waves in the YIG. The spin waves subsequently undergo spin pumping from the YIG film to an adjacent Pt layer, and is converted into a charge current via the ISHE. It is found that the presence of the SRR causes a significant enhancement of the mangetic field near the resonance frequency of the SRR, resulting in a significant increase in the ISHE signal. Furthermore, the type of spin wave generated in the system can be controlled by changing the external applied magnetic field angle (θH ). When the external applied magnetic field is near parallel to the microstrip line (θH = 0 ), magnetostatic surface spin waves are predominantly excited. On the other hand, when the external applied magnetic field is perpendicular to the microstrip line (θH = π/2 ), backward volume magnetostatic spin waves are predominantly excited. Hence, it can be seen that the SRR structure is a promising method of achieving spin-charge conversion, which has many advantages over a coaxial probe.

  15. A New Technique for Reducing Size of a WPT System Using Two-Loop Strongly-Resonant Inductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaz Rozman

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mid-range resonant coupling-based high efficient wireless power transfer (WPT techniques have gained substantial research interest due to the number of potential applications in many industries. This paper presents a novel design of a resonant two-loop WPT technique including the design, fabrication and preliminary results of this proposal. This new design employs a compensation inductor which is combined with the transmitter and receiver loops in order to significantly scale down the size of the transmitter and receiver coils. This can improve the portability of the WPT transmitters in practical systems. Moreover, the benefits of the system enhancement are not only limited to the lessened magnitude of the T X & R X , simultaneously both the weight and the bill of materials are also minimised. The proposed system also demonstrates compatibility with the conventional electronic components such as capacitors hence the development of the T X & R X is simplified. The proposed system performance has been validated using the similarities between the experimental and simulation results. The power efficiency of the prototype circuit is found to be 93%, which is close to the efficiency reached by the conventional design. However, the weight of the transmitter and receiver inductors is now reduced by 78%, while the length of these inductors is reduced by 80%.

  16. Evidence for Two Separate but Interlaced Components of the Chromospheric Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muglach, K.; Reardon, K. P.; Wang, Y.-M.; Warren, H. P.

    2012-01-01

    Chromospheric fibrils are generally thought to trace out horizontal magnetic fields that fan out from flux concentrations in the photosphere. A high-resolution (0.2") image taken in the core of the Ca IJ854.2 nm line shows the dark fibrils within an active region remnant as fine, loop-like features that are aligned parallel to each other and have lengths on the order of a supergranular diameter (approx.30 Mm). Comparison with a line-of-sight magnetogram confirms that the fibrils are centered above intranetwork areas, with one end rooted just inside the neighboring plage or strong unipolar network but the other endpoint less clearly defined. Focusing on a particular arcade-like structure lying entirely on one side of a filament channel (large-scale polarity inversion), we find that the total amount of positive-polarity flux underlying this "fibril arcade' is 50 times greater than the total amount of negative-polarity flux. Thus, if the fibrils represent closed loops, they must consist of very weak fields (in terms of flux density), which are interpenetrated by a more vertical field that contains most of the flux. This surprising result suggests that the fibrils in unipolar regions connect the network to the nearby intranetwork flux, while the bulk of the network flux is diverted upward into the corona and connects to remote regions of the opposite polarity. We conclude that the chromospheric field near the edge of the network has an interlaced structure resembling that in sunspot penumbrae, with the fibrils representing the low-lying horizontal flux that remains trapped within the highly nonpotential chromospheric layer.

  17. Breast magnetic resonance imaging significance for breast cancer diagnostic in women with genetic predisposition and a strong family history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Karpova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Screening of breast cancer with mammography recommended to women over 40 has been shown to decrease breast cancer mortality. But mam- mography has much lower accuracy in young women with BRCA1/2 mutations and women with a strong family history. Therefore new screening methods in young high-risk women are necessary to detect early-stage cancer.

  18. Design of an adaptable Stokes polarimeter for exploring chromospheric magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Rohan E.; Bayanna, A. Raja; Socas Navarro, Héctor

    2017-10-01

    The chromosphere is a highly complex and dynamic layer of the Sun, that serves as a conduit for mass and energy supply between two, very distinct regions of the solar atmosphere, namely, the photosphere and corona. Inferring magnetic fields in the chromosphere, has thus become an important topic, that can be addressed with large-aperture solar telescopes to carry out highly sensitive polarimetric measurements. In this article, we present a design of a polarimeter for investigating the chromospheric magnetic field. The instrument consists of a number of lenses, two ferro-electric liquid crystals, a Wollaston prism, and a CCD camera. The optical design is similar to that of a commercial zoom lens which allows a variable f# while maintaining focus and aberrations well within the Airy disc. The optical design of the Adaptable ChRomOspheric POLarimeter (ACROPOL) makes use of off-the-shelf components and is described for the 70 cm Vacuum Tower Telescope and the 1.5 m GREGOR telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. Our design shows that the optical train can be separated into two units where the first unit, consisting of a single lens, has to be changed while going from the VTT to the GREGOR configuration. We also discuss the tolerances within which, diffraction limited performance can be achieved with our design.

  19. Observational Searches for Chromospheric g-Mode Oscillations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Observational Searches for Chromospheric g-Mode Oscillations from CaII H-Line Observations. R. Kariyappa. 1,∗. , L. Damé. 2. & K. M. Hiremath. 1. 1Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560 034, India. 2Service d'Aéronomie du CNRS, 91371 Verrieres-le-Buisson Cedex, France. ∗ e-mail: rkari@iiap.res.in. Abstract.

  20. A Study of Chromospheric Emission Decay in Old Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Lee W.

    Little Is known about the decay of chromospheric emission with age in old solartype stars (t > 5 Gyr). The Vaughan-Preston (1980) survey of Ca II chromospheric emission among stars in the solar neighborhood suggests that chromospheric emission may not weaken significantly in stars older than the Sun. However, the true decline may be much larger than indicated by these data, as there may be large photospheric fluxes included in the observations. We propose to observe a sample of weak-emission stars from the Vaughan-Preston survey for Mg II emission with IUE. The photospheric contribution is much less at Mg II than it is at Ca II, and so we will obtain a clearer indication of chromospheric activity from the high dispersion spectra. We also propose to survey 20 stars in the spectral type range F5-G0 for which Twarog (1980b) has obtained estimates of ages and metallicities, in an effort to trace the decay of emission with age among very old dwarfs.

  1. CHROMOSPHERIC HEATING BY ACOUSTIC WAVES COMPARED TO RADIATIVE COOLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobotka, M.; Heinzel, P.; Švanda, M.; Jurčák, J. [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (v.v.i.), Fričova 298, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Del Moro, D.; Berrilli, F. [Department of Physics, University of Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy)

    2016-07-20

    Acoustic and magnetoacoustic waves are among the possible candidate mechanisms that heat the upper layers of the solar atmosphere. A weak chromospheric plage near the large solar pore NOAA 11005 was observed on 2008 October 15, in the Fe i 617.3 nm and Ca ii 853.2 nm lines of the Interferometric Bidimemsional Spectrometer attached to the Dunn Solar Telescope. In analyzing the Ca ii observations (with spatial and temporal resolutions of 0.″4 and 52 s) the energy deposited by acoustic waves is compared to that released by radiative losses. The deposited acoustic flux is estimated from the power spectra of Doppler oscillations measured in the Ca ii line core. The radiative losses are calculated using a grid of seven one-dimensional hydrostatic semi-empirical model atmospheres. The comparison shows that the spatial correlation of the maps of radiative losses and acoustic flux is 72%. In a quiet chromosphere, the contribution of acoustic energy flux to radiative losses is small, only about 15%. In active areas with a photospheric magnetic-field strength between 300 and 1300 G and an inclination of 20°–60°, the contribution increases from 23% (chromospheric network) to 54% (a plage). However, these values have to be considered as lower limits and it might be possible that the acoustic energy flux is the main contributor to the heating of bright chromospheric network and plages.

  2. Chromospheric Heating By Acoustic Waves Compared To Radiative Cooling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sobotka, Michal; Heinzel, Petr; Švanda, Michal; Jurčák, Jan; Del Moro, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 826, č. 1 (2016), 49/1-49/8 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-04338S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Sun * chromosphere * faculae, Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.533, year: 2016

  3. Wave Heating of the Solar Chromosphere Wolfgang Kalkofen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    e-mail: wolf@cfa.harvard.edu. Abstract. The nonmagnetic interior of supergranulation cells has been thought since the 1940s to be heated by the dissipation of acoustic waves. But all attempts to measure the acoustic flux have failed to show suffi- cient energy for chromospheric heating. Recent space observations with.

  4. Dynamics of fine structure in the solar chromosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijn, A.G. de

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the dynamics of fine structure of the solar chromosphere and transition region, in both quiet sun and active regions. It contains six chapters of observational studies. It presents a study on the spatial structure and temporal dynamics of reversed granulation; a study

  5. Wave Heating of the Solar Chromosphere Wolfgang Kalkofen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The nonmagnetic interior of supergranulation cells has been thought since the 1940s to be heated by the dissipation of acoustic waves. But all attempts to measure the acoustic flux have failed to show suffi- cient energy for chromospheric heating. Recent space observations with. TRACE, for example, have found ...

  6. An Estimate of Chromospheric Heating by Acoustic Waves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sobotka, Michal; Švanda, Michal; Jurčák, Jan; Heinzel, Petr; Del Moro, D.; Berrilli, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 1 (2014), s. 53-58 ISSN 1845-8319 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-04338S; GA ČR GPP209/12/P568; GA ČR GAP209/12/0287 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Sun * chromosphere * heating Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  7. Spectral line formation and oscillations in the solar chromosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouttebroze, Pierre.

    1980-09-01

    This thesis is dedicated to two kind of models: the firsts, of semi-empiric type, seek to represent the vertical structure of the solar atmosphere and are treated in chapter II thru V. The others, of rather theoretical nature, have the ambition to simulate the oscillations of the chromosphere and are treated in chapter VI to X [fr

  8. RESONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    maceutical, paper, food, dyes, petrochemi- cals, pigments, etc., to identify molecules, to monitor reaction products and so on. One of the most spectacular contributions of NMR has been in the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a method that has today revolutionized diagnosis and treatment of diseases in ...

  9. CLASP2: The Chromospheric LAyer Spectro-Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, D. E.; Ishikawa, R.; Bueno, J. Trujillo; Auchere, F.; Rachmeler, L; Kudo, M.; Kobayashi, K.; Winebarger, A.; Bethge, C.; Narukage, N.; hide

    2017-01-01

    A major remaining challenge for heliophysicsis to decipher the magnetic structure of the chromosphere, due to its 'large role in defining how energy is transported into the corona and solar wind' (NASA's Heliophysics Roadmap). Recent observational advances enabled by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) have revolutionized our view of the critical role this highly dynamic interface between the photosphere and corona plays in energizing and structuring the outer solar atmosphere. Despite these advances, a major impediment to better understanding the solar atmosphere is our lack of empirical knowledge regarding the direction and strength of the magnetic field in the upper chromosphere. Such measurements are crucial to address several major unresolved issues in solar physics: for example, to constrain the energy flux carried by the Alfven waves propagating through the chromosphere (De Pontieuet al., 2014), and to determine the height at which the plasma ß = 1 transition occurs, which has important consequences for the braiding of magnetic fields (Cirtainet al., 2013; Guerreiroet al., 2014), for propagation and mode conversion of waves (Tian et al., 2014a; Straus et al., 2008) and for non-linear force-free extrapolation methods that are key to determining what drives instabilities such as flares or coronal mass ejections (e.g., De Rosa et al., 2009). The most reliable method used to determine the solar magnetic field vector is the observation and interpretation of polarization signals in spectral lines, associated with the Zeeman and Hanle effects. Magnetically sensitive ultraviolet spectral lines formed in the upper chromosphere and transition region provide a powerful tool with which to probe this key boundary region (e.g., Trujillo Bueno, 2014). Probing the magnetic nature of the chromosphere requires measurement of the Stokes I, Q, U and V profiles of the relevant spectral lines (of which Q, U and V encode the magnetic field information).

  10. The solar chromosphere at high resolution with IBIS. IV. Dual-line evidence of heating in chromospheric network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cauzzi, G.; Reardon, K.; Rutten, R.J.; Tritschler, A.; Uitenbroek, H.

    2009-01-01

    The structure and energy balance of the solar chromosphere remain poorly known.We used the imaging spectrometer IBIS at the Dunn Solar Telescope to obtain fast-cadence, multi-wavelength profile sampling of Hα and Ca II 854.2 nm over a sizable two-dimensional field of view encompassing quiet-Sun

  11. Energy Approach to Nuclei and Atoms in a Strong Laser Field: Stark Effect and Multi-photon Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushkov, A. V.; Khetselius, O. Yu.; Svinarenko, A. A.; Lovett, L.

    2010-01-01

    A consistent energy approach to nuclei and atoms in a strong electromagnetic (laser) field is presented. The photon emission and absorption lines are described by the moments of different orders, which are calculated with the use of the Gell-Mann and Low S-matrix adiabatic formalism. In relativistic version the Gell-Mann and Low formulae expresses an imaginary part of the energy shift ImE through the scattering matrix, including interaction of quantum system as with laser field as with a field of photon vacuum.

  12. Structural analysis of mixed alkali borosilicate glasses containing Cs+ and Na+ using strong magnetic field magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kaneko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the local structure of alkali atoms in mixed alkali silicate, borate, and borosilicate glasses, which contain Cs+ and Na+, using strong magnetic field magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR spectroscopy of 133Cs and 23Na. The spectral peaks of 133Cs in borosilicate (Si:B = 1:1 and Si-rich borosilicate (Si:B = 2:1 glasses shifted to upfield with increasing Cs+/(Na+ + Cs+ ratio, which implies that the coordination number of Cs+ decreased as in the case of silicate and borate glasses. However, this trend was not observed in the 23Na spectra of either borosilicate glass. This might be because the chemical shift of 23Na in borosilicate glass is strongly affected by nearby species such as Si or B, and not by the coordination number of Na+.

  13. YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} microwave resonators for strong collective coupling with spin ensembles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghirri, A., E-mail: alberto.ghirri@nano.cnr.it [Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Centro S3, via Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); Bonizzoni, C.; Affronte, M. [Dipartimento Fisica, Informatica e Matematica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia and Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Centro S3, via Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); Gerace, D.; Sanna, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Cassinese, A. [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli Federico II, 80138 Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-04

    Coplanar microwave resonators made of 330 nm-thick superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} have been realized and characterized in a wide temperature (T, 2–100 K) and magnetic field (B, 0–7 T) range. The quality factor (Q{sub L}) exceeds 10{sup 4} below 55 K and it slightly decreases for increasing fields, remaining 90% of Q{sub L}(B=0) for B = 7 T and T = 2 K. These features allow the coherent coupling of resonant photons with a spin ensemble at finite temperature and magnetic field. To demonstrate this, collective strong coupling was achieved by using di(phenyl)-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)iminoazanium organic radical placed at the magnetic antinode of the fundamental mode: the in-plane magnetic field is used to tune the spin frequency gap splitting across the single-mode cavity resonance at 7.75 GHz, where clear anticrossings are observed with a splitting as large as ∼82 MHz at T = 2 K. The spin-cavity collective coupling rate is shown to scale as the square root of the number of active spins in the ensemble.

  14. IUE ultraviolet spectra and chromospheric models of HR 1099 and UX Arietis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T.; Linsky, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    IUE spectra in the region 1150-3200 A of the RS CVn-type variables HR 1099 and UX Arietis are presented and analyzed in terms of chromospheric models. Measurements of Mg h and k lines and Ca II H-K and H alpha spectra are indicated which are found not to be correlated with orbital phase or radio flares and which suggest that the strong emission arises in the K star rather than the G star in these systems. Under the assumption that the UV emission lines are associated with the K star, surface gravities of log g = 3.6 and 3.4 and effective temperatures of 4850 and 5000 K are adopted for HR 1099 and UX Ari, respectively, along with solar metal abundances for each. Model calculations of the chromospheric structure necessary to account for observed C(+), Mg(+), Si(+) and Si(+2) line fluxes are presented which indicate that the transition region pressure lies in the range 0.18-1.0 dynes/sq cm, implying transition regions that are more extended than that of the sun and are not conductively heated. It is noted that pressure scaling laws and the use of Mg II and C II lines as pressure diagnostics may be invalid, possibly due to atmospheric inhomogeneities or gas flows.

  15. Chromospheric Heating Driven by Cancellations of Internetwork Magnetic Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosic, M.; de la Cruz Rodriguez, J.; De Pontieu, B.; Bellot Rubio, L.; Esteban Pozuelo, S.; Ortiz-Carbonell, A. N.

    2017-12-01

    The heating of the solar chromosphere remains to be one of the most important questions in solar physics. It is believed that this phenomenon may significantly be supported by small-scale internetwork (IN) magnetic fields. Indeed, cancellations of IN magnetic flux can generate transient brightenings in the chromosphere and transition region. These bright structures might be the signature of energy release and plasma heating, probably driven by magnetic reconnection of IN field lines. Using high resolution, multiwavelength, coordinated observations recorded with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST), we analyzed cancellations of IN flux and their impact on the energetics and dynamics of the quiet Sun atmosphere. From their temporal and spatial evolution, we determine that these events can heat locally the upper atmospheric layers. However, employing multi-line inversions of the Mg II h & k lines, we show that cancellations, although occurring ubiquitously over IN regions, are not capable of sustaining the total radiative losses of the quiet Sun chromosphere.

  16. Vortex flows in the solar chromosphere. I. Automatic detection method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Y.; Wedemeyer, S.

    2017-05-01

    Solar "magnetic tornadoes" are produced by rotating magnetic field structures that extend from the upper convection zone and the photosphere to the corona of the Sun. Recent studies show that these kinds of rotating features are an integral part of atmospheric dynamics and occur on a large range of spatial scales. A systematic statistical study of magnetic tornadoes is a necessary next step towards understanding their formation and their role in mass and energy transport in the solar atmosphere. For this purpose, we develop a new automatic detection method for chromospheric swirls, meaning the observable signature of solar tornadoes or, more generally, chromospheric vortex flows and rotating motions. Unlike existing studies that rely on visual inspections, our new method combines a line integral convolution (LIC) imaging technique and a scalar quantity that represents a vortex flow on a two-dimensional plane. We have tested two detection algorithms, based on the enhanced vorticity and vorticity strength quantities, by applying them to three-dimensional numerical simulations of the solar atmosphere with CO5BOLD. We conclude that the vorticity strength method is superior compared to the enhanced vorticity method in all aspects. Applying the method to a numerical simulation of the solar atmosphere reveals very abundant small-scale, short-lived chromospheric vortex flows that have not been found previously by visual inspection.

  17. High frequency generation in the corona: Resonant cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, I. C.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2018-03-01

    Aims: Null points are prominent magnetic field singularities in which the magnetic field strength strongly decreases in very small spatial scales. Around null points, predicted to be ubiquitous in the solar chromosphere and corona, the wave behavior changes considerably. Null points are also responsible for driving very energetic phenomena, and for contributing to chromospheric and coronal heating. In previous works we demonstrated that slow magneto-acoustic shock waves were generated in the chromosphere propagate through the null point, thereby producing a train of secondary shocks escaping along the field lines. A particular combination of the shock wave speeds generates waves at a frequency of 80 MHz. The present work aims to investigate this high frequency region around a coronal null point to give a plausible explanation to its generation at that particular frequency. Methods: We carried out a set of two-dimensional numerical simulations of wave propagation in the neighborhood of a null point located in the corona. We varied both the amplitude of the driver and the atmospheric properties to investigate the sensitivity of the high frequency waves to these parameters. Results: We demonstrate that the wave frequency is sensitive to the atmospheric parameters in the corona, but it is independent of the strength of the driver. Thus, the null point behaves as a resonant cavity generating waves at specific frequencies that depend on the background equilibrium model. Moreover, we conclude that the high frequency wave train generated at the null point is not necessarily a result of the interaction between the null point and a shock wave. This wave train can be also developed by the interaction between the null point and fast acoustic-like magneto-acoustic waves, that is, this interaction within the linear regime.

  18. LINE SHAPES OF DOPPLER-FREE RESONANCE IN SRFM: STRONG ATOM-WALL INTERACTION AND PRESSURE EFFECT ON THE FREQUENCY SHIFT OF AN ALKALI VAPOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B BOUHAFS

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The attractive potential energy between the atoms of rubidium vapor and a dielectric wall has been investigated by monitoring the reflection light at the interface. The atom- wall interaction potential of the form V(z = - C /z3 (z: atom-wall allows to predict experimental results only for weak regime, i.e., where C<< 0.2 kHzmm3. In the strong interaction case, the dispersive line shape is turned into an absorption-type line shape. The influence of atomic density on the shift of  the selective reflection resonance  relatively to the frequency of unperturbed atomic transition is found to be red with a negative slope. This technique opens the way to characterize the windows made of different materials thin films.

  19. Structure and Dynamics of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    2002-04-01

    The grant supported research on the structure of the quiet, nonmagnetic chromosphere and on wave excitation and propagation in both the nonmagnetic chromosphere and the magnetic network. The work on the structure of the chromosphere culminated in the recognition that between two competing views of the solar chromosphere, older models by Avrett and collaborators (referred to as VAL) and the newer, dynamical model by Carlsson & Stein (referred to as CS), the clear decision is in favor of the older models, and this in spite of the evident lack of physics, which does not include wave motion and oscillations. The contrast between the static VAL models and the dynamical CS model can be stated most succinctly by comparing the temperature variation implied by the VAL models and the temperature fluctuations of the CS model, which are, respectively, of the order of 10% for the VAL model (at heights where hydrogen is 50% ionized) and a factor of 10 (at the upper boundary of their chromospheric model). The huge fluctuations of the CS model have never been observed, whereas the smaller temperature variations of the VAL models are consistent with ground-based and space-based observations. While it should be obvious which model describes the Sun and which one fails, the case is far from settled in the minds of solar physicists. Thus, much educational work remains to be done and, of course, more research to develop arguments that make the case more convincing. The research on waves and oscillations has been based on a unified theory of excitation of acoustic waves in the field-free atmosphere and of transverse and longitudinal waves in magnetic flux tubes located in the magnetic network by noting, first, that impulsive excitation of all these waves in gravitationally stratified media leads to oscillations at the respective cutoff frequencies and, second, that the observed oscillation frequencies in the nonmagnetic and magnetic parts of the chromosphere match corresponding cutoff

  20. Chromospheric Evaporation in an M1.8 Flare Observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss observations of chromospheric evaporation for a flare that occurred on 9 March 2012 near 03:30 UT obtained from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft. This was a multiple event with a strong energy input that reached the M1.8 class when observed by EIS. EIS was in raster mode and fortunately the slit reached almost the exact location of a significant energy input. Also, fortunately EIS obtained a full-CCD spectrum of the flare, i.e., the entire CCD was readout so that data were obtained for about the 500 lines identified in the EIS wavelength ranges. Chromospheric evaporation characterized by 150-200 km/s upflows was observed in several locations in multi-million degree spectral lines of flare ions such as Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, Fe XXIV, with simultaneous 20 - 60 km/s upflows in a host of million degree coronal lines from ions such as Fe XI - Fe XVI. The behavior of cooler, transition region ions such as O VI, Fe VIII, He II, and Fe X is more complex. At a point close to strong energy input, the flare ions reveal an isothermal source with a temperature close to 14 MK. At this point there is a strong downflow in cooler active region lines from ions such as Fe XIII and Fe XIV. Electron densities were obtained from density sensitive lines ratios from Fe XIII and Fe XIV. The results to be presented are refined from the preliminary data given above and combined with context AIA observations for a comparison with predictions of models of chromospheric evaporation as envisaged in the Standard Flare Model.

  1. Tracers of Chromospheric Structure. I. Observations of Ca II K and Hα in M Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Hawley, Suzanne L.

    2009-02-01

    We report on our observing program4This paper is based on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. to capture simultaneous spectra of Ca II and Balmer lines in a sample of nearby M3 dwarfs. Our goal is to investigate the chromospheric temperature structure required to produce these lines at the observed levels. We find a strong positive correlation between instantaneous measurements of Ca II K and the Balmer lines in active stars, although these lines may not be positively correlated in time-resolved measurements. The relationship between Hα and Ca II K remains ambiguous for weak and intermediate activity stars, with Hα absorption corresponding to a range of Ca II K emission. A similar relationship is also observed between Ca II K and the higher-order Balmer lines. As our sample consists of a single spectral type, correlations between these important chromospheric tracers cannot be ascribed to continuum effects, as suggested by other authors. These data confirm prior nonsimultaneous observations of the Hα line behavior with increasing activity, showing an initial increase in the Hα absorption with increasing Ca II K emission, prior to Hα filling in and eventually becoming a pure emission line in the most active stars. We also compare our optical measurements with archival UV and X-ray measurements, finding a positive correlation between the chromospheric and coronal emission for both high and intermediate activity stars. We compare our results with previous determinations of the active fraction of low-mass stars

  2. Strong convective and shock wave behaviour in solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomberg, H.W.; Davis, J.; Boris, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    A model has been developed to study the gasdynamics of a flare region heated by a stream of energetic electrons. It is shown that the energy deposition can introduce strong chromospheric dynamical effects. As a result of fluid motion into rarified regions, there is considerable redistribution of mass causing a profound influence on the emitted line radiation. (author)

  3. Periodic photospheric and chromospheric modulation in Alpha Orionis (Betelgeuse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, A. K.; Baliunas, S. L.; Hartmann, L.; Nassiopoulos, G. E.; Guinan, E. F.; Sonneborn, G.

    1987-01-01

    The bright cool supergiant Alpha Orionis has been monitored spectroscopically and photometrically over the past three years (1984-1986) in the optical and the ultraviolet wavelength regions. A 420-day periodic modulation of the flux is observed in the optical and ultaviolet continua, and in the Mg II line emission cores. Periodic photospheric pulsations are the most likely explanation of these observations. This identification is based on the large amplitude of the variation, the correlation of the continuum and chromospheric fluxes, and the length of the observed period. Pulsation may heat and extend the atmosphere of Alpha Ori and initiate the mass flow from the star.

  4. DISCOVERY OF UBIQUITOUS FAST-PROPAGATING INTENSITY DISTURBANCES BY THE CHROMOSPHERIC LYMAN ALPHA SPECTROPOLARIMETER (CLASP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Kano, R.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Hara, H.; Giono, G. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Tsuneta, S.; Ishikawa, S.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Cirtain, J. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Champey, P. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 301 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Auchère, F. [Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS/Univ. Paris-Sud 11, Bâtiment 121, F-91405 Orsay (France); Bueno, J. Trujillo; Ramos, A. Asensio, E-mail: masahito.kubo@nao.ac.jp [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); and others

    2016-12-01

    High-cadence observations by the slit-jaw (SJ) optics system of the sounding rocket experiment known as the Chromospheric Lyman Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP) reveal ubiquitous intensity disturbances that recurrently propagate in either the chromosphere or the transition region or both at a speed much higher than the speed of sound. The CLASP/SJ instrument provides a time series of two-dimensional images taken with broadband filters centered on the Ly α line at a 0.6 s cadence. The multiple fast-propagating intensity disturbances appear in the quiet Sun and in an active region, and they are clearly detected in at least 20 areas in a field of view of 527″ × 527″ during the 5 minute observing time. The apparent speeds of the intensity disturbances range from 150 to 350 km s{sup −1}, and they are comparable to the local Alfvén speed in the transition region. The intensity disturbances tend to propagate along bright elongated structures away from areas with strong photospheric magnetic fields. This suggests that the observed fast-propagating intensity disturbances are related to the magnetic canopy structures. The maximum distance traveled by the intensity disturbances is about 10″, and the widths are a few arcseconds, which are almost determined by a pixel size of 1.″03. The timescale of each intensity pulse is shorter than 30 s. One possible explanation for the fast-propagating intensity disturbances observed by CLASP is magnetohydrodynamic fast-mode waves.

  5. Carrington cycle 24: the solar chromospheric emission in a historical and stellar perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, K.-P.; Mittag, M.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Jack, D.; Hempelmann, A.; González-Pérez, J. N.

    2017-09-01

    We present the solar S-index record of cycle 24, obtained by the Telescopio Internacional de Guanajuato, Robotico Espectroscopico robotic telescope facility and its high-resolution spectrograph HEROS (R ≈ 20 000), which measures the solar chromospheric Ca II H&K line emission by using moonlight. Our calibration process uses the same set of standard stars as introduced by the Mount Wilson team, thus giving us a direct comparison with their huge body of observations taken between 1966 and 1992, as well as with other cool stars. Carrington cycle 24 activity started from the unusually deep and long minimum 2008/2009, with an S-index average of only 0.154, 0.015 deeper than the one of 1986 (〈S〉 = 0.169). In this respect, the chromospheric radiative losses differ remarkably from the variation of the coronal radio flux F10.7 cm and the sunspot numbers. In addition, the cycle 24 S-amplitude remained small, 0.022 (cycles 21 and 22 averaged: 0.024), and so resulted in a very low 2014 maximum of 〈S〉 = 0.176 (cycles 21 and 22 averaged: 0.193). We argue that this find is significant, since the Ca II H&K line emission is a good proxy for the solar far-ultraviolet (far-UV) flux, which plays an important role in the heating of the Earth's stratosphere, and we further argue that the solar far-UV flux changes with solar activity much more strongly than the total solar output.

  6. Fermi resonance and strong anharmonic effects in the absorption spectra of the ν-OH ( ν-OD) vibration of solid H- and D-benzoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaremko, A. M.; Ratajczak, H.; Barnes, A. J.; Baran, J.; Durlak, P.; Latajka, Z.

    2009-10-01

    The vibrational spectra of polycrystalline benzoic acid (BA) and its deuterated derivative were studied over the wide frequency region 4000-10 cm -1 by IR and Raman methods. A theoretical analysis of the hydrogen bond frequency region and calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d, 2p) level for the benzoic acid cyclic dimer in the gas phase were made. In order to study the dynamics of proton transfer two formalisms were applied: Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics (CPMD) and Path Integrals Molecular Dynamics (PIMD). It was shown that the experimentally observed very broad ν-OH band absorption is the result of complex anharmonic interaction: Fermi resonance between the OH-stretching and bending vibrations and strong interaction of the ν-OH stretching with the low frequency phonons. The theoretical analysis in the framework of such an approach gave a good correlation with experiment. From the CPMD calculations it was confirmed that the O-H⋯O bridge is not rigid, with the O⋯O distance being described by a large amplitude motion. For the benzoic acid dimer we observed stepwise (asynchronous) proton transfer.

  7. Simple anthropometric measures correlate with metabolic risk indicators as strongly as magnetic resonance imaging-measured adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, Rebecca; Shen, Wei; Bacchetti, Peter; Kotler, Donald; Lewis, Cora E; Shlipak, Michael G; Heymsfield, Steven B; Grunfeld, Carl

    2008-06-01

    Studies in persons without HIV infection have compared percentage body fat (%BF) and waist circumference as markers of risk for the complications of excess adiposity, but only limited study has been conducted in HIV-infected subjects. We compared anthropometric and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based adiposity measures as correlates of metabolic complications of adiposity in HIV-infected and control subjects. The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 666 HIV-positive and 242 control subjects in the Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection (FRAM) study assessing body mass index (BMI), waist (WC) and hip (HC) circumferences, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), %BF, and MRI-measured regional adipose tissue. Study outcomes were 3 metabolic risk variables [homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol]. Analyses were stratified by sex and HIV status and adjusted for demographic, lifestyle, and HIV-related factors. In HIV-infected and control subjects, univariate associations with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL were strongest for WC, MRI-measured visceral adipose tissue, and WHR; in all cases, differences in correlation between the strongest measures for each outcome were small (r HDL, WC appeared to be the best anthropometric correlate of metabolic complications, whereas, for triglycerides, the best was WHR. Relations of simple anthropometric measures with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol are approximately as strong as MRI-measured whole-body adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects.

  8. General Model for Light Curves of Chromospherically Active Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetsu, L.; Henry, G. W.; Lehtinen, J.

    2017-04-01

    The starspots on the surface of many chromospherically active binary stars concentrate on long-lived active longitudes separated by 180°. Shifts in activity between these two longitudes, the “flip-flop” events, have been observed in single stars like FK Comae and binary stars like σ Geminorum. Recently, interferometry has revealed that ellipticity may at least partly explain the flip-flop events in σ Geminorum. This idea was supported by the double-peaked shape of the long-term mean light curve of this star. Here we show that the long-term mean light curves of 14 chromospherically active binaries follow a general model that explains the connection between orbital motion, changes in starspot distribution, ellipticity, and flip-flop events. Surface differential rotation is probably weak in these stars, because the interference of two constant period waves may explain the observed light curve changes. These two constant periods are the active longitude period ({P}{act}) and the orbital period ({P}{orb}). We also show how to apply the same model to single stars, where only the value of P act is known. Finally, we present a tentative interference hypothesis about the origin of magnetic fields in all spectral types of stars. The CPS results are available electronically at the Vizier database.

  9. THE SEARCH FOR SUPER-SATURATION IN CHROMOSPHERIC EMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian, Damian J.; Arias, Tersi; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Jess, David B.; Jardine, Moira

    2011-01-01

    We investigate if the super-saturation phenomenon observed at X-ray wavelengths for the corona exists in the chromosphere for rapidly rotating late-type stars. Moderate resolution optical spectra of fast-rotating EUV- and X-ray-selected late-type stars were obtained. Stars in α Per were observed in the northern hemisphere with the Isaac Newton 2.5 m telescope and Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph. Selected objects from IC 2391 and IC 2602 were observed in the southern hemisphere with the Blanco 4 m telescope and R-C spectrograph at CTIO. Ca II H and K fluxes were measured for all stars in our sample. We find the saturation level for Ca II K at log (L CaK /L bol ) = -4.08. The Ca II K flux does not show a decrease as a function of increased rotational velocity or smaller Rossby number as observed in the X-ray. This lack of 'super-saturation' supports the idea of coronal stripping as the cause of saturation and super-saturation in stellar chromospheres and coronae, but the detailed underlying mechanism is still under investigation.

  10. CHROMOSPHERIC MODELS AND THE OXYGEN ABUNDANCE IN GIANT STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupree, A. K.; Avrett, E. H.; Kurucz, R. L., E-mail: dupree@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    Realistic stellar atmospheric models of two typical metal-poor giant stars in Omega Centauri, which include a chromosphere (CHR), influence the formation of optical lines of O i: the forbidden lines (λ6300, λ6363) and the infrared triplet (λλ7771−7775). One-dimensional semi-empirical non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) models are constructed based on observed Balmer lines. A full non-LTE formulation is applied for evaluating the line strengths of O i, including photoionization by the Lyman continuum and photoexcitation by Lyα and Lyβ. Chromospheric models (CHR) yield forbidden oxygen transitions that are stronger than those in radiative/convective equilibrium (RCE) models. The triplet oxygen lines from high levels also appear stronger than those produced in an RCE model. The inferred oxygen abundance from realistic CHR models for these two stars is decreased by factors of ∼3 as compared to values derived from RCE models. A lower oxygen abundance suggests that intermediate-mass AGB stars contribute to the observed abundance pattern in globular clusters. A change in the oxygen abundance of metal-poor field giants could affect models of deep mixing episodes on the red giant branch. Changes in the oxygen abundance can impact other abundance determinations that are critical to astrophysics, including chemical tagging techniques and galactic chemical evolution.

  11. Simple anthropometric measures correlate with metabolic risk indicators as strongly as magnetic resonance imaging–measured adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, Rebecca; Shen, Wei; Bacchetti, Peter; Kotler, Donald; Lewis, Cora E; Shlipak, Michael G; Heymsfield, Steven B

    2008-01-01

    Background Studies in persons without HIV infection have compared percentage body fat (%BF) and waist circumference as markers of risk for the complications of excess adiposity, but only limited study has been conducted in HIV-infected subjects. Objective We compared anthropometric and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)–based adiposity measures as correlates of metabolic complications of adiposity in HIV-infected and control subjects. Design The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 666 HIV-positive and 242 control subjects in the Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection (FRAM) study assessing body mass index (BMI), waist (WC) and hip (HC) circumferences, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), %BF, and MRI-measured regional adipose tissue. Study outcomes were 3 metabolic risk variables [homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol]. Analyses were stratified by sex and HIV status and adjusted for demographic, lifestyle, and HIV-related factors. Results In HIV-infected and control subjects, univariate associations with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL were strongest for WC, MRI-measured visceral adipose tissue, and WHR; in all cases, differences in correlation between the strongest measures for each outcome were small (r ≤ 0.07). Multivariate adjustment found no significant difference for optimally fitting models between the use of anthropometric and MRI measures, and the magnitudes of differences were small (adjusted R2 ≤ 0.06). For HOMA and HDL, WC appeared to be the best anthropometric correlate of metabolic complications, whereas, for triglycerides, the best was WHR. Conclusion Relations of simple anthropometric measures with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol are approximately as strong as MRI-measured whole-body adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects. PMID:18541572

  12. LTE modeling of inhomogeneous chromospheric structure using high-resolution limb observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, C.

    1987-01-01

    The paper discusses considerations relevant to LTE modeling of rough atmospheres. Particular attention is given to the application of recent high-resolution observations of the solar limb in the far-infrared and radio continuum to the modeling of chromospheric spicules. It is explained how the continuum limb observations can be combined with morphological knowledge of spicule structure to model the physical conditions in chromospheric spicules. This discussion forms the basis for a chromospheric model presented in a parallel publication based on observations ranging from 100 microns to 2.6 mm.

  13. Penumbral Waves Driving Solar Fan-shaped Chromospheric Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, A.; Henriques, V. M. J.; Mathioudakis, M.; Samanta, T.

    2018-03-01

    We use Hα imaging spectroscopy taken via the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope to investigate the occurrence of fan-shaped jets at the solar limb. We show evidence for near-simultaneous photospheric reconnection at a sunspot edge leading to the jets appearance, with upward velocities of 30 km s‑1, and extensions up to 8 Mm. The brightening at the base of the jets appears recurrent, with a periodicity matching that of the nearby sunspot penumbra, implying running penumbral waves could be the driver of the jets. The jets’ constant extension velocity implies that a driver counteracting solar gravity exists, possibly as a result of the recurrent reconnection erupting material into the chromosphere. These jets also show signatures in higher temperature lines captured from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, indicating a very hot jet front, leaving behind optically thick cool plasma in its wake.

  14. Chromospheric Plasma Ejections in a Light Bridge of a Sunspot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Donguk; Chae, Jongchul; Yang, Heesu; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Kwak, Hannah [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Yurchyshyn, Vasyl [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314-9672 (United States); Lim, Eun-Kyung; Cho, Kyung-Suk, E-mail: dusong@astro.snu.ac.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute 776, Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-01

    It is well-known that light bridges (LBs) inside a sunspot produce small-scale plasma ejections and transient brightenings in the chromosphere, but the nature and origin of such phenomena are still unclear. Utilizing the high-spatial and high-temporal resolution spectral data taken with the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph and the TiO 7057 Å broadband filter images installed at the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope of Big Bear Solar Observatory, we report arcsecond-scale chromospheric plasma ejections (1.″7) inside a LB. Interestingly, the ejections are found to be a manifestation of upwardly propagating shock waves as evidenced by the sawtooth patterns seen in the temporal-spectral plots of the Ca ii 8542 Å and H α intensities. We also found a fine-scale photospheric pattern (1″) diverging with a speed of about 2 km s{sup −1} two minutes before the plasma ejections, which seems to be a manifestation of magnetic flux emergence. As a response to the plasma ejections, the corona displayed small-scale transient brightenings. Based on our findings, we suggest that the shock waves can be excited by the local disturbance caused by magnetic reconnection between the emerging flux inside the LB and the adjacent umbral magnetic field. The disturbance generates slow-mode waves, which soon develop into shock waves, and manifest themselves as the arcsecond-scale plasma ejections. It also appears that the dissipation of mechanical energy in the shock waves can heat the local corona.

  15. Magnetic reconnection in the low solar chromosphere with a more realistic radiative cooling model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Lei; Lukin, Vyacheslav S.; Murphy, Nicholas A.; Lin, Jun

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection is the most likely mechanism responsible for the high temperature events that are observed in strongly magnetized locations around the temperature minimum in the low solar chromosphere. This work improves upon our previous work [Ni et al., Astrophys. J. 852, 95 (2018)] by using a more realistic radiative cooling model computed from the OPACITY project and the CHIANTI database. We find that the rate of ionization of the neutral component of the plasma is still faster than recombination within the current sheet region. For low β plasmas, the ionized and neutral fluid flows are well-coupled throughout the reconnection region resembling the single-fluid Sweet-Parker model dynamics. Decoupling of the ion and neutral inflows appears in the higher β case with β0=1.46 , which leads to a reconnection rate about three times faster than the rate predicted by the Sweet-Parker model. In all cases, the plasma temperature increases with time inside the current sheet, and the maximum value is above 2 ×104 K when the reconnection magnetic field strength is greater than 500 G. While the more realistic radiative cooling model does not result in qualitative changes of the characteristics of magnetic reconnection, it is necessary for studying the variations of the plasma temperature and ionization fraction inside current sheets in strongly magnetized regions of the low solar atmosphere. It is also important for studying energy conversion during the magnetic reconnection process when the hydrogen-dominated plasma approaches full ionization.

  16. CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN AN M1.8 FLARE OBSERVED BY THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER ON HINODE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.; Young, P. R.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss observations of chromospheric evaporation for a complex flare that occurred on 2012 March 9 near 03:30 UT obtained from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode spacecraft. This was a multiple event with a strong energy input that reached the M1.8 class when observed by EIS. EIS was in raster mode and fortunately the slit was almost at the exact location of a significant energy input. Also, EIS obtained a full-CCD spectrum of the flare, i.e., the entire CCD was readout so that data were obtained for about the 500 lines identified in the EIS wavelength ranges. Chromospheric evaporation characterized by 150-200 km s –1 upflows was observed in multiple locations in multi-million degree spectral lines of flare ions such as Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV, with simultaneous 20-60 km s –1 upflows in million degree coronal lines from ions such as Fe XII-Fe XVI. The behavior of cooler, transition region ions such as O VI, Fe VIII, He II, and Fe X is more complex, but upflows were also observed in Fe VIII and Fe X lines. At a point close to strong energy input in space and time, the flare ions Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV reveal an isothermal source with a temperature close to 14 MK and no strong blueshifted components. At this location there is a strong downflow in cooler active region lines from ions such as Fe XIII and Fe XIV, on the order of 200 km s –1 . We speculate that this downflow may be evidence of the downward shock produced by reconnection in the current sheet seen in MHD simulations. A sunquake also occurred near this location. Electron densities were obtained from density sensitive lines ratios from Fe XIII and Fe XIV. Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory are used with JHelioviewer to obtain a qualitative overview of the flare. However, AIA data are not presented in this paper. In summary, spectroscopic data from EIS are presented that can be used for predictive

  17. Chromospheric Evaporation in an M1.8 Flare Observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.; Young, P. R.

    2013-04-01

    We discuss observations of chromospheric evaporation for a complex flare that occurred on 2012 March 9 near 03:30 UT obtained from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode spacecraft. This was a multiple event with a strong energy input that reached the M1.8 class when observed by EIS. EIS was in raster mode and fortunately the slit was almost at the exact location of a significant energy input. Also, EIS obtained a full-CCD spectrum of the flare, i.e., the entire CCD was readout so that data were obtained for about the 500 lines identified in the EIS wavelength ranges. Chromospheric evaporation characterized by 150-200 km s-1 upflows was observed in multiple locations in multi-million degree spectral lines of flare ions such as Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV, with simultaneous 20-60 km s-1 upflows in million degree coronal lines from ions such as Fe XII-Fe XVI. The behavior of cooler, transition region ions such as O VI, Fe VIII, He II, and Fe X is more complex, but upflows were also observed in Fe VIII and Fe X lines. At a point close to strong energy input in space and time, the flare ions Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV reveal an isothermal source with a temperature close to 14 MK and no strong blueshifted components. At this location there is a strong downflow in cooler active region lines from ions such as Fe XIII and Fe XIV, on the order of 200 km s-1. We speculate that this downflow may be evidence of the downward shock produced by reconnection in the current sheet seen in MHD simulations. A sunquake also occurred near this location. Electron densities were obtained from density sensitive lines ratios from Fe XIII and Fe XIV. Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory are used with JHelioviewer to obtain a qualitative overview of the flare. However, AIA data are not presented in this paper. In summary, spectroscopic data from EIS are presented that can be used for predictive tests of

  18. 3D Realistic Modeling of the Interaction of Quiet-Sun Magnetic Fields with the Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution observations and 3D simulations suggest that a local dynamo operates near the surface and produces ubiquitous small-scale magnetic elements, thus contributing to the magnetic carpet in the photosphere and to the magnetic structure and dynamics of the solar atmosphere. It appears that the traditional mechanisms of chromospheric energy and mass transport by acoustic waves and shocks are likely to play a secondary role; instead, the primary drivers in the energetics and dynamics of the chromosphere and transition region are small-scale, previously unresolved, quiet-Sun magnetic fields. These fields appear as ubiquitous, rapidly changing (on the scale of a few seconds), tiny magnetic loops and magnetized vortex tubes. Questions then arise about their origin and dynamics in the chromosphere, their links to magnetic fields in the photosphere, and their role in the energy storage and exchange between subsurface layers and the chromosphere. In the talk we will present results of 3D radiative MHD simulations obtained with the StellarBox code and discuss the energetics and dynamical interlinks between the subphotospheric layers and low chromosphere, their effects on the structure of the chromosphere, and signatures of the fine-scale magnetic features in high-resolution spectro-polarimetric observations.

  19. What Can TRAPPIST-1 Tell Us About Radiation From M-Dwarf Chromospheres And Coronae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsky, Jeffrey

    2017-05-01

    The recent discovery of 7 planets orbiting the nearby star TRAPPIST-1 (Gillon et al. Nature 2017) and the discovery that this M8 V host star has very weak chromospheric compared to coronal emission (Bourrier et al. A+A 2017) raises the broader question of the relation of chromospheres to coronae in host stars. This question is important because chromospheric emission, primarily in the Lyman-alpha line, controls photochemical reactions in the outer atmospheres of exoplanets, whereas coronal X-ray emission and associated coronal mass ejections play critical roles in atmospheric mass loss. Both chromospheric and coronal emission from the host star can, therefore, determine whether a planet is habitable. I will show that the amount of emission in the Lyman-alpha line is proportional to that in X-rays for F-K dwarf stars, but that chromospheric emission becomes relatively weak in the early M dwarfs and very weak in the late-M dwarfs such as TRAPPIST-1.Stellar emission lines formed in a star's chromosphere and transition region can be separated into narrow and broad Gaussian components with the broad components formed by microflaring events or high speed flows. I will show how the broad component activity indicator depends on stellar effective temperature and age.I will also describe the results concerning star-planet interactions obtained by MUSCLES Treasury Survey team.

  20. Propagation of Alfvenic Waves from corona to chromosphere and consequences for solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, L.; Russell, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Much of the work on Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere is concerned with the transport of energy from the lower atmosphere into the corona. Here we address Alfvenic energy flow in the opposite direction. We suggest that during a solar flare, energy is radiated from the reconnection region in the corona as Alfvenic perturbations and ducted along the magnetic field to the chromosphere, where it is dissipated in electron Landau damping in the upper chromosphere, and (primarily) ion-neutral friction in the mid- to low- chromosphere. We present results of two-fluid numerical simulations of the transport of wave energy across the corona-chromosphere boundary for a number different chromospheric models (e.g. facula, plage, umbra) and evaluate the transmission, heating and acceleration that results. We conclude that for wave periods of a few seconds, between 10 and 20% of wave energy can be transmitted through the corona-chromosphere boundary, and a large fraction (up to 100%) of this is dissipated by ion-neutral friction around the temperature minimum region, which may lead to a white-light flare.

  1. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere VI. Helium in the Chromosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular hydrogen and hydrides have recently been advanced as vital agents in the generation of emission spectra in the chromosphere. This is a result of the role they play in the formation of condensed hydrogen structures (CHS within the chromosphere (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 3, 15–21. Next to hydrogen, helium is perhaps the most intriguing component in this region of the Sun. Much like other elements, which combine with hydrogen to produce hydrides, helium can form the well-known helium hydride molecular ion, HeH+, and the excited neutral helium hydride molecule, HeH∗. While HeH+ is hypothesized to be a key cosmologicalmolecule, its possible presence in the Sun, and that of its excited neutral counterpart, has not been considered. Still, these hydrides are likely to play a role in the synthesis of CHS, as the He I and He II emission lines strongly suggest. In this regard, the study of helium emission spectra can provide insight into the condensed nature of the Sun, especially when considering the 10830 Å line associated with the 23P→2 3S triplet state transition. This line is strong in solar prominences and can be seen clearly on the disk. The excessive population of helium triplet states cannot be adequately explained using the gaseous models, since these states should be depopulated by collisional processes. Conversely, when He-based molecules are used to build CHS in a liquid metallic hydrogen model, an ever increasing population of the 23S and 23P states might be expected. The overpopulation of these triplet states leads to the conclusion that these emission lines are unlikely to be produced through random collisional or photon excitation, as required by the gaseous models. This provides a significant hurdle for these models. Thus, the strong 23P→2 3S lines and the overpopulation of the helium triplet

  2. Mg II Chromospheric Emission Line Bisectors Of HD39801 And Its Relation With The Activity Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    García García, Leonardo Enrique; Pérez Martínez, M. Isabel

    2016-07-01

    Betelgeuse is a cool star of spectral type M and luminosity class I. In the present work, the activity cycle of Betelgeuse was obtained from the integrated emission flux of the Mg II H and K lines, using more than 250 spectra taken from the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) online database. Of which it was found, based on a Lomb Scargle periodogram, a cycle of 16 years, along with 2 sub-cycles with a period of the order of 0.60 and 0.65 years, which may be due to turbulence or possible stellar flares. In addition, an analysis of line asymmetry was made by means of the chromospheric emission line bisectors, due to the strong self-absorption observed in this lines, the blue and red wings were analyzed independently. In order to measure such asymmetry, a "line shift" was calculated, from which several cycles of variability were obtained from a Lomb Scargle periodogram, spanning from few months to 4 years. In the sense, the most significant cycle is about 0.44 and 0.33 years in the blue and red wing respectively. It is worth noting, that the rotation period of the star doesn't play an important role in the variability of the Mg II lines. This technique provides us with a new way to study activity cycles of evolved stars.

  3. TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF CHROMOSPHERIC OSCILLATIONS IN FLARING REGIONS: A PILOT STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monsue, T.; Stassun, K. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Hill, F., E-mail: teresa.monsue@vanderbilt.edu, E-mail: keivan.stassun@vanderbilt.edu, E-mail: hill@email.noao.edu [National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    We have analyzed H α intensity images obtained at a 1 minute cadence with the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) system to investigate the properties of oscillations in the 0–8 mHz frequency band at the location and time of strong M- and X-class flares. For each of three subregions within two flaring active regions, we extracted time series from multiple distinct positions, including the flare core and quieter surrounding areas. The time series were analyzed with a moving power-map analysis to examine power as a function of frequency and time. We find that, in the flare core of all three subregions, the low-frequency power (∼1–2 mHz) is substantially enhanced immediately prior to and after the flare, and that power at all frequencies up to 8 mHz is depleted at flare maximum. This depletion is both frequency- and time-dependent, which probably reflects the changing depths visible during the flare in the bandpass of the filter. These variations are not observed outside the flare cores. The depletion may indicate that acoustic energy is being converted into thermal energy at flare maximum, while the low-frequency enhancement may arise from an instability in the chromosphere and provide an early warning of the flare onset. Dark lanes of reduced wave power are also visible in the power maps, which may arise from the interaction of the acoustic waves and the magnetic field.

  4. Footpoint detection and mass-motion in chromospheric filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    V, Aparna; Hardersen, P. S.; Martin, S. F.

    2013-07-01

    A quiescent region on the Sun containing three filaments is used to study the properties of mass motion. This study determines if the footpoints or end-points of the filaments are the locations from where mass gets injected into the filaments. Several hypotheses have been put forth in the past to determine how a filament acquires mass. Trapping of coronal mass in the filament channel due to condensation (Martin, 1996) and injection of mass into the filaments during magnetic reconnection (Priest, et al., 1995) are some of the speculations. This study looks for indications for injection of mass via chromospheric footpoints. The data consists of blue (Hα-0.5 Å) and red (Hα+0.5 Å) wing high resolution Hα images of the W29N37 region of the Sun taken on Oct 30, 2010, from 1200 - 1600 UT. The Dutch Open Telescope was used to obtain the data. The images are aligned and animated to see Doppler motion in the fibrils. Smaller fibrils merge to form longer ones; barbs appear and disappear in one of the long filaments and is seen moving along the length of the filament. A region with no typical filament-like absorption feature is observed to be continuously receiving mass. Fibrils appear to be converging from opposite sides along what appears to be a neutral line; mass motion is seen in these fibrils as well. An eruption occurs in a region of fibrils lumped together at the end of the first hour (1300 UT) followed by plage brightening at 1430 UT near one of the filament regions. Helioviewer (Panasenco, et al., 2011) is used for aligning the images; GIMP is used for precision alignment and animation. Each frame in the sequence is studied carefully to note changes in the filament regions. The footpoints of the filaments are determined by the changes observed in the position of the filament ‘legs’ in each frame. Variations in the magnetic polarity corresponding to changes observed in the chromosphere are analyzed using HMI magnetograms. Bright and dark points on the

  5. Hα LINE PROFILE ASYMMETRIES AND THE CHROMOSPHERIC FLARE VELOCITY FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Kennedy, M.; Keenan, F. P. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Simões, P. J. A.; Voort, L. Rouppe van der; Fletcher, L. [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Carlsson, M.; Jafarzadeh, S. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Allred, J. C.; Kowalski, A. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Graham, D. [INAF-Ossevatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2015-11-10

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Hα and Ca ii λ8542 lines are studied using high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Hα line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca ii λ8542 line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesize spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Hα is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, we conclude that the steep velocity gradients in the flaring chromosphere modify the wavelength of the central reversal in the Hα line profile. The shift in the wavelength of maximum opacity to shorter and longer wavelengths generates the red and blue asymmetries, respectively.

  6. Radio frequency self-resonant coil for contactless AC-conductivity in 100 T class ultra-strong pulse magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, D.; Altarawneh, M. M.; Takeyama, S.

    2018-03-01

    A contactless measurement system of electrical conductivity was developed for application under pulsed high magnetic fields over 100 T by using a self-resonant-type, high-frequency circuit. Electromagnetic fields in the circuit were numerically analysed by the finite element method, to show how the resonant power spectra of the circuit depends on the electrical conductivity of a sample set on the probe-coil. The performance was examined using a high-temperature cuprate superconductor, La2-x Sr x CuO4, in magnetic fields up to 102 T with a high frequency of close to 800 MHz. As a result, the upper critical field could be determined with a good signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Measurements of the Magnetic Field of the Upper Chromosphere with Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmeler, Laurel; Mckenzie, David; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Ishikawa, Ryohko; Kubo, Masahito; Narukage, Noriyuki; Bueno, Trujillo, Javier; Auchere, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    A major remaining challenge for heliophysics is to decipher the magnetic structure of the chromosphere. The chromosphere is the critical interface between the Sun's photosphere and corona: it contains more mass than the entire interplanetary heliosphere, requires a heating rate that is larger than that of the corona, and mediates all the energy driving the solar wind, solar atmospheric heating and solar eruptions. While measurements of the magnetic field in the photosphere are routine, the chromosphere poses several extra challenges. The magnetically sensitive lines formed in the upper chromosphere are in the ultraviolet, so space-based observations are required. The lines are often formed over a range of heights, sampling different plasma which complicates the inversion process. These lines are sensitive to the magnetic field via polarized light that is created or modified through the Hanle and Zeeman effects. There are a few observations of these lines, and a significant challenge remains in extracting the magnetic field from the polarization measurements, as detailed model atmospheres with advanced radiative transfer physics are needed. Real progress is obtained by a simultaneous improvement in both the observational side and the modeling side. We present information on the CLASP (Chromospheric LAyer Spectro-Polarimeter) sounding rocket program, and future prospects for these types of measurements.

  8. CHROMOSPHERIC SUNSPOTS IN THE MILLIMETER RANGE AS OBSERVED BY THE NOBEYAMA RADIOHELIOGRAPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwai, Kazumasa [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Koganei 184-8795, Tokyo (Japan); Koshiishi, Hideki [Aerospace Research and Development Directorate, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Tsukuba 305-8505 (Japan); Shibasaki, Kiyoto [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Minamimaki, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Nozawa, Satoshi; Miyawaki, Shun; Yoneya, Takuro, E-mail: kazumasa.iwai@nict.go.jp [Department of Science, Ibaraki University, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan)

    2016-01-10

    We investigate the upper chromosphere and the transition region of the sunspot umbra using the radio brightness temperature at 34 GHz (corresponding to 8.8 mm observations) as observed by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). Radio free–free emission in the longer millimeter range is generated around the transition region, and its brightness temperature yields the region's temperature and density distribution. We use the NoRH data at 34 GHz by applying the Steer-CLEAN image synthesis. These data and the analysis method enable us to investigate the chromospheric structures in the longer millimeter range with high spatial resolution and sufficient visibilities. We also perform simultaneous observations of one sunspot using the NoRH and the Nobeyama 45 m telescope operating at 115 GHz. We determine that 115 GHz emission mainly originates from the lower chromosphere while 34 GHz emission mainly originates from the upper chromosphere and transition region. These observational results are consistent with the radio emission characteristics estimated from current atmospheric models of the chromosphere. On the other hand, the observed brightness temperature of the umbral region is almost the same as that of the quiet region. This result is inconsistent with current sunspot models, which predict a considerably higher brightness temperature of the sunspot umbra at 34 GHz. This inconsistency suggests that the temperature of the region at which the 34 GHz radio emission becomes optically thick should be lower than that predicted by the models.

  9. Generation of strong electromagnetic power at 35 GHz from the interaction of a resonant cavity with a relativistic electron beam generated by a free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, Thibaut

    2000-01-01

    The next generation of electron-positron linear colliders must reach the TeV energy range. For this, one requires an adequate RF power source to feed the accelerating cavities of the collider. One way to generate this source is to use the Two Beam Accelerator concept in which the RF power is produced in resonant cavities driven by an intense bunched beam. In this thesis, I present the experimental results obtained at the CEA/CESTA using an electron beam generated by an induction linac. First, some studies were performed with the LELIA induction linac (2.2 MeV, 1 kA, 80 ns) using a Free Electron Laser (FEL) as a buncher at 35 GHz. A second part relates the experiment made with the PIVAIR induction linac (7 MeV, 1 kA, 80 ns) in order to measure the RF power extracted from a resonant cavity at 35 GHz, which is driven by the bunches produced in the FEL. One can also find a simple theoretical modeling of the beam-cavity interaction, and the numerical results dealing with the design of the cavity we tested. (author) [fr

  10. Analysis of OSO data to determine the structure and energy balance of the solar chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrett, E. H.; Kalkofen, W.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed reexamination of the temperature-density structure of the photosphere and low chromosphere shows that the middle and upper chromosphere, which directly emits most of the OSO spectrum, is sensitive to conditions in this underlying region of the atmosphere. A model of this region is based on a unified compilation of all recently published broadband flux and central intensity observations of the solar spectrum from 500 microns in the far infrared to 1220 A in the far ultraviolet. This extensive compilation includes the OSO 4 and 6 observations in the wavelength range 1400 to 1220 A. A model is presented of the quiet solar atmosphere in the height range between the temperature minimum and the upper part of the chromosphere-corona transition region. This model is based on statistical equilibrium calculations of H, He 1, He 2, Si 1, C 1, and other ions.

  11. Contribution to the study of velocity fields of chromosphere and solar transition zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artzner, C.

    1982-06-01

    The LPSP (Laboratoire de Physique Stellaire et Planetaire) experiment on board 0508 is described. The properties of the instrument are discussed together with their evolution with time. The chromospheric oscillations and transients were studied (sunspost and active regions, prominences, oscillations in the chromosphere, chromosphere-corona transition lines). Simultaneous time-resolved observations of the H Lα, Mg k 2795A, and Ca, K solar lines were made. They indicate that the temporal variations of wavelength of the reversal of the solar H Lα and Mg k lines are correlated. A narrow absorption on the red part of the solar H Lα profile was observed and attributed to atomic hydrogen of the nearby interplanetary gas [fr

  12. Design of a Full Stokes Polarimeter for Chromospheric Measurements with SOLIS/VSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosain, S.; Harvey, J. W.

    2015-10-01

    The synoptic observations of the magnetic field of the Sun have continued at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) since 1970s. The daily full-disk maps of the longitudinal magnetic field are regularly combined to form Carrington maps of the photospheric magnetic flux per solar rotation. These maps continue to be used by the international research community for a variety of studies related to solar magnetism as well as for space weather studies. The current NSO synoptic facility is the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigation of the Sun (SOLIS), which regularly provides photospheric vector and chromospheric longitudinal full-disk magnetograms, among other data products. In the near future, an upgrade of SOLIS to produce chromospheric vector magnetograms is planned. We present the design of a new polarization modulator package for full Stokes polarimetry of the chromospheric Ca II 854.2 nm spectral line.

  13. Resonant behavior of dielectric objects (electrostatic resonances).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredkin, D R; Mayergoyz, I D

    2003-12-19

    Resonant behavior of dielectric objects occurs at certain frequencies for which the object permittivity is negative and the free-space wavelength is large in comparison with the object dimensions. Unique physical features of these resonances are studied and a novel technique for the calculation of resonance values of permittivity, and hence resonance frequencies, is proposed. Scale invariance of resonance frequencies, unusually strong orthogonality properties of resonance modes, and a two-dimensional phenomenon of "twin" spectra are reported. The paper concludes with brief discussions of optical controllability of these resonances in semiconductor nanoparticles and a plausible, electrostatic resonance based, mechanism for nucleation and formation of ball lightning.

  14. Theoretical analysis of the multiple resonances for many-level spin systems. The four-level spin system of s electron ions subjected to strong microwave fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, F.F.; Marica, F.

    1994-01-01

    The analytic steady state solutions of master equation for the density matrix of a multilevel spin system in dilute paramagnetic crystals at high temperature, subjected to strong microwave fields, are discussed. These solutions enable to obtain the populations of the levels, and the microwave powers absorbed or emitted by the crystal, in the presence of one, two or more microwave fields. A detailed theoretical study of the maser effects for s electron ions with nuclear spin one-half is carried out. In the case of three frequency correlated strong fields, when 'the spectroscopic' bridge conditions are fulfilled, sensitive detections, or high efficient generations of microwaves of frequency higher than those of the pumping fields are predicted. (author) 16 figs., 16 refs

  15. The mass dependence of chromospheric activity evolution & implications for gyrochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jason

    2018-01-01

    We know chromospheric emission decays over time, and yet this empirical relation is still fundamentally an interpolation over 3.5 Gyr from the Hyades to the Sun despite 45 years of progress. Furthermore, its very existence was called into question by Pace et al. (2004, 2009, 2013), who argued that activity plummets and flatlines around 1-2 Gyr. I will present new Ca II H & K data for NGC 752 (1.5 Gyr) and Ruprecht 147 (3 Gyr), and ISM-corrected data for M67 (4 Gyr, Curtis 2017), and pair this with the Sun's re-calibrated history (Egeland et al. 2017) and data on field stars from the Keck exoplanet program. I calculated ages for the field star sample using the [Y/Mg] "chemical clock," which was discovered from studies of solar twins and is due to galactic chemical enrichment. I find a mass dependence that matches the prediction from the activity-rotation-age relation of Mamajek & Hillenbrand (2008), where F stars rapidly plummet at 1-2 Gyr in line with the observations of F stars in clusters of similar age by Pace et al., whereas activity continuously declines for G and K dwarfs to approximately 5 and 7 Gyr, respectively. I will show that comparing ages estimated from [Y/Mg] to activity--rotation ages reveals known hot Jupiter hosts and other potentially anomalous stars. Combining the empirical relation between activity and Rossby number with estimates of stellar mass from spectroscopy and age from [Y/Mg] yields a gyrochronology relationship for FG and early K dwarfs that is independent of the cluster age scale and appears consistent with models from Mamajek & Hillenbrand (2008) and Barnes (2010). However, I have separately measured rotation periods for mid to late K dwarfs in 3 Gyr Ruprecht 147 with K2 and I find that they are rotating too rapidly relative to these empirical models and the semi-physical model of Matt et al. (2015). Apparently, K dwarfs spin down more slowly than the Skumanich square-root Law. Determining the K dwarf spin-down law is critical for

  16. Measurements of chromospheric velocity fields by means of the Coimbra University spectroheliograph

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Garcia, A.; Klvaňa, Miroslav; Sobotka, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2010), s. 47-56 ISSN 1845-8319 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300030808 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Sun * chromosphere * instrumentation Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Chromospherically active binaries (Karatas+, 2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Y.; Bilir, S.; Eker, Z.; Demircan, O.

    2004-05-01

    The kinematics of 237 chromospherically active binaries (CABs) were studied. The sample is heterogeneous with different orbits and physically different components from F to M spectral-type main-sequence stars to G and K giants and supergiants. The computed U, V, W space velocities indicate that the sample is also heterogeneous in velocity space. (2 data files).

  18. Discovery of Ubiquitous Fast-Propagating Intensity Disturbances by the Chromospheric Lyman Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Kano, R.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Hara, H.; Giono, G.; Tsuneta, S.; Ishikawa, S.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Cirtain, J.; Champey, P.; Auchere, F.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Ramos, A. A.; Štěpán, Jiří; Belluzzi, L.; Sainz, R.M.; de Pontieu, B.; Ichimoto, K.; Carlsson, M.; Casini, R.; Goto, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 832, č. 2 (2016), 141/1-141/9 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-16861S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : magnetic reconnection * Sun * chromosphere Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.533, year: 2016

  19. Diagnostics of Dark Chromospheric Mottles Based on High Resolution Spectra. I - Observational Data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotrč, Pavel; Schwartz, Pavol; Heinzel, Petr; Tsiropoula, G.; Tziotziou, K.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2005), s. 289-298 ISSN 0351-2657. [Hvar astrophysical colloquium /7./: Solar activity cycle and global phenomena. Hvar, 20.09.2004-24.09.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Sun * chromosphere * dark mottles Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  20. On the sensitivity of the Halpha scattering polarization to chromospheric magnetism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpán, Jiří; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 2 (2010), s. 810-813 ISSN 0037-8720. [Chromospheric structure and dynamics: From old wisdom to new insights. Sunspot ,, 31.08.2009-4.09.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : polarization * radiative transfer * scattering Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  1. Strong WW Interaction at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelaez, Jose R

    1998-12-14

    We present a brief pedagogical introduction to the Effective Electroweak Chiral Lagrangians, which provide a model independent description of the WW interactions in the strong regime. When it is complemented with some unitarization or a dispersive approach, this formalism allows the study of the general strong scenario expected at the LHC, including resonances.

  2. Chromospheric Mass Motions and Intrinsic Sunspot Rotations for NOAA Active Regions 10484, 10486, and 10488 Using ISOON Data (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-10

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TP-2013-0009 TP-2013-0009 CHROMOSPHERIC MASS MOTIONS AND INTRINSIC SUNSPOT ROTATIONS FOR NOAA ACTIVE REGIONS...SUBTITLE Chromospheric Mass Motions and Intrinsic Sunspot Rotations for NOAA Active Regions 10484, 10486, and 10488 Using ISOON Data (Postprint...Improved Solar Observing Optical Network continuum (630.2 nm) and Hα (656.2 nm) data to: (1) detect and measure intrinsic sunspot rotations occurring in

  3. Polarized Kink Waves in Magnetic Elements: Evidence for Chromospheric Helical Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stangalini, M.; Giannattasio, F. [INAF-OAR National Institute for Astrophysics, Via Frascati 33, I-00078 Monte Porzio Catone (RM) (Italy); Erdélyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Jafarzadeh, S. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Consolini, G.; Ermolli, I. [INAF-IAPS National Institute for Astrophysics, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Criscuoli, S. [NSO, National Solar Observatory, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Guglielmino, S. L.; Zuccarello, F., E-mail: marco.stangalini@inaf.it [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95125 Catania (Italy)

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, new high spatial resolution observations of the Sun's atmosphere have revealed the presence of a plethora of small-scale magnetic elements down to the resolution limit of the current cohort of solar telescopes (∼100–120 km on the solar photosphere). These small magnetic field concentrations, due to the granular buffeting, can support and guide several magnetohydrodynamic wave modes that would eventually contribute to the energy budget of the upper layers of the atmosphere. In this work, exploiting the high spatial and temporal resolution chromospheric data acquired with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope, and applying the empirical mode decomposition technique to the tracking of the solar magnetic features, we analyze the perturbations of the horizontal velocity vector of a set of chromospheric magnetic elements. We find observational evidence that suggests a phase relation between the two components of the velocity vector itself, resulting in its helical motion.

  4. The chromosphere above a δ-sunspot in the presence of fan-shaped jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robustini, Carolina; Leenaarts, Jorrit; de la Cruz Rodríguez, Jaime

    2018-01-01

    Context. Delta-sunspots are known to be favourable locations for fast and energetic events like flares and coronal mass ejections. The photosphere of this sunspot type has been thoroughly investigated in the past three decades. The atmospheric conditions in the chromosphere are not as well known, however. Aims: This study is focused on the chromosphere of a δ-sunspot that harbours a series of fan-shaped jets in its penumbra. The aim of this study is to establish the magnetic field topology and the temperature distribution in the presence of jets in the photosphere and the chromosphere. Methods: We use data from the Swedish 1m Solar Telescope (SST) and the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We invert the spectropolarimetric Fe I 6302 Å and Ca II 8542 Å data from the SST using the non-LTE inversion code NICOLE to estimate the magnetic field configuration, temperature, and velocity structure in the chromosphere. Results: A loop-like magnetic structure is observed to emerge in the penumbra of the sunspot. The jets are launched from this structure. Magnetic reconnection between this emerging field and the pre-existing vertical field is suggested by hot plasma patches on the interface between the two fields. The height at which the reconnection takes place is located between log τ500 = -2 and log τ500 = -3. The magnetic field vector and the atmospheric temperature maps show a stationary configuration during the whole observation. Movies associated to Figs. 3-5 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  5. The Fundamental Parameters and Chromospheric Structure of the M Supergiant VV Cephei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Philip D.

    2013-07-01

    The long-period binary VV Cephei (M2 Iab + B0-2, V=4.9, P=20.34 yr) is the brightest M supergiant eclipsing binary in the sky. The M star primary is a close spectral match to that of Betelgeuse. In the ultraviolet (UV), the early B-type hot companion dominates the spectrum, and as the system emerges from eclipse, the line of sight to the B star probes deep into the outer atmosphere (the "chromosphere") of the M supergiant. The UV spectrum of VV Cep has been observed from total eclipse (in 1997-98) through quadrature (2002) and periastron (2005) at a total of 22 epochs, 20 of these using STIS high-resolution ( 100,000) ultraviolet spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope, and two with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer satellite. I will present a brief overview of spectrum formation in the system, and focus on the subset of the STIS observations (those immediately following the egress from totality) that probed the chromosphere of VV Cephei. From these observations, I have constructed a spatially-resolved empirical model chromosphere that includes the temperature, density, velocity, and ionization structure of the outer atmosphere of VV Cep above the classical photosphere. I will present these results, and also constraints on the fundamental stellar and orbital parameters provided by these UV observations.

  6. Explosive Chromospheric Evaporation Driven by Nonthermal Electrons around One Footpoint of a Solar Flare Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, Q. M., E-mail: lidong@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2017-05-20

    We explore the temporal relationship between microwave/hard X-ray (HXR) emission and Doppler velocity during the impulsive phase of a solar flare on 2014 October 27 (SOL2014-10-27) that displays a pulse on the light curves in the microwave (34 GHz) and HXR (25–50 keV) bands before the flare maximum. Imaging observation shows that this pulse mainly comes from one footpoint of a solar flare loop. The slit of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) stays at this footpoint during this solar flare. The Doppler velocities of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å and Si iv 1402.77 Å are extracted from the Gaussian fitting method. We find that the hot line of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å (log T ∼ 7.05) in the corona exhibits blueshift, while the cool line of Si iv 1402.77 Å (log T ∼ 4.8) in the transition region exhibits redshift, indicating explosive chromospheric evaporation. Evaporative upflows along the flare loop are also observed in the AIA 131 Å image. To our knowledge, this is the first report of chromospheric evaporation evidence from both spectral and imaging observations in the same flare. Both microwave and HXR pulses are well correlated with the Doppler velocities, suggesting that the chromospheric evaporation is driven by nonthermal electrons around this footpoint of a solar flare loop.

  7. What Causes the High Apparent Speeds in Chromospheric and Transition Region Spicules on the Sun?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Pontieu, Bart; Martínez-Sykora, Juan; Chintzoglou, Georgios, E-mail: bdp@lmsal.com [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Spicules are the most ubuiquitous type of jets in the solar atmosphere. The advent of high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) and ground-based observatories has revealed the presence of very high apparent motions of order 100–300 km s{sup −1} in spicules, as measured in the plane of the sky. However, line of sight measurements of such high speeds have been difficult to obtain, with values deduced from Doppler shifts in spectral lines typically of order 30–70 km s{sup −1}. In this work, we resolve this long-standing discrepancy using recent 2.5D radiative MHD simulations. This simulation has revealed a novel driving mechanism for spicules in which ambipolar diffusion resulting from ion-neutral interactions plays a key role. In our simulation, we often see that the upward propagation of magnetic waves and electrical currents from the low chromosphere into already existing spicules can lead to rapid heating when the currents are rapidly dissipated by ambipolar diffusion. The combination of rapid heating and the propagation of these currents at Alfvénic speeds in excess of 100 km s{sup −1} leads to the very rapid apparent motions, and often wholesale appearance, of spicules at chromospheric and transition region temperatures. In our simulation, the observed fast apparent motions in such jets are actually a signature of a heating front, and much higher than the mass flows, which are of order 30–70 km s{sup −1}. Our results can explain the behavior of transition region “network jets” and the very high apparent speeds reported for some chromospheric spicules.

  8. Onset of 2D magnetic reconnection in the solar photosphere, chromosphere, and corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, B.; Botha, G. J. J.; McLaughlin, J. A.; Hillier, A.

    2018-01-01

    Aims: We aim to investigate the onset of 2D time-dependent magnetic reconnection that is triggered using an external (non-local) velocity driver located away from, and perpendicular to, an equilibrium Harris current sheet. Previous studies have typically utilised an internal trigger to initiate reconnection, for example initial conditions centred on the current sheet. Here, an external driver allows for a more naturalistic trigger as well as the study of the earlier stages of the reconnection start-up process. Methods: Numerical simulations solving the compressible, resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations were performed to investigate the reconnection onset within different atmospheric layers of the Sun, namely the corona, chromosphere and photosphere. Results: A reconnecting state is reached for all atmospheric heights considered, with the dominant physics being highly dependent on atmospheric conditions. The coronal case achieves a sharp rise in electric field (indicative of reconnection) for a range of velocity drivers. For the chromosphere, we find a larger velocity amplitude is required to trigger reconnection (compared to the corona). For the photospheric environment, the electric field is highly dependent on the inflow speed; a sharp increase in electric field is obtained only as the velocity entering the reconnection region approaches the Alfvén speed. Additionally, the role of ambipolar diffusion is investigated for the chromospheric case and we find that the ambipolar diffusion alters the structure of the current density in the inflow region. Conclusions: The rate at which flux enters the reconnection region is controlled by the inflow velocity. This determines all aspects of the reconnection start-up process, that is, the early onset of reconnection is dominated by the advection term in Ohm's law in all atmospheric layers. A lower plasma-β enhances reconnection and creates a large change in the electric field. A high plasma-β hinders the

  9. Mass and energy flows between the Solar chromosphere, transition region, and corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansteen, V. H.

    2017-12-01

    A number of increasingly sophisticated numerical simulations spanning the convection zone to corona have shed considerable insight into the role of the magnetic field in the structure and energetics of the Sun's outer atmosphere. This development is strengthened by the wealth of observational data now coming on-line from both ground based and space borne observatories. We discuss what numerical models can tell us about the mass and energy flows in the region of the upper chromosphere and lower corona, using a variety of tools, including the direct comparison with data and the use of passive tracer particles (so-called 'corks') inserted into the simulated flows.

  10. Radial velocity variations of photometrically quiet, chromospherically inactive Kepler stars: A link between RV jitter and photometric flicker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua; Wright, Jason T.; Aigrain, Suzanne; Basri, Gibor; Johnson, John A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2014-01-01

    We compare stellar photometric variability, as measured from Kepler light curves by Basri et al., with measurements of radial velocity (RV) rms variations of all California Planet Search overlap stars. We newly derive rotation periods from the Kepler light curves for all of the stars in our study sample. The RV variations reported herein range from less than 4 to 135 m s –1 , yet the stars all have amplitudes of photometric variability less than 3 mmag, reflecting the preference of the RV program for chromospherically 'quiet' stars. Despite the small size of our sample, we find with high statistical significance that the RV rms manifests strongly in the Fourier power spectrum of the light curve: stars that are noisier in RV have a greater number of frequency components in the light curve. We also find that spot models of the observed light curves systematically underpredict the observed RV variations by factors of ∼2-1000, likely because the low-level photometric variations in our sample are driven by processes not included in simple spot models. The stars best fit by these models tend to have simpler light curves, dominated by a single relatively high-amplitude component of variability. Finally, we demonstrate that the RV rms behavior of our sample can be explained in the context of the photometric variability evolutionary diagram introduced by Bastien et al. We use this diagram to derive the surface gravities of the stars in our sample, revealing many of them to have moved off the main sequence. More generally, we find that the stars with the largest RV rms are those that have evolved onto the 'flicker floor' sequence in that diagram, characterized by relatively low amplitude but highly complex photometric variations which grow as the stars evolve to become subgiants.

  11. Performance Characterization of the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) CCD Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Reyann; Kobayashi, Ken; Winebarger, Amy; Champey, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding rocket instrument currently being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), and other partners. The goal of this instrument is to observe and detect the Hanle effect in the scattered Lyman-Alpha UV (121.6nm) light emitted by the Sun's chromosphere. The polarized spectrum imaged by the CCD cameras will capture information about the local magnetic field, allowing for measurements of magnetic strength and structure. In order to make accurate measurements of this effect, the performance characteristics of the three on- board charge-coupled devices (CCDs) must meet certain requirements. These characteristics include: quantum efficiency, gain, dark current, read noise, and linearity. Each of these must meet predetermined requirements in order to achieve satisfactory performance for the mission. The cameras must be able to operate with a gain of 2.0+/- 0.5 e--/DN, a read noise level less than 25e-, a dark current level which is less than 10e-/pixel/s, and a residual non- linearity of less than 1%. Determining these characteristics involves performing a series of tests with each of the cameras in a high vacuum environment. Here we present the methods and results of each of these performance tests for the CLASP flight cameras.

  12. THE CHROMOSPHERIC SOLAR MILLIMETER-WAVE CAVITY ORIGINATES IN THE TEMPERATURE MINIMUM REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Luz, Victor [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Tonantzintla, Puebla, Mexico, Apdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 (Mexico); Raulin, Jean-Pierre [CRAAM, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP 01302-907 (Brazil); Lara, Alejandro [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico 04510 (Mexico)

    2013-01-10

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the local radio emission at the lower part of the solar atmosphere. To accomplish this, we have used a numerical code to simulate the emission and transport of high-frequency electromagnetic waves from 2 GHz up to 10 THz. As initial conditions, we used VALC, SEL05, and C7 solar chromospheric models. In this way, the generated synthetic spectra allow us to study the local emission and absorption processes with high resolution in both altitude and frequency. Associated with the temperature minimum predicted by these models, we found that the local optical depth at millimeter wavelengths remains constant, producing an optically thin layer that is surrounded by two layers of high local emission. We call this structure the Chromospheric Solar Millimeter-wave Cavity (CSMC). The temperature profile, which features temperature minimum layers and a subsequent temperature rise, produces the CSMC phenomenon. The CSMC shows the complexity of the relation between the theoretical temperature profile and the observed brightness temperature and may help us to understand the dispersion of the observed brightness temperature in the millimeter wavelength range.

  13. Magnetic swirls and associated fast magnetoacoustic kink waves in a solar chromospheric flux tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawski, K.; Kayshap, P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Pascoe, D. J.; Jelínek, P.; Kuźma, B.; Fedun, V.

    2018-02-01

    We perform numerical simulations of impulsively generated magnetic swirls in an isolated flux tube that is rooted in the solar photosphere. These swirls are triggered by an initial pulse in a horizontal component of the velocity. The initial pulse is launched either (a) centrally, within the localized magnetic flux tube or (b) off-central, in the ambient medium. The evolution and dynamics of the flux tube are described by three-dimensional, ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations. These equations are numerically solved to reveal that in case (a) dipole-like swirls associated with the fast magnetoacoustic kink and m = 1 Alfvén waves are generated. In case (b), the fast magnetoacoustic kink and m = 0 Alfvén modes are excited. In both these cases, the excited fast magnetoacoustic kink and Alfvén waves consist of a similar flow pattern and magnetic shells are also generated with clockwise and counter-clockwise rotating plasma within them, which can be the proxy of dipole-shaped chromospheric swirls. The complex dynamics of vortices and wave perturbations reveals the channelling of sufficient amount of energy to fulfil energy losses in the chromosphere (˜104 W m-1) and in the corona (˜102 W m-1). Some of these numerical findings are reminiscent of signatures in recent observational data.

  14. Magnetic resonance studies of mixed chalcospinel CuCr2SxSe4-x (x = 0; 2) and CoxCu1-xCr2S4 (x = 0.1; 0.2) nanocrystals with strong interparticle interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankrats, A. I.; Vorotynov, A. M.; Tugarinov, V. I.; Zharkov, S. M.; Zeer, G. M.; Ramasamy, K.; Gupta, A.

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic resonance characteristics of mixed chalcospinel nanocrystals CuCr2SxSe4-x (x = 0 and 2) and CoxCu1-xCr2S4 (x = 0.1 and 0.2) have been investigated. It has been established based on TEM, SEM and resonance data that all the samples contain both blocks with sizes from 1 to 50 m of compacted nanosized crystallites and individual nanoparticles with sizes from 10 to 30 nm. The studies provide evidence of strong interparticle interaction in all the samples leading to high values of the blocking temperature. Magnetic dipolar field arise in the boundary regions of interacting adjacent nanocrystals below the blocking temperature. This results in inhomogeneous broadening of the magnetic resonance spectrum along with appearance of additional absorption lines. With increase in magnetic anisotropy at low temperatures, a shift of the resonance field along with line broadening are observed for all the studied compounds due to freezing of the moments in the nanoparticles, both in the individual and compacted ones. A gapped characteristic of the resonance spectrum is established below the freezing temperature Tfr, with the energy gap defined by the averaged magnetic anisotropy . Anionic substitution of sulfur by selenium results in a decrease in the magnetic anisotropy. In contrast, cationic substitution of copper by cobalt increases the magnetic anisotropy due to a strong contribution from the latter ion.

  15. NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET ABSORPTION, CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY, AND STAR-PLANET INTERACTIONS IN THE WASP-12 SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haswell, C. A.; Fossati, L.; Holmes, S.; Kolb, U. C.; Busuttil, R.; Carter, A. [Department of Physical Sciences, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Ayres, T.; France, K.; Froning, C. S. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 593 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0593 (United States); Street, R. A. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Inc., 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Hebb, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, 6301 Stevenson Center Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Cameron, A. Collier; Enoch, B. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Burwitz, V. [Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Rodriguez, J. [Observatori Astronomic de Mallorca, Cami de l' Observatori, E-07144 Costitx, Mallorca (Spain); West, R. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Pollacco, D.; Wheatley, P. J., E-mail: C.A.Haswell@open.ac.uk, E-mail: l.fossati@open.ac.uk, E-mail: cynthia.froning@colorado.edu, E-mail: leslie.hebb@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-20

    Extended gas clouds have been previously detected surrounding the brightest known close-in transiting hot Jupiter exoplanets, HD 209458 b and HD 189733 b; we observed the distant but more extreme close-in hot Jupiter system, WASP-12, with Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Near-UV (NUV) transits up to three times deeper than the optical transit of WASP-12 b reveal extensive diffuse gas, extending well beyond the Roche lobe. The distribution of absorbing gas varies between visits. The deepest NUV transits are at wavelength ranges with strong stellar photospheric absorption, implying that the absorbing gas may have temperature and composition similar to those of the stellar photosphere. Our spectra reveal significantly enhanced absorption (greater than 3{sigma} below the median) at {approx}200 individual wavelengths on each of two HST visits; 65 of these wavelengths are consistent between the two visits, using a strict criterion for velocity matching that excludes matches with velocity shifts exceeding {approx}20 km s{sup -1}. Excess transit depths are robustly detected throughout the inner wings of the Mg II resonance lines independently on both HST visits. We detected absorption in Fe II {lambda}2586, the heaviest species yet detected in an exoplanet transit. The Mg II line cores have zero flux, emission cores exhibited by every other observed star of similar age and spectral type are conspicuously absent. WASP-12 probably produces normal Mg II profiles, but the inner portions of these strong resonance lines are likely affected by extrinsic absorption. The required Mg{sup +} column is an order of magnitude greater than expected from the interstellar medium, though we cannot completely dismiss that possibility. A more plausible source of absorption is gas lost by WASP-12 b. We show that planetary mass loss can produce the required column. Our Visit 2 NUV light curves show evidence for a stellar flare. We show that some of the possible transit detections in resonance

  16. Time-dependent hydrogen ionisation in 3D simulations of the solar chromosphere. Methods and first results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenaarts, J.; Wedemeyer-Bohm, S.

    2006-01-01

    Context. The hydrogen ionisation degree deviates substantially from statistical equilibrium under the conditions of the solar chromosphere. A realistic description of this atmospheric layer thus must account for time-dependent non-equilibrium effects. Aims. Advancing the realism of numerical

  17. A Comparative Study of Magnetic Fields in the Solar Photosphere and Chromosphere at Equatorial and Polar Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, G. J. D.; Patrikeeva, I.

    2009-07-01

    Besides their own intrinsic interest, correct interpretation of solar surface magnetic field observations is crucial to our ability to describe the global magnetic structure of the solar atmosphere. Photospheric magnetograms are often used as lower boundary conditions in models of the corona, but not data from the nearly force-free chromosphere. National Solar Observatory's (NSO) Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun VSM (Vector Spectromagnetograph) produces full-disk line-of-sight magnetic flux images deriving from both photospheric and chromospheric layers on a daily basis. In this paper, we investigate key properties of the magnetic field in these two layers using more than five years of VSM data. We find from near-equatorial measurements that the east-west inclination angle of most photospheric fields is less than about 12°, while chromospheric fields expand in all directions to a significant degree. Using a simple stereoscopic inversion, we find evidence that photospheric polar fields are also nearly radial but that during 2008 the chromospheric field in the south pole was expanding superradially. We obtain a spatially resolved polar photospheric flux distribution up to 80° latitude whose strength increases poleward approximately as cosine(colatitude) to the power 9-10. This distribution would give a polar field strength of 5-6 G. We briefly discuss implications for future synoptic map construction and modeling.

  18. A study of excess H-alpha emission in chromospherically active M dwarf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.; Skumanich, A.; Stauffer, J.R.; Harlan, E.; Bopp, B.W.

    1989-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations from three observatories are combined to study the properties of the excess H-alpha emission which characterizes the most chromospherically active subset of the M dwarf stars, known as the dMe stars. It is demonstrated that the excess H-alpha luminosity from these stars is a monotonically decreasing function of their (R-I) color, and evidence is presented which suggests that the product of the mean surface brightness and the mean filling factor of the emissive regions is essentially constant with color. Another significant result of the study is a linear correlation between the excess luminosity in H-alpha and the coronal X-ray luminosity. 39 refs

  19. Slender Ca ii H Fibrils Mapping Magnetic Fields in the Low Solar Chromosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafarzadeh, S.; Rutten, R. J.; Szydlarski, M. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Solanki, S. K.; Wiegelmann, T.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Noort, M. van; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Hirzberger, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Rodríguez, J. Blanco [Grupo de Astronomía y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, E-46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Iniesta, J. C. del Toro; Suárez, D. Orozco [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Apartado de Correos 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Knölker, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Pillet, V. Martínez [National Solar Observatory, 3665 Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Schmidt, W., E-mail: shahin.jafarzadeh@astro.uio.no [Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Schöneckstr. 6, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    A dense forest of slender bright fibrils near a small solar active region is seen in high-quality narrowband Ca ii H images from the SuFI instrument onboard the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. The orientation of these slender Ca ii H fibrils (SCF) overlaps with the magnetic field configuration in the low solar chromosphere derived by magnetostatic extrapolation of the photospheric field observed with Sunrise/IMaX and SDO/HMI. In addition, many observed SCFs are qualitatively aligned with small-scale loops computed from a novel inversion approach based on best-fit numerical MHD simulation. Such loops are organized in canopy-like arches over quiet areas that differ in height depending on the field strength near their roots.

  20. A First Comparison of Millimeter Continuum and Mg ii Ultraviolet Line Emission from the Solar Chromosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastian, T. S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Chintzoglou, G.; De Pontieu, B.; Schmit, D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Shimojo, M. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Leenaarts, J. [Institute for Solar Physics, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Loukitcheva, M., E-mail: tbastian@nrao.edu [Center For Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2017-08-20

    We present joint observations of the Sun by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ). Both millimeter/submillimeter- λ continuum emission and ultraviolet (UV) line emission originate from the solar chromosphere and both have the potential to serve as powerful and complementary diagnostics of physical conditions in this enigmatic region of the solar atmosphere. The observations were made of a solar active region on 2015 December 18 as part of the ALMA science verification effort. A map of the Sun’s continuum emission was obtained by ALMA at a wavelength of 1.25 mm (239 GHz). A contemporaneous map was obtained by IRIS in the Mg ii h doublet line at 2803.5 Å. While a clear correlation between the 1.25 mm brightness temperature T{sub B} and the Mg ii h line radiation temperature T {sub rad} is observed, the slope is <1, perhaps as a result of the fact that these diagnostics are sensitive to different parts of the chromosphere and that the Mg ii h line source function includes a scattering component. There is a significant difference (35%) between the mean T{sub B} (1.25 mm) and mean T {sub rad} (Mg ii). Partitioning the maps into “sunspot,” “quiet areas,” and “plage regions” we find the relation between the IRIS Mg ii h line T {sub rad} and the ALMA T {sub B} region-dependent. We suggest this may be the result of regional dependences of the formation heights of the IRIS and ALMA diagnostics and/or the increased degree of coupling between the UV source function and the local gas temperature in the hotter, denser gas in plage regions.

  1. THE CHROMOSPHERIC SOLAR LIMB BRIGHTENING AT RADIO, MILLIMETER, SUB-MILLIMETER, AND INFRARED WAVELENGTHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Luz, V.

    2016-01-01

    Observations of the emission at radio, millimeter, sub-millimeter, and infrared wavelengths in the center of the solar disk validate the autoconsistence of semi-empirical models of the chromosphere. Theoretically, these models must reproduce the emission at the solar limb. In this work, we tested both the VALC and C7 semi-empirical models by computing their emission spectrum in the frequency range from 2 GHz to 10 THz at solar limb altitudes. We calculate the Sun's theoretical radii as well as their limb brightening. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium was computed for hydrogen, electron density, and H − . In order to solve the radiative transfer equation, a three-dimensional (3D) geometry was employed to determine the ray paths, and Bremsstrahlung, H − , and inverse Bremsstrahlung opacity sources were integrated in the optical depth. We compared the computed solar radii with high-resolution observations at the limb obtained by Clark. We found that there are differences between the observed and computed solar radii of 12,000 km at 20 GHz, 5000 km at 100 GHz, and 1000 km at 3 THz for both semi-empirical models. A difference of 8000 km in the solar radii was found when comparing our results against the heights obtained from H α observations of spicules-off at the solar limb. We conclude that the solar radii cannot be reproduced by VALC and C7 semi-empirical models at radio—infrared wavelengths. Therefore, the structures in the high chromosphere provide a better measurement of the solar radii and their limb brightening as shown in previous investigations.

  2. THE CHROMOSPHERIC SOLAR LIMB BRIGHTENING AT RADIO, MILLIMETER, SUB-MILLIMETER, AND INFRARED WAVELENGTHS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Luz, V. [Conacyt—SCiESMEX, Instituto de Geofísica, Unidad Michoacán, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Morelia, Michoacán, 58190, México (Mexico)

    2016-07-10

    Observations of the emission at radio, millimeter, sub-millimeter, and infrared wavelengths in the center of the solar disk validate the autoconsistence of semi-empirical models of the chromosphere. Theoretically, these models must reproduce the emission at the solar limb. In this work, we tested both the VALC and C7 semi-empirical models by computing their emission spectrum in the frequency range from 2 GHz to 10 THz at solar limb altitudes. We calculate the Sun's theoretical radii as well as their limb brightening. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium was computed for hydrogen, electron density, and H{sup −}. In order to solve the radiative transfer equation, a three-dimensional (3D) geometry was employed to determine the ray paths, and Bremsstrahlung, H{sup −}, and inverse Bremsstrahlung opacity sources were integrated in the optical depth. We compared the computed solar radii with high-resolution observations at the limb obtained by Clark. We found that there are differences between the observed and computed solar radii of 12,000 km at 20 GHz, 5000 km at 100 GHz, and 1000 km at 3 THz for both semi-empirical models. A difference of 8000 km in the solar radii was found when comparing our results against the heights obtained from H α observations of spicules-off at the solar limb. We conclude that the solar radii cannot be reproduced by VALC and C7 semi-empirical models at radio—infrared wavelengths. Therefore, the structures in the high chromosphere provide a better measurement of the solar radii and their limb brightening as shown in previous investigations.

  3. Spatiotemporal Evolution of Hanle and Zeeman Synthetic Polarization in a Chromospheric Spectral Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlin, E. S.; Bianda, M., E-mail: escarlin@irsol.es [Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno, 6600, Locarno, Switzerland, associated to USI, Università della Svizzera Italiana (Switzerland)

    2017-07-01

    Due to the quick evolution of the solar chromosphere, its magnetic field cannot be inferred reliably without accounting for the temporal variations of its polarized light. This has been broadly overlooked in the modeling and interpretation of the polarization, due to technical problems (e.g., lack of temporal resolution or of time-dependent MHD solar models) and/or because many polarization measurements can apparently be explained without dynamics. Here, we show that the temporal evolution is critical for explaining the spectral-line scattering polarization because of its sensitivity to rapidly varying physical quantities and the possibility of signal cancellations and attenuation during extended time integration. For studying the combined effect of time-varying magnetic fields and kinematics, we solved the 1.5D non-LTE problem of the second kind in time-dependent 3D R-MHD solar models and synthesized the Hanle and Zeeman polarization in forward scattering for the chromospheric λ 4227 line. We find that the quiet-Sun polarization amplitudes depend on the periodicity and spectral coherence of the signal enhancements produced by kinematics, but that substantially larger linear polarization signals should exist all over the solar disk for short integration times. The spectral morphology of the polarization is discussed as a combination of Hanle, Zeeman, partial redistribution and dynamic effects. We give physical references for observations by degrading and characterizing our slit time series in different spatiotemporal resolutions. The implications of our results for the interpretation of the second solar spectrum and for the investigation of the solar atmospheric heatings are discussed.

  4. CHROMOSPHERICALLY ACTIVE STARS IN THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE) SURVEY. I. THE CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Žerjal, M.; Zwitter, T. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Matijevič, G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 E Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Strassmeier, K. G.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Bienaymé, O. [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, 11 rue de l' Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Bland-Hawthorn, J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Freeman, K. C. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australia National University, Weston Creek, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Kordopatis, G. [Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Munari, U. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, I-36012 Asiago (Italy); Navarro, J. F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria BC, V8P 5C2 (Canada); Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Seabroke, G. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Wyse, R. F. G., E-mail: marusa.zerjal@fmf.uni-lj.si [Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2013-10-20

    RAVE, the unbiased magnitude limited survey of southern sky stars, contained 456,676 medium-resolution spectra at the time of our analysis. Spectra cover the Ca II infrared triplet (IRT) range, which is a known indicator of chromospheric activity. Our previous work classified all spectra using locally linear embedding. It identified 53,347 cases with a suggested emission component in calcium lines. Here, we use a spectral subtraction technique to measure the properties of this emission. Synthetic templates are replaced by the observed spectra of non-active stars to bypass the difficult computations of non-local thermal equilibrium profiles of the line cores and stellar parameter dependence. We derive both the equivalent width of the excess emission for each calcium line on a 5 Å wide interval and their sum EW{sub IRT} for ∼44,000 candidate active dwarf stars with signal-to-noise ratio >20, with no cuts on the basis of the source of their emission flux. From these, ∼14,000 show a detectable chromospheric flux with at least a 2σ confidence level. Our set of active stars vastly enlarges previously known samples. Atmospheric parameters and, in some cases, radial velocities of active stars derived from automatic pipelines suffer from systematic shifts due to their shallower calcium lines. We re-estimate the effective temperature, metallicity, and radial velocities for candidate active stars. The overall distribution of activity levels shows a bimodal shape, with the first peak coinciding with non-active stars and the second with the pre-main-sequence cases. The catalog will be made publicly available with the next RAVE public data releases.

  5. Performance Characterization of UV Science Cameras Developed for the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champey, P.; Kobayashi, K.; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Hyde, D.; Robertson, B.; Beabout, D.; Beabout, B.; Stewart, M.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a science camera suitable for sub-orbital missions for observations in the UV, EUV and soft X-ray. Six cameras will be built and tested for flight with the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP), a joint National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) and MSFC sounding rocket mission. The goal of the CLASP mission is to observe the scattering polarization in Lyman-alpha and to detect the Hanle effect in the line core. Due to the nature of Lyman-alpha polarization in the chromosphere, strict measurement sensitivity requirements are imposed on the CLASP polarimeter and spectrograph systems; science requirements for polarization measurements of Q/I and U/I are 0.1 percent in the line core. CLASP is a dual-beam spectro-polarimeter, which uses a continuously rotating waveplate as a polarization modulator, while the waveplate motor driver outputs trigger pulses to synchronize the exposures. The CCDs are operated in frame-transfer mode; the trigger pulse initiates the frame transfer, effectively ending the ongoing exposure and starting the next. The strict requirement of 0.1 percent polarization accuracy is met by using frame-transfer cameras to maximize the duty cycle in order to minimize photon noise. Coating the e2v CCD57-10 512x512 detectors with Lumogen-E coating allows for a relatively high (30 percent) quantum efficiency at the Lyman-alpha line. The CLASP cameras were designed to operate with 10 e-/pixel/second dark current, 25 e- read noise, a gain of 2.0 +/- 0.5 and 1.0 percent residual non-linearity. We present the results of the performance characterization study performed on the CLASP prototype camera; dark current, read noise, camera gain and residual non-linearity.

  6. Orbits in weak and strong bars

    CERN Document Server

    Contopoulos, George

    1980-01-01

    The authors study the plane orbits in simple bar models embedded in an axisymmetric background when the bar density is about 1% (weak), 10% (intermediate) or 100% (strong bar) of the axisymmetric density. Most orbits follow the stable periodic orbits. The basic families of periodic orbits are described. In weak bars with two Inner Lindblad Resonances there is a family of stable orbits extending from the center up to the Outer Lindblad Resonance. This family contains the long period orbits near corotation. Other stable families appear between the Inner Lindblad Resonances, outside the Outer Lindblad Resonance, around corotation (short period orbits) and around the center (retrograde). Some families become unstable or disappear in strong bars. A comparison is made with cases having one or no Inner Lindblad Resonance. (12 refs).

  7. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The chromosphere is the site of weak emission lines characterizing the flash spectrum observed for a few seconds during a total eclipse. This layer of the solar atmosphere is known to possess an opaque Hα emission and a great number of spicules, which can extend well above the photosphere. A stunning variety of hydrogen emission lines have been observed in this region. The production of these lines has provided the seventeenth line of evidence that the Sun is comprised of condensed matter (Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen II: A critical assessment of current and primordial helium levels in Sun. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 2, 35–47. Contrary to the gaseous solar models, the simplest mechanism for the production of emission lines is the evaporation of excited atoms from condensed surfaces existing within the chromosphere, as found in spicules. This is reminiscent of the chemiluminescence which occurs during the condensation of silver clusters (Konig L., Rabin I., Schultze W., and Ertl G. Chemiluminescence in the Agglomeration of Metal Clusters. Science, v. 274, no. 5291, 1353–1355. The process associated with spicule formation is an exothermic one, requiring the transport of energy away from the site of condensation. As atoms leave localized surfaces, their electrons can occupy any energy level and, hence, a wide variety of emission lines are produced. In this regard, it is hypothesized that the presence of hydrides on the Sun can also facilitate hydrogen condensation in the chromosphere. The associated line emission from main group and transition elements constitutes the thirtieth line of evidence that the Sun is condensed matter. Condensation processes also help to explain why spicules manifest an apparently constant temperature over their entire length. Since the corona supports magnetic field lines, the random orientations associated with spicule formation suggests that the hydrogen condensates in the chromosphere are not metallic in

  8. RESOLVING THE FAN-SPINE RECONNECTION GEOMETRY OF A SMALL-SCALE CHROMOSPHERIC JET EVENT WITH THE NEW SOLAR TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Zhicheng; Chen, Bin; Goode, Philip R.; Cao, Wenda [Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Ji, Haisheng [Big Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Jets are ubiquitously present in both quiet and active regions on the Sun. They are widely believed to be driven by magnetic reconnection. A fan-spine structure has been frequently reported in some coronal jets and flares, and has been regarded as a signature of ongoing magnetic reconnection in a topology consisting of a magnetic null connected by a fan-like separatrix surface and a spine. However, for small-scale chromospheric jets, clear evidence of such structures is rather rare, although it has been implied in earlier works that showed an inverted-Y-shaped feature. Here we report high-resolution (0.″16) observations of a small-scale chromospheric jet obtained by the New Solar Telescope (NST) using 10830 Å filtergrams. Bi-directional flows were observed across the separatrix regions in the 10830 Å images, suggesting that the jet was produced due to magnetic reconnection. At the base of the jet, a fan-spine structure was clearly resolved by the NST, including the spine and the fan-like surface, as well as the loops before and after the reconnection. A major part of this fan-spine structure, with the exception of its bright footpoints and part of the base arc, was invisible in the extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray images (observed by the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly and the X-Ray Telescope, respectively), indicating that the reconnection occurred in the upper chromosphere. Our observations suggest that the evolution of this chromospheric jet is consistent with a two-step reconnection scenario proposed by Török et al.

  9. Time-dependent hydrogen ionisation in 3D simulations of the solar chromosphere. Methods and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaarts, J.; Wedemeyer-Böhm, S.

    2006-12-01

    Context: .The hydrogen ionisation degree deviates substantially from statistical equilibrium under the conditions of the solar chromosphere. A realistic description of this atmospheric layer thus must account for time-dependent non-equilibrium effects. Aims: .Advancing the realism of numerical simulations of the solar chromosphere by improved numerical treatment of the relevant physics will provide more realistic models that are essential for interpretation of existing and future observations. Methods: .An approximate method for solving the rate equations for the hydrogen populations was extended and implemented in the three-dimensional radiation (magneto-)hydrodynamics code CO^5BOLD. The method is based on a model atom with six energy levels and fixed radiative rates. It has been tested extensively in one-dimensional simulations. The extended method has been used to create a three-dimensional model that extends from the upper convection zone to the chromosphere. Results: .The ionisation degree of hydrogen in our time-dependent simulation is comparable to the corresponding equilibrium value up to 500 km above optical depth unity. Above this height, the non-equilibrium ionisation degree is fairly constant over time and space, and tends to be at a value set by hot propagating shock waves. The hydrogen level populations and electron density are much more constant than the corresponding values for statistical equilibrium, too. In contrast, the equilibrium ionisation degree varies by more than 20 orders of magnitude between hot, shocked regions and cool, non-shocked regions. Conclusions: .The simulation shows for the first time in 3D that the chromospheric hydrogen ionisation degree and electron density cannot be calculated in equilibrium. Our simulation can provide realistic values of those quantities for detailed radiative transfer computations.

  10. Optical Alignment of the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter using Sophisticated Methods to Minimize Activities under Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giono, G.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ishikawa, R.; Narukage, N.; Kano, R.; Kubo, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Bando, T.; Hara, H.; Suematsu, Y.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding-rocket instrument developed at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) as a part of an international collaboration. The in- strument main scientific goal is to achieve polarization measurement of the Lyman-alpha line at 121.56 nm emitted from the solar upper-chromosphere and transition region with an unprecedented 0.1% accuracy. For this purpose, the optics are composed of a Cassegrain telescope coated with a "cold mirror" coating optimized for UV reflection and a dual-channel spectrograph allowing for simultaneous observation of the two orthogonal states of polarization. Although the polarization sensitivity is the most important aspect of the instrument, the spatial and spectral resolutions of the instrument are also crucial to observe the chromospheric features and resolve the Ly- pro les. A precise alignment of the optics is required to ensure the resolutions, but experiments under vacuum conditions are needed since Ly-alpha is absorbed by air, making the alignment experiments difficult. To bypass this issue, we developed methods to align the telescope and the spectrograph separately in visible light. We will explain these methods and present the results for the optical alignment of the CLASP telescope and spectrograph. We will then discuss the combined performances of both parts to derive the expected resolutions of the instrument, and compare them with the flight observations performed on September 3rd 2015.

  11. A Comparative Study of Magnetic Fields in the Solar Photosphere and Chromosphere at Low and Polar Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrikeeva, Irina; Petrie, G.

    2009-05-01

    The SOLIS Vector-Spectromagnetograph produces full-disk line-of-sight (LOS) magnetic flux images deriving from both photospheric and chromospheric layers on a daily basis. We investigate key properties of the magnetic field in these two layers using more than five years of VSM data. We find from near-equatorial measurements that the East-West inclination angle of most photospheric fields is about 12°, while chromospheric fields expand in all directions to a significant degree. Using a simple stereoscopic inversion we find evidence that photospheric polar fields are also nearly radial, but that during 2008 the chromospheric field in the south pole was expanding super-radially. We obtain a spatially-resolved polar photospheric flux distribution up to 80° latitude whose strength increases poleward approximately as cosine(colatitude) to the power 9-10. This distribution would give a polar field strength of 5-6 G. These results have implications for future synoptic map construction and global modeling. This work is carried out through the National Solar Observatory Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) site program, which is co-funded by the Department of Defense in partnership with the National Science Foundation REU Program.

  12. Construction of a century solar chromosphere data set for solar activity related research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ganghua; Wang, Xiao Fan; Yang, Xiao; Liu, Suo; Zhang, Mei; Wang, Haimin; Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Tlatov, Andrey; Demidov, Mihail; Borovik, Aleksandr; Golovko, Aleksey

    2017-06-01

    This article introduces our ongoing project "Construction of a Century Solar Chromosphere Data Set for Solar Activity Related Research". Solar activities are the major sources of space weather that affects human lives. Some of the serious space weather consequences, for instance, include interruption of space communication and navigation, compromising the safety of astronauts and satellites, and damaging power grids. Therefore, the solar activity research has both scientific and social impacts. The major database is built up from digitized and standardized film data obtained by several observatories around the world and covers a timespan more than 100 years. After careful calibration, we will develop feature extraction and data mining tools and provide them together with the comprehensive database for the astronomical community. Our final goal is to address several physical issues: filament behavior in solar cycles, abnormal behavior of solar cycle 24, large-scale solar eruptions, and sympathetic remote brightenings. Significant progresses are expected in data mining algorithms and software development, which will benefit the scientific analysis and eventually advance our understanding of solar cycles.

  13. The prominence-corona interface compared with the chromosphere-corona transition region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrall, F. Q.; Schmahl, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    The intensities of 52 optically thin EUV emission lines formed at temperatures of 350,000 to 2.2 million K in nine hedgerow prominences observed at the limb are compared with the intensities of the same lines formed within network cells at the center of the solar disk in order to compare the prominence-corona interface (PC) with the chromosphere-corona transition region (CC). It is found for all nine prominences that the ratio of the intensity of a line measured in a cell to that in a prominence decreases with increasing temperature approximately as the -0.6 power of temperature. This ratio is used as the basis for comparing the PC with the CC in the framework of two different geometries wherein the prominence consists of one or more identical fully resolved slabs or threads in the line of sight or contains one or more identical unresolved cylindrical threads. It is concluded that three effects may contribute to the systematic difference between the PC and the CC: (1) the pressure within the PC might increase outward; (2) the temperature gradient within the PC might increase more slowly with temperature than in the CC; and (3) the unresolved internal geometry of a prominence can directly explain some, but not all, of the systematic difference.

  14. Chromospheric oscillations observed with OSO 8. III. Average phase spectra for Si II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, O.R.; Athay, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Time series of intensity and Doppler-shift fluctuations in the Si II emission lines lambda816.93 and lambda817.45 are Fourier analyzed to determine the frequency variation of phase differences between intensity and velocity and between these two lines formed 300 km apart in the middle chromosphere. Average phase spectra show that oscillations between 2 and 9 mHz in the two lines have time delays from 35 to 40 s, which is consistent with the upward propagation of sound wave at 8.6-7.5 km s -1 . In this same frequency band near 3 mHz, maximum brightness leads maximum blueshift by 60 0 . At frequencies above 11 mHz where the power spectrum is flat, the phase differences are uncertain, but approximately 65% of the cases indicate upward propagation. At these higher frequencies, the phase lead between intensity and blue Doppler shift ranges from 0 0 to 180 0 with an average value of 90 0 . However, the phase estimates in this upper band are corrupted by both aliasing and randomness inherent to the measured signals. Phase differences in the two narrow spectral features seen at 10.5 and 27 mHz in the power spectra are shown to be consistent with properties expected for aliases of the wheel rotation rate of the spacecraft wheel section

  15. TRANSITION REGION AND CHROMOSPHERIC SIGNATURES OF IMPULSIVE HEATING EVENTS. I. OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Reep, Jeffrey W. [National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow, Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Crump, Nicholas A. [Naval Center for Space Technology, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Simões, Paulo J. A. [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-20

    We exploit the high spatial resolution and high cadence of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) to investigate the response of the transition region and chromosphere to energy deposition during a small flare. Simultaneous observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager provide constraints on the energetic electrons precipitating into the flare footpoints, while observations of the X-Ray Telescope , Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, and Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) allow us to measure the temperatures and emission measures from the resulting flare loops. We find clear evidence for heating over an extended period on the spatial scale of a single IRIS pixel. During the impulsive phase of this event, the intensities in each pixel for the Si iv 1402.770 Å, C ii 1334.535 Å, Mg ii 2796.354 Å, and O i 1355.598 Å emission lines are characterized by numerous small-scale bursts typically lasting 60 s or less. Redshifts are observed in Si iv, C ii, and Mg ii during the impulsive phase. Mg ii shows redshifts during the bursts and stationary emission at other times. The Si iv and C ii profiles, in contrast, are observed to be redshifted at all times during the impulsive phase. These persistent redshifts are a challenge for one-dimensional hydrodynamic models, which predict only short-duration downflows in response to impulsive heating. We conjecture that energy is being released on many small-scale filaments with a power-law distribution of heating rates.

  16. SOLAR FLARE CHROMOSPHERIC LINE EMISSION: COMPARISON BETWEEN IBIS HIGH-RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS AND RADIATIVE HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Fatima Rubio da; Petrosian, Vahé [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kleint, Lucia [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Dalda, Alberto Sainz [Stanford-Lockheed Institute for Space Research, Stanford University, HEPL, 466 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Liu, Wei, E-mail: frubio@stanford.edu [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Solar flares involve impulsive energy release, which results in enhanced radiation over a broad spectral range and a wide range of heights. In particular, line emission from the chromosphere can provide critical diagnostics of plasma heating processes. Thus, a direct comparison between high-resolution spectroscopic observations and advanced numerical modeling results could be extremely valuable, but has not yet been attempted. In this paper, we present such a self-consistent investigation of an M3.0 flare observed by the Dunn Solar Telescope’s Interferometric Bi-dimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) on 2011 September 24 which we have modeled using the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN. We obtained images and spectra of the flaring region with IBIS in Hα 6563 Å and Ca ii 8542 Å, and with RHESSI in X-rays. The latter observations were used to infer the non-thermal electron population, which was passed to RADYN to simulate the atmospheric response to electron collisional heating. We then synthesized spectral lines and compared their shapes and intensities to those observed by IBIS and found a general agreement. In particular, the synthetic Ca ii 8542 Å profile fits well to the observed profile, while the synthetic Hα profile is fainter in the core than for the observation. This indicates that Hα emission is more responsive to the non-thermal electron flux than the Ca ii 8542 Å emission. We suggest that it is necessary to refine the energy input and other processes to resolve this discrepancy.

  17. Strong localization of photonics in symmetric Fibonacci superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Y H; Tsao, C W; Chen, C H; Hsueh, W J

    2015-01-01

    Strong localization from the Fabry-Pérot-like resonances that occur in symmetric Fibonacci superlattices is presented in this study. When compared with traditional Fabry–Pérot resonators, in symmetric Fibonacci superlattices, the middle space is a variant rather than an invariant half-wavelength thickness for each resonance with different orders. In addition, the electric fields of the resonances may be located on both sides of the space layer in the superlattice, which is in contrast to those in a traditional Fabry–Pérot resonator. The electric field of the resonances is strongly localized as the generation order increases. Moreover, the group delays of these peaks increase with generation order. More strongly localized modes can be found from the symmetric Fibonacci superlattices than from the traditional Fabry–Pérot resonators, which makes the proposed structure an attractive alternative to a wide variety of optoelectronic devices. (paper)

  18. Two-dimensional Radiative Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Partial Ionization in the Chromosphere. II. Dynamics and Energetics of the Low Solar Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan [Bay Area Environmental Research Institute, Petaluma, CA 94952 (United States); Pontieu, Bart De; Hansteen, Viggo H. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Carlsson, Mats; Gudiksen, Boris V. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Nóbrega-Siverio, Daniel, E-mail: juanms@lmsal.com [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain)

    2017-09-20

    We investigate the effects of interactions between ions and neutrals on the chromosphere and overlying corona using 2.5D radiative MHD simulations with the Bifrost code. We have extended the code capabilities implementing ion–neutral interaction effects using the generalized Ohm’s law, i.e., we include the Hall term and the ambipolar diffusion (Pedersen dissipation) in the induction equation. Our models span from the upper convection zone to the corona, with the photosphere, chromosphere, and transition region partially ionized. Our simulations reveal that the interactions between ionized particles and neutral particles have important consequences for the magnetothermodynamics of these modeled layers: (1) ambipolar diffusion increases the temperature in the chromosphere; (2) sporadically the horizontal magnetic field in the photosphere is diffused into the chromosphere, due to the large ambipolar diffusion; (3) ambipolar diffusion concentrates electrical currents, leading to more violent jets and reconnection processes, resulting in (3a) the formation of longer and faster spicules, (3b) heating of plasma during the spicule evolution, and (3c) decoupling of the plasma and magnetic field in spicules. Our results indicate that ambipolar diffusion is a critical ingredient for understanding the magnetothermodynamic properties in the chromosphere and transition region. The numerical simulations have been made publicly available, similar to previous Bifrost simulations. This will allow the community to study realistic numerical simulations with a wider range of magnetic field configurations and physics modules than previously possible.

  19. Two-dimensional Radiative Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Partial Ionization in the Chromosphere. II. Dynamics and Energetics of the Low Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Hansteen, Viggo H.; Nóbrega-Siverio, Daniel; Gudiksen, Boris V.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the effects of interactions between ions and neutrals on the chromosphere and overlying corona using 2.5D radiative MHD simulations with the Bifrost code. We have extended the code capabilities implementing ion-neutral interaction effects using the generalized Ohm’s law, I.e., we include the Hall term and the ambipolar diffusion (Pedersen dissipation) in the induction equation. Our models span from the upper convection zone to the corona, with the photosphere, chromosphere, and transition region partially ionized. Our simulations reveal that the interactions between ionized particles and neutral particles have important consequences for the magnetothermodynamics of these modeled layers: (1) ambipolar diffusion increases the temperature in the chromosphere; (2) sporadically the horizontal magnetic field in the photosphere is diffused into the chromosphere, due to the large ambipolar diffusion; (3) ambipolar diffusion concentrates electrical currents, leading to more violent jets and reconnection processes, resulting in (3a) the formation of longer and faster spicules, (3b) heating of plasma during the spicule evolution, and (3c) decoupling of the plasma and magnetic field in spicules. Our results indicate that ambipolar diffusion is a critical ingredient for understanding the magnetothermodynamic properties in the chromosphere and transition region. The numerical simulations have been made publicly available, similar to previous Bifrost simulations. This will allow the community to study realistic numerical simulations with a wider range of magnetic field configurations and physics modules than previously possible.

  20. Mechanical resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Padowitz, David; Matsiev, L; Kolosov, Oleg

    2004-01-01

    A sensor and methods for making and using the same in which a mechanical resonator is employed, comprising a resonator portion for resonating in a fluid without the substantial generation of acoustic waves; and an electrical connection between the resonator portion for oscillating and a source of an input signal; wherein the portion for resonating, the electrical connection or both includes a base material and a performance-tuning material that is different from the base material.

  1. Chromospheric lines in red dwarf flare stars. I - AD Leonis and GX Andromedae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, B. R.; Coleman, L. A.

    1981-12-01

    Line profiles with a spectral resolution of 0.45 A have been obtained for Hα(λ6563), the Na D lines (λλ5890, 5896), He I lines (λλ5876, 6678), and the Ca II infrared triplet lines (λλ8498, 8542, 8662) in the flare stars AD Leonis and GX Andromedae. The spectroscopic Reticon diode array observations of AD Leo were obtained simultaneously with high speed photometry, and major influences in the spectra due to flares are avoided by this technique. GX And has photospheric parameters very similar to AD Leo but shows a flare activity level more than one order of magnitude smaller. Simultaneous photometry was not done during spectroscopic observations of GX And because of the small probability that a flare should contaminate the data. Despite apparently equal physical parameters at the photospheric level, the chromospheric lines observed in this program appear very different in AD Leo and GX And. Hα is a prominent emission line in AD Leo with a central absorption, for which the two peaks are separated by 0.6 Å. The FWHM of the line itself is 1.35 Å in AD Leo. In contrast, the Ha line in GX And is an absorption feature with FWHM =0.75 Å. The strength of this line is too large to be formed purely in the photosphere because temperatures are so low in this region that it is transparent to Hα and consequently forms only a very weak Ha absorption line. A collisionally dominated line may strengthen its absorption feature in a chromosphere before turning into emission (Cram and Mullan), and this is probably what is seen in GX And. An emission feature in the blue wing of Hα in AD Leo, 20% above the continuum, is found to be present also in two nonflaring M dwarfs with Ha in absorption, and is associated with less TiO blanketing at that wavelength. The Na D lines are broad absorption features in both stars with equal intensity distributions in the outer wings, reflecting the similarity of photospheric conditions in these stars. In AD Leo, however, the cores of the

  2. No “Maunder Minimum” Candidates in M67: Mitigating Interstellar Contamination of Chromospheric Emission Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, Jason Lee

    2017-01-01

    The solar analogs of M67 let us glimpse the probable behavior of the Sun on timescales surpassing the duration of human civilization. M67 can serve as a solar proxy because its stars share a similar age and composition with the Sun. Previous surveys of M67 observed that 15% of its Sun-like stars exhibited chromospheric activity levels below solar minimum, which suggest that these stars might be in activity-minimum states analogous to the Maunder Minimum. The activity diagnostic used, the HK index (relative intensities of the Ca ii H and K lines integrated over 1 Å bandpasses), was measured from low-resolution spectra ( R ≈ 5000), as is traditional and suitable for nearby, bright stars. However, for stars beyond the Local Bubble, the interstellar medium (ISM) imprints absorption lines in spectra at Ca ii H and K, which negatively bias activity measurements when these lines fall within the HK index bandpass. I model the ISM clouds in the M67 foreground with high-resolution spectra of blue stragglers and solar analogs. I demonstrate that ISM absorption varies across the cluster and must be accounted for on a star-by-star basis. I then apply the ISM model to a solar spectrum and broaden it to the lower spectral resolution employed by prior surveys. Comparing HK indices measured from ISM-free and ISM-contaminated spectra, I find that all stars observed below solar minimum can be explained by this ISM bias. I conclude that there is no compelling evidence for Maunder Minimum candidates in M67 at this time.

  3. No “Maunder Minimum” Candidates in M67: Mitigating Interstellar Contamination of Chromospheric Emission Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Jason Lee, E-mail: jasoncurtis.astro@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The solar analogs of M67 let us glimpse the probable behavior of the Sun on timescales surpassing the duration of human civilization. M67 can serve as a solar proxy because its stars share a similar age and composition with the Sun. Previous surveys of M67 observed that 15% of its Sun-like stars exhibited chromospheric activity levels below solar minimum, which suggest that these stars might be in activity-minimum states analogous to the Maunder Minimum. The activity diagnostic used, the HK index (relative intensities of the Ca ii H and K lines integrated over 1 Å bandpasses), was measured from low-resolution spectra ( R ≈ 5000), as is traditional and suitable for nearby, bright stars. However, for stars beyond the Local Bubble, the interstellar medium (ISM) imprints absorption lines in spectra at Ca ii H and K, which negatively bias activity measurements when these lines fall within the HK index bandpass. I model the ISM clouds in the M67 foreground with high-resolution spectra of blue stragglers and solar analogs. I demonstrate that ISM absorption varies across the cluster and must be accounted for on a star-by-star basis. I then apply the ISM model to a solar spectrum and broaden it to the lower spectral resolution employed by prior surveys. Comparing HK indices measured from ISM-free and ISM-contaminated spectra, I find that all stars observed below solar minimum can be explained by this ISM bias. I conclude that there is no compelling evidence for Maunder Minimum candidates in M67 at this time.

  4. MHD Wave Propagation at the Interface Between Solar Chromosphere and Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.; Song, P.; Vasyliunas, V. M.

    2017-12-01

    We study the electromagnetic and momentum constraints at the solar transition region which is a sharp layer interfacing between the solar chromosphere and corona. When mass transfer between the two domains is neglected, the transition region can be treated as a contact discontinuity across which the magnetic flux is conserved and the total forces are balanced. We consider an Alfvénic perturbation that propagates along the magnetic field incident onto the interface from one side. In order to satisfy the boundary conditions at the transition region, only part of the incident energy flux is transmitted through and the rest is reflected. Taking into account the highly anisotropic propagation of waves in magnetized plasmas, we generalize the law of reflection and specify Snell's law for each of the three wave MHD modes: incompressible Alfvén mode and compressible fast and slow modes. Unlike conventional optical systems, the interface between two magnetized plasmas is not rigid but can be deformed by the waves, allowing momentum and energy to be transferred by compression. With compressible modes included, the Fresnel conditions need substantial modification. We derive Fresnel conditions, reflectivities and transmittances, and mode conversion for incident waves propagating along the background magnetic field. The results are well organized when the incident perturbation is decomposed into components in and normal to the incident plane (containing the background magnetic field and the normal direction of the interface). For a perturbation normal to the incident plane, both transmitted and reflected perturbations are incompressible Alfvén mode waves. For a perturbation in the incident plane, they can be compressible slow and fast mode waves which may produce ripples on the transition region.

  5. Dynamics of internetwork chromospheric fibrils: Basic properties and magnetohydrodynamic kink waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooroogen, K.; Morton, R. J.; Henriques, V.

    2017-11-01

    Aims: Current observational instruments are now providing data with the necessary temporal and spatial cadences required to examine highly dynamic, fine-scale magnetic structures in the solar atmosphere. Using the spectroscopic imaging capabilities of the Swedish Solar Telescope, we aim to provide the first investigation on the nature and dynamics of elongated absorption features (fibrils) observed in Hα in the internetwork. Methods: We observe and identify a number of internetwork fibrils, which form away from the kilogauss, network magnetic flux, and we provide a synoptic view on their behaviour. The internetwork fibrils are found to support wave-like behaviour, which we interpret as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink waves. The properties of these waves, that is, amplitude, period, and propagation speed, are measured from time-distance diagrams and we attempt to exploit them via magneto-seismology in order to probe the variation of plasma properties along the wave-guides. Results: We found that the Internetwork (IN) fibrils appear, disappear, and re-appear on timescales of tens of minutes, suggesting that they are subject to repeated heating. No clear photospheric footpoints for the fibrils are found in photospheric magnetograms or Hα wing images. However, we suggest that they are magnetised features as the majority of them show evidence of supporting propagating MHD kink waves, with a modal period of 120 s. Additionally, one IN fibril is seen to support a flow directed along its elongated axis, suggesting a guiding field. The wave motions are found to propagate at speeds significantly greater than estimates for typical chromospheric sound speeds. Through their interpretation as kink waves, the measured speeds provide an estimate for local average Alfvén speeds. Furthermore, the amplitudes of the waves are also found to vary as a function of distance along the fibrils, which can be interpreted as evidence of stratification of the plasma in the neighbourhood of

  6. NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET EXCESS IN SLOWLY ACCRETING T TAURI STARS: LIMITS IMPOSED BY CHROMOSPHERIC EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingleby, Laura; Calvet, Nuria; Bergin, Edwin; McClure, Melissa [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 830 Dennison Building, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Herczeg, Gregory [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestriche Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Brown, Alexander; France, Kevin [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Alexander, Richard [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Edwards, Suzan [Department of Astronomy, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063 (United States); Espaillat, Catherine; Brown, Joanna [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gregory, Scott G.; Hillenbrand, Lynne [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Roueff, Evelyne; Abgrall, Herve [LUTH and UMR 8102 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, Section de Meudon, Place J. Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Valenti, Jeff [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Walter, Frederick [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Johns-Krull, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States); Ardila, David, E-mail: lingleby@umich.edu, E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu, E-mail: gregoryh@mpe.mpg.de [NASA Herschel Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); and others

    2011-12-20

    Young stars surrounded by disks with very low mass accretion rates are likely in the final stages of inner disk evolution and therefore particularly interesting to study. We present ultraviolet (UV) observations of the {approx}5-9 Myr old stars RECX-1 and RECX-11, obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as optical and near-infrared spectroscopic observations. The two stars have similar levels of near-UV emission, although spectroscopic evidence indicates that RECX-11 is accreting and RECX-1 is not. The line profiles of H{alpha} and He I {lambda}10830 in RECX-11 show both broad and narrow redshifted absorption components that vary with time, revealing the complexity of the accretion flows. We show that accretion indicators commonly used to measure mass accretion rates, e.g., U-band excess luminosity or the Ca II triplet line luminosity, are unreliable for low accretors, at least in the middle K spectral range. Using RECX-1 as a template for the intrinsic level of photospheric and chromospheric emission, we determine an upper limit of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} for RECX-11. At this low accretion rate, recent photoevaporation models predict that an inner hole should have developed in the disk. However, the spectral energy distribution of RECX-11 shows fluxes comparable to the median of Taurus in the near-infrared, indicating that substantial dust remains. Fluorescent H{sub 2} emission lines formed in the innermost disk are observed in RECX-11, showing that gas is present in the inner disk, along with the dust.

  7. Chromospheric activity of periodic variable stars (including eclipsing binaries) observed in DR2 LAMOST stellar spectral survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyun; Lu, Hongpeng; Han, Xianming L.; Jiang, Linyan; Li, Zhongmu; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Cao, Zihuang

    2018-05-01

    The LAMOST spectral survey provides a rich databases for studying stellar spectroscopic properties and chromospheric activity. We cross-matched a total of 105,287 periodic variable stars from several photometric surveys and databases (CSS, LINEAR, Kepler, a recently updated eclipsing star catalogue, ASAS, NSVS, some part of SuperWASP survey, variable stars from the Tsinghua University-NAOC Transient Survey, and other objects from some new references) with four million stellar spectra published in the LAMOST data release 2 (DR2). We found 15,955 spectra for 11,469 stars (including 5398 eclipsing binaries). We calculated their equivalent widths (EWs) of their Hα, Hβ, Hγ, Hδ and Caii H lines. Using the Hα line EW, we found 447 spectra with emission above continuum for a total of 316 stars (178 eclipsing binaries). We identified 86 active stars (including 44 eclipsing binaries) with repeated LAMOST spectra. A total of 68 stars (including 34 eclipsing binaries) show chromospheric activity variability. We also found LAMOST spectra of 12 cataclysmic variables, five of which show chromospheric activity variability. We also made photometric follow-up studies of three short period targets (DY CVn, HAT-192-0001481, and LAMOST J164933.24+141255.0) using the Xinglong 60-cm telescope and the SARA 90-cm and 1-m telescopes, and obtained new BVRI CCD light curves. We analyzed these light curves and obtained orbital and starspot parameters. We detected the first flare event with a huge brightness increase of more than about 1.5 magnitudes in R filter in LAMOST J164933.24+141255.0.

  8. Testing strong interaction theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses possible tests of the current theories of the strong interaction, in particular, quantum chromodynamics. High energy e + e - interactions should provide an excellent means of studying the strong force. (W.D.L.)

  9. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere VII. Further Insights into the Chromosphere and Corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the liquid metallic hydrogen model of the Sun, the chromosphere is responsible for the capture of atomic hydrogen in the solar atmosphere and its eventual re-entry onto the photospheric surface (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere. Prog. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L15–L21. As for the corona, it represents a diffuse region containing both gaseous plasma and condensed matter with elevated electron affinity (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere V. On the Nature of the Corona. Prog. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L22–L25. Metallic hydrogen in the corona is thought to enable the continual harvest of electrons from the outer reaches of the Sun, thereby preserving the neutrality of the solar body. The rigid rotation of the corona is offered as the thirty-third line of evidence that the Sun is comprised of condensed matter. Within the context of the gaseous models of the Sun, a 100 km thick transition zone has been hypothesized to exist wherein temperatures increase dramatically from 104–106 K. Such extreme transitional temperatures are not reasonable given the trivial physical scale of the proposed transition zone, a region adopted to account for the ultra-violet emission lines of ions such as C IV, O IV, and Si IV. In this work, it will be argued that the transition zone does not exist. Rather, the intermediate ionization states observed in the solar atmosphere should be viewed as the result of the simultaneous transfer of protons and electrons onto condensed hydrogen structures, CHS. Line emissions from ions such as C IV, O IV, and Si IV are likely to be the result of condensation reactions, manifesting the involvement of species such as CH4, SiH4, H3O+ in the synthesis of CHS in the chromosphere. In addition, given the presence of a true solar surface at the level of the photosphere in the liquid metallic hydrogen model

  10. Nonlinear Electron Waves in Strongly Magnetized Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1980-01-01

    Weakly nonlinear dispersive electron waves in strongly magnetized plasma are considered. A modified nonlinear Schrodinger equation is derived taking into account the effect of particles resonating with the group velocity of the waves (nonlinear Landau damping). The possibility of including the ion...

  11. Pacemaker reed switch behavior in 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging units: are reed switches always closed in strong magnetic fields?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luechinger, Roger; Duru, Firat; Zeijlemaker, Volkert A; Scheidegger, Markus B; Boesiger, Peter; Candinas, Reto

    2002-10-01

    MRI is established as an important diagnostic tool in medicine. However, the presence of a cardiac pacemaker is usually regarded as a contraindication for MRI due to safety reasons. The aim of this study was to investigate the state of a pacemaker reed switch in different orientations and positions in the main magnetic field of 0.5-, 1.5-, and 3.0-T MRI scanners. Reed switches used in current pacemakers and ICDs were tested in 0.5-, 1.5-, and 3.0-T MRI scanners. The closure of isolated reed switches was evaluated for different orientations and positions relative to the main magnetic field. The field strengths to close and open the reed switch and the orientation dependency of the closed state inside the main magnetic field were investigated. The measurements were repeated using two intact pacemakers to evaluate the potential influence of the other magnetic components, like the battery. If the reed switches were oriented parallel to the magnetic fields, they closed at 1.0 +/- 0.2 mT and opened at 0.7 +/- 0.2 mT. Two different reed switch behaviors were observed at different magnetic field strengths. In low magnetic fields ( 200 mT), the reed switches opened in 50% of all tested orientations. No difference between the three scanners could be demonstrated. The reed switches showed the same behavior whether they were isolated or an integral part of the pacemakers. The reed switch in a pacemaker or an ICD does not necessarily remain closed in strong magnetic fields at 0.5, 1.5, or 3.0 T and the state of the reed switch may not be predictable with certainty in clinical situations.

  12. Snake resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepikian, S.

    1989-01-01

    Siberian Snakes provide a practical means of obtaining polarized proton beams in large accelerators. The effect of snakes can be understood by studying the dynamics of spin precession in an accelerator with snakes and a single spin resonance. This leads to a new class of energy independent spin depolarizing resonances, called snake resonances. In designing a large accelerator with snakes to preserve the spin polarization, there is an added constraint on the choice of the vertical betatron tune due to the snake resonances

  13. Multiphoton resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    The long-time average of level populations in a coherently-excited anharmonic sequence of energy levels (e.g., an anharmonic oscillator) exhibits sharp resonances as a function of laser frequency. For simple linearly-increasing anharmonicity, each resonance is a superposition of various multiphoton resonances (e.g., a superposition of 3, 5, 7, . . . photon resonances), each having its own characteristic width predictable from perturbation theory

  14. CHROMOSPHERIC VARIABILITY IN SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY M DWARFS. II. SHORT-TIMESCALE Hα VARIABILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruse, E. A.; Berger, E.; Laskar, T.; Knapp, G. R.; Gunn, J. E.; Loomis, C. P.; Lupton, R. H.; Schlegel, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive study of short-timescale chromospheric Hα variability in M dwarfs using the individual 15 minute spectroscopic exposures for 52, 392 objects from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our sample contains about 10 3 -10 4 objects per spectral type bin in the range M0-M9, with a typical number of three exposures per object (ranging up to a maximum of 30 exposures). Using this extensive data set, we find that about 16% of the sources exhibit Hα emission in at least one exposure, and of those about 45% exhibit Hα emission in all of the available exposures. As in previous studies of Hα activity (L Hα /L bol ), we find a rapid increase in the fraction of active objects from M0-M6. However, we find a subsequent decline in later spectral types that we attribute to our use of the individual spectra. Similarly, we find saturated activity at a level of L Hα /L bol ∼ 10 -3.6 for spectral types M0-M5 followed by a decline to about 10 -4.3 in the range M7-M9. Within the sample of objects with Hα emission, only 26% are consistent with non-variable emission, independent of spectral type. The Hα variability, quantified in terms of the ratio of maximum to minimum Hα equivalent width (R EW ), exhibits a rapid rise from M0 to M5, followed by a plateau and a possible decline in M9 objects. In particular, variability with R EW ∼> 10 is only observed in objects later than M5, and survival analysis indicates a probability of ∼ EW values for M0-M4 and M5-M9 are drawn from the same distribution. We further find that for an exponential distribution, the R EW values follow N(R EW ) ∝ exp[ - (R EW - 1)/2.3] for M0-M4 and ∝exp[ - (R EW - 1)/2.9] for M5-M9. Finally, comparing objects with persistent and intermittent Hα emission, we find that the latter exhibit greater variability. Based on these results, we conclude that Hα variability in M dwarfs on timescales of 15 minutes to 1 hr increases with later spectral type, and that the variability is

  15. Development of Flight Slit-Jaw Optics for Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Masahito; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Kano, Ryohei; Bando, Takamasa; Hara, Hirohisa; Narukage, Noriyuki; Katsukawa, Yukio; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Kobiki, Toshihiko; hide

    2015-01-01

    In sounding rocket experiment CLASP, I have placed a slit a mirror-finished around the focal point of the telescope. The light reflected by the mirror surface surrounding the slit is then imaged in Slit-jaw optical system, to obtain the alpha-ray Lyman secondary image. This image, not only to use the real-time image in rocket flight rocket oriented direction selection, and also used as a scientific data showing the spatial structure of the Lyman alpha emission line intensity distribution and solar chromosphere around the observation area of the polarimetric spectroscope. Slit-jaw optical system is a two off-axis mirror unit part including a parabolic mirror and folding mirror, Lyman alpha transmission filter, the optical system magnification 1x consisting camera. The camera is supplied from the United States, and the other was carried out fabrication and testing in all the Japanese side. Slit-jaw optical system, it is difficult to access the structure, it is necessary to install the low place clearance. Therefore, influence the optical performance, the fine adjustment is necessary optical elements are collectively in the form of the mirror unit. On the other hand, due to the alignment of the solar sensor in the US launch site, must be removed once the Lyman alpha transmission filter holder including a filter has a different part from the mirror unit. In order to make the structure simple, stray light measures Aru to concentrate around Lyman alpha transmission filter. To overcome the difficulties of performing optical alignment in Lyman alpha wavelength absorbed by the atmosphere, it was planned following four steps in order to reduce standing time alignment me. 1: is measured in advance refractive index at Lyman alpha wavelength of Lyman alpha transmission filter (121.567nm), to prepare a visible light Firuwo having the same optical path length in the visible light (630nm). 2: The mirror structure CLASP before mounting unit standing, dummy slit and camera standing

  16. High-spectral-resolution Observations of the Solar Chromosphere and Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Bruck, M. A.

    2007-05-01

    We continue to reduce high-spectral-resolution observations of the solar chromosphere from the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) and TRACE; and, at the 29 March 2006 total solar eclipse, of the solar corona in the [Fe XIV] green line and the [Fe X] red line. (a) The SST observations in 2006 used the SOUP Lyot filter to observe H-alpha limb spicules in five positions with 128 milliangstrom resolution for velocity imaging with several cameras to allow restoration of even noisy images. One camera is near H-alpha, providing high S/N images for extracting wavefront information. The other is deliberately defocused for Phase Diversity information. We use Multi-Object Multi-Frame Blind Deconvolution (MOMFBD; momfbd.org), assisted by Michiel Van Noort and Mats Löfdahl (Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences) and the CfA Hinode center. Simultaneous TRACE observations show spicules in emission and, silhouetted against the EUV corona, in absorption. (b) Our Fabry-Perot 2006-eclipse coronal spectra were taken with David Rust's (JHUAPL) 0.16 angstrom Y-cut lithium-niobate filter. With Rust and Matthew Noble, the etalon was stepped across the red coronal line every 0.22 angstrom. We present the profile and Doppler shifts of the [Fe X] line. (c) We collected simultaneous 10 Hz observations in the red and green coronal lines at the 2006 eclipse, with the goal of detecting high-frequency intensity oscillations ( 1 Hz), which can be relevant to coronal heating, and to confirm previous results. We present FFT and wavelet analysis of the aligned data. We thank Bryce Babcock and Steven Souza (Williams) for their eclipse collaboration. We acknowledge grants NNG04GK44G, NNG04GE48G, and NN05GG75G from NASA Planetary Astronomy. The eclipse observations were supported by NSF grant ATM-0552116 from the Solar Terrrestrial Program of the Atmospheres Sciences Division. Additional eclipse support was received from National Geographic's Committee on Research and Exploration and Williams's Rob Spring

  17. 849 RESONANCE | September 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    849. RESONANCE | September 2013. Page 2. 850. RESONANCE | September 2013. Page 3. 851. RESONANCE | September 2013. Page 4. 852. RESONANCE | September 2013. Page 5. 853. RESONANCE | September 2013. Page 6. 854. RESONANCE | September 2013. Page 7. 855. RESONANCE | September 2013.

  18. Solar Lyman-Alpha Polarization Observation of the Chromosphere and Transition Region by the Sounding Rocket Experiment CLASP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Kano, Ryohei; Bando, Takamasa; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Kubo, Masahito; Katsukawa, Yukio; Ishikawa, Shinnosuke; Hara, Hiroshi; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Giono, Gabriel; hide

    2015-01-01

    We are planning an international rocket experiment Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is (2015 planned) that Lyman a line (Ly(alpha) line) polarization spectroscopic observations from the sun. The purpose of this experiment, detected with high accuracy of the linear polarization of the Ly(alpha) lines to 0.1% by using a Hanle effect is to measure the magnetic field of the chromosphere-transition layer directly. For polarization photometric accuracy achieved that approx. 0.1% required for CLASP, it is necessary to realize the monitoring device with a high throughput. On the other hand, Ly(alpha) line (vacuum ultraviolet rays) have a sensitive characteristics that is absorbed by the material. We therefore set the optical system of the reflection system (transmission only the wavelength plate), each of the mirrors, subjected to high efficiency of the multilayer coating in accordance with the role. Primary mirror diameter of CLASP is about 30 cm, the amount of heat about 30,000 J is about 5 minutes of observation time is coming mainly in the visible light to the telescope. In addition, total flux of the sun visible light overwhelmingly large and about 200 000 times the Ly(alpha) line wavelength region. Therefore, in terms of thermal management and 0.1% of the photometric measurement accuracy achieved telescope, elimination of the visible light is essential. We therefore, has a high reflectivity (> 50%) in Lya line, visible light is a multilayer coating be kept to a low reflectance (<5%) (cold mirror coating) was applied to the primary mirror. On the other hand, the efficiency of the polarization analyzer required chromospheric magnetic field measurement (the amount of light) Conventional (magnesium fluoride has long been known as a material for vacuum ultraviolet (MgF2) manufactured ellipsometer; Rs = 22%) about increased to 2.5 times were high efficiency reflective polarizing element analysis. This device, Bridou et al. (2011) is proposed "that is

  19. Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-03

    Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators In the past year, the grant was used for work in the field of topological phases, with emphasis on finding...surface of topological insulators. In the past 3 years, we have started a new direction, that of fractional topological insulators. These are materials...in which a topologically nontrivial quasi-flat band is fractionally filled and then subject to strong interactions. The views, opinions and/or

  20. Strong Cosmic Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, James

    2017-01-01

    The Hawking-Penrose theorems tell us that solutions of Einstein's equations are generally singular, in the sense of the incompleteness of causal geodesics (the paths of physical observers). These singularities might be marked by the blowup of curvature and therefore crushing tidal forces, or by the breakdown of physical determinism. Penrose has conjectured (in his `Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture`) that it is generically unbounded curvature that causes singularities, rather than causal breakdown. The verification that ``AVTD behavior'' (marked by the domination of time derivatives over space derivatives) is generically present in a family of solutions has proven to be a useful tool for studying model versions of Strong Cosmic Censorship in that family. I discuss some of the history of Strong Cosmic Censorship, and then discuss what is known about AVTD behavior and Strong Cosmic Censorship in families of solutions defined by varying degrees of isometry, and discuss recent results which we believe will extend this knowledge and provide new support for Strong Cosmic Censorship. I also comment on some of the recent work on ``Weak Null Singularities'', and how this relates to Strong Cosmic Censorship.

  1. Synchrobetatron resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-03-01

    At the 1975 Particle Accelerator Conference it was reported that a class of resonances were observed in SPEAR II that had not appeared before in SPEAR I. While the existence of sideband resonances of the main betatron oscillation frequencies has been previously observed and analyzed, the resonances observed in SPEAR do not appear to be of the same variety. Experiments were performed at SPEAR to identify the mechanism believed to be the most likely explanation. Some of the current experimental knowledge and theoretical views on the source of these resonances are presented

  2. Snake resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepikian, S.

    1988-01-01

    Siberian Snakes provide a practical means of obtaining polarized proton beams in large accelerators. The effect of snakes can be understood by studying the dynamics of spin precession in an accelerator with snakes and a single spin resonance. This leads to a new class of energy independent spin depolarizing resonances, called snake resonances. In designing a large accelerator with snakes to preserve the spin polarization, there is an added constraint on the choice of the vertical betatron tune due to the snake resonances. 11 refs., 4 figs

  3. Radial Bragg Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuer, Jacob; Sun, Xiankai

    Circular resonators are promising candidates for a wide range of applications, ranging from optical communication systems through basic research involving highly confined fields and strong photon-atom interactions to biochemical and rotation sensing. The main characteristics of circular resonators are the Q factor, the free spectral range (FSR), and the modal volume, where the last two are primarily determined by the resonator radius. The total internal reflection (TIR) mechanism used for guidance in "conventional" resonators couples these attributes and limits the ability to realize compact devices exhibiting large FSR, small modal volume, and high Q. Recently, a new class of annular resonator, based on a single defect surrounded by radial Bragg reflectors, has been proposed and analyzed. The radial Bragg confinement decouples the modal volume from the Q and paves the way for the realization of compact, low-loss resonators. These properties as well as the unique mode profile of these circular Bragg nanoresonators (CBNRs) and nanolasers (CBNLs) make the devices within this class an excellent tool to realize nanometer scale semiconductor lasers and ultrasensitive detectors, as well as to study nonlinear optics.

  4. Performance Characterization of UV Science Cameras Developed for the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champey, Patrick; Kobayashi, Ken; Winebarger, Amy; Cirtin, Jonathan; Hyde, David; Robertson, Bryan; Beabout, Brent; Beabout, Dyana; Stewart, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a science camera suitable for sub-orbital missions for observations in the UV, EUV and soft X-ray. Six cameras will be built and tested for flight with the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP), a joint National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) and MSFC sounding rocket mission. The goal of the CLASP mission is to observe the scattering polarization in Lyman-alpha and to detect the Hanle effect in the line core. Due to the nature of Lyman-alpha polarization in the chromosphere, strict measurement sensitivity requirements are imposed on the CLASP polarimeter and spectrograph systems; science requirements for polarization measurements of Q/I and U/I are 0.1% in the line core. CLASP is a dual-beam spectro-polarimeter, which uses a continuously rotating waveplate as a polarization modulator, while the waveplate motor driver outputs trigger pulses to synchronize the exposures. The CCDs are operated in frame-transfer mode; the trigger pulse initiates the frame transfer, effectively ending the ongoing exposure and starting the next. The strict requirement of 0.1% polarization accuracy is met by using frame-transfer cameras to maximize the duty cycle in order to minimize photon noise. Coating the e2v CCD57-10 512x512 detectors with Lumogen-E coating allows for a relatively high (30%) quantum efficiency at the Lyman-$\\alpha$ line. The CLASP cameras were designed to operate with =10 e- /pixel/second dark current, = 25 e- read noise, a gain of 2.0 and =0.1% residual non-linearity. We present the results of the performance characterization study performed on the CLASP prototype camera; dark current, read noise, camera gain and residual non-linearity.

  5. Quasi-Periodic Fluctuations and Chromospheric Evaporation in a Solar Flare Ribbon Observed by Hinode/EIS, IRIS, and RHESSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Daw, Adrian N.; Inglis, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    The Hinode/Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) obtained rapid cadence (11.2 s) EUV stare spectra of an M7.3 flare ribbon in AR 12036 on 2014 April 18. Quasi-periodic (P approx. = 75.6 +/- 9.2 s) intensity fluctuations occurred in emission lines of O IV, Mg VI, Mg VII, Si VII, Fe XIV, and Fe XVI during the flare's impulsive rise, and ended when the maximum intensity in Fe XXIII was reached. The profiles of the O IV- Fe XVI lines reveal that they were all redshifted during most of the interval of quasi-periodic intensity fluctuations, while the Fe XXIII profile revealed multiple components including one or two highly blueshifted ones. This indicates that the flare underwent explosive chromospheric evaporation during its impulsive rise. Fluctuations in the relative Doppler velocities were seen, but their amplitudes were too subtle to extract significant quasi-periodicities. RHESSI detected 25-100 keV hard-X-ray sources in the ribbon near the EIS slit's pointing position during the peaks in the EIS intensity fluctuations. The observations are consistent with a series of energy injections into the chromosphere by nonthermal particle beams. Electron densities derived with Fe XIV (4.6 x 10(exp 10) per cu cm) and Mg VII (7.8 x 10(exp 9) per cu cm) average line intensity ratios during the interval of quasi-periodic intensity fluctuations, combined with the radiative loss function of an optically thin plasma, yield radiative cooling times of 32 s at 2.0 x 10(exp 6) K, and 46 s at 6.3 x 10(exp 5) K (about half the quasi-period); assuming Fe XIV's density for Fe XXIII yields a radiative cooling time of 10(exp 3) s (13 times the quasi-period) at 1.4 x 10(exp 7) K.

  6. Photothermal resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for detecting photo-thermal absorbance of a material utilising a mechanically temperature sensitive resonator (20) and a sample being arrange in thermal communication with the temperature sensitive resonator. The present invention further relates...

  7. Strong Arcwise Connectedness

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza, Benjamin; Gartside, Paul; Kovan-Bakan, Merve; Mamatelashvili, Ana

    2012-01-01

    A space is `n-strong arc connected' (n-sac) if for any n points in the space there is an arc in the space visiting them in order. A space is omega-strong arc connected (omega-sac) if it is n-sac for all n. We study these properties in finite graphs, regular continua, and rational continua. There are no 4-sac graphs, but there are 3-sac graphs and graphs which are 2-sac but not 3-sac. For every n there is an n-sac regular continuum, but no regular continuum is omega-sac. There is an omega-sac ...

  8. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally......'s scenarios have some valuable future or admitted that killing them is not seriously morally wrong. Finally, if "valuable future" is interpreted as referring to objective standards, one ends up with implausible and unpalatable moral claims....

  9. Nonlinear resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, Shanmuganathan

    2016-01-01

    This introductory text presents the basic aspects and most important features of various types of resonances and anti-resonances in dynamical systems. In particular, for each resonance, it covers the theoretical concepts, illustrates them with case studies, and reviews the available information on mechanisms, characterization, numerical simulations, experimental realizations, possible quantum analogues, applications and significant advances made over the years. Resonances are one of the most fundamental phenomena exhibited by nonlinear systems and refer to specific realizations of maximum response of a system due to the ability of that system to store and transfer energy received from an external forcing source. Resonances are of particular importance in physical, engineering and biological systems - they can prove to be advantageous in many applications, while leading to instability and even disasters in others. The book is self-contained, providing the details of mathematical derivations and techniques invo...

  10. Response of MDOF strongly nonlinear systems to fractional Gaussian noises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Mao-Lin; Zhu, Wei-Qiu, E-mail: wqzhu@zju.edu.cn [Department of Mechanics, State Key Laboratory of Fluid Power and Mechatronic Systems, Key Laboratory of Soft Machines and Smart Devices of Zhejiang Province, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2016-08-15

    In the present paper, multi-degree-of-freedom strongly nonlinear systems are modeled as quasi-Hamiltonian systems and the stochastic averaging method for quasi-Hamiltonian systems (including quasi-non-integrable, completely integrable and non-resonant, completely integrable and resonant, partially integrable and non-resonant, and partially integrable and resonant Hamiltonian systems) driven by fractional Gaussian noise is introduced. The averaged fractional stochastic differential equations (SDEs) are derived. The simulation results for some examples show that the averaged SDEs can be used to predict the response of the original systems and the simulation time for the averaged SDEs is less than that for the original systems.

  11. A strong comeback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marier, D.

    1992-01-01

    This article presents the results of a financial rankings survey which show a strong economic activity in the independent energy industry. The topics of the article include advisor turnover, overseas banks, and the increase in public offerings. The article identifies the top project finance investors for new projects and restructurings and rankings for lenders

  12. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Models of spontaneous breaking of electroweak symmetry by a strong interaction do not have fine tuning/hierarchy problem. They are conceptually elegant and use the only mechanism of spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry that is known to occur in nature. The simplest model, minimal technicolor with extended technicolor interactions, is appealing because one can calculate by scaling up from QCD. But it is ruled out on many counts: inappropriately low quark and lepton masses (or excessive FCNC), bad electroweak data fits, light scalar and vector states, etc. However, nature may not choose the minimal model and then we are stuck: except possibly through lattice simulations, we are unable to compute and test the models. In the LHC era it therefore makes sense to abandon specific models (of strong EW breaking) and concentrate on generic features that may indicate discovery. The Technicolor Straw Man is not a model but a parametrized search strategy inspired by a remarkable generic feature of walking technicolor,...

  13. Plasmons in strong superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldo, M.; Ducoin, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the possible plasmon excitations that can occur in systems where strong superconductivity is present. In these systems the plasmon energy is comparable to or smaller than the pairing gap. As a prototype of these systems we consider the proton component of Neutron Star matter just below the crust when electron screening is not taken into account. For the realistic case we consider in detail the different aspects of the elementary excitations when the proton, electron components are considered within the Random-Phase Approximation generalized to the superfluid case, while the influence of the neutron component is considered only at qualitative level. Electron screening plays a major role in modifying the proton spectrum and spectral function. At the same time the electron plasmon is strongly modified and damped by the indirect coupling with the superfluid proton component, even at moderately low values of the gap. The excitation spectrum shows the interplay of the different components and their relevance for each excitation modes. The results are relevant for neutrino physics and thermodynamical processes in neutron stars. If electron screening is neglected, the spectral properties of the proton component show some resemblance with the physical situation in high-T c superconductors, and we briefly discuss similarities and differences in this connection. In a general prospect, the results of the study emphasize the role of Coulomb interaction in strong superconductors.

  14. Strong-coupling approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, R.B.

    1984-03-01

    Standard path-integral techniques such as instanton calculations give good answers for weak-coupling problems, but become unreliable for strong-coupling. Here we consider a method of replacing the original potential by a suitably chosen harmonic oscillator potential. Physically this is motivated by the fact that potential barriers below the level of the ground-state energy of a quantum-mechanical system have little effect. Numerically, results are good, both for quantum-mechanical problems and for massive phi 4 field theory in 1 + 1 dimensions. 9 references, 6 figures

  15. Strong interaction and QFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, T.

    1981-01-01

    With an assumed weak multiplet structure for bosonic hadrons, which is consistent with the ΔI = 1/2 rule, it is shown that the strong interaction effective hamiltonian is compatible with the weak SU(2) x U(1) gauge transformation. Especially the rho-meson transforms as a triplet under SU(2)sub(w), and this is the origin of the rho-photon analogy. It is also shown that the existence of the non-vanishing Cabibbo angle is a necessary condition for the absence of the exotic hadrons. (orig.)

  16. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED BEAMS USING MULTIPLE STRONG PARTIAL SIBERIAN SNAKES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ROSER, T.; AHRENS, L.; BAI, M.

    2004-01-01

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult since depolarizing spin resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions. Using a 20-30% partial Siberian snake both imperfection and intrinsic resonances can be overcome. Such a strong partial Siberian snake was designed for the Brookhaven AGS using a dual pitch helical superconducting dipole. Multiple strong partial snakes are also discussed for spin matching at beam injection and extraction

  17. Strong Coupling Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2009-01-01

    We show that whenever a 4-dimensional theory with N particle species emerges as a consistent low energy description of a 3-brane embedded in an asymptotically-flat (4+d)-dimensional space, the holographic scale of high-dimensional gravity sets the strong coupling scale of the 4D theory. This connection persists in the limit in which gravity can be consistently decoupled. We demonstrate this effect for orbifold planes, as well as for the solitonic branes and string theoretic D-branes. In all cases the emergence of a 4D strong coupling scale from bulk holography is a persistent phenomenon. The effect turns out to be insensitive even to such extreme deformations of the brane action that seemingly shield 4D theory from the bulk gravity effects. A well understood example of such deformation is given by large 4D Einstein term in the 3-brane action, which is known to suppress the strength of 5D gravity at short distances and change the 5D Newton's law into the four-dimensional one. Nevertheless, we observe that the ...

  18. A strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuryak, Edward [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University at Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2004-08-01

    Successful description of robust collective flow phenomena at RHIC by ideal hydrodynamics, recent observations of bound c-barc,q-barq states on the lattice, and other theoretical developments indicate that QGP produced at RHIC, and probably in a wider temperature region T{sub c} < T < 4T{sub c}, is not a weakly coupled quasiparticle gas as believed previously. We discuss how strong the interaction is and why it seems to generate hundreds of binary channels with bound states, surviving well inside the QGP phase. We in particular discuss their effect on pressure and viscosity. We conclude by reviewing the similar phenomena for other 'strongly coupled systems', such as (i) strongly coupled supersymmetric theories studied via Maldacena duality; (ii) trapped ultra-cold atoms with very large scattering length, tuned to Feschbach resonances.

  19. QUASI-PERIODIC FLUCTUATIONS AND CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN A SOLAR FLARE RIBBON OBSERVED BY HINODE /EIS, IRIS , AND RHESSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Inglis, Andrew R. [Catholic University of America at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Laboratory, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Daw, Adrian N., E-mail: Jeffrey.W.Brosius@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Laboratory, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-10-20

    The Hinode /Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) obtained rapid cadence (11.2 s) EUV stare spectra of an M7.3 flare ribbon in AR 12036 on 2014 April 18. Quasi-periodic ( P ≈ 75.6 ± 9.2 s) intensity fluctuations occurred in emission lines of O iv, Mg vi, Mg vii, Si vii, Fe xiv, and Fe xvi during the flare's impulsive rise, and ended when the maximum intensity in Fe xxiii was reached. The profiles of the O iv–Fe xvi lines reveal that they were all redshifted during most of the interval of quasi-periodic intensity fluctuations, while the Fe xxiii profile revealed multiple components including one or two highly blueshifted ones. This indicates that the flare underwent explosive chromospheric evaporation during its impulsive rise. Fluctuations in the relative Doppler velocities were seen, but their amplitudes were too subtle to extract significant quasi-periodicities. RHESSI detected 25–100 keV hard-X-ray sources in the ribbon near the EIS slit's pointing position during the peaks in the EIS intensity fluctuations. The observations are consistent with a series of energy injections into the chromosphere by nonthermal particle beams. Electron densities derived with Fe xiv (4.6 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}) and Mg vii (7.8 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −3}) average line intensity ratios during the interval of quasi-periodic intensity fluctuations, combined with the radiative loss function of an optically thin plasma, yield radiative cooling times of 32 s at 2.0 × 10{sup 6} K, and 46 s at 6.3 × 10{sup 5} K (about half the quasi-period); assuming Fe xiv's density for Fe xxiii yields a radiative cooling time of 10{sup 3} s (13 times the quasi-period) at 1.4 × 10{sup 7} K.

  20. LIGO: The strong belief

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years of designing, building and testing a number of innovative technologies, with the strong belief that the endeavour would lead to a historic breakthrough. The Bulletin publishes an abstract of the Courier’s interview with Barry Barish, one of the founding fathers of LIGO.   The plots show the signals of gravitational waves detected by the twin LIGO observatories at Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington. (Image: Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab) On 11 February, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo collaborations published a historic paper in which they showed a gravitational signal emitted by the merger of two black holes. These results come after 20 years of hard work by a large collaboration of scientists operating the two LIGO observatories in the US. Barry Barish, Linde Professor of Physics, Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology and former Director of the Global Design Effort for the Internat...

  1. Multiquark Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, A.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties has been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  2. Resonant Tunneling and Hot Electron Spectroscopy in Buried Rare-Earth Arsenide/Semiconductor Heterostructures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allen, S

    1997-01-01

    .... Resonant tunneling through semi-metal quantum wells was observed for the first time. A strong coupling of the magnetization and the resonant tunneling was discovered that demonstrates magnetization controlled resonant tunneling...

  3. Neuroaesthetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2013-01-01

    tailored channeling of sensory stimulus aligned as ‘art-making’ and ‘game playing’ core experiences. Thus, affecting brain plasticity and human motoric-performance via the adaptability (plasticity) of digital medias result in closure of the human afferent-efferent neural feedback loop closure through...... the unencumbered motion-to-computer-generated activities - ‘Music Making’, ‘Painting’, ‘Robotic’ and ‘Video Game’ control. A focus of this position paper is to highlight how Aesthetic Resonance, in this context, relates to the growing body of research on Neuroaesthetics to evolve Neuroaesthetic Resonance....

  4. John Strong (1941 - 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    Wickens, F

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on Monday 31st July, a few days before his 65th birthday John started his career working with a group from Westfield College, under the leadership of Ted Bellamy. He obtained his PhD and spent the early part of his career on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), but after the early 1970s his research was focussed on experiments in CERN. Over the years he made a number of notable contributions to experiments in CERN: The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras to record the sparks in the spark chambers; He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems; He was responsible for the second level trigger system for the ALEPH detector and spent five years leading a team that designed and built the system, which ran for twelve years with only minor interventions. Following ALEPH he tur...

  5. Stirring Strongly Coupled Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir; Rajagopal, Krishna; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2009-01-01

    We determine the energy it takes to move a test quark along a circle of radius L with angular frequency w through the strongly coupled plasma of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory. We find that for most values of L and w the energy deposited by stirring the plasma in this way is governed either by the drag force acting on a test quark moving through the plasma in a straight line with speed v=Lw or by the energy radiated by a quark in circular motion in the absence of any plasma, whichever is larger. There is a continuous crossover from the drag-dominated regime to the radiation-dominated regime. In the crossover regime we find evidence for significant destructive interference between energy loss due to drag and that due to radiation as if in vacuum. The rotating quark thus serves as a model system in which the relative strength of, and interplay between, two different mechanisms of parton energy loss is accessible via a controlled classical gravity calculation. We close by speculating on the implicati...

  6. Strong-interaction nonuniversality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkas, R.R.; Foot, R.; He, X.; Joshi, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    The universal QCD color theory is extended to an SU(3) 1 direct product SU(3) 2 direct product SU(3) 3 gauge theory, where quarks of the ith generation transform as triplets under SU(3)/sub i/ and singlets under the other two factors. The usual color group is then identified with the diagonal subgroup, which remains exact after symmetry breaking. The gauge bosons associated with the 16 broken generators then form two massive octets under ordinary color. The interactions between quarks and these heavy gluonlike particles are explicitly nonuniversal and thus an exploration of their physical implications allows us to shed light on the fundamental issue of strong-interaction universality. Nonuniversality and weak flavor mixing are shown to generate heavy-gluon-induced flavor-changing neutral currents. The phenomenology of these processes is studied, as they provide the major experimental constraint on the extended theory. Three symmetry-breaking scenarios are presented. The first has color breaking occurring at the weak scale, while the second and third divorce the two scales. The third model has the interesting feature of radiatively induced off-diagonal Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements

  7. Retrospective Conversion of Solar Data Printed in "Synoptic Maps of the Solar Chromosphere": A Scientific and Librarianship Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenceau, A.; Aboudarham, J.; Renié, C.

    2015-04-01

    Between 1928 and 2003, the Observatoire de Paris published solar activity maps and their corresponding data tables, first in the Annals of the Meudon Observatory, then in the Synoptic Maps of the Solar Chromosphere. These maps represent the main solar structures in a single view and spread out on a complete Carrington rotation as well as tables of associated data, containing various information on these structures such as positions, length, morphological characteristics, and behavior. Since 2003, these maps and data tables have not been released in print, as they are only published on the online BASS2000 database, the solar database maintained by LESIA (Laboratory for space studies and astrophysical instruments). In order to make the first 80 years of observations which were available only in paper accessible and usable, the LESIA and the Library of the Observatory have started a project to digitize the publications, enter the data with the assistance of a specialized company, and then migrate the files obtained in BASS2000 and in the Heliophysics Features Catalog created in the framework of the European project HELIO.

  8. Whispering Gallery Mode Optomechanical Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveline, David C.; Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nan; Yee, Karl Y.

    2012-01-01

    Great progress has been made in both micromechanical resonators and micro-optical resonators over the past decade, and a new field has recently emerged combining these mechanical and optical systems. In such optomechanical systems, the two resonators are strongly coupled with one influencing the other, and their interaction can yield detectable optical signals that are highly sensitive to the mechanical motion. A particularly high-Q optical system is the whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator, which has many applications ranging from stable oscillators to inertial sensor devices. There is, however, limited coupling between the optical mode and the resonator s external environment. In order to overcome this limitation, a novel type of optomechanical sensor has been developed, offering great potential for measurements of displacement, acceleration, and mass sensitivity. The proposed hybrid device combines the advantages of all-solid optical WGM resonators with high-quality micro-machined cantilevers. For direct access to the WGM inside the resonator, the idea is to radially cut precise gaps into the perimeter, fabricating a mechanical resonator within the WGM. Also, a strategy to reduce losses has been developed with optimized design of the cantilever geometry and positions of gap surfaces.

  9. 817 RESONANCE September 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    817. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 2. 818. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 3. 819. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 4. 820. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 5. 821. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 6. 822. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 7. 823. RESONANCE ⎜ September ...

  10. 996 RESONANCE November 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    996. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 2. 997. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 3. 998. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 4. 999. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 5. 1000. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 6. 1001. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 7. 1002. RESONANCE. November 2013 ...

  11. 369 RESONANCE April 2016

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    369. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 2. 370. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 3. 371. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 4. 372. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 5. 373. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 6. 374. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 7. 375. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016.

  12. Resonating Statements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelholt, Morten; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2015-01-01

    IT projects are often complex arrangements of technological components, social actions, and organizational transformation that are difficult to manage in practice. This paper takes an analytical discourse perspective to explore the process of legitimizing IT projects. We introduce the concept of ...... as part of a feedback loop to re-attach the localized IT project to the broader national discourse. The paper concludes with reflections on how to actively build on resonating statements as a strategic resource for legitimizing IT projects...... of resonating statements to highlight how central actors navigate in various discourses over time. Particularly, the statements and actions of an IT project manager are portrayed to show how individuals can legitimize actions by connecting statements to historically produced discourses. The case study...... of an IT project in a Danish local government spans a two-year time period and demonstrates a double-loop legitimization process. First, resonating statements are produced to localize a national IT initiative to support the specificity of a local government discourse. Second, the resonating statements are used...

  13. Autostereogram resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, Sean; Rae, Katherine; Murray, Adam; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Autostereograms, or "Magic Eye" pictures, are repeating patterns designed to give the illusion of depth. Here we discuss optical resonators that create light patterns which, when viewed from a suitable position by a monocular observer, are autostereograms of the three-dimensional shape of one of the mirror surfaces.

  14. Strong signatures of right-handed compositeness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redi, Michele [INFN, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Sanz, Veronica [York Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Sussex Univ., Brighton (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Vries, Maikel de; Weiler, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Right-handed light quarks could be significantly composite, yet compatible with experimental searches at the LHC and precision tests on Standard Model couplings. In these scenarios, that are motivated by flavor physics, one expects large cross sections for the production of new resonances coupled to light quarks. We study experimental strong signatures of right-handed compositeness at the LHC, and constrain the parameter space of these models with recent results by ATLAS and CMS. We show that the LHC sensitivity could be significantly improved if dedicated searches were performed, in particular in multi-jet signals.

  15. Strange decays from strange resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bijker, R. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Leviatan, A. [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2001-07-01

    We discuss the mass spectrum and strong decays of baryon resonances belonging to the N, {delta}, {sigma}, {lambda}, {xi} and {omega} families in a collective string- like model for the nucleon. We find good overall agreement with the available data. Systematic discrepancies are found for low-lying S-wave states, in particular in the strong decays of N(1535), N(1650), {sigma}(1750), {lambda}{sup *}(1405), {lambda}(1670) and {lambda}(1800). (Author)

  16. Strange decays from strange resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijker, R.; Leviatan, A.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the mass spectrum and strong decays of baryon resonances belonging to the N, Δ, Σ, Λ, Ξ and Ω families in a collective string- like model for the nucleon. We find good overall agreement with the available data. Systematic discrepancies are found for low-lying S-wave states, in particular in the strong decays of N(1535), N(1650), Σ(1750), Λ * (1405), Λ(1670) and Λ(1800). (Author)

  17. Strong gauge boson scattering at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Rindani, S.D.

    2009-01-01

    In the standard model with electroweak symmetry breaking through the Higgs mechanism, electroweak gauge-boson scattering amplitudes are large if the Higgs boson is heavy, and electroweak gauge interactions become strong. In theories with electroweak symmetry breaking through alternative mechanisms, there could be a strongly interacting gauge sector, possibly with resonances in an accessible energy region. In general, the scattering of longitudinally polarized massive gauge bosons can give information on the mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking. At energies below the symmetry breaking scale, the equivalence theorem relates the scattering amplitudes to those of the "would-be" Goldstone modes. In the absence of Higgs bosons, unitarity would be restored by some new physics which can be studied through WW scattering. Some representatives models are discussed. Isolating WW scattering at a hadron collider from other contributions involving W emission from parton lines needs a good understanding of the backgrou...

  18. Strong spin-photon coupling in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkharadze, N; Zheng, G; Kalhor, N; Brousse, D; Sammak, A; Mendes, U C; Blais, A; Scappucci, G; Vandersypen, L M K

    2018-03-09

    Long coherence times of single spins in silicon quantum dots make these systems highly attractive for quantum computation, but how to scale up spin qubit systems remains an open question. As a first step to address this issue, we demonstrate the strong coupling of a single electron spin and a single microwave photon. The electron spin is trapped in a silicon double quantum dot, and the microwave photon is stored in an on-chip high-impedance superconducting resonator. The electric field component of the cavity photon couples directly to the charge dipole of the electron in the double dot, and indirectly to the electron spin, through a strong local magnetic field gradient from a nearby micromagnet. Our results provide a route to realizing large networks of quantum dot-based spin qubit registers. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  19. Neuroaesthetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Neuroaesthetic Resonance emerged from a mature body of patient- centered gesture-control research investigating non-formal rehabilitation via ICT-enhanced-Art to question ‘Aesthetic Resonance’. Motivating participation, ludic engagement, and augmenting physical motion in non-formal (fun) treatment sessions are achieved via adaptive action-analyzed activities. These interactive virtual environments are designed to empower patients’ creative and/or playful expressions via digital feedback stimu...

  20. Tuning Fano Resonances with Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emani, Naresh K.; Chung, Ting-Fung; Prokopeva, Ludmila

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate strong electrical control of plasmonic Fano resonances in dolmen structures using tunable interband transitions in graphene. Such graphene-plasmonic hybrid devices can have applications in light modulation and sensing. OCIS codes: (250.5403) Plasmonics; (160.4670) Optical materials...

  1. ENZYME CATALYTIC RESONANCE SCATTERING SPECTRAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    ABSTRACT. Hydrogen peroxide oxidized guaiacol to form tetramer particles that exhibited a strong resonance scattering (RS) peak at 530 nm in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in citric acid-Na2HPO4 buffer solution of pH 4.4. The RS peak increased when the concentration of hydrogen peroxide increased.

  2. Algebraic model of baryon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijker, R.; Leviatan, A.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss recent calculations of electromagnetic form factors and strong decay widths of nucleon and delta resonances. The calculations are done in a collective constituent model of the nucleon, in which the baryons are interpreted as rotations and vibrations of an oblate top

  3. Linearity Analysis and Efficiency Testing of The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) Science Cameras for Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S. C.; Rachmeler, L.; Winebarger, A. R.; Champey, P. R.; Bethge, C.

    2017-12-01

    To unveil the complexity of the solar atmosphere, measurement of the magnetic field in the upper chromosphere and transition region is fundamentally important, as this is where the forces transition from plasma to magnetic field dominated. Measurements of the field are also needed to shed light on the energy transport from the lower atmospheric regions to the corona beyond. Such an advance in heliospheric knowledge became possible with the first flight of the international solar sounding rocket mission, CLASP. For the first time, linear polarization was measured in H Lyman-Alpha at 121.60 nm in September 2015. For linear polarization measurements in this line, high sensitivity is required due to the relatively weak polarization signal compared to the intensity. To achieve this high sensitivity, a low-noise sensor is required with good knowledge of its characterization, including linearity. This work presents further refinement of the linearity characterization of the cameras flown in 2015. We compared the current from a photodiode in the light path to the digital response of the detectors. Pre-flight CCD linearity measurements were taken for all three flight cameras and calculations of the linear fits and residuals were performed. However, the previous calculations included a smearing pattern and a digital saturation region on the detectors which were not properly taken into account. The calculations have been adjusted and were repeated for manually chosen sub-regions on the detectors that were found not to be affected. We present a brief overview of the instrument, the calibration data and procedures, and a comparison of the old and new linearity results. The CLASP cameras will be reused for the successor mission, CLASP2, which will measure the Mg II h & k lines between 279.45 nm and 280.35 nm. The new approach will help to better prepare for and to improve the camera characterization for CLASP2.

  4. CHROMOSPHERE TO 1 au SIMULATION OF THE 2011 MARCH 7th EVENT: A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF CORONAL MASS EJECTION PROPAGATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Manchester, W. B.; Holst, B. van der; Sokolov, I.; Tóth, G.; Gombosi, T. I. [Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Vourlidas, A. [The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Koning, C. A. de, E-mail: jinmeng@lmsal.com, E-mail: chipm@umich.edu, E-mail: angelos.vourlidas@jhuapl.edu, E-mail: curt.a.dekoning@noaa.gov [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    We perform and analyze the results of a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the fast coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2011 March 7. The simulation is made using the newly developed Alfvén Wave Solar Model (AWSoM), which describes the background solar wind starting from the upper chromosphere and extends to 24 R {sub ⊙}. Coupling AWSoM to an inner heliosphere model with the Space Weather Modeling Framework extends the total domain beyond the orbit of Earth. Physical processes included in the model are multi-species thermodynamics, electron heat conduction (both collisional and collisionless formulations), optically thin radiative cooling, and Alfvén-wave turbulence that accelerates and heats the solar wind. The Alfvén-wave description is physically self-consistent, including non-Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin reflection and physics-based apportioning of turbulent dissipative heating to both electrons and protons. Within this model, we initiate the CME by using the Gibson-Low analytical flux rope model and follow its evolution for days, in which time it propagates beyond STEREO A . A detailed comparison study is performed using remote as well as in situ observations. Although the flux rope structure is not compared directly due to lack of relevant ejecta observation at 1 au in this event, our results show that the new model can reproduce many of the observed features near the Sun (e.g., CME-driven extreme ultraviolet [EUV] waves, deflection of the flux rope from the coronal hole, “double-front” in the white light images) and in the heliosphere (e.g., shock propagation direction, shock properties at STEREO A ).

  5. Linearity Analysis and Efficiency Testing of The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) Science Cameras for Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Salma C.; Rachmeler, Laurel; Winebarger, Amy; Champey, Patrick; Bethge, Christian

    2018-01-01

    To unveil the complexity of the solar atmosphere, measurement of the magnetic field in the upper chromosphere and transition region is fundamentally important, as this is where the forces transition from plasma to magnetic field dominated. Measurements of the field are also needed to elucidate the energy transport from the lower atmospheric regions to the corona beyond. Such an advance in heliospheric knowledge became possible with the first flight of the international solar sounding rocket mission, CLASP. For the first time, linear polarization was measured in Hydrogen Lyman-Alpha at 121.60 nm in September 2015. For linear polarization measurements in this emission line, high sensitivity is required due to the relatively weak polarization signal compared to the intensity. To achieve this high sensitivity, a low-noise sensor is required with good knowledge of its characterization, including linearity. This work presents further refinement of the linearity characterization of the cameras flown in 2015. We compared the current from a photodiode in the light path to the digital response of the detectors. Pre-flight CCD linearity measurements were taken for all three flight cameras and calculations of the linear fits and residuals were performed. However, the previous calculations included a smearing pattern and a digital saturation region on the detectors which were not properly taken into account. The calculations have been adjusted and were repeated for manually chosen sub-regions on the detectors that were found not to be affected. We present a brief overview of the instrument, the calibration data and procedures, and a comparison of the old and new linearity results. The CLASP cameras will be reused for the successor mission, CLASP2, which will measure the Magnesium II h & k emission lines between 279.45 nm and 280.35 nm. The new approach will help to better prepare for and to improve the camera characterization for CLASP2.

  6. General resonance mediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarrie, Moritz

    2012-07-01

    We extend the framework of general gauge mediation to cases where the mediating fields have a nontrivial spectral function, as might arise from strong dynamics. We demonstrate through examples that this setup describes a broad class of possible models of gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking. A main emphasis is to give general formulas for cross sections for σ(visible → hidden) in these resonance models. We will also give formulas for soft masses, A-terms and demonstrate the framework with a holographic setup.

  7. 1004 RESONANCE November 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    1004. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 2. 1005. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 3. 1006. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 4. 1007. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 5. 1008. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 6. 1009. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 7. 1010. RESONANCE ...

  8. Even order snake resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    We found that the perturbed spin tune due to the imperfection resonance plays an important role in beam depolarization at snake resonances. We also found that even order snake resonances exist in the overlapping intrinsic and imperfection resonances. Due to the perturbed spin tune shift of imperfection resonances, each snake resonance splits into two

  9. Optofluidic ring resonator dye lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuze; Suter, Jonathan D.; Fan, Xudong

    2010-02-01

    We overview the recent progress on optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) dye lasers developed in our research group. The fluidics and laser cavity design can be divided into three categories: capillary optofluidic ring resonator (COFRR), integrated cylindrical optofluidic ring resonator (ICOFRR), and coupled optofluidic ring resonator (CpOFRR). The COFRR dye laser is based on a micro-sized glass capillary with a wall thickness of a few micrometers. The capillary circular cross-section forms the ring resonator and supports the whispering gallery modes (WGMs) that interact evanescently with the gain medium in the core. The laser cavity structure is versatile to adapt to the gain medium of any refractive index. Owing to the high Q-factor (>109), the lasing threshold of 25 nJ/mm2 is achieved. Besides directly pump the dye molecules, lasing through fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the donor and acceptor dye molecules is also studied in COFRR laser. The energy transfer process can be further controlled by designed DNA scaffold labeled with donor/acceptor molecules. The ICOFRR dye laser is based on a cylindrical ring resonator fused onto the inner surface of a thick walled glass capillary. The structure has robust mechanical strength to sustain rapid gain medium circulation. The CpOFRR utilizes a cylindrical ring resonator fused on the inner surface of the COFRR capillary. Since the capillary wall is thin, the individual WGMs of the cylindrical ring resonator and the COFRR couples strongly and forms Vernier effect, which provides a way to generate a single mode dye laser.

  10. Neutron resonance theory for safety applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1998-01-01

    Neutron resonances exert a strong influence on the behaviour of nuclear reactors, especially on their response to the temperature changes accompanying power excursions, and also on the efficiency of shielding materials. The relevant theory of neutron resonance cross sections is reviewed, both for the resolved and the unresolved resonance region, with special emphasis on the technologically important approximations. Numerical techniques for Doppler broadening of resonances are presented, and the construction of group cross sections and self-shielding factors for neutronics calculations is outlined. (author)

  11. Waves in Strong Centrifugal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    Dynamics of waves generated by scopes in gas centrifuges (GC) for isotope separation is considered. The centrifugal acceleration in the GC reaches values of the order of 106g. The centrifugal and Coriolis forces modify essentially the conventional sound waves. Three families of the waves with different polarization and dispersion exist in these conditions. Dynamics of the flow in the model GC Iguasu is investigated numerically. Comparison of the results of the numerical modeling of the wave dynamics with the analytical predictions is performed. New phenomena of the resonances in the GC is found. The resonances occur for the waves polarized along the rotational axis having the smallest dumping due to the viscosity.

  12. Solar spectral irradiance variability of some chromospheric emission lines through the solar activity cycles 21-23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göker Ü.D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of variations of solar spectral irradiance (SSI in the wave-length ranges 121.5 nm-300.5 nm for the period 1981-2009 is presented. We used various data for ultraviolet (UV spectral lines and international sunspot number (ISSN from interactive data centers such as SME (NSSDC, UARS (GDAAC, SORCE (LISIRD and SIDC, respectively. We reduced these data by using the MATLsoftware package. In this respect, we revealed negative correlations of intensities of UV (289.5 nm-300.5 nm spectral lines originating in the solar chromosphere with the ISSN index during the unusually prolonged minimum between the solar activity cycles (SACs 23 and 24. We also compared our results with the variations of solar activity indices obtained by the ground-based telescopes. Therefore, we found that plage regions decrease while facular areas are increasing in SAC 23. However, the decrease in plage regions is seen in small sunspot groups (SGs, contrary to this, these regions in large SGs are comparable to previous SACs or even larger as is also seen in facular areas. Nevertheless, negative correlations between ISSN and SSI data indicate that these variations are in close connection with the classes of sunspots/SGs, faculae and plage regions. Finally, we applied the time series analysis of spectral lines corresponding to the wavelengths 121.5 nm-300.5 nm and made comparisons with the ISSN data. We found an unexpected increase in the 298.5 nm line for the Fe II ion. The variability of Fe II ion 298.5 nm line is in close connection with the facular areas and plage regions, and the sizes of these solar surface indices play an important role for the SSI variability, as well. So, we compared the connection between the sizes of faculae and plage regions, sunspots/SGs, chemical elements and SSI variability. Our future work will be the theoretical study of this connection and developing of a corresponding model.

  13. Nonlinear Effects in Three-minute Oscillations of the Solar Chromosphere. I. An Analytical Nonlinear Solution and Detection of the Second Harmonic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Jongchul [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Litvinenko, Yuri E. [Department of Mathematics, University of Waikato, P. B. 3105, Hamilton 3240 (New Zealand)

    2017-08-01

    The vertical propagation of nonlinear acoustic waves in an isothermal atmosphere is considered. A new analytical solution that describes a finite-amplitude wave of an arbitrary wavelength is obtained. Although the short- and long-wavelength limits were previously considered separately, the new solution describes both limiting cases within a common framework and provides a straightforward way of interpolating between the two limits. Physical features of the nonlinear waves in the chromosphere are described, including the dispersive nature of low-frequency waves, the steepening of the wave profile, and the influence of the gravitational field on wavefront breaking and shock formation. The analytical results suggest that observations of three-minute oscillations in the solar chromosphere may reveal the basic nonlinear effect of oscillations with combination frequencies, superposed on the normal oscillations of the system. Explicit expressions for a second-harmonic signal and the ratio of its amplitude to the fundamental harmonic amplitude are derived. Observational evidence of the second harmonic, obtained with the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph, installed at the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope of the Big Bear Observatory, is presented. The presented data are based on the time variations of velocity determined from the Na i D{sub 2} and H α lines.

  14. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere I. Continuous Emission and Condensed Matter Within the Chromosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The continuous spectrum of the solar photosphere stands as the paramount observation with regard to the condensed nature of the solar body. Studies relative to Kirchhoff’s law of thermal emission (e.g. Robitaille P.-M. Kirchhoff’s law of thermal emission: 150 years. Progr. Phys., 2009, v. 4, 3–13. and a detailed analysis of the stellar opacity problem (Robitaille P.M. Stellar opacity: The Achilles’ heel of the gaseous Sun. Progr. Phys., 2011, v. 3, 93–99 have revealed that gaseous models remain unable to properly account for the generation of this spectrum. Therefore, it can be stated with certainty that the photosphere is comprised of condensed matter. Beyond the solar surface, the chromospheric layer of the Sun also generates a weak continuous spectrum in the visible region. This emission exposes the presence of material in the condensed state. As a result, above the level of the photosphere, matter exists in both gaseous and condensed forms, much like within the atmosphere of the Earth. The continuous visible spectrum associated with the chromosphere provides the twenty-sixth line of evidence that the Sun is condensed matter.

  15. Fano resonances from gradient-index metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yadong; Li, Sucheng; Hou, Bo; Chen, Huanyang

    2016-01-27

    Fano resonances - resonant scattering features with a characteristic asymmetric profile - have generated much interest, due to their extensive and valuable applications in chemical or biological sensors, new types of optical switches, lasers and nonlinear optics. They have been observed in a wide variety of resonant optical systems, including photonic crystals, metamaterials, metallic gratings and nanostructures. In this work, a waveguide structure is designed by employing gradient-index metamaterials, supporting strong Fano resonances with extremely sharp spectra. As the changes in the transmission spectrum originate from the interaction of guided modes from different channels, instead of resonance structures or metamolecules, the Fano resonances can be observed for both transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations. These findings are verified by fine agreement with analytical calculations and experimental results at microwave, as well as simulated results at near infrared frequencies.

  16. Applied neutron resonance theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1978-07-01

    Utilisation of resonance theory in basic and applications-oriented neutron cross section work is reviewed. The technically important resonance formalisms, principal concepts and methods as well as representative computer programs for resonance parameter extraction from measured data, evaluation of resonance data, calculation of Doppler-broadened cross sections and estimation of level-statistical quantities from resonance parameters are described. (orig.) [de

  17. Quantum electrodynamics of strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, W.

    1983-01-01

    Quantum Electrodynamics of Strong Fields provides a broad survey of the theoretical and experimental work accomplished, presenting papers by a group of international researchers who have made significant contributions to this developing area. Exploring the quantum theory of strong fields, the volume focuses on the phase transition to a charged vacuum in strong electric fields. The contributors also discuss such related topics as QED at short distances, precision tests of QED, nonperturbative QCD and confinement, pion condensation, and strong gravitational fields In addition, the volume features a historical paper on the roots of quantum field theory in the history of quantum physics by noted researcher Friedrich Hund

  18. Nonlinear Resonant Oscillations of Gas in Optimized Acoustical Resonators and the Effect of Central Blockage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Fan; Finkbeiner, Joshua; Raman, Ganesh; Daniels, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2003-01-01

    Optimizing resonator shapes for maximizing the ratio of maximum to minimum gas pressure at an end of the resonator is investigated numerically. It is well known that the resonant frequencies and the nonlinear standing waveform in an acoustical resonator strongly depend on the resonator geometry. A quasi-Newton type scheme was used to find optimized axisymmetric resonator shapes achieving the maximum pressure compression ratio with an acceleration of constant amplitude. The acoustical field was solved using a one-dimensional model, and the resonance frequency shift and hysteresis effects were obtained through an automation scheme based on continuation method. Results are presented for optimizing three types of geometry: a cone, a horn-cone and a half cosine- shape. For each type, different optimized shapes were found when starting with different initial guesses. Further, the one-dimensional model was modified to study the effect of an axisymmetric central blockage on the nonlinear standing wave.

  19. Humanitarian mine detection by acoustic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-03-01

    The JASON Committee at MITRE Corp. was tasked by DARPA to inquire into suitable technologies for humanitarian mine detection. Acoustic resonance was one of the very few technologies that the JASONs determined might be promising for the task, but was as yet unexplored at the time that they conducted their inquiry. The objective of this Seed Money investigation into acoustic resonance was to determine if it would be feasible to use acoustic resonance to provide an improvement to present methods for humanitarian mine detection. As detailed in this report, acoustic resonance methods do not appear to be feasible for this task. Although acoustic resonant responses are relatively easy to detect when they exist, they are very difficult to excite by the non-contact means that must be used for buried objects. Despite many different attempts, this research did not discover any practical means of using sound to excite resonant responses in objects known to have strong resonances. The shaker table experiments did see an effect that might be attributable to the resonance of the object under test, but the effect was weak, and exploited the a priori knowledge of the resonant frequency of the object under test to distinguish it from the background. If experiments that used objects known to have strong acoustic resonances produced such marginal results, this does not seem to be a practical method to detect objects with weak resonances or non-existent resonances. The results of this work contribute to the ORNL countermine initiative. ORNL is exploring several unconventional mine detection technologies, and is proposed to explore others. Since this research has discovered some major pitfalls in non-metallic mine detection, this experience will add realism to other strategies proposed for mine detection technologies. The experiment provided hands-on experience with inert plastic mines under field conditions, and gives ORNL additional insight into the problems of developing practical

  20. Thomson scattering in strong external fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varró, S.; Ehlotzky, F.

    1992-09-01

    In the present paper we shall investigate relativistic Thomson scattering in two external fields. A free classical electron will be embedded in a strong, constant and homogeneous magnetic field and in a powerful electromagnetic field. Both fields will be considered in the Redmond configuration, in which case the electromagnetic wave is circularly polarized and propagates in the direction of the homogeneous magnetic field. The electron will be allowed to have arbitrary initial conditions and the electromagnetic wave will be switched on either suddenly or adiabatically. We shall present the exact solution of the Lorentz equation of motion in the above external field configuration and we shall evaluate the spectrum and cross sections of the scattered radiation. In particular, we shall consider scattering close to resonance and we shall compare our results with the findings of earlier work.

  1. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  2. Strong-back safety latch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSantis, G.N.

    1995-01-01

    The calculation decides the integrity of the safety latch that will hold the strong-back to the pump during lifting. The safety latch will be welded to the strong-back and will latch to a 1.5-in. dia cantilever rod welded to the pump baseplate. The static and dynamic analysis shows that the safety latch will hold the strong-back to the pump if the friction clamps fail and the pump become free from the strong-back. Thus, the safety latch will meet the requirements of the Lifting and Rigging Manual for under the hook lifting for static loading; it can withstand shock loads from the strong-back falling 0.25 inch

  3. Strong-back safety latch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSantis, G.N.

    1995-03-06

    The calculation decides the integrity of the safety latch that will hold the strong-back to the pump during lifting. The safety latch will be welded to the strong-back and will latch to a 1.5-in. dia cantilever rod welded to the pump baseplate. The static and dynamic analysis shows that the safety latch will hold the strong-back to the pump if the friction clamps fail and the pump become free from the strong-back. Thus, the safety latch will meet the requirements of the Lifting and Rigging Manual for under the hook lifting for static loading; it can withstand shock loads from the strong-back falling 0.25 inch.

  4. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  5. Fano resonance Rabi splitting of surface plasmons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiguang; Li, Jiafang; Liu, Zhe; Li, Wuxia; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2017-08-14

    Rabi splitting and Fano resonance are well-known physical phenomena in conventional quantum systems as atoms and quantum dots, arising from strong interaction between two quantum states. In recent years similar features have been observed in various nanophotonic and nanoplasmonic systems. Yet, realization of strong interaction between two or more Fano resonance states has not been accomplished either in quantum or in optical systems. Here we report the observation of Rabi splitting of two strongly coupled surface plasmon Fano resonance states in a three-dimensional plasmonic nanostructure consisting of vertical asymmetric split-ring resonators. The plasmonic system stably supports triple Fano resonance states and double Rabi splittings can occur between lower and upper pairs of the Fano resonance states. The experimental discovery agrees excellently with rigorous numerical simulations, and is well explained by an analytical three-oscillator model. The discovery of Fano resonance Rabi splitting could provide a stimulating insight to explore new fundamental physics in analogous atomic systems and could be used to significantly enhance light-matter interaction for optical sensing and detecting applications.

  6. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about 500...

  7. Titanium: light, strong, and white

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Laurel; Bedinger, George

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a strong silver-gray metal that is highly resistant to corrosion and is chemically inert. It is as strong as steel but 45 percent lighter, and it is twice as strong as aluminum but only 60 percent heavier. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has a very high refractive index, which means that it has high light-scattering ability. As a result, TiO2 imparts whiteness, opacity, and brightness to many products. ...Because of the unique physical properties of titanium metal and the whiteness provided by TiO2, titanium is now used widely in modern industrial societies.

  8. Electrodynamics of a hydrogenlike atom in a strong electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovarskij, V.A.; Perel'man, N.F.

    1974-01-01

    The quasienergy spectrum of the hydrogen atom in strong electromagnetic radiation is studied, the luminescence of the atom under these conditions is considered. It is shown that in a strong field the atom, being even in the ground state, radiates a spectrum of frequencies corresponding to transitions from the ground state into excited states, the strong field photons being involved. The intensity of such a luminescence is basically a non-linear function of the strong field. The exposure of the atom to two strong electromagnetic fields Ω and ω (Ω>>ω) is considered, the Ω coinciding with one of the natural frquencies of the atom. The effct of modulation of the resonance shift for an atomic level by the ω-field strength is predicted. The dependence of Ω-absorption in the ω-field on the statistic properties of the latter is investigated. (author)

  9. Electroexcitation of nucleon resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inna Aznauryan, Volker D. Burkert

    2012-01-01

    We review recent progress in the investigation of the electroexcitation of nucleon resonances, both in experiment and in theory. The most accurate results have been obtained for the electroexcitation amplitudes of the four lowest excited states, which have been measured in a range of Q2 up to 8 and 4.5 GeV2 for the Delta(1232)P33, N(1535)S11 and N(1440)P11, N(1520)D13, respectively. These results have been confronted with calculations based on lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD (pQCD), and QCD-inspired models. The amplitudes for the Delta(1232) indicate large pion-cloud contributions at low Q2 and don't show any sign of approaching the pQCD regime for Q2<7 GeV2. Measured for the first time, the electroexcitation amplitudes of the Roper resonance, N(1440)P11, provide strong evidence for this state as a predominantly radial excitation of a three-quark (3q) ground state, with additional non-3-quark contributions needed to describe the low Q2 behavior of the amplitudes. The longitudinal transition amplitude for the N(1535)S11 was determined and has become a challenge for quark models. Explanations may require large meson-cloud contributions or alternative representations of this state. The N(1520)D13 clearly shows the rapid changeover from helicity-3/2 dominance at the real photon point to helicity-1/2 dominance at Q2 > 0.5 GeV2, confirming a long-standing prediction of the constituent quark model. The interpretation of the moments of resonance transition form factors in terms of transition transverse charge distributions in infinite momentum frame is presented.

  10. Stochastic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellens, Thomas; Shatokhin, Vyacheslav; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    We are taught by conventional wisdom that the transmission and detection of signals is hindered by noise. However, during the last two decades, the paradigm of stochastic resonance (SR) proved this assertion wrong: indeed, addition of the appropriate amount of noise can boost a signal and hence facilitate its detection in a noisy environment. Due to its simplicity and robustness, SR has been implemented by mother nature on almost every scale, thus attracting interdisciplinary interest from physicists, geologists, engineers, biologists and medical doctors, who nowadays use it as an instrument for their specific purposes. At the present time, there exist a lot of diversified models of SR. Taking into account the progress achieved in both theoretical understanding and practical application of this phenomenon, we put the focus of the present review not on discussing in depth technical details of different models and approaches but rather on presenting a general and clear physical picture of SR on a pedagogical level. Particular emphasis will be given to the implementation of SR in generic quantum systems-an issue that has received limited attention in earlier review papers on the topic. The major part of our presentation relies on the two-state model of SR (or on simple variants thereof), which is general enough to exhibit the main features of SR and, in fact, covers many (if not most) of the examples of SR published so far. In order to highlight the diversity of the two-state model, we shall discuss several examples from such different fields as condensed matter, nonlinear and quantum optics and biophysics. Finally, we also discuss some situations that go beyond the generic SR scenario but are still characterized by a constructive role of noise

  11. Stochastic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellens, Thomas; Shatokhin, Vyacheslav; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    We are taught by conventional wisdom that the transmission and detection of signals is hindered by noise. However, during the last two decades, the paradigm of stochastic resonance (SR) proved this assertion wrong: indeed, addition of the appropriate amount of noise can boost a signal and hence facilitate its detection in a noisy environment. Due to its simplicity and robustness, SR has been implemented by mother nature on almost every scale, thus attracting interdisciplinary interest from physicists, geologists, engineers, biologists and medical doctors, who nowadays use it as an instrument for their specific purposes. At the present time, there exist a lot of diversified models of SR. Taking into account the progress achieved in both theoretical understanding and practical application of this phenomenon, we put the focus of the present review not on discussing in depth technical details of different models and approaches but rather on presenting a general and clear physical picture of SR on a pedagogical level. Particular emphasis will be given to the implementation of SR in generic quantum systems—an issue that has received limited attention in earlier review papers on the topic. The major part of our presentation relies on the two-state model of SR (or on simple variants thereof), which is general enough to exhibit the main features of SR and, in fact, covers many (if not most) of the examples of SR published so far. In order to highlight the diversity of the two-state model, we shall discuss several examples from such different fields as condensed matter, nonlinear and quantum optics and biophysics. Finally, we also discuss some situations that go beyond the generic SR scenario but are still characterized by a constructive role of noise.

  12. Faint emission features in the Mg II resonance-line wings. [in solar spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, M. S.; Mcallister, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    Data obtained with a rocket-borne echelle spectrograph are presented which indicate the presence of three faint emission features deep in the cores of the Mg II h and k resonance-line wings in the solar Fraunhofer spectrum. Results of wavelength measurements are discussed, and the relative intensities of the emission features are examined. It is tentatively suggested that the first feature be identified with the Fe II line at 2797.037 A, the second feature is probably the V II line at 2803.469 A, and the third feature may originate in Fe II emission at 2804.021 A. Possible emission mechanisms are proposed, and it is concluded that the detected features may be of potential diagnostic value for the analysis of depth variations of temperature and velocity in the lower chromosphere as well as for solar and possibly stellar spectroscopy.

  13. Moderately strong pump-induced ultrafast dynamics in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, H.F. [Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Zhang, Yizhu, E-mail: zhangyz@sari.ac.cn [Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Yan, T.-M., E-mail: yantm@sari.ac.cn [Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Wang, Z.Y. [Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University (China); Jiang, Y.H., E-mail: jiangyh@sari.ac.cn [Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University (China)

    2016-09-12

    Graphical abstract: Moderately strong pump pulse is applied to the transient absorption spectrum. The pump and dump processes (resonant impulsive stimulated Raman scattering) finished in one single pump pulse in moderately strong regime make the observation of high-lying excited state dynamics possible. - Highlights: • The pulse intensity in transient absorption spectrum are experimentally studied. • The higher nonlinear susceptibility responses are observed. • The resonant impulsive stimulated Raman scattering. • New dynamics information in strong pump field. - Abstract: The transient transmittance spectra of laser dye IR144 in methanol were investigated experimentally in the moderately strong pump-probe field. Observed emission spectra in the red edge of the incident-field bandwidth, created by resonant impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (RISRS), display significant nonlinear intensity dependence as the pulse intensity increases. Dynamic perspectives of RISRS spectra can be understood well in a wavepacket picture. The excitation of high vibrational levels in the ground electronic state leading to the redshift of emissions presents high dependence of the pump-pulse intensity and ultrafast dynamical features, mapping the spatial overlap and separation of ground and excited wave functions and resolving the ultrafast vibrational relaxation in the femtosecond regime.

  14. High-Q Supercavity Modes in Subwavelength Dielectric Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Koshelev, Kirill L.; Sadrieva, Zarina F.; Samusev, Kirill B.; Bogdanov, Andrey A.; Limonov, Mikhail F.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2017-12-01

    Recent progress in nanoscale optical physics is associated with the development of a new branch of nanophotonics exploring strong Mie resonances in dielectric nanoparticles with a high refractive index. The high-index resonant dielectric nanostructures form building blocks for novel photonic metadevices with low losses and advanced functionalities. However, unlike extensively studied cavities in photonic crystals, such dielectric resonators demonstrate low quality factors (Q factors). Here, we uncover a novel mechanism for achieving giant Q factors of subwavelength nanoscale resonators by realizing the regime of bound states in the continuum. In contrast to the previously suggested multilayer structures with zero permittivity, we reveal strong mode coupling and Fano resonances in homogeneous high-index dielectric finite-length nanorods resulting in high-Q factors at the nanoscale. Thus, high-index dielectric resonators represent the simplest example of nanophotonic supercavities, expanding substantially the range of applications of all-dielectric resonant nanophotonics and meta-optics.

  15. Strongly correlated electron materials. I. Theory of the quasiparticle structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Aguilar, F.; Costa-Quintana, J.; Puig-Puig, L. (Departamento de Fisica, Grupo de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain))

    1993-07-01

    In this paper we give a method for analyzing the renormalized electronic structure of the Hubbard systems. The first step is the determination of effective interactions from the random-phase approximation (RPA) and from an extended RPA (ERPA) that introduces vertex effects within the bubble polarization. The second step is the determination of the density of states deduced from the spectral functions. Its analysis leads us to conclude that these systems can exhibit three types of resonances in their electronic structures: the lower-, middle-, and upper-energy resonances. Furthermore, we analyze the conditions for which there is only one type of resonance and the causes that lead to the disappearance of the heavy-fermion state. We finally introduce the RPA and ERPA effective interactions within the strong-coupling theory and we give the conditions for obtaining coupling and superconductivity.

  16. Numerical MHD Simulation of the Coupled Evolution of Plasma and Magnetic Field in the Solar Chromosphere. I. Gradual and Impulsive Energisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseeva, L. M.; Kshevetskii, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    The dynamical coupling between solar chromospheric plasma and the magnetic field is investigated by numerically solving a fully self-consistent, two-dimensional initial-value problem for the nonlinear collisional MHD equations including electric resistivity, thermal conduction, and, in some cases, gas-dynamic viscosity. The processes in the contact zone between two horizontal magnetic fields of opposite polarities are considered. The plasma is assumed to be initially motionless and to have a temperature of 50,000 K uniform throughout the plasma volume; the characteristic magnetic field corresponds to a plasma β≳ 1. In a physical time interval of 17 seconds typically covered by a computational run, the plasma temperature gradually increases by a factor of two to three. Against this background, an impulsive (in 0.1 seconds or less) increase in the current-aligned plasma velocity occurs at the site of the current-layer thinning (sausage-type deformation, or m=0 pinch instability). This velocity burst can be interpreted physically as an event of suprathermal-proton generation. Further development of the sausage instability results in an increase in the kinetic temperature of the protons to high values, even to those observed in flares. The form of our system of MHD equations indicates that this kind of increase is a property of the exact solution of the system for an appropriate choice of parameters. Magnetic reconnection does not manifest itself in this solution: it would generate flows forbidden by the chosen geometry. Therefore, the pinch-sausage effect can act as an energiser of the upper chromosphere and be an alternative to the magnetic-reconnection process as the producer of flares.

  17. Overlapping resonances in e+e- annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dothan, Y.; Horn, D.

    1976-06-01

    The application of the general formalism of two overlapping resonances to the inclusive process of hadron production in e + e - annihilation is discussed. The strong dip observed near 4 GeV can be fitted by three different classes of solutions, all of which have to use an overlap close to its maximal value. This suggests that both resonances have one common main decay channel. The implications of this conclusion are briefly discussed

  18. Coherent and incoherent processes in resonant photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnuson, M.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    In this contribution the authors present the distinction between coherent and incoherent processes in resonant photoemission. As a first step they determine whether an autoionization process is photoemission-like or Auger-like. The discussion is based on measurements for a weakly bonded adsorption system, Ar/Pt(111). This type of system is well adapted to investigate these effects since it yields distinctly shifted spectral features depending on the nature of the process. After this, the question of resonance photoemission in metallic systems is addressed. This is done in connection with measurements at the 2p edges for Ni metal. Ni has been one of the prototype systems for resonant photoemission. The resonances have been discussed in connection with the strong correlation and d-band localization effects in this system. Based on the results some general comments about the appearance of resonant effects in metallic systems are made.

  19. The SNAP Strong Lens Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, P.

    2005-01-03

    Basic considerations of lens detection and identification indicate that a wide field survey of the types planned for weak lensing and Type Ia SNe with SNAP are close to optimal for the optical detection of strong lenses. Such a ''piggy-back'' survey might be expected even pessimistically to provide a catalogue of a few thousand new strong lenses, with the numbers dominated by systems of faint blue galaxies lensed by foreground ellipticals. After sketching out our strategy for detecting and measuring these galaxy lenses using the SNAP images, we discuss some of the scientific applications of such a large sample of gravitational lenses: in particular we comment on the partition of information between lens structure, the source population properties and cosmology. Understanding this partitioning is key to assessing strong lens cosmography's value as a cosmological probe.

  20. Strong coupling phase in QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Ken-ichi

    1988-01-01

    Existence of a strong coupling phase in QED has been suggested in solutions of the Schwinger-Dyson equation and in Monte Carlo simulation of lattice QED. In this article we recapitulate the previous arguments, and formulate the problem in the modern framework of the renormalization theory, Wilsonian renormalization. This scheme of renormalization gives the best understanding of the basic structure of a field theory especially when it has a multi-phase structure. We resolve some misleading arguments in the previous literature. Then we set up a strategy to attack the strong phase, if any. We describe a trial; a coupled Schwinger-Dyson equation. Possible picture of the strong coupling phase QED is presented. (author)

  1. Strong ground motion spectra for layered media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askar, A.; Cakmak, A.S.; Engin, H.

    1977-01-01

    This article presents an analytic method and calculations of strong motion spectra for the energy, displacement, velocity and acceleration based on the physical and geometric ground properties at a site. Although earthquakes occur with large deformations and high stress intensities which necessarily lead to nonlinear phenomena, most analytical efforts to date have been based on linear analyses in engineering seismology and soil dynamics. There are, however, a wealth of problems such as the shifts in frequency, dispersion due to the amplitude, the generation of harmonics, removal of resonance infinities, which cannot be accounted for by a linear theory. In the study, the stress-strain law for soil is taken as tau=G 0 γ+G 1 γ 3 +etaγ where tau is the stress, γ is the strain, G 0 and G 1 are the elasticity coefficients and eta is the damping and are different in each layer. The above stress-strain law describes soils with hysterisis where the hysterisis loops for various amplitudes of the strain are no longer concentric ellipses as for linear relations but are oval shapes rotated with respect to each other similar to the materials with the Osgood-Ramberg law. It is observed that even slight nonlinearities may drastically alter the various response spectra from that given by linear analysis. In fact, primary waves cause resonance conditions such that secondary waves are generated. As a result, a weak energy transfer from the primary to the secondary waves takes place, thus altering the wave spectrum. The mathematical technique that is utilized for the solution of the nonlinear equation is a special perturbation method as an extension of Poincare's procedure. The method considers shifts in the frequencies which are determined by the boundedness of the energy

  2. Strongly coupled gauge theories: What can lattice calculations teach us?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Electroweak symmetry breaking and the dynamical origin of the Higgs boson are central questions today. Strongly coupled systems predicting the Higgs boson as a bound state of a new gauge-fermion interaction are candidates to describe beyond Standard Model physics. The phenomenologically viable models are strongly coupled, near the conformal boundary, requiring non-perturbative studies to reveal their properties. Lattice studies show that many of the beyond-Standard Model candidates have a relatively light isosinglet scalar state that is well separated from the rest of the spectrum. When the scale is set via the vev of electroweak symmetry breaking, a 2 TeV vector resonance appears to be a general feature of many of these models with several other resonances that are not much heavier.

  3. Resonance and Neck Length for a Spherical Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Corning

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the neck length of a spherical resonator and its period of fundamental resonance was investigated. This was done by measuring the frequency of fundamental resonance of the resonator at 6 different neck lengths. It was found that its resonance resembled Helmholtz resonance but was not that of ideal Helmholtz resonance.

  4. Strong Decomposition of Random Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann-Jørgensen, Jørgen; Kagan, Abram M.; Pitt, Loren D.

    2007-01-01

    A random variable X is stongly decomposable if X=Y+Z where Y=Φ(X) and Z=X-Φ(X) are independent non-degenerated random variables (called the components). It is shown that at least one of the components is singular, and we derive a necessary and sufficient condition for strong decomposability...

  5. Strong interaction at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We review two methods discussed in the literature to determine the effective parameters of strongly interacting particles as they move through a heat bath. The first one is the general method of chiral perturbation theory, which may be readily applied to this problem. The other is the method of thermal QCD sum rules ...

  6. Strong-strong beam-beam simulation on parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Ji

    2004-08-02

    The beam-beam interaction puts a strong limit on the luminosity of the high energy storage ring colliders. At the interaction points, the electromagnetic fields generated by one beam focus or defocus the opposite beam. This can cause beam blowup and a reduction of luminosity. An accurate simulation of the beam-beam interaction is needed to help optimize the luminosity in high energy colliders.

  7. Strong-strong beam-beam simulation on parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang, Ji

    2004-01-01

    The beam-beam interaction puts a strong limit on the luminosity of the high energy storage ring colliders. At the interaction points, the electromagnetic fields generated by one beam focus or defocus the opposite beam. This can cause beam blowup and a reduction of luminosity. An accurate simulation of the beam-beam interaction is needed to help optimize the luminosity in high energy colliders

  8. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which

  9. Strongly correlated systems experimental techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    The continuous evolution and development of experimental techniques is at the basis of any fundamental achievement in modern physics. Strongly correlated systems (SCS), more than any other, need to be investigated through the greatest variety of experimental techniques in order to unveil and crosscheck the numerous and puzzling anomalous behaviors characterizing them. The study of SCS fostered the improvement of many old experimental techniques, but also the advent of many new ones just invented in order to analyze the complex behaviors of these systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and materials science, belong to this class of systems. The volume presents a representative collection of the modern experimental techniques specifically tailored for the analysis of strongly correlated systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognize...

  10. Strongly Correlated Systems Theoretical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Avella, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    The volume presents, for the very first time, an exhaustive collection of those modern theoretical methods specifically tailored for the analysis of Strongly Correlated Systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and materials science, belong to this class of systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognized main contributors. The exposition has a clear pedagogical cut and fully reports on the most relevant case study where the specific technique showed to be very successful in describing and enlightening the puzzling physics of a particular strongly correlated system. The book is intended for advanced graduate students and post-docs in the field as textbook and/or main reference, but also for other researchers in the field who appreciates consulting a single, but comprehensive, source or wishes to get acquainted, in a as painless as po...

  11. Strongly correlated systems numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    This volume presents, for the very first time, an exhaustive collection of those modern numerical methods specifically tailored for the analysis of Strongly Correlated Systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and material science, belong to this class of systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognized main contributors. The exposition has a clear pedagogical cut and fully reports on the most relevant case study where the specific technique showed to be very successful in describing and enlightening the puzzling physics of a particular strongly correlated system. The book is intended for advanced graduate students and post-docs in the field as textbook and/or main reference, but also for other researchers in the field who appreciate consulting a single, but comprehensive, source or wishes to get acquainted, in a as painless as possi...

  12. Strongly nonlinear oscillators analytical solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Cveticanin, Livija

    2014-01-01

    This book provides the presentation of the motion of pure nonlinear oscillatory systems and various solution procedures which give the approximate solutions of the strong nonlinear oscillator equations. The book presents the original author’s method for the analytical solution procedure of the pure nonlinear oscillator system. After an introduction, the physical explanation of the pure nonlinearity and of the pure nonlinear oscillator is given. The analytical solution for free and forced vibrations of the one-degree-of-freedom strong nonlinear system with constant and time variable parameter is considered. Special attention is given to the one and two mass oscillatory systems with two-degrees-of-freedom. The criteria for the deterministic chaos in ideal and non-ideal pure nonlinear oscillators are derived analytically. The method for suppressing chaos is developed. Important problems are discussed in didactic exercises. The book is self-consistent and suitable as a textbook for students and also for profess...

  13. Flavour Democracy in Strong Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Abel, S A; Abel, Steven; King, Steven

    1998-01-01

    We show that the fermion mass spectrum may naturally be understood in terms of flavour democratic fixed points in supersymmetric theories which have a large domain of attraction in the presence of "strong unification". Our approach provides an alternative to the approximate Yukawa texture zeroes of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. We discuss a particular model based on a broken gauged $SU(3)_L\\times SU(3)_R$ family symmetry which illustrates our approach.

  14. Resonator quantum electrodynamics on a microtrap chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinmetz, Tilo

    2008-01-01

    In the present dissertation experiments on resonator quantum electrodynamics on a microtrap chip are described. Thereby for the first time single atoms catched in a chip trap could be detected. For this in the framework of this thesis a novel optical microresonator was developed, which can because of its miniaturization be combined with the microtrap technique introduced in our working group for the manipulation of ultracold atoms. For this resonator glass-fiber ends are used as mirror substrates, between which a standing light wave is formed. With such a fiber Fabry-Perot resonator we obtain a finess of up to ∼37,000. Because of the small mode volumina in spite of moderate resonator quality the coherent interaction between an atom and a photon can be made so large that the regime of the strong atom-resonator coupling is reached. For the one-atom-one-photon coupling rate and the one-atom-one-photon cooperativity thereby record values of g 0 =2π.300 MHz respectively C 0 =210 are reached. Just so for the first time the strong coupling regime between a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and the field of a high-quality resonator could be reached. The BEC was thereby by means of the magnetic microtrap potentials deterministically brought to a position within the resonator and totally transformed in a well defined antinode of an additionally optical standing-wave trap. The spectrum of the coupled atom-resonator system was measured for different atomic numbers and atom-resonator detunings, whereby a collective vacuum Rabi splitting of more than 20 GHz could be reached. [de

  15. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  16. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    ARTICLE. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Biological Applications. B G Hegde. Recently, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectros- copy has emerged as a powerful tool to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules such as proteins, protein aggregates ... research interests are.

  17. Crossing simple resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, T.

    1985-08-01

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances.

  18. Crossing a Nonlinear Resonance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 9. Crossing a Nonlinear Resonance: Adiabatic Invariants and the Melnikov-Arnold Integral. Sudhir R Jain. General Article Volume 19 Issue 9 September 2014 pp 797-813 ...

  19. Optimized coplanar waveguide resonators for a superconductor–atom interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, M. A., E-mail: mabeck2@wisc.edu; Isaacs, J. A.; Booth, D.; Pritchard, J. D.; Saffman, M.; McDermott, R. [Department of Physics, University Of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-08-29

    We describe the design and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide cavities tailored to facilitate strong coupling between superconducting quantum circuits and single trapped Rydberg atoms. For initial superconductor–atom experiments at 4.2 K, we show that resonator quality factors above 10{sup 4} can be readily achieved. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the incorporation of thick-film copper electrodes at a voltage antinode of the resonator provides a route to enhance the zero-point electric fields of the resonator in a trapping region that is 40 μm above the chip surface, thereby minimizing chip heating from scattered trap light. The combination of high resonator quality factor and strong electric dipole coupling between the resonator and the atom should make it possible to achieve the strong coupling limit of cavity quantum electrodynamics with this system.

  20. Atoms in strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Huillier, A.

    2002-01-01

    When a high-power laser focuses into a gas of atoms, the electromagnetic field becomes of the same magnitude as the Coulomb field which binds a 1s electron in a hydrogen atom. 3 highly non-linear phenomena can happen: 1) ATI (above threshold ionization): electrons initially in the ground state absorb a large number of photons, many more than the minimum number required for ionization; 2) multiple ionization: many electrons can be emitted one at a time, in a sequential process, or simultaneously in a mechanism called direct or non-sequential; and 3) high order harmonic generation (HHG): efficient photon emission in the extreme ultraviolet range, in the form of high-order harmonics of the fundamental laser field can occur. The theoretical problem consists in solving the time dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) that describes the interaction of a many-electron atom with a laser field. A number of methods have been proposed to solve this problem in the case of a hydrogen atom or a single-active electron atom in a strong laser field. A large effort is presently being devoted to go beyond the single-active approximation. The understanding of the physics of the interaction between atoms and strong laser fields has been provided by a very simple model called ''simple man's theory''. A unified view of HHG, ATI, and non-sequential ionization, originating from the simple man's model and the strong field approximation, expressed in terms of electrons trajectories or quantum paths is slowly emerging. (A.C.)

  1. Resonant thermonuclear reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubold, H.J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Basic physical principles for the resonant and nonresonant thermonuclear reaction rates are applied to find their standard representations for nuclear astrophysics. Closed-form representations for the resonant reaction rate are derived in terms of Meijer's G-function. Analytic representations of the resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction rates are compared and the appearance of Meijer's G-function is discussed in physical terms

  2. Strongly Interacting Light Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Bruggisser, Francesco Riva, Alfredo Urbano

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of approximate global symmetries that forbid relevant interactions, strongly coupled light Dark Matter (DM can appear weakly coupled at small energy and generate a sizable relic abundance. Fundamental principles like unitarity restrict these symmetries to a small class, where the leading interactions are captured by effective operators up to dimension-8. Chiral symmetry, spontaneously broken global symmetries and non-linearly realized supersymmetry are examples of this. Their DM candidates (composite fermions, pseudo Nambu-Goldstone Bosons and Goldstini are interesting targets for LHC missing-energy searches.

  3. Strongly interacting light dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggisser, Sebastian; Riva, Francesco; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    In the presence of approximate global symmetries that forbid relevant interactions, strongly coupled light Dark Matter (DM) can appear weakly coupled at small-energy and generate a sizable relic abundance. Fundamental principles like unitarity restrict these symmetries to a small class, where the leading interactions are captured by effective operators up to dimension-8. Chiral symmetry, spontaneously broken global symmetries and non-linearly realized supersymmetry are examples of this. Their DM candidates (composite fermions, pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone Bosons and Goldstini) are interesting targets for LHC missing-energy searches.

  4. Rydberg atoms in strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppner, D.; Tsimmerman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical achievements in studying Rydberg atoms in external fields are considered. Only static (or quasistatic) fields and ''one-electron'' atoms, i.e. atoms that are well described by one-electron states, are discussed. Mainly behaviour of alkali metal atoms in electric field is considered. The state of theoretical investigations for hydrogen atom in magnetic field is described, but experimental data for atoms of alkali metals are presented as an illustration. Results of the latest experimental and theoretical investigations into the structure of Rydberg atoms in strong fields are presented

  5. Scalar strong interaction hadron theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hoh, Fang Chao

    2015-01-01

    The scalar strong interaction hadron theory, SSI, is a first principles' and nonlocal theory at quantum mechanical level that provides an alternative to low energy QCD and Higgs related part of the standard model. The quark-quark interaction is scalar rather than color-vectorial. A set of equations of motion for mesons and another set for baryons have been constructed. This book provides an account of the present state of a theory supposedly still at its early stage of development. This work will facilitate researchers interested in entering into this field and serve as a basis for possible future development of this theory.

  6. Strong Plate, Weak Slab Dichotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, R. I.; Stegman, D. R.; Tackley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Models of mantle convection on Earth produce styles of convection that are not observed on Earth.Moreover non-Earth-like modes, such as two-sided downwellings, are the de facto mode of convection in such models.To recreate Earth style subduction, i.e. one-sided asymmetric recycling of the lithosphere, proper treatment of the plates and plate interface are required. Previous work has identified several model features that promote subduction. A free surface or pseudo-free surface and a layer of material with a relatively low strength material (weak crust) allow downgoing plates to bend and slide past overriding without creating undue stress at the plate interface. (Crameri, et al. 2012, GRL)A low viscosity mantle wedge, possibly a result of slab dehydration, decouples the plates in the system. (Gerya et al. 2007, Geo)Plates must be composed of material which, in the case of the overriding plate, are is strong enough to resist bending stresses imposed by the subducting plate and yet, as in the case of the subducting plate, be weak enough to bend and subduct when pulled by the already subducted slab. (Petersen et al. 2015, PEPI) Though strong surface plates are required for subduction such plates may present a problem when they encounter the lower mantle.As the subducting slab approaches the higher viscosity, lower mantle stresses are imposed on the tip.Strong slabs transmit this stress to the surface.There the stress field at the plate interface is modified and potentially modifies the style of convection. In addition to modifying the stress at the plate interface, the strength of the slab affects the morphology of the slab at the base of the upper mantle. (Stegman, et al 2010, Tectonophysics)Slabs that maintain a sufficient portion of their strength after being bent require high stresses to unbend or otherwise change their shape.On the other hand slabs that are weakened though the bending process are more amenable to changes in morphology. We present the results of

  7. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed

  8. Multi-wavelength high-resolution observations of a small-scale emerging magnetic flux event and the chromospheric and coronal response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas Domínguez, Santiago; Kosovichev, Alexander; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl, E-mail: svargas@bbso.njit.edu [Big Bear Solar Observatory, NJIT, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314-9672 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    State-of-the-art solar instrumentation is now revealing magnetic activity of the Sun with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolutions. Observations with the 1.6 m aperture New Solar Telescope (NST) of the Big Bear Solar Observatory are making next steps in our understanding of the solar surface structure. Granular-scale magnetic flux emergence and the response of the solar atmosphere are among the key research topics of high-resolution solar physics. As part of a joint observing program with NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission on 2013 August 7, the NST observed active region NOAA 11,810 in the photospheric TiO 7057 Å band with a resolution of pixel size of 0.''034 and chromospheric He I 10830 Å and Hα 6563 Å wavelengths. Complementary data are provided by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Hinode space-based telescopes. The region displayed a group of solar pores, in the vicinity of which we detect a small-scale buoyant horizontal magnetic flux tube causing granular alignments and interacting with the preexisting ambient field in the upper atmospheric layers. Following the expansion of distorted granules at the emergence site, we observed a sudden appearance of an extended surge in the He I 10830 Å data (bandpass of 0.05 Å). The IRIS transition region imaging caught ejection of a hot plasma jet associated with the He I surge. The SDO/HMI data used to study the evolution of the magnetic and Doppler velocity fields reveal emerging magnetic loop-like structures. Hinode/Ca II H and IRIS filtergrams detail the connectivities of the newly emerged magnetic field in the lower solar chromosphere. From these data, we find that the orientation of the emerging magnetic field lines from a twisted flux tube formed an angle of ∼45° with the overlying ambient field. Nevertheless, the interaction of emerging magnetic field lines with the pre-existing overlying field generates high-temperature emission regions and boosts the

  9. Ovenized microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Roy H; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kim, Bongsang

    2014-03-11

    An ovenized micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator including: a substantially thermally isolated mechanical resonator cavity; a mechanical oscillator coupled to the mechanical resonator cavity; and a heating element formed on the mechanical resonator cavity.

  10. Quantum mechanical resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisneros S, A.; McIntosh, H.V.

    1982-01-01

    A discussion of the nature of quantum mechanical resonances is presented from the point of view of the spectral theory of operators. In the case of Bohr-Feshbach resonances, graphs are presented to illustrate the theory showing the decay of a doubly excited metastable state and the excitation of the resonance by an incident particle with proper energy. A characterization of resonances is given as well as a procedure to determine widths using the spectral density function. A sufficient condition is given for the validity of the Breit-Wigner formula for Bohr-Feshbach resonances. (author)

  11. Theory of electrically controlled resonant tunneling spin devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. -Y.; Cartoixa, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    We report device concepts that exploit spin-orbit coupling for creating spin polarized current sources using nonmagnetic semiconductor resonant tunneling heterostructures, without external magnetic fields. The resonant interband tunneling psin filter exploits large valence band spin-orbit interaction to provide strong spin selectivity.

  12. Estimation of acoustic resonances for room transfer function equalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil-Cacho, Pepe; van Waterschoot, Toon; Moonen, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Strong acoustic resonances create long room impulse responses (RIRs) which may harm the speech transmission in an acoustic space and hence reduce speech intelligibility. Equalization is performed by cancelling the main acoustic resonances common to multiple room transfer functions (RTFs), i...

  13. From strong to ultrastrong coupling in circuit QED architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemczyk, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The field of cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) studies the interaction between light and matter on a fundamental level: a single atom interacts with a single photon. If the atom-photon coupling is larger than any dissipative effects, the system enters the strong-coupling limit. A peculiarity of this regime is the possibility to form coherent superpositions of light and matter excitations - a kind of 'molecule' consisting of an atomic and a photonic contribution. The novel research field of circuit QED extends cavity QED concepts to solid-state based system. Here, a superconducting quantum bit is coupled to an on-chip superconducting one-dimensional waveguide resonator. Owing to the small mode-volume of the resonant cavity, the large dipole moment of the 'artificial atom' and the enormous engineering potential inherent to superconducting quantum circuits, remarkable atom-photon coupling strengths can be realized. This thesis describes the theoretical framework, the development of fabrication techniques and the implementation of experimental characterization techniques for superconducting quantum circuits for circuit QED applications. In particular, we study the interaction between superconducting flux quantum bits and high-quality coplanar waveguide resonators in the strong-coupling limit. Furthermore, we report on the first experimental realization of a circuit QED system operating in the ultrastrong-coupling regime, where the atom-photon coupling rate reaches a considerable fraction of the relevant system frequencies. In these experiments we could observe phenomena that can not be explained within the renowned Jaynes-Cummings model. (orig.)

  14. Physics of Strongly Coupled Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraeft, Wolf-Dietrich [Universitat Rostock (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Strongly coupled plasmas (or non-ideal plasmas) are multi-component charged many-particle systems, in which the mean value of the potential energy of the system is of the same order as or even higher than the mean value of the kinetic energy. The constituents are electrons, ions, atoms and molecules. Dusty (or complex) plasmas contain still mesoscopic (multiply charged) particles. In such systems, the effects of strong coupling (non-ideality) lead to considerable deviations of physical properties from the corresponding properties of ideal plasmas, i.e., of plasmas in which the mean kinetic energy is essentially larger than the mean potential energy. For instance, bound state energies become density dependent and vanish at higher densities (Mott effect) due to the interaction of the pair with the surrounding particles. Non-ideal plasmas are of interest both for general scientific reasons (including, for example, astrophysical questions), and for technical applications such as inertially confined fusion. In spite of great efforts both experimentally and theoretically, satisfactory information on the physical properties of strongly coupled plasmas is not at hand for any temperature and density. For example, the theoretical description of non-ideal plasmas is possible only at low densities/high temperatures and at extremely high densities (high degeneracy). For intermediate degeneracy, however, numerical experiments have to fill the gap. Experiments are difficult in the region of 'warm dense matter'. The monograph tries to present the state of the art concerning both theoretical and experimental attempts. It mainly includes results of the work performed in famous Russian laboratories in recent decades. After outlining basic concepts (chapter 1), the generation of plasmas is considered (chapter 2, chapter 3). Questions of partial (chapter 4) and full ionization (chapter 5) are discussed including Mott transition and Wigner crystallization. Electrical and

  15. Shear Layer Dynamics in Resonating Cavity Flows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ukeiley, Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    .... The PIV data was also combined with the surface pressure measurements through the application of the Quadratic Stochastic Estimation procedure to provide time resolved snapshots of the flow field. Examination of these results indicate the strong pumping action of the cavity regardless of whether resonance existed and was used to visualize the large scale structures interacting with the aft wall.

  16. Controlling Parametric Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Pettersen, Kristin Ytterstad

    2012-01-01

    if the system undergoing it could transform the large amplitude motion into, for example, energy. Therefore the development of control strategies to induce parametric resonance into a system can be as valuable as those which aim at stabilizing the resonant oscillations. By means of a mechanical equivalent......Parametric resonance is a resonant phenomenon which takes place in systems characterized by periodic variations of some parameters. While seen as a threatening condition, whose onset can drive a system into instability, this chapter advocates that parametric resonance may become an advantage...... the authors review the conditions for the onset of parametric resonance, and propose a nonlinear control strategy in order to both induce the resonant oscillations and to stabilize the unstable motion. Lagrange’s theory is used to derive the dynamics of the system and input–output feedback linearization...

  17. Hadron scattering, resonances, and QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briceno, Raul [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The non-perturbative nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) has historically left a gap in our understanding of the connection between the fundamental theory of the strong interactions and the rich structure of experimentally observed phenomena. For the simplest properties of stable hadrons, this is now circumvented with the use of lattice QCD (LQCD). In this talk I discuss a path towards a rigorous determination of few-hadron observables from LQCD. I illustrate the power of the methodology by presenting recently determined scattering amplitudes in the light-meson sector and their resonance content.

  18. Strongly coupled dust coulomb clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juan Wentau; Lai Yingju; Chen Mingheng; I Lin

    1999-01-01

    The structures and motions of quasi-2-dimensional strongly coupled dust Coulomb clusters with particle number N from few to hundreds in a cylindrical rf plasma trap are studied and compared with the results from the molecular dynamic simulation using more ideal models. Shell structures with periodic packing in different shells and intershell rotational motion dominated excitations are observed at small N. As N increases, the boundary has less effect, the system recovers to the triangular lattice with isotropic vortex type cooperative excitations similar to an infinite N system except the outer shell region. The above generic behaviors are mainly determined by the system symmetry and agree with the simulation results. The detailed interaction form causes minor effect such as the fine structure of packing

  19. Probability densities in strong turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhot, Victor

    2006-03-01

    In this work we, using Mellin’s transform combined with the Gaussian large-scale boundary condition, calculate probability densities (PDFs) of velocity increments P(δu,r), velocity derivatives P(u,r) and the PDF of the fluctuating dissipation scales Q(η,Re), where Re is the large-scale Reynolds number. The resulting expressions strongly deviate from the Log-normal PDF P(δu,r) often quoted in the literature. It is shown that the probability density of the small-scale velocity fluctuations includes information about the large (integral) scale dynamics which is responsible for the deviation of P(δu,r) from P(δu,r). An expression for the function D(h) of the multifractal theory, free from spurious logarithms recently discussed in [U. Frisch, M. Martins Afonso, A. Mazzino, V. Yakhot, J. Fluid Mech. 542 (2005) 97] is also obtained.

  20. Kondo memory in driven strongly correlated quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao; Yan, YiJing; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2013-08-23

    We investigate the real-time current response of strongly correlated quantum dot systems under sinusoidal driving voltages. By means of an accurate hierarchical equations of motion approach, we demonstrate the presence of prominent memory effects induced by the Kondo resonance on the real-time current response. These memory effects appear as distinctive hysteresis line shapes and self-crossing features in the dynamic current-voltage characteristics, with concomitant excitation of odd-number overtones. They emerge as a cooperative effect of quantum coherence-due to inductive behavior-and electron correlations-due to the Kondo resonance. We also show the suppression of memory effects and the transition to classical behavior as a function of temperature. All these phenomena can be observed in experiments and may lead to novel quantum memory applications.

  1. Polarization Calibration of the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter for a 0.1% Polarization Sensitivity in the VUV Range. Part II: In-Flight Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giono, G.; Ishikawa, R.; Narukage, N.; Kano, R.; Katsukawa, Y.; Kubo, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Bando, T.; Hara, H.; Suematsu, Y.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Auchère, F.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Tsuneta, S.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T.; Cirtain, J.; Champey, P.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Štěpán, J.; Belluzzi, L.; Manso Sainz, R.; De Pontieu, B.; Ichimoto, K.; Carlsson, M.; Casini, R.; Goto, M.

    2017-04-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter is a sounding rocket instrument designed to measure for the first time the linear polarization of the hydrogen Lyman-{α} line (121.6 nm). The instrument was successfully launched on 3 September 2015 and observations were conducted at the solar disc center and close to the limb during the five-minutes flight. In this article, the disc center observations are used to provide an in-flight calibration of the instrument spurious polarization. The derived in-flight spurious polarization is consistent with the spurious polarization levels determined during the pre-flight calibration and a statistical analysis of the polarization fluctuations from solar origin is conducted to ensure a 0.014% precision on the spurious polarization. The combination of the pre-flight and the in-flight polarization calibrations provides a complete picture of the instrument response matrix, and a proper error transfer method is used to confirm the achieved polarization accuracy. As a result, the unprecedented 0.1% polarization accuracy of the instrument in the vacuum ultraviolet is ensured by the polarization calibration.

  2. Strong Ideal Convergence in Probabilistic Metric Spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present paper we introduce the concepts of strongly ideal convergent sequence and strong ideal Cauchy sequence in a probabilistic metric (PM) space endowed with the strong topology, and establish some basic facts. Next, we define the strong ideal limit points and the strong ideal cluster points of a sequence in this ...

  3. Strong ideal convergence in probabilistic metric spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present paper we introduce the concepts of strongly ideal convergent sequence and strong ideal Cauchy sequence in a probabilistic metric (PM) space endowed with the strong topology, and establish some basic facts. Next, we define the strong ideal limit points and the strong ideal cluster points of a sequence in this ...

  4. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Byrnes, Christian T; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of ${\\cal O}(10^{-15}\\, \\Gauss)$ today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  5. Remnants of strong tidal interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mcglynn, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the properties of stellar systems that have recently undergone a strong tidal shock, i.e., a shock which removes a significant fraction of the particles in the system, and where the shocked system has a much smaller mass than the producer of the tidal field. N-body calculations of King models shocked in a variety of ways are performed, and the consequences of the shocks are investigated. The results confirm the prediction of Jaffe for shocked systems. Several models are also run where the tidal forces on the system are constant, simulating a circular orbit around a primary, and the development of tidal radii under these static conditions appears to be a mild process which does not dramatically affect material that is not stripped. The tidal radii are about twice as large as classical formulas would predict. Remnant density profiles are compared with a sample of elliptical galaxies, and the implications of the results for the development of stellar populations and galaxies are considered. 38 refs

  6. John Strong - 1941-2006

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on 31 July, a few days before his 65th birthday. John started his career and obtained his PhD in a group from Westfield College, initially working on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). From the early 1970s onwards, however, his research was focused on experiments in CERN, with several particularly notable contributions. The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras (a type of television camera) to record the sparks in the spark chambers. This highly automated system allowed Omega to be used in a similar way to bubble chambers. He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems. In these experiments the Westfield group joined forces with Italian colleagues to measure the form factors of the pion and the kaon, and the lifetime of some of the newly discovered charm particles. Such h...

  7. Strong seismic ground motion propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seale, S.; Archuleta, R.; Pecker, A.; Bouchon, M.; Mohammadioun, G.; Murphy, A.; Mohammadioun, B.

    1988-10-01

    At the McGee Creek, California, site, 3-component strong-motion accelerometers are located at depths of 166 m, 35 m and 0 m. The surface material is glacial moraine, to a depth of 30.5 m, overlying homfels. Accelerations were recorded from two California earthquakes: Round Valley, M L 5.8, November 23, 1984, 18:08 UTC and Chalfant Valley, M L 6.4, July 21, 1986, 14:42 UTC. By separating out the SH components of acceleration, we were able to determine the orientations of the downhole instruments. By separating out the SV component of acceleration, we were able to determine the approximate angle of incidence of the signal at 166 m. A constant phase velocity Haskell-Thomson model was applied to generate synthetic SH seismograms at the surface using the accelerations recorded at 166 m. In the frequency band 0.0 - 10.0 Hz, we compared the filtered synthetic records to the filtered surface data. The onset of the SH pulse is clearly seen, as are the reflections from the interface at 30.5 m. The synthetic record closely matches the data in amplitude and phase. The fit between the synthetic accelerogram and the data shows that the seismic amplification at the surface is a result of the contrast of the impedances (shear stiffnesses) of the near surface materials

  8. Electromagnetic decay of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beene, J.R.; Bertrand, F.E.; Halbert, M.L.; Auble, R.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Horen, D.J.; Robinson, R.L.; Sayer, R.O.; Sjoreen, T.P.

    1985-01-01

    Coincidence experiments were done to investigate the photon and neutron emission from the giant resonance regions of 208 Pb and 90 Zr using the ORNL Spin Spectrometer, a 72-segment NaI detector system. We have determined the total gamma-decay probability, the ground-state gamma branching ratio, and the branching ratios to a number of low-lying states as a function of excitation energy in 208 Pb to approx.15 MeV. Similar data were also obtained on 90 Zr. The total yield of ground-state E2 gamma radiation in 208 Pb and the comparative absence of such radiation in 90 Zr can only be understood if decay of compound (damped) states is considered. Other observations in 208 Pb include the absence of a significant branch from the giant quadrupole resonance (GQR) to the 3 - state at 2.6 MeV, a strong branch to a 3 - state at 4.97 MeV from the same region, and transitions to various 1 - states between 5 to 7 MeV from the E* approx. 14 MeV region (EO resonance)

  9. Atlas of neutron resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Mughabghab, Said

    2018-01-01

    Atlas of Neutron Resonances: Resonance Properties and Thermal Cross Sections Z= 1-60, Sixth Edition, contains an extensive list of detailed individual neutron resonance parameters for Z=1-60, as well as thermal cross sections, capture resonance integrals, average resonance parameters and a short survey of the physics of thermal and resonance neutrons. The long introduction contains: nuclear physics formulas aimed at neutron physicists; topics of special interest such as valence neutron capture, nuclear level density parameters, and s-, p-, and d-wave neutron strength functions; and various comparisons of measured quantities with the predictions of nuclear models, such as the optical model. As in the last edition, additional features have been added to appeal to a wider spectrum of users. These include: spin-dependent scattering lengths that are of interest to solid-state physicists, nuclear physicists and neutron evaluators; calculated and measured Maxwellian average 5-keV and 30-keV capture cross sections o...

  10. Strongly interacting photons and atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alge, W.

    1999-05-01

    This thesis contains the main results of the research topics I have pursued during the my PhD studies at the University of Innsbruck and partly in collaboration with the Institut d' Optique in Orsay, France. It is divided into three parts. The first and largest part discusses the possibility of using strong standing waves as a tool to cool and trap neutral atoms in optical cavities. This is very important in the field of nonlinear optics where several successful experiments with cold atoms in cavities have been performed recently. A discussion of the optical parametric oscillator in a regime where the nonlinearity dominates the evolution is the topic of the second part. We investigated mainly the statistical properties of the cavity output of the three interactive cavity modes. Very recently a system has been proposed which promises fantastic properties. It should exhibit a giant Kerr nonlinearity with negligible absorption thus leading to a photonic turnstile device based on cold atoms in cavity. We have shown that this model suffers from overly simplistic assumptions and developed several more comprehensive approaches to study the behavior of this system. Apart from the division into three parts of different contents the thesis is divided into publications, supplements and invisible stuff. The intention of the supplements is to reach researchers which work in related areas and provide them with more detailed information about the concepts and the numerical tools we used. It is written especially for diploma and PhD students to give them a chance to use the third part of our work which is actually the largest one. They consist of a large number of computer programs we wrote to investigate the behavior of the systems in parameter regions where no hope exists to solve the equations analytically. (author)

  11. Topics in strong Langmuir turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoric, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis discusses certain aspects of the turbulence of a fully ionised non-isothermal plasma dominated by the Langmuir mode. Some of the basic properties of strongly turbulent plasmas are reviewed. In particular, interest is focused on the state of Langmuir turbulence, that is the turbulence of a simple externally unmagnetized plasma. The problem of the existence and dynamics of Langmuir collapse is discussed, often met as a non-linear stage of the modulational instability in the framework of the Zakharov equations (i.e. simple time-averaged dynamical equations). Possible macroscopic consequences of such dynamical turbulent models are investigated. In order to study highly non-linear collapse dynamics in its advanced stage, a set of generalized Zakharov equations are derived. Going beyond the original approximation, the author includes the effects of higher electron non-linearities and a breakdown of slow-timescale quasi-neutrality. He investigates how these corrections may influence the collapse stabilisation. Recently, it has been realised that the modulational instability in a Langmuir plasma will be accompanied by the collisionless-generation of a slow-timescale magnetic field. Accordingly, a novel physical situation has emerged which is investigated in detail. The stability of monochromatic Langmuir waves in a self-magnetized Langmuir plasma, is discussed, and the existence of a novel magneto-modulational instability shown. The wave collapse dynamics is investigated and a physical interpretation of the basic results is given. A problem of the transient analysis of an interaction of time-dependent electromagnetic pulses with linear cold plasma media is investigated. (Auth.)

  12. Promoting Strong Written Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2015-12-01

    The reason that an improvement in the quality of technical writing is still needed in the classroom is due to the fact that universities are facing challenging problems not only on the technological front but also on the socio-economic front. The universities are actively responding to the changes that are taking place in the global consumer marketplace. Obviously, there are numerous benefits of promoting strong written communication skills. They can be summarized into the following six categories. First, and perhaps the most important: The University achieves learner satisfaction. The learner has documented verbally, that the necessary knowledge has been successfully acquired. This results in learner loyalty that in turn will attract more qualified learners.Second, quality communication lowers the cost per pupil, consequently resulting in increased productivity backed by a stronger economic structure and forecast. Third, quality communications help to improve the cash flow and cash reserves of the university. Fourth, having high quality communication enables the university to justify the need for high costs of tuition and fees. Fifth, better quality in written communication skills result in attracting top-quality learners. This will lead to happier and satisfied learners, not to mention greater prosperity for the university as a whole. Sixth, quality written communication skills result in reduced complaints, thus meaning fewer hours spent on answering or correcting the situation. The University faculty and staff are thus able to devote more time on scholarly activities, meaningful research and productive community service. References Boyer, Ernest L. (1990). Scholarship reconsidered: Priorities of the Professorate.Princeton, NJ: Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Hawkins, P., & Winter, J. (1997). Mastering change: Learning the lessons of the enterprise.London: Department for Education and Employment. Buzzel, Robert D., and Bradley T. Gale. (1987

  13. Theory of neutron resonance cross sections for safety applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1992-09-01

    Neutron resonances exert a strong influence on the behaviour of nuclear reactors, especially on their response to the temperature changes accompanying power excursions, and also on the efficiency of shielding materials. The relevant theory of neutron resonance cross sections including the practically important approximations is reviewed, both for the resolved and the unresolved resonance region. Numerical techniques for Doppler broadening of resonances are presented, and the construction of group constants and especially of self-shielding factors for neutronics calculations is outlined. (orig.) [de

  14. Theory of neutron resonance cross sections for safety applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron resonances exert a strong influence on the behaviour of nuclear reactors, especially on their response to the temperature changes accompanying power excursions, and also on the efficiency of shielding materials. The relevant theory of neutron resonance cross sections including the practically important approximations is reviewed, both for the resolved and the unresolved resonance region. Numerical techniques for Doppler broadening of resonance are presented, and the construction of group constants and especially of self-shielding factors for neutronics calculations is outlined. (author). 75 refs, 14 figs, 3 tabs

  15. Photothermal self-excitation of the micromachined resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churenkov, Alexander V.; Kozel, Stanislav M.; Listvin, Vladimir N.

    1990-07-01

    Recently interest has grown to the physical quantities fibre-optic sensors in which a micromachined resonator acts as a sensitive element. This resonator can change the resonant frequency when acted upon by an outside force. Energy supply necessary for the resonator excitation and transfer of information about the outer action are accomplished by optical fibres, that can be present in the zone of a higher aggressiveness, strong electromagnetic interferences atc. The frequency output of such sensors is easily processed by digital systems and is insensitive to signal level.

  16. Nuclear isovector giant resonances excited by pion single charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, B.H.

    1993-07-01

    This thesis is an experimental study of isovector giant resonances in light nuclei excited by pion single charge exchange reactions. Giant dipole resonances in light nuclei are known to be highly structured. For the mass 9 and 13 giant dipole resonances, isospin considerations were found to be very important to understanding this structure. by comparing the excitation functions from cross section measurements of the (π + , π 0 ) and (π, π 0 ) inclusive reactions, the authors determined the dominant isospin structure of the analog IVGR's. The comparison was made after decomposing the cross section into resonant and non-resonant components. This decomposition is made in the framework of strong absorption and quasi-free scattering. Measurements in the region of the isovector giant dipole resonances (IVGDR) were made to cover the inclusive angular distributions out to the second minimum. Study of the giant resonance decay process provides further understanding of the resonances. This study was carried out by observing the (π + , π 0 p) coincident reactions involving the resonances of 9 B and 13 N excited from 9 Be and 13 C nuclei. These measurements determined the spectra of the decay protons. This method also permitted a decomposition of the giant resonances into their isospin components. The multipolarities of the resonances were revealed by the decay proton angular correlations which, for dipoles, are of the form 1 + A 2 P 2 (cos θ)

  17. Dynamically generated resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.; Vicente Vacas, M.J.; Gonzalez, P.; Martinez-Torres, A.; Ramos, A.; Sarkar, S.; Sun Baoxi; Vijande, J.; Jido, D.; Sekihara, T.; Khemchandani, K.

    2009-01-01

    In this talk I report on recent work related to the dynamical generation of baryonic resonances, some made up from pseudoscalar meson-baryon, others from vector meson-baryon and a third type from two meson-one baryon systems. We can establish a correspondence with known baryonic resonances, reinforcing conclusions previously drawn and bringing new light on the nature of some baryonic resonances of higher mass. (authors)

  18. Electron paramagnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Al'tshuler, S A

    2013-01-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance is a comprehensive text on the field of electron paramagnetic resonance, covering both the theoretical background and the results of experiment. This book is composed of eight chapters that cover theoretical materials and experimental data on ionic crystals, since these are the materials that have been most extensively studied by the methods of paramagnetic resonance. The opening chapters provide an introduction to the basic principles of electron paramagnetic resonance and the methods of its measurement. The next chapters are devoted to the theory of spectra an

  19. Resonant laser printing of structural colors on high-index dielectric metasurfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Yan, Wei; Levy, Uriel

    2017-01-01

    -dependent resonances. Strong on-resonance energy absorption under pulsed laser irradiation locally elevates the lattice temperature (exceeding 1200 K) in an ultrashort time scale (1 ns). This forms the basis for resonant laser printing, where rapid melting allows for surface energy-driven morphology changes...

  20. Collective hypersonic excitations in strongly multiple scattering colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, T; Gantzounis, G; Kiefer, D; Hellmann, G; Sainidou, R; Fytas, G; Stefanou, N

    2011-04-29

    Unprecedented low-dispersion high-frequency acoustic excitations are observed in dense suspensions of elastically hard colloids. The experimental phononic band structure for SiO(2) particles with different sizes and volume fractions is well represented by rigorous full-elastodynamic multiple-scattering calculations. The slow phonons, which do not relate to particle resonances, are localized in the surrounding liquid medium and stem from coherent multiple scattering that becomes strong in the close-packing regime. Such rich phonon-matter interactions in nanostructures, being still unexplored, can open new opportunities in phononics.

  1. Cooperative fluorescence from a strongly driven dilute cloud of atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Wubs, Martijn; Lodahl, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We investigate cooperative fluorescence in a dilute cloud of strongly driven two-level emitters. Starting from the Heisenberg equations of motion, we compute the first-order scattering corrections to the saturation of the excited-state population and to the resonance-fluorescence spectrum, which...... both require going beyond the state-of-the-art linear-optics approach to describe collective phenomena. A dipole blockade is observed due to long-range dipole-dipole coupling that vanishes at stronger driving fields. Furthermore, we compute the inelastic component of the light scattered by a cloud...

  2. Strong light-matter interaction in graphene - Invited talk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui

    of graphene with noble-metal nanostructures is currently being explored for strong light-graphene interaction. We introduce a novel hybrid graphene-metal system for studying light-matter interactions with gold-void nanostructures exhibiting resonances in the visible range[1]. The hybrid system is further......Graphene has attracted lots of attention due to its remarkable electronic and optical properties, thus providing great promise in photonics and optoelectronics. However, the performance of these devices is generally limited by the weak light-matter interaction in graphene. The combination...

  3. Evidence for strong Breit interaction in dielectronic recombination of highly charged heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Kavanagh, Anthony P; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A; Li, Yueming; Kato, Daiji; Currell, Fred J; Ohtani, Shunsuke

    2008-02-22

    Resonant strengths have been measured for dielectronic recombination of Li-like iodine, holmium, and bismuth using an electron beam ion trap. By observing the atomic number dependence of the state-resolved resonant strength, clear experimental evidence has been obtained that the importance of the generalized Breit interaction (GBI) effect on dielectronic recombination increases as the atomic number increases. In particular, it has been shown that the GBI effect is exceptionally strong for the recombination through the resonant state [1s2s(2)2p(1/2)](1).

  4. ac Stark shift and dephasing of a superconducting qubit strongly coupled to a cavity field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, D I; Wallraff, A; Blais, A; Frunzio, L; Huang, R-S; Majer, J; Girvin, S M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2005-04-01

    We have performed spectroscopy of a superconducting charge qubit coupled nonresonantly to a single mode of an on-chip resonator. The strong coupling induces a large ac Stark shift in the energy levels of both the qubit and the resonator. The dispersive shift of the resonator frequency is used to nondestructively determine the qubit state. Photon shot noise in the measurement field induces qubit level fluctuations leading to dephasing which is characteristic for the measurement backaction. A crossover in line shape with measurement power is observed and theoretically explained. For weak measurement a long intrinsic dephasing time of T2>200 ns of the qubit is found.

  5. Room temperature strong light-matter coupling in three dimensional terahertz meta-atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulillo, B., E-mail: bruno.paulillo@u-psud.fr; Manceau, J.-M., E-mail: jean-michel.manceau@u-psud.fr; Colombelli, R., E-mail: raffaele.colombelli@u-psud.fr [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, Univ. Paris Sud, UMR8622 CNRS, 91405 Orsay (France); Li, L. H.; Davies, A. G.; Linfield, E. H. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Woodhouse Lane, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-07

    We demonstrate strong light-matter coupling in three dimensional terahertz meta-atoms at room temperature. The intersubband transition of semiconductor quantum wells with a parabolic energy potential is strongly coupled to the confined circuital mode of three-dimensional split-ring metal-semiconductor-metal resonators that have an extreme sub-wavelength volume (λ/10). The frequency of these lumped-element resonators is controlled by the size and shape of the external antenna, while the interaction volume remains constant. This allows the resonance frequency to be swept across the intersubband transition and the anti-crossing characteristic of the strong light-matter coupling regime to be observed. The Rabi splitting, which is twice the Rabi frequency (2Ω{sub Rabi}), amounts to 20% of the bare transition at room temperature, and it increases to 28% at low-temperature.

  6. On open electromagnetic resonators: relation between interferometers and resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manenkov, Aleksandr A; Bykov, Vladimir P; Kuleshov, N V

    2010-01-01

    The physical difference between the concepts 'Fabry-Perot interferometer' and 'open resonator' is discussed. It is shown that the use of the term 'Fabry-Perot resonator' for open laser resonators is incorrect both from the historical viewpoint and from the viewpoint of the physical meaning of the processes occurring in these resonators. (laser beams and resonators)

  7. Acoustic resonance for nonmetallic mine detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of acoustic resonance for detection of plastic mines was investigated by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Instrumentation and Controls Division under an internally funded program. The data reported in this paper suggest that acoustic resonance is not a practical method for mine detection. Representative small plastic anti-personnel mines were tested, and were found to not exhibit detectable acoustic resonances. Also, non-metal objects known to have strong acoustic resonances were tested with a variety of excitation techniques, and no practical non-contact method of exciting a consistently detectable resonance in a buried object was discovered. Some of the experimental data developed in this work may be useful to other researchers seeking a method to detect buried plastic mines. A number of excitation methods and their pitfalls are discussed. Excitation methods that were investigated include swept acoustic, chopped acoustic, wavelet acoustic, and mechanical shaking. Under very contrived conditions, a weak response that could be attributed to acoustic resonance was observed, but it does not appear to be practical as a mine detection feature. Transfer properties of soil were investigated. Impulse responses of several representative plastic mines were investigated. Acoustic leakage coupling, and its implications as a disruptive mechanism were investigated.

  8. Scattering processes and resonances from lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Young, Ross D.

    2018-04-01

    The vast majority of hadrons observed in nature are not stable under the strong interaction; rather they are resonances whose existence is deduced from enhancements in the energy dependence of scattering amplitudes. The study of hadron resonances offers a window into the workings of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) in the low-energy nonperturbative region, and in addition many probes of the limits of the electroweak sector of the standard model consider processes which feature hadron resonances. From a theoretical standpoint, this is a challenging field: the same dynamics that binds quarks and gluons into hadron resonances also controls their decay into lighter hadrons, so a complete approach to QCD is required. Presently, lattice QCD is the only available tool that provides the required nonperturbative evaluation of hadron observables. This article reviews progress in the study of few-hadron reactions in which resonances and bound states appear using lattice QCD techniques. The leading approach is described that takes advantage of the periodic finite spatial volume used in lattice QCD calculations to extract scattering amplitudes from the discrete spectrum of QCD eigenstates in a box. An explanation is given of how from explicit lattice QCD calculations one can rigorously garner information about a variety of resonance properties, including their masses, widths, decay couplings, and form factors. The challenges which currently limit the field are discussed along with the steps being taken to resolve them.

  9. A New Resonance Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Alan

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of the speed of sound in air with the resonance tube is a popular experiment that often yields accurate results. One approach is to hold a vibrating tuning fork over an air column that is partially immersed in water. The column is raised and lowered in the water until the generated standing wave produces resonance: this occurs at…

  10. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  11. Resonance and Fractal Geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, Henk W.

    The phenomenon of resonance will be dealt with from the viewpoint of dynamical systems depending on parameters and their bifurcations. Resonance phenomena are associated to open subsets in the parameter space, while their complement corresponds to quasi-periodicity and chaos. The latter phenomena

  12. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 11. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Biological Applications. B G Hegde. General Article Volume 20 Issue 11 November 2015 pp 1017-1032. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  13. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  14. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  15. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  16. Large mass hierarchies from strongly-coupled dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athenodorou, Andreas; Bennett, Ed; Bergner, Georg; Elander, Daniel; Lin, C.-J. David; Lucini, Biagio; Piai, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    Besides the Higgs particle discovered in 2012, with mass 125 GeV, recent LHC data show tentative signals for new resonances in diboson as well as diphoton searches at high center-of-mass energies (2 TeV and 750 GeV, respectively). If these signals are confirmed (or other new resonances are discovered at the TeV scale), the large hierarchies between masses of new bosons require a dynamical explanation. Motivated by these tentative signals of new physics, we investigate the theoretical possibility that large hierarchies in the masses of glueballs could arise dynamically in new strongly-coupled gauge theories extending the standard model of particle physics. We study lattice data on non-Abelian gauge theories in the (near-)conformal regime as well as a simple toy model in the context of gauge/gravity dualities. We focus our attention on the ratio R between the mass of the lightest spin-2 and spin-0 resonances, that for technical reasons is a particularly convenient and clean observable to study. For models in which (non-perturbative) large anomalous dimensions arise dynamically, we show indications that this mass ratio can be large, with R>5. Moreover,our results suggest that R might be related to universal properties of the IR fixed point. Our findings provide an interesting step towards understanding large mass ratios in the non-perturbative regime of quantum field theories with (near) IR conformal behaviour.

  17. Resonant snubber inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J.S.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Chen, D.; Scudiere, M.B.; Ott, G.W. Jr.; White, C.P.; McKeever, J.W.

    1997-06-24

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 14 figs.

  18. Fundamentals of nanomechanical resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, Silvan; Roukes, Michael Lee

    2016-01-01

    This authoritative book introduces and summarizes the latest models and skills required to design and optimize nanomechanical resonators, taking a top-down approach that uses macroscopic formulas to model the devices. The authors cover the electrical and mechanical aspects of nano electromechanical system (NEMS) devices. The introduced mechanical models are also key to the understanding and optimization of nanomechanical resonators used e.g. in optomechanics. Five comprehensive chapters address: The eigenmodes derived for the most common continuum mechanical structures used as nanomechanical resonators; The main sources of energy loss in nanomechanical resonators; The responsiveness of micro and nanomechanical resonators to mass, forces, and temperature; The most common underlying physical transduction mechanisms; The measurement basics, including amplitude and frequency noise. The applied approach found in this book is appropriate for engineering students and researchers working with micro and nanomechanical...

  19. Resonant snubber inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Young, Sr., Robert W.; Chen, Daoshen; Scudiere, Matthew B.; Ott, Jr., George W.; White, Clifford P.; McKeever, John W.

    1997-01-01

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  20. The effect of a strong stellar flare on the atmospheric chemistry of an earth-like planet orbiting an M dwarf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Antígona; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Meadows, Victoria; Kasting, James; Hawley, Suzanne

    2010-09-01

    Main sequence M stars pose an interesting problem for astrobiology: their abundance in our galaxy makes them likely targets in the hunt for habitable planets, but their strong chromospheric activity produces high-energy radiation and charged particles that may be detrimental to life. We studied the impact of the 1985 April 12 flare from the M dwarf AD Leonis (AD Leo), simulating the effects from both UV radiation and protons on the atmospheric chemistry of a hypothetical, Earth-like planet located within its habitable zone. Based on observations of solar proton events and the Neupert effect, we estimated a proton flux associated with the flare of 5.9 × 10⁸ protons cm⁻² sr⁻¹ s⁻¹ for particles with energies >10 MeV. Then we calculated the abundance of nitrogen oxides produced by the flare by scaling the production of these compounds during a large solar proton event called the Carrington event. The simulations were performed with a 1-D photochemical model coupled to a 1-D radiative/convective model. Our results indicate that the UV radiation emitted during the flare does not produce a significant change in the ozone column depth of the planet. When the action of protons is included, the ozone depletion reaches a maximum of 94% two years after the flare for a planet with no magnetic field. At the peak of the flare, the calculated UV fluxes that reach the surface, in the wavelength ranges that are damaging for life, exceed those received on Earth during less than 100 s. Therefore, flares may not present a direct hazard for life on the surface of an orbiting habitable planet. Given that AD Leo is one of the most magnetically active M dwarfs known, this conclusion should apply to planets around other M dwarfs with lower levels of chromospheric activity.

  1. Strongly Coupled Models with a Higgs-like Boson*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pich Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Considering the one-loop calculation of the oblique S and T parameters, we have presented a study of the viability of strongly-coupled scenarios of electroweak symmetry breaking with a light Higgs-like boson. The calculation has been done by using an effective Lagrangian, being short-distance constraints and dispersive relations the main ingredients of the estimation. Contrary to a widely spread believe, we have demonstrated that strongly coupled electroweak models with massive resonances are not in conflict with experimentalconstraints on these parameters and the recently observed Higgs-like resonance. So there is room for these models, but they are stringently constrained. The vector and axial-vector states should be heavy enough (with masses above the TeV scale, the mass splitting between them is highly preferred to be small and the Higgs-like scalar should have a WW coupling close to the Standard Model one. It is important to stress that these conclusions do not depend critically on the inclusion of the second Weinberg sum rule.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses ... of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  3. From strong to ultrastrong coupling in circuit QED architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemczyk, Thomas

    2011-08-10

    The field of cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) studies the interaction between light and matter on a fundamental level: a single atom interacts with a single photon. If the atom-photon coupling is larger than any dissipative effects, the system enters the strong-coupling limit. A peculiarity of this regime is the possibility to form coherent superpositions of light and matter excitations - a kind of 'molecule' consisting of an atomic and a photonic contribution. The novel research field of circuit QED extends cavity QED concepts to solid-state based system. Here, a superconducting quantum bit is coupled to an on-chip superconducting one-dimensional waveguide resonator. Owing to the small mode-volume of the resonant cavity, the large dipole moment of the 'artificial atom' and the enormous engineering potential inherent to superconducting quantum circuits, remarkable atom-photon coupling strengths can be realized. This thesis describes the theoretical framework, the development of fabrication techniques and the implementation of experimental characterization techniques for superconducting quantum circuits for circuit QED applications. In particular, we study the interaction between superconducting flux quantum bits and high-quality coplanar waveguide resonators in the strong-coupling limit. Furthermore, we report on the first experimental realization of a circuit QED system operating in the ultrastrong-coupling regime, where the atom-photon coupling rate reaches a considerable fraction of the relevant system frequencies. In these experiments we could observe phenomena that can not be explained within the renowned Jaynes-Cummings model. (orig.)

  4. Subwavelength resonant antennas enhancing electromagnetic energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumbe Tekam, Gabin; Ginis, Vincent; Seetharamdoo, Divitha; Danckaert, Jan

    2016-04-01

    In this work, an electromagnetic energy harvester operating at microwave frequencies is designed based on a cut- wire metasurface. This metamaterial is known to contain a quasistatic electric dipole resonator leading to a strong resonant electric response when illuminated by electromagnetic fields.1 Starting from an equivalent electrical circuit, we analytically design the parameters of the system to tune the resonance frequency of the harvester at the desired frequency band. Subsequently, we compare these results with numerical simulations, which have been obtained using finite elements numerical simulations. Finally, we optimize the design by investigating the best arrangement for energy harvesting by coupling in parallel and in series many single layers of cut-wire metasurfaces. We also discuss the implementation of different geometries and sizes of the cut-wire metasurface for achieving different center frequencies and bandwidths.

  5. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  6. Properties of spiral resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeuser, J.

    1989-10-01

    The present thesis deals with the calculation and the study of the application possibilities of single and double spiral resonators. The main aim was the development and the construction of reliable and effective high-power spiral resonators for the UNILAC of the GSI in Darmstadt and the H - -injector for the storage ring HERA of DESY in Hamburg. After the presentation of the construction and the properties of spiral resonators and their description by oscillating-circuit models the theoretical foundations of the bunching are presented and some examples of a rebuncher and debuncher and their influence on the longitudinal particle dynamics are shown. After the description of the characteristic accelerator quantities by means of an oscillating-circuit model and the theory of an inhomogeneous λ/4 line it is shown, how the resonance frequency and the efficiency of single and double spiral resonators can be calculated from the geometrical quantities of the structure. In the following the dependence of the maximal reachable resonator voltage in dependence on the gap width and the surface of the drift tubes is studied. Furthermore the high-power resonators are presented, which were built for the different applications for the GSI in Darmstadt, DESY in Hamburg, and for the FOM Institute in Amsterdam. (orig./HSI) [de

  7. Resonator quantum electrodynamics on a microtrap chip; Resonator-Quantenelektrodynamik auf einem Mikrofallenchip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmetz, Tilo

    2008-04-29

    In the present dissertation experiments on resonator quantum electrodynamics on a microtrap chip are described. Thereby for the first time single atoms catched in a chip trap could be detected. For this in the framework of this thesis a novel optical microresonator was developed, which can because of its miniaturization be combined with the microtrap technique introduced in our working group for the manipulation of ultracold atoms. For this resonator glass-fiber ends are used as mirror substrates, between which a standing light wave is formed. With such a fiber Fabry-Perot resonator we obtain a finess of up to {approx}37,000. Because of the small mode volumina in spite of moderate resonator quality the coherent interaction between an atom and a photon can be made so large that the regime of the strong atom-resonator coupling is reached. For the one-atom-one-photon coupling rate and the one-atom-one-photon cooperativity thereby record values of g{sub 0}=2{pi}.300 MHz respectively C{sub 0}=210 are reached. Just so for the first time the strong coupling regime between a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and the field of a high-quality resonator could be reached. The BEC was thereby by means of the magnetic microtrap potentials deterministically brought to a position within the resonator and totally transformed in a well defined antinode of an additionally optical standing-wave trap. The spectrum of the coupled atom-resonator system was measured for different atomic numbers and atom-resonator detunings, whereby a collective vacuum Rabi splitting of more than 20 GHz could be reached. [German] In der vorliegenden Dissertation werden Experimente zur Resonator-Quantenelektrodynamik auf einem Mikrofallenchip beschrieben. Dabei konnte u. a. erstmals einzelne, in einer Chipfalle gefangene Atome detektiert werden. Hier fuer wurde im Rahmen dieser Arbeit ein neuartiger optischer Mikroresonator entwickelt, der sich dank seiner Miniaturisierung mit der in unserer Arbeitsgruppe

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  10. Resonant power converters

    CERN Document Server

    Kazimierczuk, Marian K

    2012-01-01

    This book is devoted to resonant energy conversion in power electronics. It is a practical, systematic guide to the analysis and design of various dc-dc resonant inverters, high-frequency rectifiers, and dc-dc resonant converters that are building blocks of many of today's high-frequency energy processors. Designed to function as both a superior senior-to-graduate level textbook for electrical engineering courses and a valuable professional reference for practicing engineers, it provides students and engineers with a solid grasp of existing high-frequency technology, while acquainting them wit

  11. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Girit, Caglar O; Mickelson, William E; Zettl, Alexander K; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-05

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  12. Doubly resonant multiphoton ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crance, M.

    1978-01-01

    A particular case of doubly resonant multiphoton ionization is theoretically investigated. More precisely, two levels quasi-resonant with two successive harmonics of the field frequency are considered. The method used is based on the effective operator formalism first introduced for this problem by Armstrong, Beers and Feneuille. The main result is to show the possibility of observing large interference effects on the width of the resonances. Moreover this treatment allows us to make more precise the connection between effective operator formalism and standard perturbation theory

  13. Dihadronic and dileptonic resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareev, F.A.; Barabanov, M.Yu.; Kazacha, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    Simple phenomenological rules are suggested for calculation of dihadron and dilepton resonance masses. A general interpretation is given for different exotic resonances in nuclear physics: Darmstadt-effect, dibaryon, dipion and other resonances. Information about the inner structure of e ± , proton, neutron, pions and so on can be obtained from the usual reactions of the type e + + e - =>γγ, e ± +γ=>e ± γ, e ± μ ± , e ± N... at low, intermediate and high energies using existing experimental devices

  14. Perspective on resonances of metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Huang, Lirong

    2015-07-27

    Electromagnetic resonance as the most important characteristic of metamaterials enables lots of exotic phenomena, such as invisible, negative refraction, man-made magnetism, etc. Conventional LC-resonance circuit model as the most authoritative and classic model is good at explaining and predicting the fundamental resonance wavelength of a metamaterial, while feels hard for high-order resonances, especially for resonance intensity (strength of resonance, determining on the performance and efficiency of metamaterial-based devices). In present work, via an easy-to-understand mass-spring model, we present a different and comprehensive insight for the resonance mechanism of metamaterials, through which both the resonance wavelengths (including the fundamental and high-order resonance wavelengths) and resonance intensities of metamaterials can be better understood. This developed theory has been well verified by different-material and different-structure resonators. This perspective will provide a broader space for exploring novel optical devices based on metamaterials (or metasurfaces).

  15. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short Jr., Billy Joe [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  16. Atoms and clusters in strong laser fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchenko, T.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes experimental and theoretical studies on the interaction of strong infrared laser fields with atoms and atomic clusters. Part I provides an overview of the main strong-field phenomena in atoms, molecules and clusters and describes the state-of-the-art in strong-field science.

  17. Strong Bisimilarity of Simple Process Algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srba, Jirí

    2003-01-01

    We study bisimilarity and regularity problems of simple process algebras. In particular, we show PSPACE-hardness of the following problems: (i) strong bisimilarity of Basic Parallel Processes (BPP), (ii) strong bisimilarity of Basic Process Algebra (BPA), (iii) strong regularity of BPP, and (iv) ...

  18. 78 FR 15710 - Strong Sensitizer Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... definition of ``strong sensitizer'' found at 16 CFR 1500.3(c)(5). The Commission is proposing to revise the supplemental definition of ``strong sensitizer'' due to advancements in the science of sensitization that have... document is intended to clarify the ``strong sensitizer'' definition, assist manufacturers in understanding...

  19. Piezoelectric MEMS resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Piazza, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces piezoelectric microelectromechanical (pMEMS) resonators to a broad audience by reviewing design techniques including use of finite element modeling, testing and qualification of resonators, and fabrication and large scale manufacturing techniques to help inspire future research and entrepreneurial activities in pMEMS. The authors discuss the most exciting developments in the area of materials and devices for the making of piezoelectric MEMS resonators, and offer direct examples of the technical challenges that need to be overcome in order to commercialize these types of devices. Some of the topics covered include: Widely-used piezoelectric materials, as well as materials in which there is emerging interest Principle of operation and design approaches for the making of flexural, contour-mode, thickness-mode, and shear-mode piezoelectric resonators, and examples of practical implementation of these devices Large scale manufacturing approaches, with a focus on the practical aspects associate...

  20. Resonant diphoton phenomenology simplified

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panico, Giuliano [IFAE, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona,E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Vecchi, Luca [SISSA,via Bonomea 265, 34136, Trieste (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova and INFN - Sezione di Padova,via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Wulzer, Andrea [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova and INFN - Sezione di Padova,via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2016-06-30

    A framework is proposed to describe resonant diphoton phenomenology at hadron colliders in full generality. It can be employed for a comprehensive model-independent interpretation of the experimental data. Within the general framework, few benchmark scenarios are defined as representative of the various phenomenological options and/or of motivated new physics scenarios. Their usage is illustrated by performing a characterization of the 750 GeV excess, based on a recast of available experimental results. We also perform an assessment of which properties of the resonance could be inferred, after discovery, by a careful experimental study of the diphoton distributions. These include the spin J of the new particle and its dominant production mode. Partial information on its CP-parity can also be obtained, but only for J≥2. The complete determination of the resonance CP properties requires studying the pattern of the initial state radiation that accompanies the resonant diphoton production.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). ERCP is a diagnostic procedure that combines endoscopy , which uses an illuminated optical instrument to ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Biliary ...

  2. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Guhl, L.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given in this paper of the physical and technical principles underlying the 'time-of-flight' technique for imaging of vessels by magnetic resonance tomography. Major indications for the new procedure of magnetic resonance angiography at present are intracerebral and extracerebral vessels, with digital subtraction angiography quite often being required to cope with minor alterations (small aneurysms, small occlusions). Magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography are compared to each other for advantages and disadvantages. Basically, replacement of radiological angiography by magnetic resonance angiography appears to be possible only within limits, since X-ray diagnostics primarily provides morphological information about vessels, whereas flow dynamics is visualized by the 'time-of-flight' technique. (orig.) [de

  3. Resonances in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Matthias F. M.; Lange, Jens Sören; Pennington, Michael; Bettoni, Diego; Brambilla, Nora; Crede, Volker; Eidelman, Simon; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Gradl, Wolfgang; Lang, Christian B.; Metag, Volker; Nakano, Takashi; Nieves, Juan; Neubert, Sebastian; Oka, Makoto; Olsen, Stephen L.; Pappagallo, Marco; Paul, Stephan; Pelizäus, Marc; Pilloni, Alessandro; Prencipe, Elisabetta; Ritman, Jim; Ryan, Sinead; Thoma, Ulrike; Uwer, Ulrich; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting 'Resonances in QCD', which took place at GSI October 12-14, 2015 (Fig.~1). A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions; what is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD?; where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers?; and what experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with up, down and strange quark content were considered. For heavy-light and heavy-heavy meson systems, those with charm quarks were the focus.This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  4. Writing with resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Ninna; Wegener, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we explore what organization and management scholars can do to write with resonance and to facilitate an emotional, bodily, or in other ways sensory connection between the text and the reader. We propose that resonance can be relevant for organization and management scholars in two...... ways. First, it may facilitate a better understanding of the research we are attempting to convey in our papers, an understanding that draws on the reader’s prior experiences, and their embodied, embedded knowledge. Second, resonance may foster an inclination in the reader to engage with, contribute to......, and thus bring forward the field of research in question. We propose that writing with resonance may be a way to further the impact of academic work by extending the modalities with which our readers can relate to and experience our work....

  5. Lattices of dielectric resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Trubin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This book provides the analytical theory of complex systems composed of a large number of high-Q dielectric resonators. Spherical and cylindrical dielectric resonators with inferior and also whispering gallery oscillations allocated in various lattices are considered. A new approach to S-matrix parameter calculations based on perturbation theory of Maxwell equations, developed for a number of high-Q dielectric bodies, is introduced. All physical relationships are obtained in analytical form and are suitable for further computations. Essential attention is given to a new unified formalism of the description of scattering processes. The general scattering task for coupled eigen oscillations of the whole system of dielectric resonators is described. The equations for the  expansion coefficients are explained in an applicable way. The temporal Green functions for the dielectric resonator are presented. The scattering process of short pulses in dielectric filter structures, dielectric antennas  and lattices of d...

  6. Resonances and backward-angle scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokstad, R.G.

    1978-01-01

    The strong enhancement of elastic scattering at large angles observed for systems such as α + 40 Ca and recently for 12 C + 28 Si and 16 O 28 Si was interpreted in terms of entrance channel resonances having a quasi-molecular character. Alternative explanations in terms of potential scattering were also presented. An overview is given of the experimental data and their interpretations. A consistent procedure for the evaluation of the experimental data is discussed. 50 references

  7. Resonance ionization spectroscopy in dysprosium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, D., E-mail: dstuder@uni-mainz.de; Dyrauf, P.; Naubereit, P.; Heinke, R.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    We report on resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) of high-lying energy levels in dysprosium. We developed efficient excitation schemes and re-determined the first ionization potential (IP) via analysis of Rydberg convergences. For this purpose both two- and three-step excitation ladders were investigated. An overall ionization efficiency of 25(4) % could be demonstrated in the RISIKO mass separator of Mainz University, using a three-step resonance ionization scheme. Moreover, an extensive analysis of the even-parity 6sns- and 6snd-Rydberg-series convergences, measured via two-step excitation was performed. To account for strong perturbations in the observed s-series, the approach of multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) was applied. Considering all individual series limits we extracted an IP-value of 47901.76(5) cm{sup −1}, which agrees with the current literature value of 47901.7(6) cm{sup −1}, but is one order of magnitude more precise.

  8. Threshold enhancement of diphoton resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Bharucha, Aoife; Goudelis, Andreas

    2016-10-10

    The data collected by the LHC collaborations at an energy of 13 TeV indicates the presence of an excess in the diphoton spectrum that would correspond to a resonance of a 750 GeV mass. The apparently large production cross section is nevertheless very difficult to explain in minimal models. We consider the possibility that the resonance is a pseudoscalar boson $A$ with a two--photon decay mediated by a charged and uncolored fermion having a mass at the $\\frac12 M_A$ threshold and a very small decay width, $\\ll 1$ MeV; one can then generate a large enhancement of the $A\\gamma\\gamma$ amplitude which explains the excess without invoking a large multiplicity of particles propagating in the loop, large electric charges and/or very strong Yukawa couplings. The implications of such a threshold enhancement are discussed in two explicit scenarios: i) the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in which the $A$ state is produced via the top quark mediated gluon fusion process and decays into photons predominantly through...

  9. Resonant dielectric metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loui, Hung; Carroll, James; Clem, Paul G; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-12-02

    A resonant dielectric metamaterial comprises a first and a second set of dielectric scattering particles (e.g., spheres) having different permittivities arranged in a cubic array. The array can be an ordered or randomized array of particles. The resonant dielectric metamaterials are low-loss 3D isotropic materials with negative permittivity and permeability. Such isotropic double negative materials offer polarization and direction independent electromagnetic wave propagation.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Angus

    1990-01-01

    An assessment is made of the clinical benefits of expensive diagnostic technology, such as the magnetic resonance imaging. It is concluded that to most radiologists, magnetic resonance imaging has a definite place in the diagnostic scenario, especially for demonstrating central nervous system lesions in multiple sclerosis. While it is recognized that medical and financial resources are limited, it is emphasised that the cost to society must be balanced against the patient benefit. 17 refs

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor

  12. Hexagonal quartz resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1982-01-01

    A generally flat, relatively thin AT-cut piezoelectric resonator element structured to minimize the force-frequency effect when mounted and energized in a housing. The resonator is in the form of an equilateral hexagon with the X crystallographic axis of the crystal passing through one set of opposing corners with mounting being effected at an adjacent set of corners respectively .+-.60.degree. away from the X axis which thereby results in a substantially zero frequency shift of the operating frequency.

  13. Anomalous Diffusion Near Resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Synchro-betatron resonances can lead to emittance growth and the loss of luminosity. We consider the detailed dynamics of a bunch near such a low order resonance driven by crossing angles at the collision points. We characterize the nature of diffusion and find that it is anomalous and sub-diffusive. This affects both the shape of the beam distribution and the time scales for growth. Predictions of a simplified anomalous diffusion model are compared with direct simulations. Transport of particles near resonances is still not a well understood phenomenon. Often, without justification, phase space motion is assumed to be a normal diffusion process although at least one case of anomalous diffusion in beam dynamics has been reported [1]. Here we will focus on the motion near synchro-betatron resonances which can be excited by several means, including beams crossing at an angle at the collision points as in the LHC. We will consider low order resonances which couple the horizontal and longitudinal planes, both for simplicity and to observe large effects over short time scales. While the tunes we consider are not practical for a collider, nonetheless the transport mechanisms we uncover are also likely to operate at higher order resonances.

  14. Current algebra method for form factors and strong decays with hard pions and kaons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, P.P.

    1969-01-01

    The F K /F Π ratio between the kaon and pion decay couplings in one lepton pair, sum rules for Weinberg spectral functions, form factor renormalization of the K l3 decay because of the SU(3) symmetry violation and the calculations of strong decays of the K* and K A strange resonances are presented and discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  15. Working with MRI: An investigation of occupational exposure to strong static magnetic fields and associated symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, K.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) makes use of electromagnetic fields in the non-ionizing radiation frequency ranges. One of them is a continuously present strong static magnetic field (SMF), which extends up to several meters around the scanner. Each time an MRI worker performs tasks near the

  16. Observation of strong magnetic effects in visible-infrared sum frequency generation from magnetic structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirilyuk, A.; Knippels, G.M.H.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Renard, S.; Rasing, T.; Heskamp, I. R.; Lodder, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    We have observed very strong magnetization-induced changes of the infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) intensity from thin magnetic films using a free electron laser as a tunable infrared source. With the help of a magnetic grating a clear resonance is observed due to the excitation of

  17. Parity violation effects in the hydrogen atom in the field of a strong electromagnetic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labzovsky, L.N.; Mitrushchenkov, A.O.

    1989-01-01

    The parity violation effects in the hydrogen atom in a strong electromagnetic laser field are considered. It is shown that there is the possibility of hyperrate measurements of different constants of the weak interaction in the hydrogen magnetic resonance experiments. (orig.)

  18. Manifestation of Symmetry Properties of Nucleon Structure in Strong and Electromagnetic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi-Gustafsson, Egle; Rekalo, Michail P.

    2004-04-01

    In this contribution we present a specific application of a result obtained by Franco Iachello (in collaboration with R. Bijker and A. Leviatan), which concerns the inelastic electromagnetic form factors on the nucleons. In particular we show examples where symmetries inherent to the structure of the nucleon resonances can manifest in complicated processes of the strong interaction.

  19. Application of strong phosphoric acid to radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Kikuo

    1977-01-01

    Not only inorganic and organic compounds but also natural substrances, such as accumulations in soil, are completely decomposed and distilled by heating with strong phosphoric acid for 30 to 50 minutes. As applications of strong phosphoric acid to radiochemistry, determination of uranium and boron by use of solubilization effect of this substance, titration of uranyl ion by use of sulfuric iron (II) contained in this substance, application to tracer experiment, and determination of radioactive ruthenium in environmental samples are reviewed. Strong phosphoric acid is also applied to activation analysis, for example, determination of N in pyrographite with iodate potassium-strong phosphoric acid method, separation of Os and Ru with sulfuric cerium (IV) - strong phosphoric acid method or potassium dechromate-strong phosphoric acid method, analysis of Se, As and Sb rocks and accumulations with ammonium bromide, sodium chloride and sodium bromide-strong phosphoric acid method. (Kanao, N.)

  20. Gas dynamics in strong centrifugal fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogovalov, S.V.; Kislov, V.A.; Tronin, I.V. [National research nuclear university “MEPhI”, Kashirskoje shosse, 31,115409, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-10

    Dynamics of waves generated by scopes in gas centrifuges (GC) for isotope separation is considered. The centrifugal acceleration in the GC reaches values of the order of 106g. The centrifugal and Coriolis forces modify essentially the conventional sound waves. Three families of the waves with different polarisation and dispersion exist in these conditions. Dynamics of the flow in the model GC Iguasu is investigated numerically. Comparison of the results of the numerical modelling of the wave dynamics with the analytical predictions is performed. New phenomena of the resonances in the GC is found. The resonances occur for the waves polarized along the rotational axis having the smallest dumping due to the viscosity.

  1. Observation of resonant and non-resonant magnetic braking in the n = 1 non-axisymmetric configurations on KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kimin; Choe, W.; In, Y.; Ko, W. H.; Choi, M. J.; Bak, J. G.; Kim, H. S.; Jeon, Y. M.; Kwak, J. G.; Yoon, S. W.; Oh, Y. K.; Park, J.-K.

    2017-12-01

    Toroidal rotation braking by neoclassical toroidal viscosity driven by non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields, called magnetic braking, has great potential to control rotation profile, and thereby modify tokamak stability and performance. In order to characterize magnetic braking in the various 3D field configurations, dedicated experiments have been carried out in KSTAR, applying a variety of static n=1 , 3D fields of different phasing of -90 , 0, and +90 . Resonant-type magnetic braking was achieved by -90 phasing fields, accompanied by strong density pump-out and confinement degradation, and explained by excitation of kink response captured by ideal plasma response calculation. Strong resonant plasma response was also observed under +90 phasing at q95 ∼ 6 , leading to severe confinement degradation and eventual disruption by locked modes. Such a strong resonant transport was substantially modified to non-resonant-type transport at higher q95 ∼ 7.2 , as the resonant particle transport was significantly reduced and the rotation braking was pushed to plasma edge. This is well explained by ideal perturbed equilibrium calculations indicating the strong kink coupling at lower q95 is reduced at higher q95 discharge. The 0 phasing fields achieved quiescent magnetic braking without density pump-out and confinement degradation, which is consistent with vacuum and ideal plasma response analysis predicting deeply penetrating 3D fields without an excitation of strong kink response.

  2. A Study on Measurement Variations in Resonant Characteristics of Electrostatically Actuated MEMS Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Iqbal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS resonators require fast, accurate, and cost-effective testing for mass production. Among the different test methods, frequency domain analysis is one of the easiest and fastest. This paper presents the measurement uncertainties in electrostatically actuated MEMS resonators, using frequency domain analysis. The influence of the applied driving force was studied to evaluate the measurement variations in resonant characteristics, such as the natural frequency and the quality factor of the resonator. To quantify the measurement results, measurement system analysis (MSA was performed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA method. The results demonstrate that the resonant frequency ( f r is mostly affected by systematic error. However, the quality (Q factor strongly depends on the applied driving force. To reduce the measurement variations in Q factor, experiments were carried out to study the influence of DC and/or AC driving voltages on the resonator. The results reveal that measurement uncertainties in the quality factor were high for a small electrostatic force.

  3. Starspot evolution, differential rotation, and magnetic cycles in the chromospherically active binaries lambda andromedae, sigma Geminorum, II Pegasi, and V711 Tauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Gregory W.; Eaton, Joel A.; Hamer, Jamesia; Hall, Douglas S.

    1995-01-01

    We have analyzed 15-19 yr of photoelectric photometry, obtained manually and with automated telescopes, of the chromospherically active binaries lambda And, sigma Gem, II Peg, and V711 Tau. These observations let us identify individual dark starspots on the stellar surfaces from periodic dimming of the starlight, follow the evolution of these spots, and search for long-term cyclic changes in the properties of these starspots that might reveal magnetic cycles analogous to the Sun's 11 yr sunspot cycle. We developed a computer code to fit a simple two-spot model to our observed light curves that allows us to extract the most easily determinable and most reliable spot parameters from the light curves, i.e., spot longitudes and radii. We then used these measured properties to identify individual spots and to chart their life histories by constructing migration and amplitude curves. We identified and followed 11 spots in lambda And, 16 in sigma Gem, 12 in II Peg, and 15 in V711 Tau. Lifetimes of individual spots ranged from a few months to longer than 6 yr. Differential rotation coefficients, estimated from the observed range of spot rotation periods for each star and defined by equation (2), were 0.04 for lambda And, 0.038 for sigma Gem, 0.005 for II Peg, and 0.006 for V711 Tau, versus 0.19 for the Sun. We searched for cyclic changes in mean brightness, B-V color index, and spot rotation period as evidence for long-term cycles. Of these, long-term variability in mean brightness appears to offer the best evidence for such cycles in these four stars. Cycles of 11.1 yr for lambda And, 8.5 yr for sigma Gem, 11 yr for II Peg, and 16 yr V711 Tau are implied by these mean brightness changes. Cyclic changes in spot rotation period were found in lambda And and possibly II Peg. Errors in B-V were too large for any long-term changes to be detectable.

  4. A resonance without resonance. Scrutinizing the diphoton excess at 750 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Soo; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof [IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Teorica; Reuter, Juergen [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ruiz de Austri, Roberto [IFIC-UV/CSIC, Valencia (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Corpuscular

    2015-12-15

    Motivated by the recent diphoton excesses reported by both ATLAS and CMS collaborations, we suggest that a new heavy spinless particle is produced in gluon fusion at the LHC and decays to a couple of lighter pseudoscalars which then decay to photons. The new resonances could arise from a new strongly interacting sector and couple to Standard Model gauge bosons only via the corresponding Wess-Zumino-Witten anomaly. We present a detailed recast of the newest 13 TeV data from ATLAS and CMS together with the 8 TeV data to scan the consistency of the parameter space for those resonances.

  5. A resonance without resonance. Scrutinizing the diphoton excess at 750 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Soo; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Ruiz de Austri, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by the recent diphoton excesses reported by both ATLAS and CMS collaborations, we suggest that a new heavy spinless particle is produced in gluon fusion at the LHC and decays to a couple of lighter pseudoscalars which then decay to photons. The new resonances could arise from a new strongly interacting sector and couple to Standard Model gauge bosons only via the corresponding Wess-Zumino-Witten anomaly. We present a detailed recast of the newest 13 TeV data from ATLAS and CMS together with the 8 TeV data to scan the consistency of the parameter space for those resonances.

  6. The Search for new Resonances in Strong Symmetry Breaking Scenarios with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, Merlin

    Using the most recent data collected by the ATLAS detector in pp collisions delivered by the LHC at 7 and 8 TeV, this thesis shall establish severe constraints on a variety of models going beyond the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. More particularly, two types of hypothetical particles, existing in various theoretical models shall be studied and probed. The first type will be the search for vector-like quarks (VLQ) produced in pp collisions through electroweak couplings with the u and d quarks. The quest for these particles will be made as they decay into either $W(\\ell\

  7. Quasi-periodic bifurcations in a strong resonance : combination tones in gyroscopic stabilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoo, Jun

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of conservative mechanics are modelled by Hamiltonian systems. These are called integrable if they have sufficient many conserved quantities or constants of motion, this implies a certain toroidal symmetry. Classical examples of integrable Hamiltonian systems are all

  8. Superluminal plasmons with resonant gain in population inverted bilayer graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Low, Tony

    2017-12-28

    AB-stacked bilayer graphene with a tunable electronic bandgap in excess of the optical phonon energy presents an interesting active medium, and we consider such theoretical possibility in this work. We argue the possibility of a highly resonant optical gain in the vicinity of the asymmetry gap. Associated with this resonant gain are strongly amplified plasmons, plasmons with negative group velocity and superluminal effects, as well as directional leaky modes.

  9. Selective Coloration of Melanin Nanospheres through Resonant Mie Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Soojeong; Shim, Tae Soup; Kim, Ju Hyeon; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2017-06-01

    Black melanin inks are prepared to selectively exhibit colors under strong light, inspired by human hair. High absorbance of melanin suppresses multiple scattering, causing resonant Mie scattering predominant. Various colors can be developed as the resonant wavelength dictated by nanosphere diameter. Therefore, the melanin inks can be used to encrypt and selectively disclose multicolor patterns for anticounterfeiting applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Magnetic resonance investigation of magnetic-labeled baker's yeast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy Morais, J. P. M.; Azevedo, R. B.; Silva, L. P.; Lacava, Z. G. M.; Báo, S. N.; Silva, O.; Pelegrini, F.; Gansau, C.; Buske, N.; Safarik, I.; Safarikova, M.; Morais, P. C.

    2004-05-01

    In this study, the interaction of DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles (5 and 10 nm core-size) with Saccharomyces cerevisae was investigated using magnetic resonance (MR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM micrographs revealed magnetite nanoparticles attached externally to the cell wall. The MR data support the strong interaction among the nanoparticles supported by the cells. A remarkable shift in the resonance field was used as signature of particle attachment to the cell wall.

  11. The role of resonances in chiral perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecker, G.; Rafael, E. de

    1988-09-01

    The strong interactions of low-lying meson resonances (spin ≤ 1) with the octet of pseudoscalar mesons (π,Κ,η) are considered to lowest order in the derivative expansion of chiral SU(3). The resonance contributions to the coupling constants of the O(p 4 ) effective chiral lagrangian involving pseudoscalar fields only are determined. These low-energy coupling constants are found to be dominated by the resonance contributions. Although we do not treat the vector and axial-vector mesons as gauge bosons of local chiral symmetry, vector meson dominance emerges as a prominent result of our analysis. As a further application of chiral resonance couplings, we calculate the electromagnetic pion mass difference to lowest order in chiral perturbation theory with explicit resonance fields. 29 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  12. Metal-in-metal localized surface plasmon resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G B; Earp, A A

    2010-01-01

    Anomalous strong resonances in silver and gold nanoporous thin films which conduct are found to arise from isolated metal nano-islands separated from the surrounding percolating metal network by a thin loop of insulator. This observed resonant optical response is modelled. The observed peak position is in agreement with the observed average dimensions of the silver core and insulator shell. As the insulating ring thickness shrinks, the resonance moves to longer wavelengths and strengthens. This structure is the Babinet's principle counterpart of dielectric core-metal shell nanoparticles embedded in dielectric. Like for the latter, tuning of resonant absorption is possible, but here the matrix reflects rather than transmits, and tuning to longer wavelengths is more practical. A new class of metal mirror occurring as a single thin layer is identified using the same resonances in dense metal mirrors. Narrow band deep localized dips in reflectance result.

  13. Search for heavy resonances in vector boson scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Guangyi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    If the Higgs boson discovered at the LHC is not exactly the one predicted by the Standard Model the theory becomes strongly coupled at high energy and vector boson scattering violates unitarity in the TeV range. This can be regularised by the introduction of new heavy resonances. These resonances may also couple to quark pairs and can be searched for in their decay to vector or Higgs bosons. The ATLAS detector at the LHC is collecting data at 13 TeV since 2015. A search for new heavy resonances arising from WW scattering in vector boson fusion events using these data is presented. Interference effects between the new resonances and the Standard Model amplitude are fully taken into account. In addition searches for heavy resonances in the decay to a pair of bosons without tagging the initial state are shown.

  14. Epicyclic helical channels for parametric resonance ionization cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johson, Rolland Paul [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-08-23

    Proposed next-generation muon colliders will require major technical advances to achieve rapid muon beam cooling requirements. Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. In PIC, a half-integer parametric resonance causes strong focusing of a muon beam at appropriately placed energy absorbers while ionization cooling limits the beam’s angular spread. Combining muon ionization cooling with parametric resonant dynamics in this way should then allow much smaller final transverse muon beam sizes than conventional ionization cooling alone. One of the PIC challenges is compensation of beam aberrations over a sufficiently wide parameter range while maintaining the dynamical stability with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motion and dispersion. We explore use of a coupling resonance to reduce the dimensionality of the problem and to shift the dynamics away from non-linear resonances. PIC simulations are presented.

  15. Resonant Effects in Neutral beam Moderation at TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Liniers, M.; Fuentes, C.

    1999-01-01

    The structure of fast ion losses in neutral beam moderation at TJ-II is analysed theoretically, in particular the influence of resonant effects and the radial electric field dependence. The direct losses show strong resonant effects when the ratio of the poloidal and toroidal rotation velocities pass near the values -4/3, -2 or 0. These effects are visible as strong maxima on the loss fractions and also as characteristic trajectory behaviours. The delayed losses present resonant effects also, generally at intermediate energies (5 to 20 KeV for 40 keV injection). Near the resonances the population of passing particles in these losses is very high and the loss fraction can equal or even surpass the direct losses. In these delayed losses the particles concentrate along vertical strips on the loss cone diagrams of roughly constant parallel velocity. This parallel velocity increases with the electric field, the loss maxima are reached usually when the pitch and energy of these strips are near the initial injection values. The trapped particle population in these delayed losses is maximal at null electric and decreases with the field intensity for both potential signs. The corresponding final energies are usually low (1 to 5 keV). Except at extreme potentials, where the -4 resonance can appear, no resonant effects are observed for this population. The resonance ordering is similar for all configurations and follows reasonably the predictions of a simple model. The extreme configurations are dominated by the effects of the 0 and -2 resonances, giving very high loss fractions even for null electric field. In contrast the intermediate configurations, near the Reference one, do not present resonant effects and the losses are moderate at low potentials. Only above 2000 v the resonant effects start to appear. (Author) 11 refs

  16. Resonant supercollisions and electron-phonon heat transfer in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, K. S.; Gornyi, I. V.; Kachorovskii, V. Yu.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2018-02-01

    We study the effects of strong impurities on heat transfer in a coupled electron-phonon system in disordered graphene. A detailed analysis of the electron-phonon heat exchange assisted by such an impurity through the "resonant supercollision" mechanism is presented. We further explore the local modification of heat transfer in a weakly disordered graphene due to a resonant scatterer and determine spatial profiles of the phonon and electron temperature around the scatterer under electrical driving. Our results are consistent with recent experimental findings on imaging resonant dissipation from individual atomic defects.

  17. Magnetic resonance elastometry using a single-sided permanent magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Carl S; Marble, Andrew E; Ono, Yuu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a magnetic resonance method of measuring material elasticity using a single-sided magnet with a permanent static field gradient. This method encodes sample velocity in a reciprocal space using Hahn spin-echoes with variable timing. The experimental results show a strong correlation between magnetic resonance signal attenuation and elasticity when an oscillating force is applied on the sample. This relationship in turn provides us with information about the displacement velocity experienced by the sample, which is inversely proportional to Young's modulus. The proposed method shows promise in offering a portable and cost-effective magnetic resonance elastography system. (paper)

  18. Detection of internal fields in double-metal terahertz resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitrofanov, Oleg; Han, Zhanghua; Ding, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) double-metal plasmonic resonators enable enhanced light-matter coupling by exploiting strong field confinement. The double-metal design however restricts access to the internal fields. We propose and demonstrate a method for spatial mapping and spectroscopic analysis of the internal...... electromagnetic fields in double-metal plasmonic resonators. We use the concept of image charges and aperture-type scanning near-field THz time-domain microscopy to probe the fields confined within the closed resonator. The experimental method opens doors to studies of light-matter coupling in deeply sub...

  19. The research status and development trend of stochastic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Peng, Yueping; Liu, Man

    2017-12-01

    The synergistic reaction under specific conditions of the nonlinear system, weak driving signal and moderate noise can make noise to be advantageous in a certain extent, so as to achieve the purpose of signal enhancement, this seemingly anomalous phenomenon is defined as stochastic resonance. In this paper, the weak signal detection under strong noise background is the main line. The principle of white noise to counteract external noise is expounded, and the present research situation and development trend of stochastic resonance are reviewed in that paper, it also pointed out the direction of further research of stochastic resonance technology.

  20. Quantum Light from a Whispering-Gallery-Mode Disk Resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, J. U.; Strekalov, D. V.; Elser, D.

    2011-01-01

    the direct observation of intensity squeezing of -1.2 dB of each of the individual parametric beams in parametric down-conversion by use of a high quality whispering-gallery-mode disk resonator. In addition, we observed twin-beam quantum correlations of -2.7 dB with this cavity. Such resonators feature...... strong optical confinement and offer tunable coupling to an external optical field. This work exemplifies the potential of crystalline whispering-gallery-mode resonators for the generation of quantum light. The simplicity of this device makes the application of quantum light in various fields highly...

  1. Rabi-vibronic resonance with large number of vibrational quanta

    OpenAIRE

    Glenn, R.; Raikh, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    We study theoretically the Rabi oscillations of a resonantly driven two-level system linearly coupled to a harmonic oscillator (vibrational mode) with frequency, \\omega_0. We show that for weak coupling, \\omega_p \\ll \\omega_0, where \\omega_p is the polaronic shift, Rabi oscillations are strongly modified in the vicinity of the Rabi-vibronic resonance \\Omega_R = \\omega_0, where \\Omega_R is the Rabi frequency. The width of the resonance is (\\Omega_R-\\omega_0) \\sim \\omega_p^{2/3} \\omega_0^{1/3} ...

  2. MACHINERY RESONANCE AND DRILLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, R.; Fowley, M.

    2010-01-23

    New developments in vibration analysis better explain machinery resonance, through an example of drill bit chattering during machining of rusted steel. The vibration of an operating drill motor was measured, the natural frequency of an attached spring was measured, and the two frequencies were compared to show that the system was resonant. For resonance to occur, one of the natural frequencies of a structural component must be excited by a cyclic force of the same frequency. In this case, the frequency of drill bit chattering due to motor rotation equaled the spring frequency (cycles per second), and the system was unstable. A soft rust coating on the steel to be drilled permitted chattering to start at the drill bit tip, and the bit oscillated on and off of the surface, which increased the wear rate of the drill bit. This resonant condition is typically referred to as a motor critical speed. The analysis presented here quantifies the vibration associated with this particular critical speed problem, using novel techniques to describe resonance.

  3. Electrothermally Tunable Arch Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2017-03-18

    This paper demonstrates experimentally, theoretically, and numerically a wide-range tunability of electrothermally actuated microelectromechanical arch beams. The beams are made of silicon and are intentionally fabricated with some curvature as in-plane shallow arches. An electrothermal voltage is applied between the anchors of the beam generating a current that controls the axial stress caused by thermal expansion. When the electrothermal voltage increases, the compressive stress increases inside the arch beam. This leads to an increase in its curvature, thereby increasing its resonance frequencies. We show here that the first resonance frequency can increase monotonically up to twice its initial value. We show also that after some electrothermal voltage load, the third resonance frequency starts to become more sensitive to the axial thermal stress, while the first resonance frequency becomes less sensitive. These results can be used as guidelines to utilize arches as wide-range tunable resonators. Analytical results based on the nonlinear Euler Bernoulli beam theory are generated and compared with the experimental data and the results of a multi-physics finite-element model. A good agreement is found among all the results. [2016-0291

  4. Ferromagnetic resonance features of degenerate GdN semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidyasagar, Reddithota, E-mail: dr.vidyasagar1979@gmail.com [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Kita, Takashi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Sakurai, Takahiro; Shimokawa, Tokuro [Centre for Support to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Ohta, Hitoshi [Molecular Photoscience Research Center and Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Using X-band Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) Spectroscopy, we demonstrate the microscopic ferromagnetic resonance features of degenerated GdN semiconductor. The FMR spectrum suggests a single resonance mode below 10 K; interestingly, this particular structure is found to exhibit a peculiar magnetic resonance (PMR) on the top of the uniform FMR while temperature increases from 12–36 K. The low-field PMR mode attributed to the differently magnetized part of the film with an easy in-plane axis. The narrow-field gap between PMR and uniform FMR suggests the strong coupling owning to the differently magnetized part with easy in-plane axis and the magnetized part with an out-of-plane axis. The saturation magnetization, cubic magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and uniaxial anisotropy of GdN epitaxial film have been evaluated by the angular-dependence FMR. - Highlights: • Observation of peculiar magnetic resonance (PMR) on the top of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). • Newly evolving PMR manifests differently magnetized part of the film with an easy in-plane axis. • Narrow gap between PMR and FMR owing to the strong interaction between two spin–wave resonances. • Uniaxial anisotropy increases with GdN thickness decreases.

  5. Strongly correlating liquids and their isomorphs

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Ulf R.; Gnan, Nicoletta; Bailey, Nicholas P.; Schröder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the properties of strongly correlating liquids, i.e., liquids with strong correlations between virial and potential energy equilibrium fluctuations at constant volume. We proceed to focus on the experimental predictions for strongly correlating glass-forming liquids. These predictions include i) density scaling, ii) isochronal superposition, iii) that there is a single function from which all frequency-dependent viscoelastic response functions may be calculated, iv) that...

  6. Atom collisions in a strong electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, V.S.; Chaplik, A.V.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that the long-range part of interatomic interaction is considerably altered in a strong electromagnetic field. Instead of the van der Waals law the potential asymptote can best be described by a dipole-dipole R -3 law. Impact broadening and the line shift in a strong nonresonant field are calculated. The possibility of bound states of two atoms being formed in a strong light field is discussed

  7. Demonstration of Magnetic Dipole Resonances of Dielectric Nanospheres in the Visible Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evlyukhin, A. B.; Novikov, S. M.; Zywietz, U.

    2012-01-01

    Strong resonant light scattering by individual spherical Si nanoparticles is experimentally demonstrated, revealing pronounced resonances associated with the excitation of magnetic and electric modes in these nanoparticles. It is shown that the low-frequency resonance corresponds to the magnetic...... dipole excitation. Due to high permittivity, the magnetic dipole resonance is observed in the visible spectral range for Si nanoparticles with diameters of similar to 200 nm, thereby opening a way to the realization of isotropic optical metamaterials with strong magnetic responses in the visible region....

  8. Strong-field relativistic processes in highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postavaru, Octavian

    2010-12-08

    In this thesis we investigate strong-field relativistic processes in highly charged ions. In the first part, we study resonance fluorescence of laser-driven highly charged ions in the relativistic regime by solving the time-dependent master equation in a multi-level model. Our ab initio approach based on the Dirac equation allows for investigating highly relativistic ions, and, consequently, provides a sensitive means to test correlated relativistic dynamics, bound-state quantum electrodynamic phenomena and nuclear effects by applying coherent light with x-ray frequencies. Atomic dipole or multipole moments may be determined to unprecedented accuracy by measuring the interference-narrowed fluorescence spectrum. Furthermore, we investigate the level structure of heavy hydrogenlike ions in laser beams. Interaction with the light field leads to dynamic shifts of the electronic energy levels, which is relevant for spectroscopic experiments. We apply a fully relativistic description of the electronic states by means of the Dirac equation. Our formalism goes beyond the dipole approximation and takes into account non-dipole effects of retardation and interaction with the magnetic field components of the laser beam. We predicted cross sections for the inter-shell trielectronic recombination (TR) and quadruelectronic recombination processes which have been experimentally confirmed in electron beam ion trap measurements, mainly for C-like ions, of Ar, Fe and Kr. For Kr{sup 30}+, inter-shell TR contributions of nearly 6% to the total resonant photorecombination rate were found. (orig.)

  9. Longitudinal Near-Field Coupling between Acoustic Resonators Grafted onto a Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Feng Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate longitudinal near-field coupling between acoustic resonators grafted along a waveguide. Experiments are performed in the audible range with a simple acoustic system composed of a finite aperiodic sequence of air resonators. Transmission typically shows a zero around a resonance frequency of a single resonator, as is well known. When two identical resonators are brought in close proximity, however, we observe that longitudinal near-field coupling strongly influences the acoustic transmission. When the separation between resonators is increased so that they can be considered in the far field of one another, we further observe the appearance of Fano-like transmission profiles. We explain this observation by the formation of locally resonant Fabry-Perot interferometers from every pair of resonators. All experimental results are compared to three-dimensional finite element analysis of the acoustic system.

  10. Optimized Shapes of Ocsillating Resonators for Generating High-Amplitude Pressure Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Fan; Finkbeiner, Joshua; Daniels, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that the resonator geometry strongly influences the resonant frequencies of an acoustical resonator and the generated nonlinear standing pressure waveform. Maximizing the ratio of maximum to minimum gas pressure at an end of an oscillating resonator by optimizing the cavity contour is investigated numerically. A quasi-Newton type scheme is used to find optimized axisymmetric resonator shapes to achieve the maximum pressure compression ratio. The acoustical field is solved using a one-dimensional model, and the resonance frequency shift and hysteresis effects are obtained through an automation scheme based on continuation methods. Results are presented from optimizing cone, horn-cone, and cosine resonator geometries. Significant performance improvement is found in the optimized shapes over others previously published. Different optimized shapes are found when starting with different initial guesses, indicating multiple local extrema. The numerical model is validated by comparing with the experimental results of a horn-cone shaped resonator.

  11. Charge pumping in strongly coupled molecular quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughian, Patrick; Yap, Han Hoe; Gong, Jiangbin; Schmidt, Thomas L.

    2017-11-01

    The interaction between electrons and the vibrational degrees of freedom of a molecular quantum dot can lead to an exponential suppression of the conductance, an effect which is commonly termed Franck-Condon blockade. Here, we investigate this effect in a quantum dot driven by time-periodic gate voltages and tunneling amplitudes using nonequilibrium Green's functions and a Floquet expansion. Building on previous results showing that driving can lift the Franck-Condon blockade, we investigate driving protocols which can be used to pump charge across the quantum dot. In particular, we show that due to the strongly coupled nature of the system, the pump current at resonance is an exponential function of the drive strength.

  12. Beyond strong coupling in a massively multimode cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Neereja; Liu, Yanbing; Sadri, Darius; Szocs, Laszlo; Underwood, Devin; Malekakhlagh, Moein; Tureci, Hakan; Houck, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    We present experiments in a new regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED), the multimode strong coupling regime, in which the qubit-cavity coupling is comparable to the free spectral range, thus requiring the collective treatment of all modes along with the qubit. Here we show that this regime is accessible in circuit QED by coupling a 90MHz microwave cavity with a transmon qubit, resonant with the 75th harmonic with a coupling strength exceeding 30MHz. When driving this system, we observe multimode fluorescence consistent with cavity-enhanced sideband emission, with unexpected multi-photon processes and the emergence of ultra-narrow linewidths. This multimode coupling opens the door for a wide range of potential experiments, including studying the manifestation of complex many-body phenomena, the breakdown of the rotating wave approximation, and the bridge between discrete and continuous Hilbert spaces.

  13. Quartz resonator processing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a single chamber ultra-high vacuum processing system for the oduction of hermetically sealed quartz resonators wherein electrode metallization and sealing are carried out along with cleaning and bake-out without any air exposure between the processing steps. The system includes a common vacuum chamber in which is located a rotatable wheel-like member which is adapted to move a plurality of individual component sets of a flat pack resonator unit past discretely located processing stations in said chamber whereupon electrode deposition takes place followed by the placement of ceramic covers over a frame containing a resonator element and then to a sealing stage where a pair of hydraulic rams including heating elements effect a metallized bonding of the covers to the frame.

  14. Electrothermally Tunable Bridge Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2016-12-05

    This paper demonstrates experimentally, theoretically, and numerically a wide-range tunability of an in-plane clamped-clamped microbeam, bridge, and resonator compressed by a force due to electrothermal actuation. We demonstrate that a single resonator can be operated at a wide range of frequencies. The microbeam is actuated electrothermally, by passing a DC current through it. We show that when increasing the electrothermal voltage, the compressive stress inside the microbeam increases, which leads eventually to its buckling. Before buckling, the fundamental frequency decreases until it drops to very low values, almost to zero. After buckling, the fundamental frequency increases, which is shown to be as high as twice the original resonance frequency. Analytical results based on the Galerkin discretization of the Euler Bernoulli beam theory are generated and compared to the experimental data and to simulation results of a multi-physics finite-element model. A good agreement is found among all the results.

  15. Reconfigurable optical routers based on Coupled Resonator Induced Transparency resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, M; Bettotti, P; Fedeli, J M; Pavesi, L

    2012-10-08

    The interferometric coupling of pairs of resonators in a resonator sequence generates coupled ring induced transparency (CRIT) resonances. These have quality factors an order of magnitude greater than those of single resonators. We show that it is possible to engineer CRIT resonances in tapered SCISSOR (Side Coupled Integrated Space Sequence of Resonator) to realize fast and efficient reconfigurable optical switches and routers handling several channels while keeping single channel addressing capabilities. Tapered SCISSORs are fabricated in silicon-on-insulator technology. Furthermore, tapered SCISSORs show multiple-channel switching behavior that can be exploited in DWDM applications.

  16. RESONANT CLUMPING AND SUBSTRUCTURE IN GALACTIC DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloy, Matthew; Smith, Martin C.; Shen, Juntai; Evans, N. Wyn

    2015-01-01

    We describe a method to extract resonant orbits from N-body simulations, exploiting the fact that they close in frames rotating with a constant pattern speed. Our method is applied to the N-body simulation of the Milky Way by Shen et al. This simulation hosts a massive bar, which drives strong resonances and persistent angular momentum exchange. Resonant orbits are found throughout the disk, both close to the bar and out to the very edges of the disk. Using Fourier spectrograms, we demonstrate that the bar is driving kinematic substructure even in the very outer parts of the disk. We identify two major orbit families in the outskirts of the disk, one of which makes significant contributions to the kinematic landscape, namely, the m:l = 3:−2 family, resonating with the bar. A mechanism is described that produces bimodal distributions of Galactocentric radial velocities at selected azimuths in the outer disk. It occurs as a result of the temporal coherence of particles on the 3:−2 resonant orbits, which causes them to arrive simultaneously at pericenter or apocenter. This resonant clumping, due to the in-phase motion of the particles through their epicycle, leads to both inward and outward moving groups that belong to the same orbital family and consequently produce bimodal radial velocity distributions. This is a possible explanation of the bimodal velocity distributions observed toward the Galactic anticenter by Liu et al. Another consequence is that transient overdensities appear and dissipate (in a symmetric fashion), resulting in a periodic pulsing of the disk’s surface density

  17. Higgs-photon resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kearney, John [Fermilab, Theoretical Physics Department, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-10-15

    We study models that produce a Higgs boson plus photon (h{sup 0}γ) resonance at the LHC. When the resonance is a Z{sup '} boson, decays to h{sup 0}γ occur at one loop. If the Z{sup '} boson couples at tree level to quarks, then the h{sup 0}γ branching fraction is typically of order 10{sup -5} or smaller. Nevertheless, there are models that would allow the observation of Z{sup '} → h{sup 0}γ at √(s) = 13 TeV with a cross section times branching fraction larger than 1 fb for a Z{sup '} mass in the 200-450 GeV range, and larger than 0.1 fb for a mass up to 800 GeV. The one-loop decay of the Z{sup '} into lepton pairs competes with h{sup 0}γ, even if the Z{sup '} couplings to leptons vanish at tree level. We also present a model in which a Z{sup '} boson decays into a Higgs boson and a pair of collimated photons, mimicking an h{sup 0}γ resonance. In this model, the h{sup 0}γ resonance search would be the discovery mode for a Z{sup '} as heavy as 2 TeV. When the resonance is a scalar, although decay to h{sup 0}γ is forbidden by angular momentum conservation, the h{sup 0} plus collimated photons channel is allowed. We comment on prospects of observing an h{sup 0}γ resonance through different Higgs decays, on constraints from related searches, and on models where h{sup 0} is replaced by a nonstandard Higgs boson. (orig.)

  18. Nanoantenna using mechanical resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Chang Hwa Lee,

    2010-11-01

    Nanoantenna using mechanical resonance vibration is made from an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated vertically aligned nanorod array. Only this structure works as a radio with demodulator without any electrical circuit using field emission phenomenon. A top-down fabrication method of an ITO coated nanorod array is proposed using a modified UV lithography. The received radio frequency and the resonance frequency of nanoantenna can be controlled by the fabrication condition through the height of a nanorod array. The modulated signals are received successfully with the transmission carrier wave frequency (248MHz) and the proposed nanoantenna is expected to be used in communication system for ultra small scale sensor. ©2010 IEEE.

  19. Acoustic Fano resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad

    2014-07-01

    The resonances with asymmetric Fano line-shapes were originally discovered in the context of quantum mechanics (U. Fano, Phys. Rev., 124, 1866-1878, 1961). Quantum Fano resonances were generated from destructive interference of a discrete state with a continuum one. During the last decade this concept has been applied in plasmonics where the interference between a narrowband polariton and a broader one has been used to generate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) (M. Rahmani, et al., Laser Photon. Rev., 7, 329-349, 2013).

  20. Hadronic Resonances from STAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada Masayuki

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of resonance particle productions (ρ0, ω, K*, ϕ, Σ*, and Λ* measured by the STAR collaboration at RHIC from various colliding systems and energies are presented. Measured mass, width, 〈pT〉, and yield of those resonances are reviewed. No significant mass shifts or width broadening beyond the experiment uncertainties are observed. New measurements of ϕ and ω from leptonic decay channels are presented. The yields from leptonic decay channels are compared with the measurements from hadronic decay channels and the two results are consistent with each other.

  1. Resonant freak microwaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, F.M. de

    2011-01-01

    The Helmholtz equation describing transverse magnetic modes in a closed flat microwave resonator with 60 randomly distributed discs is numerically solved. At lower frequencies, the calculated wave intensity spatially distributed obeys the universal Porter-Thomas form if localized modes are excluded. A superposition of resonant modes is shown to lead to rare events of extreme intensities (freak waves) at localized 'hot spots'. The temporally distributed intensity of such a superposition at the center of a hot spot also follows the Porter-Thomas form. Branched modes are found at higher frequencies. The results bear resemblance to recent experiments reported in an open cavity.

  2. Physics of Sports: Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, David

    2000-04-01

    When force is applied by an athlete to sports equipment resonances can occur. Just a few examples are: the ringing of a spiked volleyball, the strumming of a golf club shaft during a swing, and multiple modes induced in an aluminum baseball bat when striking a ball. Resonances produce acoustic waves which, if conditions are favorable, can be detected off the playing field. This can provide a means to evaluate athletic performance during game conditions. Results are given from the use of a simple hand-held acoustic detector - by a spectator sitting in the stands - to determine how hard volleyballs were spiked during college and high school games.

  3. Passive fiber resonator gyro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groellmann, P.; Herth, J.; Kemmler, M.; Kempf, K.; Neumann, G.

    After presenting the design principles of the passive fiber resonator gyroscope, which possesses the good scale-factor stability and repeatability of its active, ring-laser gyro counterpart, attention is given to the state of the art in fiber-optic component fabrication, with a view to achieving the requirements of low-loss fiber resonators. Also important is the rugged narrow-band semiconductor-laser light source that had to be modified for application in a system of this kind. Such error terms as polarization cross coupling and fiber backscattering are discussed, and methods are presented with which system output can be improved.

  4. Strong ideal convergence in probabilistic metric spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sequence and strong ideal Cauchy sequence in a probabilistic metric (PM) space endowed with the strong topology, and ... also important applications in nonlinear analysis [2]. The theory was brought to ..... for each t > 0 since each set on the right-hand side of the relation (3.1) belongs to I. Thus, by Definition 2.11 and the ...

  5. Large N baryons, strong coupling theory, quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakita, B.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that in QCD the large N limit is the same as the static strong coupling limit. By using the static strong coupling techniques some of the results of large N baryons are derived. The results are consistent with the large N SU(6) static quark model. (author)

  6. Optimization of strong and weak coordinates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, M.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new scheme for the geometry optimization of equilibrium and transition state structures that can be used for both strong and weak coordinates. We use a screening function that depends on atom-pair distances to differentiate strong coordinates from weak coordinates. This differentiation

  7. Theoretical studies of strongly correlated fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, D. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    Strongly correlated fermions are investigated. An understanding of strongly correlated fermions underpins a diverse range of phenomena such as metal-insulator transitions, high-temperature superconductivity, magnetic impurity problems and the properties of heavy-fermion systems, in all of which local moments play an important role. (author).

  8. Seismic switch for strong motion measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harben, P.E.; Rodgers, P.W.; Ewert, D.W.

    1995-05-30

    A seismic switching device is described that has an input signal from an existing microseismic station seismometer and a signal from a strong motion measuring instrument. The seismic switch monitors the signal level of the strong motion instrument and passes the seismometer signal to the station data telemetry and recording systems. When the strong motion instrument signal level exceeds a user set threshold level, the seismometer signal is switched out and the strong motion signal is passed to the telemetry system. The amount of time the strong motion signal is passed before switching back to the seismometer signal is user controlled between 1 and 15 seconds. If the threshold level is exceeded during a switch time period, the length of time is extended from that instant by one user set time period. 11 figs.

  9. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  10. Strong Coupling of Microwave Photons to Antiferromagnetic Fluctuations in an Organic Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergenthaler, Matthias; Liu, Junjie; Le Roy, Jennifer J.; Ares, Natalia; Thompson, Amber L.; Bogani, Lapo; Luis, Fernando; Blundell, Stephen J.; Lancaster, Tom; Ardavan, Arzhang; Briggs, G. Andrew D.; Leek, Peter J.; Laird, Edward A.

    2017-10-01

    Coupling between a crystal of di(phenyl)-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)iminoazanium radicals and a superconducting microwave resonator is investigated in a circuit quantum electrodynamics (circuit QED) architecture. The crystal exhibits paramagnetic behavior above 4 K, with antiferromagnetic correlations appearing below this temperature, and we demonstrate strong coupling at base temperature. The magnetic resonance acquires a field angle dependence as the crystal is cooled down, indicating anisotropy of the exchange interactions. These results show that multispin modes in organic crystals are suitable for circuit QED, offering a platform for their coherent manipulation. They also utilize the circuit QED architecture as a way to probe spin correlations at low temperature.

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance in condensed matter was discov- ered simultaneously by Edward Purcell at Harvard and Felix. Bloch at Stanford in 1946 using different instrumentation and techniques. Both groups observed the response of magnetic nuclei, placed in a uniform magnetic field, to a continuous radio frequency ...

  12. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  13. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Twentieth century bore witness to remarkable scientists whohave advanced our understanding of the brain. Among them,EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance) imaging is particularlyuseful in monitoring hypoxic zones in tumors which arehighly resistant to radiation and chemotherapeutic treatment.This first part of the ...

  14. Magnetostatic wave tunable resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castera, J.-P.; Hartemann, P.

    1983-06-01

    Theoretical principles and techniques for the implementation of magnetostatic surface wave and volume wave resonators in high frequency oscillators are discussed. Magnetostatic waves are magnetic waves that propagate in materials exposed to a polarized magnetic field. The propagation speed ranges from 3-300 km/sec for wavelengths between 1 micron and 10 mm, in the presence of lags from 10-1000 nsec/ cm. Tunable resonators in the 1-20 GHz frequency range have been manufactured with YIG using liquid phase epitaxy for deposition on gadolinium and gallium substrates. Distributed-mirror Fabry-Perot cavity resonators are described and performance tests results are reported, including losses of 8 dB, a quality coefficient under voltage of 450, and frequency rejection outside of resonance better than 10 dB. However, saturation occurs at low power levels at frequencies lower than 4.2 GHz, a feature overcome with forward volume magnetostatic wave generators, which have a quality factor of 500, an insertion loss of 22 dB, and rejection around 15 dB.

  15. Isotopic effect giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buenerd, M.; Lebrun, D.; Martin, P.; Perrin, G.; Saintignon, P. de; Chauvin, J.; Duhamel, G.

    1981-10-01

    The systematics of the excitation energy of the giant dipole, monopole, and quadrupole resonances are shown to exhibit an isotopic effect. For a given element, the excitation energy of the transition decreases faster with the increasing neutron number than the empirical laws fitting the overall data. This effect is discussed in terms of the available models

  16. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsing, F

    2005-06-15

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  17. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    The method- ology went through vigorous growth and development during this time, laying the theoretical basis for understanding a wide array of applications. The stage was set for ... nance (NMR) is the experimental observation of the resonant absorption of ..... siveness, ranging from qualitative to quantitative. More signifi-.

  18. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Current Issue : Vol. 23, Issue 3. Current Issue Volume 23 | Issue 3. March 2018. Home · Volumes & Issues · Categories · Special Issues · Search · Editorial Board · Information for Authors · Subscription ...

  19. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    essential to understand their structure. Membrane-bound proteins are generally not amenable to crystallization and often their sizes are so large that conventional techniques such as X-ray crystal- lography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy will have limited applications in deciphering their structure. In.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... UltrasoundCT Head ScanElectrocardiogram (EKG or ECG)Pap Smear (Pap Test) Home Tests and Procedures Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ... SafetyRead Article >>Imaging and Medical Radiation SafetyPap Smear (Pap Test)Read Article >>Pap Smear (Pap Test)Preconception Carrier ...

  1. Neutron resonance absorption theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuss, P.

    1991-11-01

    After some recalls on the physics of neutron resonance absorption during their slowing down, this paper presents the main features of the theoretical developments performed by the french school of reactor physics: the effective reaction rate method so called Livolant-Jeanpierre theory, the generalizations carried out by the author, and the probability table method [fr

  2. Resonant MEMS tunable VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Chung, Il-Sug; Semenova, Elizaveta

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate how resonant excitation of a microelectro-mechanical system can be used to increase the tuning range of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser two-fold by enabling both blue- and red-shifting of the wavelength. In this way a short-cavity design enabling wide tuning range can be r...

  3. RE-SONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In school we are introduced to logarithms via the definition 'that number to which the base must be raised so as to equal the given ... A K Shukla should make for very interesting reading. There are other interesting articles and usual features which, we hope, will keep you busy till the next issue of Resonance comes along!

  4. Giant resonances in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohigas, O.

    1980-01-01

    The giant resonances: electric dipolar E1, T=1, isoscalar electric quadrupolar E2, T=0 and isoscalar electric monopolar E0, T=0 are presented. The experimental facts are reviewed and some examples are given of the kind of information supplied by experimental data [fr

  5. Resonant filtered fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Laurila, Marko; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present our recent result on utilizing resonant/bandgap fiber designs to achieve high performance ytterbium doped fiber amplifers for achieving diffraction limited beam quality in large mode area fibers, robust bending performance and gain shaping for long wavelength operation of...

  6. Electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goennenwein, S.T.B.; Schink, S.W.; Brandlmaier, A.; Boger, A.; Opel, M.; Gross, R.; Keizer, R.S.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Gupta, A.; Huebl, H.; Bihler, C.; Brandt, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    We study the magnetoresistance properties of thin ferromagnetic CrO2 and Fe3O4 films under microwave irradiation. Both the sheet resistance ? and the Hall voltage VHall characteristically change when a ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) occurs in the film. The electrically detected ferromagnetic

  7. Progressive and resonant wave helices application to electron paramagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volino, F.

    1969-01-01

    We show that helices can be used as resonant systems. Their properties are theoretically and experimentally studied. We describe resonant helices for electron paramagnetic resonance in X-band and develop a comparison between their sensitivity and the sensitivity of a normal resonant cavity. For cylindrical samples less than 3 mm diameter, the helix is more sensitive and can produce more intense microwave magnetic fields. (author) [fr

  8. Classical and Quantum Stochastic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänggi, Peter

    1996-03-01

    The idea that noise can assist the formation of order might sound paradoxical but does indeed occur in nonlinear systems with the phenomenon of Stochastic Resonance (SR)(F. Moss et al., Stochastic Resonance: Tutorial and Update), Int. J. Bif. and Chaos 4, 1383 (1994); K. Wiesenfeld and F. Moss, Nature 373, 33 (1995); P. Jung, Phys. Rep. 234 C, 175 (1993). This term is given to the effect where the detection of weak periodic signals is enhanced in presence of noise activated crossings of barriers or threshold levels. After introducing the audience into the common characterization of SR by use of the power spectrum of the output signal and/or the probability density of correponding residence times, I shall report new features for nonlinear SR where strong driving can give rise to anomalous amplification of higher harmonics, hole-burning in power spectra, or SR-induced, almost complete deletion of higher harmonics(R. Bartussek, P. Jung, P. Hänggi, Phys. Rev. E49), 3930 (1994); V. Shneidman, P. Jung, P. Hänggi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2682 (1994). These novel effects have recently been confirmed experimentally in a magnetic flux driven sensitive detection device (superconducting quantum-interference device)(R. Rouse, S. Han, J.E. Lukens, Appl. Phys. Lett. 66), 108 (1995). This device constitutes a macroscopic quantum system where with decreasing temperature quantum tunneling transitions begin to modify and blur the classical SR-responce. Recent progress in the quest of SR phenomena in the deep quantum regime(M. Grifoni and P. Hänggi, submitted to PRL) is reviewed together with experimental proposals where Quantum-SR induced manipulation of individual atoms, or whole molecular groups, can be observed.

  9. Strong and superstrong pulsed magnetic fields generation

    CERN Document Server

    Shneerson, German A; Krivosheev, Sergey I

    2014-01-01

    Strong pulsed magnetic fields are important for several fields in physics and engineering, such as power generation and accelerator facilities. Basic aspects of the generation of strong and superstrong pulsed magnetic fields technique are given, including the physics and hydrodynamics of the conductors interacting with the field as well as an account of the significant progress in generation of strong magnetic fields using the magnetic accumulation technique. Results of computer simulations as well as a survey of available field technology are completing the volume.

  10. Impurity screening in strongly coupled plasma systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kyrkos, S

    2003-01-01

    We present an overview of the problem of screening of an impurity in a strongly coupled one-component plasma within the framework of the linear response (LR) theory. We consider 3D, 2D and quasi-2D layered systems. For a strongly coupled plasma the LR can be determined by way of the known S(k) structure functions. In general, an oscillating screening potential with local overscreening and antiscreening regions emerges. In the case of the bilayer, this phenomenon becomes global, as overscreening develops in the layer of the impurity and antiscreening in the adjacent layer. We comment on the limitations of the LR theory in the strong coupling situation.

  11. The lambda sigma calculus and strong normalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schack-Nielsen, Anders; Schürmann, Carsten

    Explicit substitution calculi can be classified into several dis- tinct categories depending on whether they are confluent, meta-confluent, strong normalization preserving, strongly normalizing, simulating, fully compositional, and/or local. In this paper we present a variant of the λσ-calculus......, which satisfies all seven conditions. In particular, we show how to circumvent Mellies counter-example to strong normalization by a slight restriction of the congruence rules. The calculus is implemented as the core data structure of the Celf logical framework. All meta-theoretic aspects of this work...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety Videos related to Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Wu, O.; Dijkhuizen, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a powerful (neuro)imaging modality for the diagnosis and outcome prediction after (acute) stroke. Since MRI allows noninvasive, longitudinal, and three-dimensional assessment of vessel occlusion (with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)), tissue injury

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, stents or surgical ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  19. Resonance states in disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentosela, F.

    1985-06-01

    To study the resonances for the Schroedinger equation of an electron in one dimensional disordered solids submitted to electric field, we use a WKB type ansatz and show that resonance widths so obtained are in good agreement with numerical computations

  20. Effect of inhibitory firing pattern on coherence resonance in random neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Zhang, Lianghao; Guo, Xinmeng; Wang, Jiang; Cao, Yibin; Liu, Jing

    2018-01-01

    The effect of inhibitory firing patterns on coherence resonance (CR) in random neuronal network is systematically studied. Spiking and bursting are two main types of firing pattern considered in this work. Numerical results show that, irrespective of the inhibitory firing patterns, the regularity of network is maximized by an optimal intensity of external noise, indicating the occurrence of coherence resonance. Moreover, the firing pattern of inhibitory neuron indeed has a significant influence on coherence resonance, but the efficacy is determined by network property. In the network with strong coupling strength but weak inhibition, bursting neurons largely increase the amplitude of resonance, while they can decrease the noise intensity that induced coherence resonance within the neural system of strong inhibition. Different temporal windows of inhibition induced by different inhibitory neurons may account for the above observations. The network structure also plays a constructive role in the coherence resonance. There exists an optimal network topology to maximize the regularity of the neural systems.