WorldWideScience

Sample records for strong chemical bonding

  1. Chemical bond fundamental aspects of chemical bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Frenking, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    This is the perfect complement to ""Chemical Bonding - Across the Periodic Table"" by the same editors, who are two of the top scientists working on this topic, each with extensive experience and important connections within the community. The resulting book is a unique overview of the different approaches used for describing a chemical bond, including molecular-orbital based, valence-bond based, ELF, AIM and density-functional based methods. It takes into account the many developments that have taken place in the field over the past few decades due to the rapid advances in quantum chemica

  2. Trends in Strong Chemical Bonding in C2, CN, CN-, CO, N2, NO, NO+, and O2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2017-01-01

    systems C2+ and C2- at chemical accuracy (~1 kcal/mol or 4 kJ/mol) using CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z, with additional benchmarks of HF, MP2, CCSD, explicitly correlated F12 methods, and four density functionals. Very large correlation and basis set effects are responsible for up to 93% of total D0. The order...... of the molecular orbitals 1πu and 3σg changes, as seen in text books, depending on total and effective nuclear charge. Linear trends are observed in 2σu - 2σg orbital splitting (R2 = 0.91) and in D0 of C2, C2-, and C2+ (R2 = 0.99). The correlation component of D0 of C2 is by far the largest (~93%) due to a poor HF...

  3. Intercalation chemistry and chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenmuller, Paul

    In contrast to amphoteric graphite, the layer-type oxides or chalcogenides generally play the role of acceptors in chemical or electrochemical intercalation reactions. Due to the more ionic character of the MO bonds, the structural evolution of the oxides may usually be explained on hand of electrostatic considerations, or in terms of cation oxido-reduction. For the more covalent chalcogenides, the occupancy of higher energy levels in the band structure by the transferred electrons constitute mostly a prevailing factor, giving rise to structural changes but also to modifications of the physical properties. The ionic character of the MO bonds accounts for the strong tendency of the oxides to undergo 2D→3D transformations as a result of intercalation processes. Such features are determining for the choice of the electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries as far as users require high electrode capacity, stability, and cyclability.

  4. NMR and IR investigations of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    For the purpose of this review, strong hydrogen bonds have been defined on the basis of experimental data, such as OH stretching wavenumbers, vOH, and OH chemical shifts, dOH (in the latter case after correction for ring current effects). Limits for O–H···Y systems are taken as 2800 > vOH > 1800 ...

  5. EFFECTIVE CHEMICALLY BONDED BUILDING MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Сергей Николаевич Золотухин

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Physical and physical-and-chemical preconditions for creation of the production technology of chemically bonded building materials and products based on phosphogypsum are presented. The methodology and production technology of chemically bonded lime-and-sandy phosphogypsum material (LSPM with the use of modern computerized differential scanning calorimetry are developed and offered. The structure of LSPM is examined. The conceptions of making building composites on the basis of dispersed materials are proved and updated. It was found out that at the definite thickness of water film on the surface of disperse materials, in the thermodynamically unstable state, in the presence of external fields, heightened temperatures and definite pH, cheap water-resistant chemically bonded building composites on the basis of dispersed materials can be made. The results of the LSPM studies showed that such material is effective for forming of low- and middle-quality wall small-piece blocks, partition slabs and bulkheads.

  6. Chemical bonding in carbonitride nanolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, P.; Baake, O.; Beckhoff, B.; Ensinger, W.; Fainer, N.; Klein, A.; Kosinova, M.; Pollakowski, B.; Trunova, V.; Ulm, G.; Weser, J.

    2007-05-01

    First results are presented for the identification of chemical bonds and structures (speciation) in boron and silicon carbonitrides, produced as layers of some hundred nm. The boron carbonitride (BC xN y) films are synthesized by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) using the precursor substance trimethylamine borane. The samples of silicon carbonitride (SiC xN y) films are synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using hexamethyl disilazane. The measurements were performed by total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis combined with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure investigations (TXRF-NEXAFS) and by X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS). The results are compared with those obtained for standard samples boron carbide (B 4C), boron nitride (e.g., h-BN, c-BN), silicon carbide (SiC), and silicon nitride (Si 3N 4).

  7. The chemical bond in inorganic chemistry the bond valence model

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, I David

    2016-01-01

    The bond valence model is a version of the ionic model in which the chemical constraints are expressed in terms of localized chemical bonds formed by the valence charge of the atoms. Theorems derived from the properties of the electrostatic flux predict the rules obeyed by both ionic and covalent bonds. They make quantitative predictions of coordination number, crystal structure, bond lengths and bond angles. Bond stability depends on the matching of the bonding strengths of the atoms, while the conflicting requirements of chemistry and space lead to the structural instabilities responsible for the unusual physical properties displayed by some materials. The model has applications in many fields ranging from mineralogy to molecular biology.

  8. Making Weak Bonds (cooling) and Breaking Strong Bonds (heating ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... THE MOLECULES · Slide 34 · High Temperature Chemical Kinetics Laboratory today · Slide 36 · Ignition delay studies · CH emission and pressure rise to measure ignition delay! JP10 · Log vs 1/T plot · Arrhenius parameters for JP10 and JP10-TEA mixture · triethylamine · CONCLUSIONS · Thank you all for listening.

  9. Strong and weak hydrogen bonds in drug–DNA complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The dataset was extracted from the protein data bank (PDB). The analysis was performed with an in-house software, hydrogen bond analysis tool (HBAT). In addition to strong hydrogen bonds such as O−H···O and N−H···O, the ubiquitous presence of weak hydrogen bonds such as C−H···O is implicated in molecular ...

  10. NMR and IR Investigations of Strong Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poul Erik Hansen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of this review, strong hydrogen bonds have been defined on the basis of experimental data, such as OH stretching wavenumbers, νOH, and OH chemical shifts, δOH (in the latter case, after correction for ring current effects. Limits for O–H···Y systems are taken as 2800 > νOH > 1800 cm−1, and 19 ppm > δOH > 15 ppm. Recent results as well as an account of theoretical advances are presented for a series of important classes of compounds such as β-diketone enols, β-thioxoketone enols, Mannich bases, proton sponges, quinoline N-oxides and diacid anions. The O···O distance has long been used as a parameter for hydrogen bond strength in O–H···O systems. On a broad scale, a correlation between OH stretching wavenumbers and O···O distances is observed, as demonstrated experimentally as well as theoretically, but for substituted β-diketone enols this correlation is relatively weak.

  11. Short, strong hydrogen bonds on enzymes: NMR and mechanistic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildvan, A. S.; Massiah, M. A.; Harris, T. K.; Marks, G. T.; Harrison, D. H. T.; Viragh, C.; Reddy, P. M.; Kovach, I. M.

    2002-09-01

    The lengths of short, strong hydrogen bonds (SSHBs) on enzymes have been determined with high precision (±0.05 Å) from the chemical shifts ( δ), and independently from the D/ H fractionation factors ( φ) of the highly deshielded protons involved. These H-bond lengths agree well with each other and with those found by protein X-ray crystallography, within the larger errors of the latter method (±0.2 to±0.8 Å) [Proteins 35 (1999) 275]. A model dihydroxynaphthalene compound shows a SSHB of 2.54±0.04 Å based on δ=17.7 ppm and φ=0.56±0.04, in agreement with the high resolution X-ray distance of 2.55±0.06 Å. On ketosteroid isomerase, a SSHB is found (2.50±0.02 Å), based on δ=18.2 ppm and φ=0.34, from Tyr-14 to the 3-O - of estradiol, an analog of the enolate intermediate. Its strength is ˜7 kcal/mol. On triosephosphate isomerase, SSHBs are found from Glu-165 to the 1-NOH of phosphoglycolohydroxamic acid (PGH), an analog of the enolic intermediate (2.55±0.05 Å), and from His-95 to the enolic-O - of PGH (2.62±0.02 Å). In the methylglyoxal synthase-PGH complex, a SSHB (2.51±0.02 Å) forms between Asp-71 and the NOH of PGH with a strength of ≥4.7 kcal/mol. When serine proteases bind mechanism-based inhibitors which form tetrahedral Ser-adducts analogous to the tetrahedral intermediates in catalysis, the Asp⋯His H-bond of the catalytic triad becomes a SSHB [Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 95 (1998) 14664], 2.49-2.63 Å in length. Similarly, on the serine-esterase, butyrylcholinesterase complexed with the mechanism-based inhibitor m-( N, N, N-trimethylammonio)-2,2,2-trifluoroacetophenone, a SSHB forms between Glu-327 and His-438 of the catalytic triad, 2.61±0.04 Å in length, based on δ=18.1 ppm and φ=0.65±0.10. Very similar results are obtained with (human) acetylcholinesterase. The strength of this SSHB is at least 4.9 kcal/mol.

  12. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (figure 7). We have also been able to bond Al2O3 to graphene by using AlCl3 as the reactant. The oxide film was amor- phous after calcination at 600. ◦. C. We have prepared chemically bonded magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles to graphene by functionalizing Fe3O4 by amine, then reacting it with graphene functionalized with.

  13. "Vibrational bonding": a new type of chemical bond is discovered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christopher J; Macrae, Roderick M

    2015-01-01

    A long-sought but elusive new type of chemical bond, occurring on a minimum-free, purely repulsive potential energy surface, has recently been convincingly shown to be possible on the basis of high-level quantum-chemical calculations. This type of bond, termed a vibrational bond, forms because the total energy, including the dynamical energy of the nuclei, is lower than the total energy of the dissociated products, including their vibrational zero-point energy. For this to be the case, the ZPE of the product molecule must be very high, which is ensured by replacing a conventional hydrogen atom with its light isotope muonium (Mu, mass = 1/9 u) in the system Br-H-Br, a natural transition state in the reaction between Br and HBr. A paramagnetic species observed in the reaction Mu +Br2 has been proposed as a first experimental sighting of this species, but definitive identification remains challenging.

  14. Analysis Of Chemical Bonding Using Ab Initio Valence Bond Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelberts, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, theoretical chemical research is presented in which the Valence Bond (VB) Theory plays a central role. For the last three chapters, the VB method is used, in combination with Magnetically Induced Ring Currents, to analyze the aromaticity of several conjugated molecules. The

  15. Spectral Theory of Chemical Bonding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Langhoff, P. W; Boatz, J. A; Hinde, R. J; Sheehy, J. A

    2004-01-01

    New theoretical methods are reported for obtaining the binding energies of molecules and other chemical aggregates employing the spectral eigenstates and related properties of their atomic constituents...

  16. NMR studies of strong hydrogen bonds in enzymes and in a model compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T. K.; Zhao, Q.; Mildvan, A. S.

    2000-09-01

    Hydrogen bond lengths on enzymes have been derived with high precision (≤±0.05 Å) from both the proton chemical shifts (δ) and the fractionation factors (φ) of the proton involved and were compared with those obtained from protein X-ray crystallography. Hydrogen bond lengths derived from proton chemical shifts were obtained from a correlation of 59 O-H⋯O hydrogen bond lengths, measured by small molecule high resolution X-ray crystallography, with chemical shifts determined by solid-state NMR in the same crystals [A. McDermott, C.F. Ridenour, Encyclopedia of NMR, Wiley, Sussex, England, 1996, 3820pp]. Hydrogen bond lengths were independently obtained from fractionation factors which yield distances between the two proton wells in quartic double minimum potential functions [M.M. Kreevoy, T.M. Liang, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 102 (1980) 3315]. The high precision hydrogen bond lengths derived from their corresponding NMR-measured proton chemical shifts and fractionation factors agree well with each other and with those reported in protein X-ray structures within the larger errors (±0.2-0.8 Å) in lengths obtained by protein X-ray crystallography. The increased precision in measurements of hydrogen bond lengths by NMR has provided insight into the contributions of short, strong hydrogen bonds to catalysis for several enzymes including ketosteroid isomerase, triosephosphate isomerase, and serine proteases. The O-H⋯O hydrogen bond length derived from the proton chemical shift in a model dihydroxy-naphthalene compound in aqueous solution agreed well with lengths of such hydrogen bonds determined by high resolution, small molecule X-ray diffraction.

  17. Female chacma baboons form strong, equitable, and enduring social bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joan B; Beehner, Jacinta C; Bergman, Thore J; Crockford, Catherine; Engh, Anne L; Moscovice, Liza R; Wittig, Roman M; Seyfarth, Robert M; Cheney, Dorothy L

    2010-11-01

    Analyses of the pattern of associations, social interactions, coalitions, and aggression among chacma baboons (Papio hamadryas ursinus) in the Okavango Delta of Botswana over a 16-year period indicate that adult females form close, equitable, supportive, and enduring social relationships. They show strong and stable preferences for close kin, particularly their own mothers and daughters. Females also form strong attachments to unrelated females who are close to their own age and who are likely to be paternal half-sisters. Although absolute rates of aggression among kin are as high as rates of aggression among nonkin, females are more tolerant of close relatives than they are of others with whom they have comparable amounts of contact. These findings complement previous work which indicates that the strength of social bonds enhances the fitness of females in this population and support findings about the structure and function of social bonds in other primate groups.

  18. Quantum mechanical facets of chemical bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daudel, R.

    1976-01-01

    To define the concept of bond is both a central problem of quantum chemistry and a difficult one. The concept of bond appeared little by little in the mind of chemists from empirical observations. From the wave-mechanical viewpoint it is not an observable. Therefore there is no precise operator associated with that concept. As a consequence there is not a unique approach to the idea of chemical bond. This is why it is preferred to present various quantum mechanical facets, e.g. the energetic facet, the density facet, the partitioning facet and the functional facet, of that important concept. (Auth.)

  19. Thai students' mental model of chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarawan, Supawadee; Yuenyong, Chokchai

    2018-01-01

    This Research was finding the viewing about concept of chemical bonding is fundamental to subsequent learning of various other topics related to this concept in chemistry. Any conceptions about atomic structures that students have will be shown their further learning. The purpose of this study is to interviews conceptions held by high school chemistry students about metallic bonding and to reveal mental model of atomic structures show according to the educational level. With this aim, the questionnaire prepared making use of the literature and administered for analysis about mental model of chemical bonding. It was determined from the analysis of answers of questionnaire the 10th grade, 11th grade and 12th grade students. Finally, each was shown prompts in the form of focus cards derived from curriculum material that showed ways in which the bonding in specific metallic substances had been depicted. Students' responses revealed that learners across all three levels prefer simple, realistic mental models for metallic bonding and reveal to chemical bonding.

  20. Hirshfeld atom refinement for modelling strong hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woińska, Magdalena; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Spackman, Mark A; Edwards, Alison J; Dominiak, Paulina M; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Nishibori, Eiji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Grabowsky, Simon

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution low-temperature synchrotron X-ray diffraction data of the salt L-phenylalaninium hydrogen maleate are used to test the new automated iterative Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) procedure for the modelling of strong hydrogen bonds. The HAR models used present the first examples of Z' > 1 treatments in the framework of wavefunction-based refinement methods. L-Phenylalaninium hydrogen maleate exhibits several hydrogen bonds in its crystal structure, of which the shortest and the most challenging to model is the O-H...O intramolecular hydrogen bond present in the hydrogen maleate anion (O...O distance is about 2.41 Å). In particular, the reconstruction of the electron density in the hydrogen maleate moiety and the determination of hydrogen-atom properties [positions, bond distances and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs)] are the focus of the study. For comparison to the HAR results, different spherical (independent atom model, IAM) and aspherical (free multipole model, MM; transferable aspherical atom model, TAAM) X-ray refinement techniques as well as results from a low-temperature neutron-diffraction experiment are employed. Hydrogen-atom ADPs are furthermore compared to those derived from a TLS/rigid-body (SHADE) treatment of the X-ray structures. The reference neutron-diffraction experiment reveals a truly symmetric hydrogen bond in the hydrogen maleate anion. Only with HAR is it possible to freely refine hydrogen-atom positions and ADPs from the X-ray data, which leads to the best electron-density model and the closest agreement with the structural parameters derived from the neutron-diffraction experiment, e.g. the symmetric hydrogen position can be reproduced. The multipole-based refinement techniques (MM and TAAM) yield slightly asymmetric positions, whereas the IAM yields a significantly asymmetric position.

  1. The chemical bond of stibium. Technological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashcheulov A. A.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Thin structure of the chemical bond of the hexagonal and rhombohedral modifications of stibium was investigated. The boundaries of their polymorphism were identified, which opens new technological possibilities of creating optical, photoelectric, thermoelectric, and other materials for electronic equipment components.

  2. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Composites of graphene involving chemically bonded nano films of metal oxides have been prepared by reacting graphene containing surface oxygen functionalities with metal halide vapours followed by exposure to water vapour. The composites have been characterized by electron microscopy, atomic force ...

  3. Teaching Chemical Bonding through Jigsaw Cooperative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doymus, Kemal

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of jigsaw cooperative learning in teaching chemical bonding at tertiary level. This study was carried out in two different classes in the Department of Primary Science Education of Ataturk University during the 2005-2006 academic year. One of the classes was the non-jigsaw group (control) and the other was the…

  4. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Composites of graphene involving chemically bonded nano films of metal oxides have been prepared by reacting graphene containing surface oxygen functionalities with metal halide vapours followed by exposure to water vapour. The composites have been characterized by electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy ...

  5. X-ray diffraction and chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bats, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    Chemical bonds are investigated in sulfamic acid (H 3 N-SO 3 ), sodium sulfonlate dihydrate (H 2 NC 6 H 4 SO 3 Na.2H 2 O), 2,5-dimercaptothiadiazole (HS-C 2 N 2 S-SH), sodium cyanide dihydrate (NaCN.2H 2 O), sodium thiocyanate (NaSCN) and ammonium thiocyanate (NH 4 SCN) by X-ray diffraction, and if necessary completed with neutron diffraction. Crystal structures and electron densities are determined together with bond length and angles. Also the effects of thermal motion are discussed

  6. Visualizing Chemical Bonds in Synthetic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Laura C.; Ruth, Anthony; Green, David B.; Janko, Boldizsar; Gomes, Kenjiro K.

    The use of synthetic quantum systems makes it possible to study phenomena that cannot be probed by conventional experiments. We created synthetic molecules using atomic manipulation and directly imaged the chemical bonds using tunneling spectroscopy. These synthetic systems allow us to probe the structure and electronic properties of chemical bonds in molecules, including those that would be unstable in nature, with unprecedented detail. The experimental images of electronic states in our synthetic molecules show a remarkable match to the charge distribution predicted by density functional theory calculations. The statistical analysis of the spectroscopy of these molecules can be adapted in the future to quantify aromaticity, which has been difficult to quantify universally thus far due to vague definitions. We can also study anti-aromatic molecules which are unstable naturally, to illuminate the electronic consequences of antiaromaticity.

  7. Anatomy of Bond Formation. Bond Length Dependence of the Extent of Electron Sharing in Chemical Bonds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ponec, Robert; Cooper, D.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 727, 1-3 (2005), s. 133-138 ISSN 0166-1280 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : electron sharing * chemical bonds Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.045, year: 2005

  8. Emphasizing the Significance of Electrostatic Interactions in Chemical Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Bhawani

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a pedagogical approach to help students understand chemical bonding by emphasizing the importance of electrostatic interactions between atoms. The approach draws on prior studies that have indicated many misconceptions among students in understanding the nature of the chemical bond and energetics associated with bond formation…

  9. Direct tomography with chemical-bond contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huotari, Simo; Pylkkänen, Tuomas; Verbeni, Roberto; Monaco, Giulio; Hämäläinen, Keijo

    2011-05-29

    Three-dimensional (3D) X-ray imaging methods have advanced tremendously during recent years. Traditional tomography uses absorption as the contrast mechanism, but for many purposes its sensitivity is limited. The introduction of diffraction, small-angle scattering, refraction, and phase contrasts has increased the sensitivity, especially in materials composed of light elements (for example, carbon and oxygen). X-ray spectroscopy, in principle, offers information on element composition and chemical environment. However, its application in 3D imaging over macroscopic length scales has not been possible for light elements. Here we introduce a new hard-X-ray spectroscopic tomography with a unique sensitivity to light elements. In this method, dark-field section images are obtained directly without any reconstruction algorithms. We apply the method to acquire the 3D structure and map the chemical bonding in selected samples relevant to materials science. The novel aspects make this technique a powerful new imaging tool, with an inherent access to the molecular-level chemical environment. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  10. Bond Lengths and Bond Strengths in Weak and Strong Chemisorption: N2, CO, and CO/H on Nickel Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Sayago, David I.; Hoeft, Jon T.; Polcik, Martin; Kittel, Martin; Toomes, Rachel L.; Robinson, J.; Woodruff, David Phillip; Pascal, Mathieu; Lamont, Christine L.A.; Nisbet, Gareth

    2003-01-01

    New chemical-state-specific scanned-energy mode photoelectron diffraction experiments and density functional theory calculations, applied to CO, CO/H, and N2 adsorption on Ni(100), show that chemisorption bond length changes associated with large changes in bond strength are small, but those associated with changes in bond order are much larger, and are similar to those found in molecular systems. Specifically, halving the bond strength of atop CO to Ni increases the Ni-C distance by 0.06 Å...

  11. Strong and weak hydrogen bonds in drug–DNA complexes: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    The metrics for strong hydrogen bonds are consistent with established trends. The geometries are variable for weak hydrogen bonds. .... 'moderate'. Jeffrey's terminology is in keeping with the biological literature where bonds such ... to minimization keeping the heavy atoms rigid. This was carried out in MOE with the MMFFx ...

  12. One hundred years of Lewis Chemical Bond!

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-09-20

    , it did not take long for chemists to realize that noble gases can form bonds with other elements, under appropriate conditions. Hydrogen bonding is discussed in articles by Banerjee, Bhattacharya and Chakraborty; Karir, ...

  13. Strong and weak hydrogen bonds in drug–DNA complexes: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    The analysis was performed with an in-house software, hydrogen bond analysis tool (HBAT). In addition to strong hydrogen bonds such as O−H···O and N−H···O, the ubiquitous presence of weak hydrogen bonds such as C−H···O is implicated in molecular recognition. On an average, there are 1.4 weak hydrogen bonds.

  14. Upper Secondary Teachers' Knowledge for Teaching Chemical Bonding Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, Anna; Drechsler, Michal; Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have shown a growing interest in science teachers' professional knowledge in recent decades. The article focuses on how chemistry teachers impart chemical bonding, one of the most important topics covered in upper secondary school chemistry courses. Chemical bonding is primarily taught using models, which are key for understanding…

  15. Teaching and Learning the Concept of Chemical Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy Nahum, Tami; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi; Taber, Keith S.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical bonding is one of the key and basic concepts in chemistry. The learning of many of the concepts taught in chemistry, in both secondary schools as well as in the colleges, is dependent upon understanding fundamental ideas related to chemical bonding. Nevertheless, the concept is perceived by teachers, as well as by learners, as difficult,…

  16. Mercury stabilization in chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagh, A. S.; Singh, D.; Jeong, S. Y.

    2000-01-01

    Mercury stabilization and solidification is a significant challenge for conventional stabilization technologies. This is because of the stringent regulatory limits on leaching of its stabilized products. In a conventional cement stabilization process, Hg is converted at high pH to its hydroxide, which is not a very insoluble compound; hence the preferred route for Hg sulfidation to convert it into insoluble cinnabar (HgS). Unfortunately, efficient formation of this compound is pH-dependent. At a high pH, one obtains a more soluble Hg sulfate, in a very low pH range, insufficient immobilization occurs because of the escape of hydrogen sulfide, while efficient formation of HgS occurs only in a moderately acidic region. Thus, the pH range of 4 to 8 is where stabilization with Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics (CBPC) is carried out. This paper discusses the authors experience on bench-scale stabilization of various US Department of Energy (DOE) waste streams containing Hg in the CBPC process. This process was developed to treat DOE's mixed waste streams. It is a room-temperature-setting process based on an acid-base reaction between magnesium oxide and monopotassium phosphate solution that forms a dense ceramic within hours. For Hg stabilization, addition of a small amount ( 2 S or K 2 S is sufficient in the binder composition. Here the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results on CBPC waste forms of surrogate waste streams representing secondary Hg containing wastes such as combustion residues and Delphi DETOXtrademark residues are presented. The results show that although the current limit on leaching of Hg is 0.2 mg/L, the results from the CBPC waste forms are at least one order lower than this stringent limit. Encouraged by these results on surrogate wastes, they treated actual low-level Hg-containing mixed waste from their facility at Idaho. TCLP results on this waste are presented here. The efficient stabilization in all these cases is

  17. The chemical bond as an emergent phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Jon C; Ho, Vinh; Lubchenko, Vassiliy

    2017-05-07

    We first argue that the covalent bond and the various closed-shell interactions can be thought of as symmetry broken versions of one and the same interaction, viz., the multi-center bond. We use specially chosen molecular units to show that the symmetry breaking is controlled by density and electronegativity variation. We show that the bond order changes with bond deformation but in a step-like fashion, regions of near constancy separated by electronic localization transitions. These will often cause displacive transitions as well so that the bond strength, order, and length are established self-consistently. We further argue on the inherent relation of the covalent, closed-shell, and multi-center interactions with ionic and metallic bonding. All of these interactions can be viewed as distinct sectors on a phase diagram with density and electronegativity variation as control variables; the ionic and covalent/secondary sectors are associated with on-site and bond-order charge density wave, respectively, the metallic sector with an electronic fluid. While displaying a contiguity at low densities, the metallic and ionic interactions represent distinct phases separated by discontinuous transitions at sufficiently high densities. Multi-center interactions emerge as a hybrid of the metallic and ionic bond that results from spatial coexistence of delocalized and localized electrons. In the present description, the issue of the stability of a compound is that of the mutual miscibility of electronic fluids with distinct degrees of electron localization, supra-atomic ordering in complex inorganic compounds coming about naturally. The notions of electronic localization advanced hereby suggest a high throughput, automated procedure for screening candidate compounds and structures with regard to stability, without the need for computationally costly geometric optimization.

  18. Closing in on chemical bonds by opening up relativity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Cynthia K

    2008-03-01

    This paper develops a connection between the phenomenology of chemical bonding and the theory of relativity. Empirical correlations between electron numbers in atoms and chemical bond stabilities in molecules are first reviewed and extended. Quantitative chemical bond strengths are then related to ionization potentials in elements. Striking patterns in ionization potentials are revealed when the data are viewed in an element-independent way, where element-specific details are removed via an appropriate scaling law. The scale factor involved is not explained by quantum mechanics; it is revealed only when one goes back further, to the development of Einstein's special relativity theory.

  19. Closing in on Chemical Bonds by Opening up Relativity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Cynthia Kolb

    2008-01-01

    This paper develops a connection between the phenomenology of chemical bonding and the theory of relativity. Empirical correlations between electron numbers in atoms and chemical bond stabilities in molecules are first reviewed and extended. Quantitative chemical bond strengths are then related to ionization potentials in elements. Striking patterns in ionization potentials are revealed when the data are viewed in an element-independent way, where element-specific details are removed via an appropriate scaling law. The scale factor involved is not explained by quantum mechanics; it is revealed only when one goes back further, to the development of Einstein’s special relativity theory. PMID:19325749

  20. Phonon driven proton transfer in crystals with short strong hydrogen bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontaine-Vive, F.; Johnson, M.R.; Kearley, G.J.; Cowan, J.A.; Howard, J.A.K.; Parker, S.F.

    2006-01-01

    Recent work on understanding why protons migrate with increasing temperature in short, strong hydrogen bonds is extended here to three more organic, crystalline systems. Inelastic neutron scattering and density functional theory based simulations are used to investigate structure, vibrations, and

  1. One hundred years of Lewis Chemical Bond!

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-09-20

    Sep 20, 2016 ... Having understood the stable electronic configuration of the rare gases, Lewis suggested that H and F atom can both attain such configuration, if they were to share one electron with each other. He developed a cubic model of atoms with each surrounded by 8 electrons after forming electron pair bonds.

  2. Unicorns in the world of chemical bonding models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenking, Gernot; Krapp, Andreas

    2007-01-15

    The appearance and the significance of heuristically developed bonding models are compared with the phenomenon of unicorns in mythical saga. It is argued that classical bonding models played an essential role for the development of the chemical science providing the language which is spoken in the territory of chemistry. The advent and the further development of quantum chemistry demands some restrictions and boundary conditions for classical chemical bonding models, which will continue to be integral parts of chemistry. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Low-temperature wafer direct bonding of silicon and quartz glass by a two-step wet chemical surface cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenxi; Xu, Jikai; Zeng, Xiaorun; Tian, Yanhong; Wang, Chunqing; Suga, Tadatomo

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate a facile bonding process for combining silicon and quartz glass wafers by a two-step wet chemical surface cleaning. After a post-annealing at 200 °C, strong bonding interfaces with no defects or microcracks were obtained. On the basis of the detailed surface and bonding interface characterizations, the bonding mechanism was explored and discussed. The amino groups terminated on the cleaned surfaces might contribute to the bonding strength enhancement during the annealing. This cost-effective bonding process has great potentials for silicon- and glass-based heterogeneous integrations without requiring a vacuum system.

  4. The nature of chemical bonds from PNOF5 calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matxain, Jon M; Piris, Mario; Uranga, Jon; Lopez, Xabier; Merino, Gabriel; Ugalde, Jesus M

    2012-06-18

    Natural orbital functional theory (NOFT) is used for the first time in the analysis of different types of chemical bonds. Concretely, the Piris natural orbital functional PNOF5 is used. It provides a localization scheme that yields an orbital picture which agrees very well with the empirical valence shell electron pair repulsion theory (VSEPR) and Bent's rule, as well as with other theoretical pictures provided by valence bond (VB) or linear combination of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital (LCAO-MO) methods. In this context, PNOF5 provides a novel tool for chemical bond analysis. In this work, PNOF5 is applied to selected molecules that have ionic, polar covalent, covalent, multiple (σ and π), 3c-2e, and 3c-4e bonds. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Strong and weak hydrogen bonds in drug–DNA complexes: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... in the list of 70 complexes mentioned above, and 19 inhibitors for which the drug–DNA complex crystal structures are unknown. The virtual geometries so generated correlate well with published activities for these 26 inhibitors, justifying our assumption that strong and weak hydrogen bonds are optimized in the active site.

  6. Bonding effectiveness to different chemically pre-treated dental zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokoshi, Masanao; Poitevin, André; De Munck, Jan; Minakuchi, Shunsuke; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different chemical pre-treatments on the bond durability to dental zirconia. Fully sintered IPS e.max ZirCAD (Ivoclar Vivadent) blocks were subjected to tribochemical silica sandblasting (CoJet, 3M ESPE). The zirconia samples were additionally pre-treated using one of four zirconia primers/adhesives (Clearfil Ceramic Primer, Kuraray Noritake; Monobond Plus, Ivoclar Vivadent; Scotchbond Universal, 3M ESPE; Z-PRIME Plus, Bisco). Finally, two identically pre-treated zirconia blocks were bonded together using composite cement (RelyX Ultimate, 3M ESPE). The specimens were trimmed at the interface to a cylindrical hourglass and stored in distilled water (7 days, 37 °C), after which they were randomly tested as is or subjected to mechanical ageing involving cyclic tensile stress (10 N, 10 Hz, 10,000 cycles). Subsequently, the micro-tensile bond strength was determined, and SEM fractographic analysis performed. Weibull analysis revealed the highest Weibull scale and shape parameters for the 'Clearfil Ceramic Primer/mechanical ageing' combination. Chemical pre-treatment of CoJet (3M ESPE) sandblasted zirconia using Clearfil Ceramic Primer (Kuraray Noritake) and Monobond Plus (Ivoclar Vivadent) revealed a significantly higher bond strength than when Scotchbond Universal (3M ESPE) and Z-PRIME Plus (Bisco) were used. After ageing, Clearfil Ceramic Primer (Kuraray Noritake) revealed the most stable bond durability. Combined mechanical/chemical pre-treatment, the latter with either Clearfil Ceramic Primer (Kuraray Noritake) or Monobond Plus (Ivoclar Vivadent), resulted in the most durable bond to zirconia. As a standard procedure to durably bond zirconia to tooth tissue, the application of a combined 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate/silane ceramic primer to zirconia is clinically highly recommended.

  7. Chemical strategies for die/wafer submicron alignment and bonding.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, James Ellis; Baca, Alicia I.; Chu, Dahwey; Rohwer, Lauren Elizabeth Shea

    2010-09-01

    This late-start LDRD explores chemical strategies that will enable sub-micron alignment accuracy of dies and wafers by exploiting the interfacial energies of chemical ligands. We have micropatterned commensurate features, such as 2-d arrays of micron-sized gold lines on the die to be bonded. Each gold line is functionalized with alkanethiol ligands before the die are brought into contact. The ligand interfacial energy is minimized when the lines on the die are brought into registration, due to favorable interactions between the complementary ligand tails. After registration is achieved, standard bonding techniques are used to create precision permanent bonds. We have computed the alignment forces and torque between two surfaces patterned with arrays of lines or square pads to illustrate how best to maximize the tendency to align. We also discuss complex, aperiodic patterns such as rectilinear pad assemblies, concentric circles, and spirals that point the way towards extremely precise alignment.

  8. Planning a Teaching Sequence for the Teaching of Chemical Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, Doras; Hobden, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The current study seeks to examine how teachers plan teaching sequences to teach chemical bonding in the senior secondary phase of schooling. The study employs a learning demand tool as interpretive framework. A mixed method was used to guide the collection of data. Data were collected through a survey instrument with 227 practising physical…

  9. Processing–structure–property relations of chemically bonded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mechanical properties and microstructures of a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) and its composite with 1.0 wt% graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) reinforcement have been investigated. Microstructure was identified by using optical and scanning electron microscopes, X-ray tomography, and X-ray diffraction.

  10. Processing–structure–property relations of chemically bonded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Bend- ing and compression strength of the CBPC was improved by reducing bubbles via preparation in vacuum. Keywords. Chemical bonded ceramics; ceramic-matrix composites; particle-reinforced composites; mechanical properties. 1. Introduction. High temperature manufacturing processes contribute to global warming ...

  11. Benchmarking Density Functionals for Chemical Bonds of Gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2017-01-01

    Gold plays a major role in nanochemistry, catalysis, and electrochemistry. Accordingly, hundreds of studies apply density functionals to study chemical bonding with gold, yet there is no systematic attempt to assess the accuracy of these methods applied to gold. This paper reports a benchmark...... considering the diverse bonds to gold and the complication of relativistic effects. Thus, studies that use DFT with effective core potentials for gold chemistry, with no alternative due to computational cost, are on solid ground using TPSS-D3 or PBE-D3....

  12. Study of chemical bond strength of methyl methacrylate (MMA based bonding agent on type I dentin collagen at various humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adioro Soetojo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the basic agents used in dentin bonding solution is methyl methacrylate (MMA. This bonding agent is widely used in dentistry. It have been proved that the adhesion between dentin bonding agent and collagen fibril is chemically bond; though the chemical bonding contribution is smaller than physical mechanical bond. The purpose of the research was to examined the chemical bonding strength of MMA based dentin bonding on type I dentin collagen at various humidity. Samples of treatment group were put into desiccator with 60%, 70%, 80%, and 90% humidity, while for control groups at room humidity (65%. Chemical bond of pure MMA and MMA mixed with collagen were measured by FTIR. The lower the value of MMA carbonyl, the higher absorbance band speak of chemical bond strength between MMA and collagen. Data was statistically analyzed with One-Way ANOVA at 95% confidence level continued with Tukey-HSD test. The result showed that the highest chemical bond strength was at 65% humidity (p ≤ 0.05. In conclusion, many esther carbonyl MMA molecules reacted with amino collagen at 65% humidity. This can be shown by the lowest peak's value of the MMA carbonyl absorbance at FTIR.

  13. Strongly Phosphorescent Transition Metal π-Complexes of Boron-Boron Triple Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunschweig, Holger; Dellermann, Theresa; Dewhurst, Rian D; Hupp, Benjamin; Kramer, Thomas; Mattock, James D; Mies, Jan; Phukan, Ashwini K; Steffen, Andreas; Vargas, Alfredo

    2017-04-05

    Herein are reported the first π-complexes of compounds with boron-boron triple bonds with transition metals, in this case Cu I . Three different compounds were isolated that differ in the number of copper atoms bound to the BB unit. Metalation of the B-B triple bonds causes lengthening of the B-B and B-C NHC bonds, as well as large upfield shifts of the 11 B NMR signals, suggesting greater orbital interactions between the boron and transition metal atoms than those observed with recently published diboryne/alkali metal cation complexes. In contrast to previously reported fluorescent copper(I) π-complexes of boron-boron double bonds, the Cu n -π-diboryne compounds (n = 2, 3) show intense phosphorescence in the red to near-IR region from their triplet excited states, according to their microsecond lifetimes, with quantum yields of up to 58%. While the Cu diborene bond is dominated by electrostatic interactions, giving rise to S 1 and T 1 states of pure IL(π-π*) nature, DFT studies show that the Cu I π-complexes of diborynes reported herein exhibit enhanced metal d orbital contributions to HOMO and HOMO-1, which results in S 1 and T 1 having significant MLCT character, enabling strong spin-orbit coupling for highly efficient intersystem-crossing S 1 → T n and phosphorescence T 1 → S 0 .

  14. Weak Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds with Fluorine: Detection and Implications for Enzymatic/Chemical Reactions, Chemical Properties, and Ligand/Protein Fluorine NMR Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvit, Claudio; Vulpetti, Anna

    2016-05-23

    It is known that strong hydrogen-bonding interactions play an important role in many chemical and biological systems. However, weak or very weak hydrogen bonds, which are often difficult to detect and characterize, may also be relevant in many recognition and reaction processes. Fluorine serving as a hydrogen-bond acceptor has been the subject of many controversial discussions and there are different opinions about it. It now appears that there is compelling experimental evidence for the involvement of fluorine in weak intramolecular or intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Using established NMR methods, we have previously characterized and measured the strengths of intermolecular hydrogen-bond complexes involving the fluorine moieties CH2 F, CHF2 , and CF3 , and have compared them with the well-known hydrogen-bond complex formed between acetophenone and the strong hydrogen-bond donor p-fluorophenol. We now report evidence for the formation of hydrogen bonds involving fluorine with significantly weaker donors, namely 5-fluoroindole and water. A simple NMR method is proposed for the simultaneous measurement of the strengths of hydrogen bonds between an acceptor and a donor or water. Important implications of these results for enzymatic/chemical reactions involving fluorine, for chemical and physical properties, and for ligand/protein (19) F NMR screening are analyzed through experiments and theoretical simulations. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A dense and strong bonding collagen film for carbon/carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Sheng; Li, Hejun, E-mail: lihejun@nwpu.edu.cn; Li, Kezhi; Lu, Jinhua; Zhang, Leilei

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Significantly enhancement of biocompatibility on C/C composites by preparing a collagen film. • The dense and continuous collagen film had a strong bonding strength with C/C composites after dehydrathermal treatment (DHT) crosslink. • Numerous oxygen-containing functional groups formed on the surface of C/C composites without matrix damage. - Abstract: A strong bonding collagen film was successfully prepared on carbon/carbon (C/C) composites. The surface conditions of the modified C/C composites were detected by contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectra. The roughness, optical morphology, bonding strength and biocompatibility of collagen films at different pH values were detected by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), universal test machine and cytology tests in vitro. After a 4-h modification in 30% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution at 100 °C, the contact angle on the surface of C/C composites was decreased from 92.3° to 65.3°. Large quantities of hydroxyl, carboxyl and carbonyl functional groups were formed on the surface of the modified C/C composites. Then a dense and continuous collagen film was prepared on the modified C/C substrate. Bonding strength between collagen film and C/C substrate was reached to 8 MPa level when the pH value of this collagen film was 2.5 after the preparing process. With 2-day dehydrathermal treatment (DHT) crosslinking at 105 °C, the bonding strength was increased to 12 MPa level. At last, the results of in vitro cytological test showed that this collagen film made a great improvement on the biocompatibility on C/C composites.

  16. Intermolecular and very strong intramolecular C-SeO/N chalcogen bonds in nitrophenyl selenocyanate crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Ju; Wang, Weizhou

    2018-02-14

    Single-crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that polymorphic ortho-nitrophenyl selenocyanate (o-NSC, crystals 1a and 1b) and monomorphic para-nitrophenyl selenocyanate (p-NSC, crystal 2) crystals are all stabilized mainly by intermolecular and very strong intramolecular C-SeO/N chalcogen bonds, as well as by other different interactions. Thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry thermogram (DSC) analyses show that the starting decomposition temperatures and melting points of the three crystals are different, following the order 1b > 1a > 2, which is consistent with the structural characteristics of the crystals. In addition, atoms in molecules (AIM) and natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses indicate that the total strengths of the C-SeO and C-SeN chalcogen bonds decrease in the order 1b > 1a > 2. This study could be significant for engineering functional crystals based on robust C-SeO and C-SeN chalcogen bonds, and for designing drugs containing selenium as well as understanding their interaction in biosystems.

  17. Toward a consistent interpretation of the QTAIM: tortuous link between chemical bonds, interactions, and bond/line paths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Shahbazian, Shant; Marek, Radek

    2014-08-04

    Currently, bonding analysis of molecules based on the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) is popular; however, "misinterpretations" of the QTAIM analysis are also very frequent. In this contribution the chemical relevance of the bond path as one of the key topological entities emerging from the QTAIM's topological analysis of the one-electron density is reconsidered. The role of nuclear vibrations on the topological analysis is investigated demonstrating that the bond paths are not indicators of chemical bonds. Also, it is argued that the detection of the bond paths is not necessary for the "interaction" to be present between two atoms in a molecule. The conceptual disentanglement of chemical bonds/interactions from the bonds paths, which are alternatively termed "line paths" in this contribution, dismisses many superficial inconsistencies. Such inconsistencies emerge from the presence/absence of the line paths in places of a molecule in which chemical intuition or alternative bonding analysis does not support the presence/absence of a chemical bond. Moreover, computational QTAIM studies have been performed on some "problematic" molecules, which were considered previously by other authors, and the role of nuclear vibrations on presence/absence of the line paths is studied demonstrating that a bonding pattern consistent with other theoretical schemes appears after a careful QTAIM analysis and a new "interpretation" of data is performed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for immobilization of radioisotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun S.

    2016-04-05

    A method of immobilizing a radioisotope and vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) articles formed by the method are described. The method comprises combining a radioisotope-containing material, MgO, a source of phosphate, and optionally, a reducing agent, in water at a temperature of less than 100.degree. C. to form a slurry; curing the slurry to form a solid intermediate CBPC article comprising the radioisotope therefrom; comminuting the intermediate CBPC article, mixing the comminuted material with glass frits, and heating the mixture at a temperature in the range of about 900 to about 1500.degree. C. to form a vitrified CBPC article comprising the radioisotope immobilized therein.

  19. Nonuniform Internal Structure of Fibrin Fibers: Protein Density and Bond Density Strongly Decrease with Increasing Diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The major structural component of a blood clot is a meshwork of fibrin fibers. It has long been thought that the internal structure of fibrin fibers is homogeneous; that is, the protein density and the bond density between protofibrils are uniform and do not depend on fiber diameter. We performed experiments to investigate the internal structure of fibrin fibers. We formed fibrin fibers with fluorescently labeled fibrinogen and determined the light intensity of a fiber, I, as a function of fiber diameter, D. The intensity and, thus, the total number of fibrin molecules in a cross-section scaled as D1.4. This means that the protein density (fibrin per cross-sectional area, ρp, is not homogeneous but instead strongly decreases with fiber diameter as D-0.6. Thinner fibers are denser than thicker fibers. We also determined Young’s modulus, Y, as a function of fiber diameter. Y decreased strongly with increasing D; Y scaled as D-1.5. This implies that the bond density, ρb, also scales as D-1.5. Thinner fibers are stiffer than thicker fibers. Our data suggest that fibrin fibers have a dense, well-connected core and a sparse, loosely connected periphery. In contrast, electrospun fibrinogen fibers, used as a control, have a homogeneous cross-section.

  20. Detection of bond formations by DNA-programmed chemical reactions and PCR amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yizhou; Zhang, Mingda; Zhang, Chi; Li, Xiaoyu

    2012-10-04

    A system capable of performing both DNA-templated chemical reactions and detection of bond formations is reported. Photocleavable DNA templates direct reactions. Products from bond-forming events re-ligate original templates, amplifiable by PCR, therefore distinguishing bond formation from background. This system provides a novel approach for discovering potential new chemical reactions.

  1. NMR studies of solid pentachlorophenol-4-methylpyridine complexes exhibiting strong OHN hydrogen bonds: geometric H/D isotope effects and hydrogen bond coupling cause isotopic polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Brenda C K; Shenderovich, Ilya G; Tolstoy, Peter M; Frydel, Jaroslaw; Denisov, Gleb S; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2012-11-26

    We have studied the hydrogen bond interactions of (15)N labeled 4-methylpyridine (4-MP) with pentachlorophenol (PCP) in the solid state and in polar solution using various NMR techniques. Previous spectroscopic, X-ray, and neutron crystallographic studies showed that the triclinic 1:1 complex (4-MPPCP) exhibits the strongest known intermolecular OHN hydrogen bond in the solid state. By contrast, deuteration of the hydrogen bond gives rise to the formation of a monoclinic structure exhibiting a weaker hydrogen bond. By performing NMR experiments at different deuterium fractions and taking advantage of dipolar (1)H-(15)N recoupling under combined fast MAS and (1)H decoupling, we provide an explanation of the origin of the isotopic polymorphism of 4-MPPCP and improve previous chemical shift correlations for OHN hydrogen bonds. Because of anharmonic ground state vibrations, an ODN hydrogen bond in the triclinic form exhibits a shorter oxygen-hydron and a longer oxygen-nitrogen distance as compared to surrounding OHN hydrogen bonds, which also implies a reduction of the local dipole moment. The dipole-dipole interaction between adjacent coupled OHN hydrogen bonds which determines the structure of triclinic 4-MPPCP is then reduced by deuteration, and other interactions become dominant, leading to the monoclinic form. Finally, the observation of stronger OHN hydrogen bonds by (1)H NMR in polar solution as compared to the solid state is discussed.

  2. [Influence of primers ' chemical composition on shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łagodzińska, Paulina; Bociong, Kinga; Dejak, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Resin cements establish a strong durable bond between zirconia ceramic and hard tissues of teeth. It is essential to use primers with proper chemical composition before cementation. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of primer's chemical composition on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic to resin cements. 132 zirconia specimens were randomly assigned to four groups. There were four resin systems used. They included resin cement and respective primer, dedicated to zirconia: Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F2.0, Monobond Plus/Multilink Automix, AZ - Primer/ResiCem, Z - Prime Plus/Duo-Link. In each group the protocol of cementation was as follows: application of primer to the zirconia surface and application of the respective resin cement in cylindric mold (dimensions: 3.0 mm height and 3.0 mm diameter). Then, the shear bond strength was evaluated and the failure type was assessed in lupes (×2.5 magnification), also random specimens under SEM. The Wilcoxon test was used to analyze the data, the level of significance was α = 0.05. Finally, the known chemical composition of each primer was analysed in reference to probable chemical bonds, which may occure between primers and zirconia. The mean shear bond strength between resin cements and zirconia was the highest for Z-Prime Plus/Duo-Link (8.24 ± 3,21 MPa) and lowest for Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 (4.60 ± 2.21 MPa). The analysis revealed significant difference between all groups, except pair Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 and AZ-Primer/ResiCem. The failure type in groups of Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 and AZ-Primer/ResiCem was mainly adhesive, in groups Monobond Plus/ /Multilink Automix and Z-Prime Plus/Duo-Link mainly mixed. The chemical composition of primers affects different bond mechanisms between resin cements and zirconia. The highest shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia can be obtained for the primer composed of 10-Methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen

  3. Topology of electron charge density for chemical bonds from valence bond theory: a probe of bonding types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lixian; Ying, Fuming; Wu, Wei; Hiberty, Philippe C; Shaik, Sason

    2009-01-01

    To characterize the nature of bonding we derive the topological properties of the electron charge density of a variety of bonds based on ab initio valence bond methods. The electron density and its associated Laplacian are partitioned into covalent, ionic, and resonance components in the valence bond spirit. The analysis provides a density-based signature of bonding types and reveals, along with the classical covalent and ionic bonds, the existence of two-electron bonds in which most of the bonding arises from the covalent-ionic resonance energy, so-called charge-shift bonds. As expected, the covalent component of the Laplacian at the bond critical point is found to be largely negative for classical covalent bonds. In contrast, for charge-shift bonds, the covalent part of the Laplacian is small or positive, in agreement with the weakly attractive or repulsive character of the covalent interaction in these bonds. On the other hand, the resonance component of the Laplacian is always negative or nearly zero, and it increases in absolute value with the charge-shift character of the bond, in agreement with the decrease of kinetic energy associated with covalent-ionic mixing. A new interpretation of the topology of the total density at the bond critical point is proposed to characterize covalent, ionic, and charge-shift bonding from the density point of view.

  4. Chemical bonding in hypervalent molecules: is the octet rule relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noury, Stéphane; Silvi, Bernard; Gillespie, Ronald J

    2002-04-22

    The bonding in a large number of hypervalent molecules of P, As, S, Se, Te, Cl, and Br with the ligands F, Cl, O, CH(3), and CH(2) has been studied using the topological analysis of the electron localization function ELF. This function partitions the electron density of a molecule into core and valence basins and further classifies valence basins according to the number of core basins with which they have a contact. The number and geometry of these basins is generally in accord with the VSEPR model. The population of each basin can be obtained by integration, and so, the total population of the valence shell of an atom can be obtained as the sum of the populations of all the valence basins which share a boundary with its core basin. It was found that the population of the V(A, X) disynaptic basin corresponding to the bond, where A is the central atom and X the ligand, varies with the electronegativity of the ligand from approximately 2.0 for a weakly electronegative ligand such as CH(3) to less than 1.0 for a ligand such as F. We find that the total population of the valence shell of a hypervalent atom may vary from close to 10 for a period 15 element and close to 12 for a group 16 element to considerably less than 8 for an electronegative ligand such as F. For example, the phosphorus atom in PF(5) has a population of 5.37 electrons in its valence shell, whereas the arsenic atom in AsMe5 has a population of 9.68 electrons in its valence shell. By definition, hypervalent atoms do not obey the Lewis octet rule. They may or may not obey a modified octet rule that has taken the place of the Lewis octet rule in many recent discussions and according to which an atom in a molecule always has fewer than 8 electrons in its valence shell. We show that the bonds in hypervalent molecules are very similar to those in corresponding nonhypervalent (Lewis octet) molecules. They are all polar bonds ranging from weakly to strongly polar depending on the electronegativity of the

  5. Analysis of the radical hydrogen transfer pathway for cleaving strong bonds in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autrey, S.T.; Camaioni, D.M.; Ferris, K.F.; Franz, J.A.

    1993-09-01

    Hydrogen transfer processes involving radical intermediates are of key importance in the liquefaction of coal. While the primary function of donor solvents is to transfer H{lg_bullet} to coal-derived radicals that form when weak bonds are cleaved thermolytically, growing evidence suggests that the donor solvent can play a role in promoting cleavage of strong {alpha}-bonds. McMillen and Malhotra have explained the results in terms of a single-step mechanism referred to as radical H-transfer (RHT). Mechanistic kinetic models have been used to suggest the importance of RHT pathways in anthracene- and pyrene-based solvent systems. However, we question the reliability of these approaches because little experimental data exists to support the 16.5 kcal/mol intrinsic barriers they assume for RHT reactions. Unambiguous evidence for RHT is very difficult to obtain experimentally because at the temperatures required to activate the RHT reaction, a suite of multistep reactions can occur, which yield the same products, i.e. H-elimination from hydroaryl radicals followed by ipso addition. For this reason, we have sought to gain insight to barrier heights for RHT from theory. This paper reports our use of Marcus theory in combination with ab initio and semiempirical molecular orbital methods to show how the intrinsic barriers for RHT reactions depend on structural and thermodynamic properties of the reacting partners. In addition, reactions thought to be mediated by RHT are reexamined using mechanistic kinetic modeling (MKM) to determine the extent to which these reactions can be explained by conventional pathways.

  6. X-ray scattering and the chemical bond in N2 and CN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.P.M.; Zeevalkink, J.; Feil, D.

    1971-01-01

    X-ray scattering from the chemical bond within N2 and CN- has been studied in detail. Differences in scattering from these systems, derived from bonding and non-bonding models, are characterized by R values of ~ 0.04. Partitioning of the scattering into core and valence electron parts clearly

  7. Benchmarking Density Functionals for Chemical Bonds of Gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2017-01-01

    data set probes all types of bonding to gold from very electronegative halides that force Au+ electronic structure, via covalently bonded systems, hard and soft Lewis acids and bases that either work against or complement the softness of gold, the Au2 molecule probing gold's bond with itself, and weak...

  8. Associations Between Participant Ratings of PREP for Strong Bonds and Marital Outcomes 1 Year Postintervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Elizabeth S; Post, Kristina M; Markman, Howard J; Rhoades, Galena K; Stanley, Scott M

    2017-07-01

    After completing a relationship education program, collecting participant evaluations of the program is common practice. These are generally used as an index of "consumer satisfaction" with the program, with implications for feasibility and quality. Rarely have these ratings been used as predictors of changes in marital quality, although such feedback may be the only data providers collect or have immediate access to when considering the success of their efforts. To better understand the utility of such ratings to predict outcomes, we evaluated links between participant ratings and changes in self-reported marital satisfaction and communication scores one year later for a sample of 191 Army couples who had participated in a relationship education program delivered by Army chaplains (PREP for Strong Bonds). Overall ratings of general satisfaction with the program and the leader did not predict changes in marital outcomes one year later, whereas higher ratings of how much was learned, program helpfulness, increased similarity in outlook regarding Army life, and helpfulness of communication skills training predicted greater change in communication skills one year later. Higher ratings of items reflecting intent to invest more time in the relationship, and increased confidence in constructive communication and working as a team with the spouse predicted greater increases in both marital satisfaction and communication skills one year later. The constructs of intention and confidence (akin to perceived behavioral control) suggest that the Theory of Planned Behavior may be particularly useful when considering which Army couples will show ongoing benefit after relationship education.

  9. Present and future role of chemical mechanical polishing in wafer bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gui, C.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Lambeck, Paul

    Almost all direct wafer bonding has been conducted between chemical-mechanically polished substrates or between thin films that were present on top of the polished substrates. Introducing chemical mechanical polishing in the wafer bonding will make a large range of materials suitable for direct

  10. Method of waste stabilization with dewatered chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun; Maloney, Martin D.

    2010-06-29

    A method of stabilizing a waste in a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC). The method consists of preparing a slurry including the waste, water, an oxide binder, and a phosphate binder. The slurry is then allowed to cure to a solid, hydrated CBPC matrix. Next, bound water within the solid, hydrated CBPC matrix is removed. Typically, the bound water is removed by applying heat to the cured CBPC matrix. Preferably, the quantity of heat applied to the cured CBPC matrix is sufficient to drive off water bound within the hydrated CBPC matrix, but not to volatalize other non-water components of the matrix, such as metals and radioactive components. Typically, a temperature range of between 100.degree. C.-200.degree. C. will be sufficient. In another embodiment of the invention wherein the waste and water have been mixed prior to the preparation of the slurry, a select amount of water may be evaporated from the waste and water mixture prior to preparation of the slurry. Another aspect of the invention is a direct anyhydrous CBPC fabrication method wherein water is removed from the slurry by heating and mixing the slurry while allowing the slurry to cure. Additional aspects of the invention are ceramic matrix waste forms prepared by the methods disclosed above.

  11. The adsorption of acrolein on a Pt (1 1 1): A study of chemical bonding and electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirillo, S.; López-Corral, I.; Germán, E.; Juan, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Study of acrolein/Pt (1 1 1) adsorption using ab-initio and semiempirical methods. ► Geometry optimization and DOS curves were carried out using VASP code. ► Study of chemical bonding evolution using COOP and OP analysis. ► After adsorption Pt-Pt, C=O and C=C bonds are weakened. ► η 3 -cis and η 4 -trans most stable adsorption modes, η 1 -trans less favored one. - Abstract: The adsorption of acrolein on a Pt (1 1 1) surface was studied using ab-initio and semiempirical calculations. Geometry optimization and densities of states (DOS) curves were carried out using the Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP) code. We started our study with the preferential geometries corresponding to the different acrolein/Pt (1 1 1) adsorption modes previously reported. Then, we examined the evolution of the chemical bonding in these geometries, using the crystal orbital overlap population (COOP) and overlap population (OP) analysis of selected pairs of atoms. We analyzed the acrolein intramolecular bonds, Pt (1 1 1) superficial bonds and new molecule-surface formed bonds after adsorption. We found that Pt-Pt bonds interacting with the molecule and acrolein C=O and C=C bonds are weakened after adsorption; this last bond is significantly linked to the surface. The obtained C-Pt and O-Pt OP values suggest that the most stable adsorption modes are η 3 -cis and η 4 -trans, while the η 1 -trans is the less favored configuration. We also found that C p z orbital and Pt p z and d z 2 orbitals participate strongly in the adsorption process.

  12. Trigermanides AEGe{sub 3} (AE = Ca, Sr, Ba). Chemical bonding and superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Rodrigo; Schnelle, Walter; Baranov, Alexey I.; Burkhardt, Ulrich; Bobnar, Matej; Cardoso-Gil, Raul; Schwarz, Ulrich; Grin, Yuri [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik Fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    The crystal structures of the trigermanides AEGe{sub 3}(tI32) (AE = Ca, Sr, Ba; space group I4/mmm, for SrGe{sub 3}: a = 7.7873(1), c = 12.0622(3) Aa) comprise Ge{sub 2} dumbbells forming layered Ge substructures which enclose embedded AE atoms. The chemical bonding analysis by application of the electron localizability approach reveals a substantial charge transfer from the AE atoms to the germanium substructure. The bonding within the dumbbells is of the covalent two-center type. A detailed analysis of SrGe{sub 3} reveals that the interaction on the bond-opposite side of the Ge{sub 2} groups is not lone pair-like - as it would be expected from the Zintl-like interpretation of the crystal structure with anionic Ge layers separated by alkaline-earth cations - but multi-center strongly polar between the Ge{sub 2} dumbbells and the adjacent metal atoms. Similar atomic interactions are present in CaGe{sub 3} and BaGe{sub 3}. The variation of the alkaline-earth metal has a merely insignificant influence on the superconducting transition temperatures in the s,p-electron compounds AEGe{sub 3}.

  13. Carbene→N Coordination Bonds in Drugs: A Quantum Chemical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Coordination chemistry of bonds between main group elements and electron donating ligands as .... electronic nature of the compounds so as to establish ... a transition state. Gibbs free energy was calculated for all the optimized structures. Natural Bond Orbital. (NBO)24 analysis was also carried out to estimate.

  14. Strong dependence of ultracold chemical rates on electric dipole moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quemener, Goulven; Bohn, John L.

    2010-01-01

    We use the quantum threshold laws combined with a classical capture model to provide an analytical estimate of the chemical quenching cross sections and rate coefficients of two colliding particles at ultralow temperatures. We apply this quantum threshold model (QT model) to indistinguishable fermionic polar molecules in an electric field. At ultracold temperatures and in weak electric fields, the cross sections and rate coefficients depend only weakly on the electric dipole moment d induced by the electric field. In stronger electric fields, the quenching processes scale as d 4(L+(1/2)) where L>0 is the orbital angular-momentum quantum number between the two colliding particles. For p-wave collisions (L=1) of indistinguishable fermionic polar molecules at ultracold temperatures, the quenching rate thus scales as d 6 . We also apply this model to pure two-dimensional collisions and find that chemical rates vanish as d -4 for ultracold indistinguishable fermions. This model provides a quick and intuitive way to estimate chemical rate coefficients of reactions occuring with high probability.

  15. The adsorption of acrolein on a Pt (1 1 1): A study of chemical bonding and electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirillo, S.; López-Corral, I.; Germán, E.; Juan, A.

    2012-12-01

    The adsorption of acrolein on a Pt (1 1 1) surface was studied using ab-initio and semiempirical calculations. Geometry optimization and densities of states (DOS) curves were carried out using the Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP) code. We started our study with the preferential geometries corresponding to the different acrolein/Pt (1 1 1) adsorption modes previously reported. Then, we examined the evolution of the chemical bonding in these geometries, using the crystal orbital overlap population (COOP) and overlap population (OP) analysis of selected pairs of atoms. We analyzed the acrolein intramolecular bonds, Pt (1 1 1) superficial bonds and new moleculesbnd surface formed bonds after adsorption. We found that Ptsbnd Pt bonds interacting with the molecule and acrolein Cdbnd O and Cdbnd C bonds are weakened after adsorption; this last bond is significantly linked to the surface. The obtained Csbnd Pt and Osbnd Pt OP values suggest that the most stable adsorption modes are η3-cis and η4-trans, while the η1-trans is the less favored configuration. We also found that C pz orbital and Pt pz and d orbitals participate strongly in the adsorption process.

  16. Organometallic Bonding in an Ullmann-Type On-Surface Chemical Reaction Studied by High-Resolution Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shigeki; Sadeghi, Ali; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Pawlak, Rémy; Meier, Tobias; Takeya, Jun; Goedecker, Stefan; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-10-01

    The on-surface Ullmann-type chemical reaction synthesizes polymers by linking carbons of adjacent molecules on solid surfaces. Although an organometallic compound is recently identified as the reaction intermediate, little is known about the detailed structure of the bonded organometallic species and its influence on the molecule and the reaction. Herein atomic force microscopy at low temperature is used to study the reaction with 3,9-diiododinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-d]thiophene (I-DNT-VW), which is polymerized on Ag(111) in vacuum. Thermally sublimated I-DNT-VW picks up a Ag surface atom, forming a CAg bond at one end after removing an iodine. The CAg bond is usually short-lived, and a CAgC organometallic bond immediately forms with an adjacent molecule. The existence of the bonded Ag atoms strongly affects the bending angle and adsorption height of the molecular unit. Density functional theory calculations reveal the bending mechanism, which reveals that charge from the terminus of the molecule is transferred via the Ag atom into the organometallic bond and strengths the local adsorption to the substrate. Such deformations vanish when the Ag atoms are removed by annealing and CC bonds are established. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Glutamic Acid Selective Chemical Cleavage of Peptide Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbone, Joseph M; Lahankar, Neelam; Buissereth, Lyssa; Raj, Monika

    2016-03-04

    Site-specific hydrolysis of peptide bonds at glutamic acid under neutral aqueous conditions is reported. The method relies on the activation of the backbone amide chain at glutamic acid by the formation of a pyroglutamyl (pGlu) imide moiety. This activation increases the susceptibility of a peptide bond toward hydrolysis. The method is highly specific and demonstrates broad substrate scope including cleavage of various bioactive peptides with unnatural amino acid residues, which are unsuitable substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis.

  18. How Alan Hirsig plans to play Arco chemical's strong hand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, D.

    1993-01-01

    With 1992 net income up 4%, to $195 million. Arco Chemical (Newtown Square, PA) held its own in a year when many of its petrochemical industry peers were mauled again. Arco Chemical president and CEO Alan R. Hirsig talked recently with CW about his growth strategies for the company, and about progress with his Manufacturing Excellence initiative, lauched in the wake of the 1990 Channelview, TX tragedy. Riding on faster growth in the Asia region, Hirsig expects to see Arco's regional sales mix shift in the next three years and sales to grow from 1992's $3.1 billion to $4 billion/year. The foundation for that growth continues to be Arco's core proprietary technology competence for making propylene oxide (PO) with coproduction and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) - the key methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) feedstock, or styrene monomer. Arco claims a 28% share of world MTBE capacity, its 78,500-bbl/day capacity. He cites Jakarta, Bangkok, Mexico City, Milan, Turin, and Athens as examples of major cities where MTBE use in reformulated fuels is getting interest. Given what he views as Europe's traditional 10-year lag on the US in areas like catalytic mufflers and unleaded gasoline, he sees significant prospects in reformulated gasoline in that region in the coming years. Arco is also testing a proprietary TBA-based hydroperoxide in diesel fuels, which improves the cetane number and cleans up exhaust emissions, winning great interest in Tokyo. Also in the fuels area, Hirsig notes interest in ethyl tert-butyl ether production - which Arco launched in the US in December on a commercial scale - in France

  19. Anatomy of Bond Formation. Bond Length Dependence on the Extent of Electron Sharing in Chemical Bonds from the Analysis of Domain-Averaged Fermi holes.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ponec, Robert; Cooper, D.L.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 135, č. 7, (2007) , s. 31-41 ISSN 0301-7249 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : electron sharing * chemical bonds * domain averaged fermi holes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  20. Effect of inter-fibre bonding on the fracture of fibrous networks with strong interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutianos, Stergios; Mao, Rui; Peijs, Ton

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The mechanical response of cellulose nanopaper composites is investigated using a three-dimensional (3D) finite element fibrous network model with focus on the effect of inter-fibre bonds. It is found that the Young’s modulus and strength, for fixed fibre properties, are mainly controlle...

  1. EVALUATION OF CHEMICALLY BONDED PHOSPHATE CERAMICS FOR MERCURY STABILIZATION OF A MIXED SYNTHETIC WASTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This experimental study was conducted to evaluate the stabilization and encapsulation technique developed by Argonne National Laboratory, called the Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics technology for Hg- and HgCl2-contaminated synthetic waste materials. Leachability ...

  2. Carbene→N Coordination Bonds in Drugs: A Quantum Chemical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Coordination chemistry of bonds between main group elements and electron donating ligands as in L→E (where E is electron acceptor centre like C0, Si0, N1, P1, As1, B1 and L is an electron donating. N-heterocyclic carbene) has been recently gaining attention. Many important drugs have nitrogen atom as an.

  3. A New "Bottom-Up" Framework for Teaching Chemical Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum, Tami Levy; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi

    2008-01-01

    Traditional curriculum for teaching bonding often fosters the use of over-simplifications and over-generalizations. Therefore, there is a need for a presentation that is consistent with current scientific knowledge and that provides the student with the proper intellectual infrastructure for further studies. In this article, we present a general…

  4. Chemical bonding of hydrogen molecules to transition metal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubas, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    The complex W(CO) 3 (PR 3 ) 2 (H 2 ) (CO = carbonyl; PR 3 = organophosphine) was prepared and was found to be a stable crystalline solid under ambient conditions from which the hydrogen can be reversibly removed in vacuum or under an inert atmosphere. The weakly bonded H 2 exchanges easily with D 2 . This complex represents the first stable compound containing intermolecular interaction of a sigma-bond (H-H) with a metal. The primary interaction is reported to be donation of electron density from the H 2 bonding electron pair to a vacant metal d-orbital. A series of complexes of molybdenum of the type Mo(CO)(H 2 )(R 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PR 2 ) 2 were prepared by varying the organophosphine substitutent to demonstrate that it is possible to bond either dihydrogen or dihydride by adjusting the electron-donating properties of the co-ligands. Results of infrared and NMR spectroscopic studies are reported. 20 refs., 5 fig

  5. Chemical bonding and charge density distribution analysis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mid bond electron density values revealed the enhancement of covalent nature between titanium and oxygen ions and predominant ionic nature between barium and oxygen ions. Average grain sizes were estimated for the undoped and doped samples. SEM investigations showed the existence of smaller grains with ...

  6. Chemical bonding of hydrogen molecules to transition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubas, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    The complex W(CO){sub 3}(PR{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}) (CO = carbonyl; PR{sub 3} = organophosphine) was prepared and was found to be a stable crystalline solid under ambient conditions from which the hydrogen can be reversibly removed in vacuum or under an inert atmosphere. The weakly bonded H{sub 2} exchanges easily with D{sub 2}. This complex represents the first stable compound containing intermolecular interaction of a sigma-bond (H-H) with a metal. The primary interaction is reported to be donation of electron density from the H{sub 2} bonding electron pair to a vacant metal d-orbital. A series of complexes of molybdenum of the type Mo(CO)(H{sub 2})(R{sub 2}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PR{sub 2}){sub 2} were prepared by varying the organophosphine substitutent to demonstrate that it is possible to bond either dihydrogen or dihydride by adjusting the electron-donating properties of the co-ligands. Results of infrared and NMR spectroscopic studies are reported. 20 refs., 5 fig.

  7. Chemical bonding and charge density distribution analysis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ceramics; charge density; X-ray diffraction; bonding; microstructure. 1. Introduction. Ferroelectric perovskite materials are .... on Powder Diffraction Standards (JCPDS) database. (PDF# 05-0626). Existence of well-defined and ..... Li W, Xu Z, Chu R, Fu P and Hao J 2010 J. Alloy. Compd. 499 255. 9. Glinchuk M D, Bykov I P, ...

  8. Olefin metathesis for effective polymer healing via dynamic exchange of strong carbon-carbon bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhibin; Lu, Yixuan

    2015-09-15

    A method of preparing a malleable and/or self-healing polymeric or composite material is provided. The method includes providing a polymeric or composite material comprising at least one alkene-containing polymer, combining the polymer with at least one homogeneous or heterogeneous transition metal olefin metathesis catalyst to form a polymeric or composite material, and performing an olefin metathesis reaction on the polymer so as to form reversible carbon-carbon double bonds in the polymer. Also provided is a method of healing a fractured surface of a polymeric material. The method includes bringing a fractured surface of a first polymeric material into contact with a second polymeric material, and performing an olefin metathesis reaction in the presence of a transition metal olefin metathesis catalyst such that the first polymeric material forms reversible carbon-carbon double bonds with the second polymeric material. Compositions comprising malleable and/or self-healing polymeric or composite material are also provided.

  9. Chemical Pressure Maps of Molecules and Materials: Merging the Visual and Physical in Bonding Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Hussien H; Salvadó, Miguel A; Pertierra, Pilar; Engelkemier, Joshua; Fredrickson, Daniel C; Recio, J Manuel

    2018-01-09

    The characterization of bonding interactions in molecules and materials is one of the major applications of quantum mechanical calculations. Numerous schemes have been devised to identify and visualize chemical bonds, including the electron localization function, quantum theory of atoms in molecules, and natural bond orbital analysis, whereas the energetics of bond formation are generally analyzed in qualitative terms through various forms of energy partitioning schemes. In this Article, we illustrate how the chemical pressure (CP) approach recently developed for analyzing atomic size effects in solid state compounds provides a basis for merging these two approaches, in which bonds are revealed through the forces of attraction and repulsion acting between the atoms. Using a series of model systems that include simple molecules (H 2 , CO 2 , and S 8 ), extended structures (graphene and diamond), and systems exhibiting intermolecular interactions (ice and graphite), as well as simple representatives of metallic and ionic bonding (Na and NaH, respectively), we show how CP maps can differentiate a range of bonding phenomena. The approach also allows for the partitioning of the potential and kinetic contributions to the interatomic interactions, yielding schemes that capture the physical model for the chemical bond offered by Ruedenberg and co-workers.

  10. A qualitative study of high school students' pre- and post instructional conceptions in chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Renhong

    This study investigated high school students' understanding of chemical bonding prior to and after formal chemistry instruction. Two sets of clinical interviews were conducted prior to and after formal instructions on the topic of chemical bonding using a teacher-as-researcher protocol. Twenty-two students enrolled in a New York Regents Chemistry course were interviewed. Six students participated in the pilot study and the other sixteen were involved in the full study. Oral and pictorial data from the interviews were collected and analyzed in two parts; first, the students' conceptual understanding of chemical bonding including common themes, ideas and misconceptions were identified; second, profiles of each student were made to determine conceptual changes due to formal instruction. The findings showed that students were not familiar with the basic components and structure of atoms, especially the electrostatic properties of the sub-atomic particles. Inter-particle distance, rather than the electrostatic forces between particles, was believed to be the determining cause of the state of matter of a substance. The role of repulsive and attractive electrostatic forces in chemical bonding was not recognized. Students were unable to accurately describe the underlying scientific concepts for all types of chemical bonding and revealed a number of misconceptions, which were resistant to change by instruction. Specific areas of difficulty included the accurate descriptions of ionic bonding, covalent bonding and hydrogen bonding. Further, almost all the students could not use electrostatic forces to explain three states of water and phase changes and most students were unable to describe the energy that was released or absorbed due to bond formation or breaking. Student difficulties stemmed from a lack of understanding of some of the underlying, fundamental chemistry, such as the basic atomic structure, the particulate nature of mater and the role of electrostatic forces in

  11. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Zhou, Hui; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chen; Sun, Ying Chun; Gao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber) posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber) post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future. PMID:26066349

  12. Investigation of Chemical Bonding in In Situ Cryocrystallized Organometallic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohiwal, Abhishek; Hathwar, Venkatesha R; Dey, Dhananjay; Chopra, Deepak

    2017-10-19

    This Communication presents the crystal structure of the organometallic complexes (η 4 -1,3-cyclohexadiene) iron tricarbonyl (I) and (methyl cyclopentadienyl) manganese tricarbonyl (II) which are both liquid at room temperature. The crystal structures were determined using a state-of-the-art in situ cryocrystallization technique. The bonding features were elucidated using topological analysis of charge density in the framework of quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) and theoretical charge density analysis (multipolar refinement), to decipher the metal-carbonyl, metal-olefin and metal-carbocyclic ligand interactions in these complexes. Complex I displayed a simultaneous interplay of a "synergic effect" (σ-donation and π-back-bonding in the metal and an end-on coordinated carbonyl interaction) as well as consistency with the Dewar-Chatt-Duncanson (DCD) model (metal and side-on coordinated π-ligand interactions). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Initiated chemical vapor deposited nanoadhesive for bonding National Ignition Facility's targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tom [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Currently, the target fabrication scientists in National Ignition Facility Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is studying the propagation force resulted from laser impulses impacting a target. To best study this, they would like the adhesive used to glue the target substrates to be as thin as possible. The main objective of this research project is to create adhesive glue bonds for NIF’s targets that are ≤ 1 μm thick. Polyglycidylmethacrylate (PGMA) thin films were coated on various substrates using initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Film quality studies using white light interferometry reveal that the iCVD PGMA films were smooth. The coated substrates were bonded at 150 °C under vacuum, with low inflow of Nitrogen. Success in bonding most of NIF’s mock targets at thicknesses ≤ 1 μm indicates that our process is feasible in bonding the real targets. Key parameters that are required for successful bonding were concluded from the bonding results. They include inert bonding atmosphere, sufficient contact between the PGMA films, and smooth substrates. Average bond strength of 0.60 MPa was obtained from mechanical shearing tests. The bonding failure mode of the sheared interfaces was observed to be cohesive. Future work on this project will include reattempt to bond silica aerogel to iCVD PGMA coated substrates, stabilize carbon nanotube forests with iCVD PGMA coating, and kinetics study of PGMA thermal crosslinking.

  14. How strong is it? The interpretation of force and compliance constants as bond strength descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, Kai; Grunenberg, Jörg

    2008-08-01

    Knowledge about individual covalent or non-covalent bond strengths is the Holy Grail of many modern molecular sciences. Recent developments of new descriptors for such interaction strengths based on potential constants are summarised in this tutorial review. Several publications for and against the use of compliance matrices (inverse force constants matrix) have appeared in the literature in the last few years. However the mathematical basis for understanding, and therefore interpreting, compliance constants is still not well developed. We therefore summarise the theoretical foundations and point to the advantages and disadvantages of the use of force constants versus compliance constants for the description of both non-covalent and covalent interactions.

  15. Electronic structure and chemical bonding anisotropy investigation of wurtzite AlN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, M.; Mattesini, M.; Höglund, C.; Birch, J.; Hultman, L.

    2009-10-01

    The electronic structure and the anisotropy of the AlN π and σ chemical bonding of wurtzite AlN has been investigated by bulk-sensitive total fluorescence yield absorption and soft x-ray emission spectroscopies. The measured NK , AlL1 , and AlL2,3 x-ray emission and N1s x-ray absorption spectra are compared with calculated spectra using first-principles density-functional theory including dipole transition matrix elements. The main N2p-Al3p-Al 3d and N2p-Al3s hyridization regions are identified at -1.0 to -1.8eV and -5.0 to -5.5eV below the top of the valence band, respectively. In addition, N2s-Al3p and N2s-Al3s hybridization regions are found at the bottom of the valence band around -13.5 and -15eV , respectively. A strongly modified spectral shape of Al3s states in the AlL2,3 emission from AlN in comparison to Al metal is found, which is also reflected in the N2p-Al3p hybridization observed in the AlL1 emission. The differences between the electronic structure and chemical bonding of AlN and Al metal are discussed in relation to the position of the hybridization regions and the valence-band edge influencing the magnitude of the large band gap.

  16. Microstructure and chemical bonding of DLC films deposited on ACM rubber by PACVD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Martinez, D.; Schenkel, M.; Pei, Y.T.; Sánchez-López, J.C.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2011-01-01

    The microstructure and chemical bonding of DLC films prepared by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition on acrylic rubber (ACM) are studied in this paper. The temperature variation produced by the ion impingement during plasma cleaning and subsequent film deposition was used to modify the film

  17. Microscopic models for proton transfer in water and strongly hydrogen-bonded complexes with a single-well proton potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    A new mechanism and formalism for proton transfer in donor-acceptor complexes with long hydrogen bonds introduced recently [1], is applied to a proton transfer in liquid water. "Structural diffusion" of hydroxonium ions is regarded as totally adiabatic process, with synchronous hindered translation...... of two closest water molecules to and from the reaction complex as crucial steps. The water molecules induce a "gated" shift of the proton from the donor to the acceptor in the double-well potential with simultaneous breaking/formation of hydrogen bonds between these molecules and the proton donor...... and acceptor. The short-range and long-range proton transfer as "structural diffusion" of Zundel complexes is also considered. The theoretical formalism is illustrated with the use of Morse, exponential, and harmonic molecular potentials. This approach is extended to proton transfer in strongly hydrogen...

  18. Representational Classroom Practices that Contribute to Students' Conceptual and Representational Understanding of Chemical Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Annette; Nichols, Kim

    2011-11-01

    Understanding bonding is fundamental to success in chemistry. A number of alternative conceptions related to chemical bonding have been reported in the literature. Research suggests that many alternative conceptions held by chemistry students result from previous teaching; if teachers are explicit in the use of representations and explain their content-specific forms and functions, this might be avoided. The development of an understanding of and ability to use multiple representations is crucial to students' understanding of chemical bonding. This paper draws on data from a larger study involving two Year 11 chemistry classes (n = 27, n = 22). It explores the contribution of explicit instruction about multiple representations to students' understanding and representation of chemical bonding. The instructional strategies were documented using audio-recordings and the teacher-researcher's reflection journal. Pre-test-post-test comparisons showed an improvement in conceptual understanding and representational competence. Analysis of the students' texts provided further evidence of the students' ability to use multiple representations to explain macroscopic phenomena on the molecular level. The findings suggest that explicit instruction about representational form and function contributes to the enhancement of representational competence and conceptual understanding of bonding in chemistry. However, the scaffolding strategies employed by the teacher play an important role in the learning process. This research has implications for professional development enhancing teachers' approaches to these aspects of instruction around chemical bonding.

  19. Relaxation of the chemical bond skin chemisorption size matter ZTP mechanics H2O myths

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Chang Q

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this book is to explore the detectable properties of a material to the parameters of bond and non-bond involved and to clarify the interdependence of various properties. This book is composed of four parts; Part I deals with the formation and relaxation dynamics of bond and non-bond during chemisorptions with uncovering of the correlation among the chemical bond, energy band, and surface potential barrier (3B) during reactions; Part II is focused on the relaxation of bonds between atoms with fewer neighbors than the ideal in bulk with unraveling of the bond order-length-strength (BOLS) correlation mechanism, which clarifies the nature difference between nanostructures and bulk of the same substance; Part III deals with the relaxation dynamics of bond under heating and compressing with revealing of rules on the temperature-resolved elastic and plastic properties of low-dimensional materials; Part IV is focused on the asymmetric relaxation dynamics of the hydrogen bond (O:H-O) and the anomalous behav...

  20. Direct determination of the chemical bonding of individual impurities in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wu; Kapetanakis, Myron D; Prange, Micah P; Pantelides, Sokrates T; Pennycook, Stephen J; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2012-11-16

    Using a combination of Z-contrast imaging and atomically resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy on a scanning transmission electron microscope, we show that the chemical bonding of individual impurity atoms can be deduced experimentally. We find that when a Si atom is bonded with four atoms at a double-vacancy site in graphene, Si 3d orbitals contribute significantly to the bonding, resulting in a planar sp(2) d-like hybridization, whereas threefold coordinated Si in graphene adopts the preferred sp(3) hybridization. The conclusions are confirmed by first-principles calculations and demonstrate that chemical bonding of two-dimensional materials can now be explored at the single impurity level.

  1. Atomic Charges and Chemical Bonding in Y-Ga Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Grin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A negative deviation from Vegard rule for the average atomic volume versus yttrium content was found from experimental crystallographic information about the binary compounds of yttrium with gallium. Analysis of the electron density (DFT calculations employing the quantum theory of atoms in molecules revealed an increase in the atomic volumes of both Y and Ga with the increase in yttrium content. The non-linear increase is caused by the strengthening of covalent Y-Ga interactions with stronger participation of genuine penultimate shell electrons (4d electrons of yttrium in the valence region. Summing the calculated individual atomic volumes for a unit cell allows understanding of the experimental trend. With increasing yttrium content, the polarity of the Y-Ga bonding and, thus its ionicity, rises. The covalency of the atomic interactions in Y-Ga compounds is consistent with their delocalization from two-center to multi-center ones.

  2. Solid-State17O NMR Reveals Hydrogen-Bonding Energetics: Not All Low-Barrier Hydrogen Bonds Are Strong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiasheng; Hung, Ivan; Brinkmann, Andreas; Gan, Zhehong; Kong, Xianqi; Wu, Gang

    2017-05-22

    While NMR and IR spectroscopic signatures and structural characteristics of low-barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) formation are well documented in the literature, direct measurement of the LBHB energy is difficult. Here, we show that solid-state 17 O NMR spectroscopy can provide unique information about the energy required to break a LBHB. Our solid-state 17 O NMR data show that the HB enthalpy of the O⋅⋅⋅H⋅⋅⋅N LBHB formed in crystalline nicotinic acid is only 7.7±0.5 kcal mol -1 , suggesting that not all LBHBs are particularly strong. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Fast and accurate covalent bond predictions using perturbation theory in chemical space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kuang-Yu; von Lilienfeld, Anatole

    I will discuss the predictive accuracy of perturbation theory based estimates of changes in covalent bonding due to linear alchemical interpolations among systems of different chemical composition. We have investigated single, double, and triple bonds occurring in small sets of iso-valence-electronic molecular species with elements drawn from second to fourth rows in the p-block of the periodic table. Numerical evidence suggests that first order estimates of covalent bonding potentials can achieve chemical accuracy (within 1 kcal/mol) if the alchemical interpolation is vertical (fixed geometry) among chemical elements from third and fourth row of the periodic table. When applied to nonbonded systems of molecular dimers or solids such as III-V semiconductors, alanates, alkali halides, and transition metals, similar observations hold, enabling rapid predictions of van der Waals energies, defect energies, band-structures, crystal structures, and lattice constants.

  4. Structure and Bonding in Uranyl(VI) Peroxide and Crown Ether Complexes; Comparison of Quantum Chemical and Experimental Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet, Valérie; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2017-12-18

    The structure, chemical bonding, and thermodynamics of alkali ions in M[12-crown-4] + , M[15-crown-5] + , and M[18-crown-6] + , M[UO 2 (O 2 )(OH 2 ) 2 ] + 4,5 , and M[UO 2 (O 2 )(OH)(OH 2 )] n 1-n (n = 4, 5) complexes have been explored by using quantum chemical (QC) calculations at the ab initio level. The chemical bonding has been studied in the gas phase in order to eliminate solvent effects. QTAIM analysis demonstrates features that are very similar in all complexes and typical for electrostatic M-O bonds, but with the M-O bonds in the uranyl peroxide systems about 20 kJ mol -1 stronger than in the corresponding crown ether complexes. The regular decrease in bond strength with increasing M-O bond distance is consistent with predominantly electrostatic contributions. Energy decomposition of the reaction energies in the gas phase and solvent demonstrates that the predominant component of the total attractive (ΔE elec + ΔE orb ) energy contribution is the electrostatic component. There are no steric constraints for coordination of large cations to small rings, because the M + ions are located outside the ring plane, [O n ], formed by the oxygen donors in the ligands; coordination of ions smaller than the ligand cavity results in longer than normal M-O distances or in a change in the number of bonds, both resulting in weaker complexes. The Gibbs energies, enthalpies, and entropies of reaction calculated using the conductor-like screening model, COSMO, to account for solvent effects deviate significantly from experimental values in water, while those in acetonitrile are in much better agreement. Factors that might affect the selectivity are discussed, but our conclusion is that present QC methods are not accurate enough to describe the rather small differences in selectivity, which only amount to 5-10 kJ mol -1 . We can, however, conclude on the basis of QC and experimental data that M[crown ether] + complexes in the strongly coordinating water solvent are of

  5. Chemical bonding of nitrogen in low-energy implanted chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacio, C.; Arranz, A.; Diaz, D.

    2006-01-01

    Chromium nitride films have been grown by nitrogen implantation of metallic chromium at room temperature in the energy range of 0.25-5 keV varying the ion dose, the ion beam energy and the angle between the ion beam and the normal to the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Factor Analysis (FA) have been used to characterize in situ the chemical composition of the films. The number and spectral shape of the different Cr-N phases formed during nitrogen implantation, as well as their concentrations, have been obtained by means of FA, involving principal component analysis and target testing transformation, of the Cr 2p and N 1s XPS bands. FA results show that the composition of the chromium nitride films depends on the ion dose, on the ion energy and on the angle between the ion beam and the normal to the surface. For all ion beam energies two chromium nitride phases are formed, that is, Cr 2 N and CrN, however, for ion beam energies ≤ 0.5 k eV and normal incidence, the films are only composed of CrN, that is, the phase with the highest nitrogen content. For those experimental conditions, comparison of the experimental nitrogen concentration obtained by FA with that obtained from TRIDYN simulations suggests that in addition to nitrogen implantation and atomic mixing, other mechanisms like ion beam enhanced diffusion or the chemical reactivity of the Cr substrate towards nitrogen should be taken into account at low ion energies

  6. The role of radial nodes of atomic orbitals for chemical bonding and the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaupp, Martin

    2007-01-15

    The role of radial nodes, or of their absence, in valence orbitals for chemical bonding and periodic trends is discussed from a unified viewpoint. In particular, we emphasize the special role of the absence of a radial node whenever a shell with angular quantum number l is occupied for the first time (lack of "primogenic repulsion"), as with the 1s, 2p, 3d, and 4f shells. Although the consequences of the very compact 2p shell (e.g. good isovalent hybridization, multiple bonding, high electronegativity, lone-pair repulsion, octet rule) are relatively well known, it seems that some of the aspects of the very compact 3d shell in transition-metal chemistry are less well appreciated, e.g., the often weakened and stretched bonds at equilibrium structure, the frequently colored complexes, and the importance of nondynamical electron-correlation effects in bonding. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Chemical bonding in view of electron charge density and kinetic energy density descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2009-05-01

    Stalke's dilemma, stating that different chemical interpretations are obtained when one and the same density is interpreted either by means of natural bond orbital (NBO) and subsequent natural resonance theory (NRT) application or by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), is reinvestigated. It is shown that within the framework of QTAIM, the question as to whether for a given molecule two atoms are bonded or not is only meaningful in the context of a well-defined reference geometry. The localized-orbital-locator (LOL) is applied to map out patterns in covalent bonding interaction, and produces results that are consistent for a variety of reference geometries. Furthermore, LOL interpretations are in accord with NBO/NRT, and assist in an interpretation in terms of covalent bonding. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1991-10-01

    The formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies has been developed into a single equation which unifies the treatment of covalent bonds, ionic bonds, and partially ionic bonds. This relationship has been used to clarify the fundamental thermodynamic information relating to metal-hydrogen, metal-alkyl, and metal-metal bond energies. We have been able to obtain a direct observation and measurement of the stabilization energy provided by the agostic interaction of the C-H bond with the metal. The ionization energies have also been used to correlate the rates of carbonyl substitution reactions of (η 5 -C 5 H 4 X)Rh(CO) 2 complexes, and to reveal the electronic factors that control the stability of the transition state. The extent that the electronic features of these bonding interactions transfer to other chemical systems is being investigated in terms of the principle of additivity of ligand electronic effects. Specific examples under study include metal- phosphines, metal-halides, and metallocenes. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C 60 molecule, buckminsterfullerene, and its interaction with a metal surface. The high-resolution valence ionizations in the gas phase reveal the high symmetry of the molecule, and studies of thin films of C 60 reveal weak intermolecular interactions. Scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy reveal the arrangement of spherical molecules on gold substrates, with significant delocalization of charge from the metal surface. 21 refs

  9. Formation of aromatics in thermally induced reactions of chemically bonded RP-C18 stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prus, Wojciech

    2014-10-01

    In continuation of the research on the thermally induced chemical transformation of the silica-based chemically bonded stationary phases (C18), the oxidative cleavage of the silicon-carbon bonds with hydrogen peroxide and potassium fluoride was utilized, followed by the gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) study of the resulting products. These investigations allowed determination of the probable structures of certain thermal modification products as the various different alkyl derivatives of the phenylsilane ligands. Apart from aromatic compounds, the products with unsaturated bonds and carbonyl functionalities were found in the analyzed extracts. The analysis of the GC-MS chromatograms reveals that under the applied working conditions, the investigated process runs with relatively low yields. © The Author [2013]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Effect of Microwave Radiation on Enzymatic and Chemical Peptide Bond Synthesis on Solid Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Basso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptide bond synthesis was performed on PEGA beads under microwave radiations. Classical chemical coupling as well as thermolysin catalyzed synthesis was studied, and the effect of microwave radiations on reaction kinetics, beads' integrity, and enzyme activity was assessed. Results demonstrate that microwave radiations can be profitably exploited to improve reaction kinetics in solid phase peptide synthesis when both chemical and biocatalytic strategies are used.

  11. The Collaboration of Cooperative Learning and Conceptual Change: Enhancing the Students' Understanding of Chemical Bonding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eymur, Gülüzar; Geban, Ömer

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cooperative learning based on conceptual change approach instruction on ninth-grade students' understanding in chemical bonding concepts compared to traditional instruction. Seventy-two ninth-grade students from two intact chemistry classes taught by the same teacher in a public high…

  12. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between “static” ...

  13. Strong Coupling between Nanofluidic Transport and Interfacial Chemistry: How Defect Reactivity Controls Liquid-Solid Friction through Hydrogen Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Laurent; Tocci, Gabriele; Merabia, Samy; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-04-07

    Defects are inevitably present in nanofluidic systems, yet the role they play in nanofluidic transport remains poorly understood. Here, we report ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of the friction of liquid water on defective graphene and boron nitride sheets. We show that water dissociates at certain defects and that these "reactive" defects lead to much larger friction than the "nonreactive" defects at which water molecules remain intact. Furthermore, we find that friction is extremely sensitive to the chemical structure of reactive defects and to the number of hydrogen bonds they can partake in with the liquid. Finally, we discuss how the insight obtained from AIMD can be used to quantify the influence of defects on friction in nanofluidic devices for water treatment and sustainable energy harvesting. Overall, we provide new insight into the role of interfacial chemistry on nanofluidic transport in real, defective systems.

  14. A Relativity Enhanced, Medium-Strong Au(I)···H-N Hydrogen Bond in a Protonated Phenylpyridine-Gold(I) Thiolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Raphael J F; Schoiber, Jürgen; Monkowius, Uwe

    2017-01-17

    Gold is an electron-rich metal with a high electronegativity comparable to that of sulfur. Hence, hydrogen bonds of the Au(I)···H-E (E = electronegative element) type should be possible, but their existence is still under debate. Experimental results are scarce and often contradictory. As guidance for possible preparative work, we have theoretically investigated (ppyH)Au(SPh) (ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) bearing two monoanionic ligands which are not strongly electronegative at the same time to further increase the charge density on the gold(I) atom. The protonated pyridine nitrogen atom in ppy is geometrically ideally suited to place a proton in close proximity to the gold atom in a favorable geometry for a classical hydrogen bond arrangement. Indeed, the results of the calculations indicate that the hydrogen bonded conformation of (ppyH)Au(SPh) represents a minimum geometry with bond metrics in the expected range for medium-strong hydrogen bonds [r(N-H) = 1.043 Å, r(H···Au) = 2.060 Å, a(N-H···Au) = 141.4°]. The energy difference between the conformer containing the H···Au bond and another conformer without a hydrogen bond amounts to 7.8 kcal mol -1 , which might serve as an estimate of the hydrogen bond strength. Spectroscopic properties were calculated, yielding further characteristics of such hydrogen bonded gold species.

  15. Intramolecular interactions in dimedone and phenalen-1,3-dione adducts of 2(4)-pyridinecarboxaldehyde: Enol-enol and ring-chain tautomerism, strong hydrogen bonding, zwitterions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigalov, Mark; Shainyan, Bagrat; Krief, Pnina; Ushakov, Igor; Chipanina, Nina; Oznobikhina, Larisa

    2011-12-01

    The 2:1 adducts of dimedone and phenalen-1,3-dione with 2- and 4-pyridine carboxaldehyde, in spite of similar chemical behavior of their diketone precursors, have quite different tautomeric structure both in solid state and in solution. 2,2'-(Pyridin-2-ylmethanediyl)-bis(5,5-dimethyl-cyclohexane-1,3-dione) 5 exists as an equilibrium mixture of its dienol tautomer 5а' with two intramolecular H-bonds ОН⋯О dbnd С and OH ⋯N and the epimeric products of its reversible cyclization, that is, 4a-hydroxy-9-(pyridin-2-yl)-2,3,4,4a,6,7,9,9a-octahydro-5-H-xanthene-1,8-diones 5b (major) and 5c (minor), the latter appears only in polar media like DMSO. 2,2'-(Pyridin-4-ylmethanediyl)bis(5,5-dimethylcyclohexane-1,3-dione) 4, like other 2:1 dimedone-aldehyde adducts, both in solution and in solid state exists as dienol with two intramolecular H-bonds ОН ⋯О dbnd С. 4-[Bis(1H-phenalen-1,3(2H)-dione)methyl]pyridine 6 in nonpolar media like chloroform exists as dienol, but crystallizes from this solvent as zwitter-ion 6b with one very strong ionic hydrogen bond O sbnd H ⋯O sbnd and protonated pyridine nitrogen. The same zwitterion is formed in polar media (DMSO). For 2-[bis(1H-phenalen-1,3(2H)-dione)-methyl]-pyridine 7, fast exchange between its dienol tautomer 7a and zwitter-ion 7b occurs even in CD2Cl2, whereas in DMSO the equilibrium shifts towards zwitter-ion 7b.

  16. Enhanced dispersion stability and mobility of carboxyl-functionalized carbon nanotubes in aqueous solutions through strong hydrogen bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahk, Yeon Kyoung; He, Xu; Gitsis, Emmanouil; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Kim, Nayoung; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Dispersion of carbon nanotubes has been heavily studied due to its importance for their technical applications, toxic effects, and environmental impacts. Common electrolytes, such as sodium chloride and potassium chloride, promote agglomeration of nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. On the contrary, we discovered that acetic electrolytes enhanced the dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with carboxyl functional group through the strong hydrogen bond, which was confirmed by UV–Vis spectrometry, dispersion observations and aerosolization-quantification method. When concentrations of acetate electrolytes such as ammonium acetate (CH 3 CO 2 NH 4 ) and sodium acetate (CH 3 CO 2 Na) were lower than 0.03 mol per liter, MWCNT suspensions showed better dispersion and had higher mobility in porous media. The effects by the acetic environment are also applicable to other nanoparticles with the carboxyl functional group, which was demonstrated with polystyrene latex particles as an example

  17. The role of the 5f valence orbitals of early actinides in chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitova, T.; Pidchenko, I.; Fellhauer, D.; Bagus, P. S.; Joly, Y.; Pruessmann, T.; Bahl, S.; Gonzalez-Robles, E.; Rothe, J.; Altmaier, M.; Denecke, M. A.; Geckeis, H.

    2017-01-01

    One of the long standing debates in actinide chemistry is the level of localization and participation of the actinide 5f valence orbitals in covalent bonds across the actinide series. Here we illuminate the role of the 5f valence orbitals of uranium, neptunium and plutonium in chemical bonding using advanced spectroscopies: actinide M4,5 HR-XANES and 3d4f RIXS. Results reveal that the 5f orbitals are active in the chemical bonding for uranium and neptunium, shown by significant variations in the level of their localization evidenced in the spectra. In contrast, the 5f orbitals of plutonium appear localized and surprisingly insensitive to different bonding environments. We envisage that this report of using relative energy differences between the 5fδ/ϕ and 5fπ*/5fσ* orbitals as a qualitative measure of overlap-driven actinyl bond covalency will spark activity, and extend to numerous applications of RIXS and HR-XANES to gain new insights into the electronic structures of the actinide elements. PMID:28681848

  18. Prediction of Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation from sequence and chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.go [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics (United States)

    2010-03-15

    We present a program, named Promega, to predict the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation on the basis of backbone chemical shifts and the amino acid sequence. Using a chemical shift database of proteins of known structure together with the PDB-extracted amino acid preference of cis Xaa-Pro peptide bonds, a cis/trans probability score is calculated from the backbone and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of the proline and its neighboring residues. For an arbitrary number of input chemical shifts, which may include Pro-{sup 13}C{sup {gamma}}, Promega calculates the statistical probability that a Xaa-Pro peptide bond is cis. Besides its potential as a validation tool, Promega is particularly useful for studies of larger proteins where Pro-{sup 13}C{sup {gamma}} assignments can be challenging, and for on-going efforts to determine protein structures exclusively on the basis of backbone and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts.

  19. Developing a New Teaching Approach for the Chemical Bonding Concept Aligned with Current Scientific and Pedagogical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum, Tami Levy; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi; Krajcik, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The traditional pedagogical approach for teaching chemical bonding is often overly simplistic and not aligned with the most up-to-date scientific models. As a result, high-school students around the world lack fundamental understanding of chemical bonding. In order to improve students' understanding of this concept, it was essential to propose a…

  20. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde: IR spectrum and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi-Tekyeh, Zainab; Taherian, Fatemeh; Tayyari, Sayyed Faramarz

    2016-05-01

    The structural parameters, and vibrational frequencies of 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5NSA) were studied by the FT-IR and Raman spectra and the quantum chemical calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in order to investigate the intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IHB) present in its structure. The strength and nature of IHB in the optimized structure of 5NSA were studied in detail by means of the atoms in molecules (AIM) and the natural bond orbital (NBO) approaches. The results obtained were then compared with the corresponding data for its parent molecule, salicylaldehyde (SA). Comparisons made between the geometrical structures for 5NSA and SA, their OH/OD stretching and out-of-plane bending modes, their enthalpies for the hydrogen bond, and their AIM parameters demonstrated a stronger H-bonding in 5NSA compared with that in SA. The calculated binding enthalpy (ΔHbind) for 5NSA was -10.92 kcal mol-1. The observed νOH and γOH appeared at about 3120 cm-1 and 786 cm-1 respectively. The stretching frequency shift of H-bond formation was 426 cm-1 which is consistent with ΔHbind and the strength of H-bond in 5NSA. The delocalization energies and electron delocalization indices derived by the NBO and AIM approaches indicate that the resonance effects were responsible for the stronger IHB in 5NSA than in SA.

  1. Adjusting the Chemical Bonding of SnO2@CNT Composite for Enhanced Conversion Reaction Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yayi; Huang, Jianfeng; Qi, Hui; Cao, Liyun; Yang, Jun; Xi, Qiao; Luo, Xiaomin; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi; Li, Jiayin

    2017-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with excellent electron conductivity are widely used to improve the electrochemical performance of the SnO 2 anode. However, the chemical bonding between SnO 2 and CNTs is not clearly elucidated despite it may affect the lithiation/delithiation behavior greatly. In this work, an SnO 2 @CNT composite with SnC and SnOC bonds as a linkage bridge is reported and the influence of the SnC and SnOC bonds on the lithium storage properties is revealed. It is found that the SnC bond can act as an ultrafast electron transfer path, facilitating the reversible conversion reaction between Sn and Li 2 O to form SnO 2 . Therefore, the SnO 2 @CNT composite with more SnC bond shows high reversible capacity and nearly half capacity contributes from conversion reaction. It is opposite for the SnO 2 @CNT composite with more SnOC bond that the electrons cannot be transferred directly to CNTs, resulting in depressed conversion reaction kinetics. Consequently, this work can provide new insight for exploration and design of metal oxide/carbon composite anode materials in lithium-ion battery. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Probing Chemical Bonding and Electronic Structures in ThO-by Anion Photoelectron Imaging and Theoretical Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanli; Zou, Jinghan; Xiong, Xiao-Gen; Su, Jing; Xie, Hua; Fei, Zejie; Tang, Zichao; Liu, Hongtao

    2017-03-16

    Because of renewed research on thorium-based molten salt reactors, there is growing demand and interest in enhancing the knowledge of thorium chemistry both experimentally and theoretically. Compared with uranium, thorium has few chemical studies reported up to the present. Here we report the vibrationally resolved photoelectron imaging of the thorium monoxide anion. The electron affinity of ThO is first reported to be 0.707 ± 0.020 eV. Vibrational frequencies of the ThO molecule and its anion are determined from Franck-Condon simulation. Spectroscopic evidence is obtained for the two-electron transition in ThO - , indicating the strong electron correlation among the (7s σ ) 2 (6d δ ) 1 electrons in ThO - and the (7s σ ) 2 electrons in ThO. These findings are explained by using quantum-chemical calculations including spin-orbit coupling, and the chemical bonding of gaseous ThO molecules is analyzed. The present work will enrich our understanding of bonding capacities with the 6d valence shell.

  3. Dispersibility and chemical bonds between multi-walled carbon nanotubes and poly(ether ether ketone) in nanocomposite fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanmei, Jin; Haihui, Liu; Ning, Wang; Lichen, Hou; Xing-Xiang, Zhang

    2012-01-01

    A series of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)/poly(ether ether ketone)(PEEK) nanocomposite fibers were fabricated by mixing, melt extruding PEEK with different loadings and species of MWNTs, and melt-spun the blended chips. Nanocomposite fibers were heat-stretched and heat-treated. The morphology and dispersibility of MWNTs in nanocomposite fibers were observed using a field emission environmental scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The thermal and crystallization behavior of nanocomposite fibers were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Mechanical properties were tested using a tensile strength tester. MWNTs tend to aggregate when the loading exceeds 0.8 wt%. Functional groups on MWNTs improve the hydrophobicity and the dispersibility of MWNTs in PEEK matrix. The enhancement of mechanical properties depends on the loading and species of functional groups. The most effectively reinforced effect is in the sequence, carboxylic MWNTs (MWNT–COOH) > hydroxyl MWNTs (MWNT–OH) > MWNTs, which can be explained by the strong hydrogen bonding and the affinity between MWNT–COOH and PEEK, MWNT–OH and PEEK, and possible formation of a chemical bond between MWNT–COOH and PEEK. A nanocomposite fiber with excellent mechanical property was fabricated using 0.8 wt% MWNT–COOH as filler. The Young's modulus is 1.7 GPa; and the stress is 648 MPa. -- Highlights: ► Functional groups on MWNTs improve their hydrophobility and dispersability. ► Mechanical properties depend on the content and species of the functional groups. ► The reinforced effect is in the sequence, carboxylic MWNTs > hydroxyl MWNTs > MWNTs. ► The strength behavior was result of hydrogen bond, affinity and chemical bond. ► Dispersability of MWNTs in matrix was analyzed by calculating solubility parameter.

  4. Dispersibility and chemical bonds between multi-walled carbon nanotubes and poly(ether ether ketone) in nanocomposite fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanmei, Jin, E-mail: jinyanmei818@163.com [Tianjin Municipal Key Lab of Fiber Modification and Functional Fiber, Institute of Functional Fibers, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Haihui, Liu; Ning, Wang; Lichen, Hou [Tianjin Municipal Key Lab of Fiber Modification and Functional Fiber, Institute of Functional Fibers, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Xing-Xiang, Zhang, E-mail: zhangpolyu@gmail.com [Tianjin Municipal Key Lab of Fiber Modification and Functional Fiber, Institute of Functional Fibers, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China)

    2012-08-15

    A series of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)/poly(ether ether ketone)(PEEK) nanocomposite fibers were fabricated by mixing, melt extruding PEEK with different loadings and species of MWNTs, and melt-spun the blended chips. Nanocomposite fibers were heat-stretched and heat-treated. The morphology and dispersibility of MWNTs in nanocomposite fibers were observed using a field emission environmental scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The thermal and crystallization behavior of nanocomposite fibers were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Mechanical properties were tested using a tensile strength tester. MWNTs tend to aggregate when the loading exceeds 0.8 wt%. Functional groups on MWNTs improve the hydrophobicity and the dispersibility of MWNTs in PEEK matrix. The enhancement of mechanical properties depends on the loading and species of functional groups. The most effectively reinforced effect is in the sequence, carboxylic MWNTs (MWNT-COOH) > hydroxyl MWNTs (MWNT-OH) > MWNTs, which can be explained by the strong hydrogen bonding and the affinity between MWNT-COOH and PEEK, MWNT-OH and PEEK, and possible formation of a chemical bond between MWNT-COOH and PEEK. A nanocomposite fiber with excellent mechanical property was fabricated using 0.8 wt% MWNT-COOH as filler. The Young's modulus is 1.7 GPa; and the stress is 648 MPa. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Functional groups on MWNTs improve their hydrophobility and dispersability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanical properties depend on the content and species of the functional groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reinforced effect is in the sequence, carboxylic MWNTs > hydroxyl MWNTs > MWNTs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The strength behavior was result of hydrogen bond, affinity and chemical bond. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dispersability of MWNTs in matrix was analyzed by

  5. Topological Properties of Chemical Bonds from Static and Dynamic Electron Densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannatha Prathapa, Siriyara; Held, Jeanette; van Smaalen, Sander

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic and static electron densities (EDs) based on the independent spherical atom model (IAM) and multipole (MP) models of crambin were successfully computed, holding no series-termination effects. The densities are compared to EDs of small biological molecules at diverse temperatures. It is outlined that proteins exhibit an intrinsic flexibility, present as frozen disorder at 100 K, in contrast to small molecules. The flexibility of the proteins is reflected by atomic displacement parameters (B-factors), which are considerably larger than for small molecules at 298 K. Thus, an optimal deconvolution of deformation density and thermal motion is not guaranteed, which prevents a free refinement of MP parameters but allows an application of transferable, fixed MP parameters. The analysis of the topological properties, such as the density at bond critical points (BCPs) and the Laplacian, reveals systematic differences between static and dynamic EDs. Zero-point-vibrations, yet present in dynamic EDs at low temperature, affect but marginally the EDs of small molecules. The zero-point-vibrations cause a smearing of the ED, which becomes more pronounced with increasing temperature. Topological properties, primarily the Laplacian, of covalent bonds appear to be more sensitive to effects by temperature and the polarity of the bonds. However, dynamic EDs at ca. 20 K based on MP models provide a good characterization of chemical bonding. Both the density at BCPs and the Laplacian of hydrogen bonds constitute similar values from static and dynamic EDs for all studied temperatures. Deformation densities demonstrate the necessity of the employment of MP parameters in order to comprise the nature of covalent bonds. The character of hydrogen bonds can be roughly pictured by IAM, whereas MP parameters are recommended for a classification of hydrogen bonds beyond a solely interpretation of topological properties. PMID:25995522

  6. Physical and chemical transformations of highly compressed carbon dioxide at bond energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-06-07

    Carbon dioxide exhibits a richness of high-pressure polymorphs with a great diversity in intermolecular interaction, chemical bonding, and crystal structures. It ranges from typical molecular solids to fully extended covalent solids with crystal structures similar to those of SiO2. These extended solids of carbon dioxide are fundamentally new materials exhibiting interesting optical nonlinearity, low compressibility and high energy density. Furthermore, the large disparity in chemical bonding between the extended network and molecular structures results in a broad metastability domain for these phases to room temperature and almost to ambient pressure and thereby offers enhanced opportunities for novel materials developments. Broadly speaking, these molecular-to-non-molecular transitions occur due to electron delocalization manifested as a rapid increase in electron kinetic energy at high density. The detailed mechanisms, however, are more complex with phase metastabilities, path-dependent phases and phase boundaries, and large lattice strains and structural distortions - all of which are controlled by well beyond thermodynamic constraints to chemical kinetics associated with the governing phases and transitions. As a result, the equilibrium phase boundary is difficult to locate precisely (experimentally or theoretically) and is often obscured by the presence of metastable phases (ordered or disordered). This paper will review the pressure-induced transformations observed in highly compressed carbon dioxide and present chemistry perspectives on those molecular-to-non-molecular transformations that can be applied to other low-Z molecular solids at Mbar pressures where the compression energy rivals the chemical bond energies.

  7. Theoretical study of relativistic effects in the electronic structure and chemical bonding of UF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoe, Jun; Takeuchi, Kazuo; Sekine, Rika; Nakamatsu, Hirohide; Mukoyama, Takeshi; Adachi, Hirohiko.

    1992-01-01

    We have performed the relativistic molecular orbital calculation for the ground state of UF 6 , using the discrete-variational Dirac-Slater method (DV-DS), in order to elucidate the relativistic effects in the electronic structure and chemical bonding. Compared with the electronic structure calculated by the non-relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater (DV-X α )MO method, not only the direct relativistic effects (spin-orbit splitting etc), but also the indirect effect due to the change in screening core potential charge are shown to be important in the MO level structure. From the U-F bond overlap population analysis, we found that the U-F bond formation can be explained only by the DV-DS, not by the DV-X α . The calculated electronic structure in valence energy region (-20-OeV) and excitation energies in UV region are in agreement with experiments. (author)

  8. Studying Chemical Reactions, One Bond at a Time, with Single Molecule AFM Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Julio M.

    2008-03-01

    The mechanisms by which mechanical forces regulate the kinetics of a chemical reaction are unknown. In my lecture I will demonstrate how we use single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy and protein engineering to study the effect of force on the kinetics of thiol/disulfide exchange. Reduction of disulfide bond via the thiol/disulfide exchange chemical reaction is crucial in regulating protein function and is of common occurrence in mechanically stressed proteins. While reduction is thought to proceed through a substitution nucleophilic bimolecular (SN2) reaction, the role of a mechanical force in modulating this chemical reaction is unknown. We apply a constant stretching force to single engineered disulfide bonds and measure their rate of reduction by dithiothreitol (DTT). We find that while the reduction rate is linearly dependent on the concentration of DTT, it is exponentially dependent on the applied force, increasing 10-fold over a 300 pN range. This result predicts that the disulfide bond lengthens by 0.34 å at the transition state of the thiol/disulfide exchange reaction. In addition to DTT, we also study the reduction of the engineered disulfide bond by the E. coli enzyme thioredoxin (Trx). Thioredoxins are enzymes that catalyze disulfide bond reduction in all organisms. As before, we apply a mechanical force in the range of 25-450 pN to the engineered disulfide bond substrate and monitor the reduction of these bonds by individual enzymes. In sharp contrast with the data obtained with DTT, we now observe two alternative forms of the catalytic reaction, the first requiring a reorientation of the substrate disulfide bond, causing a shortening of the substrate polypeptide by 0.76±0.07 å, and the second elongating the substrate disulfide bond by 0.21±0.01 å. These results support the view that the Trx active site regulates the geometry of the participating sulfur atoms, with sub-ångström precision, in order to achieve efficient catalysis. Single molecule

  9. Hydrogen-Bond Accepting Properties of New Heteroaromatic Ring Chemical Motifs: A Theoretical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graton, Jérôme; Le Questel, Jean-Yves; Maxwell, Peter; Popelier, Paul

    2016-02-22

    The prediction of hydrogen-bond (H-bond) acceptor ability is crucial in drug design. This important property is quantified in a large pKBHX database of consistently measured values. We aim to expand the chemical diversity of the studied H-bond acceptors and to increase the range of H-bond strength considered. Two quantum chemical descriptors are contrasted, called ΔE(H) (the change in the energy of a topological hydrogen atom upon complexation) and Vmin (the local minimum in the electrostatic potential on the H-bond accepting site). We performed a systematic analysis of the correlations between pKBHX and Vmin for an initial set of 106 compounds (including O- and N-containing subsets, as well as compounds including sulfur, chlorine, and π-bases). Correlations improve for family dependent subsets, and after outlier treatment, a set of 90 compounds was used to set up a linear equation to predict pKBHX from Vmin. This equation and a previously published equation [Green and Popelier J. Chem. Inf. 2014, 54 (2), 553-561], to predict pKBHX from ΔE(H), were used to predict the pKBHX values for 22 potentially biologically active heteroaromatic ring compounds, [Pitt et al. J. Med. Chem. 2009, 52 (9), 2952-2963], among which several structures still remain experimentally unavailable. H-Bond basicity of sp(2) nitrogen sites were consistently predicted with both descriptors. A worse agreement was found with carbonyl acceptor sites, with the stronger deviations observed for the lactam groups. It was shown that secondary interactions involving the neighboring NH group were influencing the results. Substitution of the NH group with an NMe group resulted in an improved consistency from both Vmin and ΔE(H) predictions, the latter being more prominently affected by the methyl substitution. Both approaches appear as efficient procedures for the H-bond ability prediction of novel heteroaromatic rings. Nevertheless, the ΔE(H) parameter presents slight chemical structure limitations

  10. Effect of chemical surface treatment of titanium on its bond with dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchańska-Kowalik, Monika; Wołowiec-Korecka, Emilia; Klimek, Leszek

    2018-04-05

    Airborne-particle abrasion of titanium is a clinically accepted method of surface preparation. As a side effect of airborne-particle abrasion, particles of the abrasive material get embedded into the surface. How particle presence or removal from the titanium surface affects the strength of the titanium-ceramic bond is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the effect of removing Al 2 O 3 particles embedded into the surface by means of chemical surface treatment on the strength of the titanium-ceramic bond. Titanium (TritanCpTi 1, Dentaurum, 99.5% Ti) disks were airborne-particle abraded with 110 μm Al 2 O 3 at a pressure of 0.4 MPa and an angle of approximately 45 degrees. The surface was etched chemically using 1 of 8 reagents, and the veneering ceramic applied and fired. The strength of the metal-ceramic bond was determined using the shear strength test. Further, the effect of thermal fatigue on the bond strength was evaluated. The results were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey honest significant difference (HSD) test (α=.05). Fractographic investigations and microscopic tests were also performed to determine the quality of the titanium-ceramic bond. Effective etching of the titanium surface and removal of Al 2 O 3 particles included a 30% water solution of HNO 3  + 3% HF, a mixture of HNO 3  + HF + glycerin, a 4% solution of HF in H 2 O 2 , and a 4% solution of HF in H 2 O. A statistically significant difference (of about 50%) in bond strength was found between the groups subjected to chemical etching and the control group (P<.05). Additionally, a statistically significant difference (about 25%) was found after thermocycling (P<.05). Removing the Al 2 O 3 particles embedded into the titanium surface after airborne-particle abrasion lowers the strength of the titanium-ceramic bond (P<.05). Thermocycling also weakens the strength of the titanium-ceramic bond, regardless of the surface preparation (P<.05). Copyright © 2018

  11. Evolution of the chemical bonding nature and electrode activity of indium selenide upon the composite formation with graphene nanosheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Seung Mi; Lee, Eunsil; Adpakpang, Kanyaporn; Patil, Sharad B.; Park, Mi Jin; Lim, Young Soo; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Kim, Jong-Young; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: • In 4 Se 2.85 @graphene nanocomposite is easily prepared by high energy mechanical milling process. • The bond covalency of In 4 Se 2.85 is notably changed upon the composite formation with graphene. • In 4 Se 2.85 @graphene nanocomposite shows promising anode performance for lithium ion battery. -- Abstract: Evolution of the chemical bonding nature and electrochemical activity of indium selenide upon the composite formation with carbon species is systematically investigated. Nanocomposites of In 4 Se 2.85 @graphene and In 4 Se 2.85 @carbon-black are synthesized via a solid state reaction between In and Se elements, and the following high energy mechanical milling of In 4 Se 2.85 with graphene and carbon-black, respectively. The high energy mechanical milling (HEMM) of In 4 Se 2.85 with carbon species gives rise to a decrease of particle size with a significant depression of the crystallinity of In 4 Se 2.85 phase. In contrast to the composite formation with carbon-black, that with graphene induces a notable decrease of (In−Se) bond covalency, underscoring significant chemical interaction between graphene and In 4 Se 2.85 . Both the nanocomposites of In 4 Se 2.85 @graphene and In 4 Se 2.85 @carbon-black show much better anode performance for lithium ion batteries with larger discharge capacity and better cyclability than does the pristine In 4 Se 2.85 material, indicating the beneficial effect of composite formation on the electrochemical activity of indium selenide. Between the present nanocomposites, the electrode performance of the In 4 Se 2.85 @graphene nanocomposite is superior to that of the In 4 Se 2.85 @carbon-black nanocomposite, which is attributable to the weakening of (In−Se) bonds upon the composite formation with graphene as well as to the better mixing between In 4 Se 2.85 and graphene. The present study clearly demonstrates that the composite formation with graphene has strong influence

  12. Chemical Warfare Agent Surface Adsorption: Hydrogen Bonding of Sarin and Soman to Amorphous Silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Erin Durke; Gordon, Wesley O; Wilmsmeyer, Amanda R; Troya, Diego; Morris, John R

    2014-04-17

    Sarin and soman are warfare nerve agents that represent some of the most toxic compounds ever synthesized. The extreme risk in handling such molecules has, until now, precluded detailed research into the surface chemistry of agents. We have developed a surface science approach to explore the fundamental nature of hydrogen bonding forces between these agents and a hydroxylated surface. Infrared spectroscopy revealed that both agents adsorb to amorphous silica through the formation of surprisingly strong hydrogen-bonding interactions with primarily isolated silanol groups (SiOH). Comparisons with previous theoretical results reveal that this bonding occurs almost exclusively through the phosphoryl oxygen (P═O) of the agent. Temperature-programmed desorption experiments determined that the activation energy for hydrogen bond rupture and desorption of sarin and soman was 50 ± 2 and 52 ± 2 kJ/mol, respectively. Together with results from previous studies involving other phosphoryl-containing molecules, we have constructed a detailed understanding of the structure-function relationship for nerve agent hydrogen bonding at the gas-surface interface.

  13. Effect of raw material ratios on the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ai-juan; Yuan, Zhi-long; Zhang, Jiao; Liu, Lin-tao; Li, Jun-ming; Liu, Zheng

    2013-12-01

    The compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics is important in biomedical field. In this work, the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics was investigated with different liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios. X-ray diffractometer was applied to characterize its phase composition. The microstructure was imaged using a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the compressive strength of the chemically bonded ceramics increased with the decrease of liquid-to-solid ratio due to the change of the packing density and the crystallinity of hydrated product. However, with the increase of MgO-to-KH2PO4 weight ratio, its compressive strength increased firstly and then decreased. The low compressive strength in lower MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratio might be explained by the existence of the weak phase KH2PO4. However, the low value of compressive strength with the higher MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratio might be caused by lack of the joined phase in the hydrated product. Besides, it has been found that the microstructures were different in these two cases by the scanning electron microscope. Colloidal structure appeared for the samples with lower liquid-to-solid and higher MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios possibly because of the existence of amorphous hydrated products. The optimization of both liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios was important to improve the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics. © 2013.

  14. Transport of chemically bonded nuclear energy in a closed cycle with special consideration to energy disconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ossami, S.

    1976-01-01

    The article describes the utilisation of nuclear energy in the form of 'nuclear long-distance energy'. Heat produced by nuclear fission is bonded to a reversible chemical reaction (cracking gas) which release the heat again at the place of comsumption by catalytic transformation. The article deals in particular with the process of methane cracking/methanisation, the disconnection of the energy (heat) by the methanisation process and the decisive role of the methanisation catalyzers. (orig.) [de

  15. Chemically-bonded brick production based on burned clay by means of semidry pressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voroshilov, Ivan; Endzhievskaya, Irina; Vasilovskaya, Nina

    2016-01-01

    We presented a study on the possibility of using the burnt rocks of the Krasnoyarsk Territory for production of chemically-bonded materials in the form of bricks which are so widely used in multistory housing and private house construction. The radiographic analysis of the composition of burnt rock was conducted and a modifier to adjust the composition uniformity was identified. The mixing moisture content was identified and optimal amount at 13-15% was determined. The method of semidry pressing has been chosen. The process of obtaining moldings has been theoretically proved; the advantages of chemically-bonded wall materials compared to ceramic brick were shown. The production of efficient artificial stone based on material burnt rocks, which is comparable with conventionally effective ceramic materials or effective with cell tile was proved, the density of the burned clay-based cell tile makes up to 1630-1785 kg m3, with compressive strength of 13.6-20.0 MPa depending on the compression ratio and cement consumption, frost resistance index is F50, and the thermal conductivity in the masonry is λ = 0,459-0,546 W m * °C. The clear geometric dimensions of pressed products allow the use of the chemically-bonded brick based on burnt clay as a facing brick.

  16. Electronic structure and chemical bonding in LaIrSi-type intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matar, Samir F. [Bordeaux Univ., Pessac (France). CNRS; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie; Nakhl, Michel [Univ. Libanaise, Fanar (Lebanon). Ecole Doctorale Sciences et Technologies

    2017-05-01

    The cubic LaIrSi type has 23 representatives in aluminides, gallides, silicides, germanides, phosphides, and arsenides, all with a valence electron count of 16 or 17. The striking structural motif is a three-dimensional network of the transition metal (T) and p element (X) atoms with TX{sub 3/3} respectively XT{sub 3/3} coordination. Alkaline earth or rare earth atoms fill cavities within the polyanionic [TX]{sup δ-} networks. The present work presents a detailed theoretical study of chemical bonding in LaIrSi-type representatives, exemplarily for CaPtSi, BaIrP, BaAuGa, LaIrSi, CeRhSi, and CeIrSi. DFT-GGA-based electronic structure calculations show weakly metallic compounds with itinerant small magnitude DOSs at E{sub F} except for CeRhSi whose large Ce DOS at E{sub F} leads to a finite magnetization on Ce (0.73 μ{sub B}) and induced small moments of opposite sign on Rh and Si in a ferromagnetic ground state. The chemical bonding analyses show dominant bonding within the [TX]{sup δ-} polyanionic networks. Charge transfer magnitudes were found in accordance with the course of the electronegativites of the chemical constituents.

  17. Stabilization of low-level mixed waste in chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Sarkar, A.V.

    1994-06-01

    Mixed waste streams, which contain both chemical and radioactive wastes, are one of the important categories of DOE waste streams needing stabilization for final disposal. Recent studies have shown that chemically bonded phosphate ceramics may have the potential for stabilizing these waste streams, particularly those containing volatiles and pyrophorics. Such waste streams cannot be stabilized by conventional thermal treatment methods such as vitrification. Phosphate ceramics may be fabricated at room temperature into durable, hard and dense materials. For this reason room-temperature-setting phosphate ceramic waste forms are being developed to stabilize these to ''problem waste streams.''

  18. Size-dependent Young’s modulus in ZnO nanowires with strong surface atomic bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shiwen; Bi, Sheng; Li, Qikun; Guo, Qinglei; Liu, Junshan; Ouyang, Zhongliang; Jiang, Chengming; Song, Jinhui

    2018-03-01

    The mechanical properties of size-dependent nanowires are important in nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMSs), and have attracted much research interest. Characterization of the size effect of nanowires in atmosphere directly to broaden their practical application instead of just in high vacuum situations, as reported previously, is desperately needed. In this study, we systematically studied the Young’s modulus of vertical ZnO nanowires in atmosphere. The diameters ranged from 48 nm to 239 nm with a resonance method using non-contact atomic force microscopy. The values of Young’s modulus in atmosphere present extremely strong increasing tendency with decreasing diameter of nanowire due to stronger surface atomic bonds compared with that in vacuum. A core-shell model for nanowires is proposed to explore the Young’s modulus enhancement in atmosphere, which is correlated with atoms of oxygen occurring near the nanowire surface. The modified model is more accurate for analyzing the mechanical behavior of nanowires in atmosphere compared with the model in vacuum. Furthermore, it is possible to use this characterization method to measure the size-related elastic properties of similar wire-sharp nanomaterials in atmosphere and estimate the corresponding mechanical behavior. The study of the size-dependent Young’s modulus in ZnO nanowires in atmosphere will improve the understanding of the mechanical properties of nanomaterials as well as providing guidance for applications in NEMSs, nanogenerators, biosensors and other related areas.

  19. Experimental and numerical study of a modified ASTM C633 adhesion test for strongly-bonded coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardie, Raphaëlle; Berkouch, Reda; Valette, Stéphane; Absi, Joseph; Lefort, Pierre [University of Limoges, Limoges Cedex (France)

    2017-07-15

    When coatings are strongly bonded to their substrates it is often difficult to measure the adhesion values. The proposed method, which is suggested naming “silver print test”, consists in covering the central part of the samples with a thin layer of silver paint, before coating. The process used for testing this new method was the Air plasma spraying (APS), and the materials used were alumina coatings on C35 steel substrates, previously pre-oxidized in CO{sub 2}. The silver painted area was composed of small grains that did not oxidize but that significantly sintered during the APS process. The silver layer reduced the surface where the coating was linked to the substrate, which allowed its debonding, using the classical adhesion test ASTM C633-13, while the direct use of this test (without silver painting) led to ruptures inside the glue used in this test. The numerical modelling, based on the finite element method with the ABAQUS software, provided results in good agreement with the experimental measurements. This concordance validated the used method and allowed accessing to the values of adherence when the experimental test ASTM C633-13 failed, because of ruptures in the glue. After standardization, the “silver print test” might be used for other kinds of deposition methods, such as PVD, CVD, PECVD.

  20. Four chemical methods of porcelain conditioning and their influence over bond strength and surface integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, João Paulo Fragomeni; Oliveira, Andrea Becker; Nojima, Lincoln Issamu; Marquezan, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess four different chemical surface conditioning methods for ceramic material before bracket bonding, and their impact on shear bond strength and surface integrity at debonding. METHODS: Four experimental groups (n = 13) were set up according to the ceramic conditioning method: G1 = 37% phosphoric acid etching followed by silane application; G2 = 37% liquid phosphoric acid etching, no rinsing, followed by silane application; G3 = 10% hydrofluoric acid etching alone; and G4 = 10% hydrofluoric acid etching followed by silane application. After surface conditioning, metal brackets were bonded to porcelain by means of the Transbond XP system (3M Unitek). Samples were submitted to shear bond strength tests in a universal testing machine and the surfaces were later assessed with a microscope under 8 X magnification. ANOVA/Tukey tests were performed to establish the difference between groups (α= 5%). RESULTS: The highest shear bond strength values were found in groups G3 and G4 (22.01 ± 2.15 MPa and 22.83 ± 3.32 Mpa, respectively), followed by G1 (16.42 ± 3.61 MPa) and G2 (9.29 ± 1.95 MPa). As regards surface evaluation after bracket debonding, the use of liquid phosphoric acid followed by silane application (G2) produced the least damage to porcelain. When hydrofluoric acid and silane were applied, the risk of ceramic fracture increased. CONCLUSIONS: Acceptable levels of bond strength for clinical use were reached by all methods tested; however, liquid phosphoric acid etching followed by silane application (G2) resulted in the least damage to the ceramic surface. PMID:26352845

  1. Tensile Bond Strength between Soft Liners and Two Chemically Different Denture Base Materials: Effect of Thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugut, Faik; Coskun, Mehmet Emre; Dogan, Derya Ozdemir; Kirmali, Omer; Akin, Hakan

    2016-06-01

    The bond strength of soft denture liner to a recently introduced denture base resin after thermocycling has not been compared to traditional denture base materials. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of thermocycling on the tensile bond strength of soft denture liners to two chemically different denture base resins, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA). A total of 48 PMMA and UDMA tensile test specimens were fabricated by attaching two different soft denture liners (Molloplast-B, Permaflex) according to the manufacturers' instructions and assigned to two groups. Half of the specimens for each group were stored in water for 1 week, and the other half were thermocycled (5000 cycles) between baths of 5°C and 55°C. Specimens were mounted on a universal testing machine with a 5 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons tests (α = 0.05). The highest bond strength was measured in the specimens from the UDMA/Molloplast groups, and the lowest was seen in the PMMA/Permaflex group. No significant difference in bond strength was detected in PMMA/Permaflex groups after thermocycling (p = 0.082), whereas other groups exhibited significant differences after thermocycling (p < 0.05). Thermocycling decreased the bond strength values in both the PMMA and UDMA groups. Regardless of types of soft liners, PMMA specimens presented lower bond strength values than UDMA specimens, both before and after thermocycling. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  2. BGK-type models in strong reaction and kinetic chemical equilibrium regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monaco, R; Bianchi, M Pandolfi; Soares, A J

    2005-01-01

    A BGK-type procedure is applied to multi-component gases undergoing chemical reactions of bimolecular type. The relaxation process towards local Maxwellians, depending on mass and numerical densities of each species as well as common velocity and temperature, is investigated in two different cases with respect to chemical regimes. These cases are related to the strong reaction regime characterized by slow reactions, and to the kinetic chemical equilibrium regime where fast reactions take place. The consistency properties of both models are stated in detail. The trend to equilibrium is numerically tested and comparisons for the two regimes are performed within the hydrogen-air and carbon-oxygen reaction mechanism. In the spatial homogeneous case, it is also shown that the thermodynamical equilibrium of the models recovers satisfactorily the asymptotic equilibrium solutions to the reactive Euler equations

  3. Characteristics of chemical bond and vacancy formation in chalcopyrite-type CuInSe2 and related compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Takahiro

    2009-01-01

    We studied characteristics of chemical bond and vacancy formation in chalcopyrite-type CuInSe 2 (CIS) by first principles calculations. The chalcopyrite-type CIS has two kinds of chemical bonds, Cu-Se and In-Se. The Cu-Se bond is a weak covalent bonding because electrons occupy both bonding and antibonding orbitals of Cu 3d and Se 4p and occupy only the bonding orbital (a 1 ) of Cu 4s and Se 4p and do not occupy the antibonding orbital (a 1 * ) of Cu 4s and Se 4p. On the other hand, the In-Se bond has a partially covalent and partially ionic character because the In 5s orbital covalently interacts with Se 4p; the In 5p orbital is higher than Se 4p and so the electron in the In 5p orbital moves to the Se 4p orbital. The average bond order of the Cu-Se and In-Se bonds can be calculated to be 1/4 and 1, respectively. The bond order of Cu-Se is smaller than that of In-Se. The characteristics of these two chemical bonds are related to the formation of Cu and In vacancies in CIS. The formation energy of the Cu vacancy is smaller than that of the In vacancy under both Cu-poor and In-poor conditions. The displacement (Δl) of the surrounding Se atoms after the formation of the Cu vacancy is smaller than the Δl after the formation of the In vacancy. The interesting and unique characteristics of CIS are discussed on the basis of the characteristics of the chemical bond. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. The active site of hen egg-white lysozyme: flexibility and chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, Jeanette; Smaalen, Sander van

    2014-01-01

    Chemical bonding at the active site of lysozyme is analyzed on the basis of a multipole model employing transferable multipole parameters from a database. Large B factors at low temperatures reflect frozen-in disorder, but therefore prevent a meaningful free refinement of multipole parameters. Chemical bonding at the active site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) is analyzed on the basis of Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules [QTAIM; Bader (1994 ▶), Atoms in Molecules: A Quantum Theory. Oxford University Press] applied to electron-density maps derived from a multipole model. The observation is made that the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) of HEWL at a temperature of 100 K are larger than ADPs in crystals of small biological molecules at 298 K. This feature shows that the ADPs in the cold crystals of HEWL reflect frozen-in disorder rather than thermal vibrations of the atoms. Directly generalizing the results of multipole studies on small-molecule crystals, the important consequence for electron-density analysis of protein crystals is that multipole parameters cannot be independently varied in a meaningful way in structure refinements. Instead, a multipole model for HEWL has been developed by refinement of atomic coordinates and ADPs against the X-ray diffraction data of Wang and coworkers [Wang et al. (2007), Acta Cryst. D63, 1254–1268], while multipole parameters were fixed to the values for transferable multipole parameters from the ELMAM2 database [Domagala et al. (2012), Acta Cryst. A68, 337–351] . Static and dynamic electron densities based on this multipole model are presented. Analysis of their topological properties according to the QTAIM shows that the covalent bonds possess similar properties to the covalent bonds of small molecules. Hydrogen bonds of intermediate strength are identified for the Glu35 and Asp52 residues, which are considered to be essential parts of the active site of HEWL. Furthermore, a series of weak C

  5. The active site of hen egg-white lysozyme: flexibility and chemical bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Held, Jeanette, E-mail: jeanette.netzel@uni-bayreuth.de; Smaalen, Sander van [University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Chemical bonding at the active site of lysozyme is analyzed on the basis of a multipole model employing transferable multipole parameters from a database. Large B factors at low temperatures reflect frozen-in disorder, but therefore prevent a meaningful free refinement of multipole parameters. Chemical bonding at the active site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) is analyzed on the basis of Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules [QTAIM; Bader (1994 ▶), Atoms in Molecules: A Quantum Theory. Oxford University Press] applied to electron-density maps derived from a multipole model. The observation is made that the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) of HEWL at a temperature of 100 K are larger than ADPs in crystals of small biological molecules at 298 K. This feature shows that the ADPs in the cold crystals of HEWL reflect frozen-in disorder rather than thermal vibrations of the atoms. Directly generalizing the results of multipole studies on small-molecule crystals, the important consequence for electron-density analysis of protein crystals is that multipole parameters cannot be independently varied in a meaningful way in structure refinements. Instead, a multipole model for HEWL has been developed by refinement of atomic coordinates and ADPs against the X-ray diffraction data of Wang and coworkers [Wang et al. (2007), Acta Cryst. D63, 1254–1268], while multipole parameters were fixed to the values for transferable multipole parameters from the ELMAM2 database [Domagala et al. (2012), Acta Cryst. A68, 337–351] . Static and dynamic electron densities based on this multipole model are presented. Analysis of their topological properties according to the QTAIM shows that the covalent bonds possess similar properties to the covalent bonds of small molecules. Hydrogen bonds of intermediate strength are identified for the Glu35 and Asp52 residues, which are considered to be essential parts of the active site of HEWL. Furthermore, a series of weak C

  6. The trouble with chemical energy: why understanding bond energies requires an interdisciplinary systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Melanie M; Klymkowsky, Michael W

    2013-06-01

    Helping students understand "chemical energy" is notoriously difficult. Many hold inconsistent ideas about what energy is, how and why it changes during the course of a chemical reaction, and how these changes are related to bond energies and reaction dynamics. There are (at least) three major sources for this problem: 1) the way biologists talk about chemical energy (which is also the way we talk about energy in everyday life); 2) the macroscopic approach to energy concepts that is common in physics and physical sciences; and 3) the failure of chemistry courses to explicitly link molecular with macroscopic energy ideas. From a constructivist perspective, it is unlikely that students can, without a coherent understanding of such a central concept, attain a robust and accurate understanding of new concepts. However, changes are on the horizon, guided by the increasing understanding that difficult concepts require coherent, well-designed learning progressions and the new National Research Council Framework for K-12 Science Education. We provide supporting evidence for our assertions and suggestions for an interdisciplinary learning progression designed to better approach the concept of bond energies, a first step in an understanding chemical energy and behavior of reaction systems that is central to biological systems.

  7. YNi and its hydrides: Phase stabilities, electronic structures and chemical bonding properties from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matar, S.F., E-mail: matar@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France); Nakhl, M. [Universite Libanaise, Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique des Materiaux LCPM, Fanar (Lebanon); Al Alam, A.F.; Ouaini, N. [Universite Saint-Esprit de Kaslik, Faculte des Sciences et de Genie Informatique, Jounieh (Lebanon); Chevalier, B. [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France)

    2010-11-25

    Graphical abstract: Base centered orthorhombic YNiH{sub X} structure. For x = 3, only H1 and H2 are present. Highest hydrogen content YNiH{sub 4} is obtained when H3 are added. - Abstract: Within density functional theory, establishing the equations of states of YNi in two different controversial structures in the literature, leads to determine the orthorhombic FeB-type as the ground state one with small energy difference. For YNiH{sub 3} and YNiH{sub 4} hydrides crystallizing in the orthorhombic CrB-type structure the geometry optimization and the ab initio determination of the H atomic positions show that the stability of hydrogen decreases from the tri- to the tetra- hydride. New states brought by hydrogen within the valence band lead to its broadening and to enhanced localization of metal density of states. The chemical bonding analysis shows a preferential Ni-H bonding versus Y-H.

  8. Core level photoemission spectroscopy and chemical bonding in Sr2Ta2O7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atuchin, V. V.; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Zhang, Z. M.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic parameters of constituent element core levels of strontium pyrotantalate (Sr2Ta2O7) were measured with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The Sr2Ta2O7 powder sample was synthesized using standard solid state method. The valence electron transfer on the formation of the Sr-O and Ta......-O bonds was characterized by the binding energy differences between the O 1s and cation core levels, Delta(O-Sr) = BE(O 1s) - BE(Sr 3d(5/2)) and Delta(O-Ta) = BE(O 1s) - BE(Ta 4f(7/2)). The chemical bonding effects were considered on the basis of our XPS results for Sr2Ta2O7 and earlier published...

  9. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  10. Isotope dependent, temperature regulated, energy repartitioning in a low-barrier, short-strong hydrogen bonded cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X. H.; Oomens, J.; Eyler, J. R.; Moore, D. T.; Iyengar, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate and analyze the vibrational properties, including hydrogen/deuterium isotope effects, in a fundamental organic hydrogen bonded system using multiple experimental (infrared multiple photon dissociation and argon-tagged action spectroscopy) and computational techniques. We note a

  11. Strongly enhanced temperature dependence of the chemical potential in FeSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, L. C.; Watson, M. D.; Haghighirad, A. A.; Eschrig, M.; Kim, T. K.

    2017-05-01

    Employing a 10-orbital tight-binding model, we present a set of hopping parameters fitted directly to our latest high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data for the high-temperature tetragonal phase of FeSe. Using these parameters, we predict a large 10 meV shift of the chemical potential as a function of temperature. To confirm this large temperature dependence, we performed ARPES experiments on FeSe and observed a ˜25 meV rigid shift to the chemical potential between 100 and 300 K. This strong shift has important implications for theoretical models of superconductivity and of nematic order in FeSe materials.

  12. The use of dialogic electronic journal writing to develop students' understanding of chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Sarah Collard

    The intent of this study is to examine how the implementation of a dialogic electronic journal writing environment continues the development of students' understanding of chemistry, specifically chemical bonding, through written communication between the individual students and their chemistry teacher. This study is framed within a constructivist theoretical context where students' understanding is constructed through written discussions with the educator, the students' interaction with the classroom environment, and his/her interaction with the computer environment. The research design of collective case study was employed to allow multiple perspectives and processes conveyed by the participants to be examined in the context in which they occurred while considering multiple sources of information. Data sources included electronic journal entries, classroom artifacts, and semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method, which involved coding, categorizing, and interpreting for patterns and relationships. Four cases were reported in detail. This study found that the dialogic electronic journal-writing environment was an effective venue in revealing previously undiscovered students' alternative conceptions of chemical bonding. Opportunities to actively confront and reconcile such conceptions were afforded through educator/student dialogic written interaction. The dialogic electronic journal-writing environment was also critical in the identification of gaps in students' conceptual understanding linked to improper sequencing of chemistry content. This study also found that the on-line environment provided the educator the opportunity to scaffold chemical bonding concepts to meet the needs of the students involved in the study. This study concluded that the dialogic electronic journal-writing environment positively contributed to the development of student understanding. These findings may have practical implications for teachers in

  13. Chemical modelling of complex organic molecules with peptide-like bonds in star-forming regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quénard, David; Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun; Viti, Serena; Holdship, Jonathan; Coutens, Audrey

    2018-02-01

    Peptide bonds (N-C = O) play a key role in metabolic processes since they link amino acids into peptide chains or proteins. Recently, several molecules containing peptide-like bonds have been detected across multiple environments in the interstellar medium, growing the need to fully understand their chemistry and their role in forming larger pre-biotic molecules. We present a comprehensive study of the chemistry of three molecules containing peptide-like bonds: HNCO, NH2CHO, and CH3NCO. We also included other CHNO isomers (HCNO, HOCN) and C2H3NO isomers (CH3OCN, CH3CNO) to the study. We have used the UCLCHEM gas-grain chemical code and included in our chemical network all possible formation/destruction pathways of these peptide-like molecules recently investigated either by theoretical calculations or in laboratory experiments. Our predictions are compared to observations obtained towards the proto-star IRAS 16293-2422 and the L1544 pre-stellar core. Our results show that some key reactions involving the CHNO and C2H3NO isomers need to be modified to match the observations. Consistently with recent laboratory findings, hydrogenation is unlikely to produce NH2CHO on grain surfaces, while a combination of radical-radical surface reactions and gas-phase reactions is a better alternative. In addition, better results are obtained for NH2CHO when a slightly higher activation energy of 25 K is considered for the gas-phase reaction NH2 + H2CO → NH2CHO + H. Finally, our modelling shows that the observed correlation between NH2CHO and HNCO in star-forming regions may come from the fact that HNCO and NH2CHO react to temperature in the same manner rather than from a direct chemical link between the two species.

  14. Drag force in strongly coupled, anisotropic plasma at finite chemical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Somdeb; Haque, Najmul [Theory Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics,1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700 064 (India)

    2014-12-30

    We employ methods of gauge/string duality to analyze the drag force on a heavy quark moving through a strongly coupled, anisotropic N=4,SU(N) super Yang-Mills plasma in the presence of a finite U(1) chemical potential. We present numerical results valid for any value of the anisotropy parameter and the U(1) charge density and arbitrary direction of the quark velocity with respect to the direction of anisotropy. In the small anisotropy limit we are also able to furnish analytical results.

  15. Peptide Bond Synthesis by a Mechanism Involving an Enzymatic Reaction and a Subsequent Chemical Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Zhuang, Ye; Ge, Yin; Kumano, Takuto; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2016-01-22

    We recently reported that an amide bond is unexpectedly formed by an acyl-CoA synthetase (which catalyzes the formation of a carbon-sulfur bond) when a suitable acid and l-cysteine are used as substrates. DltA, which is homologous to the adenylation domain of nonribosomal peptide synthetase, belongs to the same superfamily of adenylate-forming enzymes, which includes many kinds of enzymes, including the acyl-CoA synthetases. Here, we demonstrate that DltA synthesizes not only N-(d-alanyl)-l-cysteine (a dipeptide) but also various oligopeptides. We propose that this enzyme catalyzes peptide synthesis by the following unprecedented mechanism: (i) the formation of S-acyl-l-cysteine as an intermediate via its "enzymatic activity" and (ii) subsequent "chemical" S → N acyl transfer in the intermediate, resulting in peptide formation. Step ii is identical to the corresponding reaction in native chemical ligation, a method of chemical peptide synthesis, whereas step i is not. To the best of our knowledge, our discovery of this peptide synthesis mechanism involving an enzymatic reaction and a subsequent chemical reaction is the first such one to be reported. This new process yields peptides without the use of a thioesterified fragment, which is required in native chemical ligation. Together with these findings, the same mechanism-dependent formation of N-acyl compounds by other members of the above-mentioned superfamily demonstrated that all members most likely form peptide/amide compounds by using this novel mechanism. Each member enzyme acts on a specific substrate; thus, not only the corresponding peptides but also new types of amide compounds can be formed. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Properties and reactions of manganese methylene complexes in the gas phase. The importance of strong metal: carbene bonds for effective olefin metathesis catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, A.E.; Beauchamp, J.L.

    1979-10-10

    In this communication the formation, properties and reactions of the gas phase carbenes MnCH/sub 2//sup +/, (CO)/sub 5/MnCH/sub 2//sup +/, and (CO)/sub 4/MnCH/sub 2//sup +/ are described. Reported results include observation of metathesis and abstraction reactions of the methylene ligand with olefins and the first experimental determination of metal-carbene bond dissociation energies. Important points are that: (a) metal-methylene bond energies are extremely strong; and (b) the Mn/sup +/-methylene bond energy is decreased substantially on addition of five carbonyls to the metal center. If the metal-carbene bond energy exceeds 100 kcal/mol, then transfer of the carbene to an olefin to give a cyclopropane or new olefin will be endothermic and thus will not compete with the metathesis reaction. In order to avoid low turnover numbers resulting from consumption of carbene intermediates, strong metal-carbene bonds are a desirable feature of practical metathesis catalysts. (DP)

  17. Nature of the chemical bond and prediction of radiation tolerance in pyrochlore and defect fluorite compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Pruneda, Miguel; Rios, Susana; Smith, Katherine L.; Trachenko, Kostya; Whittle, Karl R.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    2007-01-01

    The radiation tolerance of synthetic pyrochlore and defect fluorite compounds has been studied using ion irradiation. We show that the results can be quantified in terms of the critical temperature for amorphization, structural parameters, classical Pauling electronegativity difference, and disorder energies. Our results demonstrate that radiation tolerance is correlated with a change in the structure from pyrochlore to defect fluorite, a smaller unit cell dimension, and lower cation-anion disorder energy. Radiation tolerance is promoted by an increase in the Pauling cation-anion electronegativity difference or, in other words, an increase in the ionicity of the chemical bonds. A further analysis of the data indicates that, of the two possible cation sites in ideal pyrochlore, the smaller B-site cation appears to play the major role in bonding. This result is supported by ab initio calculations of the structure and bonding, showing a correlation between the Mulliken overlap populations of the B-site cation and the critical temperature. - Graphical abstract: Three-dimensional representation of the predicted critical amorphization temperature in pyrochlores

  18. Chemical bonding in Tl cuprates studied by x-ray photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasquez, R.P.; Siegal, M.P.; Overmyer, D.L.; Ren, Z.F.; Lao, J.Y.; Wang, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Epitaxial thin films of the Tl cuprate superconductors Tl 2 Ba 2 CaCu 2 O 8 , Tl 2 Ba 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 , and Tl 0.78 Bi 0.22 Ba 0.4 Sr 1.6 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 9-δ are studied with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. These data, together with previous measurements in this lab of Tl 2 Ba 2 CuO 6+δ and TlBa 2 CaCu 2 O 7-δ , comprise a comprehensive data set for a comparative study of Tl cuprates with a range of chemical and electronic properties. In the Cu 2p spectra, a larger energy separation between the satellite and main peaks (E s -E m ) and a lower intensity ratio (I s /I m ) are found to correlate with higher values of T c . Analysis of these spectra within a simple configuration interaction model suggests that higher values of T c are related to low values of the O 2p→Cu 3d charge transfer energy. In the O 1s region, a smaller bond length between Ba and Cu-O planar oxygen is found to correlate with a lower binding energy for the signal associated with Cu-O bonding, most likely resulting from the increased polarization screening by Ba 2+ ions. For samples near optimum doping, maximum T c is observed to occur when the Tl 4f 7/2 binding energy is near 117.9 eV, which is near the middle of the range of values observed for Tl cuprates. Higher Tl 4f 7/2 binding energies, corresponding to formal oxidation states nearer Tl 1+ , are also found to correlate with longer bond lengths between Ba and Tl-O planar oxygen, and with higher binding energies of the O 1s signal associated with Tl-O bonding. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  19. Stabilization of hazardous ash waste with newberyite-rich chemically bonded magnesium phosphate ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Jeong, S.Y.

    1995-11-01

    A novel newberyite-rich magnesium-phosphate ceramic, intended for the stabilization of the US Department of Energy's low-level mixed-waste streams, has been developed by an acid-base reaction between magnesium oxide and a phosphoric acid solution. The reaction slurry, formed at room temperature, sets rapidly and forms a lightweight hard ceramic with low open porosity and a high compression strength of ∼ 6,200 psi. It is a composite of stable mineral phases of newberyite, luenebergite, and residual Mg oxide. Using this matrix, the authors developed superior waste forms for a surrogate ash waste stream. The final waste form is a low-permeability structural-quality ceramic, in which hazardous contaminants are chemically fixed and physically encapsulated. The compression strength of the waste form is an order of magnitude higher than the land disposal requirement, even at high waste loading. The high compression strength is attributed to stronger bonds in the waste form that result from participation of ash waste in the setting reactions. Long-term leaching studies show that the waste form is stable in an aqueous environment. The chemically bonded phosphate ceramic approach in this study may be a simple, inexpensive, and efficient method for fabricating high-performance waste forms either for stabilizing waste streams or for developing value-added construction materials from high-volume benign waste streams

  20. Chemical bonding and the equilibrium composition of Grignard reagents in ethereal solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, André M; Barbosa, André G H

    2011-11-10

    A thorough analysis of the electronic structure and thermodynamic aspects of Grignard reagents and its associated equilibrium composition in ethereal solutions is performed. Considering methylmagnesium halides containing fluorine, chlorine, and bromine, we studied the neutral, charged, and radical species associated with their chemical equilibrium in solution. The ethereal solvents considered, tetrahydrofuran (THF) and ethyl ether (Et(2)O), were modeled using the polarizable continuum model (PCM) and also by explicit coordination to the Mg atoms in a cluster. The chemical bonding of the species that constitute the Grignard reagent is analyzed in detail with generalized valence bond (GVB) wave functions. Equilibrium constants were calculated with the DFT/M06 functional and GVB wave functions, yielding similar results. According to our calculations and existing kinetic and electrochemical evidence, the species R(•), R(-), (•)MgX, and RMgX(2)(-) must be present in low concentration in the equilibrium. We conclude that depending on the halogen, a different route must be followed to produce the relevant equilibrium species in each case. Chloride and bromide must preferably follow a "radical-based" pathway, and fluoride must follow a "carbanionic-based" pathway. These different mechanisms are contrasted against the available experimental results and are proven to be consistent with the existing thermodynamic data on the Grignard reagent equilibria.

  1. Carbon-Heteroatom Bond Formation by an Ultrasonic Chemical Reaction for Energy Storage Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Tak; Shin, HyeonOh; Jeon, In-Yup; Yousaf, Masood; Baik, Jaeyoon; Cheong, Hae-Won; Park, Noejung; Baek, Jong-Beom; Kwon, Tae-Hyuk

    2017-12-01

    The direct formation of CN and CO bonds from inert gases is essential for chemical/biological processes and energy storage systems. However, its application to carbon nanomaterials for improved energy storage remains technologically challenging. A simple and very fast method to form CN and CO bonds in reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by an ultrasonic chemical reaction is described. Electrodes of nitrogen- or oxygen-doped RGO (N-RGO or O-RGO, respectively) are fabricated via the fixation between N 2 or O 2 carrier gas molecules and ultrasonically activated RGO. The materials exhibit much higher capacitance after doping (133, 284, and 74 F g -1 for O-RGO, N-RGO, and RGO, respectively). Furthermore, the doped 2D RGO and 1D CNT materials are prepared by layer-by-layer deposition using ultrasonic spray to form 3D porous electrodes. These electrodes demonstrate very high specific capacitances (62.8 mF cm -2 and 621 F g -1 at 10 mV s -1 for N-RGO/N-CNT at 1:1, v/v), high cycling stability, and structural flexibility. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Chemical Bonding, Interfaces and Defects in Hafnium Oxide/Germanium Oxynitride Gate Stacks on Ge (100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Yasuhiro; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Yun; /SLAC, SSRL; Kuzum, Duygu; /Stanford U.; Sugawara, Takuya; Saraswat, Krishna C.; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL; McIntyre, Paul C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.

    2008-10-31

    Correlations among interface properties and chemical bonding characteristics in HfO{sub 2}/GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge MIS stacks were investigated using in-situ remote nitridation of the Ge (100) surface prior to HfO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition (ALD). Ultra thin ({approx}1.1 nm), thermally stable and aqueous etch-resistant GeO{sub x}N{sub y} interfaces layers that exhibited Ge core level photoelectron spectra (PES) similar to stoichiometric Ge{sub 3}N{sub 4} were synthesized. To evaluate GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface defects, the density of interface states (D{sub it}) was extracted by the conductance method across the band gap. Forming gas annealed (FGA) samples exhibited substantially lower D{sub it} ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}) than did high vacuum annealed (HVA) and inert gas anneal (IGA) samples ({approx} 1x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}). Germanium core level photoelectron spectra from similar FGA-treated samples detected out-diffusion of germanium oxide to the HfO{sub 2} film surface and apparent modification of chemical bonding at the GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface, which is related to the reduced D{sub it}.

  3. Respiratory chain strongly oxidizes the CXXC motif of DsbB in the Escherichia coli disulfide bond formation pathway.

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, T; Ito, K

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli DsbB has four essential cysteine residues, among which Cys41 and Cys44 form a CXXC redox active site motif and the Cys104-Cys130 disulfide bond oxidizes the active site cysteines of DsbA, the disulfide bond formation factor in the periplasm. Functional respiratory chain is required for the cell to keep DsbA oxidized. In this study, we characterized the roles of essential cysteines of DsbB in the coupling with the respiratory chain. Cys104 was found to form the inactive comple...

  4. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO 2 (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO 2+x . Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  5. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  6. New Raman method for aqueous solutions: xi-function dispersion evidence for strong F(-)-water H-bonds in aqueous CsF and KF solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walrafen, George E

    2005-08-15

    The Raman xi-function dispersion method recently elucidated for the strong H-bond breaker, ClO4-, in water [G. E. Walrafen, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 094510 (2005)] is extended to the strongly H-bond forming ion, F-. Measuring the xi function is analogous to measuring DeltaG from the thermodynamic activity of the water, aH2O, as the stoichiometric mol fraction of the water in the solution decreases due to addition of an electrolyte or nonelectrolyte. xi is the derivative of the OH-stretching part of the Gibbs free energy with respect to the water mol fraction; xiomega identical with-RT[ partial differential ln(Iomega/IREF) partial differentialX2](T,P). I is the Raman intensity at omega (omega=Raman shift in cm-1); IREF, that at an arbitrary reference omega; and, X2 is the water mol fraction (X1=CsF or KF mol fraction). ln(Iomega/IREF) was found to be linear in X2 for the complete range of OH-stretching omega's, with correlation coefficients as large as 0.999 96. Linearity of ln(Iomega/IREF) versus X2 is an experimental fact for all omega's throughout the spontaneous Raman OH-stretching contour; this fact cannot be negated by relative contributions of ultrafast/fast, homogeneous/inhomogeneous processes which may underlie this linearity. Linearity in ln(Iomega/IREF) versus 1T, or in ln(Iomega/IREF) versus P, was also observed for the Raman H-bond energy DeltaE and pair volume DeltaV dispersions, respectively. A low-frequency maximum (MAX) and a high-frequency minimum (MIN) were observed in the xi function dispersion curve. Deltaxi=xiMIN-xiMAX values of -7000+/-800-cal/mol H2O for CsF, and the experimentally equal Deltaxi=-6400+/-1000-cal/mol H2O for KF, were obtained. These Deltaxi's are opposite in sign but have nearly the same absolute magnitude as the Deltaxi value for NaClO4 in water; Deltaxi=+8050+/-100-cal/mol H2O. A positive Deltaxi corresponds to a water-water H-bond breaker; a negative Deltaxi to a H-bond former; specifically, a F--water H-bond former, in the

  7. Do strong, static magnetic fields act on living beings and chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demmer, W.

    1986-01-01

    In general, magnetic fields are said to have no direct influence on living beings or simple chemical reactions. There is, however, evidence to confirm that changes in the earth's magnetic field or of artificially produced magnetic fields can alter the activity of different neuronal enzyme systems. An effect on the synthesis of β-galactosidase in the bacterium Escherichia coli by a feeble magnetic field (0.2 to 0.8 mT) and disturbances of the embryogenesis of frogs by a strong magnetic field (1.0 T) have been described. These and similar investigations with whole cells raise the question as to what the effect of magnetic fields on isolated and purified enzymes will be. (orig./SHA) [de

  8. Investigation of thermal expansion and compressibility of rare-earth orthovanadates using a dielectric chemical bond method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Siyuan; Zhou, Shihong; Li, Huaiyong; Li, Ling

    2008-09-01

    The chemical bond properties, lattice energies, linear expansion coefficients, and mechanical properties of ReVO 4 (Re = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Sc, Y) are investigated systematically by the dielectric chemical bond theory. The calculated results show that the covalencies of Re-O bonds are increasing slightly from La to Lu and that the covalencies of V-O bonds in crystals are decreasing slightly from La to Lu. The linear expansion coefficients decrease progressively from LaVO 4 to LuVO 4; on the contrary, the bulk moduli increase progressively. Our calculated results are in good agreement with some experimental values for linear expansion coefficients and bulk moduli.

  9. Electronic parameters of Sr2M2O7 (M = V, Nb, Ta) and Sr-O chemical bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atuchin, Victor V.; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Zhang, Zhaoming

    2010-01-01

    on the formation of the Sr-O bonds. The chemical bonding effects were considered on the basis of our XPS results for Sr2Nb2O7 and Sr2Ta2O7 and the previously published structural and XPS data for other Sr-oxide compounds. A new empirical relationship between Δ(O-Sr) and L(Sr-O) was obtained. Possible applications...

  10. Effects of strong inter-hydrogen bond dynamical couplings in the polarized IR spectra of adipic acid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flakus, Henryk T., E-mail: flakus@ich.us.edu.pl [Institute of Chemistry, University of Silesia, 9 Szkolna Street, Pl-40-006 Katowice (Poland); Tyl, Aleksandra; Jablonska, Magdalena [Institute of Chemistry, University of Silesia, 9 Szkolna Street, Pl-40-006 Katowice (Poland)

    2009-10-16

    This paper presents the results of the re-investigation of polarized IR spectra of adipic acid and of its d{sub 2}, d{sub 8} and d{sub 10} deuterium derivative crystals. The spectra were measured at 77 K by a transmission method using polarized light for two different crystalline faces. Theoretical analysis concerned linear dichroic effects and H/D isotopic effects observed in the spectra of the hydrogen and deuterium bonds in adipic acid crystals at the frequency ranges of the {nu}{sub O-H} and the {nu}{sub O-D} bands. The two-branch fine structure pattern of the {nu}{sub O-H} and {nu}{sub O-D} bands and the basic linear dichroic effects characterizing them were ascribed to the vibronic mechanism of vibrational dipole selection rule breaking for IR transitions in centrosymmetric hydrogen bond dimers. It was proved that for isotopically diluted crystalline samples of adipic acid, a non-random distribution of protons and deuterons occurs in the dimers (H/D isotopic 'self-organization' effect). This effect results from the dynamical co-operative interactions involving the dimeric hydrogen bonds.

  11. Effects of strong inter-hydrogen bond dynamical couplings in the polarized IR spectra of adipic acid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flakus, Henryk T.; Tyl, Aleksandra; Jablońska, Magdalena

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the results of the re-investigation of polarized IR spectra of adipic acid and of its d2, d8 and d10 deuterium derivative crystals. The spectra were measured at 77 K by a transmission method using polarized light for two different crystalline faces. Theoretical analysis concerned linear dichroic effects and H/D isotopic effects observed in the spectra of the hydrogen and deuterium bonds in adipic acid crystals at the frequency ranges of the νO-H and the νO-D bands. The two-branch fine structure pattern of the νO-H and νO-D bands and the basic linear dichroic effects characterizing them were ascribed to the vibronic mechanism of vibrational dipole selection rule breaking for IR transitions in centrosymmetric hydrogen bond dimers. It was proved that for isotopically diluted crystalline samples of adipic acid, a non-random distribution of protons and deuterons occurs in the dimers (H/D isotopic " self-organization" effect). This effect results from the dynamical co-operative interactions involving the dimeric hydrogen bonds.

  12. Intra- und intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Spectroscopic, quantum chemical and molecular dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simperler, A.

    1999-03-01

    Intra- and intermolecular H-bonds have been investigated with spectroscopic, quantum chemical, and molecular dynamics methods. The work is divided into the following three parts: 1. Intramolecular interactions in ortho-substituted phenols. Theoretical and experimental data that characterizes the intramolecular hydrogen bonds in 48 different o-substituted phenols are discussed. The study covers various kinds of O-H ... Y -type interactions (Y= N, O, S, F, Cl, Br, I, C=C, C=-C, and C-=N). The bond strength sequences for several series of systematically related compounds as obtained from IR spectroscopy data (i.e., v(OH) stretching frequencies) are discussed and reproduced with several theoretical methods (B3LYP/6-31G(d,p), B3LYP/6-311G(d,p), B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p), B3LYP/DZVP, MP2/6-31G(d,p), and MP2/6-31++G(d,p) levels of theory). The experimentally determined sequences are interpreted in terms of the intrinsic properties of the molecules: hydrogen bond distances, Mulliken partial charges, van der Waals radii, and electron densities of the Y-proton acceptors. 2. Competitive hydrogen bonds and conformational equilibria in 2,6-disubstituted phenols containing two different carbonyl substituents. The rotational isomers of ten unsymmetrical 2,6-disubstituted phenols as obtained by combinations of five different carbonyl substituents (COOH, COOCH 3 , CHO, COCH 3 , and CONH 2 ) have been theoretically investigated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The relative stability of four to five conformers of each compound were determined by full geometry optimization for free molecules as well as for molecules in reaction fields with dielectric constants up to ε=37.5. A comparison with IR spectroscopic data of available compounds revealed excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted stability sequences and conformational equilibria. The stability of a conformer could be interpreted to be governed by the following two contributions: (i) an attractive hydrogen bond

  13. Analysis of Chemical Bonding and Structural Network of Gold Silicide in Core-Shell Silicon Nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Bibhu P.; Swain, Bhabani S.

    2018-02-01

    The Au-catalyzed core-shell silicon nanowires (Si-NWs) were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition by using SiH4 and H2 precursor gases. The TEM and FTIR studies revealed that the Si-NWs consist of core silicon surrounded by a thick oxide sheath and Au distributed at the a-SiOx/Si interface. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to study the chemical composition and electronic environments of gold silicide in the a-SiO x /Si-NWs. The elemental analysis and chemical network of gold silicide of core-shell Si-NWs were explained on the basis of the random atomic distribution of Si, O and Au atoms. The Raman spectra and XRD peak reveal the crystalline core of Si-NWs. The individual contribution to the Au (4d) core orbital was deconvoluted to Au-Si-Au, Au-Si-O, Au-Au, Au-O-Au, Au-O-Si and Au=O/Au-O2 bonding structure. The analysis shows that the O linked with Si and Au has also contributed to growth of Si-NWs.

  14. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Chemical-Bonding Analysis of BaZn(NCN2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex J. Corkett

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The ternary carbodiimide BaZn(NCN2 was prepared by a solid-state metathesis reaction between BaF2, ZnF2, and Li2NCN in a 1:1:2 molar ratio, and its crystal structure was determined from Rietveld refinement of X-ray data. BaZn(NCN2 represents the aristotype of the LiBa2Al(NCN4 structure which is unique to carbodiimide/cyanamide chemistry and is well regarded as being constructed from ZnN4 tetrahedra, sharing edges and vertices through NCN2− units to form corrugated layers with Ba2+ in the interlayer voids. Structural anomalies in the shape of the cyanamide units are addressed via IR spectrometry and DFT calculations, which suggest the presence of slightly bent N=C=N2− carbodiimide units with C2v symmetry. Moreover, chemical-bonding analysis within the framework of crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP reveals striking similarities between the bonding interactions in BaZn(NCN2 and SrZn(NCN2 despite their contrasting crystal structures. BaZn(NCN2 is only the second example of a ternary post-transition metal carbodiimide, and its realization paves the way for the preparation of analogues featuring divalent transition metals at the tetrahedral Zn2+ site.

  15. Chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for low-level mixed waste stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.; Cunnane, J.C.; Mayberry, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs) are being developed and fabricated for low-temperature stabilization and solidification of mixed waste streams which are amenable to conventional high-temperature stabilization processes due to presence of volatiles such as heavy metal chloride and fluorides and/or pyrophorics in the wastes. Phosphates of Mg, Mg-Na and Zr are being developed as candidate matrix materials. In this paper, we present the fabrication procedures of phosphate waste forms using surrogates compositions of three typical mixed wastes streams -- ash, cement sludges, and salts. The performance of the final waste forms such as compression strength, leachability of the contaminants, durability in aqueous environment were conducted. In addition, parameteric studies have been conducted to establish the optimal waste loading in a particular binder system. Based on the results, we present potential applications in the treatment of various mixed waste streams

  16. Novel Chemically-Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Borehole Sealants (Ceramicretes) for Arctic Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirish Patil; Godwin A. Chukwu; Gang Chen; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31

    Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramic borehole sealant, i.e. Ceramicrete, has many advantages over conventionally used permafrost cement at Alaska North Slope (ANS). However, in normal field practices when Ceramicrete is mixed with water in blenders, it has a chance of being contaminated with leftover Portland cement. In order to identify the effect of Portland cement contamination, recent tests have been conducted at BJ services in Tomball, TX as well as at the University of Alaska Fairbanks with Ceramicrete formulations proposed by the Argonne National Laboratory. The tests conducted at BJ Services with proposed Ceramicrete formulations and Portland cement contamination have shown significant drawbacks which has caused these formulations to be rejected. However, the newly developed Ceramicrete formulation at the University of Alaska Fairbanks has shown positive results with Portland cement contamination as well as without Portland cement contamination for its effective use in oil well cementing operations at ANS.

  17. Method for Producing Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics and for Stabilizing Contaminants Encapsulated therein Utilizing Reducing Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Dileep; Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung-Young

    1999-05-05

    Known phosphate ceramic formulations are improved and the ability to produce iron-based phosphate ceramic systems is enabled by the addition of an oxidizing or reducing step during the acid-base reactions that form the phosphate ceramic products. The additives allow control of the rate of the acid-base reactions and concomitant heat generation. In an alternate embodiment, waste containing metal anions is stabilized in phosphate ceramic products by the addition of a reducing agent to the phosphate ceramic mixture. The reduced metal ions are more stable and/or reactive with the phosphate ions, resulting in the formation of insoluble metal species within the phosphate ceramic matrix, such that the resulting chemically bonded phosphate ceramic product has greater leach resistance.

  18. Chemical Bonding in Tl Cuprates Studied by X-Ray Photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lao, J.Y.; Overmyer, D.L.; Ren, Z.F.; Siegal, M.P.; Vasquez, R.P.; Wang, J.H.

    1999-04-05

    Epitaxial thin films of the Tl cuprate superconductors Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}, Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10}, and TL{sub 0.78}Bi{sub 0.22}Ba{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 1.6}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 9{minus}{delta}} are studied with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. These data, together with previous measurements in this lab of Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CuO{sub 6+{delta}} and TlBa{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}, comprise a comprehensive data set for a comparative study of Tl cuprates with a range of chemical and electronic properties. In the Cu 2p spectra, a larger energy separation between the satellite and main peaks (E{sub s}-E{sub m}) and a lower intensity ratio (I{sub s}/I{sub m}) are found to correlate with higher values of T{sub c}. Analysis of these spectra within a simple configuration interaction model suggests that higher values of T{sub c} are related to low values of the O 2p {r_arrow} Cu 3d charge transfer energy. In the O 1s region, a smaller bond length between Ba and Cu-O planar oxygen is found to correlate with a lower binding energy for the signal associated with Cu-O bonding, most likely resulting from the increased polarization screening by Ba{sup 2+} ions. For samples near optimum doping, maximum T{sub c} is observed to occur when the Tl 4f{sub 7/2} binding energy is near 117.9 eV, which is near the middle of the range of values observed for Tl cuprates. Higher Tl 4f{sub 7/2} binding energies, corresponding to formal oxidation states nearer Tl{sup 1+}, are also found to correlate with longer bond lengths between Ba and Tl-O planar oxygen, and with higher binding energies of the O 1s signal associated with Tl-O bonding.

  19. Chemical bonding in Tl cuprates studied by x-ray photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, R.P. [Center for Space Microelectronics Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109-8099 (United States); Siegal, M.P.; Overmyer, D.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Ren, Z.F.; Lao, J.Y.; Wang, J.H. [Materials Synthesis Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260-3000 (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Epitaxial thin films of the Tl cuprate superconductors Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}, Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10}, and Tl{sub 0.78}Bi{sub 0.22}Ba{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 1.6}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 9{minus}{delta}} are studied with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. These data, together with previous measurements in this lab of Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CuO{sub 6+{delta}} and TlBa{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}, comprise a comprehensive data set for a comparative study of Tl cuprates with a range of chemical and electronic properties. In the Cu 2p spectra, a larger energy separation between the satellite and main peaks (E{sub s}{minus}E{sub m}) and a lower intensity ratio (I{sub s}/I{sub m}) are found to correlate with higher values of T{sub c}. Analysis of these spectra within a simple configuration interaction model suggests that higher values of T{sub c} are related to low values of the O&hthinsp;2p{r_arrow}Cu&hthinsp;3d charge transfer energy. In the O&hthinsp;1s region, a smaller bond length between Ba and Cu-O planar oxygen is found to correlate with a lower binding energy for the signal associated with Cu-O bonding, most likely resulting from the increased polarization screening by Ba{sup 2+} ions. For samples near optimum doping, maximum T{sub c} is observed to occur when the Tl 4f{sub 7/2} binding energy is near 117.9 eV, which is near the middle of the range of values observed for Tl cuprates. Higher Tl&hthinsp;4f{sub 7/2} binding energies, corresponding to formal oxidation states nearer Tl{sup 1+}, are also found to correlate with longer bond lengths between Ba and Tl-O planar oxygen, and with higher binding energies of the O&hthinsp;1s signal associated with Tl-O bonding. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Manufacturing of REBCO coils strongly bonded to cooling members with epoxy resin aimed at its application to Maglev

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. • We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. • The coil is tightly bonded to cooling members by epoxy resin without the degradation. • We made a REBCO racetrack coil with the same outer dimension as the Maglev magnet. - Abstract: The REBCO coated conductor has been attracted attention because of its high current density in the presence of high magnetic field. If the coated conductor is applied to Maglev, the operational temperature of the on-board magnets will be over 40 K and energy consumption of cryocoolers will be reduced. That high operational temperature also means the absence of liquid helium. Therefore, reliable thermal coupling is desirable for cooling the coils. We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. While the PTFE tape prevents the performance degradation of the coil, the epoxy resin bonds the coil to cooling members. We carried out three experiments to confirm that the coil structure which we propose has robust thermal coupling without the degradation. First, thermal resistances of paraffin and epoxy were measured varying the temperature from room temperature to 10 K. The measurement result indicates that paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. In another experiment, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) tape insulator prevented performance degradation of a small epoxy impregnated REBCO coil, while another REBCO coil with polyimide tape showed clear performance degradation. Finally, we produced a racetrack REBCO coil with the same outer dimension as a Maglev on-board magnet coil. Although the racetrack coil was installed in a GFRP coil case and tightly bonded to the case by epoxy impregnation, any performance degradation was not observed

  1. Characterization of electron-deficient chemical bonding of diborane with attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics and laser response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonehara, Takehiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2009-12-01

    We report a theoretical study of non-adiabatic electrons-nuclei coupled dynamics of diborane H 2BH 2BH 2 under several types of short pulse lasers. This molecule is known to have particularly interesting geometrical and electronic structures, which originate from the electron-deficient chemical bondings. We revisit the chemical bonding of diborane from the view point of electron wavepacket dynamics coupled with nuclear motions, and attempt to probe the characteristics of it by examining its response to intense laser fields. We study in the following three aspects, (i) bond formation of diborane by collision between two monoboranes, (ii) attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics in the ground state and first excited state by circularly polarized laser pulse, and (iii) induced fragmentation back to monoborane molecules by linearly polarized laser. The wave lengths of two types of laser field employed are 200 nm (in UV range) and 800 nm (in IR range), and we track the dynamics from hundreds of attoseconds up to few tens of femtoseconds. To this end, we apply the ab initio semiclassical Ehrenfest theory, into which the classical vector potential of a laser field is introduced. Basic features of the non-adiabatic response of electrons to the laser fields is elucidated in this scheme. To analyze the electronic wavepackets thus obtained, we figure out bond order density that is a spatial distribution of the bond order and bond order flux density arising only from the bonding regions, and so on. Main findings in this work are: (i) dimerization of monoboranes to diborane is so efficient that even intense laser is hard to prevent it; (ii) collective motions of electron flux emerge in the central BHHB bonding area in response to the circularly polarized laser fields; (iii) laser polarization with the direction of central two BH bonding vector is efficient for the cleavage of BH 3-BH 3; and (iv) nuclear derivative coupling plays a critical role in the field induced fragmentation

  2. Characterization of electron-deficient chemical bonding of diborane with attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics and laser response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonehara, Takehiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of non-adiabatic electrons-nuclei coupled dynamics of diborane H 2 BH 2 BH 2 under several types of short pulse lasers. This molecule is known to have particularly interesting geometrical and electronic structures, which originate from the electron-deficient chemical bondings. We revisit the chemical bonding of diborane from the view point of electron wavepacket dynamics coupled with nuclear motions, and attempt to probe the characteristics of it by examining its response to intense laser fields. We study in the following three aspects, (i) bond formation of diborane by collision between two monoboranes, (ii) attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics in the ground state and first excited state by circularly polarized laser pulse, and (iii) induced fragmentation back to monoborane molecules by linearly polarized laser. The wave lengths of two types of laser field employed are 200 nm (in UV range) and 800 nm (in IR range), and we track the dynamics from hundreds of attoseconds up to few tens of femtoseconds. To this end, we apply the ab initio semiclassical Ehrenfest theory, into which the classical vector potential of a laser field is introduced. Basic features of the non-adiabatic response of electrons to the laser fields is elucidated in this scheme. To analyze the electronic wavepackets thus obtained, we figure out bond order density that is a spatial distribution of the bond order and bond order flux density arising only from the bonding regions, and so on. Main findings in this work are: (i) dimerization of monoboranes to diborane is so efficient that even intense laser is hard to prevent it; (ii) collective motions of electron flux emerge in the central BHHB bonding area in response to the circularly polarized laser fields; (iii) laser polarization with the direction of central two BH bonding vector is efficient for the cleavage of BH 3 -BH 3 ; and (iv) nuclear derivative coupling plays a critical role in the field induced

  3. Unusually strong H-bonding to the heme ligand and fast geminate recombination dynamics of the carbon monoxide complex of Bacillus subtilis truncated hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feis, Alessandro; Lapini, Andrea; Catacchio, Bruno; Brogioni, Silvia; Foggi, Paolo; Chiancone, Emilia; Boffi, Alberto; Smulevich, Giulietta

    2008-01-22

    The active site of the oxygen-avid truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis has been characterized by infrared absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopies, and the dynamics of CO rebinding after photolysis has been investigated by picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Resonance Raman experiments on the CO bound adduct revealed the presence of two Fe-CO stretching bands at 545 and 520 cm-1, respectively. Accordingly, two C-O stretching bands at 1924 and 1888 cm-1 were observed in infrared absorption and resonance Raman measurements. The very low C-O stretching frequency at 1888 cm-1 (corresponding to the extremely high RR stretching frequency at 545 cm-1) indicates unusually strong hydrogen bonding between CO and distal residues. On the basis of a comparison with other truncated hemoglobin it is envisaged that the two CO conformers are determined by specific interactions with the TrpG8 and TyrB10 residues. Mutation of TrpG8 to Leu deeply alters the hydrogen-bonding network giving rise mainly to a CO conformer characterized by a Fe-CO stretching band at 489 cm-1 and a CO stretching band at 1958 cm-1. Picosecond laser photolysis experiments carried out on the CO bound adduct revealed dynamical processes that take place within a few nanoseconds after photolysis. Picosecond dynamics is largely dominated by CO geminate rebinding and is consistent with strong H-bonding contributions of TyrB10 and TrpG8 to ligand stabilization.

  4. DFT modeling of the electronic and magnetic structures and chemical bonding properties of intermetallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Alam, A.F.

    2009-06-01

    This thesis presents an ab initio study of several classes of intermetallics and their hydrides. These compounds are interesting from both a fundamental and an applied points of view. To achieve this aim two complementary methods, constructed within the DFT, were chosen: (i) pseudo potential based VASP for geometry optimization, structural investigations and electron localization mapping (ELF), and (ii) all-electrons ASW method for a detailed description of the electronic structure, chemical bonding properties following different schemes as well as quantities depending on core electrons such as the hyperfine field. A special interest is given with respect to the interplay between magneto-volume and chemical interactions (metal-H) effects within the following hydrided systems: binary Laves (e.g. ScFe 2 ) and Haucke (e.g. LaNi 5 ) phases on one hand, and ternary cerium based (e.g. CeRhSn) and uranium based (e.g. U 2 Ni 2 Sn) alloys on the other hand. (author)

  5. CHEMICAL ACTIVATION OF MOLECULES BY METALS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS AND BONDING; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LICHTENBERGER, DENNIS L.

    2002-01-01

    This research program is directed at obtaining detailed experimental information on the electronic interactions between metals and organic molecules. These interactions provide low energy pathways for many important chemical and catalytic processes. A major feature of the program is the continued development and application of our special high-resolution valence photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and high-precision X-ray core photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) instrumentation for study of organometallic molecules in the gas phase. The study involves a systematic approach towards understanding the interactions and activation of bound carbonyls, C-H bonds, methylenes, vinylidenes, acetylides, alkenes, alkynes, carbenes, carbynes, alkylidenes, alkylidynes, and others with various monometal, dimetal, and cluster metal species. Supporting ligands include -aryls, alkoxides, oxides, and phosphines. We are expanding our studies of both early and late transition metal species and electron-rich and electron-poor environments in order to more completely understand the electronic factors that serve to stabilize particular organic fragments and intermediates on metals. Additional new directions for this program are being taken in ultra-high vacuum surface UPS, XPS, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments on both physisorbed and chemisorbed organometallic thin films. The combination of these methods provides additional electronic structure information on surface-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions. A very important general result emerging from this program is the identification of a close relationship between the ionization energies of the species and the thermodynamics of the chemical and catalytic reactions of these systems

  6. Stabilization of lead-rich low-level mixed waste in chemically bonded phosphate ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, S.-Y.

    1999-01-01

    A chemically bonded magnesium potassium phosphate ceramic has been developed by an acid-base reaction at room temperature, for use in stabilizing U.S. Department of Energy low-level mixed waste streams that include hazardous metals and low-level radioactive elements. Using this ceramic, we solidified, in monolithic waste forms, low-level mixed waste streams containing various levels of PbCl 2 and PbCO 3 . These final waste forms were evaluated for their land disposal suitability. The results showed low open porosity (1.48-4.61 vol.%); hence, low permeability, and higher compression strengths (4310-6734 psi) that were one order of magnitude above that required. The level of lead in the leachate following the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test was reduced from 50,000 to <0.1 ppm. Leachability indexes from the long-term leaching test (ANS 16.1 test) were between 11.9 and 13.6. This excellent lead retention is due to its chemical fixation as insoluble lead phosphate and to physical encapsulation by the phosphate matrix

  7. CHEMICAL ACTIVATION OF MOLECULES BY METALS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS AND BONDING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LICHTENBERGER, DENNIS L.

    2002-03-26

    This research program is directed at obtaining detailed experimental information on the electronic interactions between metals and organic molecules. These interactions provide low energy pathways for many important chemical and catalytic processes. A major feature of the program is the continued development and application of our special high-resolution valence photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and high-precision X-ray core photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) instrumentation for study of organometallic molecules in the gas phase. The study involves a systematic approach towards understanding the interactions and activation of bound carbonyls, C-H bonds, methylenes, vinylidenes, acetylides, alkenes, alkynes, carbenes, carbynes, alkylidenes, alkylidynes, and others with various monometal, dimetal, and cluster metal species. Supporting ligands include -aryls, alkoxides, oxides, and phosphines. We are expanding our studies of both early and late transition metal species and electron-rich and electron-poor environments in order to more completely understand the electronic factors that serve to stabilize particular organic fragments and intermediates on metals. Additional new directions for this program are being taken in ultra-high vacuum surface UPS, XPS, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments on both physisorbed and chemisorbed organometallic thin films. The combination of these methods provides additional electronic structure information on surface-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions. A very important general result emerging from this program is the identification of a close relationship between the ionization energies of the species and the thermodynamics of the chemical and catalytic reactions of these systems.

  8. Valence XPS structure and chemical bond in Cs2UO2Cl4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis was done of the valence electrons X-ray photoelectron spectra structure in the binding energy (BE range of 0 eV to ~35 eV for crystalline dicaesium tetrachloro-dioxouranium (VI (Cs2UO2Cl4. This compound contains the uranyl group UO2. The BE and structure of the core electronic shells (~35 eV-1250 eV, as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the UO2Cl4(D4h cluster reflecting U close environment in Cs2UO2Cl4 were taken into account. The experimental data show that many-body effects due to the presence of cesium and chlorine contribute to the outer valence (0-~15 eV BE spectral structure much less than to the inner valence (~15 eV-~35 eV BE one. The filled U5f electronic states were theoretically calculated and experimentally confirmed to be present in the valence band of Cs2UO2Cl4. It corroborates the suggestion on the direct participation of the U5f electrons in the chemical bond. Electrons of the U6p atomic orbitals participate in formation of both the inner (IVMO and the outer (OVMO valence molecular orbitals (bands. The filled U6p and the O2s, Cl3s electronic shells were found to make the largest contributions to the IVMO formation. The molecular orbitals composition and the sequence order in the binding energy range 0 eV-~35 eV in the UO2Cl4 cluster were established. The experimental and theoretical data allowed a quantitative molecular orbitals scheme for the UO2Cl4 cluster in the BE range 0-~35 eV, which is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in Cs2UO2Cl4 and the interpretation of other X-ray spectra of Cs2UO2Cl4. The contributions to the chemical binding for the UO2Cl4 cluster were evaluated to be: the OVMO contribution - 76%, and the IVMO contribution - 24 %.

  9. Chemical composition, crystal structure, and their relationships with the intrinsic properties of spinel-type crystals based on bond valences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Wang, Hao; Lavina, Barbara; Tu, Bingtian; Wang, Weimin; Fu, Zhengyi

    2014-06-16

    Spinel-type crystals may possess complex and versatile chemical composition and crystal structure, which leads to difficulty in constructing relationships among the chemical composition, crystal structure, and intrinsic properties. In this work, we develop new empirical methods based on bond valences to estimate the intrinsic properties, namely, compressibility and thermal expansion of complex spinel-type crystals. The composition-weighted average of bond force constants in tetrahedral and octahedral coordination polyhedra is derived as a function of the composition-weighted average of bond valences, which can be calculated according to the experimental chemical composition and crystal structural parameters. We discuss the coupled effects of tetrahedral and octahedral frameworks on the aforementioned intrinsic properties. The bulk modulus could be quantitatively calculated from the composition-weighted average of bond force constants in tetrahedral and octahedral coordination polyhedra. In contrast, a quantitative estimation of the thermal expansion coefficient could be obtained from the composition-weighted average of bond force constants in octahedral coordination polyhedra. These empirical methods have been validated by the results obtained for a new complex quaternary spinel-type oxynitride Mg0.268Al2.577O3.733N0.267 as well as MgAl2O4 and Al2.85O3.45N0.55 from the literature. Further, these empirical methods have the potential to be extensively applied in other types of complex crystals.

  10. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, X F [Department of Prosthodontics, The Stomatological Hospital Affiliated Medical School, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yoshida, K [Division of Applied Prosthodontics, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8588 (Japan); Gu, N, E-mail: mengsoar@nju.edu.c [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and Devices, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2010-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C and B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R{sub a} and R{sub y} values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane

  11. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, X F; Yoshida, K; Gu, N

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C and B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R a and R y values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane coupler

  12. Understanding Boron through Size-Selected Clusters: Structure, Chemical Bonding, and Fluxionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergeeva, Alina P.; Popov, Ivan A.; Piazza, Zachary A.; Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Wang, Lai S.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2014-04-15

    Conspectus Boron is an interesting element with unusual polymorphism. While three-dimensional (3D) structural motifs are prevalent in bulk boron, atomic boron clusters are found to have planar or quasi-planar structures, stabilized by localized two-center–two-electron (2c–2e) σ bonds on the periphery and delocalized multicenter–two-electron (nc–2e) bonds in both σ and π frameworks. Electron delocalization is a result of boron’s electron deficiency and leads to fluxional behavior, which has been observed in B13+ and B19–. A unique capability of the in-plane rotation of the inner atoms against the periphery of the cluster in a chosen direction by employing circularly polarized infrared radiation has been suggested. Such fluxional behaviors in boron clusters are interesting and have been proposed as molecular Wankel motors. The concepts of aromaticity and antiaromaticity have been extended beyond organic chemistry to planar boron clusters. The validity of these concepts in understanding the electronic structures of boron clusters is evident in the striking similarities of the π-systems of planar boron clusters to those of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, naphthalene, coronene, anthracene, or phenanthrene. Chemical bonding models developed for boron clusters not only allowed the rationalization of the stability of boron clusters but also lead to the design of novel metal-centered boron wheels with a record-setting planar coordination number of 10. The unprecedented highly coordinated borometallic molecular wheels provide insights into the interactions between transition metals and boron and expand the frontier of boron chemistry. Another interesting feature discovered through cluster studies is boron transmutation. Even though it is well-known that B–, formed by adding one electron to boron, is isoelectronic to carbon, cluster studies have considerably expanded the possibilities of new structures and new materials using the B

  13. Vibrational tug-of-war: The pKA dependence of the broad vibrational features of strongly hydrogen-bonded carboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoozen, Brian L.; Petersen, Poul B.

    2018-04-01

    Medium and strong hydrogen bonds give rise to broad vibrational features frequently spanning several hundred wavenumbers and oftentimes exhibiting unusual substructures. These broad vibrational features can be modeled from first principles, in a reduced dimensional calculation, that adiabatically separates low-frequency modes, which modulate the hydrogen bond length, from high-frequency OH stretch and bend modes that contribute to the vibrational structure. Previously this method was used to investigate the origin of an unusual vibrational feature frequently found in the spectra of dimers between carboxylic acids and nitrogen-containing aromatic bases that spans over 900 cm-1 and contains two broad peaks. It was found that the width of this feature largely originates from low-frequency modes modulating the hydrogen bond length and that the structure results from Fermi resonance interactions. In this report, we examine how these features change with the relative acid and base strength of the components as reflected by their aqueous pKA values. Dimers with large pKA differences are found to have features that can extend to frequencies below 1000 cm-1. The relationships between mean OH/NH frequency, aqueous pKA, and O-N distance are examined in order to obtain a more rigorous understanding of the origin and shape of the vibrational features. The mean OH/NH frequencies are found to correlate well with O-N distances. The lowest OH stretch frequencies are found in dimer geometries with O-N distances between 2.5 and 2.6 Å. At larger O-N distances, the hydrogen bonding interaction is not as strong, resulting in higher OH stretch frequencies. When the O-N distance is smaller than 2.5 Å, the limited space between the O and N determines the OH stretch frequency, which gives rise to frequencies that decrease with O-N distances. These two effects place a lower limit on the OH stretch frequency which is calculated to be near 700 cm-1. Understanding how the vibrational features

  14. Diversity of Chemical Bonding and Oxidation States in MS4 Molecules of Group 8 Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Jiang, Ning; Schwarz, W H Eugen; Yang, Ping; Li, Jun

    2017-08-04

    The geometric and electronic ground-state structures of 30 isomers of six MS 4 molecules (M=Group 8 metals Fe, Ru, Os, Hs, Sm, and Pu) have been studied by using quantum-chemical density functional theory and correlated wavefunction approaches. The MS 4 species were compared to analogous MO 4 species recently investigated (W. Huang, W.-H. Xu, W. H. E. Schwarz, J. Li, Inorg. Chem. 2016, 55, 4616). A metal oxidation state (MOS) with a high value of eight appeared in the low-spin singlet T d geometric species (Os,Hs)S 4 and (Ru,Os,Hs)O 4 , whereas a low MOS of two appeared in the high-spin septet D 2d species Fe(S 2 ) 2 and (slightly excited) metastable Fe(O 2 ) 2 . The ground states of all other molecules had intermediate MOS values, with S 2- , S 2 2- , S 2 1- (and O 2- , O 1- , O 2 2- , O 2 1- ) ligands bonded by ionic, covalent, and correlative contributions. The known tendencies toward lower MOS on going from oxides to sulfides, from Hs to Os to Ru, and from Pu to Sm, and the specific behavior of Fe, were found to arise from the different atomic orbital energies and radii of the (n-1)p core and (n-1)d and (n-2)f valence shells of the metal atoms in row n of the periodic table. The comparative results of the electronic and geometric structures of the MO 4 and MS 4 species provides insight into the periodicity of oxidation states and bonding. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Characterization of chemical bonding in low-k dielectric materialsfor interconnect isolation: a xas and eels study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, P.; Schmeisser, D.; Engelmann, H.-J.; Zschech, E.; Stegmann, H.; Himpsel, F.; Denlinger, J.

    2006-04-10

    The use of low dielectric constant materials in the on-chipinterconnect process reduces interconnect delay, power dissipation andcrosstalk noise. To achieve the requirements of the ITRS for 2007-2009minimal sidewall damage from etch, ash or cleans is required. In chemicalvapor deposited (CVD) organo-silicate glass (OSG) which are used asintermetal dielectric (IMD) materials the substitution of oxygen in SiO2by methyl groups (-CH3) reduces the permittivity significantly (from 4.0in SiO2 to 2.6-3.3 in the OSG), since the electronic polarizability islower for Si-C bonds than for Si-O bonds. However, plasma processing forresist stripping, trench etching and post-etch cleaning removes C and Hcontaining molecular groups from the near-surface layer of OSG.Therefore, compositional analysis and chemical bonding characterizationof structured IMD films with nanometer resolution is necessary forprocess optimization. OSG thin films as-deposited and after plasmatreatment are studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) andelectron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). In both techniques, the finestructure near the C1s absorption or energy loss edge, respectively,allows to identify C-H, C-C, and C-O bonds. This gives the opportunity todifferentiate between individual low-k materials and their modifications.The O1s signal is less selective to individual bonds. XAS spectra havebeen recorded for non-patterned films and EELS spectra for patternedstructures. The chemical bonding is compared for as-deposited andplasma-treated low-k materials. The Fluorescence Yield (FY) and the TotalElectron Yield (TEY) recorded while XAS measurement are compared.Examination of the C 1s near-edge structures reveal a modified bonding ofthe remaining C atoms in the plasma-treated sample regions.

  16. Preparation and photocatalytic activity of chemically-bonded phosphate ceramics containing TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Monize Aparecida; de Lima, Bruna de Oliveira; Ferreira, Leticia Patrício; Colonetti, Emerson; Feltrin, Jucilene; De Noni, Agenor

    2017-05-01

    Titanium dioxide was incorporated into chemically-bonded phosphate ceramic for use as photocatalytic inorganic coating. The coatings obtained were applied to unglazed ceramic tiles and cured at 350 °C. The surfaces were characterized by photocatalytic activity, determined in aqueous medium, based on the degradation of methylene blue dye. The effects of the percentage of TiO2 and the thickness of the layer on the photocatalytic efficiency were evaluated. The influence of the incorporation of TiO2 on the consolidation of the phosphate matrix coating was investigated using the wear resistance test. The crystalline phases of the coatings obtained were determined by XRD. The microstructure of the surfaces was analyzed by SEM. The thermal curing treatment did not cause a phase transition from anatase to rutile. An increase in the photocatalytic activity of the coating was observed with an increase in the TiO2 content. The dye degradation indices ranged from 14.9 to 44.0%. The photocatalytic efficiency was not correlated with the thickness of the coating layer deposited. The resistance to wear decreased with an increase in the TiO2 content. Comparison with a commercial photocatalytic ceramic coating indicated that there is a range of values for the TiO2 contents which offer potential for photocatalytic applications.

  17. Are The Chemical Bonding Interactions in Halide Perovskite Solar Cells Cooperative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadwaj, Pradeep; Varadwaj, Arpita; Yamashita, Koichi

    Designing novel photo-sensitive and -responsive light harvesting solar cell materials is an important area of nanoscience and technologies mainly because these can transform the light energy directly or indirectly into electricity. Examples of a few of them, inter alia, include dye-sensitized solar cells, organic solar cells and halide perovskite solar cells. Methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite is one of the highly valued photocatalysts reported till date, which is comparable in its strength with the inorganic cesium lead iodide (CsPbI3) perovskite solar cell especially for energy conversion. The study thus has focused on the fundamental understanding of the geometrical, electronic and energetic properties of the CH3NH3PbI3 and CsPbI3 nanoclusters, obtained using density functional theory calculations. The main aim towards this end was to uncover the consequences of additivity, or non-additive cooperative binding, in the intermolecular chemical bonding interactions examined for these nanoclusters. The results obtained are compared with the current state-of-the-art, and will be discussed in detail.

  18. Crystal structure and chemical bonding of the intermetallic Zintl phase Yb11AlSb9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastbjerg, Sofie; Uvarov, Catherine A; Kauzlarich, Susan M; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Nishibori, Eiji; Spackman, Mark A; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2012-09-14

    High resolution single crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data measured at 15(2) K were used to solve the structure of the complex intermetallic Zintl phase, Yb(11)AlSb(9) (space group Iba2), made up of Yb cations and polyanions along with isolated Sb anions. The 15(2) K cell parameters are a = 11.7383(4) Å, b = 12.3600(4) Å, c = 16.6796(6) Å. The temperature dependence of the structure was investigated through high resolution synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) data measured from 90 K to 1000 K. Rietveld refinements of the crystal structure revealed near linear thermal expansion of Yb(11)AlSb(9) with expansion coefficients of 1.49(2) × 10(-5) K(-1), 1.71(3) × 10(-5) K(-1), 1.13(1) × 10(-5) K(-1) for a, b and c, respectively. The chemical bonding in Yb(11)AlSb(9) was analyzed using atomic Hirshfeld surfaces, and the analysis supports the presence of the structural elements of Yb cations, [AlSb(4)](9-) tetrahedra, [Sb(2)](4-) dimers and isolated Sb(3-) anions. However, indications of interatomic interactions between the Zintl anions and the Yb cations were also observed.

  19. Ge and As x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic study of homopolar bonding, chemical order, and topology in Ge-As-S chalcogenide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, S.; Ponader, C.W.; Aitken, B.G.

    2001-01-01

    The coordination environments of Ge and As atoms in Ge x As y S 1-x-y glasses with x:y=1:2, 1:1, and 2.5:1 and with wide-ranging S contents have been studied with Ge and As K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The coordination numbers of Ge and As atoms are found to be 4 and 3, respectively, in all glasses. The first coordination shells of Ge and As atoms in the stoichiometric and S-excess glasses consist of S atoms only, implying the preservation of chemical order at least over the length scale of the first coordination shell. As-As homopolar bonds are found to appear at low and intermediate levels of S deficiency, whereas Ge-Ge bonds are formed only in strongly S-deficient glasses indicating clustering of metal atoms and violation of chemical order in S-deficient glasses. The composition-dependent variation in chemical order in chalcogenide glasses has been hypothesized to result in topological changes in the intermediate-range structural units. The role of such topological transitions in controlling the structure-property relationships in chalcogenide glasses is discussed

  20. Role of the chemical bonding for the time-dependent electron transport through an interacting quantum dot

    KAUST Repository

    Goker, Ali

    2011-06-01

    A combination of ab initio and many-body calculations is utilized to determine the effects of the bonding in Au electrodes on the time dependent current through a quantum dot suddenly shifted into the Kondo regime by a gate voltage. For an asymmetrically coupled system the instantaneous conductance exhibits fluctuations. The frequencies of the fluctuations turn out to be proportional to the energetic separation between the dominating peaks in the density of states and the Fermi level. The chemical bonding in the electrodes, thus, drastically alters the transient current, which can be accessed by ultrafast pump-probe techniques. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Electronic bond structure of the H2+ ion in a strong magnetic field: A study of the parallel configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappes, U.; Schmelcher, P.

    1995-01-01

    A large number of magnetically dressed states of the hydrogen molecular ion for parallel internuclear and magnetic field axes are investigated. The numerical calculations of the molecular states and potential-energy curves in the fixed-nuclei approximation are based on a recently established and optimized atomic orbital basis set. We study electronic states within the range 0≤|m|≤10 of magnetic quantum numbers and for several field strengths. In particular, we also investigate many excited states within a subspace for fixed magnetic quantum number and parity. In order to understand the influence of the magnetic field on theof excited molecular states, we perform a detailed comparison of the electronic probability distributions and potential-energy curves in the field-free space with those in the presence of a magnetic field. As a major result we observe the existence of two different classes of strongly bound, i.e., stable, magnetically dressed states whose corresponding counterparts in the field-free space exhibit purely repulsive potential-energy curves, i.e., are unstable. Corrections which are going beyond the fixed-nuclei approach, i.e., the coupling of the center of mass to the electronic motion, as well as the mass corrections are investigated in order to ensure the physical validity of our results

  2. Proton dynamics in the strong chelate hydrogen bond of crystalline picolinic acid N-oxide. A new computational approach and infrared, raman and INS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stare, Jernej; Panek, Jarosław; Eckert, Juergen; Grdadolnik, Joze; Mavri, Janez; Hadzi, Dusan

    2008-02-21

    Infrared, Raman and INS spectra of picolinic acid N-oxide (PANO) were recorded and examined for the location of the hydronic modes, particularly O-H stretching and COH bending. PANO is representative of strong chelate hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) with its short O...O distance (2.425 A). H-bonding is possibly well-characterized by diffraction, NMR and NQR data and calculated potential energy functions. The analysis of the spectra is assisted by DFT frequency calculations both in the gas phase and in the solid state. The Car-Parrinello quantum mechanical solid-state method is also used for the proton dynamics simulation; it shows the hydron to be located about 99% of time in the energy minimum near the carboxylic oxygen; jumps to the N-O acceptor are rare. The infrared spectrum excels by an extended absorption (Zundel's continuum) interrupted by numerous Evans transmissions. The model proton potential functions on which the theories of continuum formation are based do not correspond to the experimental and computed characteristics of the hydrogen bond in PANO, therefore a novel approach has been developed; it is based on crystal dynamics driven hydronium potential fluctuation. The envelope of one hundred 0 --> 1 OH stretching transitions generated by molecular dynamics simulation exhibits a maximum at 1400 cm-1 and a minor hump at approximately 1600 cm-1. These positions square well with ones predicted for the COH bending and OH stretching frequencies derived from various one- and two-dimensional model potentials. The coincidences with experimental features have to be considered with caution because the CPMD transition envelope is based solely on the OH stretching coordinate while the observed infrared bands correspond to heavily mixed modes as was previously shown by the normal coordinate analysis of the IR spectrum of argon matrix isolated PANO, the present CPMD frequency calculation and the empirical analysis of spectra. The experimental infrared spectra show some

  3. The Different Sensitive Behaviors of a Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer-Coated SAW Sensor for Chemical Warfare Agents and Their Simulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Long

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A linear hydrogen-bond acidic (HBA linear functionalized polymer (PLF, was deposited onto a bare surface acoustic wave (SAW device to fabricate a chemical sensor. Real-time responses of the sensor to a series of compounds including sarin (GB, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP, mustard gas (HD, chloroethyl ethyl sulphide (2-CEES, 1,5-dichloropentane (DCP and some organic solvents were studied. The results show that the sensor is highly sensitive to GB and DMMP, and has low sensitivity to HD and DCP, as expected. However, the sensor possesses an unexpected high sensitivity toward 2-CEES. This good sensing performance can’t be solely or mainly attributed to the dipole-dipole interaction since the sensor is not sensitive to some high polarity solvents. We believe the lone pair electrons around the sulphur atom of 2-CEES provide an electron-rich site, which facilitates the formation of hydrogen bonding between PLF and 2-CEES. On the contrary, the electron cloud on the sulphur atom of the HD molecule is offset or depleted by its two neighbouring strong electron-withdrawing groups, hence, hydrogen bonding can hardly be formed.

  4. The Different Sensitive Behaviors of a Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer-Coated SAW Sensor for Chemical Warfare Agents and Their Simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yin; Wang, Yang; Du, Xiaosong; Cheng, Luhua; Wu, Penglin; Jiang, Yadong

    2015-07-28

    A linear hydrogen-bond acidic (HBA) linear functionalized polymer (PLF), was deposited onto a bare surface acoustic wave (SAW) device to fabricate a chemical sensor. Real-time responses of the sensor to a series of compounds including sarin (GB), dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), mustard gas (HD), chloroethyl ethyl sulphide (2-CEES), 1,5-dichloropentane (DCP) and some organic solvents were studied. The results show that the sensor is highly sensitive to GB and DMMP, and has low sensitivity to HD and DCP, as expected. However, the sensor possesses an unexpected high sensitivity toward 2-CEES. This good sensing performance can't be solely or mainly attributed to the dipole-dipole interaction since the sensor is not sensitive to some high polarity solvents. We believe the lone pair electrons around the sulphur atom of 2-CEES provide an electron-rich site, which facilitates the formation of hydrogen bonding between PLF and 2-CEES. On the contrary, the electron cloud on the sulphur atom of the HD molecule is offset or depleted by its two neighbouring strong electron-withdrawing groups, hence, hydrogen bonding can hardly be formed.

  5. Chemical bonding in epitaxial ZrB 2 studied by X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Martin; Tengdelius, Lina; Greczynski, Grzegorz; Hultman, Lars; Högberg, Hans

    2018-03-01

    The chemical bonding in an epitaxial ZrB2 film is investigated by Zr K-edge (1s) X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies and compared to the ZrB2 compound target from which the film was synthesized as well as a bulk {\\alpha}-Zr reference. Quantitative analysis of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy spectra reveals at the surface: ~5% O in the epitaxial ZrB2 film, ~19% O in the ZrB2 compound target and ~22% O in the bulk {\\alpha}-Zr reference after completed sputter cleaning. For the ZrB2 compound target, X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows weak but visible -111, 111, and 220 peaks from monoclinic ZrO2 together with peaks from ZrB2 and where the intensity distribution for the ZrB2 peaks show a randomly oriented target material. For the bulk {\\alpha}-Zr reference no peaks from any crystalline oxide were visible in the diffractogram recorded from the 0001-oriented metal. The Zr K-edge absorption from the two ZrB2 samples demonstrate more pronounced oscillations for the epitaxial ZrB2 film than in the bulk ZrB2 attributed to the high atomic ordering within the columns of the film. The XANES exhibits no pre-peak due to lack of p-d hybridization in ZrB2, but with a chemical shift towards higher energy of 4 eV in the film and 6 eV for the bulk compared to {\\alpha}-Zr (17.993 keV) from the charge-transfer from Zr to B. The 2 eV larger shift in bulk ZrB2 material suggests higher oxygen content than in the epitaxial film, which is supported by XPS. In EXAFS, the modelled cell-edge in ZrB2 is slightly smaller in the thin film (a=3.165 {\\AA}, c=3.520 {\\AA}) in comparison to the bulk target material (a=3.175 {\\AA}, c=3.540 {\\AA}) while in hexagonal closest-packed metal ({\\alpha}-phase, a=3.254 {\\AA}, c=5.147 {\\AA}).

  6. All-in-One: Achieving Robust, Strongly Luminescent and Highly Dispersible Hybrid Materials by Combining Ionic and Coordinate Bonds in Molecular Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zhu, Kun; Teat, Simon J; Dey, Gangotri; Shen, Zeqing; Wang, Lu; O'Carroll, Deirdre M; Li, Jing

    2017-07-12

    Extensive research has been pursued to develop low-cost and high-performance functional inorganic-organic hybrid materials for clean/renewable energy related applications. While great progress has been made in the recent years, some key challenges remain to be tackled. One major issue is the generally poor stability of these materials, which originates from relatively fragile/weak bonds between inorganic and organic constituents. Herein, we report a unique "all-in-one" (AIO) approach in constructing robust structures with desired properties. Such approach allows formation of both ionic and coordinate bonds within a molecular cluster, which greatly enhances structural stability while maintaining the molecular identity of the cluster and its high luminescence. The novel AIO structures are composed of various anionic (Cu m I m+n ) n- clusters and cationic N-ligands. They exhibit high luminescence efficiency, significantly improved chemical, thermal and moisture stability, and excellent solution processability. Both temperature dependent photoluminescence experiments and DFT calculations are performed to investigate the luminescence origin and emission mechanism of these materials, and their suitability as energy-saving LED lighting phosphors is assessed. This study offers a new material designing strategy that may be generalized to many other material classes.

  7. Rapid calculation of protein chemical shifts using bond polarization theory and its application to protein structure refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovkin, Igor; Klipfel, Marco; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Ulrich, Anne S; Luy, Burkhard; Sternberg, Ulrich

    2012-09-21

    Although difficult to analyze, NMR chemical shifts provide detailed information on protein structure. We have adapted the semi-empirical bond polarization theory (BPT) to protein chemical shift calculation and chemical shift driven protein structure refinement. A new parameterization for BPT amide nitrogen chemical shift calculation has been derived from MP2 ab initio calculations and successfully evaluated using crystalline tripeptides. We computed the chemical shifts of the small globular protein ubiquitin, demonstrating that BPT calculations can match the results obtained at the DFT level of theory at very low computational cost. In addition to the calculation of chemical shift tensors, BPT allows the calculation of chemical shift gradients and consequently chemical shift driven geometry optimizations. We applied chemical shift driven protein structure refinement to the conformational analysis of a set of Trypanosoma brucei (the causative agent of African sleeping sickness) tryparedoxin peroxidase Px III structures. We found that the interaction of Px III with its reaction partner Tpx seems to be governed by conformational selection rather than by induced fit.

  8. Coupled cluster valence bond theory for open-shell systems with application to very long range strong correlation in a polycarbene dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, David W; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2017-07-14

    The Coupled Cluster Valence Bond (CCVB) method, previously presented for closed-shell (CS) systems, is extended to open-shell (OS) systems. The theoretical development is based on embedding the basic OS CCVB wavefunction in a fictitious singlet super-system. This approach reveals that the OS CCVB amplitude equations are quite similar to those of CS CCVB, and thus that OS CCVB requires the same level of computational effort as CS CCVB, which is an inexpensive method. We present qualitatively correct CCVB potential energy curves for all low-lying spin states of P 2 and Mn 2 + . CCVB is successfully applied to the low-lying spin states of some model linear polycarbenes, systems that appear to be a hindrance to standard density functionals. We examine an octa-carbene dimer in a side-by-side orientation, which, in the monomer dissociation limit, exhibits maximal strong correlation over the length of the polycarbene.

  9. Exploration of earth-abundant transition metals (Fe, Co, and Ni) as catalysts in unreactive chemical bond activations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bo; Cao, Zhi-Chao; Shi, Zhang-Jie

    2015-03-17

    Activation of inert chemical bonds, such as C-H, C-O, C-C, and so on, is a very important area, to which has been drawn much attention by chemists for a long time and which is viewed as one of the most ideal ways to produce valuable chemicals. Under modern chemical bond activation logic, many conventionally viewed "inert" chemical bonds that were intact under traditional conditions can be reconsidered as novel functionalities, which not only avoids the tedious synthetic procedures for prefunctionalizations and the emission of undesirable wastes but also inspires chemists to create novel synthetic strategies in completely different manners. Although activation of "inert" chemical bonds using stoichiometric amounts of transition metals has been reported in the past, much more attractive and challenging catalytic transformations began to blossom decades ago. Compared with the broad application of late and noble transition metals in this field, the earth-abundant first-row transition-metals, such as Fe, Co, and Ni, have become much more attractive, due to their obvious advantages, including high abundance on earth, low price, low or no toxicity, and unique catalytic characteristics. In this Account, we summarize our recent efforts toward Fe, Co, and Ni catalyzed "inert" chemical bond activation. Our research first unveiled the unique catalytic ability of iron catalysts in C-O bond activation of both carboxylates and benzyl alcohols in the presence of Grignard reagents. The benzylic C-H functionalization was also developed via Fe catalysis with different nucleophiles, including both electron-rich arenes and 1-aryl-vinyl acetates. Cobalt catalysts also showed their uniqueness in both aromatic C-H activation and C-O activation in the presence of Grignard reagents. We reported the first cobalt-catalyzed sp(2) C-H activation/arylation and alkylation of benzo[h]quinoline and phenylpyridine, in which a new catalytic pathway via an oxidative addition process was demonstrated

  10. Spunlaced and chemically bonded nonwovens for filtration applications: Performance evaluation and comparison

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Boguslavsky, L

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available in the binder bonding of the fabric surface. Very little energy is required for evaporation of the water contained in the binder. Nonwoven fabrics for filtration application were produced from polypropylene (PP) and polyester (PET) fibres using...

  11. Quantum-Mechanical Definition of Atoms and Chemical Bonds in Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    curves of Figure 1(a) but are further quantified by the results of Figure 1(b). From a diabatic perspective, the two bonding energy curves for these... diabatic possibilities. 10 Distribution A: approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 5 10 R (Bohr) 0 2 4 6 8 10 A to m ic E ne rg y (e V ) H a...crossing region is traversed adiabatically, whereas their diabatic behaviors are less extreme, as in Figure 1(b) for the corresponding bond energy

  12. Electron Reorganization in Chemical Reactions. Structural Changes from the Analysis of Bond Order Profiles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ponec, Robert; Juzakov, G.; Cooper, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 12 (2003), s. 2100-2105 ISSN 0022-3654 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072006; GA MŠk OC D9.20 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : bond orders * bond order profiles * electron reorganization Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.679, year: 2003

  13. Stabilization of contaminated soil and wastewater with chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagh, A.S.; Jeong, S.Y.; Singh, D.

    1997-01-01

    At Argonne National Laboratory, we have developed chemically Bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) technology to stabilize the U.S. Department of Energy's problem mixed waste streams, for which no other stabilization technology is suitable. In this technology, solid waste is mixed with MgO and reacted with aqueous solutions of phosphoric acid or acid phosphates at room temperature to form a slurry that sets in ∼2 h into a hard and dense ceramic waste form. Initial studies involved stabilizing the surrogate waste streams and then testing the waste forms for leaching of contaminants. After achieving satisfactory performance of the waste forms, we next incorporated actual waste streams at bench scale and produced waste forms that were then tested with the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). This presentation deals with stabilization of soil contaminated with Cd, Cr, Pb, Ag, Ba, and Hg, and of low-level radioactive wastewater. To enhance the contaminant levels in the soil, we further spiked the soil with additional amounts of Cd, Cr, Pb, and Hg. Both the soil and the wastewater were incorporated in the same waste form by stabilizing them with the CBPC process. The waste forms had a total waste loading of ∼77 wt.% and were dense with an open porosity of 2.7 vol.% and a density of 2.17 g/cm 3 . Compression strength was 4910 psi. The TCLP results showed excellent immobilization of all the RCRA metals, and radioactive contaminant levels were below the detection limit of 0.2 pCi/mL. Long-term leaching studies using the ANS 16.1 procedure showed that the retention of contaminants is excellent and comparable to or better than most of other stabilization processes. These results demonstrate that the CBPC process is a very superior process for treatment of low level mixed wastes; we therefore conclude that the CBPC process is well suited to the treatment of low-level mixed waste streams with high waste loading

  14. Protein-ligand interfaces are polarized: discovery of a strong trend for intermolecular hydrogen bonds to favor donors on the protein side with implications for predicting and designing ligand complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschka, Sebastian; Wolf, Alex J.; Bemister-Buffington, Joseph; Kuhn, Leslie A.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding how proteins encode ligand specificity is fascinating and similar in importance to deciphering the genetic code. For protein-ligand recognition, the combination of an almost infinite variety of interfacial shapes and patterns of chemical groups makes the problem especially challenging. Here we analyze data across non-homologous proteins in complex with small biological ligands to address observations made in our inhibitor discovery projects: that proteins favor donating H-bonds to ligands and avoid using groups with both H-bond donor and acceptor capacity. The resulting clear and significant chemical group matching preferences elucidate the code for protein-native ligand binding, similar to the dominant patterns found in nucleic acid base-pairing. On average, 90% of the keto and carboxylate oxygens occurring in the biological ligands formed direct H-bonds to the protein. A two-fold preference was found for protein atoms to act as H-bond donors and ligand atoms to act as acceptors, and 76% of all intermolecular H-bonds involved an amine donor. Together, the tight chemical and geometric constraints associated with satisfying donor groups generate a hydrogen-bonding lock that can be matched only by ligands bearing the right acceptor-rich key. Measuring an index of H-bond preference based on the observed chemical trends proved sufficient to predict other protein-ligand complexes and can be used to guide molecular design. The resulting Hbind and Protein Recognition Index software packages are being made available for rigorously defining intermolecular H-bonds and measuring the extent to which H-bonding patterns in a given complex match the preference key.

  15. Advanced Sodium Ion Battery Anode Constructed via Chemical Bonding between Phosphorus, Carbon Nanotube, and Cross-Linked Polymer Binder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiangxuan; Yu, Zhaoxin; Gordin, Mikhail L; Li, Xiaolin; Peng, Huisheng; Wang, Donghai

    2015-12-22

    Maintaining structural stability is a great challenge for high-capacity conversion electrodes with large volume change but is necessary for the development of high-energy-density, long-cycling batteries. Here, we report a stable phosphorus anode for sodium ion batteries by the synergistic use of chemically bonded phosphorus-carbon nanotube (P-CNT) hybrid and cross-linked polymer binder. The P-CNT hybrid was synthesized through ball-milling of red phosphorus and carboxylic group functionalized carbon nanotubes. The P-O-C bonds formed in this process help maintain contact between phosphorus and CNTs, leading to a durable hybrid. In addition, cross-linked carboxymethyl cellulose-citric acid binder was used to form a robust electrode. As a result, this anode delivers a stable cycling capacity of 1586.2 mAh/g after 100 cycles, along with high initial Coulombic efficiency of 84.7% and subsequent cycling efficiency of ∼99%. The unique electrode framework through chemical bonding strategy reported here is potentially inspirable for other electrode materials with large volume change in use.

  16. Interfacial chemical bonding state and band alignment of CaF2/hydrogen-terminated diamond heterojunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J. W.; Liao, M. Y.; Cheng, S. H.; Imura, M.; Koide, Y.

    2013-01-01

    CaF 2 films are deposited on hydrogen-terminated diamond (H-diamond) by a radio-frequency sputter-deposition technique at room temperature. Interfacial chemical bonding state and band alignment of CaF 2 /H-diamond heterojunction are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is confirmed that there are only C-Ca bonds at the CaF 2 /H-diamond heterointerface. Valence and conductance band offsets of the CaF 2 /H-diamond heterojunciton are determined to be 3.7 ± 0.2 and 0.3 ± 0.2 eV, respectively. It shows a type I straddling band configuration. The large valence band offset suggests advantage of the CaF 2 /H-diamond heterojunciton for the development of high power and high frequency field effect transistors.

  17. Fuzzy-logic modeling of Fenton's strong chemical oxidation process treating three types of landfill leachates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Hanife; Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Ilhan, Fatih; Yazici, Senem; Kurt, Ugur; Apaydin, Omer

    2013-06-01

    Three multiple input and multiple output-type fuzzy-logic-based models were developed as an artificial intelligence-based approach to model a novel integrated process (UF-IER-EDBM-FO) consisted of ultrafiltration (UF), ion exchange resins (IER), electrodialysis with bipolar membrane (EDBM), and Fenton's oxidation (FO) units treating young, middle-aged, and stabilized landfill leachates. The FO unit was considered as the key process for implementation of the proposed modeling scheme. Four input components such as H(2)O(2)/chemical oxygen demand ratio, H(2)O(2)/Fe(2+) ratio, reaction pH, and reaction time were fuzzified in a Mamdani-type fuzzy inference system to predict the removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, color, and ammonia nitrogen. A total of 200 rules in the IF-THEN format were established within the framework of a graphical user interface for each fuzzy-logic model. The product (prod) and the center of gravity (centroid) methods were performed as the inference operator and defuzzification methods, respectively, for the proposed prognostic models. Fuzzy-logic predicted results were compared to the outputs of multiple regression models by means of various descriptive statistical indicators, and the proposed methodology was tested against the experimental data. The testing results clearly revealed that the proposed prognostic models showed a superior predictive performance with very high determination coefficients (R (2)) between 0.930 and 0.991. This study indicated a simple means of modeling and potential of a knowledge-based approach for capturing complicated inter-relationships in a highly non-linear problem. Clearly, it was shown that the proposed prognostic models provided a well-suited and cost-effective method to predict removal efficiencies of wastewater parameters prior to discharge to receiving streams.

  18. Carbene→ N⁺ Coordination Bonds in Drugs: A Quantum Chemical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Coordination chemistry of bonds between main group elements and electron donating ligands as in L→E (where E is electron acceptor centre like C⁰, Si⁰, N¹, P¹, As¹, B¹ and L is an electron donating N-heterocyclic carbene) have been recently gaining attention. Many important drugs have nitrogen atom as an electron ...

  19. Chemical bond as a test of density-gradient expansions for kinetic and exchange energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdew, J.P.; Levy, M.; Painter, G.S.; Wei, S.; Lagowski, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Errors in kinetic and exchange contributions to the molecular bonding energy are assessed for approximate density functionals by reference to near-exact Hartree-Fock values. From the molecular calculations of Allan et al. and of Lee and Ghosh, it is demonstrated that the density-gradient expansion does not accurately describe the noninteracting kinetic contribution to the bonding energy, even when this expansion is carried to fourth order and applied in its spin-density-functional form to accurate Hartree-Fock densities. In a related study, it is demonstrated that the overbinding of molecules such as N 2 and F 2 , which occurs in the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy, is not attributable to errors in the self-consistent LSD densities. Contrary to expectations based upon the Gunnarsson-Jones nodality argument, it is found that the LSD approximation for the exchange energy can seriously overbind a molecule even when bonding does not create additional nodes in the occupied valence orbitals. LSD and exact values for the exchange contribution to the bonding energy are displayed and discussed for several molecules

  20. 2-nitroveratryl as a photocleavable thiol-protecting group for directed disulfide bond formation in the chemical synthesis of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karas, John A; Scanlon, Denis B; Forbes, Briony E; Vetter, Irina; Lewis, Richard J; Gardiner, James; Separovic, Frances; Wade, John D; Hossain, Mohammed A

    2014-07-28

    Chemical synthesis of peptides can allow the option of sequential formation of multiple cysteines through exploitation of judiciously chosen regioselective thiol-protecting groups. We report the use of 2-nitroveratryl (oNv) as a new orthogonal group that can be cleaved by photolysis under ambient conditions. In combination with complementary S-pyridinesulfenyl activation, disulfide bonds are formed rapidly in situ. The preparation of Fmoc-Cys(oNv)-OH is described together with its use for the solid-phase synthesis of complex cystine-rich peptides, such as insulin. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. High pressure stability analysis and chemical bonding of Ti1-xZrxN alloy: A first principle study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Mamta; Gupta, Dinesh C.

    2016-01-01

    First-principles pseudo-potential calculations have been performed to analyze the stability of Ti 1-x Zr x N alloy under high pressures. The first order phase transition from B1 to B2 phase has been observed in this alloy at high pressure. The variation of lattice parameter with the change in concentration of Zr atom in Ti 1-x Zr x N is also reported in both the phases. The calculations for density of states have been performed to understand the alloying effects on chemical bonding of Ti-Zr-N alloy.

  2. Mechanical properties of chemically bonded sand core materials dipped in sol-gel coating impregnated with filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2012-01-01

    -displacement curve from which the mechanical properties of the materials are deduced. The fracture surfaces were examined using a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope. From the results, the strengths of the core materials were slightly reduced by the coating in tensile and flexural modes, while......A novel sol-gel coating impregnated with filter dust was applied on chemically bonded sand core materials by dipping. After curing, the strengths of the core materials were measured under uniaxial loading using a new strength testing machine (STM). The STM presents the loading history as a force...

  3. Investigation of chemical bond characteristics, thermal expansion coefficients and bulk moduli of alpha-R2MoO6 and R2Mo2O7 (R = rare earths) by using a dielectric chemical bond method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huaiyong; Zhang, Siyuan; Zhou, Shihong; Cao, Xueqiang

    2009-09-01

    Theoretical researches are performed on the alpha-R2MoO6 (R = Y, Gd, Tb Dy, Ho, Er, Tm and Yb) and pyrochlore-type R2Mo2O7 (R = Y, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb and Dy) rare earth molybdates by using chemical bond theory of dielectric description. The chemical bonding characteristics and their relationship with thermal expansion property and compressibility are explored. The calculated values of linear thermal expansion coefficient (LTEC) and bulk modulus agree well with the available experimental values. The calculations reveal that the LTECs and the bulk moduli do have linear relationship with the ionic radii of the lanthanides: the LTEC decreases from 6.80 to 6.62 10(-6)/K and the bulk modulus increases from 141 to 154 GPa when R goes in the order Gd, Tb Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb in the alpha-R2MoO6 series; while in the R2Mo2O7 series, the LTEC ranges from 6.80 to 6.61 10(-6)/K and the bulk modulus ranges from 147 to 163 GPa when R varies in the order Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb and Dy. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Controllable synthesis of silver and silver sulfide nanocrystals via selective cleavage of chemical bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Aiwei; Wang Yu; Ye Haihang; Zhou Chao; Yang Chunhe; Li Xu; Peng Hongshang; Zhang Fujun; Hou Yanbing; Teng Feng

    2013-01-01

    A one-step colloidal process has been adopted to prepare silver (Ag) and silver sulfide (Ag 2 S) nanocrystals, thus avoiding presynthesis of an organometallic precursor and the injection of a toxic phosphine agent. During the reaction, a layered intermediate compound is first formed, which then acts as a precursor, decomposing into the nanocrystals. The composition of the as-obtained products can be controlled by selective cleavage of S–C bonds or Ag–S bonds. Pure Ag 2 S nanocrystals can be obtained by directly heating silver acetate (Ag(OAc)) and n-dodecanethiol (DDT) at 200 ° C without any surfactant, and pure Ag nanocrystals can be synthesized successfully if the reaction temperature is reduced to 190 ° C and the amount of DDT is decreased to 1 ml in the presence of a non-coordinating organic solvent (1-octadecene, ODE). Otherwise, the mixture of Ag and Ag 2 S is obtained by directly heating Ag(OAc) in DDT by increasing the reaction temperature or in a mixture of DDT and ODE at 200 ° C. The formation mechanism has been discussed in detail in terms of selective S–C and Ag–S bond dissociation due to the nucleophilic attack of DDT and the lower bonding energy of Ag–S. Interestingly, some products can easily self-assemble into two- or three-dimensional (2D or 3D) highly ordered superlattice structures on a copper grid without any additional steps. The excess DDT plays a key role in the superlattice structure due to the bundling and interdigitation of the thiolate molecules adsorbed on the as-obtained nanocrystals. (paper)

  5. Controlling Physical and Chemical Bonding of Polypyrrole to Boron Doped Diamond by Surface Termination

    OpenAIRE

    Ukraintsev, Egor; Kromka, Alexander; Janssen, Wiebke; Haenen, Ken; Rezek, Bohuslav

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate and to control polypyrrole (PPy) attachment to diamond we electrochemically grow PPy layers on hydrogen- and oxygen-terminated boron doped diamonds (BDD). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that the PPy layers have similar morphology (15 nm features) and thickness (> 5 nm) on H- and O-BDD. To resolve type of PPy-diamond bonding, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to compare intensity of secondary electron emission from original BDD regions and regions where PPy was grown...

  6. Evaluation of molecular assembly, spectroscopic interpretation, intra-/inter molecular hydrogen bonding and chemical reactivity of two pyrrole precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Poonam; Singh, R. N.

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of conformational, spectroscopic, hydrogen bonding and chemical reactivity of pyrrole precursor: ethyl 3,5 dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate (EDPC) and ethyl 3,4-dimethyl-4-acetyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate (EDAPC) for the convenient characterization, synthetic usefulness and comparative evaluations. All experimental spectral values of 1H NMR, UV-Vis and FT-IR spectra coincide well with calculated values by DFT. The orbital interactions in EDPC and EDAPC are found to lengthen their Nsbnd H and Cdbnd O bonds and lowers their vibrational frequencies (red shift) resulting to dimer formation. The QTAIM and NBO analyses provide the strength of interactions and charge transfer in the hydrogen bonding unit and stability of dimers. The binding energy of EDPC and EDPAC dimer are found to be 9.92, 10.22 kcal/mol, respectively. In EDPAC and EDPC dimer, hyperconjugative interactions between monomer units is due to n1(O) → σ*(Nsbnd H) that stabilize the molecule up to 9.7 and 9.3 kcal/mol, respectively. On evaluation of molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and electronic descriptors for EDPC it has been found that it is a good precursor for synthesis of formyl and acetyl derivatives whereas EDAPC has been found to be a good precursor for synthesis of schiff base, hydrazones, hydrazide-hydrazones and chalcones.

  7. HR-EELS study of hydrogen bonding configuration, chemical and thermal stability of detonation nanodiamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelson, Sh.; Akhvlediani, R. [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Petit, T.; Girard, H.A.; Arnault, J.C. [CEA, LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Hoffman, A., E-mail: choffman@tx.technion.ac.il [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2014-06-01

    Nano-diamond films composed of 3–10 nm grains prepared by the detonation method and deposited onto silicon substrates by drop-casting were examined by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HR-EELS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The impact of (i) ex-situ ambient annealing at 400 °C and (ii) ex-situ hydrogenation on hydrogen bonding and its thermal stability were examined. In order to clarify the changes in hydrogen bonding configuration detected on the different surfaces as a function of thermal annealing, in-situ hydrogenation by thermally activated atomic hydrogen was performed and examined. This study provides direct evidence that the exposure to ambient conditions and medium temperature ambient annealing have a pronounced effect on the hydrogen-carbon bonding configuration onto the nano-diamond surfaces. In-situ 1000 °C annealing results in irreversible changes of the film surface and partial nano-diamond silicidation.

  8. Thermal stability and chemical bonding states of AlOxNy/Si gate stacks revealed by synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, G.; Toyoda, S.; Shimogaki, Y.; Oshima, M.

    2010-01-01

    Annealing-temperature dependence of the thermal stability and chemical bonding states of AlO x N y /SiO 2 /Si gate stacks grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using new chemistry was investigated by synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SRPES). Results have confirmed the formation of the AlN and AlNO compounds in the as-deposited samples. Annealing the AlO x N y samples in N 2 ambient in 600-800 deg. C promotes the formation of SiO 2 component. Meanwhile, there is no formation of Al-O-Si and Al-Si binding states, suggesting no interdiffusion of Al with the Si substrate. A thermally induced reaction between Si and AlO x N y to form volatile SiO and Al 2 O is suggested to be responsible for the full disappearance of the Al component that accompanies annealing at annealing temperature of 1000 deg. C. The released N due to the breakage of the Al-N bonding will react with the SiO 2 interfacial layer and lead to the formation of the Si 3 -N-O/Si 2 -N-O components at the top of Si substrate. These results indicate high temperature processing induced evolution of the interfacial chemistry and application range of AlO x N y /Si gate stacks in future CMOS devices.

  9. The Synthesis, Structures and Chemical Properties of Macrocyclic Ligands Covalently Bonded into Layered Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clearfield, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 The immobilization of crown ethers tends to limit the leveling effect of solvents making the macrocycles more selective. In addition immobilization has the added advantage of relative ease of recovery of the otherwise soluble crown. We have affixed CH2PO3H2 groups to azacrown ethers. The resultant phosphorylated macrocycles may spontaneously aggregate into crystalline supramolecular linear arrays or contacted with cations produce layered or linear polymers. In the linear polymers the metal and phosphonic acids covalently bond into a central stem with the macrocyclic rings protruding from the stem as leaves on a twig. Two types of layered compounds were obtained with group 4 metals. Monoaza-crown ethers form a bilayer where the M4+ plus phosphonic acid groups build the layer and the rings fill the interlayer space. 1, 10-diazadiphosphonic acids cross-link the metal phosphonate layers forming a three-dimensional array of crown ethers. In order to improve diffusion into these 3-D arrays they are spaced by inclusion of phosphate or phosphate groups. Two series of azamacrocylic crown ethers were prepared containing rings with 20 to 32 atoms. These larger rings can complex two cations per ring. Methylene phosphonic acid groups have been bonded to the aza ring atoms to increase the complexing ability of these ligands. Our approach is to carry out acid-base titrations in the absence and presence of cations to determine the pKa values of the protons, both those bonded to aza groups and those associated with the phosphonic acid groups. From the differences in the titration curves obtained with and without the cations present we obtain the stoichiometry of complex formation and the complex stability constants. Some of the applications we are targeting include phase transfer catalysis, separation of cations and the separation of radioisotopes for diagnostic and cancer therapeutic purposes

  10. Polyacrylonitrile based composite materials with extracting agents containing chemically bonded CMPO groups for separation of actinoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan Kamenik; Ferdinand Sebesta; Jan John

    2015-01-01

    Composite materials made from polyacrylonitrile binding polymer and solid extracting agents with functional groups of diphenyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide bonded to a platform of calix[4]arenes and cobalt bis(dicarbollide) cluster anion were tested for application in column chromatography. They exhibited high affinity for americium, plutonium, uranium, and europium ions in nitric acid solutions. However, europium distribution isotherm in 3 M HNO 3 indicated low capacity and unsatisfactory employment of the functional groups. Similar material with octyl(phenyl)-N,N'-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide extracting agent had both high affinity and uptake capacity. (author)

  11. Chemical bonding and electronic localization in a Ga(I) amide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Maja K; Dange, Deepak; Jones, Cameron; Overgaard, Jacob

    2015-10-05

    The electron density in a one-coordinate [Ga(I) N(SiMe3 )R] complex has been determined from ab initio calculations and multipole modeling of 90 K X-ray data. The topologies of the Laplacian distribution and the ELI-D match a situation having an sp(3) -hybridized nitrogen with a tetrahedral arrangement of two single σ-bonds (to carbon and silicon) and two lone pairs pointing towards gallium in a scissor-grasping fashion. The analysis of the Laplacian distribution furthermore reveals a ligand-induced charge concentration (LICC) in the outer core of gallium oriented directly towards the nitrogen atom, and thus in between the two lone pairs. These observations might suggest that the trigonal planar nitrogen geometry result from a dative GaN bond, in which the roles of the metal and the ligand have been reversed with respect to a "standard" metal-ligand interaction, that is, the metal is here electron-donating. The ELI-D reveals a diffuse and directional lone pair on gallium, suggesting that this complex could serve as a σ-donor. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Localization of double bonds in wax esters by high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry utilizing the fragmentation of acetonitrile-related adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Háková, Martina; Pecková, Karolina; Urbanová, Klára; Cvačka, Josef

    2011-04-15

    Unsaturated wax esters (WEs) provided molecular adducts with C(3)H(5)N ([M + 55](+•)) in APCI sources in the presence of acetonitrile. CID MS/MS of [M + 55](+•) yielded fragments allowing the localization of double bond(s) in the hydrocarbon chains of the WEs. These fragments were formed by a cleavage on each side of the double bond. In methylene-interrupted polyunsaturated WEs, diagnostic fragments related to each double bond were detected; the most abundant were those corresponding to the cleavage of the C-C bond next to the first and the last double bond. To differentiate between those fragments differing in their structure or origin, a simple nomenclature based on α and ω ions has been introduced. Fragmentation of the α-type ions (fragments containing an ester bond) provided information on the occurrence of a double bond in the acid or alcohol part of the WEs. While no significant differences between the spectra of the WEs differing by cis/trans isomerism were found, the isomers were separated chromatographically. A data-dependent HPLC/APCI-MS(2) method for the comprehensive characterization of WEs in their complex mixtures has been developed and applied to natural mixtures of WEs isolated from jojoba oil and beeswax. More than 50 WE molecular species were completely identified, including the information on the acid and alcohol chain length and the position of the double bonds. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. Effects of Jigsaw Cooperative Learning and Animation Techniques on Students' Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Their Conceptions of the Particulate Nature of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacop, Ataman; Doymus, Kemal

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of jigsaw cooperative learning and computer animation techniques on academic achievements of first year university students attending classes in which the unit of chemical bonding is taught within the general chemistry course and these students' learning of the particulate nature of matter of this unit. The sample of this study consisted of 115 first-year science education students who attended the classes in which the unit of chemical bonding was taught in a university faculty of education during the 2009-2010 academic year. The data collection instruments used were the Test of Scientific Reasoning, the Purdue Spatial Visualization Test: Rotations, the Chemical Bonding Academic Achievement Test, and the Particulate Nature of Matter Test in Chemical Bonding (CbPNMT). The study was carried out in three different groups. One of the groups was randomly assigned to the jigsaw group, the second was assigned to the animation group (AG), and the third was assigned to the control group, in which the traditional teaching method was applied. The data obtained with the instruments were evaluated using descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA, and MANCOVA. The results indicate that the teaching of chemical bonding via the animation and jigsaw techniques was more effective than the traditional teaching method in increasing academic achievement. In addition, according to findings from the CbPNMT, the students from the AG were more successful in terms of correct understanding of the particulate nature of matter.

  14. Anatomy of Bond Formation. Domain-Averaged Fermi holes as a Tool for the Study of the Nature of the Chemical Bonding in Li2, Li4 and F2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ponec, Robert; Cooper, D.L.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 44 (2007), s. 11294-11301 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : chemical bonding * domain averaged fermi hole * non-nuclear attractors Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.918, year: 2007

  15. Chemical bond in borides. Theoretical and experimental analysis; Chemische Bindung in Boriden. Theoretische und experimentelle Untersuchung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagawe, Vanessa

    2013-04-18

    The aim of this work was the analysis of the bonding situation in different borides by examining the electron density in these structures. The main focus of the analysis was on the QTAIM analysis and the evaluation of the Electron Localizability Indicator (ELI-D). For the calculation of the electron density different methods (extended Hueckel, LMTO, (L)APW) were used to prove which method leads to most precise results. The (L)APW-method was found to be the most exact one and the one with the longest computational times. The examined compounds were boron-rich Borides containing icosahedra, Transition Metal Borides and Na{sub 3}B{sub 20}. Most of the structures of the examined boron-rich Borides can be derived directly from the MgB{sub 7} structure type (MgB{sub 7}, MgB{sub 12}C{sub 2}, LiB{sub 13}C{sub 2}, Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}C{sub 2}, LiB{sub 12}PC). The influence of the different cations as well as the interstitial atoms could be analyzed by comparing these compounds. Structures which can be derived from the alpha-rhombohedral Boron were also analyzed (B{sub 12}O{sub 2}, B{sub 12}P{sub 2}, B{sub 12}As{sub 2}). Assuming Bader-Charges the icosahedron is always positively charged if the electronegativity of the interstitial atoms is higher than the electronegativity of the Boron atoms. If their electronegativitiy is lower, the icosahedra are negatively charged. From the ELI-D-basins the bonding situation can be analyzed according to Wade by bisecting the basins of the exohedral bonds. The icosahedra are always negatively charged. However, Wade's rule is never exactly fulfilled as the charge is never exactly -2. To verify the results from theoretical calculations and vice versa, experimental electron density analyses of MgB{sub 7} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}C{sub 2} were performed. However, only the examination of MgB{sub 7} gave reliable results. They promoted the results by the calculations and underlined the correctness of the used methods. Results received by single

  16. The Synthesis, Structures, and Chemical Properties of Macrocyclic Ligands Covalently Bonded into Layered Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clearfield, Abraham [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2014-11-01

    In this part of the proposal we have concentrated on the surface functionalization of α-zirconium phosphate of composition Zr(O3POH)2•H2O. It is a layered compound that can be prepared as particles as small as 30 nm to single crystals in the range of cm. This compound is an ion exchanger with a capacity of 6.64 meq per gram. It finds use as a catalyst, proton conductor, sensors, biosensors, in kidney dialysis and drug delivery. By functionalizing the surface additional uses are contemplated as will be described. The layers consist of the metal, with 4+ charge, that is positioned slightly above and below the mean layer plane and bridged by three of the four phosphate oxygens. The remaining POH groups point into the interlayer space creating double rows of POH groups but single arrays on the surface layers. The surface groups are reactive and we were able to bond silanes, isocyanates, epoxides, acrylates ` and phosphates to the surface POH groups. The layers are easily exfoliated or filled with ions by ion exchange or molecules by intercalation reactions. Highlights of our work include, in addition to direct functionalization of the surfaces, replacement of the protons on the surface with ions of different charge. This allows us to bond phosphates, biophosphates, phosphonic acids and alcohols to the surface. By variation of the ion charge of the ions that replace the surface protons, different surface structures are obtained. We have already shown that polymer fillers, catalysts and Janus particles may be prepared. The combination of surface functionalization with the ability to insert molecules and ions between the layers allow for a rich development of numerous useful other applications as well as nano-surface chemistry.

  17. Simulant molecules with trivalent or pentavalent phosphorus atoms: bond dissociation energies and other thermodynamic and structural properties from quantum chemical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, David K; RaghuVeer, Krishans S; Ortiz, J V

    2011-08-04

    The CBS-QB3 and G4 thermochemical models have been used to generate energetic, structural, and spectroscopic data on a set of molecules with trivalent or pentavalent phosphorus atoms that can serve as simulants of chemical warfare agents. Based on structural data, the conformational stabilities of these molecules are explained in terms of the anomeric interaction within the OPOC and OPSC fragments. For those cases where experimental data are available, comparisons have been made between calculated and previously reported vibrational frequencies. All varieties of bond dissociation energies have been examined except those for C-H and P═O bonds. In trivalent phosphorus molecules, the O-C and S-C bonds have the lowest dissociation energies. In the pentavalent phosphorus set, the S-C bonds, followed by P-S bonds, have the lowest dissociation energies. In the fluorinated simulant molecules, the P-F bond is strongest, and the P-C or O-C bonds are weakest. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  18. The Effect of Various Types of Mechanical and Chemical Preconditioning on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets on Zirconia Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihun Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the combined effect of mechanical and chemical treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS of metal orthodontic brackets on zirconia restoration. The zirconia specimens were randomly divided into 12 groups (n=10 according to three factors: AL (Al2O3 and CO (CoJet™ by sandblasting material; SIL (silane, ZPP (Zirconia Prime Plus, and SBU (Single Bond Universal by primer; and N (not thermocycled and T (thermocycled. The specimens were evaluated for shear bond strength, and the fractured surfaces were observed using a stereomicroscope. Scanning electron microscopy images were also obtained. CO-SBU combination had the highest bond strength after thermocycling (26.2 MPa. CO-SIL showed significantly higher SBS than AL-SIL (p0.05. Modified Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI scoring and SEM figures were consistent with the results of the surface treatments. In conclusion, CO-SBU, which combines the effect of increased surface area and chemical bonding with both 10-MDP and silane, showed the highest SBS. Sandblasting with either material improved the mechanical bonding by increasing the surface area, and all primers showed clinically acceptable increase of shear bond strength for orthodontic treatment.

  19. Finite Size Effects in Chemical Bonding: From Small Clusters to Solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleis, Jesper; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Romero, N. A.

    2011-01-01

    We address the fundamental question of which size a metallic nano-particle needs to have before its surface chemical properties can be considered to be those of a solid, rather than those of a large molecule. Calculations of adsorption energies for carbon monoxide and oxygen on a series of gold...

  20. Catalytic C-C Bond Cleavage for the Production of Chemicals from Lignin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jastrzebski, R.

    2016-01-01

    Lignin is a major component of lignocellulosic biomass and could be an important renewable feedstock in industry for the production of (aromatic) bulk and fine chemicals. To this end, the development of new catalytic processes is required; both to depolymerise the biopolymer into small aromatic

  1. Chemical bonding modifications of tetrahedral amorphous carbon and nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films induced by rapid thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCann, R.; Roy, S.S.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Bain, M.F.; Gamble, H.S.; McLaughlin, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) and nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films (ta-CN x ), deposited by double bend off plane Filtered Vacuum Cathodic Arc were annealed up to 1000 deg. C in flowing argon for 2 min. Modifications on the chemical bonding structure of the rapidly annealed films, as a function of temperature, were investigated by NEXAFS, X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The interpretation of these spectra is discussed. The results demonstrate that the structure of undoped ta-C films prepared at floating potential with an arc current of 80 A remains stable up to 900 deg. C, whereas that of ta-CN x containing 12 at.% nitrogen is stable up to 700 deg. C. At higher temperatures, all the spectra indicated the predominant formation of graphitic carbon. Through NEXAFS studies, we clearly observed three π* resonance peaks at the ' N K edge structure. The origin of these three peaks is not well established in the literature. However our temperature-dependant study ascertained that the first peak originates from C=N bonds and the third peak originates from the incorporation of nitrogen into the graphite like domains

  2. Effects of carbon vacancies on the structures, mechanical properties, and chemical bonding of zirconium carbides: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Congwei; Oganov, Artem R; Li, Duan; Debela, Tekalign Terfa; Liu, Ning; Dong, Dong; Zeng, Qingfeng

    2016-04-28

    Interstitial carbides are able to maintain structural stability even with a high concentration of carbon vacancies. This feature provides them with tunable properties through the design of carbon vacancies, and thus making it important to reveal how carbon vacancies affect their properties. In the present study, using first-principles, we have calculated the properties of a number of stable and metastable zirconium carbides ZrC1-x (x = 0 and 1/n, n = 2-8) which were predicted by the evolutionary algorithm USPEX. Effects of carbon vacancies on the structures, mechanical properties, and chemical bonding of these zirconium carbides were systematically investigated. The distribution of carbon vacancies has significant influence on mechanical properties, especially Pugh's ratio. Nonadjacent carbon vacancies enhance Pugh's ratio, while grouped carbon vacancies decrease Pugh's ratio. This is explained by the changes in strength of Zr-C and Zr-Zr bonding around differently distributed carbon vacancies. We further explored the mechanical properties of zirconium carbides with impurities (N and O) by inserting N and O atoms into the sites of carbon vacancies. The enhanced mechanical properties of zirconium carbides were found.

  3. Collapsed tetragonal phase as a strongly covalent and fully nonmagnetic state: Persistent magnetism with interlayer As-As bond formation in Rh-doped Ca0 .8Sr0 .2Fe2As2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, K.; Glasbrenner, J. K.; Gretarsson, H.; Schmitz, D.; Bednarcik, J.; Etter, M.; Sun, J. P.; Manna, R. S.; Al-Zein, A.; Lafuerza, S.; Scherer, W.; Cheng, J. G.; Gegenwart, P.

    2018-02-01

    A well-known feature of the CaFe2As2 -based superconductors is the pressure-induced collapsed tetragonal phase that is commonly ascribed to the formation of an interlayer As-As bond. Using detailed x-ray scattering and spectroscopy, we find that Rh-doped Ca0.8Sr0.2Fe2As2 does not undergo a first-order phase transition and that local Fe moments persist despite the formation of interlayer As-As bonds. Our density functional theory calculations reveal that the Fe-As bond geometry is critical for stabilizing magnetism and the pressure-induced drop in the c lattice parameter observed in pure CaFe2As2 is mostly due to a constriction within the FeAs planes. The collapsed tetragonal phase emerges when covalent bonding of strongly hybridized Fe 3 d and As 4 p states completely wins out over their exchange splitting. Thus the collapsed tetragonal phase is properly understood as a strong covalent phase that is fully nonmagnetic with the As-As bond forming as a by-product.

  4. Sandwiched Thin-Film Anode of Chemically Bonded Black Phosphorus/Graphene Hybrid for Lithium-Ion Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanwen; Zou, Yuqin; Tao, Li; Ma, Zhaoling; Liu, Dongdong; Zhou, Peng; Liu, Hongbo; Wang, Shuangyin

    2017-09-01

    A facile vacuum filtration method is applied for the first time to construct sandwich-structure anode. Two layers of graphene stacks sandwich a composite of black phosphorus (BP), which not only protect BP from quickly degenerating but also serve as current collector instead of copper foil. The BP composite, reduced graphene oxide coated on BP via chemical bonding, is simply synthesized by solvothermal reaction at 140 °C. The sandwiched film anode used for lithium-ion battery exhibits reversible capacities of 1401 mAh g -1 during the 200th cycle at current density of 100 mA g -1 indicating superior cycle performance. Besides, this facile vacuum filtration method may also be available for other anode material with well dispersion in N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP). © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Lattice dynamics and chemical bonding in Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} from first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bao-Tian, E-mail: wbt11129@sxu.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Materials Theory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Souvatzis, Petros; Eriksson, Olle, E-mail: olle.eriksson@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Materials Theory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Zhang, Ping [LCP, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2015-05-07

    Pressure effects on the lattice dynamics and the chemical bonding of the three-dimensional topological insulator, Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, have been studied from a first-principles perspective in its rhombohedral phase. Where it is possible to compare, theory agrees with most of the measured phonon dispersions. We find that the inclusion of relativistic effects, in terms of the spin-orbit interaction, affects the vibrational features to some extend and creates large fluctuations on phonon density of state in high frequency zone. By investigations of structure and electronic structure, we analyze in detail the semiconductor to metal transition at ∼2 GPa followed by an electronic topological transition at a pressure of ∼4.25 GPa.

  6. Robust C–C bonded porous networks with chemically designed functionalities for improved CO2 capture from flue gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Thirion

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective carbon dioxide (CO2 capture requires solid, porous sorbents with chemically and thermally stable frameworks. Herein, we report two new carbon–carbon bonded porous networks that were synthesized through metal-free Knoevenagel nitrile–aldol condensation, namely the covalent organic polymer, COP-156 and 157. COP-156, due to high specific surface area (650 m2/g and easily interchangeable nitrile groups, was modified post-synthetically into free amine- or amidoxime-containing networks. The modified COP-156-amine showed fast and increased CO2 uptake under simulated moist flue gas conditions compared to the starting network and usual industrial CO2 solvents, reaching up to 7.8 wt % uptake at 40 °C.

  7. Carboxymethyl chitosan based nanocomposites containing chemically bonded quantum dots and magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yongling; Yin, Hong; Chen, Rui; Bai, Ru; Chen, Chunying; Hao, Xiaojuan; Shen, Shirley; Sun, Kangning; Liu, Futian

    2018-03-01

    A biocompatible nanocomposite consisting of fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) has been constructed via carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS), resulting in magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles (MFNPs). In these MFNPs, QDs and MNPs are successfully conjugated via covalent bonds onto the surface of CMCS. The composite retains favorable magnetic and fluorescent properties and shows a good colloidal stability in physiological environments. Folate (FA) as a specific targeting ligand was further incorporated into the nanocomposites to form a delivery vehicle with a targeting function. The therapeutic activity was achieved by loading chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (DOX) through electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. The cumulative DOX release profile shows pH-sensitive. Both flow cytometry analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopic observation suggested that these nanocomposites were uptaken by cancer cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis pathway. In summary, the CMCS based nanocomposites developed in this work have a great potential for effective cancer-targeting and drug delivery, as well as in situ cellular imaging.

  8. Open chain or chemically bonded structure of H2O4: The hydroperoxyl radical dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, G.; Lee, T.J.; Schaefer, H.F. III; Bartlett, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The straight chain isomer H--O--O--O--O--H of H 2 O 4 is of considerable current interest in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. Ab initio quantum mechanical methods have been used to study the geometrical structure, energetics, and vibrational frequencies of this species. Double zeta (DZ) and double zeta plus polarization (DZ+P) basis sets have been used in this theoretical study, the latter designated O(9s5p1d/4s2p1d), H(4s1p/2s1p). These basis sets have been employed in conjunction with self--consistent field (SCF)= and configuration interaction (CI) methods, including variationally up to 470 935 configurations. For the straight chain isomer, stationary points of symmetry C/sub 2h/, C/sub i/, and C 1 have been identified, and correspond to Hessian indices 3,1, and 0, respectively. The equilibrium geometry, having no elements of symmetry at all, is relatively unique. The highest level of theory (unlinked cluster corrected DZ+P CI) predicts the straight chain structure of H 2 O 4 to lie slightly lower in total energy than the cyclic two-hydrogen bond isomer

  9. Chemical synthesis of La1 isolated from the venom of the scorpion Liocheles australasiae and determination of its disulfide bonding pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Junya; Miyashita, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Miyagawa, Hisashi

    2015-08-01

    La1 is a 73-residue cysteine-rich peptide isolated from the scorpion Liocheles australasiae venom. Although La1 is the most abundant peptide in the venom, its biological function remains unknown. Here, we describe a method for efficient chemical synthesis of La1 using the native chemical ligation (NCL) strategy, in which three peptide components of less than 40 residues were sequentially ligated. The peptide thioester necessary for NCL was synthesized using an aromatic N-acylurea approach with Fmoc-SPPS. After completion of sequential NCL, disulfide bond formation was carried out using a dialysis method, in which the linear peptide dissolved in an acidic solution was dialyzed against a slightly alkaline buffer to obtain correctly folded La1. Next, we determined the disulfide bonding pattern of La1. Enzymatic and chemical digests of La1 without reduction of disulfide bonds were analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS), which revealed two of four disulfide bond linkages. The remaining two linkages were assigned based on MS/MS analysis of a peptide fragment containing two disulfide bonds. Consequently, the disulfide bonding pattern of La1 was found to be similar to that of a von Willebrand factor type C (VWC) domain. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the experimental determination of the disulfide bonding pattern of peptides having a single VWC domain as well as their chemical synthesis. La1 synthesized in this study will be useful for investigation of its biological role in the venom. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The role of London dispersion interactions in strong and moderate intermolecular hydrogen bonds in the crystal and in the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsyuba, Sergey A.; Vener, Mikhail V.; Zvereva, Elena E.; Brandenburg, J. Gerit

    2017-03-01

    Two variants of density functional theory computations have been applied to characterization of hydrogen bonds of the 1-(2-hydroxylethyl)-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2OHmim][OAc]), i.e. with and without inclusion of dispersion interactions. A comparison of the results demonstrates that London dispersion interactions have very little impact on the energetical, geometrical, infrared spectroscopic and electron density parameters of charge-assisted intermolecular hydrogen bonds functioning both in the crystal of the [C2OHmim][OAc] and in the isolated [C2OHmim]+ [OAc]- ion pairs.

  11. The Cosmic-Chemical Bond: Chemistry from the Big Bang to Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. A.; Hartquist, T. W.

    2013-01-01

    Introducing astrochemistry to a wide audience, this book describes how molecules formed in chemical reactions occur in a range of environments in interstellar and circumstellar space, from shortly after the Big Bang up to the present epoch. Stressing that chemistry in these environments needs to be "driven", it helps identify these drivers and the various chemical networks that operate giving rise to signature molecules that enable the physics of the region to be better understood. The book emphasises, in a non-mathematical way, the chemistry of the Milky Way Galaxy and its planet-forming regions, describes how other galaxies may have rather different chemistries and shows how chemistry was important even in the Early Universe when most of the elements had yet to be formed. This book will appeal to anyone with a general interest in chemistry, from students to professional scientists working in interdisciplinary areas and non-scientists fascinated by the evolving and exciting story of chemistry in the cosmos.

  12. Research Update: Mechanical properties of metal-organic frameworks – Influence of structure and chemical bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, a young family of functional materials, have been attracting considerable attention from the chemistry, materials science, and physics communities. In the light of their potential applications in industry and technology, the fundamental mechanical properties of MOFs, which are of critical importance for manufacturing, processing, and performance, need to be addressed and understood. It has been widely accepted that the framework topology, which describes the overall connectivity pattern of the MOF building units, is of vital importance for the mechanical properties. However, recent advances in the area of MOF mechanics reveal that chemistry plays a major role as well. From the viewpoint of materials science, a deep understanding of the influence of chemical effects on MOF mechanics is not only highly desirable for the development of novel functional materials with targeted mechanical response, but also for a better understanding of important properties such as structural flexibility and framework breathing. The present work discusses the intrinsic connection between chemical effects and the mechanical behavior of MOFs through a number of prototypical examples.

  13. Chemical bonding topology superconductors: III. Layered quaternary lanthanide nickel borocarbides and boronitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    The concept of porous delocalization has been extended to the conducting skeletons of quaternary lanthanide nickel borocarbide and boronitride superconductors and related nonsuperconducting materials. Such materials exhibit layered structures of the general type (LnX) n (Ni 2 B 2 )(Ln = lanthanide, particularly the nonmagnetic La III or Lu III ; X = C or N; n 1, 2, or 3) containing planar square Ni nets bonded to BCB 2- ligands in the superconducting LnNi 2 B 2 C, BC 3- ligands in the nonsuperconducting LnNiBC and Ln 2 NiBC 2 , and BN 2- ligands in the superconducting La 3 Ni 2 B 2 N 3 . The linear BCB 2- bridges linking adjacent Ni layers in LnNi 2 B 2 C lead to a porous conducting skeleton in LnNi 2 B 2 C. The BC 3- ligands in the nonsuperconducting LuNiBC and the closely related Ln 2 NiBC 2 = Ln 2 C 2 ·2LnNiBC do not link adjacent Ni layers in LuNiBC so that LuNiBC has only a two-dimensional conducting skeleton, which is not necessarily porous in these two dimensions. The superconducting La 3 Ni 2 B 2 N 3 = LaN·2LaNiBN has a similar local Ni environment as LuNiBC but with BN 2- rather than the isolelectronic BC 3- ligands above and below each Ni layer. However, in La 3 Ni 2 B 2 N 3 unlike LuNiBC the LaNiBN units are linked electronically by the La atoms in the intermediate LaN layer leading to a three-dimensional conducting skeleton in La 3 Ni 2 B 2 N 3 rather than the two-dimensional conducting skeleton of LuNiBC. The linear BNLaNB units linking the Ni layers in La 3 Ni 2 N 3 lead to a porous conducting skeleton similar to that in the LnNi 2 B 2 C superconductors

  14. Helium Accepts Back-Donation In Highly Polar Complexes: New Insights into the Weak Chemical Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunzi, Francesca; Cesario, Diego; Pirani, Fernando; Belpassi, Leonardo; Frenking, Gernot; Grandinetti, Felice; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2017-07-20

    We studied the puzzling stability and short distances predicted by theory for helium adducts with some highly polar molecules, such as BeO or AuF. On the basis of high-level quantum-chemical calculations, we carried out a detailed analysis of the charge displacement occurring upon adduct formation. For the first time we have unambiguously ascertained that helium is able not only to donate electron density, but also, unexpectedly, to accept electron density in the formation of weakly bound adducts with highly polar substrates. The presence of a large dipole moment induces a large electric field at He, which lowers its 2p orbital energy and enables receipt of π electron density. These findings offer unprecedented important clues toward the design and synthesis of stable helium compounds.

  15. Nine supramolecular assemblies from 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine and carboxylic acids by strong classical H-bonds and other noncovalent associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Aihua; Jin, Shouwen; Jin, Shide; Guo, Ming; Liu, Hui; Guo, Jianzhong; Wang, Daqi

    2017-12-01

    This article demonstrates 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine based organic salt formation in nine crystalline solids 1-9, in which the carboxylates have been integrated. Addition of equivalents of the COOH to the solution of 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine generates the singly protonated cationic species which direct the carboxylates. The nine compounds crystallize as their organic salts with the COOH proton transferred to the aromatic N of the 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine. All salts have been characterized by IR, mp, EA and XRD technique. The major driving force in 1-9 is the classical H-bonds from 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine and the acids, here the Nsbnd H⋯O H-bonds were found in all salts. Other extensive non-covalent interactions also exhibit great functions in space association of the molecular counterparts in relevant crystals. Except 4, all salts had the CHsbnd O, or CH3sbnd O interactions or both. Except 9, the common R22 (8) graph set has been observed in all salts due to the H-bonds and the non-covalent associations. For the synergistic interactions of the classical H-bonds and the various non-covalent associations, the salts displayed 1D-3D structures.

  16. First-principles investigation of the structure and synergistic chemical bonding of Ag and Mg at the Al | Ω interface in a Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Lipeng; Irving, Douglas L.; Zikry, Mohammed A.; Brenner, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Density functional theory was used to characterize the atomic structure and bonding of the Al | Ω interface in a Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy. The most stable interfacial structure was found to be connected by Al-Al bonds with a hexagonal Al lattice on the surface of the Ω phase sitting on the vacant hollow sites of the Al {1 1 1} matrix plane. The calculations predict that when substituted separately for Al at this interface, Ag and Mg do not enhance the interface stability through chemical bonding. Combining Ag and Mg, however, was found to chemically stabilize this interface, with the lowest-energy structure examined being a bi-layer with Ag atoms adjacent to the Al matrix and Mg adjacent to the Ω phase. This study provides an atomic arrangement for the interfacial bi-layer observed experimentally in this alloy.

  17. Evolution of chemical bonding and electron density rearrangements during D(3h) → D(3d) reaction in monolayered TiS2: a QTAIM and ELF study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhikov, Maxim R; Slepkov, Vladimir A; Kozlova, Svetlana G; Gabuda, Svyatoslav P

    2014-08-15

    Monolayered titanium disulfide TiS2, a prospective nanoelectronic material, was previously shown to be subject to an exothermic solid-state D3h -D3d reaction that proceeds via a newly discovered transition state. Here, we study the reaction in detail using topological methods of quantum chemistry (quantum theory of atoms in molecules and electron localization function analysis) and show how electron density and chemical bonding between the atoms change in the course of the reaction. The reaction is shown to undergo a series of topological catastrophes, associated with elementary chemical events such as break and formation of bonds (including the unexpected formation of S-S bonding between sulfur layers), and rearrangement of electron density of outer valence and core shells. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A promising tool to achieve chemical accuracy for density functional theory calculations on Y-NO homolysis bond dissociation energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong Zhi; Hu, Li Hong; Tao, Wei; Gao, Ting; Li, Hui; Lu, Ying Hua; Su, Zhong Min

    2012-01-01

    A DFT-SOFM-RBFNN method is proposed to improve the accuracy of DFT calculations on Y-NO (Y = C, N, O, S) homolysis bond dissociation energies (BDE) by combining density functional theory (DFT) and artificial intelligence/machine learning methods, which consist of self-organizing feature mapping neural networks (SOFMNN) and radial basis function neural networks (RBFNN). A descriptor refinement step including SOFMNN clustering analysis and correlation analysis is implemented. The SOFMNN clustering analysis is applied to classify descriptors, and the representative descriptors in the groups are selected as neural network inputs according to their closeness to the experimental values through correlation analysis. Redundant descriptors and intuitively biased choices of descriptors can be avoided by this newly introduced step. Using RBFNN calculation with the selected descriptors, chemical accuracy (≤1 kcal·mol(-1)) is achieved for all 92 calculated organic Y-NO homolysis BDE calculated by DFT-B3LYP, and the mean absolute deviations (MADs) of the B3LYP/6-31G(d) and B3LYP/STO-3G methods are reduced from 4.45 and 10.53 kcal·mol(-1) to 0.15 and 0.18 kcal·mol(-1), respectively. The improved results for the minimal basis set STO-3G reach the same accuracy as those of 6-31G(d), and thus B3LYP calculation with the minimal basis set is recommended to be used for minimizing the computational cost and to expand the applications to large molecular systems. Further extrapolation tests are performed with six molecules (two containing Si-NO bonds and two containing fluorine), and the accuracy of the tests was within 1 kcal·mol(-1). This study shows that DFT-SOFM-RBFNN is an efficient and highly accurate method for Y-NO homolysis BDE. The method may be used as a tool to design new NO carrier molecules.

  19. Chemically bonded carbon nanotubes on modified gold substrate as novel unbreakable solid phase microextraction fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagheri, H.; Ayazi, Z.; Sistani, H.

    2011-01-01

    A new technique is introduced for preparation of an unbreakable fiber using gold wire as a substrate for solid phase microextraction (SPME). A gold wire is used as a solid support, onto which a first film is deposited that consists of a two-dimensional polymer obtained by hydrolysis of a self-assembled monolayer of 3-(trimethoxysilyl)-1-propanthiol. This first film is covered with a layer of 3-(triethoxysilyl)-propylamine. Next, a stationary phase of oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes was chemically bound to the surface. The synthetic strategy was verified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thermal stability of new fiber was examined by thermogravimetric analysis. The applicability of the novel coating was verified by its employment as a SPME fiber for isolation of diazinon and fenthion, as model compounds. Parameters influencing the extraction process were optimized to result in limits of detection as low as 0.2 ng mL -1 for diazinon, and 0.3 ng mL -1 for fenthion using the time-scheduled selected ion monitoring mode. The method was successfully applied to real water, and the recoveries for spiked samples were 104% for diazinon and 97% for fenthion. (author)

  20. Effects of Jigsaw Cooperative Learning and Animation Techniques on Students' Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Their Conceptions of the Particulate Nature of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacop, Ataman; Doymus, Kemal

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of jigsaw cooperative learning and computer animation techniques on academic achievements of first year university students attending classes in which the unit of chemical bonding is taught within the general chemistry course and these students' learning of the particulate nature of matter of this…

  1. Identifying Misconceptions Related to Chemical Bonding Concepts in the Slovak School System Using the Bonding Representations Inventory as a Diagnostic Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrabec, Michal; Prokša, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    In this article we present the results of a study in which we tested the use of the experimental inventory BRI (Bonding Representations Inventory), developed by Cynthia J. Luxford and Stacey Lowery Bretz. The aim of our study was to test the usability of the experimental instrument in the Slovak educational system and to identify concrete…

  2. Diversity of Chemical Bonding and Oxidation States in MS 4 Molecules of Group 8 Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wei [Department of Chemistry and Key Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics & Molecular Engineering of the Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 P.R. China; Jiang, Ning [Department of Chemistry and Key Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics & Molecular Engineering of the Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 P.R. China; Schwarz, W. H. Eugen [Department of Chemistry and Key Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics & Molecular Engineering of the Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 P.R. China; Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, University of Siegen, Siegen 57068 Germany; Yang, Ping [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos New Mexico 87545 USA; Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 953002 USA; Li, Jun [Department of Chemistry and Key Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics & Molecular Engineering of the Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 P.R. China; Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 953002 USA

    2017-07-11

    The geometric and electronic ground-state structures of six MS4 molecules (M = group-8 metals Fe, Ru, Os, Hs, Sm, and Pu) have been studied by using quantum-chemical density-functional and correlated wave-function approaches. The MS4 species are compared to analogous MO4 species recently investi-gated (Inorg. Chem. 2016, 55: 4616). Metal oxidation state (MOS) of high value VIII appears in low- spin singlet Td geometric species (Os,Hs)S4 and (Ru,Os,Hs)O4, whereas low MOS=II appears in high- spin septet D2d species Fe(S2)2 and (slightly excited) metastable Fe(O2)2. The ground states of all other molecules have intermediate MOS values, containing S2-, S22-, S21- (and resp. O2--, O1-, O22-, O21-) ligands, bonded by ionic, covalent and correlative contributions.

  3. Effects of lithium doping on microstructure, electrical properties, and chemical bonds of sol-gel derived NKN thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Cheng [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Mathematic and Physical Sciences, R.O.C. Air Force Academy, Kaohsiung 820, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chan-Ching; Weng, Chung-Ming [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chu, Sheng-Yuan, E-mail: chusy@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Hong, Cheng-Shong [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Kaohsiung Normal University, Kaohsiung 802, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Cheng-Che [Department of Digital Game and Animation Design, Tung-Fang Design University, Kaohsiung 829, Taiwan (China)

    2015-02-28

    Highly (100/110) oriented lead-free Li{sub x}(Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}){sub 1−x}NbO{sub 3} (LNKN, x = 0, 0.02, 0.04, and 0.06) thin films are fabricated on Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates via a sol-gel processing method. The lithium (Li) dopants modify the microstructure and chemical bonds of the LNKN films, and therefore improve their electrical properties. The optimal values of the remnant polarization (P{sub r} = 14.3 μC/cm{sup 2}), piezoelectric coefficient (d{sub 33} = 48.1 pm/V), and leakage current (<10{sup −5} A/cm{sup 2}) are obtained for a lithium addition of x = 0.04 (i.e., 4 at. %). The observation results suggest that the superior electrical properties are the result of an improved crystallization, a larger grain size, and a smoother surface morphology. It is shown that the ion transport mechanism is dominated by an Ohmic behavior under low electric fields and the Poole-Frenkel emission effect under high electric fields.

  4. Crystal structure and chemical bonding of the intermetallic Zintl phase Yb[subscript 11]AlSb[subscript 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastbjerg, Sofie; Uvarov, Catherine A.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Nishibori, Eiji; Spackman, Mark A.; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt (Aarhus); (UWA); (UCD); (UC); (Nagoya)

    2012-10-09

    High resolution single crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data measured at 15(2) K were used to solve the structure of the complex intermetallic Zintl phase, Yb{sub 11}AlSb{sub 9} (space group Iba2), made up of Yb cations and polyanions along with isolated Sb anions. The 15(2) K cell parameters are a = 11.7383(4) {angstrom}, b = 12.3600(4) {angstrom}, c = 16.6796(6) {angstrom}. The temperature dependence of the structure was investigated through high resolution synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) data measured from 90 K to 1000 K. Rietveld refinements of the crystal structure revealed near linear thermal expansion of Yb{sub 11}AlSb{sub 9} with expansion coefficients of 1.49(2) x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1}, 1.71(3) x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1}, 1.13(1) x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1} for a, b and c, respectively. The chemical bonding in Yb{sub 11}AlSb{sub 9} was analyzed using atomic Hirshfeld surfaces, and the analysis supports the presence of the structural elements of Yb cations, [AlSb{sub 4}]{sup 9-} tetrahedra, [Sb{sub 2}]{sup 4-} dimers and isolated Sb{sup 3-} anions. However, indications of interatomic interactions between the Zintl anions and the Yb cations were also observed.

  5. Effects of Hot Chemical Etching and 10-Metacryloxydecyl Dihydrogen Phosphate (MDP) Monomer on the Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramics to Resin-Based Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Canan; Çakırbay Tanış, Merve; Şen, Murat

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the hot chemical etching method on the shear bond strength between zirconia and two resin cements. Sixty zirconia specimens (13 × 7.5 × 2.5 mm 3 ) were prepared and treated as follows: (1) airborne-particle abrasion with 50 μm Al 2 O 3 particles; (2) hot chemical etching for 10 minutes; (3) hot chemical etching for 30 minutes. Sixty composite cylinders of 3 mm diameter and height were prepared and bonded to zirconia specimens, which were divided into subgroups A and B. Group A: cemented with conventional resin cement (Variolink II); group B: cemented with 10-metacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) monomer containing resin cement (Panavia SA) after the application of surface treatments. Next, the specimens were stored in 37ºC distilled water for 24 hours. Following water storage, shear bond strength test was performed at a 1 mm/min crosshead speed in a universal testing machine. The statistical analyses were performed with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. p MDP monomer-containing resin cement, Panavia SA, improved the resin bonding of zirconia ceramics when combined with airborne-particle abrasion. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. Combinatorial near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure: Simultaneous determination of molecular orientation and bond concentration on chemically heterogeneous surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genzer, Jan; Fischer, Daniel A.; Efimenko, Kirill

    2003-01-01

    We show that simultaneous molecular orientation and bond chemistry of planar chemically heterogeneous surfaces can be obtained by combining near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and rastering the incident x-ray beam on the specimen. This rastering produces serially two-dimensional NEXAFS images in space and energy, revealing information about the chemistry (including bond concentration) and orientation of the surface-bound molecules with submillimeter planar spatial resolution and submonolayer molecular sensitivity. We illustrate the power of the combinatorial NEXAFS method by simultaneously probing the concentration and molecular orientation of semifluorinated (SF) molecules in double-SF molecular gradients on flat silica substrates

  7. Mechanical properties investigation on single-wall ZrO2 nanotubes: A finite element method with equivalent Poisson's ratio for chemical bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Li, Huijian; Hu, Minzheng; Liu, Zeliang; Wärnå, John; Cao, Yuying; Ahuja, Rajeev; Luo, Wei

    2018-04-01

    A method to obtain the equivalent Poisson's ratio in chemical bonds as classical beams with finite element method was proposed from experimental data. The UFF (Universal Force Field) method was employed to calculate the elastic force constants of Zrsbnd O bonds. By applying the equivalent Poisson's ratio, the mechanical properties of single-wall ZrNTs (ZrO2 nanotubes) were investigated by finite element analysis. The nanotubes' Young's modulus (Y), Poisson's ratio (ν) of ZrNTs as function of diameters, length and chirality have been discussed, respectively. We found that the Young's modulus of single-wall ZrNTs is calculated to be between 350 and 420 GPa.

  8. Average and extreme multi-atom Van der Waals interactions: Strong coupling of multi-atom Van der Waals interactions with covalent bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finkelstein Alexei V

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prediction of ligand binding or protein structure requires very accurate force field potentials – even small errors in force field potentials can make a 'wrong' structure (from the billions possible more stable than the single, 'correct' one. However, despite huge efforts to optimize them, currently-used all-atom force fields are still not able, in a vast majority of cases, even to keep a protein molecule in its native conformation in the course of molecular dynamics simulations or to bring an approximate, homology-based model of protein structure closer to its native conformation. Results A strict analysis shows that a specific coupling of multi-atom Van der Waals interactions with covalent bonding can, in extreme cases, increase (or decrease the interaction energy by about 20–40% at certain angles between the direction of interaction and the covalent bond. It is also shown that on average multi-body effects decrease the total Van der Waals energy in proportion to the square root of the electronic component of dielectric permittivity corresponding to dipole-dipole interactions at small distances, where Van der Waals interactions take place. Conclusion The study shows that currently-ignored multi-atom Van der Waals interactions can, in certain instances, lead to significant energy effects, comparable to those caused by the replacement of atoms (for instance, C by N in conventional pairwise Van der Waals interactions.

  9. On the nature of chemical bonding in phase change materials on the base of (GeTe)m-(Sb2Te3)n alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, V. G.; Sergeev, G. S.

    2017-05-01

    Despite widespread use of pseudobinary alloys (GeTe)m-(Sb2Te3)n for manufacture of optical data storage memory interpretation of very fast crystallization and amorphization processes in these phase change materials (PCM) is still under discussion. To clarify the role of electron subsystem in unusual properties of PCM and to reveal the nature of their chemical bonding electron band structure calculations using WIEN2k program code were performed for compounds GeTe, Sb2Te3, GeSb2Te4 and Ge2Sb2Te5. Parameters of bond critic points in the electron density distribution for studied compounds and some related substances were obtained and analyzed. Characteristics of bond critic points inherent to basic PCM are established. They can be used as guide parameters for searching new perspective materials.

  10. The importance of play in promoting healthy child development and maintaining strong parent-child bond: focus on children in poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milteer, Regina M; Ginsburg, Kenneth R

    2012-01-01

    Play is essential to the social, emotional, cognitive, and physical well-being of children beginning in early childhood. It is a natural tool for children to develop resiliency as they learn to cooperate, overcome challenges, and negotiate with others. Play also allows children to be creative. It provides time for parents to be fully engaged with their children, to bond with their children, and to see the world from the perspective of their child. However, children who live in poverty often face socioeconomic obstacles that impede their rights to have playtime, thus affecting their healthy social-emotional development. For children who are underresourced to reach their highest potential, it is essential that parents, educators, and pediatricians recognize the importance of lifelong benefits that children gain from play.

  11. [Effect of a chemical primer on the bond strength of a zirconia ceramic with self-adhesive resin cement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Jing, Ye; Nie, Rongrong; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the bond strength and durability of a self-adhesive resin cement with a zirconia ceramic pretreated by a zirconia primer. Zirconia ceramic (Vita Inceram YZ) plates with a thickness of 2.5 mm were fired, polished, and then cleaned. Half of the polished ceramic plates were sandblasted with 50 μm alumina particles at 0.3 MPa for 20 s. The surface compound weight ratios were measured via X-ray fluorescence microscopy. The polished and sandblasted ceramic plates were directly bonded with self-adhesive resin cement (Biscem) or were pretreated by a zirconia primer (Z Primer Plus) before bonding with Biscem. The specimens of each test group were divided into two subgroups (n=10) and subjected to the shear test after 0 and 10,000 thermal cycles. The data were analyzed via three-way ANOVA. After air abrasion, 8.27% weight ratio of alumina attached to the zirconia surface. Compared with air abrasion, primer treatment more significantly improved the primary resin bond strength of the zirconia ceramic. The primary resin bond strength of the zirconia ceramic with no primer treatment was not affected by thermocycling (P>0.05). However, the primary resin bond strength of the zirconia ceramic with primer treatment was significantly decreased by thermocycling (Presin bond strengths of zirconia ceramics. However, the bond interface of the primer is not stable and rapidly degraded during thermocycling.

  12. Structural, electronic properties, and chemical bonding in quaternary layered titanium pnictide-oxides Na2Ti2Pn2O and BaTi2Pn2O (Pn = As, Sb) from FLAPW–GGA calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suetin, D.V.; Ivanovskii, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Layered Na 2 Ti 2 Pn 2 O and BaTi 2 Pn 2 O (Pn = As, Sb) are probed from first principles. •Structural, electronic properties and Fermi surfaces are evaluated. •Chemical bonding is analyzed. -- Abstract: By means of the first-principles FLAPW–GGA calculations, we have investigated the main trends in structural, electronic properties, and chemical bonding for a series of quaternary titanium pnictide-oxides: Na 2 Ti 2 As 2 O, Na 2 Ti 2 Sb 2 O, BaTi 2 As 2 O, and BaTi 2 Sb 2 O, which attracted now much attention as parent phases for a novel group of layered Fe-free superconducting materials. Our results cover the optimized lattice parameters and atomic positions, electronic bands, Fermi surface topology, total and partial density of electronic states. Besides, Bader analysis and the charge density maps are used to discuss the chemical bonding for the examined materials. We find that the atomic substitutions lead to anisotropic deformation of the crystal structure; this effect is related to strong anisotropy of inter-atomic bonds, which are of a mixed (covalent-ionic-metallic) type – in blocks [Ti 2 Pn 2 O], whereas the bonding between blocks [Ti 2 Pn 2 O] and atomic sheets of Na, Ba ions is of an ionic type. The actual effective atomic charges differ from the formal ionic charges due to covalency in blocks [Ti 2 Pn 2 O]. The near-Fermi electronic bands, which are responsible for metallic-like behavior of these materials and will be involved in the formation of superconducting state, arise mainly from the Ti 3d xy , d x2−y2 , and d z2 states of the blocks [Ti 2 Pn 2 O], which define also the anisotropic character of conduction happening mainly in these blocks. The differences in the topology of the multi-sheet Fermi surfaces of these materials are discussed

  13. Isotopic studies of trans- and cis-HOCO using rotational spectroscopy: Formation, chemical bonding, and molecular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, Michael C.; Martinez, Oscar; Crabtree, Kyle N.; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; McGuire, Brett A.; Stanton, John F.

    2016-01-01

    HOCO is an important intermediate in combustion and atmospheric processes because the OH + CO → H + CO_2 reaction represents the final step for the production of CO_2 in hydrocarbon oxidation, and theoretical studies predict that this reaction proceeds via various intermediates, the most important being this radical. Isotopic investigations of trans- and cis-HOCO have been undertaken using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and millimeter-wave double resonance techniques in combination with a supersonic molecular beam discharge source to better understand the formation, chemical bonding, and molecular structures of this radical pair. We find that trans-HOCO can be produced almost equally well from either OH + CO or H + CO_2 in our discharge source, but cis-HOCO appears to be roughly two times more abundant when starting from H + CO_2. Using isotopically labelled precursors, the OH + C"1"8O reaction predominately yields HOC"1"8O for both isomers, but H"1"8OCO is observed as well, typically at the level of 10%-20% that of HOC"1"8O; the opposite propensity is found for the "1"8OH + CO reaction. DO + C"1"8O yields similar ratios between DOC"1"8O and D"1"8OCO as those found for OH + C"1"8O, suggesting that some fraction of HOCO (or DOCO) may be formed from the back-reaction H + CO_2, which, at the high pressure of our gas expansion, can readily occur. The large "1"3C Fermi-contact term (a_F) for trans- and cis-HO"1"3CO implicates significant unpaired electronic density in a σ-type orbital at the carbon atom, in good agreement with theoretical predictions. By correcting the experimental rotational constants for zero-point vibration motion calculated theoretically using second-order vibrational perturbation theory, precise geometrical structures have been derived for both isomers.

  14. BiOBr@SiO2 flower-like nanospheres chemically-bonded on cement-based materials for photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Hou, Pengkun; Yang, Ping; Cheng, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Endowment of photocatalytic property on the surface of concrete structure can contribute to the self-cleaning of the structure and purification of the polluted environment. We developed a nano-structured BiOBr@SiO2 photocatalyst and innovatively used for surface-treatment of cement-based materials with the hope of attaining the photocatalytic property in visible-light region and surface modification/densification performances. The SiO2 layer on the flower-like BiOBr@SiO2 helps to maintain a stable distribution of the photocatalyst, as well as achieving a chemical bonding between the coating and the cement matrix. Results showed that the color fading rate of during the degradation of Rhodamine B dye of the BiOBr-cem sample is 2 times higher compared with the commonly studied C, N-TiO2-cem sample. The photo-degradation rates of samples BiOBr-cem and BiOBr@SiO2-cem are 93 and 81% within 150 min, respectively, while sample BiOBr@SiO2-cem reveals a denser and smoother surface after curing for 28 days and pore-filling effect at size within 0.01-0.2 μm when compared with untreated samples. Moreover, additional C-S-H gel can be formed due to the pozzolanic reaction between BiOBr@SiO2 and the hardened cement matrix. Both advantages of the BiOBr@SiO2 favor its application for surface-treatment of hardened cement-based material to acquire an improved surface quality, as well as durable photocatalytic functionality.

  15. Tailoring the surface chemical bond states of the NbN films by doping Ag: Achieving hard hydrophobic surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Ping; Zhang, Kan; Du, Suxuan [Department of Materials Science, State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, and Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials, MOE, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China); Meng, Qingnan [College of Construction Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun, 130026 (China); He, Xin [Department of Materials Science, State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, and Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials, MOE, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China); Wang, Shuo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wen, Mao, E-mail: wenmao225@jlu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science, State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, and Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials, MOE, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China); Zheng, Weitao, E-mail: WTZheng@jlu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science, State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, and Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials, MOE, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Intrinsically hydrophilic NbN films can transfer to hydrophobic Nb-Ag-N films by doping Ag atoms into NbN sublattice. • Solute Ag can promote that the hydrophobic Ag{sub 2}O groups formed on the Nb-Ag-N film surface through self-oxidation. • The present work may provide a straightforward approach for the production of robust hydrophobic ceramic surfaces. - Abstract: Robust hydrophobic surfaces based on ceramics capable of withstanding harsh conditions such as abrasion, erosion and high temperature, are required in a broad range of applications. The metal cations with coordinative saturation or low electronegativity are commonly chosen to achieve the intrinsically hydrophobic ceramic by reducing Lewis acidity, and thus the ceramic systems are limited. In this work, we present a different picture that robust hydrophobic surface with high hardness (≥20 GPa) can be fabricated through doping Ag atoms into intrinsically hydrophilic ceramic film NbN by reactive co-sputtering. The transition of wettability from hydrophilic to hydrophobic of Nb-Ag-N films induced by Ag doping results from the appearance of Ag{sub 2}O groups on the films surfaces through self-oxidation, because Ag cations (Ag{sup +}) in Ag{sub 2}O are the filled-shell (4d{sup 10}5S{sup 0}) electronic structure with coordinative saturation that have no tendency to interact with water. The results show that surface Ag{sub 2}O benefited for hydrophobicity comes from the solute Ag atoms rather than precipitate metal Ag, in which the more Ag atoms incorporated into Nb-sublattice are able to further improve the hydrophobicity, whereas the precipitation of Ag nanoclusters would worsen it. The present work opens a window for fabricating robust hydrophobic surface through tailoring surface chemical bond states by doping Ag into transition metal nitrides.

  16. The electronic nature of the 1,4-β-glycosidic bond and its chemical environment: DFT insights into cellulose chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerbroks, Claudia; Rinaldi, Roberto; Thiel, Walter

    2013-11-25

    The molecular understanding of the chemistry of 1,4-β-glucans is essential for designing new approaches to the conversion of cellulose into platform chemicals and biofuels. In this endeavor, much attention has been paid to the role of hydrogen bonding occurring in the cellulose structure. So far, however, there has been little discussion about the implications of the electronic nature of the 1,4-β-glycosidic bond and its chemical environment for the activation of 1,4-β-glucans toward acid-catalyzed hydrolysis. This report sheds light on these central issues and addresses their influence on the acid hydrolysis of cellobiose and, by analogy, cellulose. The electronic structure of cellobiose was explored by DFT at the BB1 K/6-31++G(d,p) level. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was performed to grasp the key bonding concepts. Conformations, protonation sites, and hydrolysis mechanisms were examined. The results for cellobiose indicate that cellulose is protected against hydrolysis not only by its supramolecular structure, as currently accepted, but also by its electronic structure, in which the anomeric effect plays a key role. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Effect of different chemical bonds in pegylation of zinc protoporphyrin that affects drug release, intracellular uptake, and therapeutic effect in the tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukigawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Hideaki; Fang, Jun; Otagiri, Masaki; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Pegylated zinc protoporphyrin (PEG-ZnPP) is a water-soluble inhibitor of heme oxygenase-1. In this study, we prepared two types of PEG-ZnPP conjugates with different chemical bonds between PEG and ZnPP, i.e., ester bonds and ether bonds, where both conjugates also contain amide bonds. Cleavability of these bonds in vitro and in vivo, especially cancer tissue, and upon intracellular uptake, was investigated in parallel with biological activities of the conjugates. Each conjugate showed different cleavability by plasma esterases and tumor proteases, as revealed by HPLC analyses. PEG-ZnPP with ester bond (esPEG-ZnPP) was more sensitive than PEG-ZnPP with ether bond (etPEG-ZnPP) for cleavage of PEG chains. etPEG-ZnPP showed no cleavage of PEG chains and had lower intracellular uptake and antitumor activity than did esPEG-ZnPP. The degradation of esPEG-ZnPP appeared to be facilitated by both serine and cysteine proteases in tumor tissues, whereas it was significantly slower in normal organs except the liver. Depegylated products such as free ZnPP had higher intracellular uptake than did intact PEG-ZnPP. We also studied hydrolytic cleavage by blood plasma of different animal species; mouse plasma showed the fastest cleavage whereas human plasma showed the slowest. These results suggest that ester-linked conjugates manifest more efficient cleavage of PEG, and greater yield of the active principle from the conjugates in tumor tissues than in normal tissues. More efficient intracellular uptake and thus an improved therapeutic effect with ester-linked conjugates are thus anticipated with fain stability, particularly in human blood. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Solvent-free thermoplastic-poly(dimethylsiloxane) bonding mediated by UV irradiation followed by gas-phase chemical deposition of an adhesion linker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, S. Y.; Lee, N. Y.

    2015-07-01

    Here, we introduce a solvent-free strategy for bonding various thermoplastic substrates with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) using ultraviolet (UV) irradiation followed by the gas-phase chemical deposition of aminosilane on the UV-irradiated thermoplastic substrates. The thermoplastic substrates were first irradiated with UV for surface hydrophilic treatment and were then grafted with vacuum-evaporated aminosilane, where the alkoxysilane side reacted with the oxidized surface of the thermoplastic substrate. Next, the amine-terminated thermoplastic substrates were treated with corona discharge to oxidize the surface and were bonded with PDMS, which was also oxidized via corona discharge. The two substrates were then hermetically sealed and pressed under atmospheric pressure for 30 min at 60 °C. This process enabled the formation of a robust siloxane bond (Si-O-Si) between the thermoplastic substrate and PDMS under relatively mild conditions using an inexpensive and commercially available UV lamp and Tesla coil. Various thermoplastic substrates were examined for bonding with PDMS, including poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), polycarbonate (PC), poly(ethyleneterephthalate) (PET) and polystyrene (PS). Surface characterizations were performed by measuring the contact angle and performing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, and the bond strength was analyzed by conducting various mechanical force measurements such as pull, delamination, leak and burst tests. The average bond strengths for the PMMA-PDMS, PC-PDMS, PET-PDMS and PS-PDMS assemblies were measured at 823.6, 379.3, 291.2 and 229.0 kPa, respectively, confirming the highly reliable performance of the introduced bonding strategy.

  19. Tensile bond strength of silicone-based soft denture liner to two chemically different denture base resins after various surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Hakan; Tugut, Faik; Guney, Umit; Kirmali, Omer; Akar, Turker

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of a silicone-based soft denture liner to two chemically different denture base resins, heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), and light-activated urethane dimethacrylate or Eclipse denture base resin. PMMA test specimens were fabricated and relined with a silicone-based soft denture liner (group AC). Eclipse test specimens were prepared according to the manufacturer's recommendation. Before they were relined with a silicone-based soft denture liner, each received one of three surface treatments: untreated (control, group EC), Eclipse bonding agent applied (group EB), and laser-irradiated (group EL). Tensile bond strength tests (crosshead speed = 5 mm/min) were performed for all specimens, and the results were analyzed using the analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (p = 0.05). Eclipse denture base and PMMA resins presented similar bond strengths to the silicone-based soft denture liner. The highest mean force was observed in group EL specimens, and the tensile bond strengths in group EL were significantly different (p < 0.05) from those in the other groups.

  20. A DFT investigation on geometry and chemical bonding of isoelectronic Si8N6V-, Si8N6Cr, and Si8N6Mn+ clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Nguyen Minh; Pham, Hung Tan; Cuong, Ngo Tuan; Tung, Nguyen Thanh

    2017-10-01

    The geometric feature and chemical bonding of isoelectronic systems Si8N6Mq (M = V, Cr, Mn and q = -1, 0, 1, respectively) are investigated by means of density-functional-theory calculations. The encapsulated form is found for all ground-state structures, where the metal atom locates at the central site of the hollow Si8N6 cage. The Si8N6 cage is established by adding two Si atoms to a distorted Si6N6 prism, which is a combination of Si4N2 and Si2N4 strings. Chemical bonding of Si8N6Mq systems is explored by using the electron localization indicator and theory of atom in molecule, revealing the vital role of metal center in stabilizing the clusters.

  1. Calculation of the NMR chemical shift for a 4d1 system in a strong crystal field environment of trigonal symmetry with a threefold axis of quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sang Woon; Oh, Se Woung; Ro, Seung Woo

    1986-01-01

    The NMR chemical shift arising from 4d electron angular momentum and 4d electron angular momentum and 4d electron spin dipolar-nuclear spin angular momentum interactions for a 4d 1 system in a strong crystal field environment of trigonal symmetry, where the threefold axis is chosen to be the axis of quantization axis, has been examined. A general expression using the nonmultipole expansion method (exact method) is derived for the NMR chemical shift. From this expression all the multipolar terms are determined. we observe that along the (100), (010), (110), and (111) axes the NMR chemical shifts are positive while along the (001) axis, it is negative. We observe that the dipolar term (1/R 3 ) is the dominant contribution to the NMR chemical shift except for along the (111) axis. A comparison of the multipolar terms with the exact values shows also that the multipolar results are exactly in agreement with the exact values around R≥0.2 nm. The temperature dependence analysis on the NMR chemical shifts may imply that along the (111) axis the contribution to the NMR chemical shift is dominantly pseudo contact interaction. Separation of the contributions of the Fermi and the pseudo contact interactions would correctly imply that the dipolar interaction is the dominant contribution to the NMR chemical shifts along the (100), (010), (001), and (110) axes, but along the (111) axis the Fermi contact interaction is incorrectly the dominant contribution to the NMR chemical shift. (Author)

  2. Fluorine-enhanced low-temperature wafer bonding of native-oxide covered Si wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Q.-Y.; Gan, Q.; Fountain, G.; Enquist, P.; Scholz, R.; Gösele, U.

    2004-10-01

    The bonding energy of bonded native-oxide-covered silicon wafers treated in the HNO3/H2O/HF or the HNO3/HF solution prior to room-temperature contact is significantly higher than bonded standard RCA1 cleaned wafer pairs after low-temperature annealing. The bonding energy reaches over 2000mJ/m2 after annealing at 100 °C. The very slight etching and fluorine in the chemically grown oxide are believed to be the main contributors to the enhanced bonding energy. Transmission-electron-microscopic images have shown that the chemically formed native oxide at bonding interface is embedded with many flake-like cavities. The cavities can absorb the by-products of the interfacial reactions that result in covalent bond formation at low temperatures allowing the strong bond to be retained.

  3. (15)N and (1)H Solid-State NMR Investigation of a Canonical Low-Barrier Hydrogen-Bond Compound: 1,8-Bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paul B; Hong, Mei

    2015-09-03

    Strong or low-barrier hydrogen bonds have often been proposed in proteins to explain enzyme catalysis and proton-transfer reactions. So far (1)H chemical shifts and scalar couplings have been used as the main NMR spectroscopic signatures for strong H-bonds. In this work, we report simultaneous measurements of (15)N and (1)H chemical shifts and N-H bond lengths by solid-state NMR in (15)N-labeled 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (DMAN), which contains a well-known strong NHN H-bond. We complexed DMAN with three different counteranions to examine the effects of the chemical environment on the H-bond lengths and chemical shifts. All three DMAN compounds exhibit significantly elongated N-H distances compared to the covalent bond length, and the (1)H(N) chemical shifts are larger than ∼17 ppm, consistent with strong NHN H-bonds in the DMAN cation. However, the (15)N and (1)H chemical shifts and the precise N-H distances differ among the three compounds, and the (15)N chemical shifts show opposite dependences on the proton localization from the general trend in organic compounds, indicating the significant effects of the counteranions on the electronic structure of the H-bond. These data provide useful NMR benchmarks for strong H-bonds and caution against the sole reliance on chemical shifts for identifying strong H-bonds in proteins since neighboring side chains can exert influences on chemical shifts similar to those of the bulky organic anions in DMAN. Instead, N-H bond lengths should be measured, in conjunction with chemical shifts, as a more fundamental parameter of H-bond strength.

  4. Efficient soluble expression of disulfide bonded proteins in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli in fed-batch fermentations on chemically defined minimal media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąciarz, Anna; Khatri, Narendar Kumar; Velez-Suberbie, M Lourdes; Saaranen, Mirva J; Uchida, Yuko; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Ruddock, Lloyd W

    2017-06-15

    The production of recombinant proteins containing disulfide bonds in Escherichia coli is challenging. In most cases the protein of interest needs to be either targeted to the oxidizing periplasm or expressed in the cytoplasm in the form of inclusion bodies, then solubilized and re-folded in vitro. Both of these approaches have limitations. Previously we showed that soluble expression of disulfide bonded proteins in the cytoplasm of E. coli is possible at shake flask scale with a system, known as CyDisCo, which is based on co-expression of a protein of interest along with a sulfhydryl oxidase and a disulfide bond isomerase. With CyDisCo it is possible to produce disulfide bonded proteins in the presence of intact reducing pathways in the cytoplasm. Here we scaled up production of four disulfide bonded proteins to stirred tank bioreactors and achieved high cell densities and protein yields in glucose fed-batch fermentations, using an E. coli strain (BW25113) with the cytoplasmic reducing pathways intact. Even without process optimization production of purified human single chain IgA 1 antibody fragment reached 139 mg/L and hen avidin 71 mg/L, while purified yields of human growth hormone 1 and interleukin 6 were around 1 g/L. Preliminary results show that human growth hormone 1 was also efficiently produced in fermentations of W3110 strain and when glucose was replaced with glycerol as the carbon source. Our results show for the first time that efficient production of high yields of soluble disulfide bonded proteins in the cytoplasm of E. coli with the reducing pathways intact is feasible to scale-up to bioreactor cultivations on chemically defined minimal media.

  5. Relating mechanical properties and chemical bonding in an inorganic-organic framework material: a single-crystal nanoindentation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jin Chong; Furman, Joshua D; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2009-10-14

    We report the application of nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy to establish the fundamental relationships between mechanical properties and chemical bonding in a dense inorganic-organic framework material: Ce(C(2)O(4))(HCO(2)), 1. Compound 1 is a mixed-ligand 3-D hybrid which crystallizes in an orthorhombic space group, in which its three basic building blocks, i.e. the inorganic metal-oxygen-metal (M-O-M) chains and the two organic bridging ligands, (oxalate and formate) are all oriented perpendicular to one another. This unique architecture enabled us to decouple the elastic and plastic mechanical responses along the three primary axes of a single crystal to understand the contribution associated with stiff vs compliant basic building blocks. The (001)-oriented facet that features rigid oxalate ligands down the c-axis exhibits the highest stiffness and hardness (E approximately 78 GPa and H approximately 4.6 GPa). In contrast, the (010)-oriented facet was found to be the most compliant and soft (E approximately 43 GPa and H approximately 3.9 GPa), since the formate ligand, which is the more compliant building block within this framework, constitutes the primary linkages down the b-axis. Notably, intermediate stiffness and hardness (E approximately 52 GPa and H approximately 4.1 GPa) were measured on the (100)-oriented planes. This can be attributed to the Ce-O-Ce chains that zigzag down the a-axis (Ce...Ce metal centers form an angle of approximately 132 degrees) and also the fact that the 9-coordinated CeO(9) polyhedra are expected to be geometrically more compliant. Our results present the first conclusive evidence that the crystal orientation dominated by inorganic chains is not necessarily more robust from the mechanical properties standpoint. Rigid organic bridging ligands (such as oxalate), on the other hand, can be used to produce greater stiffness and hardness properties in a chosen crystallographic orientation. This study demonstrates that

  6. Perovskite BaBiO3 Transformed Layered BaBiO2.5 Crystals Featuring Unusual Chemical Bonding and Luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Zhao, Qing; Liu, Bo-Mei; Zhang, Jun-Ying; Li, Zhi-Yong; Guo, Shao-Qiang; Ma, Ju-Ping; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Zheng, Li-Rong; Sun, Hong-Tao

    2018-04-14

    Engineering oxygen coordination environments of cations in oxides has received intense interest thanks to the opportunities for the discovery of novel oxides with unusual properties. Here we present the successful synthesis of stoichiometric layered BaBiO2.5 enabled by a non-topotactic phase transformation of perovskite BaBiO3. By analysing the synchrotron X-ray diffraction data using the maximum entropy method/Rietveld technique, we find that Bi forms unusual chemical bondings with four oxygen atoms, featuring one ionic bonding and three covalent bondings that results in an asymmetric coordination geometry. A broad range of photophysical characterizations reveal that this peculiar structure shows near-infrared luminescence differing from conventional Bi-bearing systems. Experimental and theoretical results lead us to propose the excitonic nature of luminescence. Our work highlights that synthesizing materials with uncommon Bi-O bonding and Bi coordination geometry provides a pathway to the discovery of systems with new functionalities. We envisage that this work could inspire interest for the exploration of a range of materials containing heavier p-block elements, offering prospects for the finding of systems with unusual properties. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Effect of oxygen inhibition in two-step self-etch systems on surface free energy and dentin bond strength with a chemically cured resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaji, Ayumi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Asaoka, Tetsui; Matsuyoshi, Saki; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2014-09-01

    We compared the surface free energies and dentin bond strengths of two-step self-etch systems with and without an oxygen-inhibited layer. The adhesives were applied to self-etching primer-treated dentin surfaces of bovine incisors, after which the teeth were light-irradiated and the oxygen-inhibited layer was left intact or removed with ethanol. We determined surface free energies (γS) and their components by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. We also measured the dentin bond strengths of chemically cured resin composite to the adhesives, with and without the oxygen-inhibited layer. For all surfaces, the estimated surface tension component, γS(LW), was relatively constant. The Lewis base (γS(-)) component decreased significantly when the oxygen-inhibited layer was removed, whereas the Lewis acid (γS(+)) component slightly increased. The dentin bond strengths of the two-step self-etch systems did not significantly differ in relation to the presence of the oxygen-inhibited layer. Although the surface free energy of the adhesive was affected by the presence of the oxygen-inhibited layer, no changes in dentin bond strength were detected.

  8. On the problem of whether mass or chemical bonding is more important to bombardment-induced compositional changes in alloys and oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.

    1980-01-01

    The bombardment of alloys, oxides, and halides often leads to marked compositional changes at the surface, and these changes have been attributed to an interplay of mass-dependent effects, chemical bonding, electronic processes, and diffusion. We attempt here to answer the limited question of whether, considering only alloys and oxides, mass or bonding is normally more important. The relevant theory is reviewed and extended, with mass effects being shown to be associated most explicitly with recoil sputtering and bonding effects being shown to be associated with all three of cascade sputtering, thermal sputtering, and surface segregation. As far as experimental examples are concerned, mass correlations are found to be quite unsuccessful, whereas most observations can be understood rather well in terms of bonding. Nevertheless, there is a basic problem in that the cascade component of sputtering, normally judged to be predominant, should give significantly less compositional change than is observed. Thermal sputtering would lead to more significant changes, but there is a new problem that, at least with alloys, the absolute yields are probably rather small. A combination of surface segregation with sputtering would also lead to more significant changes, but it is unclear whether segregation is rapid enough to be important in room-temperature bombardments. (orig.)

  9. Syn vs Anti Carboxylic Acids in Hybrid Peptides: Experimental and Theoretical Charge Density and Chemical Bonding Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Rumpa; Reddy, M B Madhusudana; Dinesh, B; Venkatesha, Manjunath A; Grabowsky, Simon; Jelsch, Christian; Guru Row, Tayur N

    2018-04-12

    A comparative study of syn vs anti carboxylic acids in hybrid peptides based on experimental electron density studies and theoretical calculations shows that, in the anti form, all three bond angles surrounding C carboxyl of the -COOH group are close to ∼120°, as expected for a C-sp 2 atom, whereas in the syn form, the ∠C α -C(O)-O hydroxyl angle is significantly smaller by 5-10°. The oxygen atom in the carboxyl group is more electronegative in the anti form, so the polarity of the acidic O-H bond is higher in the anti form compared to the syn form, as observed within the limitations of H atom treatment in X-ray diffraction. Consequently, the investigated anti carboxylic acid forms the strongest O-H···O hydrogen bond among all model compounds. Furthermore, according to natural bond orbital analysis, the oxygen lone pairs are clearly nonequivalent, as opposed to the general notion of hybridization of equivalent sp 2 and sp 3 lone pairs on carbonyl or hydroxyl oxygen atoms. The hybridization of the lone pairs is directly related to the directionality and strength of hydrogen bonds.

  10. Hydrogen Atomic Positions of O-H···O Hydrogen Bonds in Solution and in the Solid State: The Synergy of Quantum Chemical Calculations with ¹H-NMR Chemical Shifts and X-ray Diffraction Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siskos, Michael G; Choudhary, M Iqbal; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P

    2017-03-07

    The exact knowledge of hydrogen atomic positions of O-H···O hydrogen bonds in solution and in the solid state has been a major challenge in structural and physical organic chemistry. The objective of this review article is to summarize recent developments in the refinement of labile hydrogen positions with the use of: (i) density functional theory (DFT) calculations after a structure has been determined by X-ray from single crystals or from powders; (ii) ¹H-NMR chemical shifts as constraints in DFT calculations, and (iii) use of root-mean-square deviation between experimentally determined and DFT calculated ¹H-NMR chemical shifts considering the great sensitivity of ¹H-NMR shielding to hydrogen bonding properties.

  11. Theoretical Analysis of Thermal Transport in Graphene Supported on Hexagonal Boron Nitride: The Importance of Strong Adhesion Due to π -Bond Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Alexander J.; Hwang, Gyeong S.

    2016-09-01

    One important attribute of graphene that makes it attractive for high-performance electronics is its inherently large thermal conductivity (κ ) for the purposes of thermal management. Using a combined density-functional theory and classical molecular-dynamics approach, we predict that the κ of graphene supported on hexagonal boron nitride (h -BN) can be as large as 90% of the κ of suspended graphene, in contrast to the significant suppression of κ (more than 70% reduction) on amorphous silica. Interestingly, we find that this enhanced thermal transport is largely attributed to increased lifetimes of the in-plane acoustic phonon modes, which is a notable contrast from the dominant contribution of out-of-plane acoustic modes in suspended graphene. This behavior is possible due to the charge polarization throughout graphene that induces strong interlayer adhesion between graphene and h -BN. These findings highlight the potential benefit of layered dielectric substrates such as h -BN for graphene-based thermal management, in addition to their electronic advantages. Furthermore, our study brings attention to the importance of understanding the interlayer interactions of graphene with layered dielectric materials which may offer an alternative technological platform for substrates in electronics.

  12. Effect of MDP-containing Silane and Adhesive Used Alone or in Combination on the Long-term Bond Strength and Chemical Interaction with Lithium Disilicate Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Andres Millan; Siqueira, Fabiana; Hass, Viviane; Malaquias, Pâmela; Gutierrez, Mario Felipe; Reis, Alessandra; Perdigão, Jorge; Loguercio, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of a silane and an adhesive containing MDP, used alone or combined in the same solution, on the microshear bond strength (μSBS) to lithium disilicate ceramics immediately and after 1-year water storage, and compare the bond strength results with the Raman spectra of the treated lithium disilicate surfaces. A total of 30 CAD/CAM blocks of lithium disilicate (LD; IPS e.max CAD) were cut into four square sections (6 x 6 x 6 mm; n = 60 per group) and processed as recommended by the manufacturer. The LD specimens were divided into 12 groups according to the following independent variables: silane coupling agent (no silane; silane without 10-MDP [MBS, Monobond S]; silane with 10-MDP [MB+, Monobond Plus]) and adhesive + luting composite (no adhesive + Enforce; no adhesive + RelyX Ultimate; Prime & Bond Elect [PBE], a silane- and MDP-free universal adhesive + Enforce; Scotchbond Universal Adhesive [SBU], a silane- and MDP-containing universal adhesive + RelyX Ultimate). After each treatment, cylindrical, transparent matrices were filled with a luting composite and light cured. Specimens were stored in water (37°C for 24 h or 1 year) and submitted to the microshear bond strength (μSBS) test. The failure pattern and μSBS were statistically evaluated (α = 0.05). In addition, specimens were examined for chemical interaction using Raman spectroscopy. The use of the adhesive PBE alone showed higher mean μSBS compared with both groups with silane (MSB or MB+) without PBE (p MDP-containing silane was associated with a universal adhesive. The use of a simplified bonding protocol that includes either a silane or a universal adhesive is not recommended.

  13. Unlocking the Electrocatalytic Activity of Chemically Inert Amorphous Carbon-Nitrogen for Oxygen Reduction: Discerning and Refactoring Chaotic Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Caihong; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Mild annealing enables inactive nitrogen (N)-doped amorphous carbon (a-C) films abundant with chaotic bonds prepared by magnetron sputtering to become effective for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) by virtue of generating pyridinic N. The rhythmic variation of ORR activity elaborates well on t...

  14. New sol–gel refractory coatings on chemically-bonded sand cores for foundry applications to improve casting surface quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Poulsen, T.; Stage, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    Foundry refractory coatings protect bonded sand cores and moulds from producing defective castings during the casting process by providing a barrier between the core and the liquid metal. In this study, new sol–gel refractory coating on phenolic urethane cold box (PUCB) core was examined...

  15. How Irreversible Heat Transport Processes Drive Earth's Interdependent Thermal, Structural, and Chemical Evolution Providing a Strongly Heterogeneous, Layered Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, A.; Criss, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    Because magmatism conveys radioactive isotopes plus latent heat rapidly upwards while advecting heat, this process links and controls the thermal and chemical evolution of Earth. We present evidence that the lower mantle-upper mantle boundary is a profound chemical discontinuity, leading to observed heterogeneities in the outermost layers that can be directly sampled, and construct an alternative view of Earth's internal workings. Earth's beginning involved cooling via explosive outgassing of substantial ice (mainly CO) buried with dust during accretion. High carbon content is expected from Solar abundances and ice in comets. Reaction of CO with metal provided a carbide-rich core while converting MgSiO3 to olivine via oxidizing reactions. Because thermodynamic law (and buoyancy of hot particles) indicates that primordial heat from gravitational segregation is neither large nor carried downwards, whereas differentiation forced radioactive elements upwards, formation of the core and lower mantle greatly cooled the Earth. Reference conductive geotherms, calculated using accurate and new thermal diffusivity data, require that heat-producing elements are sequestered above 670 km which limits convection to the upper mantle. These irreversible beginnings limit secular cooling to radioactive wind-down, permiting deduction of Earth's inventory of heat-producing elements from today's heat flux. Coupling our estimate for heat producing elements with meteoritic data indicates that Earth's oxide content has been underestimated. Density sorting segregated a Si-rich, peridotitic upper mantle from a refractory, oxide lower mantle with high Ca, Al and Ti contents, consistent with diamond inclusion mineralogy. Early and rapid differentiation means that internal temperatures have long been buffered by freezing of the inner core, allowing survival of crust as old as ca.4 Ga. Magmatism remains important. Melt escaping though stress-induced fractures in the rigid lithosphere imparts a

  16. A comparative effect of various surface chemical treatments on the resin composite-composite repair bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaloo Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was an attempt to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength between pre-existing composite and repair composite resin. Materials and Methods: Forty acrylic blocks were prepared in a cuboidal mould. In each block, a well of 5 mm diameter and 5 mm depth was prepared to retain the composite resin (Filtek™ Z350, 3M/ESPE. Aging of the composite discs was achieved by storing them in water at 37°C for 1 week, and after that were divided into 5 groups (n = 8 according to surface treatment: Group I- 37% phosphoric acid, Group II-10% hydrofluoric acid, Group III-30% citric acid, Group IV-7% maleic acid and Group V- Adhesive (no etchant. The etched surfaces were rinsed and dried followed by application of bonding agent (Adper™ Single Bond 2. 3M/ESPE. The repair composite was placed on aged composite, light-cured for 40 seconds and stored in water at 37°C for 1 week. Shear bond strength between the aged and the new composite resin was determined with a universal testing machine (crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis: The compressive shear strengths were compared for differences using ANOVA test followed by Tamhane′s T2 post hoc analysis. Results: The surface treatment with 10% hydrofluoric acid showed the maximum bond strength followed by 30% citric acid, 7% maleic acid and 37% phosphoric acid in decreasing order. Conclusion: The use of 10% hydrofluoric acid can be a good alternative for surface treatment in repair of composite resin restoration as compared to commonly used 37% orthophosphoric acid.

  17. High pressure stability analysis and chemical bonding of Ti{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}N alloy: A first principle study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Mamta; Gupta, Dinesh C., E-mail: sosfizix@gmail.com, E-mail: mamta-physics@yahoo.co.in [Condensed Matter Theory Group, School of Studies in Physics, Jiwaji University, Gwalior – 474 011 (India)

    2016-05-23

    First-principles pseudo-potential calculations have been performed to analyze the stability of Ti{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}N alloy under high pressures. The first order phase transition from B1 to B2 phase has been observed in this alloy at high pressure. The variation of lattice parameter with the change in concentration of Zr atom in Ti{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}N is also reported in both the phases. The calculations for density of states have been performed to understand the alloying effects on chemical bonding of Ti-Zr-N alloy.

  18. Chemical Composition of Mentha spicata L. subsp. tomentosa and M. pulegium L., and their Antimicrobial Activity on Strong Pathogen Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre SEVİNDİK

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mentha L., recognized as a medical and aromatic plant, is a general name affiliated to mint species and belongs to Labiatae family. Some species are used as fresh vegetables in the Turkish kitchen and they can also be used in salads. In addition, some species have been used as a spice in food. In this study, chemical composition and antimicrobial activity towards some pathogenics (gram + and gram - microorganisms of the essential oils Mentha spicata L. subsp. tomentosa (Briq. Harley, Mentha pulegium L. grown under West Anatolian ecological conditions were investigated. Extractions were carried out with Clevenger apparatus and essential oil composition was determined by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS. Microorganisms used for the antimicrobial studies were Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterecoccus faecium DSM 13590, Escherichia coli Q157:H7 and Bacillus cereus CCM99.  As a result, M. pulegium and M. spicata subsp. tomentosa were found to be rich in piperitenone oxide: 72.77% and 28.84%, respectively. Each of the oils was found to possess antimicrobial properties against test microorganisms. Essential oils obtained from Mentha species give positive effect on all microorganisms.

  19. Investigation of chemical bonding states at interface of Zn/organic materials for analysis of early stage of inorganic/organic hybrid multi-layer formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Ken, E-mail: k_cho@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan); Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan); Shiratani, Masaharu [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan); Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru [Plasma Nanotechnology Research Center, Nagoya University Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Interactions between Ar-O{sub 2} mixture plasmas and Zn thin film on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were investigated using the combinatorial plasma process analyzer, on the basis of nondestructive depth analyses of chemical bonding states at Zn thin film and Zn/PET interface via hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HXPES). After the Ar-O{sub 2} plasma exposure, peak-area ratio of O 1 s to Zn 2p{sub 3/2} evaluated from the HXPES spectra is found to increase with increasing the ion saturation current Multiplication-Sign time and saturated at the value obtained from ZnO. The HXPES C 1 s spectra measured at a take-off angle (TOA) of 80 Degree-Sign showed insignificant change in oxygen functionalities (O=C-O bond and C-O bond) after the deposition of Zn thin film and the plasma exposure. Whereas, the HXPES C 1 s spectra measurement at a TOA of 20 Degree-Sign suggested that the oxygen functionalities degraded in shallower regions up to about a few nanometer from the Zn/PET interface due to deposition of Zn thin film. However, after the plasma exposure, oxidation of PET substrate at the degraded layer of Zn/PET interface was caused by oxygen radicals and/or ions, which diffused through the Zn thin film.

  20. A quantum-chemical validation about the formation of hydrogen bonds and secondary interactions in intermolecular heterocyclic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz Galdino Oliveira

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We have performed a detailed theoretical study in order to understand the charge density topology of the C2H4O···C2H2 and C2H4S···C2H2 heterocyclic hydrogen-bonded complexes. Through the calculations derived from Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM, it was observed the formation of hydrogen bonds and secondary interactions. Such analysis was performed through the determination of optimized geometries at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p level of theory, by which is that QTAIM topological operators were computed, such as the electronic density ρ(r, Laplacian Ñ2ρ(r, and ellipticity ε. The examination of the hydrogen bonds has been performed through the measurement of ρ(r, Ñ2ρ(r and ε between (O···H—C and (S···H—C, whereas the secondary interaction between axial hydrogen atoms Hα and carbon of acetylene. In this insight, it was verified the existence of secondary interaction only in C2H4S···C2H2 complex because its structure is propitious to form multiple interactions.

  1. Synthesis and investigation of the structure and chemical properties of acyclic compounds of bicoordinated phosphorus with a phosphorus-carbon (p-p)/sub π/ bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovskii, L.N.; Romanenko, V.D.

    1987-01-01

    Five types of reactions of phosphoalkenes can be distinguished according to the nature of the change in the coordination number and valence of the phosphorus atom in the course of chemical conversions. There are: reactions of cyclodimerization, cycloaddition, and 1,2-addition at the P-C double bond; formation of compounds of tricoordinated pentavalent phosphorus; formation of tetracoordinated phosphorus compounds; reactions of functionalization occurring without a change in the valence and coordination number of the phosphorus atom; and reactions of 1,2-elimination, leading to compounds of monocoordinated phosphorus. This paper reviews each of these reactions in detail, using double-resonance hydrogen 1 and phosphorus 31 NMR spectra and analyzing the acquired chemical shift and spin-spin coupling constants, and also demonstrates the complexation of phosphorus with several metals

  2. Exploring Conceptual Frameworks of Models of Atomic Structures and Periodic Variations, Chemical Bonding, and Molecular Shape and Polarity: A Comparison of Undergraduate General Chemistry Students with High and Low Levels of Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Yu; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore students' conceptual frameworks of models of atomic structure and periodic variations, chemical bonding, and molecular shape and polarity, and how these conceptual frameworks influence their quality of explanations and ability to shift among chemical representations. This study employed a purposeful sampling…

  3. Dissimilar Impact Welding of 6111-T4, 5052-H32 Aluminum Alloys to 22MnB5, DP980 Steels and the Structure-Property Relationship of a Strongly Bonded Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bert; Vivek, Anupam; Presley, Michael; Daehn, Glenn S.

    2018-03-01

    The ability to weld high-strength aluminum to high-strength steel is highly desired for vehicle lightweighting but difficult to attain by conventional means. In this work, vaporizing foil actuator welding was used to successfully weld four Al/Fe combinations consisting of high-strength alloys: AA5052-H32, AA6111-T4, DP980, and 22MnB5. Flyer velocities up to 727 m/s were reached using 10 kJ input energy. In lap-shear testing, samples primarily failed in base aluminum near the aluminum's native strength, showing that the welds were stronger than a base metal and that the base metal was not significantly weakened by the welding process. A particularly strong weld area was studied by transmission electron microscopy to shed light on the microstructural features of strong impact welds. It was found to be characterized by a continuously bonded, fully crystalline interface, extremely fine (nanoscale) grains, mesoscopic as well as microscopic wavy features, and lack of large continuous intermetallic compounds.

  4. SU-8-Induced Strong Bonding of Polymer Ligands to Flexible Substrates via in Situ Cross-Linked Reaction for Improved Surface Metallization and Fast Fabrication of High-Quality Flexible Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mingjun; Guo, Qiuquan; Zhang, Tengyuan; Zhou, Shaolin; Yang, Jun

    2016-02-01

    On account of in situ cross-linked reaction of epoxy SU-8 with poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) and its strong reactive bonding ability with different pretreated substrates, we developed a simple universal one-step solution-based coating method for fast surface modification of various objects. Through this method, a layer of P4VP molecules with controllable thickness can be tethered tightly onto substrates with the assistance of SU-8. P4VP molecules possess a lot of pyridine ligands to immobilize transitional metal ions that can behave as the catalyst of electroless copper plating for surface metallization while functioning as the adhesion-promoting layer between the substrate and deposited metal. Attributed to interpenetrated entanglement of P4VP molecules and as-deposited metal, ultrathick (>7 μm) strongly adhesive high-quality copper layer can be formed on flexible substrates without any delamination. Then through laser printer to print toner mask, a variety of designed circuits can be easily fabricated on modified flexible PET substrate.

  5. Dissimilar Impact Welding of 6111-T4, 5052-H32 Aluminum Alloys to 22MnB5, DP980 Steels and the Structure-Property Relationship of a Strongly Bonded Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bert; Vivek, Anupam; Presley, Michael; Daehn, Glenn S.

    2018-01-01

    The ability to weld high-strength aluminum to high-strength steel is highly desired for vehicle lightweighting but difficult to attain by conventional means. In this work, vaporizing foil actuator welding was used to successfully weld four Al/Fe combinations consisting of high-strength alloys: AA5052-H32, AA6111-T4, DP980, and 22MnB5. Flyer velocities up to 727 m/s were reached using 10 kJ input energy. In lap-shear testing, samples primarily failed in base aluminum near the aluminum's native strength, showing that the welds were stronger than a base metal and that the base metal was not significantly weakened by the welding process. A particularly strong weld area was studied by transmission electron microscopy to shed light on the microstructural features of strong impact welds. It was found to be characterized by a continuously bonded, fully crystalline interface, extremely fine (nanoscale) grains, mesoscopic as well as microscopic wavy features, and lack of large continuous intermetallic compounds.

  6. X-ray study of chemical bonding in actinides(IV) and lanthanides(III) hexa-cyanoferrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumas, T.

    2011-01-01

    Bimetallic cyanide molecular solids derived from Prussian blue are well known to foster long-range magnetic ordering and show an intense inter-valence charge transfer band resulting from an exchange interaction through the cyanide-bridge. For those reasons the ferrocyanide and ferricyanide building blocks have been chosen to study electronic delocalization and covalent character in actinide bonding using an experimental and theoretical approach based on X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In 2001, the actinide (IV) and early lanthanides (III) hexacyanoferrate have been found by powder X-ray diffraction to be isostructural (hexagonal, P6 3 /m group). Here, extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) at the iron K-edge and actinide L 3 -edge have been undertaken to probe the local environment of both actinides and iron cations. In an effort to describe the cyano bridge, a double edge fitting procedure including both iron and actinide edges and based on multiple scattering approach has been developed. We have also investigated the electronic properties of these molecular solids. Low energy electronic transitions have been used iron L 2,3 edge, nitrogen and carbon K-edge and also actinides N 4,5 edge to directly probe the valence molecular orbitals of the complex. Using a phenomenological approach, a clear distinctive behaviour between actinides and lanthanides has been shown. Then a theoretical approach using quantum chemistry calculation has shown more specifically the effect of covalency in the actinide-ferrocyanide bond. More specifically, π interactions were underlined by both theoretical and experimental methods. Finally, in agreement with the ionic character of the lanthanide bonding no inter-valence charge transfer has been observed in the corresponding optical spectra of these compounds. On the contrary, optical spectra for actinides adducts (except for thorium) show an intense inter-valence charge transfer band like in the transition metal cases which is

  7. Chemical bonding in copper-based transparent conducting oxides: CuMO{sub 2} (M = In, Ga, Sc)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godinho, K G; Morgan, B J; Allen, J P; Scanlon, D O; Watson, G W, E-mail: scanloda@tcd.ie, E-mail: watsong@tcd.ie [School of Chemistry and CRANN, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2011-08-24

    The geometry and electronic structure of copper-based p-type delafossite transparent conducting oxides, CuMO{sub 2} (M = In, Ga, Sc), are studied using the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) corrected for on-site Coulomb interactions (GGA + U). The bonding and valence band compositions of these materials are investigated, and the origins of changes in the valence band features between group 3 and group 13 cations are discussed. Analysis of the effective masses at the valence and conduction band edge explains the experimentally reported conductivity trends.

  8. Definition of a multicentral bond index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giambiagi, M.; Giambiagi, M.S. de; Mundim, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    The tensor character of the first-order density matrix leads to the definition of an MO multicentral bond index for closed-shell systems. It is here applied to three-center bonds. Satisfactory results are obtained for compounds involving 'secondary' bonds, strong and normal hydrogen bonds; the index for the peptide bond is found to be similar to that of strong hydrogen bonds. (author) [pt

  9. The solid phase extraction of some metal ions using palladium nanoparticles attached to silica gel chemically bonded by silica-bonded N-propylmorpholine as new sorbent prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, M; Rezakhani, M; Khodadoust, S; Niknam, K; Soylak, M

    2012-01-01

    In this research at first palladium nanoparticle attached to a new chemically bonded silica gel has been synthesized and has been characterized with different techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Then, this new sorbent (chemically modified silica gel with N-propylmorpholine (PNP-SBNPM)) was efficiently used for preconcentration of some metal ions in various food samples. The influence of effective variables including mass of sorbent, flow rate, pH of sample solutions and condition of eluent such as volume, type and concentration on the recoveries of understudy metal ions were investigated. Following the optimization of variables, the interfering effects of some foreign ions on the preconcentration and determination of the investigated metal ions described. At optimum values of variables, all investigated metal ions were efficiently recovered with efficiency more than 95%, relative standard deviation (RSD) between 2.4 and 2.8, and detection limit in the range of 1.4-2.7 ng mL⁻¹. The present method is simple and rapidly applicable for the determination of the understudied metal ions (ng mL⁻¹) in different natural food samples.

  10. The Solid Phase Extraction of Some Metal Ions Using Palladium Nanoparticles Attached to Silica Gel Chemically Bonded by Silica-Bonded N-Propylmorpholine as New Sorbent prior to Their Determination by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghaedi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research at first palladium nanoparticle attached to a new chemically bonded silica gel has been synthesized and has been characterized with different techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD, fourier transform infrared (FT-IR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Then, this new sorbent (chemically modified silica gel with N-propylmorpholine (PNP-SBNPM was efficiently used for preconcentration of some metal ions in various food samples. The influence of effective variables including mass of sorbent, flow rate, pH of sample solutions and condition of eluent such as volume, type and concentration on the recoveries of understudy metal ions were investigated. Following the optimization of variables, the interfering effects of some foreign ions on the preconcentration and determination of the investigated metal ions described. At optimum values of variables, all investigated metal ions were efficiently recovered with efficiency more than 95%, relative standard deviation (RSD between 2.4 and 2.8, and detection limit in the range of 1.4–2.7 ng mL−1. The present method is simple and rapidly applicable for the determination of the understudied metal ions (ng mL−1 in different natural food samples.

  11. Hydrogenolysis of C-O Chemical Bonds of Broad Scope Mediated by a New Spherical Sol-Gel Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandarus, Valerica; Ciriminna, Rosaria; Gingras, Geneviève; Béland, François; Pagliaro, Mario; Kaliaguine, Serge

    2018-01-01

    The new spherical sol-gel hybrid material Silia Cat Pd 0 selectively mediates the hydrogenolysis of aromatic alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones by using an ultralow catalytic amount (0.1 mol % Pd) under mild reaction conditions. The broad reaction scope as well as the catalyst's superior activity and pronounced stability open the route to green and convenient reductive deoxygenation processes of primary synthetic relevance in chemical research as well as in the fine chemical and petrochemical industries.

  12. Collision-Induced Dissociation Study of Strong Hydrogen-Bonded Cluster Ions Y-(HF) n (Y=F, O2) Using Atmospheric Pressure Corona Discharge Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combined with a HF Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kenya; Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) was produced by a homemade HF generator in order to investigate the properties of strong hydrogen-bonded clusters such as (HF) n . The HF molecules were ionized in the form of complex ions associated with the negative core ions Y - produced by atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI). The use of APCDI in combination with the homemade HF generator led to the formation of negative-ion HF clusters Y - (HF) n (Y=F, O 2 ), where larger clusters with n ≥4 were not detected. The mechanisms for the formation of the HF, F - (HF) n , and O 2 - (HF) n species were discussed from the standpoints of the HF generator and APCDI MS. By performing energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments on the cluster ions F - (HF) n ( n =1-3), the energies for the loss of HF from F - (HF) 3 , F - (HF) 2 , and F - (HF) were evaluated to be 1 eV or lower, 1 eV or higher, and 2 eV, respectively, on the basis of their center-of-mass energy ( E CM ). These E CM values were consistent with the values of 0.995, 1.308, and 2.048 eV, respectively, obtained by ab initio calculations. The stability of [O 2 (HF) n ] - ( n =1-4) was discussed on the basis of the bond lengths of O 2 H-F - (HF) n and O 2 - H-F(HF) n obtained by ab initio calculations. The calculations indicated that [O 2 (HF) 4 ] - separated into O 2 H and F - (HF) 3 .

  13. Enhanced capacity of chemically bonded phosphorus/carbon composite as an anode material for potassium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuan; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Hong; Qi, Xiujun; Xing, Zheng; Zhuang, Quanchao; Ju, Zhicheng

    2018-02-01

    Potassium-ion batteries are attracting great attention as a promising alternative to lithium-ion batteries due to the abundance and low price of potassium. Herein, the phosphorus/carbon composite, obtained by a simple ball-milling of 20 wt% commercial red phosphorus and 80 wt% graphite, is studied as a novel anode for potassium-ion batteries. Considering the high theoretical specific capacity of phosphorus and formation of stable phosphorus-carbon bond, which can alleviate the volume expansion efficiently, the phosphorus/carbon composite exhibits a high charge capacity of 323.5 mA h g-1 after 50 cycles at a current density of 50 mA g-1 with moderate rate capability and cycling stability. By the X-ray diffraction analysis, the alloying-dealloying mechanism of phosphorus is proposed to form a KP phase. Meanwhile, prepotassiation treatment is conducted to improve the low initial coulomb efficiency.

  14. Hydrogen bond driven chemical reactions: Beckmann rearrangement of cyclohexanone oxime into epsilon-caprolactam in supercritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boero, Mauro; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Liew, Chee Chin; Terakura, Kiyoyuki; Parrinello, Michele

    2004-05-26

    Recent experiments have shown that supercritical water (SCW) has the ability to accelerate and make selective synthetic organic reactions, thus replacing the common but environmentally harmful acid and basic catalysts. In an attempt to understand the intimate mechanism behind this observation, we analyze, via first-principles molecular dynamics, the Beckmann rearrangement of cyclohexanone oxime into epsilon-caprolactam in supercritical water, for which accurate experimental evidence has been reported. Differences in the wetting of the hydrophilic parts of the solute, enhanced by SCW, and the disrupted hydrogen bond network are shown to be crucial in triggering the reaction and in making it selective. Furthermore, the enhanced concentrations of H(+) in SCW play an important role in starting the reaction.

  15. Chemical-shift tensors of heavy nuclei in network solids: a DFT/ZORA investigation of (207)Pb chemical-shift tensors using the bond-valence method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Fahri; Dybowski, C

    2015-10-14

    Cluster models are used in calculation of (207)Pb NMR magnetic-shielding parameters of α-PbO, β-PbO, Pb3O4, Pb2SnO4, PbF2, PbCl2, PbBr2, PbClOH, PbBrOH, PbIOH, PbSiO3, and Pb3(PO4)2. We examine the effects of cluster size, method of termination of the cluster, charge on the cluster, introduction of exact exchange, and relativistic effects on calculation of magnetic-shielding tensors with density functional theory. Proper termination of the cluster for a network solid, including approximations such as compensation of charge by the bond-valence (BV) method, is essential to provide results that agree with experiment. The inclusion of relativistic effects at the spin-orbit level for such heavy nuclei is an essential factor in achieving agreement with experiment.

  16. Electron densities and chemical bonding in TiC, TiN and TiO derived from energy band calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaha, P.

    1983-10-01

    It was the aim of this paper to describe the chemical bonding of TiC, TiN and TiO by means of energy bands and electron densities. Using the respective potentials we have calculated the bandstructure of a finer k-grid with the linearized APW method to obtain accurate densities of states (DOS). These DOS wer partitioned into local partial contributions and the metal d DOS were further decomposed into tsub(2g) and esub(g) symmetry components in order to additionally characterize bonding. The electron densities corresponding to the occupied valence states are obtained from the LAPW calculations. They provide further insight into characteristic trends in the series from TiC to TiO: around the nonmetal site the density shows increasing localisation; around the metal site the deviation from spherical symmetry changes from esub(g) to tsub(2g). Electron density plots of characteristic band states allow to describe different types of bonding occurring in these systems. For TiC and TiN recent measurements of the electron densities exist for samples of TiCsub(0.94) and TiNsub(0.99), where defects cause static displacements of the Ti atoms. If this effect can be compensated by an atomic model one hopefully can extrapolate to stoichiometric composition. This procedure allows a comparison with structure factors derived from theoretical electron densities. The agreement for TiN is very good. For TiC the extrapolated data agree in terms of the deviations from spherical symmetry near the Ti site with the LAPW data, but the densities around both atoms are more localized than in theory. An explanation could be: a) the defects affect the electronic structure in TiCsub(0.94) with respect to TiCsub(1.0): b) the applied atomic model does not properly extrapolate to stoichiometry, because parameters of this model correlate or become unphysical. (Author)

  17. The antimony-group 11 chemical bond: dissociation energies of the diatomic molecules CuSb, AgSb, and AuSb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, V; Ciccioli, A; Gigli, G

    2014-02-14

    The intermetallic molecules CuSb, AgSb, and AuSb were identified in the effusive molecular beam produced at high temperature under equilibrium conditions in a double-cell-like Knudsen source. Several gaseous equilibria involving these species were studied by mass spectrometry as a function of temperature in the overall range 1349-1822 K, and the strength of the chemical bond formed between antimony and the group 11 metals was for the first time measured deriving the following thermochemical dissociation energies (D°(0), kJ/mol): 186.7 ± 5.1 (CuSb), 156.3 ± 4.9 (AgSb), 241.3 ± 5.8 (AuSb). The three species were also investigated computationally at the coupled cluster level with single, double, and noniterative quasiperturbative triple excitations (CCSD(T)). The spectroscopic parameters were calculated from the potential energy curves and the dissociation energies were evaluated at the Complete Basis Set limit, resulting in an overall good agreement with experimental values. An approximate evaluation of the spin-orbit effect was also performed. CCSD(T) calculations were further extended to the corresponding group 11 arsenide species which are here studied for the first time and the following dissociation energies (D°(0), kJ/mol): 190 ± 10 (CuAs), 151 ± 10 (AgAs), 240 ± 15 (AuAs) are proposed. Taking advantage of the new experimental and computational information here presented, the bond energy trends along group 11 and 4th and 5th periods of the periodic table were analyzed and the bond energies of the diatomic species CuBi and AuBi, yet experimentally unobserved, were predicted on an empirical basis.

  18. Chemical Bonding and Molecular Geometry: from Lewis to Electron Densities. Ronald J. Gillespie, Paul L.A. Popelier (Eds.); Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2001, xiii+268 pages, ISBN 01951049-X, US$ 39.50

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvi, B.

    2002-06-01

    This small book will certainly be one of the reference textbooks on the bonding theory of the next decade. The presentation of the different models used to describe and explain the chemical bond is made in both an epistemological and historical perspective in the first five chapters. The authors clearly show the importance of the Pauli principle as the explicative key of the chemical bonding. The respective merits and limitations of the Lewis model, of the orbital picture, of the valence shell electron pair (VSEPR) and ligand close-packing model are emphasised and illustrated by examples belonging to Inorganic Chemistry. The remaining three chapters contain an elegant presentation of the 'Atoms in Molecules' theory which provides a rigorous description of the bonding on the ground of the topological analysis of the electron density distribution. The introduction of the necessary mathematical definitions is made in a very simple and pedagogical fashion, which avoids unnecessary specialised jargon. The information extracted by the AIM analysis is then used to investigate the bonding in molecules belonging to periods 2-6. It is necessary to have read this book before teaching anything on the Chemical Bonding Theory. Its presence in the library is indispensable.

  19. Shear bond strength evaluation of chemically-cured and light-cured orthodontic adhesives after enamel deproteinization with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, J. C.; Krisnawati; Purbiati, M.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of enamel deproteinization with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) before etching on the shear bond strength (SBS) of Unite (UN; 3M Unitek) and Xihu-BIOM adhesive (XB). Fifty-two maxillary first premolars were divided into four groups: (1) UN and (2) XB according to manufacturer’s recommendation and (3) UN and (4) XB deproteinized with 5.25% NaOCl. Brackets were bonded, and a mechanical test was performed using a universal testing machine. The mean SBS value for groups A1, A2, B1, and B2 was 13.51 ± 2.552, 14.36 ± 2.902, 16.43 ± 2.615, and 13.05 ± 2.348 MPa, respectively. A statistically significant difference in SBSs was observed between chemically cured groups and between group B (p 0.05). NaOCl enamel deproteinization before acid etching has a significant effect on the SBS of Unite adhesive, but not on that of the Xihu-BIOM adhesive. Furthermore, a significant difference in the SBS of Unite and Xihu-BIOM adhesives within the enamel deproteinization group was observed in this study.

  20. Effect of the valence electron concentration on the bulk modulus and chemical bonding in Ta2AC and Zr2AC (A=Al, Si, and P)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Jochen M.; Music, Denis; Sun Zhimei

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the effect of the valence electron concentration, on the bulk modulus and the chemical bonding in Ta 2 AC and Zr 2 AC (A=Al, Si, and P) by means of ab initio calculations. Our equilibrium volume and the hexagonal ratio (c/a) agree well (within 2.7% and 1.2%, respectively) with previously published experimental data for Ta 2 AlC. The bulk moduli of both Ta 2 AC and Zr 2 AC increase as Al is substituted with Si and P by 13.1% and 20.1%, respectively. This can be understood since the substitution is associated with an increased valence electron concentration, resulting in band filling and an extensive increase in cohesion

  1. Direct, simple derivatization of disulfide bonds in proteins with organic mercury in alkaline medium without any chemical pre-reducing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM- UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Ferrari, Carlo [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, INO-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); D’Ulivo, Alessandro [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM- UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Bramanti, Emilia, E-mail: bramanti@pi.iccom.cnr.it [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM- UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-09-16

    Highlights: • A simple procedure for the derivatization of proteins disulfide bonds. • Cysteine groups in several proteins derivatised with pHMB in alkaline media. • 75–100% labelling of cysteines in proteins with pHMB. - Abstract: In this work we have studied the derivatization of protein disulfide bonds with p-Hydroxymercurybenzoate (pHMB) in strong alkaline medium without any preliminary reduction. The reaction has been followed by the determination of the protein–pHMB complex using size exclusion chromatography coupled to a microwave/UV mercury oxidation system for the on-line oxidation of free and protein-complexed pHMB and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (SEC–CVG–AFS) detection. The reaction has been optimized by an experimental design using lysozyme as a model protein and applied to several thiolic proteins. The proposed method reports, for the first time, that it is possible to label 75–100% cysteines of proteins and, thus, to determine thiolic proteins without the need of any reducing step to obtain reduced -SH groups before mercury labelling. We obtained a detection limit of 100 nmol L{sup −1} based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for unbound and complexed pHMB, corresponding to a detection limit of proteins ranged between 3 and 360 nmol L{sup −1}, depending on the number of cysteines in the protein sequence.

  2. The Bonding Situation in Metalated Ylides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Lennart T; Andrada, Diego M; Frenking, Gernot; Gessner, Viktoria H

    2017-03-28

    Quantum chemical calculations have been carried out to study the electronic structure of metalated ylides particularly in comparison to their neutral analogues, the bisylides. A series of compounds of the general composition Ph 3 P-C-L with L being either a neutral or an anionic ligand were analyzed and the impact of the nature of the substituent L and the total charge on the electronics and bonding situation was studied. The charge at the carbon atom as well as the dissociation energies, bond lengths, and Wiberg bond indices strongly depend on the nature of L. Here, not only the charge of the ligand but also the position of the charge within the ligand backbone plays an important role. Independent of the substitution pattern, the NBO analysis reveals the preference of unsymmetrical bonding situations (P=C-L or P-C=L) for almost all compounds. However, Lewis structures with two lone-pair orbitals at the central carbon atom are equally valid for the description of the bonding situation. This is confirmed by the pronounced lone-pair character of the frontier orbitals. Energy decomposition analysis mostly reveals the preference of several bonding situations, mostly with dative and ylidic electron-sharing bonds (e.g., P→C - -L). In general, the anionic systems show a higher preference of the ylidic bonding situations compared to the neutral analogues. However, in most of the cases different resonance structures have to be considered for the description of the "real" bonding situation. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  3. Electronic and Structural Evolution and Chemical Bonding in Ditungsten Oxide Clusters: W2On- and W2On (n = 1-6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Hua Jin; Huang, Xin; Cui, Lifeng; Li, Xi; Li, Jun; Wang, Lai S.

    2005-01-01

    We report a systematic and comprehensive investigation of the electronic structures and chemical bonding in a series of ditungsten oxide clusters, W 2 O n - and W 2 O n (n = 1-6), using anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Well-resolved photoelectron spectra were obtained at several photon energies (2.331, 3.496, 4.661, 6.424, and 7.866 eV) and W 5d-based spectral features were clearly observed and distinguished from O 2p-based features. More complicated spectral features were observed for the oxygen-deficient clusters due to the W 5d electrons. With increasing oxygen content in W 2 O n - , the photoelectron spectra were observed to shift gradually to higher binding energies, accompanied by a decreasing number of W 5d-derived features. A behavior of sequential oxidation as a result of charge transfers from W to O was clearly observed. A large energy gap (2.8 eV) was observed in the spectrum of W 2 O 6 - , indicating the high electronic stability of the stoichiometric W 2 O 6 molecule. Extensive DFT calculations were carried out to search for the most stable structures of both the anion and neutral clusters. Time-dependent DFT method was used to compute the vertical detachment energies and compare to the experimental data. Molecular orbitals were used to analyze the chemical bonding in the ditungsten oxide clusters and elucidate their electronic and structural evolution

  4. The chemical bonds effect of anthocyanin and chlorophyll dyes on TiO2 for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahliha, A. H.; Nurosyid, F.; Supriyanto, A.; Kusumaningsih, T.

    2017-11-01

    Anthocyanin and chlorophyll dyes have been blended as the photosensitizer of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC). The results study showed the effect of chemical bond dyes on TiO2 and the efficiency of DSSC. Ratio blend of the anthocyanin and chlorophyll dyes are 1:1. The absorbance of dyes and TiO2 were characterized using UV-Vis Spectrophotometer. The chemical bonds contained in TiO2-dyes were characterized using FT-IR spectrophotometer. The efficiency of DSSC was calculated using I-V meter. The absorption spectra of chlorophyll: anthocyanin blend dye solutions and TiO2 films can increase after the dye adsorption. Absorbance characterization of anthocyanin and chlorophyll dye blend solutions showed three peaks at the wavelength of 412 nm; 535.5 nm; and 656.5 nm. Absorbance characterization of spinach before being blend with anthocyanin dyes solutions showed two peaks at the wavelength of 431 nm and 665.5 nm. The absorption spectra of TiO2 films can increase after the dyes adsorption at the wavelength of 400 nm. FT-IR spectra of TiO2 founded the functional groups C-Br, C=C, and O-H. The functional groups founded in anthocyanin: chlorophyll dye blended on the surface of TiO2 are C-Br, C-O, O-H, C-H, C=C, C=O, and O-H. The result showed that the greatest efficiency of 0.0544% at dye red cabbage-spinach. Adsorption blends of anthocyanin and chlorophyll dyes on the surface of TiO2 can be used as the photosensitizer for DSSC.

  5. The chemical bonds effect of Amaranthus hybridus L. and Dracaena Angustifolia on TiO2 as photo-sensitizer for dye-sensitized solar Cells (DSSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahliha, A. H.; Nurosyid, F.; Supriyanto, A.

    2017-08-01

    Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSC) consists of a working electrode, dye, electrolyte, and a counter electrode. The paper showed the effect of chemical bonds Dracaena Angustifolia (suji leaves) and Amaranthus Hybridus L. (spinach leaves) on TiO2 for application in DSSC. Dracaena Angustifolia (suji leaves) and Amaranthus Hybridus L. (spinach leaves) were extracted using acetone solvent as a dye containing chlorophyll, the absorbance spectrum of the dye and TiO2 were characterized using Uv-visible spectrophotometer 1601 PC, the chemical bonds contained in TiO2-dye was characterized using FT-IR spectrophotometer Shimadzu Prestige 21. The efficiency of DSSC was calculated using I-V Keithley 2602A. Absorbance characterization of dye Dracaena Angustifolia showed two peaks at the wavelength of 665,5 nm and 412 nm. The absorbance peaks of dye Amaranthus Hybridus L. at the wavelength of 664 nm and 412,5 nm. FT-IR characterization of TiO2 founded the functional groups C=C-C, C=C-H, C-O, C-H, C=C, C-H aliphatic, and O-H. Dye Amaranthus Hybridus L. obtained functional groups C=C-C, C=C-H, C-O, C-H, C=C, C=O, C-H aliphatic, and O-H. Dye Dracaena Angustifolia obtained functional groups were identified as C=C-C, C=C-H, C-O, C-H, C=C, C-H aliphatic, and O-H. DSSC efficiency with Amaranthus Hybridus L. and Dracaena Angustifolia dyes of 0,063% and 0,058% respectively

  6. The effects of reasoning, use of models, sex type, and their interactions on posttest achievement in chemical bonding after constant instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staver, John R.; Halsted, Douglas A.

    The purpose of the authors in this study was to determine the effects of reasoning, use of models during testing, and sex type on posttest achievement in chemical bonding under controlled instruction. Eighty-four high school students taking chemistry were randomly assigned within their classes to models and no models groups for the posttest. Reasoning capabilities were assessed by the Piagetian Logical Operations Test (PLOT) (Staver & Gabel, JRST, Vol. 16, No. 6, 1979), prior to instruction. All students then received the same instruction on chemical bonding which included teacher demonstrations of concepts with three-dimensional molecular models, interspersed teacher questions during the introduction and development of concepts, student manipulation of three-dimensional molecular models during laboratory experiments, and text reading assignments on concepts prior to their instruction in class. The posttest on molecular geometry and shape contained three sections requiring memory and application (Bloom, Taxonomy of educational objective, handbook I: Cognitive domain. New York: David McKay, 1956). Data were analyzed by regression (Nie et al., Statistical package for the social sciences, 2nd ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1975). Results indicate that reasoning accounted for a significant portion (p sex type did not account for a significant (p > 0.05) portion of the variance on total scores or any section of posttest. The three-way interaction of reasoning, model usage, and sex type accounted for a significant portion (p < 0.05) of the variance in total scores, and in the memory and application sections of the posttest. Discussion focused on the results, conclusions, and implications for science teaching.

  7. Fundamentals of fiber bonding in thermally point-bonded nonwovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambaram, Aparna

    Thermal point bonding (TPB) uses heat and pressure to bond a web of fibers at discrete points imparting strength to the manufactured fabric. This process significantly reduces the strength and elongation of the bridging fibers between bond points while strengthening the web. Single fiber experiments were performed with four structurally different polypropylene fibers to analyze the inter-relationships between fiber structure, fiber properties and bonding process. Two fiber types had a low birefringence sheath or surface layer while the remaining had uniform birefringence profiles through their thickness. Bonds were formed between isolated pairs of fibers by subjecting the fibers to a calendering process and simulating TPB process conditions. The dependence of bond strength on bonding temperature and on the type of fiber used was evaluated. Fiber strengths before and after bonding were measured and compared to understand the effect of bonding on fiber strength. Additionally, bonded fiber strength was compared to the strength of single fibers which had experienced the same process conditions as the bonded pairs. This comparison estimated the effect of mechanical damage from pressing fibers together with steel rolls while creating bonds in TPB. Interfiber bond strength increased with bonding temperature for all fiber types. Fiber strength decreased with increasing bonding temperature for all fiber types except for one type of low birefringent sheath fibers. Fiber strength degradation was unavoidable at temperatures required for successful bonding. Mechanical damage from compression of fibers between rolls was an insignificant factor in this strength loss. Thermal damage during bonding was the sole significant contributor to fiber strength degradation. Fibers with low birefringence skins formed strong bonds with minimal fiber strength loss and were superior to fibers without such surface layers in TPB performance. A simple model to predict the behavior of a two-bond

  8. Reaction dynamics. Extremely short-lived reaction resonances in Cl + HD (v = 1) → DCl + H due to chemical bond softening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tiangang; Chen, Jun; Huang, Long; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Chunlei; Sun, Zhigang; Dai, Dongxu; Yang, Xueming; Zhang, Dong H

    2015-01-02

    The Cl + H2 reaction is an important benchmark system in the study of chemical reaction dynamics that has always appeared to proceed via a direct abstraction mechanism, with no clear signature of reaction resonances. Here we report a high-resolution crossed-molecular beam study on the Cl + HD (v = 1, j = 0) → DCl + H reaction (where v is the vibrational quantum number and j is the rotational quantum number). Very few forward scattered products were observed. However, two distinctive peaks at collision energies of 2.4 and 4.3 kilocalories per mole for the DCl (v' = 1) product were detected in the backward scattering direction. Detailed quantum dynamics calculations on a highly accurate potential energy surface suggested that these features originate from two very short-lived dynamical resonances trapped in the peculiar H-DCl (v' = 2) vibrational adiabatic potential wells that result from chemical bond softening. We anticipate that dynamical resonances trapped in such wells exist in many reactions involving vibrationally excited molecules. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. FTIR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible spectra and quantum chemical calculations of allantoin molecule and its hydrogen bonded dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Jane; Ahmad, Shabbir

    2015-02-05

    FTIR, FT-Raman and electronic spectra of allantoin molecule are recorded and investigated using DFT and MP2 methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The molecular structure, anharmonic vibrational spectra, natural atomic charges, non-linear optical properties, etc. have been computed for the ground state of allantoin. The anharmonic vibrational frequencies are calculated using PT2 algorithm (Barone method) as well as VSCF and CC-VSCF methods. These methods yield results that are in remarkable agreement with the experiment. The coupling strengths between pairs of modes are also calculated using coupling integral based on 2MR-QFF approximation. The simulations on allantoin dimers have been also performed at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory to investigate the effect of the intermolecular interactions on the molecular structure and vibrational frequencies of the monomer. Vibrational assignments are made with the great accuracy using PED calculations and animated modes. The combination and overtone bands have been also identified in the FTIR spectrum with the help of anharmonic computations. The electronic spectra are simulated in gas and solution at TD-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The important global quantities such as electro-negativity, electronic chemical potential, electrophilicity index, chemical hardness and softness based on HOMO, LUMO energy eigenvalues are also computed. NBO analysis has been performed for monomer and dimers of allantoin at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Three methods to measure RH bond energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Ellison, G.B. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Gutman, D. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-03-21

    In this paper the authors compare and contrast three powerful methods for experimentally measuring bond energies in polyatomic molecules. The methods are: radical kinetics; gas phase acidity cycles; and photoionization mass spectroscopy. The knowledge of the values of bond energies are a basic piece of information to a chemist. Chemical reactions involve the making and breaking of chemical bonds. It has been shown that comparable bonds in polyatomic molecules, compared to the same bonds in radicals, can be significantly different. These bond energies can be measured in terms of bond dissociation energies.

  11. Three methods to measure RH bond energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkowitz, J.; Ellison, G.B.; Gutman, D.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper the authors compare and contrast three powerful methods for experimentally measuring bond energies in polyatomic molecules. The methods are: radical kinetics; gas phase acidity cycles; and photoionization mass spectroscopy. The knowledge of the values of bond energies are a basic piece of information to a chemist. Chemical reactions involve the making and breaking of chemical bonds. It has been shown that comparable bonds in polyatomic molecules, compared to the same bonds in radicals, can be significantly different. These bond energies can be measured in terms of bond dissociation energies

  12. Atomic Structure and Valence: Level II, Unit 10, Lesson 1; Chemical Bonding: Lesson 2; The Table of Elements: Lesson 3; Electrolysis: Lesson 4. Advanced General Education Program. A High School Self-Study Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Job Corps.

    This self-study program for high-school level contains lessons on: Atomic Structure and Valence, Chemical Bonding, The Table of Elements, and Electrolysis. Each of the lessons concludes with a Mastery Test to be completed by the student. (DB)

  13. Geometrical criteria versus quantum chemical criteria for assessment of intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) interaction: A computational comparison into the effect of chlorine substitution on IMHB of salicylic acid in its lowest energy ground state conformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) in salicylic acid and its chloro derivatives. ► A complex effect of +R and −I effect of chlorine substituents on IMHB energy. ► Interplay between IMHB energy and aromaticity. ► Directional nature of IMHB from quantum chemical assessment. ► Quantum chemical treatment vs. geometrical criteria to assess weak interaction. - Abstract: Density functional theory based computational study has been performed to characterize intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) interaction in a series of salicylic acid derivatives varying in chlorine substitution on the benzene ring. The molecular systems studied are salicylic acid, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, 3,5-dichlorosalicylic acid and 3,5,6-tricholorosalicylic acid. Major emphasis is rendered on the analysis of IMHB interaction by calculation of electron density ρ(r) and Laplacian ∇ 2 ρ(r) at the bond critical point using atoms-in-molecule theory. Topological features, energy densities based on ρ(r) through perturbing the intramolecular H-bond distances suggest that at equilibrium geometry the IMHB interaction develops certain characteristics typical of covalent interaction. The interplay between aromaticity and resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RAHB) is discussed using both geometrical and magnetic criteria as the descriptors of aromaticity. The optimized geometry features, molecular electrostatic potential map analysis are also found to produce a consensus view in relation with the formation of RAHB in these systems

  14. Silica chemically bonded N-propyl kriptofix 21 and 22 with immobilized palladium nanoparticles for solid phase extraction and preconcentration of some metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Niknam, Khodabakhsh; Zamani, Saeed; Larki, Habib Abasi; Roosta, Mostafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2013-08-01

    Silica gel chemically bonded N-propyl kriptofix 21 (SBNPK 21) and N-propyl kriptofix 22 (SBNPK 22) and subsequently immobilized with palladium nanoparticles (PNP-SBNPK 21 and PNP-SBNPK 22) to produce two new complexing lipophilic materials. Then these novel sorbents were applied for the enrichment of some metal ions and their subsequent determination by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). The influences of the variables including pH, amount of solid phase, sample flow rate, eluent conditions and sample volume on the metal ion recoveries were investigated. The detection limit of proposed method was in the interval 2.1-2.3 and 1.7-2.8 ng mL(-1) for PNP-SBNPK 21 and PNP-SBNPK 22 respectively, while the preconcentration factor was 80 for two sorbents. The relative standard deviations of recoveries were between 1.23-1.31 and 1.28-1.49 for PNP-SBNPK 21 and PNP-SBNPK 22 respectively. The method has high sorption-preconcentration efficiency even in the presence of various interfering ions. Due to the reasonable selectivity of proposed method, the relative standard deviation of recoveries of all understudied metal ions in some complicated matrices was less than 3.0%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of surface pretreatment on interfacial chemical bonding states of atomic layer deposited ZrO2 on AlGaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong; Wang, Hong; Ng, Serene Lay Geok; Ji, Rong; Liu, Zhi Hong

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZrO 2 on native oxide covered (untreated) and buffered oxide etchant (BOE) treated AlGaN surface was analyzed by utilizing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Evidenced by Ga–O and Al–O chemical bonds by XPS, parasitic oxidation during deposition is largely enhanced on BOE treated AlGaN surface. Due to the high reactivity of Al atoms, more prominent oxidation of Al atoms is observed, which leads to thicker interfacial layer formed on BOE treated surface. The results suggest that native oxide on AlGaN surface may serve as a protecting layer to inhibit the surface from further parasitic oxidation during ALD. The findings provide important process guidelines for the use of ALD ZrO 2 and its pre-ALD surface treatments for high-k AlGaN/GaN metal–insulator–semiconductor high electron mobility transistors and other related device applications

  16. Thermoelectric, electronic, optical and chemical bonding properties of Ba{sub 2}PrRuO{sub 6}: At temperature 7 K and 150 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [New Technologies-Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, Kangar, Perlis 01007 Malaysia (Malaysia); Khan, Wilayat, E-mail: walayat76@gmail.com [New Technologies-Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • DFT-FPLAPW method used for calculating the electronic structure. • The Fermi surface of BPRO (7 K and 150 K) is also calculated. • The complex dielectric function has been calculated. • Thermoelectric properties were also calculated using BoltzTraP code. • Power factor shows that both compounds are good thermoelectric materials at 600 K. - Abstract: We present first principles calculations of the band structure, density of states, electronic charge density, Fermi surface and optical properties of Ba{sub 2}PrRuO{sub 6} single crystals at two different temperatures. The atomic positions were optimized by minimizing the forces acting on the atoms. We have employed the full potential linear augmented plane wave method within local density approximation, generalized gradient approximation and Engel–Vosko generalized gradient approximation to treat the exchange correlation potential. The calculation shows that the compound is superconductor with strong hybridization near the Fermi energy level. Fermi surface is composed of two sheets. The calculated electronic specific heat capacities indicate, very close agreement with the experimental one. The bonding features of the compounds are analyzed using the electronic charge density in the (1 0 0) and (0–10) crystallographic planes. The dispersion of the optical constants was calculated and discussed. The thermoelectric properties are also calculated using the BoltzTrap code.

  17. Nature of the chemical bond between metal atoms and oxide surfaces: new evidences from spin density studies of K atoms on alkaline earth oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Mario; Giamello, Elio; Di Valentin, Cristiana; Pacchioni, Gianfranco; Sojka, Zbigniew; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2005-12-07

    We have studied the interaction of K atoms with the surface of polycrystalline alkaline-earth metal oxides (MgO, CaO, SrO) by means of CW- and Pulsed-EPR, UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopies and DFT cluster model calculations. The K adsorption site is proposed to be an anionic reverse corner formed at the intersection of two steps, where K binds by more than 1 eV, resulting in thermally stable species up to about 400 K. The bonding has small covalent and large polarization contributions, and the K atom remains neutral, with one unpaired electron in the valence shell. The interaction results in strong modifications of the K electronic wave function which are directly reflected by the hyperfine coupling constant, (K)a(iso). This is found to be a very efficient "probe" to measure the degree of metal-oxide interaction which directly depends on the substrate basicity. These results provide an original and general model of the early stages of the metal-support interaction in the case of ionic oxides.

  18. Parental Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Paul de Cock

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the early parent–child bonding relationship can be valuable in research and practice. Retrospective dimensional measures of parental bonding provide a means for assessing the experience of the early parent–child relationship. However, combinations of dimensional scores may provide information that is not readily captured with a dimensional approach. This study was designed to assess the presence of homogeneous groups in the population with similar profiles on parental bonding dimensions. Using a short version of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI, three parental bonding dimensions (care, authoritarianism, and overprotection were used to assess the presence of unobserved groups in the population using latent profile analysis. The class solutions were regressed on 23 covariates (demographics, parental psychopathology, loss events, and childhood contextual factors to assess the validity of the class solution. The results indicated four distinct profiles of parental bonding for fathers as well as mothers. Parental bonding profiles were significantly associated with a broad range of covariates. This person-centered approach to parental bonding has broad utility in future research which takes into account the effect of parent–child bonding, especially with regard to “affectionless control” style parenting.

  19. LAMMPS Framework for Directional Dynamic Bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    and bond types. When breaking bonds, all angular and dihedral interactions involving broken bonds are removed. The framework allows chemical reactions to be modeled, and use it to simulate a simplistic, coarse-grained DNA model. The resulting DNA dynamics illustrates the power of the present framework.......We have extended the Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) to support directional bonds and dynamic bonding. The framework supports stochastic formation of new bonds, breakage of existing bonds, and conversion between bond types. Bond formation can be controlled...... to limit the maximal functionality of a bead with respect to various bond types. Concomitant with the bond dynamics, angular and dihedral interactions are dynamically introduced between newly connected triplets and quartets of beads, where the interaction type is determined from the local pattern of bead...

  20. Direct Detection of a Chemical Equilibrium between a Localized Singlet Diradical and Its σ-Bonded Species by Time-Resolved UV/Vis and IR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshidomi, Shohei; Mishima, Megumi; Seyama, Shin; Abe, Manabu; Fujiwara, Yoshihisa; Ishibashi, Taka-Aki

    2017-03-06

    Localized singlet diradicals are key intermediates in bond homolyses. The singlet diradicals are energetically much less stable than the σ-bonded species. In general, only one-way reactions from diradicals to σ-bonded species are observed. In this study, a thermal equilibrium between a singlet 1,2-diazacyclopentane-3,5-diyl diradical and the corresponding σ-bonded species was directly observed. The singlet diradical was more stable than the σ-bonded species. The solvent effect clarified key features, such as the zwitterionic character of the singlet diradical. The effect of the nitrogen atoms is discussed in detail. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Why are Hydrogen Bonds Directional?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore,. Karnataka 560 012, India e-mail: ... Lewis succeeded in explaining the 'chemical bonds' that held the neutral molecules together. The covalent bonding has dominated chemistry so much over the last century and most chemists appear ...

  2. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  3. Solder extrusion pressure bonding process and bonded products produced thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavis, Leonard C.; Karnowsky, Maurice M.; Yost, Frederick G.

    1992-01-01

    Production of soldered joints which are highly reliable and capable of surviving 10,000 thermal cycles between about -40.degree. C. and 110.degree. C. Process involves interposing a thin layer of a metal solder composition between the metal surfaces of members to be bonded and applying heat and up to about 1000 psi compression pressure to the superposed members, in the presence of a reducing atmosphere, to extrude the major amount of the solder composition, contaminants including fluxing gases and air, from between the members being bonded, to form a very thin, strong intermetallic bonding layer having a thermal expansion tolerant with that of the bonded members.

  4. Theoretical exploration of pnicogen bond noncovalent interactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 127; Issue 10. Theoretical ... Keywords. Noncovalent interaction; pnicogen bond; natural bond orbital theory; natural resonance theory; electron density topological property. ... The natural bond orbital interactions in the ZBs are mainly LP1,2 (O) → * (P-X). The P-X ...

  5. Chemical bond properties and charge transfer bands of O(2-)-Eu(3+), O(2-)-Mo(6+) and O(2-)-W(6+) in Eu(3+)-doped garnet hosts Ln3M5O12 and ABO4 molybdate and tungstate phosphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Li, Ling; Noh, Hyeon Mi; Moon, Byung Kee; Choi, Byung Chun; Jeong, Jung Hyun

    2014-06-21

    Charge transfer (CT) energy from the ligand to the central ions is an important factor in luminescence properties for rare earth doped inorganic phosphors. The dielectric theory of complex crystals was used to calculate chemical bond properties. Combining the photoluminescence and the dielectric theory of complex crystals, the CT bands of O(2-)-Eu(3+), O(2-)-Mo(6+) and O(2-)-W(6+) for Eu(3+)-doped inorganic phosphors have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. Taking Eu(3+)-doped Ln3M5O12 (Ln = Y, Lu and M = Al, Ga), Gd3Ga5O12, MMoO4 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) and MWO4 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) as typical phosphors, we investigated the effects of the cation size on the CT bands and chemical bond properties including the bond length (d), the covalency (fc), the bond polarizability (αb) and the environmental factor (he) of O(2-)-Eu(3+), O(2-)-Mo(6+) and O(2-)-W(6+), respectively. For systematic isostructural Ln3M5O12 (Ln = Y, Lu and M = Al, Ga) phosphors, with the increasing M ion radius, the bond length of Ln-O decreases, but fc and αb increase, which is the main reason that the environmental factor increased. For the isostructural MMoO4:Eu, with the increasing M ion radius, the Mo-O bond length increases, but fc and αb decrease, and thus he decreases. However, in the compound system MWO4:Eu (M = Ca, Ba) with the increasing M ion radius, the O-W bond length increases, but fc and αb increase, and thus he increases and the O-W CT energy decreases. Their O(2-)-Eu(3+), O(2-)-Mo(6+) and O(2-)-W(6+) CT bands as well as their full width at half maximum (FWHM) were directly influenced by he. And with the increasing he, CT bands of O-Eu or O-Mo or O-W decrease and their FWHM increases. These results indicate a promising approach for changing the material properties, searching for new Eu(3+) doped molybdate, tungstate or other oxide phosphors and analyzing the experimental result.

  6. Solid-state (185/187)Re NMR and GIPAW DFT study of perrhenates and Re2(CO)10: chemical shift anisotropy, NMR crystallography, and a metal-metal bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdifield, Cory M; Perras, Frédéric A; Bryce, David L

    2015-04-21

    Advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) methods, such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), intricate pulse sequences, and increased applied magnetic fields, allow for the study of systems which even very recently would be impractical. However, SSNMR methods using certain quadrupolar probe nuclei (i.e., I > 1/2), such as (185/187)Re remain far from fully developed due to the exceedingly strong interaction between the quadrupole moment of these nuclei and local electric field gradients (EFGs). We present a detailed high-field (B0 = 21.1 T) experimental SSNMR study on several perrhenates (KReO4, AgReO4, Ca(ReO4)2·2H2O), as well as ReO3 and Re2(CO)10. We propose solid ReO3 as a new rhenium SSNMR chemical shift standard due to its reproducible and sharp (185/187)Re NMR resonances. We show that for KReO4, previously poorly understood high-order quadrupole-induced effects (HOQIE) on the satellite transitions can be used to measure the EFG tensor asymmetry (i.e., ηQ) to nearly an order-of-magnitude greater precision than competing SSNMR and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) approaches. Samples of AgReO4 and Ca(ReO4)2·2H2O enable us to comment on the effects of counter-ions and hydration upon Re(vii) chemical shifts. Calcium-43 and (185/187)Re NMR tensor parameters allow us to conclude that two proposed crystal structures for Ca(ReO4)2·2H2O, which would be considered as distinct, are in fact the same structure. Study of Re2(CO)10 provides insights into the effects of Re-Re bonding on the rhenium NMR tensor parameters and rhenium oxidation state on the Re chemical shift value. As overtone NQR experiments allowed us to precisely measure the (185/187)Re EFG tensor of Re2(CO)10, we were able to measure rhenium chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) for the first time in a powdered sample. Experimental observations are supported by gauge-including projector augmented-wave (GIPAW) density functional theory (DFT) calculations, with NMR tensor calculations also

  7. Environmentally dependent bond-order potentials: New ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Environmentally dependent bond-order potentials: New developments and applications ... for modelling amorphous structure we found that the and bond integrals are not only transferable between graphite and diamond structures but they are also strongly anisotropic due to inter-plan bonding between graphite sheets.

  8. Effect of ethanol-wet-bonding technique on resin–enamel bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Kerim Ayar

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: The ethanol-wet-bonding technique may increase the bond strength of commercial adhesives to enamel. The chemical composition of the adhesives can affect the bond strength of adhesives when bonding to acid-etched enamel, using the ethanol-wet-bonding technique. Some adhesive systems used in the present study may simultaneously be applied to enamel and dentin using ethanol-wet-bonding. Furthermore, deploying ethanol-wet-bonding for the tested commercial adhesives to enamel can increase the adhesion abilities of these adhesives to enamel.

  9. Use of HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry for detection of formazan in in vitro Reconstructed human Tissue (RhT)-based test methods employing the MTT-reduction assay to expand their applicability to strongly coloured test chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alépée, N; Barroso, J; De Smedt, A; De Wever, B; Hibatallah, J; Klaric, M; Mewes, K R; Millet, M; Pfannenbecker, U; Tailhardat, M; Templier, M; McNamee, P

    2015-06-01

    A number of in vitro test methods using Reconstructed human Tissues (RhT) are regulatory accepted for evaluation of skin corrosion/irritation. In such methods, test chemical corrosion/irritation potential is determined by measuring tissue viability using the photometric MTT-reduction assay. A known limitation of this assay is possible interference of strongly coloured test chemicals with measurement of formazan by absorbance (OD). To address this, Cosmetics Europe evaluated use of HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry as an alternative formazan measurement system. Using the approach recommended by the FDA guidance for validation of bio-analytical methods, three independent laboratories established and qualified their HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry systems to reproducibly measure formazan from tissue extracts. Up to 26 chemicals were then tested in RhT test systems for eye/skin irritation and skin corrosion. Results support that: (1) HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry formazan measurement is highly reproducible; (2) formazan measurement by HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry and OD gave almost identical tissue viabilities for test chemicals not exhibiting colour interference nor direct MTT reduction; (3) independent of the test system used, HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry can measure formazan for strongly coloured test chemicals when this is not possible by absorbance only. It is therefore recommended that HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry to measure formazan be included in the procedures of in vitro RhT-based test methods, irrespective of the test system used and the toxicity endpoint evaluated to extend the applicability of these test methods to strongly coloured chemicals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cooperativity in Surface Bonding and Hydrogen Bonding of Water and Hydroxyl at Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Ogasawara, H.; Naslund, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    of the mixed phase at metal surfaces. The surface bonding can be considered to be similar to accepting a hydrogen bond, and we can thereby apply general cooperativity rules developed for hydrogen-bonded systems. This provides a simple understanding of why water molecules become more strongly bonded...... to the surface upon hydrogen bonding to OH and why the OH surface bonding is instead weakened through hydrogen bonding to water. We extend the application of this simple model to other observed cooperativity effects for pure water adsorption systems and H3O+ on metal surfaces.......We examine the balance of surface bonding and hydrogen bonding in the mixed OH + H2O overlayer on Pt(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) via density functional theory calculations. We find that there is a cooperativity effect between surface bonding and hydrogen bonding that underlies the stability...

  11. Localization of double bonds in triacylglycerols using high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Háková, Eva; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Míková, Radka; Schwarzová-Pecková, K.; Bosáková, Z.; Cvačka, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 407, č. 17 (2015), s. 5175-5188 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/12/0750 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : double bond * gas-phase chemistry * lipidomics * olive oil * vernix caseosa Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.125, year: 2015

  12. Identification of the double-bond position in fatty acid methyl esters by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Cvačka, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 1259, 12 Oct (2012), s. 244-250 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0139 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : APCI * double-bond localisation * fatty acids Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.612, year: 2012

  13. Chemical and quantum mechanical studies of the free radical C-C bond formation in the lipoxygenase-catalyzed dimerisation of octadeca-9,12-diynoic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Nieuwenhuizen, W.F.; Lenthe, J.H. van; Blomsma, E.J.; Kerk-van Hoof, A.C. van der; Veldink, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    Triple bond analogues of poly-unsaturated fatty acids are well-known inactivators of lipoxygenases. In an earlier study we proposed that, since 11-oxo-octadeca-9,12-diynoic acid (11-oxo-ODYA) is the only oxygenated product formed during the irreversible inactivation of soybean lipoxygenase-1, the

  14. The semiempirical quantum chemical PM6 method augmented by dispersion and H-bonding correction terms describes reliably various types of non-covalent complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáč, Jan; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Salahub, D.; Hobza, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 7 (2009), s. 1749-1760 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : hydrogen bonding * dispersion Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.804, year: 2009

  15. How overdrying wood reduces its bonding to phenol-formaldehyde adhesives : a critical review of the literature. Part II, Chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfred W. Christiansen

    1991-01-01

    Literature dealing with the effect of excessive drying (overdrying) on wood surface inactivation to bonding is reviewed in two parts and critically evaluated, primarily for phenolic adhesives. Part 1 of the review, published earlier, covers physical mechanisms that could contribute to surface inactivation. The principal physical mechanism is the migration to the...

  16. Constant time INEPT CT-HSQC (CTi-CT-HSQC) – A new NMR method to measure accurate one-bond J and RDCs with strong 1H–1H couplings in natural abundance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, B.; van Ingen, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/297054651; Freedberg, D.I.

    2013-01-01

    Strong (1)H-(1)H coupling can significantly reduce the accuracy of (1)J(CH) measured from frequency differences in coupled HSQC spectra. Although accurate (1)J(CH) values can be extracted from spectral simulation, it would be more convenient if the same accurate (1)J(CH) values can be obtained

  17. Bone bonding bioactivity of Ti metal and Ti-Zr-Nb-Ta alloys with Ca ions incorporated on their surfaces by simple chemical and heat treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, A; Takemoto, M; Saito, T; Fujibayashi, S; Neo, M; Yamaguchi, S; Kizuki, T; Matsushita, T; Niinomi, M; Kokubo, T; Nakamura, T

    2011-03-01

    Ti15Zr4Nb4Ta and Ti29Nb13Ta4.6Zr, which do not contain the potentially cytotoxic elements V and Al, represent a new generation of alloys with improved corrosion resistance, mechanical properties, and cytocompatibility. Recently it has become possible for the apatite forming ability of these alloys to be ascertained by treatment with alkali, CaCl2, heat, and water (ACaHW). In order to confirm the actual in vivo bioactivity of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) and these alloys after subjecting them to ACaHW treatment at different temperatures, the bone bonding strength of implants made from these materials was evaluated. The failure load between implant and bone was measured for treated and untreated plates at 4, 8, 16, and 26 weeks after implantation in rabbit tibia. The untreated implants showed almost no bonding, whereas all treated implants showed successful bonding by 4 weeks, and the failure load subsequently increased with time. This suggests that a simple and economical ACaHW treatment could successfully be used to impart bone bonding bioactivity to Ti metal and Ti-Zr-Nb-Ta alloys in vivo. In particular, implants heat treated at 700 °C exhibited significantly greater bone bonding strength, as well as augmented in vitro apatite formation, in comparison with those treated at 600 °C. Thus, with this improved bioactive treatment process these advantageous Ti-Zr-Nb-Ta alloys can serve as useful candidates for orthopedic devices. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Microstructures, Mechanical and Chemical Properties of TLP-Bonded Joints in a Duplex Stainless Steel with Amorphous Ni-Based Insert Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xinjian; Kim, Myung Bok; Cho, Young Ho; Kang, Chung Yun

    2012-06-01

    The changes in tensile strength and pitting corrosion resistance of transient liquid-phase (TLP)-bonded joints for a duplex stainless steel with MBF-80, MBF-30, and MBF-35 as functions of holding time and filler were interpreted with respect to the bond microstructure. Using MBF-80 after 300 seconds, the fracture strength of the joint reached the maximum value. The failure was dependent on the interplay between the reduction in residual liquid and the increase in interface precipitates. After 3600 seconds, the joint strength had the minimum value. At the same conditions, the tensile strength for MBF-80 was low compared with MBF-35 and MBF-30. In contrast with the tensile strength, the joint produced with MBF-80 for 3600 seconds exhibited the best corrosion resistance. Among the fillers used, the corrosion resistance of the joint using MBF-80 close to that of the substrate could be related intimately to the existence of Cr in this filler.

  19. Diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding. At least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces is coated with nickel. A coated surface portion is positioned in a contiguous relationship with another surface portion and subjected to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure. A force is applied on the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other. The contiguous surface portions are heated to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, and the applied force is decreased while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature. A portion of the applied force is maintained at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions

  20. The chemisorptive bond basic concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Alfred

    1974-01-01

    The Chemisorptive Bond: Basic Concepts describes the basic concepts of the chemisorptive bond on solid surfaces from the simple analogies with ordinary chemical bonds to the quantum-mechanical approaches.This book is composed of 10 chapters and begins with discussions of simple formulas for correlating measurable quantities in chemisorptions and catalysis. The succeeding chapters deal with theories based on quantum-mechanical principles that describe the mutual interactions of atoms of the solid and foreign atoms on the surface. The remaining chapters consider the possible arrangements

  1. Quantum chemical studies of a model for peptide bond formation. 3. Role of magnesium cation in formation of amide and water from ammonia and glycine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oie, T.; Loew, G. H.; Burt, S. K.; MacElroy, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The SN2 reaction between glycine and ammonia molecules with magnesium cation Mg2+ as a catalyst has been studied as a model reaction for Mg(2+)-catalyzed peptide bond formation using the ab initio Hartree-Fock molecular orbital method. As in previous studies of the uncatalyzed and amine-catalyzed reactions between glycine and ammonia, two reaction mechanisms have been examined, i.e., a two-step and a concerted reaction. The stationary points of each reaction including intermediate and transition states have been identified and free energies calculated for all geometry-optimized reaction species to determine the thermodynamics and kinetics of each reaction. Substantial decreases in free energies of activation were found for both reaction mechanisms in the Mg(2+)-catalyzed amide bond formation compared with those in the uncatalyzed and amine-catalyzed amide bond formation. The catalytic effect of the Mg2+ cation is to stabilize both the transition states and intermediate, and it is attributed to the neutralization of the developing negative charge on the electrophile and formation of a conformationally flexible nonplanar five-membered chelate ring structure.

  2. Relativity-Induced Bonding Pattern Change in Coinage Metal Dimers M2 (M = Cu, Ag, Au, Rg).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wan-Lu; Lu, Jun-Bo; Wang, Zhen-Ling; Hu, Han-Shi; Li, Jun

    2018-04-24

    The periodic table provides a fundamental protocol for qualitatively classifying and predicting chemical properties based on periodicity. While the periodic law of chemical elements had already been rationalized within the framework of the nonrelativistic description of chemistry with quantum mechanics, this law was later known to be affected significantly by relativity. We here report a systematic theoretical study on the chemical bonding pattern change in the coinage metal dimers (Cu 2 , Ag 2 , Au 2 , Rg 2 ) due to the relativistic effect on the superheavy elements. Unlike the lighter congeners basically demonstrating ns- ns bonding character and a 0 g + ground state, Rg 2 shows unique 6d-6d bonding induced by strong relativity. Because of relativistic spin-orbit (SO) coupling effect in Rg 2 , two nearly degenerate SO states, 0 g + and 2 u , exist as candidate of the ground state. This relativity-induced change of bonding mechanism gives rise to various unique alteration of chemical properties compared with the lighter dimers, including higher intrinsic bond energy, force constant, and nuclear shielding. Our work thus provides a rather simple but clear-cut example, where the chemical bonding picture is significantly changed by relativistic effect, demonstrating the modified periodic law in heavy-element chemistry.

  3. Inhibition of thermolysin by phosphonamidate transition-state analogues: measurement of 31P-15N bond lengths and chemical shifts in two enzyme-inhibitor complexes by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copié, V; Kolbert, A C; Drewry, D H; Bartlett, P A; Oas, T G; Griffin, R G

    1990-10-02

    31P and 15N chemical shifts and 31P-15N bond lengths have been measured with solid-state NMR techniques in two inhibitors of thermolysin, carbobenzoxy-Glyp-L-Leu-L-Ala (ZGpLA) and carbobenzoxy-L-Phep-L-Leu-L-Ala (ZFpLA), both as free lithium salts and when bound to the enzyme. Binding of both inhibitors to thermolysin results in large changes in the 31P chemical shifts. These changes are more dramatic for the tighter binding inhibitor ZFpLA, where a approximately 20 ppm downfield movement of the 31P isotropic chemical shift (sigma iso) is observed. This shift is due to changes in the shift tensor elements sigma 11 and sigma 22, while sigma 33 remains essentially constant. We observed a similar pattern for ZGpLA, but only a approximately 5 ppm change occurs in sigma iso. The changes in the 15N chemical shifts for both inhibitors are small upon binding, amounting to downfield shifts of 2 and 4 ppm for ZGpLA and ZFpLA, respectively. This indicates that there are no changes in the protonation state of the 15N in either the ZFpLA- or the ZGpLA-thermolysin complex. NMR distance measurements yield a P-N bond length rP-N = 1.68 +/- 0.03 A for the tight binding inhibitor ZFpLA both in its free lithium salt form and in its thermolysin-ZFpLA complex, a distance that is much shorter than the 1.90-A distance reported by X-ray crystallography studies [Holden et al. (1987) Biochemistry 26, 8542-8553].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Observation of the Strong Electronic Coupling in Near-Infrared-Absorbing Tetraferrocene aza-Dipyrromethene and aza-BODIPY with Direct Ferrocene-α- and Ferrocene-β-Pyrrole Bonds: Toward Molecular Machinery with Four-Bit Information Storage Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatsikha, Yuriy V; Holstrom, Cole D; Chanawanno, Kullapa; Osinski, Allen J; Ziegler, Christopher J; Nemykin, Victor N

    2017-01-17

    The 1,3,7,9-tetraferrocenylazadipyrromethene (3) and the corresponding 1,3,5,7-tetraferrocene aza-BODIPY (4) were prepared via three and four synthetic steps, respectively, starting from ferrocenecarbaldehyde using the chalcone-type synthetic methodology. The novel tetra-iron compounds have ferrocene groups directly attached to both the α- and the β-pyrrolic positions, and the shortest Fe-Fe distance determined by X-ray crystallography for 3 was found to be ∼6.98 Å. These new compounds were characterized by UV-vis, nuclear magnetic resonance, and high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry methods, while metal-metal couplings in these systems were probed by electro- and spectroelectrochemistry, chemical oxidations, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Electrochemical data are suggestive of the well-separated stepwise oxidations of all four ferrocene groups in 3 and 4, while spectroelectrochemical and chemical oxidation experiments allowed for characterization of the mixed-valence forms in the target compounds. Intervalence charge-transfer band analyses indicate that the mixed-valence [3] + and [4] + complexes belong to the weakly coupled class II systems in the Robin-Day classification. This interpretation was further supported by Mössbauer spectroscopy in which two individual doublets for Fe(II) and Fe(III) centers were observed in room-temperature experiments for the mixed-valence [3] n+ and [4] n+ species (n = 1-3). The electronic structure, redox properties, and UV-vis spectra of new systems were correlated with Density Functional Theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations (TDDFT), which are suggestive of a ferrocene-centered highest occupied molecular orbital and chromophore-centered lowest unoccupied molecular orbital in 3 and 4 as well as predominant spin localization at the ferrocene fragment attached to the α-pyrrolic positions in [3] + and [4] + .

  5. Chemical interaction mechanism of 10-MDP with zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Noriyuki; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Feitosa, Victor Pinheiro; Tamada, Yoshiyuki; Irie, Masao; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Hayakawa, Satoshi

    2017-03-30

    Currently, the functional monomer 10-methacryloyloxy-decyl-dihydrogen-phosphate (10-MDP) was documented to chemically bond to zirconia ceramics. However, little research has been conducted to unravel the underlying mechanisms. This study aimed to assess the chemical interaction and to demonstrate the mechanisms of coordination between 10-MDP and zirconium oxide using 1 H and 31 P magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and two dimensional (2D) 1 H →  31 P heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR. In addition, shear bond-strength (SBS) tests were conducted to determine the effect of 10-MDP concentration on the bonding effectiveness to zirconia. These SBS tests revealed a 10-MDP concentration-dependent SBS with a minimum of 1-ppb 10-MDP needed. 31 P-NMR revealed that one P-OH non-deprotonated of the PO 3 H 2 group from 10-MDP chemically bonded strongly to zirconia. 1 H- 31 P HETCOR NMR indicated that the 10-MDP monomer can be adsorbed onto the zirconia particles by hydrogen bonding between the P=O and Zr-OH groups or via ionic interactions between partially positive Zr and deprotonated 10-MDP (P-O - ). The combination of 1 H NMR and 2D 1 H- 31 P HETCOR NMR enabled to describe the different chemical states of the 10-MDP bonds with zirconia; they not only revealed ionic but also hydrogen bonding between 10-MDP and zirconia.

  6. Chemical interaction mechanism of 10-MDP with zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Noriyuki; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Feitosa, Victor Pinheiro; Tamada, Yoshiyuki; Irie, Masao; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; van Meerbeek, Bart; Hayakawa, Satoshi

    2017-03-01

    Currently, the functional monomer 10-methacryloyloxy-decyl-dihydrogen-phosphate (10-MDP) was documented to chemically bond to zirconia ceramics. However, little research has been conducted to unravel the underlying mechanisms. This study aimed to assess the chemical interaction and to demonstrate the mechanisms of coordination between 10-MDP and zirconium oxide using 1H and 31P magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and two dimensional (2D) 1H → 31P heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR. In addition, shear bond-strength (SBS) tests were conducted to determine the effect of 10-MDP concentration on the bonding effectiveness to zirconia. These SBS tests revealed a 10-MDP concentration-dependent SBS with a minimum of 1-ppb 10-MDP needed. 31P-NMR revealed that one P-OH non-deprotonated of the PO3H2 group from 10-MDP chemically bonded strongly to zirconia. 1H-31P HETCOR NMR indicated that the 10-MDP monomer can be adsorbed onto the zirconia particles by hydrogen bonding between the P=O and Zr-OH groups or via ionic interactions between partially positive Zr and deprotonated 10-MDP (P-O-). The combination of 1H NMR and 2D 1H-31P HETCOR NMR enabled to describe the different chemical states of the 10-MDP bonds with zirconia; they not only revealed ionic but also hydrogen bonding between 10-MDP and zirconia.

  7. Strong Photoluminescence Enhancement of Silicon Oxycarbide through Defect Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Ford

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The following study focuses on the photoluminescence (PL enhancement of chemically synthesized silicon oxycarbide (SiCxOy thin films and nanowires through defect engineering via post-deposition passivation treatments. SiCxOy materials were deposited via thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD, and exhibit strong white light emission at room-temperature. Post-deposition passivation treatments were carried out using oxygen, nitrogen, and forming gas (FG, 5% H2, 95% N2 ambients, modifying the observed white light emission. The observed white luminescence was found to be inversely related to the carbonyl (C=O bond density present in the films. The peak-to-peak PL was enhanced ~18 and ~17 times for, respectively, the two SiCxOy matrices, oxygen-rich and carbon-rich SiCxOy, via post-deposition passivations. Through a combinational and systematic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and PL study, it was revealed that proper tailoring of the passivations reduces the carbonyl bond density by a factor of ~2.2, corresponding to a PL enhancement of ~50 times. Furthermore, the temperature-dependent and temperature-dependent time resolved PL (TDPL and TD-TRPL behaviors of the nitrogen and forming gas passivated SiCxOy thin films were investigated to acquire further insight into the ramifications of the passivation on the carbonyl/dangling bond density and PL yield.

  8. Hexacoordinate bonding and aromaticity in silicon phthalocyanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang

    2010-12-23

    Si-E bondings in hexacoordinate silicon phthalocyanine were analyzed using bond order (BO), energy partition, atoms in molecules (AIM), electron localization function (ELF), and localized orbital locator (LOL). Bond models were proposed to explain differences between hexacoordinate and tetracoordinate Si-E bondings. Aromaticity of silicon phthalocyanine was investigated using nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS), harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity (HOMA), conceptual density functional theory (DFT), ring critical point (RCP) descriptors, and delocalization index (DI). Structure, energy, bonding, and aromaticity of tetracoordinate silicon phthalocyanine were studied and compared with hexacoordinate one.

  9. The Nature of the Hydrogen Bond Outline of a Comprehensive Hydrogen Bond Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gilli, Gastone

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen bond (H-bond) effects are known: it makes sea water liquid, joins cellulose microfibrils in trees, shapes DNA into genes and polypeptide chains into wool, hair, muscles or enzymes. Its true nature is less known and we may still wonder why O-H...O bond energies range from less than 1 to more than 30 kcal/mol without apparent reason. This H-bond puzzle is re-examined here from its very beginning and presented as an inclusive compilation of experimental H-bond energies andgeometries.New concepts emerge from this analysis: new classes of systematically strong H-bonds (CAHBs and RAHBs: cha

  10. Effect of gradual ordering of Ge/Sb atoms on chemical bonding: A proposed mechanism for the formation of crystalline Ge2Sb2Te5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Janpreet; Singh, Gurinder; Kaura, Aman; Tripathi, S. K.

    2018-04-01

    Using first principle calculations, we study the atomic arrangement and bonding mechanism in the crystalline phase of Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST). It is found that the stability of GST depends on the gradual ordering of Ge/Sb atoms. The configurations with different concentration of Ge/Sb in layers have been analyzed by the partial density of state, electron localization function and Bader charge distribution. The s and p-states of Ge atom alter with different stacking configurations but there is no change in Sb and Te atom states. Our findings show that the bonding between Ge-Te is not only responsible for the stability of GST alloy but can also predict which composition can show generic features of phase change material. As the number of Ge atoms near to vacancy layer decreases, Ge donates more charge. A growth model has been proposed for the formation of crystalline phase which justifies the structure models proposed in the literature.

  11. Structural flexibility in magnetocaloric RE5T4 (RE=rare-earth; T=Si,Ge,Ga) materials: Effect of chemical substitution on structure, bonding and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, Sumohan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The binary, ternary and multicomponent intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals (RE) with group 14 elements (Tt) at the RE5Tt4 stoichiometry have been known for over 30 years, but only in the past decade have these materials become a gold mine for solid-state chemistry, materials science and condensed matter physics. It all started with the discovery of a giant magnetocaloric effect in Gd5Si2Ge2, along with other extraordinary magnetic properties, such as a colossal magnetostriction and giant magnetoresistance. The distinctiveness of this series is in the remarkable flexibility of the chemical bonding between well-defined, subnanometer-thick slabs and the resultant magnetic, transport, and thermodynamic properties of these materials. This can be controlled by varying either or both RE and Tt elements, including mixed rare-earth elements on the RE sites and different group 14 (or T = group 13 or 15) elements occupying the Tt sites. In addition to chemical means, the interslab interactions are also tunable by temperature, pressure, and magnetic field. Thus, this system provides a splendid 'playground' to investigate the interrelationships among composition, structure, physical properties, and chemical bonding. The work presented in this dissertation involving RE5T4 materials has resulted in the successful synthesis, characterization, property measurements, and theoretical analyses of various new intermetallic compounds. The results provide significant insight into the fundamental magnetic and structural behavior of these materials and help us better understand the complex link between a compound's composition, its observed structure, and its properties.

  12. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Construction of diverse supramolecular assemblies of dimetal subunits differing in coordinated water molecules via strong hydrogen bonding interactions: Synthesis, crystal structures and spectroscopic properties. Sadhika Khullar Sanjay K Mandal. Special issue on Chemical Crystallography Volume 126 Issue 5 September ...

  13. A Comparative Evaluation of the Efficacy of Etching by the Total Etch and Self-etch Dentin Bonding Systems in the Primary Teeth: An in vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mithiborwala, Sajjad Hasim; Chaugule, Vishwas; Katge, Farhin; Poojari, Manohar; Pujari, Prashant; Pammi, Thejokrishna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Early childhood caries is now affecting the children in dangerous proportions. There is a wide spread loss of the tooth material irrespective of the type of the carious lesion. Restoration of such lesions with a strong permanent bond between the dental tissues and the restorative dental materials would be a highly desirable requisite. Ultramorphological characterizations show that the interfacial morphology and the chemical characterization of the bonding systems appear to...

  14. Why Bond Critical Points Are Not "Bond" Critical Points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazian, Shant

    2017-12-28

    Equating (3,-1) critical points (CPs), derived from the topological analysis of the electron densities, to chemical bonds has triggered a lot of confusion in recent years. Part of this confusion stems from calling these CPs "bond" CPs (BCPs). While the origin of this terminology is traceable to the late seventies and beginning of eighties, when it sounded reasonable, new computational studies conducted on molecular electron densities cast serious doubt on the supposed universal equivalence between the chemical bonds and (3,-1) CPs. Herein, recent computational studies are briefly reviewed to demonstrate why (3,-1) CPs are not indicators of chemical bonds. It is discussed why this confusing terminology needs to be changed and reemphasized that (3,-1) CPs should be called "line" critical points (LCPs). The proposed terminology detaches the topological properties of molecular electron densities from any a priori chemical interpretation. Such detachment, if adopted by other authors, will hopefully prevent further misinterpretation of the data emerging from the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Hydrogen bonding in tight environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrotta, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C.; Franco, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The single-molecule force spectroscopy of a prototypical class of hydrogen-bonded complexes is computationally investigated. The complexes consist of derivatives of a barbituric acid and a Hamilton receptor that can form up to six simultaneous hydrogen bonds. The force-extension (F-L) isotherms...... of the host-guest complexes are simulated using classical molecular dynamics and the MM3 force field, for which a refined set of hydrogen bond parameters was developed from MP2 ab initio computations. The F-L curves exhibit peaks that signal conformational changes during elongation, the most prominent...... of which is in the 60-180 pN range and corresponds to the force required to break the hydrogen bonds. These peaks in the F-L curves are shown to be sensitive to relatively small changes in the chemical structure of the host molecule. Thermodynamic insights into the supramolecular assembly were obtained...

  16. LAMMPS Framework for Dynamic Bonding and an Application Modeling DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    and bond types. When breaking bonds, all angular and dihedral interactions involving broken bonds are removed. The framework allows chemical reactions to be modeled, and use it to simulate a simplistic, coarse-grained DNA model. The resulting DNA dynamics illustrates the power of the present framework.......We have extended the Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) to support directional bonds and dynamic bonding. The framework supports stochastic formation of new bonds, breakage of existing bonds, and conversion between bond types. Bond formation can be controlled...... to limit the maximal functionality of a bead with respect to various bond types. Concomitant with the bond dynamics, angular and dihedral interactions are dynamically introduced between newly connected triplets and quartets of beads, where the interaction type is determined from the local pattern of bead...

  17. Fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Østergaard, Christian; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2011-01-01

    While silicon nitride surfaces are widely used in many micro electrical mechanical system devices, e.g. for chemical passivation, electrical isolation or environmental protection, studies on fusion bonding of two silicon nitride surfaces (Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding) are very few and highly application...

  18. Complex cubic metallides AM{sub ∝6} (A=Ca, Sr; M=Zn, Cd, Hg). Synthesis, crystal chemistry and chemical bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Michael; Wendorff, Marco; Roehr, Caroline [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie

    2017-09-01

    In a systematic synthetic, crystallographic and bond theoretical study, the stability ranges as well as the distribution of the isoelectronic late d-block elements Zn, Cd and Hg (M) in the polyanions of the YCd{sub 6}-type phases (Ca/Sr)Cd{sub 6} have been investigated. Starting from Ca(Cd/Hg){sub 6}, 12-30% of the M atoms can be substituted by Zn, which gradually occupies the center of the empty cubes. In all ternary compounds, smaller/less electronegative Zn/Cd atoms occupy the disordered tetrahedra explaining the lack of the YCd{sub 6}-type for pure mercurides. Along the section SrCd{sub 6}-SrHg{sub 6}, the ordered Eu{sub 4}Cd{sub 25}-type is formed (Sr{sub 4}Cd{sub 16.1}Hg{sub 8.9}: cF1392, Fd anti 3, a=3191.93(5) pm, R1=0.0404). Besides, two new complex cubic Ca phases appear at increased Zn proportion: Ca{sub 2}Zn{sub 5.1}Cd{sub 5.8}, which exhibits a nearly complete site preference of Zn and Cd, crystallizes in the rare cubic Mg{sub 2}Zn{sub 11}-type structure (cP39-δ, Pm anti 3, a=918.1(1) pm, R1=0.0349). In the Ca-Hg system, an increased Zn proportion yielded the new compound CaZn{sub 1.31}Hg{sub 3.69} (cF480, F anti 43m, a=2145.43(9) pm, R1=0.0572), with a complex cubic structure closely related to Ba{sub 20}Hg{sub 103}. All structures, which are commonly described using nested polyhedra around high-symmetric sites, are alternatively described in accordance with the calculated electron densities and charge distribution: building blocks are face-sharing [M{sub 4}] tetrahedra (star polyhedra such as TS, IS, OS), each with a cage-critical point in its center, and [M{sub 8}] cubes (deformed TS), which are either empty, distorted or filled. The M element distribution in the anion is determined by size criteria and the difference in electronegativity, which induces a preferred formation of heteroatomic polar bonds.

  19. Are Stock and Corporate Bond Markets Integrated?

    OpenAIRE

    van Zundert, J.; Driessen, Joost

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the cross-sectional integration of stock and corporate bond markets by comparing a firm’s expected stock return, as implied by corporate bond spreads, to its realized stock return. We compute expected corporate bond returns by correcting credit spreads for expected losses due to default, which are then transformed into expected stock returns. We find, surprisingly, a strong negative cross-sectional relation between these expected and realized stock returns over the period ...

  20. Density functional study of electronic, charge density, and chemical bonding properties of 9-methyl-3-Thiophen-2-YI-Thieno [3,2-e] [1, 2, 4] Thriazolo [4,3-c] pyrimidine-8-Carboxylic acid ethyl ester crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H., E-mail: maalidph@yahoo.co.uk [New Technologies – Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Kamarudin, H. [Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Alahmed, Z.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Auluck, S. [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K S Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Chyský, Jan [Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, CTU in Prague, Technicka 4, 166 07 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2014-06-01

    A comprehensive theoretical density functional investigation of the electronic crystal structure, chemical bonding, and the electron charge densities of 9-Methyl-3-Thiophen-2-YI-Thieno [3, 2-e] [1, 2, 4] Thriazolo [4,3-c] Pyrimidine-8-Carboxylic Acid Ethyl Ester (C{sub 15}H{sub 12}N{sub 4}O{sub 2}S{sub 2}) is performed. The density of states at Fermi level equal to 5.50 (3.45) states/Ry cell, and the calculated bare electronic specific heat coefficient is found to be 0.95 (0.59) mJ/mole-K{sup 2} for the local density approximation (Engel–Vosko generalized gradient approximation). The electronic charge density space distribution contours in (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) planes were calculated. We find that there are two independent molecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit exhibit intramolecular C–H…O, C–H…N interactions. This intramolecular interaction is different in molecules A and B, where A molecule show C–H…O interaction while B molecule exhibit C–H…N interaction. We should emphasis that there is π–π interaction between the pyrimidine rings of the two neighbors B molecules gives extra strengths and stabilizations to the superamolecular structure. The calculated distance between the two neighbors pyrimidine rings found to be 3.345 Å, in good agreement with the measured one (3.424(1) Å). - Highlights: • Electronic structure, chemical bonding, and electron charge density were studied. • Density of states at Fermi level is 5.50 (3.45) states/Ry cell, for LDA (EVGGA). • Bare electronic specific heat coefficient is 0.95 (0.59) mJ/mole-K{sup 2} for LDA(EVGGA). • There are two independent molecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit.

  1. Diffusionless bonding of aluminum to type 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.D.

    1963-03-01

    High strength diffusionless bonds can be produced between 1S aluminum and oxidized 304 stainless steel by hot pressing and extrusion bonding. Both the hot pressing and extrusion bonding techniques have been developed to a point where consistently good bonds can be obtained. Although the bonding is performed at elevated temperatures (about 510 o C) a protective atmosphere is not required to produce strong bonds. The aluminum-stainless steel bonded specimens can be used to join aluminum and stainless steel by conventional welding. Welding close to the bond zone does not appear to affect the integrity of the bond. The extrusion bonding technique is covered by Canadian patent 702,438 January 26, 1965 and the hot press bonding technique by Canadian patent application 904,548 June 6, 1964. (author)

  2. Enhanced performance of Au/P3HT/ (bilayer dielectrics)/Si thin-film-transistor having gold nanoparticles chemically bonded to P3HT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Mon-Chi; Yeh, Shin-Chi; Chiu, Li-Ko; Chen, Yen-Heng; Ho, Jeng-Rong; Tsiang, Raymond Chien-Chao

    2012-03-01

    The charge transport enhancement of using poly(3-hexylthiophene) covalently bonded with gold nanoparticles as an active layer in a bottom-gate/top contact, Au/(P3HT)/(bilayer dielectric)/Si OTFT device has been studied. P3HT was synthesized via the modified Grignard metathesis method and functionalized to have a thiol terminal (P3HT(SH)). Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with sizes ranging from 2 to 10 nm were then formed via a reduction of HAuCl4 in the presence of P3HT(SH). Compared to the pristine P3HT, the AuNPs-containing P3HT composite materials have a higher energy level of HOMO and a smaller electrochemical bandgap E(g)chem. The smaller bandgap enhances the charge carrier mobility and the higher HOMO energy level indicates a reduced barrier and an increased injection rate for charge carrier at the source contact. Furthermore, the threshold voltage V(T) of AuNPs-containing P3HT samples remain nearly unchanged and their saturation current I(D) and the field-effect mobility are higher. An OTFT device fabricated with a composite sample containing 1.30% AuNPs has a carrier mobility and saturation current nearly two time higher than pristine P3HT.

  3. A novel bonding method for fabrication of PET planar nanofluidic chip with low dimension loss and high bonding strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Zhifu; Zou, Helin; Sun, Lei; Xu, Shenbo; Qi, Liping

    2015-01-01

    Plastic planar nanofluidic chips are becoming increasingly important for biological and chemical applications. However, the majority of the present bonding methods for planar nanofluidic chips suffer from high dimension loss and low bonding strength. In this work, a novel thermal bonding technique based on O 2 plasma and ethanol treatment was proposed. With the assistance of O 2 plasma and ethanol, the PET (polyethylene terephthalate) planar nanofluidic chip can be bonded at a low bonding temperature of 50 °C. To increase the bonding rate and bonding strength, the O 2 plasma parameters and thermal bonding parameters were optimized during the bonding process. The tensile test indicates that the bonding strength of the PET planar nanofluidic chip can reach 0.954 MPa, while the auto-fluorescence test demonstrates that there is no leakage or blockage in any of the bonded micro- or nanochannels. (paper)

  4. Understanding Bonds - Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rimmer, Nina Røhr

    2016-01-01

    a specified rate of interest during the life of the bond and to repay the face value of the bond (the principal) when it “matures,” or comes due. Among the types of bonds you can choose from are: Government securities, municipal bonds, corporate bonds, mortgage and asset-backed securities, federal agency...

  5. Intramolecular Energy Transfer, Charge Transfer & Hydrogen Bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ultrafast Dynamics of Chemical Reactions in Condensed Phase: Intramolecular Energy Transfer, Charge Transfer & Hydrogen Bond. Dipak K. Palit Radaition & Photochemistry Division Bhabha Atomic Research Centre Mumbai 400 085, India.

  6. The New Resonating Valence Bond Method for Ab-Initio Electronic Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Sorella, Sandro; Zen, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The Resonating Valence Bond theory of the chemical bond was introduced soon after the discovery of quantum mechanics and has contributed to explain the role of electron correlation within a particularly simple and intuitive approach where the chemical bond between two nearby atoms is described by one or more singlet electron pairs. In this chapter Pauling's resonating valence bond theory of the chemical bond is revisited within a new formulation, introduced by P.W. Anderson after the discover...

  7. Is there substituent cross-interaction effect in all the conjugated systems containing Cdbnd N polar bond? The substituent effects on the NMR chemical shifts of 2,5-disubstituted pyrimidines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hua; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Chun-Ni; Li, Meng-Yang

    2018-03-01

    The substituent cross-interaction effect in the substituted benzylidene anilines (p-Xsbnd C6H4sbnd CHdbnd Nsbnd C6H4sbnd Y-p) has been observed and widely investigated. In order to investigate whether the substituent cross-interaction effect exist in all the conjugated systems containing Cdbnd N polar bond, this paper employed 2-X-5-Y pyrimidines as the model compounds for study. The influences of substituents X and Y on the 1H NMR and 13C NMR chemical shifts of 2, 5-disubsitituted pyrimidines have been systematically investigated. Quantitative structure-chemical shifts relationship models have been built for δ(H4,6), δ(C2), δ(C4,6) and δ(C5) with four to six molecular descriptors. These models were confirmed of good stability and predictive performances by leave-one-out cross validation. This study indicates that the substituent effects of 2,5-disubstituted pyrimidines are much more complex than that of the substituted benzylidene anilines. More structural factors besides of Hammett parameter should be taken into consideration. Different from the substituted benzylidene anilines, the cross-interaction effect (Δσ2) of substituents X and Y has little contribution to δ(H4,6), δ(C2), δ(C5) and δ(C4,6) of 2,5-disubstituted pyrimidines.

  8. Hydrogen Bonds and Life in the Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladilo, Giovanni; Hassanali, Ali

    2018-01-03

    The scientific community is allocating more and more resources to space missions and astronomical observations dedicated to the search for life beyond Earth. This experimental endeavor needs to be backed by a theoretical framework aimed at defining universal criteria for the existence of life. With this aim in mind, we have explored which chemical and physical properties should be expected for life possibly different from the terrestrial one, but similarly sustained by genetic and catalytic molecules. We show that functional molecules performing genetic and catalytic tasks must feature a hierarchy of chemical interactions operating in distinct energy bands. Of all known chemical bonds and forces, only hydrogen bonds are able to mediate the directional interactions of lower energy that are needed for the operation of genetic and catalytic tasks. For this reason and because of the unique quantum properties of hydrogen bonding, the functional molecules involved in life processes are predicted to have extensive hydrogen-bonding capabilities. A molecular medium generating a hydrogen-bond network is probably essential to support the activity of the functional molecules. These hydrogen-bond requirements constrain the viability of hypothetical biochemistries alternative to the terrestrial one, provide thermal limits to life molecular processes, and offer a conceptual framework to define a transition from a "covalent-bond stage" to a "hydrogen-bond stage" in prebiotic chemistry.

  9. Hydrogen Bonds and Life in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The scientific community is allocating more and more resources to space missions and astronomical observations dedicated to the search for life beyond Earth. This experimental endeavor needs to be backed by a theoretical framework aimed at defining universal criteria for the existence of life. With this aim in mind, we have explored which chemical and physical properties should be expected for life possibly different from the terrestrial one, but similarly sustained by genetic and catalytic molecules. We show that functional molecules performing genetic and catalytic tasks must feature a hierarchy of chemical interactions operating in distinct energy bands. Of all known chemical bonds and forces, only hydrogen bonds are able to mediate the directional interactions of lower energy that are needed for the operation of genetic and catalytic tasks. For this reason and because of the unique quantum properties of hydrogen bonding, the functional molecules involved in life processes are predicted to have extensive hydrogen-bonding capabilities. A molecular medium generating a hydrogen-bond network is probably essential to support the activity of the functional molecules. These hydrogen-bond requirements constrain the viability of hypothetical biochemistries alternative to the terrestrial one, provide thermal limits to life molecular processes, and offer a conceptual framework to define a transition from a “covalent-bond stage” to a “hydrogen-bond stage” in prebiotic chemistry. PMID:29301382

  10. Development of beryllium bonds for plasma-facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franconi, E.; Ceccotti, G.C.; Magnoli, L.

    1991-10-01

    The use of graphite as a plasma facing surface is limited due to strong erosion produced by a combination of physical and chemical sputtering, self-sputtering and radiation enhanced sublimation. The most promising alternative material appears to be beryllium which offers a number of potential advantages over graphite: oxygen impurities abatement, reduced tritium retention and reduced sputtering erosion. The greatest advantage seems to be the rapid and economical repair of the surfaces by means of spray deposition. However, a number of questions remain to be answered concerning the use of beryllium in high power tokamaks. Foremost amongst these are melting of the facing during disruptions, controversial data on self-sputtering yields, neutron irradiation effects, high operational thermal stresses and potential safety problems. This paper focuses on the techniques used to bond beryllium to structural and heat sink materials, and the characterization of the bonding material obtained. In tests of Be bonding to stainless steel and copper by the use of brazing alloys, best results were obtained with a silver-copper eutectic alloy. It was noted that the high temperature capability of the materials prepared by this method is limited by the performance of the brazing alloys at the operating temperature. To avoid this problem, a joining process known as solid state reaction bonding is being developed.

  11. Chemical bonding and quadrupole splittings of 57Fe Moessbauer spectrum in active sites of oxyhemoglobin as calculated by Xα-discrete variation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuryeva, E. I.

    2008-01-01

    Results of quantum-chemical X α -discrete variation method (X α -DVM) calculations of interaction parameters between iron (II) and oxygen molecule in active sites of α- and β-subunits of oxyhemoglobin are presented within three models: without extra electron and in spin-unrestricted mode (model I); without extra electron and in spin-restricted mode (model II); with extra electrons in spin-unrestricted mode (model III). The electronic structure and 57 Fe quadrupole splitting ΔE Q for the active site of α- and β-subunits (within model I) and only of the α-subunit (within models II and III) of oxyhemoglobin are calculated. The differences in ΔE Q values for these three models are discussed.

  12. Chemical bonding and quadrupole splittings of {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectrum in active sites of oxyhemoglobin as calculated by X{sub {alpha}}-discrete variation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuryeva, E. I., E-mail: yuryeva@ihim.uran.ru [Institute of Solid State Chemistry of the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-15

    Results of quantum-chemical X{sub {alpha}}-discrete variation method (X{sub {alpha}}-DVM) calculations of interaction parameters between iron (II) and oxygen molecule in active sites of {alpha}- and {beta}-subunits of oxyhemoglobin are presented within three models: without extra electron and in spin-unrestricted mode (model I); without extra electron and in spin-restricted mode (model II); with extra electrons in spin-unrestricted mode (model III). The electronic structure and {sup 57}Fe quadrupole splitting {Delta}E{sub Q} for the active site of {alpha}- and {beta}-subunits (within model I) and only of the {alpha}-subunit (within models II and III) of oxyhemoglobin are calculated. The differences in {Delta}E{sub Q} values for these three models are discussed.

  13. Wire bonding in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Harman, George G

    2010-01-01

    Wire Bonding in Microelectronics, Third Edition, has been thoroughly revised to help you meet the challenges of today's small-scale and fine-pitch microelectronics. This authoritative guide covers every aspect of designing, manufacturing, and evaluating wire bonds engineered with cutting-edge techniques. In addition to gaining a full grasp of bonding technology, you'll learn how to create reliable bonds at exceedingly high yields, test wire bonds, solve common bonding problems, implement molecular cleaning methods, and much more. Coverage includes: Ultrasonic bonding systems and technologies, including high-frequency systems Bonding wire metallurgy and characteristics, including copper wire Wire bond testing Gold-aluminum intermetallic compounds and other interface reactions Gold and nickel-based bond pad plating materials and problems Cleaning to improve bondability and reliability Mechanical problems in wire bonding High-yield, fine-pitch, specialized-looping, soft-substrate, and extreme-temperature wire bo...

  14. Recent advances in C-S bond formation via C-H bond functionalization and decarboxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chao; Zhang, Pengfei; Sun, Qiang; Bai, Shiqiang; Hor, T S Andy; Liu, Xiaogang

    2015-01-07

    The development of mild and general methods for C-S bond formation has received significant attention because the C-S bond is indispensable in many important biological and pharmaceutical compounds. Early examples for the synthesis of C-S bonds are generally limited to the condensation reaction between a metal thiolate and an organic halide. Recent chemical approaches for C-S bond formation, based upon direct C-H bond functionalization and decarboxylative reactions, not only provide new insights into the mechanistic understanding of C-S coupling reactions but also allow the synthesis of sulfur-containing compounds from more effective synthetic routes with high atom economy. This review intends to explore recent advances in C-S bond formation via C-H functionalization and decarboxylation, and the growing opportunities they present to the construction of complex chemical scaffolds for applications encompassing natural product synthesis, synthetic methodology development, and functional materials as well as nanotechnology.

  15. Titanium: light, strong, and white

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Laurel; Bedinger, George

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a strong silver-gray metal that is highly resistant to corrosion and is chemically inert. It is as strong as steel but 45 percent lighter, and it is twice as strong as aluminum but only 60 percent heavier. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has a very high refractive index, which means that it has high light-scattering ability. As a result, TiO2 imparts whiteness, opacity, and brightness to many products. ...Because of the unique physical properties of titanium metal and the whiteness provided by TiO2, titanium is now used widely in modern industrial societies.

  16. Hydrogen Bonding to Alkanes: Computational Evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Steen; Olesen, Solveig Gaarn

    2009-01-01

    The structural, vibrational, and energetic properties of adducts of alkanes and strong cationic proton donors were studied with composite ab initio calculations. Hydrogen bonding in [D-H+ H-alkyl] adducts contributes to a significant degree to the interactions between the two components, which...... are stronger in adducts of isobutane and in adducts of stronger acids. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in protonated long-chain alcohols manifests itself in the same manner as intermolecular hydrogen bonding and can be equally strong. Udgivelsesdato: 12 juni 2009...

  17. Phase transitions in liquids with directed intermolecular bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Son, L.; Ryltcev, R.

    2005-01-01

    Liquids with quasi - chemical bonding between molecules are described in terms of vertex model. It is shown that this bonding results in liquid - liquid phase transition, which occurs between phases with different mean density of intermolecular bonds. The transition may be suggested to be a universal phenomena for those liquids.

  18. Structures, bonding and reactivity of iron and manganese high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    attributed to the intricate metal–oxygen bonding. By thoroughly probing the bonding in all these species, their reactivity towards common chemical reactions such as C–H activation and oxygen atom transfer are discussed. Keywords. Electronic structures and bonding; DFT calculations; high-valent iron and manganese; oxo- ...

  19. Primary retention following nuclear recoil in β-decay: Proposed synthesis of a metastable rare gas oxide ((38)ArO4) from ((38)ClO4(-)) and the evolution of chemical bonding over the nuclear transmutation reaction path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Matthew J; Matta, Chérif F

    2014-12-01

    Argon tetroxide (ArO4) is the last member of the N=50 e(-) isoelectronic and isosteric series of ions: SiO4(4-), PO4(3-), SO4(2-), and ClO4(-). A high level computational study demonstrated that while ArO4 is kinetically stable it has a considerable positive enthalpy of formation (of ~298kcal/mol) (Lindh et al., 1999. J. Phys. Chem. A 103, pp. 8295-8302) confirming earlier predictions by Pyykkö (1990. Phys. Scr. 33, pp. 52-53). ArO4 can be expected to be difficult to synthesize by traditional chemistry due to its metastability and has not yet been synthesized at the time of writing. A computational investigation of the changes in the chemical bonding of chlorate (ClO4(-)) when the central chlorine atom undergoes a nuclear transmutation from the unstable artificial chlorine isotope (38)Cl to the stable rare argon isotope (38)Ar through β-decay, hence potentially leading to the formation of ArO4, is reported. A mathematical model is presented that allows for the prediction of yields following the recoil of a nucleus upon ejecting a β-electron. It is demonstrated that below a critical angle between the ejected β-electron and that of the accompanying antineutrino their respective linear momentums can cancel to such an extent as imparting a recoil to the daughter atom insufficient for breaking the Ar-O bond. As a result, a primary retention yield of ~1% of ArO4 is predicted following the nuclear disintegration. The study is conducted at the quadratic configuration interaction with single and double excitations [QCISD/6-311+G(3df)] level of theory followed by an analysis of the electron density by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). Crossed potential energy surfaces (PES) were used to construct a PES from the metastable ArO4 ground singlet state to the Ar-O bond dissociation product ArO3+O((3)P) from which the predicted barrier to dissociation is ca. 22kcal/mol and the exothermic reaction energy is ca. 28kcal/mol [(U)MP2/6-311+G(d)]. Copyright © 2014

  20. Structural, spectroscopic, and multiconfigurational quantum chemical investigations of the electron-rich metal-metal triple-bonded Tc(2)X(4)(PMe(3))(4) (X = Cl, Br) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poineau, Frederic; Forster, Paul M; Todorova, Tanya K; Gagliardi, Laura; Sattelberger, Alfred P; Czerwinski, Kenneth R

    2010-07-19

    The compounds Tc(2)Cl(4)(PMe(3))(4) and Tc(2)Br(4)(PMe(3))(4) were formed from the reaction between (n-Bu(4)N)(2)Tc(2)X(8) (X = Cl, Br) and trimethylphosphine. The Tc(II) dinuclear species were characterized by single-crystal XRD, UV-visible spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry techniques, and the results are compared to those obtained from density functional theory and multiconfigurational (CASSCF/CASPT2) quantum chemical studies. The compound Tc(2)Cl(4)(PMe(3))(4) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/c [a = 17.9995(9) A, b = 9.1821(5) A, c = 17.0090(9) A, beta = 115.4530(10) degrees ] and is isostructural to M(2)Cl(4)(PMe(3))(4) (M = Re, Mo, W) and to Tc(2)Br(4)(PMe(3))(4). The metal-metal distance (2.1318(2) A) is similar to the one found in Tc(2)Br(4)(PMe(3))(4) (2.1316(5) A). The calculated molecular structures of the ground states are in excellent agreement with the structures determined experimentally. Calculations of effective bond orders for Tc(2)X(8)(2-) and Tc(2)X(4)(PMe(3))(4) (X = Cl, Br) indicate stronger pi bonds in the Tc(2)(4+) core than in Tc(2)(6+) core. The electronic spectra were recorded in benzene and show a series of low intensity bands in the range 10 000-26 000 cm(-1). Assignment of the bands as well as computing their excitation energies and intensities were performed at both TD-DFT and CASSCF/CASPT2 levels of theory. Calculations predict that the lowest energy band corresponds to the delta* --> sigma* transition, the difference between calculated and experimental values being 228 cm(-1) for X = Cl and 866 cm(-1) for X = Br. The next bands are attributed to delta* --> pi*, delta --> sigma*, and delta --> pi* transitions. The cyclic voltammograms exhibit two reversible waves and indicate that Tc(2)Br(4)(PMe(3))(4) exhibits more positive oxidation potentials than Tc(2)Cl(4)(PMe(3))(4.) This phenomenon is discussed and ascribed to stronger metal (d) to halide (d) back bonding in the bromo complex. Further analysis indicates that Tc

  1. Experimental and quantum chemical studies on Nsbnd Hsbnd sbnd sbnd O hydrogen bonded helical chain type Morpholinium 2-chloro-4-nitrobenzoate: A phasematchable organic nonlinear optical material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, S.; Thirupugalmani, K.; Shanmugam, G.; Kannan, V.; Brahadeeswaran, S.

    2018-03-01

    We report on the studies performed on Morpholinium 2-chloro-4-nitrobenzoate (M2C4N), a second order nonlinear optical (NLO) material, which has been proved to crystallize with chiral structure as compared to its other two variants. The synthesized powder was studied for its composition, crystalline phase and NLO efficiency and phasematchability. The solubility and the metastable zone width (MSZW) of the title compound were measured for the growth of bulk crystals of M2C4N. A smoky pattern observed in the middle region of the crystals that could prevent it from optical applications was greatly reduced, through suitable modifications in the growth process. The optical properties such as luminescence and laser damage threshold resistance were studied for the bulk crystals whereas the molecular vibrations of M2C4N were studied through Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and FT-Raman spectral analysis using the polycrystalline powders derived from the single crystals. In addition, quantum chemical studies on M2C4N molecule were performed by using density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311++G (d, p) basis set. These studies showed that the M2C4N is a phasematchable NLO crystal and could be used for device fabrication.

  2. DETERMINANTS OF ORI001 TYPE GOVERNMENT BOND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosandi Yulius

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The need to build a strong bond market is amenable, especially after the 1997 crises. This paper analyzes the influence of deposit interest rate, foreign exchange rates, and Composite Stock Price Index on yield-to-maturity of Bond Series Retail ORI001, employing monthly data from Bloomberg information service, 2006(8 to 2008(12, using Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity type models. It finds the evidence that deposit interest rate and exchange rate have positive significant influence on the bond, and that stock index has a negative significant influence on the bond. It also finds that Deposit Interest Rate, exchange rate, and the stock index significantly influence the bond altogether.Keywords: Interest rate, exchange rate, composite stock price index, yield-to-maturity, bondJEL classification numbers: G12, G15

  3. An All-Integrated Anode via Interlinked Chemical Bonding between Double-Shelled-Yolk-Structured Silicon and Binder for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yajie; Tai, Zhixin; Zhou, Tengfei; Sencadas, Vitor; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Guo, Zaiping; Liu, Hua Kun

    2017-11-01

    The concept of an all-integrated design with multifunctionalization is widely employed in optoelectronic devices, sensors, resonator systems, and microfluidic devices, resulting in benefits for many ongoing research projects. Here, maintaining structural/electrode stability against large volume change by means of an all-integrated design is realized for silicon anodes. An all-integrated silicon anode is achieved via multicomponent interlinking among carbon@void@silica@silicon (CVSS) nanospheres and cross-linked carboxymethyl cellulose and citric acid polymer binder (c-CMC-CA). Due to the additional protection from the silica layer, CVSS is superior to the carbon@void@silicon (CVS) electrode in terms of long-term cyclability. The as-prepared all-integrated CVSS electrode exhibits high mechanical strength, which can be ascribed to the high adhesivity and ductility of c-CMC-CA binder and the strong binding energy between CVSS and c-CMC-CA, as calculated based on density functional theory (DFT). This electrode exhibits a high reversible capacity of 1640 mA h g -1 after 100 cycles at a current density of 1 A g -1 , high rate performance, and long-term cycling stability with 84.6% capacity retention after 1000 cycles at 5 A g -1 . © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. X hydrogen bonds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sigma electrons, can be hydrogen bond acceptors.11–14. The recent IUPAC report and recommendation on hydro gen bond have recognised the diverse nature of hydro- gen bond donors and acceptors.13,14. Unlike methane, hydrogen bonding by higher alkanes has not received much attention. One of the earlier works.

  5. Bonding and XPS chemical shifts in ZrSiO4 versus SiO2 and ZrO2: Charge transfer and electrostatic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guittet, M.J.; Gautier-Soyer, M.; Crocombette, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The degree of ionic/covalent character in oxides has a great influence on the electronic structure and the material's properties. A simple phenomenological rule is currently used to predict the evolution of covalence/ionicity in mixed oxides compared to the parent ones, and is also widely used to interpret the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) binding-energy shifts of the cations in terms of charge transfer. We test the validity of this simple rule and its application to XPS of mixed oxides with a prototypical system: zircon ZrSiO 4 and parent oxides ZrO 2 and SiO 2 . The ionic charges on Si, Zr, and O were extracted from the density functional theory in the local density approximation calculations in the plane-wave formalism. In agreement with the predictions of the phenomenological rule, the most ionic cation (Zr) becomes more ionic in ZrSiO 4 than in ZrO 2 , while the more covalent one (Si) experiences a corresponding increase in covalence with respect to SiO 2 . The XPS chemical shifts of the O 1s, Si 2p, and Zr 3d 5/2 photoelectron lines in the three oxides were measured and the respective contributions of charge transfer and electrostatic effects (initial state), as well as extra-atomic relaxation effects (final state) evaluated. The validity of the phenomenological rule of mixed oxides used in x-ray electron spectroscopy as well as the opportunity to use the O1s binding-energy shifts to derive a scale of covalence in silicates is discussed

  6. Band structure of the solid state - interpretation of the nature of the chemical bond in some transition metal compounds in terms of energy band structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neckel, A.; Schwarz, K.; Eibler, R.; Weinberger, P.; Rastl, P.

    1975-01-01

    The nature of chemical binding for some transition metal compounds (ScN, ScO, TiC, TiN, Tio, VC, VN, VO) with NaCl structure is discussed in terms of energy band structure calculations. The discussion is based on the wave functions and energy eigenvalues, as calculated by the 'Quasi self sonsistent APW method' as well as on the energy eigen values and eigen vectors resulting from the Slater-Koster LCAO-Tight binding interpolation scheme. The LCAO-TB l-like partial density of states can be used to analyse the valence bands. This analysis shows, that the deepest valence band has predominantly s-character. The following bands, which can be derived in essence from the atomic 2p states of the of the non metal are characterized not only by the partial p-like density of states but also by a substantial contribution from the d-like partial density of states, which is decreasing going from a particular Carbide to the corresponding Oxide. For the valence bands, which can be associated with the atomic 3d states of the metal, the density of states exhibits besides the partial d-density of states small contributions from the partial p-like density of states. The decomposition of the d-like partial density of states into an esub(g)-like and a tsub(2g)-like contribution is discussed. By analyzing the APW crystal wave functions the partial l-like charges inside each atomic sphere can be obtained. If the APW total charges within the atomic spheres are compared with the charges of a hypothetical crystal, which correspond to a superposition of the charge densities of the neutral atoms, a transfer of electrons from the metal to the non-metal sphere is found for all compounds under investigation. (orig.) [de

  7. Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, F.

    1993-12-07

    Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric (LCP) compositions of matter are described. LCP backbones are combined with liquid crystalline (LC) side chains in a manner which maximizes molecular ordering through interdigitation of the side chains, thereby yielding materials which are predicted to have superior mechanical properties over existing LCPs. The theoretical design of LCPs having such characteristics includes consideration of the spacing distance between side chains along the backbone, the need for rigid sections in the backbone and in the side chains, the degree of polymerization, the length of the side chains, the regularity of the spacing of the side chains along the backbone, the interdigitation of side chains in sub-molecular strips, the packing of the side chains on one or two sides of the backbone to which they are attached, the symmetry of the side chains, the points of attachment of the side chains to the backbone, the flexibility and size of the chemical group connecting each side chain to the backbone, the effect of semiflexible sections in the backbone and the side chains, and the choice of types of dipolar and/or hydrogen bonding forces in the backbones and the side chains for easy alignment. 27 figures.

  8. Suppression of interfacial voids formation during silane (SiH4)-based silicon oxide bonding with a thin silicon nitride capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Hong; Bao, Shuyu; Wang, Yue; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.; Seng Tan, Chuan

    2018-01-01

    The material properties and bonding behavior of silane-based silicon oxide layers deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition were investigated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was employed to determine the chemical composition of the silicon oxide films. The incorporation of hydroxyl (-OH) groups and moisture absorption demonstrates a strong correlation with the storage duration for both as-deposited and annealed silicon oxide films. It is observed that moisture absorption is prevalent in the silane-based silicon oxide film due to its porous nature. The incorporation of -OH groups and moisture absorption in the silicon oxide films increase with the storage time (even in clean-room environments) for both as-deposited and annealed silicon oxide films. Due to silanol condensation and silicon oxidation reactions that take place at the bonding interface and in the bulk silicon, hydrogen (a byproduct of these reactions) is released and diffused towards the bonding interface. The trapped hydrogen forms voids over time. Additionally, the absorbed moisture could evaporate during the post-bond annealing of the bonded wafer pair. As a consequence, defects, such as voids, form at the bonding interface. To address the problem, a thin silicon nitride capping film was deposited on the silicon oxide layer before bonding to serve as a diffusion barrier to prevent moisture absorption and incorporation of -OH groups from the ambient. This process results in defect-free bonded wafers.

  9. Adhesive wafer bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklaus, F.; Stemme, G.; Lu, J.-Q.; Gutmann, R. J.

    2006-02-01

    Wafer bonding with intermediate polymer adhesives is an important fabrication technique for advanced microelectronic and microelectromechanical systems, such as three-dimensional integrated circuits, advanced packaging, and microfluidics. In adhesive wafer bonding, the polymer adhesive bears the forces involved to hold the surfaces together. The main advantages of adhesive wafer bonding include the insensitivity to surface topography, the low bonding temperatures, the compatibility with standard integrated circuit wafer processing, and the ability to join different types of wafers. Compared to alternative wafer bonding techniques, adhesive wafer bonding is simple, robust, and low cost. This article reviews the state-of-the-art polymer adhesive wafer bonding technologies, materials, and applications.

  10. Thermoelectric, band structure, chemical bonding and dispersion of optical constants of new metal chalcogenides Ba{sub 4}CuGa{sub 5}Q{sub 12} (Q=S, Se)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [New Technologies – Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Azam, Sikander, E-mail: sikander.physicst@gmail.com [New Technologies – Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-01

    The electronic structure and dispersion of optical constants of the Ba{sub 4}CuGa{sub 5}S{sub 12} and Ba{sub 4}CuGa{sub 5}Se{sub 12} compounds were calculated by the first-principles full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FPLAPW) method. We employed the local density approximation (LDA), generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and Engel–Vosko GGA (EVGGA) to calculate the electronic structures, Fermi surface, thermoelectric, chemical bonding and dispersion of optical constants of these compounds. By investigating the influence of replacing S by Se, it has been found that the charge density around ‘Ga’ is greater in Ba{sub 4}CuGa{sub 5}Se{sub 12} than Ba{sub 4}CuGa{sub 5}S{sub 12}. Fermi surface of Ba{sub 4}CuGa{sub 5}S{sub 12} consists of an electronic sheet only because there is no empty region while Ba{sub 4}CuGa{sub 5}Se{sub 12} contains both holes and electronic sheets because this compound contains both empty and shaded region. As we replace S by Se the heights of the peaks decreases as a results the reflectivity also decreases. It is noticed that the reflectivity is over 68% (60%) for Ba{sub 4}CuGa{sub 5}S{sub 12} (Ba{sub 4}CuGa{sub 5}Se{sub 12}) compounds within the energy range studied. This implies that the material will serve as a good reflector. By replacing S by Se the figure of merit values increases from 0.97 to 1.0, which shows the good thermoelectric behavior of both compounds. - Highlights: • DFT-FPLAPW method used for calculating the properties. • For predicting the chemical bonding the charge density behavior is studied in 2D. • The optical properties were also calculated and analyzed. • The Fermi surface is composed of two bands crossing along the EF level. • The thermoelectric properties have also been calculated.

  11. The challenge of bonding treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2004-01-01

    Wood products are quite durable if exposure to moisture is minimized; however, most uses of wood involve considerable exposure to moisture. To preserve the wood, chemicals are used to minimize moisture pickup, to prevent insect attack, and/or to resist microbial growth. The chemicals used as preservatives can interfere with adhesive bonds to wood. Given the many...

  12. The role of weak hydrogen bonds in chiral recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuderi, Debora; Le Barbu-Debus, Katia; Zehnacker, A

    2011-10-28

    Chiral recognition has been studied in neutral or ionic weakly bound complexes isolated in the gas phase by combining laser spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. Neutral complexes of the two enantiomers of lactic ester derivatives with chiral chromophores have been formed in a supersonic expansion. Their structure has been elucidated by means of IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy in the 3 μm region. In both systems described here, the main interaction ensuring the cohesion of the complex is a strong hydrogen bond between the chromophore and methyl-lactate. However, an additional hydrogen bond of much weaker strength plays a discriminative role between the two enantiomers. For example, the 1:1 heterochiral complex between R-(+)-2-naphthyl-ethanol and S-(+) methyl-lactate is observed, in contrast with the 1:1 homochiral complex which lacks this additional hydrogen bond. On the other hand, the same kind of insertion structures is formed for the complex between S-(±)-cis-1-amino-indan-2-ol and the two enantiomers of methyl-lactate, but an additional addition complex is formed for R-methyl-lactate only. This selectivity rests on the formation of a weak CHπ interaction which is not possible for the other enantiomer. The protonated dimers of Cinchona alkaloids, namely quinine, quinidine, cinchonine and cinchonidine, have been isolated in an ion trap and studied by IRMPD spectroscopy in the region of the ν(OH) and ν(NH) stretch modes. The protonation site is located on the alkaloid nitrogen which acts as a strong hydrogen bond donor in all the dimers studied. While the nature of the intermolecular hydrogen bond is similar in the homochiral and heterochiral complexes, the heterochiral complex displays an additional weak CHO hydrogen bond located on its neutral part, which results in slightly different spectroscopic fingerprints in the ν(OH) stretch region. This first spectroscopic evidence of chiral recognition in protonated dimers opens the way to the

  13. Mechanisms and time-resolved dynamics for trihydrogen cation (H 3 +) formation from organic molecules in strong laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekanayake, N.; Nairat, M.; Kaderiya, B.; Feizollah, P.; Jochim, B.; Severt, T.; Berry, B.; Kanaka Raju, P.; Carnes, K. D.; Pathak, S.; Rolles, D.; Rudenko, A.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Jackson, J. E.; Levine, B. G.; Dantus, M.

    2017-04-01

    Strong-field laser-matter interactions often lead to exotic chemical reactions. H3+formation from organic molecules is one such case which requires multiple bonds to break and form. Here, we present the first experimental evidence for the existence of two different reaction mechanisms for H3+formation from organic molecules irradiated by a strong-field laser. The assignment of the two different mechanisms was accomplished through the strong-field ionization of methanol isotopomers, ethylene glycol, and acetone. Our findings are supported by femtosecond time-resolved measurements, coincidence measurements, and ab initio calculations with the most plausible transition states involved in the two mechanisms. This exotic chemical reaction is important as it shows that a strong laser field can not only selectively break multiple bonds but also can lead to the formation of multiple new bonds within an extremely short timescale, on the order of 100 femtoseconds. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grants DOE SISGR (DE-SC0002325) and DE-FG02-86ER13491.

  14. Facilitation of Nanoscale Thermal Transport by Hydrogen Bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Thermal transport performance at the nanoscale and/or of biomaterials is essential to the success of many new technologies including nanoelectronics, biomedical devices, and various nanocomposites. Due to complicated microstructures and chemical bonding, thermal transport process in these materials has not been well understood yet. In terms of chemical bonding, it is well known that the strength of atomic bonding can significantly affect thermal transport across materials or across interfaces...

  15. Constructing Models in Teaching of Chemical Bonds: Ionic Bond, Covalent Bond, Double and Triple Bonds, Hydrogen Bond and Molecular Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uce, Musa

    2015-01-01

    Studies in chemistry education show that chemistry topics are considered as abstract, complicated and hard to understand by students. For this reason, it is important to develop new materials and use them in classes for better understanding of abstract concepts. Moving from this point, a student-centered research guided by a teacher was conducted…

  16. Emergent property of high hardness for C-rich ruthenium carbides: partial covalent Ru-Ru bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunhong; Yu, Hongyu; Kuo, Bao; Ma, Shuailing; Xiao, Xuehui; Li, Da; Duan, Defang; Jin, Xilian; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2018-02-28

    Hard materials are being investigated all the time by combining transition metals with light elements. Combining a structure search with first-principles functional calculations, we first discovered three stable stoichiometric C-rich ruthenium carbides in view of three synthesis routes, namely, the ambient phases of Ru 2 C 3 and RuC, and two high pressure phases of RuC 4 . There is a phase transition of RuC 4 from the P3[combining macron]m1 structure to the R3[combining macron]m structure above 98 GPa. The calculations of elastic constants and phonon dispersions show their mechanical and dynamical stability. The large elastic modulus, high Debye temperature and the estimated hardness values suggest that these hard ruthenium carbides have good mechanical properties. The analyses of electronic structure and chemical bonding indicate that chemical bonding, not carbon content, is the key factor for the hardness in these metallic C-rich ruthenium carbides. The partial covalent Ru-C bonds and strong covalent C-C bonds are responsible for the high hardness. Moreover, the emergence of partial covalent Ru-Ru bonds can enhance the hardness of RuC, while the ionic Ru-Ru bonds can weaken the hardness of Ru 2 C 3 .

  17. Shear bond strength of four commercial bonding systems to cp Ti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishima, A; Fujishima, Y; Ferracane, J L

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of veneering composite to commercially pure titanium (cp Ti) using several different bonding systems and a post-cure heat treatment. Four commercial bonding systems (Cesead, Kuraray; New Metacolor, Sun Medical; Silicaoater MD, Kulzer; Termoresin LC II, GC) were evaluated. Bonding was attempted with the opaque resin provided by each bonding system as well as with the New Metacolor opaque resin. New Metacolor resin composite was used for the veneering composite. Half of the specimens were subjected to a post-cure heat treatment at 100 degrees C for 30 min. The shear bond strengths were tested after aging the specimens in water at 37 degrees C for 1 d and also after thermocycling for 16.5 d (20,000 cycles). Strong bonds, exceeding 20 MPa, were achieved with all of the bonding systems with the exception of Thermoresin LC II, which is designed for noble metals. Bond strengths were only increased by the post-cure heat treatment for the New Metacolor system. Thermocycling caused a significant reduction in bond strength for the New Metacolor adn the Thermoresin LC II systems. The use of the New Metacolor opaque resin produced increased bonding for the Silicoater MD and the opaque resin produced increased bonding for the Silicoater MD and the Cesead systems, but the effect was eliminated after thermocycling. Strong, durable bonds can be achieved between composite and sandblasted cp Ti, thus enhancing the usefulness of this metal for esthetic resin-veneered crowns and other fixed prosthetics.

  18. Spectroscopic, DFT, and XRD Studies of Hydrogen Bonds in N-Unsubstituted 2-Aminobenzamides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malose Jack Mphahlele

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The structures of the mono- and the dihalogenated N-unsubstituted 2-aminobenzamides were characterized by means of the spectroscopic (1H-NMR, UV-Vis, FT-IR, and FT-Raman and X-ray crystallographic techniques complemented with a density functional theory (DFT method. The hindered rotation of the C(O–NH2 single bond resulted in non-equivalence of the amide protons and therefore two distinct resonances of different chemical shift values in the 1H-NMR spectra of these compounds were observed. 2-Amino-5-bromobenzamide (ABB as a model confirmed the presence of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds between oxygen and the amine hydrogen. However, intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the carbonyl oxygen and the amine protons was not observed in the solution phase due to a rapid exchange of these two protons with the solvent and fast rotation of the Ar–NH2 single bond. XRD also revealed the ability of the amide unit of these compounds to function as a hydrogen bond donor and acceptor simultaneously to form strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding between oxygen of one molecule and the NH moiety of the amine or amide group of the other molecule and between the amine nitrogen and the amide hydrogen of different molecules. DFT calculations using the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p basis set revealed that the conformer (A with oxygen and 2-amine on the same side predominates possibly due to the formation of a six-membered intramolecular ring, which is assisted by hydrogen bonding as observed in the single crystal XRD structure.

  19. An Evaluation of Peptide-Bond Isosteres

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhary, Amit; Raines, Ronald T.

    2011-01-01

    Peptide-bond isosteres can enable a deep interrogation of the structure and function of a peptide or protein by amplifying or attenuating particular chemical properties. In this minireview, the electronic, structural, and conformational attributes of four such isosteres—thioamides, esters, alkenes, and fluoroalkenes—are examined in detail. In particular, the ability of these isosteres to partake in noncovalent interactions is compared with that of the peptide bond. The consequential perturbat...

  20. Electronic states and nature of bonding in the molecule MoC by all electron ab initio calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Irene; Gingerich, Karl A.

    1997-01-01

    , and the vibrational frequency as 997 cm(-1). The chemical bond in the (3) Sigma(-) electronic ground state has triple bond character due to the formation of delocalized bonding rr and a orbitals. The chemical bond in the MoC molecule is polar with charge transfer from Mo to C, giving rise to a dipole moment of 6.15 D...

  1. Australia's Bond Home Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Anil V. Mishra; Umaru B. Conteh

    2014-01-01

    This paper constructs the float adjusted measure of home bias and explores the determinants of bond home bias by employing the International Monetary Fund's high quality dataset (2001 to 2009) on cross-border bond investment. The paper finds that Australian investors' prefer investing in countries with higher economic development and more developed bond markets. Exchange rate volatility appears to be an impediment for cross-border bond investment. Investors prefer investing in countries with ...

  2. Variance Risk Premia on Stocks and Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, Philippe; Sabtchevsky, Petar; Vedolin, Andrea

    Investors in fixed income markets are willing to pay a very large premium to be hedged against shocks in expected volatility and the size of this premium can be studied through variance swaps. Using thirty years of option and high-frequency data, we document the following novel stylized facts......: First, exposure to bond market volatility is strongly priced with a Sharpe ratio of -1.8, 20% higher than what is observed in the equity market. Second, while there is strong co-movement between equity and bond market variance risk, there are distinct periods when the bond variance risk premium...... is different from the equity variance risk premium. Third, the conditional correlation between stock and bond market variance risk premium switches sign often and ranges between -60% and +90%. We then show that these stylized facts pose a challenge to standard consumption-based asset pricing models....

  3. The correlation theory of the chemical bond

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Szalay, S.; Barcza, G.; Szilvási, T.; Veis, Libor; Legeza, Ö.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, MAY 2017 (2017), č. článku 2237. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-12052S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : density matrix * quantum chemistry * theoretical model Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  4. Determinants Of Ori001 Type Government Bond

    OpenAIRE

    Yulius, Yosandi

    2011-01-01

    The need to build a strong bond market is amenable, especially after the 1997 crises. This paper analyzes the influence of deposit interest rate, foreign exchange rates, and Composite Stock Price Index on yield-to-maturity of Bond Series Retail ORI001, employing monthly data from Bloomberg information service, 2006(8) to 2008(12), using Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity type models. It finds the evidence that deposit interest rate and exchange rate have positive signif...

  5. The relationship between bond ionicity, lattice energy, coefficient of thermal expansion and microwave dielectric properties of Nd(Nb(1-x)Sb(x))O4 ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Yonggui; Wang, Xiuyu

    2015-06-28

    The crystalline structure refinement, chemical bond ionicity, lattice energy and coefficient of thermal expansion were carried out for Nd(Nb(1-x)Sb(x))O4 ceramics with a monoclinic fergusonite structure to investigate the correlations between the crystalline structure, phase stability, bond ionicity, lattice energy, coefficient of thermal expansion, and microwave dielectric properties. The bond ionicity, lattice energy, and coefficient of thermal expansion of Nd(Nb(1-x)Sb(x))O4 ceramics were calculated using a semiempirical method based on the complex bond theory. The phase structure stability varied with the lattice energy which was resulted by the substitution constant of Sb(5+). With the increasing of the Sb(5+) contents, the decrease of Nb/Sb-O bond ionicity was observed, which could be contributed to the electric polarization. The ε(r) had a close relationship with the Nb/Sb-O bond ionicity. The increase of the Q×f and |τ(f)| values could be attributed to the lattice energy and the coefficient of thermal expansion. The microwave dielectric properties of Nd(Nb(1-x)Sb(x))O4 ceramics with the monoclinic fergusonite structure were strongly dependent on the chemical bond ionicity, lattice energy and coefficient of thermal expansion.

  6. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to glass-ionomer cement using self-etching bonding agents with different pH: In vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Rajan, Karunamoorthy Jeyavel; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu; Porkodi, Ilango

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the bonding ability of composite to unset glass-ionomer cement (GIC) using different self-etching bonding systems. Materials and Methods: One hundred samples of composite bonded to unset GIC were prepared and were divided into four groups. In Group A, composite was bonded to unset GIC employing a strong (pH 1) self-etch primer was used. In Group B, intermediary strong (pH 1.4) self-etch primer was employed. In Group C and D, mild (pH 2) and (pH 2.2) self-etch primer was employed. Shear bond strength analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: Statistical analysis performed with one way analysis of variance and Tukey's test showed that the bond strength of composite to unset GIC was significantly higher for the mild self-etch primer group. In addition, energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis was used to determine the composition of various structural phases identified by FE-SEM along the GIC-bonding agent interfaces. Conclusion: Hence this present study concludes that clinically the use of mild self-etching bonding agent over unset GIC has improved bond strength compared to the use of strong and intermediate self-etching bonding agent. PMID:22368331

  7. IMPACT OF PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL MUD CONTAMINATION ON WELLBORE CEMENT- FORMATION SHEAR BOND STRENGTH Authors: Arome Oyibo1 and Mileva Radonjic1 * 1. Craft and Hawkins Department of Petroleum Engineering, 2131 Patrick F. Taylor Hall, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, aoyibo1@tigers.lsu.edu, mileva@lsu.edu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyibo, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    Wellbore cement has been used to provide well integrity through zonal isolation in oil & gas wells and geothermal wells. Cementing is also used to provide mechanical support for the casing and protect the casing from corrosive fluids. Failure of cement could be caused by several factors ranging from poor cementing, failure to completely displace the drilling fluids to failure on the path of the casing. A failed cement job could result in creation of cracks and micro annulus through which produced fluids could migrate to the surface which could lead to sustained casing pressure, contamination of fresh water aquifer and blow out in some cases. In addition, cement failures could risk the release of chemicals substances from hydraulic fracturing into fresh water aquifer during the injection process. To achieve proper cementing, the drilling fluid should be completely displaced by the cement slurry. However, this is hard to achieve in practice, some mud is usually left on the wellbore which ends up contaminating the cement afterwards. The purpose of this experimental study is to investigate the impact of both physical and chemical mud contaminations on cement-formation bond strength for different types of formations. Physical contamination occurs when drilling fluids (mud) dries on the surface of the formation forming a mud cake. Chemical contamination on the other hand occurs when the drilling fluids which is still in the liquid form interacts chemically with the cement during a cementing job. We investigated the impact of the contamination on the shear bond strength and the changes in the mineralogy of the cement at the cement-formation interface to ascertain the impact of the contamination on the cement-formation bond strength. Berea sandstone and clay rich shale cores were bonded with cement cores with the cement-formation contaminated either physically or chemically. For the physically contaminated composite cores, we have 3 different sample designs: clean

  8. Composite Laser Ceramics by Advanced Bonding Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikesue, Akio; Aung, Yan Lin; Kamimura, Tomosumi; Honda, Sawao; Iwamoto, Yuji

    2018-02-09

    Composites obtained by bonding materials with the same crystal structure and different chemical compositions can create new functions that do not exist in conventional concepts. We have succeeded in bonding polycrystalline YAG and Nd:YAG ceramics without any interstices at the bonding interface, and the bonding state of this composite was at the atomic level, similar to the grain boundary structure in ceramics. The mechanical strength of the bonded composite reached 278 MPa, which was not less than the strength of each host material (269 and 255 MPa). Thermal conductivity of the composite was 12.3 W/mK (theoretical value) which is intermediate between the thermal conductivities of YAG and Nd:YAG (14.1 and 10.2 W/mK, respectively). Light scattering cannot be detected at the bonding interface of the ceramic composite by laser tomography. Since the scattering coefficients of the monolithic material and the composite material formed by bonding up to 15 layers of the same materials were both 0.10%/cm, there was no occurrence of light scattering due to the bonding. In addition, it was not detected that the optical distortion and non-uniformity of the refractive index variation were caused by the bonding. An excitation light source (LD = 808 nm) was collimated to 200 μm and irradiated into a commercial 1% Nd:YAG single crystal, but fracture damage occurred at a low damage threshold of 80 kW/cm². On the other hand, the same test was conducted on the bonded interface of 1% Nd:YAG-YAG composite ceramics fabricated in this study, but it was not damaged until the excitation density reached 127 kW/cm². 0.6% Nd:YAG-YAG composite ceramics showed high damage resistance (up to 223 kW/cm²). It was concluded that composites formed by bonding polycrystalline ceramics are ideal in terms of thermo-mechanical and optical properties.

  9. Sol-gel bonding of silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbe, C.J.; Cassidy, D.J.; Triani, G.; Latella, B.A.; Mitchell, D.R.G.; Finnie, K.S.; Short, K.; Bartlett, J.R.; Woolfrey, J.L.; Collins, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Sol-gel bonds have been produced between smooth, clean silicon substrates by spin-coating solutions containing partially hydrolysed silicon alkoxides. The two coated substrates were assembled and the resulting sandwich fired at temperatures ranging from 60 to 600 deg. C. The sol-gel coatings were characterised using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy, while the corresponding bonded specimens were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were characterised using both microindentation and tensile testing. Bonding of silicon wafers has been successfully achieved at temperatures as low as 60 deg. C. At 300 deg. C, the interfacial fracture energy was 1.55 J/m 2 . At 600 deg. C, sol-gel bonding provided superior interfacial fracture energy over classical hydrophilic bonding (3.4 J/m 2 vs. 1.5 J/m 2 ). The increase in the interfacial fracture energy is related to the increase in film density due to the sintering of the sol-gel interface with increasing temperature. The superior interfacial fracture energy obtained by sol-gel bonding at low temperature is due to the formation of an interfacial layer, which chemically bonds the two sol-gel coatings on each wafer. Application of a tensile stress on the resulting bond leads to fracture of the samples at the silicon/sol-gel interface

  10. Sol-gel bonding of silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbe, C.J.; Cassidy, D.J.; Triani, G.; Latella, B.A.; Mitchell, D.R.G.; Finnie, K.S.; Bartlett, J.R.; Woolfrey, J.L.; Collins, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Low temperature bonding of silicon wafers was achieved using sol-gel technology. The initial sol-gel chemistry of the coating solution was found to influence the mechanical properties of the resulting bonds. More precisely, the influence of parameters such as the alkoxide concentration, water-to-alkoxide molar ratio, pH, and solution aging on the final bond morphologies and interfacial fracture energy was studied. The thickness and density of the sol-gel coating were characterised using ellipsometry. The corresponding bonded specimens were investigated using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy to monitor their chemical composition, infrared imaging to control bond integrity, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy to study their microstructure. Their interfacial fracture energy was measured using microindentation. An optimum water-to-alkoxide molar ratio of 10 and hydrolysis water at pH = 2 were found. Such conditions led to relatively dense films (> 90%), resulting in bonds with a fracture energy of 3.5 J/m 2 , significantly higher than those obtained using classical hydrophilic bonding (typically 1.5-2.5 J/m 2 ). Ageing of the coating solution was found to decrease the bond strength

  11. Testing strong interaction theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses possible tests of the current theories of the strong interaction, in particular, quantum chromodynamics. High energy e + e - interactions should provide an excellent means of studying the strong force. (W.D.L.)

  12. Green and social bonds - A promising tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, Dominique; Barochez, Aurelie de; Cozic, Aela

    2013-11-01

    Issues of green bonds, socially responsible bonds and climate bonds are on the rise. Novethic estimates that some Euro 5 billion in such bonds has been issued since the start of 2013 by development banks, the main issuers of this type of debt. The figure is equal to over half of their total issues since 2007. Including local authorities, corporations and banks, a total Euro 8 billion of these bonds has been issued thus far in 2013. Given the size of the bond market, which the OECD estimated at Euro 95,000 billion in 2011, green and social bonds are still something of a niche but have strong growth potential. A number of large issues, from Euro 500 million to Euro 1 billion, were announced at the end of the year. Unlike conventional bonds, green and social bonds are not intended to finance all the activities of the issuer or refinance its debt. They serve instead to finance specific projects, such as producing renewable energy or adapting to climate change, the risk of which is shouldered by the issuer. This makes them an innovative instrument, used to earmark investments in projects with a direct environmental or social benefit rather than simply on the basis of the issuer's sustainable development policy. With financing being sought for the ecological transition, green and social bonds are promising instruments, sketching out at global level the shape of tools adapted to the financing of a green economy. On the strength of these advantages, the interest of responsible investors - the main target of green and social bond issuers - is growing fast. Judging by issuer press releases and the most commonly used currencies, the main subscribers today are US investors, among them CalSTRS and fund managers like Calvert Investment Management and Trillium Asset Management. European asset owners are also starting to focus on green and social bonds. A Novethic survey shows that 13% of them have already subscribed to such an issue or plan to do so. The present study

  13. Structure and bonding in clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.

    1991-10-01

    We review here the recent progress made in the understanding of the electronic and atomic structure of small clusters of s-p bonded materials using the density functional molecular dynamics technique within the local density approximation. Starting with a brief description of the method, results are presented for alkali metal clusters, clusters of divalent metals such as Mg and Be which show a transition from van der Waals or weak chemical bonding to metallic behaviour as the cluster size grows and clusters of Al, Sn and Sb. In the case of semiconductors, we discuss results for Si, Ge and GaAs clusters. Clusters of other materials such as P, C, S, and Se are also briefly discussed. From these and other available results we suggest the possibility of unique structures for the magic clusters. (author). 69 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  14. Understanding M-ligand bonding and mer-/fac-isomerism in tris(8-hydroxyquinolinate) metallic complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Carlos F R A C; Taveira, Ricardo J S; Costa, José C S; Fernandes, Ana M; Melo, André; Silva, Artur M S; Santos, Luís M N B F

    2016-06-28

    Tris(8-hydroxyquinolinate) metallic complexes, Mq3, are one of the most important classes of organic semiconductor materials. Herein, the nature of the chemical bond in Mq3 complexes and its implications on their molecular properties were investigated by a combined experimental and computational approach. Various Mq3 complexes, resulting from the alteration of the metal and substitution of the 8-hydroxyquinoline ligand in different positions, were prepared. The mer-/fac-isomerism in Mq3 was explored by FTIR and NMR spectroscopy, evidencing that, irrespective of the substituent, mer- and fac-are the most stable molecular configurations of Al(iii) and In(iii) complexes, respectively. The relative M-ligand bond dissociation energies were evaluated experimentally by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS-MS), showing a non-monotonous variation along the group (Al > In > Ga). The results reveal a strong covalent character in M-ligand bonding, which allows for through-ligand electron delocalization, and explain the preferred molecular structures of Mq3 complexes as resulting from the interplay between bonding and steric factors. The mer-isomer reduces intraligand repulsions, being preferred for smaller metals, while the fac-isomer is favoured for larger metals where stronger covalent M-ligand bonds can be formed due to more extensive through-ligand conjugation mediated by metal "d" orbitals.

  15. Selective breaking of bonds in water with intense, 2-cycle, infrared laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathur, D., E-mail: atmol1@tifr.res.in; Dharmadhikari, A. K. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Dota, K. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Centre for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); Dey, D.; Tiwari, A. K. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, Mohanpur 741 246 (India); Dharmadhikari, J. A. [Centre for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); De, S. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Vasa, P. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2015-12-28

    One of the holy grails of contemporary science has been to establish the possibility of preferentially breaking one of several bonds in a molecule. For instance, the two O–H bonds in water are equivalent: given sufficient energy, either one of them is equally likely to break. We report bond-selective molecular fragmentation upon application of intense, 2-cycle pulses of 800 nm laser light: we demonstrate up to three-fold enhancement for preferential bond breaking in isotopically substituted water (HOD). Our experimental observations are rationalized by means of ab initio computations of the potential energy surfaces of HOD, HOD{sup +}, and HOD{sup 2+} and explorations of the dissociation limits resulting from either O–H or O–D bond rupture. The observations we report present a formidable theoretical challenge that need to be taken up in order to gain insights into molecular dynamics, strong field physics, chemical physics, non-adiabatic processes, mass spectrometry, and time-dependent quantum chemistry.

  16. Microstructural and microanalysis investigations of bond titanium grade1/low alloy steel st52-3N obtained by explosive welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloc, Michal; Wachowski, Marcin; Plocinski, Tomasz; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof Jan

    2016-01-01

    Explosive welding is a solid state welding process that is used for the metallurgical joining of two or more dissimilar metals. In this process, forces of controlled detonations are utilized to accelerate one metal plate into another. As a result, an atomic bond is created. It is considered as a cold-welding process since it allows metals to be joined without losing their pre-bonding properties. The metal plates are joined under the influence of very high pressure which causes local plastic deformation and grain refining at the bond interface. Moreover, between the parent and flyer plate some local melting zones are formed. The explosively cladded steel plates are used in the chemical, petrochemical and nuclear industry due to their good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In this work, microstructural and chemical analyses of clad plates obtained by the explosive method are presented. The clad plates studied were made of titanium grade 1 explosively bonded with a thin layer of st52-3N low alloy steel. The microstructure was evaluated using light (LM) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM), while chemical composition was assessed using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). It was found that the bond area had different microstructure, chemical composition and microhardness than the bonded materials. In the junction between the base steel and the cladding, a strongly defected transient zone with altered chemical composition in comparison with the bonded metals was revealed. - Highlights: • Explosive welding as an effective method for joining similar or dissimilar metals. • Slip brands, elongated grains and twins correlated with high plastic deformations. • Investigations of the local melted zones, formed at the interface of the clads. • Mechanical properties connected with microstructural changes and deformation.

  17. Hydrogen-bond-dynamics-based switching of conductivity and magnetism: a phase transition caused by deuterium and electron transfer in a hydrogen-bonded purely organic conductor crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Akira; Yamada, Shota; Isono, Takayuki; Kamo, Hiromichi; Nakao, Akiko; Kumai, Reiji; Nakao, Hironori; Murakami, Youichi; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Nishio, Yutaka; Mori, Hatsumi

    2014-08-27

    A hydrogen bond (H-bond) is one of the most fundamental and important noncovalent interactions in chemistry, biology, physics, and all other molecular sciences. Especially, the dynamics of a proton or a hydrogen atom in the H-bond has attracted increasing attention, because it plays a crucial role in (bio)chemical reactions and some physical properties, such as dielectricity and proton conductivity. Here we report unprecedented H-bond-dynamics-based switching of electrical conductivity and magnetism in a H-bonded purely organic conductor crystal, κ-D3(Cat-EDT-TTF)2 (abbreviated as κ-D). This novel crystal κ-D, a deuterated analogue of κ-H3(Cat-EDT-TTF)2 (abbreviated as κ-H), is composed only of a H-bonded molecular unit, in which two crystallographically equivalent catechol-fused ethylenedithiotetrathiafulvalene (Cat-EDT-TTF) skeletons with a +0.5 charge are linked by a symmetric anionic [O···D···O](-1)-type strong H-bond. Although the deuterated and parent hydrogen systems, κ-D and κ-H, are isostructural paramagnetic semiconductors with a dimer-Mott-type electronic structure at room temperature (space group: C2/c), only κ-D undergoes a phase transition at 185 K, to change to a nonmagnetic insulator with a charge-ordered electronic structure (space group: P1). The X-ray crystal structure analysis demonstrates that this dramatic switching of the electronic structure and physical properties originates from deuterium transfer or displacement within the H-bond accompanied by electron transfer between the Cat-EDT-TTF π-systems, proving that the H-bonded deuterium dynamics and the conducting TTF π-electron are cooperatively coupled. Furthermore, the reason why this unique phase transition occurs only in κ-D is qualitatively discussed in terms of the H/D isotope effect on the H-bond geometry and potential energy curve.

  18. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of negatively charged NH.N systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Grech, Eugeniusz

    2013-01-01

    ” and equilibrium cases. NMR assignments of the former have been revised. The NH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are rather unusual in these strongly hydrogen bonded systems between a NH and a negatively charged nitrogen atom. The formal four-bond effects are found to be negative......Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are investigated in anions of 1,8-bis(4-toluenesulphonamido)naphthalenes together with N,N-(naphthalene-1,8-diyl)bis(2,2,2-trifluoracetamide) all with bis(1,8-dimethylamino)napthaleneH+ as counter ion. These compounds represent both “static...... indicating transmission via the hydrogen bond. In addition, unusual long range effects are seen. Structures, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts and changes in nuclear shieldings upon deuteriation are calculated using density functional theory methods...

  19. Dilemmas in zirconia bonding: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradović-Đuričić Kosovka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a literature review on the resin bond to zirconia ceramic. Modern esthetic dentistry has highly recognized zirconia, among other ceramic materials. Biocompatibility of zirconia, chemical and dimensional stability, excellent mechanical properties, all together could guarantee optimal therapeutical results in complex prosthodontic reconstruction. On the other hand, low thermal degradation, aging of zirconia as well as problematic bonding of zirconia framework to dental luting cements and tooth structures, opened the room for discussion concerning their clinical durability. The well known methods of mechanical and chemical bonding used on glass-ceramics are not applicable for use with zirconia. Therefore, under critical clinical situations, selection of the bonding mechanism should be focused on two important points: high initial bond strength value and long term bond strength between zirconia-resin interface. Also, this paper emphases the use of phosphate monomer luting cements on freshly air-abraded zirconia as the simplest and most effective way for zirconia cementation procedure today.

  20. The chemical life(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    You write this narrative autoethnography to open up a conversation about our chemical lives. You go through your day with chemical mindfulness, questioning taken-for-granted ideas about natural and artificial, healthy and unhealthy, dependency and addiction, trying to understand the chemical messages we consume through the experiences of everyday life. You reflect on how messages about chemicals influence and structure our lives and why some chemicals are celebrated and some are condemned. Using a second-person narrative voice, you show how the personal is relational and the chemical is cultural. You write because you seek a connection, a chemical bond.

  1. Copper wire bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Zhong, ZhaoWei; Pecht, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    This critical volume provides an in-depth presentation of copper wire bonding technologies, processes and equipment, along with the economic benefits and risks.  Due to the increasing cost of materials used to make electronic components, the electronics industry has been rapidly moving from high cost gold to significantly lower cost copper as a wire bonding material.  However, copper wire bonding has several process and reliability concerns due to its material properties.  Copper Wire Bonding book lays out the challenges involved in replacing gold with copper as a wire bond material, and includes the bonding process changes—bond force, electric flame off, current and ultrasonic energy optimization, and bonding tools and equipment changes for first and second bond formation.  In addition, the bond–pad metallurgies and the use of bare and palladium-coated copper wires on aluminum are presented, and gold, nickel and palladium surface finishes are discussed.  The book also discusses best practices and re...

  2. Prediction and design of first super-strong liquid-crystalline polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowell, F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the details of the theoretical prediction and design (atom by atom, bond by bond) of the molecule chemical structures of the first candidate super-strong liquid-crystalline polymers (SS LCPs). These LCPs are the first LCPs designed to have good compressive strengths, as well as to have tensile strengths and tensile moduli significantly larger than those of existing strong LCPs (such as Kevlar). The key feature of this new class of LCPs is that the exceptional strength is three dimensional on a microscopic, molecular level (thus, on a macroscopic level), in contrast to present LCPs (such as Kevlar) with their one-dimensional exceptional strength. These SS LCPs also have some solubility and processing advantages over existing strong LCPs. These SS LCPs are specially-designed combined LCPs such that the side chains of a molecule interdigitate with the side chains of other molecules. This paper also presents other essential general and specific features required for SS LCPs. Considerations in the design of SS LCPs include the spacing distance between side chains along the backbone, the need for rigid sections in the backbone and side chains, the degree of polymerization, the length of the side chains, the regularity of spacing of the side chains along the backbone, the interdigitation of side chains in submolecular strips, the packing of the side chains on one or two sides of the backbone, the symmetry of the side chains, the points of attachment of the side chains to the backbone, the flexibility and size of the chemical group connecting each side chain to the backbone, the effect of semiflexible sections in the backbone and side chains, and the choice of types of dipolar and/or hydrogen bonding forces in the backbones and side chains for easy alignment

  3. Neural mechanisms of mother-infant bonding and pair bonding: Similarities, differences, and broader implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numan, Michael; Young, Larry J.

    2015-01-01

    Mother-infant bonding is a characteristic of virtually all mammals. The maternal neural system may have provided the scaffold upon which other types of social bonds in mammals have been built. For example, most mammals exhibit a polygamous mating system, but monogamy and pair bonding between mating partners occurs in ∼5% of mammalian species. In mammals, it is plausible that the neural mechanisms that promote mother-infant bonding have been modified by natural selection to establish the capacity to develop a selective bond with a mate during the evolution of monogamous mating strategies. Here we compare the details of the neural mechanisms that promote mother-infant bonding in rats and other mammals with those that underpin pair bond formation in the monogamous prairie vole. Although details remain to be resolved, remarkable similarities and a few differences between the mechanisms underlying these two types of bond formation are revealed. For example, amygdala and nucleus accumbens-ventral pallidum (NA-VP) circuits are involved in both types of bond formation, and dopamine and oxytocin action within NA appears to promote the synaptic plasticity that allows either infant or mating partner stimuli to persistently activate NA-VP attraction circuits, leading to an enduring social attraction and bonding. Further, although the medial preoptic area is essential for maternal behavior, its role in pair bonding remains to be determined. Our review concludes by examining the broader implications of this comparative analysis, and evidence is provided that the maternal care system may have also provided the basic neural foundation for other types of strong social relationships, beyond pair bonding, in mammals, including humans. PMID:26062432

  4. Bond energies of ThO{sup +} and ThC{sup +}: A guided ion beam and quantum chemical investigation of the reactions of thorium cation with O{sub 2} and CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Richard M; Citir, Murat; Armentrout, P. B., E-mail: armentrout@chem.utah.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0850 (United States); Battey, Samuel R.; Peterson, Kirk A. [Department of Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-4630 (United States)

    2016-05-14

    Kinetic energy dependent reactions of Th{sup +} with O{sub 2} and CO are studied using a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. The formation of ThO{sup +} in the reaction of Th{sup +} with O{sub 2} is observed to be exothermic and barrierless with a reaction efficiency at low energies of k/k{sub LGS} = 1.21 ± 0.24 similar to the efficiency observed in ion cyclotron resonance experiments. Formation of ThO{sup +} and ThC{sup +} in the reaction of Th{sup +} with CO is endothermic in both cases. The kinetic energy dependent cross sections for formation of these product ions were evaluated to determine 0 K bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of D{sub 0}(Th{sup +}–O) = 8.57 ± 0.14 eV and D{sub 0}(Th{sup +}–C) = 4.82 ± 0.29 eV. The present value of D{sub 0} (Th{sup +}–O) is within experimental uncertainty of previously reported experimental values, whereas this is the first report of D{sub 0} (Th{sup +}–C). Both BDEs are observed to be larger than those of their transition metal congeners, TiL{sup +}, ZrL{sup +}, and HfL{sup +} (L = O and C), believed to be a result of lanthanide contraction. Additionally, the reactions were explored by quantum chemical calculations, including a full Feller-Peterson-Dixon composite approach with correlation contributions up to coupled-cluster singles and doubles with iterative triples and quadruples (CCSDTQ) for ThC, ThC{sup +}, ThO, and ThO{sup +}, as well as more approximate CCSD with perturbative (triples) [CCSD(T)] calculations where a semi-empirical model was used to estimate spin-orbit energy contributions. Finally, the ThO{sup +} BDE is compared to other actinide (An) oxide cation BDEs and a simple model utilizing An{sup +} promotion energies to the reactive state is used to estimate AnO{sup +} and AnC{sup +} BDEs. For AnO{sup +}, this model yields predictions that are typically within experimental uncertainty and performs better than density functional theory calculations presented previously.

  5. Bond energies of ThO+ and ThC+: A guided ion beam and quantum chemical investigation of the reactions of thorium cation with O2 and CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Richard M.; Citir, Murat; Armentrout, P. B.; Battey, Samuel R.; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2016-05-01

    Kinetic energy dependent reactions of Th+ with O2 and CO are studied using a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. The formation of ThO+ in the reaction of Th+ with O2 is observed to be exothermic and barrierless with a reaction efficiency at low energies of k/kLGS = 1.21 ± 0.24 similar to the efficiency observed in ion cyclotron resonance experiments. Formation of ThO+ and ThC+ in the reaction of Th+ with CO is endothermic in both cases. The kinetic energy dependent cross sections for formation of these product ions were evaluated to determine 0 K bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of D0(Th+-O) = 8.57 ± 0.14 eV and D0(Th+-C) = 4.82 ± 0.29 eV. The present value of D0 (Th+-O) is within experimental uncertainty of previously reported experimental values, whereas this is the first report of D0 (Th+-C). Both BDEs are observed to be larger than those of their transition metal congeners, TiL+, ZrL+, and HfL+ (L = O and C), believed to be a result of lanthanide contraction. Additionally, the reactions were explored by quantum chemical calculations, including a full Feller-Peterson-Dixon composite approach with correlation contributions up to coupled-cluster singles and doubles with iterative triples and quadruples (CCSDTQ) for ThC, ThC+, ThO, and ThO+, as well as more approximate CCSD with perturbative (triples) [CCSD(T)] calculations where a semi-empirical model was used to estimate spin-orbit energy contributions. Finally, the ThO+ BDE is compared to other actinide (An) oxide cation BDEs and a simple model utilizing An+ promotion energies to the reactive state is used to estimate AnO+ and AnC+ BDEs. For AnO+, this model yields predictions that are typically within experimental uncertainty and performs better than density functional theory calculations presented previously.

  6. Destination bonding: Hybrid cognition using Instagram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arup Kumar Baksi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical research has identified the phenomenon of destination bonding as a result of summated physical and emotional values associated with the destination. Physical values, namely natural landscape & other physical settings and emotional values, namely the enculturation processes, have a significant role to play in portraying visitors’ cognitive framework for destination preference. The physical values seemed to be the stimulator for bonding that embodies action or behavior tendencies in imagery. The emotional values were the conditions that lead to affective bonding and are reflected in attitudes for a place which were evident in text narratives. Social networking on virtual platforms offers the scope for hybrid cognitive expression using imagery and text to the visitors. Instagram has emerged as an application-window to capture these hybrid cognitions of visitors. This study focuses on assessing the relationship between hybrid cognition of visitors expressed via Instagram and their bond with the destination. Further to this, the study attempts to examine the impact of hybrid cognition of visitors on the behavioral pattern of prospective visitors to the destination. The study revealed that sharing of visual imageries and related text by the visitors is an expression of the physico-emotional bonding with the destination. It was further established that hybrid cognition strongly asserts destination bonding and has been also found to have moderating impact on the link between destination bonding and electronic-word-of-mouth.

  7. Widespread Disulfide Bonding in Proteins from Thermophilic Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Jorda, Julien; Yeates, Todd O.

    2011-01-01

    Disulfide bonds are generally not used to stabilize proteins in the cytosolic compartments of bacteria or eukaryotic cells, owing to the chemically reducing nature of those environments. In contrast, certain thermophilic archaea use disulfide bonding as a major mechanism for protein stabilization. Here, we provide a current survey of completely sequenced genomes, applying computational methods to estimate the use of disulfide bonding across the Archaea. Microbes belonging to the Crenarchaea...

  8. Synthesis, structure and chemical bonding of CaFe2−xRhxSi2 (x=0, 1.32, and 2) and SrCo2Si2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlukhyy, Viktor; Hoffmann, Andrea V.; Fässler, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    The finding of superconductivity in Ba 0.6 K 0.4 Fe 2 As 2 put the attention on the investigation of compounds that crystallize with ThCr 2 Si 2 structure type such as AT 2 X 2 (A=alkali/alkaline earth/rare earth element; T=transition metal and X=element of the 13–15th group). In this context the silicides CaFe 2 Si 2 , CaFe 0.68(6) Rh 1.32(6) Si 2 , CaRh 2 Si 2 and SrCo 2 Si 2 have been synthesized by reaction of the elements under an argon atmosphere. Single crystals were obtained by special heat treatment in welded niobium/tantalum ampoules. The compounds were investigated by means of powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction. All compounds crystallize in the ThCr 2 Si 2 -type structure with space group I4/mmm (No. 139): a=3.939(1) Å, c=10.185(1) Å, R 1 =0.045, 85 F 2 values, 8 variable parameters for CaFe 2 Si 2 ; a=4.0590(2) Å, c=9.9390(8) Å, R 1 =0.030, 90 F 2 values, 10 variable parameters for CaFe 0.68(6) Rh 1.32(6) Si 2 ; a=4.0695(1) Å, c=9.9841(3) Å, R 1 =0.031, 114 F 2 values, 9 variable parameters for CaRh 2 Si 2 ; and a=3.974(1) Å, c=10.395(1) Å, R 1 =0.036, 95 F 2 values, 8 variable parameters for SrCo 2 Si 2 . The structure of SrCo 2 Si 2 contains isolated [Co 2 Si 2 ] 2− 2D-layers in the ab-plane whereas in CaFe 2−x Rh x Si 2 the [T 2 Si 2 ] layers (T=Fe and Rh) are interconnected along the c-axis via Si3Si bonds resulting in a three-dimentional (3D) [T 2 Si 2 ] 2− polyanions and therefore belong to the so-called collapsed form of the ThCr 2 Si 2 -type structure. The SrCo 2 Si 2 and CaRh 2 Si 2 are isoelectronic to the parent 122 iron–pnictide superconductors AeFe 2 As 2 (Ae=alkaline earth elements), whereas CaFe 2 Si 2 is a full substituted variant (As/Si) of CaFe 2 As 2 . The crystal chemistry and chemical bonding in the title compounds are discussed in terms of LMTO band structure calculations and a topological analysis using the Electron Localization Function (ELF). - Graphical abstract: The SrCo 2 Si 2 and CaFe 2−x Rh x Si

  9. Intrinsic Bond Energies from a Bonds-in-Molecules Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kun; Herr, John E; Brown, Seth N; Parkhill, John

    2017-06-15

    Neural networks are being used to make new types of empirical chemical models as inexpensive as force fields, but with accuracy similar to the ab initio methods used to build them. In this work, we present a neural network that predicts the energies of molecules as a sum of intrinsic bond energies. The network learns the total energies of the popular GDB9 database to a competitive MAE of 0.94 kcal/mol on molecules outside of its training set, is naturally linearly scaling, and applicable to molecules consisting of thousands of bonds. More importantly, it gives chemical insight into the relative strengths of bonds as a function of their molecular environment, despite only being trained on total energy information. We show that the network makes predictions of relative bond strengths in good agreement with measured trends and human predictions. A Bonds-in-Molecules Neural Network (BIM-NN) learns heuristic relative bond strengths like expert synthetic chemists, and compares well with ab initio bond order measures such as NBO analysis.

  10. C-S Bond formation by

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 129; Issue 2. Transition metal-promoted synthesis of 2-aryl/heteroaryl-thioquinazoline: C-S Bond formation by “Chan-Lam Cross-Coupling” Reaction. SATYA KARUNA PULAKHANDAM NARESH KUMAR KATARI RAVI PRAKASH REDDY MANDA. Regular Article ...

  11. Simple inorganic complexes but intricate hydrogen bonding ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 121; Issue 2. Simple inorganic complexes but intricate hydrogen bonding networks: Synthesis and crystal structures of [MII(opda)2(NO3)2] (M = Zn and Cd; opda = orthophenylenediamine). Sabbani Supriya. Full Papers Volume 121 Issue 2 March 2009 pp 137-143 ...

  12. Analysis of the putative Cr-Cr quintuple bond in Ar'CrCrAr' (Ar' = C6H3-2,6(C6H3-2,6-Pr(i)2)2 based on the combined natural orbitals for chemical valence and extended transition state method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndambuki, Sylvester; Ziegler, Tom

    2012-07-16

    The nature of the putative Cr-Cr quintuple bond in Ar'CrCrAr' (Ar' = C(6)H(3)-2,6(C(6)H(3)-2,6-Pr(i)(2))(2)) is investigated with the help of a newly developed energy and density decomposition scheme. The new approach combines the extended transition state (ETS) energy decomposition method with the natural orbitals for chemical valence (NOCV) density decomposition scheme within the same theoretical framework. The results show that in addition to the five bonding components (σ(2)π(2)π'(2)δ(2)δ'(2)) of the Cr-Cr bond, the quintuple bond is augmented by secondary Cr-C interactions involving the Cr-ipso-carbon of the flanking aryl rings. The presence of isopropyl groups (Pr(i)) is further shown to stabilize Ar'CrCrAr' by 20 kcal/mol compared to the two Ar'Cr monomers through stabilizing van der Waals dispersion interactions.

  13. Hydrogen Bonding and Stability of Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Perovskites

    KAUST Repository

    El-Mellouhi, Fedwa

    2016-09-08

    In the past few years, the efficiency of solar cells based on hybrid organic–inorganic perovskites has exceeded the level needed for commercialization. However, existing perovskites solar cells (PSCs) suffer from several intrinsic instabilities, which prevent them from reaching industrial maturity, and stabilizing PSCs has become a critically important problem. Here we propose to stabilize PSCs chemically by strengthening the interactions between the organic cation and inorganic anion of the perovskite framework. In particular, we show that replacing the methylammonium cation with alternative protonated cations allows an increase in the stability of the perovskite by forming strong hydrogen bonds with the halide anions. This interaction also provides opportunities for tuning the electronic states near the bandgap. These mechanisms should have a universal character in different hybrid organic–inorganic framework materials that are widely used.

  14. Bonding Study on the Chemical Separation of Am(III) from Eu(III) by S-, N-, and O-Donor Ligands by Means of All-Electron ZORA-DFT Calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Masashi; Miyashita, Sunao; Nakashima, Satoru

    2015-07-20

    We performed a theoretical investigation for the selectivity of Eu(III)/Am(III) ions depending on the donor atoms by means of all-electron ZORA-DFT calculation. We estimated their selectivity as the relative stability in the complex formation reaction. The B2PLYP functional reproduced the experimental selectivity in which S- and N-donor ligands favor Am(III) ion, but O-donor ligand favors Eu(III) ion. Mulliken's bond overlap population analysis revealed that the contribution of the f orbital to the bonding was small or zero for Eu complex, whereas it was large for Am complex. The bonding nature of the f orbital for Am ion was the bonding type to S- and N-donor ligands, while it was the antibonding type to O-donor ligand. It was suggested that the difference in the bonding nature between the f orbital in the metal and the donor atoms determines the selectivity of Eu(III)/Am(III) by donor ligands.

  15. Structures, bonding and reactivity of iron and manganese high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Direct structural comparison to iron and manganese-oxo species are made and the observed similarity and differences among them are attributed to the intricate metal–oxygen bonding. By thoroughly probing the bonding in all these species, their reactivity towards common chemical reactions such as C–H activation and ...

  16. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds: From temperature-driven proton ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    molecular hydrogen bonds [1,2]. These bonds have unique physical and chemical properties and are thought to play a fundamental role in processes like enzymatic catalysis. By combining elastic and inelastic neutron scattering results with ab initio, lattice dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations, low frequency ...

  17. Hydrogen bond and lifetime dynamics in diluted alcohols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salamatova, Evgeniia; Cunha, Ana V.; Shinokita, Keisuke; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen-bonding plays a crucial role in many chemical and biochemical reactions. Alcohols, with their hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, constitute an important class of hydrogen-bonding molecules with functional tuning possibilities through changes in the hydrophobic tails. Recent studies

  18. Note: Anodic bonding with cooling of heat-sensitive areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Henriksen, Toke Riishøj

    2010-01-01

    Anodic bonding of silicon to glass always involves heating the glass and device to high temperatures so that cations become mobile in the electric field. We present a simple way of bonding thin silicon samples to borosilicate glass by means of heating from the glass side while locally cooling heat......-sensitive areas from the silicon side. Despite the high thermal conductivity of silicon, this method allows a strong anodic bond to form just millimeters away from areas essentially at room temperature....

  19. Shape Bonding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontius, James T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method of bonding at least two surfaces together. The methods step of the present invention include applying a strip of adhesive to a first surface along a predefined outer boundary of a bond area and thereby defining a remaining open area there within. A second surface, or gusset plate, is affixed onto the adhesive before the adhesive cures. The strip of adhesive is allowed to cure and then a second amount of adhesive is applied to cover the remaining open area and substantially fill a void between said first and second surfaces about said bond area. A stencil may be used to precisely apply the strip of adhesive. When the strip cures, it acts as a dam to prevent overflow of the subsequent application of adhesive to undesired areas. The method results in a precise bond area free of undesired shapes and of a preferred profile which eliminate the drawbacks of the prior art bonds.

  20. Corporate Bonds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Corporate financing is the choice between capital generated by the corporation and capital from external investors. However, since the financial crisis shook the markets in 2007–2008, financing opportunities through the classical means of financing have decreased. As a result, corporations have...... to think in alternative ways such as issuing corporate bonds. A market for corporate bonds exists in countries such as Norway, Germany, France, the United Kingdom and the United States, while Denmark is still behind in this trend. Some large Danish corporations have instead used foreign corporate bonds...... markets. However, NASDAQ OMX has introduced the First North Bond Market in December 2012 and new regulatory framework came into place in 2014, which may contribute to a Danish based corporate bond market. The purpose of this article is to present the regulatory changes in Denmark in relation to corporate...

  1. Corporate Bonds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Corporate financing is the choice between capital generated by the corporation and capital from external investors. However, since the financial crisis shook the markets in 2007–2008, financing opportunities through the classical means of financing have decreased. As a result, corporations have...... markets. However, NASDAQ OMX has introduced the First North Bond Market in December 2012 and new regulatory framework came into place in 2014, which may contribute to a Danish based corporate bond market. The purpose of this article is to present the regulatory changes in Denmark in relation to corporate...... bonds. The purpose is further to analyse the tax consequences of issuing bonds in both a direct issue of bonds and through securitization....

  2. Ionic bonding of lanthanides, as influenced by d- and f-atomic orbitals, by core-shells and by relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wen-Xin; Xu, Wei; Schwarz, W H Eugen; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2015-03-15

    Lanthanide trihalide molecules LnX3 (X = F, Cl, Br, I) were quantum chemically investigated, in particular detail for Ln = Lu (lutetium). We applied density functional theory (DFT) at the nonrelativistic and scalar and SO-coupled relativistic levels, and also the ab initio coupled cluster approach. The chemically active electron shells of the lanthanide atoms comprise the 5d and 6s (and 6p) valence atomic orbitals (AO) and also the filled inner 4f semivalence and outer 5p semicore shells. Four different frozen-core approximations for Lu were compared: the (1s(2) -4d(10) ) [Pd] medium core, the [Pd+5s(2) 5p(6) = Xe] and [Pd+4f(14) ] large cores, and the [Pd+4f(14) +5s(2) 5p(6) ] very large core. The errors of LuX bonding are more serious on freezing the 5p(6) shell than the 4f(14) shell, more serious upon core-freezing than on the effective-core-potential approximation. The LnX distances correlate linearly with the AO radii of the ionic outer shells, Ln(3+) -5p(6) and X(-) -np(6) , characteristic for dominantly ionic Ln(3+) -X(-) binding. The heavier halogen atoms also bind covalently with the Ln-5d shell. Scalar relativistic effects contract and destabilize the LuX bonds, spin orbit coupling hardly affects the geometries but the bond energies, owing to SO effects in the free atoms. The relativistic changes of bond energy BE, bond length Re , bond force k, and bond stretching frequency vs do not follow the simple rules of Badger and Gordy (Re ∼BE∼k∼vs ). The so-called degeneracy-driven covalence, meaning strong mixing of accidentally near-degenerate, nearly nonoverlapping AOs without BE contribution is critically discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The role of hydrogen bonds in the melting points of sulfonate-based protic organic salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Jiangshui

    2016-01-01

    there is evidence of bond formation [6]. Hydrogen bonds in the solid state fall into the classification of strong, moderate, and weak hydrogen bonds [7]. In molecular systems like H2O (vs. H2S) or NH3 (vs. PH3), strong hydrogen bonds lead to higher melting points. However, in organic salts, the situation may......There are three main types of interactions inside organic salts - electrostatic interaction, hydrogen bonding and van der Waals force [1-4]. While van der Waals force is relatively weak, it is hydrogen bonding and particularly electrostatic interaction that determine the lattice energies of ionic...

  4. Quantum-chemical investigation of the nature of metal-carbene and metal-olefin bonds in complexes [ClnM(C2H4)]- (M=Mo,Pd)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gritsenko, O.V.; Mitkov, M.I.; Bagatur'yants, A.A.; Kamalov, G.L.; Kazanskij, V.B.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Odessa. Fiziko-Khimicheskij Inst.)

    1986-01-01

    On the basis of electron structure calculation using Huckel method comparative investigation of the nature of metal-ethylidene and metal-ethylene bonds in complexes [Cl 5 Mo(C 2 H 4 )] - and [Cl 3 Pd(C 2 H 4 )] - , and also carbene complex stability regarding olefine izomerization is carried out. It is shown that metal-ethylidene bond in the above complexes is stronger than metal-ethylene one, and Mo(4)-ethylidene bond is stronger than Pd(2)-ethylidene one. It is supposed that relative stability of alkylidene structures may be one of the reasons of catalytic activity of Mo(4) compounds in olefine metathesis and oligomerization reactions in which carbene complex is considered as an intermediate

  5. Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-03

    Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators In the past year, the grant was used for work in the field of topological phases, with emphasis on finding...surface of topological insulators. In the past 3 years, we have started a new direction, that of fractional topological insulators. These are materials...in which a topologically nontrivial quasi-flat band is fractionally filled and then subject to strong interactions. The views, opinions and/or

  6. Unifying Exchange Sensitivity in Transition-Metal Spin-State Ordering and Catalysis through Bond Valence Metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, Terry Z H; Kulik, Heather J

    2017-11-14

    Accurate predictions of spin-state ordering, reaction energetics, and barrier heights are critical for the computational discovery of open-shell transition-metal (TM) catalysts. Semilocal approximations in density functional theory, such as the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), suffer from delocalization error that causes them to overstabilize strongly bonded states. Descriptions of energetics and bonding are often improved by introducing a fraction of exact exchange (e.g., erroneous low-spin GGA ground states are instead correctly predicted as high-spin with a hybrid functional). The degree of spin-splitting sensitivity to exchange can be understood based on the chemical composition of the complex, but the effect of exchange on reaction energetics within a single spin state is less well-established. Across a number of model iron complexes, we observe strong exchange sensitivities of reaction barriers and energies that are of the same magnitude as those for spin splitting energies. We rationalize trends in both reaction and spin energetics by introducing a measure of delocalization, the bond valence of the metal-ligand bonds in each complex. The bond valence thus represents a simple-to-compute property that unifies understanding of exchange sensitivity for catalytic properties and spin-state ordering in TM complexes. Close agreement of the resulting per-metal-organic-bond sensitivity estimates, together with failure of alternative descriptors demonstrates the utility of the bond valence as a robust descriptor of how differences in metal-ligand delocalization produce differing relative energetics with exchange tuning. Our unified description explains the overall effect of exact exchange tuning on the paradigmatic two-state FeO + /CH 4 reaction that combines challenges of spin-state and reactivity predictions. This new descriptor-sensitivity relationship provides a path to quantifying how predictions in transition-metal complex screening are sensitive to the

  7. Strong Cosmic Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, James

    2017-01-01

    The Hawking-Penrose theorems tell us that solutions of Einstein's equations are generally singular, in the sense of the incompleteness of causal geodesics (the paths of physical observers). These singularities might be marked by the blowup of curvature and therefore crushing tidal forces, or by the breakdown of physical determinism. Penrose has conjectured (in his `Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture`) that it is generically unbounded curvature that causes singularities, rather than causal breakdown. The verification that ``AVTD behavior'' (marked by the domination of time derivatives over space derivatives) is generically present in a family of solutions has proven to be a useful tool for studying model versions of Strong Cosmic Censorship in that family. I discuss some of the history of Strong Cosmic Censorship, and then discuss what is known about AVTD behavior and Strong Cosmic Censorship in families of solutions defined by varying degrees of isometry, and discuss recent results which we believe will extend this knowledge and provide new support for Strong Cosmic Censorship. I also comment on some of the recent work on ``Weak Null Singularities'', and how this relates to Strong Cosmic Censorship.

  8. Moving beyond Definitions: What Student-Generated Models Reveal about Their Understanding of Covalent Bonding and Ionic Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxford, Cynthia J.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students encounter a variety of terms, definitions, and classification schemes that many instructors expect students to memorize and be able to use. This research investigated students' descriptions of ionic and covalent bonding beyond definitions in order to explore students' knowledge about chemical bonding. Using Johnstone's Multiple…

  9. Controlling the bond scission sequence of oxygenates for energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stottlemyer, Alan L.

    intermediates was observed on the Pt and Pt/WC surfaces. For CH3OH decomposition, DFT calculations suggested that the bond scission sequence could be controlled using monolayer coverage of Pt on WC. The Ni/Pt bimetallic system was studied as an example for using oxygenates as a hydrogen source. There are two well characterized surface structures for the Ni/Pt system: the surface configuration, in which the Ni atoms reside primarily on the surface of the Pt bulk, and the subsurface configuration, in which the second atomic layer is enriched in Ni atoms and the surface is enriched in Pt atoms. These configurations are denoted NiPtPt and PtNiPt, respectively. DFT results revealed that trends established for the Ni/Pt(111) system extend to the Ni/Pt(100) analogue. TPD studies revealed that the NiPtPt surface was more active for oxygenate reforming than the Pt or PtNiPt surfaces. HREELS confirmed the presence of strongly bound reaction intermediates, including aldehyde-like species, and suggested that the first decomposition step was likely O-H bond scission. Thus, the binding energies of the deprotonated reaction intermediates are important parameters in controlling the decomposition pathways of oxygenates. These studies have demonstrated that the bond scission sequence of oxygenate decomposition can be controlled using bimetallic and transition metal carbide catalysts. While this study has focused on oxygenate decomposition for energy applications, the principles and methodology applied herein are universally applicable to the development of novel and marketable value-added products. The value in such a methodology is in the combination of both calculations to predict catalytic and chemical properties, and experiments to fine-tune theoretical predictions.

  10. Synthesis, characterization, and chemical bonding analysis of the lithium alkaline-earth metal gallide nitrides Li{sub 2}(Ca{sub 3}N){sub 2}[Ga{sub 4}] and Li{sub 2}(Sr{sub 3}N){sub 2}[Ga{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, Manisha; Bobnar, Matej; Ormeci, Alim; Hoehn, Peter [Chemische Metallkunde, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany); Stoiber, Dominik; Niewa, Rainer [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Ovchinnikov, Alexander [Chemische Metallkunde, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2017-11-17

    Large single crystals of Li{sub 2}(Ca{sub 3}N){sub 2}[Ga{sub 4}] and Li{sub 2}(Sr{sub 3}N){sub 2}[Ga{sub 4}] up to several mm in size were grown from mixtures of the respective elements and binary alkaline-earth metal nitrides in reactive lithium melts employing a modified high-temperature centrifugation-aided filtration (HTCAF) technique. The main structural features of these isotypic phases are stella quadrangula building units [Ga{sub 4}]Li{sub 4/2} and octahedra (Nae{sub 6/2}), which form two independent interpenetrating networks. The phases crystallize in the η-carbide structure and represent diamagnetic small bandgap semiconductors. Real-space chemical bonding analysis indicates predominantly ionic bonding. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Atom interaction propensities of oxygenated chemical functions in crystal packings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Jelsch

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The crystal contacts of several families of hydrocarbon compounds substituted with one or several types of oxygenated chemical groups were analyzed statistically using the Hirshfeld surface methodology. The propensity of contacts to occur between two chemical types is described with the contact enrichment descriptor. The systematic large enrichment ratios of some interactions like the O—H...O hydrogen bonds suggests that these contacts are a driving force in the crystal packing formation. The same statement holds for the weaker C—H...O hydrogen bonds in ethers, esters and ketones, in the absence of polar H atoms. The over-represented contacts in crystals of oxygenated hydrocarbons are generally of two types: electrostatic attractions (hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. While Cl...O interactions are generally avoided, in a minority of chloro-oxygenated hydrocarbons, significant halogen bonding does occur. General tendencies can often be derived for many contact types, but outlier compounds are instructive as they display peculiar or rare features. The methodology also allows the detection of outliers which can be structures with errors. For instance, a significant number of hydroxylated molecules displaying over-represented non-favorable oxygen–oxygen contacts turned out to have wrongly oriented hydroxyl groups. Beyond crystal packings with a single molecule in the asymmetric unit, the behavior of water in monohydrate compounds and of crystals with Z′ = 2 (dimers are also investigated. It was found in several cases that, in the presence of several oxygenated chemical groups, cross-interactions between different chemical groups (e.g. water/alcohols; alcohols/phenols are often favored in the crystal packings. While some trends in accordance with common chemical principles are retrieved, some unexpected results can however appear. For example, in crystals of alcohol–phenol compounds, the strong O—H...O hydrogen bonds between

  12. Evidence of covalent bond formation at the silane-metal interface during plasma polymerization of bis-1,2-(triethoxysilyl)ethane (BTSE) on aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batan, A.; Mine, N.; Douhard, B.; Brusciotti, F.; De Graeve, I.; Vereecken, J.; Wenkin, M.; Piens, M.; Terryn, H.; Pireaux, J. J.; Reniers, F.

    2010-06-01

    Silane and silane-like films were deposited from bis-1,2-(triethoxysilyl)ethane by vacuum and atmospheric plasma onto aluminium. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used for probing the aluminium/plasma polymer film interface. An AlOSi + fragment was identified at nominal mass m/ z = 70.9539 amu, indicating a strong chemical interaction (formation of a covalent bond) at the substrate/film interface. Until now, this strong silane-aluminium interaction has never been observed in plasma polymer BTSE films. Ageing tests in an ultrasonic water bath combined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements allowed to indirectly confirm good adhesion, and therefore the formation of a chemical bond at the interface.

  13. Energy decomposition analysis of single bonds within Kohn-Sham density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Daniel S; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2017-11-28

    An energy decomposition analysis (EDA) for single chemical bonds is presented within the framework of Kohn-Sham density functional theory based on spin projection equations that are exact within wave function theory. Chemical bond energies can then be understood in terms of stabilization caused by spin-coupling augmented by dispersion, polarization, and charge transfer in competition with destabilizing Pauli repulsions. The EDA reveals distinguishing features of chemical bonds ranging across nonpolar, polar, ionic, and charge-shift bonds. The effect of electron correlation is assessed by comparison with Hartree-Fock results. Substituent effects are illustrated by comparing the C-C bond in ethane against that in bis(diamantane), and dispersion stabilization in the latter is quantified. Finally, three metal-metal bonds in experimentally characterized compounds are examined: a [Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text] dimer, the [Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text] bond in dizincocene, and the Mn-Mn bond in dimanganese decacarbonyl.

  14. Density functional theory, natural bond orbital and quantum theory of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The sign of Hb depends on which contribution, potential or kinetic, will locally prevail on the BCP. The Lapla- cian is negative if the modulus of the potential energy outweighs two times the kinetic energy, which implies the covalent character of interaction, and it may con- cern covalent bonds as well as very strong H-bonds.

  15. Is there any fundamental difference between ionic, covalent, and others types of bond? A canonical perspective on the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Jay R; Rivera-Rivera, Luis A; Lucchese, Robert R; Bevan, John W

    2017-06-21

    The concept of chemical bonding is normally presented and simplified through two models: the covalent bond and the ionic bond. Expansion of the ideal covalent and ionic models leads chemists to the concepts of electronegativity and polarizability, and thus to the classification of polar and non-polar bonds. In addition, the intermolecular interactions are normally viewed as physical phenomena without direct correlation to the chemical bond in any simplistic model. Contrary to these traditional concepts of chemical bonding, recently developed canonical approaches demonstrate a unified perspective on the nature of binding in pairwise interatomic interactions. This new canonical model, which is a force-based approach with a basis in fundamental molecular quantum mechanics, confirms much earlier assertions that in fact there are no fundamental distinctions among covalent bonds, ionic bonds, and intermolecular interactions including the hydrogen bond, the halogen bond, and van der Waals interactions.

  16. Titanium Alloy Strong Back for IXO Mirror Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Glenn P.; Kai-Wang, Chan

    2011-01-01

    A titanium-alloy mirror-holding fixture called a strong back allows the temporary and permanent bonding of a 50 degree D263 glass x-ray mirror (IXO here stands for International X-ray Observatory). The strong back is used to hold and position a mirror segment so that mounting tabs may be bonded to the mirror with ultra-low distortion of the optical surface. Ti-15%Mo alloy was the material of choice for the strong back and tabs because the coefficient of thermal expansion closely matches that of the D263 glass and the material is relatively easy to machine. This invention has the ability to transfer bonded mounting points from a temporary location on the strong back to a permanent location on the strong back with minimal distortion. Secondly, it converts a single mirror segment into a rigid body with an acceptable amount of distortion of the mirror, and then maneuvers that rigid body into optical alignment such that the mirror segment can be bonded into a housing simulator or mirror module. Key problems are that the mirrors are 0.4-mm thick and have a very low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). Because the mirrors are so thin, they are very flexible and are easily distorted. When permanently bonding the mirror, the goal is to achieve a less than 1-micron distortion. Temperature deviations in the lab, which have been measured to be around 1 C, have caused significant distortions in the mirror segment.

  17. Atomic bonding between metal and graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2013-03-07

    To understand structural and chemical properties of metal-graphene composites, it is crucial to unveil the chemical bonding along the interface. We provide direct experimental evidence of atomic bonding between typical metal nano structures and graphene, agreeing well with density functional theory studies. Single Cr atoms are located in the valleys of a zigzag edge, and few-atom ensembles preferentially form atomic chains by self-assembly. Low migration barriers lead to rich dynamics of metal atoms and clusters under electron irradiation. We demonstrate no electron-instigated interaction between Cr clusters and pristine graphene, though Cr has been reported to be highly reactive to graphene. The metal-mediated etching is a dynamic effect between metal clusters and pre-existing defects. The resolved atomic configurations of typical nano metal structures on graphene offer insight into modeling and simulations on properties of metal-decorated graphene for both catalysis and future carbon-based electronics. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  18. Transversely Compressed Bonded Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The load capacity of bonded joints can be increased if transverse pressure is applied at the interface. The transverse pressure is assumed to introduce a Coulomb-friction contribution to the cohesive law for the interface. Response and load capacity for a bonded single-lap joint was derived using...... non-linear fracture mechanics. The results indicated a good correlation between theory and tests. Furthermore, the model is suggested as theoretical base for determining load capacity of bonded anchorages with transverse pressure, in externally reinforced concrete structures....

  19. Rh2(II)-catalyzed intramolecular aliphatic C-H bond amination reactions using aryl azides as the N-atom source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quyen; Sun, Ke; Driver, Tom G

    2012-05-02

    Rhodium(II) dicarboxylate complexes were discovered to catalyze the intramolecular amination of unactivated primary, secondary, or tertiary aliphatic C-H bonds using aryl azides as the N-atom precursor. While a strong electron-withdrawing group on the nitrogen atom is typically required to achieve this reaction, we found that both electron-rich and electron-poor aryl azides are efficient sources for the metal nitrene reactive intermediate. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  20. Bonding and Molecular Geometry without Orbitals- The Electron Domain Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Ronald J.; Spencer, James N.; Moog, Richard S.

    1996-07-01

    An alternative to the conventional valence bond approach to bonding and geometry-the electron domain model-is presented. This approach avoids some of the problems with the standard approach and presents fewer difficulties for the student, while still providing a physical basis for the VSEPR model and a link to the valence bond model. The electron domain model also emphasizes the importance of the Pauli principle in understanding the chemical bond and molecular geometry. A letter from Derek W. Smith in our April 2000 issue addresses the above.

  1. Strong van der Waals attractive forces in nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Jeffrey

    The Dobson classification scheme for failure of London-like expressions for describing dispersion is reviewed. New ways to measure using STM data and calculate by first principles free energies of organic self-assembly processes from solution will be discussed, considering tetraalkylporphyrins on graphite. How strong van der Waals forces can compete against covalent bonding to produce new molecular isomers and reaction pathways will also be demonstrated, focusing on golds-sulfur bonds for sensors and stabilizing nanoparticles.

  2. Strong Arcwise Connectedness

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza, Benjamin; Gartside, Paul; Kovan-Bakan, Merve; Mamatelashvili, Ana

    2012-01-01

    A space is `n-strong arc connected' (n-sac) if for any n points in the space there is an arc in the space visiting them in order. A space is omega-strong arc connected (omega-sac) if it is n-sac for all n. We study these properties in finite graphs, regular continua, and rational continua. There are no 4-sac graphs, but there are 3-sac graphs and graphs which are 2-sac but not 3-sac. For every n there is an n-sac regular continuum, but no regular continuum is omega-sac. There is an omega-sac ...

  3. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally......'s scenarios have some valuable future or admitted that killing them is not seriously morally wrong. Finally, if "valuable future" is interpreted as referring to objective standards, one ends up with implausible and unpalatable moral claims....

  4. Symmetry in bonding and spectra an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Douglas, Bodie E

    1985-01-01

    Many courses dealing with the material in this text are called ""Applications of Group Theory."" Emphasizing the central role and primary importance of symmetry in the applications, Symmetry in Bonding and Spectra enables students to handle applications, particularly applications to chemical bonding and spectroscopy. It contains the essential background in vectors and matrices for the applications, along with concise reviews of simple molecular orbital theory, ligand field theory, and treatments of molecular shapes, as well as some quantum mechanics. Solved examples in the text illustra

  5. The variational subspace valence bond method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, Graham D. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave., Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-04-07

    The variational subspace valence bond (VSVB) method based on overlapping orbitals is introduced. VSVB provides variational support against collapse for the optimization of overlapping linear combinations of atomic orbitals (OLCAOs) using modified orbital expansions, without recourse to orthogonalization. OLCAO have the advantage of being naturally localized, chemically intuitive (to individually model bonds and lone pairs, for example), and transferrable between different molecular systems. Such features are exploited to avoid key computational bottlenecks. Since the OLCAO can be doubly occupied, VSVB can access very large problems, and calculations on systems with several hundred atoms are presented.

  6. Exploring Strong Interactions in Proteins with Quantum Chemistry and Examples of Their Applications in Drug Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neng-Zhong Xie

    Full Text Available Three strong interactions between amino acid side chains (salt bridge, cation-π, and amide bridge are studied that are stronger than (or comparable to the common hydrogen bond interactions, and play important roles in protein-protein interactions.Quantum chemical methods MP2 and CCSD(T are used in calculations of interaction energies and structural optimizations.The energies of three types of amino acid side chain interactions in gaseous phase and in aqueous solutions are calculated using high level quantum chemical methods and basis sets. Typical examples of amino acid salt bridge, cation-π, and amide bridge interactions are analyzed, including the inhibitor design targeting neuraminidase (NA enzyme of influenza A virus, and the ligand binding interactions in the HCV p7 ion channel. The inhibition mechanism of the M2 proton channel in the influenza A virus is analyzed based on strong amino acid interactions.(1 The salt bridge interactions between acidic amino acids (Glu- and Asp- and alkaline amino acids (Arg+, Lys+ and His+ are the strongest residue-residue interactions. However, this type of interaction may be weakened by solvation effects and broken by lower pH conditions. (2 The cation- interactions between protonated amino acids (Arg+, Lys+ and His+ and aromatic amino acids (Phe, Tyr, Trp and His are 2.5 to 5-fold stronger than common hydrogen bond interactions and are less affected by the solvation environment. (3 The amide bridge interactions between the two amide-containing amino acids (Asn and Gln are three times stronger than hydrogen bond interactions, which are less influenced by the pH of the solution. (4 Ten of the twenty natural amino acids are involved in salt bridge, or cation-, or amide bridge interactions that often play important roles in protein-protein, protein-peptide, protein-ligand, and protein-DNA interactions.

  7. Chemisorption bonding and catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danese, J.B.; Schrieffer, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The general features of the LCAO--MO, Green's function, and multiple-scattering chi α methods and their applications to surfaces and surface-related problems are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the localization of bonding in surface complexes

  8. Tile-bonding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynie, C. C.; Holt, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Device applies uniform, constant, precise pressure to hold tiles in place during bonding. Tool consists of pressure bladders supported by adjustable pole. Pole can accomodate single or multiple bladders. Tiles can be flat or contoured.

  9. Bond markets in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibin Mu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available African bond markets have been steadily growing in recent years, but nonetheless remain undeveloped. African countries would benefit from greater access to financing and deeper financial markets. This paper compiles a unique set of data on government securities and corporate bond markets in Africa. It then applies an econometric model to analyze the key determinants of African government securities market and corporate bond market capitalization. Government securities market capitalization is directly related to better institutions and interest rate volatility, and inversely related to smaller fiscal deficits, higher interest rate spreads, exchange rate volatility, and current and capital account openness. Corporate bond market capitalization is directly linked to economic size, the level of development of the economy and financial markets, better institutions, and interest rate volatility, and inversely related to higher interest rate spreads and current account openness. Policy implications follow.

  10. Quintuple super bonding between the superatoms of metallic clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyan; Cheng, Longjiu

    2017-09-14

    The synthesis of a stable compound with Cr-Cr quintuple bonding (σ, 2π, 2δ) opened the door to a new field of chemistry (T. Nguyen, A. D. Sutton, M. Brynda, J. C. Fettinger, G. J. Long and P. P. Power, Science, 2005, 310, 844). Looking back to the mass experiments on sodium clusters (W. D. Knight, K. Clemenger, W. A. de Heer, W. A. Saunders, M. Y. Chou and M. L. Cohen, Phys. Rev. Lett., 1984, 52, 2141), this work tells some new stories about the experimentally viewed magic numbers 26e and 30e. By unbiased global search, the 26e Li 20 Mg 3 cluster has a perfect double-icosahedral motif with a large HOMO-LUMO energy gap (1.44 eV). We theoretically found that each icosahedron is an independent superatom and molecule-like electronic shell-closure is achieved via quintuple super bonding between two superatoms: [8e](1D2S) 5 -(1D2S) 5 [8e]. Similar quintuple bonding also exists in the 30e double-icosahedral Li 18 Mg 3 Al 2 cluster: [8e](1D2S) 7 -(1D2S) 7 [8e]. The 26e/30e quintuple bonding was verified by the beautiful analogies in molecular orbital diagrams and chemical bonding patterns with V 2 /Re 2 molecules. Such a quintuple super bonding makes a bridge between the jellium model and chemical bonding, which further expands the community of chemical bonds.

  11. A strong comeback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marier, D.

    1992-01-01

    This article presents the results of a financial rankings survey which show a strong economic activity in the independent energy industry. The topics of the article include advisor turnover, overseas banks, and the increase in public offerings. The article identifies the top project finance investors for new projects and restructurings and rankings for lenders

  12. Handbook of wafer bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Ramm, Peter; Taklo, Maaike M V

    2011-01-01

    Written by an author and editor team from microsystems companies and industry-near research organizations, this handbook and reference presents dependable, first-hand information on bonding technologies.In the first part, researchers from companies and institutions around the world discuss the most reliable and reproducible technologies for the production of bonded wafers. The second part is devoted to current and emerging applications, including microresonators, biosensors and precise measuring devices.

  13. Diffusion bonding techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    The applications of diffusion bonding at the General Electric Neutron Devices Department are briefly discussed, with particular emphasis on the gold/gold or gold/indium joints made between metallized alumina ceramic parts in the vacuum switch tube and the crystal resonator programs. Fixtures which use the differential expansion of dissimilar metals are described and compared to one that uses hydraulic pressure to apply the necessary bonding force

  14. Micro-Raman Vibrational Identification of 10-MDP Bond to Zirconia and Shear Bond Strength Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Paula, Diego Martins; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Reis, Alessandra; Frota, Natasha Marques; Melo, Radamés; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Feitosa, Victor Pinheiro

    2017-01-01

    So far, there is no report regarding the micro-Raman vibrational fingerprint of the bonds between 10-methacryloyloxy-decyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) and zirconia ceramics. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify the Raman vibrational peaks related to the bonds of 10-MDP with zirconia, as well as the influence on microshear bond strength. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was employed to assess the vibrational peak of 10-MDP binding to zirconia. Microshear bond strength of the dual-cure resin cement to zirconia with the presence of 10-MDP in composition of experimental ceramic primer and self-adhesive resin cement was also surveyed. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test ( p MDP. The presence of 10-MDP in both experimental ceramic primer and self-adhesive resin cement improved microshear bond strength to zirconia ceramic. It can be concluded that the nondestructive method of micro-Raman spectroscopy was able to characterize chemical bonds of 10-MDP with zirconia, which improves the bond strengths of resin cement.

  15. Widespread Disulfide Bonding in Proteins from Thermophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Jorda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Disulfide bonds are generally not used to stabilize proteins in the cytosolic compartments of bacteria or eukaryotic cells, owing to the chemically reducing nature of those environments. In contrast, certain thermophilic archaea use disulfide bonding as a major mechanism for protein stabilization. Here, we provide a current survey of completely sequenced genomes, applying computational methods to estimate the use of disulfide bonding across the Archaea. Microbes belonging to the Crenarchaeal branch, which are essentially all hyperthermophilic, are universally rich in disulfide bonding while lesser degrees of disulfide bonding are found among the thermophilic Euryarchaea, excluding those that are methanogenic. The results help clarify which parts of the archaeal lineage are likely to yield more examples and additional specific data on protein disulfide bonding, as increasing genomic sequencing efforts are brought to bear.

  16. Widespread disulfide bonding in proteins from thermophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorda, Julien; Yeates, Todd O

    2011-01-01

    Disulfide bonds are generally not used to stabilize proteins in the cytosolic compartments of bacteria or eukaryotic cells, owing to the chemically reducing nature of those environments. In contrast, certain thermophilic archaea use disulfide bonding as a major mechanism for protein stabilization. Here, we provide a current survey of completely sequenced genomes, applying computational methods to estimate the use of disulfide bonding across the Archaea. Microbes belonging to the Crenarchaeal branch, which are essentially all hyperthermophilic, are universally rich in disulfide bonding while lesser degrees of disulfide bonding are found among the thermophilic Euryarchaea, excluding those that are methanogenic. The results help clarify which parts of the archaeal lineage are likely to yield more examples and additional specific data on protein disulfide bonding, as increasing genomic sequencing efforts are brought to bear.

  17. High strength films from oriented, hydrogen-bonded "graphamid" 2D polymer molecular ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz-Rosado, Emil; Beaudet, Todd D; Andzelm, Jan W; Wetzel, Eric D

    2018-02-27

    The linear polymer poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide), better known by its tradename Kevlar, is an icon of modern materials science due to its remarkable strength, stiffness, and environmental resistance. Here, we propose a new two-dimensional (2D) polymer, "graphamid", that closely resembles Kevlar in chemical structure, but is mechanically advantaged by virtue of its 2D structure. Using atomistic calculations, we show that graphamid comprises covalently-bonded sheets bridged by a high population of strong intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Molecular and micromechanical calculations predict that these strong intermolecular interactions allow stiff, high strength (6-8 GPa), and tough films from ensembles of finite graphamid molecules. In contrast, traditional 2D materials like graphene have weak intermolecular interactions, leading to ensembles of low strength (0.1-0.5 GPa) and brittle fracture behavior. These results suggest that hydrogen-bonded 2D polymers like graphamid would be transformative in enabling scalable, lightweight, high performance polymer films of unprecedented mechanical performance.

  18. Competing covalent and ionic bonding in Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Sun, Jifeng; Subedi, Alaska; Siegrist, Theo; Singh, David J

    2016-05-19

    Ge2Sb2Te5 and related phase change materials are highly unusual in that they can be readily transformed between amorphous and crystalline states using very fast melt, quench, anneal cycles, although the resulting states are extremely long lived at ambient temperature. These states have remarkably different physical properties including very different optical constants in the visible in strong contrast to common glass formers such as silicates or phosphates. This behavior has been described in terms of resonant bonding, but puzzles remain, particularly regarding different physical properties of crystalline and amorphous phases. Here we show that there is a strong competition between ionic and covalent bonding in cubic phase providing a link between the chemical basis of phase change memory property and origins of giant responses of piezoelectric materials (PbTiO3, BiFeO3). This has important consequences for dynamical behavior in particular leading to a simultaneous hardening of acoustic modes and softening of high frequency optic modes in crystalline phase relative to amorphous. This different bonding in amorphous and crystalline phases provides a direct explanation for different physical properties and understanding of the combination of long time stability and rapid switching and may be useful in finding new phase change compositions with superior properties.

  19. Surface activated room-temperature bonding in Ar gas ambient for MEMS encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hideki; Kurashima, Yuichi; Takamizawa, Akifumi; Ikegami, Takeshi; Yanagimachi, Shinya

    2018-02-01

    Surface activated room-temperature bonding of Si and sapphire wafers in high-purity inert gas ambient was examined. Although surface activated bonding has been mainly performed in high vacuum, Si and sapphire wafers were successfully bonded in Ar gas ambient up to 90 kPa, which is almost atmospheric pressure. The dicing test proved that the bonding prepared in Ar gas ambient was strong enough for MEMS packaging, although the bonding strength was slightly decreased compared with that prepared in vacuum. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the bonding interface prepared in Ar gas ambient is almost the same as that prepared in vacuum. It means that Ar atoms in the bonding ambient do not hamper the interatomic bond formation at the bonding interface. Room-temperature bonding in gas ambient enables hermetic packaging of MEMS devices, such as inertia sensors, MEMS switches, and Cs vapor cells for MEMS atomic clocks at various pressures.

  20. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Models of spontaneous breaking of electroweak symmetry by a strong interaction do not have fine tuning/hierarchy problem. They are conceptually elegant and use the only mechanism of spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry that is known to occur in nature. The simplest model, minimal technicolor with extended technicolor interactions, is appealing because one can calculate by scaling up from QCD. But it is ruled out on many counts: inappropriately low quark and lepton masses (or excessive FCNC), bad electroweak data fits, light scalar and vector states, etc. However, nature may not choose the minimal model and then we are stuck: except possibly through lattice simulations, we are unable to compute and test the models. In the LHC era it therefore makes sense to abandon specific models (of strong EW breaking) and concentrate on generic features that may indicate discovery. The Technicolor Straw Man is not a model but a parametrized search strategy inspired by a remarkable generic feature of walking technicolor,...