WorldWideScience

Sample records for strong behavioural predispositions

  1. Early environmental exposures influence schizophrenia expression even in the presence of strong genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husted, Janice A; Ahmed, Rashid; Chow, Eva W C; Brzustowicz, Linda M; Bassett, Anne S

    2012-05-01

    There are few studies of environmental factors in familial forms of schizophrenia. We investigated whether childhood adversity or environmental factors were associated with schizophrenia in a familial sample where schizophrenia is associated with the NOSA1P gene. We found that a cumulative adversity index including childhood illness, family instability and cannabis use was significantly associated with narrow schizophrenia, independent of NOSA1P risk genotype, previously measured childhood trauma, covariates and familial clustering (adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval)=1.55 (1.01, 2.38)). The results provide further support that early environmental exposures influence schizophrenia expression even in the presence of strong genetic predisposition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic predisposition to obesity affects behavioural traits including food reward and anxiety-like behaviour in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Heike; Kraemer, Maria; Rabasa, Cristina; Askevik, Kaisa; Adan, Roger A H; Dickson, Suzanne L

    2017-06-15

    Here we sought to define behavioural traits linked to anxiety, reward, and exploration in different strains of rats commonly used in obesity research. We hypothesized that genetic variance may contribute not only to their metabolic phenotype (that is well documented) but also to the expression of these behavioural traits. Rat strains that differ in their susceptibility to develop an obese phenotype (Sprague-Dawley, Obese Prone, Obese Resistant, and Zucker rats) were exposed to a number of behavioural tests starting at the age of 8 weeks. We found a similar phenotype in the obesity susceptible models, Obese Prone and Zucker rats, with a lower locomotor activity, exploratory activity, and higher level of anxiety-like behaviour in comparison to the leaner Obese Resistant strain. We did not find evidence that rat strains with a genetic predisposition to obesity differed in their ability to experience reward from chocolate (in a condition place preference task). However, Zucker rats show higher motivated behaviour for sucrose compared to Obese Resistant rats when the effort required to obtain palatable food is relatively low. Together our data demonstrate that rat strains that differ in their genetic predisposition to develop obesity also differ in their performance in behavioural tests linked to anxiety, exploration, and reward and that these differences are independent of body weight. We conclude that genetic variations which determine body weight and the aforementioned behaviours co-exist but that future studies are required to identify whether (and which) common genes are involved. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic predisposition to obesity affects behavioural traits including food reward and anxiety-like behaviour in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, Heike; Kraemer, Maria; Rabasa, Cristina; Askevik, Kaisa; Adan, Roger A.H.; Dickson, Suzanne L.

    2017-01-01

    Here we sought to define behavioural traits linked to anxiety, reward, and exploration in different strains of rats commonly used in obesity research. We hypothesized that genetic variance may contribute not only to their metabolic phenotype (that is well documented) but also to the expression of

  4. Breast magnetic resonance imaging significance for breast cancer diagnostic in women with genetic predisposition and a strong family history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Karpova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Screening of breast cancer with mammography recommended to women over 40 has been shown to decrease breast cancer mortality. But mam- mography has much lower accuracy in young women with BRCA1/2 mutations and women with a strong family history. Therefore new screening methods in young high-risk women are necessary to detect early-stage cancer.

  5. Strong convective and shock wave behaviour in solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomberg, H.W.; Davis, J.; Boris, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    A model has been developed to study the gasdynamics of a flare region heated by a stream of energetic electrons. It is shown that the energy deposition can introduce strong chromospheric dynamical effects. As a result of fluid motion into rarified regions, there is considerable redistribution of mass causing a profound influence on the emitted line radiation. (author)

  6. Genetic predisposition to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Clare; Hodgson, Shirley

    2005-01-01

    Over recent decades a number of genes causing predisposition to cancer have been identified. Some of these cause rare autosomal dominant monogenic cancer predisposition syndromes. In the majority of families, the increased incidence of cancers is due to a multifactorial aetiology with a number of lower penetrance cancer predisposition genes interacting with environmental factors. Identification of those at increased risk of cancer on account of their family history is important, as genetic testing, enhanced surveillance, prophylactic surgery and chemoprophylaxis may be indicated. In this article the issues surrounding genetic predisposition to cancer are considered by examining two common cancers: colorectal and breast cancer.

  7. Skin cancer screening behaviours among individuals with a strong family history of malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparian, N A; McLoone, J K; Meiser, B; Butow, P N; Simpson, J M; Mann, G J

    2010-11-09

    This study examined the prevalence and correlates of skin cancer screening behaviours among individuals at high risk of developing melanoma due to strong family history. A total of 120 individuals with a known family-specific CDKN2A mutation (72% response rate) completed a self-report questionnaire assessing annual frequency of skin self-examination (SSE), clinical skin examination (CSE) and a variety of potential demographic, clinical and psychosocial correlates. In the past 12 months, 50% of participants reported engaging in SSE at least four times, and 43% of participants had undergone at least one CSE. Engagement in SSE was associated with doctor recommendation (β=1.77, P=0.001), confidence in one's ability to perform SSE (β=1.44, Pmelanoma treatment (β=0.77, P=0.002) and intention to perform SSE in the future (β=1.69, Pmelanoma engage in suboptimal levels of skin surveillance. Improved doctor-patient communication, as well as psycho-education and behavioural support, may be viable means of improving early skin cancer detection behaviours in this high-risk population.

  8. Strong-coupling behaviour of two t - J chains with interchain single-electron hopping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guangming; Feng Shiping; Yu Lu.

    1994-01-01

    Using the fermion-spin transformation to implement spin-charge separation of constrained electrons, a model of two t - J chains with interchain single-electron hopping is studied by abelian bosonization. After spin-charge decoupling the charge dynamics can be trivially solved, while the spin dynamics is determined by a strong-coupling fixed point where the correlation functions can be calculated explicitly. This is a generalization of the Luther-Emery line for two-coupled t - J chains. The interchain single-electron hopping changes the asymptotic behaviour of the interchain spin-spin correlation functions and the electron Green function, but their exponents are independent of the coupling strength. (author). 25 refs

  9. Strong nonlinear current-voltage behaviour in perovskite-derivative calcium copper titanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sung-Yoon; Kim, Il-Doo; Kang, Suk-Joong L

    2004-11-01

    The discovery of a giant dielectric constant of 10(5) in CaCu(3)Ti(4)O(12) has increased interest in this perovskite-type oxide. Here we demonstrate that, in addition to high permittivity, CaCu(3)Ti(4)O(12) has remarkably strong nonlinear current-voltage characteristics without the addition of any dopants. An intrinsic electrostatic barrier at the grain boundaries is responsible for the unusual nonlinear behaviour. The nonlinear coefficient of CaCu(3)Ti(4)O(12) reaches a value of 900, which is even greater than that of the varistor material ZnO. As a result, CaCu(3)Ti(4)O(12) may lead to efficient switching and gas-sensing devices.

  10. Existe-t-il une predisposition genetique aux addictions ?

    OpenAIRE

    CASTERMANS, Emilie; GAILLEZ, Stephanie; BOURS, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Is free will the rule in front of drugs, alcohol or gambling? Would interindividual genetic variations influence our behaviour to such a point that addiction susceptibility would be enhanced or decreased? Addiction predisposition is a complex trait, involving numerous predisposition genes and also environment. Heritability of this trait is 50%, meaning a similar contribution of genes and environment in the setting of this trait. Some genes of the dopaminergic system and some others specific f...

  11. Pretransitional behaviour in the vicinity of the isotropic-nematic transition of strongly polar compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridevi, S; Krishna Prasad, S; Shankar Rao, D S; Yelamaggad, C V

    2008-01-01

    The isotropic-nematic transition, being weakly first order, exhibits pretransitional effects signifying the appearance of the nematic-like regions in the isotropic phase. In the isotropic phase, strongly polar liquid crystals, such as the popular alkyl and alkoxy cyano biphenyl behave in a non-standard fashion: whereas far away from the transition the dielectric constant ε iso has a 1/T dependence (a feature also commonly seen in polar liquids), on approaching the nematic phase the trend reverses resulting in a maximum in ε iso , at a temperature slightly above the transition, an effect explained on the basis of short-range correlations with an antiparallel association of the neighbouring molecules. Recently, there has been a revival in studies on this behaviour to possibly associate it with the order of transition. Here we report dielectric measurements carried in the vicinity of this transition for a number of compounds having different molecular structures including a bent core system, but with a common feature that the molecules possess a strong terminal polar group, nitro in one case and cyano in the rest. Surprisingly, the convex shape of the thermal variation of ε iso was more an exception than the rule. In materials that exhibit such an anomaly we find a linear correlation between δε = (ε peak -ε IN )/ε IN and δT = T peak -T IN , where ε peak is the maximum value of the dielectric constant in the isotropic phase, ε IN the value at the transition, and T peak and T IN the corresponding temperatures.

  12. Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yoshihisa; Tomishige, Masahiko; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Fujiwara, Masao; Shibata, Naho; Kosaka, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-05-01

    Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum was studied by using a superconducting magnet. Around a centre of a round vessel, random swimming at 0 T and aligned swimming parallel to the magnetic field (MF) of 8 T were observed. Near a wall of the vessel, however, swimming round and round along the wall at 0 T and aligned swimming of turning at right angles upon collision with the wall, which was remarkable around 1-4 T, were detected. It was experimentally revealed that the former MF-induced parallel swimming at the vessel centre was caused physicochemically by the parallel magnetic orientation of the cell itself. From magnetic field dependence of the extent of the orientation, the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy (χ ∥-χ ⊥) was first obtained to be 3.4× 10-23 emu cell-1 at 298 K for Paramecium caudatum. The orientation of the cell was considered to result from the magnetic orientation of the cell membrane. On the other hand, although mechanisms of the latter swimming near the vessel wall regardless of the absence and presence of the magnetic field are unclear at present, these experimental results indicate that whether the cell exists near the wall alters the magnetic field effect on the swimming in the horizontal magnetic field.

  13. Predisposition to Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nanna Julie; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2012-01-01

    predisposed to future obesity. The purpose of this paper is to review interventions on obesity prevention published during the past year, and to examine if interventions targeting predisposed groups or individuals seem more efficient in preventing obesity than studies targeting general populations. Among 15......Obesity prevention should remain a priority, even if there is some suggestion that the epidemic may presently have reached a stable level. However, previous interventions have not been effective in preventing overweight and obesity, and at the same time studies suggest that some subgroups are more...... identified studies, 7 targeted predisposed children or adolescents. More of the studies targeting predisposed individuals were able to show significant effects than the studies targeting general populations. Most studies targeting predisposed defined the predisposition based on ethnicity or socioeconomic...

  14. Genetic Predisposition to Rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awosika, Olabola; Oussedik, Elias

    2018-04-01

    Rosacea is a common inflammatory skin disease with a multifaceted pathophysiology, including environmental stressors and neurovascular and immune dysfunction affected by the presence of pathogens. The genetic component of this disorder is not well understood. However, a possible genetic origin in Northern European descendants, family inheritance, twin concordance, and genetic associations with autoimmune disorders attest the genetic predisposition to rosacea. Currently, one single-nucleotide polymorphism has been identified in association with rosacea and is intergenic between HLA-DRA and BTNL2. Additional associations with HLA alleles and immune-mediated disorders support the role of immune-regulating genes and innate and adaptive immunity in rosacea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiosensitivity and cancer : genetic predisposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavin, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    This paper considers radiation exposure in terms of individual sensitivity to radiation and predisposition to cancer, A-T homozygotes have an increased predisposition to a number of types of cancer. Immunodeficiency is an important factor involved. Radiosensitivity, chromosomal breakage, defective DNA repair and other abnormalities may also contribute to the increased incidence of cancer

  16. Asymptotic behaviour of the equilibrium nuclear separation for the H{sup +}{sub 2} molecule in a strong magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benguria, Rafael [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Departamento de Fisica, Casilla 306, Santiago 22, Chile (Chile); Brummelhuis, Raymond [School of Economics, Mathematics and Statistics, 7-15 Gresse Street, University of London (United Kingdom); Duclos, Pierre [Centre de Physique Theorique UMR 6207-Unite Mixte de Recherche du CNRS et des Universites Aix-Marseille I, Aix-Marseille II et de l' Universite du Sud Toulon-Var-Laboratoire affilie a la FRUMAM, Luminy Case 907, F-13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Perez-Oyarzun, Santiago [Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejercito 441, Casilla 298-v, Santiago (Chile); Vytras, Petr [Katedra Matematiky, FJFI, CVUT, Trojanova 13, CZ-Prague 12000 (Czech Republic)

    2006-06-30

    We consider the hydrogen molecular ion H{sup +}{sub 2} in the fixed nuclear approximation, in the presence of a strong homogeneous magnetic field. We determine the leading asymptotic behaviour for the equilibrium distance between the nuclei of this molecule in the limit when the strength of the magnetic field goes to infinity.

  17. Ion exchange behaviour of citrate and EDTA anions on strong and weak base organic ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askarieh, M.M.; White, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The exchange of citrate and EDTA ions with two strong base and two weak base exchangers is considered. Citrate and EDTA analysis for this work was performed using a colorimetric method developed here. The ions most selectively exchanged on the resins are H 2 cit - and H 2 EDTA 2- , though EDTA is generally less strongly sorbed on strong base resins. In contact with weak base resins, deprotonation of the resin occurs during ion exchange with a noticeable drop in solution pH. Although EDTA sorption can be reversed by nitric acid, citrate ions are significantly held on the resin at low pH. The exchange of citrate can be made reversible if bicarbonate is added to the initial solutions. Alkaline regeneration of exchangers loaded with EDTA proved to be very effective. (author)

  18. Effects of early life trauma are dependent on genetic predisposition: a rat study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Vivienne A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trauma experienced early in life increases the risk of developing a number of psychological and/or behavioural disorders. It is unclear, however, how genetic predisposition to a behavioural disorder, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, modifies the long-term effects of early life trauma. There is substantial evidence from family and twin studies for susceptibility to ADHD being inherited, implying a strong genetic component to the disorder. In the present study we used an inbred animal model of ADHD, the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR, to investigate the long-term consequences of early life trauma on emotional behaviour in individuals predisposed to developing ADHD-like behaviour. Methods We applied a rodent model of early life trauma, maternal separation, to SHR and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY, the normotensive control strain from which SHR were originally derived. The effects of maternal separation (removal of pups from dam for 3 h/day during the first 2 weeks of life on anxiety-like behaviour (elevated-plus maze and depressive-like behaviour (forced swim test were assessed in prepubescent rats (postnatal day 28 and 31. Basal levels of plasma corticosterone were measured using radioimmunoassay. Results The effect of maternal separation on SHR and WKY differed in a number of behavioural measures. Similar to its reported effect in other rat strains, maternal separation increased the anxiety-like behaviour of WKY (decreased open arm entries but not SHR. Maternal separation increased the activity of SHR in the novel environment of the elevated plus-maze, while it decreased that of WKY. Overall, SHR showed a more active response in the elevated plus-maze and forced swim test than WKY, regardless of treatment, and were also found to have higher basal plasma corticosterone compared to WKY. Maternal separation increased basal levels of plasma corticosterone in SHR females only, possibly through adaptive

  19. Characterization of 'strong-fragile' behaviour of glass-forming aqueous solutions by neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Branca, C; Galli, G; Magazù, S; Maisano, G; Migliardo, F

    2002-01-01

    Neutron-scattering measurements have been performed on trehalose/H sub 2 O and sucrose/H sub 2 O mixtures by using the spectrometer MIBEMOL at the Laboratoire Leon Brillouin (LLB, Saclay) as a function of temperature and concentration. In order to characterize the different rigidities of both the disaccharide/H sub 2 O mixtures, we have evaluated the R sub 1 (T sub g) parameter connected to the 'strong-fragile' classification of the systems according to Angell's nomenclature. (orig.)

  20. Cancer predisposition in children: genetics, phenotypes & screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, S.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the genetic, phenotypic and screening aspects of tumor predisposition syndromes in childhood cancer patients. In tumor predisposition syndromes, the same constitutional molecular defects that lead to the clinical phenotype predispose the patient to develop specific cancers.

  1. Investigation on the dynamic behaviour of a parabolic trough power plant during strongly cloudy days

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Maliki, Wisam Abed Kattea; Alobaid, Falah; Starkloff, Ralf; Kez, Vitali; Epple, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A detailed dynamic model of a parabolic trough solar thermal power plant is done. • Simulated results are compared to the experimental data from the real power plant. • Discrepancy between model result and real data is caused by operation strategy. • The model strategy increased the operating hours of power plant by around 2.5–3 h. - Abstract: The objective of this study is the development of a full scale dynamic model of a parabolic trough power plant with a thermal storage system, operated by the Actividades de Construcción y Servicios Group in Spain. The model includes solar field, thermal storage system and the power block and describes the heat transfer fluid and steam/water paths in detail. The parabolic trough power plant is modelled using Advanced Process Simulation Software (APROS). To validate the model, the numerical results are compared to the measured data, obtained from “Andasol II” during strongly cloudy periods in the summer days. The comparisons show a qualitative agreement between the dynamic simulation model and the measurements. The results confirm that the thermal storage enables the parabolic trough power plant to provide a constant power rate when the storage energy discharge is available, despite significant oscillations in the solar radiation.

  2. Dynamical models of hadrons based on string model and behaviour of strongly interacting matter at high density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senda Ikuo.

    1991-05-01

    We propose dynamical models of hadrons, the nucleation model and the free-decay model, in which results of string model are used to represent interactions. The dynamical properties of hadrons, which are obtained by string model, are examined and their parameters are fitted by experimental data. The equilibrium properties of hadrons at high density are investigated by the nucleation model and we found a singular behaviour at energy density 3 ∼ 5 GeV/fm 3 , where hadrons coalesce to create highly excited states. We argue that this singular behaviour corresponds to the phase transition to quark-gluon plasma. The possibility to observe the production of high density strongly interacting matter at collider experiments are discussed using the free-decay model, which produces pion distributions as decay products of resonances. We show that our free-decay model recovers features of hadron distributions obtained in hadron collision experiments. Finally the perspectives and extensions are discussed. (author). 34 refs, 19 figs, 2 tabs

  3. Strongly enhanced irreversibility fields and Bose-glass behaviour in bulk YBCO with discontinuous columnar irradiation defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, G; Nenkov, K; Krabbes, G; Weinstein, R; Gandini, A; Sawh, R; Mayes, B; Parks, D

    2007-01-01

    Flux pinning properties and irreversibility fields B irr (T) of melt-textured YBCO with discontinuous or multiple-in-line-damage (MILD) columnar defects produced by irradiation with high-energy U 238 ions were studied at a constant matching field of B φ = 10 T and for several energy losses between S e = 1.67 and 2.4 keV A -1 . With increasing S e and increasing length of the MILD pins, the critical current density j c (H,T) strongly increases and B irr (T) for fields along the c axis progressively shifts upwards reaching 9 T at 77 K. For S e = 2.4 keV A -1 , a pronounced kink is observed in B irr (T) at 8 T which is a strong indication of Bose-glass behaviour. The j c (H) dependence of this sample shows a peak at a low applied field B p . This peak effect is explained by the entanglement of vortices. It is argued that for MILD pins single vortices interact simultaneously with many short columnar defects in neighbouring ion trails resulting in an automatic splay in the vortex orientation. The observed decrease of B p with increasing temperature is estimated taking the increasing thermal fluctuations into account

  4. Postirradiation sarcoma in retinoblastoma. Induction or predisposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, M.B.; Burgess, L.P.; Fee, W.E. Jr.; Donaldson, S.S.

    1988-01-01

    An alarmingly high rate of postirradiation sarcomas following treatment for retinoblastoma has been described in the literature. We present four new cases and report 57 others from the English literature. Osteogenic sarcoma was the predominant histologic type (58%), followed by fibrosarcoma (21%) and various other sarcomas (21%). The average latency period between irradiation and development of the second primary (sarcoma) was 12.4 years. Irrespective of irradiation, a genetic linkage between retinoblastoma and osteogenic sarcoma on the 13q14 chromosome is recognized. Through a pleiotropic effect of this same chromosome, a predisposition for other sarcomas may exist as well. Finally, a strong role for radiation induction is proposed for all of these postirradiation sarcomas. This is based on the increased number of sarcomas arising in the field of prior irradiation (sites uncharacteristic of spontaneously occurring primary sarcomas) and the prolonged latency periods.13 references

  5. Genetic predisposition to bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to review the candidate gene and genome-wide association studies relevant to bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and to discuss the emerging understanding of the complexities involved in genetic predisposition to bronchopulmonary dysplasia and its outcomes. Genetic factors contribute much of the variance in risk for BPD. Studies to date evaluating single or a few candidate genes have not been successful in yielding results that are replicated in GWAS, perhaps due to more stringent p-value thresholds. GWAS studies have identified only a single gene (SPOCK2) at genome-wide significance in a European White and African cohort, which was not replicated in two North American studies. Pathway gene-set analysis in a North American cohort confirmed involvement of known pathways of lung development and repair (e.g., CD44 and phosphorus oxygen lyase activity) and indicated novel molecules and pathways (e.g., adenosine deaminase and targets of miR-219) involved in genetic predisposition to BPD. The genetic basis of severe BPD is different from that of mild/moderate BPD, and the variants/pathways associated with BPD vary by race/ethnicity. A pilot study of whole exome sequencing identified hundreds of genes of interest, and indicated the overall feasibility as well as complexity of this approach. Better phenotyping of BPD by severity and pathophysiology, and careful analysis of race/ethnicity is required to gain a better understanding of the genetic basis of BPD. Future translational studies are required for the identification of potential genetic predispositions (rare variants and dysregulated pathways) by next-generation sequencing methods in individual infants (personalized genomics). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Breed predisposition to canine gastric carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seim-Wikse, Tonje; Jörundsson, Einar; Nødtvedt, Ane

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has indicated a breed predisposition to gastric carcinoma in dogs. However, results to date are inconsistent since several studies have failed to prove such a predisposition. Better knowledge of breeds at risk could facilitate early detection of gastric carcinoma in dogs. The aim...

  7. Hereditary Predispositions to Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Bannon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS are heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, bone marrow dysplasia, and peripheral cytopenias. Familial forms of MDS have traditionally been considered rare, especially in adults; however, the increasing availability of somatic and germline genetic analyses has identified multiple susceptibility loci. Bone marrow failure syndromes have been well-described in the pediatric setting, e.g., Fanconi anemia (FA, dyskeratosis congenita (DC, Diamond–Blackfan anemia (DBA, and Shwachman–Diamond syndrome (SBS, hallmarked by clinically-recognizable phenotypes (e.g., radial ray anomalies in FA and significantly increased risks for MDS and/or acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the setting of bone marrow failure. However, additional families with multiple cases of MDS or AML have long been reported in the medical literature with little known regarding potential hereditary etiologies. Over the last decade, genomic investigation of such families has revealed multiple genes conferring inherited risks for MDS and/or AML as the primary malignancy, including RUNX1, ANKRD26, DDX41, ETV6, GATA2, and SRP72. As these syndromes are increasingly appreciated in even apparently de novo presentations of MDS, it is important for hematologists/oncologists to become familiar with these newly-described syndromes. Herein, we provide a review of familial MDS syndromes and practical aspects of management in patients with predisposition syndromes.

  8. Genetic predisposition to kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Laura S; Linehan, W Marston

    2016-10-01

    Kidney cancer is not a single disease but is made up of a number of different types of cancer classified by histology that are disparate in presentation, clinical course, and genetic basis. Studies of families with inherited renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have provided the basis for our understanding of the causative genes and altered metabolic pathways in renal cancer with different histologies. Von Hippel-Lindau disease was the first renal cancer disorder with a defined genetic basis. Over the next two decades, the genes responsible for a number of other inherited renal cancer syndromes including hereditary papillary renal carcinoma, Birt-Hogg-Dube´syndrome, hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma, and succinate dehydrogenase-associated renal cancer were identified. Recently, renal cell carcinoma has been confirmed as part of the clinical phenotype in individuals from families with BAP1-associated tumor predisposition syndrome and MiTF-associated cancer syndrome. Here we summarize the clinical characteristics of and causative genes for these and other inherited RCC syndromes, the pathways that are dysregulated when the inherited genes are mutated, and recommended clinical management of patients with these inherited renal cancer syndromes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Measuring and Validating a General Cancer Predisposition Perception Scale: An Adaptation of the Revised-IPQ-Genetic Predisposition Scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Wing Tak Lam

    Full Text Available Illness perceptions are linked to individual help-seeking and preventive behaviors. Previous illness perception studies have identified five dimensions of illness-related experience and behaviour. The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R for genetic predisposition (IPQ-R-GP was developed to measure illness perceptions in those genetically-predisposed to blood disease. We adapted the IPQ-R-GP to measure perceptions of generalized cancer predisposition. This paper describes the development and validation of the Cancer Predisposition Perception Scale (CPPS.The draft CPPS scale was first administered to 167 well Hepatitis B carriers and 123 other healthy individuals and the factor structure was examined using Exploratory Factor Analysis. Then the factor structure was confirmed in a second sample comprising 148 healthy controls, 150 smokers and 152 passive smokers using Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA.Six-factors comprising 26 items provided optimal fit by eigen and scree-plot methods, accounting for 58.9% of the total variance. CFA indicated good fit of the six-factor model after further excluding three items. The six factors, Emotional representation (5 items, Illness coherence (4 items, Treatment control (3 items, Consequences (5 items, Internal locus of control (2 items and External locus of control (4 items demonstrated adequate-to-good subscale internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.63-0.90. Divergent validity was suggested by low correlations with optimism, self-efficacy, and scales for measuring physical and psychological health symptoms.The CPPS appears to be a valid measure of perceived predisposition to generic cancer risks and can be used to examine cancer-risk-related cognitions in individuals at higher and lower cancer risk.

  10. Measuring and Validating a General Cancer Predisposition Perception Scale: An Adaptation of the Revised-IPQ-Genetic Predisposition Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wendy Wing Tak; Liao, Qiuyan; Wong, Jennifer Hiu Fai; Lai, Ching Lung; Yuen, Man Fung; Tsang, Janice Wing Hang; Fielding, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Illness perceptions are linked to individual help-seeking and preventive behaviors. Previous illness perception studies have identified five dimensions of illness-related experience and behaviour. The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) for genetic predisposition (IPQ-R-GP) was developed to measure illness perceptions in those genetically-predisposed to blood disease. We adapted the IPQ-R-GP to measure perceptions of generalized cancer predisposition. This paper describes the development and validation of the Cancer Predisposition Perception Scale (CPPS). The draft CPPS scale was first administered to 167 well Hepatitis B carriers and 123 other healthy individuals and the factor structure was examined using Exploratory Factor Analysis. Then the factor structure was confirmed in a second sample comprising 148 healthy controls, 150 smokers and 152 passive smokers using Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). Six-factors comprising 26 items provided optimal fit by eigen and scree-plot methods, accounting for 58.9% of the total variance. CFA indicated good fit of the six-factor model after further excluding three items. The six factors, Emotional representation (5 items), Illness coherence (4 items), Treatment control (3 items), Consequences (5 items), Internal locus of control (2 items) and External locus of control (4 items) demonstrated adequate-to-good subscale internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.63-0.90). Divergent validity was suggested by low correlations with optimism, self-efficacy, and scales for measuring physical and psychological health symptoms. The CPPS appears to be a valid measure of perceived predisposition to generic cancer risks and can be used to examine cancer-risk-related cognitions in individuals at higher and lower cancer risk.

  11. Host microsatellite alleles in malaria predisposition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trivedi Rajni

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a serious, sometimes fatal, disease caused by Plasmodium infection of human red blood cells. The host-parasite co-evolutionary processes are well understood by the association of coding variations such as G6PD, Duffy blood group receptor, HLA, and beta-globin gene variants with malaria resistance. The profound genetic diversity in host is attributed to polymorphic microsatellites loci. The microsatellite alleles in bacterial species are known to have aided their survival in fatal environmental conditions. The fascinating question is whether microsatellites are genomic cushion in the human genome to combat disease stress and has cause-effect relationships with infections. Presentation of the hypothesis It is hypothesized that repeat units or alleles of microsatellites TH01 and D5S818, located in close proximity to beta-globin gene and immune regulatory region in human play a role in malaria predisposition. Association of alleles at aforesaid microsatellites with malaria infection was analysed. To overrule the false association in unrecognized population stratification, structure analysis and AMOVA were performed among the sampled groups. Testing of hypothesis Associations of microsatellite alleles with malaria infection were verified using recombination rate, Chi-square, and powerful likelihood tests. Further investigation of population genetic structure, and AMOVA was done to rule out the confounding effects of population stratification in interpretation of association studies. Implication of the hypothesis Lower recombination rate (θ between microsatellites and genes implicated in host fitness; positive association between alleles -13 (D5S818, 9 (TH01 and strong susceptibility to Plasmodium falciparum; and alleles-12 (D5S818 and 6 (TH01 rendering resistance to human host were evident. The interesting fact emerging from the study was that while predisposition to malaria was a prehistoric attribute, among TH01

  12. Strong propensity for HIV transmission among men who have sex with men in Vietnam: behavioural data and sexual network modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Linus; Lu, Xin; Liljeros, Fredrik; Thanh, Hoang Huy; Thorson, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Survey data from men who have sex with men (MSM) in Asian cities indicate ongoing and drastic increases in HIV prevalence. It is unknown which behavioural factors are most important in driving these epidemics. We aimed to analyse detailed sexual behaviour data among MSM in Vietnam and to model HIV transmission using improved assumptions on sexual network structure. Setting Vietnam. Participants Internet-using men who had ever had sex (any type) with a man, aged ≥18 years and living in Vietnam. The study was cross-sectional, population-based and performed in 2012, using online respondent-driven sampling. The Internet-based survey instrument was completed by 982 participants, of which 857 were eligible. Questions included sociodemography and retrospective sexual behaviour, including number of unprotected anal sex (UAS) acts per partner. Primary and secondary outcome measures Estimated basic reproductive number over 3 months as a function of transmission risk per UAS act; frequency distributions of number of UAS partners and UAS acts during last 3 months. Results 36% (CI 32% to 42%) reported UAS at least once during the last 3 months. 36% (CI 32% to 41%) had ever taken an HIV test and received the result. UAS partner numbers and number of UAS acts were both highly skewed and positively correlated. Using a weighted configuration model, taking into account partner numbers, frequency of UAS and their correlations, we estimated the basic reproductive number (R0) over 3 months. The results indicated rapid transmission over a wide range of values of per-act transmissibility. Conclusions Men with multiple partners had unexpectedly high UAS frequency per partner, paired with low HIV testing rates. The study highlights the importance of collecting data on frequency of UAS acts and indicates the need to rapidly scale-up HIV prevention services and testing opportunities for MSM in Vietnam. PMID:24435887

  13. Familial Predisposition for Salivary Gland Cancer in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Aro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Salivary gland cancer (SGC accounts for 3–5% of head and neck malignancies, and register-based studies estimate the familial proportion to be 0.15%. Objective We studied familial predisposition for SGC in the genetically distinct Finnish population. Patients and Methods We sent a patient questionnaire to 161 Finnish SGC patients, 86 of whom responded. Results A total of 76% of the patients reported having one or more relatives with cancer, 30% two or more, and 9% three or more but only one patient reported having a relative with SGC. Tracing the birthplaces of the SGC patients’ grandparents showed no regional clustering suggestive of a founder effect. Conclusions Lack of familial SGC patients and the absence of a founder effect strongly suggest that familial predisposition for SGC is insignificant in the Finnish population. Various histological subtypes and the rarity of these neoplasms make it impossible to draw conclusions about site-specific association between SGC and other malignancies.

  14. Genetic Predisposition to Obesity and Medicare Expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehby, George L; Domingue, Benjamin W; Ullrich, Fred; Wolinsky, Fredric D

    2017-12-12

    The relationship between obesity and health expenditures is not well understood. We examined the relationship between genetic predisposition to obesity measured by a polygenic risk score for body mass index (BMI) and Medicare expenditures. Biennial interview data from the Health and Retirement Survey for a nationally representative sample of older adults enrolled in fee-for-service Medicare were obtained from 1991 through 2010 and linked to Medicare claims for the same period and to Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) data. The study included 6,628 Medicare beneficiaries who provided 68,627 complete person-year observations during the study period. Outcomes were total and service-specific Medicare expenditures and indicators for expenditures exceeding the 75th and 90th percentiles. The BMI polygenic risk score was derived from GWAS data. Regression models were used to examine how the BMI polygenic risk score was related to health expenditures adjusting for demographic factors and GWAS-derived ancestry. Greater genetic predisposition to obesity was associated with higher Medicare expenditures. Specifically, a 1 SD increase in the BMI polygenic risk score was associated with a $805 (p genetic predisposition to obesity is associated with higher Medicare expenditures. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Strong- and Weak-Universal Critical Behaviour of a Mixed-Spin Ising Model with Triplet Interactions on the Union Jack (Centered Square) Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strečka, Jozef

    2018-01-01

    The mixed spin-1/2 and spin-S Ising model on the Union Jack (centered square) lattice with four different three-spin (triplet) interactions and the uniaxial single-ion anisotropy is exactly solved by establishing a rigorous mapping equivalence with the corresponding zero-field (symmetric) eight-vertex model on a dual square lattice. A rigorous proof of the aforementioned exact mapping equivalence is provided by two independent approaches exploiting either a graph-theoretical or spin representation of the zero-field eight-vertex model. An influence of the interaction anisotropy as well as the uniaxial single-ion anisotropy on phase transitions and critical phenomena is examined in particular. It is shown that the considered model exhibits a strong-universal critical behaviour with constant critical exponents when considering the isotropic model with four equal triplet interactions or the anisotropic model with one triplet interaction differing from the other three. The anisotropic models with two different triplet interactions, which are pairwise equal to each other, contrarily exhibit a weak-universal critical behaviour with critical exponents continuously varying with a relative strength of the triplet interactions as well as the uniaxial single-ion anisotropy. It is evidenced that the variations of critical exponents of the mixed-spin Ising models with the integer-valued spins S differ basically from their counterparts with the half-odd-integer spins S.

  16. Can unknown predisposition in familial breast cancer be family-specific?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Henry; Wen, Hongxiu; Kim, Yeong C; Snyder, Carrie; Kinarsky, Yulia; Chen, Pei Xian; Xiao, Fengxia; Goldgar, David; Cowan, Kenneth H; Wang, San Ming

    2013-01-01

    Genetic predisposition plays a key role in the development of familial breast cancer. In spite of strong familial clustering of the disease and extensive efforts made during the past decade; however, progress has been slow in identifying genetic predisposition for the majority of familial breast cancer families. The question arises therefore as to whether current approaches are adequate in identifying the unknown genetic predisposition. We analyzed eight members of a BRCA1-, BRCA2-, p53-, and PTEN-negative breast cancer family, of which five had breast cancer, one is an obligate gene carrier, and two were unaffected. We sequenced the entire coding region of the genome for each member using exome sequencing to identify nonsynonymous variants. We identified 55 nonsynonymous germline variants affecting 49 genes in multiple members of the family, of which 22 are predicted to have damaging effects. We validated 20 of the 22 selected variants in the family by Sanger sequencing. Two variants in KAT6B, an acetal transferase gene, were identified in six family members of which five were affected with breast cancer and one is the unaffected obligate carrier. We further examined the presence of the identified variants in a cohort of 40 additional breast cancer cases from 22 familial breast cancer families, but none of the 22 variants was detected in these cases. Sequencing the entire coding exons in KAT6B detects no variants in these cases. Our results show that genetic predisposition for familial breast cancer can be rich in an affected family, but the predisposition can be family-specific. As such, it will be difficult to detect them by applying population-based approach. Our study supports the concept that focusing on each affected family will be required to determine the genetic predisposition for many familial breast cancer families whose genetic dispositions remain unknown. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Familial predisposition to anterior cruciate ligament injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Goshima

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although several risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injury have been evaluated in the literature, there are few reports on familial predisposition. This study investigated the familial predisposition to ACL injury. The study included 350 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction between January 2005 and September 2008. All patients were surveyed by telephone or a written questionnaire about family history (FH of ACL injury, sports played by family members, and mechanisms of injury. We also compared age, sex, height, weight, body mass index, Tegner activity score, general joint laxity, and tibial slope between an FH group (with FH and a control group (without FH. In addition, we compared the incidence of ACL graft rupture and contralateral ACL rupture 2 years after primary surgery. Complete information was obtained from 316 patients, 38 (12.0% of whom had FH of ACL injury. Two families had three members with ACL injuries. Of the 40 family members with ACL injuries, 38 (95% had noncontact injuries and 34 (85% shared a similar mechanism of injury with the related patient. No significant differences were identified between the two groups, except that tibial slope was significantly greater in the FH group than in the control group. Although the incidence of repeat ACL injury was greater in the FH group (23.7% than in the control group (16.4%, there was no significant difference. Our results indicated a high probability of familial predisposition to many of the identified risk factors for ACL injury. In addition, patients with FH of ACL injury might be at high risk for initial and repeat ACL injuries. Therefore, prevention programs should be implemented for patients with FH of ACL injury in order to decrease the risk of these injuries.

  18. Genetic predisposition and implications for radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streffer, Christian [University Clinics, Essen, Essen (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    Treatments of cancer patients with ionizing radiation have shown in some cases severe acute radiation effects after radiation doses which are very well tolerated by most patients. Skin fibroblasts of these patients studied after in vitro irradiation also showed a high radiosensitivity frequently. It was found that these effects are based on genetic predisposition which was usually inherited from their parents. During recent years quite a number of these syndromes have been described in humans and often the responsible genes have been characterized: Ataxia telangiectasia, Bloom's syndrome, Fanconi anemia, Li Fraumeni syndrome, Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, Neurofibromatosis, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, Retinoblastoma. In most cases it was found that the regulation processes of DNA repair processes and of the cell cycle for cell proliferation are disturbed. Frequently these processes cannot be separated from each other. Quite a number of these syndromes also show genomic instability which can also be induced by radiation exposures. These Phenomena have mainly been studied by determining the rate of chromosomal aberrations many cell generations after the exposure took place. Genomic instability apparently plays an important role for the development of stochastic late effects for which multistep events are necessary. This is especially for carcinogenesis the case. In mice it has been shown that radiation-induced genomic instability can be transmitted to the next mouse generation. In mouse models and also with radiotherapy patients it has been shown that genetic predisposition not only increases radiosensitivity with respect to cell survival and chromosomal damage but also to carcinogenesis. This has been observed cf. with p53-knock out mice and with children after radiotherapy cf. treatment of retinoblastoma. In the children with a genetic predisposition for retinoblastoma secondary tumours occurred to a much higher rate than in those children with

  19. Genetic predisposition and implications for radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Treatments of cancer patients with ionizing radiation have shown in some cases severe acute radiation effects after radiation doses which are very well tolerated by most patients. Skin fibroblasts of these patients studied after in vitro irradiation also showed a high radiosensitivity frequently. It was found that these effects are based on genetic predisposition which was usually inherited from their parents. During recent years quite a number of these syndromes have been described in humans and often the responsible genes have been characterized: Ataxia telangiectasia, Bloom's syndrome, Fanconi anemia, Li Fraumeni syndrome, Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, Neurofibromatosis, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, Retinoblastoma. In most cases it was found that the regulation processes of DNA repair processes and of the cell cycle for cell proliferation are disturbed. Frequently these processes cannot be separated from each other. Quite a number of these syndromes also show genomic instability which can also be induced by radiation exposures. These Phenomena have mainly been studied by determining the rate of chromosomal aberrations many cell generations after the exposure took place. Genomic instability apparently plays an important role for the development of stochastic late effects for which multistep events are necessary. This is especially for carcinogenesis the case. In mice it has been shown that radiation-induced genomic instability can be transmitted to the next mouse generation. In mouse models and also with radiotherapy patients it has been shown that genetic predisposition not only increases radiosensitivity with respect to cell survival and chromosomal damage but also to carcinogenesis. This has been observed cf. with p53-knock out mice and with children after radiotherapy cf. treatment of retinoblastoma. In the children with a genetic predisposition for retinoblastoma secondary tumours occurred to a much higher rate than in those children with

  20. [Update on genetic predisposition to prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cussenot, Olivier; Cancel-Tassin, Géraldine

    2015-01-01

    Genetic predisposition to prostate cancer rarely corresponds to a high penetrance Mendelian pattern of inheritance. These hereditary forms are specific entities for which mutations in the BRCA2 gene, the HOXB13 gene (variant G84E) or, to a lesser extent BRCA1 gene, must be researched. In contrast, the genetic component of the majority of prostate cancer is polygenic, involving an unfavorable combination of common genetic variants, resulting from a mixture of the genetic inheritance of the father and the mother. One hundred of these genetic susceptibility variants have now been identified and validated. The main phenotypic trait associated with hereditary predisposition is the younger age at onset, which warrants special monitoring in order to stay in the window of curability at diagnosis. The psychological impact of a family history of prostate cancer or breast cancer favors the establishment of a dedicated monitoring and procedures for early diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetic predisposition to breast cancer: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, our understanding of genetic predisposition to breast cancer has advanced significantly. Three classes of predisposition factors, categorized by their associated risks of breast cancer, are currently known. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are high-penetrance breast cancer predisposition genes identified by genome-wide linkage analysis and positional cloning. Mutational screening of genes functionally related to BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 has revealed four genes, CHEK2, ATM, BRIP1, and PALB2; mutations in these genes are rare and confer an intermediate risk of breast cancer. Association studies have further identified eight common variants associated with low-penetrance breast cancer predisposition. Despite these discoveries, most of the familial risk of breast cancer remains unexplained. In this review, we describe the known genetic predisposition factors, expound on the methods by which they were identified, and consider how further technological and intellectual advances may assist in identifying the remaining genetic factors underlying breast cancer susceptibility.

  2. Genetic predisposition to leukemia and other hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feurstein, Simone; Drazer, Michael W; Godley, Lucy A

    2016-10-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of familial myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)/acute leukemia (AL) and bone marrow failure syndromes, as well as insights into familial myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), familial multiple myeloma (MM), familial Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM), familial lymphoma, and cancer predisposition syndromes with increased risk of MDS/AL. This field will continue to accelerate as next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques identify novel predisposition alleles in families with a genetic predisposition to hematologic malignancies. Newly identified predisposition genes continue to inform the field of inherited leukemia and other hematologic malignancies. Current developments in clinical translation include techniques detailing the acquisition of appropriate germline material for patient work-ups, methods for genetic testing, and nuances essential for the treatment and clinical management of patients with a genetic predisposition to hematologic malignancies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A blueprint for vocal learning: auditory predispositions from brains to genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatcroft, David; Qvarnström, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Memorizing and producing complex strings of sound are requirements for spoken human language. We share these behaviours with likely more than 4000 species of songbirds, making birds our primary model for studying the cognitive basis of vocal learning and, more generally, an important model for how memories are encoded in the brain. In songbirds, as in humans, the sounds that a juvenile learns later in life depend on auditory memories formed early in development. Experiments on a wide variety of songbird species suggest that the formation and lability of these auditory memories, in turn, depend on auditory predispositions that stimulate learning when a juvenile hears relevant, species-typical sounds. We review evidence that variation in key features of these auditory predispositions are determined by variation in genes underlying the development of the auditory system. We argue that increased investigation of the neuronal basis of auditory predispositions expressed early in life in combination with modern comparative genomic approaches may provide insights into the evolution of vocal learning. PMID:26246333

  4. Examining the ethical predisposition of the next generation of business leaders in China and the Republic of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Fullerton

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken in an effort to determine the attitudes of business students in South Africa and China toward a battery of questionable actions undertaken by anonymous business entities.  In general, practices such as the outsourcing of labour and celebrity endorsements met with little opposition on the part of the students.  Conversely, actions such as the shipment of unsafe products to overseas markets and a doctor smuggling a potentially beneficial (but illegal drug across international borders in an effort to help a patient were strongly condemned.  A comparison of the means of the 14 scenarios resulted in statistically significant differences for the two countries on eight of the questionable actions.  In seven of the eight, the South Africans exhibited stronger opposition (or a lower level of support for the behaviour of the organization.  Furthermore, the grand means for the two countries also favored the RSA as the country with the higher ethical predisposition.

  5. Female alcoholism: Gender differences as victimogenic predispositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinović-Vilić Slobodanka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject matter of this paper is an analysis of stereotypical social reactions to women’s alcoholism in the micro and macro social and cultural environment. The social stigma and blame that female alcohol abusers are exposed to have become part of deeply rooted gender-related labels. In a broader social context, they lead to discrimination and social exclusion. In the contemporary society, female alcoholism is turning into a growing social and health problem and because of that it is essential to make the social environment more sensitive to the issue of female alcoholism in order to eliminate the causes of female alcoholism and fully support women’s medical treatment,. It would have a preventive effect in suppressing female alcoholism and it would significantly reduce victimization of women who are, in such circumstances, much more vulnerable and exposed to physical and sexual violence. The aim of this paper is to point out to the basic phenomenological and etiological feature of female alcoholism, prejudices and stereotypical attitudes they are exposed to, social and cultural implications of female alcoholism, which is perceived as a predisposition for women’s victimization and exposure to violence, so as to promote a different social approach to female alcoholism and advocate for instituting social and educational policy based on the concept of gender equality and support of social control measures.

  6. Identification of Prostate Cancer Predisposition Genes on the Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH -15 -1-0638 TITLE: Identification of Prostate Cancer Predisposition Genes on the Y Chromosome PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Identification of Prostate Cancer Predisposition Genes on the Y Chromosome 5b. GRANT NUMBER Chromosome 5c. PROGRAM...difficult. We hypothesize the existence of Y chromosome genes/variants related to increased risk, and propose multiple genetic analyses to efficiently

  7. Neighbouring chimpanzee communities show different preferences in social grooming behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Edwin J C; Cronin, Katherine A; Haun, Daniel B M; Mundry, Roger; Bodamer, Mark D

    2012-11-07

    Grooming handclasp (GHC) behaviour was originally advocated as the first evidence of social culture in chimpanzees owing to the finding that some populations engaged in the behaviour and others do not. To date, however, the validity of this claim and the extent to which this social behaviour varies between groups is unclear. Here, we measured (i) variation, (ii) durability and (iii) expansion of the GHC behaviour in four chimpanzee communities that do not systematically differ in their genetic backgrounds and live in similar ecological environments. Ninety chimpanzees were studied for a total of 1029 h; 1394 GHC bouts were observed between 2010 and 2012. Critically, GHC style (defined by points of bodily contact) could be systematically linked to the chimpanzee's group identity, showed temporal consistency both within and between groups, and could not be accounted for by the arm-length differential between partners. GHC has been part of the behavioural repertoire of the chimpanzees under study for more than 9 years (surpassing durability criterion) and spread across generations (surpassing expansion criterion). These results strongly indicate that chimpanzees' social behaviour is not only motivated by innate predispositions and individual inclinations, but may also be partly cultural in nature.

  8. Genetic Predisposition to Ischemic Stroke: A Polygenic Risk Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachiya, Tsuyoshi; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Takahashi, Atsushi; Hata, Jun; Furukawa, Ryohei; Shiwa, Yuh; Yamaji, Taiki; Hara, Megumi; Tanno, Kozo; Ohmomo, Hideki; Ono, Kanako; Takashima, Naoyuki; Matsuda, Koichi; Wakai, Kenji; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Ago, Tetsuro; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Fukushima, Akimune; Hozawa, Atsushi; Minegishi, Naoko; Satoh, Mamoru; Endo, Ryujin; Sasaki, Makoto; Sakata, Kiyomi; Kobayashi, Seiichiro; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Nakamura, Motoyuki; Hitomi, Jiro; Kita, Yoshikuni; Tanaka, Keitaro; Iso, Hiroyasu; Kitazono, Takanari; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanaka, Hideo; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Sobue, Kenji; Shimizu, Atsushi

    2017-02-01

    The prediction of genetic predispositions to ischemic stroke (IS) may allow the identification of individuals at elevated risk and thereby prevent IS in clinical practice. Previously developed weighted multilocus genetic risk scores showed limited predictive ability for IS. Here, we investigated the predictive ability of a newer method, polygenic risk score (polyGRS), based on the idea that a few strong signals, as well as several weaker signals, can be collectively informative to determine IS risk. We genotyped 13 214 Japanese individuals with IS and 26 470 controls (derivation samples) and generated both multilocus genetic risk scores and polyGRS, using the same derivation data set. The predictive abilities of each scoring system were then assessed using 2 independent sets of Japanese samples (KyushuU and JPJM data sets). In both validation data sets, polyGRS was shown to be significantly associated with IS, but weighted multilocus genetic risk scores was not. Comparing the highest with the lowest polyGRS quintile, the odds ratios for IS were 1.75 (95% confidence interval, 1.33-2.31) and 1.99 (95% confidence interval, 1.19-3.33) in the KyushuU and JPJM samples, respectively. Using the KyushuU samples, the addition of polyGRS to a nongenetic risk model resulted in a significant improvement of the predictive ability (net reclassification improvement=0.151; P<0.001). The polyGRS was shown to be superior to weighted multilocus genetic risk scores as an IS prediction model. Thus, together with the nongenetic risk factors, polyGRS will provide valuable information for individual risk assessment and management of modifiable risk factors. © 2016 The Authors.

  9. Micro-social risk factors and genetic predisposition to micro-social risk factors and genetic predisposition to digestive diseases among adolescents living in georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikava, M; Bakradze, M; Varsimashvili, M

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the genetic predisposition to digestive diseases, micro-social stressors and other risk factors among adolescents and compare them to each other by strength of association with Chronic Digestive Diseases (CDD). One phase epidemiological research was conducted in population of adolescents aged 14-21 years, living in Georgia. The representative contigent - 430 adolescents were selected by the method of simple randomization. The two groups were separated from the research contingent: 84 adolescents with the CDD (the experimental group) and 346 condtionally healthy adolescents (the control group). The degree of relationship between the defined risk factor and CDD among adolescents was studied through case-control study method. Statistical processing of the obtained data was provided through SPSS v.11,5. The risk factors ranking was held according to decrease of OR values. Analysis of micro-social and hereditary risk factors showed that the associations between CDD and the combination of chronic psychological overloads, calculated together, is stronger (OR=15,3 (95% CI: 9,06-37,8)), than with genetic predisposition to digestive diseases (OR=11,5). From chronic psychological overloads, the most strong relationship with CDD have adolescents study overloads (OR=7,1) and conflict situations at the family (OR=6,0), as well as adolescents bad habits (OR=5,14) and unsatisfactory living conditions (OR=3,74). The listed above OR indicies may be used for planning preventive measures, needed for decrease CDD prevalence among adolescents.

  10. Predisposition to insulin resistance and obesity due to staple consumption of rice: Amylose content versus germination status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilyaminu Abubakar

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder with established, well-defined precursors. Obesity and insulin resistance are amongst most important factors in predisposition to diabetes. Rice is a staple for about half the global population and its consumption has been strongly linked with diabetogenesis. We assert that tackling the prevalence of predisposing factors by modifying certain rice cultivars could reduce the global burden of obesity and insulin resistance, and by extension type 2 diabetes. Several rice cultivars with various properties were fed to nulliparous rats (five weeks old at the start of the experiment for 90 days. They were then returned to a diet of standard pellets and mated with males raised on a standard diet. The resulting pups and dams were investigated for obesity and insulin resistance markers. We found that germination did more to reduce predisposition to obesity and insulin resistance than high amylose content. The combined reducing effect of germination and high amylose content on predisposition to obesity and insulin resistance was greater than the sum of their independent effects. Polished (white rice with a low amylose content predisposed dams on a high-fat diet to markers of insulin resistance and obesity and this predisposition was inherited (in biochemical terms by their F1 offspring. Overall, the results suggest that harnessing the beneficial properties of germination and amylose in rice would reduce the burden of obesity and insulin resistance, which are known to be key risk factors for development of type 2 diabetes.

  11. Modelling the Interplay between Lifestyle Factors and Genetic Predisposition on Markers of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Celia G; Solis-Trapala, Ivonne; Holzapfel, Christina; Ambrosini, Gina L; Fuller, Nicholas R; Loos, Ruth J F; Hauner, Hans; Caterson, Ian D; Jebb, Susan A

    2015-01-01

    The risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is determined by a complex interplay involving lifestyle factors and genetic predisposition. Despite this, many studies do not consider the relative contributions of this complex array of factors to identify relationships which are important in progression or prevention of complex diseases. We aimed to describe the integrated effect of a number of lifestyle changes (weight, diet and physical activity) in the context of genetic susceptibility, on changes in glycaemic traits in overweight or obese participants following 12-months of a weight management programme. A sample of 353 participants from a behavioural weight management intervention were included in this study. A graphical Markov model was used to describe the impact of the intervention, by dividing the effects into various pathways comprising changes in proportion of dietary saturated fat, physical activity and weight loss, and a genetic predisposition score (T2DM-GPS), on changes in insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IR), insulin secretion (HOMA-B) and short and long term glycaemia (glucose and HbA1c). We demonstrated the use of graphical Markov modelling to identify the importance and interrelationships of a number of possible variables changed as a result of a lifestyle intervention, whilst considering fixed factors such as genetic predisposition, on changes in traits. Paths which led to weight loss and change in dietary saturated fat were important factors in the change of all glycaemic traits, whereas the T2DM-GPS only made a significant direct contribution to changes in HOMA-IR and plasma glucose after considering the effects of lifestyle factors. This analysis shows that modifiable factors relating to body weight, diet, and physical activity are more likely to impact on glycaemic traits than genetic predisposition during a behavioural intervention.

  12. Early environmental exposures influence schizophrenia expression even in the presence of strong genetic predisposition

    OpenAIRE

    Husted, Janice A.; Ahmed, Rashid; Chow, Eva W.C.; Brzustowicz, Linda M.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    There are few studies of environmental factors in familial forms of schizophrenia. We investigated whether childhood adversity or environmental factors were associated with schizophrenia in a familial sample where schizophrenia is associated with the NOSA1P gene. We found that a cumulative adversity index including childhood illness, family instability and cannabis use was significantly associated with narrow schizophrenia, independent of NOSA1P risk genotype, previously measured childhood tr...

  13. Biomarkers and genes predictive of disease predisposition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biomarkers and genes predictive of disease predisposition and prognosis in rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is a debilitating disease which often progresses to relentlessly severe disease. Pieter W A Meyer, NHDip Med Tech, MTech, PhD. Medical Research Council Unit for Inflammation and Immunity, Department ...

  14. Content, Structure, and Usefulness of Juvenile Predisposition Psychological Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Samantha L.; Cruise, Keith R.; Hinz, Holly; Holloway, Evan D.; Chapman, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a dearth of research regarding the content and structure of juvenile predisposition psychological evaluations. Limited research suggests that key mental health domains are insufficiently represented and judges use evaluator recommendations regarding legal outcomes more often than clinical outcomes. Studies have not addressed…

  15. Predisposition of Nigerian children with severe malaria to urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The predisposition of children with severe malaria to urinary tract infection was investigated in a group of 112 clinically diagnosed and para sitologically confirmed severe malaria patients (test) and in another subset of 114 apparently physically healthy non-malaria infected subjects (control). Standard bacteriological and ...

  16. Divorce: An Unreliable Predictor of Children's Emotional Predispositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Janine M.; Nesbitt, Sally

    1981-01-01

    Used the Children's Emotion Projection Instrument to investigate the emotional predispositions of children from divorce or disruption and children from intact families. Results indicated that children of divorce or disruption are not more hampered emotionally than children from intact families. Discusses implications for family therapists.…

  17. Family Size and Parental Education on Predisposition to Female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the influence of family size and parental education on predisposition to female trafficking in southern Nigeria. Stratified Random sampling procedure was used to select the 150 parents from various ethnic groups consisting of. Yoruba, Igbo, Bini, and Ibibio/Efik among others. A researcher-constructed ...

  18. Evidence of an Inherited Predisposition for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Alpesh A.; Spiker, William Ryan; Daubs, Michael; Brodke, Darrel S.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective population based study cross referencing a genealogic database of over 2 million Utah residents with 10 years of clinical diagnosis data from a large tertiary hospital. Objective The objective of this study is to determine the presence or absence of an inherited predisposition to the development of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Summary of Background Data A genetic predisposition for the development of cervical spondylosis has been discussed in the literature with low quality evidence. Families with a high incidence of disease or early onset disease in monozygotic twins have both been reported. However, these suggestions of an inherited predisposition for disease have never been rigorously studied. The purpose of this study is to determine a genetic predisposition among patients diagnosed with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Methods The Utah Population Database (UPDB) combines health and genealogic data on over 2 million Utah residents. ICD-9 codes were used to identify 486 patients in the database with a diagnosis of cervical spondylosis with myelopathy (ICD9 code 721.1). The hypothesis of excessive familial clustering was tested using the Genealogical Index of Familiality (GIF) and Relative risks (RR) in relatives were estimated by comparing rates of disease in relatives with rates estimated in the relatives of 5 matched controls for each case. This methodology has been previously reported and validated for other disease conditions but not for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Results The GIF analysis for patients with CSM showed significant excess relatedness for disease (pspondylosis with myelopathy. Level of Evidence III PMID:21252820

  19. Genetic predisposition to testicular germ-cell tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutke-Holzik, MF; Rapley, EA; Hoekstra, HJ; Sleijfer, DT; Nolte, IM; Sijmons, RH

    Testicular germ-cell tumours (TGCT) are the most common neoplasm in young men. Various studies have suggested the existence of an inherited predisposition to development of these tumours. Genome-wide screens subsequently provided evidence of a TGCT susceptibility gene on chromosome Xq27 (TGCT1) that

  20. [Type 1 diabetes: from genetic predisposition to hypothetical environmental triggers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phlips, J-C; Radermecker, R P

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results in a progressive (complete in most cases) destruction of insulin-secreting beta cells from Langerhans islets. Even if the autoimmune process becomes to be well known, no one is yet sure what specifically prompts the autoimmune response that destroys the body's ability to produce insulin. Etiology of this complex disease combines a genetic predisposition and still (almost) unknown environmental factors that trigger autoimmuninty specifically targeting beta cells. Genetic HLA predispositions are clearly identified. However, only few people with apparent genetic predisposition to type 1 diabetes actually end up getting the disease. Moreover, the remarkable increase of type 1 diabetes prevalence observed in numerous countries can not be explained by genetics. Because genetic factors can't predict alone the development of type 1 diabetes, environmental factors must be involved such as viral infections, toxins from food, cow milk during childhood (instead of breast feeding) or vitamin D deficiency. This paper aims at describing the role of the genetic predisposition and the environmental hypothesis which can be involved in the development of type 1 diabetes. We will conclude by briefly describing clinical trials targeting either the immune response or the potentially toxic environment.

  1. From a genetic predisposition to an interactive predisposition: rethinking the ethical implications of screening for gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabery, James

    2009-02-01

    In a widely acclaimed study from 2002, researchers found a case of gene-environment interaction for a gene controlling neuroenzymatic activity (low vs. high), exposure to childhood maltreatment, and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). Cases of gene-environment interaction are generally characterized as evincing a genetic predisposition; for example, individuals with low neuroenzymatic activity are generally characterized as having a genetic predisposition to ASPD. I first argue that the concept of a genetic predisposition fundamentally misconstrues these cases of gene-environment interaction. This misconstrual will be diagnosed, and then a new concept--interactive predisposition--will be introduced. I then show how this conceptual shift reconfigures old questions and raises new questions for genetic screening. Attempts to screen embryos or fetuses for the gene associated with low neuroenzymatic activity with an eye toward selecting against the low-activity variant fall prey to the myth of pre-environmental prediction; attempts to screen newborns for the gene associated with low neuroenzymatic activity with an eye toward early intervention will have to face the interventionist's dilemma.

  2. Childhood cancer predisposition syndromes-A concise review and recommendations by the Cancer Predisposition Working Group of the Society for Pediatric Oncology and Hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripperger, Tim; Bielack, Stefan S; Borkhardt, Arndt; Brecht, Ines B; Burkhardt, Birgit; Calaminus, Gabriele; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Deubzer, Hedwig; Dirksen, Uta; Eckert, Cornelia; Eggert, Angelika; Erlacher, Miriam; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Frühwald, Michael C; Gnekow, Astrid; Goehring, Gudrun; Graf, Norbert; Hanenberg, Helmut; Hauer, Julia; Hero, Barbara; Hettmer, Simone; von Hoff, Katja; Horstmann, Martin; Hoyer, Juliane; Illig, Thomas; Kaatsch, Peter; Kappler, Roland; Kerl, Kornelius; Klingebiel, Thomas; Kontny, Udo; Kordes, Uwe; Körholz, Dieter; Koscielniak, Ewa; Kramm, Christof M; Kuhlen, Michaela; Kulozik, Andreas E; Lamottke, Britta; Leuschner, Ivo; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Meinhardt, Andrea; Metzler, Markus; Meyer, Lüder H; Moser, Olga; Nathrath, Michaela; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Nustede, Rainer; Pajtler, Kristian W; Paret, Claudia; Rasche, Mareike; Reinhardt, Dirk; Rieß, Olaf; Russo, Alexandra; Rutkowski, Stefan; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Schneider, Dominik; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Schrappe, Martin; Schroeder, Christopher; von Schweinitz, Dietrich; Simon, Thorsten; Sparber-Sauer, Monika; Spix, Claudia; Stanulla, Martin; Steinemann, Doris; Strahm, Brigitte; Temming, Petra; Thomay, Kathrin; von Bueren, Andre O; Vorwerk, Peter; Witt, Olaf; Wlodarski, Marcin; Wössmann, Willy; Zenker, Martin; Zimmermann, Stefanie; Pfister, Stefan M; Kratz, Christian P

    2017-04-01

    Heritable predisposition is an important cause of cancer in children and adolescents. Although a large number of cancer predisposition genes and their associated syndromes and malignancies have already been described, it appears likely that there are more pediatric cancer patients in whom heritable cancer predisposition syndromes have yet to be recognized. In a consensus meeting in the beginning of 2016, we convened experts in Human Genetics and Pediatric Hematology/Oncology to review the available data, to categorize the large amount of information, and to develop recommendations regarding when a cancer predisposition syndrome should be suspected in a young oncology patient. This review summarizes the current knowledge of cancer predisposition syndromes in pediatric oncology and provides essential information on clinical situations in which a childhood cancer predisposition syndrome should be suspected. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Management of women with a hereditary predisposition for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatoi, Ismail; Benson, John R

    2016-10-01

    Women with a hereditary breast cancer predisposition have three management options: screening, chemoprevention (risk-reducing medication) and risk-reducing surgery. However, no randomized trials have addressed the effect of these strategies in mutation carriers. In the general population, randomized trials failed to demonstrate a benefit for screening in premenopausal women. Moreover, although chemoprevention reduces breast cancer incidence in high-risk populations, this benefit is potentially confined to estrogen receptor-positive tumors. Finally, observational studies suggest that prophylactic mastectomy and even prophylactic salpingo-ophorectomy reduces breast cancer risk in BRCA mutation carriers, but there are systematic biases associated with such studies. Therefore, women with a hereditary predisposition for breast cancer should be informed of the three risk-reducing strategies, and that their benefits are not fully understood.

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction in DDR-related cancer predisposition syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhovich, Alex; Graifer, Dmitry; Stefanovie, Barbora; Krejci, Lumir

    2016-04-01

    Given the key role of mitochondria in various cellular events, it is not surprising that mitochondrial dysfunction (MDF) is seen in many pathological conditions, in particular cancer. The mechanisms defining MDF are not clearly understood and may involve genetic defects, misbalance of reactive oxygen species (ROS), impaired autophagy (mitophagy), acquired mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA and inability of cells to cope with the consequences. The importance of MDF arises from its detection in the syndromes with defective DNA damage response (DDR) and cancer predisposition. Here, we will focus on the dual role of these syndromes in cancer predisposition and MDF with specific emphasis on impaired autophagy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Epidemiology, major risk factors and genetic predisposition for breast cancer in the Pakistani population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaukat, Uzma; Ismail, Muhammad; Mehmood, Nasir

    2013-01-01

    Occurrence of breast cancer is related to genetic as well as cultural, environmental and life-style factors. Variations in diversity of these factors among different ethnic groups and geographical areas emphasize the immense need for studies in all racial-ethnic populations. The incidence of breast cancer in Pakistan is highest in Asians after Jews in Israel and 2.5 times higher than that in neighboring countries like Iran and India, accounting for 34.6% of female cancers. The Pakistani population is deficient in information regarding breast cancer etiology and epidemiology, but efforts done so far had suggested consanguinity as a major risk factor for frequent mutations leading to breast cancer and has also shed light on genetic origins in different ethnic groups within Pakistan. World-wide research efforts on different ethnicities have enhanced our understanding of genetic predisposition to breast cancer but despite these discoveries, 75% of the familial risk of breast cancer remains unexplained, highlighting the fact that the majority of breast cancer susceptibility genes remain unidentified. For this purpose Pakistani population provides a strong genetic pool to elucidate the genetic etiology of breast cancer because of cousin marriages. In this review, we describe the known breast cancer predisposition factors found in the local Pakistani population and the epidemiological research work done to emphasize the importance of exploring factors/variants contributing to breast cance, in order to prevent, cure and decrease its incidence in our country.

  6. Genetic predisposition of stroke: understanding the evolving landscape through meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai-Dong; Yang, Chun-Min; Shu, Hai-Feng; Kuang, Yong-Qin; Yang, Tao; He, Wei-Qi; Zhao, Kai; Xia, Xun; Cheng, Jing-Min; Ma, Yuan; Gu, Jian-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Stroke, either ischemic or hemorrhagic, is the leading cause of death and morbidity worldwide. Identifying the risk factors is a prerequisite step for stroke prevention and treatment. It is believed that a major portion of the currently unidentified risk factors is of genetic origin. Consistent with this idea, numerous potential risk alleles for stroke have been reported, however, the genetic evidence so far is not conclusive. The major goal of this review is to update the current knowledge about the genetic predisposition to the common multifactorial stroke, and to provide a bird's-eye view of this fast moving field. We selectively review and meta-analyze the related English literatures in public domain (PubMed) from 2000 onward, including the original reports and meta-analyses, to evaluate the genetic risk factors of common multifactorial stroke. The results indicated that we reviewed and meta-analyzed original reports and existing meta-analyses that studied the genetic predisposition to the common multifactorial stroke. Some original reports and meta-analyses were specific for ischemic stroke and others were for hemorrhagic stroke only. We also evaluated the major evolving issues in this field and discussed the future directions. In conclusion, strong evidences suggest that genetic risk factors contribute to common multifactorial stroke, and many genetic risk genes have been implicated in the literatures. However, not a single risk allele has been conclusively approved.

  7. River predisposition to ice jams: a simplified geospatial model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. De Munck

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Floods resulting from river ice jams pose a great risk to many riverside municipalities in Canada. The location of an ice jam is mainly influenced by channel morphology. The goal of this work was therefore to develop a simplified geospatial model to estimate the predisposition of a river channel to ice jams. Rather than predicting the timing of river ice breakup, the main question here was to predict where the broken ice is susceptible to jam based on the river's geomorphological characteristics. Thus, six parameters referred to potential causes for ice jams in the literature were initially selected: presence of an island, narrowing of the channel, high sinuosity, presence of a bridge, confluence of rivers, and slope break. A GIS-based tool was used to generate the aforementioned factors over regular-spaced segments along the entire channel using available geospatial data. An ice jam predisposition index (IJPI was calculated by combining the weighted optimal factors. Three Canadian rivers (province of Québec were chosen as test sites. The resulting maps were assessed from historical observations and local knowledge. Results show that 77 % of the observed ice jam sites on record occurred in river sections that the model considered as having high or medium predisposition. This leaves 23 % of false negative errors (missed occurrence. Between 7 and 11 % of the highly predisposed river sections did not have an ice jam on record (false-positive cases. Results, limitations, and potential improvements are discussed.

  8. Retinal vein occlusion: genetic predisposition and systemic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannaki, Kassiani; Politou, Marianna; Rouvas, Alexandros; Merkouri, Efrossyni; Travlou, Anthi; Theodosiadis, Panayiotis; Gialeraki, Argyri

    2013-04-01

    The role of systemic risk factors (age, smoking, diabetes, arterial hypertension) in the development of retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is well established. However, the association of RVO with genetic predisposition to thrombosis remains poorly understood. The aim of the study was to assess any possible additional effect of genetic predisposition to the already well known 'classical' risk factors of RVO in a cohort of elderly Greek patients. Fifty-one elderly patients with RVO and 51 healthy individuals matched for age and sex were evaluated for systemic risk factors (smoking, diabetes, dyslipidemia, arterial hypertension) and coagulation defects (lupus anticoagulant, natural inhibitors of coagulation). Additionally, genotyping was performed for mutations/polymorphisms involved in haemostasis such as: FV G1691A, FV G4070A, FIIG 20210A, MTHFR C677T and A1298C, PAI-1-675 4G/5G, F XIII exon 2G/T, EPCR A4600G and G4678C. We identified systemic risk factors in the majority of the patients Hypertension (P=0.001), dyslipidemia (P=0.029) and diabetes (P=0.01) are associated with RVO in the majority of the patients. The prevalence of prothrombotic risk factors was not significantly different in the patients with RVO compared to controls. Apart from systemic risk factors, genetic predisposition to thrombosis does not seem to have an important association with RVO in this group of elderly patients.

  9. Spontaneous preterm birth: advances toward the discovery of genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Jerome F; Romero, Roberto; Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; Haymond-Thornburg, Hannah; Modi, Bhavi P; Teves, Maria E; Pearson, Laurel N; York, Timothy P; Schenkein, Harvey A

    2018-03-01

    Evidence from family and twin-based studies provide strong support for a significant contribution of maternal and fetal genetics to the timing of parturition and spontaneous preterm birth. However, there has been only modest success in the discovery of genes predisposing to preterm birth, despite increasing sophistication of genetic and genomic technology. In contrast, DNA variants associated with other traits/diseases have been identified. For example, there is overwhelming evidence that suggests that the nature and intensity of an inflammatory response in adults and children are under genetic control. Because inflammation is often invoked as an etiologic factor in spontaneous preterm birth, the question of whether spontaneous preterm birth has a genetic predisposition in the case of pathologic inflammation has been of long-standing interest to investigators. Here, we review various genetic approaches used for the discovery of preterm birth genetic variants in the context of inflammation-associated spontaneous preterm birth. Candidate gene studies have sought genetic variants that regulate inflammation in the mother and fetus; however, the promising findings have often not been replicated. Genome-wide association studies, an approach to the identification of chromosomal loci responsible for complex traits, have also not yielded compelling evidence for DNA variants predisposing to preterm birth. A recent genome-wide association study that included a large number of White women (>40,000) revealed that maternal loci contribute to preterm birth. Although none of these loci harbored genes directly related to innate immunity, the results were replicated. Another approach to identify DNA variants predisposing to preterm birth is whole exome sequencing, which examines the DNA sequence of protein-coding regions of the genome. A recent whole exome sequencing study identified rare mutations in genes encoding for proteins involved in the negative regulation (dampening) of the

  10. Disentangling the Importance of Psychological Predispositions and Social Constructions in the Organization of American Political Ideology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, Brad; Hatemi, Peter K; Eaves, Lindon J

    2012-06-01

    Ideological preferences within the American electorate are contingent on both the environmental conditions that provide the content of the contemporary political debate and internal predispositions that motivate people to hold liberal or conservative policy preferences. In this article we apply Jost, Federico, and Napier's (2009) top-down/bottom-up theory of political attitude formation to a genetically informative population sample. In doing so, we further develop the theory by operationalizing the top-down pathway to be a function of the social environment and the bottom-up pathway as a latent set of genetic factors. By merging insights from psychology, behavioral genetics, and political science, we find strong support for the top-down/bottom-up framework that segregates the two independent pathways in the formation of political attitudes and identifies a different pattern of relationships between political attitudes at each level of analysis.

  11. Structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus: implications for predisposition to Lynch syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Kerr, Iain D.; Min, Jinrong

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus is reported at 2.30 Å resolution. The overall structure is described along with an analysis of two clinically important mutations. Mismatch repair prevents the accumulation of erroneous insertions/deletions and non-Watson–Crick base pairs in the genome. Pathogenic mutations in the MLH1 gene are associated with a predisposition to Lynch and Turcot’s syndromes. Although genetic testing for these mutations is available, robust classification of variants requires strong clinical and functional support. Here, the first structure of the N-terminus of human MLH1, determined by X-ray crystallography, is described. The structure shares a high degree of similarity with previously determined prokaryotic MLH1 homologs; however, this structure affords a more accurate platform for the classification of MLH1 variants

  12. Structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus: implications for predisposition to Lynch syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram [University of Toronto, 101 College Street, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7 (Canada); Kerr, Iain D., E-mail: ikerr@myriad.com [Myriad Genetic Laboratories Inc., 320 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Min, Jinrong, E-mail: ikerr@myriad.com [University of Toronto, 101 College Street, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7 (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7 (Canada)

    2015-07-28

    The crystal structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus is reported at 2.30 Å resolution. The overall structure is described along with an analysis of two clinically important mutations. Mismatch repair prevents the accumulation of erroneous insertions/deletions and non-Watson–Crick base pairs in the genome. Pathogenic mutations in the MLH1 gene are associated with a predisposition to Lynch and Turcot’s syndromes. Although genetic testing for these mutations is available, robust classification of variants requires strong clinical and functional support. Here, the first structure of the N-terminus of human MLH1, determined by X-ray crystallography, is described. The structure shares a high degree of similarity with previously determined prokaryotic MLH1 homologs; however, this structure affords a more accurate platform for the classification of MLH1 variants.

  13. Genetic Predisposition to Dyslipidemia and Risk of Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, Cassandra N; Saftlas, Audrey F; Triche, Elizabeth W; Bjonnes, Andrew; Keating, Brendan; Saxena, Richa; Breheny, Patrick J; Dewan, Andrew T; Robinson, Jennifer G; Hoh, Josephine; Ryckman, Kelli K

    2015-07-01

    Large epidemiologic studies support the role of dyslipidemia in preeclampsia; however, the etiology of preeclampsia or whether dyslipidemia plays a causal role remains unclear. We examined the association between the genetic predisposition to dyslipidemia and risk of preeclampsia using validated genetic markers of dyslipidemia. Preeclampsia cases (n = 164) and normotensive controls (n = 110) were selected from live birth certificates to nulliparous Iowa women during the period August 2002 to May 2005. Disease status was verified by medical chart review. Genetic predisposition to dyslipidemia was estimated by 4 genetic risk scores (GRS) (total cholesterol (TC), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides) on the basis of established loci for blood lipids. Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationships between each of the 4 genotype scores and preeclampsia. Replication analyses were performed in an independent, US population of preeclampsia cases (n = 516) and controls (n = 1,097) of European ancestry. The GRS related to higher levels of TC, LDL-C, and triglycerides demonstrated no association with the risk of preeclampsia in either the Iowa or replication population. The GRS related to lower HDL-C was marginally associated with an increased risk for preeclampsia (odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.99-1.07; P = 0.10). In the independent replication population, the association with the HDL-C GRS was also marginally significant (OR = 1.03, 95% CI: 1.00-1.06; P = 0.04). Our data suggest a potential effect between the genetic predisposition to dyslipidemic levels of HDL-C and an increased risk of preeclampsia, and, as such, suggest that dyslipidemia may be a component along the causal pathway to preeclampsia. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Associations Between Cancer Predisposition Testing Panel Genes and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Fergus J; Shimelis, Hermela; Hu, Chunling; Hart, Steven N; Polley, Eric C; Na, Jie; Hallberg, Emily; Moore, Raymond; Thomas, Abigail; Lilyquist, Jenna; Feng, Bingjian; McFarland, Rachel; Pesaran, Tina; Huether, Robert; LaDuca, Holly; Chao, Elizabeth C; Goldgar, David E; Dolinsky, Jill S

    2017-09-01

    Germline pathogenic variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to an increased lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, the relevance of germline variants in other genes from multigene hereditary cancer testing panels is not well defined. To determine the risks of breast cancer associated with germline variants in cancer predisposition genes. A study population of 65 057 patients with breast cancer receiving germline genetic testing of cancer predisposition genes with hereditary cancer multigene panels. Associations between pathogenic variants in non-BRCA1 and non-BRCA2 predisposition genes and breast cancer risk were estimated in a case-control analysis of patients with breast cancer and Exome Aggregation Consortium reference controls. The women underwent testing between March 15, 2012, and June 30, 2016. Breast cancer risk conferred by pathogenic variants in non-BRCA1 and non-BRCA2 predisposition genes. The mean (SD) age at diagnosis for the 65 057 women included in the analysis was 48.5 (11.1) years. The frequency of pathogenic variants in 21 panel genes identified in 41 611 consecutively tested white women with breast cancer was estimated at 10.2%. After exclusion of BRCA1, BRCA2, and syndromic breast cancer genes (CDH1, PTEN, and TP53), observed pathogenic variants in 5 of 16 genes were associated with high or moderately increased risks of breast cancer: ATM (OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 2.22-3.62), BARD1 (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.31-3.63), CHEK2 (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.31-1.67), PALB2 (OR, 7.46; 95% CI, 5.12-11.19), and RAD51D (OR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.21-7.88). Conversely, variants in the BRIP1 and RAD51C ovarian cancer risk genes; the MRE11A, RAD50, and NBN MRN complex genes; the MLH1 and PMS2 mismatch repair genes; and NF1 were not associated with increased risks of breast cancer. This study establishes several panel genes as high- and moderate-risk breast cancer genes and provides estimates of breast cancer risk associated with pathogenic variants in these genes among

  15. Human cancer predisposition and the implications for radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, R.

    1994-01-01

    It is well established from clinical, epidemiological and laboratory studies that specific human germ line mutation can predispose to spontaneously arising cancer. Some of the responsible genes have been characterized at the molecular level and evidence is rapidly accumulating on mechanistic aspects of the problem. A major outstanding issue is the extent to which genetically determined cancer predisposition in man interacts with exposures to environmental genotoxic agents such as ionizing radiation. This brief review considers the current position regarding the different forms and frequencies of cancer-predisposing mutations in the human population and provides an interim view of the possible implications for protection of man from ionizing radiation. (author)

  16. Genetic Predisposition, Nongenetic Risk Factors, and Coronary Infarct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichopoulou, Antonia; Yiannakouris, Nikos; Bamia, Christina; Benetou, Vassiliki; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ordovas, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Using a genetic predisposition score (GPS), additively integrating the associations of 11 polymorphisms with coronary heart disease (CHD), we examined the consequences of the joint presence of a high GPS and nongenetic CHD risk factors. Methods Within the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition, 202 case patients with medically confirmed incident coronary infarct and 197 control subjects were identified in Greece. Each polymorphism contributed 1 unit (high-risk homozygous), one-half unit (heterozygous), or no units (low-risk homozygous) to the GPS. Odds ratios of coronary infarction for those at high risk because of genetic predisposition and simultaneous presence of an established CHD risk factor were estimated, compared with subjects at low risk, for both GPS and each CHD risk factor. Results The joint presence of a high GPS (≥3.5) and each studied CHD risk factor was in all instances associated with a significantly increased risk of coronary infarction. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) was 2.62 (1.14–6.02) for ever smoking, 2.88 (1.33–6.24) for hypertension, 3.50 (1.67–7.33) for low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) level, 3.05 (1.53–6.08) for high non-HDL level, and 3.66 (1.75–7.65) for poor adherence to the Mediterranean diet. The odds ratios were always lower and nonsignificant when the GPS was low. There was suggestive evidence for interaction of a high GPS with hypertension (P =.05) and non-HDL cholesterol level (P =.13). Conclusions Genetic predisposition may interact with hypertension and, perhaps, also with the level of non-HDL cholesterol, in the causation of CHD. Genetic predisposition and the other studied exposures seem to have converging effects. Thus, the GPS may identify individuals who could realize disproportional benefits by controlling their hypertension and, possibly, their non-HDL cholesterol level. PMID:18443266

  17. Genetic predisposition to in situ and invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Elinor; Roylance, Rebecca; Petridis, Christos; Brook, Mark N; Nowinski, Salpie; Papouli, Efterpi; Fletcher, Olivia; Pinder, Sarah; Hanby, Andrew; Kohut, Kelly; Gorman, Patricia; Caneppele, Michele; Peto, Julian; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Swann, Ruth; Dwek, Miriam; Perkins, Katherine-Anne; Gillett, Cheryl; Houlston, Richard; Ross, Gillian; De Ieso, Paolo; Southey, Melissa C; Hopper, John L; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Wesseling, Jelle; Cornelissen, Sten; Keeman, Renske; Fasching, Peter A; Jud, Sebastian M; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Kerin, Michael J; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Benitez, Javier; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K; Lochmann, Magdalena; Brauch, Hiltrud; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Investigators, Kconfab; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Van Limbergen, Erik; Hatse, Sigrid; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Volorio, Sara; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona A; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devillee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Sherman, Mark E; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Shah, Mitul; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk; Couch, Fergus J; Hallberg, Emily; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dunning, Alison M; Hall, Per; Easton, Doug; Pharoah, Paul; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Tomlinson, Ian; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2014-04-01

    Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) accounts for 10-15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+) and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast cancer, but these studies included predominantly ductal (IDC) carcinomas. To identify novel common polymorphisms that predispose to ILC and LCIS, we pooled data from 6,023 cases (5,622 ILC, 401 pure LCIS) and 34,271 controls from 36 studies genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Six novel SNPs most strongly associated with ILC/LCIS in the pooled analysis were genotyped in a further 516 lobular cases (482 ILC, 36 LCIS) and 1,467 controls. These analyses identified a lobular-specific SNP at 7q34 (rs11977670, OR (95%CI) for ILC = 1.13 (1.09-1.18), P = 6.0 × 10(-10); P-het for ILC vs IDC ER+ tumors = 1.8 × 10(-4)). Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at Plobular breast cancer specific predisposition polymorphism at 7q34, and shown for the first time that common breast cancer polymorphisms predispose to LCIS. We have shown that many of the ER+ breast cancer predisposition loci also predispose to ILC, although there is some heterogeneity between ER+ lobular and ER+ IDC tumors. These data provide evidence for overlapping, but distinct etiological pathways within ER+ breast cancer between morphological subtypes.

  18. Genetic Predisposition to In Situ and Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, Christos; Brook, Mark N.; Nowinski, Salpie; Papouli, Efterpi; Fletcher, Olivia; Pinder, Sarah; Hanby, Andrew; Kohut, Kelly; Gorman, Patricia; Caneppele, Michele; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Swann, Ruth; Dwek, Miriam; Perkins, Katherine-Anne; Gillett, Cheryl; Houlston, Richard; Ross, Gillian; De Ieso, Paolo; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Wesseling, Jelle; Cornelissen, Sten; Keeman, Renske; Fasching, Peter A.; Jud, Sebastian M.; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Kerin, Michael J.; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Benitez, Javier; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Lochmann, Magdalena; Brauch, Hiltrud; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Investigators, kConFab; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Van Limbergen, Erik; Hatse, Sigrid; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Volorio, Sara; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Mclean, Catriona A.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devillee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Sherman, Mark E.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Shah, Mitul; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk; Couch, Fergus J.; Hallberg, Emily; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dunning, Alison M.; Hall, Per; Easton, Doug; Pharoah, Paul; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Tomlinson, Ian; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) accounts for 10–15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+) and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast cancer, but these studies included predominantly ductal (IDC) carcinomas. To identify novel common polymorphisms that predispose to ILC and LCIS, we pooled data from 6,023 cases (5,622 ILC, 401 pure LCIS) and 34,271 controls from 36 studies genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Six novel SNPs most strongly associated with ILC/LCIS in the pooled analysis were genotyped in a further 516 lobular cases (482 ILC, 36 LCIS) and 1,467 controls. These analyses identified a lobular-specific SNP at 7q34 (rs11977670, OR (95%CI) for ILC = 1.13 (1.09–1.18), P = 6.0×10−10; P-het for ILC vs IDC ER+ tumors = 1.8×10−4). Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at Pbreast cancer specific predisposition polymorphism at 7q34, and shown for the first time that common breast cancer polymorphisms predispose to LCIS. We have shown that many of the ER+ breast cancer predisposition loci also predispose to ILC, although there is some heterogeneity between ER+ lobular and ER+ IDC tumors. These data provide evidence for overlapping, but distinct etiological pathways within ER+ breast cancer between morphological subtypes. PMID:24743323

  19. Sexual risk taking behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buttmann, Nina; Nielsen, Ann; Munk, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Sexual habits and risky sexual behaviour strongly affect public health. Available data indicate that sexually transmitted infections are increasing in many EU countries. Changes in the epidemiology of sexually transmitted diseases across Europe are among other factors suggested to be driven...... by changes in sexual behaviour patterns. The purpose of our study is to assess the occurrence of risky behaviour in men aged 18-45 years from the general population. Furthermore, we aim to examine factors associated with risky sexual behaviour....

  20. Genetic predisposition to colorectal cancer: Implications for treatment and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Elena M; Yurgelun, Matthew B

    2016-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer diagnosed in men and women and approximately 5% of cases are associated with identifiable germline mutations associated with hereditary cancer syndromes. Lifetime risks for CRC can approach 50%-80% for mutation carriers in the absence of endoscopic and/or surgical intervention, and early identification of at-risk individuals can guide clinical interventions for cancer prevention and treatment. Personal and family history and molecular phenotype of CRC tumors are used in determining which patients should be referred for clinical genetic evaluation. Outcomes of genetic testing performed using next-generation sequencing (NGS) multigene panels suggest there can be significant overlap in clinical features among the various hereditary cancer syndromes. This review summarizes new developments in diagnosis and management of patients with genetic predisposition to CRC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Chromosomal radiosensitivity, cancer predisposition and response to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, D.

    2000-01-01

    Aim: This paper briefly summarizes the research on this topic, undertaken in the Department of Cancer Genetics, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, England, over the previous 6 years. We have investigated the possible role of radiosensitivity as a marker of cancer predisposition and response to radiotherapy in the general population. Results: We found that 42% (57/135) of breast cancer patients exhibit chromosomal radiosensitivity when lymphocytes are irradiated in the G 2 phase of the cell cycle, compared with 6% (6/105) of healthy controls. These figures are much higher than the estimated frequencies of carriers of the ataxia-telangiectasia gene (heterozygotes) amongst breast cancer patients ( 2 sensitivity by studying relatives of breast cancer cases. The pattern of inheritance is relatively simple and attributable to 1 or 2 genes segregating in each family. In a prospective study of 123 breast cancer patients, 9 (7%) had severe acute reactions to radiotherapy and their mean G 2 sensitivity was significantly greater (p=0.001) than that of the remaining patients. In 16 patients with adverse acute reactions we found no mutations of the ataxia-telangiectasia gene (ATM). Using another chromosomal assay (micronucleus induction in G 0 lymphocytes) we found that the mean radiosensitivity of patients with severe late reactions was higher than that of normal reactors. For example, 8 patients with severe fibrosis were more sensitive (p=0.055) than 39 patients with a normal response. However, the discriminatory power of these chromosomal assays is too low for them to be used alone in a clinical setting. Conclusion: Our results provide good evidence that genes other than ATM, that confer chromosomal radiosensitivity, are involved in low penetrance predisposition to breast cancer in a high proportion of cases and contribute to adverse reactions after radiotherapy. (orig.) [de

  2. The Impact of Familial Predisposition to Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease on Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Louise Aas; Nielsen, Tenna Ruest Haarmark; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity has reached alarming rates world-wide. The aetiology seems to be an interplay between genetic and environmental factors, and a surrogate measure of this complex interaction is suggested as familial predisposition. Familial predisposition to obesity and related cardiovascular disease (CVD) complications constitute the presence of obesity and/or obesity-related complications in primarily blood-related family members. The approaches of its measurement and applicability vary, and the evidence especially of its influence on obesity and obesity treatment in childhood is limited. Studies have linked a familial predisposition of obesity, CVD (hypertension, dyslipidaemia and thromboembolic events), and type 2 diabetes mellitus to BMI as well as other adiposity measures in children, suggesting degrees of familial aggregation of metabolic derangements. A pattern of predispositions arising from mothers, parents or grandparents as being most influential have been found, but further comprehensive studies are needed in order to specify the exact implications of familial predisposition. In the scope of childhood obesity this article reviews the current literature regarding familial predisposition to obesity and obesity-related complications, and how these familial predispositions may impact obesity in the offspring. PMID:26465142

  3. From predisposition to psychosis: progression of symptoms in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parnas, Josef

    1999-01-01

    Schizophrenia is increasingly viewed as a neurodevelopmental process caused by an interaction between genetic factors and environmental stressors. Prospective studies and retrospective research using objective data indicate that behavioural deviations can be dated to early infancy and cut across...

  4. Possible genetic predisposition to lymphedema after breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Beth; Lose, Felicity; Kedda, Mary-Anne; Francois, Mathias; Ferguson, Kaltin; Janda, Monika; Yates, Patsy; Spurdle, Amanda B; Hayes, Sandra C

    2012-03-01

    Known risk factors for secondary lymphedema only partially explain who develops lymphedema following cancer, suggesting that inherited genetic susceptibility may influence risk. Moreover, identification of molecular signatures could facilitate lymphedema risk prediction prior to surgery or lead to effective drug therapies for prevention or treatment. Recent advances in the molecular biology underlying development of the lymphatic system and related congenital disorders implicate a number of potential candidate genes to explore in relation to secondary lymphedema. We undertook a nested case-control study, with participants who had developed lymphedema after surgical intervention within the first 18 months of their breast cancer diagnosis serving as cases (n=22) and those without lymphedema serving as controls (n=98), identified from a prospective, population-based, cohort study in Queensland, Australia. TagSNPs that covered all known genetic variation in the genes SOX18, VEGFC, VEGFD, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, RORC, FOXC2, LYVE1, ADM, and PROX1 were selected for genotyping. Multiple SNPs within three receptor genes, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, and RORC, were associated with lymphedema defined by statistical significance (p2.0). These provocative, albeit preliminary, findings regarding possible genetic predisposition to secondary lymphedema following breast cancer treatment warrant further attention for potential replication using larger datasets.

  5. Unclassified sequence variants (UVS and genetic predisposition to cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves-Jean Bignon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast and ovarian cancers are mainly attributable to predisposition genes whose germinal mutations are responsible for the disease. The most common genes associated with breast/ovarian cancer are BRCA1 and BRCA2 but at least 20 other genes of medium of high penetrance have been associated with these types of cancer. Lifetime risk of breast cancer for BRCA mutations carriers approaches 90%. Appropriate medical follow-up is therefore essential for women carrying mutations in these genes. BRCA mutational spectrum has not been entirely characterized but not all sequence variants are pathogenic. These are classified as benign polymorphisms or unclassified variants (UV with unknown pathological potential. To date, 43,5% of over 3500 genetic variants BRCA1 and BRCA2 are reported as having uncertain clinical significance. Whether one sequence variant has or not a pathogenicity implication is often a hard decision to take, involving important consequences for diagnosis and medical follow-up. Here we present several cases of unclassified sequence variants detection and interpretation by in-silico analysis.

  6. Genetic predisposition to acute kidney injury--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilander, Laura M; Kaunisto, Mari A; Pettilä, Ville

    2015-12-02

    The risk of an individual to develop an acute kidney injury (AKI), or its severity, cannot be reliably predicted by common clinical risk factors. Whether genetic risk factors have an explanatory role poses an interesting question, however. Thus, we conducted a systematic literature review regarding genetic predisposition to AKI or outcome of AKI patients. We searched Ovid SP (MEDLINE) and EMBASE databases and found 4027 references to AKI. Based on titles and abstracts, we approved 37 articles for further analysis. Nine were published only as abstracts, leaving 28 original articles in the final analysis. We extracted the first author, year of publication, study design, clinical setting, number of studied patients, patients with AKI, ethnicity of patients, studied polymorphisms, endpoints, AKI definition, phenotype, significant findings, and data for quality scoring from each article. We summarized the findings and scored the quality of articles. The articles were quite heterogeneous and of moderate quality (mean 6.4 of 10). Despite different gene polymorphisms with suggested associations with development or severity or outcome of AKI, definitive conclusions would require replication of associations in independent cohort studies and, preferably a hypothesis-free study design.

  7. A Specific Pathway Can Be Identified between Genetic Characteristics and Behaviour Profiles in Prader-Willi Syndrome via Cognitive, Environmental and Physiological Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, K. A.; Oliver, C.; Humphreys, G. W.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Behavioural phenotypes associated with genetic syndromes have been extensively investigated in order to generate rich descriptions of phenomenology, determine the degree of specificity of behaviours for a particular syndrome, and examine potential interactions between genetic predispositions for behaviour and environmental influences.…

  8. Interaction of genetic predisposition and environmental factors in the pathogenesis of idiopathic orthostatic intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Jacob, G.; Pohar, B.; Robertson, D.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The hemodynamic and autonomic abnormalities in idiopathic orthostatic intolerance (IOI) have been studied extensively. However, the mechanisms underlying these abnormalities are not understood. If genetic predisposition were important in the pathogenesis of IOI, monozygotic twins of patients with IOI should have similar hemodynamic and autonomic abnormalities. METHODS: We studied two patients with IOI and their identical twins. Both siblings in the first twin pair had orthostatic symptoms, significant orthostatic tachycardia, increased plasma norepinephrine levels with standing, and a greater than normal decrease in systolic blood pressure with trimethaphan infusion. RESULTS: Both siblings had a normal response of plasma renin activity to upright posture. In the second twin pair, only one sibling had symptoms of orthostatic intolerance, an orthostatic tachycardia, and raised plasma catecholamines with standing. The affected sibling had inappropriately low plasma renin activity with standing and was 8-fold more sensitive to the pressor effect of phenylephrine than the unaffected sibling. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that in some patients, IOI seems to be strongly influenced by genetic factors. In others, however, IOI may be mainly caused by nongenetic factors. These findings suggest that IOI is heterogenous, and that both genetic and environmental factors contribute individually or collectively to create the IOI phenotype.

  9. The influence of genetic predisposition and autoimmune hepatitis inducing antigens in disease development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardtke-Wolenski, Matthias; Dywicki, Janine; Fischer, Katja; Hapke, Martin; Sievers, Maren; Schlue, Jerome; Anderson, Mark S; Taubert, Richard; Noyan, Fatih; Manns, Michael P; Jaeckel, Elmar

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is defined as a chronic liver inflammation with loss of tolerance against hepatocytes. The etiology and pathophysiology of AIH are still poorly understood because reliable animal models are limited. Therefore, we recently introduced a model of experimental murine AIH by a self-limited adenoviral infection with the AIH type 2 antigen formiminotransferase cyclodeaminase (FTCD). We could demonstrate that break of humoral tolerance towards liver specific autoantigens like FTCD and cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is not dependent on the genetic background. However, the development of AIH in autoantibody positive animals is determined by genetic background genes. We could also show that the break of humoral tolerance is necessary but not sufficient for the development of AIH. In contrast the break of tolerance against the ubiquitously expressed nuclear antigens (ANAs) is strictly dependent on genetic predisposition. Priming with the UGA suppressor tRNA-associated protein (soluble liver antigen; SLA) is a strong inducer of ANA reactivity, but not sufficient to cause AIH development thereby questioning the importance of anti-SLA immune response as an important driver in AIH. Monogenetic mutations such as Aire-deficiency can cause AIH in otherwise genetically resistant strains. The results have important implications for our understanding of the pathophysiology of AIH development and for the interpretation of humoral antibody responses in AIH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic predisposition to in situ and invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elinor Sawyer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC accounts for 10-15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+ and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS. Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast cancer, but these studies included predominantly ductal (IDC carcinomas. To identify novel common polymorphisms that predispose to ILC and LCIS, we pooled data from 6,023 cases (5,622 ILC, 401 pure LCIS and 34,271 controls from 36 studies genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Six novel SNPs most strongly associated with ILC/LCIS in the pooled analysis were genotyped in a further 516 lobular cases (482 ILC, 36 LCIS and 1,467 controls. These analyses identified a lobular-specific SNP at 7q34 (rs11977670, OR (95%CI for ILC = 1.13 (1.09-1.18, P = 6.0 × 10(-10; P-het for ILC vs IDC ER+ tumors = 1.8 × 10(-4. Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at P<0.05. Two SNPs showed significantly stronger associations for ILC than LCIS (rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2, P-het = 0.04 and rs889312/5q11/MAP3K1, P-het = 0.03; and two showed stronger associations for LCIS than ILC (rs6678914/1q32/LGR6, P-het = 0.001 and rs1752911/6q14, P-het = 0.04. In addition, seven of the 75 known loci showed significant differences between ER+ tumors with IDC and ILC histology, three of these showing stronger associations for ILC (rs11249433/1p11, rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2 and rs10995190/10q21/ZNF365 and four associated only with IDC (5p12/rs10941679; rs2588809/14q24/RAD51L1, rs6472903/8q21 and rs1550623/2q31/CDCA7. In conclusion, we have identified one novel lobular breast cancer specific predisposition polymorphism at 7q34, and shown for the first time that common breast cancer polymorphisms predispose to LCIS. We have shown that many of the ER+ breast cancer predisposition loci also predispose to ILC, although there is some heterogeneity

  11. Genetic predisposition increases the tic severity, rate of comorbidities, and psychosocial and educational difficulties in children with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysturoy, Absalon Niclas; Skov, Liselotte; Debes, Nanette Mol

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to examine whether there are differences in tic severity, comorbidities, and psychosocial and educational consequences in children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome compared with children with Tourette syndrome without genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome. A total of 314 children diagnosed with Tourette syndrome participated in this study. Validated diagnostic tools were used to assess tic severity, comorbidities, and cognitive performance. A structured interview was used to evaluate psychosocial and educational consequences related to Tourette syndrome. The children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition present with statistically significant differences in terms of severity of tics, comorbidities, and a range of psychosocial and educational factors compared with the children with Tourette syndrome without genetic predisposition. Professionals need to be aware of genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome, as children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition have more severe symptoms than those children with Tourette syndrome who are without genetic predisposition. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. IMPACT OF INDIVIDUAL PREDISPOSITIONS AND WORKPLACE CONDITIONS ON ADDICTEDNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Indyk

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The World tempts with quick pleasure, easy overcoming pain and stress easily. Although, at once people are threaten by addictedness of some substances and activities which are meant to help to gain goals. The aim of our research is to check if there is a relationship between workplace conditions, social relations, individual features and tendency to take up behaviours leading to addiction. If there is such relationship which features there are to describe it. Methods: The surveys were conducted by using a set of questionnaires: socio-demographic variables, Self-estimation Questionnaire, Receiving Social Support Scale, Employees’ Relations Scale, Behaviour Questionnaire and Organizational Climate Questionnaire. Results: The mental toughness is adversely related to tendency to workaholism and shopaholism and positively related to Internet addiction. Observed, experienced and performed mobbing correlates positively with behavioural addictedness (shopping, work, Internet. However, mobbing victims can have problem with alcohol dependence. Organizational climate and received social support are not connected with addicting behaviours. Conclusions: Some particular psychical features can increase tendency to take up addicting behaviours. Acute stress in workplace increases the risk of addiction but organizational climate and social support are not connected with this risk.

  13. Genetic predisposition syndromes: when should they be considered in the work-up of MDS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babushok, Daria V; Bessler, Monica

    2015-03-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by cytopenias, ineffective hematopoiesis, myelodysplasia, and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). While sporadic MDS is primarily a disease of the elderly, MDS in children and young and middle-aged adults is frequently associated with underlying genetic predisposition syndromes. In addition to the classic hereditary bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS) such as Fanconi Anemia and Dyskeratosis Congenita, in recent years there has been an increased awareness of non-syndromic familial MDS/AML predisposition syndromes such as those caused by mutations in GATA2, RUNX1, CEBPA, and SRP72 genes. Here, we will discuss the importance of recognizing an underlying genetic predisposition syndrome a patient with MDS, will review clinical scenarios when genetic predisposition should be considered, and will provide a practical overview of the common BMFS and familial MDS/AML syndromes which may be encountered in adult patients with MDS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Influence of Familial Predisposition to Cardiovascular Complications upon Childhood Obesity Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Louise A; Bøjsøe, Christine; Kloppenborg, Julie T

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim was to investigate whether a familial predisposition to obesity related cardiovascular complications was associated with the degree of obesity at baseline and/or changes in the degree of obesity during a multidisciplinary childhood obesity treatment program. METHODS: The study......) calculated, and self-reported information on familial predisposition to obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), thromboembolic events, and dyslipidaemia were obtained. A familial predisposition included events in biological parents, siblings, grandparents, uncles, and aunts. The treatment...... outcomes were categorically analysed according to the prevalence of familial predispositions. RESULTS: The median BMI SDS at enrollment was 3.2 in boys and 2.8 in girls. One-thousand-and-forty-one children had obesity in their family, 773 had hypertension, 551 had T2DM, 568 had thromboembolic events...

  15. Prospective cohort study of cannabis use, predisposition for psychosis, and psychotic symptoms in young people.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henquet, C.J.; Krabbendam, L.; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Kaplan, C.; Lieb, R.; Wittchen, H.U.; Os, J. van

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relation between cannabis use and psychotic symptoms in individuals with above average predisposition for psychosis who first used cannabis during adolescence. DESIGN: Analysis of prospective data from a population based sample. Assessment of substance use,

  16. Verification of the model of predisposition in triathlon – structural model of confirmative factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Kovářová

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The triathlon is a combination of three different types of sport – swimming, cycling, and running. Each of these requires different top level predispositions and complex approach to talent selection is a rather difficult process. Attempts to identify assumptions in the triathlon have so far been specific and focused only on some groups of predispositions (physiology, motor tests, and psychology. The latest studies missed the structural approach and were based on determinants of sport performance, theory of sports training and expert assessment. OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to verify the model of predisposition in the short triathlon for talent assessment of young male athletes age 17–20 years. METHODS: The research sample consisted of 55 top level triathletes – men, who were included in the Government supported sports talent programme in the Czech Republic at the age of 17–20 years. We used a confirmative factor analysis (FA and Path diagram to verify the model, which allow us to explain mutual relationships among observed variables. For statistical data processing we used a structure equating modeling (SEM by software Lisrel L88. RESULTS: The study confirms best structural model for talent selection in triathlon at the age of 17–20 years old men, which composed seventeen indicators (tests and explained 91% of all cross-correlations (Goodness of Fit Index /GFI/ 0.91, Root Mean Square Residual /RMSR/ 0.13. Tests for predispositions in triathlons were grouped into five items, three motor predispositions (swimming, cycling and running skills, aerobic and psychological predispositions. Aerobic predispositions showed the highest importance to the assumptions to the general factor (1.00; 0. Running predispositions were measured as a very significant factor (–0.85; 0.28 which confirms importance of this critical stage of the race. Lower factor weight showed clusters of swimming (–0.61; 0.63 and cycling (0.53; 0

  17. Cannabis use and genetic predisposition for schizophrenia: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veling, W; Mackenbach, J P; van Os, J; Hoek, H W

    2008-09-01

    Cannabis use may be a risk factor for schizophrenia. Part of this association may be explained by genotype-environment interaction, and part of it by genotype-environment correlation. The latter issue has not been explored. We investigated whether cannabis use is associated with schizophrenia, and whether gene-environment correlation contributes to this association, by examining the prevalence of cannabis use in groups with different levels of genetic predisposition for schizophrenia. Case-control study of first-episode schizophrenia. Cases included all non-Western immigrants who made first contact with a physician for schizophrenia in The Hague, The Netherlands, between October 2000 and July 2005 (n=100; highest genetic predisposition). Two matched control groups were recruited, one among siblings of the cases (n=63; intermediate genetic predisposition) and one among immigrants who made contact with non-psychiatric secondary health-care services (n=100; lowest genetic predisposition). Conditional logistic regression analyses were used to predict schizophrenia as a function of cannabis use, and cannabis use as a function of genetic predisposition for schizophrenia. Cases had used cannabis significantly more often than their siblings and general hospital controls (59, 21 and 21% respectively). Cannabis use predicted schizophrenia [adjusted odds ratio (OR) cases compared to general hospital controls 7.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.7-22.6; adjusted OR cases compared to siblings 15.9 (95% CI 1.5-167.1)], but genetic predisposition for schizophrenia did not predict cannabis use [adjusted OR intermediate predisposition compared to lowest predisposition 1.2 (95% CI 0.4-3.8)]. Cannabis use was associated with schizophrenia but there was no evidence for genotype-environment correlation.

  18. Localization of genes modulating the predisposition to schizophrenia: a revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Z. Lopes-Machado

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The genetics of schizophrenia or bipolar affective disorder has advanced greatly at the molecular level since the introduction of probes for the localization of specific genes. Research on gene candidates for susceptibility to schizophrenia can broadly be divided into two types, i.e., linkage studies, where a gene is found near a specific DNA marker on a specific chromosome, and association studies, when a condition is associated with a specific allele of a specific gene. This review covers a decade of publications in this area, from the 1988 works of Bassett et al. and Sherrington et al. on a gene localized on the long arm of chromosome 5 at the 5q11-13 loci, to the 1997 work of Lin et al. pointing to the 13q14.1-q32 loci of chromosome 13 and to the 1998 work of Wright et al. on an HLA DRB1 gene locus on chromosome 6 at 6p21-3. The most replicated loci were those in the long arm of chromosome 22 (22q12-q13.1 and on the short arm of chromosome 6 (6p24-22. In this critical review of the molecular genetic studies involved in the localization of genes which modulate the predisposition to schizophrenia the high variability in the results obtained by different workers suggests that multiple loci are involved in the predisposition to this illness.A genética da esquizofrenia (como também do distúrbio bipolar teve grande avanço a partir da descoberta, a nível de genética molecular, da técnica de localização de genes com uso de sondas de DNA (Botstein et al., 1980. Os estudos que procuram "genes candidatos" a exercerem algum papel na susceptibilidade à esquizofrenia são, basicamente, de dois tipos: de ligação ("linkage" e de associação. Quando, à luz da genética molecular, um gene é localizado próximo a um marcador de DNA específico no cromossomo, fala-se em estudo "de ligação". Por outro lado, quando a doença é associada a um alelo específico de um determinado gene, fala-se em estudo "de associação". Esta revisão cobriu uma d

  19. Evaluation of Genetic Predisposition for MYCN-Amplified Neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungate, Eric A; Applebaum, Mark A; Skol, Andrew D; Vaksman, Zalman; Diamond, Maura; McDaniel, Lee; Volchenboum, Samuel L; Stranger, Barbara E; Maris, John M; Diskin, Sharon J; Onel, Kenan; Cohn, Susan L

    2017-10-01

    To investigate genetic predispositions for MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma, we performed a meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies totaling 615 MYCN-amplified high-risk neuroblastoma cases and 1869 MYCN-nonamplified non-high-risk neuroblastoma cases as controls using a fixed-effects model with inverse variance weighting. All statistical tests were two-sided. We identified a novel locus at 3p21.31 indexed by the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs80059929 (odds ratio [OR] = 2.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.17 to 4.02, Pmeta = 6.47 × 10-12) associated with MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma, which was replicated in 127 MYCN-amplified cases and 254 non-high-risk controls (OR = 2.30, 95% CI = 1.12 to 4.69, Preplication = .02). To confirm this signal is exclusive to MYCN-amplified tumors, we performed a second meta-analysis comparing 728 MYCN-nonamplified high-risk patients to identical controls. rs80059929 was not statistically significant in MYCN-nonamplified high-risk patients (OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.90 to 1.71, Pmeta = .19). SNP rs80059929 is within intron 16 in the KIF15 gene. Additionally, the previously reported LMO1 neuroblastoma risk locus was statistically significant only in patients with MYCN-nonamplified high-risk tumors (OR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.53 to 0.75, Pmeta = 1.51 × 10-8; Pmeta = .95). Our results indicate that common genetic variation predisposes to different neuroblastoma genotypes, including the likelihood of somatic MYCN-amplification. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Shared Genetic Predisposition in Peripartum and Dilated Cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, James S; Li, Jian; Mazaika, Erica; Yasso, Christopher M; DeSouza, Tiffany; Cappola, Thomas P; Tsai, Emily J; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Kamiya, Chizuko A; Mazzarotto, Francesco; Cook, Stuart A; Halder, Indrani; Prasad, Sanjay K; Pisarcik, Jessica; Hanley-Yanez, Karen; Alharethi, Rami; Damp, Julie; Hsich, Eileen; Elkayam, Uri; Sheppard, Richard; Kealey, Angela; Alexis, Jeffrey; Ramani, Gautam; Safirstein, Jordan; Boehmer, John; Pauly, Daniel F; Wittstein, Ilan S; Thohan, Vinay; Zucker, Mark J; Liu, Peter; Gorcsan, John; McNamara, Dennis M; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Arany, Zoltan

    2016-01-21

    Background Peripartum cardiomyopathy shares some clinical features with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a disorder caused by mutations in more than 40 genes, including TTN, which encodes the sarcomere protein titin. Methods In 172 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, we sequenced 43 genes with variants that have been associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. We compared the prevalence of different variant types (nonsense, frameshift, and splicing) in these women with the prevalence of such variants in persons with dilated cardiomyopathy and with population controls. Results We identified 26 distinct, rare truncating variants in eight genes among women with peripartum cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of truncating variants (26 in 172 [15%]) was significantly higher than that in a reference population of 60,706 persons (4.7%, P=1.3×10(-7)) but was similar to that in a cohort of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (55 of 332 patients [17%], P=0.81). Two thirds of identified truncating variants were in TTN, as seen in 10% of the patients and in 1.4% of the reference population (P=2.7×10(-10)); almost all TTN variants were located in the titin A-band. Seven of the TTN truncating variants were previously reported in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. In a clinically well-characterized cohort of 83 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, the presence of TTN truncating variants was significantly correlated with a lower ejection fraction at 1-year follow-up (P=0.005). Conclusions The distribution of truncating variants in a large series of women with peripartum cardiomyopathy was remarkably similar to that found in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. TTN truncating variants were the most prevalent genetic predisposition in each disorder.

  1. An Integrative Model of Individual Predisposition and Contextual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Specifically, our integrative model makes connection between individuals' personality factor of openness and the contextual factors. The contextual factors reflect human capital of education and experience, motivational resources representing self-efficacy and initiative and networking behaviour influencing opportunity ...

  2. Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids prevent impaired social behaviour and prefrontal dopamine metabolism in food allergic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Theije, C.G.M.; Van Den Elsen, L.W.J.; Willemsen, L.E.M.; Milosevic, V.; Lopes Da Silva, S.; Olivier, B.; Garssen, J.; Korte, S.M.; Kraneveld, A.D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is suggested that allergic immune activation, combined with a genetic predisposition, may contribute to the expression of aberrant social behaviour relevant to autism. We have previously shown that a food allergic response reduced social behaviour in mice, which was associated with

  3. Utilizing Genetic Predisposition Score in Predicting Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Incidence: A Community-based Cohort Study on Middle-aged Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Yin; Choi, Hyung Jin; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2015-08-01

    Contribution of genetic predisposition to risk prediction of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was investigated using a prospective study in middle-aged adults in Korea. From a community cohort of 6,257 subjects with 8 yr' follow-up, genetic predisposition score with subsets of 3, 18, 36 selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (genetic predisposition score; GPS-3, GPS-18, GPS-36) in association with T2DM were determined, and their effect was evaluated using risk prediction models. Rs5215, rs10811661, and rs2237892 were in significant association with T2DM, and hazard ratios per risk allele score increase were 1.11 (95% confidence intervals: 1.06-1.17), 1.09 (1.01-1.05), 1.04 (1.02-1.07) with GPS-3, GPS-18, GPS-36, respectively. Changes in AUC upon addition of GPS were significant in simple and clinical models, but the significance disappeared in full clinical models with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). For net reclassification index (NRI), significant improvement observed in simple (range 5.1%-8.6%) and clinical (3.1%-4.4%) models were no longer significant in the full models. Influence of genetic predisposition in prediction ability of T2DM incidence was no longer significant when HbA1c was added in the models, confirming HbA1c as a strong predictor for T2DM risk. Also, the significant SNPs verified in our subjects warrant further research, e.g. gene-environmental interaction and epigenetic studies.

  4. Genetic predisposition to myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia in children and young adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babushok, Daria V.; Bessler, Monica; Olson, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal blood disorder characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, cytopenias, dysplasia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). With the growing availability of clinical genetic testing, there is an increasing appreciation that a number of genetic predisposition syndromes may underlie apparent de novo presentations of MDS/AML, particularly in children and young adults. Recent findings of clonal hematopoiesis in acquired aplastic anemia add another facet to our understanding of the mechanisms of MDS/AML predisposition. As more predisposition syndromes are recognized, it is becoming increasingly important for hematologists and oncologists to have familiarity with the common as well as emerging syndromes, and to have a systematic approach to diagnosis and screening of at risk patient populations. Here, we provide a practical algorithm for approaching a patient with a suspected MDS/AML predisposition, and provide an in-depth review of the established and emerging familial MDS/AML syndromes caused by mutations in the ANKRD26, CEBPA, DDX41, ETV6, GATA2, RUNX1, SRP72 genes. Finally, we discuss recent data on the role of somatic mutations in malignant transformation in acquired aplastic anemia, and review the practical aspects of MDS/AML management in patients and families with predisposition syndromes. PMID:26693794

  5. Genetic Predisposition to High Blood Pressure Associates With Cardiovascular Complications Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qibin; Forman, John P.; Jensen, Majken K.; Flint, Alan; Curhan, Gary C.; Rimm, Eric B.; Hu, Frank B.; Qi, Lu

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension and type 2 diabetes (T2D) commonly coexist, and both conditions are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We aimed to examine the association between genetic predisposition to high blood pressure and risk of CVD in individuals with T2D. The current study included 1,005 men and 1,299 women with T2D from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses’ Health Study, of whom 732 developed CVD. A genetic predisposition score was calculated on the basis of 29 established blood pressure–associated variants. The genetic predisposition score showed consistent associations with risk of CVD in men and women. In the combined results, each additional blood pressure–increasing allele was associated with a 6% increased risk of CVD (odds ratio [OR] 1.06 [95% CI 1.03–1.10]). The OR was 1.62 (1.22–2.14) for risk of CVD comparing the extreme quartiles of the genetic predisposition score. The genetic association for CVD risk was significantly stronger in patients with T2D than that estimated in the general populations by a meta-analysis (OR per SD of genetic score 1.22 [95% CI 1.10–1.35] vs. 1.10 [1.08–1.12]; I2 = 71%). Our data indicate that genetic predisposition to high blood pressure is associated with an increased risk of CVD in individuals with T2D. PMID:22829449

  6. Genetic predisposition to myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babushok, Daria V; Bessler, Monica; Olson, Timothy S

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal blood disorder characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, cytopenias, dysplasia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). With the growing availability of clinical genetic testing, there is an increasing appreciation that a number of genetic predisposition syndromes may underlie apparent de novo presentations of MDS/AML, particularly in children and young adults. Recent findings of clonal hematopoiesis in acquired aplastic anemia add another facet to our understanding of the mechanisms of MDS/AML predisposition. As more predisposition syndromes are recognized, it is becoming increasingly important for hematologists and oncologists to have familiarity with the common as well as emerging syndromes, and to have a systematic approach to diagnosis and screening of at risk patient populations. Here, we provide a practical algorithm for approaching a patient with a suspected MDS/AML predisposition, and provide an in-depth review of the established and emerging familial MDS/AML syndromes caused by mutations in the ANKRD26, CEBPA, DDX41, ETV6, GATA2, RUNX1, SRP72 genes. Finally, we discuss recent data on the role of somatic mutations in malignant transformation in acquired aplastic anemia, and review the practical aspects of MDS/AML management in patients and families with predisposition syndromes.

  7. Considerations for comprehensive assessment of genetic predisposition in familial breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Henry; Synder, Carrie; Wang, San Ming

    2015-01-01

    About 10-15% of breast cancer cases are family related, classified as familial breast cancer. The disease was first reported in 1866 and determined to be an autosomal dominant genetic disease in 1971. Germline mutations in BRCA1 were discovered and deemed as the first genetic predisposition for the disease in 1994. By now, genetic predispositions for about 40% of familial breast cancer families have been identified. New molecular genetic approaches currently under development should accelerate the process to identify the full spectrum of genetic predispositions for the disease, thereby enabling a better understanding of the genetic basis of the disease and therein providing benefit to high-risk patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Maxillary canine displacement and genetically determined predisposition to disturbed development of the dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Franka; Grabowski, Rosemarie

    2003-05-01

    The relationship between maxillary canine displacement and the simultaneous occurrence of "genetically determined predisposition to disturbed development of the dentition" as defined by Hoffmeister was investigated in 675 patients. Panoramic radiographs taken of each patient during the first and the second mixed dentition periods were evaluated. Canine inclination and the distance between the tip of the canine and a line connecting the cusps of the molars were computed in five different age groups according to Dausch-Neumann. Statistical analysis revealed 34 patients with "potential canine displacement", who exhibited further symptoms of "genetically determined predisposition to disturbed development of the dentition" significantly more frequently than the total group. The symptoms concerned were agenesia, displaced tooth buds, rotated or tilted incisors, aplasia and microdontia of lateral incisors. Careful follow-ups in patients with a predisposition to disturbed dental development enables risks to be anticipated and canine displacement to be detected at an early stage.

  9. Evaluation of Patients and Families With Concern for Predispositions to Hematologic Malignancies Within the Hereditary Hematologic Malignancy Clinic (HHMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNardo, Courtney D; Bannon, Sarah A; Routbort, Mark; Franklin, Anna; Mork, Maureen; Armanios, Mary; Mace, Emily M; Orange, Jordan S; Jeff-Eke, Meselle; Churpek, Jane E; Takahashi, Koichi; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kornblau, Steve; Bertuch, Alison; Cheung, Hannah; Bhalla, Kapil; Futreal, Andrew; Godley, Lucy A; Patel, Keyur P

    2016-07-01

    Although multiple predispositions to hematologic malignancies exist, evaluations for hereditary cancer syndromes (HCS) are underperformed by most hematologist/oncologists. Criteria for initiating HCS evaluation are poorly defined, and results of genetic testing for hereditary hematologic malignancies have not been systematically reported. From April 2014 to August 2015, 67 patients were referred to the Hereditary Hematologic Malignancy Clinic (HHMC). Referral reasons included (1) bone marrow failure or myelodysplastic syndrome in patients ≤ 50 years, (2) evaluation for germ-line inheritance of identified RUNX1, GATA2, or CEBPA mutations on targeted next-generation sequencing panels, and (3) strong personal and/or family history of malignancy. Cultured skin fibroblasts were utilized for germ-line DNA in all patients with hematologic malignancy. Eight patients (12%) were clinically diagnosed with a HCS: 4 patients with RUNX1-related familial platelet disorder (FPD)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and 1 patient each with dyskeratosis congenita, Fanconi anemia, germ-line DDX41, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). Two patients with concern for FPD/AML and LFS, respectively, had RUNX1 and TP53 variants of unknown significance. Additionally, 4 patients with prior HCS diagnosis (1 LFS, 3 FPD/AML) were referred for further evaluation and surveillance. In this HHMC-referred hematologic malignancy cohort, HCS was confirmed in 12 patients (18%). HCS identification provides insight for improved and individualized treatment, as well as screening/surveillance opportunities for family members. The HHMC has facilitated HCS diagnosis; with increased clinical awareness of hematologic malignancy predisposition syndromes, more patients who may benefit from evaluation can be identified. Mutation panels intended for prognostication may provide increased clinical suspicion for germ-line testing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Interaction between Genetic Predisposition to Adiposity and Dietary Protein in Relation to Subsequent Change in Body Weight and Waist Circumference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankarfeldt, Mikkel Z; Larsen, Sofus C; Angquist, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic predisposition to adiposity may interact with dietary protein in relation to changes of anthropometry. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the interaction between genetic predisposition to higher body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) or waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRBMI...

  11. Being at risk for cardiovascular disease: Perceptions and preventive behavior in people with and without a known genetic predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, E.A.M.; Henneman, L.; van der Weijden, T.; Marteau, T.M.; Timmermans, D.R.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares and explains differences in perceptions of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and preventive behaviors in people with and without a known genetic predisposition to CVD. A cross-sectional study using two samples was performed. The first sample (genetic predisposition; n=51)

  12. Genetic predisposition for Type 2 diabetes, but not for overweight/obesity, is associated with a restricted adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arner, Peter; Arner, Erik; Hammarstedt, Ann; Smith, Ulf

    2011-04-12

    Development of Type 2 diabetes, like obesity, is promoted by a genetic predisposition. Although several genetic variants have been identified they only account for a small proportion of risk. We have asked if genetic risk is associated with abnormalities in storing excess lipids in the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. We recruited 164 lean and 500 overweight/obese individuals with or without a genetic predisposition for Type 2 diabetes or obesity. Adipose cell size was measured in biopsies from the abdominal adipose tissue as well as insulin sensitivity (HOMA index), HDL-cholesterol and Apo AI and Apo B. 166 additional non-obese individuals with a genetic predisposition for Type 2 diabetes underwent a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp to measure insulin sensitivity. Genetic predisposition for Type 2 diabetes, but not for overweight/obesity, was associated with inappropriate expansion of the adipose cells, reduced insulin sensitivity and a more proatherogenic lipid profile in non-obese individuals. However, obesity per se induced a similar expansion of adipose cells and dysmetabolic state irrespective of genetic predisposition. Genetic predisposition for Type 2 diabetes, but not obesity, is associated with an impaired ability to recruit new adipose cells to store excess lipids in the subcutaneous adipose tissue, thereby promoting ectopic lipid deposition. This becomes particularly evident in non-obese individuals since obesity per se promotes a dysmetabolic state irrespective of genetic predisposition. These results identify a novel susceptibility factor making individuals with a genetic predisposition for Type 2 diabetes particularly sensitive to the environment and caloric excess.

  13. Personality Predispositions to Depression in Children of Affectively-Ill Parents: The Buffering Role of Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, John R. Z.; Fishman, Michael B.; Cohen, Joseph R.; Young, Jami F.

    2012-01-01

    A major theory of personality predispositions to depression posits that individuals who possess high levels of self-criticism and/or dependency are vulnerable to developing depression following negative life events. The goal of the current study was to test this theory of personality predispositions and the self-esteem buffering hypothesis in a…

  14. Rydberg atoms in strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppner, D.; Tsimmerman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical achievements in studying Rydberg atoms in external fields are considered. Only static (or quasistatic) fields and ''one-electron'' atoms, i.e. atoms that are well described by one-electron states, are discussed. Mainly behaviour of alkali metal atoms in electric field is considered. The state of theoretical investigations for hydrogen atom in magnetic field is described, but experimental data for atoms of alkali metals are presented as an illustration. Results of the latest experimental and theoretical investigations into the structure of Rydberg atoms in strong fields are presented

  15. Bridging Home and Host Country: Educational Predispositions of Chinese and Indian Recent Immigrant Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, June A.; Liu, Xiangyan

    2015-01-01

    This research focuses on the predispositions that recent Chinese and Indian immigrant families bring with them to the United States and how these are reinforced by the communities in which they locate. The findings draw from 144 interviews in California. Three themes dominate: positioning through schooling, transnational family, and extended…

  16. Predisposition Factors of Career and Technical Education Transfer Students: A Hermeneutic Phenomenology Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hioki, Warren; Lester, Derek; Martinez, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Six college students, who were career and technical education (CTE) transfer students in the state of Nevada, were interviewed Spring Semester of 2009. The study used a hermeneutic phenomenology framework as the method to identify those predisposition variables that heavily influenced the students in their decision to transfer to a senior…

  17. The Role of Social Factors in Iranian University Students' Predispositions towards Autonomous Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeeini, Sara Kashefian; Riazi, Abdolmehdi; Salehi, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    In order to meet the demands of the changing world, students should become endowed with the ability to learn perpetually and regard learning as a life-long enterprise. This study investigated those learners belief which showed learners' predispositions toward autonomy and some social factors such as gender, academic achievement, marital status and…

  18. Developing national guidance on genetic testing for breast cancer predisposition: the role of economic evidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sullivan, W.; Evans, D.G.; Newman, W.G.; Ramsden, S.C.; Scheffer, H.; Payne, K.

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in genetic testing to identify predisposition for hereditary breast cancer (HBC) mean that it is important to understand the incremental costs and benefits of the new technologies compared with current testing strategies. This study aimed to (1) identify and critically appraise existing

  19. The influence of water table depth and the free atmospheric state on convective rainfall predisposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara Bonetti; Gabriele Manoli; Jean-Christopher Domec; Mario Putti; Marco Marani; Gabriel G. Katul

    2015-01-01

    A mechanistic model for the soil-plant system is coupled to a conventional slab representation of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) to explore the role of groundwater table (WT) variations and free atmospheric (FA) states on convective rainfall predisposition (CRP) at a Loblolly pine plantation site situated in the lower coastal plain of North Carolina....

  20. Informing family members about a hereditary predisposition to cancer: attitudes and practices among clinical geneticists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stol, Y.; Menko, F.H.; Westerman, M.J.; Janssens, M.J.P.A.

    2010-01-01

    If a hereditary predisposition to colorectal cancer or breast cancer is diagnosed, most guidelines state that clinical geneticists should request index patients to inform their at-risk relatives about the existence of this condition in their family, thus enabling them to consider presymptomatic

  1. KCNQ1OT1 hypomethylation: A Novel disguised genetic predisposition in sporadic pediatric adrenocortical tumors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnen, Mark; Alders, Mariëlle; Zwaan, Christian M.; Wagner, Anja; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric adrenal tumors, other than neuroblastoma, are rare and can be associated with a genetic predisposition. In this report we describe two patients with an isolated and apparently sporadic adrenocortical tumor; one girl with a carcinoma, the other girl with an adenoma. In both patients genetic

  2. Genetic predisposition toward suicidal ideation in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hee-Ju; Bae, Kyung-Yeol; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Hong, Young Joon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Yoon, Jin-Sang; Kim, Jae-Min

    2017-11-07

    The genetic predisposition toward suicidal ideation has been explored to identify subgroups at high risk and to prevent suicide. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is associated with an increased risk of suicide, but few studies have explored the genetic predisposition toward suicide in ACS populations. Therefore, this longitudinal study explored the genetic predisposition toward suicidal ideation in ACS patients. In total, of 969 patients within 2 weeks after ACS, 711 were followed at 1 year after ACS. Suicidal ideation was evaluated with the relevant items on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale. Ten genetic polymorphisms associated with serotonergic systems, neurotrophic factors, carbon metabolism, and inflammatory cytokines were examined. Associations between genetic polymorphisms and suicidal ideation within 2 weeks and 1 year of ACS were investigated using logistic regression models. The 5-HTTLPR s allele was significantly associated with suicidal ideation within 2 weeks of ACS after adjusting for covariates and after the Bonferroni correction. TNF-α -308 G/A , IL-1β -511 C/T , and IL-1β + 3953C/T were significantly associated with suicidal ideation within 2 weeks after ACS, but these associations did not reach significance after the Bonferroni correction in unadjusted analyses and after adjusting for covariance. However, no significant association between genetic polymorphisms and suicidal ideation was found at 1 year. Genetic predisposition, 5-HTTLPR s allele in particular, may confer susceptibility to suicidal ideation in ACS patients during the acute phase of ACS.

  3. Fundamental Theories on Consumer Behaviour: An Overview of the Influences Impacting Consumer Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Moraru Andreea Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Consumer behaviour is a component of the economic behaviour, which in its turn is a manifestation of human behaviour. As a consequence of the social and economic development of modern societies, the study of consumer behaviour has undergone a strong development process, during the past years consumer behaviour acquiring its own status among sciences. However scientists concern with the study of consumer behaviour covers a time span of many decades. Due to the multiple interdependences and par...

  4. Testing strong interaction theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses possible tests of the current theories of the strong interaction, in particular, quantum chromodynamics. High energy e + e - interactions should provide an excellent means of studying the strong force. (W.D.L.)

  5. Individual behavioural characteristics in pigs and their consequences for pig husbandry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessing, M.J.C.

    1994-01-01

    <strong>Introduction>
    The main aspect of this thesis is individual behavioural variation. Behavioural variability among individuals within a population may provide information on strategies or roles in social behaviour, on personality traits and individual recognition.

  6. Predisposition for Empathy, Intercultural Sensitivity, and Intentions for Using Motivational Interviewing in First Year Pharmacy Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekong, Gladys; Kavookjian, Jan; Hutchison, Amber

    2017-10-01

    Objective. To assess first-year pharmacy (P1) students' predispositions (eg, perceptions for empathy, intercultural sensitivity, and motivational interviewing (MI) as a patient-centered communication skillset) and identify potential curricula content/communication skills training needs. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was used to collect students' self-reported perceptions for empathy, intercultural sensitivity, counseling contexts, and projected future MI use. Relationships between variables were explored and logistic regression was used to evaluate intention for using MI in future patient encounters. Results. There were 134 students who participated. Higher predisposition for empathy and for intercultural sensitivity were significantly correlated. Significant predictors for applying MI in future patient encounters were sex, confidence with counseling skills, and current use of MI. Conclusion. Results suggest the need to incorporate innovative training strategies in communication skills curricula. Potential areas include empathy, intercultural sensitivity and significant predictor variables for future MI use. Further investigation in other schools is needed.

  7. Predisposition to essential hypertension and development of diabetic nephropathy in IDDM patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerudd, J A; Tarnow, L; Jacobsen, P

    1998-01-01

    Conflicting results have been reported on the relationship between familial predisposition to hypertension and development of diabetic nephropathy in IDDM. In our case-control study, we assessed the prevalence of hypertension among parents of 73 IDDM patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN...... for hypertension than were patients with DN+ and without parental treatment for hypertension (100 vs. 61%; P = 0.034; difference 39% [21-57%]). In conclusion, familial predisposition to essential hypertension increases the risk of diabetic nephropathy and may also contribute to the development of systemic......+; persistent albuminuria > 200 microg/min or > 300 mg/24 h) and 73 IDDM patients without diabetic nephropathy (DN-; urinary albumin excretion or = 135/85 mm...

  8. Integrated screening concept in women with genetic predisposition for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bick, U.

    1997-01-01

    Breast cancer is in 5% of cases due to a genetic disposition. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are by far the most common breast cancer susceptibility genes. For a woman with a genetic predisposition, the individual risk of developing breast cancer sometime in her life is between 70 and 90%. Compared to the spontaneous forms of breast cancer, woman with a genetic predisposition often develop breast cancer at a much younger age. This is why conventional screening programs on the basis of mammography alone cannot be applied without modification to this high-risk group. In this article, an integrated screening concept for women with genetic prodisposition for breast cancer using breast self-examination, clinical examination, ultrasound, mammography and magnetic resonance imaging is introduced. (orig.) [de

  9. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in head and neck cancer patients: evidence for genetic predisposition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ruyck, K; de Gelder, V; Van Eijkeren, M; Boterberg, T; De Neve, W; Vral, A; Thierens, H

    2008-01-01

    The association between chromosomal radiosensitivity and genetic predisposition to head and neck cancer was investigated in this study. In all, 101 head and neck cancer patients and 75 healthy control individuals were included in the study. The G2 assay was used to measure chromosomal radiosensitivity. The results demonstrated that head and neck cancer patients had a statistically higher number of radiation-induced chromatid breaks than controls, with mean values of 1.23 and 1.10 breaks per cell, respectively (Pgenetic predisposition to head and neck cancer, and the genetic contribution is highest for oral cavity and pharynx cancer patients and for early onset and non- and light smoking patients. PMID:18414410

  10. Le diabete de type 1: de la predisposition genetique a un contexte environnemental hypothetique.

    OpenAIRE

    Phlips, J.-C.; Radermecker, Régis

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results in a progressive (complete in most cases) destruction of insulin-secreting beta cells from Langerhans islets. Even if the autoimmune process becomes to be well known, no one is yet sure what specifically prompts the autoimmune response that destroys the body's ability to produce insulin. Etiology of this complex disease combines a genetic predisposition and still (almost) unknown environmental factors that trigger autoimmuninty specificall...

  11. Genetic predisposition to chikungunya ? a blood group study in chikungunya affected families

    OpenAIRE

    Sudarsanareddy, Lokireddy; Sarojamma, Vemula; Ramakrishna, Vadde

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Chikungunya fever is a viral disease transmitted to humans by the bite of CHIKV virus infected Aedes mosquitoes. During monsoon outbreak of chikungunya fever, we carried out the genetic predisposition to chikungunya in disease affected 100 families by doing blood group (ABO) tests by focusing on individuals who were likely to have a risk of chikungunya and identified the blood group involved in susceptibility/resistance to chikungunya. In the present study, based on blood group antig...

  12. Genetic Predisposition to High Blood Pressure and Lifestyle Factors: Associations With Midlife Blood Pressure Levels and Cardiovascular Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazoki, Raha; Dehghan, Abbas; Evangelou, Evangelos; Warren, Helen; Gao, He; Caulfield, Mark; Elliott, Paul; Tzoulaki, Ioanna

    2018-02-13

    High blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Both heritable and lifestyle risk factors contribute to elevated BP levels. We aimed to investigate the extent to which lifestyle factors could offset the effect of an adverse BP genetic profile and its effect on CVD risk. We constructed a genetic risk score for high BP by using 314 published BP loci in 277 005 individuals without previous CVD from the UK Biobank study, a prospective cohort of individuals aged 40 to 69 years, with a median of 6.11 years of follow-up. We scored participants according to their lifestyle factors including body mass index, healthy diet, sedentary lifestyle, alcohol consumption, smoking, and urinary sodium excretion levels measured at recruitment. We examined the association between tertiles of genetic risk and tertiles of lifestyle score with BP levels and incident CVD by using linear regression and Cox regression models, respectively. Healthy lifestyle score was strongly associated with BP ( P genetic predisposition to high BP for risk stratification needs careful evaluation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Radiation-induced breast cancer: Influence of age at exposure, latency period, age, and genetic predisposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuni, H.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation induced breast cancer: Influence of age at exposure, time since exposure, attained age and genetic predisposition. The amount of undesirable effects of screening with mammography was estimated from mortality studies after radiation exposure. Newer incidence studies demonstrate, however, an underestimation of the health detriment by mortality studies, in particular with increasing age at exposure, which amounts about five- to sixfold after an exposure in an age of 45-50y. The multidimensional analysis of the discrete values of incidence after radiation exposure respecting age at exposure, time since exposure and attained age instead of calculating a steady function simply depending from age at exposure results in an increasing relative and absolute risk of cancer incidence (and mortality) with growing age after an exposure at an age above 40y. Some genes seems to be correlated with an predisposition of breast cancer. In women carrying BRCA-1 the radiosensitivity for induction of breast cancer may exceed the risk in the normal population by about two orders of magnitude. The resulting doubling dose amounts in the order of the natural and medical radiation exposure. At least in part the genetic predisposition is associated with an early onset of the cancer after an additional radiation exposure. This kind of health detriment was not considered in the former discussion of radiation hazards. (orig.) [de

  14. Evaluation criteria of the individual motor predisposition of female sport gymnastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boraczynski T.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In the paper were presented the results of research, aimed to improve criteria for assessing the motor predisposition of girls in sports gymnastics at the initial stage of training. The studies included 24 gymnasts divided into two age groups: A 6,0-7,5 years of age and B (8,3-13,0. The level of physical fitness was assessed with the use of the EUROFIT battery tests. easurements of the maximum moment of muscle strength in the bending forearm in the elbow joint in terms of isometric contraction were also performed. Assessment f the level of individual strengthspeed and coordination abilities and physical fitness structure including the pace of biological development were the basis for the development of objective criteria for assessing the sports predispositions of young gymnasts at the initial stage of training. Our results provide the basis for improving the control system and optimization of assessment criteria in women gymnastics, including age, training experience and sports level. The results presented in this paper demonstrated the usefulness of the research methodology used to assess the physical fitness and predispositions of gymnasts at the initial stage of training, what enables individualization of training process.

  15. Age-dependent Mendelian predisposition to herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Laurent; Plancoulaine, Sabine; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Mahfoufi, Nora; Nicolas, Nathalie; Sancho-Shimizu, Vanessa; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Guo, Yiqi; Cardon, Annabelle; Boucherit, Soraya; Obach, Dorothée; Clozel, Thomas; Lorenzo, Lazaro; Amsallem, Daniel; Berquin, Patrick; Blanc, Thierry; Bost-Bru, Cécile; Chabrier, Stéphane; Chabrol, Brigitte; Cheuret, Emmanuel; Dulac, Olivier; Evrard, Philippe; Héron, Bénédicte; Lazaro, Leila; Mancini, Josette; Pedespan, Jean-Michel; Rivier, François; Vallée, Louis; Lebon, Pierre; Rozenberg, Flore; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Tardieu, Marc

    2010-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that predisposition to childhood herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 encephalitis (HSE) may be determined in part by human genetic factors. A genetic epidemiologic survey of childhood HSE (onset at age 3 months to 15 years) over a 20-year period (1985-2004) was conducted throughout France (comprising 29 university hospital neuropediatric centers). A total of 85 children fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for inclusion. Family and personal histories were obtained by face-to-face interview for 51 patients. No familial cases of HSE were identified in our survey; however, a high proportion (20%) of the children interviewed had a relevant family history: parental consanguinity (12% of patients), early-onset herpetic keratitis in a first-degree relative (6%), or both (2%). The narrow window of high susceptibility to HSE before age 3 years (62% of patients) further indicates that predisposition to HSE is tightly age-dependent. This survey suggests that childhood HSE, although sporadic, may result from Mendelian predisposition (from autosomal recessive susceptibility in particular), at least in some children. There likely is incomplete penetrance, however, which may reflect, at least in part, the impact of age at the time of HSV-1 infection. Copyright (c) 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Diabetes genetic predisposition score and cardiovascular complications among patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qibin; Meigs, James B; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Hu, Frank B; Qi, Lu

    2013-03-01

    To examine the association between genetic predisposition to type 2 diabetes (T2D) and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) among patients with T2D. The current study included 1,012 men and 1,310 women with T2D from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses' Health Study, including 677 patients with CVD and 1,645 non-CVD control subjects. A genetic predisposition score (GPS) was calculated on the basis of 36 established independent diabetes-predisposing variants. Each additional diabetes-risk allele in the GPS was associated with a 3% increased risk of CVD (odds ratio [OR] 1.03 [95% CI 1.00-1.06]). The OR was 1.47 (1.11-1.95) for CVD risk by comparing extreme quartiles of the GPS (P for trend = 0.01). We also found that the GPS was positively associated with hemoglobin A(1c) levels (P = 0.009). Genetic predisposition to T2D is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular complications in patients with T2D.

  17. Childhood neuroendocrine tumours: a descriptive study revealing clues for genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diets, I J; Nagtegaal, I D; Loeffen, J; de Blaauw, I; Waanders, E; Hoogerbrugge, N; Jongmans, M C J

    2017-01-17

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are rare in children and limited data are available. We aimed to specify tumour and patient characteristics and to investigate the role of genetic predisposition in the aetiology of paediatric NETs. Using the Dutch Pathology Registry PALGA, we collected patient- and tumour data of paediatric NETs in the Netherlands between 1991 and 2013 (N=483). The incidence of paediatric NETs in the Netherlands is 5.40 per one million per year. The majority of NETs were appendiceal tumours (N=441;91.3%). Additional surgery in appendiceal NETs was indicated in 89 patients, but performed in only 27 of these patients. Four out of five patients with pancreatic NETs were diagnosed with Von Hippel-Lindau disease (N=2) and Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (N=2). In one patient with an appendiceal NET Familial Adenomatous Polyposis was diagnosed. On the basis of second primary tumours or other additional diagnoses, involvement of genetic predisposition was suggestive in several others. We identified a significant number of patients with a confirmed or suspected tumour predisposition syndrome and show that paediatric pancreatic NETs in particular are associated with genetic syndromes. In addition, we conclude that treatment guidelines for appendiceal paediatric NETs need revision and improved implementation.

  18. Genetic Predisposition to Central Obesity and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: Two Independent Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Qi, Qibin; Zheng, Yan; Ley, Sylvia H; Manson, JoAnn E; Hu, Frank B; Qi, Lu

    2015-07-01

    Abdominal obesity is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D). We aimed to examine the association between the genetic predisposition to central obesity, assessed by the waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) genetic score, and T2D risk. The current study included 2,591 participants with T2D and 3,052 participants without T2D of European ancestry from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS). Genetic predisposition to central obesity was estimated using a genetic score based on 14 established loci for the WHR. We found that the central obesity genetic score was linearly related to higher T2D risk. Results were similar in the NHS (women) and HPFS (men). In combined results, each point of the central obesity genetic score was associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.04 (95% CI 1.01-1.07) for developing T2D, and the OR was 1.24 (1.03-1.45) when comparing extreme quartiles of the genetic score after multivariate adjustment. The data indicate that genetic predisposition to central obesity is associated with higher T2D risk. This association is mediated by central obesity. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  19. Genetic predisposition to dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes risk in two prospective cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qibin; Liang, Liming; Doria, Alessandro; Hu, Frank B; Qi, Lu

    2012-03-01

    Dyslipidemia has been associated with type 2 diabetes, but it remains unclear whether dyslipidemia plays a causal role in type 2 diabetes. We aimed to examine the association between the genetic predisposition to dyslipdemia and type 2 diabetes risk. The current study included 2,447 patients with type 2 diabetes and 3,052 control participants of European ancestry from the Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Genetic predisposition to dyslipidemia was estimated by three genotype scores of lipids (LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides) on the basis of the established loci for blood lipids. Linear relation analysis indicated that the HDL cholesterol and triglyceride genotype scores, but not the LDL cholesterol genotype score, were linearly related to elevated type 2 diabetes risk. Each point of the HDL cholesterol and triglyceride genotype scores was associated with a 3% (odds ratio [OR] 1.03 [95% CI 1.01-1.04]) and a 2% (1.02 [1.00-1.04]) increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, respectively. The ORs were 1.39 (1.17-1.65) and 1.19 (1.01-1.41) for type 2 diabetes by comparing extreme quartiles of the HDL cholesterol genotype score and triglyceride genotype score, respectively. In conclusion, genetic predisposition to low HDL cholesterol or high triglycerides is related to elevated type 2 diabetes risk.

  20. Cholesterol-Induced Hepatic Inflammation Does Not Underlie the Predisposition to Insulin Resistance in Dyslipidemic Female LDL Receptor Knockout Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruben, Nanda; Funke, Anouk; Kloosterhuis, Niels J.; Schreurs, Marijke; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Havinga, Rick; Houten, Sander M.; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; van de Sluis, Bart; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Koonen, Debby P. Y.; Hofker, Marten H.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is considered a causal risk factor predisposing to insulin resistance. However, evidence is accumulating that inflammation confined to the liver may not be causal to metabolic dysfunction. To investigate this, we assessed if hepatic inflammation explains the predisposition

  1. Comparative phenotypic and cytochemical characteristics of lymphocytes of Wistar rats and rats with genetic predisposition to catalepsy after retabolil administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteleeva, N G; Shurlygina, A V; Trufakin, V A

    2013-11-01

    We studied the possibility of using anabolic steroid retabolil injections for complex correction of behavioral and immune parameters in rats with genetic predisposition to catalepsy. Subpopulation composition of lymphoid organ and blood cells was compared in rats with genetic predisposition to catalepsy and Wistar rats after retabolil administration. In rats predisposed to catalepsy, retabolil reduced the total content of thymus cells and increased absolute count of CD8 (+) thymocytes. In Wistar rats, retabolil increased the total cell count and the content of CD4 (+) thymocytes, but reduced the number of CD8 (+) cells. Therefore, changes in the subpopulation composition of thymus cells after retabolil administration were opposite in rats with genetic predisposition to catalepsy and Wistar rats. Retabolil injections reduced the severity of catalepsy response in rats with genetic predisposition. However, the time of freezing in Wistar rats significantly increased under these conditions.

  2. Habit versus planned behaviour: a field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplanken, B; Aarts, H; van Knippenberg, A; Moonen, A

    1998-03-01

    A field experiment investigated the prediction and change in repeated behaviour in the domain of travel mode choices. Car use during seven days was predicted from habit strength (measured by self-reported frequency of past behaviour, as well as by a more covert measure based on personal scripts incorporating the behaviour), and antecedents of behaviour as conceptualized in the theory of planned behaviour (attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control and behavioural intention). Both habit measures predicted behaviour in addition to intention and perceived control. Significant habit x intention interactions indicated that intentions were only significantly related to behaviour when habit was weak, whereas no intention-behaviour relation existed when habit was strong. During the seven-day registration of behaviour, half of the respondents were asked to think about the circumstances under which the behaviour was executed. Compared to control participants, the behaviour of experimental participants was more strongly related to their previously expressed intentions. However, the habit-behaviour relation was unaffected. The results demonstrate that, although external incentives may increase the enactment of intentions, habits set boundary conditions for the applicability of the theory of planned behaviour.

  3. Interaction between genetic predisposition to obesity and dietary calcium in relation to subsequent change in body weight and waist circumference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sofus C; Angquist, Lars; Ahluwalia, Tarun Veer Singh

    2014-01-01

    Studies indicate an effect of dietary calcium on change in body weight (BW) and waist circumference (WC), but the results are inconsistent. Furthermore, a relation could depend on genetic predisposition to obesity.......Studies indicate an effect of dietary calcium on change in body weight (BW) and waist circumference (WC), but the results are inconsistent. Furthermore, a relation could depend on genetic predisposition to obesity....

  4. Emergent Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, H.A.P.; Everdij, M.H.C.; Bouarfa, S.; Cook, A; Rivas, D

    2016-01-01

    In complexity science a property or behaviour of a system is called emergent if it is not a property or behaviour of the constituting elements of the system, though results from the interactions between its constituting elements. In the socio-technical air transportation system these interactions

  5. Crack Behaviour in Laminar Ceramics with Strong Interfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Náhlík, Luboš; Šestáková, Lucie; Hutař, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 417-418, - (2010), s. 301-304 ISSN 1013-9826 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB200410803; GA ČR GA106/09/0279 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : ceramic laminate * crack propagation direction * residual stress * flaw tolerant ceramic Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  6. Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-03

    Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators In the past year, the grant was used for work in the field of topological phases, with emphasis on finding...surface of topological insulators. In the past 3 years, we have started a new direction, that of fractional topological insulators. These are materials...in which a topologically nontrivial quasi-flat band is fractionally filled and then subject to strong interactions. The views, opinions and/or

  7. Strong Cosmic Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, James

    2017-01-01

    The Hawking-Penrose theorems tell us that solutions of Einstein's equations are generally singular, in the sense of the incompleteness of causal geodesics (the paths of physical observers). These singularities might be marked by the blowup of curvature and therefore crushing tidal forces, or by the breakdown of physical determinism. Penrose has conjectured (in his `Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture`) that it is generically unbounded curvature that causes singularities, rather than causal breakdown. The verification that ``AVTD behavior'' (marked by the domination of time derivatives over space derivatives) is generically present in a family of solutions has proven to be a useful tool for studying model versions of Strong Cosmic Censorship in that family. I discuss some of the history of Strong Cosmic Censorship, and then discuss what is known about AVTD behavior and Strong Cosmic Censorship in families of solutions defined by varying degrees of isometry, and discuss recent results which we believe will extend this knowledge and provide new support for Strong Cosmic Censorship. I also comment on some of the recent work on ``Weak Null Singularities'', and how this relates to Strong Cosmic Censorship.

  8. Individual predisposition, household clustering and risk factors for human infection with Ascaris lumbricoides: new epidemiological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Martin; Hall, Andrew; Basáñez, María-Gloria

    2011-04-26

    Much of our current understanding of the epidemiology of Ascaris lumbricoides infections in humans has been acquired by analyzing worm count data. These data are collected by treating infected individuals with anthelmintics so that worms are expelled intact from the gastrointestinal tract. Analysis of such data established that individuals are predisposed to infection with few or many worms and members of the same household tend to harbor similar numbers of worms. These effects, known respectively as individual predisposition and household clustering, are considered characteristic of the epidemiology of ascariasis. The mechanisms behind these phenomena, however, remain unclear. In particular, the impact of heterogeneous individual exposures to infectious stages has not been thoroughly explored. Bayesian methods were used to fit a three-level hierarchical statistical model to A. lumbricoides worm counts derived from a three-round chemo-expulsion study carried out in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The effects of individual predisposition, household clustering and household covariates of the numbers of worms per host (worm burden) were considered simultaneously. Individual predisposition was found to be of limited epidemiological significance once household clustering had been accounted for. The degree of intra-household variability among worm burdens was found to be reduced by approximately 58% when household covariates were included in the model. Covariates relating to decreased affluence and quality of housing construction were associated with a statistically significant increase in worm burden. Heterogeneities in the exposure of individuals to infectious eggs have an important role in the epidemiology of A. lumbricoides infection. The household covariates identified as being associated with worm burden provide valuable insights into the source of these heterogeneities although above all emphasize and reiterate that infection with A. lumbricoides is inextricably associated

  9. Race and ethnicity as a victimogenic predisposition of exceeding and abuse of police authority

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesić Zoran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The unique position in society and the specific functions make the police one of the key holders of protection of the fundamental rights and freedoms of citizens. At the same time, their position and function provide police officers significant opportunities to violate the same freedoms and rights, by resorting to various forms of violation and abuse of power. This dual nature of the police authority gives us reason to question the police from a completely different angle - as a source of a specific form of victimization. The risk degree of victimization by police authority is determined by the different predispositions, and above all by the victim’s behavior. However, some individual characteristics (gender, age, sexual orientation, ethnic and social origin are also a kind of victimogenic predisposition, as they contribute to the process of victimization independently or in combination with the behavior of the victim. In this work we draw attention to the fact that race (ethnicity often makes an independent criterion which the police use when deciding how to act in the concrete case. This circumstance contributes to a distinctive form of police procedure, known as racial profiling. The fact that the race of a person is taken as a criterion for treatment suggests the conclusion that here is actually about a form of discriminatory behavior. Considered in this context, race may be treated as victimogenic predisposition of police authority, and racial profiling as a process of victimization. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179045: Razvoj institucionalnih kapaciteta, standarda i procedura za suprotstavljanje organizovanom kriminalu i terorizmu u uslovima međunarodnih integracija

  10. Management of women who have a genetic predisposition for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatoi, Ismail; Anderson, William F

    2008-08-01

    The management of women who have a genetic predisposition for breast cancer requires careful planning. Women who have BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations are at increased risk for breast cancer and for other cancers as well, particularly ovarian cancer. Screening, prophlyactic surgery, and chemoprevention are commonly utilized strategies in the management of these patients, and women may choose more than one of these strategies. No randomized prospective trials have assessed the impact of these strategies specifically in mutation carriers. All patients should be informed that screening, prophylactic surgery, and chemoprevention have the potential for harm as well as benefit.

  11. The Effect of Phototherapy on Cancer Predisposition Genes of Diabetic and Normal Human Skin Fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Chotikasemsri, Pongsathorn; Tangtrakulwanich, Boonsin; Sangkhathat, Surasak

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether LED light at different wavelengths affects the expression profile of 143 cancer predisposition genes in both diabetic and normal human fibroblasts. In this study, both diabetic and normal fibroblast cell lines were cultured and irradiated with red (635 nm), green (520 nm), and blue (465 nm) LED light for 10 minutes at 0.67 J/cm2 each. After that, mRNA from all cell lines was extracted for microarray analysis. We found that green light activ...

  12. Germline mutation in the RAD51B gene confers predisposition to breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golmard, Lisa; Nicolas, André; Castéra, Laurent; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Stern, Marc-Henri; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Davy, Grégoire; Al Ageeli, Essam; Poirot, Brigitte; Tirapo, Carole; Michaux, Dorothée; Barbaroux, Catherine; D'Enghien, Catherine Dubois

    2013-01-01

    Most currently known breast cancer predisposition genes play a role in DNA repair by homologous recombination. Recent studies conducted on RAD51 paralogs, involved in the same DNA repair pathway, have identified rare germline mutations conferring breast and/or ovarian cancer predisposition in the RAD51C, RAD51D and XRCC2 genes. The present study analysed the five RAD51 paralogs (RAD51B, RAD51C, RAD51D, XRCC2, XRCC3) to estimate their contribution to breast and ovarian cancer predisposition. The study was conducted on 142 unrelated patients with breast and/or ovarian cancer either with early onset or with a breast/ovarian cancer family history. Patients were referred to a French family cancer clinic and had been previously tested negative for a BRCA1/2 mutation. Coding sequences of the five genes were analysed by EMMA (Enhanced Mismatch Mutation Analysis). Detected variants were characterized by Sanger sequencing analysis. Three splicing mutations and two likely deleterious missense variants were identified: RAD51B c.452 + 3A > G, RAD51C c.706-2A > G, RAD51C c.1026 + 5-1026 + 7del, RAD51B c.475C > T/p.Arg159Cys and XRCC3 c.448C > T/p.Arg150Cys. No RAD51D and XRCC2 gene mutations were detected. These mutations and variants were detected in families with both breast and ovarian cancers, except for the RAD51B c.475C > T/p.Arg159Cys variant that occurred in a family with 3 breast cancer cases. This study identified the first RAD51B mutation in a breast and ovarian cancer family and is the first report of XRCC3 mutation analysis in breast and ovarian cancer. It confirms that RAD51 paralog mutations confer breast and ovarian cancer predisposition and are rare events. In view of the low frequency of RAD51 paralog mutations, international collaboration of family cancer clinics will be required to more accurately estimate their penetrance and establish clinical guidelines in carrier individuals

  13. Myeloid Neoplasms with Germline Predisposition: A New Provisional Entity Within the World Health Organization Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuchlewski, David R; Peterson, LoAnn C

    2016-03-01

    The forthcoming update of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of hematopoietic neoplasms will feature "Myeloid Neoplasms with Germline Predisposition" as a new provisional diagnostic entity. This designation will be applied to some cases of acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome arising in the setting of constitutional mutations that render patients susceptible to the development of myeloid malignancies. For the diagnostic pathologist, recognizing these cases and confirming the diagnosis will demand a sophisticated grasp of clinical genetics and molecular techniques. This article presents a concise review of this new provisional WHO entity, including strategies for clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic screens to identify pathogenic gene variants in the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drost, Mark; Lützen, Anne; van Hees, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    In many individuals suspected of the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome, variants of unclear significance (VUS), rather than an obviously pathogenic mutations, are identified in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. The uncertainty of whether such VUS inactivate MMR, and therefore...... are pathogenic, precludes targeted healthcare for both carriers and their relatives. To facilitate the identification of pathogenic VUS, we have developed an in cellulo genetic screen-based procedure for the large-scale mutagenization, identification, and cataloging of residues of MMR genes critical for MMR gene...

  15. Bone sarcoma as a second malignant neoplasm in children: influence of radiation and genetic predisposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadows, A.T.; Strong, L.C.; Li, F.P.; D'angio, G.J.; Schweisguth, O.; Freeman, A.I.; Jenkin, R.D.T.; Morris-Jones, P.; Nesbit, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    Osteosarcoma or chondrosarcoma developed as a second malignant neoplasm (SMN) in 40 of 188 individuals with SMN whose first neoplasm occurred in childhood. A genetic susceptibility to cancer was found in 23; the SMN developed in an irradiated field in 32; both factors were present in 16; neither in one. When a genetic predisposition was present, radiation shortened the interval to SMN. The intervals between tumors and the age at which the bone sarcomas developed in relation to genetic disease and therapy were analyzed by a two-mutation hypothesis

  16. Significance of genetic predisposition and genomic instability for individual sensitivity to radiation. Implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, H.

    2001-01-01

    At its closed-door meeting on 20/21 January 2000 the Radiation Protection Committee dedicated much of its attention to the significance of genetic predisposition and genetic instability for individual radiation sensitivity and to the implication of this for radiation protection. The statements and contributions to the closing plenary discussion touched on many aspects of ethics, personal rights, occupational medicine and insurance issues relating to this subject, all of which extend far beyond the purely technical issues of radiation protection. The present volume contains the lecture manuscripts of the meeting as well as a summarising assessment by the Radiation Protection Committee [de

  17. Genetic Predisposition and Cellular Basis for Ischemia-induced ST Segment Changes and Arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dan; Viskin, Sami; Oliva, Antonio; Cordeiro, Jonathan M.; Guerchicoff, Alejandra; Pollevick, Guido D.; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Recent reports have highlighted the importance of a family history of sudden death as a risk for ventricular fibrillation in patients experiencing an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), pointing to the possibility of a genetic predisposition. This report briefly reviews two recent studies designed to examine the hypothesis that there is a genetic predisposition to the development of arrhythmias associated with AMI. Ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation (VT/VF) complicating AMI as well as the arrhythmias associated with Brugada syndrome, a genetic disorder linked to SCN5A mutations, have both been linked to phase 2 reentry. Because of these mechanistic similarities in arrhythmogenesis, we examined the contribution of SCN5A mutations to VT/VF complicating AMI in patients developing VF during AMI. A missense mutation in SCN5A was found in a patient who developed an arrhythmic electrical storm during an evolving MI. All VT/VF episodes were associated with ST segment changes and were initiated by short-coupled extrasystoles. The G400A mutation and a H558R polymorphism were on the same allele and functional expression in TSA201 demonstrated a loss of function of sodium channel activity. These results suggest that a subclinical mutation in SCN5A resulting in a loss of function may predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias during acute ischemia. In another cohort of patients who developed long QT intervals and Torsade de Pointes (TdP) arrhythmias in days 2–11 following an AMI, a genetic screen of all long QT genes was performed. Six of eight patients (75%) in this group displayed the same polymorphism in KCNH2, which encodes the α subunit of the rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium current, IKr. The K897T polymorphism was detected in only 3 of 14 patients with uncomplicated myocardial infarction (MI) and has been detected in 33% of the Caucasian population. Expression of this polymorphism has previously been shown to cause a loss of function in HERG current

  18. Strong Arcwise Connectedness

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza, Benjamin; Gartside, Paul; Kovan-Bakan, Merve; Mamatelashvili, Ana

    2012-01-01

    A space is `n-strong arc connected' (n-sac) if for any n points in the space there is an arc in the space visiting them in order. A space is omega-strong arc connected (omega-sac) if it is n-sac for all n. We study these properties in finite graphs, regular continua, and rational continua. There are no 4-sac graphs, but there are 3-sac graphs and graphs which are 2-sac but not 3-sac. For every n there is an n-sac regular continuum, but no regular continuum is omega-sac. There is an omega-sac ...

  19. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally......'s scenarios have some valuable future or admitted that killing them is not seriously morally wrong. Finally, if "valuable future" is interpreted as referring to objective standards, one ends up with implausible and unpalatable moral claims....

  20. Being at risk for cardiovascular disease: perceptions and preventive behavior in people with and without a known genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, L; Henneman, L; van der Weijden, T; Marteau, T M; Timmermans, D R M

    2012-01-01

    This study compares and explains differences in perceptions of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and preventive behaviors in people with and without a known genetic predisposition to CVD. A cross-sectional study using two samples was performed. The first sample (genetic predisposition; n = 51) consisted of individuals recently diagnosed with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) through DNA testing. The second sample (no genetic predisposition; n = 49) was recruited among patients with CVD-risk profiles based on family history of CVD, cholesterol levels, and blood pressure, registered at general practices. Participants filled out a postal questionnaire asking about their perceived risk, causal attributions (i.e. genetic and lifestyle), and about perceived efficacy and adoption of preventive behavior (i.e. medication adherence and adoption of a healthy diet and being sufficiently active). Perceived comparative risk, genetic attributions of CVD, and perceived efficacy of medication were higher in the "genetic predisposition" sample than in the "no genetic predisposition" sample. The samples did not differ on lifestyle attributions, efficacy of a healthy lifestyle, or preventive behavior. Individual differences in perceived risk, genetic attributions, perceived efficacy of medication, and adoption of a healthy lifestyle were best explained by family history of CVD. Our findings suggest that in people diagnosed with a single gene disorder characterized by a family disease history such as FH, family disease history may be more important than DNA information in explaining perceptions of and responses to risk.

  1. Genetic predisposition to high blood pressure associates with cardiovascular complications among patients with type 2 diabetes: two independent studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qibin; Forman, John P; Jensen, Majken K; Flint, Alan; Curhan, Gary C; Rimm, Eric B; Hu, Frank B; Qi, Lu

    2012-11-01

    Hypertension and type 2 diabetes (T2D) commonly coexist, and both conditions are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We aimed to examine the association between genetic predisposition to high blood pressure and risk of CVD in individuals with T2D. The current study included 1,005 men and 1,299 women with T2D from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses' Health Study, of whom 732 developed CVD. A genetic predisposition score was calculated on the basis of 29 established blood pressure-associated variants. The genetic predisposition score showed consistent associations with risk of CVD in men and women. In the combined results, each additional blood pressure-increasing allele was associated with a 6% increased risk of CVD (odds ratio [OR] 1.06 [95% CI 1.03-1.10]). The OR was 1.62 (1.22-2.14) for risk of CVD comparing the extreme quartiles of the genetic predisposition score. The genetic association for CVD risk was significantly stronger in patients with T2D than that estimated in the general populations by a meta-analysis (OR per SD of genetic score 1.22 [95% CI 1.10-1.35] vs. 1.10 [1.08-1.12]; I² = 71%). Our data indicate that genetic predisposition to high blood pressure is associated with an increased risk of CVD in individuals with T2D.

  2. A strong comeback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marier, D.

    1992-01-01

    This article presents the results of a financial rankings survey which show a strong economic activity in the independent energy industry. The topics of the article include advisor turnover, overseas banks, and the increase in public offerings. The article identifies the top project finance investors for new projects and restructurings and rankings for lenders

  3. Environmental effect and genetic influence: a regional cancer predisposition survey in the Zonguldak region of Northwest Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Selahattin; Önen-Hall, A. Piril; Aydin, S. Nihal; Yakicier, Cengiz; Akarsu, Nurten; Tuncer, Murat

    2008-03-01

    The Cretaceous-Eocene volcano-sedimentary units of the Zonguldak region of the western Black Sea consist of subalkaline andesite and tuff, and sandstone dominated by smectite, kaolinite, accessory chlorite, illite, mordenite, and analcime associated with feldspar, quartz, opal-CT, amphibole, and calcite. Kaolinization, chloritization, sericitization, albitization, Fe-Ti-oxidation, and the presence of zeolite, epidote, and illite in andesitic rocks and tuffaceous materials developed as a result of the degradation of a glass shards matrix, enclosed feldspar, and clinopyroxene-type phenocrysts, due to alteration processes. The association of feldspar and glass with smectite and kaolinite, and the suborientation of feldspar-edged, subparallel kaolinite plates to fracture axes may exhibit an authigenic smectite or kaolinite. Increased alteration degree upward in which Al, Fe, and Ti are gained, and Si, Na, K, and Ca are depleted, is due to the alteration following possible diagenesis and hydrothermal activities. Micromorphologically, fibrous mordenite in the altered units and the presence of needle-type chrysotile in the residential buildings in which cancer cases lived were detected. In addition, the segregation pattern of cancer susceptibility in the region strongly suggested an environmental effect and a genetic influence on the increased cancer incidence in the region. The most likely diagnosis was Li-Fraumeni syndrome, which is one of the hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes; however, no mutations were observed in the p53 gene, which is the major cause of Li-Fraumeni syndrome. The micromorphology observed in the altered units in which cancer cases were detected may have a role in the expression of an unidentified gene, but does not explain alone the occurrence of cancer as a primary cause in the region.

  4. Genetic predisposition to higher body mass index or type 2 diabetes and leukocyte telomere length in the Nurses' Health Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng Du

    Full Text Available Although cross-sectional studies have linked higher body mass index (BMI and type 2 diabetes (T2D to shortened telomeres, whether these metabolic conditions play a causal role in telomere biology is unknown. We therefore examined whether genetic predisposition to higher BMI or T2D was associated with shortened leukocyte telomere length (LTL.We conducted an analysis of 3,968 women of European ancestry aged 43-70 years from the Nurses' Health Study, who were selected as cases or controls in genome-wide association studies and studies of telomeres and disease. Pre-diagnostic relative telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes, collected in 1989-1990, was measured by quantitative PCR. We combined information from multiple risk variants by calculating genetic risk scores based on 32 polymorphisms near 32 loci for BMI, and 36 polymorphisms near 35 loci for T2D.After adjustment for age and case-control status, there was no association between the BMI genetic risk score and LTL (β per standard deviation increase: -0.01; SE: 0.02; P = 0.52. Similarly, the T2D genetic score was not associated with LTL (β per standard deviation increase: -0.006; SE: 0.02; P = 0.69.In this population of middle-aged and older women of European ancestry, those genetically predisposed to higher BMI or T2D did not possess shortened telomeres. Although we cannot exclude weak or modest effects, our findings do not support a causal relation of strong magnitude between these metabolic conditions and telomere dynamics.

  5. Prostate-specific antigen velocity in a prospective prostate cancer screening study of men with genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikropoulos, Christos; Selkirk, Christina G Hutten; Saya, Sibel; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Vertosick, Emily; Dadaev, Tokhir; Brendler, Charles; Page, Elizabeth; Dias, Alexander; Evans, D Gareth; Rothwell, Jeanette; Maehle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Richardson, Kate; Eccles, Diana; Jensen, Thomas; Osther, Palle J; van Asperen, Christi J; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Hart, Rachel; Glover, Wayne; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Salinas, Monica; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J; Buys, Saundra S; Conner, Tom; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Ausems, Margreet Gem; Teixeira, Manuel R; Maia, Sofia; Izatt, Louise; Schmutzler, Rita; Rhiem, Kerstin; Foulkes, William D; Boshari, Talia; Davidson, Rosemarie; Ruijs, Marielle; Helderman-van den Enden, Apollonia Tjm; Andrews, Lesley; Walker, Lisa; Snape, Katie; Henderson, Alex; Jobson, Irene; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Liljegren, Annelie; Harris, Marion; Adank, Muriel A; Kirk, Judy; Taylor, Amy; Susman, Rachel; Chen-Shtoyerman, Rakefet; Pachter, Nicholas; Spigelman, Allan; Side, Lucy; Zgajnar, Janez; Mora, Josefina; Brewer, Carole; Gadea, Neus; Brady, Angela F; Gallagher, David; van Os, Theo; Donaldson, Alan; Stefansdottir, Vigdis; Barwell, Julian; James, Paul A; Murphy, Declan; Friedman, Eitan; Nicolai, Nicola; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Obeid, Elias; Murthy, Vedang; Copakova, Lucia; McGrath, John; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Strom, Sara; Kast, Karin; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Chamberlain, Anthony; Pope, Jenny; Newlin, Anna C; Aaronson, Neil; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Bangma, Chris; Castro, Elena; Dearnaley, David; Eyfjord, Jorunn; Falconer, Alison; Foster, Christopher S; Gronberg, Henrik; Hamdy, Freddie C; Johannsson, Oskar; Khoo, Vincent; Lubinski, Jan; Grindedal, Eli Marie; McKinley, Joanne; Shackleton, Kylie; Mitra, Anita V; Moynihan, Clare; Rennert, Gad; Suri, Mohnish; Tricker, Karen; Moss, Sue; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Vickers, Andrew; Lilja, Hans; Helfand, Brian T; Eeles, Rosalind A

    2018-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and PSA-velocity (PSAV) have been used to identify men at risk of prostate cancer (PrCa). The IMPACT study is evaluating PSA screening in men with a known genetic predisposition to PrCa due to BRCA1/2 mutations. This analysis evaluates the utility of PSA and PSAV for identifying PrCa and high-grade disease in this cohort. PSAV was calculated using logistic regression to determine if PSA or PSAV predicted the result of prostate biopsy (PB) in men with elevated PSA values. Cox regression was used to determine whether PSA or PSAV predicted PSA elevation in men with low PSAs. Interaction terms were included in the models to determine whether BRCA status influenced the predictiveness of PSA or PSAV. 1634 participants had ⩾3 PSA readings of whom 174 underwent PB and 45 PrCas diagnosed. In men with PSA >3.0 ng ml -l , PSAV was not significantly associated with presence of cancer or high-grade disease. PSAV did not add to PSA for predicting time to an elevated PSA. When comparing BRCA1/2 carriers to non-carriers, we found a significant interaction between BRCA status and last PSA before biopsy (P=0.031) and BRCA2 status and PSAV (P=0.024). However, PSAV was not predictive of biopsy outcome in BRCA2 carriers. PSA is more strongly predictive of PrCa in BRCA carriers than non-carriers. We did not find evidence that PSAV aids decision-making for BRCA carriers over absolute PSA value alone.

  6. [Predisposition of citizens to use Internet-based channels to communicate with doctors in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Usagre, Manuel; Reyes-Alcázar, Víctor; Valverde, José A

    2014-01-01

    Analyze factors affecting the predisposition of Spanish citizens to use Internet-based communication channels (E-mail, blogs, social networks, and online recommendations). Secondary data were analyzed by applying a boosted regression tree (BRT) to the results obtained from the survey "Use and Applications of Information and Communications Technology in Health," administered to a representative sample of the Spanish population between 16 and 85 years of age who use the Internet. Model forecasts achieved different degrees of precision for each of the communication channels: for E-mail, AUC (area under the curve) = 0.79; for the physician's blog or personal website, AUC = 0.736; for social networks, AUC = 0.73; for recommendations of websites related to health problems, AUC = 0.768. Being young was the most important parameter in citizen predisposition to communicate through social networks (relative influence; RI = 21.05%), while population density was the most important parameter in likelihood that the physician would have a blog or personal health-related website (RI = 19.48%). Having a positive perception of the technology when facilitating health-related transactions was the most important characteristic in wanting to receive recommendations on health-related Internet resources (RI = 18.66%), while having a higher level of education was the best predictor of wanting to establish E-mail communication (RI = 18.98%). Many of Spanish people are open to using physician-patient interaction channels on the Internet.

  7. The Role of Social Factors in Iranian University Students' Predispositions towards Autonomous Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Kashefian Naeeini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet the demands of the changing world, students should become endowed with the ability to learn perpetually and regard learning as a life-long enterprise. This study investigated those learners belief which showed learners’ predispositions toward autonomy  and some social factors such as gender, academic achievement, marital status and age were taken into consideration. All BA and MA students majoring in English Literature at the department of Foreign Languages of Shiraz University of Iran were involved. The data were collected through a questionnaire the items of which were obtained from two questionnaires by Cotterall (1995 and Cotterall (1999 which were incorporated into a five-point Likert-type rating scale. Factor analysis of responses of students revealed the existence of five underlying factors for learner autonomy which were learner independence, dependence on the teacher, learner confidence, attitudes towards language learning and self-assessment. Based on t-test for independent samples and Analysis of Variance it came to light that age and gender did not have impact on students’ readiness for autonomy while martial statues influenced students’  self-assessment. Moreover, good academic achievement positively influenced their predispositions towards autonomous language learning.

  8. NAT2 polymorphism in Omani gastric cancer patients-risk predisposition and clinicopathological associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Moundhri, Mansour S; Al-Kindi, Mohamed; Al-Nabhani, Maryam; Al-Bahrani, Bassim; Burney, Ikram A; Al-Madhani, Ali; Ganguly, Shyam S; Tanira, Misbah

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study whether N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) genotypes and phenotypes are associated with increased risk factor for gastric cancer in Omani patients and to study the clinico-pathological correlations and the prognostic significance of NAT2. METHODS: Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 100 gastric cancer patients and 100 control subjects. NAT2 genotyping was performed using DNA sequencing. The prognostic significance of NAT2 and other clinicopathological features was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: We observed no significant association between NAT2 genotypes and phenotypes and gastric cancer risk. The NAT2 phenotype polymorphisms and gastric cancer risk predisposition were not modified by concomitant H pylori infection and smoking. There was no significant association between NAT2 and clinicopathological features, and NAT2 had no independent prognostic significance. CONCLUSION: In the current study, NAT2 genotypes and phenotypes are not associated with gastric cancer risk predisposition. Moreover NAT2 phenotypes had no clinicopathological associations or prognostic significance. PMID:17569138

  9. Impaired mucociliary clearance in allergic rhinitis patients is related to a predisposition to rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Ioannis; Athanasopoulos, Ioannis; Mastronikolis, Nicholas S; Panogeorgou, Theodora; Margaritis, Vassilios; Naxakis, Stefanos; Goumas, Panos D

    2009-04-01

    Although mucociliary clearance has been shown to be impaired in patients with allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis, its exact role in relation to a predisposition to rhinosinusitis is unknown. To investigate this possible association, we conducted a prospective study of 125 patients with allergic rhinitis. Of this group, 23 patients were classified as being sinusitis-prone based on their history of antibiotic consumption for the treatment of rhinosinusitis; the remaining 102 patients were deemed to be not sinusitis-prone. The saccharine test was used to evaluate mucociliary clearance in all patients. Several variables-age, sex, smoking habits, rhinitis severity, and medication history-were examined. We found that the sinusitis-prone patients had a significantly greater mucociliary clearance time than did those who were not prone (median: 15 and 12 min, respectively; p = 0.02). No other statistically significant differences were seen between the 2 groups with respect to any other variables that might have affected mucociliary clearance. We conclude that impaired mucociliary clearance in allergic rhinitis patients is associated with a predisposition to rhinosinusitis.

  10. Unraveling genetic predisposition to familial or early onset gastric cancer using germline whole-exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelaar, Ingrid P; van der Post, Rachel S; van Krieken, J Han Jm; Spruijt, Liesbeth; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy Ag; Kets, C Marleen; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Teodorczyk, Urszula; Aalfs, Cora M; van Hest, Liselotte P; Pinheiro, Hugo; Oliveira, Carla; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; de Ligt, Joep; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Hoischen, Alexander; Gilissen, Christian; van de Vorst, Maartje; Goeman, Jelle J; Schackert, Hans K; Ranzani, Guglielmina N; Molinaro, Valeria; Gómez García, Encarna B; Hes, Frederik J; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Genuardi, Maurizio; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Sijmons, Rolf H; Wagner, Anja; van der Kolk, Lizet E; Bjørnevoll, Inga; Høberg-Vetti, Hildegunn; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Kuiper, Roland P; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2017-11-01

    Recognition of individuals with a genetic predisposition to gastric cancer (GC) enables preventive measures. However, the underlying cause of genetic susceptibility to gastric cancer remains largely unexplained. We performed germline whole-exome sequencing on leukocyte DNA of 54 patients from 53 families with genetically unexplained diffuse-type and intestinal-type GC to identify novel GC-predisposing candidate genes. As young age at diagnosis and familial clustering are hallmarks of genetic tumor susceptibility, we selected patients that were diagnosed below the age of 35, patients from families with two cases of GC at or below age 60 and patients from families with three GC cases at or below age 70. All included individuals were tested negative for germline CDH1 mutations before or during the study. Variants that were possibly deleterious according to in silico predictions were filtered using several independent approaches that were based on gene function and gene mutation burden in controls. Despite a rigorous search, no obvious candidate GC predisposition genes were identified. This negative result stresses the importance of future research studies in large, homogeneous cohorts.

  11. Is there a genetic predisposition to new-onset diabetes after kidney transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Yogesh N V; Abraham, Georgi; Sundaram, Varun; Reddy, Pooja P; Mathew, Milly; Nagarajan, Prethivee; Mehra, Nikita; Ramachandran, A; Ali, Asik Ali Mohammed; Reddy, Yuvaram N V

    2015-11-01

    Kidney transplant recipients may develop new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) and transplant-associated hyperglycemia (TAH) (NODAT or new-onset impaired glucose tolerance-IGT). We studied 251 consecutive renal transplant South Asian recipients for incidence of NODAT and its risk factors between June 2004 and January 2009. Pre-transplant glucose tolerance test (GTT) identified non-diabetics (n = 102, IGT-24, NGT-78) for analysis. Baseline immunosuppression along with either cyclosporine (CsA) (n = 70) or tacrolimus (Tac) (n = 32) was given. Patients underwent GTT 20 days (mean) post-transplant to identify NODAT, normal (N) or IGT. TAH was observed in 40.2% of the patients (40% in CsA and 40.6% in Tac) (P = 0.5). NODAT developed in 13.7% of the patients (12.9% in CsA and 15.6% in Tac) (P = 0.5). Overall, Hepatitis C (P = 0.007), human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B52 (P = 0.03) and lack of HLA A28 (A68/69) (P = 0.03) were associated with TAH. In the Tac group, higher Day 1 dosage (P genetic predisposition to NODAT and TAH in South Asia as seen by the HLA associations, and a predisposition exists to the individual diabetogenic effects of Tac and CsA based on HLA type. This could lead to more careful selection of calcineurin inhibitors based on HLA types in the South Asian population.

  12. Genetic predisposition, dietary restraint and disinhibition in relation to short and long-term weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, Sanne P M; Camps, Stefan G J A; Bouwman, Freek G; Mariman, Edwin C M; Westerterp, Klaas R

    2014-04-10

    Interindividual differences in response to weight loss and maintenance thereafter are ascribed to genetic predisposition and behavioral changes. To examine whether body weight and short and long-term body weight loss were affected by candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and changes in eating behavior or by an interaction between these genetic and behavioral factors. 150 healthy subjects (39 males, 111 females) aged 20-50 y with a BMI of 27-38 kg/m(2) followed a very low energy diet for 8-weeks, followed by a 3-month weight maintenance period. SNPs were selected from six candidate genes: ADRB2, FTO, MC4R, PPARG, PPARD, and PPARGC1A. Changes in eating behavior were determined with the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire. A high genetic predisposition score was associated with a high body weight at baseline and more short-term weight loss. From the six selected obesity-related SNPs, FTO was associated with increased body weight at baseline, and the effect allele of PPARGC1A was positively associated with short-term weight loss, when assessed for each SNP separately. Long-term weight loss was associated with a larger increase in dietary restraint and larger decrease in disinhibition. During long-term weight loss, genetic effects are dominated by changes in eating behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Familiality analysis of provoked vestibulodynia treated by vestibulectomy supports genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Terry K; Allen-Brady, Kristina L; Monson, Martha A; Leclair, Catherine M; Sharp, Howard T; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A

    2016-05-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia is a poorly understood disease that affects 8-15% of women in their lifetime. There is significant inflammation and nerve growth in vestibular biopsies from affected women treated by vestibulectomy compared with matched female population controls without vestibulodynia. The triggers leading to this neurogenic inflammation are unknown, but they are likely multifactorial. Our objective was to determine whether vestibulodynia is more common in close and distantly related female relatives of women diagnosed with the disease and those specifically treated by vestibulectomy. Excess familial clustering would support a potential genetic predisposition for vestibulodynia and warrant further studies to isolate risk alleles. Using population-based genealogy linked to University of Utah Hospital CPT coded data, we estimated the relative risk of vestibulectomy in female relatives of affected women. We also compared the average pairwise relatedness of cases to the expected relatedness of the population and identified high-disease-burden pedigrees. A total of 183 potential vestibulectomy probands were identified using CPT codes. The relative risk of vestibulectomy was elevated in first-degree (20 [6.6-47], P genetic predisposition. Future studies will identify candidate genes by linkage analysis in affected families and sequencing of distantly related probands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Association between pepsinogen C gene polymorphism and genetic predisposition to gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui-Jie; Guo, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Ming; Wang, Lan; Yuan, Yuan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To identify a molecular marker for gastric cancer, and to investigate the relationship between the polymorphism of pepsinogen C (PGC) gene and the genetic predisposition to gastric cancer. METHODS: A total of 289 cases were involved in this study. 115 cases came from Shenyang area, a low risk area of gastric cancer, including 42 unrelated controls and 73 patients with gastric cancer. 174 cases came from Zhuanghe area, a high-risk area of gastric cancer, including 113 unrelated controls, and 61 cases from gastric cancer kindred families. The polymorphism of PGC gene was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the relation between the genetic polymorphism of PGC and gastric cancer was examined. RESULTS: Four alleles, 310 bp (allele 1), 400 bp (allele 2), 450 bp (allele 3), and 480 bp (allele 4) were detected by PCR. The frequency of allele 1 was higher in patients with gastric cancer than that in controls. Genotypes containing homogenous allele 1 were significantly more frequent in patients with gastric cancer than that in controls (0.33, 0.14, χ2 = 3.86, P genetic predisposition to gastric cancer. The distribution of pepsinogen C gene polymorphism in Zhuanghe, a high-risk area of gastric cancer, is different from that in Shenyang, a low risk area of gastric cancer. PMID:12508350

  15. Cerebral small vessel disease in middle age and genetic predisposition to late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, James D; Su, Li; Mak, Elijah; Sheikh-Bahaei, Nasim; Wells, Katie; Ritchie, Karen; Waldman, Adam; Ritchie, Craig W; O'Brien, John T

    2018-02-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) and might contribute to the relationship between apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE ε4) and LOAD, in older people. However, it is unclear whether CSVD begins in middle age in individuals genetically predisposed to LOAD. We assessed the relationship between radiological markers of CSVD, white matter hyperintensities and microbleeds, and genetic predisposition to LOAD in a cross-sectional analysis of cognitively normal subjects aged 40-59 years recruited from the PREVENT Dementia study. Microbleed prevalence was 14.5%, and mean ± standard deviation white matter hyperintensity percentage of total brain volume was 0.41 ± 0.28%. There was no significant association between APOE ε4 carrier status or history of parental dementia and white matter hyperintensity volume (P = .713, .912 respectively) or microbleeds (P = .082, .562 respectively) on multiple regression. Genetic predisposition to LOAD, through APOE genotype or AD family history, is not associated with CSVD in middle age. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic predisposition to endocrine tumors: Diagnosis, surveillance and challenges in care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petr, Elisabeth Joye; Else, Tobias

    2016-10-01

    Endocrine tumor syndromes, eg, multiple endocrine neoplasia types 1 and 2, were among the first recognized hereditary predisposition syndromes to tumor development. Over time, the number of endocrine tumor syndromes has significantly expanded, eg, with the recent inclusion of hereditary paraganglioma syndromes. Associations of non-endocrine tumors with hereditary endocrine tumor syndromes and endocrine tumors with non-classical endocrine tumor syndromes have emerged. These findings have certainly expanded the scope of care, necessitating a multidisciplinary approach by a team of medical professionals and researchers, integrating shared patient decision-making at every step of surveillance, diagnosis, and treatment. In the absence of evidence-based guidelines, multiple aspects of patient care remain individualized, based on a patient's clinical presentation and family pedigree. This is particularly important when determining a surveillance plan for unaffected or disease-free mutation carriers. In this review, we describe the main endocrine tumor manifestations found in familial cancer syndromes in an organ-based approach, focusing on adrenocortical carcinoma, pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma, neuroendocrine tumors, differentiated thyroid cancer, and medullary thyroid cancer. We highlight the challenges in diagnosis, surveillance, and therapy unique to the patient population with hereditary syndromes. Furthermore, we underscore the importance of evaluating for genetic predisposition to tumor development, provide features that can identify index patients, and discuss the approach to screening surveillance for mutation carriers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Associated cancers in Waldenström macroglobulinemia: clues for common genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, Enrica; Varettoni, Marzia; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Arcaini, Luca; Ricci, Francesca; Pascutto, Cristiana; Rattotti, Sara; Vismara, Eleonora; Paris, Laura; Cazzola, Mario

    2013-12-01

    Several population-based and cohort studies have reported an increased risk of second cancers in lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs). The cause of second cancers in LPDs is probably multifactorial, and the relative contribution of treatments, genetic predisposition, and immune dysfunction typical of LPDs is still unclear. We retrospectively studied 230 patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) to assess the frequency, characteristics, and predictive factors of second cancers and to evaluate whether patients with WM are at higher risk of second cancers compared with an age- and sex-matched control population. In a competing-risk model, the cumulative incidence of solid cancers was 6% at 5 years, 11% at 10 years, and 17% at 15 years, whereas the incidence of hematologic malignancies was 4% at 5 years, 7% at 10 years, and 8% at 15 years. Compared with an age- and sex-matched population, the overall risk of second cancers was 1.7-fold higher than expected (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22-2.38; P = .002). Patients with WM were at increased risk for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (standardized incidence ratio [SIR], 8.64; 95% CI, 3.88-19.22; P genetic predisposition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic predisposition of RSV infection-related respiratory morbidity in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysdale, Simon B; Prendergast, Michael; Alcazar, Mireia; Wilson, Theresa; Smith, Melvyn; Zuckerman, Mark; Broughton, Simon; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Johnston, Sebastian L; Hodemaekers, Hennie M; Janssen, Riny; Bont, Louis; Greenough, Anne

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether prematurely born infants have a genetic predisposition to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection-related respiratory morbidity. One hundred and forty-six infants born at less than 36 weeks of gestation were prospectively followed. Nasopharygeal aspirates were obtained on every occasion the infants had a lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) regardless of need for admission. DNA was tested for 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Chronic respiratory morbidity was assessed using respiratory health-related questionnaires, parent-completed diary cards at a corrected age of 1 year and review of hospital notes. Lung function was measured at a post menstrual age (PMA) of 36 weeks and corrected age of 1 year. A SNP in ADAM33 was associated with an increased risk of developing RSV LRTIs, but not with significant differences in 36-week PMA lung function results. SNPs in several genes were associated with increased chronic respiratory morbidity (interleukin 10 (IL10), nitric oxide synthase 2A (NOS2A), surfactant protein C (SFTPC), matrix metalloproteinase 16 (MMP16) and vitamin D receptor (VDR)) and reduced lung function at 1 year (MMP16, NOS2A, SFTPC and VDR) in infants who had had RSV LRTIs. Our results suggest that prematurely born infants may have a genetic predisposition to RSV LRTIs and subsequent respiratory morbidity which is independent of premorbid lung function.

  19. Genetic Predisposition Increases the Tic Severity, Rate of Comorbidities, and Psychosocial and Educational Difficulties in Children With Tourette Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eysturoy, Absalon Niclas; Skov, Liselotte; Debes, Nanette Mol

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine whether there are differences in tic severity, comorbidities, and psychosocial and educational consequences in children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome compared with children with Tourette syndrome without genetic predisposition...... to Tourette syndrome. A total of 314 children diagnosed with Tourette syndrome participated in this study. Validated diagnostic tools were used to assess tic severity, comorbidities, and cognitive performance. A structured interview was used to evaluate psychosocial and educational consequences related...... to Tourette syndrome. The children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition present with statistically significant differences in terms of severity of tics, comorbidities, and a range of psychosocial and educational factors compared with the children with Tourette syndrome without genetic...

  20. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Models of spontaneous breaking of electroweak symmetry by a strong interaction do not have fine tuning/hierarchy problem. They are conceptually elegant and use the only mechanism of spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry that is known to occur in nature. The simplest model, minimal technicolor with extended technicolor interactions, is appealing because one can calculate by scaling up from QCD. But it is ruled out on many counts: inappropriately low quark and lepton masses (or excessive FCNC), bad electroweak data fits, light scalar and vector states, etc. However, nature may not choose the minimal model and then we are stuck: except possibly through lattice simulations, we are unable to compute and test the models. In the LHC era it therefore makes sense to abandon specific models (of strong EW breaking) and concentrate on generic features that may indicate discovery. The Technicolor Straw Man is not a model but a parametrized search strategy inspired by a remarkable generic feature of walking technicolor,...

  1. Plasmons in strong superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldo, M.; Ducoin, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the possible plasmon excitations that can occur in systems where strong superconductivity is present. In these systems the plasmon energy is comparable to or smaller than the pairing gap. As a prototype of these systems we consider the proton component of Neutron Star matter just below the crust when electron screening is not taken into account. For the realistic case we consider in detail the different aspects of the elementary excitations when the proton, electron components are considered within the Random-Phase Approximation generalized to the superfluid case, while the influence of the neutron component is considered only at qualitative level. Electron screening plays a major role in modifying the proton spectrum and spectral function. At the same time the electron plasmon is strongly modified and damped by the indirect coupling with the superfluid proton component, even at moderately low values of the gap. The excitation spectrum shows the interplay of the different components and their relevance for each excitation modes. The results are relevant for neutrino physics and thermodynamical processes in neutron stars. If electron screening is neglected, the spectral properties of the proton component show some resemblance with the physical situation in high-T c superconductors, and we briefly discuss similarities and differences in this connection. In a general prospect, the results of the study emphasize the role of Coulomb interaction in strong superconductors.

  2. Hook tool manufacture in New Caledonian crows: behavioural variation and the influence of raw materials

    OpenAIRE

    Klump, Barbara C.; Sugasawa, Shoko; St Clair, James J. H.; Rutz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background New Caledonian crows use a range of foraging tools, and are the only non-human species known to craft hooks. Based on a small number of observations, their manufacture of hooked stick tools has previously been described as a complex, multi-stage process. Tool behaviour is shaped by genetic predispositions, individual and social learning, and/or ecological influences, but disentangling the relative contributions of these factors remains a major research challenge. The properties of ...

  3. Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Status and Longitudinal Changes in Weight and Waist Circumference:Influence of Genetic Predisposition to Adiposity

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Sofus C; Ängquist, Lars; Moldovan, Max; Huikari, Ville; Sebert, Sylvain; Cavadino, Alana; Singh Ahluwalia, Tarunveer; Skaaby, Tea; Linneberg, Allan; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Toft, Ulla; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the relationship between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and changes in measures of adiposity have shown inconsistent results, and interaction with genetic predisposition to obesity has rarely been examined. We examined whether 25(OH)D was associated with subsequent annual changes in body weight (ΔBW) or waist circumference (ΔWC), and whether the associations were modified by genetic predisposition to a high BMI, WC or waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRBMI). The study was ba...

  4. Familial predisposition to hypertension and the association between urinary sodium excretion and blood pressure in a population-based sample of young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Moraes

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The reasons for the inconsistent association between salt consumption and blood pressure levels observed in within-society surveys are not known. A total of 157 normotensive subjects aged 18 to 35 years, selected at random in a cross-sectional population-based survey, answered a structured questionnaire. They were classified as strongly predisposed to hypertension when two or more first-degree relatives had a diagnosis of hypertension. Anthropometric parameters were obtained and sitting blood pressure was determined with aneroid sphygmomanometers. Sodium and potassium excretion was measured by flame spectrophotometry in an overnight urine sample. A positive correlation between blood pressure and urinary sodium excretion was detected only in the group of individuals strongly predisposed to hypertension, both for systolic blood pressure (r = 0.51, P<0.01 and diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.50, P<0.01. In a covariance analysis, after controlling for age, skin color and body mass index, individuals strongly predisposed to hypertension who excreted amounts of sodium above the median of the entire sample had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure than subjects classified into the remaining conditions. The influence of familial predisposition to hypertension on the association between salt intake and blood pressure may be an additional explanation for the weak association between urinary sodium excretion and blood pressure observed in within-population studies, since it can influence the association between salt consumption and blood pressure in some but not all inhabitants.

  5. Consumer behaviours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Energy-saving programmes are increasingly targeted at children to encourage household energy conservation. A study involving the assignment of energy-saving interventions to Girl Scouts shows that a child-focused intervention can improve energy-saving behaviours among children and their parents....

  6. Behaviour Questionnaire

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    symptoms signifying a hostile-aggressive dimension, factor 2 an anxious-fearful dimension, and factor 3 emerged as a ... Objective. This paper examines the factor structure of the. Yoruba translation of the Children's Behaviour Questionnaire .... Twitches/mannerisms/tics. Sucks thumb/finger. Bites nails. Often disobedient.

  7. Reducing Weak to Strong Bisimilarity in CCP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Aristizábal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Concurrent constraint programming (ccp is a well-established model for concurrency that singles out the fundamental aspects of asynchronous systems whose agents (or processes evolve by posting and querying (partial information in a global medium. Bisimilarity is a standard behavioural equivalence in concurrency theory. However, only recently a well-behaved notion of bisimilarity for ccp, and a ccp partition refinement algorithm for deciding the strong version of this equivalence have been proposed. Weak bisimiliarity is a central behavioural equivalence in process calculi and it is obtained from the strong case by taking into account only the actions that are observable in the system. Typically, the standard partition refinement can also be used for deciding weak bisimilarity simply by using Milner's reduction from weak to strong bisimilarity; a technique referred to as saturation. In this paper we demonstrate that, because of its involved labeled transitions, the above-mentioned saturation technique does not work for ccp. We give an alternative reduction from weak ccp bisimilarity to the strong one that allows us to use the ccp partition refinement algorithm for deciding this equivalence.

  8. Predicting attitudes toward nanotechnology: The influence of cultural and predispositional values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsung-Jen

    Past experience in dealing with biotechnology has suggested that public opinion plays an important role in determining the prosperity of emerging technologies. A great amount of money and energy, therefore, were invested to understand nanotechnology's impact on the society and the public, in addition to the technical advancement of the technology. However, most studies examining public opinion have focused on personal level factors and have ignored the potential influence of cultural factors. This study addresses this gap by analyzing public opinion in 21 countries, including the US and 20 European countries. Specifically, this study examines the impact of predispositional and cultural values on public support for nanotechnology, with the mediating roles of moral judgment and risk perception accounted for. This study also looks into the dynamics between cultural values and predispositional values; that is, how cultural values may moderate the effects of predispositional values in affecting attitudes toward nanotechnology. The results indicate that people rely on "information shortcuts," such as confidence and religious belief, for decision making. Individual-level factors still play an important role in shaping public attitudes even after country-level factors are controlled. Furthermore, aggregate cultural values provide people with important "mental programs" to interpret nanotechnology. They explain why people in different cultures have different moral and risk perceptions. However, most of the cultural values do not affect public support directly, suggesting that public support is contingent greatly on the core characteristics of nanotechnology, such as its usefulness, risk, and moral acceptability, which, in turn, is influenced by personal beliefs and cultural givens. The results also suggest that people in different cultures respond to survey questions in different manners. People living in cultures emphasizing uncertainty avoidance and individualism are more

  9. Phenotypic Consequences of a Genetic Predisposition to Enhanced Nitric Oxide Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emdin, Connor A; Khera, Amit V; Klarin, Derek; Natarajan, Pradeep; Zekavat, Seyedeh M; Nomura, Akihiro; Haas, Mary; Aragam, Krishna; Ardissino, Diego; Wilson, James G; Schunkert, Heribert; McPherson, Ruth; Watkins, Hugh; Elosua, Roberto; Bown, Matthew J; Samani, Nilesh J; Baber, Usman; Erdmann, Jeanette; Gormley, Padhraig; Palotie, Aarno; Stitziel, Nathan O; Gupta, Namrata; Danesh, John; Saleheen, Danish; Gabriel, Stacey; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2018-01-16

    Nitric oxide signaling plays a key role in the regulation of vascular tone and platelet activation. Here, we seek to understand the impact of a genetic predisposition to enhanced nitric oxide signaling on risk for cardiovascular diseases, thus informing the potential utility of pharmacological stimulation of the nitric oxide pathway as a therapeutic strategy. We analyzed the association of common and rare genetic variants in 2 genes that mediate nitric oxide signaling (Nitric Oxide Synthase 3 [ NOS3 ] and Guanylate Cyclase 1, Soluble, Alpha 3 [ GUCY1A3 ]) with a range of human phenotypes. We selected 2 common variants (rs3918226 in NOS3 and rs7692387 in GUCY1A3 ) known to associate with increased NOS3 and GUCY1A3 expression and reduced mean arterial pressure, combined them into a genetic score, and standardized this exposure to a 5 mm Hg reduction in mean arterial pressure. Using individual-level data from 335 464 participants in the UK Biobank and summary association results from 7 large-scale genome-wide association studies, we examined the effect of this nitric oxide signaling score on cardiometabolic and other diseases. We also examined whether rare loss-of-function mutations in NOS3 and GUCY1A3 were associated with coronary heart disease using gene sequencing data from the Myocardial Infarction Genetics Consortium (n=27 815). A genetic predisposition to enhanced nitric oxide signaling was associated with reduced risks of coronary heart disease (odds ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31-0.45; P =5.5*10 -26 ], peripheral arterial disease (odds ratio 0.42; 95% CI, 0.26-0.68; P =0.0005), and stroke (odds ratio, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.37-0.76; P =0.0006). In a mediation analysis, the effect of the genetic score on decreased coronary heart disease risk extended beyond its effect on blood pressure. Conversely, rare variants that inactivate the NOS3 or GUCY1A3 genes were associated with a 23 mm Hg higher systolic blood pressure (95% CI, 12-34; P =5.6*10 -5

  10. Strong-coupling approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, R.B.

    1984-03-01

    Standard path-integral techniques such as instanton calculations give good answers for weak-coupling problems, but become unreliable for strong-coupling. Here we consider a method of replacing the original potential by a suitably chosen harmonic oscillator potential. Physically this is motivated by the fact that potential barriers below the level of the ground-state energy of a quantum-mechanical system have little effect. Numerically, results are good, both for quantum-mechanical problems and for massive phi 4 field theory in 1 + 1 dimensions. 9 references, 6 figures

  11. Strong interaction and QFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, T.

    1981-01-01

    With an assumed weak multiplet structure for bosonic hadrons, which is consistent with the ΔI = 1/2 rule, it is shown that the strong interaction effective hamiltonian is compatible with the weak SU(2) x U(1) gauge transformation. Especially the rho-meson transforms as a triplet under SU(2)sub(w), and this is the origin of the rho-photon analogy. It is also shown that the existence of the non-vanishing Cabibbo angle is a necessary condition for the absence of the exotic hadrons. (orig.)

  12. Strong Coupling Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2009-01-01

    We show that whenever a 4-dimensional theory with N particle species emerges as a consistent low energy description of a 3-brane embedded in an asymptotically-flat (4+d)-dimensional space, the holographic scale of high-dimensional gravity sets the strong coupling scale of the 4D theory. This connection persists in the limit in which gravity can be consistently decoupled. We demonstrate this effect for orbifold planes, as well as for the solitonic branes and string theoretic D-branes. In all cases the emergence of a 4D strong coupling scale from bulk holography is a persistent phenomenon. The effect turns out to be insensitive even to such extreme deformations of the brane action that seemingly shield 4D theory from the bulk gravity effects. A well understood example of such deformation is given by large 4D Einstein term in the 3-brane action, which is known to suppress the strength of 5D gravity at short distances and change the 5D Newton's law into the four-dimensional one. Nevertheless, we observe that the ...

  13. The Changing Landscape of Genetic Testing for Inherited Breast Cancer Predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afghahi, Anosheh; Kurian, Allison W

    2017-05-01

    The advent of multiple-gene germline panel testing has led to significant advances in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer risk assessment. These include guideline-specific cancer risk management recommendations for patients and their families, such as screening with breast magnetic resonance imaging and risk-reducing surgeries, which have the potential to reduce substantially the morbidity and mortality associated with a hereditary cancer predisposition. However, controversy remains about the clinical validity and actionability of genetic testing in a broader patient population. We discuss events leading to the wider availability of commercialized multiple-gene germline panel testing, the recent data that support using this powerful tool to improve cancer risk assessment and reduction strategies, and remaining challenges to clinical optimization of this new genetic technology.

  14. DNA and RNA analyses in detection of genetic predisposition to cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurzawski Grzegorz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the past decade many new molecular methods for DNA and RNA analysis have emerged. The most popular thus far have been SSCP, HET, CMC, DGGE, RFLP or ASA, which have now been replaced by methods that are more cost effective and less time consuming. Real-time amplification techniques and particularly those with the capacity of multiplexing have become commonly used in laboratory practice. Novel screening methods enable the very rapid examination of large patients series. Use of liquid handling robotics applied to the isolation of DNA or RNA, the normalisation of sample concentration, and standardization of target amplification by PCR have also contributed to a reduced risk of sample contamination and have resulted in laboratory analysis being easier and faster. The aim of this study is the introduction of a few modern techniques, most commonly used in detection of genetic predisposition to cancer.

  15. X-ray diagnosis of predisposition to pulmonary nephrotic edema in patients with glomerulonephritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenetskij, M.S.; Pervak, M.B.; Tkachenko, G.D.; Vernikov, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    To develop criteria for determining predisposition to pulmonary edema in patients with glomerulonephritis, clinical, laboratory and X-ray examinations were made in 697 patients with glomerulonephritis at different stages of its development. X-ray examination included chest tele X-ray and its densitometric analysis. Twenty two patients underwent computerized tomography with gistographic analysis. In 106 patients, X-ray findings were compared with the volume of circulating blood, cardiac and stroke indices. CHanges in the lungs and pleural cavities were found in 22,7%, pulmonary edema was revealed in 15,7% of the patients. The prognostically unfavourable criteria for the development of pulmonary edema were found to be Stage 2 pulmonary venous hypertension with hypervolemia and peripheral edemas

  16. Job autonomy, its predispositions and its relation to work outcomes in community health centers in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Lin, Yung-Kai; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lin, Tien-Tse

    2013-06-01

    It has been debated that employees in a government or public ownership agency may perceive less need for growth opportunities or high-powered incentives than is the case for employees in private organizations. This study examined employees' job autonomy in government-run community health centers, its predispositions and its relation to their work outcomes. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Taiwan. From 230 responding community health centers, 1380 staff members responded to the self-completed, structured questionnaire. Structural equation modeling revealed that employees' job autonomy has positive work outcomes: greater work satisfaction, and less intent to transfer and intentions to leave. In addition, job autonomy was related to employees' higher education levels, medical profession, permanent employment and serving smaller populations. Moreover, employees' age, educational levels, medical profession and employment status were found to be related to their work satisfaction, intent to transfer and intent to leave.

  17. Characteristics of benzodiazepine receptors in rats differing in predisposition to experimental alcoholism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burov, Yu.V.; Maiskii, A.I.; Yukhananov, R.Yu.

    1986-01-01

    This paper studies the number and affinity of benzodiazepine receptors for diazepam in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of rats differently predisposed to the development of experimental alcoholism. Ethanol was injected once intraperitoneally, in a dose of 2.5 g/kg. Control animals received the same volume of physiological saline. Bound and free N-methyl-tritium-diazepam were separated by means of GF/B filters. The characteristics of benzodiazepine receptors are shown in rats differing in predisposition to the development of experimental alcoholism and in rats during voluntary chronic alcoholization. It is shown that weakening of functional acitivity of the GABA-benzodiazepam complex in animals predisposed to the development of experimental alcoholism is one of the neurochemical mechanisms of development of the abstinence syndrome

  18. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Genetic Predisposition in a Large Family with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing has become more widely used to reveal genetic defect in monogenic disorders. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP, the leading cause of hereditary blindness worldwide, has been attributed to more than 67 disease-causing genes. Due to the extreme genetic heterogeneity, using general molecular screening alone is inadequate for identifying genetic predispositions in susceptible individuals. In order to identify underlying mutation rapidly, we utilized next-generation sequencing in a four-generation Chinese family with RP. Two affected patients and an unaffected sibling were subjected to whole exome sequencing. Through bioinformatics analysis and direct sequencing confirmation, we identified p.R135W transition in the rhodopsin gene. The mutation was subsequently confirmed to cosegregate with the disease in the family. In this study, our results suggest that whole exome sequencing is a robust method in diagnosing familial hereditary disease.

  19. [Diagnosis of predisposition to chronic cor pulmonale formation in occupational lung diseases caused by dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panev, N I; Korotenko, O Iu; Zakharenkov, V V; Korchagina, Iu S; Gafarov, N I

    2014-01-01

    Study covered 426 miners aged 40-54 years with previously diagnosed occupational respiratory diseases due to dust (246 patients with chronic occupational obstructive bronchitis, 98 with anthracosilicosis and 82 with chronic dust nonobstructive bronchitis). 315 (73.9%) examinees out of 426 with lung diseases due to dust demonstrated chronic cor pulnmonale. Considering high share of this complication, the authors used Bayes method to create a method to diagnose predisposition towards chronic cor pulmonale in patients with dust lung diseases through respiratory failure, concomitant coronary heart disease and arterial hypertension, blood groups ABO, MN and P, some structural and functional parameters of heart: myocardium weight index, relative wall thickness index and left ventricle sphericity index, average lung artery pressure. Increasing number of analyzed factors that directly influence chronic cor pulmonale development and selecting additional markers help to improve forecasting of the complication.

  20. Effect of deregulation of Sonic Hedgehog pathway on responses to DNA damage and cancer predisposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charazac, Aurelie

    2015-01-01

    The Gorlin syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by several developmental abnormalities. Due to mutations in PTCH1, a key player of the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway, clinical manifestations also includes hyper-radiosensitivity and an increased predisposition to the development of basal cell carcinomas. Given the implication of DNA repair system defects in hyper-radiosensitivity pathologies, we decided to study the effect of PTCH1 mutations on the DNA damage response in order to better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to Gorlin's phenotype.This study demonstrate a global failure of the DNA damage repair systems in Gorlin fibroblasts with respect to controls. It highlights in particular the collapse of the base excision repair pathway (BER) responsible for the repair of oxidative DNA damage. (author) [fr

  1. Ethnic and population differences in the genetic predisposition to human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjecki, C; Alyass, A; Meyre, D

    2018-01-01

    Obesity rates have escalated to the point of a global pandemic with varying prevalence across ethnic groups. These differences are partially explained by lifestyle factors in addition to genetic predisposition to obesity. This review provides a comprehensive examination of the ethnic differences in the genetic architecture of obesity. Using examples from evolution, heritability, admixture, monogenic and polygenic studies of obesity, we provide explanations for ethnic differences in the prevalence of obesity. The debate over definitions of race and ethnicity, the advantages and limitations of multi-ethnic studies and future directions of research are also discussed. Multi-ethnic studies have great potential to provide a better understanding of ethnic differences in the prevalence of obesity that may result in more targeted and personalized obesity treatments. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  2. Association of Genetic Predisposition With Solitary Schwannoma or Meningioma in Children and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathmanaban, Omar N; Sadler, Katherine V; Kamaly-Asl, Ian D; King, Andrew T; Rutherford, Scott A; Hammerbeck-Ward, Charlotte; McCabe, Martin G; Kilday, John-Paul; Beetz, Christian; Poplawski, Nicola K; Evans, D Gareth; Smith, Miriam J

    2017-09-01

    predisposition gene. Twenty-five of 63 patients (40%) had a constitutional NF2 mutation, and 9 (14%) had a constitutional SMARCE1 mutation. In the cohort of those who developed a solitary schwannoma before age 25 years, 44 of 153 patients (29%) had an identifiable genetic predisposition. Twenty-four patients (55%) with a spinal schwannoma had a constitutional mutation, while only 20 (18%) with a cranial schwannoma had a constitutional predisposition (P < .001). Of 109 cranial schwannomas, 106 (97.2%) were vestibular. Four of 106 people (3.8%) with a cranial schwannoma had an LZTR1 mutation (3 were vestibular schwannomas and 1 was a nonvestibular schwannoma), and 9 (8.5%) had an NF2 mutation. A significant proportion of young people with an apparently sporadic solitary meningioma or schwannoma had a causative predisposition mutation. This finding has important clinical implications because of the risk of additional tumors and the possibility of familial disease. Young patients presenting with a solitary meningioma or schwannoma should be referred for genetic testing.

  3. Recognition of genetic predisposition in pediatric cancer patients: An easy-to-use selection tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongmans, Marjolijn C J; Loeffen, Jan L C M; Waanders, Esmé; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Kuiper, Roland P; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2016-03-01

    Genetic predisposition for childhood cancer is under diagnosed. Identifying these patients may lead to therapy adjustments in case of syndrome-related increased toxicity or resistant disease and syndrome-specific screening programs may lead to early detection of a further independent malignancy. Cancer surveillance might also be warranted for affected relatives and detection of a genetic mutation can allow for reproductive counseling. Here we present an easy-to-use selection tool, based on a systematic review of pediatric cancer predisposing syndromes, to identify patients who may benefit from genetic counseling. The selection tool involves five questions concerning family history, the type of malignancy, multiple primary malignancies, specific features and excessive toxicity, which results in the selection of those patients that may benefit from referral to a clinical geneticist. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic predisposition for beta cell fragility underlies type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James; Tian, Lei; Schonefeldt, Susann; Delghingaro-Augusto, Viviane; Garcia-Perez, Josselyn E; Pasciuto, Emanuela; Di Marino, Daniele; Carr, Edward J; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Franckaert, Dean; Lagou, Vasiliki; Overbergh, Lut; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; Allemeersch, Joke; Chabot-Roy, Genevieve; Dahlstrom, Jane E; Laybutt, D Ross; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Socha, Luis; Gevaert, Kris; Jetten, Anton M; Lambrechts, Diether; Linterman, Michelle A; Goodnow, Chris C; Nolan, Christopher J; Lesage, Sylvie; Schlenner, Susan M; Liston, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Type 1 (T1D) and type 2 (T2D) diabetes share pathophysiological characteristics, yet mechanistic links have remained elusive. T1D results from autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells, whereas beta cell failure in T2D is delayed and progressive. Here we find a new genetic component of diabetes susceptibility in T1D non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, identifying immune-independent beta cell fragility. Genetic variation in Xrcc4 and Glis3 alters the response of NOD beta cells to unfolded protein stress, enhancing the apoptotic and senescent fates. The same transcriptional relationships were observed in human islets, demonstrating the role of beta cell fragility in genetic predisposition to diabetes.

  5. Diagnostic criteria, specific mutations, and genetic predisposition in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachet, Jean-Baptiste; Emile, Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    In 1998, gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) emerged as a distinct oncogenetic entity and subsequently became a paradigm of targeted therapies in solid tumors. Diagnosis of GIST relies on both histology and immunohistochemistry. Ninety-five percent of GISTs express either KIT or DOG-1. Approximately 80%–90% of GISTs harbor gain-of-function mutations of either KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha polypeptide (PDGFRA) receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK). More than 100 different mutations have been described, some of which are associated with specific clinical and/or histological characteristics. Detection of KIT or PDGFRA mutations is recommended in advanced GISTs because they are highly predictive of tumor response to RTK inhibitors, as well as in KIT-negative cases to confirm diagnosis. In most cases, GISTs are sporadic, but in rare cases, they are related with genetic predisposition, such as neurofibromatosis type 1, Carney triad, Carney–Stratakis syndrome, and inherited KIT or PDGFRA germline mutations. PMID:23776354

  6. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baeyens, A

    2002-12-02

    The chromosomal radiosensitivity of breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition was investigated and compared to a group of healthy women. The chromosomal radiosensitivity was assessed with the G2 and the G0-micronucleus assay. For the G2 assay lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with a dose of 0.4 Gy (60)Co gamma-rays after 71 h incubation, and chromatid breaks were scored in 50 metaphases. For the micronucleus assay lymphocytes were exposed in vitro to 3.5 Gy (60)Co gamma-rays at a high dose rate or low dose rate. 70 h post-irradiation cultures were arrested and micronuclei were scored in 1000 binucleate cells. The results demonstrated that the group of breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition was on the average more radiosensitive than a population of healthy women, and this with the G2 as well as with the high dose rate and low dose rate micronucleus assay. With the G2 assay 43% of the patients were found to be radiosensitive. A higher proportion of the patients were radiosensitive with the micronucleus assay (45% with high dose rate and 61% with low dose rate). No correlation was found between the G2 and the G0-micronucleus chromosomal radiosensitivity. Out of the different subgroups considered, the group of the young breast cancer patients without family history showed the highest percentage of radiosensitive cases in the G2 (50%) as well as in the micronucleus assay (75-78%).

  7. Genetic predisposition for high stress reactivity amplifies effects of early-life adversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlwrick, Silja; Rechenberg, Alexandra; Matthes, Mariana; Burgstaller, Jessica; Schwarzbauer, Thomas; Chen, Alon; Touma, Chadi

    2016-08-01

    A dysregulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis and the experience of early-life adversity are both well-established risk factors for the development of affective disorders, such as major depression. However, little is known about the interaction of these two factors in shaping endophenotypes of the disease. Here, we studied the gene-environment interaction of a genetic predisposition for HPA axis dysregulation with early-life stress (ELS), assessing the short-, as well as the long-lasting consequences on emotional behavior, neuroendocrine functions and gene expression profiles. Three mouse lines, selectively bred for either high (HR), intermediate (IR), or low (LR) HPA axis reactivity, were exposed to one week of ELS using the limited nesting and bedding material paradigm. Measurements collected during or shortly after the ELS period showed that, regardless of genetic background, ELS exposure led to impaired weight gain and altered the animals' coping behavior under stressful conditions. However, only HR mice additionally showed significant changes in neuroendocrine stress responsiveness at a young age. Accordingly, adult HR mice also showed lasting consequences of ELS, including hyperactive stress-coping, HPA axis hyperreactivity, and gene expression changes in the Crh system, as well as downregulation of Fkbp5 in relevant brain regions. We suggest that the genetic predisposition for high stress reactivity interacts with ELS exposure by disturbing the suppression of corticosterone release during a critical period of brain development, thus exerting lasting programming effects on the HPA axis, presumably via epigenetic mechanisms. In concert, these changes lead to the emergence of important endophenotypes associated with affective disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic predisposition to higher blood pressure increases risk of incident hypertension and cardiovascular diseases in Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiangfeng; Huang, Jianfeng; Wang, Laiyuan; Chen, Shufeng; Yang, Xueli; Li, Jianxin; Cao, Jie; Chen, Jichun; Li, Ying; Zhao, Liancheng; Li, Hongfan; Liu, Fangcao; Huang, Chen; Shen, Chong; Shen, Jinjin; Yu, Ling; Xu, Lihua; Mu, Jianjun; Wu, Xianping; Ji, Xu; Guo, Dongshuang; Zhou, Zhengyuan; Yang, Zili; Wang, Renping; Yang, Jun; Yan, Weili; Gu, Dongfeng

    2015-10-01

    Although multiple genetic markers associated with blood pressure have been identified by genome-wide association studies, their aggregate effect on risk of incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease is uncertain, particularly among East Asian who may have different genetic and environmental exposures from Europeans. We aimed to examine the association between genetic predisposition to higher blood pressure and risk of incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease in 26 262 individuals in 2 Chinese population-based prospective cohorts. A genetic risk score was calculated based on 22 established variants for blood pressure in East Asian. We found the genetic risk score was significantly and independently associated with linear increases in blood pressure and risk of incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease (P range from 4.57×10(-3) to 3.10×10(-6)). In analyses adjusted for traditional risk factors including blood pressure, individuals carrying most blood pressure-related risk alleles (top quintile of genetic score distribution) had 40% (95% confidence interval, 18-66) and 26% (6-45) increased risk for incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease, respectively, when compared with individuals in the bottom quintile. The genetic risk score also significantly improved discrimination for incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease and led to modest improvements in risk reclassification for cardiovascular disease (all the Pgenetic predisposition to higher blood pressure is an independent risk factor for blood pressure increase and incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease and provides modest incremental information to cardiovascular disease risk prediction. The potential clinical use of this panel of blood pressure-associated polymorphisms remains to be determined. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Genetic Predisposition, Clinical Risk Factor Burden, and Lifetime Risk of Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lu-Chen; Preis, Sarah R; Hulme, Olivia L; Larson, Martin G; Choi, Seung Hoan; Wang, Biqi; Trinquart, Ludovic; McManus, David D; Staerk, Laila; Lin, Honghuang; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Ellinor, Patrick T; Benjamin, Emelia J; Lubitz, Steven A

    2018-03-06

    The long-term probability of developing atrial fibrillation (AF) considering genetic predisposition and clinical risk factor burden is unknown. We estimated the lifetime risk of AF in individuals from the community-based Framingham Heart Study. Polygenic risk for AF was derived using a score of ≈1000 AF-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Clinical risk factor burden was calculated for each individual using a validated risk score for incident AF comprised of height, weight, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, current smoking status, antihypertensive medication use, diabetes mellitus, history of myocardial infarction, and history of heart failure. We estimated the lifetime risk of AF within tertiles of polygenic and clinical risk. Among 4606 participants without AF at 55 years of age, 580 developed incident AF (median follow-up, 9.4 years; 25th-75th percentile, 4.4-14.3 years). The lifetime risk of AF >55 years of age was 37.1% and was substantially influenced by both polygenic and clinical risk factor burden. Among individuals free of AF at 55 years of age, those in low-polygenic and clinical risk tertiles had a lifetime risk of AF of 22.3% (95% confidence interval, 15.4-9.1), whereas those in high-risk tertiles had a risk of 48.2% (95% confidence interval, 41.3-55.1). A lower clinical risk factor burden was associated with later AF onset after adjusting for genetic predisposition ( P <0.001). In our community-based cohort, the lifetime risk of AF was 37%. Estimation of polygenic AF risk is feasible and together with clinical risk factor burden explains a substantial gradient in long-term AF risk. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeyens, A; Thierens, H; Claes, K; Poppe, B; Messiaen, L; De Ridder, L; Vral, A

    2002-01-01

    The chromosomal radiosensitivity of breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition was investigated and compared to a group of healthy women. The chromosomal radiosensitivity was assessed with the G2 and the G0-micronucleus assay. For the G2 assay lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with a dose of 0.4 Gy 60Co γ-rays after 71 h incubation, and chromatid breaks were scored in 50 metaphases. For the micronucleus assay lymphocytes were exposed in vitro to 3.5 Gy 60Co γ-rays at a high dose rate or low dose rate. 70 h post-irradiation cultures were arrested and micronuclei were scored in 1000 binucleate cells. The results demonstrated that the group of breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition was on the average more radiosensitive than a population of healthy women, and this with the G2 as well as with the high dose rate and low dose rate micronucleus assay. With the G2 assay 43% of the patients were found to be radiosensitive. A higher proportion of the patients were radiosensitive with the micronucleus assay (45% with high dose rate and 61% with low dose rate). No correlation was found between the G2 and the G0-micronucleus chromosomal radiosensitivity. Out of the different subgroups considered, the group of the young breast cancer patients without family history showed the highest percentage of radiosensitive cases in the G2 (50%) as well as in the micronucleus assay (75–78%). British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 1379–1385. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600628 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12454765

  11. Using Strong Gravitational Lensing to Identify Fossil Group Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lucas E.; Irwin, Jimmy A.; White, Raymond E., III; Wong, Ka-Wah; Maksym, W. Peter; Dupke, Renato A.; Miller, Eric D.; Carrasco, Eleazar R.

    2018-04-01

    Fossil galaxy systems are classically thought to be the end result of galaxy group/cluster evolution, as galaxies experiencing dynamical friction sink to the center of the group potential and merge into a single, giant elliptical that dominates the rest of the members in both mass and luminosity. Most fossil systems discovered lie within z fossil criteria within the look forward time. Since strong gravitational lensing preferentially selects groups merging along the line of sight, or systems with a high mass concentration like fossil systems, we searched the CASSOWARY survey of strong-lensing events with the goal of determining whether lensing systems have any predisposition to being fossil systems or progenitors. We find that ∼13% of lensing groups are identified as traditional fossils while only ∼3% of nonlensing control groups are. We also find that ∼23% of lensing systems are traditional fossil progenitors compared to ∼17% for the control sample. Our findings show that strong-lensing systems are more likely to be fossil/pre-fossil systems than comparable nonlensing systems. Cumulative galaxy luminosity functions of the lensing and nonlensing groups also indicate a possible, fundamental difference between strong-lensing and nonlensing systems’ galaxy populations, with lensing systems housing a greater number of bright galaxies even in the outskirts of groups.

  12. LIGO: The strong belief

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years of designing, building and testing a number of innovative technologies, with the strong belief that the endeavour would lead to a historic breakthrough. The Bulletin publishes an abstract of the Courier’s interview with Barry Barish, one of the founding fathers of LIGO.   The plots show the signals of gravitational waves detected by the twin LIGO observatories at Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington. (Image: Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab) On 11 February, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo collaborations published a historic paper in which they showed a gravitational signal emitted by the merger of two black holes. These results come after 20 years of hard work by a large collaboration of scientists operating the two LIGO observatories in the US. Barry Barish, Linde Professor of Physics, Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology and former Director of the Global Design Effort for the Internat...

  13. Modelling Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book reflects and expands on the current trend in the building industry to understand, simulate and ultimately design buildings by taking into consideration the interlinked elements and forces that act on them. This approach overcomes the traditional, exclusive focus on building tasks, while....... The chapter authors were invited speakers at the 5th Symposium "Modelling Behaviour", which took place at the CITA in Copenhagen in September 2015....

  14. Assessment of false-negative cases of breast MR imaging in women with a familial or genetic predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obdeijn, Inge-Marie A.; Loo, Claudette E.; Rijnsburger, Adriana J.; Wasser, Martin N. J. M.; Bergers, Elisabeth; Kok, Theo; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Boetes, Carla

    In order to assess the characteristics of malignant breast lesions those were not detected during screening by MR imaging. In the Dutch MRI screening study (MRISC), a non-randomized prospective multicenter study, women with high familial risk or a genetic predisposition for breast cancer were

  15. Assessment of false-negative cases of breast MR imaging in women with a familial or genetic predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.I.M. Obdeijn (Inge-Marie); C.E. Loo (Claudette); A.J. Rijnsburger (Rian); M.N.J.M. Wasser (Martin); E. Bergers (Elisabeth); T. Kok (Theo); J.G.M. Klijn (Jan); C. Boetes (Carla)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn order to assess the characteristics of malignant breast lesions those were not detected during screening by MR imaging. In the Dutch MRI screening study (MRISC), a non-randomized prospective multicenter study, women with high familial risk or a genetic predisposition for breast cancer

  16. Efficacy of MRI and mammography for breast-cancer screening in women with a familial or genetic predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kriege, M; Brekelmans, CTM; Boetes, C; Besnard, PE; Zonderland, HM; Obdeijn, IM; Manoliu, RA; Kok, T; Peterse, H; Tilanus-Linthorst, MMA; Muller, SH; Meijer, S; Oosterwijk, JC; Beex, LVAM; Tollenaar, RAEM; de Koning, HJ; Rutgers, EJT; Klijn, JGM

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The value of regular surveillance for breast cancer in women with a genetic or familial predisposition to breast cancer is currently unproven. We compared the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with that of mammography for screening in this group of high-risk women. METHODS:

  17. Efficacy of MRI and mammography for breast-cancer screening in women with a familial or genetic predisposition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kriege, M.; Brekelmans, C.T.; Boetes, C.; Besnard, P.E.; Zonderland, H.M.; Obdeijn, I.M.; Manoliu, R.A.; Kok, T.; Peterse, H.L.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M.M.; Muller, S.H.; Meijer, S.; Oosterwijk-Wakka, J.C.; Beex, L.V.A.M.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Koning, H.J. de; Rutgers, E.; Klijn, J.G.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The value of regular surveillance for breast cancer in women with a genetic or familial predisposition to breast cancer is currently unproven. We compared the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with that of mammography for screening in this group of high-risk women. METHODS:

  18. Childhood tumours with a high probability of being part of a tumour predisposition syndrome; reason for referral for genetic consultation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Floor A M; Hopman, Saskia M J; Aalfs, Cora M; Berger, Lieke P V; Bleeker, Fonnet E; Dommering, Charlotte J; Jongmans, Marjolijn C J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314344349; Letteboer, Tom G W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815837; Olderode-Berends, Maran J W; Wagner, Anja; Hennekam, Raoul C; Merks, Johannes H M

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Recognising a tumour predisposition syndrome (TPS) in childhood cancer patients is of major clinical relevance. The presence of a TPS may be suggested by the type of tumour in the child. We present an overview of 23 childhood tumours that in themselves should be a reason to refer a

  19. Childhood tumours with a high probability of being part of a tumour predisposition syndrome; reason for referral for genetic consultation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Floor A. M.; Hopman, Saskia M. J.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Berger, Lieke P. V.; Bleeker, Fonnet E.; Dommering, Charlotte J.; Jongmans, Marjolijn C. J.; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Olderode-Berends, Maran J. W.; Wagner, Anja; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Merks, Johannes H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Recognising a tumour predisposition syndrome (TPS) in childhood cancer patients is of major clinical relevance. The presence of a TPS may be suggested by the type of tumour in the child. We present an overview of 23 childhood tumours that in themselves should be a reason to refer a child for genetic

  20. Childhood tumours with a high probability of being part of a tumour predisposition syndrome; reason for referral for genetic consultation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Floor A. M.; Hopman, Saskia M. J.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Berger, Lieke P. V.; Bleeker, Fonnet E.; Dommering, Charlotte J.; Jongmans, Marjolijn C. J.; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Olderode - Berends, Maran J.W.; Wagner, Anja; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Merks, Johannes H. M.

    Introduction: Recognising a tumour predisposition syndrome (TPS) in childhood cancer patients is of major clinical relevance. The presence of a TPS may be suggested by the type of tumour in the child. We present an overview of 23 childhood tumours that in themselves should be a reason to refer a

  1. Interaction between genetic predisposition to adiposity and dietary protein in relation to subsequent change in body weight and waist circumference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankarfeldt, Mikkel Z; Larsen, Sofus C; Ängquist, Lars; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Roswall, Nina; Overvad, Kim; Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre; Halkjær, Jytte; Tjønneland, Anne; Linneberg, Allan; Toft, Ulla; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Heitmann, Berit L; Astrup, Arne; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2014-01-01

    Genetic predisposition to adiposity may interact with dietary protein in relation to changes of anthropometry. To investigate the interaction between genetic predisposition to higher body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) or waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRBMI) and dietary protein in relation to subsequent change in body weight (ΔBW) or change in WC (ΔWC). Three different Danish cohorts were used. In total 7,054 individuals constituted the study population with information on diet, 50 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BMI, WC or WHRBMI, as well as potential confounders. Mean follow-up time was ∼5 years. Four genetic predisposition-scores were based on the SNPs; a complete-score including all selected adiposity- associated SNPs, and three scores including BMI, WC or WHRBMI associated polymorphisms, respectively. The association between protein intake and ΔBW or ΔWC were examined and interactions between SNP-score and protein were investigated. Analyses were based on linear regressions using macronutrient substitution models and meta-analyses. When protein replaced carbohydrate, meta-analyses showed no associations with ΔBW (41.0 gram/y/5 energy% protein, [95% CI: -32.3; 114.3]) or ΔWC (genetic predisposition to general and abdominal adiposity, assessed by gene-scores, does not seem to modulate the influence of dietary protein on ΔBW or ΔWC.

  2. Climate change induced effects on the predisposition of forests of the water protection zone Wildalpen to disturbances by bark beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, P.; Pennerstorfer, J.; Schopf, A.

    2012-04-01

    The provision of drinking water of high quality is a precious service of forests. Large-scale disturbances like forest fires, wind throws, pest outbreaks and subsequent clear cutting may lead to changes in hydrology (runoff as well as percolation). Furthermore, water quality can be negatively influenced by increased erosion, increased decomposition of litter and humus and leaching of nitrate. Large-scale epidemics of forest pests may induce forest decline at landscape scale with subsequent long-lasting negative effects on water quality. The European spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus (L.), is one of the most significant sources of mortality in mature spruce forest ecosystems in Eurasia. The objective of this study was to apply a complex predisposition assessment system for hazard rating and for the evaluation of climate change impacts for the water protection forests of the City of Vienna in Wildalpen. The following steps have been done to adapt/apply the bark beetle phenology model and the hazard rating system: -application, adaptation and validation of the bark beetle phenology model PHENIPS concerning start of dispersion, brood initiation, duration of development, beginning of sister broods, voltinism and hibernation - spatial/temporal modelling of the phenology and voltinism of I. typographus using past, present as well as projected climate data - application and validation of the stand- and site related long-term predisposition assessment system using forest stand/site data, annual damage reports and outputs of phenology modelling as data input - mapping of endangered areas and assessment of future susceptibility to infestations by I. typographus and other disturbing agents based on climate scenarios using GIS. The assessment of site- and stand-related predisposition revealed that the forest stands in Wildalpen are highly susceptible to bark beetle infestation. More than 65% of the stands were assigned to the predisposition classes high/very high. Only 10% of

  3. John Strong (1941 - 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    Wickens, F

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on Monday 31st July, a few days before his 65th birthday John started his career working with a group from Westfield College, under the leadership of Ted Bellamy. He obtained his PhD and spent the early part of his career on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), but after the early 1970s his research was focussed on experiments in CERN. Over the years he made a number of notable contributions to experiments in CERN: The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras to record the sparks in the spark chambers; He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems; He was responsible for the second level trigger system for the ALEPH detector and spent five years leading a team that designed and built the system, which ran for twelve years with only minor interventions. Following ALEPH he tur...

  4. Stirring Strongly Coupled Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir; Rajagopal, Krishna; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2009-01-01

    We determine the energy it takes to move a test quark along a circle of radius L with angular frequency w through the strongly coupled plasma of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory. We find that for most values of L and w the energy deposited by stirring the plasma in this way is governed either by the drag force acting on a test quark moving through the plasma in a straight line with speed v=Lw or by the energy radiated by a quark in circular motion in the absence of any plasma, whichever is larger. There is a continuous crossover from the drag-dominated regime to the radiation-dominated regime. In the crossover regime we find evidence for significant destructive interference between energy loss due to drag and that due to radiation as if in vacuum. The rotating quark thus serves as a model system in which the relative strength of, and interplay between, two different mechanisms of parton energy loss is accessible via a controlled classical gravity calculation. We close by speculating on the implicati...

  5. Strong-interaction nonuniversality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkas, R.R.; Foot, R.; He, X.; Joshi, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    The universal QCD color theory is extended to an SU(3) 1 direct product SU(3) 2 direct product SU(3) 3 gauge theory, where quarks of the ith generation transform as triplets under SU(3)/sub i/ and singlets under the other two factors. The usual color group is then identified with the diagonal subgroup, which remains exact after symmetry breaking. The gauge bosons associated with the 16 broken generators then form two massive octets under ordinary color. The interactions between quarks and these heavy gluonlike particles are explicitly nonuniversal and thus an exploration of their physical implications allows us to shed light on the fundamental issue of strong-interaction universality. Nonuniversality and weak flavor mixing are shown to generate heavy-gluon-induced flavor-changing neutral currents. The phenomenology of these processes is studied, as they provide the major experimental constraint on the extended theory. Three symmetry-breaking scenarios are presented. The first has color breaking occurring at the weak scale, while the second and third divorce the two scales. The third model has the interesting feature of radiatively induced off-diagonal Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements

  6. A genetic predisposition score associates with reduced aerobic capacity in response to acute normobaric hypoxia in lowlanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masschelein, Evi; Puype, Joke; Broos, Siacia; Van Thienen, Ruud; Deldicque, Louise; Lambrechts, Diether; Hespel, Peter; Thomis, Martine

    2015-03-01

    Given the high inter-individual variability in the sensitivity to high altitude, we hypothesize the presence of underlying genetic factors. The aim of this study was to construct a genetic predisposition score based on previously identified high-altitude gene variants to explain the inter-individual variation in the reduced maximal O2 uptake (ΔVo2max) in response to acute hypoxia. Ninety-six healthy young male Belgian lowlanders were included. In both normobaric normoxia (Fio2=20.9%) and acute normobaric hypoxia (Fio2=10.7%-12.5%) Vo2max was measured. Forty-one SNPs in 21 genes were genotyped. A stepwise regression analysis was applied to detect a subset of SNPs to be associated with ΔVo2max. This subset of SNPs was included in the genetic predisposition score. A general linear model and regression analysis with age, weight, height, hypoxic protocol group, and Vo2max in normoxia as covariates were used to test the explained variance of the genetic predisposition score. A ROC analysis was performed to discriminate between the low- and high ΔVo2max subgroups. A stepwise regression analysis revealed a subset of SNPs [rs833070 (VEGFA), rs4253778 (PPARA), rs6735530 (EPAS1), rs4341 (ACE), rs1042713 (ADRB2), and rs1042714 (ADRB2)] to be associated with ΔVo2max. The genetic predisposition score was found to be an independent predictive variable with a partial explained variance of 23% (pgenetic predisposition score showed a significantly predictive value for ΔVo2max.

  7. Local-regional control in breast cancer patients with a possible genetic predisposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, Laura M.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Thames, Howard D.; Strom, Eric A.; McNeese, Marsha D.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Singletary, S. Eva; Heaton, Keith M.; Hunt, Kelly K.

    2000-01-01

    %, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with a possible genetic predisposition to breast cancer had low 5-year rates of local recurrence when treated with breast conserving surgery and radiation, but the local failure rate exceeded 50% when radiation was omitted. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that patients with an underlying genetic predisposition develop cancers with radiosensitive phenotypes

  8. Is There a Genetic Predisposition to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Rakesh; Dhillon, Mandeep Singh; Sharma, Siddhartha; Prabhakar, Sharad; Bhandari, Mohit

    2016-12-01

    Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are among the most common knee ligament injuries and frequently warrant reconstruction. The etiopathogenesis of these injuries has focused mainly on mechanism of trauma, patient sex, and anatomic factors as predisposing causes. Several genetic factors that could predispose to an ACL tear have recently been reported. This systematic review summarizes the current evidence for a genetic predisposition to ACL tears. The principal research question was to identify genetic factors, based on the available literature, that could predispose an individual to an ACL tear. Systematic review. The PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, and HuGE databases were searched; the search was run from the period of inception until June 21, 2015. A secondary search was performed by screening the references of full-text articles obtained and by manually searching selected journals. Articles were screened with prespecified inclusion criteria. The quality of studies included in the review was assessed for risk of bias by 2 reviewers using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. A total of 994 records were identified by the search, out of which 17 studies (16 case-control studies and 1 cross-sectional study) were included in the final review. Two studies observed a familial predisposition to an ACL tear. Fourteen studies looked at specific gene polymorphisms in 20 genes, from which different polymorphisms in 10 genes were positively associated with an ACL tear. In addition to these polymorphisms, 8 haplotypes were associated with ACL tear. One study looked at gene expression analysis. Although specific gene polymorphisms and haplotypes have been identified, it is difficult to come to a conclusion on the basis of the existing literature. Several sources of bias have been identified in these studies, and the results cannot be extrapolated to the general population. More studies are needed in larger populations of different ethnicities. Gene-gene interactions and gene

  9. Detection of genetic variants affecting cattle behaviour and their impact on milk production: a genome-wide association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Juliane; Brand, Bodo; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Graunke, Katharina L; Langbein, Jan; Knaust, Jacqueline; Kühn, Christa; Schwerin, Manfred

    2016-02-01

    Behaviour traits of cattle have been reported to affect important production traits, such as meat quality and milk performance as well as reproduction and health. Genetic predisposition is, together with environmental stimuli, undoubtedly involved in the development of behaviour phenotypes. Underlying molecular mechanisms affecting behaviour in general and behaviour and productions traits in particular still have to be studied in detail. Therefore, we performed a genome-wide association study in an F2 Charolais × German Holstein cross-breed population to identify genetic variants that affect behaviour-related traits assessed in an open-field and novel-object test and analysed their putative impact on milk performance. Of 37,201 tested single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs), four showed a genome-wide and 37 a chromosome-wide significant association with behaviour traits assessed in both tests. Nine of the SNPs that were associated with behaviour traits likewise showed a nominal significant association with milk performance traits. On chromosomes 14 and 29, six SNPs were identified to be associated with exploratory behaviour and inactivity during the novel-object test as well as with milk yield traits. Least squares means for behaviour and milk performance traits for these SNPs revealed that genotypes associated with higher inactivity and less exploratory behaviour promote higher milk yields. Whether these results are due to molecular mechanisms simultaneously affecting behaviour and milk performance or due to a behaviour predisposition, which causes indirect effects on milk performance by influencing individual reactivity, needs further investigation. © 2015 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  10. Prophylactic surgery in women with a hereditary predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, A; Rebbeck, T R; Wood, W C; Weber, B L

    2000-05-01

    To review the published literature on the efficacy and adverse effects of prophylactic mastectomy (PM) and prophylactic oophorectomy (PO) in women with a hereditary predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer and to provide management recommendations for these women. Using the terms "prophylactic," "preventive," "bilateral," "mastectomy," "oophorectomy," and "ovariectomy," a MEDLINE search of the English-language literature for articles related to PM and PO was performed. The bibliographies of these articles were reviewed to identify additional relevant references. There have been no prospective trials of PM or PO for the reduction of breast cancer or ovarian cancer incidence or mortality. Most of the available retrospective studies are composed of women who had surgery for a variety of indications and in whom genetic risk was not well characterized. However, some reports in women at increased risk of breast or ovarian cancer have shown that PM and PO can reduce cancer incidence. Interest in and use of PM and PO are high among physicians and high-risk women. PM and PO seem to be associated with considerable reduction in the risk of breast and ovarian cancer, albeit incomplete. The surgical morbidity of PM and PO is low, but the complications of premature menopause may be significant, and few studies address quality-of-life issues in women who have opted for PM and PO. Management recommendations for high-risk individuals are presented on the basis of the available evidence.

  11. Relationship between personality and psychopathology in a longitudinal community study: a test of the predisposition model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengartner, M P; Ajdacic-Gross, V; Wyss, C; Angst, J; Rössler, W

    2016-06-01

    Mounting evidence supports the notion that personality is crucial in the aetiopathology of common mental disorders, but studies that allow for aetiological conclusions are lacking. The aim of the present study was thus to provide a test of the predisposition model. We analysed data from the Zurich Cohort Study, a 30-year longitudinal epidemiological community study of an adult cohort (n = 591) from 1979 to 2008. Personality was assessed in 1988 with an established personality questionnaire, and psychopathology through seven semi-structured interviews between 1979 and 2008. On the basis of personality assessment from 1988, used as predictor of subsequent psychopathology (1993-2008), while adjusting for sex and prior mental disorders (1979-1988), neuroticism related significantly with future major depression episodes [odds ratio (OR) = 1.41], anxiety disorders (OR = 1.32) and depression treatment use (OR = 1.41). When participants with a past 10-year history (i.e. 1979-1988) of either major depression, anxiety disorder or depression treatment use were excluded, neuroticism in 1988 still significantly predicted first incidence (i.e. 1993-2008) of major depression episodes (OR = 1.53) and depression treatment use (OR = 1.84). The present study provides compelling evidence that the personality trait of neuroticism constitutes an independent risk factor for subsequent major depression episodes and use of respective professional treatments, which serves as a proxy for particularly severe and impairing depression episodes. We therefore advocate that personality traits could provide clinically useful prognostic information when considered carefully.

  12. Genetic association of SNPs in the FTO gene and predisposition to obesity in Malaysian Malays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.D. Apalasamy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The common variants in the fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO gene have been previously found to be associated with obesity in various adult populations. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and linkage disequilibrium (LD blocks in various regions of the FTO gene are associated with predisposition to obesity in Malaysian Malays. Thirty-one FTO SNPs were genotyped in 587 (158 obese and 429 non-obese Malaysian Malay subjects. Obesity traits and lipid profiles were measured and single-marker association testing, LD testing, and haplotype association analysis were performed. LD analysis of the FTO SNPs revealed the presence of 57 regions with complete LD (D’ = 1.0. In addition, we detected the association of rs17817288 with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The FTO gene may therefore be involved in lipid metabolism in Malaysian Malays. Two haplotype blocks were present in this region of the FTO gene, but no particular haplotype was found to be significantly associated with an increased risk of obesity in Malaysian Malays.

  13. Impact of “noncaloric” activity-related factors on the predisposition to obesity in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Tremblay

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Angelo Tremblay, Émilie Pérusse-Lachance, Patrice BrassardDivision de Kinésiologie, PEPS, Université Laval and Centre de Recherche de l’Institut Universitaire en Cardiologie et Pneumologie de Québec, Québec, CanadaAbstract: The research related to childhood obesity generally emphasizes the impact of unhealthy eating and sedentary behavior as the main determinants of the predisposition to the positive energy balance that underlies excess body fat accumulation. Recent investigations have, however, demonstrated that “noncaloric” activity-related factors can induce a significant imbalance between spontaneous energy intake and energy expenditure. This is the case for short sleep duration that favors hormonal changes that increase hunger and energy intake. This agrees with our research experience demonstrating that short sleeping predicts the risk of obesity in children to a greater extent than sedentary behavior. Recent research by our team has also showed that demanding mental work promotes a substantial increase in energy intake without altering energy expenditure. In addition, our preliminary data suggest that the regular practice of school-related cognitive efforts is predictive of an increase in abdominal fat accumulation. As discussed in this paper, individual variations in brain oxygenation and its related cerebral aerobic fitness might play a role in the relationship between mental work, energy intake, and the risk of excess body weight.Keywords: sleep duration, mental work, brain oxygenation, energy intake, energy expenditure

  14. Cliff-edge model predicts intergenerational predisposition to dystocia and Caesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitteroecker, Philipp; Windhager, Sonja; Pavlicev, Mihaela

    2017-10-31

    Recently, we presented the cliff-edge model to explain the evolutionary persistence of relatively high incidences of fetopelvic disproportion (FPD) in human childbirth. According to this model, the regular application of Caesarean sections since the mid-20th century has triggered an evolutionary increase of fetal size relative to the dimensions of the maternal birth canal, which, in turn, has inflated incidences of FPD. While this prediction is difficult to test in epidemiological data on Caesarean sections, the model also implies that women born by Caesarean because of FPD are more likely to develop FPD in their own childbirth compared with women born vaginally. Multigenerational epidemiological studies indeed evidence such an intergenerational predisposition to surgical delivery. When confined to anatomical indications, these studies report risks for Caesarean up to twice as high for women born by Caesarean compared with women born vaginally. These findings provide independent support for our model, which we show here predicts that the risk of FPD for mothers born by Caesarean because of FPD is 2.8 times the risk for mothers born vaginally. The congruence between these data and our prediction lends support to the cliff-edge model of obstetric selection and its underlying assumptions, despite the genetic and anatomical idealizations involved. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  15. Pre-disposition and epigenetics govern variation in bacterial survival upon stress.

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    Ming Ni

    Full Text Available Bacteria suffer various stresses in their unpredictable environment. In response, clonal populations may exhibit cell-to-cell variation, hypothetically to maximize their survival. The origins, propagation, and consequences of this variability remain poorly understood. Variability persists through cell division events, yet detailed lineage information for individual stress-response phenotypes is scarce. This work combines time-lapse microscopy and microfluidics to uniformly manipulate the environmental changes experienced by clonal bacteria. We quantify the growth rates and RpoH-driven heat-shock responses of individual Escherichia coli within their lineage context, stressed by low streptomycin concentrations. We observe an increased variation in phenotypes, as different as survival from death, that can be traced to asymmetric division events occurring prior to stress induction. Epigenetic inheritance contributes to the propagation of the observed phenotypic variation, resulting in three-fold increase of the RpoH-driven expression autocorrelation time following stress induction. We propose that the increased permeability of streptomycin-stressed cells serves as a positive feedback loop underlying this epigenetic effect. Our results suggest that stochasticity, pre-disposition, and epigenetic effects are at the source of stress-induced variability. Unlike in a bet-hedging strategy, we observe that cells with a higher investment in maintenance, measured as the basal RpoH transcriptional activity prior to antibiotic treatment, are more likely to give rise to stressed, frail progeny.

  16. The physical education predisposition scale: Preliminary tests of reliability and validity in Australian students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilland, Toni A; Brown, Trent D; Fairclough, Stuart J

    2018-02-01

    The main aim of this study was to psychometrically test the Physical Education Predisposition Scale (PEPS) with a cohort of Australian students, to assess secondary school students' perceived PE ability and PE worth. Secondary aims were to explore how the two variables were related and to investigate age and gender differences. Altogether, 266 Year 7, 8, 9 and 10 students (aged 12-16 years), from four schools within the South Eastern region of Melbourne, completed the PEPS at both time points. Principal components analysis revealed the presence of a simple two-factor structure explaining 66.9% of the variance. Factor 1 (labelled perceived PE worth) reflected enjoyment and attitude (α = .91), and factor 2 (labelled perceived PE ability) represented perceptions of competence and self-efficacy (α = .92). Significant positive correlations were observed between the two factors (r = .50-.82, P PEPS as a concise measurement tool for use in the PE setting, for both teachers and researchers.

  17. Genetic association of SNPs in the FTO gene and predisposition to obesity in Malaysian Malays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apalasamy, Y.D.; Ming, M.F.; Rampal, S.; Bulgiba, A.; Mohamed, Z.

    2012-01-01

    The common variants in the fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO) gene have been previously found to be associated with obesity in various adult populations. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks in various regions of the FTO gene are associated with predisposition to obesity in Malaysian Malays. Thirty-one FTO SNPs were genotyped in 587 (158 obese and 429 non-obese) Malaysian Malay subjects. Obesity traits and lipid profiles were measured and single-marker association testing, LD testing, and haplotype association analysis were performed. LD analysis of the FTO SNPs revealed the presence of 57 regions with complete LD (D' = 1.0). In addition, we detected the association of rs17817288 with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The FTO gene may therefore be involved in lipid metabolism in Malaysian Malays. Two haplotype blocks were present in this region of the FTO gene, but no particular haplotype was found to be significantly associated with an increased risk of obesity in Malaysian Malays

  18. The Effect of Phototherapy on Cancer Predisposition Genes of Diabetic and Normal Human Skin Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongsathorn Chotikasemsri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate whether LED light at different wavelengths affects the expression profile of 143 cancer predisposition genes in both diabetic and normal human fibroblasts. In this study, both diabetic and normal fibroblast cell lines were cultured and irradiated with red (635 nm, green (520 nm, and blue (465 nm LED light for 10 minutes at 0.67 J/cm2 each. After that, mRNA from all cell lines was extracted for microarray analysis. We found that green light activates EPHB2, KIT, ANTXR2, ESCO2, MSR1, EXT1, TSC1, KIT, NF1, BUB1B, FANCD2, EPCAM, FANCD2, NF, DIS3L2, and RET in normal fibroblast cells, while blue and red light can upregulate RUNX1, PDGFRA, EHBP1, GPC3, AXIN2, KDR, GLMN, MSMB, EPHB2, MSR1, KIT, FANCD2, BMPR1A, BUB1B, PDE11A, and RET. Therefore, genetic screening before phototherapy treatment may be required.

  19. The Effect of Phototherapy on Cancer Predisposition Genes of Diabetic and Normal Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotikasemsri, Pongsathorn; Tangtrakulwanich, Boonsin; Sangkhathat, Surasak

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether LED light at different wavelengths affects the expression profile of 143 cancer predisposition genes in both diabetic and normal human fibroblasts. In this study, both diabetic and normal fibroblast cell lines were cultured and irradiated with red (635 nm), green (520 nm), and blue (465 nm) LED light for 10 minutes at 0.67 J/cm 2 each. After that, mRNA from all cell lines was extracted for microarray analysis. We found that green light activates EPHB2, KIT, ANTXR2, ESCO2, MSR1, EXT1, TSC1, KIT, NF1, BUB1B, FANCD2, EPCAM, FANCD2, NF, DIS3L2, and RET in normal fibroblast cells, while blue and red light can upregulate RUNX1, PDGFRA, EHBP1, GPC3, AXIN2, KDR, GLMN, MSMB, EPHB2, MSR1, KIT, FANCD2, BMPR1A, BUB1B, PDE11A, and RET. Therefore, genetic screening before phototherapy treatment may be required.

  20. Arousal Predisposition as a Vulnerability Indicator for Psychosis: A General Population Online Stress Induction Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Clamor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Explanatory models ascribe to arousability a central role for the development of psychotic symptoms. Thus, a disposition to hyperarousal (i.e., increased arousal predisposition (AP may serve as an underlying vulnerability indicator for psychosis by interacting with stressors to cause symptoms. In this case, AP, stress-response, and psychotic symptoms should be linked before the development of a diagnosable psychotic disorder. We conducted a cross-sectional online study in a population sample (N=104; Mage=27.7 years, SD=11.2, range 18–70. Participants rated their AP and subclinical psychotic symptoms. Participants reported their stress-levels before and after two stress inductions including an arithmetic and a social stressor. The participants with an increased AP generally felt more stressed. However, AP was not associated with the specific stress-response. As expected, positive psychotic symptoms were significantly associated with AP, but this was not mediated by general stress-levels. Its association to subtle, nonclinical psychotic symptoms supports our assumption that AP could be a vulnerability indicator for psychosis. The trait is easily accessible via a short self-report and could facilitate the identification of people at risk and be a promising target for early stress-management. Further research is needed to clarify its predictive value for stress-responses.

  1. Genetic association of SNPs in the FTO gene and predisposition to obesity in Malaysian Malays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apalasamy, Y.D. [Pharmacogenomics Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ming, M.F.; Rampal, S.; Bulgiba, A. [Julius Centre University of Malaya, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Mohamed, Z. [Pharmacogenomics Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2012-08-24

    The common variants in the fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO) gene have been previously found to be associated with obesity in various adult populations. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks in various regions of the FTO gene are associated with predisposition to obesity in Malaysian Malays. Thirty-one FTO SNPs were genotyped in 587 (158 obese and 429 non-obese) Malaysian Malay subjects. Obesity traits and lipid profiles were measured and single-marker association testing, LD testing, and haplotype association analysis were performed. LD analysis of the FTO SNPs revealed the presence of 57 regions with complete LD (D' = 1.0). In addition, we detected the association of rs17817288 with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The FTO gene may therefore be involved in lipid metabolism in Malaysian Malays. Two haplotype blocks were present in this region of the FTO gene, but no particular haplotype was found to be significantly associated with an increased risk of obesity in Malaysian Malays.

  2. Genetic predisposition to radiation-related cancer and potential implications for risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigurdson, A.J.; Stram, D.O.

    2012-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that risk estimates for cancer associated with radiation exposure incorporate individuals who are more and less inherently susceptible to the carcinogenic effects of radiation, and the technology to further evaluate this issue is now available. For example, genome-wide association scan studies could be undertaken to address, at least in part, the direction of causality in the observations of differential sensitivity to radiomimetic agents in cancer cases compared with normal individuals, thereby building on previous observations that sensitivity to these agents is higher in apparently normal individuals carrying gene mutations in NBS and ATM. Direct studies of risk of second cancers in relation to radiation are underway, and some results have been reported (e.g. for the PRDM1 gene as related to sensitivity to radiation-related cancers after treatment for Hodgkin’s lymphoma). It is important to understand the risk synergies between variants affecting associations with various cancers defining susceptibility in unexposed populations and the excess risk in populations therapeutically or occupationally exposed to radiation for the purpose of risk protection, especially as additional baseline risk variants are discovered in increasingly large-scale analyses. While there are studies that are beginning to address these questions, there have been no compelling new discoveries, to date, to indicate that predisposition information should be included in risk assessment. The conclusions in ICRP Publications 79 and 103 appear relevant today.

  3. Myc contribution to γ-ray induced thymic lymphomas in mice of different genetic predispositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Toshihiro

    2008-01-01

    Myc gene has been suggested to be one of radiation targets in early genesis of γ ray-induced thymic lymphoma where Myc trisomy often occurs, and Myc activation results in p53 activation and apoptosis. The purpose of this study is to see the effects of radiation and mutation on Myc activation in the mouse. The lymphoma was induced by a single exposure of 3 Gy γ ray in BALB/c Bcl11b/Rit+/- and MSM p53-/- mice at 4 weeks after birth and by 4 weekly exposures of 2.5 Gy in p53+/- mouse. Genetic allele analysis for trisomy identification in the lymphoma was done by quantitative PCR using brain DNA as a control. Myc trisomy was found in the lymphoma of p53+/- mouse in 62% (23/37 animals) and of p53+/+, 66% (23/25), a similar frequency, suggesting that the target of radiation was not only the Myc activation. In addition, Myc trisomy frequency was 15% (4/27) in the lymphoma of Bcl11b+/+p53+/- and 36% (9/25), in heterozygote Bcl11b+/-. This finding suggested that the functional failure of Bcl11b reduced the contribution of Myc trisomy to the genesis. It was concluded that contribution of Myc trisomy to genesis of the lymphoma was dependent on genetic predisposition, and Myc-activated-, Bcl11b/Rit1-signal pathways played a parallel role in the genesis. (R.T.)

  4. Diagnosis of genetic predisposition for lactose intolerance by high resolution melting analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacour, Hervé; Leduc, Amandine; Louçano-Perdriat, Andréa; Plantamura, Julie; Ceppa, Franck

    2017-02-01

    Lactose, the principle sugar in milk, is a disaccharide hydrolyzed by intestinal lactase into glucose and galactose, which are absorbed directly by diffusion in the intestine. The decline of lactase expression (or hypolactasia) in intestinal microvilli after weaning is a normal phenomenon in mammals known as lactase deficiency. It is observed in nearly 75% of the world population and is an inherited autosomal recessive trait with incomplete penetrance. It is caused by SNPs in a regulatory element for lactase gene. In Indo-European, lactase deficiency is associated with rs4982235 SNP (or -13910C>T). The aim of this study is to describe a method based on high resolution melting for rapidly detecting genetic predisposition to lactose intolerance. Analytical performance of the assay was assessed by evaluating within and betwwen-run precision and by comparing the results (n = 50 patients) obtained with the HRM assay to those obtained with the gold standard (Sanger sequencing of the region of interest). In silico prediction of HRM curves was performed to evaluate the potential impact of the other SNPs described within the PCR product on the HRM analytical performances. The assay has good performance (CV lactose intolerance.

  5. Genetic predisposition of IL-10 promoter polymorphisms with risk of multiple sclerosis: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, V; Akram Husain, R S; Ahmed, Shiek Ssj

    2017-05-15

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a anti-inflammatory cytokine, which controls inflammation by inhibiting the synthesis of several cytokines produced by Th1 cells and macrophages. The association between Interleukin-10 promoter polymorphisms with the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) remains inconclusive. In this study, a meta-analysis has been performed to assess the relationship between IL-10 gene polymorphisms rs1800896, rs1800871 and rs1800872 with the risk of MS. Nine case-control studies were selected involving 2755 participants. The association between the polymorphisms and MS was examined by the pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in allelic, homozygote, heterozygote, dominant and recessive genetic models. Of analyzed genetic models, the pooled ORs and CIs of each SNPs calculated based on random (I 2 >50) or fixed effects (I 2 0.05) of genetic predisposition with MS susceptibility across Asian and Caucasian populations. In addition, assessment based on funnel plot and Egger's linear regression test suggests no publication bias in all analyzed genetic models. Overall, our results demonstrated that rs1800896, rs1800871 and rs1800872 polymorphisms may not be the risk factor for the development of MS in both the populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Status and Longitudinal Changes in Weight and Waist Circumference: Influence of Genetic Predisposition to Adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sofus C; Ängquist, Lars; Moldovan, Max; Huikari, Ville; Sebert, Sylvain; Cavadino, Alana; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; Skaaby, Tea; Linneberg, Allan; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Toft, Ulla; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Power, Chris; Hyppönen, Elina; Heitmann, Berit L; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the relationship between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and changes in measures of adiposity have shown inconsistent results, and interaction with genetic predisposition to obesity has rarely been examined. We examined whether 25(OH)D was associated with subsequent annual changes in body weight (ΔBW) or waist circumference (ΔWC), and whether the associations were modified by genetic predisposition to a high BMI, WC or waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRBMI). The study was based on 10,898 individuals from the Danish Inter99, the 1958 British Birth Cohort and the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966. We combined 42 adiposity-associated Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) into four scores indicating genetic predisposition to BMI, WC and WHRBMI, or all three traits combined. Linear regression was used to examine the association between serum 25(OH)D and ΔBW or ΔWC, SNP-score × 25(OH)D interactions were examined, and results from the individual cohorts were meta-analyzed. In the meta-analyses, we found no evidence of an association between 25(OH)D and ΔBW (-9.4 gram/y per 10 nmol/L higher 25(OH)D [95% CI: -23.0, +4.3; P = 0.18]) or ΔWC (-0.06 mm/y per 10 nmol/L higher 25(OH)D [95% CI: -0.17, +0.06; P = 0.33]). Furthermore, we found no statistically significant interactions between the four SNP-scores and 25(OH)D in relation to ΔBW or ΔWC. Thus, in view of the narrow CIs, our results suggest that an association between 25(OH)D and changes in measures of adiposity is absent or marginal. Similarly, the study provided evidence that there is either no or very limited dependence on genetic predisposition to adiposity.

  7. Heritable major histocompatibility complex class II-associated differences in production of tumor necrosis factor. alpha. : Relevance to genetic predisposition to systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, C.O.; Fronek, Z.; Koo, M.; McDevitt, H.O. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA)); Lewis, G.C. (Genentech Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Hansen, J.A. (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The authors report on the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and TNF-{beta} by mitogen-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes or enriched monocyte subpopulations from human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typed healthy subjects. The results indicate that HLA-DR2- and DQw1-positive donors frequently exhibit low production of TNF-{alpha}, whereas DR3- and DR4-positive subjects show high levels of TNF-{alpha} production. No correlation between TNF-{alpha} levels and HLA-A, -B, and -C genotype was found. The relevance of this quantitative polymorphism to the genetic predisposition to lupus nephritis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients was investigated. DR2, DQw1-positive SLE patients show low levels of TNF-{alpha} inducibility; this genotype is also associated with an increased incidence of lupus nephritis. DR3-positive SLE patients, on the other hand, are not predisposed to nephritis, and these patients have high TNF-{alpha} production. DR4 haplotype is associated with high TNF-{alpha} inducibility and is negatively correlated with lupus nephritis. These data may help explain the strong association between HLA-DR2, DQw1 in SLE patients and their susceptibility to nephritis.

  8. An overview of the role of prophylactic surgery in the management of individuals with a hereditary cancer predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oseni, Tawakalitu; Jatoi, Ismail

    2008-08-01

    Genetic testing for cancer susceptibility has been implemented widely in recent years, with the hope that it eventually will lead to a reduction in cancer-related mortality. Asymptomatic individuals who have a genetic predisposition for cancer can be identified, and many may benefit from early intervention. Not all of these individuals will develop cancer, however, and the penetrance varies among individuals with different mutations. Surveillance, chemoprevention, and prophylactic surgery are accepted options for managing individuals who have a genetic predisposition for cancer. Yet, there are no randomized prospective trials that have assessed the impact of these interventions specifically in mutation carriers. The decision to undergo prophylactic surgery therefore should be made after all other management options are considered, and the patient is informed of the potential risks and benefits of surgery. This article provides an overview of the role of prophylactic surgery for managing patients who have a genetic predisposition for cancer. It specifically discusses the potential role of surgery in preventing breast, colon, thyroid, and gastric cancers. Additionally, it discusses the types of prophylactic surgical procedures that are performed commonly, and their expanding role in cancer prevention.

  9. Pediatric Predispositional Genetic Risk Communication: Potential Utility for Prevention and Control of Melanoma Risk as an Exemplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yelena P; Mays, Darren; Kohlmann, Wendy; Tercyak, Kenneth P

    2017-10-01

    Predispositional genetic testing among minor children is intensely debated due to the potential benefits and harms of providing this type of genetic information to children and their families. Existing guidelines on pediatric genetic testing state that predispositional testing could be appropriate for minors if preventive services exist that mitigate children's risk for or severity of the health condition in question. We use the example of hereditary melanoma to illustrate the rationale for and potential application of genetic risk communication for an adult-onset cancer to a pediatric population where childhood behaviors may reduce risk of disease later in life. We draw from the adult melanoma genetic risk communication and pediatric health behavior change literatures to suggest ways in which genetic test reporting and complementary education could be delivered to children who carry a hereditary risk for melanoma and their families in order to foster children's engagement in melanoma preventive behaviors. Genetic discoveries will continue to yield new opportunities to provide predispositional genetic risk information to unaffected individuals, including children, and could be delivered within programs that provide personalized and translational approaches to cancer prevention.

  10. Identification of germline alterations in breast cancer predisposition genes among Malaysian breast cancer patients using panel testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, P S; Wen, W X; Fadlullah, M Z H; Yoon, S Y; Lee, S Y; Thong, M K; Yip, C H; Mohd Taib, N A; Teo, S H

    2016-10-01

    Although an association between protein-truncating variants and breast cancer risk has been established for 11 genes, only alterations in BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and PALB2 have been reported in Asian populations. Given that the age of onset of breast cancer is lower in Asians, it is estimated that inherited predisposition to breast cancer may be more significant. To determine the potential utility of panel testing, we investigated the prevalence of germline alterations in 11 established and 4 likely breast cancer genes in a cross-sectional hospital-based cohort of 108 moderate to high-risk breast cancer patients using targeted next generation sequencing. Twenty patients (19%) were identified to carry deleterious mutations, of whom 13 (12%) were in the BRCA1 or BRCA2, 6 (6%) were in five other known breast cancer predisposition genes and 1 patient had a mutation in both BRCA2 and BARD1. Our study shows that BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for the majority of genetic predisposition to breast cancer in our cohort of Asian women. Although mutations in other known breast cancer genes are found, the functional significance and breast cancer risk have not yet been determined, thus limiting the clinical utility of panel testing in Asian populations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. No (Wo)Man Is an Island-The Influence of Physicians' Personal Predisposition to Labia Minora Appearance on Their Clinical Decision Making : A Cross-Sectional Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitsma, Welmoed; Mourits, Marian J. E.; Koning, Merel; Pascal, Astrid; van der Lei, Berend

    Introduction. Physicians are increasingly presented with women requesting a labia minora reduction procedure. Aim. To assess the influencing factor of personal predisposition in general practitioners, gynecologists, and plastic surgeons to labia minora appearance in relation to their willingness to

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphism rs1800872 in the promoter region of the IL10 gene is associated with predisposition to chronic hepatitis C in Russian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhash, Andrey V; Kochneva, Galina V; Chub, Elena V; Romaschenko, Aida G

    2018-03-01

    Previously, we studied an association of two IL28B gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and three IL10 gene SNPs with predisposition to tick-borne encephalitis in a Russian population. In this study, a possible involvement of these SNPs in the development of predisposition to chronic hepatitis C (caused by structurally similar, related virus from the Flaviviridae family) was investigated in the same population. Only the IL10 promoter rs1800872 SNP was associated with predisposition to chronic hepatitis C. This SNP seems to be a common genetic marker of predisposition to two diseases caused by hepatitis C and tick-borne encephalitis viruses in Russian population. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Validation of a clinical screening instrument for tumour predisposition syndromes in patients with childhood cancer (TuPS) : Protocol for a prospective, observational, multicentre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Floor A M; Hopman, Saskia M J; De Borgie, Corianne A J M; Hammond, Peter; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Merks, Johannes H M; Aalfs, Cora M.; Anninga, Jakob K.; Berger, Lieke P V; Bleeker, Fonnet E.; De Bont, Eveline S J M; Dommering, Charlotte J.; Van Eijkelenburg, Natasha K A; Van Den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Jongmans, Marjolijn C J; Kors, Wijnanda A.; Letteboer, Tom G W; Loeffen, Jan L C M; Olderode-Berends, Maran J W; Wagner, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Recognising a tumour predisposition syndrome (TPS) in patients with childhood cancer is of significant clinical relevance, as it affects treatment, prognosis and facilitates genetic counselling. Previous studies revealed that only half of the known TPSs are recognised during standard

  14. Predisposition Factors of Students’ Choice in Agriculture, Fisheries and Natural Resources (AFNR Courses (Luzon Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DR. ROMEO C. CLEMENTE

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study is an inquiry into the motivational, personality, and extrinsic variables as factors affecting students’ predisposition in their career choice for agriculture, fisheries and forestry. It features empirical facts generally reflective of the recent conditions of public and private Higher Education Institutions (as NUCAFs, PIAs and PIFs identified by NAFES-CHED and DA of Luzon, Philippines vis-à-vis problems and reasons of continuous decline in the subscription of Filipino students for AFNR courses. Subsumed in the notable findings for Luzon area (i.e., most enrollees and their parents are marginalized; most mothers who are mere housekeepers heavily influence children’s disposition; most professional AFNR parents and enrollees’ siblings who are now AFNR professionals poorly influence them to take the same course; scholarship grants or free tuition fee as a prime way out to finish college education; personal ideal expectation of students for the government to provide promising local employment; common social motive to participate in addressing problems on food security for the continuously increasing population; economic motive to shorter waiting time for employment; SUCs feel obliged to expand curriculum offering to non-AFNR courses to survive institutional fiscal constraints; dearth of educationally qualified faculty and administrators; campaign for the AFNR curriculum programs as effective strategy to improve enrolment rate; low passing rate in AFNR board examinations due to low participation rate, expensive requirements of review, generic contents of examination, and deficiency on the quality and quantity of facilities/equipment and library holdings in most AFNR State Colleges/Universities served as framework of reference for the formulation of proposed education policy reforms/measures and advocacy interventions designed to spur interest in AFNR courses.

  15. Effect of Genetic Predisposition on Blood Lipid Traits Using Cumulative Risk Assessment in the Korean Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jin Go

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Dyslipidemia, mainly characterized by high triglyceride (TG and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels, is an important etiological factor in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Considering the relationship between childhood obesity and CVD risk, it would be worthwhile to evaluate whether previously identified lipid-related variants in adult subjects are associated with lipid variations in a childhood obesity study (n = 482. In an association analysis for 16 genome-wide association study (GWAS-based candidate loci, we confirmed significant associations of a genetic predisposition to lipoprotein concentrations in a childhood obesity study. Having two loci (rs10503669 at LPL and rs16940212 at LIPC that showed the strongest association with blood levels of TG and HDL-C, we calculated a genetic risk score (GRS, representing the sum of the risk alleles. It has been observed that increasing GRS is significantly associated with decreased HDL-C (effect size, -1.13 ± 0.07 compared to single nucleotide polymorphism combinations without two risk variants. In addition, a positive correlation was observed between allelic dosage score and risk allele (rs10503669 at LPL on high TG levels (effect size, 10.89 ± 0.84. These two loci yielded consistent associations in our previous meta-analysis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the genetic architecture of circulating lipid levels (TG and HDL-C overlap to a large extent in childhood as well as in adulthood. Post-GWAS functional characterization of these variants is further required to elucidate their pathophysiological roles and biological mechanisms.

  16. The Effect of Nutrition and Sleep Habits on Predisposition for Metabolic Syndrome in Greek Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsa, Maria Efthymia; Ioannidis, Anastasios; Zyga, Sofia; Tsironi, Maria; Koutsovitis, Paraskevas; Chatzipanagiotou, Stylianos; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes; Sachlas, Athanasios; Kolovos, Petros; Routsi, Kleopatra; Pistikou, Anna Maria; Kougioumtzi Dimoliani, Dafni Eleni; Rojas Gil, Andrea Paola

    2018-02-02

    To investigate the effect of lifestyle habits in childhood Metabolic Syndrome (MTS). Descriptive correlation study with 480 participants (5-12 years old) using a specially designed questionnaire was conducted. Anthropometric and biochemical analyses were performed. Fifteen percent of children exhibited predisposition for MTS. Regarding sleep habits, logistic regression analysis (LRA) showed that hour of sleep -before 22:00- was associated with decreased waist circumference (WC%) (p = .026). Midday siesta was negatively correlated with systolic (SBP) (p = .001) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (p = .046). In children without MTS, lack of sleep and night time sleep was positively correlated with DBP (p = .044) and fasting blood glucose (FBG) (p = .005). Regarding nutrition habits, fast food consumption was positively correlated with SBP (p = .006) and meat consumption was positively correlated with both Body Mass Index% (BMI%) (p = .038) and WC% (p = .023). LRA showed that fruit (p = .001) and legume (p = .040) consumption was associated with decreased FBG; fish consumption with decreased Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (p = .031), vegetable (p = .054) and cereal consumption (p = .012) with decreased DBP. In children with MTS, fruits were associated with increased FBG (p = .034). In children without MTS, meat consumption was associated with increased LDL (p = .024), cereal with increased WC% (p = .002) and olive products with increased High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and BMI% (p = .037). The adoption of both balanced diet and sleep habits seemed to be crucial for the prevention of MTS. Clinical health nurses could develop and implement preventive intervention programs in order to avoid metabolic complications in adulthood. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Mosaic PPM1D mutations are associated with predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruark, Elise; Snape, Katie; Humburg, Peter; Loveday, Chey; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Brough, Rachel; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Ramsay, Emma; Duarte, Silvana Del Vecchio; Rivas, Manuel A; Warren-Perry, Margaret; Zachariou, Anna; Campion-Flora, Adriana; Hanks, Sandra; Murray, Anne; Ansari Pour, Naser; Douglas, Jenny; Gregory, Lorna; Rimmer, Andrew; Walker, Neil M; Yang, Tsun-Po; Adlard, Julian W; Barwell, Julian; Berg, Jonathan; Brady, Angela F; Brewer, Carole; Brice, Glen; Chapman, Cyril; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; Donaldson, Alan; Douglas, Fiona; Eccles, Diana; Evans, D Gareth; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Henderson, Alex; Izatt, Louise; Kumar, Ajith; Lalloo, Fiona; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick J; Paterson, Joan; Porteous, Mary; Rogers, Mark T; Shanley, Susan; Walker, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Houlston, Richard; Brown, Matthew A; Caufield, Mark J; Deloukas, Panagiotis; McCarthy, Mark I; Todd, John A; Turnbull, Clare; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Ashworth, Alan; Antoniou, Antonis C; Lord, Christopher J; Donnelly, Peter; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-01-17

    Improved sequencing technologies offer unprecedented opportunities for investigating the role of rare genetic variation in common disease. However, there are considerable challenges with respect to study design, data analysis and replication. Using pooled next-generation sequencing of 507 genes implicated in the repair of DNA in 1,150 samples, an analytical strategy focused on protein-truncating variants (PTVs) and a large-scale sequencing case-control replication experiment in 13,642 individuals, here we show that rare PTVs in the p53-inducible protein phosphatase PPM1D are associated with predisposition to breast cancer and ovarian cancer. PPM1D PTV mutations were present in 25 out of 7,781 cases versus 1 out of 5,861 controls (P = 1.12 × 10(-5)), including 18 mutations in 6,912 individuals with breast cancer (P = 2.42 × 10(-4)) and 12 mutations in 1,121 individuals with ovarian cancer (P = 3.10 × 10(-9)). Notably, all of the identified PPM1D PTVs were mosaic in lymphocyte DNA and clustered within a 370-base-pair region in the final exon of the gene, carboxy-terminal to the phosphatase catalytic domain. Functional studies demonstrate that the mutations result in enhanced suppression of p53 in response to ionizing radiation exposure, suggesting that the mutant alleles encode hyperactive PPM1D isoforms. Thus, although the mutations cause premature protein truncation, they do not result in the simple loss-of-function effect typically associated with this class of variant, but instead probably have a gain-of-function effect. Our results have implications for the detection and management of breast and ovarian cancer risk. More generally, these data provide new insights into the role of rare and of mosaic genetic variants in common conditions, and the use of sequencing in their identification.

  18. Women with hereditary breast cancer predispositions should avoid using their smartphones, tablets, and laptops at night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Seyed Ali Reza; Mortazavi, Seyed Mohammad Javad

    2018-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women, both in the developed and developing countries. Women with mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancers. Recent studies show that short-wavelength visible light disturb the secretion of melatonin and causes circadian rhythm disruption. We have previously studied the health effects of exposure to different levels of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) such as mobile phones, mobile base stations, mobile phone jammers, laptop computers, and radars. Moreover, over the past several years, we investigated the health effects of exposure to the short wavelength visible light in the blue region emitted from digital screens. The reduction of melatonin secretion after exposure to blue light emitted from smartphone's screen has been reported to be associated with the negative impact of smartphone use at night on sleep. We have shown that both the blue light and RF-EMFs generated by mobile phones are linked to the disruption of the circadian rhythm in people who use their phones at night. Therefore, if women with hereditary breast cancer predispositions use their smartphones, tablets and laptops at night, disrupted circadian rhythms (suppression of melatonin caused by exposure to blue light emitted from the digital screens), amplifies the risk of breast cancer. It can be concluded that women who carry mutated BRCA1 or BRCA2, or women with family history of breast cancer should avoid using their smartphones, tablets and laptops at night. Using sunglasses with amber lenses, or smartphone applications which decrease the users' exposure to blue light before sleep, at least to some extent, can decrease the risk of circadian rhythm disruption and breast cancer.

  19. Personality Factors Predicting Smartphone Addiction Predisposition: Behavioral Inhibition and Activation Systems, Impulsivity, and Self-Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yejin Kim

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify personality factor-associated predictors of smartphone addiction predisposition (SAP. Participants were 2,573 men and 2,281 women (n = 4,854 aged 20-49 years (Mean ± SD: 33.47 ± 7.52; participants completed the following questionnaires: the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale (K-SAPS for adults, the Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System questionnaire (BIS/BAS, the Dickman Dysfunctional Impulsivity Instrument (DDII, and the Brief Self-Control Scale (BSCS. In addition, participants reported their demographic information and smartphone usage pattern (weekday or weekend average usage hours and main use. We analyzed the data in three steps: (1 identifying predictors with logistic regression, (2 deriving causal relationships between SAP and its predictors using a Bayesian belief network (BN, and (3 computing optimal cut-off points for the identified predictors using the Youden index. Identified predictors of SAP were as follows: gender (female, weekend average usage hours, and scores on BAS-Drive, BAS-Reward Responsiveness, DDII, and BSCS. Female gender and scores on BAS-Drive and BSCS directly increased SAP. BAS-Reward Responsiveness and DDII indirectly increased SAP. We found that SAP was defined with maximal sensitivity as follows: weekend average usage hours > 4.45, BAS-Drive > 10.0, BAS-Reward Responsiveness > 13.8, DDII > 4.5, and BSCS > 37.4. This study raises the possibility that personality factors contribute to SAP. And, we calculated cut-off points for key predictors. These findings may assist clinicians screening for SAP using cut-off points, and further the understanding of SA risk factors.

  20. Personality Factors Predicting Smartphone Addiction Predisposition: Behavioral Inhibition and Activation Systems, Impulsivity, and Self-Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yejin; Jeong, Jo-Eun; Cho, Hyun; Jung, Dong-Jin; Kwak, Minjung; Rho, Mi Jung; Yu, Hwanjo; Kim, Dai-Jin; Choi, In Young

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify personality factor-associated predictors of smartphone addiction predisposition (SAP). Participants were 2,573 men and 2,281 women (n = 4,854) aged 20-49 years (Mean ± SD: 33.47 ± 7.52); participants completed the following questionnaires: the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale (K-SAPS) for adults, the Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System questionnaire (BIS/BAS), the Dickman Dysfunctional Impulsivity Instrument (DDII), and the Brief Self-Control Scale (BSCS). In addition, participants reported their demographic information and smartphone usage pattern (weekday or weekend average usage hours and main use). We analyzed the data in three steps: (1) identifying predictors with logistic regression, (2) deriving causal relationships between SAP and its predictors using a Bayesian belief network (BN), and (3) computing optimal cut-off points for the identified predictors using the Youden index. Identified predictors of SAP were as follows: gender (female), weekend average usage hours, and scores on BAS-Drive, BAS-Reward Responsiveness, DDII, and BSCS. Female gender and scores on BAS-Drive and BSCS directly increased SAP. BAS-Reward Responsiveness and DDII indirectly increased SAP. We found that SAP was defined with maximal sensitivity as follows: weekend average usage hours > 4.45, BAS-Drive > 10.0, BAS-Reward Responsiveness > 13.8, DDII > 4.5, and BSCS > 37.4. This study raises the possibility that personality factors contribute to SAP. And, we calculated cut-off points for key predictors. These findings may assist clinicians screening for SAP using cut-off points, and further the understanding of SA risk factors.

  1. Genetic predisposition and genomic instability in murine stem cells exposed to low LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.A.; Bowler, D.A.; Moore, S.R.; Papworth, D.; Kadhim, M.A.; Goodhead, D.T.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The contribution of genetic factors to the initiation of radiation-induced genomic instability remains poorly understood. Studies with high LET α-particles and very high doses of low LET radiation have described several common mouse strains that differ in their sensitivity to the induction of genomic instability and apoptosis. The aim here was to investigate whether low doses of low LET radiation would elucidate a similar genetic predisposition. To assess the influence of genetic factors on the initiation of genomic instability by low doses of low LET radiation, we irradiated stem cells from two mouse strains known to differ in susceptibility to radiation-induced delayed chromosomal instability. The frequency of delayed chromosomal aberrations was measured in bone marrow cells from CBA/H and C57BL/6 mice after exposure to 0.1 - 2 Gy of 250 kV X-rays. The yield of both chromosomal and chromatid-type aberrations were assessed 13-15 cell divisions post-irradiation in the clonal descendents of surviving stem cells. The apoptotic index of these surviving clones was scored as morphological changes by electron microscopy. At low doses, the frequency of cells with aberrations increased significantly in both strains, contrary to the strain differences observed with high LET α-particles in earlier studies (Watson et al. 1997). The percentage of apoptotic cells was similar between the strains at low doses, with both showing comparable levels of cells with aberrations and apoptotic cells. However, at higher doses, strain differences became evident: CBA/H cells had a substantially higher fraction of cells with aberrations to apoptotic cells, while the converse was true for C57/Bl/6. This data indicates that low doses may be insufficient to initiate the apoptotic pathway, while still resulting in significant induction of delayed chromosomal instability. Overall, these observations have important implications for low dose low LET radiation risk assessment and human

  2. Genetic predisposition to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: Report on 500 patients from the Italian registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetica, Valentina; Sieni, Elena; Pende, Daniela; Danesino, Cesare; De Fusco, Carmen; Locatelli, Franco; Micalizzi, Concetta; Putti, Maria Caterina; Biondi, Andrea; Fagioli, Franca; Moretta, Lorenzo; Griffiths, Gillian M; Luzzatto, Lucio; Aricò, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare life-threatening disease affecting mostly children but also adults and characterized by hyperinflammatory features. A subset of patients, referred to as having familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL), have various underlying genetic abnormalities, the frequencies of which have not been systematically determined previously. This work aims to further our understanding of the pathogenic bases of this rare condition based on an analysis of our 25 years of experience. From our registry, we have analyzed a total of 500 unselected patients with HLH. Biallelic pathogenic mutations defining FHL were found in 171 (34%) patients; the proportion of FHL was much higher (64%) in patients given a diagnosis during the first year of life. Taken together, mutations of the genes PRF1 (FHL2) and UNC13D (FHL3) accounted for 70% of cases of FHL. Overall, a genetic diagnosis was possible in more than 90% of our patients with FHL. Perforin expression and the extent of degranulation have been more useful for diagnosing FHL than hemophagocytosis and the cytotoxicity assay. Of 281 (56%) patients classified as having "sporadic" HLH, 43 had monoallelic mutations in one of the FHL-defining genes. Given this gene dosage effect, FHL is not strictly recessive. We suggest that the clinical syndrome HLH generally results from the combined effects of an exogenous trigger and genetic predisposition. Within this combination, different weights of exogenous and genetic factors account for the wide disease spectrum that ranges from HLH secondary to severe infection to FHL. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic predisposition to albuminuria is associated with increased arterial stiffness: role of elastin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Ortega, M; García-Prieto, C F; Ruiz-Hurtado, G; Steireif, C; González, M C; Schulz, A; Kreutz, R; Fernández-Alfonso, M S; Arribas, S; Somoza, B

    2015-09-01

    The Munich Wistar Frömter (MWF) rat strain represents an experimental model to study cardiovascular alterations under conditions of progressive albuminuria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between genetic predisposition to albuminuria and the development of arterial stiffness and/or vascular remodelling. Experiments were performed in mesenteric arteries from 12-week-old MWF, Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and consomic MWF-6(SHR) and MWF-8(SHR) rats in which chromosomes 6 or 8 associated with albuminuria from MWF were replaced by the respective chromosome from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Incremental distensibility, wall stress and strain were reduced, and arterial stiffness was significantly increased in albuminuric MWF compared with WKY. Albuminuria suppression in both consomic strains was associated with lower β-values in MWF-8(SHR) and MWF-6(SHR) compared with MWF. Moreover, elastin content was significantly lower in MWF external elastic lamina compared with WKY and both consomic strains. In addition, a reduction in arterial external and internal diameter and cross-sectional area was detected in MWF compared with WKY, thus exhibiting an inward hypotrophic remodelling. However, these alterations remained unchanged in both consomic strains. These data demonstrate that albuminuria in MWF is associated with increased arterial stiffness due to a reduction of elastin content in the external elastic lamina. Moreover, inward hypotrophic remodelling in MWF is not directly associated with albuminuria. In contrast, we demonstrated that two major genetic loci affect both the development of albuminuria and arterial stiffness, thus linking albuminuria and impairment of mechanical properties of resistance arteries. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Nutritional habits, lifestyle, and genetic predisposition in cardiovascular and metabolic traits in Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Sefayet; Erge, Sema; Cesuroglu, Tomris; Polimanti, Renato

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular and metabolic traits (CMT) are influenced by complex interactive processes including diet, lifestyle, and genetic predisposition. The present study investigated the interactions of these risk factors in relation to CMTs in the Turkish population. We applied bootstrap agglomerative hierarchical clustering and Bayesian network learning algorithms to identify the causative relationships among genes involved in different biological mechanisms (i.e., lipid metabolism, hormone metabolism, cellular detoxification, aging, and energy metabolism), lifestyle (i.e., physical activity, smoking behavior, and metropolitan residency), anthropometric traits (i.e., body mass index, body fat ratio, and waist-to-hip ratio), and dietary habits (i.e., daily intakes of macro- and micronutrients) in relation to CMTs (i.e., health conditions and blood parameters). We identified significant correlations between dietary habits (soybean and vitamin B12 intakes) and different cardiometabolic diseases that were confirmed by the Bayesian network-learning algorithm. Genetic factors contributed to these disease risks also through the pleiotropy of some genetic variants (i.e., F5 rs6025 and MTR rs180508). However, we also observed that certain genetic associations are indirect since they are due to the causative relationships among the CMTs (e.g., APOC3 rs5128 is associated with low-density lipoproteins cholesterol and, by extension, total cholesterol). Our study applied a novel approach to integrate various sources of information and dissect the complex interactive processes related to CMTs. Our data indicated that complex causative networks are present: causative relationships exist among CMTs and are affected by genetic factors (with pleiotropic and non-pleiotropic effects) and dietary habits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Women with hereditary breast cancer predispositions should avoid using their smartphones, tablets and laptops at night

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Reza Mortazavi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women, both in the developed and developing countries. Women with mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancers. Recent studies show that short-wavelength visible light disturb the secretion of melatonin and causes circadian rhythm disruption. We have previously studied the health effects of exposure to different levels of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs such as mobile phones, mobile base stations, mobile phone jammers, laptop computers, and radars. Moreover, over the past several years, we investigated the health effects of exposure to the short wavelength visible light in the blue region emitted from digital screens. The reduction of melatonin secretion after exposure to blue light emitted from smartphone’s screen has been reported to be associated with the negative impact of smartphone use at night on sleep. We have shown that both the blue light and RF-EMFs generated by mobile phones are linked to the disruption of the circadian rhythm in people who use their phones at night. Therefore, if women with hereditary breast cancer predispositions use their smartphones, tablets and laptops at night, disrupted circadian rhythms (suppression of melatonin caused by exposure to blue light emitted from the digital screens, amplifies the risk of breast cancer. It can be concluded that women who carry mutated BRCA1 or BRCA2, or women with family history of breast cancer should avoid using their smartphones, tablets and laptops at night. Using sunglasses with amber lenses, or smartphone applications which decrease the users’ exposure to blue light before sleep, at least to some extent, can decrease the risk of circadian rhythm disruption and breast cancer.

  6. The power of associative learning and the ontogeny of optimal behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enquist, Magnus; Lind, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Behaving efficiently (optimally or near-optimally) is central to animals' adaptation to their environment. Much evolutionary biology assumes, implicitly or explicitly, that optimal behavioural strategies are genetically inherited, yet the behaviour of many animals depends crucially on learning. The question of how learning contributes to optimal behaviour is largely open. Here we propose an associative learning model that can learn optimal behaviour in a wide variety of ecologically relevant circumstances. The model learns through chaining, a term introduced by Skinner to indicate learning of behaviour sequences by linking together shorter sequences or single behaviours. Our model formalizes the concept of conditioned reinforcement (the learning process that underlies chaining) and is closely related to optimization algorithms from machine learning. Our analysis dispels the common belief that associative learning is too limited to produce ‘intelligent’ behaviour such as tool use, social learning, self-control or expectations of the future. Furthermore, the model readily accounts for both instinctual and learned aspects of behaviour, clarifying how genetic evolution and individual learning complement each other, and bridging a long-standing divide between ethology and psychology. We conclude that associative learning, supported by genetic predispositions and including the oft-neglected phenomenon of conditioned reinforcement, may suffice to explain the ontogeny of optimal behaviour in most, if not all, non-human animals. Our results establish associative learning as a more powerful optimizing mechanism than acknowledged by current opinion. PMID:28018662

  7. Quantum electrodynamics of strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, W.

    1983-01-01

    Quantum Electrodynamics of Strong Fields provides a broad survey of the theoretical and experimental work accomplished, presenting papers by a group of international researchers who have made significant contributions to this developing area. Exploring the quantum theory of strong fields, the volume focuses on the phase transition to a charged vacuum in strong electric fields. The contributors also discuss such related topics as QED at short distances, precision tests of QED, nonperturbative QCD and confinement, pion condensation, and strong gravitational fields In addition, the volume features a historical paper on the roots of quantum field theory in the history of quantum physics by noted researcher Friedrich Hund

  8. Gender and Behaviour

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender and Behaviour is an interdisciplinary journal dedicated to articles, that reflect psychological and behavioural aspects of gender in general. Gender and Behaviour welcomes scholarly manuscripts from authors all over the world on a wide array of subjects concerning psychological and behavioural aspects of gender ...

  9. Genetic predisposition to radiation induced sarcoma: possible role for BRCA and p53 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadouri, Luna; Sagi, Michal; Goldberg, Yael; Lerer, Israela; Hamburger, Tamar; Peretz, Tamar

    2013-07-01

    The estimated incidence of radiation-associated sarcoma (RAS) is 0.03-0.2 % in 5 years post treatment. Most cancer predisposing genes are involved in DNA repair; therefore, elevated RAS risk in these patients is plausible. Cases of angiosarcoma post breast cancer treatment were reported in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. We report the genetic evaluation of seven cases with suspected RAS from patients counseled in our cancer-genetic clinic. Of 2,885 breast cancer patient, 470 were BRCA1 or two mutation carriers and three were p53 mutation carriers. Of them seven developed sarcoma in the field of irradiation; five in the chest wall and two in other sites. Genetic evaluation revealed BRCA1 mutation in two, BRCA2 mutation in additional patient and a carrier of p53 mutation. The estimation of risk for RAS in patients with genetic predisposition is limited due to the rarity of this event, and the bias in referral to the clinic toward younger age. With these limitations the rate of RAS is 0.43 % (2/470, 95 % CI -0.17 to 1.02, SE = 0.3) in this group in a median follow-up of 8.2 years (range 1 month to 51 years). If we assume irradiation for the breast in 80 % of the patients than rate of RAS in group is proximately 0.53 % (2/376, 95 % CI -0.21 to 1.26, SE = 0.37). A BRCA1 carrier which had sarcoma after irradiation to head and neck carcinoma was not included in these analyses. In conclusion, we found a high frequency of BRCA1/2 mutation among our patients diagnosed with RAS. However, we estimated approximately twofold increase in the risk of RAS in BRCA1/2 carriers which was not significant compared to reports in general population. Therefore, RAS is a rare event in BRCA carriers as in the general population, and should not be considered in the decision regarding irradiation treatment in this population.

  10. Association between Maternal Fish Consumption and Gestational Weight Gain: Influence of Molecular Genetic Predisposition to Obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofus C Larsen

    Full Text Available Studies suggest that fish consumption can restrict weight gain. However, little is known about how fish consumption affects gestational weight gain (GWG, and whether this relationship depends on genetic makeup.To examine the association between fish consumption and GWG, and whether this relationship is dependent on molecular genetic predisposition to obesity.A nested case-cohort study based on the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC sampling the most obese women (n = 990 and a random sample of the remaining participants (n = 1,128. Replication of statistically significant findings was attempted in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC (n = 4,841. We included 32 body mass index (BMI associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and 5 SNPs found associated with GWG. BMI associated SNPs were combined in a genetic risk score (GRS. Associations between consumption of fish, GRS or individual variants and GWG were analysed, and interactions between fish and the GRS or individual variants were examined.In the DNBC, each portion/week (150 g of fatty fish was associated with a higher GWG of 0.58 kg (95% CI: 0.16, 0.99, P<0.01. For total fish and lean fish, similar patterns were observed, but these associations were not statistically significant. We found no association between GRS and GWG, and no interactions between GRS and dietary fish on GWG. However, we found an interaction between the PPARG Pro12Ala variant and dietary fish. Each additional Pro12Ala G-allele was associated with a GWG of -0.83 kg (95% CI: -1.29, -0.37, P<0.01 per portion/week of dietary fish, with the same pattern for both lean and fatty fish. In ALSPAC, we were unable to replicate these findings.We found no consistent evidence of association between fish consumption and GWG, and our results indicate that the association between dietary fish and GWG has little or no dependency on GRS or individual SNPs.

  11. Association between Maternal Fish Consumption and Gestational Weight Gain: Influence of Molecular Genetic Predisposition to Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sofus C; Ängquist, Lars; Laurin, Charles; Morgen, Camilla S; Jakobsen, Marianne U; Paternoster, Lavinia; Smith, George Davey; Olsen, Sjurdur F; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Nohr, Ellen A

    2016-01-01

    Studies suggest that fish consumption can restrict weight gain. However, little is known about how fish consumption affects gestational weight gain (GWG), and whether this relationship depends on genetic makeup. To examine the association between fish consumption and GWG, and whether this relationship is dependent on molecular genetic predisposition to obesity. A nested case-cohort study based on the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) sampling the most obese women (n = 990) and a random sample of the remaining participants (n = 1,128). Replication of statistically significant findings was attempted in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) (n = 4,841). We included 32 body mass index (BMI) associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 5 SNPs found associated with GWG. BMI associated SNPs were combined in a genetic risk score (GRS). Associations between consumption of fish, GRS or individual variants and GWG were analysed, and interactions between fish and the GRS or individual variants were examined. In the DNBC, each portion/week (150 g) of fatty fish was associated with a higher GWG of 0.58 kg (95% CI: 0.16, 0.99, P<0.01). For total fish and lean fish, similar patterns were observed, but these associations were not statistically significant. We found no association between GRS and GWG, and no interactions between GRS and dietary fish on GWG. However, we found an interaction between the PPARG Pro12Ala variant and dietary fish. Each additional Pro12Ala G-allele was associated with a GWG of -0.83 kg (95% CI: -1.29, -0.37, P<0.01) per portion/week of dietary fish, with the same pattern for both lean and fatty fish. In ALSPAC, we were unable to replicate these findings. We found no consistent evidence of association between fish consumption and GWG, and our results indicate that the association between dietary fish and GWG has little or no dependency on GRS or individual SNPs.

  12. Functional and genetic predisposition to rhinovirus lower respiratory tract infections in prematurely born infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysdale, Simon B; Alcazar, Mireia; Wilson, Theresa; Smith, Melvyn; Zuckerman, Mark; Hodemaekers, Hennie M; Janssen, Riny; Bont, Louis; Johnston, Sebastian L; Greenough, Anne

    2016-12-01

    Term born infants are predisposed to human rhinovirus (HRV) lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) by reduced neonatal lung function and genetic susceptibility. Our aim was to investigate whether prematurely born infants were similarly predisposed to HRV LRTIs or any other viral LRTIs. Infants born less than 36 weeks of gestational age were recruited. Prior to neonatal/maternity unit discharge, lung function (functional residual capacity by helium gas dilution and multiple breath washout, lung clearance index and compliance (C rs ), and resistance (R rs ) of the respiratory system) was assessed and DNA samples assessed for eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in seven genes: ADAM33, IL10, MMP16 NFκB1A,SFTPC, VDR, and NOS2A. Infants were prospectively followed until 1 year corrected age. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) were sent whenever an infant developed a LRTI and tested for 13 viruses. One hundred and thirty-nine infants were included in the analysis. Infants who developed HRV LRTIs had reduced C rs (1.6 versus 1.2 mL/cmH 2 O/kg, p = 0.044) at 36 weeks postmenstrual age. A SNP in the gene coding for the vitamin D receptor was associated with the development of HRV LRTIs and any viral LRTIs (p = 0.02). Prematurely born infants may have both a functional and genetic predisposition to HRV LRTIs. What is Known: • Term born infants are predisposed to rhinovirus lower respiratory tract (HRV LRTIs) infection by reduced neonatal lung function. • Term born infants requiring hospitalisation due to HRV bronchiolitis were more likely to have single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the IL-10 gene. What is New: • Prematurely born infants who developed a HRV LRTI had lower C rs before maternity unit discharge. • A SNP in the gene coding for the vitamin D receptor was associated with the development of HRV LRTIs and overall respiratory viral LRTIs in prematurely born infants.

  13. Is There a Genetic Predisposition to Frozen Shoulder?: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodromidis, Apostolos D; Charalambous, Charalambos P

    2016-02-23

    Frozen shoulder is a common disorder that leads to substantial functional loss for patients by impairing activities of daily living. It also adversely affects patients and society by impairing the ability to work. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the evidence suggesting a genetic link to frozen shoulder. A literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases using relevant keywords revealed 5506 studies. After appropriate screening of titles, abstracts, and full studies, seven studies were analyzed. Three studies investigated rates of frozen shoulder among relatives. One study (n = 1828 twin pairs) showed an 11.6% prevalence in twin pairs and demonstrated a heritability of 42% for frozen shoulder after adjusting for age. A second study (n = 273) showed that 20% of patients with frozen shoulder had a positive family history involving a first-degree relative. The relative risk of frozen shoulder was 4:1 when all patients with frozen shoulder were compared with a control population. A third study (n = 87) showed that 29% of patients with frozen shoulder had a first-degree relative with frozen shoulder. Two studies evaluated racial predilection for frozen shoulder. One study (n = 50) reported a substantially higher number of white patients (76%) with frozen shoulder than black patients (24%). A second study (n = 87) showed that being born or having parents or grandparents born in the British Isles were risk factors for frozen shoulder. Four immunological studies investigated human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 as a risk factor for frozen shoulder. Meta-analysis of two of these studies with clearly defined controls showed significantly higher rates of HLA-B27 positivity in patients with frozen shoulder as compared with controls (p genetic predisposition to frozen shoulder. However, as there is a lack of unbiased genetic approaches, there is an opportunity for genome

  14. Strong WW Interaction at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelaez, Jose R

    1998-12-14

    We present a brief pedagogical introduction to the Effective Electroweak Chiral Lagrangians, which provide a model independent description of the WW interactions in the strong regime. When it is complemented with some unitarization or a dispersive approach, this formalism allows the study of the general strong scenario expected at the LHC, including resonances.

  15. Strong-back safety latch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSantis, G.N.

    1995-01-01

    The calculation decides the integrity of the safety latch that will hold the strong-back to the pump during lifting. The safety latch will be welded to the strong-back and will latch to a 1.5-in. dia cantilever rod welded to the pump baseplate. The static and dynamic analysis shows that the safety latch will hold the strong-back to the pump if the friction clamps fail and the pump become free from the strong-back. Thus, the safety latch will meet the requirements of the Lifting and Rigging Manual for under the hook lifting for static loading; it can withstand shock loads from the strong-back falling 0.25 inch

  16. Strong-back safety latch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSantis, G.N.

    1995-03-06

    The calculation decides the integrity of the safety latch that will hold the strong-back to the pump during lifting. The safety latch will be welded to the strong-back and will latch to a 1.5-in. dia cantilever rod welded to the pump baseplate. The static and dynamic analysis shows that the safety latch will hold the strong-back to the pump if the friction clamps fail and the pump become free from the strong-back. Thus, the safety latch will meet the requirements of the Lifting and Rigging Manual for under the hook lifting for static loading; it can withstand shock loads from the strong-back falling 0.25 inch.

  17. Genetic predisposition to elevated levels of C-reactive protein is associated with a decreased risk for preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, Cassandra N; Smith, Caitlin J; Saftlas, Audrey F; Triche, Elizabeth W; Bjonnes, Andrew; Keating, Brendan J; Saxena, Richa; Breheny, Patrick J; Dewan, Andrew T; Robinson, Jennifer G; Hoh, Josephine; Ryckman, Kelli K

    2017-02-01

    To examine the association between genetic predisposition to elevated C-reactive protein (CRP)and risk for preeclampsia using validated genetic loci for C-reactive protein. Preeclampsia cases (n = 177) and normotensive controls (n = 116) were selected from live birth certificates to nulliparous Iowa women during the period August 2002-May 2005. Disease status was verified by the medical chart review. Genetic predisposition to CRP was estimated by a genetic risk score on the basis of established loci for CRP levels. Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationships between the genotype score and preeclampsia. Replication analyses were performed in an independent, US population of preeclampsia cases (n = 516) and controls (n = 1,097) of European ancestry. The genetic risk score (GRS) related to higher levels of CRP demonstrated a significantly decreased risk of preeclampsia (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.96). When the GRS was analyzed by quartile, an inverse linear trend was observed (p = 0.0006). The results were similar after adjustments for the body mass index (BMI), smoking, and leisure-time physical activity. In the independent replication population, the association with the CRP GRS was also marginally significant (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.92, 1.02). Meta-analysis of the two studies was statistically significant (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.90, 0.99). Our data suggest an inverse, counterintuitive association between the genetic predisposition to elevated levels of CRP and a decreased risk of preeclampsia. This suggests that the blood CRP level is a marker of preeclampsia, but it does not appear to be a factor on the causal pathway.

  18. Television watching, leisure time physical activity, and the genetic predisposition in relation to body mass index in women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qibin; Li, Yanping; Chomistek, Andrea K; Kang, Jae H; Curhan, Gary C; Pasquale, Louis R; Willett, Walter C; Rimm, Eric B; Hu, Frank B; Qi, Lu

    2012-10-09

    Previous studies on gene-lifestyle interaction and obesity have focused mostly on the FTO gene and physical activity, whereas little attention has been paid to sedentary behavior as indicated by television (TV) watching. We analyzed interactions between TV watching, leisure time physical activity, and genetic predisposition in relation to body mass index (BMI) in 7740 women and 4564 men from 2 prospective cohorts: The Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Data on physical activity and TV watching were collected 2 years before assessment of BMI. A weighted genetic risk score was calculated on the basis of 32 established BMI-associated variants. In both women and men, the genetic associations with BMI strengthened with increased hours of TV watching. An increment of 10 points in the weighted genetic risk score was associated with 0.8 (SE, 0.4), 0.8 (SE, 0.2), 1.4 (SE, 0.2), 1.5 (SE, 0.2), and 3.4 (SE, 1.0) kg/m(2) higher BMI across the 5 categories of TV watching (0-1, 2-5, 6-20, 21-40, and >40 h/wk; P for interaction=0.001). In contrast, the genetic association with BMI weakened with increased levels of physical activity. An increment of 10 points in the weighted genetic risk score was associated with 1.5 (SE, 0.2), 1.3 (SE, 0.2), 1.2 (SE, 0.2), 1.2 (SE, 0.2), and 0.8 (SE, 0.2) kg/m(2) higher BMI across the quintiles of physical activity. The interactions of TV watching and physical activity with genetic predisposition in relation to BMI were independent of each other. A sedentary lifestyle, indicated by prolonged TV watching, may accentuate the predisposition to elevated adiposity, whereas greater leisure time physical activity may attenuate the genetic association.

  19. Methylation of Breast Cancer Predisposition Genes in Early-Onset Breast Cancer: Australian Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron M Scott

    Full Text Available DNA methylation can mimic the effects of both germline and somatic mutations for cancer predisposition genes such as BRCA1 and p16INK4a. Constitutional DNA methylation of the BRCA1 promoter has been well described and is associated with an increased risk of early-onset breast cancers that have BRCA1-mutation associated histological features. The role of methylation in the context of other breast cancer predisposition genes has been less well studied and often with conflicting or ambiguous outcomes. We examined the role of methylation in known breast cancer susceptibility genes in breast cancer predisposition and tumor development. We applied the Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchip (HM450K array to blood and tumor-derived DNA from 43 women diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 40 years and measured the methylation profiles across promoter regions of BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, PALB2, CDH1, TP53, FANCM, CHEK2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Prior genetic testing had demonstrated that these women did not carry a germline mutation in BRCA1, ATM, CHEK2, PALB2, TP53, BRCA2, CDH1 or FANCM. In addition to the BRCA1 promoter region, this work identified regions with variable methylation at multiple breast cancer susceptibility genes including PALB2 and MLH1. Methylation at the region of MLH1 in these breast cancers was not associated with microsatellite instability. This work informs future studies of the role of methylation in breast cancer susceptibility gene silencing.

  20. Contribution of germline mutations in cancer predisposition genes to tumor etiology in young women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Seth K; Lovejoy, Leann; Shriver, Craig D; Ellsworth, Rachel E

    2017-08-01

    Although breast cancer in young women accounts for cancer predisposition genes is needed to improve the understanding of breast cancer etiology in young women. All female patients enrolled in the Clinical Breast Cancer Project between 2001 and 2015 and diagnosed with invasive breast cancer before age 40 were included in this study. Family history was classified using the NCCN Familial Risk Assessment guidelines. Targeted sequencing of 94 cancer predisposition genes was performed using peripheral blood DNA. Variants were detected using VariantStudio and classified using ClinVar. Seven percent (141/1980) of patients were young women and 44 had a significant family history. Sequencing was completed for 118 women with genomic DNA. Pathogenic mutations were present in 27 patients: BRCA1 (n = 10), BRCA2 (n = 12), TP53 (n = 1), and CHEK2 (n = 4). Mutations classified as pathogenic were also detected in APC (n = 1) and MUTYH (n = 2). Variants of uncertain significance (VUS) were detected in an additional 17 patients in ten genes. Pathogenic mutations in high- and moderate-risk breast cancer genes were detected in 23% of young women with an additional 3% having pathogenic mutations in colon cancer predisposition genes. VUS were observed in 14% of women in genes such as ATM, BRCA2, CDH1, CHEK2, and PALB2. Identification of those non-genetic factors is critical to reduce the burden of breast cancer in this population.

  1. Methylation of Breast Cancer Predisposition Genes in Early-Onset Breast Cancer: Australian Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Cameron M; Joo, JiHoon Eric; O'Callaghan, Neil; Buchanan, Daniel D; Clendenning, Mark; Giles, Graham G; Hopper, John L; Wong, Ee Ming; Southey, Melissa C

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation can mimic the effects of both germline and somatic mutations for cancer predisposition genes such as BRCA1 and p16INK4a. Constitutional DNA methylation of the BRCA1 promoter has been well described and is associated with an increased risk of early-onset breast cancers that have BRCA1-mutation associated histological features. The role of methylation in the context of other breast cancer predisposition genes has been less well studied and often with conflicting or ambiguous outcomes. We examined the role of methylation in known breast cancer susceptibility genes in breast cancer predisposition and tumor development. We applied the Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchip (HM450K) array to blood and tumor-derived DNA from 43 women diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 40 years and measured the methylation profiles across promoter regions of BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, PALB2, CDH1, TP53, FANCM, CHEK2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Prior genetic testing had demonstrated that these women did not carry a germline mutation in BRCA1, ATM, CHEK2, PALB2, TP53, BRCA2, CDH1 or FANCM. In addition to the BRCA1 promoter region, this work identified regions with variable methylation at multiple breast cancer susceptibility genes including PALB2 and MLH1. Methylation at the region of MLH1 in these breast cancers was not associated with microsatellite instability. This work informs future studies of the role of methylation in breast cancer susceptibility gene silencing.

  2. Genetic predisposition to an adverse lipid profile limits the improvement in total cholesterol in response to weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Celia G; Holzapfel, Christina; Loos, Ruth J F; Mander, Adrian P; Klopp, Norman; Illig, Thomas; Caterson, Ian D; Hauner, Hans; Jebb, Susan A

    2013-12-01

    Overweight and obesity are associated with a dyslipidaemia which can be improved by weight loss. Whether genetic predisposition to an adverse lipid profile modifies such beneficial effects of weight loss on lipid levels in overweight and obese individuals was examined. White European participants (n = 374) who completed a 12-month weight loss trial were genotyped for 36 lipid-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), previously identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Genetic predisposition scores (GPSs) were calculated for four lipid traits by summing the number of risk alleles (RA) for each participant. The associations of each GPS with four lipid traits were assessed at baseline, and with lipid changes in response to weight change after 12 months. At baseline, the trait-specific GPSs were associated with 0.11 ± 0.04 mM higher total cholesterol/RA (P = 0.004), 0.05 ± 0.02 mM higher low density lipoprotein cholesterol/RA (P = 0.005), 0.03 ± 0.007 mM lower high density lipoprotein cholesterol/RA (P = 0.00002) and 0.04 ± 0.01 mM higher triglyceride/RA (P = 0.00002). After the intervention, weight loss was associated with improvements in all lipids (P Genetic predisposition is an important determinant of lipid levels and appears to limit the improvement in TC and to some extent LDLC levels, but not in other plasma lipids, in response to weight loss. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 2013. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  3. A genetic study and meta-analysis of the genetic predisposition of prostate cancer in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzec, Jacek; Mao, Xueying; Li, Meiling; Wang, Meilin; Feng, Ninghan; Gou, Xin; Wang, Guomin; Sun, Zan; Xu, Jianfeng; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhao, Shan-Chao; Ren, Guoping; Yu, Yongwei; Wu, Yudong; Wu, Ji; Xue, Yao; Zhou, Bo; Zhang, Yanling; Xu, Xingxing; Li, Jie; He, Weiyang; Benlloch, Sara; Ross-Adams, Helen; Chen, Li; Li, Jucong; Hong, Yingqia; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Cui, Xingang; Hou, Jianguo; Guo, Jianming; Xu, Lei; Yin, Changjun; Zhou, Yuanping; Neal, David E; Oliver, Tim; Cao, Guangwen; Zhang, Zhengdong; Easton, Douglas F; Chelala, Claude; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Eeles, Rosalind A; Zhang, Hongwei; Lu, Yong-Jie

    2016-04-19

    Prostate cancer predisposition has been extensively investigated in European populations, but there have been few studies of other ethnic groups. To investigate prostate cancer susceptibility in the under-investigated Chinese population, we performed single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis on a cohort of Chinese cases and controls and then meta-analysis with data from the existing Chinese prostate cancer genome-wide association study (GWAS). Genotyping 211,155 SNPs in 495 cases and 640 controls of Chinese ancestry identified several new suggestive Chinese prostate cancer predisposition loci. However, none of them reached genome-wide significance level either by meta-analysis or replication study. The meta-analysis with the Chinese GWAS data revealed that four 8q24 loci are the main contributors to Chinese prostate cancer risk and the risk alleles from three of them exist at much higher frequencies in Chinese than European populations. We also found that several predisposition loci reported in Western populations have different effect on Chinese men. Therefore, this first extensive single-nucleotide polymorphism study of Chinese prostate cancer in comparison with European population indicates that four loci on 8q24 contribute to a great risk of prostate cancer in a considerable large proportion of Chinese men. Based on those four loci, the top 10% of the population have six- or two-fold prostate cancer risk compared with men of the bottom 10% or median risk respectively, which may facilitate the design of prostate cancer genetic risk screening and prevention in Chinese men. These findings also provide additional insights into the etiology and pathogenesis of prostate cancer.

  4. Eliminative behaviour of dairy cows at pasture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whistance, Lindsay Kay; Sinclair, Liam A.; Arney, David Richard

    2011-01-01

    Despite a strong avoidance of grazing near dung patches, cattle have traditionally been considered not to avoid bodily contact with faeces, regardless of any risk of disease. Little is understood of the behaviour of pasture-kept dairy cows at the time of defaecation and therefore, the eliminative...... behaviour of 40 Holstein-Friesian cows was observed at pasture for6 heach day between morning and afternoon milking for a total of24 h. Lying (l), standing (s) and walking (w) behaviours were recorded pre, during and post-elimination. Sequences of 3–6 changes in these behaviours were recorded if expressed...... observed events (uppercase letters denote behaviour during defaecation). In all recorded events, 383 stood and 54 walked whilst defaecating (P

  5. Rearing conditions and behaviour in pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Schouten, W.G.P.

    1985-01-01

    During the last three decades the housing conditions of our livestock have been changed drastically (chapter 1). Amongst others, reduced floor space per animal and the monotony of the environment are the most striking changes.

    As in other animals, the actual situation strongly influences the behaviour of pigs. However, the effects of early experience on later behaviour in pigs are still not well documented. The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate these effects....

  6. Interaction between genetic predisposition to adiposity and dietary protein in relation to subsequent change in body weight and waist circumference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkel Z Ankarfeldt

    Full Text Available Genetic predisposition to adiposity may interact with dietary protein in relation to changes of anthropometry.To investigate the interaction between genetic predisposition to higher body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC or waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRBMI and dietary protein in relation to subsequent change in body weight (ΔBW or change in WC (ΔWC.Three different Danish cohorts were used. In total 7,054 individuals constituted the study population with information on diet, 50 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with BMI, WC or WHRBMI, as well as potential confounders. Mean follow-up time was ∼5 years. Four genetic predisposition-scores were based on the SNPs; a complete-score including all selected adiposity- associated SNPs, and three scores including BMI, WC or WHRBMI associated polymorphisms, respectively. The association between protein intake and ΔBW or ΔWC were examined and interactions between SNP-score and protein were investigated. Analyses were based on linear regressions using macronutrient substitution models and meta-analyses.When protein replaced carbohydrate, meta-analyses showed no associations with ΔBW (41.0 gram/y/5 energy% protein, [95% CI: -32.3; 114.3] or ΔWC (<-0.1 mm/y/5 energy % protein, [-1.1; 1.1]. Similarly, there were no interactions for any SNP-scores and protein for either ΔBW (complete SNP-score: 1.8 gram/y/5 energy% protein/risk allele, [-7.0; 10.6] or ΔWC (complete SNP-score: <0.1 mm/y/5 energy% protein/risk allele, [-0.1; 0.1]. Similar results were seen when protein replaced fat.This study indicates that the genetic predisposition to general and abdominal adiposity, assessed by gene-scores, does not seem to modulate the influence of dietary protein on ΔBW or ΔWC.

  7. Interaction between genetic predisposition to obesity and dietary calcium in relation to subsequent change in body weight and waist circumference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sofus C; Ängquist, Lars; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; Skaaby, Tea; Roswall, Nina; Tjønneland, Anne; Halkjær, Jytte; Overvad, Kim; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Linneberg, Allan; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Toft, Ulla; Heitmann, Berit L; Sørensen, Thorkild Ia

    2014-04-01

    Studies indicate an effect of dietary calcium on change in body weight (BW) and waist circumference (WC), but the results are inconsistent. Furthermore, a relation could depend on genetic predisposition to obesity. The objective was to examine whether genetic predisposition to higher body mass index (BMI), WC, or waist-hip ratio (WHR) interacts with dietary calcium in relation to subsequent annual change in BW (ΔBW) and WC (ΔWC). The study was based on 7569 individuals from the MONItoring trends and determinants of CArdiovascular disease Study, a sample from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Study and the INTER99 study, with information on diet; 54 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BMI, WC, or WHR adjusted for BMI; and potential confounders. The SNPs were combined in 4 scores as indicators of genetic predisposition; all SNPs in a general score and a score for each of 3 phenotypes: BMI, WC, and WHR. Linear regression was used to examine the association between calcium intake and ΔBW or ΔWC adjusted for concurrent ΔBW. SNP score × calcium interactions were examined by adding product terms to the models. We found a significant ΔBW of -0.076 kg (P = 0.021; 95% CI: -0.140, -0.012) per 1000 mg Ca. No significant association was observed between dietary calcium and ΔWC. In the analyses with ΔBW as outcome, we found no significant interactions between the developed predisposition scores and calcium. However, we found a significant interaction between a score of 6 WC-associated SNPs and calcium in relation to ΔWC. Each risk allele was associated with a ΔWC of -0.043 cm (P = 0.038; 95% CI: -0.083, -0.002) per 1000 mg Ca. Our study suggests that dietary calcium relates weakly to BW loss. We found no evidence of a general association between calcium and ΔWC, but calcium may reduce WC among people genetically predisposed to a high WC. However, further replication of this finding is needed.

  8. The External Networking Behaviour of Public Managers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Balle; Villadsen, Anders Ryom

    2017-01-01

    There has been an increasing focus on managerial external networking behaviour within public administration. While most previous quantitative research has analysed such behaviour one-dimensionally, we suggest a two-dimensional conceptualization based on the concepts of weak and strong ties....... Utilizing measures resembling previous research, we explore the utility of the approach in an exploratory study of Danish local government. Our findings suggest that the two dimensions of external networking behaviour are distinct. We discuss our approach compared to previous approaches and argue...

  9. Titanium: light, strong, and white

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Laurel; Bedinger, George

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a strong silver-gray metal that is highly resistant to corrosion and is chemically inert. It is as strong as steel but 45 percent lighter, and it is twice as strong as aluminum but only 60 percent heavier. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has a very high refractive index, which means that it has high light-scattering ability. As a result, TiO2 imparts whiteness, opacity, and brightness to many products. ...Because of the unique physical properties of titanium metal and the whiteness provided by TiO2, titanium is now used widely in modern industrial societies.

  10. Mechanism of Ovarian Epithelial Tumor Predisposition in Individuals Carrying Germline BRCA1 Mutations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dubeau, Louis

    2006-01-01

    .... Given the strong link between menstrual activity and risk of ovarian cancer in the general population, we hypothesized that BRCA1 might predispose to ovarian cancer indirectly, by influencing ovarian...

  11. Short-term psychological impact of the BRCA1/2 test result in women with breast cancer according to their perceived probability of genetic predisposition to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, A; Kop, J L; Depauw, A; Caron, O; Sultan, S; Leblond, D; Fajac, A; Buecher, B; Gauthier-Villars, M; Noguès, C; Flahault, C; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D; Dolbeault, S

    2013-03-19

    The effect of BRCA1/2 gene test result on anxiety, depression, cancer-related thought intrusion or avoidance and perceived control over cancer risk was assessed in breast cancer (BC) patients, according to their perceived probability of genetic predisposition to cancer. Two hundred and forty-three (89% response rate) women with BC completed questionnaires after an initial genetic counselling visit (T1), of which 180 (66%) completed questionnaires again after receiving the BRCA1/2 results (T2). The discrepancy between women's perceived probability of cancer genetic predisposition at T1 and the geneticist's computed estimates was assessed. In all, 74% of women received a negative uninformative (NU), 11% a positive BRCA1/2 and 15% an unclassified variant (UV) result. On hierarchical regression analysis, in women with a positive BRCA1/2 result (vs NU or UV), a lower perceived probability of cancer genetic predisposition than objective estimates at T1 predicted lower levels of anxiety at T2 (β=-0.28; Pgenetic predisposition than objective estimates at T1 predicted higher levels of anxiety (β=0.20; Pgenetic predisposition before testing.

  12. The frequency of cancer predisposition gene mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients in Taiwan: From BRCA1/2 to multi-gene panels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pi-Lin Sung

    Full Text Available An important role of genetic factors in the development of breast cancer (BC or ovarian cancer (OC in Taiwanese (ethnic Chinese patients has been suggested. However, other than germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, which are related to hereditary breast-ovarian cancer (HBOC, cancer-predisposition genes have not been well studied in this population. The aim of the present study was to more accurately summarize the prevalence of genetic mutations in HBOC patients using various gene panels ranging in size from BRCA1/2 alone to multi-gene panels. Among 272 HBOC patients analyzed, the prevalence of BRCA1, BRCA2 and non-BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations was 7.7% (21/272, 6.8% (16/236 and 8.2% (13/159, respectively. The total mutation rate was 18.4% (50/272. Although no founder mutations were identified in this study, two recurrent mutations, BRCA1 (c.3607C>T and BRCA2 (c.5164_5165 delAG, were found. The main pathogenic/likely pathogenic mutations in non-BRCA1/2 genes included ATM, BRIP1, FANCI, MSH2, MUYTH, RAD50, RAD51C and TP53. The prevalence rate of gene mutations in HBOC patients did not differ with respect to whether BC or OC was the first diagnosis or they presented a family history of the disease or their age at diagnosis. HBOC patients with both BC and OC exhibited a higher prevalence rate of mutations (50.0% than patients with OC (25.0% or BC (8.6% alone. In conclusion, evaluation of hereditary cancer risk in Taiwan HBOC patients, particularly individuals with double cancer, is strongly encouraged. Panel testing can yield additional genomic information, and widespread and well-designed panel testing will help in assessing more accurate mutational prevalence of risk genes.

  13. Genetic predisposition of six well-defined polymorphisms in HMGB1/RAGE pathway to breast cancer in a large Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Liling; Zhang, Qibing; He, Lan; Zhang, Minglong; Dong, Jing; Zhao, Dalong; Ma, Hongxing; Pan, Hongming; Zheng, Lihong

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer constitutes an enormous burden in China. A strong familial clustering of breast cancer suggests a genetic component in its carcinogenesis. To examine the genetic predisposition of high mobility group box-1/receptor for advanced glycation end products (HMGB1/RAGE) pathway to breast cancer, we genotyped six well-defined polymorphisms in this pathway among 524 breast cancer patients and 518 cancer-free controls from Heilongjiang province, China. There were no deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for all polymorphisms. In single-locus analysis, the frequency of rs1800624 polymorphism mutant A allele in RAGE gene was significantly higher in patients than in controls (24.52% versus 19.50%, P = 0.006), with the carriers of rs1800624-A allele being 1.51 times more likely to develop breast cancer relative to those with rs1800624-GG genotype after adjustment (95% confidence interval or CI: 1.17-1.94, P = 0.001). In HMGB1 gene, haplotype analysis did not reveal any significance, while in RAGE gene, haplotypes C-T-A and C-A-G (alleles in order of rs1800625, rs18006024, rs2070600) were significantly associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (adjusted OR = 2.72 and 10.35; 95% CI: 1.20-6.18 and 1.58-67.80; P = 0.017 and 0.015 respectively). In further genetic score analysis, per unit and quartile increments of unfavourable alleles were significantly associated with an increased risk of breast cancer after adjustment (odds ratio or OR = 1.20 and 1.26; 95% CI: 1.09-1.32 and 1.12-1.42; P breast cancer risk, and more importantly a cumulative impact of multiple risk associated polymorphisms in HMGB1/RAGE pathway on breast carcinogenesis. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  14. Autoimmune predisposition in Down syndrome may result from a partial central tolerance failure due to insufficient intrathymic expression of AIRE and peripheral antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Barcons, Mireia; Casteràs, Anna; Armengol, Maria del Pilar; Porta, Eduard; Correa, Paula A; Marín, Ana; Pujol-Borrell, Ricardo; Colobran, Roger

    2014-10-15

    Down syndrome (DS), or trisomy of chromosome 21, is the most common genetic disorder associated with autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune regulator protein (AIRE), a transcription factor located on chromosome 21, plays a crucial role in autoimmunity by regulating promiscuous gene expression (pGE). To investigate if autoimmunity in DS is promoted by the reduction of pGE owing to dysregulation of AIRE, we assessed the expression of AIRE and of several peripheral tissue-restricted Ag genes by quantitative PCR in thymus samples from 19 DS subjects and 21 euploid controls. Strikingly, despite the 21 trisomy, AIRE expression was significantly reduced by 2-fold in DS thymuses compared with controls, which was also confirmed by fluorescent microscopy. Allele-specific quantification of intrathymic AIRE showed that despite its lower expression, the three copies are expressed. More importantly, decreased expression of AIRE was accompanied by a reduction of pGE because expression of tissue-restricted Ags, CHRNA1, GAD1, PLP1, KLK3, SAG, TG, and TSHR, was reduced. Of interest, thyroid dysfunction (10 cases of hypothyroidism and 1 of Graves disease) developed in 11 of 19 (57.9%) of the DS individuals and in none of the 21 controls. The thymuses of these DS individuals contained significantly lower levels of AIRE and thyroglobulin, to which tolerance is typically lost in autoimmune thyroiditis leading to hypothyroidism. Our findings provide strong evidence for the fundamental role of AIRE and pGE, namely, central tolerance, in the predisposition to autoimmunity of DS individuals. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. The interaction of genetic predisposition and socioeconomic position with type 2 diabetes mellitus: cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses from the Lifelines Cohort and Biobank Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zon, Sander K R; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; van der Most, Peter J; Swertz, Morris A; Bültmann, Ute; Snieder, Harold

    2018-01-29

    A strong genetic predisposition for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) may aggravate the negative effects of low socioeconomic position (SEP) in the etiology of the disorder. This study aimed to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations and interactions of a genetic risk score (GRS) and SEP with T2DM, and to investigate whether clinical and behavioral risk factors can explain these associations and interactions. We used data from 13,027 genotyped participants from the Lifelines study. The GRS was based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genome-wide associated with T2DM and was categorized into tertiles. SEP was measured as educational level. T2DM was based on biological markers, recorded medication use, and self-reports. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations, and interactions, between the GRS and SEP on T2DM were examined. The combination of a high GRS and low SEP had the strongest association with T2DM in cross-sectional (OR: 3.84; 95% CI: 2.28, 6.46) and longitudinal analyses (HR: 2.71; 1.39, 5.27), compared to a low GRS and high SEP. Interaction between a high GRS and a low SEP was observed in cross-sectional (relative excess risk due to interaction: 1.85; 0.65, 3.05) but not in longitudinal analyses. Clinical and behavioral risk factors mostly explained the observed associations and interactions. A high GRS combined with a low SEP provides the highest risk for T2DM. These factors also exacerbated each other's impact cross-sectionally but not longitudinally. Preventive measures should target individual and contextual factors of this high-risk group to reduce the risk of T2DM.

  16. Integrated screening concept in women with genetic predisposition for breast cancer; Integriertes Frueherkennungskonzept bei Frauen mit genetischer Praedisposition fuer Brustkrebs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bick, U. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    1997-08-01

    Breast cancer is in 5% of cases due to a genetic disposition. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are by far the most common breast cancer susceptibility genes. For a woman with a genetic predisposition, the individual risk of developing breast cancer sometime in her life is between 70 and 90%. Compared to the spontaneous forms of breast cancer, woman with a genetic predisposition often develop breast cancer at a much younger age. This is why conventional screening programs on the basis of mammography alone cannot be applied without modification to this high-risk group. In this article, an integrated screening concept for women with genetic prodisposition for breast cancer using breast self-examination, clinical examination, ultrasound, mammography and magnetic resonance imaging is introduced. (orig.) [Deutsch] Mammakarzinome sind in etwa 5% auf eine genetische Disposition zurueckzufuehren. Am haeufigsten finden sich Mutationen im Bereich der Gene BRCA1 und BRCA2. Frauen mit einer genetischen Disposition erkranken in etwa 70-90% im Laufe ihres Lebens an einem Mammakarzinom. Das Erkrankungsalter bei diesen Frauen liegt in der Regel deutlich niedriger als bei den spontanen Formen des Mammakarzinoms, so dass vorhandene Frueherkennungskonzepte auf der Basis eines Mammographiescrennings nicht ohne weiteres auf dieses Hochrisikokollektiv uebertragbar sind. Im folgenden wird ein integriertes Konzept zur Frueherkennung bei Frauen mit genetischer Praedisposition fuer ein Mammakarzinom auf der Basis von Brustselbstuntersuchung, klinischer Untersuchung, Sonographie, Mammographie und Magnetresonanztomographie vorgestellt. (orig.)

  17. Personality predispositions to depression in children of affectively-ill parents: the buffering role of self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, John R Z; Fishman, Michael B; Cohen, Joseph R; Young, Jami F

    2012-01-01

    A major theory of personality predispositions to depression posits that individuals who possess high levels of self-criticism and/or dependency are vulnerable to developing depression following negative life events. The goal of the current study was to test this theory of personality predispositions and the self-esteem buffering hypothesis in a sample of youth using an idiographic approach, a high-risk sample, and a multiwave longitudinal design. One hundred forty children aged 6 to 14 completed measures of dependency, self-criticism, self-esteem, and depressive symptoms. Over the course of the following year, 8 follow-up assessments were conducted 6 weeks apart during which all children were administered measures assessing depressive symptoms and the occurrence of negative events. Results of hierarchical linear modeling analyses indicated that higher levels of dependency were associated with greater increases in depressive symptoms following negative events among children possessing low, but not high, self-esteem. In contrast, self-criticism was not associated with changes in depressive symptoms over time regardless of children's levels of stress and/or self-esteem.

  18. Genetic predisposition to obesity is associated with insulin secretion in Chinese adults: The Cardiometabolic Risk in Chinese (CRC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jun; Sun, Yuting; Liu, Xuekui; Zhu, Yan; Pei, Ying; Wang, Yu; Qiu, Qinqin; Yang, Manqing; Qi, Lu

    2016-01-01

    The etiological role of obesity in determining diabetes risk among Asians may be different from that among Caucasians. The current study aimed to investigate the association between genetic predisposition to obesity and measures of insulin secretion and resistance in a large Chinese cohort. Study samples were from a community-based health examination survey in central China. A total of 2058 subjects with available biomarkers levels were included in the present study. A genetic risk score (GRS) of obesity was derived on the basis of thirteen Asian-specific body mass index (BMI)-associated variants. High obesity GRS was significantly associated with increased homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-B score (β=7.309; P=0.001) but not related to measures of insulin resistance. Adjustment for age, sex, BMI, and levels of lipids did not appreciably change the results. In addition, we found significant interactions between the obesity GRS and measures of body fat distribution including waist circumference (WC; P for interaction=0.004) and neck circumference (NC; P for interaction=0.014) on HOMA-B score. Our results suggest that genetic predisposition to obesity may affect beta cell function in Chinese; and body fat distribution may modify the genetic effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A genetic predisposition score for muscular endophenotypes predicts the increase in aerobic power after training: the CAREGENE study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background It is widely accepted that genetic variability might explain a large part of the observed heterogeneity in aerobic capacity and its response to training. Significant associations between polymorphisms of different genes with muscular strength, anaerobic phenotypes and body composition have been reported. Muscular endophenotypes are positively correlated with aerobic capacity, therefore, we tested the association of polymorphisms in twelve muscular related genes on aerobic capacity and its response to endurance training. Methods 935 Coronary artery disease patients (CAD) who performed an incremental exercise test until exhaustion at baseline and after three months of training were included. Polymorphisms of the genes were detected using the invader assay. Genotype-phenotype association analyses were performed using ANCOVA. Different models for a genetic predisposition score (GPS) were constructed based on literature and own data and were related to baseline and response VO2 scores. Results Carriers of the minor allele in the R23K polymorphism of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (GR) and the ciliary neurotrophic factor gene (CNTF) had a significantly higher increase in peakVO2 after training (p genetic predisposition score (GPS) showed a significant predictive value for the increase in peakVO2. PMID:21967077

  20. Changing Information Retrieval Behaviours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Constantiou, Ioanna D.; Lehrer, Christiane; Hess, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    on the continuance of LBS use and indicate changes in individuals' information retrieval behaviours in everyday life. In particular, the distinct value dimension of LBS in specific contexts of use changes individuals' behaviours towards accessing location-related information....

  1. Organizational Behaviour in Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Review of: Organizational Behaviour in Construction / Anthony Walker (Wiley-Blackwell,2011 336 pp)......Review of: Organizational Behaviour in Construction / Anthony Walker (Wiley-Blackwell,2011 336 pp)...

  2. Rooted in risk: genetic predisposition for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level associates with diminished low-density lipoprotein cholesterol response to statin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Roelof Aj; Postmus, Iris; Trompet, Stella; Barnes, Michael R; Warren, Helen; Arsenault, Benoit J; Chasman, Daniel I; Cupples, L Adrienne; Hitman, Graham A; Krauss, Ronald M; Li, Xiaohui; Psaty, Bruce M; Stein, Charles M; Rotter, Jerome I; Jukema, J Wouter

    2016-10-01

    To utilize previously reported lead SNPs for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) levels to find additional loci of importance to statin response, and examine whether genetic predisposition to LDL-c levels associates with differential statin response. We investigated effects on statin response of 59 LDL-c SNPs, by combining summary level statistics from the Global Lipids Genetics and Genomic Investigation of Statin Therapy consortia. Lead SNPs for APOE, SORT1 and NPC1L1 were associated with a decreased LDL-c response to statin treatment, as was overall genetic predisposition for increased LDL-c levels as quantified with 59 SNPs, with a 5.4% smaller statin response per standard deviation increase in genetically raised LDL-c levels. Genetic predisposition for increased LDL-c level may decrease efficacy of statin therapy.

  3. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome after gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist triggering and "freeze-all": in-depth analysis of genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Ribeiro, Samuel; Polyzos, Nikolaos P; Stouffs, Katrien; De Vos, Michel; Seneca, Sara; Tournaye, Herman; Blockeel, Christophe

    2015-07-01

    We report on the results of the whole-genome analysis performed in a patient who developed severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) following gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist triggering in a "freeze-all" protocol. A 30-year-old patient with polycystic ovary syndrome who developed severe early-onset OHSS with clinical ascites, and slight renal and hepatic dysfunction was admitted for monitoring and treatment with cabergoline and intravenous albumin. Exome sequencing to assess for any known genetic predisposition for OHSS was performed. No known genetic variants associated with OHSS predisposition were found. Case reports of severe OHSS following a "freeze-all" strategy are starting to arise, showing that OHSS has not been completely eliminated with this approach. Further studies should be conducted to confirm if such cases may be due to genetic predisposition or not.

  4. The SNAP Strong Lens Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, P.

    2005-01-03

    Basic considerations of lens detection and identification indicate that a wide field survey of the types planned for weak lensing and Type Ia SNe with SNAP are close to optimal for the optical detection of strong lenses. Such a ''piggy-back'' survey might be expected even pessimistically to provide a catalogue of a few thousand new strong lenses, with the numbers dominated by systems of faint blue galaxies lensed by foreground ellipticals. After sketching out our strategy for detecting and measuring these galaxy lenses using the SNAP images, we discuss some of the scientific applications of such a large sample of gravitational lenses: in particular we comment on the partition of information between lens structure, the source population properties and cosmology. Understanding this partitioning is key to assessing strong lens cosmography's value as a cosmological probe.

  5. Strong coupling phase in QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Ken-ichi

    1988-01-01

    Existence of a strong coupling phase in QED has been suggested in solutions of the Schwinger-Dyson equation and in Monte Carlo simulation of lattice QED. In this article we recapitulate the previous arguments, and formulate the problem in the modern framework of the renormalization theory, Wilsonian renormalization. This scheme of renormalization gives the best understanding of the basic structure of a field theory especially when it has a multi-phase structure. We resolve some misleading arguments in the previous literature. Then we set up a strategy to attack the strong phase, if any. We describe a trial; a coupled Schwinger-Dyson equation. Possible picture of the strong coupling phase QED is presented. (author)

  6. How strong and generalisable is the Generation Y effect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, Simone; Remaud, Hervé; Chabin, Yann

    2011-01-01

    alcoholic beverage consumption. A number of noticeable differences appeared between countries: wine involvement and consumption increases with age in traditional European wine markets, while they decrease in North America; environmental concerns and purchase channel usage hardly differ between generations......Purpose – This study aims to investigate how strongly Generation Y consumers differ in their values, attitudes and wine and alcoholic beverage consumption behaviour from older generations. The comparison spans seven culturally different markets. Design/methodology/approach – Large representative...

  7. Gender differences and effect of air pollution on asthma in children with and without allergic predisposition: northeast Chinese children health study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Hui Dong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Males and females exhibit different health responses to air pollution, but little is known about how exposure to air pollution affects juvenile respiratory health after analysis stratified by allergic predisposition. The aim of the present study was to assess the relationship between air pollutants and asthmatic symptoms in Chinese children selected from multiple sites in a heavily industrialized province of China, and investigate whether allergic predisposition modifies this relationship. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 30139 Chinese children aged 3-to-12 years were selected from 25 districts of seven cities in northeast China in 2009. Information on respiratory health was obtained using a standard questionnaire from the American Thoracic Society. Routine air-pollution monitoring data was used for particles with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 µm (PM(10, sulfur dioxide (SO(2, nitrogen dioxides (NO(2, ozone (O(3 and carbon monoxide (CO. A two-stage regression approach was applied in data analyses. The effect estimates were presented as odds ratios (ORs per interquartile changes for PM(10, SO(2, NO(2, O(3, and CO. The results showed that children with allergic predisposition were more susceptible to air pollutants than children without allergic predisposition. Amongst children without an allergic predisposition, air pollution effects on asthma were stronger in males compared to females; Current asthma prevalence was related to PM(10 (ORs = 1.36 per 31 µg/m(3; 95% CI, 1.08-1.72, SO(2 (ORs = 1.38 per 21 µg/m(3; 95%CI, 1.12-1.69 only among males. However, among children with allergic predisposition, more positively associations between air pollutants and respiratory symptoms and diseases were detected in females; An increased prevalence of doctor-diagnosed asthma was significantly associated with SO(2 (ORs = 1.48 per 21 µg/m(3; 95%CI, 1.21-1.80, NO(2 (ORs = 1.26 per 10 µg/m(3; 95%CI, 1.01-1.56, and current asthma with

  8. Gender Differences and Effect of Air Pollution on Asthma in Children with and without Allergic Predisposition: Northeast Chinese Children Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guang-Hui; Chen, Tao; Liu, Miao-Miao; Wang, Da; Ma, Ya-Nan; Ren, Wan-Hui; Lee, Yungling Leo; Zhao, Ya-Dong; He, Qin-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Background Males and females exhibit different health responses to air pollution, but little is known about how exposure to air pollution affects juvenile respiratory health after analysis stratified by allergic predisposition. The aim of the present study was to assess the relationship between air pollutants and asthmatic symptoms in Chinese children selected from multiple sites in a heavily industrialized province of China, and investigate whether allergic predisposition modifies this relationship. Methodology/Principal Findings 30139 Chinese children aged 3-to-12 years were selected from 25 districts of seven cities in northeast China in 2009. Information on respiratory health was obtained using a standard questionnaire from the American Thoracic Society. Routine air-pollution monitoring data was used for particles with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 µm (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxides (NO2), ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO). A two-stage regression approach was applied in data analyses. The effect estimates were presented as odds ratios (ORs) per interquartile changes for PM10, SO2, NO2, O3, and CO. The results showed that children with allergic predisposition were more susceptible to air pollutants than children without allergic predisposition. Amongst children without an allergic predisposition, air pollution effects on asthma were stronger in males compared to females; Current asthma prevalence was related to PM10 (ORs = 1.36 per 31 µg/m3; 95% CI, 1.08–1.72), SO2 (ORs = 1.38 per 21 µg/m3; 95%CI, 1.12–1.69) only among males. However, among children with allergic predisposition, more positively associations between air pollutants and respiratory symptoms and diseases were detected in females; An increased prevalence of doctor-diagnosed asthma was significantly associated with SO2 (ORs = 1.48 per 21 µg/m3; 95%CI, 1.21–1.80), NO2 (ORs = 1.26 per 10 µg/m3; 95%CI, 1.01–1.56), and current asthma with O3 (ORs = 1

  9. Breast Cancer Screening in Women with a Familial or Genetic Predisposition: the role of MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kriege (Mieke)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractWomen with a strong family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer combined with young ages at diagnosis of affected family members have an increased risk of these types of cancer. In 1994 and 1995 respectively, the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were identified. A germline mutation in one of

  10. Breast Cancer Screening in Women with a Familial or Genetic Predisposition: the role of MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kriege (Mieke)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractWomen with a strong family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer combined with young ages at diagnosis of affected family members have an increased risk of these types of cancer. In 1994 and 1995 respectively, the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were identified. A germline mutation in one

  11. Ghrelin and feeding behaviour in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, Francesco; Lupica, Maria Maddalena; Liguori, Stefania Alfonsina; Fissore, Maria Francesca; Silvestro, Leandra

    2012-03-01

    The importance of early life events in the development of metabolic diseases is well recognized. Early postnatal environment, including nutrition, is key to future health, and this is particularly true for preterm infants. It is important that these infants receive sufficient nutrients to prevent growth restriction and promote neurodevelopment, while minimizing predisposition to metabolic diseases later in life. Feeding habits are the fundamental elements of nutrition and are influenced by many factors, including personal and familial habits, socioeconomic status, and cultural environment. In the last decades, there has been an important scientific interest toward the comprehension of the molecular and neural mechanisms regulating appetite. In these networks, act many peptide hormones produced in brain or gut, among which ghrelin is important because of its action in the short-term regulation of food intake and the long-term regulation of body weight. Ghrelin stimulates appetite and plays a role in regulating feeding behaviour. Ghrelin levels vary from fetal life through to early adulthood, with the highest levels observed in the very early years. Cord ghrelin levels have been evaluated in term and preterm newborns and high ghrelin levels have been observed in small-for-gestational age newborns and in newborns with intrauterine growth restriction. Moreover, ghrelin has been detected in term and preterm human breast milk, suggesting that it may play a role in the development of neuroendocrine pathways regulating appetite and energy homeostasis in early life. However, more research is required to better define ghrelin's role in breast milk and on feeding behaviour. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Strong Decomposition of Random Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann-Jørgensen, Jørgen; Kagan, Abram M.; Pitt, Loren D.

    2007-01-01

    A random variable X is stongly decomposable if X=Y+Z where Y=Φ(X) and Z=X-Φ(X) are independent non-degenerated random variables (called the components). It is shown that at least one of the components is singular, and we derive a necessary and sufficient condition for strong decomposability...

  13. Strong interaction at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We review two methods discussed in the literature to determine the effective parameters of strongly interacting particles as they move through a heat bath. The first one is the general method of chiral perturbation theory, which may be readily applied to this problem. The other is the method of thermal QCD sum rules ...

  14. Strong-strong beam-beam simulation on parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Ji

    2004-08-02

    The beam-beam interaction puts a strong limit on the luminosity of the high energy storage ring colliders. At the interaction points, the electromagnetic fields generated by one beam focus or defocus the opposite beam. This can cause beam blowup and a reduction of luminosity. An accurate simulation of the beam-beam interaction is needed to help optimize the luminosity in high energy colliders.

  15. Strong-strong beam-beam simulation on parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang, Ji

    2004-01-01

    The beam-beam interaction puts a strong limit on the luminosity of the high energy storage ring colliders. At the interaction points, the electromagnetic fields generated by one beam focus or defocus the opposite beam. This can cause beam blowup and a reduction of luminosity. An accurate simulation of the beam-beam interaction is needed to help optimize the luminosity in high energy colliders

  16. Genetic predisposition to adiposity is associated with increased objectively assessed sedentary time in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnurr, Theresia Maria; Viitasalo, A; Eloranta, A-M

    2018-01-01

    Increased sedentariness has been linked to the growing prevalence of obesity in children, but some longitudinal studies suggest that sedentariness may be a consequence rather than a cause of increased adiposity. We used Mendelian randomization to examine the causal relations between body mass index......=0.072). Childhood BMI may have a causal influence on sedentary time but not on total physical activity or MVPA in young children. Our results provide important insights into the regulation of movement behaviour in childhood.International Journal of Obesity accepted article preview online, 26...... (BMI) and objectively assessed sedentary time and physical activity in 3-8 year-old children from one Finnish and two Danish cohorts [NTOTAL=679]. A genetic risk score (GRS) comprised of 15 independent genetic variants associated with childhood BMI was used as the instrumental variable to test causal...

  17. NCAM2 deletion in a boy with macrocephaly and autism: Cause, association or predisposition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Caroline; Steinemann, Doris; Mälzer, Madeleine; Roy, Mandy; Arslan-Kirchner, Mine; Illig, Thomas; Schmidtke, Jörg; Stuhrmann, Manfred

    2016-10-01

    We report on an 8-year-old boy with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), speech delay, behavioural problems, disturbed sleep and macrosomia including macrocephaly carrying a microdeletion that contains the entire NCAM2 gene and no other functional genes. Other family members with the microdeletion show a large skull circumference but do not exhibit any symptoms of autism spectrum disorder. Among many ASD-candidate genes, NCAM2 has been assumed to play a pivotal role in the development of ASD because of its function in the outgrowth and bundling of neurites. Our reported case raises the questions whether the NCAM2-deletion is the true cause of the ASD or only a risk factor and whether there might be any connection in NCAM2 with skull-size autism spectrum disorder, macrocephaly, neural cell adhesion molecule 2 protein (NCAM2), array comparative genomic hybridization (microarray). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Habitual coffee consumption and genetic predisposition to obesity: gene-diet interaction analyses in three US prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiange; Huang, Tao; Kang, Jae H; Zheng, Yan; Jensen, Majken K; Wiggs, Janey L; Pasquale, Louis R; Fuchs, Charles S; Campos, Hannia; Rimm, Eric B; Willett, Walter C; Hu, Frank B; Qi, Lu

    2017-05-09

    Whether habitual coffee consumption interacts with the genetic predisposition to obesity in relation to body mass index (BMI) and obesity is unknown. We analyzed the interactions between genetic predisposition and habitual coffee consumption in relation to BMI and obesity risk in 5116 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS), in 9841 women from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS), and in 5648 women from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI). The genetic risk score was calculated based on 77 BMI-associated loci. Coffee consumption was examined prospectively in relation to BMI. The genetic association with BMI was attenuated among participants with higher consumption of coffee than among those with lower consumption in the HPFS (P interaction  = 0.023) and NHS (P interaction  = 0.039); similar results were replicated in the WHI (P interaction  = 0.044). In the combined data of all cohorts, differences in BMI per increment of 10-risk allele were 1.38 (standard error (SE), 0.28), 1.02 (SE, 0.10), and 0.95 (SE, 0.12) kg/m 2 for coffee consumption of  3 cup(s)/day, respectively (P interaction  coffee consumption among participants at lower genetic risk and slightly lower BMI with higher coffee consumption among those at higher genetic risk. Each increment of 10-risk allele was associated with 78% (95% confidence interval (CI), 59-99%), 48% (95% CI, 36-62%), and 43% (95% CI, 28-59%) increased risk for obesity across these subgroups of coffee consumption (P interaction  = 0.008). From another perspective, differences in BMI per increment of 1 cup/day coffee consumption were 0.02 (SE, 0.09), -0.02 (SE, 0.04), and -0.14 (SE, 0.04) kg/m 2 across tertiles of the genetic risk score. Higher coffee consumption might attenuate the genetic associations with BMI and obesity risk, and individuals with greater genetic predisposition to obesity appeared to have lower BMI associated with higher coffee consumption.

  19. A Combination of Naltrexone + Varenicline Retards the Expression of a Genetic Predisposition Toward High Alcohol Drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, Janice C; Fischer, Stephen M; Nicholson, Emily R; Dilley, Julian E; Filosa, Nicholas J; Smith, Teal N; Rademacher, Logan C

    2017-03-01

    This study examined whether naltrexone (NTX) or varenicline (VAR), alone or in combination, can retard the phenotypic expression of a genetic predisposition toward high alcohol drinking in rats selectively bred for high alcohol intake when drug treatment is initiated prior to, or concomitantly with, the onset of alcohol drinking. Alcohol-naïve P rats were treated daily with NTX (15.0 mg/kg BW), VAR (1.0 mg/kg BW), a combination of NTX (15.0 mg/kg BW) + VAR (1.0 mg/kg BW), or vehicle (VEH) for 2 weeks prior to, or concomitantly with, their first opportunity to drink alcohol and throughout 21 days of daily 2-hour alcohol access. Drug treatment was then discontinued for 3 weeks followed by reinstatement of drug treatment for an additional 3 weeks. When P rats were pretreated with drug for 2 weeks prior to onset of alcohol access, only NTX + VAR in combination blocked the acquisition of alcohol drinking in alcohol-naïve P rats. When drug treatment was initiated concomitantly with the first opportunity to drink alcohol, NTX alone, VAR alone, and NTX + VAR blocked the acquisition of alcohol drinking. Following termination of drug treatment, NTX + VAR and VAR alone continued to reduce alcohol drinking but by the end of 3 weeks without drug treatment, alcohol intake in all groups was comparable to that seen in the vehicle-treated group as the expression of a genetic predisposition toward high alcohol drinking emerged in the drug-free P rats. After 3 weeks without drug treatment, reinstatement of NTX + VAR treatment again reduced alcohol intake. A combination of NTX + VAR, when administered prior to, or concomitantly with, the first opportunity to drink alcohol, blocks the acquisition of alcohol drinking during both initial access to alcohol and during a later period of alcohol access in P rats with a genetic predisposition toward high alcohol intake. The results suggest that NTX + VAR may be effective in curtailing alcohol drinking in individuals

  20. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which

  1. Medication overuse, healthy lifestyle behaviour and stress in chronic headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Maria Lurenda; Glümer, Charlotte; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2016-01-01

    AIM: This cross-sectional study investigated associations between chronic headache (CH) with and without medication overuse, healthy lifestyle behaviour, and stress. METHODS: Questionnaires were sent to 129,150 adults. Those with headache ≥15 days per month for three months were classified...... strong links between healthy lifestyle behaviour and stress in MOH. Stress reduction and promoting healthy behaviour are highly relevant in MOH management....

  2. Viscoelastic behaviour of cold recycled asphalt mixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizkova, Zuzana; Suda, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Behaviour of cold recycled mixes depends strongly on both the bituminous binder content (bituminous emulsion or foamed bitumen) and the hydraulic binder content (usually cement). In the case of cold recycled mixes rich in bitumen and with low hydraulic binder content, behaviour is close to the viscoelastic behaviour of traditional hot mix asphalt. With decreasing bituminous binder content together with increasing hydraulic binder content, mixes are characteristic with brittle behaviour, typical for concrete pavements or hydraulically bound layers. The behaviour of cold recycled mixes with low content of both types of binders is similar to behaviour of unbound materials. This paper is dedicated to analysing of the viscoelastic behaviour of the cold recycled mixes. Therefore, the tested mixes contained higher amount of the bituminous binder (both foamed bitumen and bituminous emulsion). The best way to characterize any viscoelastic material in a wide range of temperatures and frequencies is through the master curves. This paper includes interesting findings concerning the dependency of both parts of the complex modulus (elastic and viscous) on the testing frequency (which simulates the speed of heavy traffic passing) and on the testing temperature (which simulates the changing climate conditions a real pavement is subjected to).

  3. Strongly correlated systems experimental techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    The continuous evolution and development of experimental techniques is at the basis of any fundamental achievement in modern physics. Strongly correlated systems (SCS), more than any other, need to be investigated through the greatest variety of experimental techniques in order to unveil and crosscheck the numerous and puzzling anomalous behaviors characterizing them. The study of SCS fostered the improvement of many old experimental techniques, but also the advent of many new ones just invented in order to analyze the complex behaviors of these systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and materials science, belong to this class of systems. The volume presents a representative collection of the modern experimental techniques specifically tailored for the analysis of strongly correlated systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognize...

  4. Strongly Correlated Systems Theoretical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Avella, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    The volume presents, for the very first time, an exhaustive collection of those modern theoretical methods specifically tailored for the analysis of Strongly Correlated Systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and materials science, belong to this class of systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognized main contributors. The exposition has a clear pedagogical cut and fully reports on the most relevant case study where the specific technique showed to be very successful in describing and enlightening the puzzling physics of a particular strongly correlated system. The book is intended for advanced graduate students and post-docs in the field as textbook and/or main reference, but also for other researchers in the field who appreciates consulting a single, but comprehensive, source or wishes to get acquainted, in a as painless as po...

  5. Strongly correlated systems numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    This volume presents, for the very first time, an exhaustive collection of those modern numerical methods specifically tailored for the analysis of Strongly Correlated Systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and material science, belong to this class of systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognized main contributors. The exposition has a clear pedagogical cut and fully reports on the most relevant case study where the specific technique showed to be very successful in describing and enlightening the puzzling physics of a particular strongly correlated system. The book is intended for advanced graduate students and post-docs in the field as textbook and/or main reference, but also for other researchers in the field who appreciate consulting a single, but comprehensive, source or wishes to get acquainted, in a as painless as possi...

  6. Strongly nonlinear oscillators analytical solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Cveticanin, Livija

    2014-01-01

    This book provides the presentation of the motion of pure nonlinear oscillatory systems and various solution procedures which give the approximate solutions of the strong nonlinear oscillator equations. The book presents the original author’s method for the analytical solution procedure of the pure nonlinear oscillator system. After an introduction, the physical explanation of the pure nonlinearity and of the pure nonlinear oscillator is given. The analytical solution for free and forced vibrations of the one-degree-of-freedom strong nonlinear system with constant and time variable parameter is considered. Special attention is given to the one and two mass oscillatory systems with two-degrees-of-freedom. The criteria for the deterministic chaos in ideal and non-ideal pure nonlinear oscillators are derived analytically. The method for suppressing chaos is developed. Important problems are discussed in didactic exercises. The book is self-consistent and suitable as a textbook for students and also for profess...

  7. Risky behaviours and attitudes of healthy Nigerians towards kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This research work is aimed at determining the kidney failure risk behaviours and attitudes of healthy populace of workers of Ede North Local Government Area of ... Conclusion: The reflections of their attitude about their knowledge of kidney failure in their exhibitions of risk behaviours for kidney failure are strong ...

  8. Another Report of Acalculous Cholecystitis in a Greek Patient with Infectious Mononucleosis: A Matter of Luck or Genetic Predisposition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theocharis Koufakis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We here report a case of a young, male patient who presented with jaundice and was diagnosed with acalculous cholecystitis during the course of a primary Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV infection. The coexistence of cholestatic hepatitis and acalculous cholecystitis in patients with infectious mononucleosis is extremely uncommon and only few cases can be found in the literature. Moreover, almost one-fourth of the total reports of this rare entity are coming from Greece. Whether this is a result of physicians’ high index of suspicion due to previous reports or a consequence of genetic predisposition is an issue that deserves further investigation in the future. More studies are required in order to clarify the pathophysiological and genetic backgrounds that connect acalculous cholecystitis and EBV infection.

  9. Prostate-specific antigen velocity in a prospective prostate cancer screening study of men with genetic predisposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikropoulos, Christos; Selkirk, Christina G Hutten; Saya, Sibel

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and PSA-velocity (PSAV) have been used to identify men at risk of prostate cancer (PrCa). The IMPACT study is evaluating PSA screening in men with a known genetic predisposition to PrCa due to BRCA1/2 mutations. This analysis evaluates the utility of PS...... elevation in men with low PSAs. Interaction terms were included in the models to determine whether BRCA status influenced the predictiveness of PSA or PSAV. RESULTS: 1634 participants had ⩾3 PSA readings of whom 174 underwent PB and 45 PrCas diagnosed. In men with PSA >3.0 ng ml-l, PSAV...

  10. Flavour Democracy in Strong Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Abel, S A; Abel, Steven; King, Steven

    1998-01-01

    We show that the fermion mass spectrum may naturally be understood in terms of flavour democratic fixed points in supersymmetric theories which have a large domain of attraction in the presence of "strong unification". Our approach provides an alternative to the approximate Yukawa texture zeroes of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. We discuss a particular model based on a broken gauged $SU(3)_L\\times SU(3)_R$ family symmetry which illustrates our approach.

  11. Cross-cultural adaptation of the assistive technology device - Predisposition assessment (ATD PA) for use in Brazil (ATD PA Br).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Ana Cristina de Jesus; Matsukura, Thelma Simões; Scherer, Marcia J

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to conduct a cross-cultural adaptation of the Assistive Technology Device Predisposition Assessment (ATD PA) for use in Brazil. The selection of the Assistive Technology Device Predisposition Assessment (ATD PA) was determined by previous literature reviews of articles published in 2014 and 2016 in six databases with the terms "assistive device" or "assistive technology" or "self-help device" combined with "evidence-based practice" or "framework" or "measurement scale" or "model and outcome assessment". This review indicated that the conceptual model of Assistive Technology (AT) most discussed in the literature was the Matching Person and Technology (MPT) model, and this finding determined the selection of ATD PA as an assessment within the MPT portfolio of measures. The procedures for cross-cultural adaptation were as follows: Equivalence of Concept, Semantic and Operational. Five experts were asked to translate 725 items and these translations were evaluated and a high level of agreement was demonstrated. The Portuguese version, Avaliação de Tecnologia Assistiva - Predisposição ao Uso - ATD PA Br, was derived from the original version in English (ATD PA). The ATD PA Br will support professionals and people with disabilities in Brazil to better select AT devices according to the clients' needs. Implications for rehabilitation Provides a systematic way of selecting assistive technology devices for the use of individuals with disabilities according to the Brazilian reality. A systematic way of selecting the assistive technology that can help decrease the abandonment of the assistive technology use. The use of the Matching Person and Technology theorical model and of the assessment ATD PA Br is essential to guide the researches and clinical practice in Brazil.

  12. A genetic predisposition score for muscular endophenotypes predicts the increase in aerobic power after training: the CAREGENE study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schepers Dirk

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is widely accepted that genetic variability might explain a large part of the observed heterogeneity in aerobic capacity and its response to training. Significant associations between polymorphisms of different genes with muscular strength, anaerobic phenotypes and body composition have been reported. Muscular endophenotypes are positively correlated with aerobic capacity, therefore, we tested the association of polymorphisms in twelve muscular related genes on aerobic capacity and its response to endurance training. Methods 935 Coronary artery disease patients (CAD who performed an incremental exercise test until exhaustion at baseline and after three months of training were included. Polymorphisms of the genes were detected using the invader assay. Genotype-phenotype association analyses were performed using ANCOVA. Different models for a genetic predisposition score (GPS were constructed based on literature and own data and were related to baseline and response VO2 scores. Results Carriers of the minor allele in the R23K polymorphism of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (GR and the ciliary neurotrophic factor gene (CNTF had a significantly higher increase in peakVO2 after training (p AMPD1 gene had a significantly lower relative increase (p 2. GPS of data driven models were significantly associated with the increase in peakVO2 after training. Conclusions In CAD patients, suggestive associations were found in the GR, CNTF and the AMPD1 gene with an improved change in aerobic capacity after three months of training. Additionally data driven models with a genetic predisposition score (GPS showed a significant predictive value for the increase in peakVO2.

  13. Strong coupling from the Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minahan, Joseph A.

    2006-10-01

    It was recently observed that the one-dimensional half-filled Hubbard model reproduces the known part of the perturbative spectrum of planar {\\cal N}=4 super Yang Mills in the SU(2) sector. Assuming that this identification is valid beyond perturbation theory, we investigate the behaviour of this spectrum as the 't Hooft parameter λ becomes large. We show that the full dimension Δ of the Konishi superpartner is the solution of a sixth-order polynomial while Δ for a bare dimension 5 operator is the solution of a cubic. In both cases, the equations can be solved easily as a series expansion for both small and large λ and the equations can be inverted to express λ as an explicit function of Δ. We then consider more general operators and show how Δ depends on λ in the strong coupling limit. We are also able to distinguish those states in the Hubbard model which correspond to the gauge-invariant operators for all values of λ. Finally, we compare our results with known results for strings on AdS5 × S5, where we find agreement for a range of R-charges.

  14. Quantum centipedes with strong global constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, Pascal

    2017-06-01

    A centipede made of N quantum walkers on a one-dimensional lattice is considered. The distance between two consecutive legs is either one or two lattice spacings, and a global constraint is imposed: the maximal distance between the first and last leg is N  +  1. This is the strongest global constraint compatible with walking. For an initial value of the wave function corresponding to a localized configuration at the origin, the probability law of the first leg of the centipede can be expressed in closed form in terms of Bessel functions. The dispersion relation and the group velocities are worked out exactly. Their maximal group velocity goes to zero when N goes to infinity, which is in contrast with the behaviour of group velocities of quantum centipedes without global constraint, which were recently shown by Krapivsky, Luck and Mallick to give rise to ballistic spreading of extremal wave-front at non-zero velocity in the large-N limit. The corresponding Hamiltonians are implemented numerically, based on a block structure of the space of configurations corresponding to compositions of the integer N. The growth of the maximal group velocity when the strong constraint is gradually relaxed is explored, and observed to be linear in the density of gaps allowed in the configurations. Heuristic arguments are presented to infer that the large-N limit of the globally constrained model can yield finite group velocities provided the allowed number of gaps is a finite fraction of N.

  15. [Genetic predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer: importance of test results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian-Reynier, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Oncogenetic consultations and predictive BRCA1/2 testing are intertwined processes and the specific impact of these genetic tests if performed alone through direct-to-consumer offers remains unknown. Noteworthy, the expectations of patients vary with their own status, whether they are affected or not by breast cancer at the time genetic testing is performed. The prescription of genetic tests for BCRA mutations has doubled in France between 2003 and 2009. There is a consensus on the fact that genetic results disclosure led to a significant increase in the knowledge and understanding that the patients have of the genetic risk and also changed the medical follow-up of these patients. Evaluating the psychological burden of tests disclosure did not reveal any major distress in patients who are followed by high-quality multidisciplinary teams. Longitudinal cohorts studies have now evaluated the perception and behaviour of these patients, and observed sociodemographic as well as geographic and psychosocial differences both in the acceptation of prophylactic strategies such as surgery, and time to surgery. © 2011 médecine/sciences - Inserm / SRMS.

  16. Simultaneous occurrence of a supra- and an infratentorial glioma in a patient with Ollier's disease : more evidence for non-mesodermal tumor predisposition in multiple enchondromatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeg, M; Klein, JP; Krikke, AP

    1998-01-01

    A case is presented in which two neuro-ectodermal tumors, an infra- and a supratentorial glioma, developed in a young man with multiple enchondromatosis of Ollier's disease. This is the third such case of multifocal low-grade glioma in Ollier's disease, suggesting a predisposition for non-mesodermal

  17. A predisposition for allergies predicts subsequent hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus among patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder: a nationwide longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mu-Hong; Li, Cheng-Ta; Lin, Wei-Chen; Wei, Hang-Tin; Chang, Wen-Han; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Pan, Tai-Long; Su, Tung-Ping; Bai, Ya-Mei

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that both severe mental disorders (schizophrenia and bipolar disorder) and atopic diseases were associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome. However, the role of atopy/the predisposition for allergies in the development of metabolic syndrome is still unknown among those with severe mental disorders. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, 5826 patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (1908 with a predisposition for allergies and 3918 without) were enrolled between 1998 and 2008. Those who developed hypertension, dyslipidemia, and/or diabetes mellitus were identified during the follow-up to the end of 2011. A predisposition for allergies increased the risk of developing hypertension (HR: 1.67), dyslipidemia (HR: 1.82), and diabetes mellitus (HR: 1.37) in later life among those with severe mental disorders. A dose-dependent relationship was noted between having more atopic comorbidities and a greater likelihood of hypertension (1 atopic disease: HR: 1.60; ≧ 2 atopic comorbidities: HR: 1.87), dyslipidemia (HR: 1.73; HR: 2.12), and diabetes mellitus (HR: 1.26; HR: 1.69). A predisposition for allergies was an independent risk factor for hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus among patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Further studies would be required to elucidate the underlying pathophysiology among atopy, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Atoms in strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Huillier, A.

    2002-01-01

    When a high-power laser focuses into a gas of atoms, the electromagnetic field becomes of the same magnitude as the Coulomb field which binds a 1s electron in a hydrogen atom. 3 highly non-linear phenomena can happen: 1) ATI (above threshold ionization): electrons initially in the ground state absorb a large number of photons, many more than the minimum number required for ionization; 2) multiple ionization: many electrons can be emitted one at a time, in a sequential process, or simultaneously in a mechanism called direct or non-sequential; and 3) high order harmonic generation (HHG): efficient photon emission in the extreme ultraviolet range, in the form of high-order harmonics of the fundamental laser field can occur. The theoretical problem consists in solving the time dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) that describes the interaction of a many-electron atom with a laser field. A number of methods have been proposed to solve this problem in the case of a hydrogen atom or a single-active electron atom in a strong laser field. A large effort is presently being devoted to go beyond the single-active approximation. The understanding of the physics of the interaction between atoms and strong laser fields has been provided by a very simple model called ''simple man's theory''. A unified view of HHG, ATI, and non-sequential ionization, originating from the simple man's model and the strong field approximation, expressed in terms of electrons trajectories or quantum paths is slowly emerging. (A.C.)

  19. Relationships between Behavioural Addictions and Psychiatric Disorders: What Is Known and What Is Yet to Be Learned?

    OpenAIRE

    Starcevic, Vladan; Khazaal, Yasser

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a narrative review of the relationships between several behavioural addictions [pathological gambling, problematic Internet use (PIU), problematic online gaming, compulsive sexual behaviour disorder, compulsive buying, and exercise addiction] and psychiatric disorders. Associations between most behavioural addictions and depressive and anxiety disorders are strong and seem relatively non-specific. Strong links with substance use disorders may support the notion that some...

  20. Strongly Interacting Light Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Bruggisser, Francesco Riva, Alfredo Urbano

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of approximate global symmetries that forbid relevant interactions, strongly coupled light Dark Matter (DM can appear weakly coupled at small energy and generate a sizable relic abundance. Fundamental principles like unitarity restrict these symmetries to a small class, where the leading interactions are captured by effective operators up to dimension-8. Chiral symmetry, spontaneously broken global symmetries and non-linearly realized supersymmetry are examples of this. Their DM candidates (composite fermions, pseudo Nambu-Goldstone Bosons and Goldstini are interesting targets for LHC missing-energy searches.

  1. Strongly interacting light dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggisser, Sebastian; Riva, Francesco; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    In the presence of approximate global symmetries that forbid relevant interactions, strongly coupled light Dark Matter (DM) can appear weakly coupled at small-energy and generate a sizable relic abundance. Fundamental principles like unitarity restrict these symmetries to a small class, where the leading interactions are captured by effective operators up to dimension-8. Chiral symmetry, spontaneously broken global symmetries and non-linearly realized supersymmetry are examples of this. Their DM candidates (composite fermions, pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone Bosons and Goldstini) are interesting targets for LHC missing-energy searches.

  2. Scalar strong interaction hadron theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hoh, Fang Chao

    2015-01-01

    The scalar strong interaction hadron theory, SSI, is a first principles' and nonlocal theory at quantum mechanical level that provides an alternative to low energy QCD and Higgs related part of the standard model. The quark-quark interaction is scalar rather than color-vectorial. A set of equations of motion for mesons and another set for baryons have been constructed. This book provides an account of the present state of a theory supposedly still at its early stage of development. This work will facilitate researchers interested in entering into this field and serve as a basis for possible future development of this theory.

  3. Strong Plate, Weak Slab Dichotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, R. I.; Stegman, D. R.; Tackley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Models of mantle convection on Earth produce styles of convection that are not observed on Earth.Moreover non-Earth-like modes, such as two-sided downwellings, are the de facto mode of convection in such models.To recreate Earth style subduction, i.e. one-sided asymmetric recycling of the lithosphere, proper treatment of the plates and plate interface are required. Previous work has identified several model features that promote subduction. A free surface or pseudo-free surface and a layer of material with a relatively low strength material (weak crust) allow downgoing plates to bend and slide past overriding without creating undue stress at the plate interface. (Crameri, et al. 2012, GRL)A low viscosity mantle wedge, possibly a result of slab dehydration, decouples the plates in the system. (Gerya et al. 2007, Geo)Plates must be composed of material which, in the case of the overriding plate, are is strong enough to resist bending stresses imposed by the subducting plate and yet, as in the case of the subducting plate, be weak enough to bend and subduct when pulled by the already subducted slab. (Petersen et al. 2015, PEPI) Though strong surface plates are required for subduction such plates may present a problem when they encounter the lower mantle.As the subducting slab approaches the higher viscosity, lower mantle stresses are imposed on the tip.Strong slabs transmit this stress to the surface.There the stress field at the plate interface is modified and potentially modifies the style of convection. In addition to modifying the stress at the plate interface, the strength of the slab affects the morphology of the slab at the base of the upper mantle. (Stegman, et al 2010, Tectonophysics)Slabs that maintain a sufficient portion of their strength after being bent require high stresses to unbend or otherwise change their shape.On the other hand slabs that are weakened though the bending process are more amenable to changes in morphology. We present the results of

  4. Rethinking retailer buying behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars

    2001-01-01

    Research of retailer buying behaviour has previously focused on the buying decision. In this paper a new approach to studying retailer buying behaviour is suggested, one which focuses on the sensemaking processes leading up to a decision being made. A research project taking a sensemaking...... perspective is outlined and the implications and expected contribution of studying retailer buying behaviour from a sensemaking perspective are discussed....

  5. Behavioural present value

    OpenAIRE

    Krzysztof Piasecki

    2013-01-01

    Impact of chosen behavioural factors on imprecision of present value is discussed here. The formal model of behavioural present value is offered as a result of this discussion. Behavioural present value is described here by fuzzy set. These considerations were illustrated by means of extensive numerical case study. Finally there are shown that in proposed model the return rate is given, as a fuzzy probabilistic set.

  6. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed

  7. Physics of Strongly Coupled Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraeft, Wolf-Dietrich [Universitat Rostock (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Strongly coupled plasmas (or non-ideal plasmas) are multi-component charged many-particle systems, in which the mean value of the potential energy of the system is of the same order as or even higher than the mean value of the kinetic energy. The constituents are electrons, ions, atoms and molecules. Dusty (or complex) plasmas contain still mesoscopic (multiply charged) particles. In such systems, the effects of strong coupling (non-ideality) lead to considerable deviations of physical properties from the corresponding properties of ideal plasmas, i.e., of plasmas in which the mean kinetic energy is essentially larger than the mean potential energy. For instance, bound state energies become density dependent and vanish at higher densities (Mott effect) due to the interaction of the pair with the surrounding particles. Non-ideal plasmas are of interest both for general scientific reasons (including, for example, astrophysical questions), and for technical applications such as inertially confined fusion. In spite of great efforts both experimentally and theoretically, satisfactory information on the physical properties of strongly coupled plasmas is not at hand for any temperature and density. For example, the theoretical description of non-ideal plasmas is possible only at low densities/high temperatures and at extremely high densities (high degeneracy). For intermediate degeneracy, however, numerical experiments have to fill the gap. Experiments are difficult in the region of 'warm dense matter'. The monograph tries to present the state of the art concerning both theoretical and experimental attempts. It mainly includes results of the work performed in famous Russian laboratories in recent decades. After outlining basic concepts (chapter 1), the generation of plasmas is considered (chapter 2, chapter 3). Questions of partial (chapter 4) and full ionization (chapter 5) are discussed including Mott transition and Wigner crystallization. Electrical and

  8. Treatment-related toxicities in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia predisposition syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.

    2016-01-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) do not harbor germline mutations that strongly predispose them to development of this malignancy, large syndrome registries and detailed mapping of exomes or whole genomes of familial leukaemia kindreds have revealed that 3-5% of all...... childhood ALL cases are due to such germline mutations, but the figure may be higher. Most of these syndromes are primarily characterized by their non-malignant phenotype, whereas ALL may be the dominating or even only striking manifestation of the syndrome in some families. Identification of such ALL...... patients is important in order to adjust therapy and offer genetic counseling and cancer surveillance to mutation carriers in the family. In the coming years large genomic screening projects are expected to reveal further hitherto unrecognised familial ALL syndromes. The treatment of ALL cases harboring...

  9. Behavioural Economics, Consumer Behaviour, and Consumer Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisch, Lucia A.; Zhao, Min

    2017-01-01

    . In particular, we discuss the impacts of key principles such as status quo bias, the endowment effect, mental accounting and the sunkcost effect, other heuristics and biases related to availability, salience, the anchoring effect and simplicity rules, as well as the effects of other supposedly irrelevant...... factors such as music, temperature and physical markers on consumers’ decisions. These principles not only add significantly to research on consumer behaviour – they also offer readily available practical implications for consumer policy to nudge behaviour in beneficial directions in consumption domains...... including financial decision making, product choice, healthy eating and sustainable consumption....

  10. Strongly coupled dust coulomb clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juan Wentau; Lai Yingju; Chen Mingheng; I Lin

    1999-01-01

    The structures and motions of quasi-2-dimensional strongly coupled dust Coulomb clusters with particle number N from few to hundreds in a cylindrical rf plasma trap are studied and compared with the results from the molecular dynamic simulation using more ideal models. Shell structures with periodic packing in different shells and intershell rotational motion dominated excitations are observed at small N. As N increases, the boundary has less effect, the system recovers to the triangular lattice with isotropic vortex type cooperative excitations similar to an infinite N system except the outer shell region. The above generic behaviors are mainly determined by the system symmetry and agree with the simulation results. The detailed interaction form causes minor effect such as the fine structure of packing

  11. Probability densities in strong turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhot, Victor

    2006-03-01

    In this work we, using Mellin’s transform combined with the Gaussian large-scale boundary condition, calculate probability densities (PDFs) of velocity increments P(δu,r), velocity derivatives P(u,r) and the PDF of the fluctuating dissipation scales Q(η,Re), where Re is the large-scale Reynolds number. The resulting expressions strongly deviate from the Log-normal PDF P(δu,r) often quoted in the literature. It is shown that the probability density of the small-scale velocity fluctuations includes information about the large (integral) scale dynamics which is responsible for the deviation of P(δu,r) from P(δu,r). An expression for the function D(h) of the multifractal theory, free from spurious logarithms recently discussed in [U. Frisch, M. Martins Afonso, A. Mazzino, V. Yakhot, J. Fluid Mech. 542 (2005) 97] is also obtained.

  12. On the Strong Solution for the 3D Stochastic Leray-Alpha Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Deugoue

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove the existence and uniqueness of strong solution to the stochastic Leray-α equations under appropriate conditions on the data. This is achieved by means of the Galerkin approximation scheme. We also study the asymptotic behaviour of the strong solution as alpha goes to zero. We show that a sequence of strong solutions converges in appropriate topologies to weak solutions of the 3D stochastic Navier-Stokes equations.

  13. On the Strong Solution for the 3D Stochastic Leray-Alpha Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deugoue Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We prove the existence and uniqueness of strong solution to the stochastic Leray- equations under appropriate conditions on the data. This is achieved by means of the Galerkin approximation scheme. We also study the asymptotic behaviour of the strong solution as alpha goes to zero. We show that a sequence of strong solutions converges in appropriate topologies to weak solutions of the 3D stochastic Navier-Stokes equations.

  14. Influence of parental attitudes in the development of children eating behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglioni, Silvia; Salvioni, Michela; Galimberti, Cinzia

    2008-02-01

    The present paper is a review of available data on effects of parental feeding attitudes and styles on child nutritional behaviour. Food preferences develop from genetically determined predispositions to like sweet and salty flavours and to dislike bitter and sour tastes. There is evidence for existence of some innate, automatic mechanism that regulate appetite. However, from birth genetic predispositions are modified by experience. There are mechanisms of taste development: mere exposure, medicine effect, flavour learning, flavour nutrient learning. Parents play a pivotal role in the development of their child's food preferences and energy intake, with research indicating that certain child feeding practices, such as exerting excessive control over what and how much children eat, may contribute to childhood overweight. Mothers are of particular interest on children's eating behaviour, as they have been shown to spend significantly more time than fathers in direct interactions with their children across several familial situations.A recent paper describes two primary aspects of control: restriction, which involves restricting children's access to junk foods and restricting the total amount of food, and pressure, which involves pressuring children to eat healthy foods (usually fruits and vegetables) and pressuring to eat more in general. The results showed significant correlations between parent and child for reported nutritional behaviour like food intake, eating motivations, and body dis- and satisfaction. Parents create environments for children that may foster the development of healthy eating behaviours and weight, or that may promote overweight and aspects of disordered eating. In conclusion positive parental role model may be a better method for improving a child's diet than attempts at dietary control.

  15. Can Brief Workshop Interventions Change Care Staff Understanding of Challenging Behaviours?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowey, Alan; Toogood, Sandy; Hastings, Richard P.; Nash, Susie

    2007-01-01

    Background: The working culture surrounding challenging behaviour may have a strong effect on staff behaviour. As a first step to influencing staff talk about challenging behaviour, the aim of the present study was to explore whether a 1-day training workshop could have an effect on staff causal explanations. Methods: Fifty-four front line staff,…

  16. Encouraging pro-environmental behaviour : An integrative review and research agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steg, L.; Vlek, C.A.J.

    Environmental quality strongly depends on human behaviour patterns. We review the contribution and the potential of environmental psychology for understanding and promoting pro-environmental behaviour A general framework is proposed, comprising: (1) identification of the behaviour to be changed, (2)

  17. Behavioural Hybrid Process Calculus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinksma, Hendrik; Krilavicius, T.

    2005-01-01

    Process algebra is a theoretical framework for the modelling and analysis of the behaviour of concurrent discrete event systems that has been developed within computer science in past quarter century. It has generated a deeper nderstanding of the nature of concepts such as observable behaviour in

  18. Youth, Nutrition and Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voordouw, J.; Snoek, H.M.; Broek, van den E.; Reinders, M.J.; Meeusen, M.J.G.; Veggel, van R.J.F.M.; Kooijman, V.M.; Stijnen, D.A.J.M.; Trentelman, I.

    2012-01-01

    Healthy nutrition is widely assumed to have a beneficial influence on educational performance and social behaviour. Yet research in developed countries about the effects of food intake on children's behaviour and school performance is limited. We propose a randomised controlled field experiment to

  19. Risk Sexual Behaviour?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    lead to an increase in population-wide high-risk sexual behaviour (either because HIV transmission appears to be ... countries reported an increase in high-risk sexual behaviour amongst men who have sex with men ... government and resulted in a fall in the annual number of HIV incidence and a drop in HIV prevalence ...

  20. Effects of LPS on the behavioural stress response of genetically selected aggressive and nonaggressive wild house mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gasparotto, O. C.; Carobrez, S. G.; Bollus, B. G. J.

    2007-01-01

    The bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exerts strong effects on the immune-neuroendocrine network. On behaviour, LPS induces the symptoms of sickness behaviour. Otherwise, LPS challenge shares with psychological stress some common physiological adaptations. The proposal of this study was

  1. Behavioural aspects of terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leistedt, Samuel J

    2013-05-10

    Behavioural and social sciences are useful in collecting and analysing intelligence data, understanding terrorism, and developing strategies to combat terrorism. This article aims to examine the psychopathological concepts of terrorism and discusses the developing roles for behavioural scientists. A systematic review was conducted of studies investigating behavioural aspects of terrorism. These studies were identified by a systematic search of databases, textbooks, and a supplementary manual search of references. Several fundamental concepts were identified that continue to influence the motives and the majority of the behaviours of those who support or engage in this kind of specific violence. Regardless of the psychological aspects and new roles for psychiatrists, the behavioural sciences will continue to be called upon to assist in developing better methods to gather and analyse intelligence, to understand terrorism, and perhaps to stem the radicalisation process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Strong Ideal Convergence in Probabilistic Metric Spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present paper we introduce the concepts of strongly ideal convergent sequence and strong ideal Cauchy sequence in a probabilistic metric (PM) space endowed with the strong topology, and establish some basic facts. Next, we define the strong ideal limit points and the strong ideal cluster points of a sequence in this ...

  3. Strong ideal convergence in probabilistic metric spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present paper we introduce the concepts of strongly ideal convergent sequence and strong ideal Cauchy sequence in a probabilistic metric (PM) space endowed with the strong topology, and establish some basic facts. Next, we define the strong ideal limit points and the strong ideal cluster points of a sequence in this ...

  4. Remnants of strong tidal interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mcglynn, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the properties of stellar systems that have recently undergone a strong tidal shock, i.e., a shock which removes a significant fraction of the particles in the system, and where the shocked system has a much smaller mass than the producer of the tidal field. N-body calculations of King models shocked in a variety of ways are performed, and the consequences of the shocks are investigated. The results confirm the prediction of Jaffe for shocked systems. Several models are also run where the tidal forces on the system are constant, simulating a circular orbit around a primary, and the development of tidal radii under these static conditions appears to be a mild process which does not dramatically affect material that is not stripped. The tidal radii are about twice as large as classical formulas would predict. Remnant density profiles are compared with a sample of elliptical galaxies, and the implications of the results for the development of stellar populations and galaxies are considered. 38 refs

  5. John Strong - 1941-2006

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on 31 July, a few days before his 65th birthday. John started his career and obtained his PhD in a group from Westfield College, initially working on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). From the early 1970s onwards, however, his research was focused on experiments in CERN, with several particularly notable contributions. The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras (a type of television camera) to record the sparks in the spark chambers. This highly automated system allowed Omega to be used in a similar way to bubble chambers. He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems. In these experiments the Westfield group joined forces with Italian colleagues to measure the form factors of the pion and the kaon, and the lifetime of some of the newly discovered charm particles. Such h...

  6. Strong seismic ground motion propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seale, S.; Archuleta, R.; Pecker, A.; Bouchon, M.; Mohammadioun, G.; Murphy, A.; Mohammadioun, B.

    1988-10-01

    At the McGee Creek, California, site, 3-component strong-motion accelerometers are located at depths of 166 m, 35 m and 0 m. The surface material is glacial moraine, to a depth of 30.5 m, overlying homfels. Accelerations were recorded from two California earthquakes: Round Valley, M L 5.8, November 23, 1984, 18:08 UTC and Chalfant Valley, M L 6.4, July 21, 1986, 14:42 UTC. By separating out the SH components of acceleration, we were able to determine the orientations of the downhole instruments. By separating out the SV component of acceleration, we were able to determine the approximate angle of incidence of the signal at 166 m. A constant phase velocity Haskell-Thomson model was applied to generate synthetic SH seismograms at the surface using the accelerations recorded at 166 m. In the frequency band 0.0 - 10.0 Hz, we compared the filtered synthetic records to the filtered surface data. The onset of the SH pulse is clearly seen, as are the reflections from the interface at 30.5 m. The synthetic record closely matches the data in amplitude and phase. The fit between the synthetic accelerogram and the data shows that the seismic amplification at the surface is a result of the contrast of the impedances (shear stiffnesses) of the near surface materials

  7. The need for a behavioural analysis of behavioural addictions

    OpenAIRE

    James, Richard J.E.; Tunney, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript overviews the behavioural (i.e. associative learning, conditioning) research in behavioural addictions, with reference to contemporary models of substance addiction and ongoing controversies in the behavioural addictions literature. The role of behaviour has been well explored in substance addictions and gambling but this focus is often absent in other candidate behavioural addictions. In contrast, the standard approach to behavioural addictions has been to look at individual ...

  8. Window opening behaviour modelled from measurements in Danish dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rune Korsholm; Fabi, Valentina; Toftum, Jorn

    2013-01-01

    A method of defining occupants' window opening behaviour patterns in simulation programs, based on measurements is proposed.Occupants' window opening behaviour has a strong effect on indoor environment and the energy consumed to sustain it. Only few models of window opening behaviour exist...... and these are solely based on the thermal indoor/outdoor environment. Consequently, users of simulation software are often left with little or no guidance for the modelling of occupants' window opening behaviour, resulting in potentially large discrepancies between real and simulated energy consumption and indoor...... environment.Measurements of occupant's window opening behaviour were conducted in 15 dwellings in Denmark during eight months. Indoor and outdoor environmental conditions were monitored in an effort to relate the behaviour of the occupants to the environmental conditions. The dwellings were categorized...

  9. The Challenge of Behaviour Change and Health Promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Laverack

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The evidence about the effectiveness of behaviour change approaches—what works and what does not work—is unclear. What we do know is that single interventions that target a specific behavioural risk have little impact on the determinants that actually cause poor health, especially for vulnerable people. This has not prevented health promoters from continuing to invest in behaviour change interventions which are widely used in a range of programs. The future of behaviour change and health promotion is through the application of a comprehensive strategy with three core components: (1 a behaviour change approach; (2 a strong policy framework that creates a supportive environment and (3 the empowerment of people to gain more control over making healthy lifestyle decisions. This will require the better planning of policy interventions and the coordination of agencies involved in behaviour change and empowerment activities at the community level, with government to help develop policy at the national level.

  10. Multiple Novel Prostate Cancer Predisposition Loci Confirmed by an International Study: The PRACTICAL Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Easton, Douglas F.; Stanford, Janet L.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Schleutker, Johanna; Ingles, Sue A.; Schaid, Daniel; Thibodeau, Stephen; Dörk, Thilo; Neal, David; Cox, Angela; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walter; Guy, Michelle; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Kedda, Mary-Anne; Spurdle, Amanda; Steginga, Suzanne; John, Esther M.; Giles, Graham; Hopper, John; Chappuis, Pierre O.; Hutter, Pierre; Foulkes, William D.; Hamel, Nancy; Salinas, Claudia A.; Koopmeiners, Joseph S.; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Johanneson, Bo; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo L.; Stern, Mariana C.; Corral, Roman; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Schürmann, Peter; Meyer, Andreas; Kuefer, Rainer; Leongamornlert, Daniel A.; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Liu, Jo-fen; O'Mara, Tracy; Gardiner, R.A. (Frank); Aitken, Joanne; Joshi, Amit D.; Severi, Gianluca; English, Dallas R.; Southey, Melissa; Edwards, Stephen M.; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    2009-01-01

    A recent genome-wide association study found that genetic variants on chromosomes 3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 19 and X were associated with prostate cancer risk. We evaluated the most significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in these loci using a worldwide consortium of 13 groups (PRACTICAL). Blood DNA from 7,370 prostate cancer cases and 5,742 male controls was analyzed by genotyping assays. Odds ratios (OR) associated with each genotype were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Six of the seven SNPs showed clear evidence of association with prostate cancer (P = 0.0007-P = 10−17). For each of these six SNPs, the estimated per-allele OR was similar to those previously reported and ranged from 1.12 to 1.29. One SNP on 3p12 (rs2660753) showed a weaker association than previously reported [per-allele OR, 1.08 (95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.16; P = 0.06) versus 1.18 (95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.31)]. The combined risks associated with each pair of SNPs were consistent with a multiplicative risk model. Under this model, and in combination with previously reported SNPs on 8q and 17q, these loci explain 16% of the familial risk of the disease, and men in the top 10% of the risk distribution have a 2.1-fold increased risk relative to general population rates. This study provides strong confirmation of these susceptibility loci in multiple populations and shows that they make an important contribution to prostate cancer risk prediction. PMID:18708398

  11. The impact of nurse education on the caring behaviours of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Fiona; Jones, Steve; Edwards, Mark; James, Jane; Mayer, Alan

    2009-02-01

    This study aimed to ascertain whether nursing students' perceptions of caring behaviours as part of nursing practice change over a three-year, pre-registration, undergraduate nursing course. Students are expected to have a predisposition to care with nurse education nurturing and developing this into professional caring behaviour. However, there is some evidence that this process inures rather than develops these behaviours. This was a quantitative, single cross section survey of two nursing student cohorts from one Higher Education Institution (HEI) in Wales, United Kingdom (UK). There were two sample groups; sample group A were 80 first year students and sample group B were 94 third year students. Students completed a questionnaire incorporating the caring behaviors inventory (CBI) [Wolf, Z.R., Colahan, M., Costello, A., Warwick, F., Ambrose, M.S., Giardino, E.R., 1994. Dimensions of nurse caring. Journal of Nursing Scholarship 26 (2), 107-111]. The key finding was a statistically significant difference in the means in caring behaviours between first years and third years with third years scoring lower than first years. This was exaggerated for those under 26 and increased further for those under 26 with no previous experience of caring. Caring is a core nursing value and a desirable attribute in nursing students, but the educational process seemed to reduce their caring behaviours.

  12. Psychological and behavioural factors associated with sexual risk behaviour among Slovak students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dijk Jitse P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about the prevalence of sexual risk behaviour (SRB in adolescence is needed to prevent unwanted health consequences. Studies on SRB among adolescents in Central Europe are rare and mostly rely on a single indicator for SRB. This study aims to assess the association of behavioural and psychological factors with three types of SRB in adolescents in Central Europe. Methods We obtained data on behavioural factors (having been drunk during previous month, smoking during previous week, early sexual initiation, psychological factors (self-esteem, well-being, extroversion, neuroticism, religiousness, and SRB (intercourse under risky conditions, multiple sexual partners, and inconsistent condom use in 832 Slovak university students (response 94.3%. Results Among those with sexual experience (62%, inconsistent condom use was the most prevalent risk behaviour (81% in females, 72% in males. With the exception of having been drunk in males, no factor was associated with inconsistent condom use. Regarding the other types of SRB, early sexual initiation was most strongly associated. In addition, other, mostly behavioural, factors were associated, in particular having been drunk. Conclusion Results suggest that behavioural factors are more closely related to SRB than psychological factors. Associations differ by type of SRB and gender but offer few clues to target risk groups for inconsistent condom use. Results show a high need for health-promotion programmes in early adolescence that target SRB in conjunction with other health risk behaviours such as alcohol abuse.

  13. Strongly interacting photons and atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alge, W.

    1999-05-01

    This thesis contains the main results of the research topics I have pursued during the my PhD studies at the University of Innsbruck and partly in collaboration with the Institut d' Optique in Orsay, France. It is divided into three parts. The first and largest part discusses the possibility of using strong standing waves as a tool to cool and trap neutral atoms in optical cavities. This is very important in the field of nonlinear optics where several successful experiments with cold atoms in cavities have been performed recently. A discussion of the optical parametric oscillator in a regime where the nonlinearity dominates the evolution is the topic of the second part. We investigated mainly the statistical properties of the cavity output of the three interactive cavity modes. Very recently a system has been proposed which promises fantastic properties. It should exhibit a giant Kerr nonlinearity with negligible absorption thus leading to a photonic turnstile device based on cold atoms in cavity. We have shown that this model suffers from overly simplistic assumptions and developed several more comprehensive approaches to study the behavior of this system. Apart from the division into three parts of different contents the thesis is divided into publications, supplements and invisible stuff. The intention of the supplements is to reach researchers which work in related areas and provide them with more detailed information about the concepts and the numerical tools we used. It is written especially for diploma and PhD students to give them a chance to use the third part of our work which is actually the largest one. They consist of a large number of computer programs we wrote to investigate the behavior of the systems in parameter regions where no hope exists to solve the equations analytically. (author)

  14. Topics in strong Langmuir turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoric, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis discusses certain aspects of the turbulence of a fully ionised non-isothermal plasma dominated by the Langmuir mode. Some of the basic properties of strongly turbulent plasmas are reviewed. In particular, interest is focused on the state of Langmuir turbulence, that is the turbulence of a simple externally unmagnetized plasma. The problem of the existence and dynamics of Langmuir collapse is discussed, often met as a non-linear stage of the modulational instability in the framework of the Zakharov equations (i.e. simple time-averaged dynamical equations). Possible macroscopic consequences of such dynamical turbulent models are investigated. In order to study highly non-linear collapse dynamics in its advanced stage, a set of generalized Zakharov equations are derived. Going beyond the original approximation, the author includes the effects of higher electron non-linearities and a breakdown of slow-timescale quasi-neutrality. He investigates how these corrections may influence the collapse stabilisation. Recently, it has been realised that the modulational instability in a Langmuir plasma will be accompanied by the collisionless-generation of a slow-timescale magnetic field. Accordingly, a novel physical situation has emerged which is investigated in detail. The stability of monochromatic Langmuir waves in a self-magnetized Langmuir plasma, is discussed, and the existence of a novel magneto-modulational instability shown. The wave collapse dynamics is investigated and a physical interpretation of the basic results is given. A problem of the transient analysis of an interaction of time-dependent electromagnetic pulses with linear cold plasma media is investigated. (Auth.)

  15. Promoting Strong Written Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2015-12-01

    The reason that an improvement in the quality of technical writing is still needed in the classroom is due to the fact that universities are facing challenging problems not only on the technological front but also on the socio-economic front. The universities are actively responding to the changes that are taking place in the global consumer marketplace. Obviously, there are numerous benefits of promoting strong written communication skills. They can be summarized into the following six categories. First, and perhaps the most important: The University achieves learner satisfaction. The learner has documented verbally, that the necessary knowledge has been successfully acquired. This results in learner loyalty that in turn will attract more qualified learners.Second, quality communication lowers the cost per pupil, consequently resulting in increased productivity backed by a stronger economic structure and forecast. Third, quality communications help to improve the cash flow and cash reserves of the university. Fourth, having high quality communication enables the university to justify the need for high costs of tuition and fees. Fifth, better quality in written communication skills result in attracting top-quality learners. This will lead to happier and satisfied learners, not to mention greater prosperity for the university as a whole. Sixth, quality written communication skills result in reduced complaints, thus meaning fewer hours spent on answering or correcting the situation. The University faculty and staff are thus able to devote more time on scholarly activities, meaningful research and productive community service. References Boyer, Ernest L. (1990). Scholarship reconsidered: Priorities of the Professorate.Princeton, NJ: Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Hawkins, P., & Winter, J. (1997). Mastering change: Learning the lessons of the enterprise.London: Department for Education and Employment. Buzzel, Robert D., and Bradley T. Gale. (1987

  16. Processes that influence noncondom use behaviour of adolescents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Characteristics of condom use behaviour in five types emerged. The types were: i) Strong intention to have safer sex - due to parents, fear, future plans or self-respect; ii) Strong intention to have safer sex - learning through experience and bad examples; iii) Unsafe sex - impact of male dominance and sexual power; ...

  17. Foraging behaviour of parasitoids in multi-herbivore communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijk, de M.

    2016-01-01

    <strong>Foraging behaviour of parasitoids in multi-herbivore communitiesstrong> Parasitic wasps, or parasitoids, use herbivore-induced plant volatiles and infochemicals produced directly by the herbivore to locate their herbivorous hosts. This process could be interrupted by the presence of

  18. Theory and simulation of strong correlations in quantum Coulomb systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonitz, M.; Semkat, D.; Filinov, A.; Golubnychyi, V.; Kremp, D.; Gericke, D. O.; Murillo, M. S.; Filinov, V.; Fortov, V.; Hoyer, W.; Koch, S. W.

    2003-06-01

    Strong correlations in quantum Coulomb systems (QCS) are attracting increasing interest in many fields ranging from dense plasmas and semiconductors to metal clusters and ultracold trapped ions. Examples are bound states in dense plasmas (atoms, molecules, clusters) and semiconductors (excitons, trions, biexcitons) or Coulomb crystals. We present first-principle simulation results of these systems including path integral Monte Carlo simulations of the equilibrium behaviour of dense hydrogen and electron-hole plasmas and molecular dynamics and quantum kinetic theory simulations of the nonequilibrium properties of QCS. Finally, we critically assess potential and limitations of the various methods in their application to Coulomb systems.

  19. Trends in suicidal behaviour in Dutch general practice 1983–2013: a retrospective observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurs, D.P. de; Hooiveld, M.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.; Korevaar, J.C.; Donker, G.A.

    2016-01-01

    <strong>Objectives> To analyse trends in suicidal behaviour as reported by the Dutch sentinel general practices from 1983 to 2013. Second, to examine the relationship between suicidal behaviour and several patient characteristics. Finally, to compare the relationship between suicidal

  20. Development of genetic testing for breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer predisposition: a step closer to targeted cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, D M

    2011-12-01

    Individuals who inherit a high penetrance cancer susceptibility gene represent a population in which cancer diagnoses occur at younger ages and much more frequently than in the general population. Screening regimens aimed at early detection of cancer may reduce cancer mortality but in order to reduce cancer incidence, surgery and medical therapies have been advocated. In high genetic risk patients, either surgical or medical intervention may provide long term protection against cancer and at young ages co-morbidities will be low. The use of genetic testing for high risk predisposition genes to refine risk estimates and inform choices about cancer prevention is now readily available in many countries and routinely used to target cancer prevention strategies. Surgical approaches to cancer prevention are currently the mainstay in many conditions where a high risk is identified but medical prevention strategies also have demonstrated some efficacy in lowering cancer risk. Using the genetic status of an individual to target cancer treatment and prevent recurrence is increasingly gaining momentum as clinical trials involving known high risk gene carriers are now being conducted using both established cytotoxic drugs and novel targeted agents. Translation of new mechanistic insights into beneficial clinical care strategies requires more research. Robust evidence supporting medical approaches to cancer prevention in particular will require well designed large international collaborative clinical trials.

  1. Identification ofKANSARLas the first cancer predisposition fusion gene specific to the population of European ancestry origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jeff Xiwu; Yang, Xiaoyan; Ning, Shunbin; Wang, Ling; Wang, Kesheng; Zhang, Yanbin; Yuan, Fenghua; Li, Fengli; Zhuo, David D; Tang, Liren; Zhuo, Degen

    2017-08-01

    Gene fusion is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Recent advances in RNA-seq of cancer transcriptomes have facilitated the discovery of fusion transcripts. In this study, we report identification of a surprisingly large number of fusion transcripts, including six KANSARL ( KANSL1 - ARL17A ) transcripts that resulted from the fusion between the KANSL1 and ARL17A genes using a RNA splicingcode model. Five of these six KANSARL fusion transcripts are novel. By systematic analysis of RNA-seq data of glioblastoma, prostate cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, and lymphoma from different regions of the World, we have found that KANSARL fusion transcripts were rarely detected in the tumors of individuals from Asia or Africa. In contrast, they exist in 30 - 52% of the tumors from North Americans cancer patients. Analysis of CEPH/Utah Pedigree 1463 has revealed that KANSARL is a familially-inherited fusion gene. Further analysis of RNA-seq datasets of the 1000 Genome Project has indicated that KANSARL fusion gene is specific to 28.9% of the population of European ancestry origin. In summary, we demonstrated that KANSARL is the first cancer predisposition fusion gene associated with genetic backgrounds of European ancestry origin.

  2. Anatomical predisposition of the ankle joint for lateral sprain or lateral malleolar fracture evaluated by radiographic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Lee, SeungYeol; Kim, Tae Gyun; Choi, Young; Jung, Ki Jin; Kim, Yeon Ho; Koo, Seung Bum; Park, Moon Seok

    2015-01-01

    Injury mechanism and the amount of force are important factors determining whether a fracture or sprain occurs at the time of an ankle inversion injury. However, the anatomical differences between the ankle fracture and sprain have not been investigated sufficiently. This study was performed to investigate whether an anatomical predisposition of the ankle joint results in a lateral malleolar fracture or lateral ankle sprain. Two groups of consecutive patients, one with lateral malleolar fracture (274 patients, mean age 49.0 years) and the other with lateral ankle sprain (400 patients, mean age 38.4 years), were evaluated. Ankle radiographs were examined for 7 measures: distal tibial articular surface (DTAS) angle, bimalleolar tilt (BT), medial malleolar relative length (MMRL), lateral malleolar relative length (LMRL), medial malleolar slip angle (MMSA), anterior inclination of tibia (AI), and fibular position (FP). After an interobserver reliability test, the radiographic measurements were compared between the 2 groups. Linear regression analysis was performed to correct for age and sex effects between the groups. The fracture group and the sprain group showed significant differences in BT (P = .001), MMSA (P sprain groups showed a significant difference in BT (P = .001), MMRL (P ankle sprain group. Further 3-dimensional assessment of the bony structure and subsequent biomechanical studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of injury according to the various types of ankle fractures and ankle sprain. Level III, retrospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Mass psychogenic illness: psychological predisposition and iatrogenic pseudo-vocal cord dysfunction and pseudo-reactive airways disease syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudenmayer, Herman; Christopher, Kent L; Repsher, Lawrence; Hill, Ronald H

    2011-06-01

    A multidisciplinary team assessed five patients who alleged chronic medically unexplained multiorgan system symptoms described by idiopathic environmental intolerance allegedly triggered by exposure to solvents used in membrane roofing repair work on an office building. The event precipitated an incident of mass psychogenic illness (MPI). Treating physicians diagnosed irritant-associated vocal cord dysfunction (IVCD) and reactive airways disease syndrome (RADS) resulting from exposure. The authors conducted medical, psychological, and industrial hygiene evaluations. Air monitoring data for total volatile organic compounds obtained during the 2-day exposure period, measurements of emissions during membrane roofing repair at a similar site, mathematical modeling of air contaminant concentrations, and injection of tracer gas into the incident building revealed exposure levels well below those doses anticipated to cause clinical symptoms. There was no objective medical evidence validating symptoms. Review of the medical records indicated that the video laryngoscopy data, pulmonary function tests, and medical examinations relied upon by the treating physicians were inconsistent with published criteria for IVCD and RADS. Psychological evaluation identified defensiveness and self-serving misrepresentations of exaggerated health concerns associated with somatization and malingering. Each case had personality traits associated with at least one personality disorder. Social histories identified premorbid life events and stressors associated with distress. This is the first study to assess psychological predisposition, social interaction among the plaintiffs, and iatrogenic reinforcement of beliefs by diagnoses of pseudo-disorders associated with patient misrepresentation of exaggerated health concerns in an incident of MPI.

  4. A Methyl-Balanced Diet Prevents CRF-Induced Prenatal Stress-Triggered Predisposition to Binge Eating-like Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Mariana; Jakovcevski, Mira; Polacheck, Tamar; Lebow, Maya; Drori, Yonat; Engel, Mareen; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Chen, Alon

    2017-06-06

    Binge eating (BE) is a common aberrant form of eating behavior, characterized by overconsumption of food in a brief period of time. Recurrent episodes of BE constitute the BE disorder, which mostly affects females and is associated with early-life adversities. Here, we show that corticotropin releasing factor (CRF)-induced prenatal stress (PNS) in late gestation predisposes female offspring to BE-like behavior that coincides with hypomethylation of hypothalamic miR-1a and downstream dysregulation of the melanocortin system through Pax7/Pax3. Moreover, exposing the offspring to a methyl-balanced diet during adolescence prevents the dysregulation and predisposition from being triggered. We demonstrate that gestational programming, per se, will not lead to BE-like behavior, but pre-existing alterations due to prenatal programming are revealed only when challenged during adolescence. We provide experimental evidence for long-term epigenetic abnormalities stemming from PNS in predisposing female offspring to BE disorder as well as a potential non-invasive prevention strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic mapping of a third Li-Fraumeni syndrome predisposition locus to human chromosome 1q23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachinski, Linda L; Olufemi, Shodimu-Emmanuel; Zhou, Xiaojun; Wu, Chih-Chieh; Yip, Linwah; Shete, Sanjay; Lozano, Guillermina; Amos, Christopher I; Strong, Louise C; Krahe, Ralf

    2005-01-15

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous inherited cancer syndrome. Most cases ( approximately 70%) identified and characterized to date are associated with dominantly inherited germ line mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 (p53) in chromosome 17p13.1. In a subset of non-p53 patients with LFS, CHEK2 in chromosome 22q11 has been identified as another predisposing locus. Studying a series of non-p53 LFS kindred, we have shown that there is additional genetic heterogeneity in LFS kindred with inherited predisposition at loci other than p53 or CHEK2. Using a genome-wide scan for linkage with complementing parametric and nonparametric analysis methods, we identified linkage to a region of approximately 4 cM in chromosome 1q23, a genomic region not previously implicated in this disease. Identification ofa third predisposing gene and its underlying mutation(s) should provide insight into other genetic events that predispose to the genesis of the diverse tumor types associated with LFS and its variants.

  6. Childhood tumours with a high probability of being part of a tumour predisposition syndrome; reason for referral for genetic consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postema, Floor A M; Hopman, Saskia M J; Aalfs, Cora M; Berger, Lieke P V; Bleeker, Fonnet E; Dommering, Charlotte J; Jongmans, Marjolijn C J; Letteboer, Tom G W; Olderode-Berends, Maran J W; Wagner, Anja; Hennekam, Raoul C; Merks, Johannes H M

    2017-07-01

    Recognising a tumour predisposition syndrome (TPS) in childhood cancer patients is of major clinical relevance. The presence of a TPS may be suggested by the type of tumour in the child. We present an overview of 23 childhood tumours that in themselves should be a reason to refer a child for genetic consultation. We performed a PubMed search to review the incidence of TPSs in children for 85 tumour types listed in the International Classification of Childhood Cancer third edition (ICCC-3). The results were discussed during a national consensus meeting with representative clinical geneticists from all six academic paediatric oncology centres in The Netherlands. A TPS incidence of 5% or more was considered a high probability and therefore in itself a reason for referral to a clinical geneticist. The literature search resulted in data on the incidence of a TPS in 26 tumours. For 23/26 tumour types, a TPS incidence of 5% or higher was reported. In addition, during the consensus meeting the experts agreed that children with any carcinoma should always be referred for clinical genetic consultation as well, as it may point to a TPS. We present an overview of 23 paediatric tumours with a high probability of a TPS; this will facilitate paediatric oncologists to decide which patients should be referred for genetic consultation merely based on type of tumour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. AIRE genetic variants and predisposition to polygenic autoimmune disease: The case of Graves' disease and a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colobran, Roger; Giménez-Barcons, Mireia; Marín-Sánchez, Ana; Porta-Pardo, Eduard; Pujol-Borrell, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) is a transcriptional regulator that is crucial for establishing central tolerance as illustrated by the Mendelian Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy-Candidiasis-Ectodermal Dystrophy (APECED) syndrome associated with AIRE-inactivating recessive or dominant mutations. Polymorphisms in AIRE have been proposed to be implicated in genetic susceptibility to non-Mendelian organ specific autoimmune diseases. Because there is evidence that in predisposition to Graves' disease (GD) central tolerance is crucial, we investigated whether AIRE polymorphisms could modulate risk of GD. A case-control association study using 29 variants and conducted in 150 GD patients and 200 controls did not detect any significant association. This result is not exceptional: a systematic review of the literature, including GWAS, on the association of AIRE variants with organ specific autoimmune diseases did not show clear associations; similarly heterozygous recessive mutations are not associated to non-Mendelian autoimmunity. Dominant negative mutations of AIRE are associated to autoimmunity but as mild forms of APECED rather than to non-Mendelian organ specific autoimmunity. The lack of association of common AIRE polymorphisms with polygenic autoimmune diseases is counterintuitive as many other genes less relevant for immunological tolerance have been found to be associated. These findings give rise to the intriguing possibility that evolution has excluded functionally modifying polymorphisms in AIRE. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic predisposition of variants in TLR2 and its co-receptors to severe malaria in Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Subhendu; Kar, Avishek; Tripathy, Sagnika; Mohapatra, Manoj K; Dhangadamajhi, Gunanidhi

    2016-02-01

    Although the role of TLRs signalling in malaria pathogenesis is well established, contribution of individual TLR to clinical outcome of malaria still remains inconclusive. Given the importance of TLR2 and its co-receptors in recognising distinct structural forms of key malaria toxins and mediating innate immune response, it is essential to delineate their genetic contribution. Variants in TLR1 (I602S) and TLR6 (P249S) were genotyped by PCR-RFLP methods, and TLR2 (I/D) was genotyped by PCR in 200 samples each from uncomplicated malaria (UM) and severe malaria (SM). Further, SM was categorised into its sub-clinical groups (CM and NCSM or SOD and MODS) and analysed. The results showed the PP genotype of TLR6 (P249S) to be significantly more common in UM (P genetic predisposition to SM and that its association with either TLR2 'D' or TLR1 '602S' modulates for CM development. The present study opens up several new avenues for their exploration and validation in future studies in different global settings for malaria.

  9. The RadGenomics project. Prediction for radio-susceptibility of individuals with genetic predisposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    strong candidates for genotyping. Finally, the DNA polymorphisms of these candidate genes in the patients who show heterogeneity in their response to radiation therapy have been analyzed. We believe that the results of our project will greatly contribute to the establishment of personalized radiotherapy. (authors)

  10. Changing doctor prescribing behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.S.; Mäkelä, M.; Vermeulen, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this overview was to identify interventions that change doctor prescribing behaviour and to derive conclusions for practice and further research. Relevant studies (indicating prescribing as a behaviour change) were located from a database of studies maintained by the Cochrane...... (approximately) showed no significant change compared to control or no overall positive findings. We identified 79 eligible studies which described 96 separate interventions to change prescribing behaviour. Of these interventions, 49 (51%, 41%-61%) showed a positive significant change compared to the control...

  11. [Hormonal-metabolic pattern of postmenopausal females with new onset of diabetes mellitus type 2: the role of cancer and hereditary predisposition to diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershteĭn, L M; Vasil'ev, D A; Poroshina, T E; Boiarkina, M P; Tsyrlina, E V

    2013-01-01

    85 females were studied, 35 females had new onset of diabetes (DM2) and in 50 women DM2 was associated with recently diagnosed cancer (C+DM2). Group C+DM2 was characterized by higher levels ofbody mass index, insulinemia, estradiolemia, interleukin 6 in serum, and glyoxalase I activity in mononuclears. At the same time patients in C+DM2 group who had familial predisposition to DM2 were characterized by lower body mass index, body fat content, waist circumference, insulinemia, serum interleukin 6, viscosity of erythrocyte membranes and percent of comets in mononuclears in comparison with patients without familial predisposition to DM2. These trends were mostly opposite to the data of subgroups comparison (with or without relatives with DM2) in females with DM2 without cancer. The conclusion is made that the hereditary load with DM2 is differently realized in diabetics with higher or lower predisprosition to cancer that deserves further study.

  12. Early ant trajectories: spatial behaviour before behaviourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    In the beginning of the twentieth century, when Jacques Loeb's and John Watson's mechanistic view of life started to dominate animal physiology and behavioural biology, several scientists with different academic backgrounds got engaged in studying the wayfinding behaviour of ants. Largely unaffected by the scientific spirit of the time, they worked independently of each other in different countries: in Algeria, Tunisia, Spain, Switzerland and the United States of America. In the current literature on spatial cognition these early ant researchers--Victor Cornetz, Felix Santschi, Charles Turner and Rudolf Brun--are barely mentioned. Moreover, it is virtually unknown that the great neuroanatomist Santiago Ramón y Cajal had also worked on spatial orientation in ants. This general neglect is certainly due to the fact that nearly all these ant researchers were scientific loners, who did their idiosyncratic investigations outside the realm of comparative physiology, neurobiology and the behavioural sciences of the time, and published their results in French, German, and Spanish at rather inaccessible places. Even though one might argue that much of their work resulted in mainly anecdotal evidence, the conceptual approaches of these early ant researchers preempt much of the present-day discussions on spatial representation in animals.

  13. The correlates and course of multiple health risk behaviour in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Daniel R; Viner, Russell M

    2016-05-31

    Health risk behaviours often co-occur in adolescence. This may be partially explained by a set of common risk and protective factors. The current study examines the association between risk behaviours throughout adolescence and identifies common risk factors for multiple risk behaviour in late adolescence. We use data from the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England. We examined the association between risk behaviours at age 14 (n = 15,588), age 16 (n = 12,416) and age 19 (n = 9,548). The associations between age 19 risk behaviour and earlier risk behaviours and risk and protective factors were assessed longitudinally. Health risk behaviours included smoking, alcohol use, illicit drug use, delinquency and unsafe sexual behaviour. All risk behaviours were found to be associated with other risk behaviours with associations weakening through adolescence. A number of sociodemographic, interpersonal, school and family factors at age 14 predicted risk behaviour and multiple risk behaviour at 19, though predictors for heavy alcohol use often differed from other health risk behaviours. Past risk behaviour was a strong predictor of age 19 risk behaviour though many involved in only one form of risk behaviour in mid-adolescence do not progress to multiple risk behaviour. Our findings reaffirm the links between health risk behaviours, but these diminish throughout adolescence with multiple risk behaviour usually initiated in mid-adolescence. Multiple risk behaviour is initiated in early or mid adolescence with a number of common risk factors explaining the co-occurrence of risk behaviours.

  14. Behaviour of Anastrepha fraterculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salles, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    A number of experiments and observations on the behaviour, host associations, attractants for adults and pupation of the South American fruit fly Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann), conducted under field or semi-natural conditions are presented here. (author)

  15. ELECTROCHEMICAL BEHAVIOUR OF ENVIRONMENTALLY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    ABSTRACT. Electrochemical behaviour of Aloe secundiflora on carbon steel corrosion control in neutral and aerated soft water solutions have been investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and Tafel polarization techniques. The investigation was performed at different inhibitor concentrations under ...

  16. Beyond Anxious Predisposition: Do Padecer de Nervios and Ataque de Nervios Add Incremental Validity to Predictions of Current Distress among Mexican Mothers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, Carmela; Abelson, James L.; Gone, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nervios (PNRV) and ataque de nervios (ATQ) are culture-bound syndromes with overlapping symptoms of anxiety, depression, and dissociation, shown to have inconsistent associations to psychiatric disorder. Few studies test the basic assumption that PNRV and ATQ are uniformly linked to distress outcomes across Latina/o immigrant groups. This study examined: (a) the extent to which acculturative stress, Latino/U.S. American acculturation, and anxious predisposition were associated with lifetime history of ATQ and PNRV, and (b) the extent to which ATQ and PNRV add incremental validity in explaining acculturative stress and psychological distress beyond measures of anxious predisposition. Method Participants (n = 82) included Mexican mothers who completed surveys on acculturation, trait anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, lifetime ATQ/PNRV, psychological distress, and acculturative stress. Results Lifetime PNRV, but not lifetime ATQ, was significantly predictive of psychological distress. PNRV was also linked to trait anxiety. Psychometric measures of anxious predisposition (trait anxiety, anxiety sensitivity) were more robust predictors of distress outcomes than lifetime history of ATQ/PNRV. Conclusions Inquiry into lifetime history of nervios may be a useful point of entry in talking to Mexican immigrant mothers about stress and distress. However, standard tools for assessing anxiety sensitivity and trait anxiety appear most useful in identifying and explaining presence of psychological distress. Further research is needed to determine the cross-cultural relevance of trait anxiety and anxiety sensitivity, and its implications for the development of anxiety treatments that are effective across cultures. PMID:21769996

  17. Genetic predisposition influences plasma lipids of participants on habitual diet, but not the response to reductions in dietary intake of saturated fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C.G.; Loos, R.J.F.; Olson, A.D.; Frost, G.S.; Griffin, B.A.; Lovegrove, J.A.; Sanders, T.A.B.; Jebb, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective SNPs identified from genome-wide association studies associate with lipid risk markers of cardiovascular disease. This study investigated whether these SNPs altered the plasma lipid response to diet in the ‘RISCK’ study cohort. Methods Participants (n = 490) from a dietary intervention to lower saturated fat by replacement with carbohydrate or monounsaturated fat, were genotyped for 39 lipid-associated SNPs. The association of each individual SNP, and of the SNPs combined (using genetic predisposition scores), with plasma lipid concentrations was assessed at baseline, and on change in response to 24 weeks on diets. Results The associations between SNPs and lipid concentrations were directionally consistent with previous findings. The genetic predisposition scores were associated with higher baseline concentrations of plasma total (P = 0.02) and LDL (P = 0.002) cholesterol, triglycerides (P = 0.001) and apolipoprotein B (P = 0.004), and with lower baseline concentrations of HDL cholesterol (P genetic predisposition was associated with an unfavourable plasma lipid profile at baseline, but did not influence the improvement in lipid profiles by the low-saturated-fat diets. PMID:21292264

  18. Younger age of onset and multiple primary lesions associated with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cases with a positive family history of the cancer suggests genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Nan; Wen, Xiaoduo; Zhang, Nan; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Liwei; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Na; Wen, Denggui

    2014-01-01

    Previous epidemiological studies have consistently found a positive family history of esophageal cancer is associated with a significantly increased risk of the cancer. However, whether the elevated risk could be attributed to common household exposure or inherited susceptibility is uncertain. This study aimed to highlight the effect of genetic predisposition by noting the significant differences in onset age and multiple primary cancers between esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cases with or without a positive family history of the cancer. Age at onset and the percentage of multiple primary cancers were compared between ESCCs with (n = 766) or without (n = 1 776) a positive family history of the cancer in a consecutive surgery cohort at the Department of Thoracic Surgery of Hebei Tumor Hospital and the Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University. Overall, ESCCs with a positive family history of the cancer featured both a significantly younger age of onset and significantly more multiple primary cancers than those with a negative family history (onset age 51.83 vs. 53.49 years old, P genetic predisposition. The results of subgroup analyses indicate a younger age of ESCC development results from the interaction of environmental and genetic risk factors, but multiple primary cancers may be related only to genetic predisposition.

  19. Bovine neonatal pancytopenia (BNP): novel insights into the incidence, vaccination-associated epidemiological factors and a potential genetic predisposition for clinical and subclinical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demasius, W; Weikard, R; Kromik, A; Wolf, C; Müller, K; Kühn, C

    2014-06-01

    Bovine neonatal pancytopenia (BNP) is a haemorrhagic disease of newborn calves elicited by colostrum from specific cows. Two studies have indicated that BNP-inducing colostrum might be associated with alloantibodies directed against MHC class I in response to vaccination with a distinct inactivated viral vaccine. However, the proportion of alloantibody-producing individuals by far exceeds the proportion of clinical BNP cases in the vaccinated population. This raises the question about the incidence of subclinical, unrecognised cases and also suggests further factors involved in BNP pathogenesis, e.g., genetic predisposition. Our results on neonatal calves from a closely monitored resource population confirmed the hypothesis of a genetic predisposition for clinical BNP and suggest that the predisposition is also involved in subclinical BNP-cases. No indication was obtained for a higher frequency of subclinical BNP-cases compared with clinical cases. Neither time point nor frequency of vaccination was a relevant factor for BNP in our resource population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Everyday behaviour in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Eken Asp, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The absolute majority of dogs are kept as companion animals. Dogs kept as family pets are frequently exposed to noisy and crowded environments, and often have to interact with unfamiliar dogs and humans. In Sweden, we have a long history of recording behaviour in dogs on a large scale. The Swedish Working Dog Association (SBK) has, since 1989, carried out a standardized behavioural test called Dog Mentality Assessment (DMA). Results from the DMA can be condensed into five personality traits: ...

  1. Tritium behaviour in higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenot, J.

    1984-05-01

    Vine grapes and potato seedlings have been exposed in situ to tritiated water vapor and 14 C labeled carbon dioxide. Leaves sampling was done during and after the exposition. Measurements allowed to distinguish the three forms of tritium in leaves, i.e. tissue free water tritium (TFWT) and organically bound tritium (OBT), in exchangeable position or not. The results lead to a description of the dynamical behaviour of tritium between these three compartments. It has been shown that 20% of organically bound hydrogen is readily exchangeable thus being in permanent isotopic equilibium with tissue free water. Moreover, the activity of nonexchangeable OBT appears to be strongly related to the organic 14 C, which shows that photosynthesis is responsible of tritium incorporation in organic nonexchangeable position, and occurs with a 20% discrimination in favor of protium. In contrast with the other two compartments, this fixation is almost irreversible, which is a fact of importance from a radiological point of view [fr

  2. IMAGE ANALYSIS FOR MODELLING SHEAR BEHAVIOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Lopez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Through laboratory research performed over the past ten years, many of the critical links between fracture characteristics and hydromechanical and mechanical behaviour have been made for individual fractures. One of the remaining challenges at the laboratory scale is to directly link fracture morphology of shear behaviour with changes in stress and shear direction. A series of laboratory experiments were performed on cement mortar replicas of a granite sample with a natural fracture perpendicular to the axis of the core. Results show that there is a strong relationship between the fracture's geometry and its mechanical behaviour under shear stress and the resulting damage. Image analysis, geostatistical, stereological and directional data techniques are applied in combination to experimental data. The results highlight the role of geometric characteristics of the fracture surfaces (surface roughness, size, shape, locations and orientations of asperities to be damaged in shear behaviour. A notable improvement in shear understanding is that shear behaviour is controlled by the apparent dip in the shear direction of elementary facets forming the fracture.

  3. Mechanical behaviour of a creased thin strip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study the mechanical behaviour of a creased thin strip under opposite-sense bending was investigated. It was found that a simple crease, which led to the increase of the second moment of area, could significantly alter the overall mechanical behaviour of a thin strip, for example the peak moment could be increased by 100 times. The crease was treated as a cylindrical segment of a small radius. Parametric studies demonstrated that the geometry of the strip could strongly influence its flexural behaviour. We showed that the uniform thickness and the radius of the creased segment had the greatest and the least influence on the mechanical behaviour, respectively. We further revealed that material properties could dramatically affect the overall mechanical behaviour of the creased strip by gradually changing the material from being linear elastic to elastic-perfect plastic. After the formation of the fold, the moment of the two ends of the strip differed considerably when the elasto-plastic materials were used, especially for materials with smaller tangent modulus in the plastic range. The deformation patterns of the thin strips from the finite element simulations were verified by physical models made of thin metal strips. The findings from this study provide useful information for designing origami structures for engineering applications using creased thin strips.

  4. Consumer behaviour in agricultural direct marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Heer, Ines M.

    2008-01-01

    Scandals in the food production industry have caused an uncertainty about quality and innocuousness of food for many consumers. This resulted in a strong risk perception of consumers at the point of sale. The direct marketing of products by farmers can be an important way to strengthen consumer confidence. In this contribution, buying behaviour is examined by an observation and a following interview. We develop an econometric model about the number of bought products and the proposition of ma...

  5. Screen time behaviours may interact with obesity genes, independent of physical activity, to influence adolescent BMI in an ethnically diverse cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, M; North, K E; Richardson, A S; Young, K M; Mohlke, K L; Lange, L A; Lange, E M; Harris, K M; Gordon-Larsen, P

    2013-12-01

    There has been little investigation of gene-by-environment interactions related to sedentary behaviour, a risk factor for obesity defined as leisure screen time (ST; i.e. television, video and computer games). To test the hypothesis that limiting ST use attenuates the genetic predisposition to increased body mass index (BMI), independent of physical activity. Using 7642 wave II participants of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, (Add Health; mean = 16.4 years, 52.6% female), we assessed the interaction of ST (h week(-1) ) and 41 established obesity single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with age- and sex-specific BMI Z-scores in 4788 European-American (EA), 1612 African-American (AA) and 1242 Hispanic American (HA) adolescents. Nominally significant SNP*ST interaction were found for FLJ35779 in EA, GNPDA2 in AA and none in HA (EA: beta [SE] = 0.016[0.007]), AA: beta [SE] = 0.016[0.011]) per 7 h week(-1) ST and one risk allele in relation to BMI Z-score. While for two established BMI loci, we find evidence that high levels of ST exacerbate the influence of obesity susceptibility variants on body mass; overall, we do not find strong evidence for interactions between the majority of established obesity loci. However, future studies with larger sample sizes, or that may build on our current study and the growing published literature, are clearly warranted. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2013 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  6. Gender and Behaviour: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. Gender and Behaviour is an interdisciplinary journal dedicated to articles, that reflect psychological and behavioural aspects of gender in general. Gender and Behaviour welcomes scholarly manuscripts from authors all over the world on a wide array of subjects concerning psychological and behavioural ...

  7. Some Molecular and Clinical Aspects of Genetic Predisposition to Malignant Melanoma and Tumours of Various Site of Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dębniak Tadeusz

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Based on epidemiological data we can assume that at least some malignant melanoma (MM and breast cancer cases can be caused by the same genetic factors. CDKN2A, which encodes the p16 protein, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor suppressing cell proliferation, is regarded as a major melanoma susceptibility gene and the literature has also implicated this gene in predisposition to breast cancer. Genes also known to predispose to MM include XPD and MC1R. We studied CDKN2A/ARF, XPD and MC1R for their associations with melanoma and breast cancer risk in Polish patients and controls. We found that CDKN2A and ARF do not contribute significantly to either familial melanoma or malignant melanoma within the context of a cancer familial aggregation of disease with breast cancer. However, the common variant of the CDKN2A gene A148T, previously regarded as non-pathogenic, may predispose to malignant melanoma, early-onset breast cancer and lung cancer. Compound carriers of common XPD variants may be at slightly increased risk of breast cancer or late–onset malignant melanoma. Common recurrent variants of the MC1R gene (V60L, R151C, R163Q and R160W may predispose to malignant melanoma. In general, the establishment of surveillance protocols proposed as an option for carriers of common alterations in CDKN2A, XPD or MC1R variants requires additional studies. It is possible that missense variants of genes for which truncating mutations are clearly pathogenic may also be deleterious, but with reduced penetrance. This may be overlooked unless large numbers of patients and controls are studied. A registry that includes 2000 consecutive breast cancer cases, 3500 early onset breast cancer patients, 500 unselected malignant melanoma and over 700 colorectal cancer patients has been established in the International Hereditary Cancer Centre and can contribute to these types of large association studies.

  8. Systematic search for enhancer elements and somatic allelic imbalance at seven low-penetrance colorectal cancer predisposition loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houlston Richard S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in ten chromosomal loci have been shown to predispose to colorectal cancer (CRC in genome-wide association studies. A plausible biological mechanism of CRC susceptibility associated with genetic variation has so far only been proposed for three loci, each pointing to variants that affect gene expression through distant regulatory elements. In this study, we aimed to gain insight into the molecular basis of seven low-penetrance CRC loci tagged by rs4779584 at 15q13, rs10795668 at 10p14, rs3802842 at 11q23, rs4444235 at 14q22, rs9929218 at 16q22, rs10411210 at 19q13, and rs961253 at 20p12. Methods Possible somatic gain of the risk allele or loss of the protective allele was studied by analyzing allelic imbalance in tumour and corresponding normal tissue samples of heterozygous patients. Functional variants were searched from in silico predicted enhancer elements locating inside the CRC-associating linkage-disequilibrium regions. Results No allelic imbalance targeting the SNPs was observed at any of the seven loci. Altogether, 12 SNPs that were predicted to disrupt potential transcription factor binding sequences were genotyped in the same population-based case-control series as the seven tagging SNPs originally. None showed association with CRC. Conclusions The results of the allelic imbalance analysis suggest that the seven CRC risk variants are not somatically selected for in the neoplastic progression. The bioinformatic approach was unable to pinpoint cancer-causing variants at any of the seven loci. While it is possible that many of the predisposition loci for CRC are involved in control of gene expression by targeting transcription factor binding sites, also other possibilities, such as regulatory RNAs, should be considered.

  9. Genetic predisposition to increased blood cholesterol and triglyceride lipid levels and risk of Alzheimer disease: a Mendelian randomization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proitsi, Petroula; Lupton, Michelle K; Velayudhan, Latha; Newhouse, Stephen; Fogh, Isabella; Tsolaki, Magda; Daniilidou, Makrina; Pritchard, Megan; Kloszewska, Iwona; Soininen, Hilkka; Mecocci, Patrizia; Vellas, Bruno; Williams, Julie; Stewart, Robert; Sham, Pak; Lovestone, Simon; Powell, John F

    2014-09-01

    Although altered lipid metabolism has been extensively implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) through cell biological, epidemiological, and genetic studies, the molecular mechanisms linking cholesterol and AD pathology are still not well understood and contradictory results have been reported. We have used a Mendelian randomization approach to dissect the causal nature of the association between circulating lipid levels and late onset AD (LOAD) and test the hypothesis that genetically raised lipid levels increase the risk of LOAD. We included 3,914 patients with LOAD, 1,675 older individuals without LOAD, and 4,989 individuals from the general population from six genome wide studies drawn from a white population (total n=10,578). We constructed weighted genotype risk scores (GRSs) for four blood lipid phenotypes (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-c], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-c], triglycerides, and total cholesterol) using well-established SNPs in 157 loci for blood lipids reported by Willer and colleagues (2013). Both full GRSs using all SNPs associated with each trait at pGenetic predisposition to increased blood cholesterol and triglyceride lipid levels is not associated with elevated LOAD risk. The observed epidemiological associations between abnormal lipid levels and LOAD risk could therefore be attributed to the result of biological pleiotropy or could be secondary to LOAD. Limitations of this study include the small proportion of lipid variance explained by the GRS, biases in case-control ascertainment, and the limitations implicit to Mendelian randomization studies. Future studies should focus on larger LOAD datasets with longitudinal sampled peripheral lipid measures and other markers of lipid metabolism, which have been shown to be altered in LOAD. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  10. Personalized prostate cancer screening among men with high risk genetic predisposition- study protocol for a prospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer screening among the general population is highly debatable. Nevertheless, screening among high-risk groups is appealing. Prior data suggests that men carrying mutations in the BRCA1& 2 genes may be at increased risk of developing prostate cancer. Additionally, they appear to develop prostate cancer at a younger age and with a more aggressive course. However, prior studies did not systematically perform prostate biopsies and thus cannot determine the true prevalence of prostate cancer in this population. Methods This will be a prospective diagnostic trial of screening for prostate cancer among men with genetic predisposition. The target population is males (40–70 year old) carrying a BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 germ line mutation. They will be identified via our Genetic counseling unit. All men after signing an informed consent will undergo the following tests: PSA, free to total PSA, MRI of prostate and prostate biopsy. The primary endpoint will be to estimate the prevalence, stage and grade of prostate cancer in this population. Additionally, the study aims to estimate the impact of these germ line mutations on benign prostatic hyperplasia. Furthermore, this study aims to create a bio-bank of tissue, urine and serum of this unique cohort for future investigations. Finally, this study will identify an inception cohort for future interventional studies of primary and secondary prevention. Discussion The proposed research is highly translational and focuses not only on the clinical results, but on the future specimens that will be used to advance our understanding of prostate cancer patho-physiology. Most importantly, these high-risk germ-line mutation carriers are ideal candidates for primary and secondary prevention initiatives. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02053805. PMID:25047061

  11. The Synergistic Effect of TNFA and IL10 Promoter Polymorphisms on Genetic Predisposition to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolova, Irena; Miteva, Lyuba; Ivanova, Mariana; Kundurzhiev, Todor; Stoilov, Rumen; Stanilova, Spaska

    2018-02-01

    We investigated the individual and combined effect of functional TNFA -308G/A and IL10 -1082G/A single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and their genotypes on the susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a Bulgarian population. Genotyping for -1082A/G IL10 (rs1800896) and -308G/A TNFA (rs1800629) polymorphisms was performed for 154 SLE patients and 224 healthy controls. An association between SLE and the rs1800629 polymorphism was established under the allelic model (allele A vs. allele G; odds ratios [OR] = 2.317), the dominant model (GA+AA vs. GG; OR = 3.214), and the overdominant model (GA vs. AA+GG; OR = 3.494). There was no association between rs1800896 and SLE, although a tendency for genetic predisposition to SLE was observed for the IL10 -1082 GG genotype under the recessive genetic model (OR = 1.454). When analyzing the influence of the combined TNFA/IL10 genotypes on SLE occurrence, we found that the carriage of both high cytokine-producing genotypes of two SNPs (TNFA -308AA/GA and IL10 -1082GG) significantly increased the risk of developing SLE with OR of 9.026 (p = 0.006). Our findings suggest that the combinatorial complexity of TNFA and IL10 promoter polymorphisms impacts SLE susceptibility. Notably, we found that a TNFA promoter polymorphism is a leading risk factor for SLE susceptibility in a Bulgarian population, while the IL10 -1082 locus appears to act as a significant modifier.

  12. Progressive Fibrosis Is Driven by Genetic Predisposition, Allo-immunity, and Inflammation in Pediatric Liver Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, S; Ambroise, J; Komuta, M; Latinne, D; Baldin, P; Reding, R; Smets, F; Stephenne, X; Sokal, E M

    2016-07-01

    To determine predisposing factors of idiopathic allograft fibrosis among pediatric liver transplant recipients. Protocol biopsies (PB) from stable liver transplant (LT) recipient children frequently exhibit idiopathic fibrosis. The relation between allograft inflammation, humoral immune response and fibrosis is uncertain. Also the role of HLA-DRB1 genotype has not been evaluated, though it's associated with fibrosis in autoimmune hepatitis. This observational study, included 89 stable LT recipient transplanted between 2004-2012 with mean follow-up of 4.3years, 281 serial PBs (3.1 biopsy/child) and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibody data. PBs were taken 1-2, 2-3, 3-5, 5-7, and 7-10years post-LT, and evaluated for inflammation and fibrosis using liver allograft fibrosis score (LAFSc). The evolution of fibrosis, inflammation and related predisposing factors were analysed. HLA-DRB1*03/04 allele and Class II DSA were significantly associated with portal fibrosis (p=0.03; p=0.03, respectively). Portal inflammation was predisposed by Class II DSA (p=0.02) and non-HLA antibody presence (p=0.01). Non-portal fibrosis wasn't predisposed by inflammation. Lobular inflammation was associated with non-HLA antibodies. We conclusively demonstrated that allograft inflammation results in fibrosis and is associated with post-LT Class II DSA and non-HLA antibodies. The HLA-DRB1*03/04 allele caused genetic predisposition for fibrosis. None. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The potential of energy behaviours in a smart(er) grid: Policy implications from a Portuguese exploratory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Marta A.R.; Henggeler Antunes, Carlos; Janda, Kathryn B.; Peixoto, Paulo; Martins, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    The transition to smart grids is an on-going process that may both shape and be shaped by end-users' energy behavioural adaptations. This study explores current and potential energy behavioural adaptations in Portugal during the smart grid transition process. A web-based survey was made to a representative sample of a specific segment of Portuguese residential end-users. The survey evaluated current energy behaviours and hypothetical future behaviours in a dynamic pricing scenario. Results show this population segment has a positive predisposition towards smart technologies and demand shifting, but it is less likely to accept load control and switch to the liberalised energy market. Factors influencing the behavioural potential are mostly related with market regulation, households' practices and usage behaviours, interference with the private domain, information and technical aspects, and social values. To facilitate behavioural adaptations several strategies are recommended, such as improving the energy market regulation, assessing households' behaviours, prioritising actions already embedded in households daily routines, not interfering with their activities and ensure an override option, and improving energy services, trust and information provided to end-users. The conclusions of the present study are of utmost importance for the design of more effective demand response programmes and energy policies. - Highlights: • Energy behavioural adaptations during the transition to smart grids are explored. • A web-based survey was performed to a representative sample of Portuguese consumers. • Users are prone to adopt smart technologies and shift demand rejecting load control. • Preferences for adopting a demand-responsive energy management system are assessed. • Factors influencing behavioural adaptations are analysed and strategies proposed.

  14. Safety-seeking behaviours and verbal auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaix, Joséphine; Ma, Edgar; Nguyen, Alexandra; Ortiz Collado, Maria Assumpta; Rexhaj, Shyhrete; Favrod, Jérôme

    2014-12-15

    Verbal auditory hallucinations can have a strong impact on the social and professional functioning of individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia. The safety-seeking behaviours used to reduce the threat associated with voices play a significant role in explaining the functional consequences of auditory hallucinations. Nevertheless, these safety-seeking behaviours have been little studied. Twenty-eight patients with schizophrenia and verbal auditory hallucinations were recruited for this study. Hallucinations were evaluated using the Psychotic Symptom Rating Scale and the Belief About Voice Questionnaire and safety behaviours using a modified version of the Safety Behaviour Questionnaire. Our results show that the vast majority of patients relies on safety behaviours to reduce the threat associated with voices. This reliance on safety behaviours is mostly explained by beliefs about origin of voices the omnipotence attributed to hallucinations and the behavioural and emotional reactions to the voices. Safety-seeking behaviours play an important role in maintaining dysfunctional beliefs with respect to voices. They should be better targeted within the cognitive and behavioural therapies for auditory hallucinations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Predictive Value of Early Behavioural Assessments in Pet Dogs – A Longitudinal Study from Neonates to Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, Stefanie; Müller, Corsin; Virányi, Zsófia; Huber, Ludwig; Range, Friederike

    2014-01-01

    Studies on behavioural development in domestic dogs are of relevance for matching puppies with the right families, identifying predispositions for behavioural problems at an early stage, and predicting suitability for service dog work, police or military service. The literature is, however, inconsistent regarding the predictive value of tests performed during the socialisation period. Additionally, some practitioners use tests with neonates to complement later assessments for selecting puppies as working dogs, but these have not been validated. We here present longitudinal data on a cohort of Border collies, followed up from neonate age until adulthood. A neonate test was conducted with 99 Border collie puppies aged 2–10 days to assess activity, vocalisations when isolated and sucking force. At the age of 40–50 days, 134 puppies (including 93 tested as neonates) were tested in a puppy test at their breeders' homes. All dogs were adopted as pet dogs and 50 of them participated in a behavioural test at the age of 1.5 to 2 years with their owners. Linear mixed models found little correspondence between individuals' behaviour in the neonate, puppy and adult test. Exploratory activity was the only behaviour that was significantly correlated between the puppy and the adult test. We conclude that the predictive validity of early tests for predicting specific behavioural traits in adult pet dogs is limited. PMID:25003341

  16. The predictive value of early behavioural assessments in pet dogs--a longitudinal study from neonates to adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, Stefanie; Müller, Corsin; Virányi, Zsófia; Huber, Ludwig; Range, Friederike

    2014-01-01

    Studies on behavioural development in domestic dogs are of relevance for matching puppies with the right families, identifying predispositions for behavioural problems at an early stage, and predicting suitability for service dog work, police or military service. The literature is, however, inconsistent regarding the predictive value of tests performed during the socialisation period. Additionally, some practitioners use tests with neonates to complement later assessments for selecting puppies as working dogs, but these have not been validated. We here present longitudinal data on a cohort of Border collies, followed up from neonate age until adulthood. A neonate test was conducted with 99 Border collie puppies aged 2-10 days to assess activity, vocalisations when isolated and sucking force. At the age of 40-50 days, 134 puppies (including 93 tested as neonates) were tested in a puppy test at their breeders' homes. All dogs were adopted as pet dogs and 50 of them participated in a behavioural test at the age of 1.5 to 2 years with their owners. Linear mixed models found little correspondence between individuals' behaviour in the neonate, puppy and adult test. Exploratory activity was the only behaviour that was significantly correlated between the puppy and the adult test. We conclude that the predictive validity of early tests for predicting specific behavioural traits in adult pet dogs is limited.

  17. The predictive value of early behavioural assessments in pet dogs--a longitudinal study from neonates to adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Riemer

    Full Text Available Studies on behavioural development in domestic dogs are of relevance for matching puppies with the right families, identifying predispositions for behavioural problems at an early stage, and predicting suitability for service dog work, police or military service. The literature is, however, inconsistent regarding the predictive value of tests performed during the socialisation period. Additionally, some practitioners use tests with neonates to complement later assessments for selecting puppies as working dogs, but these have not been validated. We here present longitudinal data on a cohort of Border collies, followed up from neonate age until adulthood. A neonate test was conducted with 99 Border collie puppies aged 2-10 days to assess activity, vocalisations when isolated and sucking force. At the age of 40-50 days, 134 puppies (including 93 tested as neonates were tested in a puppy test at their breeders' homes. All dogs were adopted as pet dogs and 50 of them participated in a behavioural test at the age of 1.5 to 2 years with their owners. Linear mixed models found little correspondence between individuals' behaviour in the neonate, puppy and adult test. Exploratory activity was the only behaviour that was significantly correlated between the puppy and the adult test. We conclude that the predictive validity of early tests for predicting specific behavioural traits in adult pet dogs is limited.

  18. Psychobiology of partnership behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploog, D

    1975-11-01

    Animal experiments demonstrate that it is not only the quality of transmitted and received social signals that is important, but also their frequency and the timing of the information transmitted. In order for progress to be made in the investigation of human social behaviour and its disorders, methods must be developed which allow the transmission of verbal and non-verbal information to be measured. Experiments carried out with healthy adults and healthy and disturbed children to investigate human eye contact and distance behaviour are reported, along with experiments on the influence of gaze and body posture on spoken communication. Finally, a report on the use of behaviour therapy for an autistic child is outlined in order to explore the psychobiological correlations between social behaviour and language, which concur with extensive experiments on brain stimulation. It is suggested that there is a cerebral representation for species-specific social behaviour and a vocalization system embedded in these brain structures which is a phylogenetically-patterned prerequisite for the development of human language.

  19. The association of genetic predisposition to depressive symptoms with non-suicidal and suicidal self-injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maciejewski, D.F.; Renteria, M.E.; Abdellaoui, A.; Medland, S.E.; Few, L.R.; Gordon, S.D.; Madden, P.A.F.; Montgomery, G.W.; Trull, T.J.; Heath, A.C.; Statham, D.J.; Martin, N.G.; Zietsch, B.P.; Verweij, K.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    Non-suicidal and suicidal self-injury are very destructive, yet surprisingly common behaviours. Depressed mood is a major risk factor for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. We conducted a genetic risk prediction study to examine the polygenic overlap of

  20. The Association of Genetic Predisposition to Depressive Symptoms with Non-suicidal and Suicidal Self-Injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maciejewski, Dominique F; Renteria, Miguel E; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Medland, Sarah E; Few, Lauren R; Gordon, Scott D; Madden, Pamela A F; Montgomery, Grant W; Trull, Timothy J; Heath, Andrew C; Statham, Dixie J; Martin, Nicholas G; Zietsch, Brendan P; Verweij, Karin J. H.

    Non-suicidal and suicidal self-injury are very destructive, yet surprisingly common behaviours. Depressed mood is a major risk factor for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. We conducted a genetic risk prediction study to examine the polygenic overlap of

  1. Changing doctor prescribing behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.S.; Mäkelä, M.; Vermeulen, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this overview was to identify interventions that change doctor prescribing behaviour and to derive conclusions for practice and further research. Relevant studies (indicating prescribing as a behaviour change) were located from a database of studies maintained by the Cochrane...... (approximately) showed no significant change compared to control or no overall positive findings. We identified 79 eligible studies which described 96 separate interventions to change prescribing behaviour. Of these interventions, 49 (51%, 41%-61%) showed a positive significant change compared to the control...... or inconclusive. Positive studies (+) were those that demonstrated a statistically significant change in the majority of outcomes measured at level of p change in the opposite direction and inconclusive studies...

  2. Super strong dopamine hydrogels with shape memory and bioinspired actuating behaviours modulated by solvent exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiahe; Liao, Jiexin; Wang, Tao; Sun, Weixiang; Tong, Zhen

    2018-03-07

    Dopamine-containing hydrogels were synthesized by copolymerization of dopamine methacrylamide (DMA), N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMAA), and an N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (BIS) crosslinker in a mixed solvent of water and DMSO. The association of DMA was formed by simply immersing in water to facilely reinforce the hydrogel due to the introduction of the second physical crosslinking. The tensile strength of the hydrogels was increased greatly and regulated in a wide range from 200 kPa to over 2 MPa. The association of DMA was destroyed upon immersing in DMSO. This reversible formation and dissociation of the association structure endowed the hydrogel with shape memory and actuating capabilities. Rapid shape fixing in water and complete shape recovery in DMSO was realized within several minutes. Bioinspired functional soft actuators were designed based on the reversible association and metal ion coordination of DMA, including fast responsive hydrogel tentacles, programable multiple shape change, reversible and versatile painting and writing "hydrogel paper". The facile preparation and strength regulation provide a new way to design novel soft actuators through solvent exchange, and will inspire more complex applications upon combining the association with other properties of mussel inspired dopamine derivatives.

  3. Phase and viscosity behaviour of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisneros, Sergio; Garcia, J.; Fernandez, J.

    2005-01-01

    The understanding of thermophysical properties and phase behaviour of refrigerant-lubricant oil mixtures is highly important for the optimal design of refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. Refrigerant lubricant mixtures, which are likely to have strong asymmetry, can show complex phase...... behaviour such as closed miscibility gaps, open miscibility gaps, liquid-liquid-vapour equilibrium, and even barotropic phenomena (density inversions). In fact, the type of phase behaviour that refrigerant-lubricant mixtures may show is linked to the transition between different types of phase diagrams...

  4. Breast cancer predisposition syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemel, Deborah; Domchek, Susan M

    2010-10-01

    A small, but important, percentage of breast cancer cases is caused by the inheritance of a single copy of a mutated gene. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the genes most commonly associated with inherited breast cancer; however, mutations in TP53 and PTEN cause Li-Fraumeni syndrome and Cowden syndrome, respectively, both of which are associated with high lifetime risks of breast cancer. Advances in the field of breast cancer genetics have led to an improved understanding of detection and prevention strategies. More recently, strategies to target the underlying genetic defects in BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast and ovarian cancers are emerging and may have implications for certain types of sporadic breast cancer. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Atoms and clusters in strong laser fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchenko, T.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes experimental and theoretical studies on the interaction of strong infrared laser fields with atoms and atomic clusters. Part I provides an overview of the main strong-field phenomena in atoms, molecules and clusters and describes the state-of-the-art in strong-field science.

  6. Strong Bisimilarity of Simple Process Algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srba, Jirí

    2003-01-01

    We study bisimilarity and regularity problems of simple process algebras. In particular, we show PSPACE-hardness of the following problems: (i) strong bisimilarity of Basic Parallel Processes (BPP), (ii) strong bisimilarity of Basic Process Algebra (BPA), (iii) strong regularity of BPP, and (iv) ...

  7. 78 FR 15710 - Strong Sensitizer Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... definition of ``strong sensitizer'' found at 16 CFR 1500.3(c)(5). The Commission is proposing to revise the supplemental definition of ``strong sensitizer'' due to advancements in the science of sensitization that have... document is intended to clarify the ``strong sensitizer'' definition, assist manufacturers in understanding...

  8. Information behaviour and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Rafferty, Pauline; Baker, David

    2015-01-01

    This special issue explores information behaviour and practice in general, and specifically focuses on the implications for library and information services. Information seeking behaviour and information practice remain areas of importance in information science and librarianship, perhaps even more so in the digital age. This special issue is an opportunity to share ideas and scholarship and to explore models and methods. The papers chosen for inclusion cover a range of topics and approach them from a number of different epistemological and methodological positions demonstrating the liveliness

  9. Recycling as moral behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John

    of Reasoned Action (TRA) with regard to understanding recycling behaviour. Further, examples of misleading policy conclusions are discussed suggested that within the framework of cognitive psychology, Schwartz's model of altruistic behaviour offers a more satisfying starting point for understanding recycling...... of the balance of costs and benefits. Rather, they are a function of the person's moral beliefs, i.e., beliefs in what is the right or wrong thing to do. The paper gives a brief review of the literature with the intention of uncovering problems and shortcomings in the framework of the SEU-model and the Theory...

  10. The Role of screening in the strongly correlated 2D systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, E H

    2003-01-01

    We investigate recently observed experiments in the strongly correlated 2D systems (r sub s >> 1) (low-density 2D plasmons, metallic behaviour of 2D systems and frictional drag resistivity between two 2D hole layers). We compare them with our theoretical results calculated within a conventional Fermi liquid theory with RPA screening.

  11. Behaviour Centred Design: towards an applied science of behaviour change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aunger, Robert; Curtis, Valerie

    2016-12-01

    Behaviour change has become a hot topic. We describe a new approach, Behaviour Centred Design (BCD), which encompasses a theory of change, a suite of behavioural determinants and a programme design process. The theory of change is generic, assuming that successful interventions must create a cascade of effects via environments, through brains, to behaviour and hence to the desired impact, such as improved health. Changes in behaviour are viewed as the consequence of a reinforcement learning process involving the targeting of evolved motives and changes to behaviour settings, and are produced by three types of behavioural control mechanism (automatic, motivated and executive). The implications are that interventions must create surprise, revalue behaviour and disrupt performance in target behaviour settings. We then describe a sequence of five steps required to design an intervention to change specific behaviours: Assess, Build, Create, Deliver and Evaluate. The BCD approach has been shown to change hygiene, nutrition and exercise-related behaviours and has the advantages of being applicable to product, service or institutional design, as well as being able to incorporate future developments in behaviour science. We therefore argue that BCD can become the foundation for an applied science of behaviour change.

  12. Application of strong phosphoric acid to radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Kikuo

    1977-01-01

    Not only inorganic and organic compounds but also natural substrances, such as accumulations in soil, are completely decomposed and distilled by heating with strong phosphoric acid for 30 to 50 minutes. As applications of strong phosphoric acid to radiochemistry, determination of uranium and boron by use of solubilization effect of this substance, titration of uranyl ion by use of sulfuric iron (II) contained in this substance, application to tracer experiment, and determination of radioactive ruthenium in environmental samples are reviewed. Strong phosphoric acid is also applied to activation analysis, for example, determination of N in pyrographite with iodate potassium-strong phosphoric acid method, separation of Os and Ru with sulfuric cerium (IV) - strong phosphoric acid method or potassium dechromate-strong phosphoric acid method, analysis of Se, As and Sb rocks and accumulations with ammonium bromide, sodium chloride and sodium bromide-strong phosphoric acid method. (Kanao, N.)

  13. Senescent remodeling of the immune system and its contribution to the predisposition of the elderly to infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Sheilesh Kumar; Zheng, Song-bai; Xia, Shi-jin; Bill, Kalionis

    2012-09-01

    To review the senescent remodeling of the immune system with aging and its relevance to the increased susceptibility of the elderly to infectious diseases, along with an outlook on emerging immunological biomarkers. The data selected were from PubMed with relevant published articles in English or French from 1995 to the present. Searches were made using the terms "immunosenescence" and "aging" paired with the following: "innate immunity", "T-cell", "B-cell", "adaptive immunity" and "biomarkers". Articles were reviewed for additional citations and some information was gathered from web searches. Articles on aging of both the innate and adaptive immunity were reviewed, with special attention to the remodeling effect on the ability of the immune system to fight infectious diseases. Articles related to biomarkers of immunosenescence were selected with the goal of identifying immunological biomarkers predisposing the elderly to infections. Innate immunity is generally thought to be relatively well preserved or enhanced during aging compared with adaptive immunity which manifests more profound alterations. However, evidence, particularly in the last decade, reveals that both limbs of the immune system undergo profound remodeling with aging. Reported data on adaptive immunity is consistent and changes are well established but conflicting results about innate immunity were reported between in vivo and in vitro studies, as well as between murine and human studies. Epidemiological data suggests increased predisposition of the elderly to infections, but no compelling scientific evidence has directly linked senescent immune remodeling to this increased susceptibility. Recently, growing interest in identifying immunological biomarkers and defining "immune risk phenotypes/profiles" (IRP) has been expressed. Identification of biomarkers is in its early days and few potential biomarkers have been identified, with the Swedish having defined one IRP based on the adaptive immune

  14. Immoral behaviour in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmon, P; Tabak, N

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to emphasize a social phenomenon that exists in Israel: immoral medicine. In recent years, nurses have been exposed to many instances of immoral medicine in hospitals. We want to protest about the demands for money from patients who are waiting for surgical intervention, arouse the medical community's conscience concerning these immoral activities, and improve professional and moral behaviour.

  15. ELECTROCHEMICAL BEHAVIOUR AND VOLTAMMETRIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The electrochemical behaviour of Geshoidin was investigated at a glassy carbon electrode in mixtures of citric acid and di-sodium hydrogen orthophosphate aqueous buffer system over a wide pH range (pH 2-11) using cyclic voltammetry. Chemically irreversible single oxidation and reduction peaks were obtained in the ...

  16. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    2003-05-20

    May 20, 2003 ... It is a form of therapy where the patient is helped to recognise patterns of ... The article briefly discusses the development of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT), and makes mention of the important contri- butions made by South ..... was the displace- ment of aspects of the Newtonian paradigm of physics by.

  17. Corporate Social Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Peter; Rahbek Pedersen, Esben

    2003-01-01

    Over the last decades, the industrialised countries have experienced a shift from the Keynesian state intervention paradigm towards a more market-regulated economy. Firms have found themselves in a new era, where they are expected to self-regulate their behaviour in terms of working conditions...

  18. Behavioural economics, travel behaviour and environmental-transport policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Sierra, M.; van den Bergh, J.C.J.M.; Miralles, C.

    2015-01-01

    The transport sector creates much environmental pressure. Many current policies aimed at reducing this pressure are not fully effective because the behavioural aspects of travellers are insufficiently recognised. Insights from behavioural economics can contribute to a better understanding of travel

  19. Personality traits predicting children's social behaviour in the first grade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Horvat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents concurrent predictive relations of personality traits with social behaviour of children at the transition from early to middle childhood. Personality ratings of firstgraders (N = 316 were collected using the Inventory of Child and Adolescent Individual Differences (Zupančič & Kavčič, 2009 and the Social Competence and Behaviour Evaluation Scale (La Freniere et al., 2001 was employed to obtain assessments on the children's social competence, internalizing behaviour, and externalizing behaviour. To account for the same rater bias, the children's personality and social behaviour were rated by both teachers and assisstent teachers in the first grade of a nine-year compulsory school; the predictions were based on two sets of their cross-ratings. The firstgraders' social competentnce was consistently (over the cross-ratings predicted by high conscientiousness, mainly due to ratings of child compliance, whereas low conscientiousness was predictive of internalizing behaviour, especially due to low ratings of subjectively perceived child intelligence. Disagreeableness (both antagonism and strong will and low neuroticism contributed to assessments of the observed children's externalizing behaviour. In regard to neuroticism, ratings of child fear/insecurity were positively related to externalizing and ratings of child shyness were negatively associated with the observed incidence of externalizing behaviour.

  20. Behavioural lateralisation in reindeer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yngve Espmark

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus kept in corrals or otherwise forced to clump typically start milling in response to stressing events. This behaviour is generally considered to have an antipredator effect. An inquiry on herd behaviour, to which 35 Norwegian reindeer husbandry districts responded, showed that 32 experienced that corralled rein¬deer consistently circled leftwards, whereas the remaining three reported consistently rightward circling. Regular monitoring of a reindeer herd in central Norway over a two-year period (1993-94, and experimental studies on a fraction of the same herd, revealed the following traits. Free-ranging reindeer showed no right- or left-turning preference during grazing or browsing, but when the reindeer were driven into corrals or forced to clump in the open they invariably rotated leftwards. The circling of corralled reindeer was triggered at an average group size of 20 to 25 animals, apparently independently of the age and sex of the animals. When they dug craters in the snow to reach food, the reindeer used their left foreleg significantly more often than their right. In 23 out of 35 reindeer, the right hemisphere of the brain was heavier than the left. However, in the sample as a whole, the weights of the left and right hemispheres did not differ significantly. Lateralised behaviour in reindeer is thought to be determined by natural and stress induced asymmetries in brain structure and hormonal activity. In addition, learning is probably important for passing on the behaviour between herd members and generations. Differences in lateralised behaviour between nearby herds are thought to be related primarily to different exposure to stress and learning, whereas genetical and environmental fac¬tors (e.g. diet, age structure and sex ratio are probably more important for explaining differences between distant pop¬ulations.

  1. Television Watching, Leisure-Time Physical Activity and the Genetic Predisposition in Relation to Body Mass Index in Women and Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qibin; Li, Yanping; Chomistek, Andrea K.; Kang, Jae H.; Curhan, Gary C.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Willett, Walter C.; Rimm, Eric B.; Hu, Frank B.; Qi, Lu

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies on gene-lifestyle interaction and obesity have mostly focused on the FTO gene and physical activity, while little attention has been paid to sedentary behavior as indicated by television (TV) watching. Methods and Results We analyzed interactions between TV watching, leisure-time physical activity and genetic predisposition in relation to body mass index (BMI) in 7740 women and 4564 men from 2 prospective cohorts: the Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Data on physical activity and TV watching were collected 2 years prior to assessment of BMI. A weighted genetic risk score (GRS) was calculated on the basis of 32 established BMI-associated variants. In both women and men, the genetic associations with BMI strengthened with increased hours of TV watching. An increment of 10 points in the weighted GRS was associated with 0.8 [SE 0.4], 0.8 [0.2], 1.4 [0.2], 1.5 [0.2] and 3.4 [1.0] kg/m2 higher BMI across the 5 categories of TV watching (0-1, 2-5, 6-20, 21-40, and >40h/wk) (P for interaction=0.001). In contrast, the genetic association with BMI weakened with increased levels of physical activity. An increment of 10 points in the weighted GRS was associated with 1.5 [0.2], 1.3 [0.2], 1.2 [0.2], 1.2 [0.2] and 0.8 [0.2] kg/m2 higher BMI across the quintiles of physical activity. The interactions of TV watching and physical activity with genetic predisposition in relation to BMI were independent of each other. Conclusions Sedentary lifestyle indicated by prolonged TV watching may accentuate predisposition to elevated adiposity, whereas greater leisure-time physical activity may attenuate the genetic association. PMID:22949498

  2. Strongly coupled dusty plasmas: crystals, liquids, clusters and waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeng-Mei Liu; Wen-Tau Juan; Ju-Wang Hsu; Zen-Hong Huang; Lin I

    1999-01-01

    The dusty plasma is a system that consists of many strongly-charged fine dust particles suspended in a plasma background. The slow dynamics and strong coupling due to the large mass and charges lead to the formation of highly-ordered dust crystal structures suspended in the plasma background, which can be directly observed. The dusty plasma forms a link to the area of condensed matter physics for the study of many interesting microscopic phenomena from order to disorder. In this paper, we introduce the special properties of this system from the viewpoint of conventional plasma physics, then we briefly review past works on the structure and dynamical behaviour from the highly-ordered state, through the melting and liquid states with associated vortex-type excitation and anomalous diffusion, to the state with self-organized macroscopic dust waves after losing microscopic order. The first observation of strongly-coupled dust Coulomb clusters with small numbers of particles from a few to a few hundred, which resemble classical atoms, is also demonstrated. (author)

  3. Pelagic behaviour of reservoir fishes: sinusoidal swimming and associated behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    JAROLÍM, Oldřich

    2009-01-01

    Annotation Long-term fixed-location hydroacoustic study with uplooking transducer was performed during 2005 in Římov reservoir, Czech Republic. It dealt mainly with fish behaviour in the open water of reservoir, especially with sinusoidal swimming behaviour. The dependence of pelagic fish behaviour on environmental conditions was also studied.

  4. Etiological theories of addiction: A comprehensive update on neurobiological, genetic and behavioural vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzir, Mounir; Errami, Mohammed

    2016-09-01

    Currently, about 246 million people around the world have used an illicit drug. The reasons for this use are multiple: e.g. to augment the sensation of pleasure or to reduce the withdrawal and other aversive effects of a given substance. This raises the problem of addiction, which remains a disease of modern society. This review offers a comprehensive update of the different theories about the etiology of addictive behaviors with emphasis on the neurobiological, environmental, psychopathological, behavioural and genetic aspects of addictions, discussed from an evolutionary perspective. The main conclusion of this review is that vulnerability to drug addiction suggests an interaction between many brain systems (including the reward, decision-making, serotonergic, oxytocin, interoceptive insula, CRF, norepinephrine, dynorphin/KOR, orexin and vasopressin systems), genetic predisposition, sociocultural context, impulsivity and drugs types. Further advances in biological and psychological science are needed to address the problems of addiction at its roots. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. ANALYSIS OF ACE, ACTN3, ENOS, PPARG, PPARA, HIF-15, PPARGC1B GENE POLYMORPHISMS FOR DETERMINATION A GENETIC PREDISPOSITION TO A VARIETY OF SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Drozdovska

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To establishing the possibility of assessing genetic iinherited predisposition to various sports, the differences in the distribution of genotypes of the complex polymorphisms in groups of athletes, specializing in sports with different types of energy supply of muscular work were studied. The paper examined the DNA 332 persons, of which 110 athletes involved in speed- power sports, 85 - in endurance sports , 51 - in sports that require a combination of strength and endurance, 86 - with no experience regular exercise.

  6. Entrepreneurial personality and entrepreneurial behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Marcela Rodica LUCA

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a literature analysis concerning the concept of entrepreneurial personality. Several topics are discussed, such as: entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial personality, personality traits and factors associated with entrepreneurship, context variables influencing entrepreneurial behaviour, psychological explanations of entrepreneurial behaviour.

  7. Clinical characteristics, management and long-term outcome of suspected rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in 14 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, T A; Chidester, R M; Chrisman, C L

    2011-02-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics, management and long-term outcome in dogs with suspected rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. Medical records and video recordings of 14 dogs with suspected rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder were reviewed and the owners were contacted via telephone or email for further information. Clinical signs included episodes of violent limb movements, howling, barking, growling, chewing, or biting during sleep. Episodes occurred at night and during daytime naps. The age at onset ranged from 8 weeks to 7·5 years with a median of 6 years but 64% of dogs were one year or less. There was no apparent sex or breed predisposition. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder events were reduced in severity and frequency in 78% of the dogs treated with 40 mg/kg/day oral potassium bromide. One dog was euthanized within 3 months of the onset of signs because of their severity. The duration of the disorder in the 13 surviving dogs ranged from 1·5 to 9 years. None of the dogs spontaneously recovered. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is suspected to occur in dogs, as it does in human beings. It causes concern to the owners and disrupts the home environment. Unlike human beings, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder of dogs often has a juvenile onset. © 2011 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  8. Strongly correlating liquids and their isomorphs

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Ulf R.; Gnan, Nicoletta; Bailey, Nicholas P.; Schröder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the properties of strongly correlating liquids, i.e., liquids with strong correlations between virial and potential energy equilibrium fluctuations at constant volume. We proceed to focus on the experimental predictions for strongly correlating glass-forming liquids. These predictions include i) density scaling, ii) isochronal superposition, iii) that there is a single function from which all frequency-dependent viscoelastic response functions may be calculated, iv) that...

  9. Atom collisions in a strong electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, V.S.; Chaplik, A.V.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that the long-range part of interatomic interaction is considerably altered in a strong electromagnetic field. Instead of the van der Waals law the potential asymptote can best be described by a dipole-dipole R -3 law. Impact broadening and the line shift in a strong nonresonant field are calculated. The possibility of bound states of two atoms being formed in a strong light field is discussed

  10. Quantum dynamics of a strongly driven Josephson Junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosner, Jennifer; Kubala, Bjoern; Ankerhold, Joachim [Institute for Complex Quantum Systems, University of Ulm (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    A Josephson Junction embedded in a dissipative circuit can be driven to exhibit non-linear oscillations. Classically the non-linear oscillator shows under sufficient strong driving and weak damping dynamical bifurcations and a bistable region similar to the conventional Duffing-oscillator. These features depend sensitively on initial conditions and parameters. The sensitivity of this circuit, called Josephson Bifurcation Amplifier, can be used to amplify an incoming signal, to form a sensing device or even for measuring a quantum system. The quantum dynamics can be described by a dissipative Lindblad master equation. Signatures of the classical bifurcation phenomena appear in the Wigner representation, used to characterize and visualize the resulting behaviour. In order to compare this quantum dynamics to that of the conventional Duffing-oscillator, the complete cosine-nonlinearity of the Josephson Junction is kept for the quantum description while going into a rotating frame.

  11. Integrating out resonances in strongly-coupled electroweak scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosell Ignasi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Accepting that there is a mass gap above the electroweak scale, the Electroweak Effective Theory (EWET is an appropriate tool to describe this situation. Since the EWET couplings contain information on the unknown high-energy dynamics, we consider a generic strongly-coupled scenario of electroweak symmetry breaking, where the known particle fields are coupled to heavier states. Then, and by integrating out these heavy fields, we study the tracks of the lightest resonances into the couplings. The determination of the low-energy couplings (LECs in terms of resonance parameters can be made more precise by considering a proper short-distance behaviour on the Lagrangian with heavy states, since the number of resonance couplings is then reduced. Notice that we adopt a generic non-linear realization of the electroweak symmetry breaking with a singlet Higgs.

  12. Occupants' window opening behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabi, Valentina; Andersen, Rune Korsholm; Corgnati, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    systems is proposed, based on studies presented in literature and a general process leading to the effects on energy consumptions is identified.Existing studies on the topic of window opening behaviour are highlighted and a theoretical framework to deal with occupants' interactions with building controls......, aimed at improving or maintaining the preferred indoor environmental conditions, is elaborated. This approach is used to look into the drivers for the actions taken by the occupants (windows opening and closing) and to investigate the existing models in literature of these actions for both residential...... and office buildings. The analysis of the literature highlights how a shared approach on identifying the driving forces for occupants' window opening and closing behaviour has not yet been reached. However, the reporting of variables found not to be drivers may reveal contradictions in the obtained results...

  13. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy & Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael; Hansen, Tia G. B.; Gulbrandsen, Knut Arild

    Coaching is an expanding area of professional work, and recent years have brought forward the notion of cognitive coaching (Costa, 2006; Oestrich, 2005) which adapts theory and techniques from cognitive therapy to serve self-enhancement in non-clinical populations. We suggest that a cognitive...... coaching module in the graduate curriculum for students of psychology is a rewarding introduction to cognitive behavioural approaches, since it allows combination of traditional lectures with “action-reflection-learning” workshops, during which students train cognitive behavioural techniques in their own...... repertoire. The skills needed for cognitive coaching reflect all therapeutic techniques but at a less advanced psychotherapeutic level, and still prepare for future clinical work and development. In the poster, we summarise a cognitive coaching course syllabus as well as results from data collected...

  14. Energy efficiency and behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Trine Agervig; Kunnasvirta, Annika; Kiviluoto, Katariina

    The purpose of Work Package 5 Deliverable 5.1., “Case study reports on energy efficiency and behaviour” is to present examples of behavioral interventions to promote energy efficiency in cities. The case studies were collected in January – June 2014, and they represent behavioural interventions...... from different sectors of energy efficiency from the following PLEEC partner countries: Denmark, Sweden, Finland, the UK, the Netherlands, Estonia, Bulgaria and Spain. Each case is presented shortly with key details of budget, target group, and methods as well as a short assessment of main success...... factors. The main addressees of D5.1. are city officials, NGO representatives, private sector actors and any other relevant actors who plan and realize behavioural energy efficiency interventions in European cities. The WP5 team will also further apply results from D5.1. with a more general model on how...

  15. Consumer choice behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming; Percy, Larry; Hallum Hansen, Morten

    2004-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the measurement of emotions and the study of the role ofemotions in consumer choice. Contemporary neurological findings suggest that emotionsmay play a role in its own right, quite different from the way in which they have beenconsidered in traditional consumer choice...... behaviour theory. A large-scale study including800 respondents, covering 64 brands, provide findings on emotional response tendenciesfor the brands, and relate these to involvement, type of need gratification, purchasingbehaviour, etc....

  16. Quantum circuit behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulton, D.

    1989-09-01

    Single electron tunnelling in multiply connected weak link systems is considered. Using a second quantised approach the tunnel current, in both normal and superconducting systems, using perturbation theory, is derived. The tunnel currents are determined as a function of an Aharanov-Bohm phase (acquired by the electrons). Using these results, the multiply connected system is then discussed when coupled to a resonant LC circuit. The resulting dynamics of this composite system are then determined. In the superconducting case the results are compared and contrasted with flux mode behaviour seen in large superconducting weak link rings. Systems in which the predicted dynamics may be seen are also discussed. In analogy to the electron tunnelling analysis, the tunnelling of magnetic flux quanta through the weak link is also considered. Here, the voltage across the weak link, due to flux tunnelling, is determined as a function of an externally applied current. This is done for both singly and multiply connected flux systems. The results are compared and contrasted with charge mode behaviour seen in superconducting weak link systems. Finally, the behaviour of simple quantum fluids is considered when subject to an external rotation. Using a microscopic analysis it is found that the microscopic quantum behaviour of the particles is manifest on a macroscopic level. Results are derived for bosonic, fermionic and BCS pair-type systems. The connection between flux quantisation in electromagnetic systems is also made. Using these results, the dynamics of such a quantum fluid is considered when coupled to a rotating torsional oscillator. The results are compared with those found in SQUID devices. A model is also presented which discusses the possible excited state dynamics of such a fluid. (author)

  17. Consumer choice behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming; Percy, Larry; Hallum Hansen, Morten

    2004-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the measurement of emotions and the study of the role ofemotions in consumer choice. Contemporary neurological findings suggest that emotionsmay play a role in its own right, quite different from the way in which they have beenconsidered in traditional consumer choice ...... behaviour theory. A large-scale study including800 respondents, covering 64 brands, provide findings on emotional response tendenciesfor the brands, and relate these to involvement, type of need gratification, purchasingbehaviour, etc....

  18. Consumer choice behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Flemming; Percy, Larry; Hallum Hansen, Morten

    2004-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the measurement of emotions and the study of the role of emotions in consumer choice. Contemporary neurological findings suggest that emotions may play a role in its own right, quite different from the way in which they have been considered in traditional consumer choice behaviour theory. A large-scale study including 800 respondents, covering 64 brands, provide findings on emotional response tendencies for the brands, and relate these to involvement...

  19. Sexual behaviour in cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    Short duration or weak expression of oestrus are frequently cited as major reasons for poor results when artificial insemination of Bos indicus breeds is attempted. The existing literature on sexual behaviour certainly indicates that oestrus sometimes lasts for only a few hours in Bos indicus, but similar patterns are also reported in Bos taurus animals. The period of sexual receptivity in suckled Hereford or Hereford-dairy cross-breds maintained in small, totally confined groups ranged from 1 to 18 h, with a mean of 4.4 h and a median of 3.5 h. In totally confined Holstein cows the onset of the LH surge always followed the beginning of homosexual activity by 1 or 2 h even when the period of receptivity was very short. Thus, the beginning rather than the end of oestrus should be used for estimating ovulation time. The expression of sexual behaviour is modified by many factors, including environmental conditions, the number of peri-oestrous females in the group and the presence of observers. In Hereford beef, Holstein dairy and probably all other cattle breeds, the variability in duration and intensity of oestrous activity is very large, so generalizations on a typical individual behavioural pattern are not possible. (author). 39 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  20. Sedentary behaviour and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Margot; Tremblay, Mark S

    2008-06-01

    This article examines sedentary behaviours (television viewing, computer use and reading) in relation to obesity among Canadian adults aged 20 to 64 years. The analysis is based on 42,612 respondents from the 2007 Canadian Community Health Survey Cross-tabulations were used to compare the prevalence of obesity by time engaged in sedentary behaviours. Multiple logistic regression models were used to determine if associations between sedentary behaviours and obesity were independent of the effects of sociodemographic variables, leisure-time physical activity and diet. Approximately one-quarter of men (25%) and women (24%) who reported watching television 21 or more hours per week were classified as obese. The prevalence of obesity was substantially lower for those who averaged 5 or fewer hours of television per week (14% of men and 11% of women). When examined in multivariate models controlling for leisure-time physical activity and diet, the associations between time spent watching television and obesity persisted for both sexes. Frequent computer users (11 or more hours per week) of both sexes had increased odds of obesity, compared with those who used computers for 5 or fewer hours per week. Time spent reading was not related to obesity.

  1. Strong ideal convergence in probabilistic metric spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sequence and strong ideal Cauchy sequence in a probabilistic metric (PM) space endowed with the strong topology, and ... also important applications in nonlinear analysis [2]. The theory was brought to ..... for each t > 0 since each set on the right-hand side of the relation (3.1) belongs to I. Thus, by Definition 2.11 and the ...

  2. Large N baryons, strong coupling theory, quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakita, B.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that in QCD the large N limit is the same as the static strong coupling limit. By using the static strong coupling techniques some of the results of large N baryons are derived. The results are consistent with the large N SU(6) static quark model. (author)

  3. Optimization of strong and weak coordinates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, M.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new scheme for the geometry optimization of equilibrium and transition state structures that can be used for both strong and weak coordinates. We use a screening function that depends on atom-pair distances to differentiate strong coordinates from weak coordinates. This differentiation

  4. Strong decays of nucleon and delta resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijker, R.; Leviatan, A.

    1996-01-01

    We study the strong couplings of the nucleon and delta resonances in a collective model. In the ensuing algebraic treatment we derive closed expressions for decay widths which are used to analyze the experimental data for strong decays into the pion and eta channels. (Author)

  5. Theoretical studies of strongly correlated fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, D. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    Strongly correlated fermions are investigated. An understanding of strongly correlated fermions underpins a diverse range of phenomena such as metal-insulator transitions, high-temperature superconductivity, magnetic impurity problems and the properties of heavy-fermion systems, in all of which local moments play an important role. (author).

  6. Genetic predisposition to increased blood cholesterol and triglyceride lipid levels and risk of Alzheimer disease: a Mendelian randomization analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petroula Proitsi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although altered lipid metabolism has been extensively implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD through cell biological, epidemiological, and genetic studies, the molecular mechanisms linking cholesterol and AD pathology are still not well understood and contradictory results have been reported. We have used a Mendelian randomization approach to dissect the causal nature of the association between circulating lipid levels and late onset AD (LOAD and test the hypothesis that genetically raised lipid levels increase the risk of LOAD.We included 3,914 patients with LOAD, 1,675 older individuals without LOAD, and 4,989 individuals from the general population from six genome wide studies drawn from a white population (total n=10,578. We constructed weighted genotype risk scores (GRSs for four blood lipid phenotypes (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-c], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-c], triglycerides, and total cholesterol using well-established SNPs in 157 loci for blood lipids reported by Willer and colleagues (2013. Both full GRSs using all SNPs associated with each trait at p<5×10-8 and trait specific scores using SNPs associated exclusively with each trait at p<5 × 10-8 were developed. We used logistic regression to investigate whether the GRSs were associated with LOAD in each study and results were combined together by meta-analysis. We found no association between any of the full GRSs and LOAD (meta-analysis results: odds ratio [OR]=1.005, 95% CI 0.82-1.24, p = 0.962 per 1 unit increase in HDL-c; OR=0.901, 95% CI 0.65-1.25, p=0.530 per 1 unit increase in LDL-c; OR=1.104, 95% CI 0.89-1.37, p=0.362 per 1 unit increase in triglycerides; and OR=0.954, 95% CI 0.76-1.21, p=0.688 per 1 unit increase in total cholesterol. Results for the trait specific scores were similar; however, the trait specific scores explained much smaller phenotypic variance.Genetic predisposition to increased blood cholesterol and

  7. On “Hearing” Voices and “Seeing” Things: Probing Hallucination Predisposition in a Portuguese Nonclinical Sample with the Launay-Slade Hallucination Scale-Revised

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Castiajo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The experience of hallucinations is a hallmark of psychotic disorders, but they are also present in other psychiatric and medical conditions, and may be reported in nonclinical individuals. Despite the increased number of studies probing the incidence of nonclinical hallucinations, the underlying phenomenological characteristics are still poorly understood. This study aimed to examine the psychometrics proprieties of the Portuguese adaptation of the 16-item Launay-Slade Hallucinations Scale (LSHS, the phenomenological characteristics of nonclinical hallucinatory experiences in a Portuguese sample, and the relationship between clinical symptoms and hallucination predisposition. Three-hundred-and-fifty-four European Portuguese college students completed the LSHS. Of those, 16 participants with high LSHS scores and 14 with low LSHS scores were further screened for clinical symptoms. A three-factor solution for the LSHS Portuguese version proved to be the most adequate. Intrusive or vivid thoughts and sleep-related hallucinations were the most common. Although, fundamentally perceived as positive experiences, all types of hallucinations were described as uncontrollable and dominating. However, the more pleasant they were perceived, the more controllable they were assessed. In addition, hallucination predisposition was associated with increased clinical symptoms. These results corroborate the lower severity of hallucinations in the general population compared to psychotic individuals. Further, they support an association between clinical symptoms and increased vulnerability to hallucinations. Specifically, increased schizotypal tendencies and negative mood (anxiety and depression may be related to increased psychotic risk.

  8. Intratumoral Th2 predisposition combines with an increased Th1 functional phenotype in clinical response to intravesical BCG in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Renate; Gruenbacher, Georg; Culig, Zoran; Brunner, Andrea; Fuchs, Dietmar; Fritz, Josef; Gander, Hubert; Rahm, Andrea; Thurnher, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Th1-type immunity is considered to be required for efficient response to BCG in bladder cancer, although Th2 predisposition of BCG responders has recently been reported. The aim was to evaluate the relationship of Th1 and Th2 components in 23 patients undergoing BCG treatment. Peripheral blood, serum and urine samples were prospectively collected at baseline, during and after BCG. Th1 (neopterin, tryptophan, kynurenine, kynurenine-to-tryptophan ratio (KTR), IL-12, IFN-γ, soluble TNF-R75 and IL-2Rα) and Th2 (IL-4, IL-10) biomarkers as well as CD4 expression in T helper (Th), effector and regulatory T cells were determined. Local immune cell subsets were measured on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry to examine expression of transcription factors that control Th1 (T-bet) and Th2-type (GATA3) immunity. We confirmed a Th2 predisposition with a mean GATA3/T-bet ratio of 5.51. BCG responders showed significantly higher levels of urinary (p = 0.003) and serum neopterin (p = 0.012), kynurenine (p = 0.015), KTR (p = 0.005), IFN-γ (p = 0.005) and IL-12 (p = 0.003) during therapy, whereas levels of IL-10 decreased significantly (p Th1-type immune responses and thus contribute to the BCG success.

  9. On “Hearing” Voices and “Seeing” Things: Probing Hallucination Predisposition in a Portuguese Nonclinical Sample with the Launay-Slade Hallucination Scale-Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiajo, Paula; Pinheiro, Ana P.

    2017-01-01

    The experience of hallucinations is a hallmark of psychotic disorders, but they are also present in other psychiatric and medical conditions, and may be reported in nonclinical individuals. Despite the increased number of studies probing the incidence of nonclinical hallucinations, the underlying phenomenological characteristics are still poorly understood. This study aimed to examine the psychometrics proprieties of the Portuguese adaptation of the 16-item Launay-Slade Hallucinations Scale (LSHS), the phenomenological characteristics of nonclinical hallucinatory experiences in a Portuguese sample, and the relationship between clinical symptoms and hallucination predisposition. Three-hundred-and-fifty-four European Portuguese college students completed the LSHS. Of those, 16 participants with high LSHS scores and 14 with low LSHS scores were further screened for clinical symptoms. A three-factor solution for the LSHS Portuguese version proved to be the most adequate. Intrusive or vivid thoughts and sleep-related hallucinations were the most common. Although, fundamentally perceived as positive experiences, all types of hallucinations were described as uncontrollable and dominating. However, the more pleasant they were perceived, the more controllable they were assessed. In addition, hallucination predisposition was associated with increased clinical symptoms. These results corroborate the lower severity of hallucinations in the general population compared to psychotic individuals. Further, they support an association between clinical symptoms and increased vulnerability to hallucinations. Specifically, increased schizotypal tendencies and negative mood (anxiety and depression) may be related to increased psychotic risk. PMID:28744234

  10. On "Hearing" Voices and "Seeing" Things: Probing Hallucination Predisposition in a Portuguese Nonclinical Sample with the Launay-Slade Hallucination Scale-Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiajo, Paula; Pinheiro, Ana P

    2017-01-01

    The experience of hallucinations is a hallmark of psychotic disorders, but they are also present in other psychiatric and medical conditions, and may be reported in nonclinical individuals. Despite the increased number of studies probing the incidence of nonclinical hallucinations, the underlying phenomenological characteristics are still poorly understood. This study aimed to examine the psychometrics proprieties of the Portuguese adaptation of the 16-item Launay-Slade Hallucinations Scale (LSHS), the phenomenological characteristics of nonclinical hallucinatory experiences in a Portuguese sample, and the relationship between clinical symptoms and hallucination predisposition. Three-hundred-and-fifty-four European Portuguese college students completed the LSHS. Of those, 16 participants with high LSHS scores and 14 with low LSHS scores were further screened for clinical symptoms. A three-factor solution for the LSHS Portuguese version proved to be the most adequate. Intrusive or vivid thoughts and sleep-related hallucinations were the most common. Although, fundamentally perceived as positive experiences, all types of hallucinations were described as uncontrollable and dominating. However, the more pleasant they were perceived, the more controllable they were assessed. In addition, hallucination predisposition was associated with increased clinical symptoms. These results corroborate the lower severity of hallucinations in the general population compared to psychotic individuals. Further, they support an association between clinical symptoms and increased vulnerability to hallucinations. Specifically, increased schizotypal tendencies and negative mood (anxiety and depression) may be related to increased psychotic risk.

  11. Seismic switch for strong motion measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harben, P.E.; Rodgers, P.W.; Ewert, D.W.

    1995-05-30

    A seismic switching device is described that has an input signal from an existing microseismic station seismometer and a signal from a strong motion measuring instrument. The seismic switch monitors the signal level of the strong motion instrument and passes the seismometer signal to the station data telemetry and recording systems. When the strong motion instrument signal level exceeds a user set threshold level, the seismometer signal is switched out and the strong motion signal is passed to the telemetry system. The amount of time the strong motion signal is passed before switching back to the seismometer signal is user controlled between 1 and 15 seconds. If the threshold level is exceeded during a switch time period, the length of time is extended from that instant by one user set time period. 11 figs.

  12. Psychological Factors Influencing Consumer Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Vainikka, Bianca

    2015-01-01

    This paper’s aim is to provide an in-depth elucidation of the many aspects that influence consumer behaviour. The study of consumer behaviour emphasizes the “why” and “how” questions involved in decision making and buying behaviour. This exciting field visits a dynamic blend of themes of consumer marketing strategies, psychology and behavioural discipline. Consumer behaviour in this day and age is highly applicable to modern society as it is an integral part of our everyday lives. This paper ...

  13. Predicting People's Environmental Behaviour: Theory of Planned Behaviour and Model of Responsible Environmental Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yu-Long

    2012-01-01

    Using different measures of self-reported and other-reported environmental behaviour (EB), two important theoretical models explaining EB--Hines, Hungerford and Tomera's model of responsible environmental behaviour (REB) and Ajzen's theory of planned behaviour (TPB)--were compared regarding the fit between model and data, predictive ability,…

  14. Physical activity attenuates the genetic predisposition to obesity in 20,000 men and women from EPIC-Norfolk prospective population study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengxu Li

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that multiple genetic loci identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS increase the susceptibility to obesity in a cumulative manner. It is, however, not known whether and to what extent this genetic susceptibility may be attenuated by a physically active lifestyle. We aimed to assess the influence of a physically active lifestyle on the genetic predisposition to obesity in a large population-based study.We genotyped 12 SNPs in obesity-susceptibility loci in a population-based sample of 20,430 individuals (aged 39-79 y from the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC-Norfolk cohort with an average follow-up period of 3.6 y. A genetic predisposition score was calculated for each individual by adding the body mass index (BMI-increasing alleles across the 12 SNPs. Physical activity was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Linear and logistic regression models were used to examine main effects of the genetic predisposition score and its interaction with physical activity on BMI/obesity risk and BMI change over time, assuming an additive effect for each additional BMI-increasing allele carried. Each additional BMI-increasing allele was associated with 0.154 (standard error [SE] 0.012 kg/m(2 (p = 6.73 x 10(-37 increase in BMI (equivalent to 445 g in body weight for a person 1.70 m tall. This association was significantly (p(interaction = 0.005 more pronounced in inactive people (0.205 [SE 0.024] kg/m(2 [p = 3.62 x 10(-18; 592 g in weight] than in active people (0.131 [SE 0.014] kg/m(2 [p = 7.97 x 10(-21; 379 g in weight]. Similarly, each additional BMI-increasing allele increased the risk of obesity 1.116-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.093-1.139, p = 3.37 x 10(-26 in the whole population, but significantly (p(interaction = 0.015 more in inactive individuals (odds ratio [OR] = 1.158 [95% CI 1.118-1.199; p = 1.93 x 10(-16] than in active individuals (OR = 1.095 (95% CI 1.068-1.123; p = 1

  15. Physical activity attenuates the genetic predisposition to obesity in 20,000 men and women from EPIC-Norfolk prospective population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengxu; Zhao, Jing Hua; Luan, Jian'an; Ekelund, Ulf; Luben, Robert N; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Loos, Ruth J F

    2010-08-31

    We have previously shown that multiple genetic loci identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) increase the susceptibility to obesity in a cumulative manner. It is, however, not known whether and to what extent this genetic susceptibility may be attenuated by a physically active lifestyle. We aimed to assess the influence of a physically active lifestyle on the genetic predisposition to obesity in a large population-based study. We genotyped 12 SNPs in obesity-susceptibility loci in a population-based sample of 20,430 individuals (aged 39-79 y) from the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk cohort with an average follow-up period of 3.6 y. A genetic predisposition score was calculated for each individual by adding the body mass index (BMI)-increasing alleles across the 12 SNPs. Physical activity was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Linear and logistic regression models were used to examine main effects of the genetic predisposition score and its interaction with physical activity on BMI/obesity risk and BMI change over time, assuming an additive effect for each additional BMI-increasing allele carried. Each additional BMI-increasing allele was associated with 0.154 (standard error [SE] 0.012) kg/m(2) (p = 6.73 x 10(-37)) increase in BMI (equivalent to 445 g in body weight for a person 1.70 m tall). This association was significantly (p(interaction) = 0.005) more pronounced in inactive people (0.205 [SE 0.024] kg/m(2) [p = 3.62 x 10(-18); 592 g in weight]) than in active people (0.131 [SE 0.014] kg/m(2) [p = 7.97 x 10(-21); 379 g in weight]). Similarly, each additional BMI-increasing allele increased the risk of obesity 1.116-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.093-1.139, p = 3.37 x 10(-26)) in the whole population, but significantly (p(interaction) = 0.015) more in inactive individuals (odds ratio [OR] = 1.158 [95% CI 1.118-1.199; p = 1.93 x 10(-16)]) than in active individuals (OR = 1.095 (95% CI 1.068-1.123; p = 1

  16. Intense extrapair behaviour in a semicolonial passerine does not result in extrapair fertilizations

    OpenAIRE

    Mota, Paulo Gama; Hoi-Leitner, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Sperm competition is a strong force on the evolution of mating behaviour of animals, particularly birds. In monogamous birds extrapair behaviour is one main source of variation in the reproductive success of males, which has caused the evolution of paternity guards as well as strategies by females to increase the genetic quality of their descendants. We investigated the importance of sperm competition in the reproductive behaviour of serins, Serinus serinus. Male serins guarded their mates an...

  17. Functional architecture of behavioural thermoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouris, Andreas D

    2011-01-01

    The human thermoregulatory system relies primarily on behavioural adaptation and secondarily on autonomic and endocrine responses for thermal homeostasis. This is because autonomic and endocrine responses have a limited capacity in preventing hyper/hypothermia in extreme environments. Until recently, the neuroanatomy of behavioural thermoregulation as well as the neuroanatomic substrate of the various thermoregulatory behaviours remained largely unknown. However, this situation has changed in recent years as behavioural thermoregulation has become a topic of considerable attention. The present review evaluates the current knowledge on behavioural thermoregulation in order to summarize the present state-of-the-art and to point towards future research directions. Findings on the fundamental distinction between thermal (dis)comfort and sensation are reviewed showing that the former drives behaviour while the latter initiates autonomic thermoregulation. Moreover, the thermosensitive neurons and thermoeffector functions of behavioural thermoregulation are presented and analysed in a detailed discussion.

  18. Association between oral and general hygiene behaviours among Iranian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbariha, Maryam; Sheiham, Aubrey; Rakhshani, Fatemeh; Dorri, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    To assess the association between oral and general hygiene behaviours in 12-year-old Iranians and the impact of sociodemographic and educational factors on the association. A representative random sample of 550 12-year-old Iranian adolescents from two deprived tribes answered a 41-item questionnaire on sociodemographic background, education and oral and general hygiene behaviours. The association between tooth cleaning frequency and other study outcome variables were tested using binary logistic regression. The sex differences in the study outcome variables were investigated using chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests. The frequency of tooth cleaning was significantly associated with a general hygiene behaviour: frequency of taking a bath (OR 0.5; 95% CI: 0.3, 0.7). This association remained significant when sociodemographic factors and educational factors were added to the model both separately (P Oral and a general hygiene behaviour were strongly associated. Oral, general and environmental hygiene programmes should use integrated approaches.

  19. The Association of Genetic Predisposition to Depressive Symptoms with Non-suicidal and Suicidal Self-Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Dominique F; Renteria, Miguel E; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Medland, Sarah E; Few, Lauren R; Gordon, Scott D; Madden, Pamela A F; Montgomery, Grant; Trull, Timothy J; Heath, Andrew C; Statham, Dixie J; Martin, Nicholas G; Zietsch, Brendan P; Verweij, Karin J H

    2017-01-01

    Non-suicidal and suicidal self-injury are very destructive, yet surprisingly common behaviours. Depressed mood is a major risk factor for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. We conducted a genetic risk prediction study to examine the polygenic overlap of depressive symptoms with lifetime NSSI, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts in a sample of 6237 Australian adult twins and their family members (3740 females, mean age = 42.4 years). Polygenic risk scores for depressive symptoms significantly predicted suicidal ideation, and some predictive ability was found for suicide attempts; the polygenic risk scores explained a significant amount of variance in suicidal ideation (lowest p = 0.008, explained variance ranging from 0.10 to 0.16 %) and, less consistently, in suicide attempts (lowest p = 0.04, explained variance ranging from 0.12 to 0.23 %). Polygenic risk scores did not significantly predict NSSI. Results highlight that individuals genetically predisposed to depression are also more likely to experience suicidal ideation/behaviour, whereas we found no evidence that this is also the case for NSSI.

  20. Spillover of environment-friendly consumer behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John; Ølander, Carl Folke

    2003-01-01

    circle and whether it is a necessary prerequisite for a virtuous circle to emerge and to continue to work that the individual possesses certain general values or ethical norms. The data material is a three-wave panel study with a large random sample of Danish consumers. The data were analysed by means...... of spillover is marginally but significantly higher when respondents give high priority to the value domain that Schwartz (1994) termed universalism or hold strong personal norms for envi-ronmentally friendly behaviour. Udgivelsesdato: SEP...

  1. Problem Gambling and Delinquent Behaviours Among Adolescents: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryszajtys, David T; Hahmann, Tara E; Schuler, Andrée; Hamilton-Wright, Sarah; Ziegler, Carolyn P; Matheson, Flora I

    2018-02-22

    Despite many studies indicating an association between problem gambling and delinquent behaviours among adolescents, there has been no effort to systematically analyze the state of the literature on this relationship. To fill this gap, we conducted a scoping review of the literature published between 2000 and 2016 on problem gambling and delinquent behaviours among adolescents. We searched twelve databases and reviewed reference lists to identify eligible studies. Search terms included a combination of medical subject headings and keywords for gambling, youth, and delinquency, which were combined with the Boolean operator "AND". 1795 studies were identified through the literature search. Nine studies were eligible for inclusion. All of the studies were conducted in North America, with primarily male participants, and most of the data were cross-sectional. No qualitative studies met the inclusion criteria. Screening tools used to measure problem gambling were inconsistent, making comparisons across studies difficult. We found a consistent moderate to strong association between problem gambling and delinquent behaviour. Only one study presented associations by socio-economic status and none considered gender, sex or ethnic differences. Studies in the review showed that problem gambling is associated with both violent and non-violent behaviours among adolescents. These associations may suggest that problem gambling and delinquent behaviours have common risk factors and reflect a syndrome of risky behaviours best targeted through prevention and treatment that is holistic and considers the context in which the youth is situated. Further research is warranted to better understand the relationship between problem gambling and delinquent behaviours.

  2. Micro-universes and strong black-roles: a purely geometric approach to elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recami, E.; Raciti, F.; Rodrigues Junior, W.A.; Zanchin, V.T.

    1993-09-01

    A panoramic view is presented of a proposed unified, bi-scale theory of gravitational and strong interactions [which is mathematically analogous to the last version of N. Rosen's bi-metric theory; and yields physical results similar to strong gravity's]. This theory, is purely geometrical in nature, adopting the methods of General Relativity for the description of hadron structure and strong interactions. In particular, hadrons are associated with strong black-holes, from the external point of view, and with micro-universes, from the internal point of view. Among the results herein presented, it should be mentioned the derivation: of confinement and asymptotic freedom from the hadron constituents; of the Yukawa behaviour for the potential at the static limit; of the strong coupling constant, and of mesonic mass spectra. (author)

  3. Modelling and prediction of non-stationary optical turbulence behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doelman, N.J.; Osborn, J.

    2016-01-01

    There is a strong need to model the temporal fluctuations in turbulence parameters, for instance for scheduling, simulation and prediction purposes. This paper aims at modelling the dynamic behaviour of the turbulence coherence length r0, utilising measurement data from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument

  4. Mother's health seeking behaviour during child illness in a rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In most developing countries, the health of the children is strongly dependant on maternal healthcare behaviour. The study describes the prevalence of illness among preschool children in a rural sugarcane growing community and the mother's health seeking behavior. Objectives: To document the presence of ...

  5. Cyclic deformation behaviour of austenitic steels at ambient and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fatigue behaviour of X6CrNiTi1810 (AISI 321), X10CrNiCb189 (AISI 348) and X5CrNi1810 (AISI 304) is characterised by cyclic hardening and softening effects which are strongly influenced by specific loading conditions. Martensite formation varies with the composition, loading conditions, temperature and number of ...

  6. Behaviour of tunnelling transition rate of argon atom exposed to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 565–573. Behaviour of tunnelling transition rate of argon atom exposed to strong low-frequency elliptical laser field. TATJANA B MILADINOVI ´C and VIOLETA M ... There are two laser field polarizations, linear and circular, as ... is the electron momentum [1], expressed using the field strength F and the parabolic.

  7. Family communication about HIV/AIDS and sexual behaviour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sexually active adolescents in Ghana are increasingly at risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. As a primary agent of socialization, the family can exert a strong influence on adolescent sexual behaviour. Therefore, to aid in the design and implementation of effective prevention programmes, it is ...

  8. Environmental Education for Behaviour Change: Which Actions Should Be Targeted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyes, Edward; Stanisstreet, Martin

    2012-01-01

    One aim of environmental education is to enable people to make informed decisions about their environmental behaviour; this is particularly significant with environmental problems that are believed to be both major and imminent, such as climate change resulting from global warming. Previous research suggests no strong link between a person's…

  9. Effects of Adult Familiarity on Social Behaviours in Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, R.; Oliver, C.; Berg, K.; Horsler, K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Angelman syndrome appear strongly motivated by social contact, but there have been few studies that have examined the relationship between sociability and familiarity. In this study we compared social behaviour in Angelman syndrome when in contact with mothers and strangers. Methods: We systematically manipulated adult…

  10. Colour, pleasantness, and consumption behaviour within a meal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piqueras Fiszman, B.; Spence, C.

    2014-01-01

    It is often claimed that colour (e.g., in a meal) affects consumption behaviour. However, just how strong is the evidence in support of this claim, and what are the underlying mechanisms? It has been shown that not only the colour itself, but also the variety and the arrangement of the

  11. Strong and superstrong pulsed magnetic fields generation

    CERN Document Server

    Shneerson, German A; Krivosheev, Sergey I

    2014-01-01

    Strong pulsed magnetic fields are important for several fields in physics and engineering, such as power generation and accelerator facilities. Basic aspects of the generation of strong and superstrong pulsed magnetic fields technique are given, including the physics and hydrodynamics of the conductors interacting with the field as well as an account of the significant progress in generation of strong magnetic fields using the magnetic accumulation technique. Results of computer simulations as well as a survey of available field technology are completing the volume.

  12. Impurity screening in strongly coupled plasma systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kyrkos, S

    2003-01-01

    We present an overview of the problem of screening of an impurity in a strongly coupled one-component plasma within the framework of the linear response (LR) theory. We consider 3D, 2D and quasi-2D layered systems. For a strongly coupled plasma the LR can be determined by way of the known S(k) structure functions. In general, an oscillating screening potential with local overscreening and antiscreening regions emerges. In the case of the bilayer, this phenomenon becomes global, as overscreening develops in the layer of the impurity and antiscreening in the adjacent layer. We comment on the limitations of the LR theory in the strong coupling situation.

  13. The lambda sigma calculus and strong normalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schack-Nielsen, Anders; Schürmann, Carsten

    Explicit substitution calculi can be classified into several dis- tinct categories depending on whether they are confluent, meta-confluent, strong normalization preserving, strongly normalizing, simulating, fully compositional, and/or local. In this paper we present a variant of the λσ-calculus......, which satisfies all seven conditions. In particular, we show how to circumvent Mellies counter-example to strong normalization by a slight restriction of the congruence rules. The calculus is implemented as the core data structure of the Celf logical framework. All meta-theoretic aspects of this work...

  14. We are at risk, and so what? Place attachment, environmental risk perceptions and preventive coping behaviours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Dominicis, Stefano; Fornara, Ferdinando; Ganucci Cancellieri, Uberta

    2015-01-01

    Place attachment regulates people-environment transactions across various relevant environmental-psychological processes. However, there is no consensus about its role in the relationship between environmental risk perception and coping behaviours. Since place attachment is strongly related to pl...

  15. Self-Organization of Polymeric Fluids in Strong Stress Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Semakov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of literature data and our own experimental observations have led to the conclusion that, at high deformation rates, viscoelastic liquids come to behave as rubbery materials, with strong domination by elastic deformations over flow. This can be regarded as a deformation-induced fluid-to-rubbery transition. This transition is accompanied by elastic instability, which can lead to the formation of regular structures. So, a general explanation for these effects requires the treatment of viscoelastic liquids beyond critical deformation rates as rubbery media. Behaviouristic modeling of their behaviour is based on a new concept, which considers the medium as consisting of discrete elastic elements. Such a type of modeling introduces a set of discrete rotators settled on a lattice with two modes of elastic interaction. The first of these is their transformation from spherical to ellipsoidal shapes and orientation in an external field. The second is elastic collisions between rotators. Computer calculations have demonstrated that this discrete model correctly describes the observed structural effects, eventually resulting in a “chaos-to-order” transformation. These predictions correspond to real-world experimental data obtained under different modes of deformation. We presume that the developed concept can play a central role in understanding strong nonlinear effects in the rheology of viscoelastic liquids.

  16. Behavioural design: A process for integrating behaviour change and design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cash, Philip; Hartlev, Charlotte Gram; Durazo, Christine Boysen

    2017-01-01

    Nudge, persuasion, and the influencing of human behaviour through design are increasingly important topics in design research and in the wider public consciousness. However, current theoretical approaches to behaviour change have yet to be operationalized this in design process support....... Specifically, there are few empirically grounded processes supporting designers in realising behaviour change projects. In response to this, 20 design projects from a case company are analysed in order to distil a core process for behavioural design. Results show a number of process stages and activities...... associated with project success, pointing to a new perspective on the traditional design process, and allowing designers to integrate key insights from behaviour change theory. Using this foundation we propose the Behavioural Design process....

  17. Strong Coupling Corrections in Quantum Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perarnau-Llobet, M.; Wilming, H.; Riera, A.; Gallego, R.; Eisert, J.

    2018-03-01

    Quantum systems strongly coupled to many-body systems equilibrate to the reduced state of a global thermal state, deviating from the local thermal state of the system as it occurs in the weak-coupling limit. Taking this insight as a starting point, we study the thermodynamics of systems strongly coupled to thermal baths. First, we provide strong-coupling corrections to the second law applicable to general systems in three of its different readings: As a statement of maximal extractable work, on heat dissipation, and bound to the Carnot efficiency. These corrections become relevant for small quantum systems and vanish in first order in the interaction strength. We then move to the question of power of heat engines, obtaining a bound on the power enhancement due to strong coupling. Our results are exemplified on the paradigmatic non-Markovian quantum Brownian motion.

  18. Finding quantum effects in strong classical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegelich, B. Manuel; Labun, Lance; Labun, Ou Z.

    2017-06-01

    The long-standing challenge to describing charged particle dynamics in strong classical electromagnetic fields is how to incorporate classical radiation, classical radiation reaction and quantized photon emission into a consistent unified framework. The current, semiclassical methods to describe the dynamics of quantum particles in strong classical fields also provide the theoretical framework for fundamental questions in gravity and hadron-hadron collisions, including Hawking radiation, cosmological particle production and thermalization of particles created in heavy-ion collisions. However, as we show, these methods break down for highly relativistic particles propagating in strong fields. They must therefore be improved and adapted for the description of laser-plasma experiments that typically involve the acceleration of electrons. Theory developed from quantum electrodynamics, together with dedicated experimental efforts, offer the best controllable context to establish a robust, experimentally validated foundation for the fundamental theory of quantum effects in strong classical potentials.

  19. The Charm and Beauty of Strong Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bennich, Bruno

    2018-01-01

    We briefly review common features and overlapping issues in hadron and flavor physics focussing on continuum QCD approaches to heavy bound states, their mass spectrum and weak decay constants in different strong interaction models.

  20. Atomica ionization by strong coherent radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandi, H.S.; Davidovich, L.

    1979-07-01

    The relation among the three most frequently used non-perturbative methods proposed to study the ionization of atoms by strong electromagnetic fields is established. Their range of validity is also determined. (Author) [pt