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Sample records for strong acidic solutions

  1. Facile preparation of acid-resistant magnetite particles for removal of Sb(?) from strong acidic solution

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dong; Guan, Kaiwen; Bai, Zhiping; Liu, Fuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new facile coating strategy based on the hydrophobicity of methyl groups was developed to prevent nano-sized magnetite particles from strong acid corrosion. In this method, three steps of hydrolysis led to three layers of protection shell coating Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Filled with hydrophobic methyl groups, the middle layer mainly prevented the magnetic core from strong acid corrosion. These magnetite particles managed to resist 1 M HCl solution and 2.5 M H2SO4 solution. The acid res...

  2. Treatment of infectious skin defects or ulcers with electrolyzed strong acid aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, S; Ohmori, K; Harii, K

    1997-01-01

    A chronic ulcer with an infection such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is hard to heal. Plastic and reconstructive surgeons often encounter such chronic ulcers that are resistant to surgical or various conservative treatments. We applied conservative treatment using an electrolyzed strong acid aqueous solution and obtained satisfactory results. The lesion was washed with the solution or soaked in a bowl of the solution for approximately 20 min twice a day. Fresh electrolyzed strong acid aqueous solution is unstable and should be stored in a cool, dark site in a sealed bottle. It should be used within a week after it has been produced. Here we report on 15 cases of infectious ulcers that were treated by electrolyzed strong acid aqueous solution. Of these cases, 7 patients were healed, 3 were granulated, and in 5, infection subsided. In most cases the lesion became less reddish and less edematous. Discharge or foul odor from the lesion was decreased. Electrolyzed strong acid aqueous solution was especially effective for treating a chronic refractory ulcer combined with diabetes melitus or peripheral circulatory insufficiency. This clinically applied therapy of electrolyzed strong acid aqueous solution was found to be effective so that this new therapeutic technique for ulcer treatment can now be conveniently utilized.

  3. Removal and Recovery of Chromium from Solutions Simulating Tannery Wastewater by Strong Acid Cation Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulten Cetin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The process in this study was conducted on removal of chromium(III in a solution simulating a typical spent chrome tanning bath by the resin having matrix of styrene-divinylbenzene-based macroporous sulphonate, Amberjet 1200Na. The column experiments were carried out with the bed volumes of the resin as 751 mL and 1016 mL for different installation systems of the laboratory-scale pilot plant. The feeding solutions in the bed volumes of 200 and 190 were used for each installation system. The regeneration behaviour of the resin was determined by using reverse regeneration procedure with the solution of hydrogen peroxide in alkaline. The regeneration kinetics of the exhausted resin was examined with a range of the solutions having different concentration series of the alkaline hydrogen peroxide. The solutions of the basic chromium sulphate were recycled for each installation system following the regeneration cycles. The chromium ions in effluent were quantitatively eluted, and satisfactory removal of chromium(III and recovery of chromium(VI were achieved.

  4. Removal and Recovery of Chromium from Solutions Simulating Tannery Wastewater by Strong Acid Cation Exchanger

    OpenAIRE

    Cetin, Gulten; Kocaoba, Sevgi; Akcin, Goksel

    2013-01-01

    The process in this study was conducted on removal of chromium(III) in a solution simulating a typical spent chrome tanning bath by the resin having matrix of styrene-divinylbenzene-based macroporous sulphonate, Amberjet 1200Na. The column experiments were carried out with the bed volumes of the resin as 751 mL and 1016 mL for different installation systems of the laboratory-scale pilot plant. The feeding solutions in the bed volumes of 200 and 190 were used for each installation system. The ...

  5. Comparison of the Electrochemical Behavior of Ti and Nanostructured Ti-Coated AISI 304 Stainless Steel in Strongly Acidic Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attarzadeh, Farid Reza; Elmkhah, Hassan; Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the electrochemical behaviors of pure titanium (Ti) and nanostructured (NS) Ti-coated AISI 304 stainless steel (SS) in strongly acidic solutions of H2SO4 were investigated and compared. A type of physical vapor deposition method, cathodic arc evaporation, was applied to deposit NS Ti on 304 SS. Scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize surface coating morphology. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and Mott-Schottky (M-S) analysis were used to evaluate the passive behavior of the samples. Electrochemical measurements revealed that the passive behavior of NS Ti coating was better than that of pure Ti in 0.1 and 0.01 M H2SO4 solutions. M-S analysis indicated that the passive films behaved as n-type semiconductors in H2SO4 solutions and the deposition method did not affect the semiconducting type of passive films formed on the coated samples. In addition, this analysis showed that the NS Ti coating had lower donor densities. Finally, all electrochemical tests showed that the passive behavior of the Ti-coated samples was superior, mainly due to the formation of thicker, yet less defective passive films.

  6. The pH of very dilute solutions of strong acids – a calculation for a medical or biomedical class involving the application of simple numerical skills

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Michael Barling

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the solution to a calculationof the pH of a very dilute solution of a strong acid orbase, taking into account the effect of the hydroniumor hydroxyl ions generated from the ionisation of thestrong acid or base on the ionisation of water, as asecond very weak acid. To be solved successfully, thiscalculation involves the concepts of conservation ofcharge, pH and the application of the general solutionto a quadratic equation. Such an exercise involves theapplication of skills...

  7. Strongly nonlinear oscillators analytical solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Cveticanin, Livija

    2014-01-01

    This book provides the presentation of the motion of pure nonlinear oscillatory systems and various solution procedures which give the approximate solutions of the strong nonlinear oscillator equations. The book presents the original author’s method for the analytical solution procedure of the pure nonlinear oscillator system. After an introduction, the physical explanation of the pure nonlinearity and of the pure nonlinear oscillator is given. The analytical solution for free and forced vibrations of the one-degree-of-freedom strong nonlinear system with constant and time variable parameter is considered. Special attention is given to the one and two mass oscillatory systems with two-degrees-of-freedom. The criteria for the deterministic chaos in ideal and non-ideal pure nonlinear oscillators are derived analytically. The method for suppressing chaos is developed. Important problems are discussed in didactic exercises. The book is self-consistent and suitable as a textbook for students and also for profess...

  8. Fluorinated antimony(v) derivatives: strong Lewis acidic properties and application to the complexation of formaldehyde in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofan, Daniel; Gabbaï, François P

    2016-11-01

    As part of our ongoing studies of water tolerant Lewis acids, we have synthesized and investigated the properties of Sb(C 6 F 5 ) 3 (O 2 C 6 Cl 4 ), a fluorinated stiborane whose Lewis acidity approaches that of B(C 6 F 5 ) 3 . While chloroform solutions of this Lewis acid can be kept open to air or exposed to water for extended periods of time, this new Lewis acid reacts with P t Bu 3 and paraformaldehyde to form the corresponding formaldehyde adduct t Bu 3 P-CH 2 -O-Sb(C 6 F 5 ) 3 (O 2 C 6 Cl 4 ). To test if this reactivity can also be observed with systems that combine the phosphine and the stiborane within the same molecule, we have also prepared o -C 6 H 4 (PPh 2 )(SbAr 2 (O 2 C 6 Cl 4 )) (Ar = Ph, C 6 F 5 ). These yellow compounds, which possess an intramolecular P→Sb interaction, are remarkably inert to water but do, nonetheless, react with and accomodate formaldehyde into the P/Sb pocket. In the case of the fluorinated derivative o -C 6 H 4 (PPh 2 )(Sb(C 6 F 5 ) 2 (O 2 C 6 Cl 4 )), formaldehyde complexation, which occurs in water/dichloromethane biphasic mixtures, is accompanied by a colourimetric turn-off response thus highlighting the potential that this chemistry holds in the domain of molecular sensing.

  9. Graphene-oxide-supported Pt nanoparticles with high activity and stability for hydrazine electro-oxidation in a strong acidic solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Dang; Choi, Myong Yong; Choi, Hyun Chul

    2017-10-01

    Graphene-oxide-supported Pt (GO-Pt) nanoparticles were prepared by performing diimide-activated amidation and used in an electrocatalyst for hydrazine electro-oxidation in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution. The physico-chemical properties of the GO-Pt nanoparticles were characterized with various techniques, which revealed that highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles with an average size of 2.6 nm were densely deposited on the amidated GO due to their strong adhesion. Cyclic voltammograms were obtained and demonstrate that the GO-Pt catalyst exhibits significantly improved catalytic activity and long-term stability in hydrazine electro-oxidation in a strong acidic solution when compared to commercial Pt/C and Pt metal electrodes. These enhanced electrochemical properties are attributed to the large electrochemically active surface area that results from the smaller size and excellent dispersion of the Pt nanoparticles on amidated GO.

  10. Perturbation of an exact strong gravity solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran, S.A.

    1982-10-01

    Perturbations of an exact strong gravity solution are investigated. It is shown, by using the new multipole expansions previously presented, that this exact and static spherically symmetric solution is stable under odd parity perturbations. (author)

  11. Analytical solution of strongly nonlinear Duffing oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    El-Naggar, A.M.; Ismail, G.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new perturbation technique is employed to solve strongly nonlinear Duffing oscillators, in which a new parameter α=α(ε)α=α(ε) is defined such that the value of α is always small regardless of the magnitude of the original parameter εε. Therefore, the strongly nonlinear Duffing oscillators with large parameter ε are transformed into a small parameter system with respect to αα. Approximate solution obtained by the present method is compared with the solution of energy balance m...

  12. Analytical solution of strongly nonlinear Duffing oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. El-Naggar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new perturbation technique is employed to solve strongly nonlinear Duffing oscillators, in which a new parameter α=α(ε is defined such that the value of α is always small regardless of the magnitude of the original parameter ε. Therefore, the strongly nonlinear Duffing oscillators with large parameter ε are transformed into a small parameter system with respect to α. Approximate solution obtained by the present method is compared with the solution of energy balance method, homotopy perturbation method, global error minimization method and lastly numerical solution. We observe from the results that this method is very simple, easy to apply, and gives a very good accuracy not only for small parameter εbut also for large values of ε.

  13. Application of strong phosphoric acid to radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Kikuo

    1977-01-01

    Not only inorganic and organic compounds but also natural substrances, such as accumulations in soil, are completely decomposed and distilled by heating with strong phosphoric acid for 30 to 50 minutes. As applications of strong phosphoric acid to radiochemistry, determination of uranium and boron by use of solubilization effect of this substance, titration of uranyl ion by use of sulfuric iron (II) contained in this substance, application to tracer experiment, and determination of radioactive ruthenium in environmental samples are reviewed. Strong phosphoric acid is also applied to activation analysis, for example, determination of N in pyrographite with iodate potassium-strong phosphoric acid method, separation of Os and Ru with sulfuric cerium (IV) - strong phosphoric acid method or potassium dechromate-strong phosphoric acid method, analysis of Se, As and Sb rocks and accumulations with ammonium bromide, sodium chloride and sodium bromide-strong phosphoric acid method. (Kanao, N.)

  14. Perturbation Solutions of the Quintic Duffing Equation with Strong Nonlinearities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Pakdemirli

    Full Text Available The quintic Duffing equation with strong nonlinearities is considered. Perturbation solutions are constructed using two different techniques: The classical multiple scales method (MS and the newly developed multiple scales Lindstedt Poincare method (MSLP. The validity criteria for admissible solutions are derived. Both approximate solutions are contrasted with the numerical solutions. It is found that MSLP provides compatible solution with the numerical solution for strong nonlinearities whereas MS solution fail to produce physically acceptable solution for large perturbation parameters.

  15. Lactic acid polymers: strong, degradable thermoplastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehrenberg, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Copolymers of lactic and glycolic acids are being developed by researchers at Battelle and elsewhere as renewable-resource plastics. Other uses include matrices for controlled release of drugs and pesticides as well as in prosthetic devices. In contrast to conventional plastics, lactic acid polymers are biodegradable, and after several months exposure to moisture, these materials convert back to natural harmless products. The properties of lactic acid polymers are examined.

  16. Weak and strong solutions for differential equations in Banach spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we give a generalization to recent results by using weak and strong measures of noncompactness. For f:[0,T]xE→E with E is a Banach space we prove that, under suitable assumptions, the Cauchy problem (fd((P) (ar((r((c(x(t)=f(t,x(t)),))(c(t/in R: =set membership[0,T],))))(r((c(x(0)=x 0 ,))(c()))))))) has at least one weak solution furthermore, with certain conditions, the Cauchy problem (P) has a solution. Next under a generalization of the compactness assumptions, we show that (P) has a solution too

  17. Iterative solutions of nonlinear equations with strongly accretive or strongly pseudocontractive maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidume, C.E.

    1994-03-01

    Let E be a real q-uniformly smooth Banach space. Suppose T is a strongly pseudo-contractive map with open domain D(T) in E. Suppose further that T has a fixed point in D(T). Under various continuity assumptions on T it is proved that each of the Mann iteration process or the Ishikawa iteration method converges strongly to the unique fixed point of T. Related results deal with iterative solutions of nonlinear operator equations involving strongly accretive maps. Explicit error estimates are also provided. (author). 38 refs

  18. Iterative solution of nonlinear equations with strongly accretive operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidume, C.E.

    1991-10-01

    Let E be a real Banach space with a uniformly convex dual, and let K be a nonempty closed convex and bounded subset of E. Suppose T:K→K is a strongly accretive map such that for each f is an element of K the equation Tx=f has a solution in K. It is proved that each of the two well known fixed point iteration methods (the Mann and Ishikawa iteration methods) converges strongly to a solution of the equation Tx=f. Furthermore, our method shows that such a solution is necessarily unique. Explicit error estimates are given. Our results resolve in the affirmative two open problems (J. Math. Anal. Appl. Vol 151(2) (1990), p. 460) and generalize important known results. (author). 32 refs

  19. Guanidinium Group Remains Protonated in a Strongly Basic Arginine Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bo; Jacobs, Michael I; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid

    2017-06-20

    Knowledge of the acid dissociation constant of an amino acid has very important ramifications in the biochemistry of proteins and lipid bilayers in aqueous environments because charge and proton transfer depend on its value. The acid dissociation constant for the guanidinium group in arginine has historically been posited as 12.5, but there is substantial variation in published values over the years. Recent experiments suggest that the dissociation constant for arginine is much higher than 12.5, which explains why the arginine guanidinium group retains its positive charge under all physiological conditions. In this work, we use X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to study unsupported, aqueous arginine nanoparticles. By varying the pH of the constituent solution, we provide evidence that the guanidinium group is protonated even in a very basic solution. By analyzing the energy shifts in the C and N X-ray photoelectron spectra, we establish a molecular level picture of how charge and proton transport in aqueous solutions of arginine occur. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Approximation for a Coulomb-Volkov solution in strong fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, H. R.; Krainov, V. P.

    1994-08-01

    A simple analytical approximation is found for the wave function of an electron simultaneously exposed to a strong, circularly polarized plane-wave field and an atomic Coulomb potential. The approximation is valid when α0>>1, where α0 is the classical radius of motion of a free electron in the plane-wave field. This constraint is sufficiently mild at low frequencies that it makes possible a major extension of the lower bound of laser intensities for which Volkov-solution-based approximations are useful.

  1. Acetic acid extraction from aqueous solutions using fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJmker, H.M.; Gramblicka, M.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; Schuur, Boelo

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge for production of acetic acid via bio-based routes is cost-effective concentration and purification of the acetic acid from the aqueous solutions, for which liquid–liquid extraction is a possible method. A main challenge in extraction of acetic acid from dilute aqueous solutions is

  2. Ionisation constants of inorganic acids and bases in aqueous solution

    CERN Document Server

    Perrin, D D

    2013-01-01

    Ionisation Constants of Inorganic Acids and Bases in Aqueous Solution, Second Edition provides a compilation of tables that summarize relevant data recorded in the literature up to the end of 1980 for the ionization constants of inorganic acids and bases in aqueous solution. This book includes references to acidity functions for strong acids and bases, as well as details about the formation of polynuclear species. This text then explains the details of each column of the tables, wherein column 1 gives the name of the substance and the negative logarithm of the ionization constant and column 2

  3. Photolysis of Periodate and Periodic Acid in Aqueous Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Knud; Kläning, U. K.

    1978-01-01

    The photochemistry of periodate and periodic acid in aqueous solution was studied (i) by quantum yield measurements at low light intensity (ii) by flash photolysis, and (iii) by photolysis of glassy samples at 77 K. The photochemical studies were supplemented with pulse radiolysis studies...... of aqueous periodate solutions and with kinetic studies using stopped-flow technique. In strongly alkaline solution the photodecomposition of periodate proceeds via formation of O– and IVI. At pH

  4. Corrosion control of vanadium in aqueous solutions by amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Rabiee, M.M.; Helal, N.H.; El-Hafez, Gh.M. Abd; Badawy, W.A.

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of vanadium in amino acid free and amino acid containing aqueous solutions of different pH was studied using open-circuit potential measurements, polarization techniques and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The corrosion current density, i corr , the corrosion potential, E corr and the corrosion resistance, R corr , were calculated. A group of amino acids, namely, glycine, alanine, valine, histidine, glutamic and cysteine has been investigated as environmentally safe inhibitors. The effect of Cl - on the corrosion inhibition efficiency especially in acid solutions was investigated. In neutral and basic solutions, the presence of amino acids increases the corrosion resistance of the metal. The electrochemical behavior of V before and after the corrosion inhibition process has shown that some amino acids like glutamic acid and histidine have promising corrosion inhibition efficiency at low concentration (≅25 mM). The inhibition efficiency (η) was found to depend on the structure of the amino acid and the constituents of the corrosive medium. The corrosion inhibition process is based on the adsorption of the amino acid molecules on the metal surface and the adsorption process follows the Freundlich isotherm. The adsorption free energy for valine on V in acidic solutions was found to be -9.4 kJ/mol which reveals strong physical adsorption of the amino acid molecules on the vanadium surface

  5. How strong are strong poly(sulfonic acids)? An example of the poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gospodinova, Natalia; Tomšík, Elena; Omelchenko, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 74, January (2016), s. 130-135 ISSN 0014-3057 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-14791S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polyelectrolytes * strong poly(acids) * proton conductors Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.531, year: 2016

  6. Strong solutions of semilinear stochastic partial differential equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofmanová, Martina

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2013), s. 757-778 ISSN 1021-9722 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP201/10/0752 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : stochastic partial differential equations * strongly elliptic differential operator * strongly continuous semigroup Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.971, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/SI/hofmanova-0393085.pdf

  7. NIR spectroscopic properties of aqueous acids solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; Atan, Hanafi; Matjafri, Mohd Zubir

    2012-06-15

    Acid content is one of the important quality attributes in determining the maturity index of agricultural product, particularly fruits. Despite the fact that much research on the measurement of acidity in fruits through non-destructive spectroscopy analysis at NIR wavelengths between 700 to 1,000 nm has been conducted, the same response towards individual acids is not well known. This paper presents NIR spectroscopy analysis on aqueous citric, tartaric, malic and oxalic solutions through quantitative analysis by selecting a set of wavelengths that can best be used to measure the pH of the solutions. The aquaphotomics study of the acid solutions has generated R² above 0.9 for the measurement of all acids. The most important wavelengths for pH are located at 918-925 nm and 990-996 nm, while at 975 nm for water.

  8. Dielectric loss property of strong acids doped polyaniline (PANi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalia, Rianti; Hafizah, Mas Ayu Elita; Andreas, Manaf, Azwar

    2018-04-01

    In this study, strong acid doped polyaniline (PANi) has been successfully fabricated through the chemical oxidative polymerization process with various polymerization times. Nonconducting PANi resulting from the polymerization process at various polymerization times were then doped by a strong acid HClO4 to generate dielectric properties. Ammonium Persulfate (APS) as an initiator was used during Polymerization process to develop dark green precipitates which then called Emeraldine Base Polyaniline (PANi-EB). The PANi-EB was successively doped by strong acid HClO4 with dopant and PANi ratio 10:1 to enhance the electrical conductivity. The conductivity of doped PANi was evaluated by Four Point Probe. Results of evaluation showed that the conductivity values of HClO4 doped PANi were in the range 337-363 mS/cm. The dielectric properties of doped PANi were evaluated by Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) which suggested that an increase in the permittivity value in the conducting PANi. It is concluded that PANi could be a potential candidate for electromagnetic waves absorbing materials.

  9. Moderately strong pump-induced ultrafast dynamics in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, H.F. [Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Zhang, Yizhu, E-mail: zhangyz@sari.ac.cn [Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Yan, T.-M., E-mail: yantm@sari.ac.cn [Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Wang, Z.Y. [Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University (China); Jiang, Y.H., E-mail: jiangyh@sari.ac.cn [Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University (China)

    2016-09-12

    Graphical abstract: Moderately strong pump pulse is applied to the transient absorption spectrum. The pump and dump processes (resonant impulsive stimulated Raman scattering) finished in one single pump pulse in moderately strong regime make the observation of high-lying excited state dynamics possible. - Highlights: • The pulse intensity in transient absorption spectrum are experimentally studied. • The higher nonlinear susceptibility responses are observed. • The resonant impulsive stimulated Raman scattering. • New dynamics information in strong pump field. - Abstract: The transient transmittance spectra of laser dye IR144 in methanol were investigated experimentally in the moderately strong pump-probe field. Observed emission spectra in the red edge of the incident-field bandwidth, created by resonant impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (RISRS), display significant nonlinear intensity dependence as the pulse intensity increases. Dynamic perspectives of RISRS spectra can be understood well in a wavepacket picture. The excitation of high vibrational levels in the ground electronic state leading to the redshift of emissions presents high dependence of the pump-pulse intensity and ultrafast dynamical features, mapping the spatial overlap and separation of ground and excited wave functions and resolving the ultrafast vibrational relaxation in the femtosecond regime.

  10. Strong Feller solutions to SPDEďs are strong Feller in the weak topology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maslowski, Bohdan; Seidler, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 148, č. 2 (2001), s. 111-129 ISSN 0039-3223 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/98/1454 Keywords : strong Feller property% stochastic parabolic equations Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.399, year: 2001

  11. On the Strong Solution for the 3D Stochastic Leray-Alpha Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Deugoue

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove the existence and uniqueness of strong solution to the stochastic Leray-α equations under appropriate conditions on the data. This is achieved by means of the Galerkin approximation scheme. We also study the asymptotic behaviour of the strong solution as alpha goes to zero. We show that a sequence of strong solutions converges in appropriate topologies to weak solutions of the 3D stochastic Navier-Stokes equations.

  12. On the Strong Solution for the 3D Stochastic Leray-Alpha Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deugoue Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We prove the existence and uniqueness of strong solution to the stochastic Leray- equations under appropriate conditions on the data. This is achieved by means of the Galerkin approximation scheme. We also study the asymptotic behaviour of the strong solution as alpha goes to zero. We show that a sequence of strong solutions converges in appropriate topologies to weak solutions of the 3D stochastic Navier-Stokes equations.

  13. Big, strong, neutral, twisted, and chiral π acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingjie; Huang, Guangxi; Besnard, Celine; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2015-04-13

    General synthetic access to expanded π-acidic surfaces of variable size, topology, chirality, and π acidity is reported. The availability of π surfaces with these characteristics is essential to develop the functional relevance of anion-π interactions with regard to molecular recognition, translocation, and transformation. The problem is that, with expanded π surfaces, the impact of electron-withdrawing substituents decreases and the high π acidity needed for strong anion-π interactions can be more difficult to obtain. To overcome this problem, it is herein proposed to build large surfaces from smaller fragments and connect these fragments with bridges that are composed only of single atoms. Two central surfaces for powerful anion-π interactions, namely, perfluoroarenes and naphthalenediimides (NDIs), were selected as fragments and coupled with through sulfide bridges. Their oxidation to sulfoxides and sulfones, as well as fluorine substitution in the peripheral rings, provides access to the full chemical space of relevant π acidities. According to cyclic voltammetry, LUMO levels range from -3.96 to -4.72 eV. With sulfoxide bridges, stereogenic centers are introduced to further enrich the intrinsic planar chirality of the expanded surfaces. The stereoisomers were separated by chiral HPLC and characterized by X-ray crystallography. Their topologies range from chairs to π boats, and the latter are reminiscent of the cation-π boxes in operational neuronal receptors. With pentafluorophenyl acceptors, the π acidity of NDIs with two sulfoxide groups in the core reaches -4.45 eV, whereas two sulfone moieties give a value of -4.72 eV, which is as low as with four ethyl sulfone groups, that is, a π superacid near the limit of existence. Beyond anion-π interactions, these conceptually innovative π-acidic surfaces are also of interest as electron transporters in conductive materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Investigation of methanol oxidation on unsupported platinum electrodes in strong alkali and strong acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhuram, J.; Manoharan, R.

    Porous unsupported electrodes are made from platinum powder prepared by a room-temperature NaBH 4 reduction method. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) are recorded in different electrolytes of high and low pH in the presence and the absence of different concentrations of methanol. Various electrochemical processes occurring in different potential regions of the CVs are discussed. Steady-state galvanostatic polarisation measurements for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) on these electrodes in different electrolyte/methanol mixtures are also carried out. The MOR performance increases from a highly acidic range to a highly alkaline range. On increasing the KOH concentration above 6 M, however, the activity declines. Also, the MOR performance changes on changing the methanol concentration in a solution of a given pH. The highest MOR activity is obtained in a 6 M KOH+6 M CH 3OH mixture. It is concluded that by choosing the proper ratio of OH - ions and CH 3OH in solution, it is possible to remove completely the intermediate organic species and/or poisonous species that retard the MOR rate on the electrode surface.

  15. Uranium recovery process in phosphoric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginisty, Claude; Marteau, Michel; Mauborgne, Bernard.

    1982-01-01

    The description is given of a process for recovering uranium in a phosphoric acid solution by means of an organic solvent composed of a neutral phosphine oxide and an acid organophosphorated compound to the formulation R'R'' HPO 4 where R' and R'' which are identical or different, represent a linear or branched alkoxyalkyl radical comprising at least one -CH 2 -O-CH 2 - grouping or an aryloxyalkyl radical [fr

  16. Blood gas analysis, anion gap, and strong ion difference in horses treated with polyethylene glycol balanced solution (PEG 3350 or enteral and parenteral electrolyte solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Luís Nina Gomes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Large volumes of different electrolytes solutions are commonly used for ingesta hydration in horses with large colon impaction, but little is known about their consequences to blood acid-base balance. To evaluate the effects of PEG 3350 or enteral and parenteral electrolyte solutions on the blood gas analysis, anion gap and strong ion difference, five adult female horses were used in a 5x5 latin square design. The animals were divided in five groups and distributed to each of the following treatments: NaCl (0.9% sodium chloride solution; EES (enteral electrolyte solution, EES+LR (EES plus lactated Ringer's solution; PEG (balanced solution with PEG 3350 and PEG+LR (PEG plus lactated Ringer's solution. Treatments PEG or PEG + LR did not change or promoted minimal changes, while the EES caused a slight decrease in pH, but its association with lactated Ringer's solution induced increase in AG and SID values, as well as caused hypernatremia. In turn, the treatment NaCl generated metabolic acidosis. PEG 3350 did not alter the acid-base balance. Despite it's slight acidifying effect, the enteral electrolyte solution (EES did not cause clinically relevant changes.

  17. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…

  18. Extraction of uranium: comparison of stripping with ammonia vs. strong acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldovan, B.; Grinbaum, B.; Efraim, A.

    2008-01-01

    Following extraction of uranium in the first stage of solvent extraction using a tertiary amine, typically Alamine 336, the stripping of the extracted uranium is accomplished either by use of an aqueous solution of (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 /NH 4 OH or by strong-acid stripping using 400-500 g/L H 2 SO 4 . Both processes have their merits and determine the downstream processing. The classical stripping with ammonia is followed by addition of strong base, to precipitate ammonium uranyl sulfate (NH 4 ) 2 UO 2 (SO 4 ) 2 , which yields finally the yellow cake. Conversely, stripping with H 2 SO 4 , followed by oxidation with hydrogen peroxide yields uranyl oxide as product. At the Cameco Key Lake operation, both processes were tested on a pilot scale, using a Bateman Pulsed Column (BPC). The BPC proved to be applicable to both processes. It met the process criteria both for extraction and stripping, leaving less than 1 mg/L of U 3 O 8 in the raffinate, and product solution had the required concentration of U 3 O 8 at high flux and reasonable height of transfer unit. In the Key Lake mill, each operation can be carried out in a single column. The main advantages of the strong-acid stripping over ammonia stripping are: (1) 60% higher flux in the extraction, (2) tenfold higher concentration of the uranium in the product solution, and (3) far more robust process, with no need of pH control in the stripping and no need to add acid to the extraction in order to keep the pH above the point of precipitation of iron compounds. The advantages of the ammoniacal process are easier stripping, that is, less stages needed to reach equilibrium and lower concentration of modifier needed to prevent the creation of a third phase. (authors)

  19. Carbon-based strong solid acid for cornstarch hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nata, Iryanti Fatyasari, E-mail: yanti_tkunlam@yahoo.com [Chemical Engineering Study Program, Faculty of Engineering, Lambung Mangkurat University, Jl. A. Yani Km. 36 Banjarbaru, South Kalimantan 70714 (Indonesia); Irawan, Chairul; Mardina, Primata [Chemical Engineering Study Program, Faculty of Engineering, Lambung Mangkurat University, Jl. A. Yani Km. 36 Banjarbaru, South Kalimantan 70714 (Indonesia); Lee, Cheng-Kang, E-mail: cklee@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 43 Keelung Rd. Sec.4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highly sulfonated carbonaceous spheres with diameter of 100–500 nm can be generated by hydrothermal carbonization of glucose in the presence of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid and acrylic acid at 180 °C for 4 h. The acidity of the prepared carbonaceous sphere C4-SO{sub 3}H can reach 2.10 mmol/g. It was used as a solid acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of cornstarch. Total reducing sugar (TRS) concentration of 19.91 mg/mL could be obtained by hydrolyzing 20 mg/mL cornstarch at 150 °C for 6 h using C4-SO{sub 3}H as solid acid catalyst. The solid acid catalyst demonstrated good stability that only 9% decrease in TRS concentration was observed after five repeat uses. The as-prepared carbon-based solid acid catalyst can be an environmentally benign replacement for homogeneous catalyst. - Highlights: • Carbon solid acid was successfully prepared by one-step hydrothermal carbonization. • The acrylic acid as monomer was effectively reduce the diameter size of particle. • The solid acid catalyst show good catalytic performance of starch hydrolysis. • The solid acid catalyst is not significantly deteriorated after repeated use.

  20. Carbon-based strong solid acid for cornstarch hydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nata, Iryanti Fatyasari; Irawan, Chairul; Mardina, Primata; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Highly sulfonated carbonaceous spheres with diameter of 100–500 nm can be generated by hydrothermal carbonization of glucose in the presence of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid and acrylic acid at 180 °C for 4 h. The acidity of the prepared carbonaceous sphere C4-SO 3 H can reach 2.10 mmol/g. It was used as a solid acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of cornstarch. Total reducing sugar (TRS) concentration of 19.91 mg/mL could be obtained by hydrolyzing 20 mg/mL cornstarch at 150 °C for 6 h using C4-SO 3 H as solid acid catalyst. The solid acid catalyst demonstrated good stability that only 9% decrease in TRS concentration was observed after five repeat uses. The as-prepared carbon-based solid acid catalyst can be an environmentally benign replacement for homogeneous catalyst. - Highlights: • Carbon solid acid was successfully prepared by one-step hydrothermal carbonization. • The acrylic acid as monomer was effectively reduce the diameter size of particle. • The solid acid catalyst show good catalytic performance of starch hydrolysis. • The solid acid catalyst is not significantly deteriorated after repeated use

  1. Carbon-based strong solid acid for cornstarch hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nata, Iryanti Fatyasari; Irawan, Chairul; Mardina, Primata; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2015-10-01

    Highly sulfonated carbonaceous spheres with diameter of 100-500 nm can be generated by hydrothermal carbonization of glucose in the presence of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid and acrylic acid at 180 °C for 4 h. The acidity of the prepared carbonaceous sphere C4-SO3H can reach 2.10 mmol/g. It was used as a solid acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of cornstarch. Total reducing sugar (TRS) concentration of 19.91 mg/mL could be obtained by hydrolyzing 20 mg/mL cornstarch at 150 °C for 6 h using C4-SO3H as solid acid catalyst. The solid acid catalyst demonstrated good stability that only 9% decrease in TRS concentration was observed after five repeat uses. The as-prepared carbon-based solid acid catalyst can be an environmentally benign replacement for homogeneous catalyst.

  2. Simultaneous estimation of a binary mixture of a weak acid and a strong acid by volumetric titration and pH measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmakar, Sanat; Mallika, C.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2012-01-01

    High level liquid waste (HLLW) generated in the aqueous reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels for the separation of uranium and plutonium by PUREX process, comprises the fission and corrosion products in 4 M nitric acid. Reduction in waste volume is accomplished by destroying the acidity of the waste solution from 4 to less than 2 M by treating it with formaldehyde and subsequent concentration by evaporation. In the denitration by HCHO, nitric acid in the waste solution is reduced to NOx and water via nitrous acid as the intermediate product: whereas formaldehyde is oxidized to formic acid which is converted to CO 2 and H 2 O subsequently. The reaction is highly exothermic and the release of all gaseous products may lead to uncontrollable process conditions. Hence, for the safe operation, it is desirable to estimate the concentration of residual formic acid as well as nitric acid in the product stream as a function of time. The acidity in the feed solution is 4 M and the concentration of HNO 3 in the product solution is in the range 1- 4 M. Since the formic acid generated during the reaction will be consumed immediately, the concentration of residual acid will be in the range 0.05-0.5 M. A simultaneous titration method based on pH measurement and volumetric analysis has been developed in the present work for the quantitative determination of the weak acid (HCOOH)with known pKa value and the strong acid (HNO 3 ) in the binary mixture

  3. Determination of Wastewater Acids from Chromium Plating and Electropolishing Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sopok, Samuel

    1995-01-01

    ... Laboratories vessel plating program. The chemical literature provides offline laboratory detection of chromic acid from chromium plating wastewater solutions, as well as phosphoric and sulfuric acids from electropolishing wastewater solutions...

  4. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 ± 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO 4 at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO 2 F 2 . Studies on the effect of added LiNO 3 or Na 2 WO 4 ·2H 2 O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF 6 content of WF 6 gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF 6

  5. Corrosion inhibition of aqueous solutions of inorganic mineral acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanford, J.R.

    1971-06-15

    A particularly corrosive use of mineral acids is the employment of 15% solutions and, in some instances, even more concentrated solutions of hydrochloric acid in oil well acidizing applications. It has been found that aqueous solutions of inorganic mineral acids, particularly hydrochloric acid solutions, may be inhibited against their corrosive tendencies toward ferrous metals by adding novel compositions of the invention whereby inhibited mineral acid aqueous solutions are provided. In its simplest embodiment the invention comprises using in combination the Mannich reaction products of a hydroabietyl amine, formaldehyde, and certain aliphatic aldehydes in combination with an acetylenic alcohol which contains from 3 to 12 carbon atoms. (7 claims)

  6. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-06

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 4 figs.

  7. Synthesis of novel carbon/silica composites based strong acid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hydrophobic acid-catalyzed reactions proceed in poor or with no catalytic activity (Nakajima et al 2009). The novel car- bon/silica composites based solid acid was synthesized for the purpose. However, the new method added the step of impregnating sucrose to the channels of SBA-15, which fur- ther added to the cost for ...

  8. Containment of Nitric Acid Solutions of Plutonium-238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Silver, G.L.; Pansoy-Hjelvik, L.; Ramsey, K.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion of various metals that could be used to contain nitric acid solutions of Pu-238 has been studied. Tantalum and tantalum/2.5% tungsten resisted the test solvent better than 304L stainless steel and several INCONEL alloys. The solvent used to imitate nitric acid solutions of Pu-238 contained 70% nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid, and ammonium hexanitratocerate

  9. Investigations on the oxidation of nitric acid plutonium solutions with ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, M.

    1983-01-01

    The reaction of ozone with nitric acid Pu solutions was studied as a function of reaction time, acid concentration and Pu concentration. Strong nitric acid Pu solutions are important in nuclear fuel element production and reprocessing. The Pu must be converted into hexavalent Pu before precipitation from the homogeneous solution together with uranium-IV, ammonia and CO 2 in the form of ammonium uranyl/plutonyl carbonate (AUPuC). Formation of a solid phase during ozonation was observed for the first time. The proneness to solidification increases with incrasing plutonium concentrations and with decreasing acid concentrations. If the formation of a solid phase during ozonation of nitric acid Pu solutions cannot be prevented, the PU-IV oxidation process described is unsuitable for industrial purposes as Pu solutions in industrial processes have much higher concentrations than the solutions used in the present investigation. (orig./EF) [de

  10. Polyaniline: Aniline oxidation with strong and weak oxidants under various acidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bláha, Michal, E-mail: blaha@imc.cas.cz [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Trchová, Miroslava; Bober, Patrycja; Morávková, Zuzana [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Prokeš, Jan [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Stejskal, Jaroslav [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2017-06-15

    Aniline was oxidized with three strong inorganic oxidants (ammonium peroxydisulfate, cerium(IV) sulfate, potassium dichromate), two weak inorganic oxidants (iron(III) chloride, silver nitrate), and one organic oxidant (p-benzoquinone) in aqueous solutions of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) of various concentration. Whereas oxidation of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate yielded high-molecular-weight conducting polyaniline (PANI) in the whole acidity range, the oxidation with cerium(IV) sulfate led also to a single product close to PANI with considerably lower molecular weight and lower conductivity. Potassium dichromate gave PANI only at high concentration of MSA. The use of iron(III) chloride yielded composite mixtures of PANI and low-molecular-weight aniline oligomers. The oxidation of aniline with silver nitrate led to composites of silver and an organic part, which was constituted either by aniline oligomers or conducting polyaniline or both. p-Benzoquinone as oxidant produced mainly aniline oligomers with poor conductivity and 2,5-dianilino-p-benzoquinone-like structure detected in FTIR and Raman spectra when oxidation proceeded with weak oxidants. A general model of oxidation with strong and weak oxidants was formulated. - Highlights: • Comparison of aniline oxidation with oxidants of different redox potential. • UV–vis, FTIR and Raman spectroscopies combined with size-exclusion chromatography. • The contents of polymer and oligomers were analyzed and discussed. • General model of aniline oxidation with strong and weak oxidants was formulated.

  11. Process for denitrating waste solutions containing nitric acid actinides simultaneously separating the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gompper, K.

    1984-01-01

    The invention should reduce the acid and nitrate content of waste solutions containing nitric acid as much as possible, should reduce the total salt content of the waste solution, remove the actinides contained in it by precipitation and reduce the α radio-activity in the remaining solution, without having to worry about strong reactions or an increase in the volume of the waste solution. The invention achieves this by mixing the waste solution with diethyl oxalate at room temperature and heating the mixture to at least 80 0 C. (orig.) [de

  12. Description of the magnetic properties of strongly correlated disordered solid solutions in the coherent potential approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotin, M. A.; Skorikov, N. A.

    2015-06-01

    A method for electronic structure calculations of strongly correlated materials based on the coherent potential approximation is formulated and implemented. Method is applied for investigation of the electronic structure and local magnetic moments of the strongly correlated systems with d- and f-electrons: NiO-ZnO solid solution, nonstoichiometric perovskite LaMnO3-x, doped compound TiO2:Fe, and rare-earth transition-metal intermetallic compound GdNi2:Mn.

  13. Communication: Strong laser alignment of solvent-solute aggregates in the gas-phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippel, Sebastian; Wiese, Joss; Mullins, Terry; Küpper, Jochen

    2018-03-01

    Strong quasi-adiabatic laser alignment of the indole-water-dimer clusters, an amino-acid chromophore bound to a single water molecule through a hydrogen bond, was experimentally realized. The alignment was visualized through ion and electron imaging following strong-field ionization. Molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions showed a clear suppression of the electron yield in the plane of the ionizing laser's polarization, which was analyzed as strong alignment of the molecular cluster with ⟨cos2 θ2D⟩ ≥ 0.9.

  14. Catalytic Deprotection of Acetals In Strongly Basic Solution Usinga Self-Assembled Supramolecular 'Nanozyme'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-07-26

    Acetals are among the most commonly used protecting groups for aldehydes and ketones in organic synthesis due to their ease of installation and resistance to cleavage in neutral or basic solution.[1] The common methods for hydrolyzing acetals almost always involve the use of either Broensted acid or Lewis acid catalysts.[2] Usually aqueous acids or organic solutions acidified with organic or inorganic acids have been used for reconversion of the acetal functionality to the corresponding carbonyl group; however, recently a number of reports have documented a variety of strategies for acetal cleavage under mild conditions. These include the use of Lewis acids such as bismuth(III)[3] or cerium(IV),[4, 5] functionalized silica gel, such as silica sulfuric acid[6] or silica-supported pyridinium p-toluene sulfonate,[7] or the use of silicon-based reagents such as TESOTf-2,6-Lutidine.[8] Despite these mild reagents, all of the above conditions require either added acid or overall acidic media. Marko and co-workers recently reported the first example of acetal deprotection under mildly basic conditions using catalytic cerium ammonium nitrate at pH 8 in a water-acetonitrile solution.[5] Also recently, Rao and co-workers described a purely aqueous system at neutral pH for the deprotection of acetals using {beta}-cyclodextrin as the catalyst.[9] Herein, we report the hydrolysis of acetals in strongly basic aqueous solution using a self-assembled supramolecular host as the catalyst. During the last decade, we have used metal-ligand interactions for the formation of well-defined supramolecular assemblies with the stoichiometry M{sub 4}L{sub 6}6 (M = Ga{sup III} (1 refers to K{sub 12}[Ga{sub 4}L{sub 6}]), Al{sup III}, In{sup III}, Fe{sup III}, Ti{sup IV}, or Ge{sup IV}, L = N,N{prime}-bis(2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl)-1,5-diaminonaphthalene) (Figure 1).[10] The metal ions occupy the vertices of the tetrahedron and the bisbidentate catecholamide ligands span the edges. The strong

  15. A novel nucleic acid analogue shows strong angiogenic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Ikuko, E-mail: tukamoto@med.kagawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Pharmaco-Bio-Informatics, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, 1750-1 Ikenobe, Miki, Kita, Kagawa 761-0793 (Japan); Sakakibara, Norikazu; Maruyama, Tokumi [Kagawa School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, 1314-1 Shido, Sanuki, Kagawa 769-2193 (Japan); Igarashi, Junsuke; Kosaka, Hiroaki [Department of Cardiovascular Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, 1750-1 Ikenobe, Miki, Kita, Kagawa 761-0793 (Japan); Kubota, Yasuo [Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, 1750-1 Ikenobe, Miki, Kita, Kagawa 761-0793 (Japan); Tokuda, Masaaki [Department of Cell Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, 1750-1 Ikenobe, Miki, Kita, Kagawa 761-0793 (Japan); Ashino, Hiromi [The Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 1-6 Kamikitazawa2-chome, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Hattori, Kenichi; Tanaka, Shinji; Kawata, Mitsuhiro [Teikoku Seiyaku Co., Ltd., Sanbonmatsu, Higashikagawa, Kagawa 769-2695 (Japan); Konishi, Ryoji [Department of Pharmaco-Bio-Informatics, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, 1750-1 Ikenobe, Miki, Kita, Kagawa 761-0793 (Japan)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} A novel nucleic acid analogue (2Cl-C.OXT-A, m.w. 284) showed angiogenic potency. {yields} It stimulated the tube formation, proliferation and migration of HUVEC in vitro. {yields} 2Cl-C.OXT-A induced the activation of ERK1/2 and MEK in HUVEC. {yields} Angiogenic potency in vivo was confirmed in CAM assay and rabbit cornea assay. {yields} A synthesized small angiogenic agent would have great clinical therapeutic value. -- Abstract: A novel nucleic acid analogue (2Cl-C.OXT-A) significantly stimulated tube formation of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). Its maximum potency at 100 {mu}M was stronger than that of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a positive control. At this concentration, 2Cl-C.OXT-A moderately stimulated proliferation as well as migration of HUVEC. To gain mechanistic insights how 2Cl-C.OXT-A promotes angiogenic responses in HUVEC, we performed immunoblot analyses using phospho-specific antibodies as probes. 2Cl-C.OXT-A induced robust phosphorylation/activation of MAP kinase ERK1/2 and an upstream MAP kinase kinase MEK. Conversely, a MEK inhibitor PD98059 abolished ERK1/2 activation and tube formation both enhanced by 2Cl-C.OXT-A. In contrast, MAP kinase responses elicited by 2Cl-C.OXT-A were not inhibited by SU5416, a specific inhibitor of VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase. Collectively these results suggest that 2Cl-C.OXT-A-induces angiogenic responses in HUVEC mediated by a MAP kinase cascade comprising MEK and ERK1/2, but independently of VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase. In vivo assay using chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and rabbit cornea also suggested the angiogenic potency of 2Cl-C.OXT-A.

  16. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Reserpine Adsorption onto Strong Acidic Cationic Exchange Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhanjing; Liu, Xiongmin; Huang, Hongmiao

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption process of reserpine adsorbed onto the strong acidic cationic exchange fiber (SACEF) were studied by batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption capacity strongly depended on pH values, and the optimum reserpine adsorption onto the SACEF occurred at pH = 5 of reserpine solution. With the increase of temperature and initial concentration, the adsorption capacity increased. The equilibrium was attained within 20 mins. The adsorption process could be better described by the pseudo-second-order model and the Freundlich isotherm model. The calculated activation energy Ea was 4.35 kJ/mol. And the thermodynamic parameters were: 4.97thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that the adsorption was an endothermic, spontaneous and feasible process of physisorption within the temperature range between 283 K and 323 K and the initial concentration range between 100 mg/L and 300 mg/L. All the results showed that the SACEF had a good adsorption performance for the adsorption of reserpine from alcoholic solution. PMID:26422265

  17. Aqueous interactions of zeolitic material in acidic and basic solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Polatoğlu, İlker; Çakıcıoğlu Özkan, Seher Fehime

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous interactions of natural zeolitic material in as-received and modified forms were studied. The zeolitic materials was interacted with acidic (hydrochloric acid, lactic acid, acetic acid) and basic (sodium hydroxide) solutions. Ion exchange, adsorption, complex formation, precipitation and cation hydrolysis were possible interaction mechanisms affected by the amount and cation content of zeolite and pH. The dominant mechanisms seemed to be ion exchange and adsorption in HCl solution whe...

  18. Radiation protection by ascorbic acid in sodium alginate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliste, A.J.; Mastro, N.L. Del

    2004-01-01

    Alginates are gelling hydrocolloids extracted from brown seaweed used widely in the nourishing and pharmaceutical industries. As alginic acid gellification retard food entrance in the stomach alginate is an additive used in diets. The objective of this work was to study the protective action of the ascorbic acid in alginate solutions against the action of 60 Co gamma radiation. One % (w/v) solutions of alginate had been used and concentrations of ascorbic acid varied from 0 to 2.5% (w/v). The solutions were irradiated with doses up to 10 kGy. Viscosity/dose relationship and the p H of the solutions at 25 Centigrade were determined. Ascorbic acid behaved as an antioxidant against radiation oxidative shock in this model system of an irradiated viscous solution. Besides its radiation protective role on alginate solutions ascorbic acid promoted a viscosity increase in the range of concentrations employed. (Author)

  19. Radiation protection by ascorbic acid in sodium alginate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliste, A.J.; Mastro, N.L. Del [Center of Radiation Technology, IPEN/CNEN/SP, University City, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: ajaliste@ipen.br

    2004-07-01

    Alginates are gelling hydrocolloids extracted from brown seaweed used widely in the nourishing and pharmaceutical industries. As alginic acid gellification retard food entrance in the stomach alginate is an additive used in diets. The objective of this work was to study the protective action of the ascorbic acid in alginate solutions against the action of {sup 60} Co gamma radiation. One % (w/v) solutions of alginate had been used and concentrations of ascorbic acid varied from 0 to 2.5% (w/v). The solutions were irradiated with doses up to 10 kGy. Viscosity/dose relationship and the p H of the solutions at 25 Centigrade were determined. Ascorbic acid behaved as an antioxidant against radiation oxidative shock in this model system of an irradiated viscous solution. Besides its radiation protective role on alginate solutions ascorbic acid promoted a viscosity increase in the range of concentrations employed. (Author)

  20. Solutions to the strong-CP problem in a world with gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, R.; Watkins, R.; Widrow, L.M.; Toronto Univ., ON

    1992-01-01

    We examine various solutions of the strong-CP problem to determine their sensitivity to possible violations of global symmetries by Plauck scale physics. While some solutions remain viable even in the face of such effects. Violations of the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry by non-renormalizable operators of dimension less than 10 will generally shift the value of bar θ to values inconsistent with the experimental bound bar θ approx-lt 10 - 9. We show that it is possible to construct axion models where gauge symmetries protect PQ symmetry to the requisite level

  1. Online Automatic Titration of Chromic Acid in Chromium Plating Solutions and Phosphoric and Sulfuric Acids in Electropolishing Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sopok, Samuel

    1991-01-01

    .... The analytical chemistry literature lacks an adequate online automatic titration method for the monitoring of chromic acid in chromium plating solutions and the monitoring of phosphoric and sulfuric...

  2. Local strong solutions to the stochastic compressible Navier-Stokes system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Breit, D.; Feireisl, Eduard; Hofmanová, M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 2 (2018), s. 313-345 ISSN 0360-5302 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 320078 - MATHEF Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : compressible fluids * local strong solution s * Navier-Stokes system Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.608, year: 2016 https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03605302.2018.1442476

  3. Local strong solutions to the stochastic compressible Navier-Stokes system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Breit, D.; Feireisl, Eduard; Hofmanová, M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 2 (2018), s. 313-345 ISSN 0360-5302 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 320078 - MATHEF Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : compressible fluids * local strong solutions * Navier-Stokes system Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.608, year: 2016 https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03605302.2018.1442476

  4. Strongly increasing solutions of cyclic systems of second order differential equations with power-type nonlinearities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Jaroš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider \\(n\\-dimensional cyclic systems of second order differential equations \\[(p_i(t|x_{i}'|^{\\alpha_i -1}x_{i}'' = q_{i}(t|x_{i+1}|^{\\beta_i-1}x_{i+1},\\] \\[\\quad i = 1,\\ldots,n, \\quad (x_{n+1} = x_1 \\tag{\\(\\ast\\}\\] under the assumption that the positive constants \\(\\alpha_i\\ and \\(\\beta_i\\ satisfy \\(\\alpha_1{\\ldots}\\alpha_n \\gt \\beta_1{\\ldots}\\beta_n\\ and \\(p_i(t\\ and \\(q_i(t\\ are regularly varying functions, and analyze positive strongly increasing solutions of system (\\(\\ast\\ in the framework of regular variation. We show that the situation for the existence of regularly varying solutions of positive indices for (\\(\\ast\\ can be characterized completely, and moreover that the asymptotic behavior of such solutions is governed by the unique formula describing their order of growth precisely. We give examples demonstrating that the main results for (\\(\\ast\\ can be applied to some classes of partial differential equations with radial symmetry to acquire accurate information about the existence and the asymptotic behavior of their radial positive strongly increasing solutions.

  5. Effect of Strong Acid Functional Groups on Electrode Rise Potential in Capacitive Mixing by Double Layer Expansion

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2014-12-02

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. The amount of salinity-gradient energy that can be obtained through capacitive mixing based on double layer expansion depends on the extent the electric double layer (EDL) is altered in a low salt concentration (LC) electrolyte (e.g., river water). We show that the electrode-rise potential, which is a measure of the EDL perturbation process, was significantly (P = 10-5) correlated to the concentration of strong acid surface functional groups using five types of activated carbon. Electrodes with the lowest concentration of strong acids (0.05 mmol g-1) had a positive rise potential of 59 ± 4 mV in the LC solution, whereas the carbon with the highest concentration (0.36 mmol g-1) had a negative rise potential (-31 ± 5 mV). Chemical oxidation of a carbon (YP50) using nitric acid decreased the electrode rise potential from 46 ± 2 mV (unaltered) to -6 ± 0.5 mV (oxidized), producing a whole cell potential (53 ± 1.7 mV) that was 4.4 times larger than that obtained with identical electrode materials (from 12 ± 1 mV). Changes in the EDL were linked to the behavior of specific ions in a LC solution using molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The EDL expanded in the LC solution when a carbon surface (pristine graphene) lacked strong acid functional groups, producing a positive-rise potential at the electrode. In contrast, the EDL was compressed for an oxidized surface (graphene oxide), producing a negative-rise electrode potential. These results established the linkage between rise potentials and specific surface functional groups (strong acids) and demonstrated on a molecular scale changes in the EDL using oxidized or pristine carbons.

  6. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1992-03-31

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 5 figs.

  7. Corrosion of alloy C-22 in organic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.; Rodriguez, Martin A.; Giordano, Celia M.

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical studies such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022) in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C degrees. All the tested material was wrought Mill Annealed (MA). Tests were also performed in NaCl solutions containing weak organic acids such as oxalic, acetic, citric and picric acids. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was significantly higher in solutions containing oxalic acid than in solutions of pure NaCl at the same pH. Citric and Picric acids showed a slightly higher corrosion rate, and Acetic acid maintained the corrosion rate of pure chloride solutions at the same pH. Organic acids revealed to be weak inhibitors for crevice corrosion. Higher concentration ratios, compared to nitrate ions, were needed to completely inhibit crevice corrosion in chloride solutions. Results are discussed considering acid dissociation constants, buffer capacity and complex formation constants of the different weak acids. (author) [es

  8. Titration of strong and weak acids by sequential injection analysis technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskula, S; Nyman, J; Ivaska, A

    2000-05-31

    A sequential injection analysis (SIA) titration method has been developed for acid-base titrations. Strong and weak acids in different concentration ranges have been titrated with a strong base. The method is based on sequential aspiration of an acidic sample zone and only one zone of the base into a carrier stream of distilled water. On their way to the detector, the sample and the reagent zones are partially mixed due to the dispersion and thereby the base is partially neutralised by the acid. The base zone contains the indicator. An LED-spectrophotometer is used as detector. It senses the colour of the unneutralised base and the signal is recorded as a typical SIA peak. The peak area of the unreacted base was found to be proportional to the logarithm of the acid concentration. Calibration curves with good linearity were obtained for a strong acid in the concentration ranges of 10(-4)-10(-2) and 0.1-3 M. Automatic sample dilution was implemented when sulphuric acid at concentration of 6-13 M was titrated. For a weak acid, i.e. acetic acid, a linear calibration curve was obtained in the range of 3x10(-4)-8x10(-2) M. By changing the volumes of the injected sample and the reagent, different acids as well as different concentration ranges of the acids can be titrated without any other adjustments in the SIA manifold or the titration protocol.

  9. Fate of aliphatic compounds in nitric acid processing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.E.; Howerton, W.B.

    1975-01-01

    The reaction of hyperazeotropic iodic acid-saturated nitric acid with short chain aliphatic iodides, nitrates, and acids was studied in order to determine the conditions for complete removal of organic materials from nitric acid systems. The aliphatic iodides are converted to the nitrates and the nitrates in strong HNO 3 are extensively converted into CO 2 and acids. The aliphatic acids are rather stable; acetic acid was unattacked by boiling in 20M HNO 3 and n-butyric acid was 80 percent unattacked. The dibasic acids oxalic and malonic are extensively attacked, but succinic acid is relatively stable. A wet oxidation method is successful in destroying acetic acid in 5 to 8M HNO 3 . (U.S.)

  10. Strong convergence and convergence rates of approximating solutions for algebraic Riccati equations in Hilbert spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kazufumi

    1987-01-01

    The linear quadratic optimal control problem on infinite time interval for linear time-invariant systems defined on Hilbert spaces is considered. The optimal control is given by a feedback form in terms of solution pi to the associated algebraic Riccati equation (ARE). A Ritz type approximation is used to obtain a sequence pi sup N of finite dimensional approximations of the solution to ARE. A sufficient condition that shows pi sup N converges strongly to pi is obtained. Under this condition, a formula is derived which can be used to obtain a rate of convergence of pi sup N to pi. The results of the Galerkin approximation is demonstrated and applied for parabolic systems and the averaging approximation for hereditary differential systems.

  11. No fragile-to-strong crossover in LiCl-H2O solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Masahiro; Griffin, Philip; Mamontov, Eugene; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2012-03-01

    Dynamics of water, especially in the temperature range of the "no man's land", remain a mystery. We present detailed study of dynamics in aqueous LiCl solution that is often considered as a model for bulk water. We employ broadband dielectric and light scattering spectroscopy in a broad frequency and temperature range. Our analysis reveals no sign of the fragile-to-strong crossover (FSC) neither in structural relaxation nor in translational motions. Our experimental results combined with a large selection of literature data lead to the clear conclusion-there is no FSC in dynamics of aqueous solutions at T ˜ 200-230 K. Instead, our analysis reveals appearance of the so-called excess wing at the high frequency tail of the structural relaxation peak. We discuss the localized nature of the relaxation process that contributes to the excess wing.

  12. Strong cosmic censorship for solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell field equations with polarized Gowdy symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nungesser, Ernesto; Rendall, Alan D [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2009-05-21

    A proof of strong cosmic censorship is presented for a class of solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations, those with polarized Gowdy symmetry. A key element of the argument is the observation that by means of a suitable choice of variables the central equations in this problem can be written in a form where they are identical to the central equations for general (i.e. non-polarized) vacuum Gowdy spacetimes. Using this, it is seen that the deep results of Ringstroem on strong cosmic censorship in the vacuum case have implications for the Einstein-Maxwell case. Working out the geometrical meaning of these analytical results leads to the main conclusion.

  13. Determination of free acid in plutonium (IV) solutions - thermometrically, potentiometrically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, T.L.; Tucker, G.M.; Huff, G.A.; Jordan, L.G.

    1981-09-01

    The thermometric titration technique was found to offer certain advantages over potentiometry in the determination of free acid in Pu(IV) solutions. The thermometric technique was applied to the determination of free acid in plutonium nitrate solutions using potassium fluoride to suppress the hydrolytic interference of plutonium(IV). The results indicate that 0.2 to 2.0 milliequivalents of free acid can be determined with acceptable bias and precision in solutions containing up to 30 milligrams of plutonium. In contrast, neither the thermometric nor the potentiometric technique was suitable for samples containing more than eight milligrams of plutonium complexed with potassium oxalate

  14. Kinetics of Strong Acid Hydrolysis of a Bleached Kraft Pulp for Producing Cellulose Nanocrystals (CNCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qianqian Wang; Xuebing Zhao; J.Y. Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrytals (CNCs) are predominantly produced using the traditional strong acid hydrolysis process. In most reported studies, the typical CNC yield is low (approximately 30%) despite process optimization. This study investigated the hydrolysis of a bleached kraft eucalyptus pulp using sulfuric acid between 50 and 64 wt % at temperatures of 35−80 °C...

  15. Transplutonium elements separation on anionites by using aqueous-alcohol solutions of nitric acid and butyric acid mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.

    1978-01-01

    The behaviour of 243 Am, 243 Cm, and 249 Cf isotopes has been investigated in aqueous-methanol solutions of butyric, isobutyric, α-oxybutyric and α-oxynisobutyric acids in a mixture with nitric acid during their sorption on strongly basic anionites. The coefficients of distribution of transplutonium elements have been determined depending on the concentration of various components of the solution. Under the optimum conditions, the factors of separation of Am-Cm and Cm-Cf pairs amount to about 6 and 4 respectively. The advantages of using macroporous anionites of the soviet production have been demonstrated for the separation of transplutonium elements in the systems under examination

  16. Comparison of peak shape in hydrophilic interaction chromatography using acidic salt buffers and simple acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, James C; Russell, Joseph J; Underwood, Tim; Boughtflower, Robert; McCalley, David V

    2014-06-20

    The retention and peak shape of neutral, basic and acidic solutes was studied on hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) stationary phases that showed both strong and weak ionic retention characteristics, using aqueous-acetonitrile mobile phases containing either formic acid (FA), ammonium formate (AF) or phosphoric acid (PA). The effect of organic solvent concentration on the results was also studied. Peak shape was good for neutrals under most mobile phase conditions. However, peak shapes for ionised solutes, particularly for basic compounds, were considerably worse in FA than AF. Even neutral compounds showed deterioration in performance with FA when the mobile phase water concentration was reduced. The poor performance in FA cannot be entirely attributed to the negative impact of ionic retention on ionised silanols on the underlying silica base materials, as results using PA at lower pH (where their ionisation is suppressed) were inferior to those in AF. Besides the moderating influence of the salt cation on ionic retention, it is likely that salt buffers improve peak shape due to the increased ionic strength of the mobile phase and its impact on the formation of the water layer on the column surface. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Critical experiments on an enriched uranium solution system containing periodically distributed strong thermal neutron absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    A series of 62 critical and critical approach experiments were performed to evaluate a possible novel means of storing large volumes of fissile solution in a critically safe configuration. This study is intended to increase safety and economy through use of such a system in commercial plants which handle fissionable materials in liquid form. The fissile solution's concentration may equal or slightly exceed the minimum-critical-volume concentration; and experiments were performed for high-enriched uranium solution. Results should be generally applicable in a wide variety of plant situations. The method is called the 'Poisoned Tube Tank' because strong neutron absorbers (neutron poisons) are placed inside periodically spaced stainless steel tubes which separate absorber material from solution, keeping the former free of contamination. Eight absorbers are investigated. Both square and triangular pitched lattice patterns are studied. Ancillary topics which closely model typical plant situations are also reported. They include the effect of removing small bundles of absorbers as might occur during inspections in a production plant. Not taking the tank out of service for these inspections would be an economic advantage. Another ancillary topic studies the effect of the presence of a significant volume of unpoisoned solution close to the Poisoned Tube Tank on the critical height. A summary of the experimental findings is that boron compounds were excellent absorbers, as expected. This was true for granular materials such as Gerstley Borate and Borax; but it was also true for the flexible solid composed of boron carbide and rubber, even though only thin sheets were used. Experiments with small bundles of absorbers intentionally removed reveal that quite reasonable tanks could be constructed that would allow a few tubes at a time to be removed from the tank for inspection without removing the tank from production service

  18. Thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions with citrate ions. Compressibility studies in aqueous solutions of citric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apelblat, Alexander; Korin, Eli; Manzurola, Emanuel

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Over a wide range of concentrations and temperatures sound velocities were measured in aqueous solutions of citric acid. • Compressibility properties of citric acid solutions are thermodynamically characterized. • Changes in the structure of water when citric acid is dissolved are discussed. -- Abstract: Sound velocities in aqueous solutions of citric acid were measured from 15 °C to 50 °C in 5 °C intervals, within the 0.1 mol · kg −1 to 5.0 mol · kg −1 concentration range. These sound velocities served to evaluate the isentropic and isothermal compressibilities, the apparent molar compressibilities, the isochoric thermal pressure coefficients, changes of the cubic expansion coefficients with pressure at constant temperature, the changes of heat capacities with volume and hydration numbers of citric acid in aqueous solutions

  19. Potentiometric titration of free acid in uranium solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, M. Y.; Kim, W. H.; Kim, J. S.; Sohn, S. C.; Eom, T. Y.; Lee, C. H.; Jeon, Y. S.; Han, S. H.

    1998-02-01

    Hydrolysis properties of metal cations and fundamental principles of the potentiometric titration of free acid in aqueous solutions containing metal cations were described. The published papers and reports for the alkalimetric and acidimetric titration of free acid were surveyed, and the applicability of these titration methods to the uranium and/or plutonium solutions were discussed. This technical report also includes the various results obtained from the authors` researches to establish the alkalimetric and acidimetric titration methods for the determination of free acid in nitric acid solutions containing uranium and/or oxalic acid, and aluminum. The procedure manuals used in chemical processes and the newly prepared manuals based on the authors` researches are appended. (author). 26 refs., 54 figs.

  20. Study of free acidity determinations in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kergreis, A.

    1966-04-01

    The object of this work is the study of the principal methods which can be applied to the measurement of 'free' acidity. In the first part, we define the various types of acidity which can exist in aqueous solution; then, after having studied some hydrolysis reactions, we compare the value of the neutralisation pH of the hydrated cation and that of the precipitation of the hydroxide. In the second part we have started to study the determination of the acidity of an aqueous solution. After having rapidly considered the 'total' acidity determination, we deal with the problem of the 'free' acidity titration. We have considered in particular certain methods: extrapolation of the equivalent point, colorimetric titrations with or without a complexing agent, and finally the use of ion-exchange resins with mixed aqueous and solvent solutions. (author) [fr

  1. Decomposition Studies of Triphenylboron, Diphenylborinic Acid and Phenylboric Acid in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions Containing Copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Peterson, R. A.

    1997-02-11

    This report documents the copper-catalyzed chemical kinetics of triphenylboron, diphenylborinic acid and phenylboric acid (3PB, 2PB and PBA) in aqueous alkaline solution contained in carbon-steel vessels between 40 and 70 degrees C.

  2. Using solute and heat tracers for aquifer characterization in a strongly heterogeneous alluvial aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Theo S.; Close, Murray; Abraham, Phillip

    2018-03-01

    A test using Rhodamine WT and heat as tracers, conducted over a 78 day period in a strongly heterogeneous alluvial aquifer, was used to evaluate the utility of the combined observation dataset for aquifer characterization. A highly parameterized model was inverted, with concentration and temperature time-series as calibration targets. Groundwater heads recorded during the experiment were boundary dependent and were ignored during the inversion process. The inverted model produced a high resolution depiction of the hydraulic conductivity and porosity fields. Statistical properties of these fields are in very good agreement with estimates from previous studies at the site. Spatially distributed sensitivity analysis suggests that both solute and heat transport were most sensitive to the hydraulic conductivity and porosity fields and less sensitive to dispersivity and thermal distribution factor, with sensitivity to porosity greatly reducing outside the monitored area. The issues of model over-parameterization and non-uniqueness are addressed through identifiability analysis. Longitudinal dispersivity and thermal distribution factor are highly identifiable, however spatially distributed parameters are only identifiable near the injection point. Temperature related density effects became observable for both heat and solute, as the temperature anomaly increased above 12 degrees centigrade, and affected down gradient propagation. Finally we demonstrate that high frequency and spatially dense temperature data cannot inform a dual porosity model in the absence of frequent solute concentration measurements.

  3. Vacuum-jacketed hydrofluoric acid solution calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robie, R.A.

    1965-01-01

    A vacuum-jacketed metal calorimeter for determining heats of solution in aqueous HF was constructed. The reaction vessel was made of copper and was heavily gold plated. The calorimeter has a cooling constant of 0.6 cal-deg -1-min-1, approximately 1/4 that of the air-jacketed calorimeters most commonly used with HF. It reaches equilibrium within 10 min after turning off the heater current. Measurements of the heat of solution of reagent grade KCl(-100 mesh dried 2 h at 200??C) at a mole ratio of 1 KCl to 200 H2O gave ??H = 4198??11 cal at 25??C. ?? 1965 The American Institute of Physics.

  4. Raman spectra of amino acids and their aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangyong; Zhu, Xian; Fan, Qi; Wan, Xueliang

    2011-03-01

    Amino acids are the basic "building blocks" that combine to form proteins and play an important physiological role in all life-forms. Amino acids can be used as models for the examination of the importance of intermolecular bonding in life processes. Raman spectra serve to obtain information regarding molecular conformation, giving valuable insights into the topology of more complex molecules (peptides and proteins). In this paper, amino acids and their aqueous solution have been studied by Raman spectroscopy. Comparisons of certain values for these frequencies in amino acids and their aqueous solutions are given. Spectra of solids when compared to those of the solute in solution are invariably much more complex and almost always sharper. We present a collection of Raman spectra of 18 kinds of amino acids (L-alanine, L-arginine, L-aspartic acid, cystine, L-glutamic acid, L-glycine, L-histidine, L-isoluecine, L-leucine, L-lysine, L-phenylalanine, L-methionone, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, L-valine) and their aqueous solutions that can serve as references for the interpretation of Raman spectra of proteins and biological materials. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Extraction of indium from sulfuric acid solutions by mixture of di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric and caprylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flejtlikh, I.Yu.; Pashkov, G.L.; Nikiforova, L.K.; Grigor'eva, N.A.; Pavlenko, N.I.; Kolesnichenko, G.V.; Stoyanov, E.S.; Makarov, I.V.; Khol'kin, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Data on indium extraction from sulfuric acid solutions by mixtures of di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HR) and caprylic acid (HA) are presented. By the methods of IR spectroscopy state of HR in HA is investigated. It is shown that imperfection in this system is described by the processes of partial HR dimerization in organic phase. During indium extraction there is strong antagonistic effect caused by interaction HR and HA because of formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. In the case of low indium concentration and big excess of extractant formation of In(HR 2 ) 3 takes place in organic phase as is in the case of application of inert diluents [ru

  6. Improved method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

    1983-07-26

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions uses a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  7. RECOVERY OF ACTINIDES FROM AQUEOUS NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ader, M.

    1963-11-19

    A process of recovering actinides is presented. Tetravalent actinides are extracted from rare earths in an aqueous nitric acid solution with a ketone and back-extracted from the ketone into an aqueous medium. The aqueous actinide solution thus obtained, prior to concentration by boiling, is sparged with steam to reduce its ketone to a maximum content of 3 grams per liter. (AEC)

  8. Compatible solutes in lactic acid bacteria subjected to water stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kets, E.P.W.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the research project described in this thesis was to investigate the protective effect of compatible solutes on tactic acid bacteria subjected to drying. Dried preparations of lactic acid bacteria are applied as starter cultures in feed and food industries. Dried starter

  9. Ion-exchange equilibrium of N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid on a strong anionic exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinglan; Ke, Xu; Zhang, Xudong; Zhuang, Wei; Zhou, Jingwei; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-09-15

    N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) is a high value-added product widely applied in the food industry. A suitable equilibrium model is required for purification of Neu5Ac based on ion-exchange chromatography. Hence, the equilibrium uptake of Neu5Ac on a strong anion exchanger, AD-1 was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The uptake of Neu5Ac by the hydroxyl form of the resin occurred primarily by a stoichiometric exchange of Neu5Ac(-) and OH(-). The experimental data showed that the selectivity coefficient for the exchange of Neu5Ac(-) with OH(-) was a non-constant quantity. Subsequently, the Saunders' model, which took into account the dissociation reactions of Neu5Ac and the condition of electroneutrality, was used to correlate the Neu5Ac sorption isotherms at various solution pHs and Neu5Ac concentrations. The model provided an excellent fit to the binary exchange data for Cl(-)/OH(-) and Neu5Ac(-)/OH(-), and an approximate prediction of equilibrium in the ternary system Cl(-)/Neu5Ac(-)/OH(-). This basic information combined with the general mass transfer model could lay the foundation for the prediction of dynamic behavior of fixed bed separation process afterwards. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiolysis studies of uranyl nitrate solution in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siri, Sandra; Mondino, Angel V.

    2005-01-01

    The radiolysis of acidic uranyl nitrate solutions was investigated using Co-60 gamma radiation. Hydrogen peroxide was determined as a function of increasing dose. The UV-vis absorption spectra of the irradiated solutions were measured and the spectral changes were analyzed. The increasing dose increases the absorbance intensities, possibly by an increment in nitrate concentration produced by radiolysis, which can originate the formation of different uranyl complexes in solution. (author)

  11. Pulse radiolysis of pyridinecarboxylic acids in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar, S.; Getoff, N.; Sehested, K.; Holcman, J.

    The reactivity of OH, e -aq and H radicals towards aqueous carboxypyridines: picolinic acid (2-pyridinecarboxylic acid), PA; isonicotinic acid (4-pyridinecarboxylic acid), i-NA; 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 2,6-PDCA; and 3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 3,5-PDCA was investigated in the pH-range 1-13.8. The absorption spectra of the OH-adducts, H-adducts and pyridinyl radicals are given as well as the formation and decay kinetics. In acid (but not in alkaline) solution, the reaction of H-atoms leads to the formation of two distinct products, namely H-adduct and pyridinyl radicals. The yields of pyridinyl radical are: 20% for PA, 75% for i-NA, 60% for 2,6-PDCA and 25% for 3,5-PDCA (a yield of 50% has been found earlier for nicotinic acid, NA).

  12. Monte Carlo solutions of Schroedinger's equation for H2+ ion in strong magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Jiro; Tomishima, Yasuo

    1980-01-01

    The analytical expressions suitable for the Monte Carlo calculation to obtain the solution of Schroedinger's equation of hydrogen molecular ion in a strong magnetic field are derived. The wave functions, the energy values and the equilibrium internuclear distances of 1σsub(g) state of H 2 + are obtained numerically through the Monte Carlo simulation and compared with other results based on the variational method. The agreement between them is fairly good over a wide range of magnetic field. The calculation of the energy values of 1πsub(g) state of H 2 + for various internuclear distances taking a constant magnetic field as a parameter, shows that the antibonding 1πsub(g) state in the absence of the external magnetic field changes to a bonding state with an increasing magnetic field. The lowest energy values and the equilibrium internuclear distances of 1πsub(g) state are also calculated for various magnetic field. (author)

  13. Carborane acids. New "strong yet gentle" acids for organic and inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Christopher A

    2005-04-07

    Icosahedral carborane anions such as CHB11Cl11- are amongst the least coordinating, most chemically inert anions known. They are also amongst the least basic, so their conjugate acids, H(carborane), are superacids (i.e. stronger than 100% H2SO4). Acidity scale measurements indicate that H(CHB11Cl11) is the strongest pure Brønsted acid presently known, surpassing triflic and fluorosulfuric acid. Nevertheless, it is also an extremely gentle acid--because its conjugate base engages in so little chemistry. Carborane acids separate protic acidity from anion nucleophilicity and destructive oxidative capacity in the conjugate base, to a degree not previously achieved. As a result, many long-sought, highly acidic, reactive cations such as protonated benzene (C6H7+), protonated C60(HC60+), tertiary carbocations (R3C+), vinyl cations (R2C=C(+)-R), silylium ions (R3Si+) and discrete hydronium ions (H3O+, H5O2+ etc.) can be readily isolated as carborane salts and characterized at room temperature by X-ray crystallography.

  14. Strong Circularly Polarized Luminescence from Highly Emissive Terbium Complexes in Aqueous Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel, Amanda; Lunkley, Jamie; Muller, Gilles; Raymond, Kenneth

    2010-03-15

    Two luminescent terbium(III) complexes have been prepared from chiral ligands containing 2-hydroxyisophthalamide (IAM) antenna chromophores and their non-polarized and circularly-polarized luminescence properties have been studied. These tetradentate ligands, which form 2:1 ligand/Tb{sup III} complexes, utilize diaminocyclohexane (cyLI) and diphenylethylenediamine (dpenLI) backbones, which we reasoned would impart conformational rigidity and result in Tb{sup III} complexes that display both large luminescence quantum yield ({phi}) values and strong circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) activities. Both Tb{sup III} complexes are highly emissive, with {phi} values of 0.32 (dpenLI-Tb) and 0.60 (cyLI-Tb). Luminescence lifetime measurements in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O indicate that while cyLI-Tb exists as a single species in solution, dpenLI-Tb exists as two species: a monohydrate complex with one H{sub 2}O molecule directly bound to the Tb{sup III} ion and a complex with no water molecules in the inner coordination sphere. Both cyLI-Tb and dpenLI-Tb display increased CPL activity compared to previously reported Tb{sup III} complexes made with chiral IAM ligands. The CPL measurements also provide additional confirmation of the presence of a single emissive species in solution in the case of cyLI-Tb, and multiple emissive species in the case of dpenLI-Tb.

  15. Removal of tartrazine from aqueous solutions by strongly basic polystyrene anion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzkiewicz, Monika; Hubicki, Zbigniew

    2009-05-30

    The removal of tartrazine from aqueous solutions onto the strongly basic polystyrene anion exchangers of type 1 (Amberlite IRA-900) and type 2 (Amberlite IRA-910) was investigated. The experimental data obtained at 100, 200, 300 and 500 mg/dm(3) initial concentrations at 20 degrees C were applied to the pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and Weber-Morris kinetic models. The calculated sorption capacities (q(e,cal)) and the rate constant of the first order adsorption (k(1)) were determined. The pseudo-second order kinetic constants (k(2)) and capacities were calculated from the plots of t/q(t) vs. t, 1/q(t) vs. 1/t, 1/t vs. 1/q(t) and q(t)/t vs. q(t) for type 1, type 2, type 3 and type 4 of the pseudo-second order expression, respectively. The influence of phase contact time, solution pH and temperature on tartrazine removal was also discussed. The FTIR spectra of pure anion exchangers and those loaded with tartrazine were recorded, too.

  16. Numerical path integral solution to strong Coulomb correlation in one dimensional Hooke's atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruokosenmäki, Ilkka; Gholizade, Hossein; Kylänpää, Ilkka; Rantala, Tapio T.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new approach based on real time domain Feynman path integrals (RTPI) for electronic structure calculations and quantum dynamics, which includes correlations between particles exactly but within the numerical accuracy. We demonstrate that incoherent propagation by keeping the wave function real is a novel method for finding and simulation of the ground state, similar to Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method, but introducing new useful tools lacking in DMC. We use 1D Hooke's atom, a two-electron system with very strong correlation, as our test case, which we solve with incoherent RTPI (iRTPI) and compare against DMC. This system provides an excellent test case due to exact solutions for some confinements and because in 1D the Coulomb singularity is stronger than in two or three dimensional space. The use of Monte Carlo grid is shown to be efficient for which we determine useful numerical parameters. Furthermore, we discuss another novel approach achieved by combining the strengths of iRTPI and DMC. We also show usefulness of the perturbation theory for analytical approximates in case of strong confinements.

  17. Reduction of trace quantities of chromium(VI by strong acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezzin Sérgio H

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical behavior of Cr(VI at low concentrations (10-4 to 10-7 mol L-1 in several strong acids was studied using high specific activity 51Cr(VI as a tracer. The speciation of the products from these systems was carried out by ion exchange chromatography with stepwise elution. The results show that trace quantities of Cr(VI, monitored by means of radiochromium (51Cr, are reduced in the presence of mineral acids such as perchloric, hydrochloric, hydrofluoric, sulfuric, nitric and trifluoromethanesulfonic acids, even in the absence of conventional reducing agents, producing different measureable Cr(III species, depending on the acid anion. Detailed studies of the reduction of low concentrations of Cr(VI with nitric acid have shown that the relative rate of reduction increases as the concentration of the acid increases or as the concentration of the Cr(VI decreases.

  18. Uranium extraction from sulfuric acid solution using anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheta, M. E.; Abdel Aal, M. M.; Kandil, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Uranium is currently recovered from sulfuric acid leach liquor using anion exchange resin as Amberlite IRA 402 (CT). This technology is based on fact that, uranium exists as anionic complexes. This takes place by controlling the pH of the solution, agitation time, temperature and resin to solution ratio (R/S). In this work, batch stirrer tank used for uranium extraction from sulfate medium and after extraction, elution process was done using 1M NaCl solution. After extraction and elution process, the resin was separated from the system and uranium was determined in the solution. (Author)

  19. Population and size distribution of solute-rich mesospecies within mesostructured aqueous amino acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawor-Baczynska, Anna; Moore, Barry D; Lee, Han Seung; McCormick, Alon V; Sefcik, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of highly soluble substances such as small amino acids are usually assumed to be essentially homogenous systems with some degree of short range local structuring due to specific interactions on the sub-nanometre scale (e.g. molecular clusters, hydration shells), usually not exceeding several solute molecules. However, recent theoretical and experimental studies have indicated the presence of much larger supramolecular assemblies or mesospecies in solutions of small organic and inorganic molecules as well as proteins. We investigated both supersaturated and undersaturated aqueous solutions of two simple amino acids (glycine and DL-alanine) using Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Brownian Microscopy/Nanoparticles Tracking Analysis (NTA) and Cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM). Colloidal scale mesospecies (nanodroplets) were previously reported in supersaturated solutions of these amino acids and were implicated as intermediate species on non-classical crystallization pathways. Surprisingly, we have found that the mesospecies are also present in significant numbers in undersaturated solutions even when the solute concentration is well below the solid-liquid equilibrium concentration (saturation limit). Thus, mesopecies can be observed with mean diameters ranging from 100 to 300 nm and a size distribution that broadens towards larger size with increasing solute concentration. We note that the mesospecies are not a separate phase and the system is better described as a thermodynamically stable mesostructured liquid containing solute-rich domains dispersed within bulk solute solution. At a given temperature, solute molecules in such a mesostructured liquid phase are subject to equilibrium distribution between solute-rich mesospecies and the surrounding bulk solution.

  20. Utilization of Ion Chromatography and Statistics to Determine Important Acids in Chromium Plating and Electropolishing Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sopok, Samuel

    1991-01-01

    Inadequate monitoring of sulfuric and chromic acids in chromium plating solutions and phosphoric and sulfluric acids in electropolishing solutions can cause serious problems for the chromium plating...

  1. Dissolution of thorium/uranium mixed oxide in nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filgueiras, S.A.C.

    1984-01-01

    The dissolution process of thorium oxide and mixed uranium-thorium oxide is studied, as a step of the head-end of the fuel reprocessing. An extensive bibliography was analysed, concerning the main aspects of the system, specially the most important process variables. Proposed mechanisms and models for the thorium oxide dissolution are presented. The laboratory tests were performed in two phases: at first, powdered thoria was used as the material to be dissolved. The objective was to know how changes in he concentrations of the dissolvent solution components HNO 3 , HF and Al(NO 3 ) 3 affect the dissolution rate. The tests were planned according to the fractional factorial method. Thes results showed that it is advantageous to work with powdered material, since the reaction occurs rapidly. And, if the Thorex solution (HNO 3 13M, HF 0.05M and Al(NO 3 ) 3 0.10M) is a suitable dissolvent, it was verified that it is possible to reduce the concentration of either nitric or fluoridric acid, without reducing the reaction rate to an undesirable value. It was also observed significant interaction between the components of the dissolvent solution. In the second phase of the tests, (Th, 5%U)O 2 sintered pellets were used. The main goals were to know the pellets dissolution behaviour and to compare the results for different pellets among themselves. It was observed that the metallurgical history of the material strongly influences its dissolution, specially the density and the microstructure. It was also studied how the (Th,U)O 2 mass/Thorex solution volume ratio affects the time needed to obtain an 1 M Th/liter solution. The activation energy for the reaction was obtained. (Author) [pt

  2. Does Nitric Acid Dissociate at the Aqueous Solution Surface?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Tanza; Winter, Berndt; Stern, Abraham C.; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tobias, Douglas J.; Hemminger, J. C.

    2011-11-03

    Nitric acid is a prevalent component of atmospheric aerosols, and the extent of nitric acid dissociation at aqueous interfaces is relevant to its role in heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry. Several experimental and theoretical studies have suggested that the extent of dissociation of nitric acid near aqueous interfaces is less than in bulk solution. Here, dissociation of HNO3 at the surface of aqueous nitric acid is quantified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the nitrogen local electronic structure. The relative amounts of undissociated HNO3(aq) and dissociated NO3-(aq) are identified by the distinguishable N1s core-level photoelectron spectra of the two species, and we determine the degree of dissociation, αint, in the interface (the first ~3 layers of solution) as a function of HNO3 concentration. Our measurements show that dissociation is decreased by approximately 20% near the solution interface compared with bulk, and furthermore that dissociation occurs even in the top-most solution layer. The experimental results are supported by first-principles MD simulations, which show that hydrogen-bonds between HNO3 and water molecules at the solution surface stabilize the molecular form at low concentration, in analogy to the stabilization of molecular HNO3 that occurs in bulk solution at high concentration. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  3. Hydrogen oxidation on gold electrode in perchloric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sustersic, M.G.; Almeida, N.V.; Von Mengershausen, A.E. [Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, 25 de Mayo N 384, 5730 Villa Mercedes, San Luis (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    The aim of this research is to study the interface gold/perchloric acid solution in presence of hydrogen. The reactive is generated by H{sup +} ion reduction and by saturating the electrolyte with the gaseous H{sub 2}. No evidence of H{sub 2} dissociative adsorption is found. In special conditions, a strongly adsorbed layer is formed from the atoms diffusing from inside of the metal. The mass transport occurs in three ways: the diffusion of H atoms inwards, the diffusion of H atoms back to the surface and the dissolved H{sub 2} diffusion from the bulk electrolyte to the surface. When dissolved H{sub 2} reacts, the reaction is kinetically controlled when the H{sub 2} partial pressure is high, and it is diffusionally controlled when the reactive partial pressure is low. Above 0.7 V, (measured vs. RHE), the (100) plane surface reconstruction lifts, and the rate determining step is the H diffusion towards inside of the metal, and the current suddenly falls. The Hydrogen redox reaction on gold shows reversibility with respect to the potential when the reactives are the H diffusing outwards of the metal and the H{sup +} ion present in the electrolyte. However, the absolute current values of oxidation and reduction are different because the reactive sources are different. (author)

  4. Assorted interactions of amino acids prevailing in aqueous vitamin C solutions probed by physicochemical and ab-initio contrivances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Koyeli; Roy, Milan Chandra; Rajbanshi, Biplab; Roy, Mahendra Nath

    2017-11-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of molecular interaction prevailing in tyrosine and tryptophan in aqueous solution of vitamin C have been probed by thermophysical properties. The apparent molar volume (ϕV), viscosity B-coefficient, molal refraction (RM) of tyrosine and tryptophan have been studied in aqueous vitamin C solutions at diverse temperatures via Masson equation which deduced solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions, respectively. Spectroscopic study along with physicochemical and computational techniques provides lots of interesting and highly significant insights of the model biological systems. The overall results established strong solute-solvent interactions between studied amino acids and vitamin C mixture in the ternary solutions.

  5. Coprecipitation of thorium and uranium peroxides from acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McTaggart, D.R.; Mailen, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    The factors affecting successful coprecipitation of thorium and uranium peroxides from acid media were studied. Variables considered in this work were H/sup +/ concentration, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentration, duration of contact, and rate of feed solution addition. In all experiments, stock solutions of Th(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/ and UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ were fed at a controlled rate into H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ solutions with constant stirring. Samples were taken as a function of time to follow the H/sup +/ concentration of the solution, uranium precipitation, thorium precipitation, precipitant weight/volume of solution, and crystalline structure and growth. The optimum conditions for maximum coprecipitation are low H/sup +/ concentration, high H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentration, and extended contact time between the solutions.

  6. Strong isotope effects on melting dynamics and ice crystallisation processes in cryo vitrification solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Kirichek

    Full Text Available The nucleation and growth of crystalline ice during cooling, and further crystallization processes during re-warming are considered to be key processes determining the success of low temperature storage of biological objects, as used in medical, agricultural and nature conservation applications. To avoid these problems a method, termed vitrification, is being developed to inhibit ice formation by use of high concentration of cryoprotectants and ultra-rapid cooling, but this is only successful across a limited number of biological objects and in small volume applications. This study explores physical processes of ice crystal formation in a model cryoprotective solution used previously in trials on vitrification of complex biological systems, to improve our understanding of the process and identify limiting biophysical factors. Here we present results of neutron scattering experiments which show that even if ice crystal formation has been suppressed during quench cooling, the water molecules, mobilised during warming, can crystallise as detectable ice. The crystallisation happens right after melting of the glass phase formed during quench cooling, whilst the sample is still transiting deep cryogenic temperatures. We also observe strong water isotope effects on ice crystallisation processes in the cryoprotectant mixture. In the neutron scattering experiment with a fully protiated water component, we observe ready crystallisation occurring just after the glass melting transition. On the contrary with a fully deuteriated water component, the process of crystallisation is either completely or substantially supressed. This behaviour might be explained by nuclear quantum effects in water. The strong isotope effect, observed here, may play an important role in development of new cryopreservation strategies.

  7. Effect of Intravenously Administered Crystalloid Solutions on Acid?Base Balance in Domestic Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Muir, W.

    2017-01-01

    Intravenous fluid therapy can alter plasma acid?base balance. The Stewart approach to acid?base balance is uniquely suited to identify and quantify the effects of the cationic and anionic constituents of crystalloid solutions on plasma pH. The plasma strong ion difference (SID) and weak acid concentrations are similar to those of the administered fluid, more so at higher administration rates and with larger volumes. A crystalloid's in vivo effects on plasma pH are described by 3 general rules...

  8. On the strong solution of a class of partial differential equations that arise in the pricing of mortgage backed securities

    KAUST Repository

    Parshad, Rana

    2011-01-01

    We consider a reduced form pricing model for mortgage backed securities, formulated as a non-linear partial differential equation. We prove that the model possesses a weak solution. We then show that under additional regularity assumptions on the initial data, we also have a mild solution. This mild solution is shown to be a strong solution via further regularity arguments. We also numerically solve the reduced model via a Fourier spectral method. Lastly, we compare our numerical solution to real market data. We observe interestingly that the reduced model captures a number of recent market trends in this data, that have escaped previous models.

  9. Highly purified eicosapentaenoic acid as free fatty acids strongly suppresses polyps in Apc(Min/+) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, Lucia; Piazzi, Giulia; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Daoud, Yahya; Belluzzi, Andrea; Munarini, Alessandra; Graziani, Giulia; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Selgrad, Michael; Garcia, Melissa; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Genta, Robert M; Boland, C Richard; Ricciardiello, Luigi

    2010-12-01

    Although cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors could represent the most effective chemopreventive tool against colorectal cancer (CRC), their use in clinical practice is hampered by cardiovascular side effects. Consumption of ω-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3-PUFAs) is associated with a reduced risk of CRC. Therefore, in this study, we assessed the efficacy of a novel 99% pure preparation of ω-3-PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid as free fatty acids (EPA-FFA) on polyps in Apc(Min/+) mice. Apc(Min/+) and corresponding wild-type mice were fed control diet (Ctrl) or diets containing either EPA-FFA 2.5% or 5%, for 12 weeks while monitoring food intake and body weight. We found that both EPA-FFA diets protected from the cachexia observed among Apc(Min/+) animals fed Ctrl diet (P acid was replaced by EPA (P < 0.0001), leading to a significant reduction in COX-2 expression and β-catenin nuclear translocation. Moreover, in the EPA-FFA arms, we found a significant decrease in proliferation throughout the intestine together with an increase in apoptosis. Our data make 99% pure EPA-FFA an excellent candidate for CRC chemoprevention. ©2010 AACR.

  10. Tested Demonstrations: Comparison of Strong Acid and Weak Acid Titration Curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    A lecture demonstration is presented for comparing titration curves. A plot of pH vs volume of strong base is produced by connecting the external output of a pH meter to a strip recorder. Thus, pH is recorded as a function of time. (BB)

  11. Gamma-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions. [prebiotic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Graff, R. L.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1980-01-01

    The gamma-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions was studied under initially oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions in an attempt to determine the possible interconversion of malic acid into other carboxylic acids, specifically those associated with Krebs cycle. The effect of dose on product formation of the system was investigated. Gas-liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry was used as the principal means of identification of the nonvolatile products. Thin layer chromatography and direct probe mass spectroscopy were also employed. The findings show that a variety of carboxylic acids are formed, with malonic and succinic acids in greatest abundance. These products have all been identified as being formed in the gamma-irradiation of acetic acid, suggesting a common intermediary. Since these molecules fit into a metabolic cycle, it is strongly suggestive that prebiotic pathways provided the basis for biological systems.

  12. High-order approximate solutions of strongly nonlinear cubic-quintic Duffing oscillator based on the harmonic balance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, M. S. H.; Hosen, Md. Alal; Ahmad, Kartini; Ali, M. Y.; Ismail, A. F.

    In this paper, a new reliable analytical technique has been introduced based on the Harmonic Balance Method (HBM) to determine higher-order approximate solutions of the strongly nonlinear cubic-quintic Duffing oscillator. The application of the HBM leads to very complicated sets of nonlinear algebraic equations. In this technique, the high-order nonlinear algebraic equations are approximated in the form of a power series solution, and this solution produces desired results even for small as well as large amplitudes of oscillation. Moreover, a suitable truncation formula is found in which the solution measures better results than existing results and it saves a lot of calculation. It is highly noteworthy that using the proposed technique, the third-order approximate solutions gives an excellent agreement as compared with the numerical solutions (considered to be exact). The proposed technique is applied to the strongly nonlinear cubic-quintic Duffing oscillator to reveals its novelty, reliability and wider applicability.

  13. Process for extracting uranium from phosphoric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The description is given of a method for extracting uranium from phosphoric acid solutions whereby the previously oxided acid is treated with an organic solvent constituted by a mixture of dialkylphosphoric acid and trialkylphosphine oxide in solution in a non-reactive inert solvent so as to obtain de-uraniated phosphoric acid and an organic extract constituted by the solvent containing most of the uranium. The uranium is then separated from the extract as uranyl ammonium tricarbonate by reaction with ammonia and ammonium carbonate and the extract de-uraniated at the extraction stage is recycled. The extract is treated in a re-extraction apparatus comprising not less than two stages. The extract to be treated is injected at the top of the first stage. At the bottom of the first stage, ammonia is introduced counter current as gas or as an aqueous solution whilst controlling the pH of the first stage so as to keep it to 8.0 or 8.5 and at the bottom of the last stage an ammonium carbonate aqueous solution is injected in a quantity representing 50 to 80% of the stoichiometric quantity required to neutralize the dialkylphosphoric acid contained in the solvent and transform the uranium into uranyl ammonium tricarbonate [fr

  14. 15N NMR spectroscopic investigation of nitrous and nitric acids in sulfuric acid solutions of varying acidities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, G.K.S.; Heiliger, L.; Olah, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Both nitrous and nitric acids were studied in sulfuric acid solutions of varying acid strengths by 15 N NMR spectroscopy. The study gives new insights into the nature of intermediates present at different acid strengths. Furthermore, we have also discovered a novel redox reaction between NO 2 + and NO + ions involving the intermediacy of their respective acids. A mechanism is proposed to explain the observed results. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  15. Click Reactions and Boronic Acids: Applications, Issues, and Potential Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaofeng Dai

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Boronic acids have been widely used in a wide range of organic reactions, in the preparation of sensors for carbohydrates, and as potential pharmaceutical agents. With the growing importance of click reactions, inevitably they are also applied to the synthesis of compounds containing the boronic acid moiety. However, such applications have unique problems. Chief among them is the issue of copper-mediated boronic acid degradation in copper-assisted [2,3]-cycloadditions involving an alkyne and an azido compound as the starting materials. This review summarizes recent developments, analyzes potential issues, and discusses known as well as possible solutions.

  16. Selective extraction of metals from acidic uranium(VI) solutions using neo-tridecano-hydroxamic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardoncelli, F.; Grossi, G.

    1975-01-01

    According to this invention neo-alkyl-hydroxamic acids are employed as ion-exchanging agents in processes for liquid-liquid extraction with the aim of separating, purifying dissolved metals and of converting a metal salt solution into a solution of a salt of the same metal but with different anion. In particular it is an objective of this invention to provide a method whereby a molecular pure uranium solution is obtained by selective extraction from a uranium solution delivered by irradiated fuel reprocessing plants and containing plutonium, fission products and other unwanted metals, in which method neo-tridecane-hydroxamic acid is employed as ion exchanger. (Official Gazette)

  17. Volumetric studies of some amino acids in binary aqueous solutions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 117; Issue 3. Volumetric studies of some amino acids in binary aqueous solutions of MgCl2.6H2O at 288.15, and 308.15 K. Amalendu Pal Suresh Kumar. Volume 117 Issue 3 May 2005 pp 267-273 ...

  18. Coagulation of some humic acid solutions by Moringa oleifera Lam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10 g/L) were required to clarify humic acid solutions whereas 0.5 g/L were used to remove 90% of initial turbidity of a surface water. ... (coagulation of both surface water and distilled water containing a suspension of mineral particles) deal mainly with the effect of some ... metals, pesticides, etc.) inside the water [11, 12].

  19. Volumetric studies of some amino acids in binary aqueous solutions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 117; Issue 3. Volumetric studies of some amino acids in binary aqueous solutions of MgCl2.6H2O at 288.15, and 308.15 K. Amalendu Pal Suresh Kumar. Volume 117 Issue 3 May 2005 pp 267-273 ...

  20. The adsorption of methylene blue on montmorillonite from acid solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klika, Z.; Pustková, P.; Dudová, M.; Čapková, P.; Kliková, Ch.; Matys Grygar, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 3 (2011), s. 461-471 ISSN 0009-8558 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : montmorillonite * dissolution * acid solutions * methylene blue * adsorption Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 1.053, year: 2011

  1. Volumetric studies of some amino acids in binary aqueous solutions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    partial molar volumes (Vφ. 0) of each amino acid have been calculated. These data were combined with the earlier reported Vφ. 0 values of glycine, L-alanine, and L-valine in aqueous MgCl2⋅6H2O solutions at. 298⋅15 K in order to describe the temperature dependence behaviour of partial molar quantities. Group.

  2. Copper complexation by tannic acid in aqueous solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraal, P.; Jansen, B.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Verstraten, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The speciation of titrated copper in a dissolved tannic acid (TA) solution with an initial concentration of 4 mmol organic carbon ((OC)/l was investigated in a nine-step titration experiment (Cu/oC molar ratio = 0.0030-0.0567). We differentiated between soluble and insoluble Cu species by 0.45 mu m

  3. Strong ion difference in urine: new perspectives in acid-base assessment.

    OpenAIRE

    Gattinoni, L.; Carlesso, E.; Cadringher, P.; Caironi, P.

    2006-01-01

    The plasmatic strong ion difference (SID) is the difference between positively and negatively charged strong ions. At pH 7.4, temperature 37°C and partial carbon dioxide tension 40 mmHg, the ideal value of SID is 42 mEq/l. The buffer base is the sum of negatively charged weak acids ([HCO3 -], [A-], [H2PO4 -]) and its normal value is 42 mEq/l. According to the law of electroneutrality, the amount of positive and negative charges must be equal, and therefore the SID value is equal to the buffer...

  4. Mechanisms of neptunium redox reactions in nitric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Sayandev; Bryan, Samuel A.; Casella, Amanda J.; Peterson, James M.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

    2017-01-01

    First transuranium element neptunium (Np) exhibits complicated behavior in acidic solutions because it can adopt wide range of oxidation states typically from +3 to +6 and coordinate large variety of ligands. In particular, accurate determination of Np redox potentials in nitric acid solutions is challenging due to overlapping chemical and electrochemical reactions leading to significant experimental uncertainties. Furthermore, over past decades spectrophotometry has been extensively applied to identify and characterize Np solution species in different oxidation states. However, relevant spectral database of Np in nitric acid solutions that can serve for the reference purposes has yet to be established due to the experimental difficulty to isolate and stabilize Np species in pure oxidation states without compromising solution optical properties. This work demonstrates that combination of voltammetry and controlled-potential in situ thin-layer spectropotentiometry overcomes these challenges so that Np species in pure +3, +4, +5, or +6 oxidation states were electrochemically generated in the systematically varied 0.1 – 5 M nitric acid solutions, and corresponding vis-NIR spectral signatures were obtained. In situ optical monitoring of the interconversion between adjacent Np oxidation states resulted in elucidation of the mechanisms of the involved redox reactions, in-depth understanding of the relative stability of the Np oxidation states, and allowed benchmarking of the redox potentials of the NpO22+/NpO2+, NpO2+/Np4+ and Np4+/Np3+ couples. Notably, the NpO2+/Np4+ couple was distinguished from the proximal Np4+/Np3+ process overcoming previous concerns and challenges encountered in accurate determination of the respective potentials.

  5. Interactions of acidic solutions with sediments: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.R.; Serne, R.J.; Felmy, A.R.; Erikson, R.L.; Krupka, K.M.; Gee, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology is presented for investigating the chemical interactions of acidic solutions with sediments. The MINTEQ geochemical computer code was used to predict solid-phase reactions that might occur when acidic solutions contact neutral sediments which, in turn, may control the concentrations of certain dissolved components. Results of X-ray diffraction analysis of laboratory samples of sediments that have been contacted with acidic uranium mill tailings solutions suggest gypsum and jarosite precipitated. These same mineralogical changes were identified in sediment samples collected from a drained uranium mill evaporation pond (Lucky Mc mine in Wyoming) with a 10-year history of acid attack. Geochemical modeling predicted that these same phases and several amorphous solids not identifiable by X-ray diffraction should have precipitated in the contacted sediments. An equilibrium conceptual model consisting of an assemblage of minerals and amorphous solid phases was then developed to represent a sediment column through which uranium mill tailings solutions were percolated. The MINTEQ code was used to predict effluent solution concentrations resulting from the reactions of the tailings solution with the assemblage of solid phases in the conceptual model. The conceptual model successfully predicted the concentrations of several of the macro-constituents (e.g., Ca, SO 4 , Al, Fe, and Mn), but was not successful in modeling the concentrations of trace elements. The lack of success in predicting the observed trace metal concentrations suggests that other mechanisms, such as adsorption, must be included in future models. The geochemical modeling methodology coupled with the laboratory and field studies should be applicable to a variety of waste disposal problems

  6. Osmotic coefficient of aqueous solutions of cyclohexylsulfamic Acid at the freezing point of solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bešter-Rogač, Marija; Klofutar, Cveto; Rudan-Tasič, Darja

    2010-12-01

    The osmotic coefficient of aqueous solutions of cyclohexylsulfamic acid was determined by freezing point measurements up to the molality 0.65 mol kg-1. The osmotic coefficients were fitted to the Pitzer equation, and ion interaction parameters α1, β(0) and β(1) were evaluated. The mean ion activity coefficient of the solute was calculated, and the non-ideal behaviour of the system investigated was characterized by calculation of the excess Gibbs energy of solution, as well as the respective partial molar functions of solute and solvent. The partial molar excess Gibbs energy of the solute is negative, like the excess Gibbs energy of its solution, while the partial molar excess Gibbs energy of the solvent is positive and increases with increasing concentration of the solute. The solvation ability of water was calculated from the difference between the Gibbs energy of solution of water in solution and that of pure water, and found to be positive and small for the solute investigated, throughout the concentration range studied.

  7. Drop coating deposition Raman spectroscopy of proteinogenic amino acids compared with their solution and crystalline state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazderka, Tomáš; Kopecký, Vladimír

    2017-10-01

    The Raman spectra of 20 proteinogenic amino acids were recorded in the solution, glass phase (as drop coating deposition Raman (DCDR) samples) and crystalline forms in the wide spectral range of 200-3200 cm- 1. The most apparent spectral differences between the Raman spectra of the crystalline forms, glass phases and aqueous solutions of amino acids were briefly discussed and described in the frame of published works. The possible density dependencies of spectral bands were noted. In some cases, a strong influence of the sample density, as well as of the organization of the water envelope, was observed. The most apparent changes were observed for Ser and Thr. Nevertheless, for the majority of amino acids, the DCDR sample form is an intermediate between the solution and crystalline forms. In contrast, aromatic amino acids have only a small sensitivity to the form of the sample. Our reference set of Raman spectra is useful for revealing discrepancies between the SERS and solid/solution spectra of amino acids. We also found that some previously published Raman spectra of polycrystalline samples resemble glassy state rather than crystalline spectra. Therefore, this reference set of spectra will find application in every branch of Raman spectroscopy where the spectra of biomolecules are collected from coatings.

  8. Purification of di-nonyl phenyl phosphoric acid (DNPPA) for synergistic extraction of uranium from strong phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.K.; Vijayalakshmi, R.; Singh, H.; Sharma, J.N.; Ruhela, R.

    2009-01-01

    Di-nonyl phenyl phosphoric acid (DNPPA) obtained from various synthesis methods is always associated with impurities such as mono-nonyl phenyl phosphoric acid and nonyl phenol which need to be separated for its effective use in the extraction of uranium from strong phosphoric acid. Two methods of purification namely liquid-solid separation method using neodymium salt and liquid-liquid separation method using methylene glycol have been described. In the liquid solid separation method the purity of DNPPA obtained was about 95% with less than 1.0% monoester, however it heavily suffers in the recovery aspect which is of the order of 50-60%. The methylene glycol treatment method, results in high purity and recovery of the product. Purity obtained was about 95.0% diester and less than 0.5% monoester and recovery was more than 90%. Analysis of DNPPA was done by potentiometric titration method using autotitrator. (author)

  9. British strong-acid leach process targeted at refractory uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The UKAEA-patented strong-acid leach process for refractory U ores is briefly outlined with emphasis on its variations from the conventional dilute-acid process and the projected economics for a processing plant using this process. The process uses 6N H 2 SO 4 with a sharply reduced leaching time over conventional processes. The solubilized U is removed by percolation and the use of only about 10 percent liquid produces less effluent. Conventional processing plant equipment can be used except at the feed preparation, acid mixing, curing, and washing stages. Ore can be processed at larger grain sizes and the milling is done in a dry rod mill. Alternatives to the percolation removal of U are listed. Other work being done by UKAEA on U recovery from ores is briefly indicated. (U.S.)

  10. Anion-exchange Studies of Radioactive Trace Elements in Sulphuric Acid Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsahl, K.

    1963-01-01

    As part of a chemical group separation procedure used as a pretreatment in gamma spectrometric analysis, a study has been made of the adsorption from sulphuric acid solutions on strongly basic anion exchange resins, prepared in the hydroxide and the sulphate forms, of trace activities of Na, P, K, Ca, Sc, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ag, Cd, In, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Hf, Ta, W, Ir, Pa and Np. Besides adsorbing some of the trace elements in the solution, the anion exchange resin in the hydroxide form will neutralize the bulk of the sulphuric acid. This makes possible the subsequent sequential separation of chloride complexes on short anion-exchange columns by a stepwise increasing of the HCl concentration of the solution. On the basis of the results obtained in the present and earlier experiments, a new improved chemical group-separation procedure for mixtures of radioactive trace elements is outlined

  11. Kinetics of the complexation of dioxouranium(VI) with selected diphosphonic acids in acidic solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hines, M.A.; Sullivan, J.C.; Nash, K.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1993-04-28

    The kinetics of reactions of dioxouranium(VI) with diphosphonic acid complexants (methanediphosphonic acid (MDPA), 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA), and ethane-1,2-diphosphonic acid (E12DPA)) have been investigated in acidic solutions (pH 1-2) by stopped-flow spectrophotometry where arsenazo III is used as an indicator for the free uranyl ion. The complex formation reaction was acid independent at acidities above 0.03 M while the dissociation reaction had a direct dependence on the acidity over the range of hydrogen ion concentration 0.1-0.01 M. The measured first-order rate parameter is defined as k[sub obs] = k[sub f][UO[sub 2][sup 2+

  12. Effect of Na2CO3 degumming concentration on LiBr-formic acid-silk fibroin solution properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salt-acid system has been proved to be of high efficiency for silk fibroin dissolution. Using salt-acid system to dissolve silk, native silk fibrils can be preserved in the regenerated solution. Increasing experiments indicate that acquirement of silk fibrils in solution is strongly associated with the degumming process. In this study, the effect of sodium carbonate degumming concentration on solution properties based on lithium bromide-formic acid dissolution system was systematically investigated. Results showed that the morphology transformation of silk fibroin in solution from nanospheres to nanofibrils is determined by sodium carbonate concentration during the degumming process. Solutions containing different silk fibroin structure exhibited different rheological behaviors and different electrospinnability, leading to different electrospun nanofibre properties. The results have guiding significance for preparation and application of silk fibroin solutions.

  13. Studies of the Tc oxidation states in humic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bo; Liu Dejun; Yao Jun

    2010-01-01

    The oxidation state is an important aspect of the speciation of Tc in groundwater that contained organic substances due to it control the precipitation, complexation, sorption and colloid formation behavior of the Tc under HWL geological disposal conditions. In present work, the oxidation states of Tc were investigated using the LaCl 3 coagulation method and solution extraction method in aqueous solutions in which the humic acid concentration range is from 0 to 20 mg L -1 and the Tc (Ⅶ) concentration range is about 10 -8 mol l -1 . The radiocounting of 99 Tc was determined using liquid scintillation spectrometry. The humic acid will influence the radiocounting ratio of 99 Tc apparently, however, the quenching effect can be restrained once keep the volume of the cocktail to about twenty times of the sample volume. The LaCl 3 coagulation methods were carried out for the investigation of Tc oxidation states in humic acid aqueous systems at about pH 8. The tetraphenylarsonium chloride (IPA)-chloroform extraction method was used also simultaneously to investigation the concentrations of Tc (Ⅳ) and Tc (Ⅶ) for the availability of the LaCl 3 precipitation method, and the experimental results demonstrate that tetravalent technetium and pertechnetate concentrations are well agreement with the LaCl 3 precipitation method. These two experimental results demonstrated that Tc (Ⅶ) is very stable in the Tc (Ⅶ)-humic acid system during a 350 days experimental period, and the Tc (Ⅳ) concentrations are very lower, that is indicate that there didn't oxidizing reactions between the Fluka humic acid and Tc (Ⅶ) in aqueous solutions under anaerobic conditions. That is means the presence of humic acids even in anaerobic groundwater is disadvantage for the retardance of radionuclides. (authors)

  14. Studies of Tc oxidation states in humic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bo; Liu Dejun; Yao Jun

    2011-01-01

    The oxidation state of Tc is an important aspect of the speciation in groundwater which contained organic substances due to it control the precipitation, complexation, sorption and colloid formation behavior of the Tc under HWL geological disposal conditions. In present work, the oxidation states of Tc were investigated using the LaCl 3 coagulation method and solution extraction method in aqueous solutions in which the humic acid concentration range is from 0 to 20 mg/L and the Tc (VII) concentration is about 10 -8 mol/L. The radiocounting of 99 Tc was determined using liquid scintillation spectrometry. The humic acid will influence the radiocounting ratio of 99 Tc apparently, however, the quenching effect can be restrained once keep the volume of the cocktail to about twenty times of the sample volume. The LaCl 3 coagulation method was carried out for the investigation of Tc oxidation states in humic acid aqueous systems at about pH 8. The tetraphenylarsonium chloride (TPA)-chloroform extraction method was used also simultaneously to investigation the concentrations of Tc (IV) and Tc (VII) for the availability of the LaCl 3 precipitation method, and the experimental results demonstrate that tetravalent technetium and pertechnetate concentration are well agreement with the LaCl 3 precipitation method. These two experimental results demonstrated that Tc (VII) is very stable in the Tc (VII)-humic acid system during a 350 days experimental period, and the Tc (IV) concentrations are very lower, that is indicate that there didn't oxidizing reactions between the Fluka humic acid and Tc (VII) in aqueous solutions under anaerobic conditions. That means the presence of humic acids even in anaerobic groundwater is disadvantage for the retardance of radionuclides. (authors)

  15. Determination of free nitric acid in uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayankutty, P.C.; Ravi, S.; Nadkarni, M.N.

    1981-01-01

    Potentiometric titration of uranyl nitrate solution with sodium hydroxide exhibits two peaks. The first peak characterises the following reaction, UO 2 (C 2 O 4 )+NaOH Na[UO 2 (C 2 O 4 )(OH)]. This reaction, indicating the partial hydrolysis of uranyl oxalate complex, appears to be complete at pH9. If the titration is carried out to this end-point pH, the total alkali consumed can be equated to the sum of uranium content and the free acidity present in the sample volume. Based on this, a method was standardised to determine the free acidity in uranyl nitrate solution. The sample, taken in a solution of potassium oxalate previously adjusted to pH9, is titrated to this pH with standard sodium hydroxide. The free acidity in the sample can be computed by subtracting the alkali reacted with uranium from the total alkali consumed. Analyses of several synthetic samples containing uranium and nitric acid in a wide range of combinations indicate that the free acidity can be accurately determined by this method, if uranium concentration in the sample is known. The results are compared to those obtained by two other widely used methods, viz., (i) titration of pH7 in the presence of neutral potassium oxalate to suppress hydrolysis and (ii) separation of hydrolyzable ions on a cationic resin and alkali titration of the free acid released. The advantages of and the precision obtained with the present method over the above two methods are discussed. (author)

  16. On local strong solutions to the three-dimensional nonhomogeneous incompressible magnetohydrodynamic equations with density-dependent viscosity and vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sisi

    2018-04-01

    This paper concerns the three-dimensional nonhomogeneous incompressible magnetohydrodynamic equations with density-dependent viscosity and vacuum on Ω \\subset R^3. The domain Ω \\subset R^3 is a general connected smooth one, either bounded or unbounded. In particular, the initial density can have compact support when Ω is unbounded. First, we obtain the local existence and uniqueness of strong solution to the three-dimensional nonhomogeneous incompressible magnetohydrodynamic equations without any compatibility condition assumed on the initial data. Then, we also prove the continuous dependence of strong solution on the initial data under an additional compatibility condition.

  17. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Kalina, Dale G.; Kaplan, Louis; Mason, George W.

    1985-01-01

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions with an organic extractant having the formula: ##STR1## where .phi. is phenyl, R.sup.1 is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R.sup.2 is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  18. Sorption of molybdenum by cellulose polyphosphate from acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luneva, N.K.; Oputina, A.G.; Ermolenko, I.N.

    1985-01-01

    The sorption of molybdenum on cellulose polyphosphate from acid solutions of ammonium molybdate depending on the phosphorus content in samples, concentration and pH of the solution, sorption time is studied. It is shown that a maximum molybdenum content on the cellulose samples with different phosphorus content is pointed out at an ammonium molybdate concentration 0.02 M. Saturation of the sorption curve is attained at molar ratio of adsrbed molybdenum to phosphorus 1:4. In case of small fillings the compound with molybdenum to phosphorus ratio 1:10 is formed

  19. A Novel Method for Fabricating Double Layers Porous Anodic Alumina in Phosphoric/Oxalic Acid Solution and Oxalic Acid Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfang Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for fabricating ordered double layers porous anodic alumina (DL-PAA with controllable nanopore size was presented. Highly ordered large pore layer with interpore distance of 480 nm was fabricated in phosphoric acid solution with oxalic acid addition at the potential of 195 V and the small pore layer was fabricated in oxalic acid solution at the potential from 60 to 100 V. Experimental results show that the thickness of large pore layer is linearly correlative with anodizing time, and pore diameter is linearly correlative with pore widening time. When the anodizing potential in oxalic acid solution was adjusted from 60 to 100 V, the small pore layers with continuously tunable interpore distance from 142 to 241 nm and pore density from 1.94×109 to 4.89×109 cm−2 were obtained. And the interpore distance and the pore density of small pore layers are closely correlative with the anodizing potential. The fabricated DL-PAA templates can be widely utilized for fabrication of ordered nanomaterials, such as superhydrophobic or gecko-inspired adhesive materials and metal or semiconductor nanowires.

  20. Pulse Radiolysis of Adrenaline in Acid Aqueous Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gohn, M.; Getoff, N.; Bjergbakke, Erling

    1976-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis of adrenaline in acid aqueous solutions (pH 1–3) was carried out. The rate constants for the reactions of adrenaline with H and OH were determined: k(H + adr.) = (0·9±0·1) × 109 dm3 mol−1s−1; k(OH + adr.) = (1·65±0·15) × 1010 dm3 mol−1s−1. The H-adduct of adrenaline has two λmax...

  1. Volumetric studies of some amino acids in binary aqueous solutions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    0 values of glycine, L-alanine, and L-valine in aqueous MgCl2⋅6H2O solutions at. 298⋅15 K in order to describe the temperature dependence behaviour of partial molar quantities. Group contributions to partial molar volumes have been determined for the amino acids. The trends of transfer volumes (∆Vφ. 0) have been ...

  2. Decomposition mechanism of chromite in sulfuric acid-dichromic acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing; Liu, Cheng-jun; Li, Bao-kuan; Jiang, Mao-fa

    2017-12-01

    The sulfuric acid leaching process is regarded as a promising, cleaner method to prepare trivalent chromium products from chromite; however, the decomposition mechanism of the ore is poorly understood. In this work, binary spinels of Mg-Al, Mg-Fe, and Mg-Cr in the powdered and lump states were synthesized and used as raw materials to investigate the decomposition mechanism of chromite in sulfuric acid-dichromic acid solution. The leaching yields of metallic elements and the changes in morphology of the spinel were studied. The experimental results showed that the three spinels were stable in sulfuric acid solution and that dichromic acid had little influence on the decomposition behavior of the Mg-Al spinel and Mg-Fe spinel because Mg2+, Al3+, and Fe3+ in spinels cannot be oxidized by Cr6+. However, in the case of the Mg-Cr spinel, dichromic acid substantially promoted the decomposition efficiency and functioned as a catalyst. The decomposition mechanism of chromite in sulfuric acid-dichromic acid solution was illustrated on the basis of the findings of this study.

  3. Conformation of poly(γ-glutamic acid) in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroga, Yoshio; Nakaya, Asami; Inoue, Atsuki; Itoh, Daiki; Abiru, Masaya; Wada, Kaori; Takada, Masako; Ikake, Hiroki; Shimizu, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    Local conformation and overall conformation of poly(γ-DL-glutamic acid) (PγDLGA) and poly(γ-L-glutamic acid) (PγLGA) in aqueous solution was studied as a function of degree of ionization ε by (1) H-NMR, circular dichroism, and potentiometric titration. It was clarified that their local conformation is represented by random coil over an entire ε range and their overall conformation is represented by expanded random-coil in a range of ε > ε(*) , where ε(*) is about 0.3, 0.35, 0.45, and 0.5 for added-salt concentration of 0.02M, 0.05M, 0.1M, and 0.2M, respectively. In a range of ε acidic media. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Strong solutions for the Navier-Stokes equations on bounded and unbounded domains with a moving boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juergen Saal

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available It is proved under mild regularity assumptions on the data that the Navier-Stokes equations in bounded and unbounded noncylindrical regions admit a unique local-in-time strong solution. The result is based on maximal regularity estimates for the in spatial regions with a moving boundary obtained in [16] and the contraction mapping principle.

  5. Transformations of griseofulvin in strong acidic conditions--crystal structures of 2'-demethylgriseofulvin and dimerized griseofulvin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśniewska, Barbara; Jebors, Said; Coleman, Anthony W; Suwińska, Kinga

    2012-03-01

    The structure of griseofulvic acid, C16H15ClO6, at 100 K has orthorhombic (P2(1)2(1)2) symmetry. It is of interest with respect to biological activity. The structure displays intermolecular O-H...O, C-H...O hydrogen bonding as well as week C-H...pi and pi...pi interactions. In strong acidic conditions the griseofulvin undergoes dimerization. The structure of dimerized griseofulvin, C34H32C12O12 x C2H6O x H2O, at 100 K has monoclinic (P2(1)) symmetry. The molecule crystallized as a solvate with one ethanol and one water molecule. The dimeric molecules form intermolecular O-H...O hydrogen bonds to solvents molecules only but they interact via week C-H...O, C-H...pi, C-Cl...pi and pi...pi interactions with other dimerized molecules.

  6. Domains of analyticity for response solutions in strongly dissipative forced systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corsi, Livia; Feola, Roberto; Gentile, Guido

    2013-01-01

    We study the ordinary differential equation εx ¨ +x . +εg(x)=εf(ωt), where g and f are real-analytic functions, with f quasi-periodic in t with frequency vector ω. If c 0 ∈R is such that g(c 0 ) equals the average of f and g′(c 0 ) ≠ 0, under very mild assumptions on ω there exists a quasi-periodic solution close to c 0 with frequency vector ω. We show that such a solution depends analytically on ε in a domain of the complex plane tangent more than quadratically to the imaginary axis at the origin

  7. Effect of Intravenously Administered Crystalloid Solutions on Acid-Base Balance in Domestic Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, W

    2017-09-01

    Intravenous fluid therapy can alter plasma acid-base balance. The Stewart approach to acid-base balance is uniquely suited to identify and quantify the effects of the cationic and anionic constituents of crystalloid solutions on plasma pH. The plasma strong ion difference (SID) and weak acid concentrations are similar to those of the administered fluid, more so at higher administration rates and with larger volumes. A crystalloid's in vivo effects on plasma pH are described by 3 general rules: SID > [HCO3-] increases plasma pH (alkalosis); SID solutions has little to no effect on plasma pH because of their low titratable acidity. Appreciation of IV fluid composition and an understanding of basic physicochemical principles provide therapeutically valuable insights about how and why fluid therapy can produce and correct alterations of plasma acid-base equilibrium. The ideal balanced crystalloid should (1) contain species-specific concentrations of key electrolytes (Na + , Cl - , K + , Ca ++ , Mg ++ ), particularly Na + and Cl - ; (2) maintain or normalize acid-base balance (provide an appropriate SID); and (3) be isosmotic and isotonic (not induce inappropriate fluid shifts) with normal plasma. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. Protonation of maleic and fumaric acid in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ILINKA SPIREVSKA

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The protonations of maleic and fumaric acid in an acidic medium (aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid were followed spectrophotometrically at room temperature. The acid-base equilibria were characterised qualitatively and quantitatively. The pKBH+ values were determined using the Hammett equation, employing several acid functions in order to determine which of them describes best the protonation process of the studied organic acids. The thermodynamic pKBH+ values as well as those of the solvation parameters m, m* and f and of the thermodynamic protonation constants (or, rather, the pKa,p values were also defermined. The method of characteristic vector analysis (CVA was used to reconstruct the experimental spectra.

  9. Calorimetric investigation of solution heat of rare earth sulfates in acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasin, S.K.; Babkin, A.G.; Kessler, Yu.M.

    1978-01-01

    To determine the thermodynamic characteristics of sulfates of rare elements an adiabatic airtight calorimeter has been developed, enabling measurement of minor heat effects of processes in aggressive media with an absolute error of about 5x10 -3 cal, the temperature sensitivity being no less than 2x10 -5 C 0 . The calorimeter is schematically represented. Measured with the aid of the calorimeter was the heat of dissolution of TiOSO 4 x2H 2 O in chloric acid solutions

  10. Blow-Up of Solutions for a Class of Sixth Order Nonlinear Strongly Damped Wave Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huafei Di

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the blow-up phenomenon of sixth order nonlinear strongly damped wave equation. By using the concavity method, we prove a finite time blow-up result under assumptions on the nonlinear term and the initial data.

  11. Ion exchange behaviour of Zr, Hf, Nb and Pa in mixed acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monroy-Guzman, F.; Trubert, D.; Le Naour, C.

    2002-01-01

    A systematic study of the adsorbabilities of zirconium, hafnium, niobium and protactinium, elements with a chemical behaviour very similar, were realised in the systems Dowex 50 - oxalic acid, Dowex 50 - oxalic acid/HCl, Dowex 1 - oxalic acid, Dowex 1 - oxalic acid/HCl, BIO-RAD AGMP1 - oxalic acid/H 2 SO 4 and HDEHP - oxalic acid/H 2 SO 4 . These elements exhibited no significant adsorption on Dowex 50, while on the anionic exchange resins (Dowex 1 and BIO-RAD AGMP1) showed strong adsorption, particularly in oxalic acid and in mixed solutions at low concentrations of hydrochloric and sulphuric acids. This trend could be linked to the formation of anionic species of the types M(C 2 O 4 ) x (n-x) , MO(C 2 O 4 ) x (n-(2+x)) , M(C 2 O 4 H) x (n-x) and MO(C 2 O 4 H) x (n-(2+x)) , or mixed complexes of the form M(Y) y (C 2 O 4 ) x (n-x-y) , MO(Y) y (C 2 O 4 ) x (n-(2+x+y)) , where M n+ is the metallic cation and Y the ligand. The combination of two complexing agents alter the ion exchange behaviour of the above mentioned elements. In the case of system HDEHP, we suggest a procedure to separate these elements. (author)

  12. Concentration-Purification of Uranium from an Acid Leaching Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guettaf, H.; Becis, A.; Ferhat, K.; Hanou, K.; Bouchiha, D.; Yakoubi, K.; Ferrad, F.

    2009-11-01

    Chemical processes for the elaboration of uranium concentrate from uranium ore have been studied. This process is composed of successive units operations: crushing, milling, acid conventional leaching, filtration-washing, purification-concentration by ion exchange resins and uranium precipitation. The acid leaching operating conditions allow us to obtain a recovery uranium rate of 93%. The uranium concentration of the pregnant solution is approximately of 1.2 g/l. This value justifies the use of ion exchange resins to the concentration-purification of our pregnant solution. We have noticed that the pregnant solution contains a relatively high phosphate concentration which causes a premature uranium precipitation at pH=1.8. This pH value is in general, considered optimal to obtain the highest amount of fixed uranium by the anionic resin. To avoid the precipitation of uranium, the pH=1.5 has been fixed. We have obtained at this condition a good adsorption capacity. A 75% uranium concentrate have been elaborated, but the filtration of this concentrate has been very difficult. We have also noticed an excessive sulphate concentration. In order to improve this process, we have tested nitrates as eluant at different operating conditions.

  13. Spectrophotometric investigation of uranyl interaction with orthosilicic acid and polymeric silicon acids in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusov, A.B.; Fedoseev, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Interaction of uranyl ion with orthosilicic acid and polymeric silicic acids is investigated using spectrophotometry. Equilibrium constant of UO 2 2+ + Si(OH) 4 = UO 2 OSi(OH) 3 + + H + reaction is lg K=-2.56±0.09 in solutions with ionic strength I=0.1-0.2. Stability constant of UO 2 OSi(OH) 3 + complex is determined [ru

  14. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracy Elias; Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Jim Muller; Leigh R. Martin

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director - toluene, in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using ?, and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection was primarily used to assess the stable reaction products. GC-MS and LC-MS were used to confirm the results from HPLC. Free-radical nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In acidic medium, the ring substitution and side chain substitution and oxidation produced different nitro products. In ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to hydroxyl radical-produced cyclohexadienyl radical, and in side chain substitution they were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite toluene solution, radiolytic ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a free-radical reaction involving addition of the •NO2 radical.

  15. Quenching characteristics of bathocuproinedisulfonic acid, disodium salt in aqueous solution and copper sulfate plating solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Toshiaki; Hirakawa, Chieko; Takeshita, Michinori; Terasaki, Nao

    2018-04-01

    Bathocuproinedisulfonic acid, disodium salt (BCS) is generally used to detect Cu(I) through a color reaction. We newly found BCS fluorescence in the visible blue region in an aqueous solution. However, the fluorescence mechanism of BCS is not well known, so we should investigate its fundamental information. We confirmed that the characteristics of fluorescence are highly dependent on the molecular concentration and solvent properties. In particular, owing to the presence of the copper compound, the fluorescence intensity extremely decreases. By fluorescence quenching, we observed that a copper compound concentration of 10-6 mol/L or less could easily be measured in an aqueous solution. We also observed BCS fluorescence in copper sulfate plating solution and the possibility of detecting monovalent copper by fluorescence reabsorption.

  16. A steady Navier-Stokes model for compressible fluid with partially strong solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Muzereau, O.; Neustupa, Jiří; Penel, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 348, 11-12 (2010), s. 619-624 ISSN 1631-073X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/08/0012 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Navier-Stokes equations * Compressible fluids * Weak solution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.399, year: 2010 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1631073X10001160

  17. Robustness of strong solutions to the compressible Navier-Stokes system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bella, P.; Feireisl, Eduard; Jin, B.J.; Novotný, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 362, 1-2 (2015), s. 281-303 ISSN 0025-5831 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 320078 - MATHEF Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : compressible Navier-Stokes system * smooth solution * stability Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.366, year: 2015 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00208-014-1119-2

  18. Streptomyces clavuligerus shows a strong association between TCA cycle intermediate accumulation and clavulanic acid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Malule, Howard; Junne, Stefan; Nicolás Cruz-Bournazou, Mariano; Neubauer, Peter; Ríos-Estepa, Rigoberto

    2018-05-01

    Clavulanic acid (CA) is produced by Streptomyces clavuligerus (S. clavuligerus) as a secondary metabolite. Knowledge about the carbon flux distribution along the various routes that supply CA precursors would certainly provide insights about metabolic performance. In order to evaluate metabolic patterns and the possible accumulation of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates during CA biosynthesis, batch and subsequent continuous cultures with steadily declining feed rates were performed with glycerol as the main substrate. The data were used to in silico explore the metabolic capabilities and the accumulation of metabolic intermediates in S. clavuligerus. While clavulanic acid accumulated at glycerol excess, it steadily decreased at declining dilution rates; CA synthesis stopped when glycerol became the limiting substrate. A strong association of succinate, oxaloacetate, malate, and acetate accumulation with CA production in S. clavuligerus was observed, and flux balance analysis (FBA) was used to describe the carbon flux distribution in the network. This combined experimental and numerical approach also identified bottlenecks during the synthesis of CA in a batch and subsequent continuous cultivation and demonstrated the importance of this type of methodologies for a more advanced understanding of metabolism; this potentially derives valuable insights for future successful metabolic engineering studies in S. clavuligerus.

  19. Removal of Acid Green 25 from Aqueous Solution by Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Parimalam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorptive removal of Acid Green 25 by Ananas Comosus (L Activated carbon was investigated in this study. The effects of initial dye concentration, contact time, pH and temperature were studied for the adsorption of Acid Green 25 in batch mode. At 100 mg/L of initial dye concentration the adsorbent removes 182.6 mg/g of dye from solution; it further increases on increasing the temperature. The calculated values of ∆G° indicate that the adsorption process is spontaneous, negative ∆H° indicate that the adsorption process is exothermic and the positive value of ∆S° indicates the increase in randomness. The rate of dye adsorption follows pseudo second order model with an r2 value of 0. 999. Standard adsorption isotherms were used to fit the experimental equilibrium data. The Langmuir, Freundlich, and Tempkin models are appropriate to explain the adsorption phenomenon with good fit.

  20. Electrochemical Studies of Lead Telluride Behavior in Acidic Nitrate Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudnik E.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemistry of lead telluride stationary electrode was studied in nitric acid solutions of pH 1.5-3.0. E-pH diagram for Pb-Te-H2O system was calculated. Results of cyclic voltammetry of Pb, Te and PbTe were discussed in correlation with thermodynamic predictions. Anodic dissolution of PbTe electrode at potential approx. -100÷50 mV (SCE resulted in tellurium formation, while above 300 mV TeO2 was mainly produced. The latter could dissolve to HTeO+2 under acidic electrolyte, but it was inhibited by increased pH of the bath.

  1. Temperature Induced Aggregation and Clouding in Humic Acid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Shaffer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Humic acids in aqueous solution demonstrate inverse temperature-solubility relationships when solution conditions are manipulated to reduce coulombic repulsion among the humic polyanions. These effects were followed by dynamic light scattering (DLS measurements of the resulting aggregates, as well as the addition of a polarity sensitive fluorescent probe (pyrene. The humic solutions could be primed for temperature induced clouding by carefully lowering the pH to a point where hydration effects became dominant. The exact value of the cloud point (CP was a function of both pH and humate concentration. The CPs mostly lay in the range 50–90°C, but DLS showed that temperature induced aggregation proceeded from approximately 30°C onward. Similar effects could be achieved by adding multivalent cations at concentrations below those which cause spontaneous precipitation. The declouding of clouded humate solutions could be affected by lowering the temperature combined with mechanical agitation to disentangle the humic polymers.

  2. Study of the interactions of PAMAM-NH2 G4 dendrimer with selected natural amino acids in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buczkowski, Adam; Palecz, Bartlomiej

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Calorimetric titration and dilution calorimetry show strong interactions between PAMAM-NH 2 G4 dendrimer and amino acids. • The more polar the amino acid side chain, the more exothermic the effects of the direct interactions with dendrimer. • Macromolecule of PAMAM-NH 2 G4 dendrimer can coordinate 20 to 40 molecules of amino acid. -- Abstract: The interactions of PAMAM-NH 2 G4 dendrimer with selected natural amino acids (Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, Phe, Ser, Thr, Met, Asn, Gln, Pro and Trp) in aqueous solutions were measured with the use of the techniques of calorimetric titration and dilution calorimetry. The results of calorimetric measurements show strong interactions between PAMAM-NH 2 G4 dendrimer and amino acids with polar substituents. A macromolecule of PAMAM-NH 2 G4 dendrimer can coordinate 20 to 40 molecules of amino acid

  3. Beryllium Chelation by Dicarboxylic Acids in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael; Bauer, Andreas; Schmidbaur, Hubert

    1997-05-07

    Maleic and phthalic acids are found to react with Be(OH)(2), generated in situ from BeSO(4)(aq) and Ba(OH)(2)(aq), in aqueous solution at pH 3.0 or 4.4, respectively (25 degrees C), to give solutions containing the complexes (H(2)O)(2)Be[(OOCCH)(2)] (1) and (H(2)O)(2)Be[(OOC)(2)C(6)H(4)] (3). The products can be isolated in high yield and identified by microanalytical data. With 2 equiv of the dicarboxylic acids and the pH adjusted to 5.5 and 5.9, respectively, by addition of ammonia, the bis-chelate complexes [(NH(4))(+)](2){[Be[(OOCCH)(2)](2)}(2)(-) (2) and [(NH(4))(+)](2){Be[(OOC)(2)C(6)H(4)](2)}(2)(-) (4) are obtained, which can also be isolated. The compounds show distinct (9)Be, (1)H, and (13)C resonances in their NMR spectra in aqueous solutions. Layering of an aqueous solution of compound 4 with acetone at ambient temperature leads to the precipitation of single crystals suitable for an X-ray structure determination. This salt (5) was found to contain the bis-chelated dianion {Be[(OOC)(2)C(6)H(4)](2)}(2)(-) with the beryllium atom in the spiro center of two seven-membered rings and an overall geometry approaching closely C(2) symmetry. These anions are associated with two crystallographically independent but structurally similar counterions [MeC(O)CH(2)CMe(2)NH(3)](+), which are the product of a condensation reaction of the ammonium cation with the acetone solvent. In the crystal the ammonium hydrogen atoms of the cations form N-H.O hydrogen bonds with the oxo functions of the dianion.

  4. Systems solutions by lactic acid bacteria: from paradigms to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Willem M

    2011-08-30

    Lactic acid bacteria are among the powerhouses of the food industry, colonize the surfaces of plants and animals, and contribute to our health and well-being. The genomic characterization of LAB has rocketed and presently over 100 complete or nearly complete genomes are available, many of which serve as scientific paradigms. Moreover, functional and comparative metagenomic studies are taking off and provide a wealth of insight in the activity of lactic acid bacteria used in a variety of applications, ranging from starters in complex fermentations to their marketing as probiotics. In this new era of high throughput analysis, biology has become big science. Hence, there is a need to systematically store the generated information, apply this in an intelligent way, and provide modalities for constructing self-learning systems that can be used for future improvements. This review addresses these systems solutions with a state of the art overview of the present paradigms that relate to the use of lactic acid bacteria in industrial applications. Moreover, an outlook is presented of the future developments that include the transition into practice as well as the use of lactic acid bacteria in synthetic biology and other next generation applications.

  5. Effects of acidic solutions on sexual reproduction of Pteridium aquilinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, L.S.; Conway, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effects of acidic solutions on spermatozoid motility and fertilization of gametophytes of Pteridium aquilinum. Buffered solutions (approx 0.0025 m) were used to simulate exposures to acidic precipitation for up to a 3.5 hr exposure. Experimental results suggest that the spermatozoid population can be subdivided into several groups with respect to pH sensitivity: About 25% spermatozoids are immobile one min after exposure to pH 6.1 buffer while about an equal percentage remain motile after 30 min exposure to buffer of pH 5.1. Between these two response extremes are two other subpopulations. One is quite sensitive to pH but shows some recovery if pH is between 5.6 and 6.1, while the second subpopulation does not seem to exhibit any motility recovery at all but is more resistant to acidity than the first subpopulation. To complement experiments that evaluate spermatozoid responses, experiments were performed to view the process of fertilization under controlled environmental conditions as well as under the canopy of a forest. Fertilization of gametophytes in uncovered petri dishes under a forest canopy was similar to results in aseptic culture after gametophytes were exposed to various pH levels and 86.6 micrometers sulfate. Fertilization at pH 4.5 and 3.6 was about one-half that occurring at pH 6.1. Fertilization in gametophytes exposed to pH 3.0 was about 10-20% of that occurring at pH 6.1. Addition of 86.6 micrometers sulfate decreased fertilization under all culture conditions. These experimental results suggest that fertilization in p. Aquilinum may be used as a bioindicator of contaminants in rainwater. The results demonstrate that spermatozoid motility (and the process of fertilization) is more acid sensitive than gametophytic and sporophytic tissues.

  6. Characterization of 'strong-fragile' behaviour of glass-forming aqueous solutions by neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Branca, C; Galli, G; Magazù, S; Maisano, G; Migliardo, F

    2002-01-01

    Neutron-scattering measurements have been performed on trehalose/H sub 2 O and sucrose/H sub 2 O mixtures by using the spectrometer MIBEMOL at the Laboratoire Leon Brillouin (LLB, Saclay) as a function of temperature and concentration. In order to characterize the different rigidities of both the disaccharide/H sub 2 O mixtures, we have evaluated the R sub 1 (T sub g) parameter connected to the 'strong-fragile' classification of the systems according to Angell's nomenclature. (orig.)

  7. Intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine against copper corrosion in hydrochloric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Daquan, E-mail: zhdq@sh163.net [Department of Environmental Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Xie Bin; Gao Lixin; Cai Qirui [Department of Environmental Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Joo, Hyung Goun; Lee, Kang Yong [Stress Analysis and Failure Design Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-31

    The corrosion protection of copper by glutamic acid, cysteine, glycine and their derivative (glutathione) in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid solution has been studied by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The inhibition efficiency of the organic inhibitors on copper corrosion increases in the order: glutathione > cysteine > cysteine + glutamic acid + glycine > glutamic acid > glycine. Maximum inhibition efficiency for cysteine reaches about 92.9% at 15 mM concentration level. The glutathione can give 96.4% inhibition efficiency at a concentration of 10 mM. The molecular structure parameters were obtained by PM3 (Parametric Method 3) semi-empirical calculation. The intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine moieties in glutathione is attributed to the lower energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E{sub LUMO}) level and to the excess hetero-atom adsorption centers and the bigger coverage on the copper surface.

  8. Intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine against copper corrosion in hydrochloric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Daquan; Xie Bin; Gao Lixin; Cai Qirui; Joo, Hyung Goun; Lee, Kang Yong

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion protection of copper by glutamic acid, cysteine, glycine and their derivative (glutathione) in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid solution has been studied by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The inhibition efficiency of the organic inhibitors on copper corrosion increases in the order: glutathione > cysteine > cysteine + glutamic acid + glycine > glutamic acid > glycine. Maximum inhibition efficiency for cysteine reaches about 92.9% at 15 mM concentration level. The glutathione can give 96.4% inhibition efficiency at a concentration of 10 mM. The molecular structure parameters were obtained by PM3 (Parametric Method 3) semi-empirical calculation. The intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine moieties in glutathione is attributed to the lower energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E LUMO ) level and to the excess hetero-atom adsorption centers and the bigger coverage on the copper surface.

  9. Copper-Sulfate Pentahydrate as a Product of the Waste Sulfuric Acid Solution Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Radmila; Stevanović, Jasmina; Avramović, Ljiljana; Nedeljković, Dragutin; Jugović, Branimir; Stajić-Trošić, Jasna; Gvozdenović, Milica

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is synthesis of copper-sulfate pentahydrate from the waste sulfuric acid solution-mother liquor generated during the regeneration process of copper bleed solution. Copper is removed from the mother liquor solution in the process of the electrolytic treatment using the insoluble lead anodes alloyed with 6 mass pct of antimony on the industrial-scale equipment. As the result of the decopperization process, copper is removed in the form of the cathode sludge and is precipitated at the bottom of the electrolytic cell. By this procedure, the content of copper could be reduced to the 20 mass pct of the initial value. Chemical characterization of the sludge has shown that it contains about 90 mass pct of copper. During the decopperization process, the very strong poison, arsine, can be formed, and the process is in that case terminated. The copper leaching degree of 82 mass pct is obtained using H2SO4 aqueous solution with the oxygen addition during the cathode sludge chemical treatment at 80 °C ± 5 °C. Obtained copper salt satisfies the requirements of the Serbian Standard for Pesticide, SRPS H.P1. 058. Therefore, the treatment of waste sulfuric acid solutions is of great economic and environmental interest.

  10. Design requirements for uranium ion exchange from acidic solutions in a fluidized system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traut, D.E.; Nichols, I.L.; Seidel, D.C.

    1974-01-01

    A fluidized, countercurrent ion-exchange system was developed, operated, and evaluated by the Bureau of Mines in support of its objective to help assure an adequate uranium supply for future national needs. The system consisted of integrated multiple-compartment absorption and elution columns in which the solution flows are continuous, except for short periods when resin increments are withdrawn. The exchange of uranyl sulfate between a simulated acid-leach-uranium solution and a strong-base, ion-exchange resin was studied, together with subsequent elution using an acidified sodium chloride solution. The effects of the number of compartments, compartment height, amount of resin withdrawal, solution flow rate, and column diameter were investigated. Also examined were the kinetic and equilibrium relationships for the absorption and elution steps. The experimental data indicate a strong interdependence between variables. Solution retention time appears to be a major limiting variable in the absorption process, while resin residence time is the determining factor in the elution process. The columns system was efficient over a range of conditions, but close control was needed for optimum operation

  11. Solution of the Neutron transport equation in hexagonal geometry using strongly discontinuous nodal schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mugica R, C.A.; Valle G, E. del

    2005-01-01

    In 2002, E. del Valle and Ernest H. Mund developed a technique to solve numerically the Neutron transport equations in discrete ordinates and hexagonal geometry using two nodal schemes type finite element weakly discontinuous denominated WD 5,3 and WD 12,8 (of their initials in english Weakly Discontinuous). The technique consists on representing each hexagon in the union of three rhombuses each one of which it is transformed in a square in the one that the methods WD 5,3 and WD 12,8 were applied. In this work they are solved the mentioned equations of transport using the same discretization technique by hexagon but using two nodal schemes type finite element strongly discontinuous denominated SD 3 and SD 8 (of their initials in english Strongly Discontinuous). The application in each case as well as a reference problem for those that results are provided for the effective multiplication factor is described. It is carried out a comparison with the obtained results by del Valle and Mund for different discretization meshes so much angular as spatial. (Author)

  12. Strong solutions to the Stokes equations of a flow around a rotating body in weighted Lq spaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nečasová, Šárka; Schumacher, K.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 284, č. 13 (2011), s. 1701-1714 ISSN 0025-584X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190505; GA AV ČR IAA100190804; GA MŠk LC06052 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : strong solution * Stokes problem * weighted spaces Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.682, year: 2011 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ mana .200810166/abstract

  13. Strong solutions to a Navier–Stokes–Lamé system on a domain with a non-flat boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukavica, Igor; Ziane, Mohammed; Tuffaha, Amjad

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a Navier–Stokes–Lamé system modeling a fluid–structure interaction. For a general domain, we establish local well-posedness for strong solutions in which initial velocity u 0 belongs to H 1 while the initial data (w 0 , w 1 ) for the elasticity equation belongs to (H 3/2+k , H 1/2+k ) for any k in (0, k 0 ) where k 0 is an explicit positive constant

  14. Relative entropies, suitable weak solutions, and weak-strong uniqueness for the compressible Navier–Stokes system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard; Jin, B.J.; Novotný, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2012), s. 717-730 ISSN 1422-6928 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0917 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : suitable weak solution * weak-strong uniqueness * compressible Navier-Stokes system Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.415, year: 2012 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00021-011-0091-9

  15. Electrocatalytic hydrogenation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in acidic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Youngkook; Birdja, Yuvraj Y; Raoufmoghaddam, Saeed; Koper, Marc T M

    2015-05-22

    Electrocatalytic hydrogenation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is studied on solid metal electrodes in acidic solution (0.5 M H2 SO4 ) by correlating voltammetry with on-line HPLC product analysis. Three soluble products from HMF hydrogenation are distinguished: 2,5-dihydroxymethylfuran (DHMF), 2,5-dihydroxymethyltetrahydrofuran (DHMTHF), and 2,5-dimethyl-2,3-dihydrofuran (DMDHF). Based on the dominant reaction products, the metal catalysts are divided into three groups: (1) metals mainly forming DHMF (Fe, Ni, Cu, and Pb), (2) metals forming DHMF and DMDHF depending on the applied potentials (Co, Ag, Au, Cd, Sb, and Bi), and (3) metals forming mainly DMDHF (Pd, Pt, Al, Zn, In, and Sb). Nickel and antimony are the most active catalysts for DHMF (0.95 mM cm(-2) at ca. -0.35 VRHE and -20 mA cm(-2) ) and DMDHF (0.7 mM cm(-2) at -0.6 VRHE and -5 mA cm(-2) ), respectively. The pH of the solution plays an important role in the hydrogenation of HMF: acidic condition lowers the activation energy for HMF hydro-genation and hydrogenates the furan ring further to tetrahydrofuran. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Processes for working-up an aqueous fluosilicic acid solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpha O. Toure

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous fluosilicic acid solutions were once considered to be only adverse by-products of phosphoric acid production, which required treatment to prevent ecosystem destruction when discharged into the sea. However, a range of chemicals can be generated by the transformation of this industrial waste product. Through experiments undertaken in the laboratory, we have shown the possibility of caustic soda production. Volumetric analysis showed caustic soda to be present as a 6%– 7%solution with yields of about 70% – 80%by weight. Two processes were investigated for the caustification of sodium fluoride, using different precipitates: sodium chloride and ethanol and are described by modelling caustification curves. The activation energies of precipitation determined by semi-empirical correlations showed that precipitation by ethanol (EA = 933.536 J/mol was more successful than precipitation by sodium chloride (EA = 7452.405 J/mol. Analyses performed on the precipitates highlighted compositions that are essential and useful constituents in the cement industry.

  17. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Gracy, E-mail: gracy.elias@inl.go [Idaho National Laboratory, Chemical and Radiation Measurement Department, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2213 (United States); Mincher, Bruce J. [Idaho National Laboratory, Aqueous Separations and Radiochemistry Department, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6180 (United States); Mezyk, Stephen P. [California State University-Long Beach, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 1250 Bellflower Boulevard, Long Beach, CA 90840-3903 (United States); Muller, Jim [University of Utah, Department of Chemistry, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0850 (United States); Martin, Leigh R. [Idaho National Laboratory, Aqueous Separations and Radiochemistry Department, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6180 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the nitration of aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director toluene in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using {gamma} and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection, GC-MS and LC-MS, were used to assess the stable reaction products. Free-radical based nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In 6.0 M HNO{sub 3}, ring substitution, side chain substitution, and oxidation, produced different nitrated toluene products. For ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to cyclohexadienyl radicals, whereas for side chain substitution, these radicals were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite solutions, radiolytically-induced ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a direct free-radical reaction involving addition of the {sup {center_dot}N}O{sub 2} radical.

  18. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Gracy; Mincher, Bruce J.; Mezyk, Stephen P.; Muller, Jim; Martin, Leigh R.

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the nitration of aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director toluene in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using γ and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection, GC-MS and LC-MS, were used to assess the stable reaction products. Free-radical based nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In 6.0 M HNO3, ring substitution, side chain substitution, and oxidation, produced different nitrated toluene products. For ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to cyclohexadienyl radicals, whereas for side chain substitution, these radicals were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite solutions, radiolytically-induced ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a direct free-radical reaction involving addition of the rad NO2 radical.

  19. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, Gracy; Mincher, Bruce J.; Mezyk, Stephen P.; Muller, Jim; Martin, Leigh R.

    2011-01-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the nitration of aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director toluene in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using γ and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection, GC-MS and LC-MS, were used to assess the stable reaction products. Free-radical based nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In 6.0 M HNO 3 , ring substitution, side chain substitution, and oxidation, produced different nitrated toluene products. For ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to cyclohexadienyl radicals, whereas for side chain substitution, these radicals were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite solutions, radiolytically-induced ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a direct free-radical reaction involving addition of the · NO 2 radical.

  20. Sorption of As(V) from aqueous solution using acid modified carbon black.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Dipu; Satokawa, Shigeo; Kato, Shigeru; Kojima, Toshinori

    2009-03-15

    The sorption performance of a modified carbon black was explored with respect to arsenic removal following batch equilibrium technique. Modification was accomplished by refluxing the commercial carbon black with an acid mixture comprising HNO(3) and H(2)SO(4). Modification resulted in the substantial changes to the inherent properties like surface chemistry and morphology of the commercial carbon black to explore its potential as sorbent. The suspension pH as well as the point of zero charge (pH(pzc)) of the material was found to be highly acidic. The material showed excellent sorption performance for the removal of arsenic from a synthetic aqueous solution. It removed approximately 93% arsenic from a 50mg/L solution at equilibration time. The modified carbon black is capable of removing arsenic in a relatively broad pH range of 3-6, invariably in the acidic region. Both pseudo-first-order and second-order kinetics were applied to search for the best fitted kinetic model to the sorption results. The sorption process is best described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic. It has also been found that intra-particle diffusion is the rate-controlling step for the initial phases of the reaction. Modelling of the equilibrium data with Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms revealed that the correlation coefficient is more satisfactory with the Langmuir model although Freundlich model predicted a good sorption process. The sorption performance has been found to be strongly dependent on the solution pH with a maximum display at pH of 5.0. The temperature has a positive effect on sorption increasing the extent of removal with temperature up to the optimum temperature. The sorption process has been found to be spontaneous and endothermic in nature, and proceeds with the increase in randomness at the solid-solution interface. The spent sorbent was desorbed with various acidic and basic extracting solutions with KOH demonstrating the best result ( approximately 85% desorption).

  1. The Estimation of Acidic Behavior of Wood by Treatment with Aqueous NaHPO Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güneş Uçar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As a new approach, the acidity that wood exhibits under moderate conditions is assayed by stimulated dissociation of weak wood acids in lightly basic secondary phosphate solutions. To assure a sufficient dissociation of hardly soluble weak acids in the solution, the amount of wood suspended in Na2HPO4 solutions should be small but vary depending on the degree of acidity of wood species. However, the difficulties are associated with the titration of very dilute acids limiting the precision of the measurement. If the disintegrated wood is suspended in a secondary phosphate solution, the weak woods acids form the conjugate acid Na2HPO4 from secondary phosphate Na2HPO4 resulting in a pH fall of the solution. The decrease in the pH value in phosphate solution, which depends on the wood acidity, can be evaluated to estimate the acidity arising from wood under moderate conditions.

  2. An Exact Method to Determine the Conductivity of Aqueous Solutions in Acid-Base Titrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Rodríguez-Laguna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several works in the literature show that it is possible to establish the analytic equations to estimate the volume V of a strong base or a strong acid (Vb and Va, resp. being added to a solution of a substance or a mix of substances during an acid-base titration, as well as the equations to estimate the first derivative of the titration plot dpH/dV, and algebraic expressions to determine the buffer β capacity with dilution βdil. This treatment allows establishing the conditions of thermodynamic equilibria for all species within a system containing a mix of species from one or from various polyacid systems. The present work shows that it is possible to determine exactly the electric conductivity of aqueous solutions for these Brønsted acid-base titrations, because the functional relation between this property and the composition of the system in equilibrium is well known; this is achieved using the equivalent conductivity λi values of each of the ions present in a given system. The model employed for the present work confirms the experimental outcomes with the H2SO4, B(OH3, CH3COOH, and H3PO4 aqueous solutions’ titration.

  3. Double thermal transitions of type I collagen in acidic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Lingrong; Chen, Mingmao; Zhang, Qiqing

    2013-01-01

    Contributed equally to this work. To further understand the origin of the double thermal transitions of collagen in acidic solution induced by heating, the denaturation of acidic soluble collagen was investigated by micro-differential scanning calorimeter (micro-DSC), circular dichroism (CD), dynamic laser light scattering (DLLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and two-dimensional (2D) synchronous fluorescence spectrum. Micro-DSC experiments revealed that the collagen exhibited double thermal transitions, which were located within 31-37 °C (minor thermal transition, T(s) ∼ 33 °C) and 37-55 °C (major thermal transition, T(m) ∼ 40 °C), respectively. The CD spectra suggested that the thermal denaturation of collagen resulted in transition from polyproline II type structure to unordered structure. The DLLS results showed that there were mainly two kinds of collagen fibrillar aggregates with different sizes in acidic solution and the larger fibrillar aggregates (T(p2) = 40 °C) had better heat resistance than the smaller one (T(p1) = 33 °C). TEM revealed that the depolymerization of collagen fibrils occurred and the periodic cross-striations of collagen gradually disappeared with increasing temperature. The 2D fluorescence correlation spectra were also applied to investigate the thermal responses of tyrosine and phenylalanine residues at the molecular level. Finally, we could draw the conclusion that (1) the minor thermal transition was mainly due to the defibrillation of the smaller collagen fibrillar aggregates and the unfolding of a little part of triple helices; (2) the major thermal transition primarily arose from the defibrillation of the larger collagen fibrillar aggregates and the complete denaturation of the majority part of triple helices.

  4. Precipitation of plutonium from acidic solutions using magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    Plutonium (IV) is only marginally soluble in alkaline solution. Precipitation of plutonium using sodium or potassium hydroxide to neutralize acidic solutions produces a gelatinous solid that is difficult to filter and an endpoint that is difficult to control. If the pH of the solution is too high, additional species precipitate producing an increased volume of solids separated. The use of magnesium oxide as a reagent has advantages. It is added as a solid (volume of liquid waste produced is minimized), the pH is self-limiting (pH does not exceed about 8.5), and the solids precipitated are more granular (larger particle size) than those produced using KOH or NaOH. Following precipitation, the raffinate is expected to meet criteria for disposal to tank farms. The solid will be heated in a furnace to dry it and convert any hydroxide salts to the oxide form. The material will be cooled in a desiccator. The material is expected to meet vault storage criteria

  5. The photochemistry of neptunium in aqueous perchloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, H.A.; Toth, L.M.; Osborne, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    The photochemistry of neptunium ions in aqueous perchloric acid has been investigated using 254 and 300 nm UV radiation. In the absence of other reagents, Np(IV) and (V) oxidized to Np(VI), in a stepwise fashion, with individual quantum efficiencies for each step that vary from 0.02 to 0.004. Decreasing acid concentration favors the Np(IV) → Np(V) reaction whereas it hinders the Np(V) → Np(VI) photo-oxidation. When ethanol, acetaldehyde and other mild reducing agents are added to neptunium-perchloric acid solutions which are then photolyzed, the Np species are reduced to Np(III) in a stepwise fashion with individual quantum efficiencies that vary from 0.07 to 0.006. The overall photoredox reactions of neptunium are subject to competing secondary product reactions that become significant as the photolysis products accumulate. Absorption spectrophotometry was used to monitor the changes in Np oxidation states and reference spectra of the various Np oxidation states are given for 1.0 N HClO 4 . The Np species have absorption bands in the 300 to 1320 nm region that obey Beer's law only when they were properly resolved. (author)

  6. Oxidation and etching behaviors of the InAs surface in various acidic and basic chemical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Jihoon; Lee, Seunghyo; Lim, Sangwoo

    2017-04-01

    Indium arsenide (InAs) is the candidate of choice as a new channel material for application in future technologies beyond the Si-based electronic devices because it has a much higher electron mobility than silicon. In this study, the oxidation and etching behaviors of InAs (100) in various acidic and basic solutions, such as HF, HCl, H2SO4, NaOH, KOH, and NH4OH, were investigated. In addition, the effect of pH on the oxidation and etching reactions taking place on the InAs surface was studied using solutions with a pH ranging from 1 to 13. It was observed that the oxidation of the InAs surface was hindered in acidic solutions, which was attributed to the dissolution of the oxidized surface layer. In particular, the treatment of the InAs surface using a strongly acidic solution with a pH of less than 3 produced an oxide-free surface due to the predominant etching of the InAs surface. The addition of H2O2 to the acidic solutions greatly increased the etching rate of the InAs surface, which suggests that the oxidation process is the rate-limiting step in the sequence of reactions that occur during the etching of the InAs surface in acidic solutions. The etching of InAs was suppressed in neutral solutions, which resulted in the formation of a relatively thicker oxide layer on the surface, and mild etching of the InAs surface took place in basic solutions. However, in basic solutions, the addition of H2O2 did not significantly contribute to the increase of the oxidation state of the InAs surface; thus, its effect on the etching rate of InAs was smaller than in acidic solutions.

  7. Relaxation to equilibrium following photoacid dissociation in mineral acids and buffer solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pines, D; Nibbering, E T J; Pines, E

    2007-01-01

    The relaxation to the dissociation equilibrium of a weak acid undergoing a transient pK a change in the presence of a strong mineral acid has been the subject of considerable interest both experimentally and theoretically. Here we compare this process with the analogue event taking place in a buffer solution of a weak carboxylic acid. The comparison has been performed in identical pH and ionic strength conditions and at a sufficiently short timescale where the buffer can only affect the weak acid relaxation by proton scavenging. Although the two relaxation processes have been found to differ in their temporal behaviour, they have both resulted in identical equilibrium amplitudes of the photoacid. This observation reassures the well-known chemical wisdom that pK a values measured in buffer solutions do not depend on the specific chemical reactivity of the buffer. We analyse the essentially many-body relaxation problem in terms of a re-normalized geminate recombination reaction which persists over longer times than the exponential relaxation to equilibrium of homogenously distributed populations of the reactants

  8. An online computer method for the potentiometric titration of mixtures of a strong and a weak acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.

    1977-01-01

    A PDP-11 online computer method for the titration of mixtures or a strong and a weak acid is described.The method is based on multiparametric curve-fitting. One or the parameters found from the calculations is the dissociation constant of the weak acid, hence the method can be applied even when this

  9. Studies on extraction of beryllium by di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid from hydrochloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Yamani, I.S.; Farah, M.Y.; Adb El-Messieh, E.N.

    1978-01-01

    The distribution of Be between aqueous HCl solutions and organic phases of di-(2-ethyl hexyl)-phosphoric acid has been described. Equal volumes of both the tracer-labelled aqueous phase and the organic phase were mixed together in separatory funnels then shaken mechanically at room temperature. After centrifugation, aliquots of both phases were counted in the γ-scintillation counter. In all experiments, duplicates were made and average values recorded. The dependence of extraction on aqueous acidity, metal and extractant concentration as also on the diluent type, was thoroughly examined. The possible mechanism of extraction has been discussed in the light of results obtained. (T.G.)

  10. Hydrogen electrosorption on TiHg alloy in acidic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafarian, M.; Azizi, O.; Gobal, F.; Mahjani, M.G.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen evolution and electrosorption on/in TiHg alloy have been investigated in acidic solution using cyclic voltammetry, open circuit potential transient, steady-state polarization, chronopotentiometry and electrochemical impedance measurements. Comparison has been made with pure Ti. Cyclic voltammetry and open circuit potential measurements show that hydrogen absorption into the electrode material occurs during proton discharge. The steady-state polarization curves in the course of positive and negative potential scans illustrate that the formation of absorbed hydrogen slightly improves the electrocatalytic properties of the electrode. The hydrogen diffusion coefficient into the bulk of TiHg alloy was estimated as 1.24 x 10 -13 cm 2 s -1 from a chronoamperometry measurement and was compared with other materials. Finally, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to further characterize this electrode. The results show that this electrode displays porous behavior and may be well described by a serial combination of two parallel R-CPE circuit

  11. A novel solution to the Klein-Gordon equation in the presence of a strong rotating electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raicher, E.; Eliezer, S.; Zigler, A.

    2015-11-01

    The Klein-Gordon equation in the presence of a strong electric field, taking the form of the Mathieu equation, is studied. A novel analytical solution is derived for particles whose asymptotic energy is much lower or much higher than the electromagnetic field amplitude. The condition for which the new solution recovers the familiar Volkov wavefunction naturally follows. When not satisfied, significant deviation from the Volkov wavefunction is demonstrated. The new condition is shown to differ by orders of magnitudes from the commonly used one. As this equation describes (neglecting spin effects) the emission processes and the particle motion in Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) cascades, our results suggest that the standard theoretical approach towards this phenomenon should be revised.

  12. A novel solution to the Klein–Gordon equation in the presence of a strong rotating electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raicher, E., E-mail: erez.raicher@mail.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Department of Applied Physics, Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Eliezer, S. [Department of Applied Physics, Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Nuclear Fusion Institute, Polytechnic University of Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Zigler, A. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2015-11-12

    The Klein–Gordon equation in the presence of a strong electric field, taking the form of the Mathieu equation, is studied. A novel analytical solution is derived for particles whose asymptotic energy is much lower or much higher than the electromagnetic field amplitude. The condition for which the new solution recovers the familiar Volkov wavefunction naturally follows. When not satisfied, significant deviation from the Volkov wavefunction is demonstrated. The new condition is shown to differ by orders of magnitudes from the commonly used one. As this equation describes (neglecting spin effects) the emission processes and the particle motion in Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) cascades, our results suggest that the standard theoretical approach towards this phenomenon should be revised.

  13. A novel solution to the Klein–Gordon equation in the presence of a strong rotating electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Raicher

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Klein–Gordon equation in the presence of a strong electric field, taking the form of the Mathieu equation, is studied. A novel analytical solution is derived for particles whose asymptotic energy is much lower or much higher than the electromagnetic field amplitude. The condition for which the new solution recovers the familiar Volkov wavefunction naturally follows. When not satisfied, significant deviation from the Volkov wavefunction is demonstrated. The new condition is shown to differ by orders of magnitudes from the commonly used one. As this equation describes (neglecting spin effects the emission processes and the particle motion in Quantum Electrodynamics (QED cascades, our results suggest that the standard theoretical approach towards this phenomenon should be revised.

  14. Strong coupling effects during X-pulse CPMG experiments recorded on heteronuclear ABX spin systems: artifacts and a simple solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallurupalli, Pramodh; Scott, Lincoln; Williamson, James R.; Kay, Lewis E.

    2007-01-01

    Simulation and experiment have been used to establish that significant artifacts can be generated in X-pulse CPMG relaxation dispersion experiments recorded on heteronuclear ABX spin-systems, such as 13 C i - 13 C j - 1 H, where 13 C i and 13 C j are strongly coupled. A qualitative explanation of the origin of these artifacts is presented along with a simple method to significantly reduce them. An application to the measurement of 1 H CPMG relaxation dispersion profiles in an HIV-2 TAR RNA molecule where all ribose sugars are protonated at the 2' position, deuterated at all other sugar positions and 13 C labeled at all sugar carbons is presented to illustrate the problems that strong 13 C- 13 C coupling introduces and a simple solution is proposed

  15. Global well-posedness and decay estimates of strong solutions to a two-phase model with magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Huanyao; Zhu, Limei

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we consider the Cauchy problem for a two-phase model with magnetic field in three dimensions. The global existence and uniqueness of strong solution as well as the time decay estimates in H2 (R3) are obtained by introducing a new linearized system with respect to (nγ -n˜γ , n - n ˜ , P - P ˜ , u , H) for constants n ˜ ≥ 0 and P ˜ > 0, and doing some new a priori estimates in Sobolev Spaces to get the uniform upper bound of (n - n ˜ ,nγ -n˜γ) in H2 (R3) norm.

  16. The Activation Mechanism of Bi3+ Ions to Rutile Flotation in a Strong Acidic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xiao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lead hydroxyl compounds are known as rutile flotation of the traditional activated component, but the optimum pH range for flotation is 2–3 using styryl phosphoric acid (SPA as collector, without lead hydroxyl compounds in slurry solution. In this study, Bi3+ ions as a novel activator was investigated. The results revealed that the presence of Bi3+ ions increased the surface potential, due to the specific adsorption of hydroxyl compounds, which greatly increases the adsorption capacity of SPA on the rutile surface. Bi3+ ions increased the activation sites through the form of hydroxyl species adsorbing on the rutile surface and occupying the steric position of the original Ca2+ ions. The proton substitution reaction occurred between the hydroxyl species of Bi3+ ions (Bi(OHn+(3−n and the hydroxylated rutile surface, producing the compounds of Ti-O-Bi2+. The micro-flotation tests results suggested that Bi3+ ions could improve the flotation recovery of rutile from 61% to 90%, and from 61% to 64% for Pb2+ ions.

  17. Bactericidal Effect of Strong Acid Electrolyzed Water against Flow Enterococcus faecalis Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaogang; Tian, Yu; Zhao, Chunmiao; Qu, Tiejun; Ma, Chi; Liu, Xiaohua; Yu, Qing

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the bactericidal effect of strong acid electrolyzed water (SAEW) against flow Enterococcus faecalis biofilm and its potential application as a root canal irrigant. Flow E. faecalis biofilms were generated under a constant shear flow in a microfluidic system. For comparison, static E. faecalis biofilms were generated under a static condition on coverslip surfaces. Both the flow and static E. faecalis biofilms were treated with SAEW. Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, 5.25%) and normal saline (0.9%) were included as the controls. Bacterial reductions were evaluated using confocal laser scanning microscopy and the cell count method. Morphological changes of bacterial cells were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The confocal laser scanning microscopic and cell count results showed that SAEW had a bactericidal effect similar to that of 5.25% NaOCl against both the flow and static E. faecalis biofilms. The scanning electron microscopic results showed that smooth, consecutive, and bright bacteria surfaces became rough, shrunken, and even lysed after treated with SAEW, similar to those in the NaOCl group. SAEW had an effective bactericidal effect against both the flow and static E. faecalis biofilms, and it might be qualified as a root canal irrigant for effective root canal disinfection. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Plasma Modification of Poly Lactic Acid Solutions to Generate High Quality Electrospun PLA Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Fatemeh; Nikiforov, Anton; Morent, Rino; De Geyter, Nathalie

    2018-02-02

    Physical properties of pre-electrospinning polymer solutions play a key role in electrospinning as they strongly determine the morphology of the obtained electrospun nanofibers. In this work, an atmospheric-pressure argon plasma directly submerged in the liquid-phase was used to modify the physical properties of poly lactic acid (PLA) spinning solutions in an effort to improve their electrospinnability. The electrical characteristics of the plasma were investigated by two methods; V-I waveforms and Q-V Lissajous plots while the optical emission characteristics of the plasma were also determined using optical emission spectroscopy (OES). To perform a complete physical characterization of the plasma-modified polymer solutions, measurements of viscosity, surface tension, and electrical conductivity were performed for various PLA concentrations, plasma exposure times, gas flow rates, and applied voltages. Moreover, a fast intensified charge-couple device (ICCD) camera was used to image the bubble dynamics during the plasma treatments. In addition, morphological changes of PLA nanofibers generated from plasma-treated PLA solutions were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The performed plasma treatments were found to induce significant changes to the main physical properties of the PLA solutions, leading to an enhancement of electrospinnability and an improvement of PLA nanofiber formation.

  19. Uptake of ozone to mixed sodium bromide/ citric acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Tao; Steimle, Emilie; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Kato, Shunsuke; Lampimäki, Markus; Brown, Matthew; van Bokhoven, Jeroen; Nolting, Frithjof; Kleibert, Armin; Türler, Andreas; Ammann, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Sea-salt solution - air interfaces play an important role in the chemistry of the marine boundary layer. The reaction of ozone (O3) with bromide is of interest in the context of formation of photolabile halogens (Br2, BrCl) in the marine boundary layer. Recent experiments have suggested that the bromide oxidation rate is related to the surface concentration of bromide [1] and inversely related to the gas phase concentration of O3, an indication for a precursor mediated reaction at the surface [2]. So far, the effect of organics (such as those occurring at the ocean surface or in marine aerosols) on the reaction of O3 with bromide aerosols has not been studied yet. In our study we investigate the uptake kinetics of O3 to a mixed solution of sodium bromide (NaBr) and citric acid (CA), which represents highly oxidized organic compounds present in the environment, with a well-established coated wall flow tube technique, which leads to exposure of the film to O3 allowing the heterogeneous reactions to take place and the loss of O3 being measured. The results indicate that the uptake of O3 to the films with the higher bromide concentrations (0.34M and 4M) is independent of the gas phase concentration and roughly consistent with uptake limited by reaction in the bulk. For the lower bromide concentration (84mM), however, we observe a trend of the uptake coefficient to decrease with increasing O3 concentration, indicating an increasing importance of a surface reaction. In an attempt to constrain the kinetic data, we employed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to get insight into the surface composition of the aqueous solution - air interface. Previous XPS studies have shown that halide ion concentrations are enhanced at the aqueous solution air interface [3-4], which likely promotes the surface reactions of bromide or iodide with O3. A first XPS study of ternary solutions of KI with butanol indicated the importance of specific interactions of the cation with the alcohol

  20. Uptake of hypobromous acid (HOBr by aqueous sulfuric acid solutions: low-temperature solubility and reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. Iraci

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypobromous acid (HOBr is a key species linking inorganic bromine to the chlorine and odd hydrogen chemical families. We have measured the solubility of HOBr in 45-70wt% sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol composition. Over the temperature range 201-252 K, HOBr is quite soluble in sulfuric acid, with an effective Henry's law coefficient, H*=104-107mol L-1atm-1. H* is inversely dependent on temperature, with ΔH=-45.0±5.4 kJ mol-1 and ΔS=-101±24 J mol-1K-1 for 55-70wt% H2SO4 solutions. Our study includes temperatures which overlap both previous measurements of HOBr solubility. For uptake into 55-70wt% H2SO4, the solubility is described by log H*=(2349±280/T-(5.27±1.24. At temperatures colder than ~213K, the solubility of HOBr in 45wt% H2SO4 is at least a factor of five larger than in 70wt% H2SO4, with log H*=(3665±270/T-(10.63±1.23. The solubility of HOBr is comparable to that of HBr, indicating that upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols should contain equilibrium concentrations of HOBr which equal or exceed those of HBr. Upon uptake of HOBr into aqueous sulfuric acid in the presence of other brominated gases, particularly for 70wt% H2SO4 solution, our measurements demonstrate chemical reaction of HOBr followed by evolution of gaseous products including Br2O and Br2.

  1. High-Yield Production of Levulinic Acid from Pretreated Cow Dung in Dilute Acid Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialei Su

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural waste cow dung was used as feedstock for the production of a high value–added chemical levulinic acid (LA in dilute acid aqueous solutions. A high LA yield of 338.9 g/kg was obtained from the pretreated cow dung, which was much higher than that obtained from the crude cow dung (135 g/kg, mainly attributed to the breakage of the lignin fraction in the lignocellulose structure of the cow dung by potassium hydroxide (KOH pretreatment, and thus enhanced the accessibility of cow dung to the acid sites in the catalytic reaction. Meanwhile, another value-added chemical formic acid could be obtained with a yield of ca. 160 g/kg in the process, implying a total production of ca. 500 g/kg yield for LA and formic acid from the pretreated cow dung with the proposed process. The developed process was shown to be tolerant to high initial substrate loading with a satisfied LA yield. This work provides a promising strategy for the value-increment utilization of liglocellulosic agricultural residues.

  2. High-Yield Production of Levulinic Acid from Pretreated Cow Dung in Dilute Acid Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jialei; Shen, Feng; Qiu, Mo; Qi, Xinhua

    2017-02-14

    Agricultural waste cow dung was used as feedstock for the production of a high value-added chemical levulinic acid (LA) in dilute acid aqueous solutions. A high LA yield of 338.9 g/kg was obtained from the pretreated cow dung, which was much higher than that obtained from the crude cow dung (135 g/kg), mainly attributed to the breakage of the lignin fraction in the lignocellulose structure of the cow dung by potassium hydroxide (KOH) pretreatment, and thus enhanced the accessibility of cow dung to the acid sites in the catalytic reaction. Meanwhile, another value-added chemical formic acid could be obtained with a yield of ca. 160 g/kg in the process, implying a total production of ca. 500 g/kg yield for LA and formic acid from the pretreated cow dung with the proposed process. The developed process was shown to be tolerant to high initial substrate loading with a satisfied LA yield. This work provides a promising strategy for the value-increment utilization of liglocellulosic agricultural residues.

  3. Compatible solute influence on nucleic acids: Many questions but few answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Compatible solutes are small organic osmolytes including but not limited to sugars, polyols, amino acids, and their derivatives. They are compatible with cell metabolism even at molar concentrations. A variety of organisms synthesize or take up compatible solutes for adaptation to extreme environments. In addition to their protective action on whole cells, compatible solutes display significant effects on biomolecules in vitro. These include stabilization of native protein and nucleic acid structures. They are used as additives in polymerase chain reactions to increase product yield and specificity, but also in other nucleic acid and protein applications. Interactions of compatible solutes with nucleic acids and protein-nucleic acid complexes are much less understood than the corresponding interactions of compatible solutes with proteins. Although we may begin to understand solute/nucleic acid interactions there are only few answers to the many questions we have. I summarize here the current state of knowledge and discuss possible molecular mechanisms and thermodynamics. PMID:18522725

  4. Sustainable Soil Washing: Shredded Card Filtration of Potentially Toxic Elements after Leaching from Soil Using Organic Acid Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Christopher; Drábek, Ondřej; Tejnecký, Václav; Jehlička, Jan; Michon, Ninon; Borůvka, Luboš

    2016-01-01

    Shredded card (SC) was assessed for use as a sorbent of potentially toxic elements (PTE) carried from contaminated soil in various leachates (oxalic acid, formic acid, CaCl2, water). We further assessed SC for retention of PTE, using acidified water (pH 3.4). Vertical columns and a peristaltic pump were used to leach PTE from soils (O and A/B horizons) before passing through SC. Sorption onto SC was studied by comparing leachates, and by monitoring total PTE contents on SC before and after leaching. SC buffers against acidic soil conditions that promote metals solubility; considerable increases in solution pH (+4.49) were observed. Greatest differences in solution PTE content after leaching with/without SC occurred for Pb. In oxalic acid, As, Cd, Pb showed a high level of sorption (25, 15, and 58x more of the respective PTE in leachates without SC). In formic acid, Pb sorption was highly efficient (219x more Pb in leachate without SC). In water, only Pb showed high sorption (191x more Pb in leachate without SC). In desorption experiments, release of PTE from SC varied according to the source of PTE (organic/mineral soil), and type of solvent used. Arsenic was the PTE most readily leached in desorption experiments. Low As sorption from water was followed by fast release (70% As released from SC). A high rate of Cd sorption from organic acid solutions was followed by strong retention (~12% Cd desorption). SC also retained Pb after sorption from water, with subsequent losses of ≤8.5% of total bound Pb. The proposed use of this material is for the filtration of PTE from extract solution following soil washing. Low-molecular-mass organic acids offer a less destructive, biodegradable alternative to strong inorganic acids for soil washing. PMID:26900684

  5. Sustainable Soil Washing: Shredded Card Filtration of Potentially Toxic Elements after Leaching from Soil Using Organic Acid Solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ash

    Full Text Available Shredded card (SC was assessed for use as a sorbent of potentially toxic elements (PTE carried from contaminated soil in various leachates (oxalic acid, formic acid, CaCl2, water. We further assessed SC for retention of PTE, using acidified water (pH 3.4. Vertical columns and a peristaltic pump were used to leach PTE from soils (O and A/B horizons before passing through SC. Sorption onto SC was studied by comparing leachates, and by monitoring total PTE contents on SC before and after leaching. SC buffers against acidic soil conditions that promote metals solubility; considerable increases in solution pH (+4.49 were observed. Greatest differences in solution PTE content after leaching with/without SC occurred for Pb. In oxalic acid, As, Cd, Pb showed a high level of sorption (25, 15, and 58x more of the respective PTE in leachates without SC. In formic acid, Pb sorption was highly efficient (219x more Pb in leachate without SC. In water, only Pb showed high sorption (191x more Pb in leachate without SC. In desorption experiments, release of PTE from SC varied according to the source of PTE (organic/mineral soil, and type of solvent used. Arsenic was the PTE most readily leached in desorption experiments. Low As sorption from water was followed by fast release (70% As released from SC. A high rate of Cd sorption from organic acid solutions was followed by strong retention (~12% Cd desorption. SC also retained Pb after sorption from water, with subsequent losses of ≤8.5% of total bound Pb. The proposed use of this material is for the filtration of PTE from extract solution following soil washing. Low-molecular-mass organic acids offer a less destructive, biodegradable alternative to strong inorganic acids for soil washing.

  6. Isothermal heat measurements of TBP-nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.R.; Cavin, W.S.

    1994-01-01

    Net heats of reaction were measured in an isothermal calorimeter for both single phase (organic) and two phase (organic and aqueous) TBP/HNO 3 reacting solutions at temperatures above 100 C. The oxidation rate constant was determined to be 5.4E-4 min -1 at 110 C for an open ''vented'' system as compared to 1.33 E-3 min -1 in the closed system. The heat released per unit material oxidized was also reduced. The oxidation in both phases was found to be first order in nitric acid and pseudo-zero order in butylnitrate and water. The hydrolysis (esterification) rate constant determined by Nichols' (1.33E-3 min -1 ) fit the experimental data from this work well. Forced evaporation of the volatile components by the product gases from oxidation resulted in a cooling mechanism which more than balanced the heat from the oxidation reaction in the two-phased systems. Rate expressions were derived and rate constants determined for both the single and two phase systems. An approximating mathematical model was developed to fit the experimental data and to extrapolate beyond the experimental conditions. This model shows that one foot of ''reacting'' 14.3M HNO 3 aqueous phase solution at 121 C will transport sufficient water to the organic phase to replace evaporative losses, maintaining endothermicity, for organic layers up to 12.2 + 6.0 feet deep. If the pressure in a reacting system is allowed to increase due to insufficient venting the temperature of the organic phase would increase in temperature to reach a new equilibrium. The rate of oxidation would increase not only due to the increase in temperature but also from the increased concentration of dissolved HNO 3 reduction products. Another important factor is that the cooling system described in this work becomes less effective as the total pressure increases. These factors probably contributed to the explosion at Tomsk

  7. A contribution to the problem of strong acid determination in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieter Klockow; Helmut Denzinger; Gerhard R& #246; nicke; Gerhard nicke

    1976-01-01

    The main indicator for acidic substances in the atmosphere is, now as before, the pH of rainwater. Factors influencing the acidity of precipitation are discussed, using results of air monitoring stations in Germany.

  8. Reaction of aromatic azides with strong acids: formation of fused nitrogen heterocycles and arylamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Marcia de

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe in this paper the action of trifluoroacetic acid, trifluoromethanesulfonic acid and aluminum chloride upon ortho-substituted aryl azides to form indoles, azepines and arylamines in good yields. The protonated azides lose nitrogen to form arylnitrenium ion intermediates which undergo intramolecular aromatic N-substitution. The acid decomposition of aryl azides is compared with reported thermolyses.

  9. Isolation of a thermostable acid phytase from Aspergillus niger UFV-1 with strong proteolysis resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo S. Monteiro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An Aspergillus niger UFV-1 phytase was characterized and made available for industrial application. The enzyme was purified via ultrafiltration followed by acid precipitation, ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. This protein exhibited a molecular mass of 161 kDa in gel filtration and 81 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, indicating that it may be a dimer. It presented an optimum temperature of 60 °C and optimum pH of 2.0. The KM for sodium phytate hydrolysis was 30.9 mM, while the kcat and kcat/KM were 1.46 ×105 s−1 and 4.7 × 106s−1.M−1, respectively. The purified phytase exhibited broad specificity on a range of phosphorylated compounds, presenting activity on sodium phytate, p-NPP, 2- naphthylphosphate, 1- naphthylphosphate, ATP, phenyl-phosphate, glucose-6-phosphate, calcium phytate and other substrates. Enzymatic activity was slightly inhibited by Mg2+, Cd2+, K+ and Ca2+, and it was drastically inhibited by F−. The enzyme displayed high thermostability, retaining more than 90% activity at 60 °C during 120 h and displayed a t1/2 of 94.5 h and 6.2 h at 70 °C and 80 °C, respectively. The enzyme demonstrated strong resistance toward pepsin and trypsin, and it retained more than 90% residual activity for both enzymes after 1 h treatment. Additionally, the enzyme efficiently hydrolyzed phytate in livestock feed, liberating 15.3 μmol phosphate/mL after 2.5 h of treatment.

  10. Column chromatographic boron isotope separation at 5 and 17 MPa with diluted boric acid solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musashi, Masaaki; Oi, Takao; Matsuo, Motoyuki; Nomura, Masao

    2008-08-01

    Boron isotopic fractionation factor (S) between boron taken up in strongly basic anion exchange resin and boron in aqueous solution was determined by breakthrough column chromatography at 5 and 17 MPa at 25 degrees C, using 0.1 mM boric acid solution as feed solution. The S values obtained were 1.018 and 1.012, respectively, which were smaller than the value reported by using the same chromatographic method at the atmospheric pressure at 25 degrees C with the boron concentration of 10mM, but were larger than the values under the same condition with much higher concentration of 100 and 501 mM. Calculations based on the theory of isotope distribution between two phases estimated that 21% (5 MPa) and 47% (17 MPa) of boron taken up in the resin phase was in the three-coordinated B(OH)(3)-form, instead of in the four-coordinated B(OH)(4)-form, at high pressures even with a very diluted boric acid solution. We discussed the present results by introducing (1) hydration and (2) a partial molar volume difference between isotopic molecules. Borate may have been partially dehydrated upon transfer from the solution phase to the resin phase at high pressures, which resulted in smaller S values compared with those at the atmospheric pressure. Instead, it may be possible that the difference in the isotopic partial molar volume difference between B(OH)(3) and B(OH)(4)(-) caused the S value to decrease with increasing pressure.

  11. Calorimetric study of interaction of barium hydroxide with diluted solutions of hydrofluoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurbanov, A.R.; Sharipov, D.Sh.

    1993-01-01

    Present article is devoted to calorimetric study of interaction of barium hydroxide with diluted solutions of hydrofluoric acid. The calorimetric study of interaction of barium hydroxide with diluted solutions of hydrofluoric acid was carried out in order to determine the thermal effects of reactions. The results of interaction of Ba(OH) 4 ·8H 2 O with 5, 10, and 20% solution of hydrofluoric acid were considered.

  12. Characteristics of alkali activated material (geopolymer) in sulfuric acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simatupang, Partogi H.

    2017-09-01

    Alkali Activated Material (AAM) or Geopolymer is a solid material which made by mixing rich silica alumina material with alkaline activator. AAM is a well known candidate to replace cement based material. Many researches have claimed that AAM has better durability compared to cement based material in agressive environment. However, there was rare paper presented the direct comparison of material characteristics between Class F fly ash based AAM and Class C fly ash based AAM in such aggresive environment. Because of that, this paper present material characteristics of Class F fly ash based AAM and Class C fly ash based AAM if the materials were immersed in 10% sulfuric acid solution for 65 days. Material characteristics evaluated were (1) weight loss, (2) mineral of the material which evaluated by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), (3) morphology and oxide compounds of material which evaluated by SEM/EDXA (Scanning Electron Microscopic/Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analyzer) and (4) compound bond which evaluated by FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra Red) Spectroscopy Testing. Alkali Activated Material used were Class F fly ash based AAM Mortar and Class C fly ash based AAM Mortar. The result is a quite difference of material characteristics between Class F fly ash based AAM and Class C fly ash based AAM.

  13. Pulse radiolysis of adrenaline in acid aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohn, M.; Getoff, N.; Bjergbakke, E.

    1976-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis of adrenaline in acid aqueous solutions (pH 1 to 3) was carried out. The rate constants for the reactions of adrenaline with H and 0H were determined: k(H + adr.) = (0.9 +- 0.1) x 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 ; k(0H + adr.) = (1.65 +- 0.15) x 10 10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . The H-adduct of adrenaline has two lambdasub(max), at 280 and 355 nm, with epsilon 280 = 420 m 2 mol -1 and epsilon 355 = 390 m 2 mol -1 , which disappears according to a first order reaction, k 1 = 1.4 x 10 3 s -1 . The spectra formed by 0H attack was assigned to the corresponding benzoxy radical with absorption maxima at 285 and 365 nm and epsilon 285 = 620 m 2 mol -1 and epsilon 365 = 105 m 2 mol -1 . Due to the overlapping of the intermediates, no decay kinetics could be obtained. (author)

  14. Selective Adsorption of Ag+ on a New Cyanuric-Thiosemicarbazide Chelating Resin with High Capacity from Acid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Lin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A new cyanuric-thiosemicarbazid (TSC-CC chelating resin was synthesized and employed to selectively adsorb Ag+ from acid solutions. The effects of acid concentration, initial concentration of Ag+, contact time and coexisting ions were investigated. The optimal acid concentration was 0.5 mol/L. The adsorption capacity of Ag+ reached 872.63 mg/g at acid concentration of 0.5 mol/L. The adsorption isotherm was fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model and the kinetic data preferably followed the pseudo-second order model. The chelating resin showed a good selectivity for the Ag+ adsorption from acid solutions. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS were used to study the adsorption mechanism. The chelating and ionic interaction was mainly adsorption mechanism. The adsorbent presents a great potential in selective recovery Ag+ from acid solutions due to the advantage of high adsorption capacity and adapting strongly acidic condition. The recyclability indicated that the (TSC-CC resin had a good stability and can be recycled as a promising agent for removal of Ag+.

  15. A method for calculating the acid-base equilibria in aqueous and nonaqueous electrolyte solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanganov, B. B.; Alekseeva, I. A.

    2017-06-01

    Concentrations of particles in acid-base equilibria in aqueous and nonaqueous solutions of electrolytes are calculated on the basis of logarithmic charts, activity coefficients, and equilibrium constants.

  16. Hyaluronic acid solution injection for upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding after failed conventional endoscopic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyung Hun

    2014-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid solution injection can be an additional endoscopic modality for controlling bleeding in difficult cases when other techniques have failed. We evaluated 12 cases in which we used hyaluronic acid solution injection for stopping bleeding. Immediately following hyaluronic acid solution injection, bleeding was controlled in 11 out of 12 cases. There was no clinical evidence of renewed bleeding in 11 cases during follow up.Hyaluronic acid solution injection can be a simple and efficient additional method for controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding after failed endoscopic therapy. © 2013 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2013 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  17. Pulse radiolysis of pyridinecarboxylic acids in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solar, S.; Getoff, N.; Sehested, K.

    1991-01-01

    The reactivity of OH, e(aq)- and H radicals towards aqueous carboxypyridines: picolinic acid (2-pyridinecarboxylic acid), PA; isonicotinic acid (4-pyridinecarboxylic acid), i-NA; 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 2,6-PDCA; and 3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 3,5-PDCA was investigated in the pH-range 1...... radical are: 20% for PA, 75% for i-NA, 60% for 2,6-PDCA and 25% for 3,5-PDCA (a yield of 50% has been found earlier for nicotinic acid, NA)....

  18. Enhanced dispersion stability and mobility of carboxyl-functionalized carbon nanotubes in aqueous solutions through strong hydrogen bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahk, Yeon Kyoung; He, Xu; Gitsis, Emmanouil; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Kim, Nayoung; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Dispersion of carbon nanotubes has been heavily studied due to its importance for their technical applications, toxic effects, and environmental impacts. Common electrolytes, such as sodium chloride and potassium chloride, promote agglomeration of nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. On the contrary, we discovered that acetic electrolytes enhanced the dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with carboxyl functional group through the strong hydrogen bond, which was confirmed by UV–Vis spectrometry, dispersion observations and aerosolization-quantification method. When concentrations of acetate electrolytes such as ammonium acetate (CH 3 CO 2 NH 4 ) and sodium acetate (CH 3 CO 2 Na) were lower than 0.03 mol per liter, MWCNT suspensions showed better dispersion and had higher mobility in porous media. The effects by the acetic environment are also applicable to other nanoparticles with the carboxyl functional group, which was demonstrated with polystyrene latex particles as an example

  19. Evaluation of acid neutralizing capacity data for solutions containing natural organic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, K.J.; Serkiz, S.M.; Perdue, E.M. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta (USA))

    1990-05-01

    When the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of an aqueous solution is measured by an acidimetric titration, the measured parameter (ANC{sub t}) is generally assumed to correspond to the ANC of the sample (ANC{sub i}). This paper demonstrates that ANC{sub t} actually corresponds to ANC{sub i} - ANC{sub e}, where ANC{sub e} is the ANC of the sample at the titration endpoint. This relationship applies whether the endpoint occurs at a fixed pH or is determined by a Gran plot. When the sample contains organic acids, ANC{sub e} is generally non-zero and its neglect can introduce serious errors into the interpretation of ANC titration data. This paper presents computer simulations of ANC titrations in systems containing both carbonate and organic alkalinity, using a realistic thermodynamic model of the acidities of natural organic acids. The necessity of considering ANC{sub e} is demonstrated both computationally and by analysis of published results in which discrepancies between Gran ANC values and anion deficits could not previously be explained.

  20. A pulse radiolysis study of salicylic acid and 5-sulpho-salicylic acid in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, Kamal; Mukherjee, T.

    2006-01-01

    Reactions of H, OH, e aq - and some one-electron oxidants have been studied with salicylic acid and 5-sulpho-salicylic acid in aqueous solutions. Rate constants for the reaction of e aq - with these compounds were of the order of 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 and this reaction led to the formation of reducing radicals which could transfer electron to methyl viologen. Other one-electron reductants were not able to reduce these compounds. OH radicals reacted with these compounds by addition pathway with very high rate constants (>10 10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 ) while O - radical anions could oxidize these molecules to give phenoxyl type of radicals. Amongst the one-electron oxidants, only N 3 radicals and SO 4 - radicals could oxidize salicylic acid while 5-sulpho-salicylic acid could be oxidized only by SO 4 - radicals indicating that while one-electron reduction potential for semi-oxidized SA may be o1 for N 3 ? radical), it is more than 1.33V vs. NHE for semi-oxidized SSA species

  1. Uptake of Hypobromous Acid (HOBr) by Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions: Low-Temperature Solubility and Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Ashbourn, Samatha F. M.; Rammer, Thomas A.; Golden, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Hypobromous acid (HOBr) is a key species linking inorganic bromine to the chlorine and odd hydrogen chemical families. We have measured the solubility of HOBr in 45 - 70 wt% sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol composition. Over the temperature range 201 - 252 K, HOBr is quite soluble in sulfuric acid, with an effective Henry's law coefficient, H* = 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 7) mol/L/atm. H* is inversely dependent on temperature, with Delta H = -46.2 kJ/mol and Delta S = -106.2 J/mol/K for 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4 solutions. Our study includes temperatures which overlap both previous measurements of HOBr solubility. For uptake into aqueous 45 wt% H2SO4, the solubility can be described by log H* = 3665/T - 10.63. For 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4, log H* = 2412/T - 5.55. At temperatures colder than approx. 213 K, the solubility of HOBr in 45 wt% H2SO4 is noticeably larger than in 70 wt% H2SO4. The solubility of HOBr is comparable to that of HBr, indicating that upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols should contain equilibrium concentrations of HOBr which equal or exceed those of HBr. Our measurements indicate chemical reaction of HOBr upon uptake into aqueous sulfuric acid in the presence of other brominated gases followed by evolution of gaseous products including Br2O and Br2, particularly at 70 wt% H2SO4.

  2. Extraction equilibrium of indium(III) from nitric acid solutions by di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid dissolved in kerosene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hung-Sheng; Tsai, Teh-Hua

    2012-01-04

    The extraction equilibrium of indium(III) from a nitric acid solution using di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) as an acidic extractant of organophosphorus compounds dissolved in kerosene was studied. By graphical and numerical analysis, the compositions of indium-D2EHPA complexes in organic phase and stoichiometry of the extraction reaction were examined. Nitric acid solutions with various indium concentrations at 25 °C were used to obtain the equilibrium constant of InR₃ in the organic phase. The experimental results showed that the extraction distribution ratios of indium(III) between the organic phase and the aqueous solution increased when either the pH value of the aqueous solution and/or the concentration of the organic phase extractant increased. Finally, the recovery efficiency of indium(III) in nitric acid was measured.

  3. Serum uric acid: A strong and independent predictor of metabolic syndrome after adjusting for body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tae Yang; Jee, Jae Hwan; Bae, Ji Cheol; Jin, Sang-Man; Baek, Jong-Ha; Lee, Moon-Kyu; Kim, Jae Hyeon

    2016-04-01

    Some observational studies have suggested that serum uric acid (SUA) levels are one of the determinants of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, previous studies reported combined results for men and women after adjusting for sex and few studies take body composition into consideration. Therefore, we performed this sex-specific longitudinal study to investigate how baseline SUA levels influence incident MetS, including body composition as an adjusting factor in a large number of subjects. A total of 14,442 participants (8715 men and 5727 women) participating in a medical health check-up program without diagnosed MetS at baseline were enrolled. Separate analyses were performed for men and women including body composition as a confounding factor. Cox proportional hazards models were used to quantify independent associations between SUA levels and incident MetS. During 63,940person-years of follow-up, there were 4215 (2974 men, 1241 women) incident cases of MetS between 2006 and 2012. After adjustments for age, systolic BP, diastolic BP, BMI, eGFR, smoking status, TG, LDL-C, HDL-C, fasting glucose, and proportion of fat-free mass (100-fat mass, %), the hazard ratios (HR) [95% confidence interval (CI)] for incident MetS comparing the second, the third, and the fourth quartiles to the first quartile of SUA levels were 0.862 (0.770-0.965), 1.102 (0.991-1.225), and 1.246 (1.121-1.385) in men (p for trend<0.001), and 1.045 (0.862-1.266), 1.251 (1.050-1.490), and 1.321 (1.109-1.574) in women (p for trend<0.001), respectively. As a continuous variable, in fully-adjusted models, the HRs (95% CI) for incident MetS associated with each increase of 1mg/dl of SUA levels were 1.094 (1.060-1.130) in men (p<0.001) and 1.148 (1.072-1.228) in women (p<0.001), respectively. We demonstrated that SUA levels are strong and independent predictors of MetS. This relationship remained significant after full adjustments for multiple associated confounders including body composition in both

  4. Solute transport analysis in pH-responsive, complexing hydrogels of poly(methacrylic acid-g-ethylene glycol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, A M; Peppas, N A

    1999-01-01

    We report on the preparation and properties of hydrogels of poly(methacrylic acid-g-ethylene glycol) that exhibit pH-responsive swelling behavior due to the reversible formation/dissociation of interpolymer complexes. Because of their nature, these materials may be useful in drug delivery applications. In this work, we studied the diffusional behavior of three solutes of varying molecular size in the complexing hydrogels as a function of solution pH. The ability of these gels to control the solute diffusion rates was strongly dependent on the molecular size of the solute and the environmental pH. The diffusion coefficients for solutes were calculated as a function of pH and were lower in acidic than neutral or basic media due to the formation of interpolymer complexes in the gels. However, the ratio of the solute radius to the network mesh size also was a significant factor in the overall behavior of these gels. The diffusion coefficient of the smallest solute, proxyphylline, studied only changed by a factor of five between the complexed and uncomplexed state. However, for the largest solute, FITC-dextran, which has a molecular radius ten times greater than proxyphylline, the diffusion coefficients of the drugs in complexed and uncomplexed gels varied by almost two orders of magnitude. These results are explained in terms of mesh size characteristics of the gels.

  5. Studies on the adsorption of plutonium(IV) on alumina from aqueous nitric acid-oxalic acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subba Rao, M.; Gaikwad, A.M.; Rao, V.K.; Natarajan, P.R. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Radiochemistry Div.)

    1983-05-11

    Results of experiments on the adsorption of plutonium(IV) on alumina from solutions containing oxalic acid-nitric acid are reported. Distribution coefficients for Pu adsortion at various oxalic acid and nitric acid concentrations have been determined and optimum conditions for loading and elution of plutonium from columns packed with alumina have been established. Plutonium recoveries better than 99.5% were obtained. The effect of ions like U(VI) and Fe(III) on plutonium loading has also been studied.

  6. Catalytic performance of strong acid catalyst: Methyl modified SBA-15 loaded perfluorinated sulfonic acid obtained by the waste perfluorinated sulfonic acid ion exchange membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tingshun; Huang, Qiuyan; Li, Yingying; Fang, Minglan; Zhao, Qian

    2018-02-01

    Mesoporous molecular sieve (SBA-15) was modified using the trimethylchlorosilane as functional agent and the silylation SBA-15 mesoporous material was prepared in this work. The alcohol solution of perfluorinated sulfonic acid dissolved from the waste perfluorinated sulfonic acid ion exchange membrane (PFSIEM) was loaded onto the resulting mesoporous material by the impregnation method and their physicochemical properties were characterized by FT-IR, N2-physisorption, XRD, TG-DSC and TEM. The catalytic activities of these synthesized solid acid catalysts were evaluated by alkylation of phenol with tert-butyl alcohol. The influence of reaction temperature, weight hour space velocity (WHSV) and reaction time on the phenol conversion and product selectivity were assessed by means of a series of experiments. The results showed that with the increase of the active component of the catalyst, these catalysts still remained good mesoporous structure, but the mesoporous ordering decreased to some extent. These catalysts exhibited good catalytic performance for the alkylation of phenol with tert-butanol. The maximum phenol conversion of 89.3% with 70.9% selectivity to 4-t-butyl phenol (4-TBP) was achieved at 120 °C and the WHSV is 4 h-1. The methyl group was loaded on the surface of the catalyst by trimethylchlorosilane. This is beneficial to retard the deactivation of the catalyst. In this work, the alkylation of phenol with tert-butyl alcohol were carried out using the methyl modified SBA-15 mesoporous materials loaded perfluorinated sulfonic acid as catalysts. The results show that the resulting catalyst exhibited high catalytic activity.

  7. Effects of intravenous solutions on acid-base equilibrium: from crystalloids to colloids and blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Thomas; Ferrari, Michele; Zazzeron, Luca; Gattinoni, Luciano; Caironi, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous fluid administration is a medical intervention performed worldwide on a daily basis. Nevertheless, only a few physicians are aware of the characteristics of intravenous fluids and their possible effects on plasma acid-base equilibrium. According to Stewart's theory, pH is independently regulated by three variables: partial pressure of carbon dioxide, strong ion difference (SID), and total amount of weak acids (ATOT). When fluids are infused, plasma SID and ATOT tend toward the SID and ATOT of the administered fluid. Depending on their composition, fluids can therefore lower, increase, or leave pH unchanged. As a general rule, crystalloids having a SID greater than plasma bicarbonate concentration (HCO₃-) cause an increase in plasma pH (alkalosis), those having a SID lower than HCO₃- cause a decrease in plasma pH (acidosis), while crystalloids with a SID equal to HCO₃- leave pH unchanged, regardless of the extent of the dilution. Colloids and blood components are composed of a crystalloid solution as solvent, and the abovementioned rules partially hold true also for these fluids. The scenario is however complicated by the possible presence of weak anions (albumin, phosphates and gelatins) and their effect on plasma pH. The present manuscript summarises the characteristics of crystalloids, colloids, buffer solutions and blood components and reviews their effect on acid-base equilibrium. Understanding the composition of intravenous fluids, along with the application of simple physicochemical rules best described by Stewart's approach, are pivotal steps to fully elucidate and predict alterations of plasma acid-base equilibrium induced by fluid therapy.

  8. Strong Hydrogen Bonded Molecular Interactions between Atmospheric Diamines and Sulfuric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elm, Jonas; Jen, Coty N; Kurtén, Theo; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2016-05-26

    We investigate the molecular interaction between methyl-substituted N,N,N',N'-ethylenediamines, propane-1,3-diamine, butane-1,4-diamine, and sulfuric acid using computational methods. Molecular structure of the diamines and their dimer clusters with sulfuric acid is studied using three density functional theory methods (PW91, M06-2X, and ωB97X-D) with the 6-31++G(d,p) basis set. A high level explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12a/VDZ-F12 method is used to obtain accurate binding energies. The reaction Gibbs free energies are evaluated and compared with values for reactions involving ammonia and atmospherically relevant monoamines (methylamine, dimethylamine, and trimethylamine). We find that the complex formation between sulfuric acid and the studied diamines provides similar or more favorable reaction free energies than dimethylamine. Diamines that contain one or more secondary amino groups are found to stabilize sulfuric acid complexes more efficiently. Elongating the carbon backbone from ethylenediamine to propane-1,3-diamine or butane-1,4-diamine further stabilizes the complex formation with sulfuric acid by up to 4.3 kcal/mol. Dimethyl-substituted butane-1,4-diamine yields a staggering formation free energy of -19.1 kcal/mol for the clustering with sulfuric acid, indicating that such diamines could potentially be a key species in the initial step in the formation of new particles. For studying larger clusters consisting of a diamine molecule with up to four sulfuric acid molecules, we benchmark and utilize a domain local pair natural orbital coupled cluster (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) method. We find that a single diamine is capable of efficiently stabilizing sulfuric acid clusters with up to four acid molecules, whereas monoamines such as dimethylamine are capable of stabilizing at most 2-3 sulfuric acid molecules.

  9. SOLVENT EFFECTS IN THE LIQUID-PHASE HYDRATION OF CYCLOHEXENE CATALYZED BY A MACROPOROUS STRONG ACID ION-EXCHANGE RESIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PANNEMAN, HJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    1992-01-01

    The liquid-phase hydration of cyclohexene, a pseudo first order reversible reaction catalyzed by a strong acid ion exchange resin, macroporous Amberlite XE 307, was investigated in solvent mixtures of water and sulfolane. A decrease by a factor of 3 and 6 is observed in the experimentally measured

  10. Genesis and solution chemistry of acid sulfate soils in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.

    1976-01-01

    To study short-term and long-term chemical processes in periodically flooded acid sulfate soils in the Bangkok Plain and in various smaller coastal plains along the Gulf of Thailand, 16 acid sulfate soils and one non-acid marine soil were examined for distribution of iron-sulfur compounds, elemental

  11. Separation of rare earths from solutions of phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.A.

    1977-01-01

    Rare earths are separated from 6M phosphoric acid by adsorption onto cation resin BIORAD AG50W-X8. The phosphoric acid is then washed from the column, and the rare earths are eluted with 4M hydrochloric acid

  12. Solubility of acetic acid and trifluoroacetic acid in low-temperature (207-245 k) sulfuric acid solutions: implications for the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Mads P Sulbaek; Axson, Jessica L; Michelsen, Rebecca R H; Nielsen, Ole John; Iraci, Laura T

    2011-05-05

    The solubility of gas-phase acetic acid (CH(3)COOH, HAc) and trifluoroacetic acid (CF(3)COOH, TFA) in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions was measured in a Knudsen cell reactor over ranges of temperature (207-245 K) and acid composition (40-75 wt %, H(2)SO(4)). For both HAc and TFA, the effective Henry's law coefficient, H*, is inversely dependent on temperature. Measured values of H* for TFA range from 1.7 × 10(3) M atm(-1) in 75.0 wt % H(2)SO(4) at 242.5 K to 3.6 × 10(8) M atm(-1) in 40.7 wt % H(2)SO(4) at 207.8 K. Measured values of H* for HAc range from 2.2 × 10(5) M atm(-1) in 57.8 wt % H(2)SO(4) at 245.0 K to 3.8 × 10(8) M atm(-1) in 74.4 wt % H(2)SO(4) at 219.6 K. The solubility of HAc increases with increasing H(2)SO(4) concentration and is higher in strong sulfuric acid than in water. In contrast, the solubility of TFA decreases with increasing sulfuric acid concentration. The equilibrium concentration of HAc in UT/LS aerosol particles is estimated from our measurements and is found to be up to several orders of magnitude higher than those determined for common alcohols and small carbonyl compounds. On the basis of our measured solubility, we determine that HAc in the upper troposphere undergoes aerosol partitioning, though the role of H(2)SO(4) aerosol particles as a sink for HAc in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere will only be discernible under high atmospheric sulfate perturbations.

  13. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When the...

  14. Complexation of UVI with 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid in acidic to basic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Wendy A; Rao, Linfeng; Zanonato, PierLuigi; Garnov, Alexander Yu; Powell, Brian A; Nash, Kenneth L

    2007-04-02

    Complexation of UVI with 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) in acidic to basic solutions has been studied with multiple techniques. A number of 1:1 (UO2H3L), 1:2 (UO2HjL2 where j = +4, +3, +2, +1, 0, and -1), and 2:2 [(UO2)2HjL2 where j = +1, 0, and -1] complexes form, but the 1:2 complexes are the major species in a wide pH range. Thermodynamic parameters (formation constants and enthalpy and entropy of complexation) were determined by potentiometry and calorimetry. Data indicate that the complexation of UVI with HEDPA is exothermic, favored by the enthalpy of complexation. This is in contrast to the complexation of UVI with dicarboxylic acids in which the enthalpy term usually is unfavorable. Results from electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and 31P NMR have confirmed the presence of 1:1, 1:2, and 2:2 UVIHEDPA complexes.

  15. Experimental Observation of Strongly Bound Dimers of Sulfuric Acid: Application to Nucleation in the Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petaja, Tuukka; Sipila, Mikko; Paasonen, Pauli

    2011-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is a key compound in atmospheric nucleation. Here we report on the observation of a close-to-collision-limited sulfuric acid dimer formation in atmospherically relevant laboratory conditions in the absence of measurable quantities of ammonia or organics. The observed dimer formation...... compound(s) with (a) concentration(s) high enough to prevent the dimer evaporation. Such a stabilizing compound should be abundant enough in any natural environment and would therefore not limit the formation of sulfuric acid dimers in the atmosphere....

  16. Comparative radiosensitivity of amino acids during γ-radiolysis in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duzhenkova, N.A.; Savich, A.V.

    1977-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of amino acids contained in proteins has been compared. The γ-radiolysis of aqueous solutions of amino acids has studied over a wide range of concentrations in the presence of air, the dose rate being 60 rad/sec, and the dose, 100 krad. Radiation-chemical yields of amino acid decay and ammonia accumulation are given. An increase in yields with amino acid concentration has been established. Assumptions concerning some peculiarities of the amino acid decay mechanism are made

  17. Enthalpic characteristics of interactions occurring between an ascorbic acid and some saccharides in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terekhova, Irina V.; Kulikov, Oleg V.; Titova, Elena S.

    2004-01-01

    The enthalpies of solution of mono- and disaccharides were measured in water and aqueous ascorbic acid solutions at 298.15 K using a calorimeter of solution. Enthalpies of transfer of saccharides from water to aqueous ascorbic acid solutions were derived, and enthalpic coefficients of pair interaction h xy were calculated according to MacMillan-Mayer theory. Interactions of ascorbic acid with D-fructose and sucrose are energetically favorable and characterized by negative h xy coefficients while h xy for the interactions occurring between ascorbic acid and α-D glucose, D-galactose and maltose are positive. The obtained results are interpreted in terms of the influence of structure and solvation of solutes on the thermodynamic parameters of their interaction in solutions

  18. Interpolymer reactions of nonionic polymers with polyacrylic acid in aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Shaikhutdinov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Results of fundamental investigations in the intermacromolecular reactions and interpolymer complexes to be performed by authors with co-workes within last 20 years have been intergrated and summarized in the present review. The raw of fundamental regularities in the effect of factors of different nature (pH, ionic strength, temperature, hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance of macrochain, etc. on the complexation of nonionic polymers with polycarboxylic acids in aqueous solutions has been revealed. Critical pH upon complexation (pHcrit. has been used for evaluation of the complexing ability of the polymers. It was shown tha tdepending on pHcrit. all systems can be divided into 2 groups, namely, weak complexing and strongly complexing. The existence of two critical pH upon complexation responsible for formation typical interpolymer complexes and hydrophilic associations has been demonstrated by the method of luminescence spectroscopy.

  19. Electrochemical oxidation behavior of some hazardous phenolic compounds in acidic solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nady

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical oxidation of phenol, resorcinol and pyrogallol was investigated in sulfuric acid solution. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, EIS, were used. The mechanism of the electrochemical oxidation process was proposed and discussed. The process includes a selective oxidation and PtOx formation. EIS measurements were carried out to further examine the reaction kinetics involved in the phenolic compounds electro-oxidation. The EIS responses were found to be strongly dependent on electrode potentials. The result showed the presence of an oxidation peak in the region around 1 V vs SCE to all conditions evaluated. In cyclic voltammetric experiments a gradual decrease of the oxidation peak with the number of cycles was observed. This suggests the deactivation or blockage of the electrode surface by the adsorption of substances and/or phenoxy radical polymerization.

  20. Adsorption of beta-naphthalenesulfonic acid/sulfuric acid from their solution by weakly basic resin: equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-Hai; Si, Peng-Fei

    2005-01-01

    Experiments for single and bisolute competitive adsorption were carried out to investigate the adsorption behavior of beta-naphthalenesulfonic acid (NSA) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) from their solution at 25 degrees C onto weakly basic resin D301R. Adsorption affinity of sulfuric acid on D301R was found to be much higher than that of NSA. The data of single-solute adsorption were fitted to the Langmuir model and the Freundlich adsorption model. The ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) coupled with the single-solute adsorption models were used to predict the bisolute competitive adsorption equilibria. The IAST coupled with the Langmuir and the Freundlich model for sulfuric acid and NSA, respectively, yields the favorable representation of the bisolute competitive adsorption behavior.

  1. Global existence of strong solutions to the three- dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with special boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Douglas A.

    We study the three-dimensional incompressible Navier- Stokes equations in a domain of the form W'×(0,e) . First, we assume W' is a C3 bounded domain and impose no-slip boundary conditions on 6W'×(0,e ) , and periodic conditions on W'×0,e . Physically, this models fluid flow through a pipe with cross-section W' where the inlet and outlet conditions are assumed periodic. Secondly, we assume W'=(0,l4) ×(0,l5) and impose periodic boundary conditions. This problem is of interest mathematically, and has been more widely considered than the pipe flow problem. For both sets of boundary conditions, we show that a strong solution exists for all time with conditions on the initial data and forcing. We start by recalling that if the forcing function and initial condition do not depend on x3, then a global strong solution exists which also does not depend on x3. Here (x1,x2,x3) ∈W≡W'×( 0,e) . With this observation as motivation, and using an additive decomposition introduced by Raugel and Sell, we split the initial data and forcing into a portion independent of x3 and a remainder. In our first result, we impose a smallness condition on the remainder and assume the forcing function is square- integrable in time as a function into L2(W) . With these assumptions, we prove a global existence theorem that does not require a smallness condition on e or on the portion of the initial condition and forcing independent of x3. However, these quantities do affect the allowable size of the remainder. For our second result, we assume the forcing is only bounded in time as a function into L2(W) . In this case, we need a smallness condition on the initial data, the forcing, and e to obtain global existence. The interesting observation is that the allowable sizes for the initial data and forcing grow as e-->0 . Thus, we obtain a `thin-domain' result as originally obtained by Raugel and Sell. In fact, our results allow the portion of the initial data and forcing independent of x3 to

  2. Desorption of metals from Cetraria islandica (L. Ach. Lichen using solutions simulating acid rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čučulović Ana A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Desorption of metals K, Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, Ba, Zn, Mn, Cu and Sr from Cetraria islandica (L. with solutions whose composition was similar to that of acid rain, was investigated. Desorption of metals from the lichen was performed by five successive desorption processes. Solution mixtures containing H2SO4, HNO3 and H2SO4-HNO3 were used for desorption. Each solution had three different pH values: 4.61, 5.15 and 5.75, so that the desorptions were performed with nine different solutions successively five times, always using the same solution volume. The investigated metals can be divided into two groups. One group was comprised of K, Ca and Mg, which were desorbed in each of the five desorption processes at all pH values used. The second group included Al, Fe, Zn, Ba, Mn and Sr; these were not desorbed in each individual desorption and not at all pH values, whereas Cu was not desorbed at all under any circumstances. Using the logarithmic dependence of the metal content as a function of the desorption number, it was found that potassium builds two types of links and is connected with weaker links in lichen. Potassium is completely desorbed, 80% in the first desorption, and then gradually in the following desorptions. Other metals are linked with one weaker link (desorption 1-38% and with one very strong link (desorption below the metal detection limit. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43009 i br. ON 172019

  3. Regioselective dimerization of ferulic acid in a micellar solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, E; Andreasen, Mette Findal; Christensen, L P

    2001-01-01

    -hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3,7-dioxabicyclo[3.3.0]octane-2,6-dione (18%) as the main product. The use of micelles appears to be not only a new way to synthesize regioisomeric ferulic acid dehydrodimers but may also help to understand the regiospecificity of dimeric hydroxycinnamate formation in vivo...... that regioisomeric ferulic acid dehydrodimers can be obtained in one step from trans-ferulic acid after attachment to these micelles and using the biomimetic peroxidase-H2O2 system. The surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium hydroxide yielded trans-4-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-5......-oxotetrahydrofuran-3-carboxylic acid (25%), (E,E)-4,4'-dihydroxy-5,5'-dimethoxy-3,3'-bicinnamic acid (21%), and trans-5-[(E)-2-carboxyvinyl]-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-7-methoxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-3-carboxylic acid (14%), whereas the surfactant tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide gave 4-cis, 8-cis-bis(4...

  4. Extraction of As (V from sulphuric acid solutions by Cyanex 925

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alguacil, F. J.

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of As (V from sulphuric acid solutions using the phosphine oxide Cyanex 925 dissolved in various diluents was studied. Arsenic extraction depends strongly of temperature, decreasing with the increase of this variable, and to a lesser extent on the sulphuric acid concentration, approximately up to 300 g/L H2SO4. To increase the degree of arsenic extraction it needs to operate with Cyanex 925 concentrations of at least 50 % v/v, although this also promotes the coextraction of the acid. Stripping of the loaded arsenic and sulphuric acid can be carried out using water, better As-H2SO4 separations can be obtained at lower temperatures or operating using high O/A ratios for acid stripping and lower O/A ratios for arsenic stripping.

    Se estudia la extracción de As (V de disoluciones sulfúricas mediante Cyanex 925 disuelto en varios diluyentes. La extracción de arsénico depende de la temperatura y disminuye al aumentar esta variable, y también la concentración de ácido sulfúrico, hasta 300 g/L del ácido. Para aumentar la extracción del metal es necesario trabajar con concentraciones de Cyanex 925 superiores a 50 % v/v, aunque a la vez aumenta la coextracción del ácido. La reextracción se puede llevar a cabo con agua, obteniéndose mejores separaciones As-H2SO4 trabajando con temperaturas bajas o con altas relaciones O/A, para reextraer el ácido, y bajas relaciones para el arsénico.

  5. Magnesium hydroxide as the neutralizing agent for radioactive hydrochloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, M.J.; Fife, K.W.

    1995-10-01

    The current technology at Los Alamos for removing actinides from acidic chloride waste streams is precipitation with approximately 10 M potassium hydroxide. Although successful, there are many inherent drawbacks to this precipitation technique which will be detailed in this paper. Magnesium hydroxide (K sp = 1.3 x 10 -11 ) has limited solubility in water and as a result of the common ion effect, cannot generate a filtrate with a pH greater than 9. At a pH of 9, calcium (K sp = 5.5 x 10 -6 ) will not coprecipitate as the hydroxide. This is an important factor since many acidic chloride feeds to hydroxide precipitation contain significant amounts of calcium. In addition, neutralization with Mg(OH) 2 produces a more filterable precipitate because neutralization occurs as the Mg(OH) 2 is dissolved by the acid rather than as a result of the much faster liquid/liquid reaction of KOH with the waste acid. This slower solid/liquid reaction allows time for crystal growth to occur and produces more easily filterable precipitates. On the other hand, neutralization of spent acid with strong KOH that yields numerous hydroxide ions in solution almost instantaneously forming a much larger volume of small crystallites that result in gelatinous, slow-filtering precipitates. Magnesium hydroxide also offers a safety advantage. Although mildly irritating, it is a weak base and safe and easy to handle. From a waste minimization perspective, Mg(OH) 2 offers many advantages. First, the magnesium hydroxide is added as a solid. This step eliminates the diluent water used in KOH neutralizations. Secondly, because the particle size of the precipitate is larger, more actinides are caught on the filter paper resulting in a smaller amount of actinide being transferred to the TA-50 Liquid Waste Treatment Facility. Third, the amount of solids that must be reprocessed is significantly smaller resulting in less waste generation from the downstream processes

  6. Solution properties and taste behavior of lactose monohydrate in aqueous ascorbic acid solutions at different temperatures: Volumetric and rheological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Abhijit; Sinha, Biswajit

    2016-11-15

    The densities and viscosities of lactose monohydrate in aqueous ascorbic acid solutions with several molal concentrations m=(0.00-0.08)molkg(-1) of ascorbic acid were determined at T=(298.15-318.15)K and pressure p=101kPa. Using experimental data apparent molar volume (ϕV), standard partial molar volume (ϕV(0)), the slope (SV(∗)), apparent specific volumes (ϕVsp), standard isobaric partial molar expansibility (ϕE(0)) and its temperature dependence [Formula: see text] the viscosity B-coefficient and solvation number (Sn) were determined. Viscosity B-coefficients were further employed to obtain the free energies of activation of viscous flow per mole of the solvents (Δμ1(0≠)) and of the solute (Δμ2(0≠)). Effects of molality, solute structure and temperature and taste behavior were analyzed in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions; results revealed that the solutions are characterized predominantly by solute-solvent interactions and lactose monohydrate behaves as a long-range structure maker. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Thermal decomposition of dilute aqueous formic acid solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, A.B.; Sørensen, E.

    1992-01-01

    The aqueous-phase oxidation of formic acid and formate has been studied in a batch autoclave reactor at 260-degrees-C and 2 MPa of O2. The formate is converted to bicarbonate whereas formic acid, besides oxidation, decomposes by at least two different routes, namely a dehydration or a decarboxyla......The aqueous-phase oxidation of formic acid and formate has been studied in a batch autoclave reactor at 260-degrees-C and 2 MPa of O2. The formate is converted to bicarbonate whereas formic acid, besides oxidation, decomposes by at least two different routes, namely a dehydration...

  8. Oxalic acid complexes: Promising draw solutes for forward osmosis (FO) in protein enrichment

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Qingchun

    2015-01-01

    Highly soluble oxalic acid complexes (OACs) were synthesized through a one-pot reaction. The OACs exhibit excellent performance as draw solutes in FO processes with high water fluxes and negligible reverse solute fluxes. Efficient protein enrichment was achieved. The diluted OACs can be recycled via nanofiltration and are promising as draw solutes.

  9. On the Absorption of Isobutene and trans-2-Butene in Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brilman, D.W.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van; Versteeg, G.F.

    1997-01-01

    In reactions in which alkenes react in the presence of homogeneous Brønstedt acid catalysts, the protonation step is rate determining. Existing reaction rate correlations for protonation of butenes in sulfuric acid solutions are not consistent and limited to sulfuric acid concentrations below 80 wt

  10. Carboxylic acid terminated, solution exfoliated graphite by organic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    under mild conditions using succinic anhydride as acylating agent and anhydrous aluminum chloride as Lewis acid. Such reaction renders towards the carboxylic acid terminated graphite nanosheets (SEGn–FC) that usually requires harsh reaction conditions. The product thus obtained was characterized using various ...

  11. Corrosion and Inhibition Effects of Mild Steel in Hydrochloric Acid Solutions Containing Organophosphonic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A study has been made on the mechanism of corrosion of mild steel and the effect of nitrilo trimethylene phosphonic (NTMP acid as a corrosion inhibitor in acidic medium, that is, 10% HC1 using the weight loss method and electrochemical techniques, that is, potentiodynamic and galvanostatic polarization measurements. Although corrosion is a long-time process, but it takes place at a faster rate in the beginning which goes on decreasing with due course of time. The above-mentioned methods of corrosion rate determination furnish an average value for a long-time interval. Looking at the versatility and minimum detection limit of the voltammetric method, the authors have developed a new voltammetric method for the determination of corrosion rate at short-time intervals. The results of corrosion of mild steel in 10% HC1 solution with and without NTMP inhibitor at short-time intervals have been reported. The corrosion inhibition efficiency of NTMP is 93% after 24 h.

  12. Method for separation of Cs from acid solution dissolving radionuclides and microanalysis of solution with ICP-AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Toru; Hidaka, Akihide; Kudo, Tamotsu; Nakamura, Takehiko; Fuketa, Toyoshi

    2004-06-01

    The VEGA (Verification Experiments of radionuclides Gas/Aerosol release) program is being performed at JAERI to understand mechanisms of radionuclides release from irradiated fuel during severe accidents. As a part of evaluation in the program, the mass balances of released and deposited FP (Fission Products) onto the test apparatus are estimated from gamma ray measurement for acid solution leached from the apparatus, but short-life nuclides are difficult to be measured because those in the VEGA fuel have been mostly depleted due to cooling for several years. Moreover, the radionuclides without emitting gamma rays and very small quantity of elements cannot be quantified by gamma ray measurement. Therefore, a microanalysis by ICP-AES (Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectrometry) for the acid solution leached from VEGA apparatuses is being applied to evaluate the released and deposited masses for those elements. Since Cs-134 and -137, which are major FP dissolved in the solution, have high intensity of gamma ray spectrum, they have to be removed from the solution before the microanalysis in order to avoid contamination of ICP system and to decrease exposure to gamma ray. In this report, methods for separation of Cs from acid solution were reviewed and the applicability of them to the ICP-AES analysis was discussed. The method for Cs separation using the inorganic ion exchanger, AMP (Ammonium Molybdate Phosphate) was applied to the solutions of cold and hot test and the effectiveness was examined. The results showed that more than 99.9% of Cs could be removed from the test solutions, and once removed Sb by AMP was recovered by using a complexing agent such as citric acid. Next, the method was applied to an acid solution leached from VEGA-3 apparatus, and ICP-AES analysis was performed for it. The analysis showed that amount of U, Sr and Zr were successfully quantified. Most of elements to be analyzed were measurable except for Sb, Ag and Sn, although

  13. Comparison of three strong ion models used for quantifying the acid-base status of human plasma with special emphasis on the plasma weak acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstey, Chris M

    2005-06-01

    Currently, three strong ion models exist for the determination of plasma pH. Mathematically, they vary in their treatment of weak acids, and this study was designed to determine whether any significant differences exist in the simulated performance of these models. The models were subjected to a "metabolic" stress either in the form of variable strong ion difference and fixed weak acid effect, or vice versa, and compared over the range 25 titration curves. The results were analyzed for linearity by using ordinary least squares regression and for collinearity by using correlation. In every case, the results revealed a linear relationship between log(Pco(2)) and pH over the range 6.8 acid-base physiology and by the ease of measurement of the independent model parameters.

  14. Reprocessing cruds: zirconium (IV) contribution to their formation dibutylphosphoric acid demixion induced by zirconium (IV) in nitric acid solutions. Solubility of zirconium (IV) in HDBP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livet, J.; Berthon, C.

    1994-01-01

    The low Zr(IV) compounds solubility with the most important degradation products of tributylphosphate (TBP), the PUREX process extractant (dibutylphosphoric acid (HDBP) and monobutylphosphoric acid (H 2 MBP)), can strongly disturb the implementation of the process (clogging or third phases formation). CEA studied systematically the formation and the properties of these compounds: 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy allowed to understand the original Zr(IV) property that induces demixions of HDBP from aqueous nitric solutions. The temperature variation and the spectra simulation induce that Zr(IV) is very soluble in pure HDBP (more than 1M). Zr(IV) in HDBP solutions can also be prepared by dissolving Zr(DBP) 2 (NO 3 ) 2 in HDBP. 4 figs., 4 refs

  15. Reprocessing cruds: zirconium (IV) contribution to their formation dibutylphosphoric acid demixion induced by zirconium (IV) in nitric acid solutions. Solubility of zirconium (IV) in HDBP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livet, J.; Berthon, C.

    1994-12-31

    The low Zr(IV) compounds solubility with the most important degradation products of tributylphosphate (TBP), the PUREX process extractant (dibutylphosphoric acid (HDBP) and monobutylphosphoric acid (H{sub 2}MBP)), can strongly disturb the implementation of the process (clogging or third phases formation). CEA studied systematically the formation and the properties of these compounds: {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy allowed to understand the original Zr(IV) property that induces demixions of HDBP from aqueous nitric solutions. The temperature variation and the spectra simulation induce that Zr(IV) is very soluble in pure HDBP (more than 1M). Zr(IV) in HDBP solutions can also be prepared by dissolving Zr(DBP){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} in HDBP. 4 figs., 4 refs.

  16. Process for the removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheitlin, F.M.

    The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of /sup 226/Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

  17. Investigations of the sorption of cesium from acid solutions by various inorganic sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suess, M.; Pfrepper, G.

    1981-01-01

    Studies have been made to investigate the suitability of various inorganic sorbents for separating and obtaining cesium from acid solutions. In greater details, the distribution coefficients of cesium from nitric acid and ammonium nitrate solution were determined. To determine the saturation capacities it was necessary to plot the isotherms of adsorption from 0.5 N and 3.1 N nitric acid. Experimental sorption from a model solution, of which the composition was equal to that of the liquid Purex waste, enabled the suitability of the various exchangers for obtaining cesium from fission product solutions to be determined. From the results obtained it is apparent that ammonium phosphomolybdate is best suited for obtaining cesium from acid fission product solutions. (orig.)

  18. New Raman method for aqueous solutions: xi-function dispersion evidence for strong F(-)-water H-bonds in aqueous CsF and KF solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walrafen, George E

    2005-08-15

    The Raman xi-function dispersion method recently elucidated for the strong H-bond breaker, ClO4-, in water [G. E. Walrafen, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 094510 (2005)] is extended to the strongly H-bond forming ion, F-. Measuring the xi function is analogous to measuring DeltaG from the thermodynamic activity of the water, aH2O, as the stoichiometric mol fraction of the water in the solution decreases due to addition of an electrolyte or nonelectrolyte. xi is the derivative of the OH-stretching part of the Gibbs free energy with respect to the water mol fraction; xiomega identical with-RT[ partial differential ln(Iomega/IREF) partial differentialX2](T,P). I is the Raman intensity at omega (omega=Raman shift in cm-1); IREF, that at an arbitrary reference omega; and, X2 is the water mol fraction (X1=CsF or KF mol fraction). ln(Iomega/IREF) was found to be linear in X2 for the complete range of OH-stretching omega's, with correlation coefficients as large as 0.999 96. Linearity of ln(Iomega/IREF) versus X2 is an experimental fact for all omega's throughout the spontaneous Raman OH-stretching contour; this fact cannot be negated by relative contributions of ultrafast/fast, homogeneous/inhomogeneous processes which may underlie this linearity. Linearity in ln(Iomega/IREF) versus 1T, or in ln(Iomega/IREF) versus P, was also observed for the Raman H-bond energy DeltaE and pair volume DeltaV dispersions, respectively. A low-frequency maximum (MAX) and a high-frequency minimum (MIN) were observed in the xi function dispersion curve. Deltaxi=xiMIN-xiMAX values of -7000+/-800-cal/mol H2O for CsF, and the experimentally equal Deltaxi=-6400+/-1000-cal/mol H2O for KF, were obtained. These Deltaxi's are opposite in sign but have nearly the same absolute magnitude as the Deltaxi value for NaClO4 in water; Deltaxi=+8050+/-100-cal/mol H2O. A positive Deltaxi corresponds to a water-water H-bond breaker; a negative Deltaxi to a H-bond former; specifically, a F--water H-bond former, in the

  19. The tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in cultured primary astrocytes is strongly accelerated by the protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor tyrphostin 23

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohnholt, Michaela C; Blumrich, Eva-Maria; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-01-01

    Tyrphostin 23 (T23) is a well-known inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases and has been considered as potential anti-cancer drug. T23 was recently reported to acutely stimulate the glycolytic flux in primary cultured astrocytes. To investigate whether T23 also affects the tricarboxylic acid (TCA...... production. In addition, T23-treatment strongly increased the molecular carbon labeling of the TCA cycle intermediates citrate, succinate, fumarate and malate, and significantly increased the incorporation of (13)C-labelling into the amino acids glutamate, glutamine and aspartate. These results clearly...... demonstrate that, in addition to glycolysis, also the mitochondrial TCA cycle is strongly accelerated after exposure of astrocytes to T23, suggesting that a protein tyrosine kinase may be involved in the regulation of the TCA cycle in astrocytes....

  20. Evaluation of DNA typing as a positive identification method for soft and hard tissues immersed in strong acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robino, C; Pazzi, M; Di Vella, G; Martinelli, D; Mazzola, L; Ricci, U; Testi, R; Vincenti, M

    2015-11-01

    Identification of human remains can be hindered by several factors (e.g., traumatic mutilation, carbonization or decomposition). Moreover, in some criminal cases, offenders may purposely adopt various expedients to thwart the victim's identification, including the dissolution of body tissues by the use of corrosive reagents, as repeatedly reported in the past for Mafia-related murders. By means of an animal model, namely porcine samples, we evaluated standard DNA typing as a method for identifying soft (muscle) and hard (bone and teeth) tissues immersed in strong acids (hydrochloric, nitric and sulfuric acid) or in mixtures of acids (aqua regia). Samples were tested at different time intervals, ranging between 2 and 6h (soft tissues) and 2-28 days (hard tissues). It was shown that, in every type of acid, complete degradation of the DNA extracted from soft tissues preceded tissue dissolution and could be observed within 4h of immersion. Conversely, high molecular weight DNA amenable to STR analysis could be isolated from hard tissues as long as cortical bone fragments were still present (28 days for sulfuric acid, 7 days for nitric acid, 2 days for hydrochloric acid and aqua regia), or the integrity of the dental pulp chamber was preserved (7 days, in sulfuric acid only). The results indicate that DNA profiling of acid-treated body parts (in particular, cortical bone) is still feasible at advanced stages of corrosion, even when the morphological methods used in forensic anthropology and odontology can no longer be applied for identification purposes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sorption of beryllium from sulfuric acid solutions by aminocarboxylic polyampholites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakholkov, V.S.; Tsevin, A.P.; Rychkov, V.N.

    1985-01-01

    Sorption of beryllium ions from BeSo 4 solutions by aminocarboxylic polyampholites at 18 deg C under steady-state conditions is studied. With the pH value growth the sorption of beryllium ions increases, that is characteristic for sorption according the cation exchange mechanism. Co- sorption of beryllium and uranium from BeSO 4 , UO 2 SO 4 , (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 solution is considered, and possibility of sorption beryllium purification from uranium impurity is shown

  2. Separation of ions in acidic solution by capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, Michelle [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an effective method for separating ionic species according to differences in their electrophoretic mobilities. CE separations of amino acids by direct detection are difficult due to their similar electrophoretic mobilities and low absorbances. However, native amino acids can be separated by CE as cations at a low pH by adding an alkanesulfonic acid to the electrolyte carrier which imparts selectivity to the system. Derivatization is unnecessary when direct UV detection is used at 185 nm. Simultaneous speciation of metal cations such as vanadium (IV) and vanadium (V) can easily be performed without complexation prior to analysis. An indirect UV detection scheme for acidic conditions was also developed using guanidine as the background carrier electrolyte (BCE) for the indirect detection of metal cations. Three chapters have been removed for separate processing. This report contains introductory material, references, and general conclusions. 80 refs.

  3. The use of anarcadic acid solution as cleaning agent prior to adhesive restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Maria Fernandes Queiroz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the performance of anacardic acid as a cavity-cleaning agent in adhesive restorations. Three cleaning agents were used: distilled water (DW), chlorhexidine digluconate solution at 2% (CHX) and anacardic acid (AA). Each cleaning agent was used in two strategies adhesive: after acid etching with phosphoric acid with etch&rinse adhesive or prior to the primer application in self-etch adhesive. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performe...

  4. Adsorption of pertechnetate ion on various active carbons from mineral acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, K.

    1991-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of pertechnetate ion (TcO 4 - ) on active carbon has been studied for various acid solutions, taking as indicative value the distribution coefficient K d of Tc between active carbon surface and solution. In a system where the total anion concentration of the acid and its sodium salt was maintained constant, modifying the pH of the solution proved distinctly to influence the Tc adsorption behavior of active carbon: taking the case of active carbon derived from coconut shell, increasing the acidity raised K d ; around neutrality there occurred a level stage; in the alkali region, K d declined. The rise of K d in the acid region, however, was observed only with active carbon derived from coconut shell, from oil pitch or from saw dust; it failed to occur when the active carbon was derived from coal or from bone. With a hydrochloric acid system, the rise of K d started around 1 M (mol dm -1 ) HCl. Beyond 3 M, on the other hand, a breakthrough occurred, and K d declined with increasing acidity. With a nitric acid system, K d rose from 1 M, and the breakthrough occurred at 2 M. When the adsorption was left to equilibrate beyond 4 h, desorption displacement of TcO 4 - by a coexisting other anion was observed in the case of perchloric acid solutions of concentration above 0.1 M and with sulfuric acid solutions above 0.5 M. (author)

  5. Amino acid behavior in aqueous amide solutions: Temperature dependence of the L-phenylalanine–N,N-dimethylformamide interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kustov, Andrey V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamics of amino acid solvation in aqueous DMF solutions was studied at 288–318 K. • The pair interaction parameters were compared with those for urea solutions. • For hydrophobic solutes enthalpies and entropies of interaction reveal strong temperature changes. • The relationship between the temperature dependence of solvation and solute–solute interactions was found. - Abstract: We have studied thermodynamics of the L-phenylalanine (Phe) pair interaction with denaturing agents – urea (U) and dimethylformamide (DMF) at 288–318 K. Our study does indicate that enthalpies and entropies of the Phe–U interaction reveal the anomalous temperature dependence which does not occur for DMF solutions. The anomalous Phe behavior in U solutions appears to be closely related to peculiarities of U hydration. One more result is in the fact that for hydrophobic solutes such as L-phenylalanine and substituted amides it is not justified to use the results obtained at 298 K for predicting the solute behavior at physiological temperatures

  6. Extraction of Collagen from Chicken Feet with Various Acidic Solutions and Soaking Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prayitno Prayitno

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to know the ability of various acidic solutions on dissolving collagen  chicken feet, with different soaked time.  Each acid 5 percent (v/v, collagen extraction was done by washing chicken feet and then cutted into small pieces and finally grinded.  Every 100 gram treatment was soaked in acetic acid (a1, citric acid (a2, lactic acid (a3 and hydrochloric acid (a4, for 12, 24 and 36 hours.  Precipitated collagen in the filtrate was 5 percent NaOH to reach the neutral pH (pH 7.  Collagen precipitate was separated by filtration usingfilter paper and then  rendement was calculated, HPLC was used to determin amino acid composition, and SDS-PAGE was use determin the type of collagen.  This experiment use factorial completely randomized design (CRD 4 x 3 and three time replication.   Result showed that lactic acid has highest capability to dissolve collagen, while citric acid the lowest.  Combination of acid solution and soaking time had significant (P<0.01 effect on dissolving collagen of chicken feet.  Extracted collagen in all acid solution, hassame amino acid, composition but different in percentage of amino acid molecules.  Collagen type in treatment combination was the same, but for soaking time of 36 hours revealed some peptide band.  Lactic acid had highest capability of collagen extraction in chicken feet than citric acid, acetic acid and hydrochloric acid with soaking time of 12, 24 and 36 hours.  It was estimated that extracted collagen can be grouped to type I consisted of two chain of a1. (Animal Production 9(2: 99-104 (2007   Key Words : Chicken feet, acids, soaking time, collagen

  7. Mutagenicity of irradiated solutions of nuclei acid bases and nucleosides in Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmer, J.; Schubert, J.

    1981-01-01

    Solutions of nucleic acid bases, nucleosides and a nucleotide, saturated with either N 2 , N 2 O or O 2 , were irradiated and tested for mutagenicity towards Salmonella typhimurium, with and without pre-incubation. Irradiated solutions of the nuclei acid bases were all non-mutagenic. Irradiated solutions of the nucleosides showed mutagenicity in S. typhimurium TA100 (pre-incubation assay). Generally, the mutagenicity followed the order: N 2 O > N 2 > O 2 . The results show that the formation of mutagenic radiolytic products is initiated by attack of mainly solutions of the nucleotide thymidine-5'-monophosphate, no mutagenicity could be detected. (orig.)

  8. Measuring and modeling aqueous electrolyte/amino-acid solutions with ePC-SAFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, Christoph; Reschke, Thomas; Müller, Rainer; Kunz, Werner; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Amino-acid solubilities and osmotic coefficients in ternary solutions containing one amino acids and one salt measured. • Weak salt influence on amino-acid solubilities except for salts containing Mg [2+] or NO 3 [−] (salting-in behavior). • Osmotic coefficients dominated by the solute with the highest molality. • Amino-acid solubilities and osmotic coefficients predicted reasonably with ePC-SAFT with deviations of 3.7% and 9.3%. • Predictions based on pure-component parameters for ions and amino acids using no ion/amino-acid fitting parameters. -- Abstract: In this work thermodynamic properties of electrolyte/amino acid/water solutions were measured and modeled. Osmotic coefficients at 298.15 K were measured by means of vapor-pressure osmometry. Amino-acid solubility at 298.15 K was determined gravimetrically. Considered aqueous systems contained one of the four amino acids: glycine, L-/DL-alanine, L-/DL-valine, and L-proline up to the respective amino-acid solubility limit and one of 13 salts composed of the ions Li + , Na + , K + , NH 4 + , Cl − , Br − , I − , NO 3 − , and SO 4 2− at salt molalities of 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 mol · kg −1 , respectively. The data show that the salt influence is more pronounced on osmotic coefficients than on amino-acid solubility. The electrolyte Perturbed-Chain Statistical Association Theory (ePC-SAFT) was applied to model thermodynamic properties in aqueous electrolyte/amino-acid solutions. In previous works, this model had been applied to binary salt/water and binary amino acid/water systems. Without fitting any additional parameters, osmotic coefficients and amino-acid solubility in the ternary electrolyte/amino acid/water systems could be predicted with overall deviations of 3.7% and 9.3%, respectively, compared to the experimental data

  9. Mechanistic studies of nitrations and oxidations in solutions of dinitrogen pentaoxide in nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willmer, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanisms of nitrations in solutions of dinitrogen pentaoxide in nitric acid of 1,2,4-trichloro-5-nitrobenzene and 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene have been proposed. The kinetics and products of the nitration, in the title medium, of substantially deactivated benzoic acids and benzaldehydes have been investigated. Kinetics of nitration of some substituted benzoic acids in nitric acid solutions containing dinitrogen pentaoxide or nitronium trifluoro-methanesulphonate (nitronium triflate) have been compared. Rate coefficients for reactions in dinitrogen pentaoxide solutions were generally similar to those from nitronium triflate solutions of the same estimated nitronium ion concentration. Yields of aromatic products of nitration of some benzoic acid derivatives in the nitric acid solutions have been determined. Nitrodecarboxylation of 4-fluorobenzoic acid occurs as a result of nitronium ion attach at C(1). The competition between oxidation to the corresponding benzoic acid and nitration in the aromatic ring of some substituted benzaldehydes has been probed by kinetic and product studies. 4-Carboxybenzaldehyde is nitrated but more deactivated substrates are predominantly oxidized. Rapid reversible gem-dinitrate formation occurs in concentrated dinitrogen pentaoxide solutions. The equilibrium extent of formation of [alpha]-deuterio-(4-nitropheny)-dinitratomethane from [alpha]-deuterio-4-nitrobenzaldehyde is reported. 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and the gem-dinitrate are oxidized in processes in which [alpha]-hydrogen loss is at least partially rate determining. The relative rates of oxidation in nitronium triflate solutions suggest that the [alpha]-hydrogen is removed as a hydride ion in that medium. There is evidence for the intrusion of a radical mechanism of nitration in concentrated solutions of dinitrogen pentaoxide. (4-Nitrophenyl)dinitratomethane was produced on the addition of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde to a solution of dinitrogen pentaoxide in dichloromethane.

  10. Ion exchange investigation for recovery of uranium from acidic pregnant leach solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danko Bożena

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article describes studies on the separation of uranium from acid pregnant leach solutions obtained from Polish uranium ores: dictyonema shales and sandstone rocks. Ion exchange chromatography was applied for uranium sorption, using commercially available, strongly basic anion exchanger, Dowex 1. In model experiments, the influence of degree of crosslinking of Dowex 1 on the efficiency of uranium extraction was investigated. The effect of H2SO4 concentration on the breakthrough curve of uranyl ions for the Dowex 1 resins, of different crosslinking: X4, X8 and X10, was examined. Unexpectedly high increase of exchange capacity of uranium was observed in case of Dowex 1X10. This gives potential opportunity of improving the effectiveness of uranium recovery process. Applying column packed with Dowex 1X10, ‘yellow cake’ with ca. 92% yield and high purity of recovered uranium was obtained. A block diagram of the procedure for uranium and lanthanides extraction from acidic leach liquor has been proposed.

  11. Systems solutions by lactic acid bacteria: from paradigms to practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are among the powerhouses of the food industry, colonize the surfaces of plants and animals, and contribute to our health and well-being. The genomic characterization of LAB has rocketed and presently over 100 complete or nearly complete genomes are available, many of which

  12. Amino acid salt solutions for carbon dioxide capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majchrowicz, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Reactive absorption is a common process in the chemical industry and is used, among others, in the treatment of CO2 containing industrial gas streams. The current work was a part of a project with the aim to assess new reactive solvents based on amino acid salts for CO2 removal from industrial gas

  13. Effect of temperature on the dilution enthalpies of α,ω-amino acids in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, C.M.; Cadena, J.C.; Lamprecht, I.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The dilution of 3-amino propanoic acid, 4-amino butanoic acid, 5-amino pentanoic acid, and 6-amino hexanoic acid in water is an exothermic process at T = (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K. → The limiting experimental slopes of the enthalpies of dilution with respect to the molality change Δm, are negative suggesting that the solutes interact with water primarily through their alkyl groups. → The value of the pairwise coefficient is positive at the temperatures considered, and the magnitude increases linearly with the number of methylene groups. → The comparison between the pairwise interaction coefficients for α,ω-amino acids and α-amino acids shows that the change in the enthalpic interaction coefficient is related to the relative position of the polar groups. - Abstract: Dilution enthalpies of aqueous solutions of 3-amino propanoic acid, 4-amino butanoic acid, 5-amino pentanoic acid, and 6-amino hexanoic acid were determined at T = (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K using an LKB flow microcalorimeter. The homotactic interaction coefficients were obtained according to the McMillan-Mayer theory from the experimental data. For all the systems studied, the dilution of α,ω-amino acids in water is an exothermic process; the pair coefficients have positive values which increases with chain length. The obtained values of the interaction coefficients are interpreted in terms of solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions and are used as indicative of hydrophobic behavior of the amino acid studied.

  14. Effect of citric acid on the acidification of artificial pepsin solution for metacercariae isolation from fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Ki; Pyo, Kyoung-Ho; Hwang, Young-Sang; Chun, Hyang Sook; Park, Ki Hwan; Ko, Seong-Hee; Chai, Jong-Yil; Shin, Eun-Hee

    2013-11-15

    Artificial digestive solution based on pepsin is essential for collecting metacercariae from fish. To promote the enzymatic reactivity of pepsin, the pH of the solution has to be adjusted to pH 1.0-2.0. Hydrochloride (HCl) is usually used for this purpose, but the use of HCl raises safety concerns. The aim of this work was to address the usefulness of citric acid as an alternative for HCl for the acidification of pepsin solution, and to examine its potential to damage metacercariae during in vitro digestion as compared with HCl. Changes in pH after adding 1-9% of citric acid (m/v) to pepsin solution were compared to a 1% HCl (v/v) addition. Digestion of fish muscle was evaluated by measuring released protein concentrations by spectrophotometry. In addition, survival rates of metacercariae in pepsin solution were determined at different citric acid concentrations and were compared that of with 1% HCl. The present study shows that addition of citric acid reduced the pH of pepsin solutions to the required level. Addition of more than 5% of citric acid resulted in the effective digestion of fish muscle over 3h in vitro, and 5% citric acid was less lethal to metacercariae than 1% HCl in pepsin solution. Pepsin solution containing 5% citric acid had digestive capacity superior to pepsin solution containing 1% HCl after 3h incubation with released protein concentrations of 12.0 ng/ml for 5% citric acid and 9.6 ng/ml for 1% HCl. Accordingly, the present study suggests that the addition of 5% citric acid to pepsin solution is a good alternative to 1% HCl in infection studies because citric acid is a stable at room temperature and has a good safety profile. In addition, we suggest that the use of citric acid enables the preparation of commercial digestive solutions for the detection of microorganisms in fish and other vertebrate muscle tissue. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Process for the removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheitlin, F.M.

    1984-01-01

    Radium is removed from an inorganic-acid solution contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of 226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings, and thus contain thorium and uranium. The contaminated fly ash may be incorporated in a suitable matrix and stored, and the residual solutions processed to separate uranium and thorium. (author)

  16. A bibliographical review on the radiolysis of uranyl nitrate solutions in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siri, Sandra; Mondino, Angel V.

    2004-01-01

    A bibliographical study on the effects of ionizing radiation on uranyl nitrate solutions in nitric acid medium was performed, and the state of knowledge on this subject is presented. The main experimental and theoretical results on water, nitric acid and uranium solutions radiolysis are reviewed and critically evaluated. This paper provides a collection of references as an aid to the development of practical applications, and to stimulate new research on fundamental processes in these systems. (author) [es

  17. Nectar sugars and amino acids in day- and night-flowering Nicotiana species are more strongly shaped by pollinators' preferences than organic acids and inorganic ions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira Tiedge

    , nectar sugars and amino acids are more strongly correlated with the preferences of predominant pollinators than organic acids and inorganic ions.

  18. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK CLEANING: CORROSION RATE FOR ONE VERSUS EIGHT PERCENT OXALIC ACID SOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2011-01-20

    Until recently, the use of oxalic acid for chemically cleaning the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste tanks focused on using concentrated 4 and 8-wt% solutions. Recent testing and research on applicable dissolution mechanisms have concluded that under appropriate conditions, dilute solutions of oxalic acid (i.e., 1-wt%) may be more effective. Based on the need to maximize cleaning effectiveness, coupled with the need to minimize downstream impacts, SRS is now developing plans for using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution. A technology gap associated with using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution was a dearth of suitable corrosion data. Assuming oxalic acid's passivation of carbon steel was proportional to the free oxalate concentration, the general corrosion rate (CR) from a 1-wt% solution may not be bound by those from 8-wt%. Therefore, after developing the test strategy and plan, the corrosion testing was performed. Starting with the envisioned process specific baseline solvent, a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution, with sludge (limited to Purex type sludge-simulant for this initial effort) at 75 C and agitated, the corrosion rate (CR) was determined from the measured weight loss of the exposed coupon. Environmental variations tested were: (a) Inclusion of sludge in the test vessel or assuming a pure oxalic acid solution; (b) acid solution temperature maintained at 75 or 45 C; and (c) agitation of the acid solution or stagnant. Application of select electrochemical testing (EC) explored the impact of each variation on the passivation mechanisms and confirmed the CR. The 1-wt% results were then compared to those from the 8-wt%. The immersion coupons showed that the maximum time averaged CR for a 1-wt% solution with sludge was less than 25-mils/yr for all conditions. For an agitated 8-wt% solution with sludge, the maximum time averaged CR was about 30-mils/yr at 50 C, and 86-mils/yr at 75 C. Both the 1-wt% and the 8-wt% testing demonstrated that if the sludge was removed

  19. An investigation into the stability and sterility of citric acid solutions used for cough reflex testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, James R; Wu, Zimei; Lau, Hugo; Suen, Joanna; Wang, Lucy; Pottinger, Sarah; Lee, Elaine; Alazawi, Nawar; Kallesen, Molly; Gargiulo, Derryn A; Swift, Simon; Svirskis, Darren

    2014-10-01

    Citric acid is used in cough reflex testing in clinical and research settings to assess reflexive cough in patients at risk of swallowing disorders. To address a lack of knowledge in this area, this study investigated the stability and sterility of citric acid solutions. Triplicate solutions of citric acid (0.8 M) in isotonic saline were stored at 4 ± 2 °C for up to 28 days and analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbiological sterility of freshly prepared samples and bulk samples previously used for 2 weeks within the hospital was determined using a pour plate technique. Microbial survival in citric acid was determined by inoculating Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, or Candida albicans into citric acid solution and monitoring the number of colony-forming units/mL over 40 min. Citric acid solutions remained stable at 4 °C for 28 days (98.4 ± 1.8 % remained). The freshly prepared and clinical samples tested were sterile. However, viability studies revealed that citric acid solution allows for the survival of C. albicans but not for S. aureus or E. coli. The microbial survival study showed that citric acid kills S. aureus and E. coli but has no marked effect on C. albicans after 40 min. Citric acid samples at 0.8 M remained stable over the 4-week testing period, with viable microbial cells absent from samples tested. However, C. albicans has the ability to survive in citric acid solution if inadvertently introduced in practice. For this reason, in clinical and research practice it is suggested to use single-use aliquots prepared aseptically which can be stored for up to 28 days at 4 °C.

  20. Plutonium determination in solution with excess hydrofluoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krtil, J.; Kuvik, V.; Spevackova, V.

    1975-01-01

    The determination is described of plutonium in solutions in the presence of fluoride ions resulting from the hydrolysis of PuF 6 . The method is based on reduction of Pu(VI) by excess of Fe(II) and on re-titration of Fe(II) with ceric salt. The effect of fluoride ions on plutonium determination was studied. It was found that a 3 mole excess of HF with respect to Pu decreased the results of Pu determination. The interference of fluoride ions was eliminated by a two-fold evaporation of the solution to be titrated with HNO 3 to dryness or by complex formation with boric arid. The amount of 20.50 mg Pu in the presence of a 10 mole excess of fluoride ions (17 mg HF) was determined with an error of +- 0.09 mg ). (author)

  1. Some remarks on hydrogen release from nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specht, S.

    1980-01-01

    After a survey of the literature on generalisable statements on β, γ-radiolysis of water and salty solutions, an attempt is made to summarize and evaluate existing measurements in connection with the formation of H 2 in nitrous fission product solutions (or corresponding simulates). It is seen that laboratory experiments with such fission products show rather uniform and plausible G(H 2 )-values in the region -3 . It is also seen, however, that G(H 2 )-values and steady H 2 -release rates are not suitable to describe technical systems (HAW stores). Either H 2 is carried away by purge air or it is, in a non-operating system, consumed again in situ, obviously by back reactions. (orig.) [de

  2. The immiscible aqueous solutions of alkyl phosphates. Study for the purpose of uranium extraction from phosphoric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauborgne, Bernard

    1979-01-01

    Systems of immiscible aqueous solutions composed by a phase rich in mineral salt and by another phase almost totally containing an organic salt, have been studied for years, with quaternary ammonium salts with an organic cation. The objective of this research is to study systems symmetric to the previous ones, i.e. with organic anions such as alkyl phosphates, and then to try to understand mechanisms of extraction of metals in these environments. Based on properties of immiscible aqueous solutions, an original three-phase process of liquid-liquid extraction has been developed, and is used to separate uranium in phosphoric acids with better performance than the existing industrial processes [fr

  3. [Effect of amino acid solutions on the blood ammonia level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjo, K; Harihara, Y; Kawasaki, S; Umekita, N; Idezuki, Y

    1985-09-01

    We have carried out several basic experiments on artificial liver support and found that the plasma free amino acid balance was lost after treatment according to this procedure. Application of fluid therapy--Using conventional amino acid preparations available on the market--Is not adequate during and after the treatment with artificial liver. Fluid therapy using mainly special amino acid preparations should have been established; preparations, named Todai Hospital fluid (THF), are intended to correct the deranged aminogram, supply nutrition and promote the improvement in symptoms. Furthermore, experimental animals with acute hepatic insufficiency of diverse severity were prepared and basic experiments were performed which these animals to see how the efficacy of THF developed. In the basic experiments, psychoneurotic symptoms and the electroencephalogram were improved with the lowering of the blood ammonia level. Clinically, THF was not only used as a therapeutic agent after treatment by artificial liver support in patients with fulminant hepatitis, but is also served as a further indication in hepatic encephalopathy accompanying chronic liver diseases in late stages. Improvement in encephalopathy was observed immediately after the administration of THF and persisted while the aminogram pattern returned to the premedication representation. There was more improvement in patients in whom ammonemia was complicated, and the blood ammonia level was reduced markedly.

  4. CO2 Capture from Flue Gas using Amino Acid Salt Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    amine and the pH dropped between 2 and 3 units during the absorption process. In both types of solutions the temperature increased as a result of the CO2 absorption, which is expected due to the exothermic nature of the absorption reaction. The increase in temperature for the potassium glycinate......The reversible absorption of CO2 into a chemical solvent is currently the leading CO2 capture technology. Available solvents are almost exclusively based on aqueous alkanolamine solutions, which entail both economic and environmental complications, making the commercialization of the technology...... difficult. Amino acid salt solutions have emerged as an alternative to the alkanolamine solutions. A number of advantages make amino acid salt solutions attractive solvents for CO2 capture from flue gas. In the present study CO2 absorption in aqueous solutions of 0.5 M potassium glycinate and 0.5 M...

  5. Determining the saturation vapour pressures of keto-dicarboxylic acids in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crljenica, Ivica; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Zardini, Alessandro A.; Julin, Jan; Bilde, Merete; Riipinen, Ilona

    2013-05-01

    A two-compartment binary mass transport model with group contribution methods parametrizations for the physical properties of the organic acids (UNIFAC Dortmund method for activity coefficients, GCVOL-OL-60 method for the pure liquid acid density, GC-MG method for the pure acid surface tension at room temperature, Fuller et al. method for the diffusion coefficients) was used to interpret the evaporation experiments of 100 nm sized ketodicarboxylic acid aqueous solutions droplets at ambient temperature. The determined values for the saturation vapour pressure of liquid 2-keto-glutaric acid are in the order of 10-5 Pa.

  6. Influence of carbamide content in nitric acid solutions of uranium on ammoniac precipitation of ammonium polyuranates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakhonov, V.G.; Dorda, F.A.; Zagumennov, V.S.; Lazarchuk, V.V.; Ledovskikh, A.K.; Matyukha, V.A.; Portnyagina, Eh.O.; Tinin, V.V.

    2004-01-01

    Regularities of ammoniac precipitation of ammonium polyuranates from nitric acid solutions of uranium in the presence of carbamide are investigated. Influence of temperature, carbamide and uranium concentration in initial solution on sedimentation and filtration properties of precipitates is determined. Optimal regimes of operations of ammoniac precipitation of ammonium polyuranates containing carbamide providing preparation of crystalline, effectively filtered precipitates are selected [ru

  7. Adsorption of di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid from toluene the interface with inorganic salt aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajnshtejn, E.V.; Popov, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Interfacial tension in the system toluene solution of di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid HDEHP-aqueous solutions of inorganic salts has been measured by the drop volume method. The ion-exchange constants in the monolayers formed by HDEHP and alkaline-earth metals have been measured

  8. Deprotonation of p-Hydroxybenzoic Acid: Does Electrospray Ionization Sample Solution or Gas-Phase Structures?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schröder, Detlef; Buděšínský, Miloš; Roithová, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 134, č. 38 (2012), s. 15897-15905 ISSN 0002-7863 Grant - others:European Research Council(XE) AdG HORIZOMS Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : mobility-mass-spectrometry * 4-hydroxybenzoic acid * air/water interfase * DFT calculations * aqueous-solution * benzoic-acids Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 10.677, year: 2012

  9. Study of the mechanism and kinetics of the reduction of uranyl ions in phosphoric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Kacemi, K.; Tyburce, B.; Belcadi, S.

    1982-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of uranyl ions in 0.1 to 9 M phosphoric acid has been investigated by polarography, cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and potentiostatic coulometry. In concentrated phosphoric acid solutions (H 3 PO 4 3 PO 4 concentrations. So, when the concentration of U(VI) increases and/or that of H 3 PO 4 reduces, the system becomes reversible. (author)

  10. Dynamic flow method to study the CO2 loading capacity of amino acid salt solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Thomsen, Kaj

    Due to a number of advantages amino acid salt solutions have emerged as alternatives to the alkanolamine solvents for the chemical absorption of CO2 from flue gas. The use of amino acids in CO2 capture is a bio-mimetic process, as it is similar to CO2 binding by proteins in the blood, such as hem...

  11. Dissociation of strong acid revisited: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations of HNO3 in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Tanza; Winter, Berndt; Stern, Abraham C.; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tobias, Douglas J.; Hemminger, J. C.

    2011-08-04

    Molecular-level insight into the dissociation of nitric acid in water is obtained from photoelectron X-ray spectroscopy and first-principles molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our combined studies reveal surprisingly abrupt changes in solvation configurations of undissociated nitric acid at approximately 4 M concentration. Experimentally, this is inferred from N1s binding energy shifts of HNO3(aq) as a function of concentration, and is associated with variations in the local electronic structure of the nitrogen atom. It also shows up as a discontinuity in the degree of dissociation as a function of concentration, determined here from the N1s photoelectron signal intensity, which can be separately quantified for undissociated HNO3(aq) and dissociated NO3-(aq). Intermolecular interactions within the nitric acid solution are discussed on the basis of MD simulations, which reveal that molecular HNO3 interacts remarkably weakly with solvating water molecules at low concentration; around 4 M there is a turnover to a more structured solvation shell, accompanied by an increase in hydrogen bonding between HNO3 and water. We suggest that the driving force behind the more structured solvent configuration of HNO3 is the overlap of nitric acid solvent shells that sets in around 4 M concentration. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  12. Vapor-liquid equilibria for nitric acid-water and plutonium nitrate-nitric acid-water solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maimoni, A.

    1980-01-01

    The liquid-vapor equilibrium data for nitric acid and nitric acid-plutnonium nitrate-water solutions were examined to develop correlations covering the range of conditions encountered in nuclear fuel reprocessing. The scanty available data for plutonium nitrate solutions are of poor quality but allow an order of magnitude estimate to be made. A formal thermodynamic analysis was attempted initially but was not successful due to the poor quality of the data as well as the complex chemical equilibria involved in the nitric acid and in the plutonium nitrate solutions. Thus, while there was no difficulty in correlating activity coefficients for nitric acid solutions over relatively narrow temperature ranges, attempts to extend the correlations over the range 25 0 C to the boiling point were not successful. The available data were then analyzed using empirical correlations from which normal boiling points and relative volatilities can be obtained over the concentration ranges 0 to 700 g/l Pu, 0 to 13 M nitric acid. Activity coefficients are required, however, if estimates of individual component vapor pressures are needed. The required ternary activity coefficients can be approximated from the correlations

  13. Copper-Sulfate Pentahydrate as a Product of the Waste Sulfuric Acid Solution Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Marković, Radmila; Stevanović, Jasmina; Avramović, Ljiljana; Nedeljković, Dragutin; Jugović, Branimir; Stajić Trošić, Jasna; Gvozdenović, Milica M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is synthesis of copper-sulfate pentahydrate from the waste sulfuric acid solution-mother liquor generated during the regeneration process of copper bleed solution. Copper is removed from the mother liquor solution in the process of the electrolytic treatment using the insoluble lead anodes alloyed with 6 mass pct of antimony on the industrial-scale equipment. As the result of the decopperization process, copper is removed in the form of the cathode sludge and is precipit...

  14. Study on the utilization of a sodium-sulfuric acid solution for the uranium minerals' leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echenique, Patricia; Fruchtenicht, Fernando; Gil, Daniel; Vigo, Daniel; Bouza, Angel; Vert, Gabriela; Becquart, Elena

    1988-01-01

    Argentine uranium minerals have been leached at bench scale with a different agent trying to reduce sulfuric acid consumption. The leaching agent was a sodium sulfate-sulfuric acid solution and the ore was from Sierra Pintada (San Rafael - Mendoza). The work was performed in stirred vessel at atmospheric pressure. The influence of different variables, pH, temperature, oxidant agent, sodium sulfate concentration and time, in the sulfuric acid consumption and the uranium yield was studied. (Author) [es

  15. Uric Acid Is a Strong Risk Marker for Developing Hypertension From Prehypertension: A 5-Year Japanese Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Masanari; Hisatome, Ichiro; Niwa, Koichiro; Hara, Shigeko; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Bjornstad, Petter; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Andres-Hernando, Ana; Sato, Yuka; Jensen, Thomas; Garcia, Gabriela; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Ohno, Minoru; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Johnson, Richard J

    2018-01-01

    Prehypertension frequently progresses to hypertension, a condition associated with high morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular diseases and stroke. However, the risk factors for developing hypertension from prehypertension remain poorly understood. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the data from 3584 prehypertensive Japanese adults (52.1±11.0 years, 2081 men) found to be prehypertensive in 2004 and reexamined in 2009. We calculated the cumulative incidences of hypertension over 5 years, examined risk factors, and calculated odds ratios (ORs) for developing hypertension after adjustments for age, sex, body mass index, smoking and drinking habits, baseline systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pulse rate, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease, and serum uric acid levels. The additional analysis evaluated whether serum uric acid (hyperuricemia) constituted an independent risk factor for developing hypertension. The cumulative incidence of hypertension from prehypertension over 5 years was 25.3%. There were no significant differences between women and men (24.4% versus 26.0%; P =0.28). The cumulative incidence of hypertension in subjects with hyperuricemia (n=726) was significantly higher than those without hyperuricemia (n=2858; 30.7% versus 24.0%; P uric acid (OR, 1.149; P uric acid is a strong risk marker for developing hypertension from prehypertension. Further studies are needed to determine whether treatment of hyperuricemia in prehypertensive subjects could impede the onset of hypertension. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Strong Quantum Confinement Effects and Chiral Excitons in Bio-Inspired ZnO–Amino Acid Cocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Muhammed, Madathumpady Abubaker Habeeb

    2018-02-20

    Elucidating the underlying principles behind band gap engineering is paramount for the successful implementation of semiconductors in photonic and optoelectronic devices. Recently it has been shown that the band gap of a wide and direct band gap semiconductor, such as ZnO, can be modified upon cocrystallization with amino acids, with the role of the biomolecules remaining unclear. Here, by probing and modeling the light-emitting properties of ZnO-amino acid cocrystals, we identify the amino acids\\' role on this band gap modulation and demonstrate their effective chirality transfer to the interband excitations in ZnO. Our 3D quantum model suggests that the strong band edge emission blue-shift in the cocrystals can be explained by a quasi-periodic distribution of amino acid potential barriers within the ZnO crystal lattice. Overall, our findings indicate that biomolecule cocrystallization can be used as a truly bio-inspired means to induce chiral quantum confinement effects in quasi-bulk semiconductors.

  17. Boron removal from aqueous solutions by activated carbon impregnated with salicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celik, Z. Ceylan; Can, B.Z.; Kocakerim, M. Muhtar

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the removal of boric acid from aqueous solution by activated carbon impregnated with salicylic acid was studied in batch system. pH, adsorbent amount, initial boron concentration, temperature, shaking rate and salicylic acid film thickness were chosen as parameters. Boron removal efficiencies increased with increasing adsorbent amount, temperature and pH, decreasing initial boron concentration. As thickness of salicylic acid film on activated carbon becomes thin up to 0.088 nm, the efficiency increased, and then, the efficiency decreased with becoming thinner than 0.088 nm of salicylic acid film. Shaking rate was no effect on removal efficiency. In result, it was determined that the use of salicylic acid as an impregnant for activated carbon led to the increase of the amount of boron adsorbed. A lactone ring, being the most appropriate conformation, forms between boric acid and -COOH and -OH groups of salicylic acid

  18. TBP determination in nitric acid solutions from solvent extraction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuada, T.A.; Carvalho, E.I. de; Araujo, I. da C.; Cohen, V.H.

    1988-07-01

    Heavy organic phases have been observed on some occasions during TBP extraction process. These products, described as red oils, were considered as the main cause for process failures, specially in evaporators and concentrators. In view of safety aspects it is necessary to control organic concentration in product and waste solutions. The proposed method involves the organic removal by chloroform as a first step, followed by purification onto a silica gel column. The results are given from analysing TBP and its degradation product (DBP) by gas chromatography. (author) [pt

  19. Reactive extraction and recovery of levulinic acid, formic acid and furfural from aqueous solutions containing sulphuric acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Thomas; Blahusiak, Marek; Babic, Katarina; Schuur, Boelo

    2017-01-01

    Levulinic acid (LA) can be produced from lignocellulosic materials via hydroxylation followed by an acid-catalyzed conversion of hexoses. Inorganic homogeneous catalysts are mostly used, in particular sulphuric acid, yielding a mixture of LA with sulphuric acid, formic acid (FA) and furfural.

  20. Effect of acetic acid on wet patterning of copper/molybdenum thin films in phosphoric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Bo.-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Park, In-Sun [Department of Materials Engineering, Korea Aerospace University, Hwajeon, Goyang, Gyonggi-do 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jong Hyun, E-mail: jhseo@kau.ac.kr [Department of Materials Engineering, Korea Aerospace University, Hwajeon, Goyang, Gyonggi-do 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, HeeHwan; Jeon, Jae-Hong [School of Electronics, Telecommunications and Computer Engineering, Korea Aerospace University, Hwajeon, Goyang, Gyonggi-do 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Munpyo [Display and Semiconductor Physics, Korea University (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong Uk [PETEC (The Printable Electronics Technology Centre) (United Kingdom); Winkler, Joerg [PLANSEE Metal GmbH, Metallwerk-Plansee-Str. 71A-6600, Reutte (Austria)

    2011-08-01

    Copper metallization is a key issue for high performance thin film transistor (TFT) technology. A phosphoric acid based copper etchant is a potentially attractive alternative to the conventional hydrogen peroxide based etchant due to its longer-life expectancy time and higher stability in use. In this paper, it is shown that amount of the acetic acid in the phosphoric based copper etchant plays an important role in controlling the galvanic reaction between the copper and the molybdenum. As the concentration of acetic acid in the phosphoric mixture solution increased from 0 M to 0.4 M, the measured galvanic current density dropped from 32 mA/cm{sup 2} to 26 mA/cm{sup 2}, indicating that the acetic acid induces the lower galvanic reaction between the copper and the molybdenum in the solution. From the XPS analysis, with the addition of the acetic acid, the thickness of the protective MoO{sub 2} passive film covering the molybdenum surface grew and the dissolution rate of the molybdenum thin film decreased. However, the dissolution rate of the copper thin film increased as the concentration of acetic acid in the mixture solution increased.

  1. Effect of acetic acid on wet patterning of copper/molybdenum thin films in phosphoric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Bo.-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Park, In-Sun; Seo, Jong Hyun; Choe, HeeHwan; Jeon, Jae-Hong; Hong, Munpyo; Lee, Yong Uk; Winkler, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    Copper metallization is a key issue for high performance thin film transistor (TFT) technology. A phosphoric acid based copper etchant is a potentially attractive alternative to the conventional hydrogen peroxide based etchant due to its longer-life expectancy time and higher stability in use. In this paper, it is shown that amount of the acetic acid in the phosphoric based copper etchant plays an important role in controlling the galvanic reaction between the copper and the molybdenum. As the concentration of acetic acid in the phosphoric mixture solution increased from 0 M to 0.4 M, the measured galvanic current density dropped from 32 mA/cm 2 to 26 mA/cm 2 , indicating that the acetic acid induces the lower galvanic reaction between the copper and the molybdenum in the solution. From the XPS analysis, with the addition of the acetic acid, the thickness of the protective MoO 2 passive film covering the molybdenum surface grew and the dissolution rate of the molybdenum thin film decreased. However, the dissolution rate of the copper thin film increased as the concentration of acetic acid in the mixture solution increased.

  2. Extraction of plutonium and uranium from oxalate bearing solutions using phosphonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godbole, A.G.; Mapara, P.M.; Swarup, Rajendra

    1995-01-01

    A feasibility study on the solvent extraction of plutonium and uranium from solutions containing oxalic and nitric acids using a phosphonic acid extractant (PC88A) was made to explore the possibility of recovering Pu from these solutions. Batch experiments on the extraction of Pu(IV) and U(VI) under different parameters were carried out using PC88A in dodecane. The results indicated that Pu could be extracted quantitatively by PC88A from these solutions. A good separation of Pu from U could be achieved at higher temperatures. (author). 6 refs., 3 tabs

  3. The amino acid's backup bone - storage solutions for proteomics facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckel, Hagen; Stephan, Christian; Bunse, Christian; Krafzik, Michael; Reher, Christopher; Kohl, Michael; Meyer, Helmut Erich; Eisenacher, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics methods, especially high-throughput mass spectrometry analysis have been continually developed and improved over the years. The analysis of complex biological samples produces large volumes of raw data. Data storage and recovery management pose substantial challenges to biomedical or proteomic facilities regarding backup and archiving concepts as well as hardware requirements. In this article we describe differences between the terms backup and archive with regard to manual and automatic approaches. We also introduce different storage concepts and technologies from transportable media to professional solutions such as redundant array of independent disks (RAID) systems, network attached storages (NAS) and storage area network (SAN). Moreover, we present a software solution, which we developed for the purpose of long-term preservation of large mass spectrometry raw data files on an object storage device (OSD) archiving system. Finally, advantages, disadvantages, and experiences from routine operations of the presented concepts and technologies are evaluated and discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics in the Post-Identification Era. Guest Editors: Martin Eisenacher and Christian Stephan. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Solution phase thermodynamics of strong electrolytes based on ionic concentrations, hydration numbers and volumes of dissolved entities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heyrovská, Raji

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 6 (2013), s. 1895-1901 ISSN 1040-0400 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Solution thermodynamics * Aqueous electrolytes * Partial electrolytic dissociation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.900, year: 2013

  5. Heavy emulsifying solution on a petrolium base stabilized by calcium soaps of organic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anikeenko, G.I.; Kasperskii, B.V.; Penkov, A.I.; Vakhrushev, L.P.

    1980-01-01

    These studies make possible the solution to the problem at hand through a special selection of organic acids contained in the emulsifier. It was found that the addition of an organic acid mixture obtained from sebacious acid production to the oil-based emulsifying solution (OBES) results in clearly defined thixotropic properties in the emulsifying system. Additional studies have shown that the electrostability of OBES increases 1.5 to 1.8X following the addition of 225g of bentonite to 1 1 of emulsion (tested on bentonite) with a 20% increase in the calcium chloride content.

  6. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  7. Solute-enhanced production of gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from aqueous solutions of levulinic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumesic, James A.; Wettstein, Stephanie G.; Alonso, David Martin; Gurbuz, Elif Ispir

    2016-06-28

    A method to produce levulinic acid (LA) and gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from biomass-derived cellulose or lignocellulose by selective extraction of LA using GVL and optionally converting the LA so isolated into GVL, with no purifications steps required to yield the GVL.

  8. Solute-enhanced production of gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from aqueous solutions of levulinic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumesic, James A; Wettstein, Stephanie G; Alonso, David Martin; Gurbuz, Elif Ispir

    2015-02-24

    A method to produce levulinic acid (LA) and gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from biomass-derived cellulose or lignocellulose by selective extraction of LA using GVL and optionally converting the LA so isolated into GVL, with no purifications steps required to yield the GVL.

  9. Variation in concentration of perfluorooctanoic acid in methanol solutions during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanari, Nobuyasu; Itoh, Nobuyasu; Ishikawa, Keiichiro; Yarita, Takashi; Numata, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) have been widely recognized as persistent environmental contaminants. For accurate quantification of PFCAs, their stability in calibration solutions is important because they are criteria of quantification. To examine stability of PFCAs in methanol, we monitored PFOA and its related compounds around 4 years. Interestingly, perfluorooctanoate was varied randomly, and methyl perfluorooctanoate (MePFOA) and methyl formate were observed when perfluorooctanoate decreased. Moreover, no detection of both methyl esters was in methanol solutions immediately after preparation. In each of prepared methanol solution of perfluorohexanoic, perfluoroheptanoic, and perfluorononanoic acids, their corresponding methyl esters and methyl formate were observed. Furthermore, MePFOA was observed even in the solutions stored around 4 months and thereafter MePFOA increased with increase in methyl formate. Therefore, PFCAs including PFOA should be used immediately after preparation when methanol is used as a solvent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Amino acid salt solutions as solvents in CO2 capture from flue gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai; Thomsen, Kaj; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    solutions is their ability to form solid precipitates upon the absorption of CO2. The occurrence of crystallization offers the possibility of increasing the CO2 loading capacity of the solvent. However, precipitation can also have negative effect on the CO2 capture process. The chemical nature of the solid...... formed is a decisive factor in determining the effect of precipitation on the process. For the purpose of studying the CO2 loading capacity of amino acid salt solutions, we developed an experimental set-up based on a dynamic analytical mode, with analysis of the effluent gas. Using this set-up, the CO2......New solvents based on the salts of amino acids have emerged as an alternative to the alkanolamine solutions, for the chemical absorption of CO2 from flue gas. But only few studies on amino acids as CO2 capturing agents have been performed so far. One of the interesting features of amino acid salt...

  11. Studies on triazole derivatives as inhibitors for the corrosion of muntz metal in acidic and neutral solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berchmans, L. John; Sivan, V.; Iyer, S. Venkata Krishna

    2006-01-01

    The influence of few triazole derivatives namely, 4-amino-5-mercapto-3-methyl 1,2,4 triazole (AMMT), 4-amino-5-mercapto-3-methyl 1,2,4 triazole (AMET) and 4-amino-5-mercapto-3-propyl 1,2,4 triazole (AMPT) on the corrosion behavior of muntz metal (60Cu-40Zn) in acidic and neutral solutions has been studied using weight loss measurements and potentiodynamic polarization methods. Surface morphological examinations such as UV spectral analysis, XRD and SEM have also been carried out to understand the mechanism of inhibition of corrosion. All the triazoles derivatives are found to inhibit the corrosion of muntz metal very effectively in both the acidic and neutral solutions. Polarization measurements clearly show that the inhibitors behave as mixed type in neutral medium and are predominantly cathodic nature in acidic solutions. UV spectra, XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopic studies clearly reveal the formation of a strongly adsorbed film on the metal surface, which is responsible for the inhibition of corrosion in both the media. From the above studies, it can be concluded that the inhibition of corrosion by these compounds is due to a chmisorption process. Among these compounds, AMPT is found to offer better corrosion inhibition than the other compounds

  12. Voltammetric oxidation of dipyridamole in aqueous acid solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castilho Marilza

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical oxidation of dipyridamole (DIP has been studied in acidified aqueous solutions at platinum electrodes employing cyclic voltammetry and controlled-potential electrolysis. The progress of the anodic oxidation as a function of time was monitored by cyclic voltammetry with platinum ultramicroelectrodes, absorption and fluorescence optical spectroscopies, the resulting integrated charge being indicative of a two electron process. The cyclic voltammograms registered for low scan speeds are characterized by a single irreversible diffusion controlled anodic wave, the related cathodic wave being also observable for scan speeds higher than 1 V s-1. Oxidation reaction stoichiommetric parameters were obtained through Tafel slopes resulting in unitary reaction orders for DIP and H+.

  13. Synergistic extraction behaviour of americium from simulated acidic waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, P.N.; Veeraraghavan, R.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Manchanda, V.K.

    1998-01-01

    The extraction behaviour of americium has been investigated with mixtures of 3-phenyl-4-benzoyl-5-isoxazolone (PBI) and oxodonors viz. tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) and di-n-butyl octanamide (DBOA) using dodecane as the diluent from 1-6 M HNO 3 media. It is observed that D Am remains unaltered with PBI concentration (in the range 0.06-0.1 M) at 1.47 M TBP in the entire range of HNO 3 concentration. PBI and TBP in combination appears more promising compared to other synergistic systems. The possibility of using this mixture for americium removal from high level liquid waste solution has been explored. Extraction studies indicated that prior removal of uranium by 20% TBP in dodecane is helpful in the quantitative recovery of americium in three contacts. Effect of lanthanides on D Am is found to be marginal. (orig.)

  14. Dissolution of Simulated and Radioactive Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Sludges with Oxalic Acid & Citric Acid Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STALLINGS, MARY

    2004-01-01

    This report presents findings from tests investigating the dissolution of simulated and radioactive Savannah River Site sludges with 4 per cent oxalic acid and mixtures of oxalic and citric acid previously recommended by a Russian team from the Khlopin Radium Institute and the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC). Testing also included characterization of the simulated and radioactive waste sludges. Testing results showed the following: Dissolution of simulated HM and PUREX sludges with oxalic and citric acid mixtures at SRTC confirmed general trends reported previously by Russian testing. Unlike the previous Russian testing six sequential contacts of a mixture of oxalic acid citric acids at a 2:1 ratio (v/w) of acid to sludge did not produce complete dissolution of simulated HM and PUREX sludges. We observed that increased sludge dissolution occurred at a higher acid to sludge ratio, 50:1 (v/w), compared to the recommended ratio of 2:1 (v/w). We observed much lower dissolution of aluminum in a simulated HM sludge by sodium hydroxide leaching. We attribute the low aluminum dissolution in caustic to the high fraction of boehmite present in the simulated sludge. Dissolution of HLW sludges with 4 per cent oxalic acid and oxalic/citric acid followed general trends observed with simulated sludges. The limited testing suggests that a mixture of oxalic and citric acids is more efficient for dissolving HM and PUREX sludges and provides a more homogeneous dissolution of HM sludge than oxalic acid alone. Dissolution of HLW sludges in oxalic and oxalic/citric acid mixtures produced residual sludge solids that measured at higher neutron poison to equivalent 235U weight ratios than that in the untreated sludge solids. This finding suggests that residual solids do not present an increased nuclear criticality safety risk. Generally the neutron poison to equivalent 235U weight ratios of the acid solutions containing dissolved sludge components are lower than those in the untreated

  15. Acidic and basic solutions dissolve protein plugs made of lithostathine complicating choledochal cyst/pancreaticobiliary maljunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kenitiro; Ono, Yasuyuki; Tainaka, Takahisa; Sumida, Wataru; Ando, Hisami

    2009-07-01

    Symptoms of choledochal cysts are caused by protein plugs made of lithostathine, which block the long common channel and increase pancreaticobiliary ductal pressure. Agents that dissolve protein plugs can provide relief from or prevent symptoms. In the present study, drugs reportedly effective for pancreatic and biliary stones were used in dissolution tests. Protein plugs were obtained from choledochal cysts during surgery in two children (5- and 6-year-old girls). Plugs approximately 2 mm in diameter were immersed in citric acid, tartaric acid, dimethadione, bromhexine, dehydrocholic acid, sodium citrate, hydrochloric acid, and sodium hydroxide solutions under observation with a digital microscope. The pH of each solution was measured using a pH meter. Plugs dissolved in citric acid (5.2 mM; pH 2.64), tartaric acid (6.7 mM; pH 2.51), dimethadione (75 mM; pH 3.70), hydrochloric acid (0.5 mM; pH 3.13), and sodium hydroxide (75 mM; pH 12.75) solutions. Plugs did not dissolve in dimethadione (7.5 mM; pH 4.31), bromhexine (0.1%; pH 4.68), dehydrocholic acid (5%; pH 7.45), and sodium citrate (75 mM; pH 7.23) solutions. Protein plugs in choledochal cysts are dissolved in acidic and basic solutions, which may eliminate longitudinal electrostatic interactions of the lithostathine protofibrils.

  16. Interaction of sulphuric acid solutions with carbonates and feldspar during underground uranium leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, V.A.; Klassova, N.S.; Prisyagina, N.I.; Volodina, E.A.; Rafal'skij, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of sulphuric acid solutions with calcite, dolomite and alkali feldspar at room temperature is experimentally studied. The mineral ground up to 0.63-1 mm has been mixed with crushed quartz glass and poured over by sulphate solution. The time required for sulphate solution neutralization by these minerals is determined. The interaction of sulphuric acid with calcite occurs very quickly, the solution has a neutral reaction in some days, the process with dolomite proceeds at first quickly up to total neutralization, then its rate sharply drops, the H 2 SO 4 interaction with alkali feldspars proceeds very slowly. To estimate the extent of equilibrium between the solution and carbonates the experimental data are compared with the results of computer calculations of partial equilibria at various degrees of main reaction course. The results can be used in supplement to the processes occurring at underground uranium leaching as well as processes in oxidation and cementation zones of sulphide deposits

  17. Laser-induced photochemical reaction of aqueous maleic acid solutions containing H2O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yuichi; Kawanishi, Shunichi; Suzuki, Nobutake

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxy acid such as glycolic, tartaric and malic acids was directly produced by XeF-laser irradiation of the N 2 -saturated maleic acid aqueous solution containing H 2 O 2 . The selectivities of these products at the maximum of tartaric acid were 71, 4, and 2% at H 2 O 2 feeding rate of 3.2 ml h -1 , respectively. On the other hand, the irradiation of maleates such as dipotassium, calcium, and disodium greatly enhanced the selectivities of tartaric acid formation to 19%, and of malic acid formation to 13%, respectively, for dipotassium maleate. It may be considered from these results that the stability of the hydroxylated intermediate radical plays an important role for the efficient formations of tartaric and malic acids. (author)

  18. Influence of an acetate- and a lactate-based balanced infusion solution on acid base physiology and hemodynamics: an observational pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann-Kiefer, Klaus F; Chappell, Daniel; Kammerer, Tobias; Jacob, Matthias; Paptistella, Michaela; Conzen, Peter; Rehm, Markus

    2012-07-06

    The current pilot study compares the impact of an intravenous infusion of Ringer's lactate to an acetate-based solution with regard to acid-base balance. The study design included the variables of the Stewart approach and focused on the effective strong ion difference. Because adverse hemodynamic effects have been reported when using acetate buffered solutions in hemodialysis, hemodynamics were also evaluated. Twenty-four women who had undergone abdominal gynecologic surgery and who had received either Ringer's lactate (Strong Ion Difference 28 mmol/L; n = 12) or an acetate-based solution (Strong Ion Difference 36.8 mmol/L; n = 12) according to an established clinical protocol and its precursor were included in the investigation. After induction of general anesthesia, a set of acid-base variables, hemodynamic values and serum electrolytes was measured three times during the next 120 minutes. Patients received a mean dose of 4,054 ± 450 ml of either one or the other of the solutions. In terms of mean arterial blood pressure and norepinephrine requirements there were no differences to observe between the study groups. pH and serum HCO3- concentration decreased slightly but significantly only with Ringer's lactate. In addition, the acetate-based solution kept the plasma effective strong ion difference more stable than Ringer's lactate. Both of the solutions provided hemodynamic stability. Concerning consistency of acid base parameters none of the solutions seemed to be inferior, either. Whether the slight advantages observed for the acetate-buffered solution in terms of stability of pH and plasma HCO3- are clinically relevant, needs to be investigated in a larger randomized controlled trial.

  19. Silylium ion-catalyzed challenging Diels-Alder reactions: the danger of hidden proton catalysis with strong Lewis acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ruth K; Müther, Kristine; Mück-Lichtenfeld, Christian; Grimme, Stefan; Oestreich, Martin

    2012-03-07

    The pronounced Lewis acidity of tricoordinate silicon cations brings about unusual reactivity in Lewis acid catalysis. The downside of catalysis with strong Lewis acids is, though, that these do have the potential to mediate the formation of protons by various mechanisms, and the thus released Brønsted acid might even outcompete the Lewis acid as the true catalyst. That is an often ignored point. One way of eliminating a hidden proton-catalyzed pathway is to add a proton scavenger. The low-temperature Diels-Alder reactions catalyzed by our ferrocene-stabilized silicon cation are such a case where the possibility of proton catalysis must be meticulously examined. Addition of the common hindered base 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine resulted, however, in slow decomposition along with formation of the corresponding pyridinium ion. Quantitative deprotonation of the silicon cation was observed with more basic (Mes)(3)P to yield the phosphonium ion. A deuterium-labeling experiment verified that the proton is abstracted from the ferrocene backbone. A reasonable mechanism of the proton formation is proposed on the basis of quantum-chemical calculations. This is, admittedly, a particular case but suggests that the use of proton scavengers must be carefully scrutinized, as proton formation might be provoked rather than prevented. Proton-catalyzed Diels-Alder reactions are not well-documented in the literature, and a representative survey employing TfOH is included here. The outcome of these catalyses is compared with our silylium ion-catalyzed Diels-Alder reactions, thereby clearly corroborating that hidden Brønsted acid catalysis is not operating with our Lewis acid. Several simple-looking but challenging Diels-Alder reactions with exceptionally rare dienophile/enophile combinations are reported. Another indication is obtained from the chemoselectivity of the catalyses. The silylium ion-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction is general with regard to the oxidation level of the

  20. Acid-base chemistry of omeprazole in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Rong; Schulman, Stephen G.; Zavala, Pedro J.

    2003-01-01

    Omeprazole is a potent anti-acid drug. Its absorption and mode of action are closely related to its prototropic behavior. In the present study, omeprazole samples from different sources and in different forms were studied spectrophotometrically to obtain pK a values. In the neutral to alkaline pH region, two consistent pK a values of 7.1 and 14.7 were obtained from various samples. The assignment of these pK a values was realized by comparison with the prototropic properties of N(1)-methylated omeprazole substituted on the nitrogen at the 1-position of the benzimidazole ring, which was found to have a pK a of 7.5. The omeprazole pK a of 14.7 is assigned to the dissociation of the hydrogen from the 1-position of the benzimidazole ring and the pK a of 7.1 is assigned to the dissociation from the protonated pyridine nitrogen of omeprazole. The results presented are at variance with those of earlier work

  1. Acid-base chemistry of omeprazole in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Rong; Schulman, Stephen G.; Zavala, Pedro J

    2003-03-28

    Omeprazole is a potent anti-acid drug. Its absorption and mode of action are closely related to its prototropic behavior. In the present study, omeprazole samples from different sources and in different forms were studied spectrophotometrically to obtain pK{sub a} values. In the neutral to alkaline pH region, two consistent pK{sub a} values of 7.1 and 14.7 were obtained from various samples. The assignment of these pK{sub a} values was realized by comparison with the prototropic properties of N(1)-methylated omeprazole substituted on the nitrogen at the 1-position of the benzimidazole ring, which was found to have a pK{sub a} of 7.5. The omeprazole pK{sub a} of 14.7 is assigned to the dissociation of the hydrogen from the 1-position of the benzimidazole ring and the pK{sub a} of 7.1 is assigned to the dissociation from the protonated pyridine nitrogen of omeprazole. The results presented are at variance with those of earlier work.

  2. Zinc-Nickel Codeposition in Sulfate Solution Combined Effect of Cadmium and Boric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Addi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined effect of cadmium and boric acid on the electrodeposition of zinc-nickel from a sulfate has been investigated. The presence of cadmium ion decreases zinc in the deposit. In solution, cadmium inhibits the zinc ion deposition and suppresses it when deposition potential value is more negative than −1.2 V. Low concentration of CdSO4 reduces the anomalous nature of Zn-Ni deposit. Boric acid decreases current density and shifts potential discharge of nickel and hydrogen to more negative potential. The combination of boric acid and cadmium increases the percentage of nickel in the deposit. Boric acid and cadmium.

  3. Comparison of XAD macroporous resins for the concentration of fulvic acid from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    Five macroreticular, nonlonlc AmberlHe XAD resins were evaluated for concentration and Isolation of fulvlc acid from aqueous solution. The capacity of each resin for fulvlc acid was measured by both batch and column techniques. Elution efficiencies were determined by desorptlon with 0.1 N NaOH. Highest recoveries were obtained with the acrylic ester resins which proved to be most efficient for both adsorption and elution of fulvlc acid. Compared to the acrylic ester resins, usefulness of the styrene dvlnybenzene resins to remove fulvlc acid is limited because of slow diffusion-controlled adsorption and formation of charge-transfer complexes, which hinders elution. ?? 1979 American Chemical Society.

  4. Dissolving behavior and calcium release from fibrous wollastonite in acetic acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptacek, Petr, E-mail: ptacek@fch.vutbr.cz [Institute of Materials Science, Faculty of Chemistry, Brno University of Technology, Purkynova 464/118, Brno CZ-621 00 (Czech Republic); Noskova, Magdalena; Brandstetr, Jiri; Soukal, Frantisek; Opravil, Tomas [Institute of Materials Science, Faculty of Chemistry, Brno University of Technology, Purkynova 464/118, Brno CZ-621 00 (Czech Republic)

    2010-01-20

    The degradability of fibrous wollastonite (CaSiO{sub 3}) in an aqueous solution of acetic acid and leaching of Ca{sup 2+} ions were investigated in the temperature range from 22 to 50 {sup o}C. The Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES) was used for the assessment of calcium and other selected cations in the leaching medium. The amount of calcium in the solvent can be significantly enhanced through leaching at higher temperature. Fibrous silica particles are the main by-product of the leaching process. The properties of by-product were examined by thermal analysis (simultaneous TG-DTA-EGA), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The formation of silica layer on the surface of fibrous wollastonite particles is an important factor in the leaching process. Particles were covered by the silica layer and wollastonite core size was continually decreasing during leaching. The shape of resulting silica particles shows no significant changes during this process. Specific surface of the formed fibrous silica particles strongly depends on the leaching temperature.

  5. Intergranular corrosion testing of austenitic stainless steels in nitric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whillock, G.O.H.; Dunnett, B. F. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, BNFL, B170, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    In hot strong nitric acid solutions, stainless steels exhibit intergranular corrosion. Corrosion rates are often measured from immersion testing of specimens manufactured from the relevant material (e.g. plate or pipe). The corrosion rates, measured from weight loss, are found to increase with time prior to reaching steady state, which can take thousands of hours to achieve. The apparent increase in corrosion rate as a function of time was found to be an artefact due to the surface area of the specimen's being used in the corrosion rate calculations, rather than that of the true area undergoing active corrosion i.e. the grain boundaries. The steady state corrosion rate coincided with the onset of stable grain dropping, where the use of the surface area of the specimen to convert the weight loss measurements to corrosion rates was found to be appropriate. This was confirmed by sectioning of the specimens and measuring the penetration depths. The rate of penetration was found to be independent of time and no induction period was observed. A method was developed to shorten considerably the testing time to reach the steady state corrosion rate by use of a pre-treatment that induces grain dropping. The long-term corrosion rates from specimens which were pre-treated was similar to that achieved after prolonged testing of untreated (i.e. initially ground) specimens. The presence of cut surfaces is generally unavoidable in the simple immersion testing of specimens in test solutions. However, inaccuracy in the results may occur as the measured corrosion rate is often influenced by the orientation of the microstructure, the highest rates typically being observed on the cut surfaces. Two methods are presented which allow deconvolution of the corrosion rates from immersion testing of specimens containing cut surfaces, thus allowing reliable prediction of the long-term corrosion rate of plate surfaces. (authors)

  6. On thermodynamics of rhenium ion exchange sorption by strong-base anionite from nitrate-sulfate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokhin, A.A.; Pak, V.I.; Siracheva, M.K.

    1984-01-01

    The apparent thermodynamic parameters of the process of rhenium absorption by strong-base anionites from nitrate-sulfate media in the range of low degrees of filling the sorbents with perrhenate ions are estimated. On the basis of studying the temperature dependence of ion-exchange rhenium sorption it is shown that this process is accompanied by heat release and entropy reduction

  7. Brownian representations of cylindrical local martingales, martingale problem and strong Markov property of weak solutions of SPDEs in Banach spaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondreját, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2005), s. 1003-1039 ISSN 0011-4642 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA201/01/1197 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Brownian representations * martingale problem * strong Markov property Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.112, year: 2005

  8. The recuperation of sulphuric acid out of contaminated solutions by electro electrodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattoir, S.

    1997-05-01

    The dismantling of a nuclear reactor results in large amounts of contaminated waste. The amount of waste is minimized by so-called decontamination processes. These decontamination processes result in decontaminated metal as well as contaminated effluents, containing acid and metal salts. Standard treatment of these effluents involves neutralisation of the acid using sodium hydroxide, resulting in the precipitation of hydroxides; and evaporation of the solvent. However, if the acid is extracted out of the decontamination effluents prior to neutralisation, this acid can be re-used in the decontamination process, substantially reducing the final waste. This report investigates the possibility of using Electro Electrodialysis (EED) for the extraction of 900 moles of sulphuric acid out of a 1 m 3 contaminated solution, containing 22 kg of ferrous, chromous, cerous and nickel ions and 1000 moles of sulphuric acid. EED removes acids out of acid/salts solutions, using an electrolyser equipped with an anionic membrane: the acid-anion is displaced by migration through the membrane while the proton is displaced by electrolysis. This report gives a full description of the technique, the lab-scale apparatus, the analyses involved in studying the technique on lab-scale or monitoring it on full scale, the choice of electrode and membrane and of process parameters such as temperature and current density. On lab scale, EED can displace 90% of the acid out of the acid/salt solution just described, at a current density as high as 0.14 A.cm -2 , at 50 degrees Celsius, if the cathode and the anode are of smoothed platina or of platinised titanium, and the anion selective membrane is the Neosepta AMH -membrane of Tokuyama. The study of EED still needs to be completed with a further study of metal deposition on the cathode, and a comparison of the technique to other (electro)membrane techniques

  9. Amination of oxy acids in aqueous solution by gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ema, Kimiko; Kato, Taizo; Shinagawa, Mutsuaki

    1978-01-01

    Alanin, β-alanine, glicine, and aspartic, α-amino-n-butyric, and γ-amino-n-butyric acids were obtained by γ-irradiation of aqueous ammonia solutions of lactic, β-oxypropionic, glycolic, malic, α-oxybutyric, and γ-oxybutyric acids, respectively. The yields of amino acids were examined for functions of radiation dose (0.75 - 3.55Mrad), concentrations of oxy acid (0.01 - 0.1M) and ammonia (0.1 - 15M), and substances added as radical (potassium iodide), and hydrated electron (nitrous oxide) scavengers. The maximum G-values were 0.6 for alanine in a solution of 0.1M lactic acid-4M ammonia and some nitrous oxide and 1.14 for β-alanine in a solution of 0.1M β-oxypropionic acid and 0.7M ammonia. The yield of alanine increased with increased concentrations of lactic acid and ammonia due to saturation of nitrous oxide but decreased when potassium iodide (0.03M) was added. The yield of β-alanine showed a maximum increase at ca. 0.7M ammonia and decreased when potassium iodide and nitrous oxide were added. Serine was obtained from G = 0.002 in a solution of β-oxypropionic acid and increased to G = 0.058 due to saturation of nitrous oxide. The manner of chemical amination due to radiation was studied from the above results. In general, oxy acids from which hydrogen has been abstracted by an H or OH radical react with ammonia to form amino acids. The effect of ammonia concentration on the yield of amino acids demonstrates that the NH 2 radical abstracts the α-hydrogen of lactic acid but does not react with the β-hydrogen of β-oxypropionic acid. The effect of nitrous oxide indicates that hydrated electrons interfere with alanine formation, contribute to β-alanine formation, react with the carboxyl group of lactic acids to form lactamide, and abstract the β-hydroxyl group of β-oxypropionic acids to form β-alanine. (Bell, E.)

  10. Determination of humic acid in alkali leaching solution of uranium by spectophotrometry-COD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yu; An Wei; Chen Shusen

    2014-01-01

    It is one of the main causes of extraction emulsification or resin toxicosis during alkali leaching process in uranium metallurgy which organic matters including humic acid exist in lixiviums. In order to study the effect of humic acid in uranium metallurgy, a method for determination of content of humic acid in aqueous solution need to be established. Spectrophotometry is a simple and convenient method in humic acid analysis. However, accuracy of spectrophotometry can be reduced greatly because of interference of uranium and other elements in the humic acid solutions. Although chemical oxygen demand (COD) method is a common analysis way of organic matters in aqueous solutions, the concentration of humic acid cannot be directly measured. In this paper, COD method is related with spectrophotometry to avoid the interference of uranium and ensure the accurate analysis of humic acid. The results showed that the detection limit of the method was 1.78 mg/L and the recovery rate was 101.2%. (authors)

  11. Crack propagation behavior of Ti-5Ta alloy in boiling nitric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motooka, Takafumi; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    1999-05-01

    The crack propagation behavior of Ti-5Ta alloy both in boiling nitric acid solution and in air at room temperature has been investigated. The crack growth rate of Ti-5Ta alloy was measured as a function of the stress intensity factor range. After the tests, the fracture surface morphology was observed by a scanning electron microscope and the crystallographic orientation was examined by X-ray diffraction analysis. Difference in the crack growth behavior was not observed in both environments. The crack growth rate in boiling nitric acid solution was similar to that in air at room temperature. Moreover, the crystallographic orientation of Ti-5Ta alloy had little effect on the fatigue behavior, because this alloy does not have the susceptibility to SCC in nitric acid solution. (author)

  12. Water activity, pH and density of aqueous amino acids solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninni, L; Meirelles, A J

    2001-01-01

    The water activity, pH and density of some aqueous amino acid solutions were determined at 25 degrees C in three different types of solvents. Previous published experimental data on water activity and solubility of amino acids in aqueous solutions were used together with data from this work to test the applicability of a group contribution model. The activity coefficients were estimated by the UNIFAC-Larsen model combined with the Debye-Hückel equation, taking also into account the partial dissociation phenomena of species in solution. Interaction energies between the charged species Na(+) and Cl(-) and the specific groups of amino acids (COOH and NH(2)) were adjusted using experimental solubility data.

  13. Extraction of gallium(III) from hydrochloric acid solutions by trioctylammonium-based mixed ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuta, Shoichi; Okai, Miho; Yoshimoto, Yuki; Kudo, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    The extractabilities of aluminium(III), gallium(III), and indium(III) from hydrochloric acid solutions were investigated using a mixture of two protic ionic liquids, trioctylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ([TOAH][NTf(2)]) and trioctylammonium nitrate ([TOAH][NO(3)]). At a HCl concentration of 4 mol L(-1) or more, gallium(III) was nearly quantitatively extracted and the extractability order was Ga > Al > In. The extractability of gallium(III) increased with increasing [TOAH][NO(3)] content in the mixed ionic liquid. The extracted gallium(III) was quantitatively stripped with aqueous nitric acid solutions. The separation and recovery of gallium(III) from hydrochloric acid solutions containing excess indium(III) was demonstrated using the mixed ionic liquid.

  14. Gold recovery from acidic leach solutions using as extractants trialkylamines of N,N'-di-alkyl-aliphatic amides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroncelli, F.; Carlini, D.; Gasparini, G.M.; Simonetti, E.

    1988-07-01

    TriOctylAmine (TOA) and a di-substituted aliphatic amide, N,N-Di-N-ButylOctanamide (DBOA), were examined in batch and in mini mixer-settler experiments using leachates of Peruvian and Bolivian concentrates. With these minerals, very rich in sulfur (pyrites, stybine), 90-95% gold recovery in 12-24 hours was reached by leaching with 4M aqua regia (HCl 3M nitric acid 1M) at room temperature and with 1/3 solid/liquid ratio. With these leachate solutions (2-3M total acidity, 10-60 ppm ao Au), the two processes with TOA (GAMEX PROCESS) and with DBOA (AUMIDEX PROCESS) were tested and compared. Experimental results strongly support the possibility of using TOA and DBOA on an industrial scale.

  15. Smoothed solutions in the kinetic theory of e+e- vacuum pair creation in strong laser fields. Linear polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyansky, S. A.; Prozorkevich, A. V.; Dmitriev, V. V.; Tarakanov, A. V.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the dynamical Schwinger effect of vacuum creation of electron-positron pairs driven by an intense laser pulse is studied on the basis of correct quantum kinetic theory. In the general case, the numerical solutions of corresponding system of kinetic equations exhibit complex time dependence which makes the analysis of the physical processes complicated. In particular, the question of secondary effects, such as creation of annihilation photons from the focus spot of the colliding laser beams, remains an important open problem. In our previous work [S. A. Smolyansky, M. Bonitz and A. V. Prozorkevich, Contrib. Plasma Phys.53 (2013) 788], we presented a perturbation theory which is able to capture the dominant time dependence of the produced electron-positron pair distribution during the pulse (quasiparticle excitations). In the present work, we develop appreciably this approximation scheme. We demonstrate effectiveness of the proposed method for solution of such kind nonstationary problems in the simplest models of the laser field. However, this approach opens perspective for search of the relevant approximate solutions in kinetic theory of the e+e- quasiparticle plasma for the more realistic field models (arbitrary polarization, space inhomogeneous, etc).

  16. Elimination par électrodialyse des ions Fe(II) d'une solution d'acide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elimination by electrodialysis of Fe (II) ions with a sulfuric acid solution. This work was aimed at applying the electrodialysis technique for the purification of a synthetic solution of sulfuric acid charged by cations of Fe(II), where the composition content is close to that of reel industrial acid bath. The study was conducted on a ...

  17. Effect of humic acid on the underpotential deposition-stripping voltammetry of copper in acetic acid soil extract solutions at mercaptoacetic acid-modified gold electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, Gregoire; Beni, Valerio; Dillon, Patrick H.; Barry, Thomas; Arrigan, Damien W.M

    2004-05-24

    Electrochemical measurements were undertaken for the investigation of the underpotential deposition-stripping process of copper at bare and modified gold electrodes in 0.11 M acetic acid, the first fraction of the European Union's Bureau Communautaire de References (BCR) sequential extraction procedure for fractionating metals within soils and sediments. Gold electrodes modified with mercaptoacetic acid showed higher sensitivity for the detection of copper than bare gold electrodes, both in the absence and in the presence of humic acid in acetic acid solutions, using the underpotential deposition-stripping voltammetry (UPD-SV) method. In the presence of 50 mg l{sup -1} of humic acid, the mercaptoacetic acid modified electrode proved to be 1.5 times more sensitive than the bare gold electrode. The mercaptoacetic acid monolayer formed on the gold surface provided efficient protection against the adsorption of humic acid onto the gold electrode surface. Variation of the humic acid concentration in the solution showed little effect on the copper stripping signal at the modified electrode. UPD-SV at the modified electrode was applied to the analysis of soil extract samples. Linear correlation of the electrochemical results with atomic spectroscopic results yielded the straight-line equation y ({mu}g l{sup -1}) = 1.10x - 44 (ppb) (R=0.992, n=6), indicating good agreement between the two methods.

  18. The influence of temperature on the decomposition kinetics of peracetic acid in solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kunigk

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Peracetic acid is a powerful sanitizer that has only recently been introduced in the Brazilian food industry. The main disadvantage of this sanitizer is its decomposition rate. The main purpose of this paper is to present results obtained in experiments carried out to study the decomposition kinetics of peracetic acid in aqueous solutions at 25, 35, 40 and 45 °C. The decompositon of peracetic acid is a first-order reaction. The decomposition rate constants are between 1.71x10-3 h -1 for 25 °C and 9.64x10-3 h-1 for 45 °C. The decomposition rate constant is affected by temperature according to the Arrhenius equation, and the activation energy for the decomposition of peracetic acid in aqueous solutions prepared from the commercial formulation used in this work is 66.20 kJ/mol.

  19. Stability of antimicrobial activity of peracetic acid solutions used in the final disinfection process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Alves da Silva COSTA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The instruments and materials used in health establishments are frequently exposed to microorganism contamination, and chemical products are used before sterilization to reduce occupational infection. We evaluated the antimicrobial effectiveness, physical stability, and corrosiveness of two commercial formulations of peracetic acid on experimentally contaminated specimens. Stainless steel specimens were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, blood, and saliva and then immersed in a ready peracetic acid solution: 2% Sekusept Aktiv (SA or 0.25% Proxitane Alpha (PA, for different times. Then, washes of these instruments were plated in culture medium and colony-forming units counted. This procedure was repeated six times per day over 24 non-consecutive days. The corrosion capacity was assessed with the mass loss test, and the concentration of peracetic acid and pH of the solutions were measured with indicator tapes. Both SA and PA significantly eliminated microorganisms; however, the SA solution was stable for only 4 days, whereas PA remained stable throughout the experiment. The concentration of peracetic acid in the SA solutions decreased over time until the chemical was undetectable, although the pH remained at 5. The PA solution had a concentration of 500-400 mg/L and a pH of 2-3. Neither formulation induced corrosion and both reduced the number of microorganisms (p = 0.0001. However, the differences observed in the performance of each product highlight the necessity of establishing a protocol for optimizing the use of each one.

  20. Corrosion behavior of niobium coated 304 stainless steel in acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, T.J., E-mail: tjpan@cczu.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Photovolatic Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Material Surface Technology, Changzhou 213164 (China); Chen, Y.; Zhang, B. [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Photovolatic Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Hu, J. [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Photovolatic Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Material Surface Technology, Changzhou 213164 (China); Li, C. [Light Industry College of Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)

    2016-04-30

    Highlights: • The Nb coating produced by HEMAA offers good protection for 304SS in acid solution. • The coating increases corrosion potential and induces decrease of corrosion rate. • The protection of coating is ascribed to the stability of Nb in acid solution. - Abstract: The niobium coating is fabricated on the surface of AISI Type 304 stainless steel (304SS) by using a high energy micro arc alloying technique in order to improvecorrosion resistance of the steel against acidic environments. The electrochemical corrosion resistance of the niobium coating in 0.7 M sulfuric acid solutions is evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization and the open circuit potential versus time. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the niobium coating increases the free corrosion potential of the substrate by 110 mV and a reduction in the corrosion rate by two orders of magnitude compared to the substrate alone. The niobium coating maintains large impedance and effectively offers good protection for the substrate during the long-term exposure tests, which is mainly ascribed to the niobium coating acting inhibiting permeation of corrosive species. Finally, the corresponding electrochemical impedance models are proposed to elucidate the corrosion resistance behavior of the niobium coating in acid solutions.

  1. Swelling compositions based polycarboxylic acids and bentonite clays in solutions of salts of metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sarshesheva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to the synthesis of chemical cross-linked composite materials made of natural inorganic polymer bentonite clay of Manrak deposit, and polyacrylic and polymethacrylic acids. The swelling ability of the composition in solutions of salts of heavy metals (Ni2+ and Pb2+, influence of solution of concentration, pH and temperature on the swelling ability is investigated.

  2. The initial behaviour of freshly etched copper in modertely acid, aerated chloride solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Jaskula, M.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2002-01-01

    When freshly etched samples of various types of copper were exposed in moderately acid, aerated chloride solutions, two phenomena were observed. First the corrosion potential and the pH of the solution decreased over a shorter time, then the potential increased over a long period (600-1500 min...... in thickness with exposure time. The dissolution kinetics can be described in terms of two parallel electrochemical reactions and a simultaneous non-electrochemical dissolution reaction....

  3. Water activity in aqueous amino acid solutions, with and without KCl, at 298.15 K

    OpenAIRE

    Pinho, Simão

    2007-01-01

    The study of physical chemical properties of amino acids (AA) aqueous solutions have been a very important studied subject, not only because they are the basic building blocks of proteins and peptides but also for their importance in industrial processes, particularly for pharmaceutical and food industries. In this work an humidity sensor instrument was used to measure water activity in aqueous solutions of DLalanine, glycine or L-serine with potassium chloride, molality ranging f...

  4. Evaluation of the Efficiency of Electron Beam Irradiation for Removal of Humic Acid from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad hasan Ehrampoosh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Humic acids (HAs have adverse effects on the environment; therefore, they should be removed from the water and wastewater. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of the electron beam irradiation for removal of humic acid from aqueous solutions. Methods: Humic acid was purchased from Sigma-Aldrich Company. After preparation of stock solution in alkaline condition, different concentrations of humic acid (10, 25 and 50 mg were prepared. Study has done at pH= 8 and in different dose rates of 1, 3, 6, 9 and 15 kGy. Then initial absorption of samples was measured at 254 nm using UV-Visible spectrophotometer before and after the irradiation. Excel and SPSS Ver. 18 were used for analyzing the data and drawing graphs. Results: The results of this study showed that by increasing adsorbed dose from 1 to 15 kGy, the efficiency of HA removal increased and by increasing humic acid concentration from 10 to 50 mg/L, the removal efficiency of humic acid decreased. The results of the kinetic study showed that irradiation of humic acid followed pseudo second-order reaction. Conclusion: It can be concluded that electron beam irradiation can be a useful technology for the treatment of environmental samples contaminated by humic acid.

  5. Extraction kinetics of uranium (VI) from nitric acid solution by N-octanoylpiperidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Hua; Bao Borong; Han Jingtian; Yang Yonghui; Sun Sixiu

    2002-01-01

    The extraction kinetics of uranium (VI) from nitric acid solution with N-octanoylpiperidine (OP) in toluene was investigated by means of stationary interface stirring cell. The experimental results show that the extraction process may be controlled by the following interface reaction: UO 2 (NO 3 ) + + OP·HNO 3(i) = UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 ·OP (i) + H + . The effects of temperature, acidity and extractant concentration on the extraction rate were also discussed

  6. Thermodynamics of uranium and nitric acid extraction from aqueous solution of TBP/diluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Freitas, R.F. de.

    1982-06-01

    A thermodynamically consistent procedure for predicting distribution equilibria for uranyl nitrate and nitric acid between an aqueous solution and 30 vol % tributyl phosphate (TBP) in a hydrocarbon diluent is studied. Experimental work is developed in order to obtain equilibrium data for the system uranyl nitrate, nitric acid, water and 30 vol % TBP in n-dodecane, at 25 0 C and 40 0 C. The theoretical equilibrium data, obtained with the aid of a computer, are compared with the experimental results. (Author) [pt

  7. Sorption of elements on phosphonic acid cation exchanger from nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razbash, A.A.; Sevast'yanov, Yu.G.; Bykhovskii, D.N.

    1988-01-01

    The coefficients of distribution of 25 elements between KRF-20t-60 macroporous phosphonic acid cation exchanger and 0.1-2.0 M nitric acid have been determined by a static method. The above cation exchanger has a high affinity for some multivalent metal ions like Fe (III) , In (III) , Ce (IV) , Ti (IV) , etc. A mechanism has been proposed which explains the increase in cerium(IV) sorption with the rise of acid concentration above 2 M. An example of separation of an artificial mixture of lead and bismuth has been given

  8. Analytical solutions by squeezing to the anisotropic Rabi model in the nonperturbative deep-strong-coupling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Yu; Chen, Xiang-You

    2017-12-01

    An unexplored nonperturbative deep strong coupling (npDSC) achieved in superconducting circuits has been studied in the anisotropic Rabi model by the generalized squeezing rotating-wave approximation. Energy levels are evaluated analytically from the reformulated Hamiltonian and agree well with numerical ones in a wide range of coupling strength. Such improvement ascribes to deformation effects in the displaced-squeezed state presented by the squeezed momentum variance, which are omitted in previous displaced states. The atom population dynamics confirms the validity of our approach for the npDSC strength. Our approach offers the possibility to explore interesting phenomena analytically in the npDSC regime in qubit-oscillator experiments.

  9. highly selective amino acid salt solutions as absorption liquid for CO(2) capture in gas-liquid membrane contactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Katja; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Mengers, Harro; Brilman, Wim; Wessling, Matthias

    2010-08-23

    The strong anthropogenic increase in the emission of CO(2) and the related environmental impact force the developments towards sustainability and carbon capture and storage (CCS). In the present work, we combine the high product yields and selectivities of CO(2) absorption processes with the advantages of membrane technology in a membrane contactor for the separation of CO(2) from CH(4) using amino acid salt solutions as competitive absorption liquid to alkanol amine solutions. Amino acids, such as sarcosine, have the same functionality as alkanol amines (e.g., monoethanolamine=MEA), but in contrast, they exhibit a better oxidative stability and resistance to degradation. In addition, they can be made nonvolatile by adding a salt functionality, which significantly reduces the liquid loss due to evaporation at elevated temperatures in the desorber. Membrane contactor experiments using CO(2)/CH(4) feed mixtures to evaluate the overall process performance, including a full absorption/desorption cycle show that even without a temperature difference between absorber and desorber, a CO(2)/CH(4) selectivity of over 70 can be easily achieved with the sarcosine salt solution as absorption liquid. This selectivity reaches values of 120 at a temperature difference between absorber and desorber of 35 degrees C, compared to a value of only 60 for MEA under the same conditions. Although CO(2) permeance values are somewhat lower than the values obtained for MEA, the results clearly show the potential of amino acid salt solutions as competitive absorption liquids for the energy efficient removal of CO(2). In addition, due to the low absorption of CH(4) in sarcosine compared to MEA, the loss of CH(4) is reduced and significantly higher CH(4) product yields can be obtained.

  10. α,β-D-constrained nucleic acids are strong terminators of thermostable DNA polymerases in polymerase chain reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Martínez

    Full Text Available (S(C5', R(P α,β-D- Constrained Nucleic Acids (CNA are dinucleotide building blocks that can feature either B-type torsional angle values or non-canonical values, depending on their 5'C and P absolute stereochemistry. These CNA are modified neither on the nucleobase nor on the sugar structure and therefore represent a new class of nucleotide with specific chemical and structural characteristics. They promote marked bending in a single stranded DNA so as to preorganize it into a loop-like structure, and they have been shown to induce rigidity within oligonucleotides. Following their synthesis, studies performed on CNA have only focused on the constraints that this family of nucleotides introduced into DNA. On the assumption that bending in a DNA template may produce a terminator structure, we investigated whether CNA could be used as a new strong terminator of polymerization in PCR. We therefore assessed the efficiency of CNA as a terminator in PCR, using triethylene glycol phosphate units as a control. Analyses were performed by denaturing gel electrophoresis and several PCR products were further analysed by sequencing. The results showed that the incorporation of only one CNA was always skipped by the polymerases tested. On the other hand, two CNA units always stopped proofreading polymerases, such as Pfu DNA polymerase, as expected for a strong replication terminator. Non-proofreading enzymes, e.g. Taq DNA polymerase, did not recognize this modification as a strong terminator although it was predominantly stopped by this structure. In conclusion, this first functional use of CNA units shows that these modified nucleotides can be used as novel polymerization terminators of proofreading polymerases. Furthermore, our results lead us to propose that CNA and their derivatives could be useful tools for investigating the behaviour of different classes of polymerases.

  11. Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Gregory Hudson [Castro Valley, CA

    2012-05-15

    A system is described for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizing a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate, in particular water-insoluble calcium carbonate or magnesium carbonate, is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide. Among other uses, the metal hydroxide formed can be employed to absorb acid gases such as carbon dioxide from a gas mixture. The invention can also generate hydrogen and oxidative gases such as oxygen or chlorine.

  12. On the existence of global strong solutions to the equations modeling a motion of a rigid body around a viscous fluid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nečasová, Šárka; Wolf, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 3 (2016), s. 1539-1562 ISSN 1078-0947 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : incompressible fluid * motion of rigid body * strong solutions Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.099, year: 2016 http://www.aimsciences.org/journals/displayArticlesnew.jsp?paperID=11589

  13. Green approach to corrosion inhibition of mild steel in hydrochloric acid and sulphuric acid solutions by the extract of Murraya koenigii leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quraishi, M.A., E-mail: maquraishi@rediffmail.com [Department of Applied Chemistry, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Singh, Ambrish; Singh, Vinod Kumar [Udai Pratap Autonomous College, Varanasi 221002 (India); Yadav, Dileep Kumar; Singh, Ashish Kumar [Department of Applied Chemistry, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2010-07-01

    The inhibition of the corrosion of mild steel in hydrochloric acid and sulphuric acid solutions by the extract of Murraya koenigii leaves has been studied using weight loss, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization and potentiodynamic polarization techniques. Inhibition was found to increase with increasing concentration of the leaves extract. The effect of temperature, immersion time and acid concentration on the corrosion behavior of mild steel in 1 M HCl and 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} with addition of extract was also studied. The inhibition was assumed to occur via adsorption of the inhibitor molecules on the metal surface. The adsorption of the extract on the mild steel surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The activation energy as well as other thermodynamic parameters (Q, {Delta}H*, and {Delta}S*) for the inhibition process was calculated. These thermodynamic parameters show strong interaction between inhibitor and mild steel surface. The results obtained show that the extract of the leaves of M. koenigii could serve as an effective inhibitor of the corrosion of mild steel in hydrochloric and sulphuric acid media.

  14. EXTRACTION AND SORPTION BENZOIC ACID FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF POLYMERS BASED ON N-VINYLAMIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Savvina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of aromatic acids (benzoic acid, salicylic as preservatives necessitates their qualitative and quantitative determination in food. Effective and common way to separation and concentration of aromatic acids liquid extraction. Biphasic system of water-soluble polymers based on (poly-N-vinyl pyrrolidone, and poly-N-vinylcaprolactam satisfy the requirements of the extraction system. When sorption concentration improved definition of the metrological characteristics, comply with the requirements for sensitivity and selectivity definition appears possible, use of inexpensive and readily available analytical equipment. When studying the adsorption of benzoic acid used as a sorbent crosslinked polymer based on N-vinyl pyrrolidone, obtained by radical polymerisation of a functional monomer and crosslinker. In the extraction of benzoic acid to maximize the allocation of water and the organic phase of the polymer used salt solutions with concentrations close to saturation. Regardless of the nature of the anion salt is used as salting-out agent, aromatic acids sorption increases with the size of the cations. In the experiment the maximum recovery rate (80% benzoic acid obtained in the PVP (0.2 weight%. Ammonium sulphate. The dependence stepepni benzoic acid extraction from time sorption sorbent mass and the pH of the aqueous phase. To establish equilibrium in the system, for 20 minutes. The dependence of the degree of extraction of the acid pH indicates that the acid is extracted into the molecular form. The maximum adsorption is reached at pH 3,5, with its efficiency decreases symbatically reduce the amount of undissociated acid molecules in solution.

  15. On the microstructure of organic solutions of mono-carboxylic acids: Combined study by infrared spectroscopy, small-angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremin, Roman A., E-mail: era@jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Kholmurodov, Kholmirzo T. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); International University “Dubna”, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Kyiv 03022 (Ukraine); Rosta, László [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest H-1525 (Hungary); Grigoryeva, Natalia A. [Faculty of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, 198504 Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-05

    Highlights: • The model of the scattering particle for a reliable SANS analysis is proposed. • The structural parameters of saturated mono-carboxylic acids in solutions are obtained. • The differences in nematic transitions correlate to solvation peculiarities. - Abstract: The data of infrared spectroscopy (IR), molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) have been combined to conclude about the nanoscale structural organization of organic non-polar solutions of saturated mono-carboxylic acids with different alkyl chain lengths for diluted solutions of saturated myristic (C14) and stearic (C18) acids in benzene and decalin. In particular, the degree of dimerization was found from the IR spectra. The structural anisotropy of the acids and their dimers was used in the treatment of the data of MD simulations to describe the solute–solvent interface in a cylindrical approximation and show its rather strong influence on SANS. The corresponding scattering length density profiles were used to fit the experimental SANS data comprising the information about the acid molecule isomerization. The SANS data from concentrated solutions showed a partial self-assembling of the acids within the nematic transition is different for two solvents due to lyophobic peculiarities.

  16. Length Scale Dependence of the Dynamic Properties of Hyaluronic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horkay, Ferenc; Falus, Peter; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik (CNRS-UMR); (NIH); (ILL)

    2010-12-07

    In solutions of the charged semirigid biopolymer hyaluronic acid in salt-free conditions, the diffusion coefficient D{sub NSE} measured at high transfer momentum q by neutron spin echo is more than an order of magnitude smaller than that determined by dynamic light scattering, D{sub DLS}. This behavior contrasts with neutral polymer solutions. With increasing salt content, D{sub DLS} approaches D{sub NSE}, which is independent of ionic strength. Contrary to theoretical expectation, the ion-polymer coupling, which dominates the low q dynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions, already breaks down at distance scales greater than the Debye-Hueckel length.

  17. The leachability of osmium-185 from acid solutions by sorption using of anionite A - 100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuravlev, A.A.; Hudaybergenov, U.; Mirzaeva, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text:The sorption methods are use in analytical chemistry in technological practice very often, but methods of osmium and ruthenium selection and them leachability from another metals are not much. It is connect with that substance contenting osmium and ruthenium participate in hydrolyze process and are reduce to low rate of oxidation during coming into contact with ionite. The EDE - 10P leachable 95 % osmium from acid solution, desorption of osmium by inorganic acids is very difficult. Because to find another new methods of desorption of osmium is very important. The anionite A - 100 which are use for head metal leachability was used for this purpose. The investigation of leachability by ionite is suitable with using of radionuclide osmium - 185 ( T 1/2 = 93,6 days, E γ = 646 keV ). The sorption kinetic of osmium on A - 100 (CI - , SO 4 2- , NO 3 -forms) was studded in independence of mineral acid concentrate. The leachability of osmium increases with change of concentrate of acid from 1.0 M to 1.10 -4 M. This acids are in order of decreasing of efficiency of leachability for osmium: HCl>H 2 SO 4 >HNO 3 . The leachability of osmium increases with change of concentrate of acids from 1.0 M to 1.10 -4 M. This acids are in order of decreasing of efficiency of leachability for osmium: HCl>H S O 4 >HNO 3 . The cupric (concentrate 40 g/l), nickel (concentrate 11 g/l), molybdenum (concentrate 40 g/l) are influence on leachability of osmium from acid solution HC, H 2 SO 4 (pH=1). The sorption of osmium equals 85-94%. The NO 3 (from 50 g/l to 300 g/l) decreases sorption of osmium (from 68 to 33%). The sorption of osmium was investigated from wastes of molybdenum enterprise. This solution of had pH=1-2 and contented next elements (g/l): 0.3 Cu, 0.08 Mo, 0.04 Re, 5.10 -5 Os, Fe,, nitrates, sulfates. The sorption kinetic of osmium was investigated. The increasing of osmium concentrate in solution influence on capacity of ionite. With purpose of finding of optimal

  18. In vitro evaluation of the microhardness of bovine enamel exposed to acid solutions after bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Gorgulho Zanet

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Acid erosion is a superficial loss of enamel caused by chemical processes that do not involve bacteria. Intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as the presence of acid substances in the oral cavity, may cause a pH reduction, thus potentially increasing acid erosion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microhardness of bleached and unbleached bovine enamel after immersion in a soda beverage, artificial powder juice and hydrochloric acid. The results obtained for the variables of exposure time, acid solution and substrate condition (bleached or unbleached enamel were statistically analyzed by the ANOVA and Tukey tests. It was concluded that a decrease in microhardness renders dental structures more susceptible to erosion and mineral loss, and that teeth left unbleached show higher values of microhardness compared to bleached teeth.

  19. Strong and long-lasting antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory conjugate of naturally occurring oleanolic acid and aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Bednarczyk-Cwynar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The conjugate 8 was obtained as a result of condensation of 3-hydroxyiminooleanolic acid morfolide (7 and aspirin in dioxane. Analgesic effect of OAO-ASA (8 for the range of doses 0.3 – 300.0 mg/kg (p.o. was performed in mice using a hot plate test. Anti-inflammatory activity was assessed on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats for the same range of doses. The conjugate OAO-ASA (8 did not significantly change locomotor activity of mice, therefore sedative properties of the compound should be excluded. The compound 8 proved a simple, proportional, dose-dependent analgesic action and expressed strong anti-inflammatory activity showing a reversed U-shaped, dose-dependent relation with its maximum at 30.0 mg/kg. After its combined administration with morphine (MF, 5.0 mg/kg, s.c. the lowering of antinociceptive activity was found; however, the interaction with naloxone (NL, 3.0 mg/kg, s.c. did not affect the antinociceptive effect of OAO-ASA (8, therefore its opioid mechanism of action should be rather excluded. After combined administration with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, 300.0 mg/kg, p.o. in hot-plate test, the examined compound 8 enhanced the antinociceptive activity in significant way. It also shows that rather the whole molecule is responsible for the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of the tested compound 8, however it cannot be excluded that the summarizing effect is produced by ASA released from the compound 8 and the rest of triterpene derivative. The occurrence of tolerance for triterpenic derivative 8 was not observed, since the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects after chronic administration of the conjugate OAO-ASA (8 was on the same level as after its single treatment. It seemed that the anti-inflammatory mechanism of action of OAO-ASA (8 is not simple, even its chronic administration lowered both blood concentration of IL-6 and mRNA IL-6 expression. However, the effects of the conjugate OAO-ASA (8 on TNF-α level

  20. Capillary electrophoresis method for the analysis of organic acids and amino acids in the presence of strongly alternating concentrations of aqueous lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Hendrik; Boden, Jana; Schneider, Roland

    2017-07-01

    During the production of bio-based bulk chemicals, such as lactic acid (LA), organic impurities have to be removed to produce a ready-to-market product. A capillary electrophoresis method for the simultaneous detection of LA and organic impurities in less than 10 min was developed. LA and organic impurities were detected using a direct UV detection method with micellar background electrolyte, which consisted of borate and sodium dodecyl sulfate. We investigated the effects of electrolyte composition and temperature on the speed, sensitivity, and robustness of the separation. A few validation parameters, such as linearity, limit of detection, and internal and external standards, were evaluated under optimized conditions. The method was applied for the detection of LA and organic impurities, including tyrosine, phenylalanine, and pyroglutamic acid, in samples from a continuous LA fermentation process from post-extraction tapioca starch and yeast extract.

  1. Forward osmosis for oily wastewater reclamation: Multi-charged oxalic acid complexes as draw solutes

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Qingchun

    2017-06-11

    Forward osmosis (FO) has demonstrated its merits in hybrid FO seawater desalination. However, FO may have a potential for other applications if suitable draw solutes are available. In this study, a series of novel draw solutes based on oxalic acid (OA)-transitional metal complexes are presented. Influential factors of FO performance have been systematically investigated by varying the transitional metals, cations of the complex draw solutes as well as the experimental conditions. Compared to NaCl and other recently synthesized draw solutes, the OA complexes show superior FO performance in terms of high water fluxes up to 27.5 and 89.1 LMH under the respective FO and PRO (pressure retarded osmosis) modes, both with negligible reverse solute fluxes. The features of octahedral geometry, abundant hydrophilic groups and ionic species are crucial for the OA complexes as appropriate draw solutes with satisfactory FO performance. Among the synthesized OA complexes, the ammonium salt of chromic complex (NH4-Cr-OA) outperforms others due to the presence of more ionic species in its complex system. NH4-Cr-OA also performs better than the typical NaCl draw solute in FO oily wastewater treatment with higher water recovery and negligible reverse fluxes. Dilute solutions of OA complexes have been reconcentrated through membrane distillation (MD) and reused to new round of FO processes. The OA complexes have demonstrated their suitability and superiority as a novel class of draw solutes for the FO process in this study.

  2. Radiolytic degradation of gallic acid and its derivatives in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, R. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, UCQR, Estrada Nacional No. 10, Apartado 21, 2686-953, Sacavem (Portugal); Leal, J.P. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, UCQR, Estrada Nacional No. 10, Apartado 21, 2686-953, Sacavem (Portugal); Centro Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Takacs, E., E-mail: takacs@iki.kfki.hu [Institute of Isotopes, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 77, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Wojnarovits, L. [Institute of Isotopes, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 77, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2009-12-30

    Polyphenols, like gallic acid (GA) released in the environment in larger amount, by inducing some unwanted oxidations, may constitute environmental hazard: their concentration in wastewater should be controlled. Radiolytic degradation of GA was investigated by pulse radiolysis and final product techniques in dilute aqueous solution. Subsidiary measurements were made with 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid (TMBA) and 3,4,5-trihydroxy methylbenzoate (MGA). The hydroxyl radical and hydrogen atom intermediates of water radiolysis react with the solute molecules yielding cyclohexadienyl radicals. The radicals formed in GA and MGA solutions in acid/base catalyzed water elimination decay to phenoxyl radicals. This reaction is not observed in TMBA solution. The hydrated electron intermediate of water decomposition adds to the carbonyl oxygen, the anion thus formed protonates on the ring forming cyclohexadienyl radical or on the carbonyl group forming carbonyl centred radical. The GA intermediates formed during reaction with primary water radicals in presence of oxygen transform to non-aromatic molecules, e.g., to aliphatic carboxylic acids.

  3. Oxidation of some aliphatic and cyclic diols by cerium(4) in perchloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehka, M; Dzegets, Yu.

    1998-01-01

    Oxidation velocities of 1,5-pentandiol and 1,8-octanediol by cerium(4) in water solutions of perchloric acid, as well as the dependence of Ce(4) quantity reduced by trans-1,2-cyclohexanol on the reduction time are studied. Stoichiometry of the process is determined, intermediate and final products of oxidation are identified. Possible reaction mechanisms are proposed [ru

  4. Critical phenomena in ethylbenzene oxidation in acetic acid solution at high cobalt(II) concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gavrichkov, AA; Zakharov, [No Value

    Critical phenomena in ethylbenzene oxidation in an acetic acid solution at high cobalt(ill) concentrations (from 0.01 to 0.2 mol L-1) were studied at 60-90 degrees C by the gasometric (O-2 absorption), spectrophotometric (Co-III accumulation), and chemiluminescence (relative concentration of radical

  5. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed in...

  6. Cesium absorption from acidic solutions using ammonium molybdophosphate on a polyacrylonitrile support (AMP-PAN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.J.; Olson, A.L.; Johnson, C.K.

    1995-01-01

    Recent efforts at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) have included evaluation of cesium removal technologies as applied to ICPP acidic radioactive waste streams. Ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP) immobilized on a polyacrylonitrile support (AMP-PAN) has been studied as an ion exchange agent for cesium removal from acidic waste solutions. Capacities, distribution coefficients, elutability, and kinetics of cesium-extraction have been evaluated. Exchange breakthrough curves using small columns have been determined from 1M HNO 3 and simulated waste solutions. The theoretical capacity of AMP is 213 g Cs/kg AMP. The average experimental capacity in batch contacts with various acidic solutions was 150 g Cs/kg AMP. The measured cesium distribution coefficients from actual waste solutions were 3287 mL/g for dissolved zirconia calcines, and 2679 mL/g for sodium-bearing waste. The cesium in the dissolved alumina calcines was analyzed for; however, the concentration was below analytical detectable limits resulting in inconclusive results. The reaction kinetics are very rapid (2-10 minutes). Cesium absorption appears to be independent of acid concentration over the range tested (0.1 M to 5 M HNO 3 )

  7. Ginger extract as green corrosion inhibitor of mild steel in hydrochloric acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidrusli, A.; Suryanto; Mahmood, M.

    2018-01-01

    Ginger extract as corrosion inhibitor from natural resources was studied to prevent corrosion of mild steel in acid media. Ginger rhizome was extracted to produce green corrosion inhibitor (G-1) while ginger powder bought at supermarket was also extract to form green corrosion inhibitor (G-2). Effectiveness of inhibitor in preventing corrosion process of mild steel was studied in 1.0 M of hydrochloric acid. The experiment of weight loss method and polarization technique were conducted to measure corrosion rate and inhibition efficiency of mild steel in solution containing 1.0 M of hydrochloric acid with various concentration of inhibitor at room temperature. The results showed that, the rate of corrosion dropped from 8.09 mmpy in solution containing no inhibitor to 0.72 mmpy in solution containing 150g/l inhibitor while inhibition efficiency up to 91% was obtained. The polarization curve in polarization experiments shows that the inhibition efficiency is 86% with high concentration of inhibitor. The adsorption of ginger extract on the surface of mild steel was observed by using optical microscope and the characterization analysis was done by using pH measurement method. When high concentration of green inhibitor in the acid solution is used, the pH at the surface of steel is increasing.

  8. Solution structure of fatty acid-binding protein from human brain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademacher, M.; Zimmerman, A.W.; Ruterjans, H.; Veerkamp, J.H.; Lucke, C.

    2002-01-01

    Human brain-type fatty acid-binding protein (B-FABP) has been recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli both unlabelled and 15N-enriched for structure investigation in solution using high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. The sequential assignments of the 1H and 15N resonances were achieved by applying

  9. Existence of thickness threshold for crystal growth rate of ascorbic acid from its thin solution film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Yoshino, Hiroki; Kikuchi, Mitsunobu; Kashiwase, Sakiko

    2017-06-01

    Growth rate of ascorbic acid crystal domains from its aqueous solution film depends on the film thickness. Existence of a thickness threshold is experimentally confirmed below which growth rate becomes quite low and is considered to almost stop. This threshold is one of the essential factors for the dynamical transition between uniform and rhythmic growth modes.

  10. Solubility of concrete in acid solution as a determinant factor in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The need exists for early assessment of strength of concrete in modem reinforced concrete construction to minimise losses. Possibility of using solubility of concrete in acid solutions to carry out its strength assessment was investigated. Standard concrete cubes were cast and cured for different days. At each curing day, a set ...

  11. Liquid crystalline solutions of cellulose in phosphoric acid for preparing cellulose yarns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerstoel, H.

    2006-01-01

    The presen thesis describes a new process for manufacturing high tenacity and high modulus cellulose yarns. A new direct solvent for cellulose has been discovered, leading to liquid crystalline solutions. This new solvent, superphosphoric acid, rapidly dissolves cellulose. These liquid crystalline

  12. Solution blow spun Poly(lactic acid)/Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose nanofibers with antimicrobial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanofibers containing hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and tetracycline hydrochloride (THC) were solution blow spun from two different solvents, chloroform/acetone (CA, 80:20 v/v) and 2,2,2-triflouroethanol (TFE). The diameter distribution, chemical, thermal, thermal stab...

  13. Nanostructural characterization of large-scale porous alumina fabricated via anodizing in arsenic acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiya, Shunta; Kikuchi, Tatsuya, E-mail: kiku@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Natsui, Shungo; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Anodic porous alumina was formed in an arsenic acid solution. • Potential difference (voltage) anodizing at 340 V was achieved. • The porous alumina was slightly ordered under the appropriate conditions. • Pore sealing behavior was not observed in boiling distilled water. • The porous alumina exhibits a white photoluminescence emission under UV irradiation. - Abstract: Anodizing of aluminum in an arsenic acid solution is reported for the fabrication of anodic porous alumina. The highest potential difference (voltage) without oxide burning increased as the temperature and the concentration of the arsenic acid solution decreased, and a high anodizing potential difference of 340 V was achieved. An ordered porous alumina with several tens of cells was formed in 0.1–0.5 M arsenic acid solutions at 310–340 V for 20 h. However, the regularity of the porous alumina was not improved via anodizing for 72 h. No pore sealing behavior of the porous alumina was observed upon immersion in boiling distilled water, and it may be due to the formation of an insoluble complex on the oxide surface. The porous alumina consisted of two different layers: a hexagonal alumina layer that contained arsenic from the electrolyte and a pure alumina honeycomb skeleton. The porous alumina exhibited a white photoluminescence emission at approximately 515 nm under UV irradiation at 254 nm.

  14. Identification of major degradation products of 5-aminosalicylic acid formed in aqueous solutions and in pharmaceuticals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Cornett, Claus; Olsen, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    The formation of four major degradation products of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) in buffered solutions at pH 7.0 was demonstrated by gradient HPLC analysis. The isolation and structural elucidation of the resulting degradation products showed that the degradation of 5-ASA led to the formation...

  15. Assessment of the Effects Exerted by Acid and Alkaline Solutions on Bone: Is Chemistry the Answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadasi, Alberto; Camici, Arianna; Porta, Davide; Cucca, Lucia; Merli, Daniele; Milanese, Chiara; Profumo, Antonella; Rassifi, Nabila; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    The treatment of corpses with extremely acid or basic liquids is sometimes performed in criminal contexts. A thorough characterization by chemical analysis may provide further help to macroscopic and microscopic analysis; 63 porcine bone samples were treated with solutions at different pH (1-14) for immersion periods up to 70 days, as well as in extremely acidic sulfuric acid solutions (9 M/18 M) and extremely basic sodium hydroxide. Inductively coupled optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES)/plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that only the sulfuric acid solution 18 M was able to completely dissolve the sample. In addition, chemical analysis allowed to recognize the contact between bone and substances. Hydrated calcium sulfate arose from extreme pH. The possibility of detecting the presence of human material within the residual solution was demonstrated, especially with FT-IR, ICP-OES, and EDX. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  16. Chemically modified carbon paste electrode for fast screening of oxalic acid levels in soil solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šestáková, Ivana; Jakl, M.; Jaklová Dytrtová, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 102, - (2008), s. 140-140 E-ISSN 1213-7103. [International Conference on Electroanalysis /12./. 16.06.2008-19.06.2008, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/06/0496 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : oxalic acid * carbon paste electrodes * soil solutions Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  17. Long-term stability of earthen materials in contact with acidic tailings solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.R.; Erikson, R.L.; Gee, G.W.

    1982-11-01

    The objectives of the studies documented in this report were to use experimental and geochemical computer modeling tools to assess the long-term environmental impact of leachate movement from acidic uranium mill tailings. Liner failure (i.e., an increase in the permeability of the liner material) was not found to be a problem when various acidic tailings solutions leached through liner materials for periods up to 3 years. On the contrary, materials that contained over 30% clay showed a decrease in permeability with time in the laboratory columns. The high clay materials tested appear suitable for lining tailings impoundment ponds. The decreases in permeability are attributed to pore plugging resulting from the precipitation of minerals and solids. This precipitation takes place due to the increase in pH of the tailings solution brought about by the buffering capacity of the soil. Geochemical modeling predicts, and x-ray characterization confirms, that precipitation of solids from solution is occurring in the acidic tailings solution/liner interactions studied. In conclusion the same mineralogical changes and contaminant reactions predicted by geochemical modeling and observed in laboratory studies were found at a drained evaporation pond (Lucky Mc in Wyoming) with a 4 year history of acid attack

  18. Diffusion coefficient and solubility of isobutene and trans-2-butene in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Versteeg, Geert

    2001-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient and the physical solubility of isobutene and trans-2-butene in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions cannot be determined experimentally due to the occurrence of fast chemical reactions. In the present contribution these physicochemical parameters are estimated. For the

  19. Ab initio molecular dynamics study of the reaction of water with formaldehyde in sulfuric acid solution.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprik, M.; Meijer, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics methods have been used to study the reaction mechanism of acidcatalyzed addition of water to formaldehyde in a model system of an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid. Using the method of constraints we find that an H

  20. Improved process for the production of cellulose sulfate using sulfuric acid/ethanol solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Jun; Chen, Hongwen

    2013-06-05

    An improved process for production of cellulose sulfate (CS) was developed by using sulfuric acid/ethanol solution as sulfonating agent and Na2SO4 as water absorbent. The FTIR, SEM and TG analysis were used to characterize the CS prepared. The total degree of substitution and viscosity of the product solution (2%, w/v) were ranging from 0.28 to 0.77 and from 115 to 907 mPa s, respectively, by changing the process parameters such as the amount of Na2SO4, the reaction time, the temperature, the sulfuric acid/alcohol ratio and liquid/solid ratio. The results indicated that the product with DS (0.28-0.77) and η2% (115-907) mPa s could be produced by using this improved process and more cellulose sulfate could be produced when cellulose was sulfonated for 3-4 h at -2 °C in sulfuric acid/ethanol (1.4-1.6) solution with addition of 0.8 g Na2SO4. The (13)C NMR indicated that the sulfate group of CS produced using sulfuric acid/ethanol solution was at C6 position. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Diffusion Coefficient and Solubility of Isobutene and trans-2-Butene in Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brilman, Derk W.F.; Swaaij, Wim P.M. van; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2001-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient and the physical solubility of isobutene and trans-2-butene in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions cannot be determined experimentally due to the occurrence of fast chemical reactions. In the present contribution these physicochemical parameters are estimated. For the

  2. Weibull Statistical Analysis on the Mechanical Properties of SiC by Immersion in Acidic and Alkaline Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Seok-Hwan; Jeong, Sang-Cheol; Nam, Ki-Woo

    2016-01-01

    A Weibull statistical analysis of the mechanical properties of SiC ceramics was carried out by immersion in acidic and alkaline solutions. The heat treatment was carried out at 1373 K. The corrosion of SiC was carried out in acidic and alkaline solutions under KSL1607. The bending strength of corroded crack-healed specimens decreased 47 % and 70 % compared to those of uncorroded specimens in acidic and alkaline solutions, respectively. The corrosion of SiC ceramics is faster in alkaline solution than in acid solution. The scale and shape parameters were evaluated for the as-received and corroded materials, respectively. The shape parameter of the as-received material corroded in acidic and alkaline solutions was significantly more apparent in the acidic solution. Further, the heat-treated material was large in acidic solution but small in alkaline solution. The shape parameters of the as-received and heat-treated materials were smaller in both acidic and alkaline solutions

  3. Features of obtaining malt with use of aqueous solutions of organic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Pivovarov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the traditional formulations of essential food products are actively including malt – a valuable dietary product rich in extractives and hydrolytic enzymes, obtained by germination in artificially created conditions. Containing a full set of essential amino acids and a high saccharifying ability of malt, obtained from grain cereals, determines its wide use in the production of beer, alcohol, mono- and poly-malt extracts, bakery products, special types of flour, food additives, cereals, non-alcoholic beverages, lactic acid products and, in particular, in the production of natural coffee substitutes. However, the classical germination technology, which includes 2-3 days of soaking and 5-8 days of germination due to the considerable duration and laboriousness of the process, does not meet the requirements of modern technology and the constantly growing rates of industrial production, so this problem requires finding new and improving existing scientific and technical solutions. The features of malt production using organic acids of different concentrations are presented. The malt production technology has been analyzed and investigated. It includes washing, disinfection, air and water soaking of grains, germination and drying. The feature of the technology under investigation is using of aqueous solutions of butadiene, 3-pyridinecarboxylic acid and pteroylglutamic acid. The results of the inquiry of the effect of these organic acids on energy and the ability of germination of the grain are presented. The optimal values of concentrations of active substances in solutions are revealed. The influence of organic acids on the absorption of grain moisture has been investigated. It has been established that in comparison with the classical technology, the use of these acids as a growth stimulator can reduce the overall length of the reproduction process of the material from 1.5 to 2 times and increase the yield of flour grains in the batch of

  4. Oxidation of benzenesulphonic acid derivatives with cerium (IV) in perchloric acid solution

    OpenAIRE

    Ignaczak, Maksymilian; Deka, Mirosława

    1985-01-01

    The effact of several reagents on the oxidation rate of o- - and p-toluenesulphfonic acids and p-toluenesulphfonamide was ascertained by potentiometric determination of cerium ions concentration. It was shown that the transfer of the first electron is the step limiting the rate of these processes in the reaction mixtures where perchloric acid concentrations are of the order of l-4 mole/1 while in the case of concentrations of 8-10 mole/1 the decisive step is the transfer of ...

  5. Adsorption of NI (II on activated Carbon of Coconut shell Chemicaly Modifieded with Acid Nitric Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Hernández-Rodríguez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the research the effect of modification of coconut shell activated carbon with diluted solutions of nitric acid, in its chemical characteristics and removal capacity of the nickel (II ions present in modeling solutions of sulfates with similar characteristics to the acid liquor waste of the nickel industry, was studied. The characterization of the adsorbent material evidenced that the modification process increases the superficial acids groups according with the increase of acid nitric concentration employee in the treatment. The adsorption equilibrium tests, carried out with metallic species solutions at concentrations between 0,5 and 3,5 g/L evidenced that the process is described by Freundlich model. The effect of chemical modification of the adsorbent material in adsorption capacity of nickel (II ions was evaluated using a traditional experimental design at pH of 1,2 and 6,9 units, obtaining that the increase of acid groups in the carbon surface causes an increase of adsorption capacity and removal percentages of nickel (II, due to specific interactions of these groups with the metal cations.

  6. Bentonite swelling pressure in strong NaCl solutions. Correlation of model calculations to experimentally determined data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, O. [Clay Technology, Lund (Sweden)

    1998-01-01

    A number of quite different quantitative models concerning swelling pressure in bentonite clay have been proposed. This report discusses a number of models which possibly can be used also for saline conditions. A discrepancy between calculated and measured values was noticed for all models at brine conditions. In general the models predicted a too low swelling pressure compared to what was experimentally found. An osmotic component in the clay/water system is proposed in order to improve the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. Calculations of this osmotic component is proposed to be made by use of the clay cation exchange capacity and Donnan equilibrium. Calculations made by this approach showed considerably better correlation to literature laboratory data, compared to calculations made by the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. A few verifying laboratory tests were made and are briefly described in the report. The improved model predicts a substantial bentonite swelling pressure also in a saturated sodium chloride solution if the density of the system is sufficiently high. This means in practice that the buffer in a KBS-3 repository will give rise to an acceptable swelling pressure, but that the positive effects of mixing bentonite into a backfill material will be lost if the system is exposed to brines. (orig.). 14 refs.

  7. Bentonite swelling pressure in strong NaCl solutions. Correlation between model calculations and experimentally determined data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, O. [Clay Technology, Lund (Sweden)

    1997-12-01

    A number of quite different quantitative models concerning swelling pressure in bentonite clay have been proposed by different researchers over the years. The present report examines some of the models which possibly may be used also for saline conditions. A discrepancy between calculated and measured values was noticed for all models at brine conditions. In general the models predicted a too low swelling pressure compared to what was experimentally found. An osmotic component in the clay/water system is proposed in order to improve the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. Calculations of this osmotic component is proposed to be made by use of the clay cation exchange capacity and Donnan equilibrium. Calculations made by this approach showed considerably better correlation to literature laboratory data, compared to calculations made by the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. A few verifying laboratory tests were made and are briefly described in the report. The improved thermodynamic model predicts substantial bentonite swelling pressures also in saturated sodium chloride solution if the density of the system is high enough. In practice, the model predicts a substantial swelling pressure for the buffer in a KBS-3 repository if the system is exposed to brines, but the positive effects of mixing bentonite into a backfill material will be lost, since the available compaction technique does not give a sufficiently high bentonite density 37 refs, 15 figs

  8. Bentonite swelling pressure in strong NaCl solutions. Correlation between model calculations and experimentally determined data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnland, O.

    1997-12-01

    A number of quite different quantitative models concerning swelling pressure in bentonite clay have been proposed by different researchers over the years. The present report examines some of the models which possibly may be used also for saline conditions. A discrepancy between calculated and measured values was noticed for all models at brine conditions. In general the models predicted a too low swelling pressure compared to what was experimentally found. An osmotic component in the clay/water system is proposed in order to improve the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. Calculations of this osmotic component is proposed to be made by use of the clay cation exchange capacity and Donnan equilibrium. Calculations made by this approach showed considerably better correlation to literature laboratory data, compared to calculations made by the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. A few verifying laboratory tests were made and are briefly described in the report. The improved thermodynamic model predicts substantial bentonite swelling pressures also in saturated sodium chloride solution if the density of the system is high enough. In practice, the model predicts a substantial swelling pressure for the buffer in a KBS-3 repository if the system is exposed to brines, but the positive effects of mixing bentonite into a backfill material will be lost, since the available compaction technique does not give a sufficiently high bentonite density

  9. Bentonite swelling pressure in strong NaCl solutions. Correlation of model calculations to experimentally determined data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnland, O.

    1998-01-01

    A number of quite different quantitative models concerning swelling pressure in bentonite clay have been proposed. This report discusses a number of models which possibly can be used also for saline conditions. A discrepancy between calculated and measured values was noticed for all models at brine conditions. In general the models predicted a too low swelling pressure compared to what was experimentally found. An osmotic component in the clay/water system is proposed in order to improve the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. Calculations of this osmotic component is proposed to be made by use of the clay cation exchange capacity and Donnan equilibrium. Calculations made by this approach showed considerably better correlation to literature laboratory data, compared to calculations made by the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. A few verifying laboratory tests were made and are briefly described in the report. The improved model predicts a substantial bentonite swelling pressure also in a saturated sodium chloride solution if the density of the system is sufficiently high. This means in practice that the buffer in a KBS-3 repository will give rise to an acceptable swelling pressure, but that the positive effects of mixing bentonite into a backfill material will be lost if the system is exposed to brines. (orig.)

  10. Influence of seawater-component on corrosion of steel in nitric acid solution containing vanadium and ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irisawa, Eriko; Ueno, Fumiyoshi; Uchida, Naoki; Taguchi, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion rate of stainless steel in boiling-nitiric-acid solutions containing oxidizing metallic ions (vanadium and ruthenium) and seawater components were investigated by the immersion tests in order to evaluate the influence of the seawater components on the corrosion of steel in the nitric acid solution containing oxidizing metallic ions. The corrosion rates of 310Nb in the solution containing seawater components were lower than that in the solution without seawater components. These results described that contamination of seawater components in the spent fuel reprocessing fluid seems not to accelerate the corrosion of steels, which are material for the devices treating the nitric-acid reprocessing solutions. (author)

  11. Corrosion of stainless steels and nickel-base alloys in solutions of nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, E.M.; Renner, M.

    1992-01-01

    Reactions involving nitric acid may always result in the contamination of this acid with fluorides. In highly concentrted nitric acid, the presence of small amounts of HF will substantially reduce the corrosion of metallic materials. Mixtures consisting of hydrofluoric acid and hypo-azeotropic nitric acid on the other hand will strongly attack: the metal loss will markedly increase with increasing HNO 3 and HF concentrations as well as with rising temperatures. The investigation covered 12 stainless steel grades and nickel-base alloys. With constant HNO 3 content, corrosion rates will rise linearly when increasing the HF concentration. With constant HF concentration (0,25 M), corrosion rates will increase rapidly with increasing nitric acid concentration (from 0.3 M to 14.8 M). This can best be described by superimposing a linear function and a hyperbolic function that is reflecting the change in the HNO 3 content. Alloys containing as much chromium as possible (up to 46 wt.%) will exhibit the best corrosion resistance. Alloy NiCr30FeMo (Hastelloy alloy G-30) proved to be well suitable in this investigation. (orig.) [de

  12. Effect of Surface Precipitate on the Crevice Corrosion in HYBRID and Oxalic Acid Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. Y.; Jung, J. Y.; Won, H. J.; Kim, S. B.; Choi, W. K.; Moon, J. K.; Park, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the characteristics of the crevice corrosion for Inconel-600 and 304SS in OA solution according to the change in pH. The evaluation of the crevice corrosion with the chemical thermodynamic analysis identified the effect of the residual chemicals such as iron-oxalate and nickeloxalate to the crevice corrosion behavior. Test results were compared with those of HYBRID (HYdrizine Base Reductive metal Ion Decontamination). The crevice corrosion properties of 304 SS and Inconel-600 in HYBRID and oxalic acid solution were evaluated. In case of oxalic acid solution, the corrosion rate on 304SS was rapidly increased with a pH decrease of around 2, but there was no increase in the corrosion rate on Inconel-600

  13. Influence of biuret and cyanuric acid on dewaxing petroleum stocks with alcoholic urea solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullaev, E.Sh.; Ismailov, A.G.; Gadzhiev, A.Sh.; Balayan, R.D.

    1987-11-01

    The influence of biuret and cyanuric acid contents on the formation and separation of the adduct in commercial dewaxing of petroleum stocks by a urea solution in a water and isopropyl alcohol mixture was studied. The stock was a diesel fuel distillate with a solid point of -12/sup 0/C. Experiments were performed with a 3.5:1 volume ratio of urea solution to feed, urea content 38% by weight, isopropyl alcohol concentration 70% by weight, adduct formation temperature 55-30/sup 0/C, and adduct formation duration 30 min. Test results show the adverse effects at different quantities of cyanuric and biuret acids on adduct formation. Solutions for overcoming these effects are proposed.

  14. Raman spectrometric determination of Pu(VI) and Pu(V) in nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantner, E.; Freudenberger, M.; Steinert, D.; Ache, H.J.

    1987-03-01

    The determination of Pu(VI) in nitric acid solutions by spontaneous Laser Raman Spectrometry (LRS) was investigated and a calibration curve was established using U(VI) as internal standard. In addition, the concentrations of Pu(VI) and Pu(V) as a function of time were measured by this method in Pu(VI) solutions of different acidity containing H 2 O 2 as the reducing agent. In solutions which are intensely coloured by the presence of Ru(NO) complexes Pu(VI) can also be determined by LRS using a Kr + laser as excitation source. In future experiments, the study of the Pu(IV)-interaction with Ru using LRS and spectrophotometry as analytical techniques is therefore intended. (orig.) [de

  15. High-temperature extraction of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with trialkylamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladyhev, V.P.; Andreeva, N.N.; Kim, E.M.; Kovaleva, S.V.

    1985-01-01

    This paper attempts to determine the possibility of conducting high-temperature extraction of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with trialkylamines (TAA) using higher hydrocarbon-paraffin mixtures as the diluent of the extraction system. Substitution of kerosene by paraffin in the extraction system would permit decreasing the danger of fire and explosions during he extraction process. In extracting rhenium from industrial solutions with a melt of higher paraffins containing TAA and alcohols, the extraction system can be continously heated in heat exchangers through which washing sulfuric acid passes and then goes to the extractor. This permits utilizing the heat and decreases the temperature of the solutions for extraction to the optimum temperatures. Extraction of rhenium with a melt of trioctylamine in paraffin obeys the same mechanisms as high-temperature extraction of ruthenium (IV) by amines in kerosene and aromatic hydrocarbons

  16. Characterisation of solution cast cellulose nanofibre – reinforced poly(lactic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose nanofibres, 20 nm in diameter and 300 nm long, were prepared by acid hydrolysis of flax yarns. Composite films containing 2.5 and 5.0 wt% flax cellulose (FC fibres were prepared by solution casting of mixtures of poly(lactic acid (PLA solution and cellulose nanofibre suspension in chloroform. The resulting composite films and solution cast pure PLA film, with thickness of around 160 m, showed good transparency. For composites with 2.5 and 5.0 wt% FC, the tensile strength increased by 25 and 59% and tensile modulus by 42 and 47%, respectively, compared to pure PLA film. The composite film with 2.5 wt% FC combined high strength and ductility with tensile strength of 24.3 MPa and 70% elongation at break. Flax cellulose appeared to facilitate nucleation and subsequent crystallisation of PLA more effectively in the amorphous composites than in the crystalline composites.

  17. CO2 Capture from Flue gas using Amino acid salt solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai

    /or amino acid salt concentrations. The formation of solids poses challenges, but it also holds the promise for improving the efficiency of the capture process. This project focuses on phase equilibrium experiments of five systems CO2 + amino acid salt + H2O, at conditions relevant for the CO2 capture...... to storage. Typical solvents for the process are based on aqueous solutions of alkanolamines, such as mono-ethanolamine (MEA), but their use implies economic disadvantages and environmental complications. Amino acid salt solutions have emerged as an alternative to the alkanolamines, partlybecause...... they are naturally occurring substances, and partly because they have desirable properties, such as lower vapor pressures and higher stability against oxidative degradation. One important feature of these new solvents is the formation of solids upon CO2 absorption, which happens especially at higher CO2 loadings and...

  18. Corrosion behavior of niobium coated 304 stainless steel in acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, T. J.; Chen, Y.; Zhang, B.; Hu, J.; Li, C.

    2016-04-01

    The niobium coating is fabricated on the surface of AISI Type 304 stainless steel (304SS) by using a high energy micro arc alloying technique in order to improvecorrosion resistance of the steel against acidic environments. The electrochemical corrosion resistance of the niobium coating in 0.7 M sulfuric acid solutions is evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization and the open circuit potential versus time. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the niobium coating increases the free corrosion potential of the substrate by 110 mV and a reduction in the corrosion rate by two orders of magnitude compared to the substrate alone. The niobium coating maintains large impedance and effectively offers good protection for the substrate during the long-term exposure tests, which is mainly ascribed to the niobium coating acting inhibiting permeation of corrosive species. Finally, the corresponding electrochemical impedance models are proposed to elucidate the corrosion resistance behavior of the niobium coating in acid solutions.

  19. Dissolution behaviour of freibergite-tetrahedrite concentrate in acidic dichromate solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Nyamdelger

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Asgat ore sample with estimated content of 431g/t silver was concentrated by using floatation method and obtained freibergite-tetrahedrite concentrate with 9050g/t Ag, 35.75% Cu, 28.5% Sb and 10.6% Fe, respectively. The dissolution of concentrate in acidic potassium dichromate solution has been investigated with respect to the sulfuric acid and potassium dichromate concentrations and by changing leaching temperature and time. Leaching freibergitetetrahedrite concentrate in dichromate acidic solution (K2Cr2O7-0.1M, H2SO4-0.4M leaching time 4h, leaching temperature 95°С resulted total amount of leaching of 95.65 % silver, 93.85% copper, 99.86 % antimony and 30.18% iron. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5564/mjc.v14i0.196 Mongolian Journal of Chemistry 14 (40, 2013, p36-40

  20. Whole-body nitrogen and tyrosine metabolism in surgical patients receiving branched-chain amino acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, S.P.; Bistrian, B.R.; Moldawer, L.L.; Blackburn, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    Fifteen patients undergoing gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity received preoperatively a standard crystalline amino acid solution containing 15.6% branched-chain amino acids. During the first five postoperative days, the patients were randomized to receive one of three amino acid solutions of different branched-chain amino acid content. Whole-body amino acid appearance and oxidation were estimated using a continuous intravenous infusion of L-(U- 14 C)-tyrosine preoperatively and on the third postoperative day. This study suggests that an adequate nitrogen intake of a balanced amino acid mixture, as well as a solution enriched with branched-chain amino acids, maintains protein homeostasis and supports protein synthesis similarly in well-nourished patients following major abdominal surgery. A diet containing only branched-chain amino acids in isomolar ratios was as effective at maintaining protein retention and whole-body protein synthesis and albumin renewal postoperatively when compared with a standard amino acid formula

  1. The strong reactions of Lewis-base noble-metals with vanadium and other acidic transition metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbinghaus, Bartley B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-05-01

    The noble metals often thought of as unreactive solids,react strongly with nearly 40% of the elements in the periodictable: group IIIB-VB transition metals, lanthanides, theactinides, and group IIIA-IVA non-transition metals. These strong reactions arise from increased bonding/electron transfer fromnonbonding electrons d electron pairs on the noble metal tovacant orbitals on V, etc. This effect is a generalized Lewis acid-base interaction. The partial Gibbs energy of V in the noblemetals has been measured as a function of concentration at a temperature near 1000C. Thermodynamics of the intermetallics are determined by ternary oxide equilibria, ternary carbide equilibria, and the high-temperature galvanic cell technique. These experimental methods use equilibrated solid composite mixtures in which grains of V oxides or of V carbides are interspersed with grains of V-NM(noble-metal) alloys. In equilibrium the activity of V in the oxide or the carbide equals the activity in the alloy. Consequently, the thermodynamics available in the literature for the V oxides and V carbides are reviewed. Test runs on the galvanic cell were attempted. The V oxide electrode reacts with CaF2, ThO2, YDT(0.85ThO2-0.15YO1.5), and LDT(0.85ThO2- 0.15LaO1.5) to interfere with the measured data observed toward the beginning of a galvanic cell experiment are the most accurate. The interaction of vanadium at infinite dilution in the noble-metals was determined.

  2. The strong reactions of Lewis-base noble-metals with vanadium and other acidic transition metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.

    1991-05-01

    The noble metals often thought of as unreactive solids,react strongly with nearly 40% of the elements in the periodictable: group IIIB-VB transition metals, lanthanides, theactinides, and group IIIA-IVA non-transition metals. These strong reactions arise from increased bonding/electron transfer fromnonbonding electrons d electron pairs on the noble metal tovacant orbitals on V, etc. This effect is a generalized Lewis acid-base interaction. The partial Gibbs energy of V in the noblemetals has been measured as a function of concentration at a temperature near 1000C. Thermodynamics of the intermetallics are determined by ternary oxide equilibria, ternary carbide equilibria, and the high-temperature galvanic cell technique. These experimental methods use equilibrated solid composite mixtures in which grains of V oxides or of V carbides are interspersed with grains of V-NM(noble-metal) alloys. In equilibrium the activity of V in the oxide or the carbide equals the activity in the alloy. Consequently, the thermodynamics available in the literature for the V oxides and V carbides are reviewed. Test runs on the galvanic cell were attempted. The V oxide electrode reacts with CaF[sub 2], ThO[sub 2], YDT(0.85ThO[sub 2]-0.15YO[sub 1.5]), and LDT(0.85ThO[sub 2]- 0.15LaO[sub 1.5]) to interfere with the measured data observed toward the beginning of a galvanic cell experiment are the most accurate. The interaction of vanadium at infinite dilution in the noble-metals was determined.

  3. Solubility and solution thermodynamics of sorbic acid in eight pure organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Jing; Zhang, Meijing; Zhu, Peipei; Ouyang, Jinbo; Gong, Junbo; Chen, Wei; Xu, Fengxia

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The solubility of sorbic acid in eight pure organic solvents was experimentally determined. • Several solution thermodynamic properties of sorbic acid in eight pure organic solvents were calculated. • The experimental solubility data were correlated by five models. • The COSMO-RS model was employed to predict the solubility of sorbic acid in eight pure organic solvents. - Abstract: By the gravimetric method, the solubility of sorbic acid in eight solvents including ethanol, 2-propanol, methanol, 1-butanol, ethyl acetate, methyl tert-butyl ether, acetone and acetonitrile was determined over a temperature range from 285.15 to K at atmospheric pressure. For the temperature range investigated, the solubility of sorbic acid in the solvents increased with increasing temperature. The experimental values were correlated with the linear solvation energy relationship, modified Apelblat equation, λh equation, non-random two-liquid (NRTL) model, and Wilson model. On the other hand, the enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy of dissolution were obtained from these solubility values by using the van’t Hoff and Gibbs equations. The excess enthalpy of solution was estimated on the basis of λh equation. Furthermore, the a priori predictive model COSMO-RS was employed to predict the solubility of sorbic acid in selected solvents and reasonable agreement with experimental values is achieved

  4. Liquid Superlubricity of Polyethylene Glycol Aqueous Solution Achieved with Boric Acid Additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiangyu; Li, Jinjin; Zhang, Chenhui; Luo, Jianbin

    2018-03-27

    Boric acid is a weak acid and has been used as a lubrication additive because of its special structure. In this study, we report that boric acid could achieve a robust superlubricity (μ friction coefficient of approximately 0.004-0.006 could be achieved with boric acid under neutral conditions (pH of approximately 6.4), which is different from the acidic conditions leading to superlubricity. The influence of various factors, including boric acid concentration, sliding speed, applied load, PEG molecular weight, and the volume of lubricant on the superlubricity, were investigated. The results reveal that the PEG aqueous solution with the boric acid additive could achieve superlubricity under a wide range of conditions. The surface composition analysis shows that the synergy effect between boric acid and PEG provides sufficient H + ions to realize the running-in process. Moreover, a composite tribochemical film composed of silica and ammonia-containing compounds were formed on the ball surface, contributing to the superlubricity. The film thickness calculation shows that superlubricity was achieved in a mixed lubrication region, and therefore, the superlubricity state was dominated by both the composite tribochemical film formed via the tribochemical reaction on the contact surfaces and the hydrodynamic lubricating film between the contact surfaces. Such a liquid superlubricity achieved under neutral conditions is of importance for both scientific understanding and engineering applications.

  5. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renwu Zhou

    Full Text Available Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS. Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma.

  6. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhuang, Jinxing; Zong, Zichao; Zhang, Xianhui; Liu, Dongping; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-01-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma.

  7. Removal of health hazards causing acidic dyes from aqueous solutions by the process of adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumanjit

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The association of dyes, particularly acidic dyes with health related problems is not a new phenomenon. A lot of well established literature is already available on the role of dyes as a major cause in skin and respiratory diseases. The adsorbents which are of low cost, locally available and are relatively new for their acidic dyes removal capacity from aqueous solutions were investigated. Bagasse, cow dung, groundnut shells, pea shells, used tea leaves, wheat straw were used in their charcoal form whereas brick kiln ash and cement kiln ash adsorbents were used as such for the removal of acid violet 17, acid violet 49, acid violet 54, acid blue 15 and acid red 119. The effects of various experimental parameters, initial pH, dye concentration, sorbent dosage, ion strength, contact time were examined and optimal experimental conditions were decided. At initial basic pH more than 8.0, all the five dyes studied could be removed effectively. The isothermal data for adsorption followed the Freundlich and Langmuir models. The adsorption results in this study indicated that all the adsorbents were attractive candidates for removing acidic dyes from dye wastewater.

  8. RECOVERY OF CARBOXYLIC ACIDS FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION WITH A TRIISOOCTYLAMINE DILUENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Malmary

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Tertiary alkylamines in solution with organic diluents are attractive extractants for the recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous phases. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism for extraction of organic acids from water by a long-chain aliphatic tertiary amine. In order to attain this objective, we studied the liquid-liquid equilibria between the triisooctylamine + 1-octanol + n-heptane system as solvent and an aqueous solution of an individual carboxylic acid such as citric, lactic and malic acids. The experiments showed that the partition coefficient for a particular organic acid depends on the kind of solute, notably when the acid concentration in the aqueous phase is low. A mathematical model, where both chemical association and physical distribution are taken into consideration, is proposed. The model suggests that the various complexes obtained between amine and organic acids contribute to the distribution of the solute between the coexisting phases in equilibrium.

  9. A strategy for the preparation of thioantimonates based on the concept of weak acids and corresponding strong bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderer, Carolin; Delwa de Alarcón, Natalie; Näther, Christian; Bensch, Wolfgang

    2014-12-15

    By following a new synthetic approach, which is based on the in situ formation of a basic medium by the reaction between the strong base Sb(V)S4 (3-) and the weak acid H2 O, it was possible to prepare three layered thioantimonate(III) compounds of composition [TM(2,2'-bipyridine)3 ][Sb6 S10 ] (TM=Ni, Fe) and [Ni(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)3 ][Sb6 S10 ] under hydrothermal conditions featuring two different thioantimonate(III) network topologies. The antimony source, Na3 SbS4 ⋅ 9 H2 O, undergoes several decomposition reactions and produces the Sb(III) S3 species, which condenses to generate the layered anion. The application of transition-metal complexes avoids crystallization of dense phases. The reactions are very fast compared to conventional hydrothermal/solvothermal syntheses and are much less sensitive to changes of the reaction parameters. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Solution of Azelaic Acid (20%, Resorcinol (10% and Phytic Acid (6% Versus Glycolic Acid (50% Peeling Agent in the Treatment of Female Patients with Facial Melasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Faghihi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Melasma, a common acquired disorder of hyperpigmentation, especially in women, is often resistant to therapy. This study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of azelaic acid, resorcinol and phytic acid solution in chemical peeling of melasma in comparison to 50% glycolic acid. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial was performed, on 42 female patients with bilateral melasma. Severity of melasma was assessed by melasma area and severity index (MASI. Combination of (20% azelaic acid + 10% resorcinol + 6% phytic acid was used as a new peeling agent on the right side of the face and 50% glycolic acid on the left side every 2 weeks for 6 times. Follow-up was carried out for 3 months after the last session. Any decrease in MASI score and unwanted complications following peeling were evaluated and compared during the trial. Results: Patients showed marked improvement as calculated with MASI score before and after treatment in both sides of the face. The efficacy of combination formula (azelaic acid, resorcinol and phytic acid was similar to glycolic acid, but with fewer complications. There was no statistically difference in improvement between two groups (P > 0.05. However, the patient's discomfort following procedures was significantly lower with azelaic acid, resorcinol and phytic compared with the glycolic acid peels (P < 0.05 and there was the same duration in the beginning of the therapeutic response in both groups. Conclusion: Results showed that triple-combination was found to be an effective and safe peeling agent in the treatment of melasma and it was as effective as 50% glycolic acid peel.

  11. Solution of Azelaic Acid (20%), Resorcinol (10%) and Phytic Acid (6%) Versus Glycolic Acid (50%) Peeling Agent in the Treatment of Female Patients with Facial Melasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Gita; Taheri, Azam; Shahmoradi, Zabihollah; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali

    2017-01-01

    Melasma, a common acquired disorder of hyperpigmentation, especially in women, is often resistant to therapy. This study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of azelaic acid, resorcinol and phytic acid solution in chemical peeling of melasma in comparison to 50% glycolic acid. This clinical trial was performed, on 42 female patients with bilateral melasma. Severity of melasma was assessed by melasma area and severity index (MASI). Combination of (20% azelaic acid + 10% resorcinol + 6% phytic acid) was used as a new peeling agent on the right side of the face and 50% glycolic acid on the left side every 2 weeks for 6 times. Follow-up was carried out for 3 months after the last session. Any decrease in MASI score and unwanted complications following peeling were evaluated and compared during the trial. Patients showed marked improvement as calculated with MASI score before and after treatment in both sides of the face. The efficacy of combination formula (azelaic acid, resorcinol and phytic acid) was similar to glycolic acid, but with fewer complications. There was no statistically difference in improvement between two groups ( P > 0.05). However, the patient's discomfort following procedures was significantly lower with azelaic acid, resorcinol and phytic compared with the glycolic acid peels ( P < 0.05) and there was the same duration in the beginning of the therapeutic response in both groups. Results showed that triple-combination was found to be an effective and safe peeling agent in the treatment of melasma and it was as effective as 50% glycolic acid peel.

  12. Behaviour of Type 316 steel in acidic sulphate solutions at 300-3500C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, J.F.

    1987-11-01

    Most cation resin beds in service in CEGB power stations, and particularly those in AGR stations, are regenerated with sulphuric acid. Slippage results in trace levels of sulphate passing into the boilers. Previous work has shown that in once-through boilers, feedwater containing 2 μg kg -1 of sulphate could concentrate at localized dry-out sites to form solutions having from 0.1 to 7 wt% of solute. It has been shown also that if the sulphate was present in an acidic solution and it were to be in contact with Type 316 austentitic superheater steel, then intergranular corrosion and intergranular cracking could occur. Previous data, including some unreported results, are tabulated and discussed. The current work had two main objectives. The first was to extend the previous investigations to examine a wider range of acidic sulphate concentrations (as indicated by calculations on the concentration of solute in feedwater), the influence of environment pH, and the effect of sensitization of specimens. The second objective was primarily concerned with elucidating the causes of scatter in the results. This involved examining the influence of electrode potential, the ageing characteristics of the environment, and the method of applying stress to the specimens. (author)

  13. THE EMULSIFICATION OF HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN AND HYALURONIC ACID SOLUTIONS IN POLYDIMETHYLSILOXANE PDMS-1000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. M. Ruban

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To create a biologically inert material suitable for use in a wide range of temperatures and in corrosive environments, the methods of optical microscopy and NMR-cryometry were used for investigation of emulsification of solutions of human serum albumin and hyaluronic acid in polymethylsiloxane PDMS-1000. Unlike hyaluronic acid, human serum albumin forms persistent emulsions in the silicon matrix, whose size of the droplets varies from 100 to 10 000 nm. The presence of dispersed phase (human serum albumin or hyaluronic acid increases significantly melting temperature of polydimethylsiloxane. It is probably due to ordering influence of micro- and nanodrops of biopolymers on PDMS crystals localized between them. In case of dispersion of hyaluronic acid solution in liquid silicone only microdroplets of the aqueous phase are observed and nanosized droplets either didn’t form or were in amount not sufficient to be detected by NMR cryometry. The possibility of a significant influence of human serum albumin emulsified solution on PDMS-1000 defrosting temperature is revealed, that is impacted on its optical parameters. This effect is recorded both in the low temperature region and at temperature close to human body, which might influence on silicone state when it is used as implant.

  14. Non-destructive evaluation by terahertz spectroscopy for penetration of acid solutions into epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kusano

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epoxy resins are used as high-performance thermosetting linings to protect substrates under corrosive environments. However, in a severe corrosive chemical solution, such protective layers may degrade with long time due to penetrations of solvent and solute molecules into resin network. In this regard, the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS is a promising tool for non-destructive evaluation of the penetrant amounts due to high transparency of such plastic materials and high sensitivity to the molecular vibrations in terahertz spectral range. In this work, the complex refractive indexes n and κ of epoxy specimens were measured after immersion into sulfuric acid solutions and compared with penetrated mass fractions of water and acid ions. It was found that n and κ depended linearly with water and sulfuric acid mass fraction in specimens, and κ of sulfuric acid immersed specimens was lager at higher frequency. While the calculated Δκ agreed well with THz-TDS measurement by THz-TDS, the calculated Δn was higher than the measurement. The difference may be attributed to the water and sulfuric states in the specimen.

  15. Adsorption of uranium ions by crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cemal Oezeroglu; Niluefer Metin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the crosslinked polyester resin containing acrylic acid functional groups was used for the adsorption of uranium ions from aqueous solutions. For this purpose, the crosslinked polyester resin of unsaturated polyester in styrene monomer (Polipol 353, Poliya) and acrylic acid as weight percentage at 80 and 20%, respectively was synthesized by using methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKp, Butanox M60, Azo Nobel)-cobalt octoate initiator system. The adsorption of uranium ions on the sample (0.05 g copolymer and 5 mL of U(VI) solution were mixed) of the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid was carried out in a batch reactor. The effects of adsorption parameters of the contact time, temperature, pH of solution and initial uranium(VI) concentration for U(VI) adsorption on the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid were investigated. The adsorption data obtained from experimental results depending on the initial U(VI) concentration were analyzed by the Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity and free energy change were determined by using D-R isotherm. The obtained experimental adsorption data depending on temperature were evaluated to calculate the thermodynamic parameters of enthalpy (ΔH o ), entropy (ΔS o ) and free energy change (ΔG o ) for the U(VI) adsorption on the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid from aqueous solutions. The obtained adsorption data depending on contact time were analyzed by using adsorption models such as the modified Freundlich, Elovich, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. (author)

  16. Collagen tissue treated with chitosan solutions in carbonic acid for improved biological prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallyamov, Marat O; Chaschin, Ivan S; Khokhlova, Marina A; Grigorev, Timofey E; Bakuleva, Natalia P; Lyutova, Irina G; Kondratenko, Janna E; Badun, Gennadii A; Chernysheva, Maria G; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2014-04-01

    Calcification of bovine pericardium dramatically shortens typical lifetimes of biological prosthetic heart valves and thus precludes their choice for younger patients. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate that the calcification is to be mitigated by means of treatment of bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid, i.e. water saturated with carbon dioxide at high pressure. This acidic aqueous fluid unusually combines antimicrobial properties with absolute biocompatibility as far as at normal pressure it decomposes spontaneously and completely into H2O and CO2. Yet, at high pressures it can protonate and dissolve chitosan materials with different degrees of acetylation (in the range of 16-33%, at least) without any further pretreatment. Even exposure of the bovine pericardium in pure carbonic acid solution without chitosan already favours certain reduction in calcification, somewhat improved mechanical properties, complete biocompatibility and evident antimicrobial activity of the treated collagen tissue. The reason may be due to high extraction ability of this peculiar compressed fluidic mixture. Moreover, exposure of the bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid introduces even better mechanical properties and highly pronounced antimicrobial activity of the modified collagen tissue against adherence and biofilm formation of relevant Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains. Yet, the most important achievement is the detected dramatic reduction in calcification for such modified collagen tissues in spite of the fact that the amount of the thus introduced chitosan is rather small (typically ca. 1wt.%), which has been reliably detected using original tritium labelling method. We believe that these improved properties are achieved due to particularly deep and uniform impregnation of the collagen matrix with chitosan from its pressurised solutions in carbonic acid. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. High night temperature strongly impacts TCA cycle, amino acid and polyamine biosynthetic pathways in rice in a sensitivity-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaubitz, Ulrike; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Hincha, Dirk K; Zuther, Ellen

    2015-10-01

    Global climate change combined with asymmetric warming can have detrimental effects on the yield of crop plants such as rice (Oryza sativa L.). Little is known about metabolic responses of rice to high night temperature (HNT) conditions. Twelve cultivars with different HNT sensitivity were used to investigate metabolic changes in the vegetative stage under HNT compared to control conditions. Central metabolism, especially TCA cycle and amino acid biosynthesis, were strongly affected particularly in sensitive cultivars. Levels of several metabolites were correlated with HNT sensitivity. Furthermore, pool sizes of some metabolites negatively correlated with HNT sensitivity under control conditions, indicating metabolic pre-adaptation in tolerant cultivars. The polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine showed increased abundance in sensitive cultivars under HNT conditions. Correlations between the content of polyamines and 75 other metabolites indicated metabolic shifts from correlations with sugar-phosphates and 1-kestose under control to correlations with sugars and amino and organic acids under HNT conditions. Increased expression levels of ADC2 and ODC1, genes encoding enzymes catalysing the first committed steps of putrescine biosynthesis, were restricted to sensitive cultivars under HNT. Additionally, transcript levels of eight polyamine biosynthesis genes were correlated with HNT sensitivity. Responses to HNT in the vegetative stage result in distinct differences between differently responding cultivars with a dysregulation of central metabolism and an increase of polyamine biosynthesis restricted to sensitive cultivars under HNT conditions and a pre-adaptation of tolerant cultivars already under control conditions with higher levels of potentially protective compatible solutes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  18. An analytic solution of the non-linear equation ∇2λ(r=f(λ and its application to the ion-atmosphere theory of strong electrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Bagchi

    1981-01-01

    directly into the distribution functions, had been proved to be mathematically consistent. It also yielded reliable physical results for both thermodynamic and transport properties of electrolytic solutions. Further, it has already been proved by the author from theoretical considerations (cf. Bagchi [4]as well as from a posteriori verification (see refs. [1] [2] that the concept of ion-atmosphere and the use of PB equation retain their validities generally. Now during the past 30 years, for convenice of calculations, various simplified versions of the original Dutta-Bagchi distribution function (Dutta & Bagchi [5]had been used successfully in modified DH theory of solutions of strong electrolytes. The primary object of this extensive study, (carried out by the author during 1968-73, was to decide a posteriori by using the exact analytic solution of the relevant PB equation about the most suitable, yet theoretically consistent, form of the distribution function. A critical analysis of these results eventually led to the formulation of a new approach to the statistical mechanics of classical systems, (see Bagchi [2], In view of the uncertainties inherent in the nature of the system to be discussed below, it is believed that this voluminous work, (containing 35 tables and 120 graphs, in spite of its legitimate simplifying assumptions, would be of great assistance to those who are interested in studying the properties of ionic solutions from the standpoint of a physically and mathematically consistent theory.

  19. Mechanism and Kinetics for the Dissolution of Apatitic Materials in Acid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calmanovici C.E.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - This work concerns the study of the digestion step in the production process of phosphoric acid. Some qualitative experiments indicate that the difference between the pH at the surface of the phosphate and that in the bulk of the solution is negligible and that the dissolution is controlled by diffusion of products away from the phosphate particle. In further experiments, to isolate the dissolution phenomenon from the formation of calcium sulfate, the sulfuric acid normally used industrially is replaced by hydrochloric acid. The phosphate material used in our experiments is a model apatitic material: synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP. The dissolution of calcium hydroxyapatite was studied with increasing amounts of calcium and phosphate at different temperatures. A simple method was developed for this observation based on the time required for complete dissolution of the HAP powder. The results confirm that the dissolution is controlled by a diffusional process through an interface of calcium and phosphate ions released from the solid surface. A kinetic model for the dissolution of apatitic materials is proposed which assumes a shrinking particle behaviour controlled by diffusion of calcium ions. The experimental results are fitted to this model to determine the mass transfer constant for HAP dissolution in acid solutions. The activation energy of the reaction is about 14kJ/mol. This study was carried on in conditions similar to the industrial ones for the production of phosphoric acid by the dihydrate-process

  20. Metabolic Engineering of Yeast to Produce Fatty Acid-derived Biofuels: Bottlenecks and Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayuan eSheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid-derived biofuels can be a better solution than bioethanol to replace petroleum fuel, since they have similar energy content and combustion properties as current transportation fuels. The environmentally friendly microbial fermentation process has been used to synthesize advanced biofuels from renewable feedstock. Due to their robustness as well as the high tolerance to fermentation inhibitors and phage contamination, yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica have attracted tremendous attention in recent studies regarding the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, including fatty acids, fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and fatty alkanes. However, the native yeast strains cannot produce fatty acids and fatty acid-derived biofuels in large quantities. To this end, we have summarized recent publications in this review on metabolic engineering of yeast strains to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, identified the bottlenecks that limit the productivity of biofuels, and categorized the appropriate approaches to overcome these obstacles.

  1. Solvent Extraction of Tungsten(VI) from Moderate Hydrochloric Acid Solutions with LIX 63

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Hoai Thanh; Lee, Man Seung [Mokpo National University, Jeollanamdo (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Hwan [Incheon Technology Service Centre, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The solvent extraction of tungsten(VI) from hydrochloric acid solutions using 5,8-diethyl-7-hydroxydodecan-6-one oxime (LIX 63) was analyzed in solutions having an initial pH range from 2 to 5, by varying the concentration of metal and extractant. In our experimental range, the cationic exchange reaction as well as the solvation reaction occurred simultaneously. The cation exchange reaction was identified by applying a slope analysis method to the extraction data. The existence of cationic tungsten(VI) species was confirmed by ion exchange experiments with Diphonix resin at pH 3. Further study is needed to identify the nature of this tungsten cationic species.

  2. Complexation of molybdenum(VI with methyliminodiacetic acid in different water + methanol solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeighaminezhad Saleh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexation of molybdenum(VI with methyliminodiacetic acid (MIDA at pH = 6.00, T = 298 K , I = 0.1 mol.dm-3 of sodium chloride and different water + methanol solutions (0-45% v/v was studied by using potentiometric and UV spectrophotometric measurements. The stability constants values were calculated and their trends have been interpreted by using the Kamlet-Abboud-Taft (KAT model in order to investigate the role of different specific and non-specific interactions in the aqueous solutions of methanol. Hyperquad 2013 and Microsoft Excel 2010 softwares have been used for the calculations.

  3. Synthesis of hydrochloric acid solution for total mercury determination in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel-Sorrentino, Nathalie; Benaim, Jean-Yves; Cossa, Daniel; Lucas, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Total mercury (Hg(T)) determination requires the addition of concentrated hydrochloric acid solution (≥10 mol L(-1) HCl) in relatively high amounts to preserve the samples and to prepare reagent solutions. A method for the preparation of concentrated HCl with Hg(T) concentration of lower than 5 ng L(-1) is described in this article. It is based on the well-known chemical reaction: 2 NH(4)Cl + H(2)SO(4) → (NH(4))(2)SO(4) + 2 HCl. This method is validated thanks to the US Environmental Protection Agency method 1631 and standard reference materials BCR-579 (mercury in coastal seawater).

  4. Ferulic acid stabilizes a solution of vitamins C and E and doubles its photoprotection of skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Lin, Jing-Yi; Gupta, Ravindra D; Tournas, Joshua A; Burch, James A; Selim, M Angelica; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A; Grichnik, James M; Zielinski, Jan; Pinnell, Sheldon R

    2005-10-01

    Ferulic acid is a potent ubiquitous plant antioxidant. Its incorporation into a topical solution of 15%l-ascorbic acid and 1%alpha-tocopherol improved chemical stability of the vitamins (C+E) and doubled photoprotection to solar-simulated irradiation of skin from 4-fold to approximately 8-fold as measured by both erythema and sunburn cell formation. Inhibition of apoptosis was associated with reduced induction of caspase-3 and caspase-7. This antioxidant formulation efficiently reduced thymine dimer formation. This combination of pure natural low molecular weight antioxidants provides meaningful synergistic protection against oxidative stress in skin and should be useful for protection against photoaging and skin cancer.

  5. The extraction thermodynamics of uranium (VI) from nitric acid solution by N-octanoyl piperidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Borong; Shao Hua; Han Jingtian; Yang Yonghui; Sun Sixiu

    2002-01-01

    The extraction thermodynamics of uranium (VI) from nitric acid solution by N-octanoyl piperidine in toluene was investigated. The results showed that two extracted species of UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 (OP) and UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 (OP) 2 were formed, and the equilibrium constants were K ex1 = 0.538 and K ex2 = 4.230 respectively. Through considering the sub-reaction of extraction, the equilibrium constant of extracting nitric acid with N-octanoyl piperidine were obtained to be K HNO 3 = 0.097

  6. Strong Lewis acids of air-stable metallocene bis(perfluorooctanesulfonate)s as high-efficiency catalysts for carbonyl-group transformation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Renhua; Xu, Xinhua; Peng, Lifeng; Zhao, Yalei; Li, Ningbo; Yin, Shuangfeng

    2012-05-14

    Strong Lewis acids of air-stable metallocene bis(perfluorooctanesulfonate)s [M(Cp)(2)][OSO(2)C(8)F(17)](2)⋅nH(2)O⋅THF (M = Zr (2 a⋅3 H(2)O⋅THF), M = Ti (2 b⋅2 H(2)O⋅THF)) were synthesized by the reaction of [M(Cp)(2)]Cl(2) (M = Zr (1 a), M = Ti (1 b)) with nBuLi and C(8)F(17)SO(3)H (2 equiv) or with C(8)F(17)SO(3)Ag (2 equiv). The hydrate numbers (n) of these complexes were variable, changing from 0 to 4 depending on conditions. In contrast to well-known metallocene triflates, these complexes suffered no change in open air for a year. thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) analysis showed that 2 a and 2 b were thermally stable at 300 and 180 °C, respectively. These complexes exhibited unusually high solubility in polar organic solvents. Conductivity measurement showed that the complexes (2 a and 2 b) were ionic dissociation in CH(3)CN solution. X-ray analysis result confirmed 2 a⋅3 H(2)O⋅THF was a cationic organometallic Lewis acid. UV/Vis spectra showed a significant red shift due to the strong complex formation between 10-methylacridone and 2 a. Fluorescence spectra showed that the Lewis acidity of 2 a fell between those of Sc(3+) (λ(em)=474 nm) and Fe(3+) (λ(em)=478 nm). ESR spectra showed the Lewis acidity of 2 a (0.91 eV) was at the same level as that of Sc(3+) (1.00 eV) and Y(3+) (0.85 eV), while the Lewis acidity of 2 b (1.06 eV) was larger than that of Sc(3+) (1.00 eV) and Y(3+) (0.85 eV). They showed high catalytic ability in carbonyl-compound transformation reactions, such as the Mannich reaction, the Mukaiyama aldol reaction, allylation of aldehydes, the Friedel-Crafts acylation of alkyl aromatic ethers, and cyclotrimerization of ketones. Moreover, the complexes possessed good reusability. On account of their excellent catalytic efficiency, stability, and reusability, the complexes will find broad catalytic applications in organic synthesis. Copyright © 2012

  7. Spectroscopic studies on the molecular interaction between salicylic acid and riboflavin (B{sub 2}) in micellar solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattar, S.L.; Kolekar, G.B. [Fluorescence Spectroscopy Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur-416 004, Maharashtra (India); Patil, S.R., E-mail: srp_fsl@rediffmail.co [Fluorescence Spectroscopy Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur-416 004, Maharashtra (India)

    2010-03-15

    The interaction between salicylic acid (SA) and riboflavin (RF) was studied by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in micellar solution. The riboflavin strongly quenches the intrinsic fluorescence of SA by radiative energy transfer. The extent of energy transfer in sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) micellar solution of different concentration is quantified from the energy transfer efficiency data. It is seen that the energy transfer is more efficient in the micellar solution. The critical energy transfer distance (R{sub 0}) was determined from which the mean distance between SA and RF molecules was calculated. The quenching was found to fit into Stern-Volmer relation. The results on variation of Stern-Volmer constant (K{sub sv}) with quencher concentration obtained at different temperatures suggested the formation of complex between SA and RF. The association constant of complex formation was estimated and found to decrease with temperature. The values of thermodynamic parameters DELTAH, DELTAG and DELTAS at different temperatures were estimated and the results indicated that the molecular interaction between SA and RF is electrostatic in nature.

  8. Studies on the thermal and radiolytic resistance of an anion exchanger with benzimidazole functional groups in nitric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasa, Satoru; Murata, Kiyoshi; Takeda, Kunihiko; Arai, Tsuyoshi; Wei, Y.Z.; Kumagai, Mikio

    2001-01-01

    Thermal and radiolytic resistance of AR-01R anion exchanger containing benzimidazole groups as exchange sites in nitric acid solution has been studied. Changes in its exchange capacity (EC), structure and shape were investigated and compared with those of a commercial Amberlite IRA-900 anion exchanger with quaternary ammonium group. Compared to the IRA-900, the AR-01R anion exchanger showed significantly higher thermal resistance and its decrease in EC was less than 10% after immersion in 9 mol·dm -3 solution for 72 h. On the other hand, it was found that the EC decrease of these two anion exchangers induced by γ-ray irradiation was almost the same; their EC decreased by 20-25% after irradiation in 9 mol·dm -3 HNO 3 solution at room temperature with absorption dose of 3.0 MGy. The change of the strong-base benzimidazole group to weak-base benzimidazole group in AR-01 was found to be the main damage by heat and γ-ray irradiation. (author)

  9. Some dilute solution properties of highly isotactic polyacrylonitrile in aq. nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hitoshi; Miyazaki, Yukio; Saito, Masatoshi; Kamide, Kenji

    1991-01-01

    An attempt was made to investigate the dilute solution properties of highly isotactic polyacrylonitrile (PAN) dissolved in aq. nitric acid and to estimate the molecular parameters, such as the unperturbed chain dimension A and the characteristic ratio C ∞ . For this purpose a highly isotactic polymer with isotactic triad content of 73.4% was synthesized by irradiating γ-ray on acrylonitrile-urea canal complex at -78degC and was subjected to successive precipitation fractionation, using dimethyl sulfoxide as solvent and toluene as precipitant, into 7 fractions. Among them 2 fractions with isotactic triad of 71.0 and 77.9%, respectively were employed for further study. The weight-average molecular weight M w and the second virial coefficient A 2 of these fractions in 70wt% aq. nitric acid soln. were measured by the light scattering method. The 70wt% aq. nitric acid soln. was predicted to be able to dissolve perfectly-isotactic PAN with M w of 1.5-2.6 x 10 5 at room temperature. The Mark-Houwink-Sakurada equations in aq. nitric acid solutions differ significantly depending on the stereoregularity of PAN employed, even if highly concentrated acids are used. A 57.5wt% aq. nitric acid soln. is determined, by the dependence of A 2 on the nitric acid concentration, to be a Flory's theta solvent for PAN with isotactic triad of 71.0% at 25degC. A of PAN increases rapidly with isotactic triad content, especially in the range higher than 50%. C ∞ of PAN is always far larger than the calculated value of non-polar Monte Carlo chain for polypropyrene [P. J. Flory et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 88, 639 (1966)] over the whole range higher than 50% isotactic diad. (author)

  10. Detection of hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid in γ-irradiated aqueous solution of cytosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tsuya; Shirai, Kazuo

    1979-01-01

    The aqueous solution of cytosine of 3.6 x 10 -2 M was irradiated with gamma -ray (60 megarad) in nitrogen-saturated glass ampules, and freeze-dried, then the residue obtained was changed to trimethylsilylacid, and this was analyzed by paper chromatography, UV spectrometry, and/or gas-liquid chromatography. Hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid were detected in this solution, in addition to some other compounds already known to be produced by gamma -irradiation, e.g., TMS-uracil, TMS-6-hydroxyuracil and TMS-hypoxanthine. It was presumed that these compounds were formed by the recombination of the primary radiolytic products. Uric acid formation by this mechanism was confirmed by gamma -irradiation of the mixture that contained urea, and 5- and 6-hydroxyuracil. (Kaihara, S.)

  11. Evaluation of the Magnesium Hydroxide Treatment Process for Stabilizing PFP Plutonium/Nitric Acid Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Mark A.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Baker, Aaron B.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2000-09-28

    This document summarizes an evaluation of the magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] process to be used at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for stabilizing plutonium/nitric acid solutions to meet the goal of stabilizing the plutonium in an oxide form suitable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99. During the treatment process, nitric acid solutions bearing plutonium nitrate are neutralized with Mg(OH)2 in an air sparge reactor. The resulting slurry, containing plutonium hydroxide, is filtered and calcined. The process evaluation included a literature review and extensive laboratory- and bench-scale testing. The testing was conducted using cerium as a surrogate for plutonium to identify and quantify the effects of key processing variables on processing time (primarily neutralization and filtration time) and calcined product properties.

  12. Surface characterisation of ethylene-propylene-diene rubber upon exposure to aqueous acidic solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, S.; Ghanbari-Siahkali, Afshin; Kingshott, P.

    2006-01-01

    but significantly different with respect to molar mass and the presence of long chain branching. Both rubbers contained 5-ethylidene-2-norbomene (ENB) as diene. Solution cast films of pure EPDM samples were exposed in two different acidic solutions, viz. chromosulphuric (Cr (VI)/H2SO4) and sulphuric acid (H2SO4....... Furthermore, 20% Cr (VI)/H2SO4 also attacked the allylic carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds of ENB resulting in more oxygenated species on the surface compared to 20% H2SO4 under identical conditions. Cr (VI) in the 20% Cr (VI)/H2SO4 was found to play an important role in alteration of surface chemistry. Studies...

  13. Corrosion inhibition of iron in acidic solution by a green formulation derived from Nigella sativa L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chellouli, M.; Chebabe, D.; Dermaj, A.; Erramli, H.; Bettach, N.; Hajjaji, N.; Casaletto, M.P.; Cirrincione, C.; Privitera, A.; Srhiri, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work the corrosion inhibition of iron in acidic solution by a formulation based on the oil extracted from the seeds of Nigella Sativa L. (labeled as FBN) was investigated by means of potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and weight loss measurements. Results showed that the formulation acts as a good mixed type (cathodic/anodic) inhibitor. The dissolution rate decreased with the increase of the FBN concentration and the immersion time. An inhibition efficiency of 99% was reached for FBN concentration at 2500 ppm. Surface analysis of the samples was performed by Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with chemical analysis (SEM-EDS) and X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS). Results confirmed a good protective action of the FBN film on the iron substrate in acidic solution. The FBN formulation is a not toxic and environmentally safe product, as determined by acute toxicity tests, and can be fruitfully used for a sustainable conservation of iron-based artifacts.

  14. Superhydrophobic copper surfaces fabricated by fatty acid soaps in aqueous solution for excellent corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wenlong; Hu, Yuanyuan; Bao, Wenda; Xie, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yiran; Song, Aixin, E-mail: songaixin@sdu.edu.cn; Hao, Jingcheng

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • The superhydrophobic property can be realized in a much quicker process (7.5 min) in aqueous solution than in ethanol. • The fabrication process of superhydrophobic metal surfaces greatly increases the safety in industrial manufacture in commercial scale. • The superhydrophobic copper surfaces show excellent corrosion resistance. - Abstract: A simple and safe one-step immersion method was developed to obtain the stable superhydrophobic copper surfaces with excellent corrosion resistance ability using fatty acids in water-medium instead of ethanol. An organic alkali, N,N-dimethylcyclohexylamine (DMCHA), was chosen to solve the poor solubility of fatty acids in water and the high Krafft point of carboxylate salts with inorganic counterions. The superhydrophobic property can be realized in a much quicker process (7.5 min) in aqueous solution than in ethanol (more than 2 d), which is universally feasible for the fabrication of superhydrophobic metal surfaces in industry scale, thereby greatly increasing the safety in industrial manufacture.

  15. Comparing the Titrations of Mixed-Acid Solutions Using Dropwise and Constant-Flow Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, Paul; Seguin, Matthew J.; Chesney, David J.

    2003-11-01

    A mixed-acid solution containing hydrochloric and phosphoric acids was used to determine the error associated with performing a real-time titration. The results were compared against those obtained by performing the titration in a more traditional dropwise addition of titrant near the equivalence points. It was found that the real-time techniques resulted in significantly decreased analysis times while maintaining a low experimental error. The constant-flow techniques were implemented into two different levels of chemistry. It was found that students could successfully utilize the modified experiments. Problems associated with the techniques, major sources of error, and their solutions are discussed. In both cases, the use of the constant-flow setup has increased student recollection of key concepts, such as pKa determination, proper indicator choice, and recognizing the shape of specific titration curves by increasing student interest in the experiment.

  16. Separation of glycols from dilute aqueous solutions via complexation with boronic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randel, L.A.; King, C.J.

    1991-07-01

    This work examines methods of separating low molecular weight glycols from dilute aqueous solution. Extraction into conventional solvents is generally not economical, since, in the literature reviewed, distribution ratios for the two- to four-carbon glycols are all less than one. Distribution ratios can be increased, however, by incorporating into the organic phase an extracting agent that will complex with the solute of interest. The extracting agent investigated in this work is 3-nitrophenylboronic acid (NPBA). NPBA, a boric acid derivative, reversibly complexes with many glycols. The literature on complexation of borate and related compounds with glycols, including mechanistic data, measurement techniques, and applications to separation processes, provides information valuable for designing experiments with NPBA and is reviewed herein. 88 refs., 15 figs., 24 tabs.

  17. Potentiometric determination of free nitric-acid in trilaurylamine solutions containing plutonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, J.J.; Saey, J.C.

    1965-01-01

    A potentiometric method of determination of the free nitric acid in trilaurylamine solutions containing plutonium or thorium nitrates is described. The potentiometric titration is carried out in a mixture of benzene and 1,2-dichloro ethane with a standard solution of trilaurylamine as the titrant. When thorium nitrate is present the metal complex is not dissociated then the titration has a single end-point. In the case of plutonium nitrate the partial dissociation of the plutonium complex corresponds to a second point. The experimental error in duplicate analyses of 50 samples is about 1 per cent for free acid concentrations in the range of 0,03 to 0,1 N and plutonium concentrations between 1 to 5 g/l. (authors) [fr

  18. Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part I. Regeneration of Amine-Carboxylic Acid Extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poole, Loree Joanne [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); King, C. Judson [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1990-03-01

    Two novel regenerated solvent extraction processes are examined. The first process has the potential to reduce the energy costs inherent in the recovery of low-volatility carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. The second process has the potential for reducing the energy costs required for separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases (e.g. CO2 and H2S) from industrial sour waters. The recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution can be achieved by extraction with tertiary amines. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back-extract the carboxylic acid with a water-soluble, volatile tertiary amine, such as trimethylamine. The resulting trimethylammonium carboxylate solution can be concentrated and thermally decomposed, yielding the product acid and the volatile amine for recycle. Experimental work was performed with lactic acid, succinic acid, and fumaric acid. Equilibrium data show near-stoichiometric recovery of the carboxylic acids from an organic solution of Alamine 336 into aqueous solutions of trimethylamine. For fumaric and succinic acids, partial evaporation of the aqueous back extract decomposes the carboxylate and yields the acid product in crystalline form. The decomposition of aqueous solutions of trimethylammonium lactates was not carried out to completion, due to the high water solubility of lactic acid and the tendency of the acid to self-associate. The separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases from sour waters can be achieved by combining steam-stripping of the acid gases with simultaneous removal of ammonia by extraction with a liquid cation exchanger. The use of di-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid as the liquid cation exchanger is explored in this work. Batch extraction experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium distribution ratio of ammonia between an aqueous buffer solution and an organic solution of the phosphinic acid (0.2N) in Norpar 12. The

  19. Forward osmosis for oily wastewater reclamation: Multi-charged oxalic acid complexes as draw solutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qingchun; Amy, Gary Lee; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2017-10-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) has demonstrated its merits in hybrid FO seawater desalination. However, FO may have a potential for other applications if suitable draw solutes are available. In this study, a series of novel draw solutes based on oxalic acid (OA)-transitional metal complexes are presented. Influential factors of FO performance have been systematically investigated by varying the transitional metals, cations of the complex draw solutes as well as the experimental conditions. Compared to NaCl and other recently synthesized draw solutes, the OA complexes show superior FO performance in terms of high water fluxes up to 27.5 and 89.1 LMH under the respective FO and PRO (pressure retarded osmosis) modes, both with negligible reverse solute fluxes. The features of octahedral geometry, abundant hydrophilic groups and ionic species are crucial for the OA complexes as appropriate draw solutes with satisfactory FO performance. Among the synthesized OA complexes, the ammonium salt of chromic complex (NH 4 -Cr-OA) outperforms others due to the presence of more ionic species in its complex system. NH 4 -Cr-OA also performs better than the typical NaCl draw solute in FO oily wastewater treatment with higher water recovery and negligible reverse fluxes. Dilute solutions of OA complexes have been reconcentrated through membrane distillation (MD) and reused to new round of FO processes. The OA complexes have demonstrated their suitability and superiority as a novel class of draw solutes for the FO process in this study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Collagen tissue treated with chitosan solutions in carbonic acid for improved biological prosthetic heart valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallyamov, Marat O., E-mail: glm@spm.phys.msu.ru [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie gory 1–2, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Chaschin, Ivan S. [Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Khokhlova, Marina A. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie gory 1–2, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Grigorev, Timofey E. [Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Bakuleva, Natalia P.; Lyutova, Irina G.; Kondratenko, Janna E. [Bakulev Scientific Center for Cardiovascular Surgery of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Roublyevskoe Sh. 135, Moscow 121552 (Russian Federation); Badun, Gennadii A.; Chernysheva, Maria G. [Radiochemistry Division, Faculty of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie gory 1–2, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Khokhlov, Alexei R. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie gory 1–2, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-01

    Calcification of bovine pericardium dramatically shortens typical lifetimes of biological prosthetic heart valves and thus precludes their choice for younger patients. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate that the calcification is to be mitigated by means of treatment of bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid, i.e. water saturated with carbon dioxide at high pressure. This acidic aqueous fluid unusually combines antimicrobial properties with absolute biocompatibility as far as at normal pressure it decomposes spontaneously and completely into H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}. Yet, at high pressures it can protonate and dissolve chitosan materials with different degrees of acetylation (in the range of 16–33%, at least) without any further pretreatment. Even exposure of the bovine pericardium in pure carbonic acid solution without chitosan already favours certain reduction in calcification, somewhat improved mechanical properties, complete biocompatibility and evident antimicrobial activity of the treated collagen tissue. The reason may be due to high extraction ability of this peculiar compressed fluidic mixture. Moreover, exposure of the bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid introduces even better mechanical properties and highly pronounced antimicrobial activity of the modified collagen tissue against adherence and biofilm formation of relevant Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains. Yet, the most important achievement is the detected dramatic reduction in calcification for such modified collagen tissues in spite of the fact that the amount of the thus introduced chitosan is rather small (typically ca. 1 wt.%), which has been reliably detected using original tritium labelling method. We believe that these improved properties are achieved due to particularly deep and uniform impregnation of the collagen matrix with chitosan from its pressurised solutions in carbonic acid. - Highlights: • Treatment of GA

  1. Acidity and Structure of Isosaccharinate in Aqueous Solution: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Herman M.; Rai, Dhanpat; Hess, Nancy J.; Xia, Yuanxian; Rao, Linfeng

    2003-01-01

    Dilute aqueous solutions of the calcium and sodium salts of -D-isosaccharinate (ISA) have been analyzed by 13C and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The positions of the six 13C ISA NMR lines show a pH dependence that can be used to infer that the most acidic proton is the one associated with the carboxylate group, with a log k0 of -3.27 - -3.36 for the reaction H(ISA) H+ K ISA-

  2. Shock wave synthesis of amino acids from solutions of ammonium formate and ammonium bicarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Chizuka; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Sekine, Toshimori; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The emergence of life's building blocks, such as amino acids and nucleobases, on the prebiotic Earth was a critical step for the beginning of life. Reduced species with low mass, such as ammonia, amines, or carboxylic acids, are potential precursors for these building blocks of life. These precursors may have been provided to the prebiotic ocean by carbonaceous chondrites and chemical reactions related to meteorite impacts on the early Earth. The impact of extraterrestrial objects on Earth occurred more frequently during this period than at present. Such impacts generated shock waves in the ocean, which have the potential to progress chemical reactions to form the building blocks of life from reduced species. To simulate shock-induced reactions in the prebiotic ocean, we conducted shock-recovery experiments on ammonium bicarbonate solution and ammonium formate solution at impact velocities ranging from 0.51 to 0.92 km/s. In the products from the ammonium formate solution, several amino acids (glycine, alanine, ß-alanine, and sarcosine) and aliphatic amines (methylamine, ethylamine, propylamine, and butylamine) were detected, although yields were less than 0.1 mol % of the formic acid reactant. From the ammonium bicarbonate solution, smaller amounts of glycine, methylamine, ethylamine, and propylamine were formed. The impact velocities used in this study represent minimum cases because natural meteorite impacts typically have higher velocities and longer durations. Our results therefore suggest that shock waves could have been involved in forming life's building blocks in the ocean of prebiotic Earth, and potentially in aquifers of other planets, satellites, and asteroids.

  3. Determination of diaryl[dialkylcarbamoylmethyl]phosphine oxides solubility in nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmutova, M.K.; Ianova, L.A.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1995-01-01

    A method for ascertaining solubility of bidentate neutral organophosphoric compounds, diaryl[dialkylcarbamoylmethyl]phosphines in particular, in aqueous solutions of acids has been suggested. When developing the method, the phenomenon of essential increase in extraction of transplutonium, rare earth elements, iron, uranium, etc, with addition of small amounts of HClO 4 was employed. The reagent concentration was determined indirectly according to the obtained distribution factor using a calibration curve lg D el =f([R]). 9 refs.; 1 fig

  4. Adsorption of and acidic dye from aqueous solution by surfactant modified bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouberka, Z.; Khenifi, A.; Belkaid, N.; Ait Mahamed, H.; Haddou, B.; Derriche, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the adsorption of an acidic dye S. Y. 4 GL (i.e: Supranol yellow 4GL) from aqueous solution on inorgano-organo clay. Bentonite is a kind of natural clay with good exchanging ability. By exchanging its inter lamellar cations with Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and hydroxy aluminic or chromium poly cations, the properties of natural bentonite can be greatly improved. (Author)

  5. Efficient saccharification by pretreatment of bagasse pith with ionic liquid and acid solutions simultaneously

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Gang; Zhang, Suping; Xu, Wenjuan; Qi, Wei; Yan, Yongjie; Xu, Qingli

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Bagasse pith was pretreated by BMIMCl solution containing HCl and water. • Hemicellulose was hydrolyzed to reducing sugars by HCl to maximize total sugar yield. • Cellulose was dissolved by BMIMCl and 95% of cellulose recovery was obtained. • The recovered cellulose was disrupted which is conducive to cellulase hydrolysis. • The total sugars yield is 89.9% obtained from pretreatment and cellulase hydrolysis. - Abstract: Hydrolysis of hemicellulose and disruption of cellulose during pretreatment process are conducive to the following cellulase hydrolysis performance. In this work, bagasse pith was first pretreated by 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM]Cl) solution containing 0–1.2% hydrochloric acid (HCl) and 30% water. The water (30%) added into the acidic ionic liquid (IL) solutions led to an increase in the biomass loading up to a biomass/IL solutions ratio of 1:10 (wt.%). Hemicellulose was hydrolyzed to reducing sugars by HCl and cellulose was dissolved by [BMIM]Cl. In this process, 76.9% of hemicellulose conversion and 95% of cellulose recovery were obtained. The pretreated bagasse pith was then followed by hydrolysis with commercially available enzymes. The effects of pretreatment temperature, reaction time and acid concentration on cellulase hydrolysis of pretreated bagasse pith were investigated. Pretreatment of bagasse pith with [BMIM]Cl solutions containing 1.0% HCl at 120 °C for 30 min resulted in the glucose concentration of 92.3 g/l and yield of 94.5% after 72 h of cellulase hydrolysis. The maximum total reducing sugars yield reached to 89.9% after pretreatment and cellulase hydrolysis

  6. Moessbauer spectroscopic evidence for iron(III) complexation and reduction in acidic aqueous solutions of indole-3-butyric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, K.; Kuzmann, E.; Vertes, A.; Kamnev, A.A.; Shchelochkov, A.G.; Medzihradszky-Schweiger, H.; Mink, J.; Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest

    2004-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopic studies were carried out in acidic (pH 2.3) 57 Fe III nitrate containing aqueous solutions of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), rapidly frozen in liquid nitrogen at various periods of time after mixing the reagents. The data obtained show that in solution in the presence of IBA, iron(III) forms a complex with a dimeric structure characterised by a quadrupole doublet, whereas without IBA under similar conditions iron(III) exhibits a broad spectral feature due to a slow paramagnetic spin relaxation which, at liquid nitrogen temperature, results in a large anomalous line broadening (or, at T = 4.2 K, in a hyperfine magnetic splitting). The spectra of 57 Fe III +IBA solutions, kept at ambient temperature under aerobic conditions for increasing periods of time before freezing, contained a gradually increasing contribution of a component with a higher quadrupole splitting. The Moessbauer parameters for that component are typical for iron(II) aquo complexes, thus showing that under these conditions gradual reduction of iron(III) occurs, so that the majority (85%) of dissolved iron(III) is reduced within 2 days. The Moessbauer parameters for the iron(III)-IBA complex in aqueous solution and in the solid state (separated from the solution by filtration) were found to be similar, which may indicate that the dissolved and solid complexes have the same composition and/or iron(III) coordination environment. For the solid complex, the data of elemental analysis suggest the following composition of the dimer: [L 2 Fe-(OH) 2 -FeL 2 ] (where L is indole-3-butyrate). This structure is also in agreement with the data of infrared spectroscopic study of the complex reported earlier, with the side-chain carboxylic group in indole-3-butyrate as a bidentate ligand. The Moessbauer parameters for the solid 57 Fe III -IBA complex at T = 80 K and its acetone solution rapidly frozen in liquid nitrogen were virtually identical, which indicates that the complex retains its

  7. Comparison of 30% salicylic acid with jessner's solution for superficial chemical peeling in epidermal melasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejaz, A.; Raza, N.; Iftikhar, N.; Muzzafar, F.

    2008-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of Jessner's solution with 30% salicylic acid as superficial chemical peeling agents in treating epidermal melasma in Asian skin. Sixty consenting patients with epidermal melasma were randomly divided into two groups. Group A was treated with Jessner's solution and Group B with 30% salicylic acid. Baseline Melasma Area Severity Index (MASI) score was noted and peeling started at 2-weekly intervals. Sunscreen in morning and moisturizer at night were prescribed in all patients. MASI score and adverse effects were recorded biweekly. Treatment was stopped at 12 weeks and patients were followed-up at 4 weekly intervals for further 12 weeks. Final MASI score and adverse effects were noted at the end of follow-up period. Mean MASI scores were compared using paired sample t-test and one-way ANOVA. Difference in baseline, treatment end and follow-up end MASI scores was not statistically significant between the two groups (p=0.54, 0.26, and 0.55 respectively). On the other hand, within group analysis of difference between pre and posttreatment MASI score was highly significant in both groups (p < 0.0001). Adverse effects were mild and comparable in both groups. Jessner's solution and 30% salicylic acid are equally effective and safe peeling agents for use in epidermal melasma in Asian skin. (author)

  8. Exceptionally crystalline and conducting acid doped polyaniline films by level surface assisted solution casting approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puthirath, Anand B.; Varma, Sreekanth J.; Jayalekshmi, S., E-mail: jayalekshmi@cusat.ac.in [Division for Research in Advanced Materials, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin, Kerala 682022 (India); Methattel Raman, Shijeesh [Nanophotonic and Optoelectronic Devices Laboratory, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin, Kerala 682022 (India)

    2016-04-18

    Emeraldine salt form of polyaniline (PANI) was synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerisation method using ammonium persulfate as oxidant. Resultant emeraldine salt form of PANI was dedoped using ammonia solution and then re-doped with camphor sulphonic acid (CSA), naphthaline sulphonic acid (NSA), hydrochloric acid (HCl), and m-cresol. Thin films of these doped PANI samples were deposited on glass substrates using solution casting method with m-cresol as solvent. A level surface was employed to get homogeneous thin films of uniform thickness. Detailed X-ray diffraction studies have shown that the films are exceptionally crystalline. The crystalline peaks observed in the XRD spectra can be indexed to simple monoclinic structure. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy studies provide convincing explanation for the exceptional crystallinity observed in these polymer films. FESEM and AFM images give better details of surface morphology of doped PANI films. The DC electrical conductivity of the samples was measured using four point probe technique. It is seen that the samples also exhibit quite high DC electrical conductivity, about 287 S/cm for CSA doped PANI, 67 S/cm for NSA doped PANI 65 S/cm for HCl doped PANI, and just below 1 S/cm for m-cresol doped PANI. Effect of using the level surface for solution casting is studied and correlated with the observed crystallinity.

  9. Development of Temperature Control Solutions for Non-Instrumented Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests (NINAAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Pardy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-instrumented nucleic acid amplification tests (NINAAT are a novel paradigm in portable molecular diagnostics. They offer the high detection accuracy characteristic of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT in a self-contained device, without the need for any external instrumentation. These Point-of-Care tests typically employ a Lab-on-a-Chip for liquid handling functionality, and perform isothermal nucleic acid amplification protocols that require low power but high accuracy temperature control in a single well-defined temperature range. We propose temperature control solutions based on commercially available heating elements capable of meeting these challenges, as well as demonstrate the process by which such elements can be fitted to a NINAAT system. Self-regulated and thermostat-controlled resistive heating elements were evaluated through experimental characterization as well as thermal analysis using the finite element method (FEM. We demonstrate that the proposed solutions can support various NAAT protocols, as well as demonstrate an optimal solution for the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP protocol. Furthermore, we present an Arduino-compatible open-source thermostat developed for NINAAT applications.

  10. On solubility of perchloric (periodic) acid and α-cyanacetanmide in aqueous solutions at 25 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omarova, R.A.; Balysbekov, S.M.; Erkasov, R.Sh.; Nikolenko, O.N.

    1996-01-01

    Acid-base interaction within perchloric (periodic) acid-α-cyanacetamide-water systems in studied by method of solubility under isothermal conditions at 25 deg C. Solubility regularities of crystalline α-cyanacetamide in perchloric and periodic acid solutions are determined, the concentration limits of formation of a new solid phase-tris(α-cyanacetamide) perchlorate within perchloric acid-α-cyanacetamide-water system are determined. The compound is identified by means of chemical and X-ray phase analyses, its density and melting temperature are determined. Iodic acid and α-cyanacetamide water solution base system is shown to belong to a simple eutonic type. 2 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Studies of dissolution solutions of ruthenium metal, oxide and mixed compounds in nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousset, F.; Eysseric, C.; Bedioui, F

    2004-07-01

    Ruthenium is one of the fission products generated by irradiated nuclear fuel. It is present throughout all the steps of nuclear fuel reprocessing-particularly during extraction-and requires special attention due to its complex chemistry and high {beta}{gamma} activity. An innovative electro-volatilization process is now being developed to take advantage of the volatility of RuO{sub 4} in order to eliminate it at the head end of the Purex process and thus reduce the number of extraction cycles. Although the process operates successfully with synthetic nitrato-RuNO{sup 3+} solutions, difficulties have been encountered in extrapolating it to real-like dissolution solutions. In order to better approximate the chemical forms of ruthenium found in fuel dissolution solutions, kinetic and speciation studies on dissolved species were undertaken with RuO{sub 2},xH{sub 2}O and Ru{sup 0} in nitric acid media. (authors)

  12. Studies of dissolution solutions of ruthenium metal, oxide and mixed compounds in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousset, F.; Eysseric, C.; Bedioui, F.

    2004-01-01

    Ruthenium is one of the fission products generated by irradiated nuclear fuel. It is present throughout all the steps of nuclear fuel reprocessing-particularly during extraction-and requires special attention due to its complex chemistry and high βγ activity. An innovative electro-volatilization process is now being developed to take advantage of the volatility of RuO 4 in order to eliminate it at the head end of the Purex process and thus reduce the number of extraction cycles. Although the process operates successfully with synthetic nitrato-RuNO 3+ solutions, difficulties have been encountered in extrapolating it to real-like dissolution solutions. In order to better approximate the chemical forms of ruthenium found in fuel dissolution solutions, kinetic and speciation studies on dissolved species were undertaken with RuO 2 ,xH 2 O and Ru 0 in nitric acid media. (authors)

  13. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions by modification of purex solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Kalina, Dale G.

    1986-01-01

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous solutions with an extraction solution containing an organic extractant having the formula: ##STR1## where .phi. is phenyl, R.sup.1 is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R.sup.2 is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms and phase modifiers in a water-immiscible hydrocarbon diluent. The addition of the extractant to the Purex process extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent, will permit the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from 0.1 to 12.0 molar acid solutions.

  14. Thermometric titration of a free acid and of uranyl in spent fuel element solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamek, M.; Strafelda, F.

    1975-01-01

    A method was elaborated of determining nitric acid in the presence of uranyl nitrate in both aqueous and non-aqueous solutions using a pyridine aqueous solution as a titration agent, and of determining excess uranyl after a hydrogen peroxide addition by a further titration using the same agent. Even a hundred-fold excess of magnesium did not disturb the titration. The method is used in operating solution analyses in the extraction fuel reprocessing in the presence of a small amount of plutonium and of fission products. The reproducibility and accuracy of the method varied in the order of tens to units per cent depending on the concentration of components to be determined. The procedure is applicable for test volumes ranging between 0.1 and 10 ml in concentrations of 1 to 10 -3 M. (author)

  15. Environmentally friendly method for regeneration of copper chloride acidic solutions used in etching of printed circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopyto Dorota

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Etching of copper with acidic CuCl2 solution is a widely used chemical method in printed circuits production. During the process, the solution is enriched in Cu(I ions, resulting in reduction and then loss of etching bath capacity. In order to ensure the required etching kinetics, the solution is regenerated by oxidation of Cu(I to Cu(II. The industrially applied Cu(I oxidants are, e.g.: Cl2, chlorates. Their application is expensive and associated with drawbacks related to health, safety and environmental hazards (e.g. Cl2 emission. In the result of long-standing cooperation between the IMN and MATUSEWICZ Budowa Maszyn, an innovative, original and environmentally friendly method of acidic solutions regeneration used during printed circuits etching was developed. A new-type reactor equipped with oxidation monitoring-control systems using oxygen or oxygen-enriched air was applied. The reactor construction enables to run the process with oxygen circulation in the reactor, ensures full oxygen utilisation in the regeneration process, achievement of the required performance and process rate, and eliminates expensive, hazardous and often toxic reagents. This is an innovative method, and since there are no analogous technologies currently known and used in Europe and worldwide, the presented method is technologically, economically and ecologically unrivalled.

  16. Coalescence of organic solutions in acid and metal extraction by tri-alkylamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blain, J.

    1970-01-01

    The formation of two layers with tri-alkylammonium salts solutions in low polarity diluents could be explained on the basis of settling of micelles. Light scattering and viscosity measurements reveal that micelles size increases rather sharply before coalescence. The existence of micelles in the solution has been confirmed by ultracentrifuge experiments. The behaviour of these solutions, in general, is similar to that of colloidal soap solutions. The various parameters which promote third phase formation are: anion size in the order of Cl - ∼ Br - 3 4 - ; extraction of excess acid; metal cation size in the order of UO 2 ++ 4+ ∼ Th 4+ ; decreasing in the length of the n-alkyl chain in the alkyl-ammonium salts; decreasing in diluent polarity. The above phenomenon could be explained on the basis of the affinity between alkylammonium salts and organic solvent. The composition of the three phases is independent of the initial amine concentration for a fixed acid and metal concentration. This has been verified experimentally and is in conformity with phase rule. (author) [fr

  17. Properties of alkali-solubilized collagen solution crosslinked by N-hydroxysuccinimide activated adipic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yihui; Zhang, Min; Liu, Wentao; Li, Guoying

    2011-03-01

    The effect of N-hydroxysuccinimide activated adipic acid (NHS-AA) on the properties of alkali-solubilized collagen solutions was examined. The residual amino group content in crosslinked collagen, determined by trinitrobenzensulfonic acid (TNBS) assay, was decreased with increasing NHS-AA concentration. The results from differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) indicated that the maximum denaturation temperature ( T d) of crosslinked collagen solution was about 4.2°C higher than that of un-crosslinked collagen solution (36.6°C). Moreover, the values of storage modulus ( G'), loss modulus ( G″) and complex viscosity ( η*), obtained by means of dynamic frequency sweeps, were increased as NHS-AA concentration added up to 1.5 mM, and then decreased slightly when further increased NHS-AA concentration. Besides, for collagen solution crosslinked with 1.5 mM NHS-AA, dynamic denaturation temperature ( T dd) was about 1.1°C lower than T d (40.8°C), and the Arrhenius-type time-temperature superposition (TTS) principle was applied to yield the activation energy to be 474.4 kJmol-1.

  18. White Paper on Potential Hazards Associated with Contaminated Cheesecloth Exposed to Nitric Acid Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hypes, Philip A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-20

    This white paper addresses the potential hazards associated with waste cheesecloth that has been exposed to nitric acid solutions. This issue was highlighted by the cleanup of a 100 ml leak of aqueous nitric acid solution containing Heat Source (HS) plutonium on 21 June 2016. Nitration of cellulosic material is a well-understood process due to industrial/military applications of the resulting material. Within the Department of Energy complex, nitric acids have been used extensively, as have cellulosic wipes. If cellulosic materials are nitrated, the cellulosic material can become ignitable and in extreme cases, reactive. We have chemistry knowledge and operating experience to support the conclusion that all current wastes are safe and compliant. There are technical questions worthy of further experimental evaluation. An extent of condition evaluation has been conducted back to 2004. During this time period there have been interruptions in the authorization to use cellulosic wipes in PF-4. Limited use has been authorized since 2007 (for purposes other than spill cleanup), so our extent of condition includes the entire current span of use. Our evaluation shows that there is no indication that process spills involving high molarity nitric acid were cleaned up with cheesecloth since 2007. The materials generated in the 21 June leak will be managed in a safe manner compliant with all applicable requirements.

  19. Corrosion behavior of ODS steels with several chromium contents in hot nitric acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanno, Takashi; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Kaito, Takeji

    2017-10-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel cladding tubes have been developed for fast reactors. Tempered martensitic ODS steels with 9 and 11 wt% of chromium (9Cr-, 11Cr-ODS steel) are the candidate material in research being carried out at JAEA. In this work, fundamental immersion tests and electrochemical tests of 9 to 12Cr-ODS steels were systematically conducted in various nitric acid solutions at 95 °C. The corrosion rate decreased exponentially with effective solute chromium concentration (Creff) and nitric acid concentration. Addition of vanadium (V) and ruthenium (Ru) also decreased the corrosion rate. The combination of low Creff and dilute nitric acid could not avoid the active mass dissolution during active domain at the beginning of immersion, and the corrosion rate was high. Higher Creff decreased the partial anodic current during the active domain and assisted the passivation of the surface of the steel. Concentrated nitric acid and addition of Ru and V increased partial cathodic current and shifted the corrosion potential to noble side. These effects should have prevented the active mass dissolution and decreased the corrosion rate.

  20. Kinetic Aspects of Leaching Zinc from Waste Galvanizing Zinc by Using Hydrochloric Acid Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sminčáková, Emília; Trpčevská, Jarmila; Pirošková, Jana

    2017-10-01

    In this work, the results of acid leaching of flux skimmings coming from two plants are presented. Sample A contained two phases, Zn(OH)Cl and NH4Cl. In sample B, the presence of three phases, Zn5(OH)8Cl2·H2O, (NH4)2(ZnCl4) and ZnCl2(NH3)2, was proved. The aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid and distilled water was used as the leaching medium. The effects of the leaching time, temperature and concentration of the leaching medium on the zinc extraction were investigated. The apparent activation energy, E a = 4.61 kJ mol-1, and apparent reaction order n = 0.18 for sample A, and the values E a = 6.28 kJ mol-1 and n = 0.33 for sample B were experimentally determined. Zinc leaching in acid medium is a diffusion-controlled process.

  1. E.s.r. of spin-trapped radicals in aqueous solutions of amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustgi, S.; Joshi, A.; Rieze, P.; Friedberg, F.

    1977-01-01

    The reactions of hydrated electrons (esub(aq) - ) with amino acids were investigated by the spin-trapping method and by electron spin resonance. Tertiary nitrosobutane was used as a spin-trap to stabilize the short-lived radicals. Hydrated electrons were produced by X-radiolysis of de-aerated aqueous solutions of amino acids in the presence of sodium formate or tertiary butanol to scavenge OH. Radicals produced by reductive deamination of 19 amino acids were identified. Radicals formed by scission of the CH 3 -S- and -S-CH 2 bonds of methionine as well as deamination were observed. In the case of phenylalanine the radical formed by electron addition followed by proton transfer was identified. The reaction of proline and of hydroxyproline with esub(aq) - resulted in the opening of the cyclic structure. (author)

  2. Corrosion Behaviour of Sn-based Lead-Free Solders in Acidic Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordarina, J.; Mohd, H. Z.; Ahmad, A. M.; Muhammad, F. M. N.

    2018-03-01

    The corrosion properties of Sn-9(5Al-Zn), Sn-Cu and SAC305 were studied via potentiodynamic polarization method in an acidic solution of 1 M hydrochloric acid (HCl). Sn-9(5Al-Zn) produced different polarization profile compared with Sn-Cu and SAC305. The morphological analysis showed that small, deep grooves shaped of corrosion product formed on top of Sn-9(5Al-Zn) solder while two distinctive structures of closely packed and loosely packed corrosion product formed on top of Sn-Cu and SAC305 solder alloys. Phase analysis revealed the formations of various corrosion products such as SnO and SnO2 mainly dominant on surface of solder alloys after potentiodynamic polarization in 1 M hydrochloric acid (HCl).

  3. Global solutions of restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock theory from semidefinite programming with applications to strongly correlated quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraraghavan, Srikant; Mazziotti, David A

    2014-03-28

    We present a density matrix approach for computing global solutions of restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock theory, based on semidefinite programming (SDP), that gives upper and lower bounds on the Hartree-Fock energy of quantum systems. While wave function approaches to Hartree-Fock theory yield an upper bound to the Hartree-Fock energy, we derive a semidefinite relaxation of Hartree-Fock theory that yields a rigorous lower bound on the Hartree-Fock energy. We also develop an upper-bound algorithm in which Hartree-Fock theory is cast as a SDP with a nonconvex constraint on the rank of the matrix variable. Equality of the upper- and lower-bound energies guarantees that the computed solution is the globally optimal solution of Hartree-Fock theory. The work extends a previously presented method for closed-shell systems [S. Veeraraghavan and D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. A 89, 010502-R (2014)]. For strongly correlated systems the SDP approach provides an alternative to the locally optimized Hartree-Fock energies and densities with a certificate of global optimality. Applications are made to the potential energy curves of C2, CN, Cr2, and NO2.

  4. Silica precipitation in acidic solutions: mechanism, pH effect, and salt effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrepati, Elizabeth A; Wongthahan, Pattanapong; Raha, Sasanka; Fogler, H Scott

    2010-07-06

    This study is the first to show that silica precipitation under very acidic conditions ([HCl] = 2-8 M) proceeds through two distinct steps. First, the monomeric form of silica is quickly depleted from solution as it polymerizes to form primary particles approximately 5 nm in diameter. Second, the primary particles formed then flocculate. A modified Smoluchowski equation that incorporates a geometric population balance accurately describes the exponential growth of silica flocs. Variation of the HCl concentration between 2 and 8 M further showed that polymerization to form primary particles and subsequent particle flocculation become exponentially faster with increasing acid concentration. The effect of salt was also studied by adding 1 M chloride salts to the solutions; it was found that salts accelerated both particle formation and growth rates in the order: AlCl(3) > CaCl(2) > MgCl(2) > NaCl > CsCl > no salt. It was also found that ionic strength, over cation identity, determines silica polymerization and particle flocculation rates. This research reveals that precipitation of silica products from acid dissolution of minerals can be studied apart from the mineral dissolution process. Thus, silica product precipitation from mineral acidization follows a two-step process--formation of 5 nm primary particles followed by particle flocculation--which becomes exponentially faster with increasing HCl concentration and with salts accelerating the process in the above order. This result has implications for any study of acid dissolution of aluminosilicate or silicate material. In particular, the findings are applicable to the process of acidizing oil-containing rock formations, a common practice of the petroleum industry where silica dissolution products encounter a low-pH, salty environment within the oil well.

  5. Characterization of lignocellulosic biomass thermal degradation and physiochemical structure: Effects of demineralization by diverse acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asadieraghi, Masoud; Wan Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • HF showed interesting results on EFB (empty fruit bunches) and PMF (palm mesocarp fibre) deashing. • HCl indicated maximum ash removal from PKS (palm kernel shell). • Significant pyrolysis reactions took place at ∼250 °C to ∼400 °C. • Inorganics played a considerable catalytic role during the biomasses pyrolysis. • Acid pretreatment introduced some impacts on the biomasses structure. - Abstract: To eliminate the negative impacts of inorganic constituents during biomass thermochemical processes, leaching method by different diluted acid solutions was chosen. The different palm oil biomass samples (palm kernel shell (PKS), empty fruit bunches (EFB) and palm mesocarp fiber (PMF)) were pretreated by various diluted acid solutions (H 2 SO 4 , HClO 4 , HF, HNO 3 , HCl). Acids with the highest degrees of demineralization were selected to investigate the dematerialization impacts on the biomass thermal characteristics and physiochemical structure. Thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectroscopy (TGA-MS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TGA-FTIR) were employed to examine the biomass thermal degradation. TGA and DTG (Derivative thermogravimetry) indicated that the maximum degradation temperatures increased after acid pretreatment due to the minerals catalytic effects. The main permanent evolved gases comprising H 2 , CO 2 , CO were detected online during analysis. The major permanent gases produced at the temperature range of 250–750 °C were attributed to the condensable vapors cracking and probably some secondary reactions. The physiochemical structure change of the acid-treated biomass samples was examined by using Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) method, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and FTIR. The pyrolysis kinetics of the different palm oil biomasses were investigated using first order reaction model

  6. Corrosion and hydrogen absorption of commercially pure zirconium in acid fluoride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Ken’ichi; Yamada, Daisuke; Sakai, Jun’ichi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Zirconium corrodes and absorbs hydrogen in acid fluoride solutions. •Hydrogen thermal desorption is observed at 300–700 °C. •The resistance to hydrogen absorption of zirconium is higher than that of titanium. -- Abstract: The corrosion and hydrogen absorption of commercially pure zirconium have been investigated in acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) solutions. Upon immersion in 2.0% APF solution of pH 5.0 at 25 °C, a granular corrosion product (Na 3 ZrF 7 ) deposits over the entire side surface of the specimen, thereby inhibiting further corrosion. In 0.2% APF solution, marked corrosion is observed from the early stage of immersion; no deposition of the corrosion product is observed by scanning electron microscopy. A substantial amount of hydrogen absorption is confirmed in both APF solutions by hydrogen thermal desorption analysis. The amount of absorbed hydrogen of the specimen immersed in the 2.0% APF solution is smaller than that in the 0.2% APF solution in the early stage of immersion. The hydrogen absorption behavior is not always consistent with the corrosion behavior. Hydrogen thermal desorption occurs in the temperature range of 300–700 °C for the specimen without the corrosion product. Under the same immersion conditions, the amount of absorbed hydrogen in commercially pure zirconium is smaller than that in commercially pure titanium as reported previously. The present results suggest that commercially pure zirconium, compared with commercially pure titanium, is highly resistant to hydrogen absorption, although corrosion occurs in fluoride solutions

  7. Sorption behaviour of microelements in aqueous solutions in the presence of humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, E.V.; Surikov, V.T.; Moskova, N.S.; Zhernakova, Z.M.

    2006-01-01

    Migration of stable and radioactive forms of microelements in soil as a result of interaction of atmosphere fallouts with monazite sand is one of the factors of a local radiological situation in Sverdlovsk Region of Urals, Russia. Though no experimental data exist on the physicochemical state in soil of such water soluble products as Th(IV), U(VI), lanthanides (REE), thermodynamic analysis predicts crucial role of humic acids (HA) in the complexation of these elements in natural heterogeneous aqueous media. The object of our research consisted in the experimental evaluation of the impact of Th(IV), U(VI), REE(III) physicochemical state on their partitioning between a cation exchanger (CE) and aqueous solution of HA (800-900 mg HA/L). Determination of equilibrium abundance of the elements in the CE, insoluble fraction of HA and water allowed us to trace both general (ε b ) and partial (ε KY2 , ε HA ) behaviour of more than 20 major and minor elements in the system 'HA-CE-HCl-NaOH-H 2 O' as a function of pH. Sorption system 'CE-HCl-NaOH-H 2 O-microelement' was selected as a reference one with regard to the chemical state of microelements. It was shown that sorption behaviour of Th(IV), U(VI), lanthanides(III) and a number of other microelements toward CE in the reference system is fully determined by the formation of aqua-hydroxo- and mixed hydroxo-carbonate complexes of these elements. For example, in the case of U(VI), the partitioning of positively charged hydroxo complexes leads to cupola-shaped isotherm of sorption due to the formation of non-adsorbable uranium carbonate complexes at pH>6. Presence of HA in sorption system changes substantially the sorption behaviour of microelements due to the formation of strong HA-complexes at pH>4 and insoluble HA solid at pH<4. The peculiarities of sorption behaviour of Th(IV), U(VI) and lanthanides(III) in the investigated systems are discussed in detail. (author)

  8. Biosorption of acid dyes from aqueous solution using Curcuma angustifolia scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Suresh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of even a very small quantity of dye in water bodies is undesirable and affects the water bodies. Dye removal from industrial waste water is significant; hence in this study, a material that is an economical waste product was employed to test its acid dye removing capacity from aqueous solution. Methods: In this study, batch mode experiments were performed in the sorption process of Acid Red 97 (AR 97, Acid Red 114 (AR 114 and Acid Red 151 (AR 151 onto Curcuma angustifolia scales (CS. Also, the effect of process parameters like pH and adsorbent dosage was studied. The experimental data of AR 97, AR 114 and AR 151 sorption was fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models. Kinetic results in AR 97, AR 114 and AR 151 sorption were fitted at various concentrations to pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich and Intra-particle diffusion model. Results: The monolayer sorption capacity of the acid dyes was found to be AR 97 (350.87 mg/g, AR 114 (202.42 mg/g and AR 151 (168.91 mg/g. The Pseudo-second order model proved to be the best fit for the acid dyes. Boyd plot, confirms film diffusion in all acid dye sorption processes. Conclusion: The results showed higher dye removal for acid dyes at pH 2. The isotherm data, demonstrated good sorption capacity with AR 97>AR 114>AR 151. Employing the CS material in this study proves to be a potential alternative to costlier adsorbents, utilized for the treatment of dye containing industrial waste water.

  9. Quantitative physicochemical analysis of acid-base balance and clinical utility of anion gap and strong ion gap in 806 neonatal calves with diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefz, F M; Constable, P D; Lorenz, I

    2015-01-01

    Acid-base abnormalities in neonatal diarrheic calves can be assessed by using the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation or the simplified strong ion approach which use the anion gap (AG) or the strong ion gap (SIG) to quantify the concentration of unmeasured strong anions such as D-lactate. To determine and compare the clinical utility of AG and SIG in quantifying the unmeasured strong anion charge in neonatal diarrheic calves, and to examine the associations between biochemical findings and acid-base variables by using the simplified strong ion approach. We hypothesized that the SIG provides a more accurate prediction of unmeasured strong anions than the AG. Eight hundred and six neonatal diarrheic calves admitted to a veterinary teaching hospital. Retrospective study utilizing clinicopathologic findings extracted from medical records. Hyperphosphatemia was an important predictor of venous blood pH. Serum inorganic phosphorus and plasma D-lactate concentrations accounted for 58% of the variation in venous blood pH and 77% of the variation in AG and SIG. Plasma D- and total lactate concentrations were slightly better correlated with SIG (rs = -0.69; -0.78) than to AG (rs = 0.63; 0.74). Strong ion gap is slightly better at quantifying the unmeasured strong anion concentration in neonatal diarrheic calves than AG. Phosphorus concentrations should be included as part of the calculation of Atot when applying the simplified strong ion approach to acid-base balance to critically ill animals with hyperphosphatemia. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  10. Sorption of carboxylic acid from carboxylic salt solutions at PHS close to or above the pK.sub.a of the acid, with regeneration with an aqueous solution of ammonia or low-molecular-weight alkylamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, C. Judson; Tung, Lisa A.

    1992-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks at pHs close to or above the acids' pH.sub.a into a strongly basic organic liquid phase or onto a basic solid adsorbent or moderately basic ion exchange resin. the acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine or ammonia thus forming an alkylammonium or ammonium carobxylate which dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine or ammonia.

  11. Sorption of carboxylic acid from carboxylic salt solutions at pHs close to or above the pK[sub a] of the acid, with regeneration with an aqueous solution of ammonia or low-molecular-weight alkylamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, C.J.; Tung, L.A.

    1992-07-21

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks at pHs close to or above the acids' pH[sub a] into a strongly basic organic liquid phase or onto a basic solid adsorbent or moderately basic ion exchange resin. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine or ammonia thus forming an alkylammonium or ammonium carboxylate which dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine or ammonia. 8 figs.

  12. Effect of Organic Acid Additions on the General and Localized Corrosion Susceptibility of Alloy 22 in Chloride Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carranza, R M; Giordano, C M; Rodr?guez, M A; Ilevbare, G O; Rebak, R B

    2007-08-28

    Electrochemical studies such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022) in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C. All the tested material was wrought Mill Annealed (MA). Tests were also performed in NaCl solutions containing weak organic acids such as oxalic, acetic, citric and picric. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was significantly higher in solutions containing oxalic acid than in solutions of pure NaCl at the same pH. Citric and picric acids showed a slightly higher corrosion rate, and acetic acid maintained the corrosion rate of pure chloride solutions at the same pH. Organic acids revealed to be weak inhibitors for crevice corrosion. Higher concentration ratios, compared to nitrate ions, were needed to completely inhibit crevice corrosion in chloride solutions. Results are discussed considering acid dissociation constants, buffer capacity and complex formation constants of the different weak acids.

  13. A new oxidimetric reagent-potassium dichromate in a strong phosphoric acid medium-VIII Potentiometric titration of molybdenum(VI) and vanadium(V).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralikrishna, U; Rao, G G

    1968-01-01

    A new titrimetric method is described for the determination of molybdenum(VI) involving prior reduction to Mo(V) with an excess of Fe(II) in a concentrated phosphoric acid solution, followed by titration with dichromate. The titration can be done at room temperature and without protective atmosphere. Uranium interferes, but vanadium may be determined simultaneously.

  14. Volumetric behaviour of amino acids and their group contributions in aqueous lactose solutions at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Amalendu; Chauhan, Nalin

    2011-01-01

    Densities, ρ, for glycine, L-alanine, L-valine, and L-leucine [(0.05 to 0.30) m] in aqueous lactose solutions ranging from pure water to 6 mass% lactose were determined at T = (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K. The density was used to compute apparent molar volume, V φ , partial molar volume at infinite dilution, V φ o , and experimental slope, S V were obtained and interpreted in terms of solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions. These data were used to calculate the (∂V φ 0 /∂T) P values. The partial molar volume of transfer, ΔV φ 0 from water to aqueous lactose solutions at infinite dilution has also been calculated. In addition to this, the linear correlation of V φ 0 with number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain of amino acids was utilized to determine the respective contributions of NH 3 + COO - , and CH 2 groups to V φ 0 .

  15. Volumetric behaviour of amino acids and their group contributions in aqueous lactose solutions at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Amalendu, E-mail: palchem@sify.co [Department of Chemistry, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119 (India); Chauhan, Nalin [Department of Chemistry, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119 (India)

    2011-02-15

    Densities, {rho}, for glycine, L-alanine, L-valine, and L-leucine [(0.05 to 0.30) m] in aqueous lactose solutions ranging from pure water to 6 mass% lactose were determined at T = (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K. The density was used to compute apparent molar volume, V{sub {phi}}, partial molar volume at infinite dilution, V{sub {phi}}{sup o}, and experimental slope, S{sub V} were obtained and interpreted in terms of solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions. These data were used to calculate the ({partial_derivative}V{sub {phi}}{sup 0}/{partial_derivative}T){sub P} values. The partial molar volume of transfer, {Delta}V{sub {phi}}{sup 0} from water to aqueous lactose solutions at infinite dilution has also been calculated. In addition to this, the linear correlation of V{sub {phi}}{sup 0} with number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain of amino acids was utilized to determine the respective contributions of NH{sub 3}{sup +}COO{sup -}, and CH{sub 2} groups to V{sub {phi}}{sup 0}.

  16. Electrospinning of chitosan solutions in acetic acid with poly(ethylene oxide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Bin; Dong, Cunhai; Yuan, Xiaoyan; Yao, Kangde

    2004-01-01

    Electrospinning of chitosan solutions with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) in an aqueous solution of 2 wt% acetic acid was studied. The properties of the chitosan/PEO solutions, including conductivity, surface tension and viscosity, were measured. Morphology of the electrospun chitosan/PEO was observed by using scanning electron micrographs. Results showed that the ultrafine fibers could be generated after addition of PEO in 2:1 or 1:1 mass ratios of chitosan to PEO from 4-6 wt% chitosan/PEO solutions at 15 kV voltage, 20 cm capillary-collector distance and flow rate 0.1 ml/h. During electrospinning of the chitosan/PEO solutions, ultrafine fibers with diameters from 80 nm to 180 nm were obtained, while microfibers with visually thicker diameters could be formed as well. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimeter exhibited the larger electrospun microfibers were almost entirely made from PEO, while the electrospun ultrafine fibers mainly contained chitosan.

  17. Evaluation of poly (aspartic acid sodium salt) as a draw solute for forward osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Gimun; Jung, Bokyung; Han, Sungsoo; Hong, Seungkwan

    2015-09-01

    Poly (aspartic acid sodium salt) (PAspNa) was evaluated for its potential as a novel draw solute in forward osmosis (FO). The inherent advantages of PAspNa, such as good water solubility, high osmotic pressure, and nontoxicity, were first examined through a series of physicochemical analyses and atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Then, lab-scale FO tests were performed to evaluate its suitability in practical processes. Compared to other conventional inorganic solutes, PAspNa showed comparable water flux but significantly lower reverse solute flux, demonstrating its suitability as a draw solute. Moreover, fouling experiments using synthetic wastewater as a feed solution demonstrated that PAspNa reversely flowed to the feed side reduced inorganic scaling on the membrane active layer. The recyclability of PAspNa was studied using both nanofiltration (NF) and membrane distillation (MD) processes, and the results exhibited its ease of recovery. This research reported the feasibility and applicability of FO-NF or FO-MD processes using PAspNa for wastewater reclamation and brackish water desalination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of Organic Solutes in the Chemistry Of Acid-Impacted Bog Waters of the Western Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    HrušKa, Jakub; Johnson, Chris E.; KráM, Pavel

    1996-04-01

    In many regions, naturally occurring organic acid anions can effectively buffer mineral acid inputs from atmospheric deposition, moderating their effect on surface water pH. We studied the effect of chronically high inputs of acid rain on the chemistry of three brown-water streams in the western Czech Republic. The dissolved organic acids in the streams were similar in character to those of other systems in Europe and North America. The site densities (the carboxyl group content per mass of C) were similar to values reported from Fenno-Scandia, and the relationship between the apparent pKa and pH conformed to those from two North American studies. Sulfate and organic acid anions (OA-) were the dominant anions in all three streams, yet despite high dissolved organic carbon and total organic acid concentrations, OA - comprised only 21-32% of total anion charge. This pattern was due to very high sulfate concentrations and, in two of the streams, a low degree of dissociation of the organic acids, probably the results of high long-term inputs of strong acids. Stream water pH was highly correlated to sulfate concentration, but uncorrelated with OA-, suggesting that free acidity is controlled by strong mineral acids rather than organic acids. Thus future reductions in strong acid inputs should result in increased pH and a return to organic control over acid-base chemistry.

  19. Simultaneous determination of nitric acid and uranium concentrations in aqueous solution from measurements of electrical conductivity, density, and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing plants handle aqueous solutions of nitric acid and uranium in large quantities. Automatic control of process operations requires reliable measurements of these solutes concentration, but this is difficult to directly measure. Physical properties such as solution density and electrical conductivity vary with solute concentration and temperature. Conductivity, density and temperature can be measured accurately with relatively simple and inexpensive devices. These properties can be used to determine solute concentrations will good correlations. This paper provides the appropriate correlations for solutions containing 2 to 6 Molar (M) nitric acid and 0 to 300 g/L uranium metal at temperatures from 25--90 degrees C. The equations are most accurate below 5 M nitric acid, due to a broad maximum in the conductivity curve at 6 M. 12 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Substituent effects on the photophysical properties of pterin derivatives in acidic and alkaline aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrerizo, Franco M; Petroselli, Gabriela; Lorente, Carolina; Capparelli, Alberto L; Thomas, Andrés H; Braun, André M; Oliveros, Esther

    2005-01-01

    Pterins are heterocyclic compounds with important biological functions, and most of them may exist in two acid-base forms in the pH range between 3 and 13 in aqueous solution. In this work, the photophysical properties of acid and basic forms of six compounds of the pterin family (6-hydroxymethylpterin [HPT], 6-methylpterin [MPT], 6,7-dimethylpterin [DPT], rhamnopterin [RPT], N-methylfolic acid [MFA], and pteroic acid [PA]) have been studied. The effects of the chemical nature of the substituents at position 6 of the pterin moiety and the effects of the pH on the absorption and emission properties are analyzed. The fluorescence characteristics (spectra, quantum yields, lifetimes) of these compounds have been investigated using the single-photon-counting technique. Results obtained for pterin derivatives containing small substituents with 1 carbon atom (HPT, MPT, DPT) and short hydrocarbon chain (4 carbon atoms) (RPT) are different from those found for pterin derivatives containing a p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) moiety in the substituent (MFA and PA). Fluorescence quantum yields (Phi(F)) of the first group of compounds are relatively high (>/=0.4), whereas MFA and PA exhibit very small Phi(F) values (

  1. Lanthanide triflates. Effecient lewis acid catalysts in aqueous solution; Rantanoido torifurato. Suiyoekichu de kinosuru ruisu san shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, S. [Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1996-02-01

    It is a common sense in chemistry that Lewis acid is hydrolyzed quickly in water, while a new Lewis acid is discovered by which said common sense is overthrown. This new Lewis acid is lanthanide triflate (lanthanide trifluoromethanesulfonate). Such new lanthanide catalysts which have many characteristics different from the conventional Lewis acid, are paid attention as clean catalysts of next generation gentle to environment. In this paper, the details of discovery of lanthanide triflates by the present authors are introduced, and the fact that this triflates is not hydrolyzed in water though they have the same Lewis acidic properties as other Lewis acid is clarified. Further, as the examples of the synthesis reactions using lanthanide triflates as catalysts, hydroxymethylate reaction using aqueous solution of formaldehyde, Mannich reaction proceeding in aqueous solution, Friedel-Crafts reaction in organic solution and Fries rearrangement are described. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Solution structure of human intestinal fatty acid binding protein: Implications for ligand entry and exit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fengli [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Biophysics (United States); Luecke, Christian [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet (Germany); Baier, Leslie J. [NIDDK, NIH, Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch (United States); Sacchettini, James C. [Texas A and M University, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics (United States); Hamilton, James A. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Biophysics (United States)

    1997-04-15

    The human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a small (131 amino acids) protein which binds dietary long-chain fatty acids in the cytosol of enterocytes. Recently, an alanine to threonine substitution at position 54 in I-FABP has been identified which affects fatty acid binding and transport, and is associated with the development of insulin resistance in several populations including Mexican-Americans and Pima Indians. To investigate the molecular basis of the binding properties of I-FABP, the 3D solution structure of the more common form of human I-FABP (Ala54) was studied by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy.Recombinant I-FABP was expressed from E. coli in the presence and absence of 15N-enriched media. The sequential assignments for non-delipidated I-FABP were completed by using 2D homonuclear spectra (COSY, TOCSY and NOESY) and 3D heteronuclear spectra(NOESY-HMQC and TOCSY-HMQC). The tertiary structure of human I-FABP was calculated by using the distance geometry program DIANA based on 2519 distance constraints obtained from the NMR data. Subsequent energy minimization was carried out by using the program SYBYL in the presence of distance constraints. The conformation of human I-FABP consists of 10 antiparallel {beta}-strands which form two nearly orthogonal {beta}-sheets of five strands each, and two short {alpha}-helices that connect the {beta}-strands A and B. The interior of the protein consists of a water-filled cavity between the two {beta}-sheets. The NMR solution structure of human I-FABP is similar to the crystal structure of rat I-FABP.The NMR results show significant conformational variability of certain backbone segments around the postulated portal region for the entry and exit of fatty acid ligand.

  3. Waste Treatment of Acidic Solutions from the Dissolution of Irradiated LEU Targets for 99-Mo Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakel, Allen J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Conner, Cliff [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Quigley, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2016-10-01

    One of the missions of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program (and now the National Nuclear Security Administrations Material Management and Minimization program) is to facilitate the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) targets for 99Mo production. The conversion from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU targets will require five to six times more uranium to produce an equivalent amount of 99Mo. The work discussed here addresses the technical challenges encountered in the treatment of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH)/nitric acid solutions remaining after the dissolution of LEU targets. Specifically, the focus of this work is the calcination of the uranium waste from 99Mo production using LEU foil targets and the Modified Cintichem Process. Work with our calciner system showed that high furnace temperature, a large vent tube, and a mechanical shield are beneficial for calciner operation. One- and two-step direct calcination processes were evaluated. The high-temperature one-step process led to contamination of the calciner system. The two-step direct calcination process operated stably and resulted in a relatively large amount of material in the calciner cup. Chemically assisted calcination using peroxide was rejected for further work due to the difficulty in handling the products. Chemically assisted calcination using formic acid was rejected due to unstable operation. Chemically assisted calcination using oxalic acid was recommended, although a better understanding of its chemistry is needed. Overall, this work showed that the two-step direct calcination and the in-cup oxalic acid processes are the best approaches for the treatment of the UNH/nitric acid waste solutions remaining from dissolution of LEU targets for 99Mo production.

  4. SOLVENT EFFECTS ON THE HYDRATION OF CYCLOHEXENE CATALYZED BY A STRONG ACID ION-EXCHANGE RESIN .3. EFFECT OF SULFOLANE ON THE EQUILIBRIUM CONVERSION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PANNEMAN, HJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    The liquid-phase hydration of cyclohexene, a pseudo-first-order reversible reaction catalyzed by a strong acid ion-exchange resin, was investigated in solvent mixtures of water and sulfolane. Macroporous Amberlite XE 307 was used because of its superior catalytic activity. Chemical equilibrium

  5. Modeling the acid-base chemistry of organic solutes in Adirondack, New York, lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Charles T.; Lehtinen, Michael D.; Sullivan, Timothy J.

    1994-02-01

    Data from the large and diverse Adirondack Lake Survey were used to calibrate four simple organic acid analog models in an effort to quantify the influence of naturally occurring organic acids on lake water pH and acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). The organic acid analog models were calibrated to observations of pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and organic anion (An-) concentrations from a reduced data set representing 1128 individual lake samples, expressed as 41 observations of mean pH, in intervals of 0.1 pH units from pH 3.9 to 7.0. Of the four organic analog approaches examined, including the Oliver et al. (1983) model, as well as monoprotic, diprotic, and triprotic representations, the triprotic analog model yielded the best fit (r2 = 0.92) to the observed data. Moreover, the triprotic model was qualitatively consistent with observed patterns of change in organic solute charge density as a function of pH. A low calibrated value for the first H+ dissociation constant (pKal = 2.62) and the observation that organic anion concentrations were significant even at very low pH (acidic functional groups. Inclusion of organic acidity in model calculations resulted in good agreement between measured and predicted values of lake water pH and ANC. Assessments to project the response of surface waters to future changes in atmospheric deposition, through the use of acidification models, will need to include representations of organic acids in model structure to make accurate predictions of pH and ANC.

  6. Effect of adding acid solution on setting time and compressive strength of high calcium fly ash based geopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Herianto, Jason Ghorman; Anastasia, Evelin; Hardjito, Djwantoro

    2017-09-01

    Fly ash with high calcium oxide content when used as the base material in geopolymer concrete could cause flash setting or rapid hardening. However, it might increase the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete. This rapid hardening could cause problems if the geopolymer concrete is used on a large scale casting that requires a long setting time. CaO content can be indicated by pH values of the fly ash, while higher pH is correlated with the rapid setting time of fly ash-based geopolymer. This study investigates the addition of acid solution to reduce the initial pH of the fly ash and to prolong the setting time of the mixture. The acids used in this study are hydrochloric acid (HCl), sulfuric acid (H2 SO4), nitric acid (HNO3) and acetic acid (CH3 COOH). It was found that the addition of acid solution in fly ash was able to decrease the initial pH of fly ash, however, the initial setting time of geopolymer was not reduced. It was even faster than that of the control mixture. The acid type causes various influence, depending on the fly ash properties. In addition, the use of acid solution in fly ash reduces the compressive strength of geopolymer mortar. It is concluded that the addition of acid solution cannot prolong the rapid hardening of high calcium fly ash geopolymer, and it causes adverse effect on the compressive strength.

  7. Effective diffusion coefficients for methanol in sulfuric acid solutions measured by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Loon, Lisa L; Allen, Heather C; Wyslouzil, Barbara E

    2008-10-30

    The diffusion of methanol into 0-96.5 wt % sulfuric acid solutions was followed using Raman spectroscopy. Because methanol reacts to form protonated methanol (CH 3OH 2 (+)) and methyl hydrogen sulfate in H 2SO 4 solutions, the reported diffusion coefficients, D, are effective diffusion coefficients that include all of the methyl species diffusing into H 2SO 4. The method was first verified by measuring D for methanol into water. The value obtained here, D = (1.4 +/- 0.6) x 10 (-5) cm (2)/s, agrees well with values found in the literature. The values of D in 39.2-96.5 wt % H 2SO 4 range from (0.11-0.3) x 10 (-5) cm (2)/s, with the maximum value of D occurring for 61.6 wt % H 2SO 4. The effective diffusion coefficients do not vary systematically with the viscosity of the solutions, suggesting that the speciation of both methanol and sulfuric acid may be important in determining these transport coefficients.

  8. Solution thermodynamics of pyrazinamide, isoniazid, and p-aminobenzoic acid in buffers and octanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokhina, Svetlana V.; Ol’khovich, Marina V.; Sharapova, Angelica V.; Volkova, Tatyana V.; Perlovich, German L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubility of pyrazinamide, isoniazid, p-aminobenzoic acid were measured. • The activity coefficients of the compounds at infinite dilution were determined. • Thermodynamic functions of dissolution and solvation were calculated. - Abstract: The solubility values of pyrazinamide, isoniazid, and p-aminobenzoic acid in buffers (pH 2.0 and 7.4) and octanol were measured in the temperature range of 293.15 to 313.15 K. The dissolution Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy were calculated. The dissolving process was endothermic and enthalpy-determined. The activity coefficients of the compounds at infinite dilution were determined based on the solubility data and thermophysical parameters. A positive deviation from the ideality was observed in all the solutions. A common tendency of the solubility increase with a decrease in the activity coefficients at T = 298.15 K was revealed for the investigated solute-solvent systems. The excess thermodynamic solubility functions were calculated from the temperature dependences of the activity coefficients. The solvation processes were found to have a considerable influence on the solubility of the substances in solutions studied.

  9. Copper solvent extraction from chalcopyrite concentrate acid leach solutions by LIX 984

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elamari K.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper production from ores or sulphide concentrates is classically realized by pyrometallurgical route. In this study, hydrometallurgical treatment of a copper sulphide concentrate, provided by Hajar Mine (ONA-Group, Morocco, was tested by using a mixture of nitric and hexafluorosilicic acids. Copper is present in the solid product as chalcopyrite and its amount is 28.1 % by weight. Leaching stage allows to dissolve more than 90% of copper witch is accompanied, in the same averages, by Zn and Fe. The leach solution obtained has pH = 0.6 and Eh = 580 mV/ENH and contains 19.3 g/L Cu, 18.1 g/L Fe, 4.5 g/L Zn and 0.03 g/L Pb. The recovery of copper from this leach solution was curried out by solvent extraction using Lix 984, diluted in Escaid 110. McCabe - Thiele distribution isotherms showed that at pH 1.7 total and selective copper extraction can be realized with Øo:Øa =1.5:1 in 3 extraction stages. Stripping of the loaded copper by treating the organic phases was easily obtained by a sulphuric acid solution.

  10. Removal of acidic indigo carmine textile dye from aqueous solutions using radiation induced cationic hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Müfrettin Murat

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the removal of acidic indigo carmine dyes from aqueous solutions using cationic hydrogels. Irradiated hydrogels were investigated as a new sorbent for dye removal from aqueous solution. Poly(N,N-Diethylamino ethyl methacrylate) [poly(DEAEMA)] hydrogels were prepared by radiation polymerisation of N,N-diethylamino ethyl methacrylate [DEAEMA] monomer in the presence of cross-linking agent, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate [EGDMA], and used for the removal of acidic indigo carmine textile dye. The adsorption of dyes was examined using a batch sorption technique. The effects of pH, time and initial dye concentration on the adsorption capacity of hydrogels were investigated. Maximum gelation ratio was 98.2% at irradiation dose of 5.3 kGy. Maximum equilibrium volume swelling, V/V(0), value was 21.3 at pH 2.8. Maximum amount of adsorbed indigo carmine onto hydrogels was 96.7 mg dye/g gel at pH 2.8, 21 h of adsorption time and 120 mg/L initial dye solution. Swelling and adsorption capacity increased with decreasing of pH. Compared with Congo red, amounts of adsorbed indigo carmine are much higher than those of Congo red. Langmuir isotherm model was the best fit for these poly(DEAEMA) hydrogels-indigo carmine systems.

  11. Straining electrode behavior and corrosion resistance of nickel base alloys in high temperature acidic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Kazuo

    1992-01-01

    Repassivation behavior and IGA resistance of nickel base alloys containing 0∼30 wt% chromium was investigated in high temperature acid sulfate solution. (1) The repassivation rate was increased with increasing chromium content. And so the amounts of charge caused by the metal dissolution were decreased with increasing chromium content. (2) Mill-annealed Alloy 600 suffered IGA at low pH environment below about 3.5 at the fixed potentials above the corrosion potential in 10%Na 2 SO 4 +H 2 SO 4 solution at 598K. On the other hand, thermally-treated Alloy 690 was hard to occur IGA at low pH environments which mill-annealed Alloy 600 occurred IGA. (3) It was considered that the reason, why nickel base alloys containing high chromium content such as Alloy 690 (60%Ni-30%Cr-10%Fe) had high IGA/SCC resistance in high temperature acidic solution containing sulfate ion, is due to both the promotion of the repassivation and the suppression of the film dissolution by the formation of the dense chromium oxide film

  12. Survey Electrocoagulation Process in Removal of Acid Blue 113 Dye from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Faraji

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment of textile industry wastewaters, due to having color and many pollutants, is one of the most important environmental issues. Acid Blue 113 dyes because of having benzene ring, which is not biodegradable, is toxic and carcinogen. The main objective of this study was determination of electrochemical process efficacy for removal acid blue 113 from aqueous solutions by using aluminum electrodes in batch reactor. Methods: This study performed in lab-scale in batch reactor. The effect of different parameters such as voltages (10, 20, and 40 volt, electrode distance (0.5 and 1 cm, and electrolysis times (5 to 80 min was investigated. Results: The results of experiments demonstrated that with applying voltage 40V, 0.5 cm distance between electrodes, electrolyte concentration equal to 5 g/l, and 20 minutes electrolysis time, the color and COD removal rate was 99 and 78%, respectively. By increasing voltage and reaction time and reducing distance between the electrodes, power consumption is reduced and also final pH and dye removal efficiency increased. Conclusion: According to the results, the best removal efficiency of dye was obtained after 20 minutes contact time on the electric potential of 40 V, which was 99%. This process is environmental friendly and can be economically acceptable. Therefore, it can be results that electrocoagulation process by using aluminum electrode is an efficient and suitable method for acid blue 113 dye removal from aqueous solutions.

  13. Adsorption of Copper Ion using Acrylic Acid-g-Polyaniline in Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarudin, Sabariah; Mohammad, Masita

    2018-04-01

    A conductive polymer, polyaniline (PANI) has unique electrical behaviour, stable in the environment, easy synthesis and have wide application in various fields. Modification of PANI in order to improve its adsorption capacity has been done. In this study, the polyaniline-grafted acrylic acid has been prepared and followed by adsorption of copper ion in aqueous solution. Acrylic acid, PANI and acrylic acid-g-polyaniline (Aag-PANI) were characterized by FTIR and SEM to determine its characteristic. The adsorption capacity was investigated to study the removal capacity of Cu ion from aqueous solution. Two parameters were selected which are pH (2, 4 and 6) and initial metal ion concentration (50 mg/L, 100 mg/L and 200 mg/L). The maximum adsorption capacity for PANI and Aag-PANI are 1.7 mg/g and 64.6 mg/g, respectively, at an initial concentration of 100 mg/L. The Langmuir adsorption isotherm model and Freundlich adsorption isotherm model have been used and showed that it is heterolayer adsorption by follows the Freundlich isotherm model.

  14. Determination of free acid in U(VI)-Al(III) solution by Gran plot titration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Moo Yul; Lee, Chang Heon; Sohn, Se Chul; Kim, Jung Suk; Kim, Won Ho; Eom, Tae Yoon

    1999-01-01

    The determination method of free acid in spent U-Al nuclear fuel solutions by Gran plot titration was described. Effect of U(VI) and Al(III) on the alkalimetric titration of nitric acid was investigation in oxalate complexing media as well as in noncomplexing media. Positive biases were observed in both titration media when the end-point was estimated by the Gran plot method. It was found that the cause of the bias was U(VI) in the oxalate complexing media, but Al(III) in the noncomplexing media. The relative error was less than 1% in the titration of 0.1 M HNO 3 at a U(VI):Al(III):H + mole ratio of up to 2:12:1 as long as the pH of the oxalate titration media was sustained to be below 5.0 at the beginning of titration. The method was successfully applied to the determination of nitric acid in a solution of HANARO reactor fuel with U:Al mole ratio of 1:6

  15. THIOGLYCOLIC ACID ESTERIFIED IN TO RICE STRAW FOR REMOVING LEAD FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Thiol rice straw (TRS was prepared by esterifying thioglycolic acid onto rice straw in the medium of acetic anhydride and acetic acid with sulfuric acid as catalyst. The sorption of lead (Pb on TRS from aqueous solution was subsequently investigated. The batch experiments showed that Pb removal was dependent on initial pH, sorbent dose, Pb concentration, contact time, and temperature. The maximum value of Pb removal appeared at pH 5. For 100 mg/L of Pb solution, a removal ratio of greater than 98% could be achieved with 2.0 g/L or more of TRS. The isothermal data of Pb sorption conformed well to the Langmuir model, and the maximum sorption capacity (Qm of TRS for Pb was 104.17 mg/g. The equilibrium of Pb removal was reached within 120 min. The Pb removal process could be described by the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic study indicated that the Pb removal process was spontaneous and endothermic.

  16. Study on radiation-induced oxide-reduction of actinoid ions in acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishigure, Kenkichi; Katsumura, Yosuke; Hiroishi, Daisuke [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Many studies have been made on the application of actinoid ion, especially UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} to change atomic valance but the mechanism of photoreduction has not yet been solved. In this study, the mechanism of photoreduction of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in acid solution was investigated. As functions of alcohol and acid concentrations, {phi}(U{sup IV}) was determined and photoreduction of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was investigated as well as NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. As an increase of alcohol content (EtOH, MtOH, iso-PrOH), {phi}(U{sup IV}) increased to reach a plateau ({approx}0.6). In addition, {phi}(U{sup IV}) increased linearly with an increase of acid content and the value became smaller in the order, H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, HClO{sub 4} solution. Comparing with these results of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, photoreduction of NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was investigated. Only NpO{sub 2}{sup +} was produced as the final products, but not Np{sup IV} and NP{sup III}. Alcohol dependency of NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} photoreduction was similar to that of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} system but the plateau level of {phi} (NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) was lower ({approx}0.15) than the latter. (M.N.)

  17. Dissolution of beidellite in acidic solutions: Ion exchange reactions and effect of crystal chemistry on smectite reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Valentin; Tertre, Emmanuel; Regnault, Olivier; Descostes, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The dissolution rate of beidellite, a dioctahedral smectite with tetrahedral charge that is a common swelling clay mineral in surface and subsurface natural environments, was studied in acidic solutions at 25 °C under far from equilibrium conditions. A rates with stirred and non-stirred particles. The aqueous Al/Si ratio measured at the outlet of the reactor was followed as a function of time and compared to solid stoichiometry values to assess the mechanisms occurring at the solid/solution interface. The reversible adsorption of Al3+ in the smectite interlayer space was evidenced for pH > 1.1, and the presence of an amorphous Si-enriched layer can be reasonably assumed in some cases from the interpretation of the aqueous concentrations and the characterization of the solid phase (X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy). Beidellite dissolution rates normalized to the sample mass (mol g-1 s-1) were obtained from Si and Al concentrations under steady state dissolution conditions. Calculated rates were compared with those previously reported for montmorillonite in several publications. The beidellite dissolution rates are, on average, ten times lower than those of montmorillonite. This implies that the smectite crystal chemistry (i.e., amount of Al3+ versus Mg2+ or Fe3+ substitution in the structure) has a strong effect on its stability and should be considered in reactive transport models in which the dissolution properties of smectites are taken into account.

  18. Behaviour of xyloisosaccharinic acid and xyloisosaccharino-1,4-lactone in aqueous solutions at varying pHs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, Michael; Shaw, Paul B; Humphreys, Paul N; Chadha, Marcus J; Niemelä, Klaus; Laws, Andrew P

    2012-12-01

    Xyloisosaccharinic acid is one of the major degradation products formed during the alkali catalysed hydrolysis of hemicelluloses. In acidic solution xyloisosaccharinic acid undergoes an acid catalysed lactonisation to generate xyloisosaccharino-1,4-lactone. We report here the solution phase properties of xyloisosaccharinic including measurement of its aqueous pK(a) (3.00 ± 0.05) using (13)C NMR methods. We also report rate constants for the acid catalysed lactonisation, k(lact(D20)), of xyloisosaccharinic acid and the results of our investigations of the kinetics of hydrolysis of xyloisosaccharino-1,4-lactone at acidic and basic pHs. The second-order rate constants for the hydrolysis reactions k(HO-) (25 M(-1)s(-1)) and k(D+) (4.13 E-4M(-1)s(-1)). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fast Hydrazone Reactants: Electronic and Acid/Base Effects Strongly Influence Rate at Biological pH

    OpenAIRE

    Kool, Eric T.; Park, Do-Hyoung; Crisalli, Pete

    2013-01-01

    Kinetics studies with structurally varied aldehydes and ketones in aqueous buffer at pH 7.4 reveal that carbonyl compounds with neighboring acid/base groups form hydrazones at accelerated rates. Similarly, tests of a hydrazine with a neighboring carboxylic acid group show that it also reacts at an accelerated rate. Rate constants for the fastest carbonyl/hydrazine combinations are 2–20 M−1sec−1, which is faster than recent strain-promoted cycloaddition reactions.

  20. Effects of infusion of branched chain amino-acids enriched TPN solutions on plasma amino-acid profiles in sepsis and trauma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vente, J. P.; von Meyenfeldt, M. F.; van Eijk, H. M.; van Berlo, C. L.; Gouma, D. J.; van der Linden, C. J.; Soeters, P. B.

    1990-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition with branched chain amino-acids enriched solutions has been advocated in patients with sepsis and stress because of favourable effects on nitrogen balance, protein synthesis and immune competence. The rationale for the use of BCAA-enriched solutions is based on their