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Sample records for stromal cell culture

  1. Immunocytochemical characterization of explant cultures of human prostatic stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kooistra (Anko); A.M.J. Elissen (Arianne ); J.J. Konig (Josee); M. Vermey; Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); J.C. Romijn (Johannes); F.H. Schröder (Fritz)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe study of stromal-epithelial interactions greatly depends on the ability to culture both cell types separately, in order to permit analysis of their interactions under defined conditions in reconstitution experiments. Here we report the establishment of explant cultures of human

  2. Co-Culturing of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells with Autological and Allogenic Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapranov, N M; Davydova, Yu O; Gal'tseva, I V; Petinati, N A; Bakshinskaitė, M V; Drize, N I; Kuz'mina, L A; Parovichnikova, E N; Savchenko, V G

    2018-03-01

    We studied the effect of autologous and allogeneic lymphocytes on multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in co-culture. It is shown that changes in multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells and in lymphocytes did not depend on the source of lymphocytes. Contact with lymphocytes triggers expression of HLA-DR molecules on multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells and these cells lose their immune privilege. In multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells, the relative level of expression of factors involved in immunomodulation (IDO1, PTGES, and IL-6) and expression of adhesion molecule ICAM1 increased, while expression of genes involved in the differentiation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells remained unchanged. Priming of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells with IFN did not affect these changes. In turn, lymphocytes underwent activation, expression of HLA-DR increased, subpopulation composition of lymphocytes changed towards the increase in the content of naïve T cells. These findings are important for cell therapy.

  3. Isolation, culture and intraportal transplantation of rat marrow stromal cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ping; Wang Jianhua; Yan Zhiping; Li Wentao; Lin Genlai; Hu Meiyu; Wang Yanhong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the tracing and evolution of marrow stromal cell (MSC) after intraportal transplantation into the liver of homogenous rats, and to provide experimental data for MSC differentiation to hepatocyte in vivo. Methods: The MSC was isolated from the leg bone marrow of adult SD rats, and purified by culture-expanded in vitro. Before transplantation, MSC was labeled with DAPI. Then 10 5 MSC were intraportally transplanted into the homogenous rat liver. Rats were killed at 2 hours and 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks after transplantation. The cryosection samples of liver and lung were observed under fluorescence microscopy. Results: MSC in vitro culture had high ability of proliferation. Except 4 rats were dead because of abdominal bleeding or infection, other recipients were healthy until sacrificed. The implantation cells were detected by identifying the DAPI labeled MSC in the host livers, but not in the host lungs. Conclusion: Intraportal transplanted MSC could immigrate and survive in the host livers at least for 4 weeks. They could immigrate from the small branches of portal veins to hepatic parenchyma

  4. Ultrastructural and radiobiological characterization of stromal cells in continuous, long-term marrow culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavassoli, M.

    1982-01-01

    Hemopoietic stromal cells were studied in continuous, long-term marrow culture. A correlative study was carried out involving cytochemistry as well as scanning (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with sections cut either perpendicular or parallel to the substratum. Only two stromal cell types were identified: epithelioid cells and macrophages. The appearance of these cells, however, varied according to their topography in the culture and the method of observation; a finding that may explain the multiplicity of the cell types reported in these cultures. The two cell types displayed considerable interconnections and interactions which may be essential in their support function for the proliferation and maintenance of hemopoietic stem cells. They also demonstrated numerous coated pits and vesicles suggestive of extensive receptor-mediated endocytosis. Stromal cells, generally thought to be relatively radioresistant, demonstrated hitherto unrecognized radiosensitivity in culture. Doses of radiation as low as 500 rads interfered with their support function for the maintenance of the hemopoietic stem cell

  5. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on prostaglandin-E2 production by cultured corneal stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinreb, R.N.; Yue, B.Y.J.T.; Peyman, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on the release of prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) by rabbit corneal stromal cells in culture. Considerable amounts of PGE 2 were present in the media of control corneal cultures following 1, 2, 4, 8 and 24 hr of incubation. Irradiation with UV-A (320-400 nm) for 30 min resulted in more than a 50% increase in PGE 2 release. Dexamethasone inhibited PGE 2 release by corneal stromal cells. It was, however, ineffective in protecting the cells from the UV-induced release of PGE 2 . (author)

  6. Activation of NK Cells in Mixed Cultures of Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirshchevskaya, E V; Poltavtsev, A M; Os'mak, G Zh; Poltavtseva, R A

    2018-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells possess immunosuppressive properties that might be used for the therapy of inflammatory diseases of various geneses. The effects of mesenchymal stromal cells depend on their lifetime in the recipient tissues. During heterologous transplantation, mesenchymal stromal cells are eliminated by NK cells. We studied NK cell formation in mixed cultures of Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stromal cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes from an autologous donor. Lymphocytes were activated by a mitogen or IL-2. The lifetime of mesenchymal stromal cells was estimated by MTT test. Cytotoxic activity and phenotype of NK cells were evaluated by flow cytometry. It was found that activation of NK cells depended on IL-2 and was registered on day 2 of incubation with IL-2. In cultures with mitogen-activated lymphocytes, cytotoxicity was observed after 5-6 days. Cytotoxicity of NK correlated with significant decrease in CD16+ and increase in CD56+ NK and with reduction of mesenchymal stromal cell viability. Thus, the main mechanism of elimination of mesenchymal stromal cells is cytotoxicity of NK cells that depended on IL-2 production.

  7. Embryonal carcinoma cell induction of miRNA and mRNA changes in co-cultured prostate stromal fibromuscular cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    VÊNCIO, ENEIDA F.; PASCAL, LAURA E.; PAGE, LAURA S.; DENYER, GARETH; WANG, AMY J.; RUOHOLA-BAKER, HANNELE; ZHANG, SHILE; WANG, KAI; GALAS, DAVID J.; LIU, ALVIN Y.

    2014-01-01

    The prostate stromal mesenchyme controls organ-specific development. In cancer, the stromal compartment shows altered gene expression compared to non-cancer. The lineage relationship between cancer-associated stromal cells and normal tissue stromal cells is not known. Nor is the cause underlying the expression difference. Previously, the embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell line, NCCIT, was used by us to study the stromal induction property. In the current study, stromal cells from non-cancer (NP) and cancer (CP) were isolated from tissue specimens and co-cultured with NCCIT cells in a trans-well format to preclude heterotypic cell contact. After 3 days, the stromal cells were analyzed by gene arrays for microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA expression. In co-culture, NCCIT cells were found to alter the miRNA and mRNA expression of NP stromal cells to one like that of CP stromal cells. In contrast, NCCIT had no significant effect on the gene expression of CP stromal cells. We conclude that the gene expression changes in stromal cells can be induced by diffusible factors synthesized by EC cells, and suggest that cancer-associated stromal cells represent a more primitive or less differentiated stromal cell type. PMID:20945389

  8. Engraftment Outcomes after HPC Co-Culture with Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Osteoblasts

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    Matthew M. Cook

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Haematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation is an established cell-based therapy for a number of haematological diseases. To enhance this therapy, there is considerable interest in expanding HSCs in artificial niches prior to transplantation. This study compared murine HSC expansion supported through co-culture on monolayers of either undifferentiated mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs or osteoblasts. Sorted Lineage− Sca-1+ c-kit+ (LSK haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HPC demonstrated proliferative capacity on both stromal monolayers with the greatest expansion of LSK shown in cultures supported by osteoblast monolayers. After transplantation, both types of bulk-expanded cultures were capable of engrafting and repopulating lethally irradiated primary and secondary murine recipients. LSKs co-cultured on MSCs showed comparable, but not superior, reconstitution ability to that of freshly isolated LSKs. Surprisingly, however, osteoblast co-cultured LSKs showed significantly poorer haematopoietic reconstitution compared to LSKs co-cultured on MSCs, likely due to a delay in short-term reconstitution. We demonstrated that stromal monolayers can be used to maintain, but not expand, functional HSCs without a need for additional haematopoietic growth factors. We also demonstrated that despite apparently superior in vitro performance, co-injection of bulk cultures of osteoblasts and LSKs in vivo was detrimental to recipient survival and should be avoided in translation to clinical practice.

  9. Proliferation of Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Wharton's Jelly in Mixed and Membrane-Separated Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltavtsev, A M; Poltavtseva, R A; Yushina, M N; Pavlovich, S V; Svirshchevskaya, E V

    2017-08-01

    We studied the effect of mesenchymal stromal cells on proliferation of CFSE-stained T cells in mixed and membrane-separated (Transwell) cultures and in 3D culture of mesenchymal stromal cells from Wharton's jelly. The interaction of mesenchymal stromal cells with mitogen-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes from an allogeneic donor was followed by suppression of T-cell proliferation in a wide range of cell proportions. Culturing in the Transwell system showed the absence of suppression assessed by the fraction of proliferating cells and by the cell cycle analysis. In 3D cultures, contact interaction of mesenchymal stromal cells and lymphocytes was demonstrated that led to accumulation of G2/M phase lymphocytes and G0/G1 phase mesenchymal stromal cells. The suppressive effect of mesenchymal stromal cells from Wharton's jelly is mediated by two mechanisms. The effects are realized within 6 days, which suggests that the therapeutic effects of mesenchymal stromal cells persist until their complete elimination from the body.

  10. Kinetic analysis of thymocyte attachment to thymus stromal cells in culture by using phase-contrast and scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaRochelle, G.G.; Jones, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    Direct cellular contact between thymocytes and thymus stromal cells within the thymus appears to contribute to the maturation of thymocytes. Thymocyte-stromal cell complexes, formed in vivo, have been isolated by others and postulated to play a role in T-cell differentiation. These previous studies have been hampered, however, by a time-consuming isolation procedure from which only small numbers of these complexes are recovered. We have examined a model to study thymocyte-stromal cell complexes in vitro in which thymocytes are added to primary cultures of thymus stromal cells. In the present study, we found that thymocytes were histotypically selective in their attachment to thymus stromal cells. We also investigated the kinetics of thymocyte attachment to these thymus stromal cells. Cultures were examined at selected time intervals from 5 min through 3 days of incubation. Thymocyte attachment to stromal cells was a biphasic interaction, with maximum surface attachment at 15 min of cocultivation, followed by migration of thymocytes into the cultures. Morphological studies were confirmed by using 3 H-leucine-labeled thymocytes and liquid scintigraphy. With increased time in culture, thymocytes became amoeboid and migrated between the layers of stromal cells where thymocyte mitotic figures were seen at 4 and 8 hr. In some cases it appeared that stromal cells, which often grew two to three cell layers deep, played an active role in enclosing thymocytes within the cultures. Large numbers of viable thymocytes were observed in the cultures at 24 hr. The number of thymocytes then decreased progressively on days 2 and 3, when relatively few were found within the layers of the culture

  11. Comparison of different culture conditions for human mesenchymal stromal cells for clinical stem cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sorensen, M.; Friis, T.; Bindslev, L.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from adult bone marrow (BM) are considered potential candidates for therapeutic neovascularization in cardiovascular disease. When implementing results from animal trials in clinical treatment, it is essential to isolate and expand the MSCs under...... conditions following good manufacturing practice (GMP). The aims of the study were first to establish culture conditions following GMP quality demands for human MSC expansion and differentiation for use in clinical trials, and second to compare these MSCs with MSCs derived from culture in four media commonly...... analysis showed that the plastic-adherent MSCs cultured in EMEA medium or in the other four media were identically negative for the haematopoietic surface markers CD45 and CD34 and positive for CD105, CD73, CD90, CD166 and CD13, which in combined expression is characteristic of MSCs. MSC stimulation...

  12. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Phenotype is not Influenced by Confluence during Culture Expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Hansen, Susanne Kofoed; Hansen, Louise

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accumulating preclinical and clinical evidence indicates that human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are good candidates for cell therapy. For clinical applications of MSCs extensive in vitro expansion is required to obtain an adequate number of cells. It is evident that the pursuit...... differentiation. This phenotype persisted independent of increasing cell densities. DISCUSSION: These data demonstrate that MSC characteristics and plasticity can be maintained during culture expansion from bone marrow mononuclear cells to MSCs and that a homogeneous phenotype of undifferentiated MSCs which...... persists independent of cell density can be used for clinical therapies....

  13. Changes in adipose tissue stromal-vascular cells in primary culture due to porcine sera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jewell, D.E.; Hausman, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the response of rat stromal-vascular cells to pig sea. Sera were collected from unselected contemporary (lean) and high backfat thickness selected (obese) pigs. Sera from obese pigs were collected either by exsanguination or cannulation. sera from lean pigs during the growing phase (45 kg) and the fattening phase (100-110 kg) were collected. Stromal-vascular cells derived rom rat inguinal tissue were cultured on either 25 cm 2 flasks, collagen-coated coverslips or petri dishes. Cell proliferation was measured by [ 3 H]-thymidine incorporation during the fourth day of culture. Coverslip cultures were used for histochemical analysis. Petri dish cultures were used for analysis of Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity. All cells were plated for 24 hours in media containing 10 fetal bovine sera. Test media contained 2.5, 5.0, 10.0% sera. Sera from obese pigs increased GPDH activity and fat cell production when compared to the lean controls. The increased concentration of sera increased esterase activity and lipid as measured with oil red O. The sera from obese pigs collected at slaughter stimulated more fat cell production than obese sera collected by cannulation. These studies show there are adipogenic factors in obese pigs sera which promote fat cell development in primary cell culture

  14. Transplantation of human neonatal foreskin stromal cells in ex vivo organotypic cultures of embryonic chick femurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    NSSCs in ex vivo organotypic cultures of embryonic chick femurs. Isolated embryonic chick femurs (E10 and E11) were cultured for 10 days together with micro-mass cell pellets of hNSSCs, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or a combination of the two cell types. Changes in femurs gross morphology......We have previously reported that human neonatal foreskin stromal cells (hNSSCs) promote angiogenesis in vitro and in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay in vivo. To examine the in vivo relevance of this observation, we examined in the present study the differentiation potential of h......NSSC + HUVEC cultures. Our data suggest that organotypic cultures can be employed to test the differentiation potential of stem cells and demonstrate the importance of stem cell interaction with 3D-intact tissue microenvironment for their differentiation....

  15. Hematopoietic microenvironment. Origin, lineage, and transplantability of the stromal cells in long-term bone marrow cultures from chimeric mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, S.; Fleischman, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Studies of bone marrow transplant patients have suggested that the stromal cells of the in vitro hematopoietic microenvironment are transplantable into conditioned recipients. Moreover, in patients with myeloproliferative disorders, all of the stromal cells, which include presumptive endothelial cells, appear to be derived from hematopoietic precursors. To confirm these findings, we have constructed two chimeric mouse models: (a) traditional radiation chimeras, and (b) fetal chimeras, produced by placental injection of bone marrow into genetically anemic Wx/Wv fetuses, a technique that essentially precludes engraftment of nonhematopoietic cells. Using two-color indirect immunofluorescence, the stromal cells in long-term bone marrow culture derived from these chimeras were analyzed for donor or host origin by strain-specific H-2 antigens, and for cell lineage by a variety of other specific markers. 75-95% of the stromal cells were shown to be hematopoietic cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, based upon donor origin, phagocytosis, and expression of specific hematopoietic surface antigens. The remaining 5-25% of the stromal cells were exclusively host in origin. Apart from occasional fat cells, these cells uniformly expressed collagen type IV, laminin, and a surface antigen associated with endothelial cells. Since these endothelial-like cells are not transplantable into radiation or fetal chimeras, they are not derived from hematopoietic stem cells. The contrast between our findings and human studies suggests either unexpected species differences in the origin of stromal lineages or limitations in the previous methodology used to detect nonhematopoietic stromal cells

  16. Transcriptomic comparisons between cultured human adipose tissue-derived pericytes and mesenchymal stromal cells

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    Lindolfo da Silva Meirelles

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, sometimes called mesenchymal stem cells, are cultured cells able to give rise to mature mesenchymal cells such as adipocytes, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes, and to secrete a wide range of trophic and immunomodulatory molecules. Evidence indicates that pericytes, cells that surround and maintain physical connections with endothelial cells in blood vessels, can give rise to MSCs (da Silva Meirelles et al., 2008 [1]; Caplan and Correa, 2011 [2]. We have compared the transcriptomes of highly purified, human adipose tissue pericytes subjected to culture-expansion in pericyte medium or MSC medium, with that of human adipose tissue MSCs isolated with traditional methods to test the hypothesis that their transcriptomes are similar (da Silva Meirelles et al., 2015 [3]. Here, we provide further information and analyses of microarray data from three pericyte populations cultured in pericyte medium, three pericyte populations cultured in MSC medium, and three adipose tissue MSC populations deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE67747. Keywords: Mesenchymal stromal cells, Mesenchymal stem cells, Pericytes, Microarrays

  17. Patterns of proliferation and differentiation of irradiated haemopoietic stem cells cultured on normal 'stromal' cell colonies in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, K.J.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were designed to elucidate whether or not the irradiated bone marrow cells receive any stimulation for the self-replication and differentiation from normal 'stromal' cell colonies in the bone marrow cell culture in vitro. When irradiated or unirradiated bone marrow cells were overlaid on the normal adherent cell colonies, the proliferation of haemopoietic stem cells was supported, the degree of the stimulation depending on the starting cellular concentration. There was, however, no significant changes in the concentration of either CFUs or CFUc regardless of the dose of irradiation on the bone marrow cells overlaid. This was a great contrast to the dose-dependent decrease of CFUs or CFUc within the culture in which both the stem cells and stromal cells were simultaneously irradiated. These results suggest that the balance of self-replication and differentiation of the haemopoietic stem cells is affected only when haemopoietic microenvironment is perturbed. (author)

  18. Isolation, Culture, and Differentiation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Osteoclast Progenitors from Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maridas, David E; Rendina-Ruedy, Elizabeth; Le, Phuong T; Rosen, Clifford J

    2018-01-06

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) constitute a cell population routinely used as a representation of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro. They reside within the bone marrow cavity alongside hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which can give rise to red blood cells, immune progenitors, and osteoclasts. Thus, extractions of cell populations from the bone marrow results in a very heterogeneous mix of various cell populations, which can present challenges in experimental design and confound data interpretation. Several isolation and culture techniques have been developed in laboratories in order to obtain more or less homogeneous populations of BMSCs and HSCs invitro. Here, we present two methods for isolation of BMSCs and HSCs from mouse long bones: one method that yields a mixed population of BMSCs and HSCs and one method that attempts to separate the two cell populations based on adherence. Both methods provide cells suitable for osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation experiments as well as functional assays.

  19. Influence of patient related factors on number of mesenchymal stromal cells reached after in vitro culture expansion for clinical treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Kaur, Kamal Preet; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun

    2017-01-01

    of autologous stromal cells reached after in vitro culture expansion for clinical therapy. METHODS: Culture expansion data from 111 patients with IHD treated with autologous stromal cells in three clinical trials were used. We correlated the final cell count after two passages of cultivation with different...... correlation between left ventricular ejection fraction and number of MSCs was found (r = -0.287, p = .017). CONCLUSIONS: Patient related factors such as BMI, hypertension and gender may influence the number of MSCs reached after in vitro culture expansion....... patient factors. RESULTS: There was a significant relation between body mass index (BMI) and the number of adipose derived stromal cells (ASCs) reached after culture expansion and for all patients included into the three studies (r = 0.375, p = .019 and r = 0.200, p = .036, respectively). Moreover...

  20. Efficient expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells in a disposable fixed bed culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Amanda; Orellana, Maristela D; Caruso, Sâmia R; de Lima Prata, Karen; Covas, Dimas T; Swiech, Kamilla

    2013-01-01

    The need for efficient and reliable technologies for clinical-scale expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) has led to the use of disposable bioreactors and culture systems. Here, we evaluate the expansion of cord blood-derived MSC in a disposable fixed bed culture system. Starting from an initial cell density of 6.0 × 10(7) cells, after 7 days of culture, it was possible to produce of 4.2(±0.8) × 10(8) cells, which represents a fold increase of 7.0 (±1.4). After enzymatic retrieval from Fibra-Cell disks, the cells were able to maintain their potential for differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes and were positive for many markers common to MSC (CD73, CD90, and CD105). The results obtained in this study demonstrate that MSC can be efficiently expanded in the culture system. This novel approach presents several advantages over the current expansion systems, based on culture flasks or microcarrier-based spinner flasks and represents a key element for MSC cellular therapy according to GMP compliant clinical-scale production system. Copyright © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  1. Increased Paracrine Immunomodulatory Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Three-Dimensional Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Follin, Bjarke; Juhl, Morten; Cohen, Smadar

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have been investigated extensively through the past years, proving to have great clinical therapeutic potential. In vitro cultivation of MSCs in three-dimensional (3D) culture systems, such as scaffolds, hydrogels, or spheroids, have recently gained attention...... for tissue engineering applications. Studies on MSC spheroids demonstrated that such cultivation increased the paracrine immunomodulatory potential of the MSCs, accompanied by phenotypic alterations. In this review, we gather results from recent experimental studies on the immunomodulatory abilities of MSCs...... when cultured as spheroids or in biomaterials like scaffolds or hydrogels compared to regular two-dimensional (2D) culture and show that alterations occurring to MSCs in spheroids also occur in MSCs in biomaterials. We provide a brief description of known mechanisms of MSC immunomodulatory capacity...

  2. Octanoate in Human Albumin Preparations Is Detrimental to Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Way-Wua Wong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapies hold great promise as the next major advance in medical treatment. To enable safe, effective ex vivo culture whilst maintaining cell phenotype, growth media constituents must be carefully controlled. We have used a chemically defined mesenchymal stromal cell culture medium to investigate the influence of different preparations of human serum albumin. We examined two aspects of cell culture, growth rate as measured by population doubling time and colony forming ability which is a representative measure of the stemness of the cell population. Albumin preparations showed comparative differences in both of these criteria. Analysis of the albumin bound fatty acids also showed differences depending on the manufacturing procedure used. We demonstrated that octanoate, an additive used to stabilize albumin during pasteurization, slows growth and lowers colony forming ability during ex vivo culture. Further to this we also found the level of Na+/K+ ATPase, a membrane bound cation pump inhibited by octanoate, is increased in cells exposed to this compound. We conclude that the inclusion of human serum albumin in ex vivo growth media requires careful consideration of not only the source of albumin, but also the associated molecular cargo, for optimal cell growth and behavior.

  3. Human adipose-derived stromal/stem cell isolation, culture, and osteogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Ammar T; Chen, Cong; Shah, Forum; Thomas-Porch, Caasy; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Hayes, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Annually, more than 200,000 elective liposuction procedures are performed in the United States and over a million worldwide. The ease of harvest and abundance make human adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (hASCs) isolated from lipoaspirates an attractive, readily available source of adult stem cells that have become increasingly popular for use in many studies. Here, we describe common methods for hASC culture, preservation, and osteogenic differentiation. We introduce methods of ceramic, polymer, and composite scaffold synthesis with a description of morphological, chemical, and mechanical characterization techniques. Techniques for scaffold loading are compared, and methods for determining cell loading efficiency and proliferation are described. Finally, we provide both qualitative and quantitative techniques for in vitro assessment of hASC osteogenic differentiation. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimization of Femtosecond Laser Polymerized Structural Niches to Control Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Fate in Culture

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    Manuela T. Raimondi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We applied two-photon polymerization to fabricate 3D synthetic niches arranged in complex patterns to study the effect of mechano-topological parameters on morphology, renewal and differentiation of rat mesenchymal stromal cells. Niches were formed in a photoresist with low auto-fluorescence, which enabled the clear visualization of the fluorescence emission of the markers used for biological diagnostics within the internal niche structure. The niches were structurally stable in culture up to three weeks. At three weeks of expansion in the niches, cell density increased by almost 10-fold and was 67% greater than in monolayer culture. Evidence of lineage commitment was observed in monolayer culture surrounding the structural niches, and within cell aggregates, but not inside the niches. Thus, structural niches were able not only to direct stem cell homing and colony formation, but also to guide aggregate formation, providing increased surface-to-volume ratios and space for stem cells to adhere and renew, respectively.

  5. Tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase production by human dental pulp stromal cells is enhanced by high density cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Matthew J; Dennis, Caitriona; Yang, Xuebin B; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    The cell surface hydrolase tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) (also known as MSCA-1) is used to identify a sub-population of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) with high mineralising potential and is found on subsets of cells within the dental pulp. We aim to determine whether TNAP is co-expressed by human dental pulp stromal cells (hDPSCs) alongside a range of BMSC markers, whether this is an active form of the enzyme and the effects of culture duration and cell density on its expression. Cells from primary dental pulp and culture expanded hDPSCs expressed TNAP. Subsequent analyses revealed persistent TNAP expression and co-expression with BMSC markers such as CD73 and CD90. Flow cytometry and biochemical assays showed that increased culture durations and cell densities enhanced TNAP expression by hDPSCs. Arresting the hDPSC cell cycle also increased TNAP expression. These data confirm that TNAP is co-expressed by hDPSCs together with other BMSC markers and show that cell density affects TNAP expression levels. We conclude that TNAP is a potentially useful marker for hDPSC selection especially for uses in mineralised tissue regenerative therapies.

  6. Clonal chromosomal and genomic instability during human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells long-term culture.

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    Victoria Nikitina

    Full Text Available Spontaneous mutagenesis often leads to appearance of genetic changes in cells. Although human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC are considered as genetically stable, there is a risk of genomic and structural chromosome instability and, therefore, side effects of cell therapy associated with long-term effects. In this study, the karyotype, genetic variability and clone formation analyses have been carried out in the long-term culture MSC from human gingival mucosa.The immunophenotype of MSC has been examined using flow cytofluorometry and short tandem repeat (STR analysis has been carried out for authentication. The karyotype has been examined using GTG staining and mFISH, while the assessment of the aneuploidy 8 frequency has been performed using centromere specific chromosome FISH probes in interphase cells.The immunophenotype and STR loci combination did not change during the process of cultivation. From passage 23 the proliferative activity of cultured MSCs was significantly reduced. From passage 12 of cultivation, clones of cells with stable chromosome aberrations have been identified and the biggest of these (12% are tetrasomy of chromosome 8. The random genetic and structural chromosomal aberrations and the spontaneous level of chromosomal aberrations in the hMSC long-term cultures were also described.The spectrum of spontaneous chromosomal aberrations in MSC long-term cultivation has been described. Clonal chromosomal aberrations have been identified. A clone of cells with tetrasomy 8 has been detected in passage 12 and has reached the maximum size by passage 18 before and decreased along with the reduction of proliferative activity of cell line by passage 26. At later passages, the MSC line exhibited a set of cells with structural variants of the karyotype with a preponderance of normal diploid cells. The results of our study strongly suggest a need for rigorous genetic analyses of the clone formation in cultured MSCs before

  7. Platelet lysate as replacement for fetal bovine serum in mesenchymal stromal cell cultures.

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    Bieback, Karen

    2013-10-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) emerged as highly attractive in cell-based regenerative medicine. Initially thought to provide cells capable of differentiation towards mesenchymal cell types (osteoblasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes etc.), by and by potent immunoregulatory and pro-regenerative activities have been discovered, broadening the field of potential applications from bone and cartilage regeneration to wound healing and treatment of autoimmune diseases. Due to the limited frequency in most tissue sources, ex vivo expansion of MSC is required compliant with good manufacturing practice (GMP) guidelines to yield clinically relevant cell doses. Though, still most manufacturing protocols use fetal bovine serum (FBS) as cell culture supplement to isolate and to expand MSC. However, the high lot-to-lot variability as well as risk of contamination and immunization call for xenogenic-free culture conditions. In terms of standardization, chemically defined media appear as the ultimate achievement. Since these media need to maintain all key cellular and therapy-relevant features of MSC, the development of chemically defined media is still - albeit highly investigated - only in its beginning. The current alternatives to FBS rely on human blood-derived components: plasma, serum, umbilical cord blood serum, and platelet derivatives like platelet lysate. Focusing on quality aspects, the latter will be addressed within this review.

  8. Priming 3D cultures of human mesenchymal stromal cells toward cartilage formation via developmental pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centola, Matteo; Tonnarelli, Beatrice; Schären, Stefan; Glaser, Nicolas; Barbero, Andrea; Martin, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    The field of regenerative medicine has increasingly recognized the importance to be inspired by developmental processes to identify signaling pathways crucial for 3D organogenesis and tissue regeneration. Here, we aimed at recapitulating the first events occurring during limb development (ie, cell condensation and expansion of an undifferentiated mesenchymal cell population) to prime 3D cultures of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hBM-MSC) toward the chondrogenic route. Based on embryonic development studies, we hypothesized that Wnt3a and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) induce hBM-MSC to proliferate in 3D culture as an undifferentiated pool of progenitors (defined by clonogenic capacity and expression of typical markers), retaining chondrogenic potential upon induction by suitable morphogens. hBM-MSC were responsive to Wnt signaling in 3D pellet culture, as assessed by significant upregulation of main target genes and increase of unphosphorylated β-catenin levels. Wnt3a was able to induce a five-fold increase in the number of proliferating hBM-MSC (6.4% vs. 1.3% in the vehicle condition), although total DNA content of the 3D construct was decreasing over time. Preconditioning with Wnt3a improved transforming growth factor-β1 mediated chondrogenesis (30% more glycosaminoglycans/cell in average). In contrast to developmental and 2D MSC culture models, FGF2 antagonized the Wnt-mediated effects. Interestingly, the CD146⁺ subpopulation was found to be more responsive to Wnt3a. The presented data indicate a possible strategy to prime 3D cultures of hBM-MSC by invoking a "developmental engineering" approach. The study also identifies some opportunities and challenges to cross-fertilize skeletal development models and 3D hBM-MSC culture systems.

  9. Evaluation of human platelet lysate versus fetal bovine serum for culture of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemeda, Hatim; Giebel, Bernd; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2014-02-01

    Culture media for therapeutic cell preparations-such as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs)-usually comprise serum additives. Traditionally, fetal bovine serum is supplemented in basic research and in most clinical trials. Within the past years, many laboratories adapted their culture conditions to human platelet lysate (hPL), which further stimulates proliferation and expansion of MSCs. Particularly with regard to clinical application, human alternatives for fetal bovine serum are clearly to be preferred. hPL is generated from human platelet units by disruption of the platelet membrane, which is commonly performed by repeated freeze and thaw cycles. Such culture supplements are notoriously ill-defined, and many parameters contribute to batch-to-batch variation in hPL such as different amounts of plasma, a broad range of growth factors and donor-specific effects. The plasma components of hPL necessitate addition of anticoagulants such as heparins to prevent gelatinization of hPL medium, and their concentration must be standardized. Labels for description of hPL-such as "xenogen-free," "animal-free" and "serum free"-are not used consistently in the literature and may be misleading if not critically assessed. Further analysis of the precise composition of relevant growth factors, attachment factors, microRNAs and exosomes will pave the way for optimized and defined culture conditions. The use of hPL has several advantages and disadvantages: they must be taken into account because the choice of cell culture additive has major impact on cell preparations. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Epithelialization and stromalization of porcine follicular granulosa cells during real-time proliferation - a primary cell culture approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesiółka, S; Bryja, A; Budna, J; Kranc, W; Chachuła, A; Bukowska, D; Piotrowska, H; Porowski, L; Antosik, P; Bruska, M; Brüssow, K P; Nowicki, M; Zabel, M; Kempisty, B

    2016-01-01

    The process of oocyte growth and development takes place during long stages of folliculogenesis and oogenesis. This is accompanied by biochemical and morphological changes, occurring from the preantral to antral stages during ovarian follicle differentiation. It is well known that the process of follicle growth is associated with morphological modifications of theca (TCs) and granulosa cells (GCs). However, the relationship between proliferation and/or differentiation of porcine GCs during long-term in vitro culture requires further investigation. Moreover, the expression of cytokeratins and vimentin in porcine GCs, in relation to real-time cell proliferation, has yet to be explored. Utilizing confocal microscopy, we analyzed cytokeratin 18 (CK18), cytokeratin 8 + 18 + 19 (panCK), and vimentin (Vim) expression, as well as their protein distribution, within GCs isolated from slaughtered ovarian follicles. The cells were cultured for 168 h with protein expression and cell proliferation index analyzed at 24-h intervals. We found the highest expression of CK18, panCK, and Vim occurred at 120 h of in vitro culture (IVC) as compared with other experimental time intervals. All of the investigated proteins displayed cytoplasmic distribution. Analysis of real-time cell proliferation revealed an increased cell index after the first 24 h of IVC. Additionally, during each period between 24-168 h of IVC, a significant difference in the proliferation profile, expressed as the cell index, was also observed. We concluded that higher expression of vimentin at 120 h of in vitro proliferation might explain the culmination of the stromalization process associated with growth and domination of stromal cells in GC culture. Cytokeratin expression within GC cytoplasm confirms the presence of epithelial cells as well as epithelial-related GC development during IVC. Moreover, expression of both cytokeratins and vimentin during short-term culture suggests that the process of GC proliferation

  11. Macrophage inflammatory protein-3α influences growth of K562 leukemia cells in co-culture with anticancer drug-pretreated HS-5 stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.C.; Chiou, T.-J.; Tzeng, W.-F.; Chu, S.T.

    2008-01-01

    Stromal cell monolayers have been an important means of studying the regulation of hematopoiesis, because they produce cytokines. Cytosine arabinoside, vincristine, daunorubicin, and doxorubicin are common drugs for hematological cancer therapy, and they may have some effects on bone marrow stroma during chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to elucidate interactions between the bone marrow stromal microenvironment and leukemic cells after drug treatment. We tested the hypothesis that human HS-5 stromal cells, pretreated with anticancer drugs, affected the growth of leukemic K562 cells by changing the cytokines in the culture microenvironment. Thereafter, proliferation of K562 cells increased nearly 2.5-fold compared the co-cultivation with drugs-pretreated HS-5 stromal cells and drugs-untreated HS-5 stromal cells. The results indicated that co-cultivation with HS-5 stromal cells pretreated with drugs caused significant K562 cell proliferation. Cytokines in the microenvironment were detected via the RayBio Human Cytokine Antibody Array Membrane. The levels of the cytokines CKβ, IL-12, IL-13, IGFBP-2, MCP-1, MCP-3, MCP-4, MDC, MIP-1β and MIP-1δ were decreased, with a particularly marked decrease in MIP-3α. In co-culture medium, there was a 20-fold decrease in MIP-3α in daunorubicin-pretreated HS-5 cells and at least a 3-fold decrease in Ara-C-pretreated cells. This indicated a significant effect of anticancer drugs on the stromal cell line. Using phosphorylated Erk and pRb proteins as cell proliferation markers, we found that phosphorylation of these markers in K562 cells was inhibited during co-cultivation with drug-pretreated stromal cells in MIP-3α-supplemented medium and restored by MIP-3α antibody supplement. In conclusion, anticancer drug pretreatment suppresses the negative control exerted by HS-5 cells on leukemic cell proliferation, via modulation of cytokines in the microenvironment, especially at the level of MIP-3α

  12. Differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on collagen sponges for cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjurjo-Rodríguez, Clara; Martínez-Sánchez, Adela Helvia; Hermida-Gómez, Tamara; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac; Díaz-Prado, Silvia; Blanco, Francisco J

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of human bone-marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSCs) cultured on collagen biomaterials. hBMSCs were seeded on five different collagen (Col) sponges: C1C2 (types I and II Col), C1C2HS (types I and II Col plus heparan sulphate (HS)), C1C2CHS (types I and II Col plus chondroitin sulphate (CHS)), C1-OLH3 (type I Col plus low molecular weight heparin) and C1CHS (type I Col plus CHS). The resulting constructs were analyzed by histological and immunohistochemical staining, molecular biology and electron microscopy. Col released into culture media was measured by a dye-binding method Results: hBMSCs on biomaterials C1C2, C1C2HS and C1C2CHS had more capacity to attach, proliferate and synthesize Col II and proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix (ECM) than on C1-OLH3 and C1CHS. The presence of aggrecan was detected only at the gene level. Total Col liberated by the cells in the supernatants in all scaffold cultures was detected. The level of Col I in the ECM was lower in C1-OLH3 and that of Col II was highest in C1C2 and C1C2HS. Electron microscopy showed differently shaped cells, from rounded to flattened, in all constructs. Col fibers in bundles were observed in C1C2CHS by transmission electron microscopy. The results show that Col I and Col II (C1C2, C1C2HS and C1C2CHS) biomaterials allowed cell proliferation and chondrogenic-like differentiation of hBMSCs at an early stage. Constructs cultured on C1C2HS and C1C2CHS showed better cartilage-like phenotype than the other ones.

  13. Radiosensitivity of stromal cells responsible for in vitro maintenance of hemopoietic stem cells in continuous, long-term marrow culture. [/sup 137/Cs; Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassoli, M

    1982-05-01

    Marrow stromal cells are generally thought to be radioresistant. However, when the marrow was irradiated in vivo or in vitro before its use for the continuous longterm marrow culture, doses of radiation as low as 500 rad interfered with the establishment of the adherent stromal layer. Moreover, when the stromal layer was permitted to establish, similar doses of radiation interfered with its potential to support the proliferation and maintenance of the hemopoietic stem cell. Thus, marrow stromal cells appear to be more radiosensitive than hitherto thought. The type of damage may vary, however, according to the dose of radiation. Small doses may interfere with such functions as adhesion or cell division while larger doses may completely destroy the cell.

  14. Efficient generation of hepatic cells from mesenchymal stromal cells by an innovative bio-microfluidic cell culture device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Meng-Hua; Wu, Yuan-Yi; Liu, Yi-Shiuan; Rimando, Marilyn; Ho, Jennifer Hui-Chun; Lee, Oscar Kuang-Sheng

    2016-08-19

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent and have great potential in cell therapy. Previously we reported the differentiation potential of human MSCs into hepatocytes in vitro and that these cells can rescue fulminant hepatic failure. However, the conventional static culture method neither maintains growth factors at an optimal level constantly nor removes cellular waste efficiently. In addition, not only is the duration of differentiating hepatocyte lineage cells from MSCs required to improve, but also the need for a large number of hepatocytes for cell therapy has not to date been addressed fully. The purpose of this study is to design and develop an innovative microfluidic device to overcome these shortcomings. We designed and fabricated a microfluidic device and a culture system for hepatic differentiation of MSCs using our protocol reported previously. The microfluidic device contains a large culture chamber with a stable uniform flow to allow homogeneous distribution and expansion as well as efficient induction of hepatic differentiation for MSCs. The device enables real-time observation under light microscopy and exhibits a better differentiation efficiency for MSCs compared with conventional static culture. MSCs grown in the microfluidic device showed a higher level of hepatocyte marker gene expression under hepatic induction. Functional analysis of hepatic differentiation demonstrated significantly higher urea production in the microfluidic device after 21 days of hepatic differentiation. The microfluidic device allows the generation of a large number of MSCs and induces hepatic differentiation of MSCs efficiently. The device can be adapted for scale-up production of hepatic cells from MSCs for cellular therapy.

  15. Culture of equine bone marrow mononuclear fraction and adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction cells in different media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesiane Ribeiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the culture of equine bone marrow mononuclear fraction and adipose tissue - derived stromal vascular fraction cells in two different cell culture media. Five adult horses were submitted to bone marrow aspiration from the sternum, and then from the adipose tissue of the gluteal region near the base of the tail. Mononuclear fraction and stromal vascular fraction were isolated from the samples and cultivated in DMEM medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum or in AIM-V medium. The cultures were observed once a week with an inverted microscope, to perform a qualitative analysis of the morphology of the cells as well as the general appearance of the cell culture. Colony-forming units (CFU were counted on days 5, 15 and 25 of cell culture. During the first week of culture, differences were observed between the samples from the same source maintained in different culture media. The number of colonies was significantly higher in samples of bone marrow in relation to samples of adipose tissue.

  16. Skeletal (stromal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Zaher, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal (marrow stromal) stem cells (BMSCs) are a group of multipotent cells that reside in the bone marrow stroma and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Studying signaling pathways that regulate BMSC differentiation into osteoblastic cells is a strategy....../preadipocyte factor 1 (Dlk1/Pref-1), the Wnt co-receptor Lrp5 and intracellular kinases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stem Cells and Bone....

  17. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  18. In vitro differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells into neurons and glial cells and differential protein expression in a two-compartment bone marrow stromal cell/neuron co-culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xu; Shao, Ming; Peng, Haisheng; Bi, Zhenggang; Su, Zhiqiang; Li, Hulun

    2010-07-01

    This study was performed to establish a bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC)/neuron two-compartment co-culture model in which differentiation of BMSCs into neurons could occur without direct contact between the two cell types, and to investigate protein expression changes during differentiation of this entirely BMSC-derived population. Cultured BMSCs isolated from Wistar rats were divided into three groups: BMSC culture, BMSC/neuron co-culture and BMSC/neuron two-compartment co-culture. Cells were examined for neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. The electrophysiological behavior of the BMSCs was examined using patch clamping. Proteins that had significantly different expression levels in BMSCs cultured alone and co-cultured with neurons were studied using a protein chip-mass spectroscopy technique. Expression of NSE and GFAP were significantly higher in co-culture cells than in two-compartment co-culture cells, and significantly higher in both co-culture groups than in BMSCs cultured alone. Five proteins showed significant changes in expression during differentiation: TIP39_RAT and CALC_RAT underwent increases, and INSL6_RAT, PNOC_RAT and PCSK1_RAT underwent decreases in expression. We conclude that BMSCs can differentiate into neurons during both contact co-culture with neurons and two-compartment co-culture with neurons. The rate at which BMSCs differentiated into neurons was higher in contact co-culture than in non-contact co-culture.

  19. Standards for the culture and quality control of umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells for neurorestorative clinical application (2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ao Q

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Qiang Ao,1,* Juan Xiao,2,3,* Yanqiu Yu,4 Gengsheng Mao,2 Qingyan Zou,5 Wenyong Gao,2,3 Hongyun Huang2,3 On behalf of Neurorestoratology Professional Committee of Chinese Medical Doctor Association (Chinese Association of Neurorestoratology 1Department of Tissue Engineering, China Medical University, Shen Yang, 2Institute of Neurorestoratology, General Hospital of Armed Police Forces, Beijing, 3Cell Therapy Center, Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, Beijing, 4Department of Pathophysiology, China Medical University, Shen Yang, 5Guangdong 999 Brain Hospital, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Formulating common standards for the culture and quality control of umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs is crucial for the standardization of clinical neurorestorative therapy. But to date, there have been no standardized guidelines for the culture and quality control of MSCs in neurorestorative clinical application. Based on a relatively comprehensive review of published clinical studies as well as the existing methods of MSC culture and quality control, the Chinese Association of Neurorestoratology has developed standards for the culture and quality control of umbilical cord MSCs which possess the potential in neurorestorative clinical application. These guidelines include standardized training and management procedures for laboratory operators; standardized use and management of materials and equipment; standardized collection, culture and proliferation of umbilical cord MSCs; standardized management for cell preservation, transport and related safeguard measures; as well as standardization of a clean environment, routine maintenance and related tests and examinations and so on. These guidelines represent the minimum required standards for the culture and quality control of umbilical cord MSCs for potential use in current neurorestorative clinical therapy, and will be further

  20. Covalent immobilization of stem cell factor and stromal derived factor 1α for in vitro culture of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuchiara, Maude L; Horter, Kelsey L; Banda, Omar A; West, Jennifer L

    2013-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are currently utilized in the treatment of blood diseases, but widespread application of HSC therapeutics has been hindered by the limited availability of HSCs. With a better understanding of the HSC microenvironment and the ability to precisely recapitulate its components, we may be able to gain control of HSC behavior. In this work we developed a novel, biomimetic PEG hydrogel material as a substrate for this purpose and tested its potential with an anchorage-independent hematopoietic cell line, 32D clone 3 cells. We immobilized a fibronectin-derived adhesive peptide sequence, RGDS; a cytokine critical in HSC self-renewal, stem cell factor (SCF); and a chemokine important in HSC homing and lodging, stromal derived factor 1α (SDF1α), onto the surfaces of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels. To evaluate the system's capabilities, we observed the effects of the biomolecules on 32D cell adhesion and morphology. We demonstrated that the incorporation of RGDS onto the surfaces promotes 32D cell adhesion in a dose-dependent fashion. We also observed an additive response in adhesion on surfaces with RGDS in combination with either SCF or SDF1α. In addition, the average cell area increased and circularity decreased on gel surfaces containing immobilized SCF or SDF1α, indicating enhanced cell spreading. By recapitulating aspects of the HSC microenvironment using a PEG hydrogel scaffold, we have shown the ability to control the adhesion and spreading of the 32D cells and demonstrated the potential of the system for the culture of primary hematopoietic cell populations. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Differentiation capacity and maintenance of differentiated phenotypes of human mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on two distinct types of 3D polymeric scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Anne Marijke; Santos, D.; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Truckenmüller, R.K.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have shown the influence of soluble factors and material properties on the differentiation capacity of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) cultured as monolayers. These types of two-dimensional (2D) studies can be used as simplified models to understand cell processes related to stem cell

  2. Enhancing proliferation and optimizing the culture condition for human bone marrow stromal cells using hypoxia and fibroblast growth factor-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Seok Lee

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the cellular characteristics and behaviors of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs expanded in media in a hypoxic or normoxic condition and with or without fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 treatment. hBMSCs isolated from the vertebral body and expanded in these four groups were evaluated for cellular proliferation/migration, colony-forming units, cell-surface characterization, in vitro differentiation, in vivo transplantation, and gene expression. Culturing hBMSCs using a particular environmental factor (hypoxia and with the addition of FGF-2 increased the cellular proliferation rate while enhancing the regenerative potential, modulated the multipotency-related processes (enhanced chondrogenesis-related processes/osteogenesis, but reduced adipogenesis, and increased cellular migration and collagen formation. The gene expression levels in the experimental samples showed activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 pathway and glycolysis in the hypoxic condition, with this not being affected by the addition of FGF-2. The concurrent application of hypoxia and FGF-2 could provide a favorable condition for culturing hBMSCs to be used in clinical applications associated with bone tissue engineering, due to the enhancement of cellular proliferation and regenerative potential. Keywords: Bone marrow stromal cells, Hypoxia, Fibroblast growth factor, Tissue regeneration, Microenvironment interactions

  3. The Osteogenic Properties of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Cultures on TiO2 Sol-Gel-Derived Biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Marycz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The biocompatibility of the bone implants is a crucial factor determining the successful tissue regeneration. The aim of this work was to compare cellular behavior and osteogenic properties of rat adipose-derived multipotent stromal cells (ASCs and bone marrow multipotent stromal cells (BMSCs cultured on metallic substrate covered with TiO2 sol-gel-derived nanolayer. The morphology, proliferation rate, and osteogenic differentiation potential of both ASCs and BMSCs propagated on the biomaterials were examined. The potential for osteogenic differentiation of ASCs and BMSCs was determined based on the presence of specific markers of osteogenesis, that is, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, osteopontin (OPN, and osteocalcin (OCL. Additionally, the concentration of calcium and phosphorus in extracellular matrix was determined using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX. Obtained results showed that TiO2 layer influenced proliferation activity of ASCs, which manifested by shortening of population doubling time and increase of OPN secretion. However, characteristic features of cells morphology and growth pattern of cultures prompted us to conclude that ultrathin TiO2 layer might also enhance osteodifferentiation of BMSCs. Therefore in our opinion, both populations of MSCs should be used for biological evaluation of biomaterials compatibility, such results may enhance the area of investigations related to regenerative medicine.

  4. Proinflammatory interleukins' production by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells: the impact of cell culture conditions and cell-to-cell interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Elena; Andrianova, Irina; Rylova, Julia; Gornostaeva, Aleksandra; Bobyleva, Polina; Buravkova, Ludmila

    2015-08-01

    The impact of culture conditions and interaction with activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells on the interleukin (IL) gene expression profile and proinflammatory IL-6 and IL-8 production by adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) was investigated. A microarray analysis revealed a wide range of IL genes either under standard (20%) or hypoxic (5%) O2 concentrations, some highly up-regulated at hypoxia. IL-6 and IL-8 production was inversely dependent on cell culture density. In early (first-third) passages, IL-6 and IL-8 concentration was higher at 20% O2 and in late (8th-12th) passages under 5% O2. Interaction between ASCs and mononuclear cells in indirect setting was accompanied with a significant decrease of IL-6 and did not result in the elevation of IL-8 concentration. Thereby, the production of proinflammatory interleukins (IL-6 and IL-8) may be affected by the ASC intrinsic features (density in culture, and duration of expansion), as well as by microenvironmental factors, such as hypoxia and the presence of blood-borne cells. These data are important for elucidating ASC paracrine activity regulation in vitro. They would also be on demand for optimisation of the cell therapy protocols, based on the application of ASC biologically active substances. SIGNIFICANCE PARAGRAPH: Ex vivo expansion is widely used for increasing the number of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) and improving of their quality. The present study was designed to elucidate the particular factors influencing the interleukin production in ASCs. The presented data specified the parameters (i.e. cell density, duration of cultivation, hypoxia, etc.) that should be taken in mind when ASCs are intended to be used in protocols implying their paracrine activity. These data would be of considerable interest for researchers and clinicians working in the biomedical science. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The Influence of IL-10 and TNFα on Chondrogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Three-Dimensional Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Jagielski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chondrogenic differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are a promising cell source for articular cartilage repair. This study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of two three-dimensional (3D culture systems for chondrogenic MSC differentiation in comparison to primary chondrocytes and to assess the effect of Interleukin (IL-10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNFα on chondrogenesis by MSCs in 3D high-density (H-D culture. MSCs were isolated from femur spongiosa, characterized using a set of typical markers and introduced in scaffold-free H-D cultures or non-woven polyglycolic acid (PGA scaffolds for chondrogenic differentiation. H-D cultures were stimulated with recombinant IL-10, TNFα, TNFα + IL-10 or remained untreated. Gene and protein expression of type II collagen, aggrecan, sox9 and TNFα were examined. MSCs expressed typical cell surface markers and revealed multipotency. Chondrogenic differentiated cells expressed cartilage-specific markers in both culture systems but to a lower extent when compared with articular chondrocytes. Chondrogenesis was more pronounced in PGA compared with H-D culture. IL-10 and/or TNFα did not impair the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. Moreover, in most of the investigated samples, despite not reaching significance level, IL-10 had a stimulatory effect on the type II collagen, aggrecan and TNFα expression when compared with the respective controls.

  6. The influence of IL-10 and TNFα on chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stromal cells in three-dimensional cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagielski, Michal; Wolf, Johannes; Marzahn, Ulrike; Völker, Anna; Lemke, Marion; Meier, Carola; Ertel, Wolfgang; Godkin, Owen; Arens, Stephan; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2014-09-09

    Chondrogenic differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a promising cell source for articular cartilage repair. This study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of two three-dimensional (3D) culture systems for chondrogenic MSC differentiation in comparison to primary chondrocytes and to assess the effect of Interleukin (IL)-10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)α on chondrogenesis by MSCs in 3D high-density (H-D) culture. MSCs were isolated from femur spongiosa, characterized using a set of typical markers and introduced in scaffold-free H-D cultures or non-woven polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds for chondrogenic differentiation. H-D cultures were stimulated with recombinant IL-10, TNFα, TNFα + IL-10 or remained untreated. Gene and protein expression of type II collagen, aggrecan, sox9 and TNFα were examined. MSCs expressed typical cell surface markers and revealed multipotency. Chondrogenic differentiated cells expressed cartilage-specific markers in both culture systems but to a lower extent when compared with articular chondrocytes. Chondrogenesis was more pronounced in PGA compared with H-D culture. IL-10 and/or TNFα did not impair the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. Moreover, in most of the investigated samples, despite not reaching significance level, IL-10 had a stimulatory effect on the type II collagen, aggrecan and TNFα expression when compared with the respective controls.

  7. Proliferation of mouse endometrial stromal cells in culture is highly sensitive to lysophosphatidic acid signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aikawa, Shizu; Kano, Kuniyuki; Inoue, Asuka; Aoki, Junken

    2017-01-01

    Endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) proliferate rapidly both in vivo and in vitro. Here we show that proliferation of ESCs in vitro is strongly dependent on lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling. LPA is produced by autotaxin (ATX) and induces various kinds of cellular processes including migration, proliferation and inhibition of cell death possibly through six G protein-coupled receptors (LPA 1-6 ). We found that ESCs proliferated rapidly in vitro in an autocrine manner and that the proliferation was prominently suppressed by either an ATX inhibitor (ONO-8430506) or an LPA 1/3 antagonist (Ki16425). Among the cells lines tested, mouse ESCs were the most sensitive to these inhibitors. Proliferation of ESCs isolated from either LPA 1 - or LPA 3 -deficient mice was comparable to proliferation of ESCs isolated from control mice. An LPA receptor antagonist (AM095), which was revealed to be a dual LPA 1 /LPA 3 antagonist, also suppressed the proliferation of ESCs. The present results show that LPA signaling has a critical role in the proliferation of ESCs, and that this role is possibly mediated redundantly by LPA 1 and LPA 3 . - Highlights: • Uterine endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) proliferate rapidly both in vivo and in vitro. • ESCs proliferated in vitro in an autocrine fashion. • Proliferation of mouse ESCs was prominently suppressed by inhibitors of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling. • LPA receptors, LPA 1 and LPA 3 , had redundant role in supporting the proliferation of ESCs.

  8. Origin of hemopoietic stromal progenitor cells in chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chertkov, J.L.; Drize, N.J.; Gurevitch, O.A.; Samoylova, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    Intravenously injected bone marrow cells do not participate in the regeneration of hemopoietic stromal progenitors in irradiated mice, nor in the curetted parts of the recipient's marrow. The hemopoietic stromal progenitors in allogeneic chimeras are of recipient origin. The adherent cell layer (ACL) of long-term cultures of allogeneic chimera bone marrow contains only recipient hemopoietic stromal progenitors. However, in ectopic hemopoietic foci produced by marrow implantation under the renal capsule and repopulated by the recipient hemopoietic cells after irradiation and reconstitution by syngeneic hemopoietic cells, the stromal progenitors were of implant donor origin, as were stromal progenitors of the ACL in long-term cultures of hemopoietic cells from ectopic foci. Our results confirm that the stromal and hemopoietic progenitors differ in origin and that hemopoietic stromal progenitors are not transplantable by the intravenous route in mice

  9. Co-culture of chondrons and mesenchymal stromal cells reduces the loss of collagen VI and improves extracellular matrix production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owida, H A; De Las Heras Ruiz, T; Dhillon, A; Yang, Y; Kuiper, N J

    2017-12-01

    Adult articular chondrocytes are surrounded by a pericellular matrix (PCM) to form a chondron. The PCM is rich in hyaluronan, proteoglycans, and collagen II, and it is the exclusive location of collagen VI in articular cartilage. Collagen VI anchors the chondrocyte to the PCM. It has been suggested that co-culture of chondrons with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) might enhance extracellular matrix (ECM) production. This co-culture study investigates whether MSCs help to preserve the PCM and increase ECM production. Primary bovine chondrons or chondrocytes or rat MSCs were cultured alone to establish a baseline level for ECM production. A xenogeneic co-culture monolayer model using rat MSCs (20, 50, and 80%) was established. PCM maintenance and ECM production were assessed by biochemical assays, immunofluorescence, and histological staining. Co-culture of MSCs with chondrons enhanced ECM matrix production, as compared to chondrocyte or chondron only cultures. The ratio 50:50 co-culture of MSCs and chondrons resulted in the highest increase in GAG production (18.5 ± 0.54 pg/cell at day 1 and 11 ± 0.38 pg/cell at day 7 in 50:50 co-culture versus 16.8 ± 0.61 pg/cell at day 1 and 10 ± 0.45 pg/cell at day 7 in chondron monoculture). The co-culture of MSCs with chondrons appeared to decelerate the loss of the PCM as determined by collagen VI expression, whilst the expression of high-temperature requirement serine protease A1 (HtrA1) demonstrated an inverse relationship to that of the collagen VI. Together, this implies that MSCs directly or indirectly inhibited HtrA1 activity and the co-culture of MSCs with chondrons enhanced ECM synthesis and the preservation of the PCM.

  10. Cell shape and spreading of stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells cultured on fibronectin coated gold and hydroxyapatite surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A; Jensen, Thomas Hartvig Lindkjær; Kolind, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    In order to identify the cellular mechanisms leading to the biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite implants, we studied the interaction of human bone marrow derived stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) with fibronectin-coated gold (Au) and hydroxyapatite (HA) surfaces. The adsorption of fibronectin...

  11. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Cultured in Serum from Heart Failure Patients Are More Resistant to Simulated Chronic and Acute Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Z. Nazari-Shafti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite regulatory issues surrounding the use of animal-derived cell culture supplements, most clinical cardiac cell therapy trials using mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs still rely on fetal bovine serum (FBS for cell expansion before transplantation. We sought to investigate the effect of human serum from heart failure patients (HFS on cord blood MSCs (CB-MSCs during short-term culture under regular conditions and during simulated acute and chronic stress. Cell survival, proliferation, metabolic activity, and apoptosis were quantified, and gene expression profiles of selected apoptosis and cell cycle regulators were determined. Compared to FBS, HFS and serum from healthy donors (CS showed similar effects by substantially increasing cell survival during chronic and acute stress and by increasing cell yields 5 days after acute stress. Shortly after the termination of acute stress, both HFS and CS resulted in a marked decrease in apoptotic cells. Transcriptome analysis suggested a decrease in TNF-mediated induction of caspases and decreased activation of mitochondrial apoptosis. Our data confirm that human serum from both healthy donors and heart failure patients results in increased cell yields and increased resistance to cellular stress signals. Therefore, we consider autologous serum a valid alternative to FBS in cell-based therapies addressing severe heart disease.

  12. Human platelet lysate as a fetal bovine serum substitute improves human adipose-derived stromal cell culture for future cardiac repair applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naaijkens, B.A.; Niessen, H.W.M.; Prins, H.J.; Krijnen, P.A.J.; Kokhuis, T.J.A.; de Jong, N.; van Hinsbergh, V.W.M.; Kamp, O.; Helder, M.N.; Musters, R.J.P.; van Dijk, A.; Juffermans, L.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC) are promising candidates for cell therapy, for example to treat myocardial infarction. Commonly, fetal bovine serum (FBS) is used in ASC culturing. However, FBS has several disadvantages. Its effects differ between batches and, when applied clinically,

  13. Human platelet lysate as a fetal bovine serum substitute improves human adipose-derived stromal cell culture for future cardiac repair applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Naaijkens (Benno); H.W.M. Niessen (Hans ); H.-J. Prins (H.); P.A.J. Krijnen (Paul); T.J.A. Kokhuis (Tom); N. de Jong (Nico); V.W.M. van Hinsbergh (Victor); O. Kamp (Otto); K. Helder MScN (Onno); R.J.P. Musters (René); A. van Dijk (Annemieke); L.J.M. Juffermans (Lynda)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAdipose-derived stromal cells (ASC) are promising candidates for cell therapy, for example to treat myocardial infarction. Commonly, fetal bovine serum (FBS) is used in ASC culturing. However, FBS has several disadvantages. Its effects differ between batches and, when applied clinically,

  14. Hyaluronan preserves the proliferation and differentiation potentials of long-term cultured murine adipose-derived stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, P.-Y.; Huang, Lynn L.H.; Hsieh, H.-J.

    2007-01-01

    For long-term culture, murine adipose-derived stromal cells (mADSCs) at latter passages demonstrated a marked decline in proliferative activity, exhibited senescent morphology and reduced differentiation potentials, particularly osteogenesis. To extend the lifespan of mADSCs, two culture conditions containing hyaluronan (HA) was compared in our study, one as a culture medium supplement (SHA), and the other where HA was pre-coated on culture surface (CHA). mADSCs cultivated with SHA exhibited a prolonged lifespan, reduced cellular senescence, and enhanced osteogenic potential compared to regular culture condition (control). Upon CHA treatment, mADSCs tended to form cell aggregates with gradual growth profiles, while their differentiation activities remained similar to SHA groups. After transferring mADSCs from CHA to control surface, they were shown to have an extended lifespan and an increase of osteogenic potential. Our results suggested that HA can be useful for preserving the proliferation and differentiation potentials of long-term cultured mADSCs

  15. Culture expansion of adipose derived stromal cells. A closed automated Quantum Cell Expansion System compared with manual flask-based culture

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    Mandana Haack-Sørensen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adipose derived stromal cells (ASCs are a rich and convenient source of cells for clinical regenerative therapeutic approaches. However, applications of ASCs often require cell expansion to reach the needed dose. In this study, cultivation of ASCs from stromal vascular fraction (SVF over two passages in the automated and functionally closed Quantum Cell Expansion System (Quantum system is compared with traditional manual cultivation. Methods Stromal vascular fraction was isolated from abdominal fat, suspended in α-MEM supplemented with 10% Fetal Bovine Serum and seeded into either T75 flasks or a Quantum system that had been coated with cryoprecipitate. The cultivation of ASCs from SVF was performed in 3 ways: flask to flask; flask to Quantum system; and Quantum system to Quantum system. In all cases, quality controls were conducted for sterility, mycoplasmas, and endotoxins, in addition to the assessment of cell counts, viability, immunophenotype, and differentiation potential. Results The viability of ASCs passage 0 (P0 and P1 was above 96%, regardless of cultivation in flasks or Quantum system. Expression of surface markers and differentiation potential was consistent with ISCT/IFATS standards for the ASC phenotype. Sterility, mycoplasma, and endotoxin tests were consistently negative. An average of 8.0 × 107 SVF cells loaded into a Quantum system yielded 8.96 × 107 ASCs P0, while 4.5 × 106 SVF cells seeded per T75 flask yielded an average of 2.37 × 106 ASCs—less than the number of SVF cells seeded. ASCs P1 expanded in the Quantum system demonstrated a population doubling (PD around 2.2 regardless of whether P0 was previously cultured in flasks or Quantum, while ASCs P1 in flasks only reached a PD of 1.0. Conclusion: Manufacturing of ASCs in a Quantum system enhances ASC expansion rate and yield significantly relative to manual processing in T-flasks, while maintaining the purity and quality essential to

  16. Culture expansion of adipose derived stromal cells. A closed automated Quantum Cell Expansion System compared with manual flask-based culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Follin, Bjarke; Juhl, Morten; Brorsen, Sonja K; Søndergaard, Rebekka H; Kastrup, Jens; Ekblond, Annette

    2016-11-16

    Adipose derived stromal cells (ASCs) are a rich and convenient source of cells for clinical regenerative therapeutic approaches. However, applications of ASCs often require cell expansion to reach the needed dose. In this study, cultivation of ASCs from stromal vascular fraction (SVF) over two passages in the automated and functionally closed Quantum Cell Expansion System (Quantum system) is compared with traditional manual cultivation. Stromal vascular fraction was isolated from abdominal fat, suspended in α-MEM supplemented with 10% Fetal Bovine Serum and seeded into either T75 flasks or a Quantum system that had been coated with cryoprecipitate. The cultivation of ASCs from SVF was performed in 3 ways: flask to flask; flask to Quantum system; and Quantum system to Quantum system. In all cases, quality controls were conducted for sterility, mycoplasmas, and endotoxins, in addition to the assessment of cell counts, viability, immunophenotype, and differentiation potential. The viability of ASCs passage 0 (P0) and P1 was above 96%, regardless of cultivation in flasks or Quantum system. Expression of surface markers and differentiation potential was consistent with ISCT/IFATS standards for the ASC phenotype. Sterility, mycoplasma, and endotoxin tests were consistently negative. An average of 8.0 × 10 7 SVF cells loaded into a Quantum system yielded 8.96 × 10 7 ASCs P0, while 4.5 × 10 6 SVF cells seeded per T75 flask yielded an average of 2.37 × 10 6 ASCs-less than the number of SVF cells seeded. ASCs P1 expanded in the Quantum system demonstrated a population doubling (PD) around 2.2 regardless of whether P0 was previously cultured in flasks or Quantum, while ASCs P1 in flasks only reached a PD of 1.0. Manufacturing of ASCs in a Quantum system enhances ASC expansion rate and yield significantly relative to manual processing in T-flasks, while maintaining the purity and quality essential to safe and robust cell production. Notably, the use of the Quantum

  17. Transdifferentiation of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells into acinar cells of the submandibular gland using a co-culture system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jingu; Park, Sangkyu; Roh, Sangho

    2015-01-01

    A loss of salivary gland function often occurs after radiation therapy in head and neck tumors, though secretion of saliva by the salivary glands is essential for the health and maintenance of the oral environment. Transplantation of salivary acinar cells (ACs), in part, may overcome the side effects of therapy. Here we directly differentiated mouse adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) into ACs using a co-culture system. Multipotent ADSCs can be easily collected from stromal vascular fractions of adipose tissues. The isolated ADSCs showed positive expression of markers such as integrin beta-1 (CD29), cell surface glycoprotein (CD44), endoglin (CD105), and Nanog. The cells were able to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, and neural-like cells after 14 days in culture. ADSCs at passage 2 were co-cultured with mouse ACs in AC culture medium using the double-chamber (co-culture system) to avoid mixing the cell types. The ADSCs in this co-culture system expressed markers of ACs, such as α-amylases and aquaporin5, in both mRNA and protein. ADSCs cultured in AC-conditioned medium also expressed AC markers. Cellular proliferation and senescence analyses demonstrated that cells in the co-culture group showed lower senescence and a higher proliferation rate than the AC-conditioned medium group at Days 14 and 21. The results above imply direct conversion of ADSCs into ACs under the co-culture system; therefore, ADSCs may be a stem cell source for the therapy for salivary gland damage. - Highlights: • ADSCs could transdifferentiate into acinar cells (ACs) using ACs co-culture (CCA). • Transdifferentiated ADSCs expressed ACs markers such as α-amylase and aquaporin5. • High proliferation and low senescence were presented in CCA at Day 14. • Transdifferentiation of ADSCs into ACs using CCA may be an appropriate method for cell-based therapy

  18. Transdifferentiation of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells into acinar cells of the submandibular gland using a co-culture system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jingu; Park, Sangkyu; Roh, Sangho, E-mail: sangho@snu.ac.kr

    2015-05-15

    A loss of salivary gland function often occurs after radiation therapy in head and neck tumors, though secretion of saliva by the salivary glands is essential for the health and maintenance of the oral environment. Transplantation of salivary acinar cells (ACs), in part, may overcome the side effects of therapy. Here we directly differentiated mouse adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) into ACs using a co-culture system. Multipotent ADSCs can be easily collected from stromal vascular fractions of adipose tissues. The isolated ADSCs showed positive expression of markers such as integrin beta-1 (CD29), cell surface glycoprotein (CD44), endoglin (CD105), and Nanog. The cells were able to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, and neural-like cells after 14 days in culture. ADSCs at passage 2 were co-cultured with mouse ACs in AC culture medium using the double-chamber (co-culture system) to avoid mixing the cell types. The ADSCs in this co-culture system expressed markers of ACs, such as α-amylases and aquaporin5, in both mRNA and protein. ADSCs cultured in AC-conditioned medium also expressed AC markers. Cellular proliferation and senescence analyses demonstrated that cells in the co-culture group showed lower senescence and a higher proliferation rate than the AC-conditioned medium group at Days 14 and 21. The results above imply direct conversion of ADSCs into ACs under the co-culture system; therefore, ADSCs may be a stem cell source for the therapy for salivary gland damage. - Highlights: • ADSCs could transdifferentiate into acinar cells (ACs) using ACs co-culture (CCA). • Transdifferentiated ADSCs expressed ACs markers such as α-amylase and aquaporin5. • High proliferation and low senescence were presented in CCA at Day 14. • Transdifferentiation of ADSCs into ACs using CCA may be an appropriate method for cell-based therapy.

  19. A stromal cell free culture system generates mouse pro-T cells that can reconstitute T-cell compartments in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehre, Nadine; Nusser, Anja; von Muenchow, Lilly; Tussiwand, Roxane; Engdahl, Corinne; Capoferri, Giuseppina; Bosco, Nabil; Ceredig, Rhodri; Rolink, Antonius G

    2015-03-01

    T-cell lymphopenia following BM transplantation or diseases such as AIDS result in immunodeficiency. Novel approaches to ameliorate this situation are urgently required. Herein, we describe a novel stromal cell free culture system in which Lineage(-) Sca1(+)c-kit(+) BM hematopoietic progenitors very efficiently differentiate into pro-T cells. This culture system consists of plate-bound Delta-like 4 Notch ligand and the cytokines SCF and IL-7. The pro-T cells developing in these cultures express CD25, CD117, and partially CD44; express cytoplasmic CD3ε; and have their TCRβ locus partially D-J rearranged. They could be expanded for over 3 months and used to reconstitute the T-cell compartments of sublethally irradiated T-cell-deficient CD3ε(-/-) mice or lethally irradiated WT mice. Pro-T cells generated in this system could partially correct the T-cell lymphopenia of pre-Tα(-/-) mice. However, reconstituted CD3ε(-/-) mice suffered from a wasting disease that was prevented by co-injection of purified CD4(+) CD25(high) WT Treg cells. In a T-cell-sufficient or T-lymphopenic setting, the development of disease was not observed. Thus, this in vitro culture system represents a powerful tool to generate large numbers of pro-T cells for transplantation and possibly with clinical applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Investigating Effects of Gelatin-Chitosan Film on Culture of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in Rat

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    A Karami joyani

    2015-02-01

    Conclusion: Results of proliferation,differentiation and apoptosis cultured BMSCs on a gelatin-chitosan film showed that gelatin-chitosan film can be used as a good model of a biodegradable scaffold in tissue engineering and cell therapy.

  1. Serum-converted platelet lysate can substitute for fetal bovine serum in human mesenchymal stromal cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica-Henshaw, Mariluz P; Jacobson, Pam; Morris, Julie; Kelley, Linda; Pierce, Jan; Boyer, Michael; Reems, Jo-Anna

    2013-12-01

    Fetal bovine serum (FBS) is commonly used as a serum supplement for culturing human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). However, human cells grown in FBS, especially for extended periods, risk potential exposure to bovine immunogenic proteins and infectious agents. To address this issue, we investigated the ability of a novel human platelet serum supplement to substitute for FBS in hMSC cultures. Platelet lysate-serum (PL-serum) was converted from platelet lysate-plasma (PL-plasma) that was manufactured from pooled platelet-rich plasma (PRP) apheresis units. Growth factor levels and the number of residual intact platelets in PL-serum and PL-plasma were compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and flow cytometry, respectively. Proliferation responses of hMSCs cultured in PL-serum, PL-plasma, or FBS were assessed with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, the immunophenotype of harvested hMSCs was evaluated by flow cytometry and tri-lineage differentiation potential was evaluated by assessing adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic development. Selected growth factor levels in PL-serum were not significantly different from PL-plasma (P > 0.05). hMSC cultures supplemented with PL-serum had comparable growth kinetics to PL-plasma, and hMSC yields were consistently greater than with FBS. hMSCs harvested from cultures supplemented with PL-serum, PL-plasma or FBS had similar cell surface phenotypes and maintained tri-lineage differentiation potential. PL-serum, similar to PL-plasma, can substitute for FBS in hMSC cultures. Use of PL-serum, in contrast to PL-plasma, has an added advantage of not requiring addition of a xenogeneic source of heparin, providing a completely xeno-free culture medium. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mesenchymal stromal cells of osteosarcoma patients do not show evidence of neoplastic changes during long-term culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddingh, Emilie P; Ruslan, S Eriaty N; Reijnders, Christianne M A; Szuhai, Karoly; Kuijjer, Marieke L; Roelofs, Helene; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Maarten Egeler, R; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Lankester, Arjan C

    2015-01-01

    In vitro expanded mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are increasingly used as experimental cellular therapy. However, there have been concerns regarding the safety of their use, particularly with regard to possible oncogenic transformation. MSCs are the hypothesized precursor cells of high-grade osteosarcoma, a tumor with often complex karyotypes occurring mainly in adolescents and young adults. To determine if MSCs from osteosarcoma patients could be predisposed to malignant transformation we cultured MSCs of nine osteosarcoma patients and five healthy donors for an average of 649 days (range 601-679 days). Also, we compared MSCs derived from osteosarcoma patients at diagnosis and from healthy donors using genome wide gene expression profiling. Upon increasing passage, increasing frequencies of binucleate cells were detected, but no increase in proliferation suggestive of malignant transformation occurred in MSCs from either patients or donors. Hematopoietic cell specific Lyn substrate 1 (HLCS1) was differentially expressed (fold change 0.25, P value 0.0005) between MSCs of osteosarcoma patients (n = 14) and healthy donors (n = 9). This study shows that although HCLS1 expression was downregulated in MSCs of osteosarcoma patients and binucleate cells were present in both patient and donor derived MSCs, there was no evidence of neoplastic changes to occur during long-term culture.

  3. Toxicity and oxidative stress of canine mesenchymal stromal cells from adipose tissue in different culture passages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arícia Gomes Sprada

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Stem cells in regenerative therapy have received attention from researchers in recent decades. The culture of these cells allows studies about their behavior and metabolism. Thus, cell culture is the basis for cell therapy and tissue engineering researches. A major concern regarding the use of cultivated stem cell in human or veterinary clinical routine is the risk of carcinogenesis. Cellular activities require a balanced redox state. However, when there is an imbalance in this state, oxidative stress occurs. Oxidative stress contributes to cytotoxicity, which may result in cell death or genomic alterations, favoring the development of cancer cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are differences in the behavior of cultured mesenchymal stem cells from canine adipose tissue according to its site of collection (omentum and subcutaneous evaluating the rate of proliferation, viability, level of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity over six passages. For this experiment, two samples of adipose tissue from subcutaneous and omentum where taken from a female dog corpse, 13 years old, Pitbull. The results showed greater levels of oxidative stress in the first and last passages of both groups, favoring cytotoxicity and cell death.

  4. Membrane culture and reduced oxygen tension enhances cartilage matrix formation from equine cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co, C; Vickaryous, M K; Koch, T G

    2014-03-01

    Ongoing research is aimed at increasing cartilage tissue yield and quality from multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for the purpose of treating cartilage damage in horses. Low oxygen culture has been shown to enhance chondrogenesis, and novel membrane culture has been proposed to increase tissue yield and homogeneity. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of reduced oxygen and membrane culture during in vitro chondrogenesis of equine cord blood (CB) MSC. CB-MSC (n = 5 foals) were expanded at 21% oxygen prior to 3-week differentiation in membrane or pellet culture at 5% and 21% oxygen. Assessment included histological examination (H&E, toluidine Blue, immunohistochemistry (IHC) for collagen type I and II), protein quantification by hydroxyproline assay and dimethylmethylene assay, and mRNA analysis for collagen IA1, collagen IIA1, collagen XA1, HIF1α and Sox9. Among treatment groups, 5% membrane culture produced neocartilage most closely resembling hyaline cartilage. Membrane culture resulted in increased wet mass, homogenous matrix morphology and an increase in total collagen content, while 5% oxygen culture resulted in higher GAG and type II collagen content. No significant differences were observed for mRNA analysis. Membrane culture at 5% oxygen produces a comparatively larger amount of higher quality neocartilage. Matrix homogeneity is attributed to a uniform diffusion gradient and reduced surface tension. Membrane culture holds promise for scale-up for therapeutic purposes, for cellular preconditioning prior to cytotherapeutic applications, and for modeling system for gas-dependent chondrogenic differentiation studies. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Increasing efficiency of human mesenchymal stromal cell culture by optimization of microcarrier concentration and design of medium feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Allen Kuan-Liang; Chew, Yi Kong; Tan, Hong Yu; Reuveny, Shaul; Weng Oh, Steve Kah

    2015-02-01

    Large amounts of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are needed for clinical cellular therapy. In a previous publication, we described a microcarrier-based process for expansion of MSCs. The present study optimized this process by selecting suitable basal media, microcarrier concentration and feeding regime to achieve higher cell yields and more efficient medium utilization. MSCs were expanded in stirred cultures on Cytodex 3 microcarriers with media containing 10% fetal bovine serum. Process optimization was carried out in spinner flasks. A 2-L bioreactor with an automated feeding system was used to validate the optimized parameters explored in spinner flask cultures. Minimum essential medium-α-based medium supported faster MSC growth on microcarriers than did Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (doubling time, 31.6 ± 1.4 vs 42 ± 1.7 h) and shortened the process time. At microcarrier concentration of 8 mg/mL, a high cell concentration of 1.08 × 10(6) cells/mL with confluent cell concentration of 4.7 × 10(4)cells/cm(2) was achieved. Instead of 50% medium exchange every 2 days, we have designed a full medium feed that is based on glucose consumption rate. The optimal medium feed that consisted of 1.5 g/L glucose supported MSC growth to full confluency while achieving the low medium usage efficiency of 3.29 mL/10(6)cells. Finally, a controlled bioreactor with the optimized parameters achieved maximal confluent cell concentration with 16-fold expansion and a further improved medium usage efficiency of 1.68 mL/10(6)cells. We have optimized the microcarrier-based platform for expansion of MSCs that generated high cell yields in a more efficient and cost-effective manner. This study highlighted the critical parameters in the optimization of MSC production process. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling in cultured eutopic and ectopic endometrial stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Yamagata

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to characterize the genome-wide DNA methylation profiles of isolated endometrial stromal cells obtained from eutopic endometria with (euESCa and without endometriosis (euESCb and ovarian endometrial cysts (choESC. Three samples were analyzed in each group. The infinium methylation array identified more hypermethylated and hypomethylated CpGs in choESC than in euESCa, and only a few genes were methylated differently in euESCa and euESCb. A functional analysis revealed that signal transduction, developmental processes, immunity, etc. were different in choESC and euESCa. A clustering analysis and a principal component analysis performed based on the methylation levels segregated choESC from euESC, while euESCa and euESCb were identical. A transcriptome analysis was then conducted and the results were compared with those of the DNA methylation analysis. Interestingly, the hierarchical clustering and principal component analyses showed that choESC were segregated from euESCa and euESCb in the DNA methylation analysis, while no segregation was recognized in the transcriptome analysis. The mRNA expression levels of the epigenetic modification enzymes, including DNA methyltransferases, obtained from the specimens were not significantly different between the groups. Some of the differentially methylated and/or expressed genes (NR5A1, STAR, STRA6 and HSD17B2, which are related with steroidogenesis, were validated by independent methods in a larger number of samples. Our findings indicate that different DNA methylation profiles exist in ectopic ESC, highlighting the benefits of genome wide DNA methylation analyses over transcriptome analyses in clarifying the development and characterization of endometriosis.

  7. Extended Culture of Encapsulated Human Blastocysts in Alginate Hydrogel Containing Decidualized Endometrial Stromal Cells in the Presence of Melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, Fatemeh; Khanmohammadi, Manijeh; Arasteh, Shaghayegh; Mohammadzadeh, Afsaneh; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Akhondi, Mohammad-Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    Extended in vitro culture of human embryos beyond blastocyst stage could serve as a tool to explore the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying embryo development and to identify factors regulating pregnancy outcomes. This study presents the first report on the maintenance of human embryo in vitro by alginate co-encapsulation of human blastocyst and decidualized endometrial stromal cells (EnSCs) under melatonin-fortified culture conditions. The effectiveness of the 3D culture system was studied through monitoring of embryo development in terms of survival time, viability, morphological changes, and production of the two hormones of 17b-oestradiol and human chorionic gonadotropin. The embryo structural integrity was preserved during alginate encapsulation; however, only 23 % of the encapsulated embryos could retain in the hydrogels over time and survived until day 4 post-encapsulation. The culture medium fortification with melatonin significantly elevated the maintenance rate of expanded embryos in alginate beads by 65 % and prolonged survival time of human embryos to day 5. Furthermore, embryo co-culture with EnSCs using melatonin-fortified medium increased the survival time of encapsulated embryos to 44 %. The levels of two measured hormones significantly rose at day 4 in comparison with day 2 post-encapsulation especially in the group co-encapsulated with EnSCs and cultivated in melatonin-fortified culture medium. These data are the first evidence representing in vitro development of human embryos until day 10 post-fertilization. This achievement can facilitate the investigation of the mechanisms regulating human embryo development.

  8. Maintenance of osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation potential with age and osteoporosis in human marrow stromal cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, J; Dokkedahl, Karin Stenderup; Eriksen, E F

    2002-01-01

    Osteoblasts and adipocytes share a common precursor cell in the bone marrow stroma, termed marrow stromal cell (MSC). As the volume of bone adipose tissue increases in vivo with age, we hypothesized that decreased bone formation observed during aging and in patients with osteoporosis (OP) is the ...

  9. Lycopene inhibits IGF-I signal transduction and growth in normal prostate epithelial cells by decreasing DHT-modulated IGF-I production in co-cultured reactive stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xunxian; Allen, Jeffrey D; Arnold, Julia T; Blackman, Marc R

    2008-04-01

    Prostate stromal and epithelial cell communication is important in prostate functioning and cancer development. Primary human stromal cells from normal prostate stromal cells (PRSC) maintain a smooth muscle phenotype, whereas those from prostate cancer (6S) display reactive and fibroblastic characteristics. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) stimulates insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) production by 6S but not PSRC cells. Effects of reactive versus normal stroma on normal human prostate epithelial (NPE or PREC) cells are poorly understood. We co-cultured NPE plus 6S or PRSC cells to compare influences of different stromal cells on normal epithelium. Because NPE and PREC cells lose androgen receptor (AR) expression in culture, DHT effects must be modulated by associated stromal cells. When treated with camptothecin (CM), NPE cells, alone and in stromal co-cultures, displayed a dose-dependent increase in DNA fragmentation. NPE/6S co-cultures exhibited reduced CM-induced cell death with exposure to DHT, whereas NPE/PRSC co-cultures exhibited CM-induced cell death regardless of DHT treatment. DHT blocked CM-induced, IGF-I-mediated, NPE death in co-cultured NPE/6S cells without, but not with, added anti-IGF-I and anti-IGF-R antibodies. Lycopene consumption is inversely related to human prostate cancer risk and inhibits IGF-I and androgen signaling in rat prostate cancer. In this study, lycopene, in dietary concentrations, reversed DHT effects of 6S cells on NPE cell death, decreased 6S cell IGF-I production by reducing AR and beta-catenin nuclear localization and inhibited IGF-I-stimulated NPE and PREC growth, perhaps by attenuating IGF-I's effects on serine phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3beta and tyrosine phosphorylation of GSK3. This study expands the understanding of the preventive mechanisms of lycopene in prostate cancer.

  10. Post-thaw non-cultured and post-thaw cultured equine cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells equally suppress lymphocyte proliferation in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn B Williams

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC are receiving increased attention for their non-progenitor immunomodulatory potential. Cryopreservation is commonly used for long-term storage of MSC. Post-thaw MSC proliferation is associated with a lag-phase in vitro. How this lag-phase affect MSC immunomodulatory properties is unknown. We hypothesized that in vitro there is no difference in lymphocyte suppression potential between quick-thawed cryopreserved equine cord blood (CB MSC immediately included in mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR and same MSC allowed post-thaw culture time prior to inclusion in MLR. Cryopreserved CB-MSC from five unrelated foals were compared using two-way MLR. For each of the five unrelated MSC cultures, paired MLR assays of MSC allowed five days of post-thaw culture and MSC included in MLR assay immediately post-thawing were evaluated. We report no difference in the suppression of lymphocyte proliferation by CB-MSC that had undergone post-thaw culture and MSC not cultured post-thaw (p<0.0001. Also, there was no inter-donor variability between the lymphocyte suppressive properties of MSC harvested from the five different donors (p = 0.13. These findings suggest that cryopreserved CB-MSC may have clinical utility immediately upon thawing. One implication hereof is the possibility of using cryopreserved CB-MSC at third party locations without the need for cell culture equipment or competencies.

  11. Stromal cells from the adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction and culture expanded adipose tissue-derived stromal/stem cells: a joint statement of the International Federation for Adipose Therapeutics and Science (IFATS) and the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourin, Philippe; Bunnell, Bruce A; Casteilla, Louis; Dominici, Massimo; Katz, Adam J; March, Keith L; Redl, Heinz; Rubin, J Peter; Yoshimura, Kotaro; Gimble, Jeffrey M

    2013-06-01

    Adipose tissue is a rich and very convenient source of cells for regenerative medicine therapeutic approaches. However, a characterization of the population of adipose-derived stromal and stem cells (ASCs) with the greatest therapeutic potential remains unclear. Under the authority of International Federation of Adipose Therapeutics and International Society for Cellular Therapy, this paper sets out to establish minimal definitions of stromal cells both as uncultured stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and as an adherent stromal/stem cells population. Phenotypic and functional criteria for the identification of adipose-derived cells were drawn from the literature. In the SVF, cells are identified phenotypically by the following markers: CD45-CD235a-CD31-CD34+. Added value may be provided by both a viability marker and the following surface antigens: CD13, CD73, CD90 and CD105. The fibroblastoid colony-forming unit assay permits the evaluation of progenitor frequency in the SVF population. In culture, ASCs retain markers in common with other mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs), including CD90, CD73, CD105, and CD44 and remain negative for CD45 and CD31. They can be distinguished from bone-marrow-derived MSCs by their positivity for CD36 and negativity for CD106. The CFU-F assay is recommended to calculate population doublings capacity of ASCs. The adipocytic, chondroblastic and osteoblastic differentiation assays serve to complete the cell identification and potency assessment in conjunction with a quantitative evaluation of the differentiation either biochemically or by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The goal of this paper is to provide initial guidance for the scientific community working with adipose-derived cells and to facilitate development of international standards based on reproducible parameters. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. All rights reserved.

  12. A stable explant culture of HER2/neu invasive carcinoma supported by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin expressing stromal cells to evaluate therapeutic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piechocki Marie P

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To gain a better understanding of the effects of therapeutic agents on the tumor microenvironment in invasive cancers, we developed a co-culture model from an invasive lobular carcinoma. Tumor cells expressing HER2/neu organize in nests surrounded by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin (α-SMA expressing tumor stroma to resemble the morphology of an invading tumor. This co-culture, Mammary Adenocarcinoma Model (MAM-1 maintains a 1:1 ratio of HER2/neu positive tumor cells to α-SMA-reactive stromal cells and renews this configuration for over 20 passages in vitro. Methods We characterized the cellular elements of the MAM-1 model by microarray analysis, and immunocytochemistry. We developed flow cytometric assays to evaluate the relative responses of the tumor and stroma to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Iressa. Results The MAM-1 gene expression profile contains clusters that represent the ErbB-2 breast cancer signature and stroma-specific clusters associated with invasive breast cancers. The stability of this model and the ability to antigenically label the tumor and stromal fractions allowed us to determine the specificity of Iressa, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, for targeting the tumor cell population. Treatment resulted in a selective dose-dependent reduction in phospho-pMEK1/2 and pp44/42MAPK in tumor cells. Within 24 h the tumor cell fraction was reduced 1.9-fold while the stromal cell fraction increased >3-fold, consistent with specific reductions in phospho-pp44/42 MAPK, MEK1/2 and PCNA in tumor cells and reciprocal increases in the stromal cells. Erosion of the tumor cell nests and augmented growth of the stromal cells resembled a fibrotic response. Conclusion This model demonstrates the specificity of Iressa for HER2/neu expressing tumor cells versus the tumor associated myofibroblasts and is appropriate for delineating effects of therapy on signal transduction in the breast tumor microenvironment and improving

  13. A stable explant culture of HER2/neu invasive carcinoma supported by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin expressing stromal cells to evaluate therapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piechocki, Marie P

    2008-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the effects of therapeutic agents on the tumor microenvironment in invasive cancers, we developed a co-culture model from an invasive lobular carcinoma. Tumor cells expressing HER2/neu organize in nests surrounded by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin (α-SMA) expressing tumor stroma to resemble the morphology of an invading tumor. This co-culture, Mammary Adenocarcinoma Model (MAM-1) maintains a 1:1 ratio of HER2/neu positive tumor cells to α-SMA-reactive stromal cells and renews this configuration for over 20 passages in vitro. We characterized the cellular elements of the MAM-1 model by microarray analysis, and immunocytochemistry. We developed flow cytometric assays to evaluate the relative responses of the tumor and stroma to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Iressa. The MAM-1 gene expression profile contains clusters that represent the ErbB-2 breast cancer signature and stroma-specific clusters associated with invasive breast cancers. The stability of this model and the ability to antigenically label the tumor and stromal fractions allowed us to determine the specificity of Iressa, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, for targeting the tumor cell population. Treatment resulted in a selective dose-dependent reduction in phospho-pMEK1/2 and pp44/42MAPK in tumor cells. Within 24 h the tumor cell fraction was reduced 1.9-fold while the stromal cell fraction increased >3-fold, consistent with specific reductions in phospho-pp44/42 MAPK, MEK1/2 and PCNA in tumor cells and reciprocal increases in the stromal cells. Erosion of the tumor cell nests and augmented growth of the stromal cells resembled a fibrotic response. This model demonstrates the specificity of Iressa for HER2/neu expressing tumor cells versus the tumor associated myofibroblasts and is appropriate for delineating effects of therapy on signal transduction in the breast tumor microenvironment and improving strategies that can dually or differentially target the tumor and stromal

  14. Count of splenic stromal precursor cells in mice and expression of cytokine genes in these cells in primary cultures during different periods after immunization of animals with S. typhimurium antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorskaya, Yu F; Danilova, T A; Mezentseva, M V; Shapoval, I M; Narovlyanskii, A N; Nesterenko, V G

    2011-06-01

    Injection of S. typhimurium antigens significantly (9-fold) increased cloning efficiency and, hence, the content of stromal precursor cells in the spleen as soon as after 24 h. These parameters returned to normal by days 6-15 after immunization. Cultured splenocytes collected from immune (but not intact) animals expressed the genes of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β (on days 1, 6, 15) and IL-6 (on days 1 and 6), TNF-α (on days 6 and 15), and of IFN-α and IL-18 (on days 6 and 15). The expression of IL-4 gene was suppressed on day 6 after immunization, of IL-10 gene on days 1 and 6, of IL-6 gene on day 15. Hence, no signs of immune response suppression by stromal cells were found in this system. The spectrum and dynamics of the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine genes in stromal cell cultures from the spleen of immunized mice seemed to correspond to those needed for support of the immune response to S. typhimurium antigens, observed in immunized animals. The results indicate possible involvement of stromal cells in the realization of immune response in vivo. The increase of stromal precursor cells cloning efficiency in response to antigen injection could not be reproduced in vitro: the presence of S. typhimurium antigens in primary cultures of intact mouse bone marrow and spleen throughout the entire period of culturing ≈ 20-fold reduced cloning efficiency in cultures.

  15. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 synthesis and secretion by progestin and relaxin in long term cultures of human endometrial stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, S.C.; Jackson, J.A.; Ashmore, J.; Zhu, H.H.; Tseng, L. (Univ. of Leicester, (United Kingdom))

    1991-05-01

    The decidualized endometrium during the first trimester of pregnancy synthesizes and secretes a 32-kDa insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (termed hIGFBP-1) at high levels. IGFBP-1 is the major soluble protein product of this tissue and is principally localized to the differentiated endometrial stromal cell, the decidual cell. In the present study long term culture of stromal cells from the nonpregnant endometrium have been employed to elucidate the hormonal requirements for IGFBP-1 production. Immunoreactive IGFBP-1 was undetectable in control cultures. However, inclusion of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) induced rates of 0.35 +/- 0.09 microgram/0.1 mg cell DNA.day after 20-30 days. In these cultures cells exhibited morphological changes consistent with decidual cell differentiation. In all cultures removal of MPA after exposure for 10-16 days, with or without subsequent inclusion of relaxin (RLX), increased production of IGFBP-1 450- to 4600-fold to rates of 150-710 micrograms/0.1 mg cell DNA.day or 26-131 micrograms/10(6) cells.day on days 24-26. The rates tended to be higher with the inclusion of RLX and were sustained in contrast to cultures without RLX, where rates fell by day 30. Individual cultures responded differently to RLX when added from the initiation of culture, with either a response similar to MPA alone or a cyclical change in production, achieving maximal rates of 190-290 micrograms/0.1 mg cell DNA.day. Cultures in which RLX alone induced high IGFBP-1 high production were obtained from endometrium during the progesterone-dominated luteal phase. In cultures exhibiting high rates of immunoreactive IGFBP-1 production, the protein represented their major secretory protein product. This was confirmed by ({sup 35}S)methionine incorporation and the presence of IGFBP-1 as the predominant protein in serum-free culture medium.

  16. Scalability and process transfer of mesenchymal stromal cell production from monolayer to microcarrier culture using human platelet lysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathman, Thomas R J; Stolzing, Alexandra; Fabian, Claire; Rafiq, Qasim A; Coopman, Karen; Nienow, Alvin W; Kara, Bo; Hewitt, Christopher J

    2016-04-01

    The selection of medium and associated reagents for human mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC) culture forms an integral part of manufacturing process development and must be suitable for multiple process scales and expansion technologies. In this work, we have expanded BM-hMSCs in fetal bovine serum (FBS)- and human platelet lysate (HPL)-containing media in both a monolayer and a suspension-based microcarrier process. The introduction of HPL into the monolayer process increased the BM-hMSC growth rate at the first experimental passage by 0.049 day and 0.127/day for the two BM-hMSC donors compared with the FBS-based monolayer process. This increase in growth rate in HPL-containing medium was associated with an increase in the inter-donor consistency, with an inter-donor range of 0.406 cumulative population doublings after 18 days compared with 2.013 in FBS-containing medium. Identity and quality characteristics of the BM-hMSCs are also comparable between conditions in terms of colony-forming potential, osteogenic potential and expression of key genes during monolayer and post-harvest from microcarrier expansion. BM-hMSCs cultured on microcarriers in HPL-containing medium demonstrated a reduction in the initial lag phase for both BM-hMSC donors and an increased BM-hMSC yield after 6 days of culture to 1.20 ± 0.17 × 10(5) and 1.02 ± 0.005 × 10(5) cells/mL compared with 0.79 ± 0.05 × 10(5) and 0.36 ± 0.04 × 10(5) cells/mL in FBS-containing medium. This study has demonstrated that HPL, compared with FBS-containing medium, delivers increased growth and comparability across two BM-hMSC donors between monolayer and microcarrier culture, which will have key implications for process transfer during scale-up. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Decreased hypertrophic differentiation accompanies enhanced matrix formation in co-cultures of outer meniscus cells with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The main objective of this study was to determine whether meniscus cells from the outer (MCO) and inner (MCI) regions of the meniscus interact similarly to or differently with mesenchymal stromal stem cells (MSCs). Previous study had shown that co-culture of meniscus cells with bone marrow-derived MSCs result in enhanced matrix formation relative to mono-cultures of meniscus cells and MSCs. However, the study did not examine if cells from the different regions of the meniscus interacted similarly to or differently with MSCs. Methods Human menisci were harvested from four patients undergoing total knee replacements. Tissue from the outer and inner regions represented pieces taken from one third and two thirds of the radial distance of the meniscus, respectively. Meniscus cells were released from the menisci after collagenase treatment. Bone marrow MSCs were obtained from the iliac crest of two patients after plastic adherence and in vitro culture until passage 2. Primary meniscus cells from the outer (MCO) or inner (MCI) regions of the meniscus were co-cultured with MSCs in three-dimensional (3D) pellet cultures at 1:3 ratio, respectively, for 3 weeks in the presence of serum-free chondrogenic medium containing TGF-β1. Mono-cultures of MCO, MCI and MSCs served as experimental control groups. The tissue formed after 3 weeks was assessed biochemically, histochemically and by quantitative RT-PCR. Results Co-culture of inner (MCI) or outer (MCO) meniscus cells with MSCs resulted in neo-tissue with increased (up to 2.2-fold) proteoglycan (GAG) matrix content relative to tissues formed from mono-cultures of MSCs, MCI and MCO. Co-cultures of MCI or MCO with MSCs produced the same amount of matrix in the tissue formed. However, the expression level of aggrecan was highest in mono-cultures of MSCs but similar in the other four groups. The DNA content of the tissues from co-cultured cells was not statistically different from tissues formed from mono-cultures of

  18. Feasibility and Efficiency of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Culture with Allogeneic Platelet Lysate-Supplementation for Cell Therapy against Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengbo Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is increasing interest in human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs as regeneration therapy against cerebral stroke. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and validity of hBMSC cultures with allogeneic platelet lysates (PLs. Platelet concentrates (PC were harvested from healthy volunteers and made into single donor-derived PL (sPL. The PL mixtures (mPL were made from three different sPL. Some growth factors and platelet cell surface antigens were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The hBMSCs cultured with 10% PL were analyzed for their proliferative potential, surface markers, and karyotypes. The cells were incubated with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO agents and injected into a pig brain. MRI and histological analysis were performed. Consequently, nine lots of sPL and three mPL were prepared. ELISA analysis showed that PL contained adequate growth factors and a particle of platelet surface antigens. Cell proliferation capacity of PLs was equivalent to or higher than that of fetal calf serum (FCS. No contradiction in cell surface markers and no chromosomal aberrations were found. The MRI detected the distribution of SPIO-labeled hBMSCs in the pig brain. In summary, the hBMSCs cultured with allogeneic PL are suitable for cell therapy against stroke.

  19. Regulation of adipose-tissue-derived stromal cell orientation and motility in 2D- and 3D-cultures by direct-current electrical field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Long, Haiyan; Ren, Xiaomei; Ma, Kunlong; Xiao, Zhenghua; Wang, Ying; Guo, Yingqiang

    2017-02-01

    Cell alignment and motility play a critical role in a variety of cell behaviors, including cytoskeleton reorganization, membrane-protein relocation, nuclear gene expression, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Direct current electric field (EF) in vitro can direct many types of cells to align vertically to EF vector. In this work, we investigated the effects of EF stimulation on rat adipose-tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) in 2D-culture on plastic culture dishes and in 3D-culture on various scaffold materials, including collagen hydrogels, chitosan hydrogels and poly(L-lactic acid)/gelatin electrospinning fibers. Rat ADSCs were exposed to various physiological-strength EFs in a homemade EF-bioreactor. Changes of morphology and movements of cells affected by applied EFs were evaluated by time-lapse microphotography, and cell survival rates and intracellular calcium oscillations were also detected. Results showed that EF facilitated ADSC morphological changes, under 6 V/cm EF strength, and that ADSCs in 2D-culture aligned vertically to EF vector and kept a good cell survival rate. In 3D-culture, cell galvanotaxis responses were subject to the synergistic effect of applied EF and scaffold materials. Fast cell movement and intracellular calcium activities were observed in the cells of 3D-culture. We believe our research will provide some experimental references for the future study in cell galvanotaxis behaviors. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  20. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells exhibit immature nucleus pulposus cell phenotype in a laminin-rich pseudo-three-dimensional culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Brian H; Lee, Esther J; Jing, Liufang; Setton, Lori A; Chen, Jun

    2013-10-02

    Cell supplementation to the herniated or degenerated intervertebral disc (IVD) is a potential strategy to promote tissue regeneration and slow disc pathology. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (HUCMSCs) - originating from the Wharton's jelly - remain an attractive candidate for such endeavors with their ability to differentiate into multiple lineages. Previously, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been studied as a potential source for disc tissue regeneration. However, no studies have demonstrated that MSCs can regenerate matrix with unique characteristics matching that of immature nucleus pulposus (NP) tissues of the IVD. In our prior work, immature NP cells were found to express specific laminin isoforms and laminin-binding receptors that may serve as phenotypic markers for evaluating MSC differentiation to NP-like cells. The goal of this study is to evaluate these markers and matrix synthesis for HUCMSCs cultured in a laminin-rich pseudo-three-dimensional culture system. HUCMSCs were seeded on top of Transwell inserts pre-coated with Matrigel™, which contained mainly laminin-111. Cells were cultured under hypoxia environment with three differentiation conditions: NP differentiation media (containing 2.5% Matrigel™ solution to provide for a pseudo-three-dimensional laminin culture system) with no serum, or the same media supplemented with either insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) or transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Cell clustering behavior, matrix production and the expression of NP-specific laminin and laminin-receptors were evaluated at days 1, 7, 13 and 21 of culture. Data show that a pseudo-three-dimensional culture condition (laminin-1 rich) promoted HUCMSC differentiation under no serum conditions. Starting at day 1, HUCMSCs demonstrated a cell clustering morphology similar to that of immature NP cells in situ and that observed for primary immature NP cells within the similar laminin-rich culture system (prior study

  1. Three-dimensional spheroid cell culture of umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells leads to enhanced paracrine induction of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Jorge M; Camões, Sérgio P; Filipe, Elysse; Cipriano, Madalena; Barcia, Rita N; Filipe, Mariana; Teixeira, Mariana; Simões, Sandra; Gaspar, Manuela; Mosqueira, Diogo; Nascimento, Diana S; Pinto-do-Ó, Perpétua; Cruz, Pedro; Cruz, Helder; Castro, Matilde; Miranda, Joana P

    2015-05-09

    The secretion of trophic factors by mesenchymal stromal cells has gained increased interest given the benefits it may bring to the treatment of a variety of traumatic injuries such as skin wounds. Herein, we report on a three-dimensional culture-based method to improve the paracrine activity of a specific population of umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (UCX®) towards the application of conditioned medium for the treatment of cutaneous wounds. A UCX® three-dimensional culture model was developed and characterized with respect to spheroid formation, cell phenotype and cell viability. The secretion by UCX® spheroids of extracellular matrix proteins and trophic factors involved in the wound-healing process was analysed. The skin regenerative potential of UCX® three-dimensional culture-derived conditioned medium (CM3D) was also assessed in vitro and in vivo against UCX® two-dimensional culture-derived conditioned medium (CM2D) using scratch and tubulogenesis assays and a rat wound splinting model, respectively. UCX® spheroids kept in our three-dimensional system remained viable and multipotent and secreted considerable amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor A, which was undetected in two-dimensional cultures, and higher amounts of matrix metalloproteinase-2, matrix metalloproteinase-9, hepatocyte growth factor, transforming growth factor β1, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, fibroblast growth factor 2 and interleukin-6, when compared to CM2D. Furthermore, CM3D significantly enhanced elastin production and migration of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in vitro. In turn, tubulogenesis assays revealed increased capillary maturation in the presence of CM3D, as seen by a significant increase in capillary thickness and length when compared to CM2D, and increased branching points and capillary number when compared to basal medium. Finally, CM3D-treated wounds presented signs of faster and better resolution when compared to untreated and CM

  2. Different culture media affect growth characteristics, surface marker distribution and chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Sebastien; Moradi, Babak; Frank, Sebastian; Dreher, Thomas; Kämmerer, Peer Wolfgang; Richter, Wiltrud; Gotterbarm, Tobias

    2013-07-30

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) play an important role in modern tissue engineering, while distinct variations of culture media compositions and supplements have been reported. Because MSCs are heterogeneous regarding their regenerative potential and their surface markers, these parameters were compared in four widely used culture media compositions. MSCs were isolated from bone marrow and expanded in four established cell culture media. MSC yield/1000 MNCs, passage time and growth index were observed. In P4, typical MSC surface markers were analysed by fluorescence cytometry. Additionally, chondrogenic, adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential were evaluated. Growth index and P0 cell yield varied importantly between the media. The different expansion media had a significant influence on the expression of CD10, CD90, CD105, CD140b CD146 and STRO-1. While no significant differences were observed regarding osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation, chondrogenic differentiation was superior in medium A as reflected by GAG/DNA content. The choice of expansion medium can have a significant influence on growth, differentiation potential and surface marker expression of mesenchymal stromal cells, which is of fundamental importance for tissue engineering procedures.

  3. Bone tissue engineering with a collagen–hydroxyapatite scaffold and culture expanded bone marrow stromal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Max M.; Wang, Liping; Huang, Jianping; Rowe, David W.; Wei, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Osteoprogenitor cells combined with supportive biomaterials represent a promising approach to advance the standard of care for bone grafting procedures. However, this approach faces challenges, including inconsistent bone formation, cell survival in the implant, and appropriate biomaterial degradation. We have developed a collagen–hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold that supports consistent osteogenesis by donor derived osteoprogenitors, and is more easily degraded than a pure ceramic scaffold. Herein, the material properties are characterized as well as cell attachment, viability, and progenitor distribution in vitro. Furthermore, we examined the biological performance in vivo in a critical-size mouse calvarial defect. To aid in the evaluation of the in-house collagen–HA scaffold, the in vivo performance was compared with a commercial collagen–HA scaffold (Healos®, Depuy). The in-house collagen–HA scaffold supported consistent bone formation by predominantly donor-derived osteoblasts, nearly completely filling a 3.5 mm calvarial defect with bone in all samples (n=5) after 3 weeks of implantation. In terms of bone formation and donor cell retention at 3 weeks postimplantation, no statistical difference was found between the in-house and commercial scaffold following quantitative histomorphometry. The collagen–HA scaffold presented here is an open and well-defined platform that supports robust bone formation and should facilitate the further development of collagen–hydroxyapatite biomaterials for bone tissue engineering. PMID:24909953

  4. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for chronic myocardial ischemia (MyStromalCell Trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun

    2012-01-01

    Adipose tissue represents an abundant, accessible source of multipotent adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs). Animal studies have suggested that ADSCs have the potential to differentiate in vivo into endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. This makes ADSCs a promising new cell source...... for regenerative therapy to replace injured tissue by creating new blood vessels and cardiomyocytes in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease. The aim of this special report is to review the present preclinical data leading to clinical stem cell therapy using ADSCs in patients with ischemic heart disease....... In addition, we give an introduction to the first-in-man clinical trial, MyStromalCell Trial, which is a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study using culture-expanded ADSCs obtained from adipose-derived cells from abdominal adipose tissue and stimulated with VEGF-A(165) the week...

  5. Modulation of hemopoiesis by novel stromal cell factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipori, D.

    1988-01-01

    The microenvironment of the bone marrow in mammals is a crucial site for the maintenance of a pluripotent hemopoietic stem cell pool. Our previous studies and present findings support the notion that both this function and the fine architecture of hemopoietic organs, i.e., the spatial arrangement of blood cells within the tissue, may be directed by stromal cells. Despite the ability of cloned stromal cells to support prolonged hempoiesis and maintenance in vitro of stem cells with high radioprotective ability, they are a poor source of colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and do not secrete the other species of CSF. Furthermore, cultured stromal cells antagonize the activity of CSF. It is proposed that stromal cell factors distinct from known CSFs, regulate stem cell renewal. An additional phenomenon that is mediated by stromal cells and can not be attributed to CSF, is their ability to specifically inhibit the accumulation of cells of particular lineage and stage of differentiation. A glycoprotein that inhibits the growth of plasmacytomas but not a variety of other cell types was isolated from one type of cloned stromal cells. Such specific inhibitors may account for the control of cell localization in the hemopoietic system

  6. 3D printed scaffolds of calcium silicate-doped β-TCP synergize with co-cultured endothelial and stromal cells to promote vascularization and bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuan; Jiang, Chuan; Li, Cuidi; Li, Tao; Peng, Mingzheng; Wang, Jinwu; Dai, Kerong

    2017-07-17

    Synthetic bone scaffolds have potential application in repairing large bone defects, however, inefficient vascularization after implantation remains the major issue of graft failure. Herein, porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds with calcium silicate (CS) were 3D printed, and pre-seeded with co-cultured human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) to construct tissue engineering scaffolds with accelerated vascularization and better bone formation. Results showed that in vitro β-TCP scaffolds doped with 5% CS (5%CS/β-TCP) were biocompatible, and stimulated angiogenesis and osteogenesis. The results also showed that 5%CS/β-TCP scaffolds not only stimulated co-cultured cells angiogenesis on Matrigel, but also stimulated co-cultured cells to form microcapillary-like structures on scaffolds, and promoted migration of BMSCs by stimulating co-cultured cells to secrete PDGF-BB and CXCL12 into the surrounding environment. Moreover, 5%CS/β-TCP scaffolds enhanced vascularization and osteoinduction in comparison with β-TCP, and synergized with co-cultured cells to further increase early vessel formation, which was accompanied by earlier and better ectopic bone formation when implanted subcutaneously in nude mice. Thus, our findings suggest that porous 5%CS/β-TCP scaffolds seeded with co-cultured cells provide new strategy for accelerating tissue engineering scaffolds vascularization and osteogenesis, and show potential as treatment for large bone defects.

  7. Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Expansion in Contact with Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in a Hanging Drop Model Uncovers Disadvantages of 3D Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Schmal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells with a concomitant preservation of stemness and self-renewal potential is still an unresolved ambition. Increased numbers of methods approaching this issue using three-dimensional (3D cultures were reported. Here, we describe a simplified 3D hanging drop model for the coculture of cord blood-derived CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. When seeded as a mixed cell suspension, MSCs segregated into tight spheroids. Despite the high expression of niche-specific extracellular matrix components by spheroid-forming MSCs, HSPCs did not migrate into the spheroids in the initial phase of coculture, indicating strong homotypic interactions of MSCs. After one week, however, HSPC attachment increased considerably, leading to spheroid collapse as demonstrated by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence staining. In terms of HSPC proliferation, the conventional 2D coculture system was superior to the hanging drop model. Furthermore, expansion of primitive hematopoietic progenitors was more favored in 2D than in 3D, as analyzed in colony-forming assays. Conclusively, our data demonstrate that MSCs, when arranged with a spread (monolayer shape, exhibit better HSPC supportive qualities than spheroid-forming MSCs. Therefore, 3D systems are not necessarily superior to traditional 2D culture in this regard.

  8. Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Expansion in Contact with Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in a Hanging Drop Model Uncovers Disadvantages of 3D Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmal, Olga; Seifert, Jan; Schäffer, Tilman E; Walter, Christina B; Aicher, Wilhelm K; Klein, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Efficient ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells with a concomitant preservation of stemness and self-renewal potential is still an unresolved ambition. Increased numbers of methods approaching this issue using three-dimensional (3D) cultures were reported. Here, we describe a simplified 3D hanging drop model for the coculture of cord blood-derived CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). When seeded as a mixed cell suspension, MSCs segregated into tight spheroids. Despite the high expression of niche-specific extracellular matrix components by spheroid-forming MSCs, HSPCs did not migrate into the spheroids in the initial phase of coculture, indicating strong homotypic interactions of MSCs. After one week, however, HSPC attachment increased considerably, leading to spheroid collapse as demonstrated by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence staining. In terms of HSPC proliferation, the conventional 2D coculture system was superior to the hanging drop model. Furthermore, expansion of primitive hematopoietic progenitors was more favored in 2D than in 3D, as analyzed in colony-forming assays. Conclusively, our data demonstrate that MSCs, when arranged with a spread (monolayer) shape, exhibit better HSPC supportive qualities than spheroid-forming MSCs. Therefore, 3D systems are not necessarily superior to traditional 2D culture in this regard.

  9. Therapeutic Potential of Human Adipose-Derived Stem/Stromal Cell Microspheroids Prepared by Three-Dimensional Culture in Non-Cross-Linked Hyaluronic Acid Gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineda, Kazuhide; Feng, Jingwei; Ishimine, Hisako; Takada, Hitomi; Doi, Kentaro; Kuno, Shinichiro; Kinoshita, Kahori; Kanayama, Koji; Kato, Harunosuke; Mashiko, Takanobu; Hashimoto, Ichiro; Nakanishi, Hideki; Kurisaki, Akira; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional culture of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells for spheroid formation is known to enhance their therapeutic potential for regenerative medicine. Spheroids were prepared by culturing human adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) in a non-cross-linked hyaluronic acid (HA) gel and compared with dissociated hASCs and hASC spheroids prepared using a nonadherent dish. Preliminary experiments indicated that a 4% HA gel was the most appropriate for forming hASC spheroids with a relatively consistent size (20-50 µm) within 48 hours. Prepared spheroids were positive for pluripotency markers (NANOG, OCT3/4, and SOX-2), and 40% of the cells were SSEA-3-positive, a marker of the multilineage differentiating stress enduring or Muse cell. In contrast with dissociated ASCs, increased secretion of cytokines such as hepatocyte growth factor was detected in ASC spheroids cultured under hypoxia. On microarray ASC spheroids showed upregulation of some pluripotency markers and downregulation of genes related to the mitotic cell cycle. After ischemia-reperfusion injury to the fat pad in SCID mice, local injection of hASC spheroids promoted tissue repair and reduced the final atrophy (1.6%) compared with that of dissociated hASCs (14.3%) or phosphate-buffered saline (20.3%). Part of the administered hASCs differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. ASC spheroids prepared in a HA gel contain undifferentiated cells with therapeutic potential to promote angiogenesis and tissue regeneration after damage. This study shows the therapeutic value of human adipose-derived stem cell spheroids prepared in hyarulonic acid gel. The spheroids have various benefits as an injectable cellular product and show therapeutic potential to the stem cell-depleted conditions such as diabetic chronic skin ulcer. ©AlphaMed Press.

  10. Culture expansion of adipose derived stromal cells. A closed automated Quantum Cell Expansion System compared with manual flask-based culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Follin, Bjarke; Juhl, Morten

    2016-01-01

    ) over two passages in the automated and functionally closed Quantum Cell Expansion System (Quantum system) is compared with traditional manual cultivation. Methods: Stromal vascular fraction was isolated from abdominal fat, suspended in α-MEM supplemented with 10% Fetal Bovine Serum and seeded...... into either T75 flasks or a Quantum system that had been coated with cryoprecipitate. The cultivation of ASCs from SVF was performed in 3 ways: flask to flask; flask to Quantum system; and Quantum system to Quantum system. In all cases, quality controls were conducted for sterility, mycoplasmas......, and endotoxins, in addition to the assessment of cell counts, viability, immunophenotype, and differentiation potential. Results: The viability of ASCs passage 0 (P0) and P1 was above 96%, regardless of cultivation in flasks or Quantum system. Expression of surface markers and differentiation potential...

  11. Cryopreservation and revival of mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Kastrup, Jens

    2011-01-01

    initiated. As there has been a precedent for the use of bone marrow stem cells in the treatment of hematological malignancies and ischemic heart diseases through randomized clinical safety and efficacy trials, the development of new therapies based on culture-expanded human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs......Over the past few years, the pace of preclinical stem cell research is astonishing and adult stem cells have become the subject of intense research. Due to the presence of promising supporting preclinical data, human clinical trials for stem cell regenerative treatment of various diseases have been......) opens up new possibilities for cell therapy. To facilitate these applications, cryopreservation and long-term storage of MSCs becomes an absolute necessity. As a result, optimization of this cryopreservation protocol is absolutely critical. The major challenge during cellular cryopreservation...

  12. Effect of adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells on tendon healing in aging and estrogen deficiency: an in vitro co-culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Francesca; Della Bella, Elena; Torricelli, Paola; Pagani, Stefania; Fini, Milena

    2015-11-01

    Aging and estrogen deficiency play a pivotal role in reducing tenocyte proliferation, collagen turnover and extracellular matrix remodeling. Mesenchymal stromal cells are being studied as an alternative for tendon regeneration, but little is known about the molecular events of adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ADSCs) on tenocytes in tendons compromised by aging and estrogen deficiency. The present in vitro study aims to compare the potential therapeutic effects of ADSCs, harvested from healthy young (sham) and aged estrogen-deficient (OVX) subjects, for tendon healing. An indirect co-culture system was set up with ADSCs, isolated from OVX or sham rats, and tenocytes from OVX rats. Cell proliferation, healing rate and gene expression were evaluated in both a standard culture condition and a microwound-healing model. It was observed that tenocyte proliferation, healing rate and collagen expression improved after the addition of sham ADSCs in both culture situations. OVX ADSCs also increased tenocyte proliferation and healing rate but less compared with sham ADSCs. Decorin and Tenascin C expression increased in the presence of OVX ADSCs. Findings suggest that ADSCs might be a promising treatment for tendon regeneration in advanced age and estrogen deficiency. However, some differences between allogenic and autologous cells were found and should be investigated in further in vivo studies. It appears that allogenic ADSCs improve tenocyte proliferation, collagen expression and the healing rate more than autologous cells. Autologous cells increase collagen expression only in the absence of an injury and increase Decorin and Tenascin C more than allogenic cells. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, YM529/ONO-5920 (a novel minodronic acid), inhibits RANKL expression in a cultured bone marrow stromal cell line ST2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Shozo; Tsubaki, Masanobu; Hoshino, Mayumi; Namimatsu, Ayumi; Uji, Hiromi; Yoshioka, Shohei; Tanimori, Yoshihiro; Yanae, Masashi; Iwaki, Masahiro; Irimajiri, Kiyohiro

    2005-01-01

    Increase in bone resorption by osteoclasts can cause metabolic bone diseases, such as osteoporosis. Recent attention has been paid to the receptor activator of the NF-κB ligand (RANKL), an accelerator of osteoclast differentiation. RANKL is expressed on the bone marrow-derived stromal cell membrane and induces the differentiation of osteoclasts by binding to RANK expressed on the osteoclast precursor cell membrane. Since the inhibition of RANKL expression can lead to the inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption, the clinical application of RANKL inhibition could be expected to have a major effect on metabolic bone disease therapy. In this study, we investigated whether or not YM529/ONO-5920, a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate (a novel minodronic acid), inhibits RANKL expression in a bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (ST2 cells). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the administration of YM529/ONO-5920 to ST2 cells inhibited RANKL mRNA expression and reduced RANKL proteins as assessed by Western blot analysis. The inhibition of RANKL mRNA expression was reversed when geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), an intermediate in the mevalonate pathway, was used in combination. Furthermore, YM529/ONO-5920 reduced phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and similarly, U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibitor, inhibited RANKL expression. Pretreatment with GGPP reversed the YM529/ONO-5920-induced decrease in phosphorylation of ERK. Furthermore, YM529/ONO-5920 decreased TRAP-positive cells in co-culture of ST2 cells and an osteoclast cell line, C7 cells, and this decrease was inhibited by pretreatment with GGPP. This indicates that YM529/ONO-5920 inhibits GGPP biosynthesis in the mevalonate pathway and then signal transduction in the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, thereby inhibiting RANKL expression on ST2 cells. These results suggest a newly elucidated action of bisphosphonates in

  14. Integrated culture platform based on a human platelet lysate supplement for the isolation and scalable manufacturing of umbilical cord matrix-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Soure, António M; Fernandes-Platzgummer, Ana; Moreira, Francisco; Lilaia, Carla; Liu, Shi-Hwei; Ku, Chen-Peng; Huang, Yi-Feng; Milligan, William; Cabral, Joaquim M S; da Silva, Cláudia L

    2017-05-01

    Umbilical cord matrix (UCM)-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are promising therapeutic candidates for regenerative medicine settings. UCM MSCs have advantages over adult cells as these can be obtained through a non-invasive harvesting procedure and display a higher proliferative capacity. However, the high cell doses required in the clinical setting make large-scale manufacturing of UCM MSCs mandatory. A commercially available human platelet lysate-based culture supplement (UltraGRO TM , AventaCell BioMedical) (5%(v/v)) was tested to effectively isolate UCM MSCs and to expand these cells under (1) static conditions, using planar culture systems and (2) stirred culture using plastic microcarriers in a spinner flask. The MSC-like cells were isolated from UCM explant cultures after 11 ± 2 days. After five passages in static culture, UCM MSCs retained their immunophenotype and multilineage differentiation potential. The UCM MSCs cultured under static conditions using UltraGRO TM -supplemented medium expanded more rapidly compared with UCM MSCs expanded using a previously established protocol. Importantly, UCM MSCs were successfully expanded under dynamic conditions on plastic microcarriers using UltraGRO TM -supplemented medium in spinner flasks. Upon an initial 54% cell adhesion to the beads, UCM MSCs expanded by >13-fold after 5-6 days, maintaining their immunophenotype and multilineage differentiation ability. The present paper reports the establishment of an easily scalable integrated culture platform based on a human platelet lysate supplement for the effective isolation and expansion of UCM MSCs in a xenogeneic-free microcarrier-based system. This platform represents an important advance in obtaining safer and clinically meaningful MSC numbers for clinical translation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Targeting Stromal Recruitment by Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Ensinger, C., Tumer , Z., Tommerup, N. et al.: Hedgehog signaling in small-cell lung cancer : frequent in vivo but a rare event in vitro. Lung Cancer , 52...W81XWH-04-1-0157 TITLE: Targeting Stromal Recruitment by Prostate Cancer Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jingxian Zhang, Ph.D...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 Feb 2004 – 14 Feb 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Stromal Recruitment by Prostate Cancer

  16. Equine platelet lysate as an alternative to fetal bovine serum in equine mesenchymal stromal cell culture - too much of a good thing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, K A; Koch, T G

    2016-03-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are often culture-expanded in vitro. Presently, expansion medium (EM) for MSC is supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS). However, increasing cost, variable composition and potential risks associated with bovine antigens call for alternatives. Platelet lysate (PL) has shown promise as an alternative supplement. To determine how equine umbilical cord blood (CB) MSC proliferate in EM enriched with PL or FBS at various concentrations. Randomised dose escalation study. Platelet concentrate was generated from 5 equine whole blood samples through a double centrifugation method and standardised to 1 × 10(12) platelets/l prior to a freeze/thaw cycle to produce PL. Pooled PL or pooled FBS was added to EM at concentrations of 5% to 60%. Proliferation of 4 equine CB-MSC cultures was determined after 4 days using a resazurin semiquantitative assay. Cord blood-MSC proliferated with a dose-dependent response with no significant difference found between PL and FBS up to a 30% concentration. Beyond 30%, proliferation fell in the PL-cultured cells, while continued dose-dependent proliferation was noted in the FBS-cultured cells. Despite reduced cell numbers in high PL concentrations, live/dead staining revealed that adherent cells remained viable. Expansion medium enriched with PL can support short-term equine CB-MSC proliferation at conventional culture concentrations. Based on the unexpected suppression of CB-MSC at higher PL concentrations, an in vivo dose study is indicated to investigate if combinational therapies of CB-MSC and platelet-rich plasma are associated with synergistic or antagonistic effect on CB-MSC function. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  17. Production of interleukin-1alpha by human endometrial stromal cells is triggered during menses and dysfunctional bleeding and is induced in culture by epithelial interleukin-1alpha released upon ovarian steroids withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretto, Chrystel M; Gaide Chevronnay, Héloïse P; Cornet, Patricia B; Galant, Christine; Delvaux, Denis; Courtoy, Pierre J; Marbaix, Etienne; Henriet, Patrick

    2008-10-01

    Endometrial breakdown during menstruation and dysfunctional bleeding is triggered by the abrupt expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including interstitial collagenase (MMP-1). The paracrine induction of MMP-1 in stromal cells via epithelium-derived IL-1alpha is repressed by ovarian steroids. However, the control by estradiol (E) and progesterone (P) of endometrial IL-1alpha expression and bioactivity remains unknown. Variations of endometrial IL-1alpha mRNA and protein along the menstrual cycle and during dysfunctional bleeding were determined using RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunolabeling. The mechanism of EP control was analyzed using culture of explants, laser capture microdissection, and purified cells. Data were compared with expression changes of IL-1beta and IL-1 receptor antagonist. IL-1alpha is synthesized by epithelial cells throughout the cycle but E and/or P prevents its release. In contrast, endometrial stromal cells produce IL-1alpha only at menses and during irregular bleeding in areas of tissue breakdown. Stromal expression of IL-1alpha, like that of MMP-1, is repressed by P (alone or with E) but triggered by epithelium-derived IL-1alpha released upon EP withdrawal. Our experiments in cultured endometrium suggest that IL-1alpha released by epithelial cells triggers the production of IL-1alpha by stromal cells in a paracrine amplification loop to induce MMP-1 expression during menstruation and dysfunctional bleeding. All three steps of this amplification cascade are repressed by EP.

  18. Evaluation of GMP-compliant culture media for in vitro expansion of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuchter, Patrick; Vetter, Marcel; Saffrich, Rainer; Diehlmann, Anke; Bieback, Karen; Ho, Anthony D; Horn, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from human bone marrow serve as a resource for cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. Clinical applications require standardized protocols according to good manufacturing practice (GMP) guidelines. Donor variability as well as the intrinsic heterogeneity of MSC populations must be taken into consideration. The composition of the culture medium is a key factor in successful MSC expansion. The aim of this study was to comparatively assess the efficiency of xeno-free human platelet lysate (HPL)-based cell expansion with two commercially available media-StemPro MSC SFM CTS (for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications) and MSCGM (non-GMP-compliant, for research only)-in an academic setting as the first optimization step toward GMP-compliant manufacturing. We report the feasibility of MSC expansion up to the yielded cell number with all three media. MSCs exhibited the typical fibroblastoid morphology, with distinct differences in cell size depending on the medium. The differentiation capacity and characteristic immunophenotype were confirmed for all MSC populations. Proliferation was highest using StemPro MSC SFM CTS, whereas HPL medium was more cost-effective and its composition could be adjusted individually according to the respective needs. In summary, we present a comprehensive evaluation of GMP-compatible culture media for MSC expansion. Both StemPro and HPL medium proved to be suitable for clinical application and allowed sufficient cell proliferation. Specific differences were observed and should be considered according to the intended use. This study provides a detailed cost analysis and tools that may be helpful for the establishment of GMP-compliant MSC expansion. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Adenoviral Mediated Expression of BMP2 by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Cultured in 3D Copolymer Scaffolds Enhances Bone Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sunita; Sapkota, Dipak; Xue, Ying; Sun, Yang; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Bruland, Ove; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Selection of appropriate osteoinductive growth factors, suitable delivery method and proper supportive scaffold are critical for a successful outcome in bone tissue engineering using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). This study examined the molecular and functional effect of a combination of adenoviral mediated expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) in BMSC and recently developed and characterized, biodegradable Poly(L-lactide-co-є-caprolactone){poly(LLA-co-CL)}scaffolds in osteogenic molecular changes and ectopic bone formation by using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Pathway-focused custom PCR array, validation using TaqMan based quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and ALP staining showed significant up-regulation of several osteogenic and angiogenic molecules, including ALPL and RUNX2 in ad-BMP2 BMSC group grown in poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds both at 3 and 14 days. Micro CT and histological analyses of the subcutaneously implanted scaffolds in NOD/SCID mice revealed significantly increased radiopaque areas, percentage bone volume and formation of vital bone in ad-BMP2 scaffolds as compared to the control groups both at 2 and 8 weeks. The increased bone formation in the ad-BMP2 group in vivo was paralleled at the molecular level with concomitant over-expression of a number of osteogenic and angiogenic genes including ALPL, RUNX2, SPP1, ANGPT1. The increased bone formation in ad-BMP2 explants was not found to be associated with enhanced endochondral activity as evidenced by qRT-PCR (SOX9 and FGF2) and Safranin O staining. Taken together, combination of adenoviral mediated BMP-2 expression in BMSC grown in the newly developed poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds induced expression of osteogenic markers and enhanced bone formation in vivo.

  20. Restored in vivo-like membrane lipidomics positively influence in vitro features of cultured mesenchymal stromal/stem cells derived from human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatgilialoglu, Alexandros; Rossi, Martina; Alviano, Francesco; Poggi, Paola; Zannini, Chiara; Marchionni, Cosetta; Ricci, Francesca; Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Taglioli, Valentina; Calder, Philip C; Bonsi, Laura

    2017-02-07

    The study of lipid metabolism in stem cell physiology has recently raised great interest. The role of lipids goes beyond the mere structural involvement in assembling extra- and intra-cellular compartments. Nevertheless, we are still far from understanding the impact of membrane lipidomics in stemness maintenance and differentiation patterns. In the last years, it has been reported how in vitro cell culturing can modify membrane lipidomics. The aim of the present work was to study the membrane fatty acid profile of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) derived from human fetal membranes (hFM-MSCs) and to correlate this to specific biological properties by using chemically defined tailored lipid supplements (Refeed®). Freshly isolated hFM-MSCs were characterized for their membrane fatty acid composition. hFM-MSCs were cultivated in vitro following a classical protocol and their membrane fatty acid profile at different passages was compared to the profile in vivo. A tailored Refeed® lipid supplement was developed with the aim of reducing the differences created by the in vitro cultivation and was tested on cultured hFM-MSCs. Cell morphology, viability, proliferation, angiogenic differentiation, and immunomodulatory properties after in vitro exposure to the tailored Refeed® lipid supplement were investigated. A significant modification of hFM-MSC membrane fatty acid composition occurred during in vitro culture. Using a tailored lipid supplement, the fatty acid composition of cultured cells remained more similar to their in vivo counterparts, being characterized by a higher polyunsaturated and omega-6 fatty acid content. These changes in membrane composition had no effect on cell morphology and viability, but were linked with increased cell proliferation rate, angiogenic differentiation, and immunomodulatory properties. In particular, Refeed®-supplemented hFM-MSCs showed greater ability to express fully functional cell membrane molecules. Culturing hFM-MSCs alters their

  1. Flow cytometric characterization of culture expanded multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from horse adipose tissue: towards the definition of minimal stemness criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascucci, L; Curina, G; Mercati, F; Marini, C; Dall'Aglio, C; Paternesi, B; Ceccarelli, P

    2011-12-15

    In the last decades, multipotent mesenchymal progenitor cells have been isolated from many adult tissues of different species. The International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) has recently established that multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is the currently recommended designation. In this study, we used flow cytometry to evaluate the expression of several molecules related to stemness (CD90, CD44, CD73 and STRO-1) in undifferentiated, early-passaged MSCs isolated from adipose tissue of four donor horses (AdMSCs). The four populations unanimously expressed high levels of CD90 and CD44. On the contrary, they were unexpectedly negative to CD73. A small percentage of the cells, finally, showed the expression of STRO-1. This last result might be due to the existence of a small subpopulation of STRO-1+ cells or to a poor cross-reactivity of the antibody. A remarkable donor-to-donor consistency and reproducibility of these findings was demonstrated. The data presented herein support the idea that equine AdMSCs may be easily isolated and selected by adherence to tissue culture plastic and exhibit a surface profile characterized by some peculiar differences in comparison to those described in other species. Continued characterization of these cells will help to clarify several aspects of their biology and may ultimately enable the isolation of specific, purified subpopulations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tencerova, Michaela; Kassem, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) microenvironment represents an important compartment of bone that regulates bone homeostasis and the balance between bone formation and bone resorption depending on the physiological needs of the organism. Abnormalities of BM microenvironmental dynamics can lead to metabolic bone...... diseases. BM stromal cells (also known as skeletal or mesenchymal stem cells) [bone marrow stromal stem cell (BMSC)] are multipotent stem cells located within BM stroma and give rise to osteoblasts and adipocytes. However, cellular and molecular mechanisms of BMSC lineage commitment to adipocytic lineage...

  3. Bone marrow stromal cells spontaneously produce Flt3-ligand: influence of ionizing radiations and cytokine stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertho, Jean Marc; Demarquay, Christelle; Mouiseddine, Moubarak; Douenat, Noémie; Stefani, Johanna; Prat, Marie; Paquet, François

    2008-08-01

    To define the ability of human bone marrow (BM) stromal cells to produce fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3)-ligand (FL), and the effect of irradiation, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) or tumour growth factor beta (TGFbeta) on FL production. Primary BM stromal cell cultures were irradiated at 2-10 Gy or were stimulated with TNFalpha or TGFbeta1. The presence of FL was tested in culture supernatants and in cell lysate. The presence of a membrane-bound form of FL and the level of gene expression were also tested. Primary BM stromal cells spontaneously released FL. This production was increased by TNFalpha but not by TGFbeta1 or by irradiation. Chemical induction of osteoblastic differentiation from BM stromal cells also induced an increase in FL release. Our results suggest that the observed increase in FL concentration after in vivo irradiation is an indirect effect. The possible implication of BM stromal cells in these mechanisms is discussed.

  4. Long-term in-vivo tumorigenic assessment of human culture-expanded adipose stromal/stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacIsaac, Zoe Marie, E-mail: zmm4a@virgina.edu [University of Virginia (United States); Shang, Hulan, E-mail: shanghulan@gmail.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia (United States); Agrawal, Hitesh, E-mail: hiteshdos@hotmail.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia (United States); Yang, Ning, E-mail: ny6u@virgina.edu [Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia (United States); Parker, Anna, E-mail: amp4v@virginia.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Virginia (United States); Katz, Adam J., E-mail: ajk2f@virginia.edu [Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia (United States)

    2012-02-15

    After more than a decade of extensive experimentation, the promise of stem cells to revolutionize the field of medicine has negotiated their entry into clinical trial. Adipose tissue specifically holds potential as an attainable and abundant source of stem cells. Currently undergoing investigation are adipose stem cell (ASC) therapies for diabetes and critical limb ischemia, among others. In the enthusiastic pursuit of regenerative therapies, however, questions remain regarding ASC persistence and migration, and, importantly, their safety and potential for neoplasia. To date, assays of in vivo ASC activity have been limited by early end points. We hypothesized that with time, ASCs injected subcutaneously undergo removal by normal tissue turnover and homeostasis, and by the host's immune system. In this study, a high dose of culture expanded ASCs was formulated and implanted as multicellular aggregates into immunocompromised mice, which were maintained for over one year. Animals were monitored for toxicity, and surviving cells quantified at study endpoint. No difference in growth/weight or lifespan was found between cell-treated and vehicle treated animals, and no malignancies were detected in treated animals. Moreover, real-time PCR for a human specific sequence, ERV-3, detected no persistent ASCs. With the advent of clinical application, clarification of currently enigmatic stem cell properties has become imperative. Our study represents the longest duration determination of stem cell activity in vivo, and contributes strong evidence in support of the safety of adipose derived stem cell applications. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adipose stem cells promise novel clinical therapies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Before clinical translation, safety profiles must be further elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subcutaneously injected non-autologous adipose stem cells do not form tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subcutaneously injected non

  5. Long-term in-vivo tumorigenic assessment of human culture-expanded adipose stromal/stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacIsaac, Zoe Marie; Shang, Hulan; Agrawal, Hitesh; Yang, Ning; Parker, Anna; Katz, Adam J.

    2012-01-01

    After more than a decade of extensive experimentation, the promise of stem cells to revolutionize the field of medicine has negotiated their entry into clinical trial. Adipose tissue specifically holds potential as an attainable and abundant source of stem cells. Currently undergoing investigation are adipose stem cell (ASC) therapies for diabetes and critical limb ischemia, among others. In the enthusiastic pursuit of regenerative therapies, however, questions remain regarding ASC persistence and migration, and, importantly, their safety and potential for neoplasia. To date, assays of in vivo ASC activity have been limited by early end points. We hypothesized that with time, ASCs injected subcutaneously undergo removal by normal tissue turnover and homeostasis, and by the host's immune system. In this study, a high dose of culture expanded ASCs was formulated and implanted as multicellular aggregates into immunocompromised mice, which were maintained for over one year. Animals were monitored for toxicity, and surviving cells quantified at study endpoint. No difference in growth/weight or lifespan was found between cell-treated and vehicle treated animals, and no malignancies were detected in treated animals. Moreover, real-time PCR for a human specific sequence, ERV-3, detected no persistent ASCs. With the advent of clinical application, clarification of currently enigmatic stem cell properties has become imperative. Our study represents the longest duration determination of stem cell activity in vivo, and contributes strong evidence in support of the safety of adipose derived stem cell applications. -- Highlights: ► Adipose stem cells promise novel clinical therapies. ► Before clinical translation, safety profiles must be further elucidated. ► Subcutaneously injected non-autologous adipose stem cells do not form tumors. ► Subcutaneously injected non-autologous adipose stem cells undergo complete removal by one year.

  6. New aspects of galectin functionality in nuclei of cultured bone marrow stromal and epidermal cells: biotinylated galectins as tool to detect specific bindong sites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Purkrábková, T.; Smetana Jr., K.; Dvořánková, B.; Holíková, Z.; Böck, C.; Lensch, M.; André, S.; Pytlík, R.; Liu, F.; Klíma, Jiří; Smetana, K.; Motlík, Jan; Gabius, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 95, - (2003), s. 535-545 ISSN 0248-4900 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : biotinylation * bone marrow stromal cells * galectin Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.159, year: 2003

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells from the Wharton’s jelly of umbilical cord segments provide stromal support for the maintenance of cord blood hematopoietic stem cells during long-term ex vivo culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshi, Tiki; Zabriskie, Ryan C.; Bodie, Shamanique; Kidd, Shannon; Ramin, Susan; Paganessi, Laura A.; Gregory, Stephanie A.; Fung, Henry C.; Christopherson, Kent W.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are routinely obtained from marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, and umbilical cord blood. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are traditionally isolated from marrow. Bone marrow–derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) have previously demonstrated their ability to act as a feeder layer in support of ex vivo cord blood expansion. However, the use of BM-MSCs to support the growth, differentiation, and engraftment of cord blood may not be ideal for transplant purposes. Therefore, the potential of MSCs from a novel source, the Wharton’s jelly of umbilical cords, to act as stromal support for the long-term culture of cord blood HSC was evaluated. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Umbilical cord–derived MSCs (UC-MSCs) were cultured from the Wharton’s jelly of umbilical cord segments. The UC-MSCs were then profiled for expression of 12 cell surface receptors and tested for their ability to support cord blood HSCs in a long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) assay. RESULTS Upon culture, UC-MSCs express a defined set of cell surface markers (CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD166, and HLA-A) and lack other markers (CD45, CD34, CD38, CD117, and HLA-DR) similar to BM-MSCs. Like BM-MSCs, UC-MSCs effectively support the growth of CD34+ cord blood cells in LTC-IC assays. CONCLUSION These data suggest the potential therapeutic application of Wharton’s jelly–derived UC-MSCs to provide stromal support structure for the long-term culture of cord blood HSCs as well as the possibility of cotransplantation of genetically identical, HLA-matched, or unmatched cord blood HSCs and UC-MSCs in the setting of HSC transplantation. PMID:18798803

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells from the Wharton's jelly of umbilical cord segments provide stromal support for the maintenance of cord blood hematopoietic stem cells during long-term ex vivo culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshi, Tiki; Zabriskie, Ryan C; Bodie, Shamanique; Kidd, Shannon; Ramin, Susan; Paganessi, Laura A; Gregory, Stephanie A; Fung, Henry C; Christopherson, Kent W

    2008-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are routinely obtained from marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, and umbilical cord blood. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are traditionally isolated from marrow. Bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) have previously demonstrated their ability to act as a feeder layer in support of ex vivo cord blood expansion. However, the use of BM-MSCs to support the growth, differentiation, and engraftment of cord blood may not be ideal for transplant purposes. Therefore, the potential of MSCs from a novel source, the Wharton's jelly of umbilical cords, to act as stromal support for the long-term culture of cord blood HSC was evaluated. Umbilical cord-derived MSCs (UC-MSCs) were cultured from the Wharton's jelly of umbilical cord segments. The UC-MSCs were then profiled for expression of 12 cell surface receptors and tested for their ability to support cord blood HSCs in a long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) assay. Upon culture, UC-MSCs express a defined set of cell surface markers (CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD166, and HLA-A) and lack other markers (CD45, CD34, CD38, CD117, and HLA-DR) similar to BM-MSCs. Like BM-MSCs, UC-MSCs effectively support the growth of CD34+ cord blood cells in LTC-IC assays. These data suggest the potential therapeutic application of Wharton's jelly-derived UC-MSCs to provide stromal support structure for the long-term culture of cord blood HSCs as well as the possibility of cotransplantation of genetically identical, HLA-matched, or unmatched cord blood HSCs and UC-MSCs in the setting of HSC transplantation.

  9. Innate lymphoid cells and their stromal microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermayer, Zoltán; Vojkovics, Dóra; Balogh, Péter

    2017-09-01

    In addition to the interaction between antigen presenting cells, T and B lymphocytes, recent studies have revealed important roles for a diverse set of auxiliary cells that profoundly influence the induction and regulation of immune responses against pathogens. Of these the stromal cells composed of various non-hematopoietic constituents are crucial for the creation and maintenance of specialized semi-static three-dimensional lymphoid tissue microenvironment, whereas the more recently described innate lymphoid cells are generated by the diversification of committed lymphoid precursor cells independently from clonally rearranged antigen receptor genes. Recent findings have revealed important contributions by innate lymphoid cells in inflammation and protection against pathogens in a tissue-specific manner. Importantly, lymphoid stromal cells also influence the onset of immune responses in tissue-specific fashion, raising the possibility of tissue-specific stromal - innate lymphoid cell collaboration. In this review we summarize the main features and interactions between these two cells types, with particular emphasis on ILC type 3 cells and their microenvironmental partners. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Crosstalk between stromal cells and cancer cells in pancreatic cancer: New insights into stromal biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Han-Xiang; Zhou, Bin; Cheng, Yu-Gang; Xu, Jian-Wei; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Guang-Yong; Hu, San-Yuan

    2017-04-28

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies worldwide. Increasing evidence has confirmed the pivotal role of stromal components in the regulation of carcinogenesis, invasion, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance in PC. Interaction between neoplastic cells and stromal cells builds a specific microenvironment, which further modulates the malignant properties of cancer cells. Instead of being a "passive bystander", stroma may play a role as a "partner in crime" in PC. However, the role of stromal components in PC is complex and requires further investigation. In this article, we review recent advances regarding the regulatory roles and mechanisms of stroma biology, especially the cellular components such as pancreatic stellate cells, macrophages, neutrophils, adipocytes, epithelial cells, pericytes, mast cells, and lymphocytes, in PC. Crosstalk between stromal cells and cancer cells is thoroughly investigated. We also review the prognostic value and molecular therapeutic targets of stroma in PC. This review may help us further understand the molecular mechanisms of stromal biology and its role in PC development and therapeutic resistance. Moreover, targeting stroma components may provide new therapeutic strategies for this stubborn disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of chemotherapy and irradiation on interactions between stromal and hemopoietic cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, G.I.; Greenberger, J.S.; Canellos, G.P.

    1982-01-01

    We examined the interactions between stromal and hemopoietic cells in mouse long-term bone marrow cultures. The adherent stroma is formed by several layers of cells consisting of macrophage, fibroblasts, and adventitial cells which accumulate lipid to become adipocytes. Stromal cells become closely apposed to loosely adherent hemopoietic cells but gap junctions occur only among cells in the adherent layer. The hemopoietic cells form tightly packed structures resembling cobblestones which contain granulocytes in all stages of differentiation. Using an in vitro model for bone marrow transplantation (BMT), we treated pure mouse stromal cell cultures with irradiation (1000 R) or chemotherapy (BCNU) prior to engraftment with hemopoietic stem cells. After two weeks, engrafted cultures were indistinguishable from the long-term bone marrow cultures previously described by Dexter. The adipocytes in irradiated cultures developed numerous submembrane pinocytotic vesicles but stromal-hemopoietic cell interactions remained unchanged compared to unirradiated controls. By contrast, granulocytes grafted onto chemotherapy treated stroma showed swelling of endoplasmic reticulum suggesting early toxic injury. These findings are consistent with functional studies of hemopoiesis after engraftment onto treated stroma and confirm an important role for stromal cells in the support of hemopoiesis

  12. Reproducible isolation of lymph node stromal cells reveals site-dependent differences in fibroblastic reticular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne L Fletcher

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Within lymph nodes, non-hematopoietic stromal cells organize and interact with leukocytes in an immunologically important manner. In addition to organizing T and B cell segregation and expressing lymphocyte survival factors, several recent studies have shown that lymph node stromal cells shape the naïve T cell repertoire, expressing self-antigens which delete self-reactive T cells in a unique and non-redundant fashion. A fundamental role in peripheral tolerance, in addition to an otherwise extensive functional portfolio, necessitates closer study of lymph node stromal cell subsets using modern immunological techniques; however this has not routinely been possible in the field, due to difficulties reproducibly isolating these rare subsets. Techniques were therefore developed for successful ex vivo and in vitro manipulation and characterization of lymph node stroma. Here we discuss and validate these techniques in mice and humans, and apply them to address several unanswered questions regarding lymph node composition. We explored the steady-state stromal composition of lymph nodes isolated from mice and humans, and found that marginal reticular cells and lymphatic endothelial cells required lymphocytes for their normal maturation in mice. We also report alterations in the proportion and number of fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs between skin-draining and mesenteric lymph nodes. Similarly, transcriptional profiling of FRCs revealed changes in cytokine production from these sites. Together, these methods permit highly reproducible stromal cell isolation, sorting, and culture.

  13. Reproducible isolation of lymph node stromal cells reveals site-dependent differences in fibroblastic reticular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Anne L; Malhotra, Deepali; Acton, Sophie E; Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika; Bellemare-Pelletier, Angelique; Curry, Mark; Armant, Myriam; Turley, Shannon J

    2011-01-01

    Within lymph nodes, non-hematopoietic stromal cells organize and interact with leukocytes in an immunologically important manner. In addition to organizing T and B cell segregation and expressing lymphocyte survival factors, several recent studies have shown that lymph node stromal cells shape the naïve T cell repertoire, expressing self-antigens which delete self-reactive T cells in a unique and non-redundant fashion. A fundamental role in peripheral tolerance, in addition to an otherwise extensive functional portfolio, necessitates closer study of lymph node stromal cell subsets using modern immunological techniques; however this has not routinely been possible in the field, due to difficulties reproducibly isolating these rare subsets. Techniques were therefore developed for successful ex vivo and in vitro manipulation and characterization of lymph node stroma. Here we discuss and validate these techniques in mice and humans, and apply them to address several unanswered questions regarding lymph node composition. We explored the steady-state stromal composition of lymph nodes isolated from mice and humans, and found that marginal reticular cells and lymphatic endothelial cells required lymphocytes for their normal maturation in mice. We also report alterations in the proportion and number of fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) between skin-draining and mesenteric lymph nodes. Similarly, transcriptional profiling of FRCs revealed changes in cytokine production from these sites. Together, these methods permit highly reproducible stromal cell isolation, sorting, and culture.

  14. Insufficient stromal support in MDS results from molecular and functional deficits of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyh, S; Oz, S; Cadeddu, R-P; Fröbel, J; Brückner, B; Kündgen, A; Fenk, R; Bruns, I; Zilkens, C; Hermsen, D; Gattermann, N; Kobbe, G; Germing, U; Lyko, F; Haas, R; Schroeder, T

    2013-09-01

    Ineffective hematopoiesis is a major characteristic of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) causing relevant morbidity and mortality. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to physiologically support hematopoiesis, but their contribution to the pathogenesis of MDS remains elusive. We show that MSC from patients across all MDS subtypes (n=106) exhibit significantly reduced growth and proliferative capacities accompanied by premature replicative senescence. Osteogenic differentiation was significantly reduced in MDS-derived MSC, indicated by cytochemical stainings and reduced expressions of Osterix and Osteocalcin. This was associated with specific methylation patterns that clearly separated MDS-MSC from healthy controls and showed a strong enrichment for biological processes associated with cellular phenotypes and transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, in MDS-MSC, we detected altered expression of key molecules involved in the interaction with hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), in particular Osteopontin, Jagged1, Kit-ligand and Angiopoietin as well as several chemokines. Functionally, this translated into a significantly diminished ability of MDS-derived MSC to support CD34+ HSPC in long-term culture-initiating cell assays associated with a reduced cell cycle activity. Taken together, our comprehensive analysis shows that MSC from all MDS subtypes are structurally, epigenetically and functionally altered, which leads to impaired stromal support and seems to contribute to deficient hematopoiesis in MDS.

  15. Mammary fibroadenoma with pleomorphic stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Najla; Kallel, Rim; Ellouze, Sameh; Mellouli, Manel; Gouiaa, Naourez; Mnif, Héla; Boudawara, Tahia

    2015-01-01

    The presence of enlarged and pleomorphic nuclei is usually regarded as a feature of malignancy, but it may on occasion be seen in benign lesions such as mammary fibroadenomas. We present such a case of fibroadenoma occurring in a 37-year-old woman presenting with a self-palpable right breast mass. Histological examination of the tumor revealed the presence of multi and mononucleated giant cells with pleomorphic nuclei. The recognition of the benign nature of these cells is necessary for differential diagnosis from malignant lesions of the breast. fibroadenoma - pleomorphic stromal cells - atypia - breast.

  16. Simulated Microgravity Alters Actin Cytoskeleton and Integrin-Mediated Focal Adhesions of Cultured Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershovich, P. M.; Gershovic, J. G.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2008-06-01

    Cytoskeletal alterations occur in several cell types including lymphocytes, glial cells, and osteoblasts, during spaceflight and under simulated microgravity (SMG) (3, 4). One potential mechanism for cytoskeletal gravisensitivity is disruption of extracellular matrix (ECM) and integrin interactions. Focal adhesions are specialized sites of cell-matrix interaction composed of integrins and the diversity of focal adhesion-associated cytoplasmic proteins including vinculin, talin, α-actinin, and actin filaments (4, 5). Integrins produce signals essential for proper cellular function, survival and differentiation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of SMG on F-actin cytoskeleton structure, vinculin focal adhesions, expression of some integrin subtypes and cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) in mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone marrow (hMSCs). Simulated microgravity was produced by 3D-clinostat (Dutch Space, Netherlands). Staining of actin fibers with TRITC-phalloidin showed reorganization even after 30 minutes of simulated microgravity. The increasing of cells number with abnormal F-actin was observed after subsequent terms of 3D-clinorotation (6, 24, 48, 120 hours). Randomization of gravity vector altered dimensional structure of stress fibers and resulted in remodeling of actin fibers inside the cells. In addition, we observed vinculin redistribution inside the cells after 6 hours and prolonged terms of clinorotation. Tubulin fibers in a contrast with F-actin and vinculin didn't show any reorganization even after long 3Dclinorotation (120 hours). The expression of integrin α2 increased 1,5-6-fold in clinorotated hMSCs. Also we observed decrease in number of VCAM-1-positive cells and changes in expression of ICAM-1. Taken together, our findings indicate that SMG leads to microfilament and adhesion alterations of hMSCs most probably associated with involvement of some integrin subtypes.

  17. Evaluation of umbilical cord blood CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells expansion with inhibition of TGF-β receptorII in co-culture with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi Akhkand, Saman; Amirizadeh, Naser; Nikougoftar, Mahin; Alizadeh, Javad; Zaker, Farhad; Sarveazad, Arash; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Faramarzi, Mahmood

    2016-08-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an important source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). However, low number of HSCs in UCB has been an obstacle for adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The expansion of HSCs in culture is one approach to overcome this problem. In this study, we investigated the expansion of UCB-HSCs by using human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as feeder layer as well as inhibiting the TGF-β signaling pathway through reduction of TGF-βRII expression. CD34(+) cells were isolated from UCB and transfected by SiRNA targeting TGF-βRII mRNA. CD34(+) cells were expanded in four culture media with different conditions, including 1) expansion of CD34(+) cells in serum free medium containing growth factors, 2) expansion of cells transfected with SiRNA targeting TGF-βRII in medium containing growth factors, 3) expansion of cells in presence of growth factors and MSCs, 4) expansion of cells transfected with SiRNA targeting TGF-βRII on MSCs feeder layer in medium containing growth factors. These culture conditions were evaluated for the number of total nucleated cells (TNCs), CD34 surface marker as well as using CFU assay on 8th day after culture. The fold increase in CD34(+) cells, TNCs, and colony numbers (71.8±6.9, 93.2±10.2 and 128±10, respectively) was observed to be highest in fourth culture medium compared to other culture conditions. The difference between number of cells in four culture media in 8th day compared to unexpanded cells (0day) before expansion was statistically significant (P<0.05). The results showed that transfection of CD34(+) cells with SiRNA targeting TGF-βRII and their co-culture with MSCs could considerably increase the number of progenitors. Therefore, this method could be useful for UCB-HSCs expansion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cyclin G1 inhibits the proliferation of mouse endometrial stromal cell in decidualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Qian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Uterine stromal cell decidualization is a dynamic physiological process in which cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis are orchestrated and occur in a temporal and cell-specific manner. This process is important for successful embryo implantation. Many cell-cycle regulators are involved in decidualization. The protein cyclin G1 is a unique regulator of the cell cycle with dual functions in cell proliferation. It was reported that cyclin G1 is expressed in mouse uterine stromal cells during the period of peri-implantation. To prove the function of cyclin G1 in mouse uterine stromal cells during this period, immunohistochemistry was used to stain mouse uterine tissues on days 4-8 of pregnancy. The results showed obvious spatial and temporal expression of cyclin G1 in uterine stromal cells, and that it is expressed in the cells of the primary decidual zone (PDZ on day 5 and secondary decidual zone (SDZ on days 6 and 7, when the stromal cells experienced active proliferation and differentiation was initiated. Applying the decidualization model of cultured primary stromal cells in vitro, we further revealed that the expression of cyclin G1 is associated with decidualization of stromal cells induced by medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA and estradiol-17β (E2. RNA interference was used for the knockdown of cyclin G1 in the induced decidual cells. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that the proportion of cells in the S stage was increased, and decreased in the G2/M phase. Our study indicates that cyclin G1, as a negative regulator of the cell cycle, plays an important role in the process of decidualization in mouse uterine stromal cells by inhibiting cell-cycle progression.

  19. The Stromal Microenvironment Modulates Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

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    Hima V. Vangapandu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL cells are replicationally quiescent mature B-cells. In short-term cultures, supporting stromal cells provide a survival advantage to CLL cells by inducing transcription and translation without promoting proliferation. We hypothesized that the stromal microenvironment augments malignant B cells' metabolism to enable the cells to cope with their energy demands for transcription and translation. We used extracellular flux analysis to assess the two major energy-generating pathways, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos and glycolysis, in primary CLL cells in the presence of three different stromal cell lines. OxPhos, measured as the basal oxygen consumption rate (OCR and maximum respiration capacity, was significantly higher in 28 patients' CLL cells cocultured with bone marrow–derived NK.Tert stromal cells than in CLL cells cultured alone (P = .004 and <.0001, respectively. Similar OCR induction was observed in CLL cells cocultured with M2-10B4 and HS-5 stromal lines. In contrast, heterogeneous changes in the extracellular acidification rate (a measure of glycolysis were observed in CLL cells cocultured with stromal cells. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of CLL cells' metabolomics profile indicated stroma-mediated stimulation of nucleotide synthesis. Quantitation of ribonucleotide pools showed a significant two-fold increase in CLL cells cocultured with stromal cells, indicating that the stroma may induce CLL cellular bioenergy and the RNA building blocks necessary for the transcriptional requirement of a prosurvival phenotype. The stroma did not impact the proliferation index (Ki-67 staining of CLL cells. Collectively, these data suggest that short-term interaction (≤24 hours with stroma increases OxPhos and bioenergy in replicationally quiescent CLL cells.

  20. Honokiol, a constituent of Magnolia species, inhibits adrenergic contraction of human prostate strips and induces stromal cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Herrmann

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: Honokiol inhibits smooth muscle contraction in the human prostate, and induces cell death in cultured stromal cells. Because prostate smooth muscle tone and prostate growth may cause LUTS, it appears possible that honokiol improves voiding symptoms.

  1. Isolation and differentiation of stromal vascular cells to beige/brite cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aune, Ulrike Liisberg; Ruiz, Lauren; Kajimura, Shingo

    2013-01-01

    cold exposure or by PPARγ agonists, therefore, this cell type has potential as a therapeutic target for obesity treatment. Although most immortalized adipocyte lines cannot recapitulate the process of "browning" of white fat in culture, primary adipocytes isolated from stromal vascular fraction...

  2. CULTIVATION OF HUMAN LIVER CELLS AND ADIPOSE-DERIVED MESENCHYMAL STROMAL CELLS IN PERFUSION BIOREACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. В. Basok

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to show the progress of the experiment of cultivation of human liver cells and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells in perfusion bioreactor.Materials and methods. The cultivation of a cell-engineered construct, consisting of a biopolymer microstructured collagen-containing hydrogel, human liver cells, adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells, and William’s E Medium, was performed in a perfusion bioreactor.Results. On the 7th day large cells with hepatocyte morphology – of a polygonal shape and a centrally located round nucleus, – were present in the culture chambers of the bioreactor. The metabolic activity of hepatocytes in cell-engineered constructs was confi rmed by the presence of urea in the culture medium on the seventh day of cultivation in the bioreactor and by the resorption of a biopolymer microstructured collagen-containing hydrogel.

  3. PHD-2 Suppression in Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Enhances Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Sae Hee; Nauta, Allison C; Morrison, Shane D; Hu, Michael S; Zimmermann, Andrew S; Chung, Michael T; Glotzbach, Jason P; Wong, Victor W; Walmsley, Graham G; Peter Lorenz, H; Chan, Denise A; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Giaccia, Amato J; Longaker, Michael T

    2018-01-01

    Cell therapy with mesenchymal stromal cells is a promising strategy for tissue repair. Restoration of blood flow to ischemic tissues is a key step in wound repair, and mesenchymal stromal cells have been shown to be proangiogenic. Angiogenesis is critically regulated by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) superfamily, consisting of transcription factors targeted for degradation by prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD)-2. The aim of this study was to enhance the proangiogenic capability of mesenchymal stromal cells and to use these modified cells to promote wound healing. Mesenchymal stromal cells harvested from mouse bone marrow were transduced with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against PHD-2; control cells were transduced with scrambled shRNA (shScramble) construct. Gene expression quantification, human umbilical vein endothelial cell tube formation assays, and wound healing assays were used to assess the effect of PHD knockdown mesenchymal stromal cells on wound healing dynamics. PHD-2 knockdown mesenchymal stromal cells overexpressed HIF-1α and multiple angiogenic factors compared to control (p cells treated with conditioned medium from PHD-2 knockdown mesenchymal stromal cells exhibited increased formation of capillary-like structures and enhanced migration compared with human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with conditioned medium from shScramble-transduced mesenchymal stromal cells (p cells healed at a significantly accelerated rate compared with wounds treated with shScramble mesenchymal stromal cells (p cells (p cells augments their proangiogenic potential in wound healing therapy. This effect appears to be mediated by overexpression of HIF family transcription factors and up-regulation of multiple downstream angiogenic factors.

  4. Hemangioblastomas: histogenesis of the stromal cell studied by immunocytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurco, S; Nadji, M; Harvey, D G; Parker, J C; Font, R L; Morales, A R

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-one cases of hemangioblastoma from the cerebellum, spinal cord and retina were studied using the unlabeled antibody peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique with antibodies directed against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and factor VIII related antigen (VIIIR:Ag). In 19 of 21 cases studied with anti-GFAP, astrocytes were identified peripherally, and in 13 cases they were found centrally within the tumor. In no instance did stromal cells react positively for GFAP. Sixteen cases with anti-VIIIR:Ag antibody were examined, and in all cases many stromal cells showed positive staining. It is concluded that the stromal cells were of endothelial origin. The occasional stromal cells that other investigators have identified as reacting positively for GFAP may represent stromal cells capable of ingesting extracellular GFAP derived from reactive astrocytes within the tumor, or they may be lipidized astrocytes.

  5. Identification of a candidate proteomic signature to discriminate multipotent and non-multipotent stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosu-Myles, Michael; She, Yi-Min; Fair, Joel; Muradia, Gauri; Mehic, Jelica; Menendez, Pablo; Prasad, Shiv S; Cyr, Terry D

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cell cultures contain multipotent cells that may have therapeutic utility for tissue restoration; however, the identity of the cell that maintains this function remains poorly characterized. We have utilized a unique model of murine bone marrow stroma in combination with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry to compare the nuclear, cytoplasmic and membrane associated proteomes of multipotent (MSC) (CD105+) and non-multipotent (CD105-) stromal cells. Among the 25 most reliably identified proteins, 10 were verified by both real-time PCR and Western Blot to be highly enriched, in CD105+ cells and were members of distinct biological pathways and functional networks. Five of these proteins were also identified as potentially expressed in human MSC derived from both standard and serum free human stromal cultures. The quantitative amount of each protein identified in human stromal cells was only minimally affected by media conditions but varied highly between bone marrow donors. This study provides further evidence of heterogeneity among cultured bone marrow stromal cells and identifies potential candidate proteins that may prove useful for identifying and quantifying both murine and human MSC in vitro.

  6. Identification of a candidate proteomic signature to discriminate multipotent and non-multipotent stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rosu-Myles

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cell cultures contain multipotent cells that may have therapeutic utility for tissue restoration; however, the identity of the cell that maintains this function remains poorly characterized. We have utilized a unique model of murine bone marrow stroma in combination with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry to compare the nuclear, cytoplasmic and membrane associated proteomes of multipotent (MSC (CD105+ and non-multipotent (CD105- stromal cells. Among the 25 most reliably identified proteins, 10 were verified by both real-time PCR and Western Blot to be highly enriched, in CD105+ cells and were members of distinct biological pathways and functional networks. Five of these proteins were also identified as potentially expressed in human MSC derived from both standard and serum free human stromal cultures. The quantitative amount of each protein identified in human stromal cells was only minimally affected by media conditions but varied highly between bone marrow donors. This study provides further evidence of heterogeneity among cultured bone marrow stromal cells and identifies potential candidate proteins that may prove useful for identifying and quantifying both murine and human MSC in vitro.

  7. Changing the Properties of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells by IFNγ Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petinati, N A; Kapranov, N M; Bigil'deev, A E; Popova, M D; Davydova, Yu O; Gal'tseva, I V; Drize, N I; Kuz'mina, L A; Parovichnikova, E N; Savchenko, V G

    2017-06-01

    We studied changes in the population of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells activated by IFNγ. The cells were cultured under standard conditions; IFNγ was added in various concentrations for 4 h or over 2 passages. It was shown that the total cell production significantly decreased after long-term culturing with IFNγ, but 4-h exposure did not affect this parameter. After 4-h culturing, the expression levels of IDO1, CSF1, and IL-6 increased by 300, 7, and 2.4 times, respectively, and this increase persisted 1 and 2 days after removal of IFNγ from the culture medium. The expression of class I and II MHC (HLA) on cell surface practically did not change immediately after exposure to IFNγ, but during further culturing, HLA-ABC (MHC I) and HLA-DR (MHC II) expression significantly increased, which abolished the immune privilege in these cells, the property allowing clinical use of allogenic multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells can suppress proliferation of lymphocytes. The degree of this suppression depends on individual properties of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell donor. Treatment with IFNγ did not significantly affect the intensity of inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation by these cells.

  8. Cryopreservation and revival of human mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Ekblond, Annette; Kastrup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapy is a promising and innovative new treatment for different degenerative and autoimmune diseases, and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the bone marrow have demonstrated great therapeutic potential due to their immunosuppressive and regenerative capacities. The establishment ...

  9. The cannabinoid receptor type 2 as mediator of mesenchymal stromal cell immunosuppressive properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Rossi

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells are non-hematopoietic, multipotent progenitor cells producing cytokines, chemokines, and extracellular matrix proteins that support hematopoietic stem cell survival and engraftment, influence immune effector cell development, maturation, and function, and inhibit alloreactive T-cell responses. The immunosuppressive properties of human mesenchymal stromal cells have attracted much attention from immunologists, stem cell biologists and clinicians. Recently, the presence of the endocannabinoid system in hematopoietic and neural stem cells has been demonstrated. Endocannabinoids, mainly acting through the cannabinoid receptor subtype 2, are able to modulate cytokine release and to act as immunosuppressant when added to activated T lymphocytes. In the present study, we have investigated, through a multidisciplinary approach, the involvement of the endocannabinoids in migration, viability and cytokine release of human mesenchymal stromal cells. We show, for the first time, that cultures of human mesenchymal stromal cells express all of the components of the endocannabinoid system, suggesting a potential role for the cannabinoid CB2 receptor as a mediator of anti-inflammatory properties of human mesenchymal stromal cells, as well as of their survival pathways and their capability to home and migrate towards endocannabinoid sources.

  10. Selective isolation and differentiation of a stromal population of human embryonic stem cells with osteogenic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda M; Mahmood, Amer; Ditzel, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    cultured in osteogenic differentiation media, up regulation of osteoblastic lineage markers (DLX5, MSX2, RUNX2, SPARC, ALP, COL1a1, BGLAP, IBSP, DCN, LOX-L4) and production of in vitro mineralized matrix was detected. hESC-stromal cells loaded on a carrier and implanted either subcutaneously...... or in a critical size calvarial defect in immune deficient mice for 10weeks, resulted in new bone formation and partial repair of the calvarial defect. In conclusion, hESC-stromal can be isolated from hESC cultures and represent a good source for obtaining cells with osteogenic differentiation potential suitable...

  11. Intestinal stromal cells in mucosal immunity and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, B M J; Simmons, A

    2013-03-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that non-hematopoietic stromal cells of the intestine have multiple roles in immune responses and inflammation at this mucosal site. Despite this, many still consider gut stromal cells as passive structural entities, with past research focused heavily on their roles in fibrosis, tumor progression, and wound healing, rather than their contributions to immune function. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of stromal cells in intestinal immunity, highlighting the many immunological axes in which stromal cells have a functional role. We also consider emerging data that broaden the potential scope of their contribution to immunity in the gut and argue that these so-called "non-immune" cells are reclassified in light of their diverse contributions to intestinal innate immunity and the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis.

  12. Gut Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Messina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, first found in bone marrow (BM, are the structural architects of all organs, participating in most biological functions. MSCs possess tissue-specific signatures that allow their discrimination according to their origin and location. Among their multiple functions, MSCs closely interact with immune cells, orchestrating their activity to maintain overall homeostasis. The phenotype of tissue MSCs residing in the bowel overlaps with myofibroblasts, lining the bottom walls of intestinal crypts (pericryptal or interspersed within intestinal submucosa (intercryptal. In Crohn’s disease, intestinal MSCs are tightly stacked in a chronic inflammatory milieu, which causes their enforced expression of Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC. The absence of Class II MHC is a hallmark for immune-modulator and tolerogenic properties of normal MSCs and, vice versa, the expression of HLA-DR is peculiar to antigen presenting cells, that is, immune-activator cells. Interferon gamma (IFNγ is responsible for induction of Class II MHC expression on intestinal MSCs. The reversal of myofibroblasts/MSCs from an immune-modulator to an activator phenotype in Crohn’s disease results in the formation of a fibrotic tube subverting the intestinal structure. Epithelial metaplastic areas in this context can progress to dysplasia and cancer.

  13. Non-multipotent stroma inhibit the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosu-Myles, Michael; Fair, Joel; Pearce, Nelson; Mehic, Jelica

    2010-10-01

    The ability to expand and maintain bone marrow (BM)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in vitro is an important aspect of their therapeutic potential. Despite this, the exact composition of stromal cell types within these cultures and the potential effects of non-stem cells on the maintenance of MSC are poorly understood. C57BL/6J BM stroma was investigated as a model to determine the relationship between MSC and non-multipotent cells in vitro. Whole BM and single-cell derived cultures were characterized using flow cytometry and cell sorting combined with multipotent differentiation. Proliferation of individual stromal populations was evaluated using BrdU. At a single-cell level, MSC were distinguished from committed progenitors, and cells lacking differentiation ability, by the expression of CD105 (CD105+). A 3-fold reduction in the percentage of CD105+ cells was detected after prolonged culture and correlated with loss of MSC. Depletion of CD105+ cells coincided with a 10-20% increase in the frequency of proliferating CD105(-) cells. Removal of CD105(-) stroma caused increased proliferation in CD105+ cells, which could be diminished by conditioned media from parent cultures. Comparison of the multipotent differentiation potential in purified and non-purified CD105+ cells determined that MSC were detectable for at least 3 weeks longer when cultured in the absence of CD105(-) cells. This work identifies a simple model for characterizing the different cellular components present in BM stromal cultures and demonstrates that stromal cells lacking multipotent differentiating capacity greatly reduce the longevity of MSC.

  14. Aging up-regulates ARA55 in stromal cells, inducing androgen-mediated prostate cancer cell proliferation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Qingsong; Cui, Di; Liang, Shengjie; Xia, Shujie; Jing, Yifeng; Han, Bangmin

    2016-06-01

    Stromal cells in the peripheral zone (PZ) of the prostate from older males (PZ-old) could significantly promote Prostate cancer (PCa) growth compared with stromal cells from young males (PZ-young). But the mechanism is still unknown. In the co-culture system with PZ-old cells, Pc3/Du145 cells showed advanced proliferation and migration after Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) incubation, but DHT didn't show the similar effect in PZ-young co-culture system. Also, higher androgen/AR signal pathway activity and AR-related cytokines secretion (FGF-2, KGF, IGF-1) were found in PZ-old cells. As AR exprssison was equivalent in PZ-old and PZ-young cells, we focused on Androgen receptor associated protein-55(ARA55), a stromal-specific androgen receptor (AR) coactivator. ARA55 expression was higher in PZ-old cells compared with PZ-young cells in vitro. After knocking down ARA55 expression in PZ-old cells, the PCa growth- promoting effect from the PZ-old cells was diminished, which may be explained by the decreased the progressive cytokines secretion (FGF-2, KGF, IGF-1) from PZ-old stromal cells. In vivo, the consistent results were also found: PZ-old cells promoted prostate cancer cells growth, but this effect receded when knocking down ARA55 expression in PZ-old cells. From our study, we found PZ stromal cells presented age-related effects in proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells in the androgen/AR dependent manner. As aging increased, more ARA55 were expressed in PZ stromal cells, leading to more sensitive androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signal pathway, then constituting a more feasible environment to cancer cells.

  15. Chondrocytes co-cultured with Stromal Vascular Fraction of adipose tissue present more intense chondrogenic characteristics than with Adipose Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Ling; Prins, H.J.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Helder, M.; Evseenko, D.; Moroni, L; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Lin, Y.; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Partly replacement of chondrocytes by stem cells has been proposed to improve the performance of autologous chondrocytes implantation (ACI). Our previous studies showed that the increased cartilage production in pellet co-cultures of chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is due to a trophic

  16. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Antineoplastic Drug Loading and Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrella, Francesco; Rimoldi, Isabella; Rizzo, Stefania; Spaggiari, Lorenzo

    2017-11-23

    Mesenchymal stromal cells are a population of undifferentiated multipotent adult cells possessing extensive self-renewal properties and the potential to differentiate into a variety of mesenchymal lineage cells. They express broad anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activity on the immune system and after transplantation can interact with the surrounding microenvironment, promoting tissue healing and regeneration. For this reason, mesenchymal stromal cells have been widely used in regenerative medicine, both in preclinical and clinical settings. Another clinical application of mesenchymal stromal cells is the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to neoplastic cells, maximizing the cytotoxic activity against cancer cells and minimizing collateral damage to non-neoplastic tissues. Mesenchymal stem cells are home to the stroma of several primary and metastatic neoplasms and hence can be used as vectors for targeted delivery of antineoplastic drugs to the tumour microenvironment, thereby reducing systemic toxicity and maximizing antitumour effects. Paclitaxel and gemcitabine are the chemotherapeutic drugs best loaded by mesenchymal stromal cells and delivered to neoplastic cells, whereas other agents, like pemetrexed, are not internalized by mesenchymal stromal cells and therefore are not suitable for advanced antineoplastic therapy. This review focuses on the state of the art of advanced antineoplastic cell therapy and its future perspectives, emphasizing in vitro and in vivo preclinical results and future clinical applications.

  17. Engineering Cartilage Tissue by Pellet Coculture of Chondrocytes and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Ling; Post, Janine Nicole; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; van Wijnen, Andre J.

    2015-01-01

    Coculture of chondrocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in pellets has been shown to be beneficial in engineering cartilage tissue in vitro. In these cultures trophic effects of MSCs increase the proliferation and matrix deposition of chondrocytes. Thus, large cartilage constructs can be made

  18. Aging is associated with decreased maximal life span and accelerated senescence of bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dokkedahl, Karin Stenderup; Justesen, Jeannette; Clausen, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Age-related decrease in bone formation is well described. However, the cellular causes are not known. Thus, we have established cultures of bone marrow stromal cells (MSC) from young (aged 18-29 years, n = 6) and old (aged 68-81 years, n = 5) donors. MSC were serially passaged until reaching maxi...

  19. Cell sheet engineering using the stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue as a vascularization strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, M.; Cerqueira, Mariana Teixeira; Santos, T. C.; Marques, Belém Sampaio; Ludovico, Paula; Marques, A. P.; Pirraco, Rogério P.; Reis, R. L.

    2017-01-01

    Current vascularization strategies for Tissue Engineering constructs, in particular cell sheet-based, are limited by time-consuming and expensive endothelial cell isolation and/or by the complexity of using extrinsic growth factors. Herein, we propose an alternative strategy using angiogenic cell sheets (CS) obtained from the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue that can be incorporated into more complex constructs. Cells from the SVF were cultured in normoxic and hypoxic conditi...

  20. Mouse endometrial stromal cells produce basement-membrane components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Damjanov, A; Weiss, J

    1986-01-01

    During mouse pregnancy, uterine stromal cells transform into morphologically distinct decidual cells under the influence of the implanting embryo and a proper hormonal environment. Mechanical stimulation of hormonally primed uterine stromal cells leads to the same morphologic alterations. The dec......During mouse pregnancy, uterine stromal cells transform into morphologically distinct decidual cells under the influence of the implanting embryo and a proper hormonal environment. Mechanical stimulation of hormonally primed uterine stromal cells leads to the same morphologic alterations....... Mouse decidual cells isolated from 6- to 7-day pregnant uteri explanted in vitro continue to synthesize basement-membrane-like extracellular matrix. Using immunohistochemistry and metabolic labeling followed by immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and fluorography, it was shown that the decidual cells...... to undergo pseudodecidualization. We thus showed that stromal cells from pregnant and nonpregnant mouse uteri synthesize significant amounts of basement-membrane components in vitro, and hence could serve as a good model for the study of normal basement-membrane components....

  1. FGF7 supports hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and niche-dependent myeloblastoma cells via autocrine action on bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Ruri; Minami, Kaori; Tanaka, Satowa; Nagai, Mami; Matsui, Keiji; Hasegawa, Natsumi; Roeder, Robert G.; Asano, Shigetaka; Ito, Mitsuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •FGF7 is downregulated in MED1-deficient mesenchymal cells. •FGF7 produced by mesenchymal stromal cells is a novel hematopoietic niche molecule. •FGF7 supports hematopoietic progenitor cells and niche-dependent leukemia cells. •FGF7 activates FGFR2IIIb of bone marrow stromal cells in an autocrine manner. •FGF7 indirectly acts on hematopoietic cells lacking FGFR2IIIb via stromal cells. -- Abstract: FGF1 and FGF2 support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) under stress conditions. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF7) may be a novel niche factor for HSPC support and leukemic growth. FGF7 expression was attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for the MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex. When normal mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were cocultured with Med1 +/+ MEFs or BM stromal cells in the presence of anti-FGF7 antibody, the growth of BM cells and the number of long-time culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) decreased significantly. Anti-FGF7 antibody also attenuated the proliferation and cobblestone formation of MB1 stromal cell-dependent myeloblastoma cells. The addition of recombinant FGF7 to the coculture of BM cells and Med1 −/− MEFs increased BM cells and LTC-ICs. FGF7 and its cognate receptor, FGFR2IIIb, were undetectable in BM cells, but MEFs and BM stromal cells expressed both. FGF7 activated downstream targets of FGFR2IIIb in Med1 +/+ and Med1 −/− MEFs and BM stromal cells. Taken together, we propose that FGF7 supports HSPCs and leukemia-initiating cells indirectly via FGFR2IIIb expressed on stromal cells

  2. FGF7 supports hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and niche-dependent myeloblastoma cells via autocrine action on bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishino, Ruri; Minami, Kaori; Tanaka, Satowa [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Nagai, Mami [Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Matsui, Keiji; Hasegawa, Natsumi [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Roeder, Robert G. [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Asano, Shigetaka [Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Ito, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: itomi@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Department of Family and Community Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan)

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •FGF7 is downregulated in MED1-deficient mesenchymal cells. •FGF7 produced by mesenchymal stromal cells is a novel hematopoietic niche molecule. •FGF7 supports hematopoietic progenitor cells and niche-dependent leukemia cells. •FGF7 activates FGFR2IIIb of bone marrow stromal cells in an autocrine manner. •FGF7 indirectly acts on hematopoietic cells lacking FGFR2IIIb via stromal cells. -- Abstract: FGF1 and FGF2 support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) under stress conditions. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF7) may be a novel niche factor for HSPC support and leukemic growth. FGF7 expression was attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for the MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex. When normal mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were cocultured with Med1{sup +/+} MEFs or BM stromal cells in the presence of anti-FGF7 antibody, the growth of BM cells and the number of long-time culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) decreased significantly. Anti-FGF7 antibody also attenuated the proliferation and cobblestone formation of MB1 stromal cell-dependent myeloblastoma cells. The addition of recombinant FGF7 to the coculture of BM cells and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs increased BM cells and LTC-ICs. FGF7 and its cognate receptor, FGFR2IIIb, were undetectable in BM cells, but MEFs and BM stromal cells expressed both. FGF7 activated downstream targets of FGFR2IIIb in Med1{sup +/+} and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs and BM stromal cells. Taken together, we propose that FGF7 supports HSPCs and leukemia-initiating cells indirectly via FGFR2IIIb expressed on stromal cells.

  3. Stromal-cell and cancer-cell exosomes leading the metastatic exodus for the promised niche

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are thought to play an important role in metastasis. Luga and colleagues have described the production of exosomes by stromal cells such as cancer-associated fibroblasts that are taken up by breast cancer cells and are then loaded with Wnt 11, which is associated with stimulation of the invasiveness and metastasis of the breast cancer cells. Previous studies have shown that exosomes produced by breast cancer cells are taken up by stromal fibroblasts and other stromal cells, suggestin...

  4. IL-8 and MCP Gene Expression and Production by LPS-Stimulated Human Corneal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni M. Shtein

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine time course of effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS on production of interleukin-8 (IL-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP by cultured human corneal stromal cells. Methods. Human corneal stromal cells were harvested from donor corneal specimens, and fourth to sixth passaged cells were used. Cell cultures were stimulated with LPS for 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours. Northern blot analysis of IL-8 and MCP gene expression and ELISA for IL-8 and MCP secretion were performed. ELISA results were analyzed for statistical significance using two-tailed Student's t-test. Results. Northern blot analysis demonstrated significantly increased IL-8 and MCP gene expression after 4 and 8 hours of exposure to LPS. ELISA for secreted IL-8 and MCP demonstrated statistically significant increases (P<0.05 after corneal stromal cell stimulation with LPS. Conclusions. This paper suggests that human corneal stromal cells may participate in corneal inflammation by secreting potent leukocyte chemotactic and activating proteins in a time-dependent manner when exposed to LPS.

  5. Nonviral transfection of adipose tissue stromal cells: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatina, T V; Kalinina, N I; Parfyonova, E V

    2009-04-01

    Delivery of plasmid DNA and interfering RNA into adipose tissue stromal cells was carried out by the methods of lipofection, calcium phosphate method, and by electroporation. The percent of transfected cells after delivery of plasmid DNA by the calcium phosphate method and lipofection was 0 and 15%, respectively, vs. more than 50% after electroporation. Similar results were obtained for delivery of short-strand RNA into cells. These data indicate that electroporation is the most effective method of nonviral transfection of adipose tissue stromal cells.

  6. Developing a Continuous Bioprocessing Approach to Stromal Cell Manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotto, Martina; Gouveia, Ricardo; Abidin, Fadhilah Zainal; Figueiredo, Francisco; Connon, Che J

    2017-11-29

    To this day, the concept of continuous bioprocessing has been applied mostly to the manufacture of molecular biologics such as proteins, growth factors, and secondary metabolites with biopharmaceutical uses. The present work now sets to explore the potential application of continuous bioprocess methods to source large numbers of human adherent cells with potential therapeutic value. To this purpose, we developed a smart multifunctional surface coating capable of controlling the attachment, proliferation, and subsequent self-detachment of human corneal stromal cells. This system allowed the maintenance of cell cultures under steady-state growth conditions, where self-detaching cells were continuously replenished by the proliferation of those remaining attached. This facilitated a closed, continuous bioprocessing platform with recovery of approximately 1% of the total adherent cells per hour, a yield rate that was maintained for 1 month. Moreover, both attached and self-detached cells were shown to retain their original phenotype. Together, these results represent the proof-of-concept for a new high-throughput, high-standard, and low-cost biomanufacturing strategy with multiple potentials and important downstream applications.

  7. Characteristics and function of bone marrow stromal adherent cells in normal and irradiated mice and guinea pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changyu, Zheng; Ji, Liu; Xiaoying, Bi

    1986-04-01

    It has been shown from cytochemical and other characteristic studies of bone marrow stromal cells in CFU-F that there are seven types of stromal cells in the stromal adherent cell layer of normal and irradiated C/sub 57/ mice whereas there are only six types in guinea pigs. On the other hand, a radioresistant cell subtype appears in adherent layer after irradiation of both C/sub 57/ mice and guinea pig since the supernatant of cultured CFU-F of the normal and irradiated C/sub 57/ mice can stimulate production of CFU-Gm. It is justifiable that the bone marrow stromal adherent cells of the C/sub 57/ mice could produce CSF.

  8. A stromal myoid cell line provokes thymic erythropoiesis between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The thymus provides an optimal cellular and humoral microenvironment for cell line committed differentiation of haematopoietic stem cells. The immigration process requires the secretion of at least one peptide called thymotaxine by cells of the reticulo-epithelial (RE) network of the thymic stromal cellular ...

  9. Senescence and quiescence in adipose-derived stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Rebekka Harary; Follin, Bjarke; Lund, Lisbeth Drozd

    2017-01-01

    Background aims. Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) are attractive sources for cell-based therapies. The hypoxic niche of ASCs in vivo implies that cells will benefit from hypoxia during in vitro expansion. Human platelet lysate (hPL) enhances ASC proliferation rates, compared with fetal bovine...

  10. Generation of mesenchymal stromal cells in the presence of platelet lysate: a phenotypic and functional comparison of umbilical cord blood- and bone marrow-derived progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzini, Maria Antonietta; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Cometa, Angela Maria; Perotti, Cesare; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Novara, Francesca; Visai, Livia; Moretta, Antonia; Del Fante, Claudia; Villa, Raffaella; Ball, Lynne M.; Fibbe, Willem E.; Maccario, Rita; Locatelli, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells are employed in various different clinical settings in order to modulate immune response. However, relatively little is known about the mechanisms responsible for their immunomodulatory effects, which could be influenced by both the cell source and culture conditions. Design and Methods We tested the ability of a 5% platelet lysate-supplemented medium to support isolation and ex vivo expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells from full-term umbilical-cord blood. We also investigated the biological/functional properties of umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells, in comparison with platelet lysate-expanded bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells. Results The success rate of isolation of mesenchymal stromal cells from umbilical cord blood was in the order of 20%. These cells exhibited typical morphology, immunophenotype and differentiation capacity. Although they have a low clonogenic efficiency, umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells may possess high proliferative potential. The genetic stability of these cells from umbilical cord blood was demonstrated by a normal molecular karyotype; in addition, these cells do not express hTERT and telomerase activity, do express p16ink4a protein and do not show anchorage-independent cell growth. Concerning alloantigen-specific immune responses, umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells were able to: (i) suppress T- and NK-lymphocyte proliferation, (ii) decrease cytotoxic activity and (iii) only slightly increase interleukin-10, while decreasing interferon-γ secretion, in mixed lymphocyte culture supernatants. While an indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-specific inhibitor did not reverse mesenchymal stromal cell-induced suppressive effects, a prostaglandin E2-specific inhibitor hampered the suppressive effect of both umbilical cord blood- and bone marrow-mesenchymal stromal cells on alloantigen-induced cytotoxic activity. Mesenchymal stromal cells from both sources expressed HLA

  11. Hypoxia impedes hypertrophic chondrogenesis of human multipotent stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlitta, Debby; van Rijen, Mattie H P; Schrijver, Edmée J M; Alblas, Jacqueline; Dhert, Wouter J A

    2012-10-01

    Within the field of bone tissue engineering, the endochondral approach to forming bone substitutes represents a novel concept, where cartilage will undergo hypertrophic differentiation before its conversion into bone. For this purpose, clinically relevant multipotent stromal cells (MSCs), MSCs, can be differentiated into the chondrogenic lineage before stimulating hypertrophy. Controversy exists in literature on the oxygen tensions naturally present during this transition in, for example, the growth plate. Therefore, the present study focused on the effects of different oxygen tensions on the progression of the hypertrophic differentiation of MSCs. Bone marrow-derived MSCs of four human donors were expanded, and differentiation was induced in aggregate cultures. Normoxic (20% oxygen) and hypoxic (5%) conditions were imposed on the cultures in chondrogenic or hypertrophic differentiation media. After 4 weeks, the cultures were histologically examined and by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Morphological assessment showed the chondrogenic differentiation of cultures from all donors under normoxic chondrogenic conditions. In addition, hypertrophic differentiation was observed in cultures derived from all but one donor. The deposition of collagen type X was evidenced in both chondrogenically and hypertrophically stimulated cultures. However, mineralization was exclusively observed in hypertrophically stimulated, normoxic cultures. Overall, the progression of hypertrophy was delayed in hypoxic compared with normoxic groups. The observed delay was supported by the gene expression patterns, especially showing the up-regulation of the late hypertrophic markers osteopontin and osteocalcin under normoxic hypertrophic conditions. Concluding, normoxic conditions are more beneficial for hypertrophic differentiation of MSCs than are hypoxic conditions, as long as the MSCs possess hypertrophic potential. This finding has implications for cartilage tissue engineering as well

  12. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detamore, Michael S

    2013-11-25

    Cells of the human umbilical cord offer tremendous potential for improving human health. Cells from the Wharton’s jelly (umbilical cord stroma) in particular, referred to as human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (HUCMSCs), hold several advantages that make them appealing for translational research. In the previous issue of Stem Cell Research & Therapy, Chon and colleagues made an important contribution to the HUCMSC literature not only by presenting HUCMSCs as an emerging cell source for intervertebral disc regeneration in general and the nucleus pulposus in particular, but also by demonstrating that an extracellular matrix-based strategy might be preferred over the use of growth factors. By culturing HUCMSCs under hypoxia in serum-free conditions in the presence of Matrigel with laminin-111, they were able to achieve intense collagen II staining by 21 days without the addition of exogenous growth factors. There is tremendous translational significance here in that such raw materials may alleviate the need for the use of growth factors in some instances, and this may have important ramifications in reducing product cost and streamlining regulatory approval. Chon and colleagues provide a promising example of the potential of HUCMSCs, demonstrating the ability to guide HUCMSC differentiation even in the absence of serum and growth factors and supporting the use of HUCMSCs as a viable alternative in intervertebral disc regeneration.

  13. Immune suppressor factor confers stromal cell line with enhanced supporting activity for hematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Shibata, Fumi; Fukuchi, Yumi; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Ito, Miyuki; Urano, Atsushi; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kitamura, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    Immune suppressor factor (ISF) is a subunit of the vacuolar ATPase proton pump. We earlier identified a short form of ISF (ShIF) as a stroma-derived factor that supports cytokine-independent growth of mutant Ba/F3 cells. Here, we report that ISF/ShIF supports self-renewal and expansion of primary hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Co-culture of murine bone marrow cells with a stromal cell line overexpressing ISF or ShIF (MS10/ISF or MS10/ShIF) not only enhanced their colony-forming activity and the numbers of long-term culture initiating cells, but also maintained the competitive repopulating activity of HSC. This stem cell supporting activity depended on the proton-transfer function of ISF/ShIF. Gene expression analysis of ISF/ShIF-transfected cell lines revealed down-regulation of secreted frizzled-related protein-1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3, and the restoration of their expressions in MS10/ISF cells partially reversed its enhanced LTC-IC supporting activity to a normal level. These results suggest that ISF/ShIF confers stromal cells with enhanced supporting activities for HSCs by modulating Wnt-activity and the extracellular matrix

  14. In vitro differentiation of neural cells from human adipose tissue derived stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Shruti D; Patel, Chetan N; Vanikar, Aruna V; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2018-01-01

    Stem cells, including neural stem cells (NSCs), are endowed with self-renewal capability and hence hold great opportunity for the institution of replacement/protective therapy. We propose a method for in vitro generation of stromal cells from human adipose tissue and their differentiation into neural cells. Ten grams of donor adipose tissue was surgically resected from the abdominal wall of the human donor after the participants' informed consents. The resected adipose tissue was minced and incubated for 1 hour in the presence of an enzyme (collagenase-type I) at 37 0 C followed by its centrifugation. After centrifugation, the supernatant and pellets were separated and cultured in a medium for proliferation at 37 0 C with 5% CO2 for 9-10 days in separate tissue culture dishes for generation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). At the end of the culture, MSC were harvested and analyzed. The harvested MSC were subjected for further culture for their differentiation into neural cells for 5-7 days using differentiation medium mainly comprising of neurobasal medium. At the end of the procedure, culture cells were isolated and studied for expression of transcriptional factor proteins: orthodenticle homolog-2 (OTX-2), beta-III-tubulin (β3-Tubulin), glial-fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) and synaptophysin-β2. In total, 50 neural cells-lines were generated. In vitro generated MSC differentiated neural cells' mean quantum was 5.4 ± 6.9 ml with the mean cell count being, 5.27 ± 2.65 × 10 3/ μl. All of them showed the presence of OTX-2, β3-Tubulin, GFAP, synaptophysin-β2. Neural cells can be differentiated in vitro from MSC safely and effectively. In vitro generated neural cells represent a potential therapy for recovery from spinal cord injuries and neurodegenerative disease.

  15. Equine Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Retain a Pericyte-Like Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Cristina L; Sheldrake, Tara A; Dawson, Lucy; Menghini, Timothy; Rink, Burgunde Elisabeth; Amilon, Karin; Khan, Nusrat; Péault, Bruno; Donadeu, Francesc Xavier

    2017-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been used in human and equine regenerative medicine, and interest in exploiting their potential has increased dramatically over the years. Despite significant effort to characterize equine MSCs, the actual origin of these cells and how much of their native phenotype is maintained in culture have not been determined. In this study, we investigated the relationship between MSCs, derived from adipose tissue (AT) and bone marrow (BM), and pericytes in the horse. Both pericyte (CD146, NG2, and αSMA) and MSC (CD29, CD90, and CD73) markers were detected in equine AT and colocalized around blood vessels. Importantly, as assessed by flow cytometry, both pericyte (CD146, NG2, and αSMA) and MSC (CD29, CD44, CD90, and CD105) markers were present in a majority (≥90%) of cells in cultures of AT-MSCs and BM-MSCs; however, levels of pericyte markers were variable within each of those populations. Moreover, the expression of pericyte markers was maintained for at least eight passages in both AT-MSCs and BM-MSCs. Hematopoietic (CD45) and endothelial (CD144) markers were also detected at low levels in MSCs by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Finally, in coculture experiments, AT-MSCs closely associated with networks produced by endothelial cells, resembling the natural perivascular location of pericytes in vivo. Our results indicate that equine MSCs originate from perivascular cells and moreover maintain a pericyte-like phenotype in culture. Therefore, we suggest that, in addition to classical MSC markers, pericyte markers such as CD146 could be used when assessing and characterizing equine MSCs.

  16. Natural stimulus responsive scaffolds/cells for bone tissue engineering: influence of lysozyme upon scaffold degradation and osteogenic differentiation of cultured marrow stromal cells induced by CaP coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Ana M; Pham, Quynh P; Malafaya, Patrícia B; Raphael, Robert M; Kasper, F Kurtis; Reis, Rui L; Mikos, Antonios G

    2009-08-01

    This work proposes the use of nonporous, smart, and stimulus responsive chitosan-based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. The overall vision is to use biodegradable scaffolds based on chitosan and starch that present properties that will be regulated by bone regeneration, with the capability of gradual in situ pore formation. Biomimetic calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings were used as a strategy to incorporate lysozyme at the surface of chitosan-based materials with the main objective of controlling and tailoring their degradation profile as a function of immersion time. To confirm the concept, degradation tests with a lysozyme concentration similar to that incorporated into CaP chitosan-based scaffolds were used to study the degradation of the scaffolds and the formation of pores as a function of immersion time. Degradation studies with lysozyme (1.5 g/L) showed the formation of pores, indicating an increase of porosity ( approximately 5-55% up to 21 days) resulting in porous three-dimensional structures with interconnected pores. Additional studies investigated the influence of a CaP biomimetic coating on osteogenic differentiation of rat marrow stromal cells (MSCs) and showed enhanced differentiation of rat MSCs seeded on the CaP-coated chitosan-based scaffolds with lysozyme incorporated. At all culture times, CaP-coated chitosan-based scaffolds with incorporated lysozyme demonstrated greater osteogenic differentiation of MSCs, bone matrix production, and mineralization as demonstrated by calcium deposition measurements, compared with controls (uncoated scaffolds). The ability of these CaP-coated chitosan-based scaffolds with incorporated lysozyme to create an interconnected pore network in situ coupled with the demonstrated positive effect of these scaffolds upon osteogenic differentiation of MSCs and mineralized matrix production illustrates the strong potential of these scaffolds for application in bone tissue engineering strategies.

  17. CD34+ Testicular Stromal Cells Support Long-Term Expansion of Embryonic and Adult Stem and Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyeon; Seandel, Marco; Falciatori, Ilaria; Wen, Duancheng; Rafii, Shahin

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells reside in specialized microenvironments created by supporting stromal cells that orchestrate self-renewal and lineage-specific differentiation. However, the precise identity of the cellular and molecular pathways that support self-renewal of stem cells is not known. For example, long-term culture of prototypical stem cells, such as adult spermatogonial stem and progenitor cells (SPCs), in vitro has been impeded by the lack of an optimal stromal cell line that initiates and sustains proliferation of these cells. Indeed, current methods, including the use of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), have not been efficient and have generally led to inconsistent results. Here, we report the establishment of a novel CD34-positive cell line, referred to as JK1, derived from mouse testicular stromal cells that not only facilitated long-term SPC culture but also allowed faithful generation of SPCs and multipotent stem cells. SPCs generated on JK1 maintained key features of germ line stem cells, including expression of PLZF, DAZL, and GCNA. Furthermore, these feeders also promoted the long-term cultivation of other types of primitive cells including multi-potent adult spermatogonial-derived stem cells, pluripotent murine embryonic stem cells, and embryonic germ cells derived from primordial germ cells. Stem cells could be passaged serially and still maintained expression of characteristic markers such as OCT4 and NANOG in vitro, as well as the ability to generate all three germ layers in vivo. These results indicate that the JK1 cell line is capable of promoting long-term culture of primitive cells. As such, this cell line allows for identification of stromal-derived factors that support long-term proliferation of various types of stem cells and constitutes a convenient alternative to other types of feeder layers. PMID:18669907

  18. Stromal cell regulation of homeostatic and inflammatory lymphoid organogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kain, Matthew J W; Owens, Benjamin M J

    2013-01-01

    Summary Secondary lymphoid organs function to increase the efficiency of interactions between rare, antigen-specific lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells, concentrating antigen and lymphocytes in a supportive environment that facilitates the initiation of an adaptive immune response. Homeostatic lymphoid tissue organogenesis proceeds via exquisitely controlled spatiotemporal interactions between haematopoietic lymphoid tissue inducer populations and multiple subsets of non-haematopoietic stromal cells. However, it is becoming clear that in a range of inflammatory contexts, ectopic or tertiary lymphoid tissues can develop inappropriately under pathological stress. Here we summarize the role of stromal cells in the development of homeostatic lymphoid tissue, and assess emerging evidence that suggests a critical role for stromal involvement in the tertiary lymphoid tissue development associated with chronic infections and inflammation. PMID:23621403

  19. Designed Surface Topographies Control ICAM-1 Expression in Tonsil-Derived Human Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliaksei S. Vasilevich

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs, the T-cell zone stromal cell subtype in the lymph nodes, create a scaffold for adhesion and migration of immune cells, thus allowing them to communicate. Although known to be important for the initiation of immune responses, studies about FRCs and their interactions have been impeded because FRCs are limited in availability and lose their function upon culture expansion. To circumvent these limitations, stromal cell precursors can be mechanotranduced to form mature FRCs. Here, we used a library of designed surface topographies to trigger FRC differentiation from tonsil-derived stromal cells (TSCs. Undifferentiated TSCs were seeded on a TopoChip containing 2176 different topographies in culture medium without differentiation factors, then monitored cell morphology and the levels of ICAM-1, a marker of FRC differentiation. We identified 112 and 72 surfaces that upregulated and downregulated, respectively, ICAM-1 expression. By monitoring cell morphology, and expression of the FRC differentiation marker ICAM-1 via image analysis and machine learning, we discovered correlations between ICAM-1 expression, cell shape and design of surface topographies and confirmed our findings by using flow cytometry. Our findings confirmed that TSCs are mechano-responsive cells and identified particular topographies that can be used to improve FRC differentiation protocols.

  20. Stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Dana; Bjørnager, Louise; Langkilde, Anne

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Stromal cell-derived factor 1a (SDF-1α), is a chemokine and is able to home hematopoietic progenitor cells to injured areas of heart tissue for structural repair. Previous studies have found increased levels of SDF-1α in several cardiac diseases, but only few studies have investigated...

  1. Endogenous collagen influences differentiation of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, H.; Mentink, A.; Bank, R.; Stoop, R.; Blitterswijk, C. van; Boer, J. de

    2010-01-01

    Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) are multipotent cells that, in the presence of appropriate stimuli, can differentiate into different lineages such as the osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. In the presence of ascorbic acid, MSCs secrete an extracellular matrix

  2. Endogenous Collagen Influences Differentiation of Human Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, Hugo; Mentink, Anouk; Bank, Ruud; Stoop, Reinout; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) are multipotent cells that, in the presence of appropriate stimuli, can differentiate into different lineages such as the osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. In the presence of ascorbic acid, MSCs secrete an extracellular matrix

  3. Endogenous Collagen Influences Differentiation of Human Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, H.A.M.; Mentink-Leusink, Anouk; Bank, Ruud; Stoop, Reinout; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) are multipotent cells that, in the presence of appropriate stimuli, can differentiate into different lineages such as the osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. In the presence of ascorbic acid, MSCs secrete an extracellular matrix

  4. Expression of tyrosine kinase gene in mouse thymic stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinke de Wit, T. F.; Izon, D. J.; Revilla, C.; Oosterwegel, M.; Bakker, A. Q.; van Ewijk, W.; Kruisbeek, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    Amongst the most important signal transduction molecules involved in regulating growth and differentiation are the protein tyrosine kinases (PTK). Since T cell development is a consequence of interactions between thymic stromal cells (TSC) and thymocytes, identification of the PTK in both

  5. Bone marrow stromal cell : mediated neuroprotection for spinal cord repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, Gaby Jane

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no treatment available that restores anatomy and function after spinal cord injury. This thesis explores transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSCs) as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. BMSCs secrete neurotrophic

  6. IL-33 and Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin in mast cell functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saluja, Rohit; Zoltowska, Anna; Ketelaar, Maria Elizabeth; Nilsson, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP) and Interleukin 33 (IL-33) are two cytokines released by cells that are in proximity to our environment, e.g., keratinocytes of the skin and epithelial cells of the airways. Pathogens, allergens, chemicals and other agents induce the release of TSLP and IL-33,

  7. Radiation-induced DNA damage in canine hemopoietic cells and stromal cells as measured by the comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreja, L.; Selig, C.; Plappert, U.; Nothdurft, W.

    1996-01-01

    Stromal cell progenitors (fibroblastoid colony-forming unit; CFU-Fs) are representative of the progenitor cell population of the hemopoietic microenvironment in bone marrow (BM). Previous studies of the radiation dose-effect relationships for colony formation have shown that canine CFU-Fs are relatively radioresistant as characterized by a D 0 value of about 2.4 Gy. In contrast, hemopoietic progenitors are particularly radiosensitive (D 0 values = 0.12-0.60 Gy). In the present study, the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis technique for the in situ quantitation of DNA strand breaks and alkalilabile site was employed. Canine buffy coat cells from BM aspirates and cells harvested from CFU-F colonies or from mixed populations of adherent BM stromal cell (SC) layers were exposed to increasing doses of X-rays, embedded in agarose gel on slides, lysed with detergents, and placed in an electric field. DNA migrating from single cells in the gel was made visible as open-quotes cometsclose quotes by ethidium bromide staining. Immediate DNA damage was much less in cultured stromal cells than in hemopoietic cells in BM aspirates. These results suggest that the observed differences in clonogenic survival could be partly due to differences in the type of the initial DNA damage between stromal cells and hemopoietic cells. 37 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Oth.Utr.05.AllAg.Endometrial_stromal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. Epimorphin Regulates the Intestinal Stem Cell Niche via Effects on the Stromal Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishy, Courtney E; Swietlicki, Elzbieta A; Gazit, Vered; Amara, Suneetha; Heslop, Gabriela; Lu, Jianyun; Levin, Marc S; Rubin, Deborah C

    2018-04-06

    Stem cell therapy is a potential therapeutic approach for disorders characterized by intestinal injury or loss of functional surface area. Stem cell function and proliferation are mediated by the stem cell niche. Stromal cells such as intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs) are important but poorly studied components of the stem cell niche. To examine the role of ISEMFs, we have previously generated mice with deletion of epimorphin (Epim), an ISEMF protein and member of the syntaxin family of intracellular vesicle docking proteins that regulate cell secretion. Herein we explore the mechanisms for previous observations that Epim deletion increases gut crypt cell proliferation, crypt fission and small bowel length in vivo. Stem cell derived crypt culture techniques were used to explore the interaction between enteroids and myofibroblasts from Epim -/- and WT mice. Enteroids co-cultured with ISEMFS had increased growth and crypt-like budding compared to enteroids cultured without stromal support. Epim deletion in ISEMFs resulted in increased enteroid budding and surface area compared to co-cultures with WT ISEMFs. In primary crypt cultures, Epim -/- enteroids had significantly increased surface area and budding compared WTs. However stem cell assays comparing the number of Epim -/- vs WT colony forming units after first passage showed no differences in the absence of ISEMF support. Epim -/- vs. WT ISEMFs had increased Wnt4 expression and addition of Wnt4 to WT co-cultures enhanced budding. We conclude that ISEMFs play an important role in the stem cell niche. Epim regulates stem cell proliferation and differentiation via stromal contributions to the niche microenvironment.

  5. Induction of quiescence (G0) in bone marrow stromal stem cells enhances their stem cell characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumman, Mohammad; Majumder, Abhijit; Harkness, Linda

    2018-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that bone marrow stromal steam cells (BMSC) exist in a quiescent state (G0) within the in vivo niche; however, an explicit analysis of the biology of G0 state-BMSC has not been reported. We hypothesized that induction of G0 in BMSC might enhance their stem cell...... properties. Thus, we induced quiescence in BMSC in vitro by (a) suspension culture in a viscous medium or (b) culture on soft polyacrylamide substrate; and examined their molecular and functional phenotype. Induction of G0 was confirmed by bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labelling and analysis of cell cycle gene...... expression. Upon reactivation and re-entry into cell cycle, G0 state-BMSC exhibited enhanced clonogenic self-renewal, preferential differentiation into osteoblastic rather than adipocytic cells and increased ectopic bone formation when implanted subcutaneously in vivo in immune-deficient mice, compared...

  6. Derivation of Stromal (Skeletal, Mesenchymal) Stem-like cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Amer; Harkness, Linda; Abdallah, Basem

    2012-01-01

    EBs using BMP2 (bone morphogenic protein 2) combined with standard osteoblast induction medium led to weak osteoblastic induction. Conversely, subcutaneous in vivo implantation of day 20 hEBs in immune deficient mice, mixed with hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) as an osteoconductive scaffold......Derivation of bone forming cells (osteoblasts) from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) is a pre-requisite for their use in clinical applications. However, there is no standard protocol for differentiating hESC into osteoblastic cells. The aim of this study was to identify the emergence of a human...... stromal (mesenchymal, skeletal) stem cell (hMSC)-like population, known to be osteoblastic cell precursors and to test their osteoblastic differentiation capacity in ex vivo cultures and in vivo. We cultured hESC in a feeder-free environment using serum replacement and as suspension aggregates (embryoid...

  7. Endogenous collagen influences differentiation of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Hugo; Mentink, Anouk; Bank, Ruud; Stoop, Reinout; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) are multipotent cells that, in the presence of appropriate stimuli, can differentiate into different lineages such as the osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. In the presence of ascorbic acid, MSCs secrete an extracellular matrix mainly composed of collagen type I. Here we assessed the potential role of endogenous collagen synthesis in hMSC differentiation and stem cell maintenance. We observed a sharp reduction in proliferation rate of hMSCs in the absence of ascorbic acid, concomitant with a reduction in osteogenesis in vitro and bone formation in vivo. In line with a positive role for collagen type I in osteogenesis, gene expression profiling of hMSCs cultured in the absence of ascorbic acid demonstrated increased expression of genes involved in adipogenesis and chondrogenesis and a reduction in expression of osteogenic genes. We also observed that matrix remodeling and anti-osteoclastogenic signals were high in the presence of ascorbic acid. The presence of collagen type I during the expansion phase of hMSCs did not affect their osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential. In conclusion, the collagenous matrix supports both proliferation and differentiation of osteogenic hMSCs but, on the other hand, presents signals stimulating matrix remodeling and inhibiting osteoclastogenesis.

  8. Adult Stromal (Skeletal, Mesenchymal) Stem Cells: Advances Towards Clinical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) are non-hematopoietic adult stromal cells that reside in a perivascular niche in close association with pericytes and endothelial cells and possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity. The origin, unique properties, and therapeutic benefits of MSC ...... the translation of MSC into clinic: Generation of MSC-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells, strategies to enhance homing of MSC to injured tissues, and targeting of MSC in vivo.......Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) are non-hematopoietic adult stromal cells that reside in a perivascular niche in close association with pericytes and endothelial cells and possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity. The origin, unique properties, and therapeutic benefits of MSC...

  9. Proliferation of Prostate Stromal Cell Induced by Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Epithelial Cell Stimulated With Trichomonas vaginalis via Crosstalk With Mast Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Su; Han, Ik-Hwan; Sim, Seobo; Ahn, Myoung-Hee; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2016-11-01

    Chronic inflammation has a role in the pathogenesis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. Mast cells have been detected in chronic inflammatory infiltrate of the prostate, and it is possible that the interaction between prostate epithelial cells and Trichomonas vaginalis influences the activity of mast cells in the prostate stroma. Activated mast cells might influence the biological functions of nearby tissues and cells. In this study, we investigated whether mast cells reacted with the culture supernatant of BPH epithelial cells infected with T. vaginalis may induce the proliferation of prostate stromal cells. To measure the proliferation of prostate stromal cells in response to chronic inflammation caused by the infection of BPH-1 cells with T. vaginalis, the CCK-8 assay and wound healing assay were used. ELISAs, quantitative real-time PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to measure the production and expression of inflammatory cytokine and cytokine receptor. BPH-1 cells incubated with live trichomonads produced increased levels of CCL2, IL-1β, IL-6, and CXCL8, and induced the migration of mast cells and monocytes. When the culture supernatant of BPH-1 cells stimulated with trichomonads (TCM) was added to mast cells, they became activated, as confirmed by release of β-hexosaminidase and CXCL8. Prostate stromal cells incubated with the culture supernatant of mast cells activated with TCM (M-TCM) proliferated and expressed increased levels of CXCL8, CCL2, and the cytokine receptors CXCR1 and CCR2. Blocking the chemokine receptors reduced the proliferation of stromal cells and also decreased the production of CXCL8 and CCL2. Moreover, the expression of FGF2, cyclin D1, and Bcl-2 was increased in the proliferated stromal cells stimulated with M-TCM. Additionally, the M-TCM-treated stromal cells were more invasive than control cells. The inflammatory mediators released by BPH epithelial cells in response to infection by

  10. A relativity concept in mesenchymal stromal cell manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ivan; De Boer, Jan; Sensebe, Luc

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are being experimentally tested in several biological systems and clinical settings with the aim of verifying possible therapeutic effects for a variety of indications. MSCs are also known to be heterogeneous populations, with phenotypic and functional features that depend heavily on the individual donor, the harvest site, and the culture conditions. In the context of this multidimensional complexity, a recurrent question is whether it is feasible to produce MSC batches as "standard" therapeutics, possibly within scalable manufacturing systems. Here, we provide a short overview of the literature on different culture methods for MSCs, including those employing innovative technologies, and of some typically assessed functional features (e.g., growth, senescence, genomic stability, clonogenicity, etc.). We then offer our perspective of a roadmap on how to identify and refine manufacturing systems for MSCs intended for specific clinical indications. We submit that the vision of producing MSCs according to a unique standard, although commercially attractive, cannot yet be scientifically substantiated. Instead, efforts should be concentrated on standardizing methods for characterization of MSCs generated by different groups, possibly covering a vast gamut of functionalities. Such assessments, combined with hypotheses on the therapeutic mode of action and associated clinical data, should ultimately allow definition of in-process controls and measurable release criteria for MSC manufacturing. These will have to be validated as predictive of potency in suitable pre-clinical models and of therapeutic efficacy in patients. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Human mesenchymal stromal cells : biological characterization and clinical application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardo, Maria Ester

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the characterization of the biological and functional properties of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), isolated from different tissue sources. The differentiation capacity of MSCs from fetal and adult tissues has been tested and compared. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has

  12. Transitions from mono- to co- to tri-culture uniquely affect gene expression in breast cancer, stromal, and immune compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regier, Mary C; Maccoux, Lindsey J; Weinberger, Emma M; Regehr, Keil J; Berry, Scott M; Beebe, David J; Alarid, Elaine T

    2016-08-01

    Heterotypic interactions in cancer microenvironments play important roles in disease initiation, progression, and spread. Co-culture is the predominant approach used in dissecting paracrine interactions between tumor and stromal cells, but functional results from simple co-cultures frequently fail to correlate to in vivo conditions. Though complex heterotypic in vitro models have improved functional relevance, there is little systematic knowledge of how multi-culture parameters influence this recapitulation. We therefore have employed a more iterative approach to investigate the influence of increasing model complexity; increased heterotypic complexity specifically. Here we describe how the compartmentalized and microscale elements of our multi-culture device allowed us to obtain gene expression data from one cell type at a time in a heterotypic culture where cells communicated through paracrine interactions. With our device we generated a large dataset comprised of cell type specific gene-expression patterns for cultures of increasing complexity (three cell types in mono-, co-, or tri-culture) not readily accessible in other systems. Principal component analysis indicated that gene expression was changed in co-culture but was often more strongly altered in tri-culture as compared to mono-culture. Our analysis revealed that cell type identity and the complexity around it (mono-, co-, or tri-culture) influence gene regulation. We also observed evidence of complementary regulation between cell types in the same heterotypic culture. Here we demonstrate the utility of our platform in providing insight into how tumor and stromal cells respond to microenvironments of varying complexities highlighting the expanding importance of heterotypic cultures that go beyond conventional co-culture.

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. The proteomic dataset for bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stromal cells: Effect of in vitro passaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel T. Mindaye

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs have been in clinical trials for therapy. One major bottleneck in the advancement of BMSC-based products is the challenge associated with cell isolation, characterization, and ensuring cell fitness over the course of in vitro cell propagation steps. The data in this report is part of publications that explored the proteomic changes following in vitro passaging of BMSCs [4] and the molecular heterogeneity in cultures obtained from different human donors [5,6].The methodological details involving cell manufacturing, proteome harvesting, protein identification and quantification as well as the bioinformatic analyses were described to ensure reproducibility of the results.

  18. Color-Coded Imaging of Syngeneic Orthotopic Malignant Lymphoma Interacting with Host Stromal Cells During Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuro; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Kosuke; Nakamura, Miki; Aoki, Hitomi; Kunisada, Takahiro; Tsurumi, Hisashi; Shimizu, Masahito; Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-04-01

    The EL4 cell line was previously derived from a lymphoma induced in a C57/BL6 mouse by 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene. In a previous study, EL4 lymphoma cells expressing red fluorescent protein (EL4-RFP) were established and injected into the tail vein of C57/BL6 green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice. Metastasis was observed at multiple sites which were also enriched with host GFP-expressing stromal cells. In the present study, our aim was to establish an orthotopic model of EL4-RFP. In the present study, EL4-RFP lymphoma cells were injected in the spleen of C57/BL6 GFP transgenic mice as an orthotopic model of lymphoma. Resultant primary tumor and metastases were imaged with the Olympus FV1000 scanning laser confocal microscope. EL4-RFP metastasis was observed 21 days later. EL4-RFP tumors in the spleen (primary injection site), liver, supra-mediastinum lymph nodes, abdominal lymph nodes, bone marrow, and lung were visualized by color-coded imaging. EL4-RFP metastases in the liver, lymph nodes, and bone marrow in C57/BL6 GFP mice were rich in GFP stromal cells such as macrophages, fibroblasts, dendritic cells, and normal lymphocytes derived from the host animal. Small tumors were observed in the spleen, which were rich in host stromal cells. In the lung, no mass formation of lymphoma cells occurred, but lymphoma cells circulated in lung peripheral blood vessels. Phagocytosis of EL4-RFP lymphoma cells by macrophages, as well as dendritic cells and fibroblasts, were observed in culture. Color-coded imaging of the lymphoma microenvironment suggests an important role of stromal cells in lymphoma progression and metastasis. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  19. Apoptosis induction of human endometriotic epithelial and stromal cells by noscapine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rasoul Khazaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Endometriosis is a complex gynecologic disease with unknown etiology. Noscapine has been introduced as a cancer cell suppressor. Endometriosis was considered as a cancer like disorder, The aim of present study was to investigate noscapine apoptotic effect on human endometriotic epithelial and stromal cells in vitro. Materials and Methods:In this in vitro study, endometrial biopsies from endometriosis patients (n=9 were prepared and digested by an enzymatic method (collagenase I, 2 mg/ml. Stromal and epithelial cells were separated by sequential filtration through a cell strainer and ficoll layering. The cells of each sample were divided into five groups: control (0, 10, 25, 50 and 100 micromole/liter (µM concentration of noscapine and were cultured for three different periods of times; 24, 48 and 72 hr. Cell viability was assessed by colorimetric assay. Nitric oxide (NO concentration was measured by Griess reagent. Cell death was analyzed by Acridine Orange (AO–Ethidium Bromide (EB double staining and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL assay. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results: Viability of endometrial epithelial and stromal cells significantly decreased in 10, 25, 50 and 100 µM noscapine concentration in 24, 48, 72 hr (P

  20. Chemotaxis of primitive hematopoietic cells in response to stromal cell–derived factor-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Deog-Yeon; Rafii, Shahin; Hamada, Tsuneyoshi; Moore, Malcolm A.S.

    2000-01-01

    Stromal cell–derived factor-1 (SDF-1) provides a potent chemotactic stimulus for CD34+ hematopoietic cells. We cultured mobilized peripheral blood (PB) and umbilical cord blood (CB) for up to 5 weeks and examined the migratory activity of cobblestone area–forming cells (CAFCs) and long-term culture–initiating cells (LTC-ICs) in a transwell assay. In this system, SDF-1 or MS-5 marrow stromal cells placed in the lower chamber induced transmembrane and transendothelial migration by 2- and 5-week-old CAFCs and LTC-ICs in 3 hours. Transmigration was blocked by preincubation of input CD34+ cells with antibody to CXCR4. Transendothelial migration of CB CAFCs and LTC-ICs was higher than that of PB. We expanded CD34+ cells from CB in serum-free medium with thrombopoietin, flk-2 ligand, and c-kit ligand, with or without IL-3 and found that CAFCs cultured in the absence of IL-3 had a chemotactic response equivalent to noncultured cells, even after 5 weeks. However, addition of IL-3 to the culture reduced this response by 20–50%. These data indicate that SDF-1 induces chemotaxis of primitive hematopoietic cells signaling through CXCR4 and that the chemoattraction could be downmodulated by culture ex vivo. PMID:10619866

  1. Effect of pirfenidone on the proliferation of rat corneal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Jie Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the effects of pirfenidone(PFDon the proliferation and transfomring growth factor-β1(TGF-β1expression in vitro culture rat corneal stromal cells. METHODS: Corneal stromal cells from 8 to 10wk SD rats were isolated, cultured and treated with different concentrations of PFD 0mg/mL(control group, 0.15mg/mL(experimental group Ⅰ, 0.3mg/mL(experimental group Ⅱ, 1mg/mL(experimental group Ⅲfor 48h. CCK-8 assay was performed to assess cell proliferation, while immunocytochemistry and Western Blot were used to detect the expression of ki-67 and TGF-β1 expression, respectively. RESULTS: Compared with control group, PFD significantly inhibited the proliferation in a dose-dependent manner(all P1 in a dose-dependent manner(PCONCLUSION: Pirfenidone can significantly inhibit the proliferation of rat corneal stromal cell by down regulating TGF-β1 expression, therefore, it has potential prospect in lightening the corneal wound healing reaction.

  2. Fibrin glue as the cell-delivery vehicle for mesenchymal stromal cells in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiuwen; Ren, Jianan; Li, Jieshou

    2012-05-01

    The use of tissue-engineering techniques such as stem-cell therapy to renew injured tissues is a promising strategy in regenerative medicine. As a cell-delivery vehicle, fibrin glues (FG) facilitate cell attachment, growth and differentiation and, ultimately, tissue formation and organization by its three-dimensional structure. Numerous studies have provided evidence that stromal cells derived from bone marrow (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSC) and adipose tissue (adipose-derived stromal cells; ADSC) contain a population of adult multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and endothelial progenitor cells that can differentiate into several lineages. By combining MSC with FG, the implantation could take advantage of the mutual benefits. Researchers and physicians have pinned their hopes on stem cells for developing novel approaches in regenerative medicine. This review focuses on the therapeutic potential of MSC with FG in bone defect reconstruction, cartilage and tendon injury repair, ligament, heart and nerve regeneration, and, furthermore, wound healing.

  3. In vitro inhibitory effects of imatinib mesylate on stromal cells and hematopoietic progenitors from bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.B. Soares

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib mesylate (IM is used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML because it selectively inhibits tyrosine kinase, which is a hallmark of CML oncogenesis. Recent studies have shown that IM inhibits the growth of several non-malignant hematopoietic and fibroblast cells from bone marrow (BM. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of IM on stromal and hematopoietic progenitor cells, specifically in the colony-forming units of granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM, using BM cultures from 108 1.5- to 2-month-old healthy Swiss mice. The results showed that low concentrations of IM (1.25 µM reduced the growth of CFU-GM in clonogenic assays. In culture assays with stromal cells, fibroblast proliferation and α-SMA expression by immunocytochemistry analysis were also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner, with a survival rate of approximately 50% with a dose of 2.5 µM. Cell viability and morphology were analyzed using MTT and staining with acrydine orange/ethidium bromide. Most cells were found to be viable after treatment with 5 µM IM, although there was gradual growth inhibition of fibroblastic cells while the number of round cells (macrophage-like cells increased. At higher concentrations (15 µM, the majority of cells were apoptotic and cell growth ceased completely. Oil red staining revealed the presence of adipocytes only in untreated cells (control. Cell cycle analysis of stromal cells by flow cytometry showed a blockade at the G0/G1 phases in groups treated with 5-15 µM. These results suggest that IM differentially inhibits the survival of different types of BM cells since toxic effects were achieved.

  4. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Osteoarthritic Synovium Are a Distinct Population Compared to Their Bone-Marrow Counterparts regarding Surface Marker Distribution and Immunomodulation of Allogeneic CD4+ T-Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Hagmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The participation of an inflammatory joint milieu has been described in osteoarthritis (OA pathogenesis. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs play an important role in modulating inflammatory processes. Based on previous studies in an allogeneic T-cell coculture model, we aimed at further determining the role of synovial MSCs in OA pathogenesis. Methods. Bone-marrow (BM and synovial membrane (SM MSCs from hip joints of late stage OA patients and CD4+ T-cells from healthy donors were analysed regarding surface marker expression before and after coculture. Proliferation upon CD3/CD28 stimulation and cytokine analyses were compared between MSCs. Results. SM-MSCs differed from BM-MSCs in several surface markers and their osteogenic differentiation potential. Cocultures of both MSCs with CD4+ T-cells resulted in recruitment of CD45RA+ FoxP3+ regulatory T-cells. Upon stimulation, only SM-MSCs suppressed CD4+ T-cell proliferation, while both SM-MSCs and BM-MSCs modified cytokine profiles through suppressing IL-2 and TNF-α as well as increasing IL-6 secretion. Conclusions. Synovial MSCs from OA joints are a unique fraction that can be distinguished from their bone-marrow derived counterparts. Their unique ability to suppress CD3/CD28 induced CD4+ T-cell proliferation makes them a potential target for future therapeutic approaches.

  5. Fetal liver stromal cells promote hematopoietic cell expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Kun; Hu, Caihong; Zhou, Zhigang; Huang, Lifang; Liu, Wenli; Sun, Hanying

    2009-01-01

    Future application of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in clinical therapies largely depends on their successful expansion in vitro. Fetal liver (FL) is a unique hematopoietic organ in which hematopoietic cells markedly expand in number, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Stromal cells (StroCs) have been suggested to provide a suitable cellular environment for in vitro expansion of HSPCs. In this study, murine StroCs derived from FL at E14.5, with a high level of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Wnt expression, were found to have an increased ability to support the proliferation of HSPCs. This effect was inhibited by blocking Shh signaling. Supplementation with soluble Shh-N promoted the proliferation of hematopoietic cells by activating Wnt signaling. Our findings suggest that FL-derived StroCs support proliferation of HSPCs via Shh inducing an autocrine Wnt signaling loop. The use of FL-derived StroCs and regulation of the Shh pathway might further enhance HPSC expansion.

  6. The effect of LHRH antagonist cetrorelix in crossover conditioned media from epithelial (BPH-1) and stromal (WPMY-1) prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siejka, A; Schally, A V; Barabutis, N

    2014-01-01

    Stromal cells strictly modulate the differentiation of the normal prostate epithelium. In benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissue, the ratio of stromal to epithelial cells reaches a 5:1 ratio. In this study, we evaluated the effects of crossover conditioned media (CM) of stromal and epithelial prostate cells before and after treatment with LHRH antagonist Cetrorelix. WPMY-1 human prostate stromal cells and BPH-1 human benign prostatic hyperplasia cells were cultured in vitro and the effects of crossover conditioned media (CM) from those cells were studied. We evaluated the effect of Cetrorelix on the expression of PCNA and p53 in those cells. We then studied the effect of Cetrorelix on BPH-1 cells cultured with the CM from WPMY-1 cells, as well as the mechanisms which govern these interactions. CM from WPMY-1 cells strongly stimulated the proliferation of BPH-1 cells in a dose dependent manner, while CM from BPH-1 cells only slightly increased the proliferation of WPMY-1 cells. Cetrorelix inhibited the proliferation of both cell lines and the expression of PCNA, while the expression of p53 was increased. Cetrorelix also inhibited the proliferation of BPH-1 cells stimulated with the CM from WPMY-1 cells. In the crossover experiment, conditioned media from WPMY-1 and BPH-1 cells increased the expression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and STAT3. Our results support previous observations on the bidirectional stromal-epithelial interactions in prostate gland and shed more light on the mechanistic action of those effects. Our study strongly supports the hypothesis that LHRH antagonists may be beneficial for BPH prevention and treatment. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Prostate stromal cells express the progesterone receptor to control cancer cell mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Lee, Jennifer Suehyun; Xie, Ning; Li, Estelle; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Fazli, Ladan; Cox, Michael; Plymate, Stephen; Gleave, Martin; Dong, Xuesen

    2014-01-01

    Reciprocal interactions between epithelium and stroma play vital roles for prostate cancer development and progression. Enhanced secretions of cytokines and growth factors by cancer associated fibroblasts in prostate tumors create a favorable microenvironment for cancer cells to grow and metastasize. Our previous work showed that the progesterone receptor (PR) was expressed specifically in prostate stromal fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells. However, the expression levels of PR and its impact to tumor microenvironment in prostate tumors are poorly understood. Immunohistochemistry assays are applied to human prostate tissue biopsies. Cell migration, invasion and proliferation assays are performed using human prostate cells. Real-time PCR and ELISA are applied to measure gene expression at molecular levels. Immunohistochemistry assays showed that PR protein levels were decreased in cancer associated stroma when compared with paired normal prostate stroma. Using in vitro prostate stromal cell models, we showed that conditioned media collected from PR positive stromal cells inhibited prostate cancer cell migration and invasion, but had minor suppressive impacts on cancer cell proliferation. PR suppressed the secretion of stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and interlukin-6 (IL-6) by stromal cells independent to PR ligands. Blocking PR expression by siRNA or supplementation of exogenous SDF-1 or IL-6 to conditioned media from PR positive stromal cells counteracted the inhibitory effects of PR to cancer cell migration and invasion. Decreased expression of the PR in cancer associated stroma may contribute to the elevated SDF-1 and IL-6 levels in prostate tumors and enhance prostate tumor progression.

  8. Early passage bone marrow stromal cells express genes involved in nervous system development supporting their relevance for neural repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandoe Tewarie, R.D.S.; Bossers, K.; Ritfeld, G.J.; Blits, B.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Verhaagen, J.; Oudega, M.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The assessment of the capacity of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) to repair the nervous system using gene expression profiling. The evaluation of effects of long-term culturing on the gene expression profile of BMSC. METHODS: Fourty four k whole genome rat microarrays were used to study

  9. Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells for Treatment of Patients with Chronic Ischemic Heart Disease (MyStromalCell Trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Mygind, Naja Dam

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of intramyocardial injections of autologous VEGF-A165-stimulated adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) in patients with refractory angina. MyStromalCell trial is a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study including sixty patients with CCS/NYHA class II...... to 54) (P= 0.41), and in METs 0.1 (95%CI -1.7 to 1.9) (P= 0.757). The difference between the groups was not significant (P= 0.680,P= 0.608, andP= 0.720 for time duration, watt, and METs, resp.). Intramyocardial delivered VEGF-A165-stimulated ASC treatment was safe but did not improve exercise capacity...

  10. Actin depolymerization enhances adipogenic differentiation in human stromal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Hu, Huimin; Qiu, Weimin

    2018-01-01

    Human stromal stem cells (hMSCs) differentiate into adipocytes that play a role in skeletal tissue homeostasis and whole body energy metabolism. During adipocyte differentiation, hMSCs exhibit significant changes in cell morphology suggesting changes in cytoskeletal organization. Here, we examined...... the effect of direct modulation of actin microfilament dynamics on adipocyte differentiation. Stabilizing actin filaments in hMSCs by siRNA-mediated knock down of the two main actin depolymerizing factors (ADFs): Cofilin 1 (CFL1) and Destrin (DSTN) or treating the cells by Phalloidin reduced adipocyte...

  11. Mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens; Mygind, Naja Dam; Ali Qayyum, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    is very costly for the health care system. Therefore, new treatment options and strategies are being researched intensely. Stem cell therapy to improve myocardial perfusion and stimulate growth of new cardiomyocytes could be a new way to go. Nevertheless, the results from clinical studies have varied...... considerably, probably due to the use of many different cell lines obtained from different tissues and the different patient populations. The present review will focus on treatment with the mesenchymal stromal cell from bone marrow and adipose tissue in animal and patients with acute and chronic IHD (CIHD)....

  12. Cryopreservation and revival of mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Kastrup, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Over the past few years, the pace of preclinical stem cell research is astonishing and adult stem cells have become the subject of intense research. Due to the presence of promising supporting preclinical data, human clinical trials for stem cell regenerative treatment of various diseases have be...

  13. Scalable microcarrier-based manufacturing of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Soure, António M; Fernandes-Platzgummer, Ana; da Silva, Cláudia L; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2016-10-20

    Due to their unique features, mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) have been exploited in clinical settings as therapeutic candidates for the treatment of a variety of diseases. However, the success in obtaining clinically-relevant MSC numbers for cell-based therapies is dependent on efficient isolation and ex vivo expansion protocols, able to comply with good manufacturing practices (GMP). In this context, the 2-dimensional static culture systems typically used for the expansion of these cells present several limitations that may lead to reduced cell numbers and compromise cell functions. Furthermore, many studies in the literature report the expansion of MSC using fetal bovine serum (FBS)-supplemented medium, which has been critically rated by regulatory agencies. Alternative platforms for the scalable manufacturing of MSC have been developed, namely using microcarriers in bioreactors, with also a considerable number of studies now reporting the production of MSC using xenogeneic/serum-free medium formulations. In this review we provide a comprehensive overview on the scalable manufacturing of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, depicting the various steps involved in the process from cell isolation to ex vivo expansion, using different cell tissue sources and culture medium formulations and exploiting bioprocess engineering tools namely microcarrier technology and bioreactors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Therapeutic effect of mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells on memory in animals with Alzheimer-type neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkova, N V; Poltavtseva, R A; Samokhin, A N; Sukhikh, G T

    2013-11-01

    Transplantation of human mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells improved spatial memory in bulbectomized mice with Alzheimer-type neurodegeneration. The positive effect was observed in 1 month after intracerebral transplantation and in 3 months after systemic injection of mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells. No cases of malignant transformation were noted. These findings indicate prospects of using mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells for the therapy of Alzheimer disease and the possibility of their systemic administration for attaining the therapeutic effect.

  15. Stromal cells expressing hedgehog-interacting protein regulate the proliferation of myeloid neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobune, M; Iyama, S; Kikuchi, S; Horiguchi, H; Sato, T; Murase, K; Kawano, Y; Takada, K; Ono, K; Kamihara, Y; Hayashi, T; Miyanishi, K; Sato, Y; Takimoto, R; Kato, J

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant reactivation of hedgehog (Hh) signaling has been described in a wide variety of human cancers including cancer stem cells. However, involvement of the Hh-signaling system in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment during the development of myeloid neoplasms is unknown. In this study, we assessed the expression of Hh-related genes in primary human CD34 + cells, CD34 + blastic cells and BM stromal cells. Both Indian Hh (Ihh) and its signal transducer, smoothened (SMO), were expressed in CD34 + acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)-derived cells. However, Ihh expression was relatively low in BM stromal cells. Remarkably, expression of the intrinsic Hh-signaling inhibitor, human Hh-interacting protein (HHIP) in AML/MDS-derived stromal cells was markedly lower than in healthy donor-derived stromal cells. Moreover, HHIP expression levels in BM stromal cells highly correlated with their supporting activity for SMO + leukemic cells. Knockdown of HHIP gene in stromal cells increased their supporting activity although control cells marginally supported SMO + leukemic cell proliferation. The demethylating agent, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine rescued HHIP expression via demethylation of HHIP gene and reduced the leukemic cell-supporting activity of AML/MDS-derived stromal cells. This indicates that suppression of stromal HHIP could be associated with the proliferation of AML/MDS cells

  16. Androgen Receptor Expression in Epithelial and Stromal Cells of Prostatic Carcinoma and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipovski, Vanja; Kubelka-Sabit, Katerina; Jasar, Dzengis; Janevska, Vesna

    2017-08-15

    Prostatic carcinoma (PCa) derives from prostatic epithelial cells. However stromal microenvironment, associated with malignant epithelium, also plays a role in prostatic carcinogenesis. Alterations in prostatic stromal cells contribute to the loss of growth control in epithelial cells that lead to progression of PCa. To analyse the differences between Androgen Receptor (AR) expression in both epithelial and stromal cells in PCa and the surrounding benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and to compare the results with tumour grade. Samples from 70 cases of radical prostatectomy specimens were used. The expression and intensity of the signal for AR was analysed in the epithelial and stromal cells of PCa and BPH, and the data was quantified using histological score (H-score). AR showed significantly lower expression in both epithelial and stromal cells of PCa compared to BPH. In PCa a significant positive correlation of AR expression was found between stromal and epithelial cells of PCa. AR expression showed a correlation between the stromal cells of PCa and tumour grade. AR expression is reduced in epithelial and stromal cells of PCa. Expression of AR in stromal cells of PCa significantly correlates with tumour grade.

  17. The globoseries glycosphingolipid SSEA-4 is a marker of bone marrow-derived clonal multipotent stromal cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosu-Myles, Michael; McCully, Jennifer; Fair, Joel; Mehic, Jelica; Menendez, Pablo; Rodriguez, Rene; Westwood, Carole

    2013-05-01

    The therapeutic potential of multipotent stromal cells (MSC) may be enhanced by the identification of markers that allow their discrimination and enumeration both in vivo and in vitro. Here, we investigated the ability of embryonic stem cell-associated glycosphingolipids to isolate human MSC from both whole-bone-marrow (BM) and stromal cell cultures. Only SSEA-4 was consistently expressed on cells within the CD45loCD105hi marrow fraction and could be used to isolate cells with the capacity to give rise to stromal cultures containing MSC. Human stromal cultures, generated in either the presence or absence of serum, contained heterogeneous cell populations discriminated by the quantity of SSEA-4 epitopes detected on their surface. A low level of surface SSEA-4 (SSEA-4lo) correlated with undetectable levels of the α2,3-sialyltransferase-II enzyme required to synthesize SSEA-4; a reduced proliferative potential; and the loss of fat-, bone-, and cartilage-forming cells during long-term culture. In vitro, single cells with the capacity to generate multipotent stromal cultures were detected exclusively in the SSEA-4hi fraction. Our data demonstrate that a high level of surface epitopes for SSEA-4 provides a definitive marker of MSC from human BM.

  18. Improved isolation protocol for equine cord blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Thomsen, Preben Dybdahl; Betts, Dean H.

    2009-01-01

      BACKGROUND AIMS: A robust methodology for the isolation of cord blood-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (CB-MSCs) from fresh umbilical cord blood has not been reported in any species. The objective of this study was to improve the isolation procedure for equine CB-MSCs. METHODS: Pre......-culture separation of red and white blood cells was done using either PrepaCyte?-EQ medium or Ficoll-Paque? PREMIUM density medium. Regular FBS and MSC-qualified FBS were compared for their ability to support the establishment of putative primary MSC colonies. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that Prepa...

  19. Clinical-grade production of human mesenchymal stromal cells: occurrence of aneuploidy without transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarte, Karin; Gaillard, Julien; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Fouillard, Loic; Becker, Martine; Mossafa, Hossein; Tchirkov, Andrei; Rouard, Hélène; Henry, Catherine; Splingard, Marie; Dulong, Joelle; Monnier, Delphine; Gourmelon, Patrick; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Sensebé, Luc

    2010-02-25

    Clinical-grade human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been expanded in vitro for tissue engineering or immunoregulatory purposes without standardized culture conditions or release criteria. Although human MSCs show poor susceptibility for oncogenic transformation, 2 recent studies described their capacity to accumulate chromosomal instability and to give rise to carcinoma in immunocompromised mice after long-term culture. We thus investigated the immunologic and genetic features of MSCs expanded with fetal calf serum and fibroblast growth factor or with platelet lysate in 4 cell-therapy facilities during 2 multicenter clinical trials. Cultured MSCs showed a moderate expression of human leukocyte antigen-DR without alteration of their low immunogenicity or their immunomodulatory capacity. Moreover, some transient and donor-dependent recurring aneuploidy was detected in vitro, independently of the culture process. However, MSCs with or without chromosomal alterations showed progressive growth arrest and entered senescence without evidence of transformation either in vitro or in vivo.

  20. Interaction between x-irradiated plateau-phase bone marrow stromal cell lines and co-cultivated factor-dependent cell lines leading to leukemogenesis in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naparstek, E.; Anklesaria, P.; FitzGerald, T.J.; Sakakeeny, M.A.; Greenberger, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Plateau-phase mouse clonal bone marrow stromal cell lines D2XRII and C3H cl 11 produce decreasing levels of M-CSF (CSF-1), a specific macrophage progenitor cell humoral regulator, following X-irradiation in vitro. The decrease did not go below 40% of control levels, even after irradiation doses of 50,000 rad (500 Gy). In contrast, a distinct humoral regulator stimulating growth of GM-CSF/IL-3 factor-dependent (FD) hematopoietic progenitor cell lines was detected following radiation to doses above 2000 rad. This humoral factor was not detectable in conditioned medium from irradiated cells, weakly detected using factor-dependent target cell populations in agar overlay, and was prominently detected by liquid co-cultivation of factor-dependent cells with irradiated stromal cell cultures. Subclonal lines of FD cells, derived after co-cultivation revealed karyotypic abnormalities and induced myeloblastic tumors in syngeneic mice. Five-eight weeks co-cultivation was required for induction of factor independence and malignancy and was associated with dense cell to cell contact between FD cells and stromal cells demonstrated by light and electron microscopy. Increases in hematopoietic to stromal cell surface area, total number of adherent cells per flask, total non-adherent cell colonies per flask, and cumulative non-adherent cell production were observed after irradiation. The present data may prove very relevant to an understanding of the cell to cell interactions during X-irradiation-induced leukemia

  1. Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer of a human c-fos cDNA into mouse bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, P; Verrier, B; Klein, B; Niccolino, M; Marty, L; Alexandre, C; Piechaczyk, M

    1991-11-01

    A cDNA encoding a complete human c-fos protein was isolated and inserted into two different murine MoMuLV-derived recombinant retroviruses allowing expression of c-fos protein in different cell types. One c-fos-expressing retrovirus, chosen for its ability to express high levels of proteins in fibroblast-like cells, was shown to potentiate long-term cultures of mouse bone marrow stromal cells in vitro and therefore constitutes a potential tool for immortalizing such cells. Moreover, when tested in an in vitro differentiation assay, stromal cells constitutively expressing c-fos favor the granulocyte differentiation of hematopoietic precursors. Interestingly, retroviruses expressing v-src and v-abl oncogenes, included as controls in our experiments, do not produce any detectable effects, whereas those expressing polyoma virus middle T antigen facilitate long-term growth in vitro of stromal cells that favor the macrophage differentiation pathway of bone marrow stem cells. Our observation supports the idea that constitutive expression of some oncogenes, including c-fos and polyoma virus middle T antigen, may influence cytokine production by bone marrow stromal cells.

  2. Potential Effect of CD271 on Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Calabrese

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Low-Affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor (LNGFR, also known as CD271, is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily. The CD271 cell surface marker defines a subset of multipotential mesenchymal stromal cells and may be used to isolate and enrich cells derived from bone marrow aspirate. In this study, we compare the proliferative and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271− mesenchymal stromal cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from bone marrow aspirate and adipose tissue by plastic adherence and positive selection. The proliferation and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271− mesenchymal stromal cells were assessed by inducing osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic in vitro differentiation. Compared to CD271+, CD271− mesenchymal stromal cells showed a lower proliferation rate and a decreased ability to give rise to osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Furthermore, we observed that CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from adipose tissue displayed a higher efficiency of proliferation and trilineage differentiation compared to CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow samples, although the CD271 expression levels were comparable. In conclusion, these data show that both the presence of CD271 antigen and the source of mesenchymal stromal cells represent important factors in determining the ability of the cells to proliferate and differentiate.

  3. Potential Effect of CD271 on Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Proliferation and Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Giovanna; Giuffrida, Raffaella; Lo Furno, Debora; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Forte, Stefano; Gulino, Rosario; Colarossi, Cristina; Schinocca, Luciana Rita; Giuffrida, Rosario; Cardile, Venera; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2015-07-09

    The Low-Affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor (LNGFR), also known as CD271, is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily. The CD271 cell surface marker defines a subset of multipotential mesenchymal stromal cells and may be used to isolate and enrich cells derived from bone marrow aspirate. In this study, we compare the proliferative and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271- mesenchymal stromal cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from bone marrow aspirate and adipose tissue by plastic adherence and positive selection. The proliferation and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271- mesenchymal stromal cells were assessed by inducing osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic in vitro differentiation. Compared to CD271+, CD271- mesenchymal stromal cells showed a lower proliferation rate and a decreased ability to give rise to osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Furthermore, we observed that CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from adipose tissue displayed a higher efficiency of proliferation and trilineage differentiation compared to CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow samples, although the CD271 expression levels were comparable. In conclusion, these data show that both the presence of CD271 antigen and the source of mesenchymal stromal cells represent important factors in determining the ability of the cells to proliferate and differentiate.

  4. Stimulation and support of haemopoietic stem cell proliferation by irradiated stroma cell colonies in bone marrow cell culture in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, K.J.; Izumi, Hiroko; Seto, Akira

    1981-01-01

    A culture system was established in which haemopoietic stem cells can undergo a recovery proliferation after a depletion of the stem cells, completely in vitro. To elucidate the source of the stimulatory factors, normal bone marrow cells were overlayed on top of the irradiated adherent 'stromal' cell colonies in the bone marrow cell culture. This stimulated the proliferation of haemopoietic stem cells in the cultured cells in suspension. The present results indicate that the stromal cells produce factors which stimulate stem cell proliferation. Whether the stimulation is evoked by direct cell-cell interactions or by humoral factors is as yet to be studied. (author)

  5. Data on isolating mesenchymal stromal cells from human adipose tissue using a collagenase-free method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassim Shebaby

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present dataset describes a detailed protocol to isolate mesenchymal cells from human fat without the use of collagenase. Human fat specimen, surgically cleaned from non-fat tissues (e.g., blood vessels and reduced into smaller fat pieces of around 1–3 mm size, is incubated in complete culture media for five to seven days. Then, cells started to spread out from the fat explants and to grow in cultures according to an exponential pattern. Our data showed that primary mesenchymal cells presenting heterogeneous morphology start to acquire more homogenous fibroblastic-like shape when cultured for longer duration or when subcultured into new flasks. Cell isolation efficiency as well as cell doubling time were also calculated throughout the culturing experimentations and illustrated in a separate figure thereafter. This paper contains data previously considered as an alternative protocol to isolate adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell published in “Proliferation and differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs into osteoblastic lineage are passage dependent” [1]. Keywords: Adipose tissue, mesenchymal stromal cell, cell culture, doubling time

  6. Radiosensitivity of marrow stromal cells and the effect of some radioprotective agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuhua

    1992-01-01

    The results showed that marrow stromal cells include fibroblasts, reticular cells, macrophages and adipocytes. The capability of the adherent layer derived from marrow cells of 2 mouse femurs to support hematopoietic stem cells was stronger than those of layers derived from 0.5 or 1 mouse femurs. The radiosensitivity of bone marrow stromal cells was lower than that of hematopoietic stem cells. The radioprotective effect of AET and PLP (polysaccharide of Lobaria Pulmonaria Hoffm) on the bone marrow stromal cells and their capability to support hematopoietic stem cells was clearly demonstrated

  7. Differentiation of Equine Mesenchymal Stromal Cells into Cells of Neural Lineage: Potential for Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cruz Villagrán

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are able to differentiate into extramesodermal lineages, including neurons. Positive outcomes were obtained after transplantation of neurally induced MSCs in laboratory animals after nerve injury, but this is unknown in horses. Our objectives were to test the ability of equine MSCs to differentiate into cells of neural lineage in vitro, to assess differences in morphology and lineage-specific protein expression, and to investigate if horse age and cell passage number affected the ability to achieve differentiation. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were obtained from young and adult horses. Following demonstration of stemness, MSCs were neurally induced and microscopically assessed at different time points. Results showed that commercially available nitrogen-coated tissue culture plates supported proliferation and differentiation. Morphological changes were immediate and all the cells displayed a neural crest-like cell phenotype. Expression of neural progenitor proteins, was assessed via western blot or immunofluorescence. In our study, MSCs generated from young and middle-aged horses did not show differences in their ability to undergo differentiation. The effect of cell passage number, however, is inconsistent and further experiments are needed. Ongoing work is aimed at transdifferentiating these cells into Schwann cells for transplantation into a peripheral nerve injury model in horses.

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  12. Mesenchymal stromal cell derived endothelial progenitor treatment in patients with refractory angina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Tina; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Mathiasen, Anders B

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aims. We evaluated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of intra-myocardial injection of autologous mesenchymal stromal cells derived endothelial progenitor cell (MSC) in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and refractory angina in this first in man trial. Methods and resu......Abstract Aims. We evaluated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of intra-myocardial injection of autologous mesenchymal stromal cells derived endothelial progenitor cell (MSC) in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and refractory angina in this first in man trial. Methods...... and results. A total of 31 patients with stable CAD, moderate to severe angina and no further revascularization options, were included. Bone marrow MSC were isolated and culture expanded for 6-8 weeks. It was feasible and safe to establish in-hospital culture expansion of autologous MSC and perform intra......-myocardial injection of MSC. After six months follow-up myocardial perfusion was unaltered, but the patients increased exercise capacity (p angina attacks (p Angina Questionnaire (SAQ) evaluations (p

  13. Bone marrow stromal cell transplantation mitigates radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome in mice.

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    Subhrajit Saha

    Full Text Available Nuclear accidents and terrorism presents a serious threat for mass casualty. While bone-marrow transplantation might mitigate hematopoietic syndrome, currently there are no approved medical countermeasures to alleviate radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS, resulting from direct cytocidal effects on intestinal stem cells (ISC and crypt stromal cells. We examined whether bone marrow-derived adherent stromal cell transplantation (BMSCT could restitute irradiated intestinal stem cells niche and mitigate radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome.Autologous bone marrow was cultured in mesenchymal basal medium and adherent cells were harvested for transplantation to C57Bl6 mice, 24 and 72 hours after lethal whole body irradiation (10.4 Gy or abdominal irradiation (16-20 Gy in a single fraction. Mesenchymal, endothelial and myeloid population were characterized by flow cytometry. Intestinal crypt regeneration and absorptive function was assessed by histopathology and xylose absorption assay, respectively. In contrast to 100% mortality in irradiated controls, BMSCT mitigated RIGS and rescued mice from radiation lethality after 18 Gy of abdominal irradiation or 10.4 Gy whole body irradiation with 100% survival (p<0.0007 and p<0.0009 respectively beyond 25 days. Transplantation of enriched myeloid and non-myeloid fractions failed to improve survival. BMASCT induced ISC regeneration, restitution of the ISC niche and xylose absorption. Serum levels of intestinal radioprotective factors, such as, R-Spondin1, KGF, PDGF and FGF2, and anti-inflammatory cytokines were elevated, while inflammatory cytokines were down regulated.Mitigation of lethal intestinal injury, following high doses of irradiation, can be achieved by intravenous transplantation of marrow-derived stromal cells, including mesenchymal, endothelial and macrophage cell population. BMASCT increases blood levels of intestinal growth factors and induces regeneration of the irradiated

  14. Characterization of Cellular and Molecular Heterogeneity of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsafadi, Mona; Manikandan, Muthurangan; Atteya, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    and osteoblast differentiation genes which included several homeobox genes: TBX15, HOXA2 and HOXA10, and IGF1, FGFR3, BMP6, MCAM, ITGA10, IGFBP5, and ALP. siRNA-based downregulation of the ALP gene in CL1 impaired osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation. Our studies demonstrate the existence of molecular......Human bone marrow-derived stromal stem cells (hBMSC) exhibit multiple functions, including differentiation into skeletal cells (progenitor function), hematopoiesis support, and immune regulation (nonprogenitor function). We have previously demonstrated the presence of morphological and functional...... and functional heterogeneity in cultured hBMSC. ALP can be employed to identify osteoblastic and adipocytic progenitor cells in the heterogeneous hBMSC cultures...

  15. Regenerative Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Age-Related Changes

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    Flavia Bruna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that a therapeutic effect results from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs transplant. No systematic information is currently available regarding whether donor age modifies MSC regenerative potential on cutaneous wound healing. Here, we evaluate whether donor age influences this potential. Two different doses of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs from young, adult, or old mouse donors or two doses of their acellular derivatives mesenchymal stromal cells (acd-MSCs were intradermally injected around wounds in the midline of C57BL/6 mice. Every two days, wound healing was macroscopically assessed (wound closure and microscopically assessed (reepithelialization, dermal-epidermal junction, skin appendage regeneration, granulation tissue, leukocyte infiltration, and density dermal collagen fibers after 12 days from MSC transplant. Significant differences in the wound closure kinetic, quality, and healing of skin regenerated were observed in lesions which received BM-MSCs from different ages or their acd-MSCs compared to lesions which received vehicle. Nevertheless, our data shows that adult’s BM-MSCs or their acd-MSCs were the most efficient for recovery of most parameters analyzed. Our data suggest that MSC efficacy was negatively affected by donor age, where the treatment with adult’s BM-MSCs or their acd-MSCs in cutaneous wound promotes a better tissue repair/regeneration. This is due to their paracrine factors secretion.

  16. PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 potentiates homoharringtonine antimyeloma activity in myeloma cells adhered to stromal cells and in SCID mouse xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Wen, Xiaofang; Wang, Bin; Hou, Diyu; Zou, Hong; Yuan, Qin; Yang, Hui; Xie, Jieqiong; Huang, Huifang

    2018-05-01

    Homoharringtonine (HHT) is a known anti-leukemia drug that inhibits multiple myeloma (MM) cells both in vitro and in vivo. Our prior study demonstrated that the potency of HHT in MM cells was compromised significantly when myeloma cells were co-cultured with BM stromal cells. This study aimed to investigate whether PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 could potentiate the antimyeloma activity of HHT against MM cells adhered to BM stromal cells and in vivo xenograft models. A co-culture system composed of MM cells and human stromal cells was employed to mimic MM cells in bone marrow niche. The inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effect of HHT and LY294002 was determined by CCK-8 assay or flow cytometry. Expression of PI3K/Akt signaling molecules and anti-apoptotic protein myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) was assessed by western blot analysis and/or reverse transcription real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). MM xenografts were used to evaluate antitumor effect of combined therapy with HHT and LY294002. Adhesion to BM stromal cells rendered MM cells resistant to HHT whereas silencing Mcl-1 partly reversed the resistance. LY294002 induced apoptosis in MM cells and potentiated the antimyeloma effects of HHT by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt signal pathway which was abnormally activated during adhesion. LY294002 also enhanced the antimyeloma effect of HHT in in vivo xenograft models. These findings suggest that activation of PI3K/Akt signal pathway was responsible for the resistance to HHT in MM cells adhered to stromal cells. LY294002 can potentiate the antimyeloma activity of HHT both in vitro and in vivo, which may represent a new clinical treatment in MM.

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  1. Prostate stromal cells express the progesterone receptor to control cancer cell mobility.

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    Yue Yu

    Full Text Available Reciprocal interactions between epithelium and stroma play vital roles for prostate cancer development and progression. Enhanced secretions of cytokines and growth factors by cancer associated fibroblasts in prostate tumors create a favorable microenvironment for cancer cells to grow and metastasize. Our previous work showed that the progesterone receptor (PR was expressed specifically in prostate stromal fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells. However, the expression levels of PR and its impact to tumor microenvironment in prostate tumors are poorly understood.Immunohistochemistry assays are applied to human prostate tissue biopsies. Cell migration, invasion and proliferation assays are performed using human prostate cells. Real-time PCR and ELISA are applied to measure gene expression at molecular levels.Immunohistochemistry assays showed that PR protein levels were decreased in cancer associated stroma when compared with paired normal prostate stroma. Using in vitro prostate stromal cell models, we showed that conditioned media collected from PR positive stromal cells inhibited prostate cancer cell migration and invasion, but had minor suppressive impacts on cancer cell proliferation. PR suppressed the secretion of stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1 and interlukin-6 (IL-6 by stromal cells independent to PR ligands. Blocking PR expression by siRNA or supplementation of exogenous SDF-1 or IL-6 to conditioned media from PR positive stromal cells counteracted the inhibitory effects of PR to cancer cell migration and invasion.Decreased expression of the PR in cancer associated stroma may contribute to the elevated SDF-1 and IL-6 levels in prostate tumors and enhance prostate tumor progression.

  2. Mineralization by mesenchymal stromal cells is variously modulated depending on commercial platelet lysate preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boraldi, Federica; Burns, Jorge S; Bartolomeo, Angelica; Dominici, Massimo; Quaglino, Daniela

    2018-03-01

    Numerous cellular models have been developed to investigate calcification for regenerative medicine applications and for the identification of therapeutic targets in various complications associated with age-related diseases. However, results have often been contradictory due to specific culture conditions, cell type ontogeny and aging status. Human platelet lysate (hPL) has been recently investigated as valuable alternative to fetal bovine serum (FBS) in cell culture and bone regeneration. A parallel comparison of how all these multiple factors may converge to influence mineralization has yet to be reported. To compare mineralization of human mesenchymal cell types known to differ in extracellular matrix calcification potency, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells and dermal fibroblasts from neonatal and adult donors, at both low and high passages, were investigated in an ex vivo experimental model by supplementing the osteogenic induction medium with FBS or with hPL. Four commercial hPL preparations were profiled by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight spectrometry, and mineralization was visualized by von Kossa staining and quantified by morphometric evaluations after 9, 14 and 21 days of culture. Data demonstrate that (i) commercial hPL preparations differ according to mass spectra profiles, (ii) hPL variously influences mineral deposition depending on cell line and possibly on platelet product preparation methods, (iii) donor age modifies mineral deposition in the presence of the same hPL and (iv) reduced in vitro proliferative capacity affects osteogenic induction and response to hPL. Despite the standardized procedures applied to obtain commercial hPL, this study highlights the divergent effects of different preparations and emphasizes the importance of cellular ontology, donor age and cell proliferative capacity to optimize the osteogenic induction capabilities of mesenchymal stromal cells and design more effective

  3. Leukemia inhibitory factor increases the proliferation of human endometrial stromal cells and expression of genes related to pluripotency

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    Mojdeh Salehnia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concerning the low population of human endometrial mesenchymal cells within the tissue and their potential application in the clinic and tissue engineering, some researches have been focused on their in vitro expansion. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF as a proliferative factor on the expansion and proliferation of human endometrial stromal cells. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, the isolated and cultured human endometrial stromal cells from women at ovulatory phase aged 20-35 years, after fourth passage were divided into control and LIF-treated groups. In the experimental group, the endometrial cells were treated by 10 ng/ml LIF in culture media and the cultured cells without adding LIF considered as control group. Both groups were evaluated and compared for proliferation rate using MTT assay, for CD90 marker by flow cytometric analysis and for the expression of Oct4, Nanog, PCNA and LIFr genes using real-time RT-PCR. Results: The proliferation rate of control and LIF-treated groups were 1.17±0.17 and 1.61±0.06 respectively and there was a significant increase in endometrial stromal cell proliferation following in vitro treatment by LIF compared to control group (p=0.049. The rate of CD90 positive cells was significantly increased in LIFtreated group (98.96±0.37% compared to control group (94.26±0.08% (p=0.0498. Also, the expression ratio of all studied genes was significantly increased in the LIFtreated group compared to control group (p=0.0479. Conclusion: The present study showed that LIF has a great impact on proliferation, survival, and maintenance of pluripotency of human endometrial stromal cells and it could be applicable in cell therapies.

  4. CD34 defines an osteoprogenitor cell population in mouse bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Al-Shammary, Asma; Skagen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) and their progenitors have been identified based on retrospective functional criteria. CD markers are employed to define cell populations with distinct functional characteristics. However, defining and pro...

  5. Amniotic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Exhibit Preferential Osteogenic and Chondrogenic Differentiation and Enhanced Matrix Production Compared With Adipose Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topoluk, Natasha; Hawkins, Richard; Tokish, John; Mercuri, Jeremy

    2017-09-01

    Therapeutic efficacy of various mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) types for orthopaedic applications is currently being investigated. While the concept of MSC therapy is well grounded in the basic science of healing and regeneration, little is known about individual MSC populations in terms of their propensity to promote the repair and/or regeneration of specific musculoskeletal tissues. Two promising MSC sources, adipose and amnion, have each demonstrated differentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) production in the setting of musculoskeletal tissue regeneration. However, no study to date has directly compared the differentiation potential of these 2 MSC populations. To compare the ability of human adipose- and amnion-derived MSCs to undergo osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. Controlled laboratory study. MSC populations from the human term amnion were quantified and characterized via cell counting, histologic assessment, and flow cytometry. Differentiation of these cells in comparison to commercially purchased human adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hADSCs) in the presence and absence of differentiation media was evaluated via reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for bone and cartilage gene transcript markers and histology/immunohistochemistry to examine ECM production. Analysis of variance and paired t tests were performed to compare results across all cell groups investigated. The authors confirmed that the human term amnion contains 2 primary cell types demonstrating MSC characteristics-(1) human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) and (2) human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs)-and each exhibited more than 90% staining for MSC surface markers (CD90, CD105, CD73). Average viable hAEC and hAMSC yields at harvest were 2.3 × 10 6 ± 3.7 × 10 5 and 1.6 × 10 6 ± 4.7 × 10 5 per milliliter of amnion, respectively. As well, hAECs and hAMSCs demonstrated significantly greater osteocalcin ( P = .025), aggrecan ( P

  6. Comparison of clinical grade human platelet lysates for cultivation of mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Morten; Tratwal, Josefine; Follin, Bjarke

    2016-01-01

    be devoid of any animal derived components. We have evaluated whether human Platelet Lysate (hPL) could be an attractive alternative to animal supplements. METHODS: MSCs from bone marrow (BMSCs) and adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASCs) obtained from three donors were culture expanded in three...... culture conditions with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Cell morphology, proliferation, phenotype, genomic stability, and differentiation potential were analyzed. RESULTS: Regardless of manufacturer, BMSCs and ASCs cultured in hPL media showed a significant increase in proliferation capacity compared to FBS...

  7. Differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells into low immunogenic hepatocyte-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qinjun; Ren, Hongying; Li, Xiyuan; Chen, Zhong; Zhang, Xiangyu; Gong, Wei; Liu, Yongjun; Pang, Tianxiang; Han, Zhong Chao

    2009-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) isolated from several human tissues have been known to differentiate into the hepatic lineage in vitro, but the immunogenicity of the differentiated hepatocyte-like cells (DHC) has not been reported. Umbilical cord (UC) MSC are thought to be an attractive cell source for cell therapy because of their young age and low infection rate compared with adult tissue MSC. Hepatic differentiation of UC-MSC was induced with a 2-step protocol. The expressions of hepatic markers were detected by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining. Albumin production and urea secretion were measured by ELISA and colorimetric assay respectively. The immunosuppressive properties of DHC was detected by mixed lymphocyte culture. After incubation with specific growth factors, including hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), UC MSC exhibited a high hepatic differentiation ability in an adherent culture condition. The differentiated UC MSC showed hepatocyte-like morphology and expressed several liver-specific markers at gene and protein levels. Furthermore, the DHC exhibited hepatocyte-specific functions, including albumin secretion, low-density lipoprotein uptake and urea production. More importantly, DHC did not express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II antigen and were not able to induce lymphocyte proliferation in mixed lymphocyte culture, as undifferentiated UC MSC did. Our results indicate that UC MSC are able to differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells that still retain their low immunogenicity in vitro. More importantly, DHC incorporated into the parenchyma of liver when transplanted into mice with CCl(4)-induced liver injury. Therefore, DHC may be an ideal source for cell therapy of liver diseases.

  8. Microarray Analysis on Gene Regulation by Estrogen, Progesterone and Tamoxifen in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells

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    Chun-E Ren

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial stromal cells represent a major cellular component of human uterine endometrium that is subject to tight hormonal regulation. Through cell-cell contacts and/or paracrine mechanisms, stromal cells play a significant role in the malignant transformation of epithelial cells. We isolated stromal cells from normal human endometrium and investigated the morphological and transcriptional changes induced by estrogen, progesterone and tamoxifen. We demonstrated that stromal cells express appreciable levels of estrogen and progesterone receptors and undergo different morphological changes upon hormonal stimulation. Microarray analysis indicated that both estrogen and progesterone induced dramatic alterations in a variety of genes associated with cell structure, transcription, cell cycle, and signaling. However, divergent patterns of changes, and in some genes opposite effects, were observed for the two hormones. A large number of genes are identified as novel targets for hormonal regulation. These hormone-responsive genes may be involved in normal uterine function and the development of endometrial malignancies.

  9. Actin depolymerization enhances adipogenic differentiation in human stromal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Hu, Huimin; Qiu, Weimin

    2018-01-01

    Human stromal stem cells (hMSCs) differentiate into adipocytes that play a role in skeletal tissue homeostasis and whole body energy metabolism. During adipocyte differentiation, hMSCs exhibit significant changes in cell morphology suggesting changes in cytoskeletal organization. Here, we examined...... differentiation as evidenced by decreased number of mature adipocytes and decreased adipocyte specific gene expression (ADIPOQ, LPL, PPARG, FABP4). In contrast, disruption of actin cytoskeleton by Cytochalasin D enhanced adipocyte differentiation. Follow up studies revealed that the effects of CFL1 on adipocyte...... differentiation depended on the activity of LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1) which is the major upstream kinase of CFL1. Inhibiting LIMK by its specific chemical inhibitor LIMKi inhibited the phosphorylation of CFL1 and actin polymerization, and enhanced the adipocyte differentiation. Moreover, treating h...

  10. Actin depolymerization enhances adipogenic differentiation in human stromal stem cells

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    Li Chen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Human stromal stem cells (hMSCs differentiate into adipocytes that play a role in skeletal tissue homeostasis and whole body energy metabolism. During adipocyte differentiation, hMSCs exhibit significant changes in cell morphology suggesting changes in cytoskeletal organization. Here, we examined the effect of direct modulation of actin microfilament dynamics on adipocyte differentiation. Stabilizing actin filaments in hMSCs by siRNA-mediated knock down of the two main actin depolymerizing factors (ADFs: Cofilin 1 (CFL1 and Destrin (DSTN or treating the cells by Phalloidin reduced adipocyte differentiation as evidenced by decreased number of mature adipocytes and decreased adipocyte specific gene expression (ADIPOQ, LPL, PPARG, FABP4. In contrast, disruption of actin cytoskeleton by Cytochalasin D enhanced adipocyte differentiation. Follow up studies revealed that the effects of CFL1 on adipocyte differentiation depended on the activity of LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1 which is the major upstream kinase of CFL1. Inhibiting LIMK by its specific chemical inhibitor LIMKi inhibited the phosphorylation of CFL1 and actin polymerization, and enhanced the adipocyte differentiation. Moreover, treating hMSCs by Cytochalasin D inhibited ERK and Smad2 signaling and this was associated with enhanced adipocyte differentiation. On the other hand, Phalloidin enhanced ERK and Smad2 signaling, but inhibited adipocyte differentiation which was rescued by ERK specific chemical inhibitor U0126. Our data provide a link between restructuring of hMSCs cytoskeleton and hMSCs lineage commitment and differentiation. Keywords: Actin cytoskeleton, Actin depolymerizing factors, Adipocyte differentiation, Human stromal stem cells

  11. In vitro differentiation of human skin-derived multipotent stromal cells into putative endothelial-like cells

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    Vishnubalaji Radhakrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multipotent stem cells have been successfully isolated from various tissues and are currently utilized for tissue-engineering and cell-based therapies. Among the many sources, skin has recently emerged as an attractive source for multipotent cells because of its abundance. Recent literature showed that skin stromal cells (SSCs possess mesoderm lineage differentiation potential; however, the endothelial differentiation and angiogenic potential of SSC remains elusive. In our study, SSCs were isolated from human neonatal foreskin (hNFSSCs and adult dermal skin (hADSSCs using explants cultures and were compared with bone marrow (hMSC-TERT and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs for their potential differentiation into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and endothelial cells. Results Concordant with previous studies, both MSCs and SSCs showed similar morphology, surface protein expression, and were able to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes. Using an endothelial induction culture system combined with an in vitro matrigel angiogenesis assay, hNFSSCs and hADSSCs exhibited the highest tube-forming capability, which was similar to those formed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, with hNFSSCs forming the most tightly packed, longest, and largest diameter tubules among the three cell types. CD146 was highly expressed on hNFSSCs and HUVEC followed by hADSSCs, and hMSC-TERT, while its expression was almost absent on hADMSCs. Similarly, higher vascular density (based on the expression of CD31, CD34, vWF, CD146 and SMA was observed in neonatal skin, followed by adult dermal skin and adipose tissue. Thus, our preliminary data indicated a plausible relationship between vascular densities, and the expression of CD146 on multipotent cells derived from those tissues. Conclusions Our data is the first to demonstrate that human dermal skin stromal cells can be differentiated into endothelial lineage. Hence, SSCs

  12. The Pericytic Phenotype of Adipose Tissue-Derived Stromal Cells Is Promoted by NOTCH2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terlizzi, Vincenzo; Kolibabka, Matthias; Burgess, Janette Kay; Hammes, Hans Peter; Harmsen, Martin Conrad

    Long-term diabetes leads to macrovascular and microvascular complication. In diabetic retinopathy (DR), persistent hyperglycemia causes permanent loss of retinal pericytes and aberrant proliferation of microvascular endothelial cells (ECs). Adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASCs) may serve to

  13. Impaired Angiogenic Potential of Human Placental Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Intrauterine Growth Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandò, Chiara; Razini, Paola; Novielli, Chiara; Anelli, Gaia Maria; Belicchi, Marzia; Erratico, Silvia; Banfi, Stefania; Meregalli, Mirella; Tavelli, Alessandro; Baccarin, Marco; Rolfo, Alessandro; Motta, Silvia; Torrente, Yvan; Cetin, Irene

    2016-04-01

    Human placental mesenchymal stromal cells (pMSCs) have never been investigated in intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). We characterized cells isolated from placental membranes and the basal disc of six IUGR and five physiological placentas. Cell viability and proliferation were assessed every 7 days during a 6-week culture. Expression of hematopoietic, stem, endothelial, and mesenchymal markers was evaluated by flow cytometry. We characterized the multipotency of pMSCs and the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial content and function. Cell viability was high in all samples, and proliferation rate was lower in IUGR compared with control cells. All samples presented a starting heterogeneous population, shifting during culture toward homogeneity for mesenchymal markers and occurring earlier in IUGR than in controls. In vitro multipotency of IUGR-derived pMSCs was restricted because their capacity for adipocyte differentiation was increased, whereas their ability to differentiate toward endothelial cell lineage was decreased. Mitochondrial content and function were higher in IUGR pMSCs than controls, possibly indicating a shift from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism, with the loss of the metabolic characteristics that are typical of undifferentiated multipotent cells. This study demonstrates that the loss of endothelial differentiation potential and the increase of adipogenic ability are likely to play a significant role in the vicious cycle of abnormal placental development in intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). This is the first observation of a potential role for placental mesenchymal stromal cells in intrauterine growth restriction, thus leading to new perspectives for the treatment of IUGR. ©AlphaMed Press.

  14. Enzymatically crosslinked gelatin hydrogel promotes the proliferation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells

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    Gang Yang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gelatin hydrogel crosslinked by microbial transglutaminase (mTG exhibits excellent performance in cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. We examined the gelation time and gel strength of gelatin/mTG hydrogels in various proportions to investigate their physical properties and tested their degradation performances in vitro. Cell morphology and viability of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs cultured on the 2D gel surface or in 3D hydrogel encapsulation were evaluated by immunofluorescence staining. Cell proliferation was tested via Alamar Blue assay. To investigate the hydrogel effect on cell differentiation, the cardiac-specific gene expression levelsof Nkx2.5, Myh6, Gja1, and Mef2c in encapsulated ADSCs with or without cardiac induction medium were detected by real-time RT-PCR. Cell release from the encapsulated status and cell migration in a 3D hydrogel model were assessed in vitro. Results show that the gelatin/mTG hydrogels are not cytotoxic and that their mechanical properties are adjustable. Hydrogel degradation is related to gel concentration and the resident cells. Cell growth morphology and proliferative capability in both 2D and 3D cultures were mainly affected by gel concentration. PCR result shows that hydrogel modulus together with induction medium affects the cardiac differentiation of ADSCs. The cell migration experiment and subcutaneous implantation show that the hydrogels are suitable for cell delivery.

  15. A Stromal Cell Niche for Human and Mouse Type 3 Innate Lymphoid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorweg, Kerim; Narang, Priyanka; Li, Zhi; Thuery, Anne; Papazian, Natalie; Withers, David R; Coles, Mark C; Cupedo, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Adaptive immunity critically depends on the functional compartmentalization of secondary lymphoid organs. Mesenchymal stromal cells create and maintain specialized niches that support survival, activation, and expansion of T and B cells, and integrated analysis of lymphocytes and their niche has been instrumental in understanding adaptive immunity. Lymphoid organs are also home to type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3), innate effector cells essential for barrier immunity. However, a specialized stromal niche for ILC3 has not been identified. A novel lineage-tracing approach now identifies a subset of murine fetal lymphoid tissue organizer cells that gives rise exclusively to adult marginal reticular cells. Moreover, both cell types are conserved from mice to humans and colocalize with ILC3 in secondary lymphoid tissues throughout life. In sum, we provide evidence that fetal stromal organizers give rise to adult marginal reticular cells and form a dedicated stromal niche for innate ILC3 in adaptive lymphoid organs. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Application of cell sheet technology to bone marrow stromal cell transplantation for rat brain infarct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masaki; Shichinohe, Hideo; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2017-02-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplantation enhances functional recovery after cerebral infarct, but the optimal delivery route is undetermined. This study was aimed to assess whether a novel cell-sheet technology non-invasively serves therapeutic benefits to ischemic stroke. First, the monolayered cell sheet was engineered by culturing rat BMSCs on a temperature-responsive dish. The cell sheet was analysed histologically and then transplanted onto the ipsilateral neocortex of rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion at 7 days after the insult. Their behaviours and histology were compared with those in the animals treated with direct injection of BMSCs or vehicle over 4 weeks post-transplantation. The cell sheet was 27.9 ± 8.0 μm thick and was composed of 9.8 ± 2.4 × 10 5 cells. Cell sheet transplantation significantly improved motor function when compared with the vehicle-injected animals. Histological analysis revealed that the BMSCs were densely distributed to the neocortex adjacent to the cerebral infarct and expressed neuronal phenotype in the cell sheet-transplanted animals. These findings were almost equal to those for the animals treated with direct BMSC injection. The attachment of the BMSC sheet to the brain surface did not induce reactive astrocytes in the adjacent neocortex, although direct injection of BMSCs profoundly induced reactive astrocytes around the injection site. These findings suggest that the BMSCs in cell sheets preserve their biological capacity of migration and neural differentiation. Cell-sheet technology may enhance functional recovery after ischaemic stroke, using a less invasive method. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Cell sheet engineering using the stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue as a vascularization strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marina; Cerqueira, Mariana T; Santos, Tírcia C; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Ludovico, Paula; Marques, Alexandra P; Pirraco, Rogério P; Reis, Rui L

    2017-06-01

    Current vascularization strategies for Tissue Engineering constructs, in particular cell sheet-based, are limited by time-consuming and expensive endothelial cell isolation and/or by the complexity of using extrinsic growth factors. Herein, we propose an alternative strategy using angiogenic cell sheets (CS) obtained from the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue that can be incorporated into more complex constructs. Cells from the SVF were cultured in normoxic and hypoxic conditions for up to 8days in the absence of extrinsic growth factors. Immunocytochemistry against CD31 and CD146 revealed spontaneous organization in capillary-like structures, more complex after hypoxic conditioning. Inhibition of HIF-1α pathway hindered capillary-like structure formation in SVF cells cultured in hypoxia, suggesting a role of HIF-1α. Moreover, hypoxic SVF cells showed a trend for increased secretion of angiogenic factors, which was reflected in increased network formation by endothelial cells cultured on matrigel using that conditioned medium. In vivo implantation of SVF CS in a mouse hind limb ischemia model revealed that hypoxia-conditioned CS led to improved restoration of blood flow. Both in vitro and in vivo data suggest that SVF CS can be used as simple and cost-efficient tools to promote functional vascularization of TE constructs. Neovascularization after implantation is a major obstacle for producing clinically viable cell sheet-based tissue engineered constructs. Strategies using endothelial cells and extrinsic angiogenic growth factors are expensive and time consuming and may raise concerns of tumorigenicity. In this manuscript, we describe a simplified approach using angiogenic cell sheets fabricated from the stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue. The strong angiogenic behavior of these cell sheets, achieved without the use of external growth factors, was further stimulated by low oxygen culture. When implanted in an in vivo model of hind limb

  18. Morphological changes in paraurethral area after introduction of tissue engineering construct on the basis of adipose tissue stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, A V; Arutyunyan, I V; Bol'shakova, G B; Volkov, A V; Gol'dshtein, D V

    2009-10-01

    We studied morphological changes in the paraurethral area of Wistar rats after introduction of tissue engineering constructs on the basis of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells and gelatin sponge. The tissue engineering construct containing autologous culture of the stromal fraction of the adipose tissue was most effective. After introduction of this construct we observed more rapid degradation of the construct matrix and more intensive formation of collagen fibers.

  19. Hypoxic stress simultaneously stimulates vascular endothelial growth factor via hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and inhibits stromal cell-derived factor-1 in human endometrial stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Tomoko; Okada, Hidetaka; Cho, Hisayuu; Tsuji, Shoko; Nishigaki, Akemi; Yasuda, Katsuhiko; Kanzaki, Hideharu

    2012-02-01

    Hypoxia of the human endometrium is a physiologic event occurring during the perimenstrual period and the local stimulus for angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hypoxic stress on the regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXCL12), and the potential role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in the endometrium. Human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs, n= 22 samples) were studied in vitro. ESCs were cultured under hypoxic and normoxic conditions and treated with cobalt chloride (CoCl₂; a hypoxia-mimicking agent) and/or echinomycin, a small-molecule inhibitor of HIF-1α activity. The mRNA levels and production of VEGF and SDF-1 were assessed by real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. The HIF-1α protein levels were measured using western blot analysis. Hypoxia simultaneously induced the expression of mRNA and production of VEGF and attenuated the expression and production of SDF-1 from ESCs in a time-dependent manner. Similar changes were observed in the ESCs after stimulation with CoCl₂ in a dose-dependent manner. CoCl₂ significantly induced the expression of HIF-1α protein, and its highest expression was observed at 6 h. Echinomycin inhibited hypoxia-induced VEGF production without affecting the HIF-1α protein level and cell toxicity and had no effect on SDF-1 secretion (P hypoxic conditions that could influence angiogenesis in the human endometrium.

  20. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Stimulate Skeletal Myoblast Proliferation through the Paracrine Release of VEGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellini, Flaminia; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Nistri, Silvia; Nosi, Daniele; Saccardi, Riccardo; Quercioli, Franco; Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra; Formigli, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are the leading cell candidates in the field of regenerative medicine. These cells have also been successfully used to improve skeletal muscle repair/regeneration; however, the mechanisms responsible for their beneficial effects remain to be clarified. On this basis, in the present study, we evaluated in a co-culture system, the ability of bone-marrow MSCs to influence C2C12 myoblast behavior and analyzed the cross-talk between the two cell types at the cellular and molecular level. We found that myoblast proliferation was greatly enhanced in the co-culture as judged by time lapse videomicroscopy, cyclin A expression and EdU incorporation. Moreover, myoblasts immunomagnetically separated from MSCs after co-culture expressed higher mRNA and protein levels of Notch-1, a key determinant of myoblast activation and proliferation, as compared with the single culture. Notch-1 intracellular domain and nuclear localization of Hes-1, a Notch-1 target gene, were also increased in the co-culture. Interestingly, the myoblastic response was mainly dependent on the paracrine release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by MSCs. Indeed, the addition of MSC-derived conditioned medium (CM) to C2C12 cells yielded similar results as those observed in the co-culture and increased the phosphorylation and expression levels of VEGFR. The treatment with the selective pharmacological VEGFR inhibitor, KRN633, resulted in a marked attenuation of the receptor activation and concomitantly inhibited the effects of MSC-CM on C2C12 cell growth and Notch-1 signaling. In conclusion, this study provides novel evidence for a role of MSCs in stimulating myoblast cell proliferation and suggests that the functional interaction between the two cell types may be exploited for the development of new and more efficient cell-based skeletal muscle repair strategies. PMID:22815682

  1. Mortalin antibody-conjugated quantum dot transfer from human mesenchymal stromal cells to breast cancer cells requires cell–cell interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietilä, Mika [National Institute of Advanced industrial Sciences and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 8562 (Japan); Lehenkari, Petri [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, Aapistie 7, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 (Finland); Institute of Clinical Medicine, Division of Surgery, University of Oulu and Clinical Research Centre, Department of Surgery and Intensive Care, Oulu University Hospital, Aapistie 5a, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 (Finland); Kuvaja, Paula [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, Aapistie 7, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 (Finland); Department of Pathology, Oulu University Hospital, P.O. Box 50, FIN-90029 OYS, Oulu (Finland); Kaakinen, Mika [Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FI-90014 (Finland); Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu [National Institute of Advanced industrial Sciences and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 8562 (Japan); Uemura, Toshimasa, E-mail: t.uemura@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced industrial Sciences and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 8562 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The role of tumor stroma in regulation of breast cancer growth has been widely studied. However, the details on the type of heterocellular cross-talk between stromal and breast cancer cells (BCCs) are still poorly known. In the present study, in order to investigate the intercellular communication between human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) and breast cancer cells (BCCs, MDA-MB-231), we recruited cell-internalizing quantum dots (i-QD) generated by conjugation of cell-internalizing anti-mortalin antibody and quantum dots (QD). Co-culture of illuminated and color-coded hMSCs (QD655) and BCCs (QD585) revealed the intercellular transfer of QD655 signal from hMSCs to BCCs. The amount of QD double positive BCCs increased gradually within 48 h of co-culture. We found prominent intercellular transfer of QD655 in hanging drop co-culture system and it was non-existent when hMSCs and BBCs cells were co-cultured in trans-well system lacking imminent cell–cell contact. Fluorescent and electron microscope analyses also supported that the direct cell-to-cell interactions may be required for the intercellular transfer of QD655 from hMSCs to BCCs. To the best of our knowledge, the study provides a first demonstration of transcellular crosstalk between stromal cells and BCCs that involve direct contact and may also include a transfer of mortalin, an anti-apoptotic and growth-promoting factor enriched in cancer cells.

  2. Primary observation on adherent function of bone marrow stromal cells in mice post combined radiation-burn injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xinghua; Luo Chengji; Guo Chaohua; Wang Ping; Deng Xuecai

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the adherent function of bone marrow stromal cells in hematopoietic inductive microenvironment post combined radiation-burn injury. Methods: The expression of cell adhesion molecules including vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), fibro-connection (Fn), laminin (Ln) and collagen type IV (Col IV) on bone marrow stromal cells cultured in vitro was detected by flow cytometry and the binding capacity of bone marrow mononuclear cells to stromal cell adherence layer was tested by cell binding assay and cell binding blocking assay respectively from mice treated with 5.0 Gy γ-ray 15% of total body surface area (TBSA), third-degree burn injury and combined irradiation-burn injury, respectively. Results: 1. The expression levels of molecules mentioned above in burn-injured mice were the highest. The molecules levels in control mice were greater than those in radiation-injured mice, which were lower than those in mice with combined radiation-burn injury. 2. The binding capacity of stromal cell adherence layer in burn-injured mice was greater than that in control mice, and significantly increased from 3 to 7 days post injury as compared with that in controls, radiation-injured mice and combined radiation-burn-injured mice, respectively (P < 0.05-0.01). Contrarily, the capacity of binding in the radiation-injured and combined radiation-burn-injured mice was the lowest from 3 to 7 days post injury. 3. The binding rate of bone marrow mononuclear cells to stromal cell adherence layer descended in different degrees after pre-treatment with monoclonal antibodies directed to VCAM-1, Fn, Ln, or Col IV respectively or VCAM-1 combined with anti-Fn, anti-Ln or anti-Col IV, respectively, in stromal cell adherence layer. Conclusion: The damage of cell adherent function for bone marrow hematopoietic inductive microenvironment post combined radiation-burn injury might be one of the important factors in hematopoietic disorder in combined radiation-burn injury

  3. Radiation effects on haematopoietic stem cells in vitro: possible role of stromal niches in the stem cell hierarchy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, J.G.; Crouse, D.A.; Jackson, J.D.; Schmidt, C.M.; Ritter, E.K.; Udeaja, G.C.; Mann, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    The authors describe experiments which attempt to elucidate the nature of haemopoietic stem cell and microenvironmental stromal cell interactions which might explain anomalies in explanations of the differential effects of radiation on HSC versus MSC. In particular, there is an attempt to demonstrate the existence of stromal niches. (UK)

  4. Stromal Cells Positively and Negatively Modulate the Growth of Cancer Cells: Stimulation via the PGE2-TNFα-IL-6 Pathway and Inhibition via Secreted GAPDH-E-Cadherin Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Manabu; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ohba, Shun-ichi; Yoshida, Junjiro; Masuda, Tohru; Yamasaki, Manabu; Usami, Ihomi; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Abe, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takumi; Yamori, Takao; Shibasaki, Masakatsu; Nomoto, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast-like stromal cells modulate cancer cells through secreted factors and adhesion, but those factors are not fully understood. Here, we have identified critical stromal factors that modulate cancer growth positively and negatively. Using a cell co-culture system, we found that gastric stromal cells secreted IL-6 as a growth and survival factor for gastric cancer cells. Moreover, gastric cancer cells secreted PGE2 and TNFα that stimulated IL-6 secretion by the stromal cells. Furthermore, we found that stromal cells secreted glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Extracellular GAPDH, or its N-terminal domain, inhibited gastric cancer cell growth, a finding confirmed in other cell systems. GAPDH bound to E-cadherin and downregulated the mTOR-p70S6 kinase pathway. These results demonstrate that stromal cells could regulate cancer cell growth through the balance of these secreted factors. We propose that negative regulation of cancer growth using GAPDH could be a new anti-cancer strategy. PMID:25785838

  5. HOX and TALE signatures specify human stromal stem cell populations from different sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picchi, Jacopo; Trombi, Luisa; Spugnesi, Laura; Barachini, Serena; Maroni, Giorgia; Brodano, Giovanni Barbanti; Boriani, Stefano; Valtieri, Mauro; Petrini, Mario; Magli, Maria Cristina

    2013-04-01

    Human stromal stem cell populations reside in different tissues and anatomical sites, however a critical question related to their efficient use in regenerative medicine is whether they exhibit equivalent biological properties. Here, we compared cellular and molecular characteristics of stromal stem cells derived from the bone marrow, at different body sites (iliac crest, sternum, and vertebrae) and other tissues (dental pulp and colon). In particular, we investigated whether homeobox genes of the HOX and TALE subfamilies might provide suitable markers to identify distinct stromal cell populations, as HOX proteins control cell positional identity and, together with their co-factors TALE, are involved in orchestrating differentiation of adult tissues. Our results show that stromal populations from different sources, although immunophenotypically similar, display distinct HOX and TALE signatures, as well as different growth and differentiation abilities. Stromal stem cells from different tissues are characterized by specific HOX profiles, differing in the number and type of active genes, as well as in their level of expression. Conversely, bone marrow-derived cell populations can be essentially distinguished for the expression levels of specific HOX members, strongly suggesting that quantitative differences in HOX activity may be crucial. Taken together, our data indicate that the HOX and TALE profiles provide positional, embryological and hierarchical identity of human stromal stem cells. Furthermore, our data suggest that cell populations derived from different body sites may not represent equivalent cell sources for cell-based therapeutical strategies for regeneration and repair of specific tissues. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Analysis for apoptosis and necrosis on adipocytes, stromal vascular fraction, and adipose-derived stem cells in human lipoaspirates after liposuction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei Z; Fang, Xin-Hua; Williams, Shelley J; Stephenson, Linda L; Baynosa, Richard C; Wong, Nancy; Khiabani, Kayvan T; Zamboni, William A

    2013-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells have become the most studied adult stem cells. The authors examined the apoptosis and necrosis rates for adipocyte, stromal vascular fraction, and adipose-derived stem cells in fresh human lipoaspirates. Human lipoaspirate (n = 8) was harvested using a standard liposuction technique. Stromal vascular fraction cells were separated from adipocytes and cultured to obtain purified adipose-derived stem cells. A panel of stem cell markers was used to identify the surface phenotypes of cultured adipose-derived stem cells. Three distinct stem cell subpopulations (CD90/CD45, CD105/CD45, and CD34/CD31) were selected from the stromal vascular fraction. Apoptosis and necrosis were determined by annexin V/propidium iodide assay and analyzed by flow cytometry. The cultured adipose-derived stem cells demonstrated long-term proliferation and differentiation evidenced by cell doubling time and positive staining with oil red O and alkaline phosphatase. Isolated from lipoaspirates, adipocytes exhibited 19.7 ± 3.7 percent apoptosis and 1.1 ± 0.3 percent necrosis; stromal vascular fraction cells revealed 22.0 ± 6.3 percent of apoptosis and 11.2 ± 1.9 percent of necrosis; stromal vascular fraction cells had a higher rate of necrosis than adipocytes (p vascular fraction cells, 51.1 ± 3.7 percent expressed CD90/CD45, 7.5 ± 1.0 percent expressed CD105/CD45, and 26.4 ± 3.8 percent expressed CD34/CD31. CD34/CD31 adipose-derived stem cells had lower rates of apoptosis and necrosis compared with CD105/CD45 adipose-derived stem cells (p necrosis than adipocytes. However, the extent of apoptosis and necrosis was significantly different among adipose-derived stem cell subpopulations.

  7. Translating Research into Clinical Scale Manufacturing of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Bieback

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It sounds simple to obtain sufficient numbers of cells derived from fetal or adult human tissues, isolate and/or expand the stem cells, and then transplant an appropriate number of these cells into the patient at the correct location. However, translating basic research into routine therapies is a complex multistep process which necessitates product regulation. The challenge relates to managing the expected therapeutic benefits with the potential risks and to balance the fast move to clinical trials with time-consuming cautious risk assessment. This paper will focus on the definition of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, and challenges and achievements in the manufacturing process enabling their use in clinical studies. It will allude to different cellular sources, special capacities of MSCs, but also to current regulations, with a special focus on accessory material of human or animal origin, like media supplements. As cellular integrity and purity, formulation and lot release testing of the final product, validation of all procedures, and quality assurance are of utmost necessity, these topics will be addressed.

  8. Gold nanoparticles cellular toxicity and recovery: adipose Derived Stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironava, Tatsiana; Hadjiargyrou, Michael; Simon, Marcia; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2014-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are currently used in numerous medical applications. Herein, we describe their in vitro impact on human adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) using 13 nm and 45 nm citrate-coated AuNPs. In their non-differentiated state, ADSCs were penetrated by the AuNPs and stored in vacuoles. The presence of the AuNPs in ADSCs resulted in increased population doubling times, decreased cell motility and cell-mediated collagen contraction. The degree to which the cells were impacted was a function of particle concentration, where the smaller particles required a sevenfold higher concentration to have the same effect as the larger ones. Furthermore, AuNPs reduced adipogenesis as measured by lipid droplet accumulation and adiponectin secretion. These effects correlated with transient increases in DLK1 and with relative reductions in fibronectin. Upon removal of exogenous AuNPs, cellular NP levels decreased and normal ADSC functions were restored. As adiponectin helps regulate energy metabolism, local fluctuations triggered by AuNPs can lead to systemic changes. Hence, careful choice of size, concentration and clinical application duration of AuNPs is warranted.

  9. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Therapy for Pancreatitis: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Based on animal studies, adult mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are promising for the treatment of pancreatitis. However, the best type of this form of cell therapy and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Methods. We searched the PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar, and Clinical Trials.gov websites for studies using MSCs as a therapy for both acute and chronic pancreatitis published until September 2017. Results. We identified 276 publications; of these publications, 18 met our inclusion criteria. In animal studies, stem cell therapy was applied more frequently for acute pancreatitis than for chronic pancreatitis. No clinical trials were identified. MSC therapy ameliorated pancreatic inflammation in acute pancreatitis and pancreatic fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis. Bone marrow and umbilical cord MSCs were the most frequently administered cell types. Due to the substantial heterogeneity among the studies regarding the type, source, and dose of MSCs used, conducting a meta-analysis was not feasible to determine the best type of MSCs. Conclusion. The available data were insufficient for determining the best type of MSCs for the treatment of acute or chronic pancreatitis; therefore, clinical trials investigating the use of MSCs as therapy for pancreatitis are not warranted.

  10. Stromal cell migration precedes hemopoietic repopulation of the bone marrow after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werts, E.D.; Gibson, D.P.; Knapp, S.A.; DeGowin, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Circulation of hemopoietic stem cells into an irradiated site has been thoroughly documented, but migration of stromal cells to repair radiation damage has not. We determined the radiosensitivity of mouse bone marrow stroma and evaluated stromal and hemopoietic repopulation in x-irradiated marrow. The D 0 for growth of colonies of marrow stromal cells (MSC) was 215 to 230 rad. Total-body irradiation (TB) obliterated marrow stromal and hemopoietic cells within 3 days. In contrast, 1 day after 1000 rad leg irradiation (LI), MSC rose to 80% of normal, but fell to 34% by 3 days and recovered to 72% by 30 days. However, femoral nucleated cells diminished to 20% by 3 days and recovered to 74% of normal by 30 days. Likewise, differentiated marrow cells and hemopoietic stem cells were initially depleted. With 1000 rad LI followed 3 h later by 1000 rad to the body while shielding the leg, MSC and femoral nucleated cells recovered to values intermediate between 1000 rad TB and 1000 rad LI. We concluded that: (1) the D 0 for MSC was 215 to 230 rad, (2) stromal repopulation preceded hemopoietic recovery, and (3) immigration of stromal cells from an unirradiated sanctuary facilitated hemopoietic repopulation of a heavily irradiated site

  11. Breast cancer cells induce stromal fibroblasts to secrete ADAMTS1 for cancer invasion through an epigenetic change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiaw-Wei Tyan

    Full Text Available Microenvironment plays an important role in cancer development. We have reported that the cancer-associated stromal cells exhibit phenotypic and functional changes compared to stromal cells neighboring to normal tissues. However, the molecular mechanisms as well as the maintenance of these changes remain elusive. Here we showed that through co-culture with breast cancer cells for at least three to four passages, breast normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs gained persistent activity for promoting cancer cell invasion, partly via up-regulating ADAM metallopeptidase with thrombospondin type 1 motif, 1 (ADAMTS1. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the DNA methylation pattern in the ADAMTS1 promoter has no alteration. Instead, the loss of EZH2 binding to the ADAMTS1 promoter and the resulting decrease of promoter-associated histone H3K27 methylation may account for the up-regulation of ADAMTS1. Importantly, the lack of EZH2 binding and the H3K27 methylation on the ADAMTS1 promoter were sustained in cancer cell-precocultured NAFs after removal of cancer cells. These results suggest that cancer cells are capable of inducing stromal fibroblasts to secrete ADAMTS1 persistently for their invasion and the effect is epigenetically inheritable.

  12. Progestins inhibit estradiol-induced vascular endothelial growth factor and stromal cell-derived factor 1 in human endometrial stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hidetaka; Okamoto, Rika; Tsuzuki, Tomoko; Tsuji, Shoko; Yasuda, Katsuhiko; Kanzaki, Hideharu

    2011-09-01

    To investigate whether 17β-estradiol (E(2)) and progestins exert direct effects on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) in human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) and thereby to clarify the regulatory function of these local angiogenic factors in the endometrium. In vitro experiment. Research laboratory at Kansai Medical University. Fourteen patients undergoing hysterectomy for benign reasons. ESCs were cultured with E(2) and/or various clinically relevant progestins (medroxyprogesterone acetate [MPA], norethisterone [NET], levonorgestrel [LNG], dienogest [DNG], and progesterone [P]). The mRNA levels and production of VEGF and SDF-1 were assessed by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and ELISA, respectively. E(2) significantly induced the mRNA levels and protein production of VEGF and SDF-1 in ESCs. MPA could antagonize the E(2)-stimulated effects in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and this effect could be reversed by RU-486 (P receptor antagonist). All of the progestins (MPA, NET, LNG, and DNG; 10(-9) to 10(-7) mol/L) attenuated E(2)-induced VEGF and SDF-1 production, whereas P showed these inhibitory effects only when present in a high concentration (10(-7) mol/L). Progestins have inhibitory effects on E(2)-induced VEGF and SDF-1 in ESCs. These results may indicate a potential mechanism for action of the female sex steroids in the human endometrium that can be helpful for various clinical applications. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fibroadenoma With Pleomorphic Stromal Giant Cells: It's Not as Bad as It Looks!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawire, Jonathan; Singh, Kamaljeet; Steinhoff, Margaret M

    2017-08-01

    Clinically relevant histological categorization of fibroepithelial lesions can be a daunting task, especially in a core needle biopsy. Assessment of stromal nuclear atypia, including nuclear pleomorphism and mitotic activity, is a key morphological feature employed to classify fibroepithelial lesions. We describe a case of fibroadenoma with markedly atypical nuclear features in the stromal cells that led to misclassification as phyllodes tumor in the core needle biopsy. Excision showed a fibroadenoma containing pleomorphic stromal giant cells, with occasional mitotic figures, including atypical forms. Aforementioned nuclear findings in a fibroepithelial lesion raise a legitimate question of phyllodes tumor. Knowledge of this pitfall may help avoid overtreatment of an otherwise benign fibroepithelial lesion.

  14. Canonical hedgehog signaling augments tumor angiogenesis by induction of VEGF-A in stromal perivascular cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiwei; Tang, Tracy; Eastham-Anderson, Jeff; Dunlap, Debra; Alicke, Bruno; Nannini, Michelle; Gould, Stephen; Yauch, Robert; Modrusan, Zora; DuPree, Kelly J.; Darbonne, Walter C.; Plowman, Greg; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Callahan, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is critical to the patterning and development of a variety of organ systems, and both ligand-dependent and ligand-independent Hh pathway activation are known to promote tumorigenesis. Recent studies have shown that in tumors promoted by Hh ligands, activation occurs within the stromal microenvironment. Testing whether ligand-driven Hh signaling promotes tumor angiogenesis, we found that Hh antagonism reduced the vascular density of Hh-producing LS180 and SW480 xenografts. In addition, ectopic expression of sonic hedgehog in low-Hh–expressing DLD-1 xenografts increased tumor vascular density, augmented angiogenesis, and was associated with canonical Hh signaling within perivascular tumor stromal cells. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying Hh-mediated tumor angiogenesis, we established an Hh-sensitive angiogenesis coculture assay and found that fibroblast cell lines derived from a variety of human tissues were Hh responsive and promoted angiogenesis in vitro through a secreted paracrine signal(s). Affymetrix array analyses of cultured fibroblasts identified VEGF-A, hepatocyte growth factor, and PDGF-C as candidate secreted proangiogenic factors induced by Hh stimulation. Expression studies of xenografts and angiogenesis assays using combinations of Hh and VEGF-A inhibitors showed that it is primarily Hh-induced VEGF-A that promotes angiogenesis in vitro and augments tumor-derived VEGF to promote angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:21597001

  15. Radiation effect on the generation and expression of bone marrow stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiaoya; Jin Weilao; Gao Jianjun; Zhou Yi; Sheng Hui

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate focal flushing dose radiation effect on the generation, differentiation and gene expression of bone marrow stromal cells the femoral head of rats was irradiated at 30 Gy by 137 Cs γ-rays (dose rate: 0.83 Gy/min). Then the bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) was cultured. The ability of proliferation and colony formation was observed and the expression level of Cbf-α1, PPAR-γ, VEGF-a and KDR was detected by RT-PCR technology in two weeks later. It has been found that after partly irradiated by 137 Cs γ-rays the proliferation and the number of colony of BMSCs in irradiated group decreases obviously meanwhile the expression level of Cbf-α1, PPAR-γ and VEGF-a in irradiated BMSCs obviously decreases by 18.98 %, 9.46 %, 57.34 % and 5.56 % respectively compared to the normal BMSCs (p<0.05). It shows that the focal great radiation could damage the BMSCs and depress the generation, differentiation and the expression of the related genes obviously. (authors)

  16. Impaired lymph node stromal cell function during the earliest phases of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hähnlein, Janine S.; Nadafi, Reza; de Jong, Tineke; Ramwadhdoebe, Tamara H.; Semmelink, Johanna F.; Maijer, Karen I.; Zijlstra, Ijsbrand A.; Maas, Mario; Gerlag, Danielle M.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Tak, Paul P.; Mebius, Reina E.; van Baarsen, Lisa G. M.

    2018-01-01

    Systemic autoimmunity can be present years before clinical onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Adaptive immunity is initiated in lymphoid tissue where lymph node stromal cells (LNSCs) regulate immune responses through their intimate connection with leucocytes. We postulate that malfunctioning of

  17. Expanded cryopreserved mesenchymal stromal cells as an optimal source for graft-versus-host disease treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, M.; Lysák, D.; Vlas, T.; Vannucci, Luca; Jindra, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 3 (2014), s. 139-144 ISSN 1045-1056 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Mesenchymal stromal cells * Cryopreservation * Immunomodulation Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.209, year: 2014

  18. Decidual Stromal Cell Response to Paracrine Signals from the Trophoblast: Amplification of Immune and Angiogenic Modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, AP; Hamilton, AE; Talbi, S

    2007-01-01

    During the invasive phase of implantation, trophoblasts and maternal decidual stromal cells secrete products that regulate trophoblast differentiation and migration into the maternal endometrium. Paracrine interactions between the extravillous trophoblast and the maternal decidua are important...... a functional genomics approach to investigate these paracrine interactions. Human endometrial stromal cells were decidualized with progesterone and were further treated with conditioned media (CM) from human trophoblasts (TCM) or, as a control, with conditioned media (CCM) from non-decidualized stromal cells...... regulated groups. The data demonstrate a significant induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as angiogenic/static factors in decidualized endometrial stromal cells in response to trophoblast-secreted products. The data suggest that the trophoblast acts to alter the local immune...

  19. Reducing macrophages to improve bone marrow stromal cell survival in the contused spinal cord.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, G.J.; Nandoe Tewarie, R.D.S.; Rahiem, S.T.; Hurtado, A.; Roos, R.A.; Grotenhuis, A.; Oudega, M.

    2010-01-01

    We tested whether reducing macrophage infiltration would improve the survival of allogeneic bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplanted in the contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord. Treatment with cyclosporine, minocycline, or methylprednisolone all resulted in a significant decrease in

  20. Actin depolymerization enhances adipogenic differentiation in human stromal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Hu, Huimin; Qiu, Weimin; Shi, Kaikai; Kassem, Moustapha

    2018-05-01

    Human stromal stem cells (hMSCs) differentiate into adipocytes that play a role in skeletal tissue homeostasis and whole body energy metabolism. During adipocyte differentiation, hMSCs exhibit significant changes in cell morphology suggesting changes in cytoskeletal organization. Here, we examined the effect of direct modulation of actin microfilament dynamics on adipocyte differentiation. Stabilizing actin filaments in hMSCs by siRNA-mediated knock down of the two main actin depolymerizing factors (ADFs): Cofilin 1 (CFL1) and Destrin (DSTN) or treating the cells by Phalloidin reduced adipocyte differentiation as evidenced by decreased number of mature adipocytes and decreased adipocyte specific gene expression (ADIPOQ, LPL, PPARG, FABP4). In contrast, disruption of actin cytoskeleton by Cytochalasin D enhanced adipocyte differentiation. Follow up studies revealed that the effects of CFL1 on adipocyte differentiation depended on the activity of LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1) which is the major upstream kinase of CFL1. Inhibiting LIMK by its specific chemical inhibitor LIMKi inhibited the phosphorylation of CFL1 and actin polymerization, and enhanced the adipocyte differentiation. Moreover, treating hMSCs by Cytochalasin D inhibited ERK and Smad2 signaling and this was associated with enhanced adipocyte differentiation. On the other hand, Phalloidin enhanced ERK and Smad2 signaling, but inhibited adipocyte differentiation which was rescued by ERK specific chemical inhibitor U0126. Our data provide a link between restructuring of hMSCs cytoskeleton and hMSCs lineage commitment and differentiation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabolic programming of mesenchymal stromal cells by oxygen tension directs chondrogenic cell fate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Georgi, Nicole; Moreira Teixeira, Liliana; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Post, Janine Nicole; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Actively steering the chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) into either permanent cartilage or hypertrophic cartilage destined to be replaced by bone has not yet been possible. During limb development, the developing long bone is exposed to a concentration gradient of

  2. Attenuation of radiation-induced DNA damage due to paracrine interactions between normal human epithelial and stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenko, V.A.; Nakazawa, Yu.; Rogounovitch, T.I.; Suzuki, K.; Mitsutake, N.; Matsuse, M.; Yamashita, S.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: Developmentally, every tissue accommodates different types of cells, such as epitheliocytes and stromal cells in parenchymal organs. To better understand the complexity of radiation response, it is necessary to evaluate possible cross-talk between different tissue components. This work was set out to investigate reciprocal influence of normal human epithelial cells and fibroblasts on the extent of radiation-induced DNA damage. Methods: Model cultures of primary human thyrocytes (PT), normal diploid fibroblasts (BJ), PT/BJ cell co-culture and conditioned medium transfer were used to examine DNA damage in terms of γ-H2AX foci number per cell or by Comet assay after exposure to different doses of γ-rays. Results: In co-cultures, the kinetics of γ-H2AX foci number change was dose-dependent and similar to that in individual PT and BJ cultures. The number of γ-H2AX foci in co-cultures was significantly lower (∼25%) in both types of cells comparing to individual cultures. Reciprocal conditioned medium transfer to individual counterpart cells prior to irradiation resulted in approximately 35% reduction in the number γ-H2AX foci at 1 Gy and lower doses in both PT and BJ demonstrating the role of paracrine soluble factors. Comet assay corroborated the results of γ-H2AX foci counting in conditioned medium transfer experiments. In contrast to medium conditioned on PT cells, conditioned medium collected from several human thyroid cancer cell lines failed to establish DNA-protected state in BJ fibroblasts. In its turn, medium conditioned on BJ cells did not change the extent of radiation-induced DNA damage in cancer cell lines tested. Conclusion: The results imply the existence of a network of soluble factor-mediated paracrine interactions between normal epithelial and stromal cells that could be a part of natural mechanism by which cells protect DNA from genotoxic stress.

  3. Sequential growth factor application in bone marrow stromal cell ligament engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Jodie E; Chen, Jingsong; Horan, Rebecca L; Kaplan, David L; Altman, Gregory H

    2005-01-01

    In vitro bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) growth may be enhanced through culture medium supplementation, mimicking the biochemical environment in which cells optimally proliferate and differentiate. We hypothesize that the sequential administration of growth factors to first proliferate and then differentiate BMSCs cultured on silk fiber matrices will support the enhanced development of ligament tissue in vitro. Confluent second passage (P2) BMSCs obtained from purified bone marrow aspirates were seeded on RGD-modified silk matrices. Seeded matrices were divided into three groups for 5 days of static culture, with medium supplement of basic fibroblast growth factor (B) (1 ng/mL), epidermal growth factor (E; 1 ng/mL), or growth factor-free control (C). After day 5, medium supplementation was changed to transforming growth factor-beta1 (T; 5 ng/mL) or C for an additional 9 days of culture. Real-time RT-PCR, SEM, MTT, histology, and ELISA for collagen type I of all sample groups were performed. Results indicated that BT supported the greatest cell ingrowth after 14 days of culture in addition to the greatest cumulative collagen type I expression measured by ELISA. Sequential growth factor application promoted significant increases in collagen type I transcript expression from day 5 of culture to day 14, for five of six groups tested. All T-supplemented samples surpassed their respective control samples in both cell ingrowth and collagen deposition. All samples supported spindle-shaped, fibroblast cell morphology, aligning with the direction of silk fibers. These findings indicate significant in vitro ligament development after only 14 days of culture when using a sequential growth factor approach.

  4. Low physiologic oxygen tensions reduce proliferation and differentiation of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells

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    Handgretinger Rupert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC can be isolated from various tissues including bone marrow. Here, MSC participate as bone lining cells in the formation of the hematopoietic stem cell niche. In this compartment, the oxygen tension is low and oxygen partial pressure is estimated to range from 1% to 7%. We analyzed the effect of low oxygen tensions on human MSC cultured with platelet-lysate supplemented media and assessed proliferation, morphology, chromosomal stability, immunophenotype and plasticity. Results After transferring MSC from atmospheric oxygen levels of 21% to 1%, HIF-1α expression was induced, indicating efficient oxygen reduction. Simultaneously, MSC exhibited a significantly different morphology with shorter extensions and broader cell bodies. MSC did not proliferate as rapidly as under 21% oxygen and accumulated in G1 phase. The immunophenotype, however, was unaffected. Hypoxic stress as well as free oxygen radicals may affect chromosomal stability. However, no chromosomal abnormalities in human MSC under either culture condition were detected using high-resolution matrix-based comparative genomic hybridization. Reduced oxygen tension severely impaired adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of human MSC. Elevation of oxygen from 1% to 3% restored osteogenic differentiation. Conclusion Physiologic oxygen tension during in vitro culture of human MSC slows down cell cycle progression and differentiation. Under physiological conditions this may keep a proportion of MSC in a resting state. Further studies are needed to analyze these aspects of MSC in tissue regeneration.

  5. High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity Identifies a Subset of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells with Vascular Regenerative Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Stephen E; Kuljanin, Miljan; Cooper, Tyler T; Putman, David M; Lajoie, Gilles A; Hess, David A

    2017-06-01

    During culture expansion, multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) differentially express aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), an intracellular detoxification enzyme that protects long-lived cells against oxidative stress. Thus, MSC selection based on ALDH-activity may be used to reduce heterogeneity and distinguish MSC subsets with improved regenerative potency. After expansion of human bone marrow-derived MSCs, cell progeny was purified based on low versus high ALDH-activity (ALDH hi ) by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and each subset was compared for multipotent stromal and provascular regenerative functions. Both ALDH l ° and ALDH hi MSC subsets demonstrated similar expression of stromal cell (>95% CD73 + , CD90 + , CD105 + ) and pericyte (>95% CD146 + ) surface markers and showed multipotent differentiation into bone, cartilage, and adipose cells in vitro. Conditioned media (CDM) generated by ALDH hi MSCs demonstrated a potent proliferative and prosurvival effect on human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) under serum-free conditions and augmented HMVEC tube-forming capacity in growth factor-reduced matrices. After subcutaneous transplantation within directed in vivo angiogenesis assay implants into immunodeficient mice, ALDH hi MSC or CDM produced by ALDH hi MSC significantly augmented murine vascular cell recruitment and perfused vessel infiltration compared with ALDH l ° MSC. Although both subsets demonstrated strikingly similar mRNA expression patterns, quantitative proteomic analyses performed on subset-specific CDM revealed the ALDH hi MSC subset uniquely secreted multiple proangiogenic cytokines (vascular endothelial growth factor beta, platelet derived growth factor alpha, and angiogenin) and actively produced multiple factors with chemoattractant (transforming growth factor-β, C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 1, 2, and 3 (GRO), C-C motif chemokine ligand 5 (RANTES), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), interleukin [IL]-6, IL-8) and matrix

  6. Specific profiles of ion channels and ionotropic receptors define adipose- and bone marrow derived stromal cells.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Forostyak, Oksana; Butenko, Olena; Anděrová, Miroslava; Forostyak, Serhiy; Syková, Eva; Verkhratsky, A.; Dayanithi, Govindan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 3 (2016), s. 622-634 ISSN 1873-5061 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-34077S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/2373; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : adipose derived stromal cells * bone marrow stromal cell * Ca(2+) signaling * Ion channels Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.494, year: 2016

  7. * Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells as Favorable Source for Cartilage Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muiños-López, Emma; Hermida-Gómez, Tamara; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac; de Toro-Santos, Javier; Blanco, Francisco Javier; Díaz-Prado, Silvia María

    2017-09-01

    Localized trauma-derived breakdown of the hyaline articular cartilage may progress toward osteoarthritis, a degenerative condition characterized by total loss of articular cartilage and joint function. Tissue engineering technologies encompass several promising approaches with high therapeutic potential for the treatment of these focal defects. However, most of the research in tissue engineering is focused on potential materials and structural cues, while little attention is directed to the most appropriate source of cells endowing these materials. In this study, using human amniotic membrane (HAM) as scaffold, we defined a novel static in vitro model for cartilage repair. In combination with HAM, four different cell types, human chondrocytes, human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSCs), human amniotic epithelial cells, and human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs) were assessed determining their therapeutic potential. A chondral lesion was drilled in human cartilage biopsies simulating a focal defect. A pellet of different cell types was implanted inside the lesion and covered with HAM. The biopsies were maintained for 8 weeks in culture. Chondrogenic differentiation in the defect was analyzed by histology and immunohistochemistry. HAM scaffold showed good integration and adhesion to the native cartilage in all groups. Although all cell types showed the capacity of filling the focal defect, hBMSCs and hAMSCs demonstrated higher levels of new matrix synthesis. However, only the hAMSCs-containing group presented a significant cytoplasmic content of type II collagen when compared with chondrocytes. More collagen type I was identified in the new synthesized tissue of hBMSCs. In accordance, hBMSCs and hAMSCs showed better International Cartilage Research Society scoring although without statistical significance. HAM is a useful material for articular cartilage repair in vitro when used as scaffold. In combination with hAMSCs, HAM showed better

  8. The fate of autologous endometrial mesenchymal stromal cells after application in the healthy equine uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Elisabeth; Beyer, Teresa; French, Hilari; Watson, Elaine; Aurich, Christine; Donadeu, Xavier

    2018-05-23

    Because of their distinct differentiation, immunomodulatory and migratory capacities, endometrial mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) may provide an optimum source of therapeutic cells not only in relation to the uterus but also for regeneration of other tissues. This study reports the fate of endometrial MSCs following intrauterine application in mares. Stromal cell fractions were isolated from endometrial biopsies taken from seven reproductively healthy mares, expanded and fluorescence-labeled in culture. MSCs (15 x 106) or PBS were autologously infused into each uterine horn during early diestrus and subsequently tracked by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry of endometrial biopsies and blood samples taken periodically after infusion. The inflammatory response to cell infusion was monitored in endometrial cytology samples. MSCs were detected in endometrial sections at 6, 12 and 24 hours but not later (7 or 14 days) after cell infusion. Cells were in all cases located in the uterine lumen, never within endometrial tissue. No fluorescence signal was detected in blood samples at any time point after infusion. Cytology analyses showed an increase in %PMN between 1 and 3 hours after uterine infusion with either MSCs or PBS, and a further increase by 6 hours only in mares infused with PBS. In summary, endometrial MSCs were detected in the uterine lumen for up to 24 h after infusion but did not migrate into healthy endometrium. Moreover, MSCs effectively attenuated the inflammatory response to uterine infusion. We conclude that endometrial MSCs obtained from routine uterine biopsies could provide a safe and effective cell source for treatment of inflammatory conditions of the uterus and potentially other tissues.

  9. The clinical application of mesenchymal stromal cells in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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    Ke Zhao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are multipotent stem cells well known for repairing tissue, supporting hematopoiesis, and modulating immune and inflammation response. These outstanding properties make MSCs as an attractive candidate for cellular therapy in immune-based disorders, especially hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. In this review, we outline the progress of MSCs in preventing and treating engraftment failure (EF, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD following HSCT and critically discuss unsolved issues in clinical applications.

  10. Enrichment of Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells for BMPR1A Facilitates Enhanced Adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielins, Elizabeth R; Paik, Kevin; Ransom, Ryan C; Brett, Elizabeth A; Blackshear, Charles P; Luan, Anna; Walmsley, Graham G; Atashroo, David A; Senarath-Yapa, Kshemendra; Momeni, Arash; Rennert, Robert; Sorkin, Michael; Seo, Eun Young; Chan, Charles K; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Longaker, Michael T; Wan, Derrick C

    2016-02-01

    Reconstruction of soft tissue defects has traditionally relied on the use of grafts and flaps, which may be associated with variable resorption and/or significant donor site morbidity. Cell-based strategies employing adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs), found within the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue, may offer an alternative strategy for soft tissue reconstruction. In this study, we investigated the potential of a bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1A (BMPR1A)(+) subpopulation of ASCs to enhance de novo adipogenesis. Human lipoaspirate was enzymatically digested to isolate SVF and magnetic-activated cell separation was utilized to obtain BMPR1A(+) and BMPR1A(-) cells. These cells, along with unenriched cells, were expanded in culture and evaluated for adipogenic gene expression and in vitro adipocyte formation. Cells from each group were also labeled with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) lentivirus and transplanted into the inguinal fat pads, an adipogenic niche, of immunocompromised mice to determine their potential for de novo adipogenesis. Confocal microscopy along with staining of lipid droplets and vasculature was performed to evaluate the formation of mature adipocytes by transplanted cells. In comparison to BMPR1A(-) and unenriched ASCs, BMPR1A(+) cells demonstrated significantly enhanced adipogenesis when cultured in an adipogenic differentiation medium, as evidenced by increased staining with Oil Red O and increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4). BMPR1A(+) cells also formed significantly more adipocytes in vivo, as demonstrated by quantification of GFP+ adipocytes. Minimal formation of mature adipocytes was appreciated by BMPR1A(-) cells. BMPR1A(+) ASCs show an enhanced ability for adipogenesis in vitro, as shown by gene expression and histological staining. Furthermore, within an adipogenic niche, BMPR1A(+) cells possessed an increased capacity

  11. Mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in COPD: from bench to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes MA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mariana A Antunes,1,2 José Roberto Lapa e Silva,3 Patricia RM Rocco1,2 1Laboratory of Pulmonary Investigation, Carlos Chagas Filho Institute of Biophysics, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ, RJ, Brazil; 2National Institute of Science and Technology for Regenerative Medicine, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil; 3Institute of Thoracic Medicine, Clementino Fraga Filho University Hospital, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil Abstract: COPD is the most frequent chronic respiratory disease and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The major risk factor for COPD development is cigarette smoke, and the most efficient treatment for COPD is smoking cessation. However, even after smoking cessation, inflammation, apoptosis, and oxidative stress may persist and continue contributing to disease progression. Although current therapies for COPD (primarily based on anti-inflammatory agents contribute to the reduction of airway obstruction and minimize COPD exacerbations, none can avoid disease progression or reduce mortality. Within this context, recent advances in mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC therapy have made this approach a strong candidate for clinical use in the treatment of several pulmonary diseases. MSCs can be readily harvested from diverse tissues and expanded with high efficiency, and have strong immunosuppressive properties. Preclinical studies have demonstrated encouraging outcomes of MSCs therapy for lung disorders, including emphysema. These findings instigated research groups to assess the impact of MSCs in human COPD/emphysema, but clinical results have fallen short of expectations. However, MSCs have demonstrated a good adjuvant role in the clinical scenario. Trials that used MSCs combined with another, primary treatment (eg, endobronchial valves found that patients derived greater benefit in pulmonary function tests and/or quality of life reports, as well as reductions in systemic

  12. Isolation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs from Human Adenoid Tissue

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    Yoon Se Lee

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are multipotent progenitor cells that originally derived from bone marrow. Clinical use of bone marrow-derived MSC is difficult due to morbidity and low MSC abundance and isolation efficiency. Recently, MSCs have been isolated from various adult tissues. Here we report the isolation of adenoid tissue-derived MSCs (A-MSCs and their characteristics. Methods: We compared the surface markers, morphologies, and differentiation and proliferation capacities of previously established tonsil-derived MSCs (T-MSCs and bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs with cells isolated from adenoid tissue. The immunophenotype of A-MSCs was investigated upon interferon (IFN-γ stimulation. Results: A-MSCs, T-MSCs, and BM-MSCs showed negative CD45, CD31 HLA-DR, CD34, CD14, CD19 and positive CD 90, CD44, CD73, CD105 expression. A-MSCs were fibroblast-like, spindle-shaped non-adherent cells, similar to T-MSCs and BM-MSCs. Adipogenesis was observed in A-MSCs by the formation of lipid droplets after Oil Red O staining. Osteogenesis was observed by the formation of the matrix mineralization in Alizarin Red staining. Chondrogenesis was observed by the accumulation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan-rich matrix in collagen type II staining. These data were similar to those of T-MSCs and BM-MSCs. Expression of marker genes (i.e., adipogenesis; lipoprotein lipase, proliferator-activator receptor-gamma, osteogenesis; osteocalcin, alkaline phasphatase, chondrogenesis; aggrecan, collagen type II α1 in A-MSCs were not different from those in T-MSCs and BM-MSCs. Conclusions: A-MSCs possess the characteristics of MSCs in terms of morphology, multipotent differentiation capacity, cell surface markers, and immunogeneity. Therefore, A-MSCs fulfill the definition of MSCs and represent an alternate source of MSCs.

  13. Proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells under hypoxic conditions

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    Hongying, Ren; Huiguo, Cai; Zhongchao, Han; Renchi, Yang; Zhao, Qinjun [State Key Lab of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Disease Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union of Medical College, Tianjin (China); Ying, Cao; Jing, Li [Institute of Basic Medical Sciences and School of Basic Medicine, Center of Excellence in Tissue Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Cixiang, Zhou [Health Science Center, Shanghai Institutes of Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Science-SSMU, Shanghai (China); Lianming, Liao; Mingyue, Jia [Institute of Basic Medical Sciences and School of Basic Medicine, Center of Excellence in Tissue Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Qian, Zhao [Health Science Center, Shanghai Institutes of Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Science-SSMU, Shanghai (China); Guoqiang, Chen [Health Science Center, Shanghai Institutes of Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Science-SSMU, Shanghai (China); Zhao, R C [State Key Lab of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Disease Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union of Medical College, Tianjin (China); [Institute of Basic Medical Sciences and School of Basic Medicine, Center of Excellence in Tissue Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)]. E-mail: chunhuaz@public.tpt.tj.cn

    2006-08-18

    Low oxygen tension is a potent differentiation inducer of numerous cell types and an effective stimulus of many gene expressions. Here, we described that under 8% O{sub 2}, bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) exhibited proliferative and morphologic changes. The level of differentiated antigen H-2Dd and the number of G{sub 2}/S/M phase cells increased evidently under 8% O{sub 2} condition. Also, the proportion of wide, flattened, and epithelial-like cells (which were alkaline phosphatase staining positive) in MSCs increased significantly. When cultured in adipogenic medium, there was a 5- to 6-fold increase in the number of lipid droplets under hypoxic conditions compared with that in normoxic culture. We also demonstrated the existence of MSC differentiation under hypoxic conditions by electron microscopy. Expression of Oct4 was inhibited under 8% O{sub 2} condition, but after adipocyte differentiation in normoxic culture and hypoxia-mimicking agents cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}) and deferoxamine mesylate (DFX) treatments, Oct4 was still expressed in MSCs. These results indicate hypoxia accelerates MSC differentiation and hypoxia and hypoxia-mimicking agents exert different effects on MSC differentiation.

  14. Proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells under hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Hongying; Cao Ying; Zhao, Qinjun; Li Jing; Zhou Cixiang; Liao Lianming; Jia Mingyue; Zhao Qian; Cai Huiguo; Han Zhongchao; Yang Renchi; Chen Guoqiang; Zhao, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    Low oxygen tension is a potent differentiation inducer of numerous cell types and an effective stimulus of many gene expressions. Here, we described that under 8% O 2 , bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) exhibited proliferative and morphologic changes. The level of differentiated antigen H-2Dd and the number of G 2 /S/M phase cells increased evidently under 8% O 2 condition. Also, the proportion of wide, flattened, and epithelial-like cells (which were alkaline phosphatase staining positive) in MSCs increased significantly. When cultured in adipogenic medium, there was a 5- to 6-fold increase in the number of lipid droplets under hypoxic conditions compared with that in normoxic culture. We also demonstrated the existence of MSC differentiation under hypoxic conditions by electron microscopy. Expression of Oct4 was inhibited under 8% O 2 condition, but after adipocyte differentiation in normoxic culture and hypoxia-mimicking agents cobalt chloride (CoCl 2 ) and deferoxamine mesylate (DFX) treatments, Oct4 was still expressed in MSCs. These results indicate hypoxia accelerates MSC differentiation and hypoxia and hypoxia-mimicking agents exert different effects on MSC differentiation

  15. Tissue engineering of ligaments: a comparison of bone marrow stromal cells, anterior cruciate ligament, and skin fibroblasts as cell source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eijk, F; Saris, D B F; Riesle, J; Willems, W J; Van Blitterswijk, C A; Verbout, A J; Dhert, W J A

    2004-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery still has important problems to overcome, such as "donor site morbidity" and the limited choice of grafts in revision surgery. Tissue engineering of ligaments may provide a solution for these problems. Little is known about the optimal cell source for tissue engineering of ligaments. The aim of this study is to determine the optimal cell source for tissue engineering of the anterior cruciate ligament. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), ACL, and skin fibroblasts were seeded onto a resorbable suture material [poly(L-lactide/glycolide) multifilaments] at five different seeding densities, and cultured for up to 12 days. All cell types tested attached to the suture material, proliferated, and synthesized extracellular matrix rich in collagen type I. On day 12 the scaffolds seeded with BMSCs showed the highest DNA content (p engineered ligament.

  16. Derivation of Stromal (Skeletal and Mesenchymal) Stem-Like Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Linda; Abdallah, Basem M.; Elsafadi, Mona; Al-Nbaheen, May S.; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Kassem, Moustapha

    2012-01-01

    Derivation of bone forming cells (osteoblasts) from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is a prerequisite for their use in clinical applications. However, there is no standard protocol for differentiating hESCs into osteoblastic cells. The aim of this study was to identify the emergence of a human stromal (mesenchymal and skeletal) stem cell (hMSC)-like population, known to be osteoblastic cell precursors and to test their osteoblastic differentiation capacity in ex vivo cultures and in vivo. We cultured hESCs in a feeder-free environment using serum replacement and as suspension aggregates (embryoid bodies; hEBs). Over a 20 day developmental period, the hEBs demonstrated increasing enrichment for cells expressing hMSC markers: CD29, CD44, CD63, CD56, CD71, CD73, CD105, CD106, and CD166 as revealed by immunohistochemical staining and flow cytometry (fluorescence-activated cell sorting) analysis. Ex vivo differentiation of hEBs using bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2) combined with standard osteoblast induction medium led to weak osteoblastic induction. Conversely, subcutaneous in vivo implantation of day 20 hEBs in immune deficient mice, mixed with hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) as an osteoconductive scaffold, revealed bone and cartilage, and fibrous tissue elements after 8 weeks. These tissues were of human origin and there was no evidence of differentiation to nonmesodermal tissues. hEBs implanted in the absence of HA/TCP formed vacuolated tissue containing glandular, fibrous and muscle-like tissue elements. Conversely, implantation of undifferentiated hESCs resulted in the formation of a teratoma containing a mixture of endodermal, mesodermal, and ectodermal tissues. Our study demonstrates that hMSC-like cells can be obtained from hESCs and they can be induced to form skeletal tissues in vivo when combined with HA/TCP. These findings are relevant for tissue engineering and suggest that differentiated hEBs can provide an unlimited source for

  17. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Generate Muscle Cells and Repair Muscle Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezawa, Mari; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Itokazu, Yutaka; Yoshihara, Tomoyuki; Hoshino, Mikio; Takeda, Shin-ichi; Ide, Chizuka; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi

    2005-07-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) have great potential as therapeutic agents. We report a method for inducing skeletal muscle lineage cells from human and rat general adherent MSCs with an efficiency of 89%. Induced cells differentiated into muscle fibers upon transplantation into degenerated muscles of rats and mdx-nude mice. The induced population contained Pax7-positive cells that contributed to subsequent regeneration of muscle upon repetitive damage without additional transplantation of cells. These MSCs represent a more ready supply of myogenic cells than do the rare myogenic stem cells normally found in muscle and bone marrow.

  18. DHT and testosterone, but not DHEA or E2, differentially modulate IGF-I, IGFBP-2, and IGFBP-3 in human prostatic stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hanh; Arnold, Julia T; McFann, Kimberly K; Blackman, Marc R

    2006-05-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the four most common cancers in the United States, affecting one of six men. Increased serum levels of androgens and IGF-I are associated with an augmented risk of prostate cancer. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone (T) stimulate prostate cancer cell growth, development, and function, whereas the effects of DHT and T in prostate stromal cells, and of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in prostate cancer or stromal cells, are uncertain. We investigated the actions of DHT, T, DHEA, and estradiol (E2) on insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, IGF-II, IGF-I receptor (R), IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-2, IGFBP-3, and IGFBP-5 in primary cultures of human prostatic stromal cells by assessing cell proliferation, mRNA expression, and protein secretion by MTT growth assay, quantitative real-time PCR, and ELISA, respectively. DHT and T each increased IGF-I (7-fold) and decreased IGFBP-3 (2-fold) mRNA expression and protein secretion in a dose- and time-dependent manner and increased IGFBP-2 (2-fold) mRNA in a dose- and time-dependent manner. DHEA and E2 did not significantly alter these measures. Flutamide abolished the DHT-modulated increases in IGF-I and IGFBP-2, suggesting that the influences of DHT and T on these measures were androgen receptor mediated. None of the four steroids significantly affected IGF-IR, IGF-II, or IGFBP-5 mRNA levels or stromal cell proliferation. The effects of DHT on IGF-I, IGFBP-2, and IGFBP-3 were more pronounced in stromal cultures that did not express desmin. These data suggest that DHT and T promote prostate growth partly via modulation of the stromal cell IGF axis, with potential paracrine effects on prostate epithelial cells.

  19. Molecular Validation of Chondrogenic Differentiation and Hypoxia Responsiveness of Platelet-Lysate Expanded Adipose Tissue–Derived Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galeano-Garces, Catalina; Camilleri, Emily T.; Riester, Scott M.; Dudakovic, Amel; Larson, Dirk R.; Qu, Wenchun; Smith, Jay; Dietz, Allan B.; Im, Hee-Jeong; Krych, Aaron J.; Larson, A. Noelle; Karperien, Marcel; van Wijnen, Andre J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the optimal environmental conditions for chondrogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue–derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (AMSCs). In this investigation we specifically investigate the role of oxygen tension and 3-dimensional (3D) culture systems. Design: Both

  20. Destiny of autologous bone marrow-derived stromal cells implanted in the vocal fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemaru, Shin-ichi; Nakamura, Tatsuo; Yamashita, Masaru; Magrufov, Akhmar; Kita, Tomoko; Tamaki, Hisanobu; Tamura, Yoshihiro; Iguchi, Fuku-ichiro; Kim, Tae Soo; Kishimoto, Masanao; Omori, Koichi; Ito, Juichi

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the destiny of implanted autologous bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BSCs) containing mesenchymal stem cells. We previously reported the successful regeneration of an injured vocal fold through implantation of BSCs in a canine model. However, the fate of the implanted BSCs was not examined. In this study, implanted BSCs were traced in order to determine the type of tissues resulting at the injected site of the vocal fold. After harvest of bone marrow from the femurs of green fluorescent transgenic mice, adherent cells were cultured and selectively amplified. By means of a fluorescence-activated cell sorter, it was confirmed that some cells were strongly positive for mesenchymal stem cell markers, including CD29, CD44, CD49e, and Sca-1. These cells were then injected into the injured vocal fold of a nude rat. Immunohistologic examination of the resected vocal folds was performed 8 weeks after treatment. The implanted cells were alive in the host tissues and showed positive expression for keratin and desmin, markers for epithelial tissue and muscle, respectively. The implanted BSCs differentiated into more than one tissue type in vivo. Cell-based tissue engineering using BSCs may improve the quality of the healing process in vocal fold injuries.

  1. Isolation and characterization of equine peripheral blood-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando de M. Carvalho

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to isolate, cultivate and characterize equine peripheral blood-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (PbMSCs. Peripheral blood was collected, followed by the isolation of mononuclear cells using density gradient reagents, and the cultivation of adherent cells. Monoclonal mouse anti-horse CD13, mouse anti-horse CD44, and mouse anti-rat CD90 antibodies were used for the immunophenotypic characterization of the surface of the PbMSCs. These cells were also cultured in specific media for adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. There was no expression of the CD13 marker, but CD44 and CD90 were expressed in all of the passages tested. After 14 days of cell differentiation into adipocytes, lipid droplets were observed upon Oil Red O (ORO staining. Twenty-one days after chondrogenic differentiation, the cells were stained with Alcian Blue. Although the technique for the isolation of these cells requires improvement, the present study demonstrates the partial characterization of PbMSCs, classifying them as a promising type of progenitor cells for use in equine cell therapy.

  2. [Long-term expansion of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells under reduced oxygen tension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylova, Iu V; Buravkova, L B

    2013-01-01

    We have shown that the decrease in oxygen tension in the culture medium of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MMSCs) results in a short-term reduction in the proportion of CD73(+)-cells in the population, without effecting the number of cells expressing other constitutive surface markers (CD90 and CD105). In this case, the heterogeneity of the cell population declined: large spread cells disappeared. The proliferative activity of MMSCs significantly increased and remained stable in conditions in which the oxygen content was close to the tissue oxygen levels (5% O2). At lower oxygen concentration, proliferative activity of the cells gradually reduced from passages 3-4. The increase in proliferative activity was not accompanied by increased expression of telomerase gene indicateding the alsance of cell transformation. However, genome-wide analysis of MMSC gene expression level revealed changes in expression of cyclins (CCND2 and PCNA), regulatory subunit cyclin-dependent kinase (CKS2) and an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDKN2C), regulating the cell cycle, which is obviously facilitated the increase in the proliferative capacity of cells at lower oxygen tension.

  3. Oncologic trogocytosis of an original stromal cells induces chemoresistance of ovarian tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Rafii

    Full Text Available The microenvironment plays a major role in the onset and progression of metastasis. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC tends to metastasize to the peritoneal cavity where interactions within the microenvironment might lead to chemoresistance. Mesothelial cells are important actors of the peritoneal homeostasis; we determined their role in the acquisition of chemoresistance of ovarian tumours.We isolated an original type of stromal cells, referred to as "Hospicells" from ascitis of patients with ovarian carcinosis using limiting dilution. We studied their ability to confer chemoresistance through heterocellular interactions. These stromal cells displayed a new phenotype with positive immunostaining for CD9, CD10, CD29, CD146, CD166 and Multi drug resistance protein. They preferentially interacted with epithelial ovarian cancer cells. This interaction induced chemoresistance to platin and taxans with the implication of multi-drug resistance proteins. This contact enabled EOC cells to capture patches of the Hospicells membrane through oncologic trogocytosis, therefore acquiring their functional P-gp proteins and thus developing chemoresistance. Presence of Hospicells on ovarian cancer tissue micro-array from patients with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy was also significantly associated to chemoresistance.This is the first report of trogocytosis occurring between a cancer cell and an original type of stromal cell. This interaction induced autonomous acquisition of chemoresistance. The presence of stromal cells within patient's tumour might be predictive of chemoresistance. The specific interaction between cancer cells and stromal cells might be targeted during chemotherapy.

  4. Wnt/β-Catenin Stimulation and Laminins Support Cardiovascular Cell Progenitor Expansion from Human Fetal Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta Månsson-Broberg

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic regenerative capacity of human fetal cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs has not been fully characterized. Here we demonstrate that we can expand cells with characteristics of cardiovascular progenitor cells from the MSC population of human fetal hearts. Cells cultured on cardiac muscle laminin (LN-based substrata in combination with stimulation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway showed increased gene expression of ISL1, OCT4, KDR, and NKX2.5. The majority of cells stained positive for PDGFR-α, ISL1, and NKX2.5, and subpopulations also expressed the progenitor markers TBX18, KDR, c-KIT, and SSEA-1. Upon culture of the cardiac MSCs in differentiation media and on relevant LNs, portions of the cells differentiated into spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes, and endothelial and smooth muscle-like cells. Our protocol for large-scale culture of human fetal cardiac MSCs enables future exploration of the regenerative functions of these cells in the context of myocardial injury in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Nanofiber scaffolds influence organelle structure and function in bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutak, Wojtek; Jyotsnendu, Giri; Bajcsy, Peter; Simon, Carl G

    2017-07-01

    Recent work demonstrates that osteoprogenitor cell culture on nanofiber scaffolds can promote differentiation. This response may be driven by changes in cell morphology caused by the three-dimensional (3D) structure of nanofibers. We hypothesized that nanofiber effects on cell behavior may be mediated by changes in organelle structure and function. To test this hypothesis, human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) were cultured on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers scaffolds and on PCL flat spuncoat films. After 1 day-culture, hBMSCs were stained for actin, nucleus, mitochondria, and peroxisomes, and then imaged using 3D confocal microscopy. Imaging revealed that the hBMSC cell body (actin) and peroxisomal volume were reduced during culture on nanofibers. In addition, the nucleus and peroxisomes occupied a larger fraction of cell volume during culture on nanofibers than on films, suggesting enhancement of the nuclear and peroxisomal functional capacity. Organelles adopted morphologies with greater 3D-character on nanofibers, where the Z-Depth (a measure of cell thickness) was increased. Comparisons of organelle positions indicated that the nucleus, mitochondria, and peroxisomes were closer to the cell center (actin) for nanofibers, suggesting that nanofiber culture induced active organelle positioning. The smaller cell volume and more centralized organelle positioning would reduce the energy cost of inter-organelle vesicular transport during culture on nanofibers. Finally, hBMSC bioassay measurements (DNA, peroxidase, bioreductive potential, lactate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)) indicated that peroxidase activity may be enhanced during nanofiber culture. These results demonstrate that culture of hBMSCs on nanofibers caused changes in organelle structure and positioning, which may affect organelle functional capacity and transport. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl

  6. Human endometrial stromal stem cells differentiate into megakaryocytes with the ability to produce functional platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinju Wang

    Full Text Available Human endometrium is a high dynamic tissue that contains endometrial stromal stem cells (hESSCs. The hESSCs have been differentiated into a number of cell lineages. However, differentiation of hESSCs into megakaryocytes (MKs has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of MK generation from hESSCs and subsequent production of functional platelets (PLTs. In our study, hESSCs were cultured from endometrial stromal cells as confirmed by positive stromal cell specific markers (CD90 and CD29 and negative hematopoietic stem cell markers (CD45 and CD34 expression. Then, hESSCs were differentiated in a medium supplemented with thrombopoietin (TPO for 18 days. The MK differentiation was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The differentiation medium was collected for PLT production analysis by flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy and functional measurements. Our results show: 1 MKs were successfully generated from hESSCs as identified by expression of specific markers (CD41a: 1 ± 0.09% and 39 ± 3.0%; CD42b: 1.2 ± 0.06% and 28 ± 2.0%, control vs. differentiation accompanied with reduction of pluripotent transcription factors (Oct4 and Sox2 expression; 2 The level of PLTs in the differentiation medium was 16 ± 1 number/µl as determined by size (2-4 µm and CD41a expression (CD41a: 1 ± 0.4% and 90±2.0%, control vs. differentiation; 3 Generated PLTs were functional as evidenced by the up-regulation of CD62p expression and fibrinogen binding following thrombin stimulation; 4 Released PLTs showed similar ultra-structure characteristics (alpha granules, vacuoles and dense tubular system as PLTs from peripheral blood determined by electron microscopic analysis. Data demonstrate the feasibility of generating MKs from hESSCs, and that the generated MKs release functional PLTs. Therefore, hESSCs could be a potential new stem cell source for in vitro MK/PLT production.

  7. Hematopoiesis on cellulose ester membranes (CEM). X. Effects of in vitro irradiation of stromal cells prior to application on CEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knospe, W.H.; Husseini, S.G.

    1986-01-01

    Cellulose ester membranes (CEM) were coated with stromal cells from murine bone or bone marrow irradiated in vitro with 1000, 2000, or 4000 rad and then implanted i.p. in CAF1 mice for periods of six and 12 months. CEM coated with stromal cells from bone showed excellent regeneration of bone and hematopoiesis after 1000 rad in vitro irradiation. After 2000 rad, hematopoietic and bone regeneration was reduced by about 50%, and after 4000 rad it was completely absent in CEM coated with stromal cells from bone. CEM coated with stromal cells from bone marrow showed no regeneration of hematopoiesis or bone after 1000, 2000, and 4000 rad in vitro irradiation and residence i.p. for six and 12 months. These results indicate that regeneration of the hematopoietic microenvironment is dependent upon living stromal cells. A difference in radiation sensitivity is demonstrated between stromal cells from bone and from bone marrow

  8. Osterix enhances proliferation and osteogenic potential of bone marrow stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Qisheng; Valverde, Paloma; Chen, Jake

    2006-01-01

    Osterix (Osx) is a zinc-finger-containing transcription factor that is expressed in osteoblasts of all endochondral and membranous bones. In Osx null mice osteoblast differentiation is impaired and bone formation is absent. In this study, we hypothesized that overexpression of Osx in murine bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) would be able to enhance their osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization in vitro. Retroviral transduction of Osx in BMSC cultured in non-differentiating medium did not affect expression of Runx2/Cbfa1, another key transcription factor of osteoblast differentiation, but induced an increase in the expression of other markers associated with the osteoblastic lineage including alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and osteopontin. Retroviral transduction of Osx in BMSC also increased their proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and ability to form bone nodules. These events occurred without significant changes in the expression of α1(II) procollagen or lipoprotein lipase, which are markers of chondrogenic and adipogenic differentiation, respectively

  9. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell treatment in patients with severe ischaemic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Jørgensen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Regenerative treatment with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been promising in patients with ischaemic heart failure but needs confirmation in larger randomized trials. We aimed to study effects of intra-myocardial autologous bone marrow-derived MSC treatment in patients with severe isc...... identified. CONCLUSION: Intra-myocardial injections of autologous culture expanded MSCs were safe and improved myocardial function in patients with severe ischaemic heart failure. STUDY REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT00644410 (ClinicalTrials.gov)....... ischaemic heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS: The MSC-HF trial is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Patients were randomized 2 : 1 to intra-myocardial injections of MSC or placebo, respectively. The primary endpoint was change in left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV), measured...

  10. Pulmonary stromal cells induce the generation of regulatory DC attenuating T-cell-mediated lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Guo, Zhenhong; Xu, Xiongfei; Xia, Sheng; Cao, Xuetao

    2008-10-01

    The tissue microenvironment may affect the development and function of immune cells such as DC. Whether and how the pulmonary stromal microenvironment can affect the development and function of lung DC need to be investigated. Regulatory DC (DCreg) can regulate T-cell response. We wondered whether such regulatory DC exist in the lung and what is the effect of the pulmonary stromal microenvironment on the generation of DCreg. Here we demonstrate that murine pulmonary stromal cells can drive immature DC, which are regarded as being widely distributed in the lung, to proliferate and differentiate into a distinct subset of DCreg, which express high levels of CD11b but low levels of MHC class II (I-A), CD11c, secrete high amounts of IL-10, NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and suppress T-cell proliferation. The natural counterpart of DCreg in the lung with similar phenotype and regulatory function has been identified. Pulmonary stroma-derived TGF-beta is responsible for the differentiation of immature DC to DCreg, and DCreg-derived PGE2 contributes to their suppression of T-cell proliferation. Moreover, DCreg can induce the generation of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg. Importantly, infusion with DCreg attenuates T-cell-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation in vivo. Therefore, the pulmonary microenvironment may drive the generation of DCreg, thus contributing to the maintenance of immune homoeostasis and the control of inflammation in the lung.

  11. Regulatory perspective on in vitro potency assays for human mesenchymal stromal cells used in immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wolf, Charlotte; van de Bovenkamp, Marja; Hoefnagel, Marcel C

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells derived from various tissues that can differentiate into several cell types. MSCs are able to modulate the response of immune cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. Because of these multimodal properties, the potential use of MSCs for

  12. Potential of iPSC-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Treating Periodontal Disease

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    K. Hynes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cell-like populations have been derived from mouse-induced pluripotent stem cells (miPSC-MSC with the capability for tissue regeneration. In this study, murine iPSC underwent differentiation towards an MSC-like immunophenotype. Stable miPSC-MSC cultures expressed the MSC-associated markers, CD73, CD105, and Sca-1, but lacked expression of the pluripotency marker, SSEA1, and hematopoietic markers, CD34 and CD45. Functionally, miPSC-MSC exhibited the potential for trilineage differentiation into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes and the capacity to suppress the proliferation of mitogen-activated splenocytes. The efficacy of miPSC-MSC was assessed in an acute inflammation model following systemic or local delivery into mice with subcutaneous implants containing heat-inactivated P. gingivalis. Histological analysis revealed less inflammatory cellular infiltrate within the sponges in mice treated with miPSC-MSC cells delivered locally rather than systemically. Assessment of proinflammatory cytokines in mouse spleens found that CXCL1 transcripts and protein were reduced in mice treated with miPSC-MSC. In a periodontitis model, mice subjected to oral inoculation with P. gingivalis revealed less bone tissue destruction and inflammation within the jaws when treated with miPSC-MSC compared to PBS alone. Our results demonstrated that miPSC-MSC derived from iPSC have the capacity to control acute and chronic inflammatory responses associated with the destruction of periodontal tissue. Therefore, miPSC-MSC present a promising novel source of stromal cells which could be used in the treatment of periodontal disease and other inflammatory systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  13. Lysyl oxidase activates cancer stromal cells and promotes gastric cancer progression: quantum dot-based identification of biomarkers in cancer stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng CW

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chunwei Peng,1 Jiuyang Liu,1 Guifang Yang,2 Yan Li3 1Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors & Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 2Department of Pathology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuchang District, Wuhan, 3Department of Peritoneal Cancer Surgery, Cancer Center of Beijing Shijitan Hospital Affiliated to the Capital Medical University, Yangfangdian, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs are a promising alternative to organic fluorescent dyes for multiplexed molecular imaging of cancer stroma, which have great advantages in holistically analyzing the complex interactions among cancer stromal components in situ.Patients and methods: A QD probe-based multiplexed spectral molecular imaging method was established for simultaneous imaging. Three tissue microarrays (TMAs including 184 gastric cancer (GC tissues were constructed for the study. Multispectral analyses were performed for quantifying stromal biomarkers, such as lysyl oxidase (LOX. The stromal status including infiltrating of immune cells (high density of macrophages, angiogenesis (high density of microvessel density [MVD], low neovessel maturation and extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling (low density of type IV collagen, intense expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 [MMP-9] was evaluated.Results: This study compared the imaging features of the QD probe-based single molecular imaging method, immunohistochemistry, and organic dye-based immunofluorescent methods, and showed the advantages of the QD probe-based multiple molecular imaging method for simultaneously visualizing complex components of cancer stroma. The risk of macrophages in high density, high MVD, low neomicrovessel maturation, MMP-9 expression and low type IV collagen was significantly increased for the expression of LOX. With the advantages of the established QD probe

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Induced DDR2 Mediates Stromal-Breast Cancer Interactions and Metastasis Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Gonzalez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased collagen deposition by breast cancer (BC-associated mesenchymal stem/multipotent stromal cells (MSC promotes metastasis, but the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we report that the collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2 is essential for stromal-BC communication. In human BC metastasis, DDR2 is concordantly upregulated in metastatic cancer and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. In MSCs isolated from human BC metastasis, DDR2 maintains a fibroblastic phenotype with collagen deposition and induces pathological activation of DDR2 signaling in BC cells. Loss of DDR2 in MSCs impairs their ability to promote DDR2 phosphorylation in BC cells, as well as BC cell alignment, migration, and metastasis. Female ddr2-deficient mice homozygous for the slie mutation show inefficient spontaneous BC metastasis. These results point to a role for mesenchymal stem cell DDR2 in metastasis and suggest a therapeutic approach for metastatic BC.

  15. High Harvest Yield, High Expansion, and Phenotype Stability of CD146 Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Whole Primitive Human Umbilical Cord Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca C. Schugar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord blood is an excellent primitive source of noncontroversial stem cells for treatment of hematologic disorders; meanwhile, new stem cell candidates in the umbilical cord (UC tissue could provide therapeutic cells for nonhematologic disorders. We show novel in situ characterization to identify and localize a panel of some markers expressed by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs; CD44, CD105, CD73, CD90 and CD146 in the UC. We describe enzymatic isolation and purification methods of different UC cell populations that do not require manual separation of the vessels and stroma of the coiled, helical-like UC tissue. Unique quantitation of in situ cell frequency and stromal cell counts upon harvest illustrate the potential to obtain high numerical yields with these methods. UC stromal cells can differentiate to the osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages and, under specific culturing conditions, they exhibit high expandability with unique long-term stability of their phenotype. The remarkable stability of the phenotype represents a novel finding for human MSCs, from any source, and supports the use of these cells as highly accessible stromal cells for both basic studies and potentially therapeutic applications such as allogeneic clinical use for musculoskeletal disorders.

  16. In vitro expression of erythropoietin by transfected human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, P-L; Cheong, S-K; Leong, C-F; Othman, A

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are pluripotent progenitor cells that can be found in human bone marrow (BM). These cells have low immunogenicity and could suppress alloreactive T-cell responses. In the current study, MSC were tested for their capacity to carry and deliver the erythropoietin (EPO) gene in vitro. Expanded BM MSC was transfected with EPO-encoded plasmid pMCV1.2 and EPO-encoded MIDGE (minimalistic immunologically defined gene expression) vector by electroporation. The expressed EPO was used to induce hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) into erythroid colonies. The results showed that the MIDGE vector was more effective and stable than the plasmid (pMCV1.2) in delivering EPO gene into MSC. The supernatants containing EPO obtained from the transfected cell culture were able to induce the differentiation of HSC into erythroid colonies. MSC hold promise as a cell factory for the production of biologic molecules, and MIDGE vector is more effective and stable than the plasmid in nucleofection involving the EPO gene.

  17. Inflammatory response of a prostate stromal cell line induced by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, S J; Han, I H; Kim, J H; Gu, N Y; Seo, M Y; Chung, Y H; Ryu, J S

    2016-04-01

    While Trichomonas vaginalis, a cause of sexually transmitted infection, is known as a surface-dwelling protozoa, trichomonads have been detected in prostatic tissue from benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis by immunoperoxidase assay or PCR. However, the immune response of prostate stromal cells infected with T. vaginalis has not been investigated. Our objective was to investigate whether T. vaginalis could induce an inflammatory response in prostate stromal cells. Incubation of a human prostate stromal myofibroblast cells (WPMY-1) with live T. vaginalis T016 increased expression of the inflammatory chemokines CXCL8 and CCL2. In addition, TLR4, ROS, MAPK and NF-κB expression increased, while inhibitors of TLR4, ROS, MAPKs and NF-κB reduced CXCL8 and CCL2 production. Medium conditioned by incubation of WPMY-1 cells with T. vaginalis stimulated the migration of human neutrophils and monocytes (THP-1 cells). We conclude that T. vaginalis increases CXCL8 and CCL2 production by human prostate stromal cells by activating TLR4, ROS, MAPKs and NF-κB, and this in turn attracts neutrophils and monocytes and leads to an inflammatory response. This study is the first attempt to demonstrate an inflammatory reaction in prostate stromal cells caused by T. vaginalis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Enzymatic detachment of therapeutic mesenchymal stromal cells grown on glass carriers in a bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzig, Denise; Schmiermund, Alexandra; P Grace, Pablo; Elseberg, Christiane; Weber, Christian; Czermak, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Cell therapies require the in vitro expansion of adherent cells such as mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) in bioreactor systems or other culture environments, followed by cell harvest. As hMSCs are strictly adherent cells, cell harvest requires cell detachment. The use of hMSCs for cell therapy requires GMP production in accordance with the guidelines for advanced therapeutic medical products. Therefore, several GMP-conform available proteolytic enzymes were investigated for their ability to promote hMSC detachment. An allogeneic hMSC cell line (hMSC-TERT) that is used in clinical trials in the form of alginate cell capsules was chosen as a model. This study investigated the influence of several factors on the outcome of proteolytic hMSC-TERT detachment. Therefore, hMSC-TERT detachment was analyzed in different cultivation systems (static, dynamic) and in combination with further cell processing including encapsulation. Only two of the commercially available enzymes (AccutaseTM, TrypZeanTM) that fulfill all process requirements (commercial availability, cost, GMP conditions during manufacturing and non-animal origin) are found to be generally suitable for detaching hMSC-TERT. Combining cell detachment with encapsulation demonstrated a high impact of the experimental set up on cell damage. It was preferable to reduce the temperature during detachment and limit the detachment time to a maximum of 20 minutes. Cell detachment in static systems was not comparable with detachment in dynamic systems. Detachment yields in dynamic systems were lower and cell damage was higher for the same experimental conditions. Finally, only TrypZeanTM seemed to be suitable for the detachment of hMSC-TERT from dynamic reactor systems.

  19. Intrathymic lymphopoiesis: stromal cell-associated proliferation of T cells is independent of lymphocyte genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyewski, B A; Travis, M; Kaplan, H S

    1984-09-01

    We analyzed the genetic restriction of direct cell-cell interactions between thymocytes and a) cortical epithelial cells, b) macrophages, and c) medullary dendritic cells in the mouse thymus. Thymectomized (C3H X C57BL/Ka)F1 hybrid mice were doubly grafted with P1 and P2 neonatal thymus grafts, were lethally irradiated, and were reconstituted with a mixture of P1 and P2 bone marrow cells which differed in the Thy-1 locus. The contributions of both parental inocula to the composition of the free and stromal cell-associated T cell compartments were analyzed separately in thymic grafts of each parental strain. The lymphoid composition in both compartments essentially reflected the peripheral T cell-chimerism in the host. The development of lymphostromal complexes was not restricted by the genotype of the partner cells. Statistical analysis of the distributions of P1 and P2 T cells among free thymocytes and within individual lymphostromal complexes, however, suggests that the T cells of an individual complex are the progeny of oligoclonal proliferation. Thus, both epithelial cells and bone marrow-derived stromal cells seem to be involved in different stages of intrathymic lymphopoiesis.

  20. Construction of a human corneal stromal equivalent with non-transfected human corneal stromal cells and acellular porcine corneal stromata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Jin-Mei; Pang, Xin; Qiu, Yue; Miao, Ying; Yu, Miao-Miao; Fan, Ting-Jun

    2015-03-01

    A tissue-engineered human corneal stroma (TE-HCS) has been developed as a promising equivalent to the native corneal stroma for replacement therapy. However, there is still a crucial need to improve the current approaches to render the TE-HCS equivalent more favorable for clinical applications. At the present study, we constructed a TE-HCS by incubating non-transfected human corneal stromal (HCS) cells in an acellular porcine corneal stromata (aPCS) scaffold in 20% fetal bovine serum supplemented DMEM/F12 (1:1) medium at 37 °C with 5% CO2in vitro. After 3 days of incubation, the constructed TE-HCS had a suitable tensile strength for transplantation, and a transparency that is comparable to native cornea. The TE-HCS had a normal histological structure which contained regularly aligned collagen fibers and differentiated HCS cells with positive expression of marker and functional proteins, mimicking a native HCS. After transplantation into rabbit models, the TE-HCS reconstructed normal corneal stroma in vivo and function well in maintaining corneal clarity and thickness, indicating that the completely biological TE-HCS could be used as a HCS equivalent. The constructed TE-HCS has promising potentials in regenerative medicine and treatment of diseases caused by corneal stromal disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Insect Cell Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oers, van M.M.; Lynn, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    Insect cell cultures are widely used in studies on insect cell physiology, developmental biology and microbial pathology. In particular, insect cell culture is an indispensable tool for the study of insect viruses. The first continuously growing insect cell cultures were established from

  2. Human fetal liver stromal cells that overexpress bFGF support growth and maintenance of human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiafei Xi

    Full Text Available In guiding hES cell technology toward the clinic, one key issue to be addressed is to culture and maintain hES cells much more safely and economically in large scale. In order to avoid using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs we isolated human fetal liver stromal cells (hFLSCs from 14 weeks human fetal liver as new human feeder cells. hFLSCs feeders could maintain hES cells for 15 passages (about 100 days. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF is known to play an important role in promoting self-renewal of human embryonic stem (hES cells. So, we established transgenic hFLSCs that stably express bFGF by lentiviral vectors. These transgenic human feeder cells--bFGF-hFLSCs maintained the properties of H9 hES cells without supplementing with any exogenous growth factors. H9 hES cells culturing under these conditions maintained all hES cell features after prolonged culture, including the developmental potential to differentiate into representative tissues of all three embryonic germ layers, unlimited and undifferentiated proliferative ability, and maintenance of normal karyotype. Our results demonstrated that bFGF-hFLSCs feeder cells were central to establishing the signaling network among bFGF, insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2, and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β, thereby providing the framework in which hES cells were instructed to self-renew or to differentiate. We also found that the conditioned medium of bFGF-hFLSCs could maintain the H9 hES cells under feeder-free conditions without supplementing with bFGF. Taken together, bFGF-hFLSCs had great potential as feeders for maintaining pluripotent hES cell lines more safely and economically.

  3. Do ABO blood group antigens hamper the therapeutic efficacy of mesenchymal stromal cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Guido; Hult, Annika; von Bahr, Lena; Alm, Jessica J; Heldring, Nina; Hamad, Osama A; Stenbeck-Funke, Lillemor; Larsson, Stella; Teramura, Yuji; Roelofs, Helene; Nilsson, Bo; Fibbe, Willem E; Olsson, Martin L; Le Blanc, Katarina

    2014-01-01

    Investigation into predictors for treatment outcome is essential to improve the clinical efficacy of therapeutic multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). We therefore studied the possible harmful impact of immunogenic ABO blood groups antigens - genetically governed antigenic determinants - at all given steps of MSC-therapy, from cell isolation and preparation for clinical use, to final recipient outcome. We found that clinical MSCs do not inherently express or upregulate ABO blood group antigens after inflammatory challenge or in vitro differentiation. Although antigen adsorption from standard culture supplements was minimal, MSCs adsorbed small quantities of ABO antigen from fresh human AB plasma (ABP), dependent on antigen concentration and adsorption time. Compared to cells washed in non-immunogenic human serum albumin (HSA), MSCs washed with ABP elicited stronger blood responses after exposure to blood from healthy O donors in vitro, containing high titers of ABO antibodies. Clinical evaluation of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients found only very low titers of anti-A/B agglutination in these strongly immunocompromised patients at the time of MSC treatment. Patient analysis revealed a trend for lower clinical response in blood group O recipients treated with ABP-exposed MSC products, but not with HSA-exposed products. We conclude, that clinical grade MSCs are ABO-neutral, but the ABP used for washing and infusion of MSCs can contaminate the cells with immunogenic ABO substance and should therefore be substituted by non-immunogenic HSA, particularly when cells are given to immunocompentent individuals.

  4. In vitro induction of alkaline phosphatase levels predicts in vivo bone forming capacity of human bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk-Jan Prins

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the applications of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs that are produced by ex vivo expansion is for use in in vivo bone tissue engineering. Cultured stromal cells are a mixture of cells at different stages of commitment and expansion capability, leading to a heterogeneous cell population that each time can differ in the potential to form in vivo bone. A parameter that predicts for in vivo bone forming capacity is thus far lacking. We employed single colony-derived BMSC cultures to identify such predictive parameters. Using limiting dilution, we have produced sixteen single CFU-F derived BMSC cultures from human bone marrow and found that only five of these formed bone in vivo. The single colony-derived BMSC strains were tested for proliferation, osteogenic-, adipogenic- and chondrogenic differentiation capacity and the expression of a variety of associated markers. The only robust predictors of in vivo bone forming capacity were the induction of alkaline phosphatase, (ALP mRNA levels and ALP activity during in vitro osteogenic differentiation. The predictive value of in vitro ALP induction was confirmed by analyzing “bulk-cultured” BMSCs from various bone marrow biopsies. Our findings show that in BMSCs, the additional increase in ALP levels over basal levels during in vitro osteogenic differentiation is predictive of in vivo performance.

  5. Long-Term Engraftment of Primary Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Repairs Niche Damage and Improves Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbuehl, Jean-Paul; Tatarova, Zuzana; Held, Werner; Huelsken, Joerg

    2017-08-03

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation represents a curative treatment for various hematological disorders. However, delayed reconstitution of innate and adaptive immunity often causes fatal complications. HSC maintenance and lineage differentiation are supported by stromal niches, and we now find that bone marrow stroma cells (BMSCs) are severely and permanently damaged by the pre-conditioning irradiation required for efficient HSC transplantation. Using mouse models, we show that stromal insufficiency limits the number of donor-derived HSCs and B lymphopoiesis. Intra-bone transplantation of primary, but not cultured, BMSCs quantitatively reconstitutes stroma function in vivo, which is mediated by a multipotent NT5E + (CD73) + ENG - (CD105) - LY6A + (SCA1) + BMSC subpopulation. BMSC co-transplantation doubles the number of functional, donor-derived HSCs and significantly reduces clinically relevant side effects associated with HSC transplantation including neutropenia and humoral immunodeficiency. These data demonstrate the potential of stroma recovery to improve HSC transplantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 production by reciprocal cell-to-cell interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts through IL-1α in ameloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchigami, Takao; Kibe, Toshiro; Koyama, Hirofumi; Kishida, Shosei; Iijima, Mikio; Nishizawa, Yoshiaki; Hijioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Tomomi; Ueda, Masahiro; Nakamura, Norifumi; Kiyono, Tohru; Kishida, Michiko

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We studied the interaction between tumor cells and fibroblasts in ameloblastoma. • AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted significantly high IL-1α levels. • IL-1α derived from AM-3 cells promoted IL-6 and IL-8 secretion of fibroblasts. • IL-6 and IL-8 activated the cellular motility and proliferation of AM-3 cells. - Abstract: Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic benign tumor that occurs in the jawbone, which invades bone and reoccurs locally. This tumor is treated by wide surgical excision and causes various problems, including changes in facial countenance and mastication disorders. Ameloblastomas have abundant tumor stroma, including fibroblasts and immune cells. Although cell-to-cell interactions are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, intercellular communications in ameloblastoma have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts via soluble factors in ameloblastoma. We used a human ameloblastoma cell line (AM-3 ameloblastoma cells), human fibroblasts (HFF-2 fibroblasts), and primary-cultured fibroblasts from human ameloblastoma tissues, and analyzed the effect of ameloblastoma-associated cell-to-cell communications on gene expression, cytokine secretion, cellular motility and proliferation. AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α than HFF-2 fibroblasts. Treatment with conditioned medium from AM-3 ameloblastoma cells upregulated gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 of HFF-2 fibroblasts and primary-cultured fibroblast cells from ameloblastoma tissues. The AM3-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts was neutralized by pretreatment of AM-3 cells with anti-IL-1α antibody and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Reciprocally, cellular motility of AM-3 ameloblastoma cells was stimulated by HFF-2 fibroblasts in IL-6 and IL-8 dependent manner. In conclusion, ameloblastoma cells and stromal fibroblasts behave

  7. Regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 production by reciprocal cell-to-cell interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts through IL-1α in ameloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchigami, Takao [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kibe, Toshiro [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Koyama, Hirofumi; Kishida, Shosei; Iijima, Mikio [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Nishizawa, Yoshiaki [Kagoshima University Faculty of Medicine, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Hijioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Tomomi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Ueda, Masahiro [Natural Science Centre for Research and Education, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Koorimoto, Kagoshima 890-8580 (Japan); Nakamura, Norifumi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kiyono, Tohru [Department of Virology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuouku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Kishida, Michiko, E-mail: kmichiko@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • We studied the interaction between tumor cells and fibroblasts in ameloblastoma. • AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted significantly high IL-1α levels. • IL-1α derived from AM-3 cells promoted IL-6 and IL-8 secretion of fibroblasts. • IL-6 and IL-8 activated the cellular motility and proliferation of AM-3 cells. - Abstract: Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic benign tumor that occurs in the jawbone, which invades bone and reoccurs locally. This tumor is treated by wide surgical excision and causes various problems, including changes in facial countenance and mastication disorders. Ameloblastomas have abundant tumor stroma, including fibroblasts and immune cells. Although cell-to-cell interactions are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, intercellular communications in ameloblastoma have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts via soluble factors in ameloblastoma. We used a human ameloblastoma cell line (AM-3 ameloblastoma cells), human fibroblasts (HFF-2 fibroblasts), and primary-cultured fibroblasts from human ameloblastoma tissues, and analyzed the effect of ameloblastoma-associated cell-to-cell communications on gene expression, cytokine secretion, cellular motility and proliferation. AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α than HFF-2 fibroblasts. Treatment with conditioned medium from AM-3 ameloblastoma cells upregulated gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 of HFF-2 fibroblasts and primary-cultured fibroblast cells from ameloblastoma tissues. The AM3-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts was neutralized by pretreatment of AM-3 cells with anti-IL-1α antibody and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Reciprocally, cellular motility of AM-3 ameloblastoma cells was stimulated by HFF-2 fibroblasts in IL-6 and IL-8 dependent manner. In conclusion, ameloblastoma cells and stromal fibroblasts behave

  8. The Origin of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Dictates Their Reparative Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naftali-Shani, Nili; Itzhaki-Alfia, Ayelet; Landa-Rouben, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) from adipose cardiac tissue have attracted considerable interest in regard to cell-based therapies. We aimed to test the hypothesis that hMSCs from the heart and epicardial fat would be better cells for infarct repair....

  9. Molecular characterisation of stromal populations derived from human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, L.; Twine, N. A.; Abu Dawud, R.

    2015-01-01

    Human bone marrow-derived stromal (skeletal) stem cells (BM-hMSC) are being employed in an increasing number of clinical trials for tissue regeneration. A limiting factor for their clinical use is the inability to obtain sufficient cell numbers. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) can provide an un...

  10. Human adipose-derived stromal cells in a clinically applicable injectable alginate hydrogel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarke Follin; Juhl, Morten; Cohen, Smadar

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AIMS: Clinical trials have documented beneficial effects of mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue (ASCs) as treatment in patients with ischemic heart disease. However, retention of transplanted cells is poor. One potential way to increase cell retention is to in...

  11. Bone marrow-derived stromal cells are more beneficial cell sources for tooth regeneration compared with adipose-derived stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lanfeng; Chen, Lin; Feng, Fan; Cui, Junhui; Li, Kaide; Li, Zhiyong; Liu, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Tooth loss is presently a global epidemic and tooth regeneration is thought to be a feasible and ideal treatment approach. Choice of cell source is a primary concern in tooth regeneration. In this study, the odontogenic differentiation potential of two non-dental-derived stem cells, adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs), were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. ADSCs and BMSCs were induced in vitro in the presence of tooth germ cell-conditioned medium (TGC-CM) prior to implantation into the omentum majus of rats, in combination with inactivated dentin matrix (IDM). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to detect the mRNA expression levels of odontogenic-related genes. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical assays were used to detect the protein levels of odontogenic-specific genes, such as DSP and DMP-1 both in vitro and in vivo. The results suggest that both ADSCs and BMSCs have odontogenic differentiation potential. However, the odontogenic potential of BMSCs was greater compared with ADSCs, showing that BMSCs are a more appropriate cell source for tooth regeneration. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  12. Effects of extracellular calcium on viability and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shaowen; Wang, Wei; Lin, Zhongqin; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Qingyu; Kou, Dongquan; Ying, Xiaozhou; Shen, Yue; Cheng, Xiaojie; Yu, Ziming; Peng, Lei; Lu, Chuanzhu

    2013-09-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been extensively used for tissue engineering. However, the effect of Ca(2+) on the viability and osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs has yet to be evaluated. To determine the dose-dependent effect of Ca(2+) on viability and osteogenesis of BMSCs in vitro, BMSCs were cultured in calcium-free DMEM medium supplemented with various concentrations of Ca(2+) (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mM) from calcium citrate. Cell viability was analyzed by MTT assay and osteogenic differentiation was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay, Von Kossa staining, and real-time PCR. Ca(2+) stimulated BMSCs viability in a dose-dependent manner. At slightly higher concentrations (4 and 5 mM) in the culture, Ca(2+) significantly inhibited the activity of ALP on days 7 and 14 (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05), significantly suppressed collagen synthesis (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05), and significantly elevated calcium deposition (P < 0.01) and mRNA levels of osteocalcin (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05) and osteopontin (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). Therefore, elevated concentrations of extracellular calcium may promote cell viability and late-stage osteogenic differentiation, but may suppress early-stage osteogenic differentiation in BMSCs.

  13. Transcriptional profiling of mesenchymal stromal cells from young and old rats in response to Dexamethasone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rechavi Gideon

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marrow-derived stromal cells (MSCs maintain the capability of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple lineages in adult life. Age-related changes are recognized by a decline in the stemness potential that result in reduced regeneration potential of the skeleton. To explore the molecular events that underline skeletal physiology during aging we catalogued the profile of gene expression in ex vivo cultured MSCs derived from 3 and 15 month old rats. The ex vivo cultured cells were analyzed following challenge with or without Dexamethasone (Dex. RNA retrieved from these cells was analyzed using Affymetrix Gene Chips to compare the effect of Dex on gene expression in both age groups. Results The molecular mechanisms that underline skeletal senescence were studied by gene expression analysis of RNA harvested from MSCs. The analysis resulted in complex profiles of gene expression of various differentiation pathways. We revealed changes of lineage-specific gene expression; in general the pattern of expression included repression of proliferation and induction of differentiation. The functional analysis of genes clustered were related to major pathways; an increase in bone remodeling, osteogenesis and muscle formation, coupled with a decrease in adipogenesis. We demonstrated a Dex-related decrease in immune response and in genes that regulate bone resorption and an increase in osteoblastic differentiation. Myogenic-related genes and genes that regulate cell cycle were induced by Dex. While Dex repressed genes related to adipogenesis and catabolism, this decrease was complementary to an increase in expression of genes related to osteogenesis. Conclusion This study summarizes the genes expressed in the ex vivo cultured mesenchymal cells and their response to Dex. Functional clustering highlights the complexity of gene expression in MSCs and will advance the understanding of major pathways that trigger the natural changes

  14. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia with multinucleated stromal giant cells is neither exceptional in gynecomastia nor characteristic of neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pižem, Jože; Velikonja, Mojca; Matjašič, Alenka; Jerše, Maja; Glavač, Damjan

    2015-04-01

    Six cases of gynecomastia with pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) and multinucleated stromal giant cells (MSGC) associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) have been reported, and finding MSGC within PASH in gynecomastia has been suggested as being a characteristic of NF1. The frequency of PASH with MSGC in gynecomastia and its specificity for NF1 have not, however, been systematically studied. A total of 337 gynecomastia specimens from 215 patients, aged from 8 to 78 years (median, 22 years) were reevaluated for the presence of PASH with MSGC. Breast tissue samples of 25 patients were analyzed for the presence of an NF1 gene mutation using next generation sequencing. Rare MSGC, usually in the background of PASH, were noted at least unilaterally in 27 (13 %) patients; and prominent MSGC, always in the background of PASH, were noted in 8 (4 %) patients. The NF1 gene was mutated in only 1 (an 8-year-old boy with known NF1 and prominent MSGC) of the 25 tested patients, including 6 patients with prominent MSGC and 19 patients with rare MSGC. MSGC, usually in the background of PASH, are not characteristic of NF1.

  15. Multipotent human stromal cells improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction in mice without long-term engraftment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iso, Yoshitaka; Spees, Jeffrey L.; Serrano, Claudia; Bakondi, Benjamin; Pochampally, Radhika; Song, Yao-Hua; Sobel, Burton E.; Delafontaine, Patrick; Prockop, Darwin J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether intravenously administered multipotent stromal cells from human bone marrow (hMSCs) can improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI) without long-term engraftment and therefore whether transitory paracrine effects or secreted factors are responsible for the benefit conferred. hMSCs were injected systemically into immunodeficient mice with acute MI. Cardiac function and fibrosis after MI in the hMSC-treated group were significantly improved compared with controls. However, despite the cardiac improvement, there was no evident hMSC engraftment in the heart 3 weeks after MI. Microarray assays and ELISAs demonstrated that multiple protective factors were expressed and secreted from the hMSCs in culture. Factors secreted by hMSCs prevented cell death of cultured cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells under conditions that mimicked tissue ischemia. The favorable effects of hMSCs appear to reflect the impact of secreted factors rather than engraftment, differentiation, or cell fusion

  16. Secretomes from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells enhance periodontal tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Takamasa; Katagiri, Wataru; Osugi, Masashi; Sugimura, Yukiko; Hibi, Hideharu; Ueda, Minoru

    2015-04-01

    Periodontal tissue regeneration with the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been regarded as a future cell-based therapy. However, low survival rates and the potential tumorigenicity of implanted MSCs could undermine the efficacy of cell-based therapy. The use of conditioned media from MSCs (MSC-CM) may be a feasible approach to overcome these limitations. The aim of this study was to confirm the effect of MSC-CM on periodontal regeneration. MSC-CM were collected during their cultivation. The concentrations of the growth factors in MSC-CM were measured with the use of enzyme-linked immunoassay. Rat MSCs (rMSCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells cultured in MSC-CM were assessed on wound-healing and angiogenesis. The expressions of osteogenetic- and angiogenic-related genes of rMSCs cultured in MSC-CM were quantified by means of real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. In vivo, periodontal defects were prepared in the rat models and the collagen sponges with MSC-CM were implanted. MSC-CM includes insulin-like growth factor-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-β1 and hepatocyte growth factor. In vitro, wound-healing and angiogenesis increased significantly in MSC-CM. The levels of expression of osteogenetic- and angiogenic-related genes were significantly upregulated in rMSCs cultured with MSC-CM. In vivo, in the MSC-CM group, 2 weeks after implantation, immunohistochemical analysis showed several CD31-, CD105-or FLK-1-positive cells occurring frequently. At 4 weeks after implantation, regenerated periodontal tissue was observed in MSC-CM groups. The use of MSC-CM may be an alternative therapy for periodontal tissue regeneration because several cytokines included in MSC-CM will contribute to many processes of complicated periodontal tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ameliorating replicative senescence of human bone marrow stromal cells by PSMB5 overexpression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Li; Song, Hui-Fang; Wei, Jiao-Long; Liu, Xue-Qin; Song, Wen-Hui; Yan, Ba-Yi; Yang, Gui-Jiao; Li, Ang; Yang, Wu-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PSMB5 overexpression restores the differentiation potential of aged hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression enhances the proteasomal activity of late-stage hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression inhibits replicative senescence and improved cell viability. • PSMB5 overexpression promotes cell growth by upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. - Abstract: Multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) potentially serve as a source for cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine. However, in vitro expansion was inescapably accompanied with cell senescence, characterized by inhibited proliferation and compromised pluripotency. We have previously demonstrated that this aging process is closely associated with reduced 20S proteasomal activity, with down-regulation of rate-limiting catalytic β-subunits particularly evident. In the present study, we confirmed that proteasomal activity directly contributes to senescence of hBMSCs, which could be reversed by overexpression of the β5-subunit (PSMB5). Knocking down PSMB5 led to decreased proteasomal activity concurrent with reduced cell proliferation in early-stage hBMSCs, which is similar to the senescent phenotype observed in late-stage cells. In contrast, overexpressing PSMB5 in late-stage cells efficiently restored the normal activity of 20S proteasomes and promoted cell growth, possibly via upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. Additionally, PSMB5 could enhance cell resistance to oxidative stress, as evidenced by the increased cell survival upon exposing senescent hBMSCs to hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, PSMB5 overexpression retained the pluripotency of late-stage hBMSCs by facilitating their neural differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of PSMB5 in 20S proteasome-mediated protection against replicative senescence, pointing to a possible strategy for maintaining the integrity of culture-expanded hBMSCs by manipulating the expression of PSMB5

  18. Ameliorating replicative senescence of human bone marrow stromal cells by PSMB5 overexpression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Li, E-mail: luli7300@126.com [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Song, Hui-Fang; Wei, Jiao-Long; Liu, Xue-Qin [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Song, Wen-Hui [Department of Orthopaedics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Yan, Ba-Yi; Yang, Gui-Jiao [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Li, Ang [Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Anatomy, University of Hong Kong Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Yang, Wu-Lin, E-mail: wulinyoung@163.com [School of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Laboratory of Metabolic Medicine, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium (SBIC), Agency for Science, Technology and Research - A*STAR (Singapore)

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • PSMB5 overexpression restores the differentiation potential of aged hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression enhances the proteasomal activity of late-stage hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression inhibits replicative senescence and improved cell viability. • PSMB5 overexpression promotes cell growth by upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. - Abstract: Multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) potentially serve as a source for cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine. However, in vitro expansion was inescapably accompanied with cell senescence, characterized by inhibited proliferation and compromised pluripotency. We have previously demonstrated that this aging process is closely associated with reduced 20S proteasomal activity, with down-regulation of rate-limiting catalytic β-subunits particularly evident. In the present study, we confirmed that proteasomal activity directly contributes to senescence of hBMSCs, which could be reversed by overexpression of the β5-subunit (PSMB5). Knocking down PSMB5 led to decreased proteasomal activity concurrent with reduced cell proliferation in early-stage hBMSCs, which is similar to the senescent phenotype observed in late-stage cells. In contrast, overexpressing PSMB5 in late-stage cells efficiently restored the normal activity of 20S proteasomes and promoted cell growth, possibly via upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. Additionally, PSMB5 could enhance cell resistance to oxidative stress, as evidenced by the increased cell survival upon exposing senescent hBMSCs to hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, PSMB5 overexpression retained the pluripotency of late-stage hBMSCs by facilitating their neural differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of PSMB5 in 20S proteasome-mediated protection against replicative senescence, pointing to a possible strategy for maintaining the integrity of culture-expanded hBMSCs by manipulating the expression of PSMB5.

  19. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells from Discarded Neonatal Sternal Tissue: In Vitro Characterization and Angiogenic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous and nonautologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs are being evaluated as proangiogenic agents for ischemic and vascular disease in adults but not in children. A significant number of newborns and infants with critical congenital heart disease who undergo cardiac surgery already have or are at risk of developing conditions related to inadequate tissue perfusion. During neonatal cardiac surgery, a small amount of sternal tissue is usually discarded. Here we demonstrate that MSCs can be isolated from human neonatal sternal tissue using a nonenzymatic explant culture method. Neonatal sternal bone MSCs (sbMSCs were clonogenic, had a surface marker expression profile that was characteristic of bone marrow MSCs, were multipotent, and expressed pluripotency-related genes at low levels. Neonatal sbMSCs also demonstrated in vitro proangiogenic properties. Sternal bone MSCs cooperated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs to form 3D networks and tubes in vitro. Conditioned media from sbMSCs cultured in hypoxia also promoted HUVEC survival and migration. Given the neonatal source, ease of isolation, and proangiogenic properties, sbMSCs may have relevance to therapeutic applications.

  20. Stable subcutaneous cartilage regeneration of bone marrow stromal cells directed by chondrocyte sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Zhu, Lian; Liu, Yu; Yin, Zongqi; Liu, Yi; Liu, Fangjun; He, Aijuan; Feng, Shaoqing; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Wenjie; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin; Zhou, Guangdong

    2017-05-01

    In vivo niche plays an important role in regulating differentiation fate of stem cells. Due to lack of proper chondrogenic niche, stable cartilage regeneration of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in subcutaneous environments is always a great challenge. This study explored the feasibility that chondrocyte sheet created chondrogenic niche retained chondrogenic phenotype of BMSC engineered cartilage (BEC) in subcutaneous environments. Porcine BMSCs were seeded into biodegradable scaffolds followed by 4weeks of chondrogenic induction in vitro to form BEC, which were wrapped with chondrocyte sheets (Sheet group), acellular small intestinal submucosa (SIS, SIS group), or nothing (Blank group) respectively and then implanted subcutaneously into nude mice to trace the maintenance of chondrogenic phenotype. The results showed that all the constructs in Sheet group displayed typical cartilaginous features with abundant lacunae and cartilage specific matrices deposition. These samples became more mature with prolonged in vivo implantation, and few signs of ossification were observed at all time points except for one sample that had not been wrapped completely. Cell labeling results in Sheet group further revealed that the implanted BEC directly participated in cartilage formation. Samples in both SIS and Blank groups mainly showed ossified tissue at all time points with partial fibrogenesis in a few samples. These results suggested that chondrocyte sheet could create a chondrogenic niche for retaining chondrogenic phenotype of BEC in subcutaneous environment and thus provide a novel research model for stable ectopic cartilage regeneration based on stem cells. In vivo niche plays an important role in directing differentiation fate of stem cells. Due to lack of proper chondrogenic niche, stable cartilage regeneration of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in subcutaneous environments is always a great challenge. The current study demonstrated that chondrocyte sheet generated by

  1. Human mesenchymal stromal cell-secreted lactate induces M2-macrophage differentiation by metabolic reprogramming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civini, Sara; Pacelli, Consiglia; Dieng, Mame Massar; Lemieux, William; Jin, Ping; Bazin, Renée; Patey, Natacha; Marincola, Francesco M.; Moldovan, Florina; Zaouter, Charlotte; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Benabdhalla, Basma; Louis, Isabelle; Beauséjour, Christian; Stroncek, David; Le Deist, Françoise; Haddad, Elie

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to dampen immune response and promote tissue repair, but the underlying mechanisms are still under investigation. Herein, we demonstrate that umbilical cord-derived MSC (UC-MSC) alter the phenotype and function of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) through lactate-mediated metabolic reprogramming. UC-MSC can secrete large quantities of lactate and, when present during monocyte-to-DC differentiation, induce instead the acquisition of M2-macrophage features in terms of morphology, surface markers, migratory properties and antigen presentation capacity. Microarray expression profiling indicates that UC-MSC modify the expression of metabolic-related genes and induce a M2-macrophage expression signature. Importantly, monocyte-derived DC obtained in presence of UC-MSC, polarize naïve allogeneic CD4+ T-cells into Th2 cells. Treatment of UC-MSC with an inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase strongly decreases lactate concentration in culture supernatant and abrogates the effect on monocyte-to-DC differentiation. Metabolic analysis further revealed that UC-MSC decrease oxidative phosphorylation in differentiating monocytes while strongly increasing the spare respiratory capacity proportional to the amount of secreted lactate. Because both MSC and monocytes are recruited in vivo at the site of tissue damage and inflammation, we propose the local increase of lactate concentration induced by UC-MSC and the consequent enrichment in M2-macrophage generation as a mechanism to achieve immunomodulation. PMID:27070086

  2. Adult rat bone marrow stromal cells express genes associated with dopamine neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Brian C.; Woodbury, Dale; Black, Ira B.

    2006-01-01

    An intensive search is underway to identify candidates to replace the cells that degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD). To date, no suitable substitute has been found. We have recently found that adult rat bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) can be induced to assume a neuronal phenotype in vitro. These findings may have particular relevance to the treatment of PD. We now report that adult MSCs express multiple dopaminergic genes, suggesting that they are potential candidates for cell therapy. Using RT-PCR, we have examined families of genes that are associated with the development and/or survival of dopaminergic neurons. MSCs transcribe a variety of dopaminergic genes including patched and smoothened (components of the Shh receptor), Gli-1 (downstream mediator of Shh), and Otx-1, a gene associated with formation of the mesencephalon during development. Furthermore, Shh treatment elicits a 1.5-fold increase in DNA synthesis in cultured MSCs, suggesting the presence of a functional Shh receptor complex. We have also found that MSCs transcribe and translate Nurr-1, a nuclear receptor essential for the development of dopamine neurons. In addition, MSCs express a variety of growth factor receptors including the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored ligand-binding subunit of the GDNF receptor, GFRα1, as well as fibroblast growth factor receptors one and four. The expression of genes that are associated with the development and survival of dopamine neurons suggests a potential role for these cells in the treatment of Parkinson's disease

  3. Effects of Na/K-ATPase and its ligands on bone marrow stromal cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa Sayed

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous ligands of Na/K-ATPase have been demonstrated to increase in kidney dysfunction and heart failure. It is also reported that Na/K-ATPase signaling function effects stem cell differentiation. This study evaluated whether Na/K-ATPase activation through its ligands and associated signaling functions affect bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiation capacity. BMSCs were isolated from male Sprague–Dawley rats and cultured in minimal essential medium alpha (MEM-α supplemented with 15% Fetal Bovine serum (FBS. The results showed that marinobufagenin (MBG, a specific Na/K-ATPase ligand, potentiated rosiglitazone-induced adipogenesis in these BMSCs. Meanwhile, it attenuated BMSC osteogenesis. Mechanistically, MBG increased CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPα protein expression through activation of an extracellular regulated kinase (ERK signaling pathway, which leads to enhanced rosiglitazone-induced adipogenesis. Inhibition of ERK activation by U0126 blocks the effect of MBG on C/EBPα expression and on rosiglitazone-induced adipogenesis. Reciprocally, MBG reduced runt-related transcription factor 2 (RunX2 expression, which resulted in the inhibition of osteogenesis induced by β-glycerophosphate/ascorbic acid. MBG also potentiated rosiglitazone-induced adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells and in mouse BMSCs. These results suggest that Na/K-ATPase and its signaling functions are involved in the regulation of BMSCs differentiation.

  4. Effects of continuous and pulsatile PTH treatments on rat bone marrow stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chiming; Frei, Hanspeter; Burt, Helen M.; Rossi, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) differentiation and proliferation are controlled by numerous growth factors and hormones. Continuous parathyroid hormone (PTH) treatment has been shown to decrease osteoblast differentiation, whereas pulsatile PTH increases osteoblast differentiation. However, the effects of PTH treatments on MSCs have not been investigated. This study showed continuous PTH treatment in the presence of dexamethasone (DEX) promoted osteogenic differentiation of rat MSCs in vitro, as demonstrated by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, number of ALP expressing cells, and up-regulation of PTH receptor-1, ALP, and osteocalcin mRNA expressions. In contrast, pulsatile PTH treatment was found to suppress osteogenesis of rat MSCs, possibly by promoting the maintenance of undifferentiated cells. Additionally, the observed effects of PTH were strongly dependent on the presence of DEX. MSC proliferation however was not influenced by PTH independent of treatment regimen and presence or absence of DEX. Furthermore, our work raised the possibility that PTH treatment may modulate stem/progenitor cell activity within MSC cultures.

  5. Perfusion bioreactor-based cryopreservation of 3D human mesenchymal stromal cell tissue grafts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrenko, Yuriy; Petrenko, A.; Martin, I.; Wendt, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 76, jun. (2017), s. 150-153 ISSN 0011-2240 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : cryopreservation * tissue engineering * mesenchymal stromal cells Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 1.996, year: 2016

  6. Chondrogenic potential of mesenchymal stromal cells derived from equine bone marrow and umbilical cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Lise Charlotte; Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Heerkens, T.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Orthopaedic injury is the most common cause of lost training days or premature retirement in the equine athlete. Cell-based therapies are a potential new treatment option in musculo-skeletal diseases. Mesenthymal stromal cells (MSC) have been derived from multiple sources in the horse...

  7. Aging of marrow stromal (skeletal) stem cells and their contribution to age-related bone loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellantuono, Ilaria; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Kassem, Moustapha

    2009-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells (MSC) are thought to be stem cells with osteogenic potential and therefore responsible for the repair and maintenance of the skeleton. Age related bone loss is one of the most prevalent diseases in the elder population. It is controversial whether MSC undergo a process of agi...

  8. Ceramic hydroxyapatite coating on titanium implants drives selective bone marrow stromal cell adhesion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torensma, R.; Brugge, P.J. ter; Jansen, J.A.; Figdor, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the cell characteristics that regulate implant osseointegration. The heterogeneity of bone marrow stromal cells obtained from 11 donors was assessed by measuring the expression of a large panel of adhesion molecules. Large differences in expression of adhesion

  9. Chick embryo xenograft model reveals a novel perineural niche for human adipose-derived stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid R. Cordeiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stromal cells (hADSC are a heterogeneous cell population that contains adult multipotent stem cells. Although it is well established that hADSC have skeletal potential in vivo in adult organisms, in vitro assays suggest further differentiation capacity, such as into glia. Thus, we propose that grafting hADSC into the embryo can provide them with a much more instructive microenvironment, allowing the human cells to adopt diverse fates or niches. Here, hADSC spheroids were grafted into either the presumptive presomitic mesoderm or the first branchial arch (BA1 regions of chick embryos. Cells were identified without previous manipulations via human-specific Alu probes, which allows efficient long-term tracing of heterogeneous primary cultures. When grafted into the trunk, in contrast to previous studies, hADSC were not found in chondrogenic or osteogenic territories up to E8. Surprisingly, 82.5% of the hADSC were associated with HNK1+ tissues, such as peripheral nerves. Human skin fibroblasts showed a smaller tropism for nerves. In line with other studies, hADSC also adopted perivascular locations. When grafted into the presumptive BA1, 74.6% of the cells were in the outflow tract, the final goal of cardiac neural crest cells, and were also associated with peripheral nerves. This is the first study showing that hADSC could adopt a perineural niche in vivo and were able to recognize cues for neural crest cell migration of the host. Therefore, we propose that xenografts of human cells into chick embryos can reveal novel behaviors of heterogeneous cell populations, such as response to migration cues.

  10. Rapid isolation of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells using integrated centrifuge-based technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meppelink, Amanda M; Wang, Xing-Hua; Bradica, Gino; Barron, Kathryn; Hiltz, Kathleen; Liu, Xiang-Hong; Goldman, Scott M; Vacanti, Joseph P; Keating, Armand; Hoganson, David M

    2016-06-01

    The use of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in cell-based therapies is currently being developed for a number of diseases. Thus far, the clinical results have been inconclusive and variable, in part because of the variety of cell isolation procedures and culture conditions used in each study. A new isolation technique that streamlines the method of concentration and demands less time and attention could provide clinical and economic advantages compared with current methodologies. In this study, we evaluated the concentrating capability of an integrated centrifuge-based technology compared with standard Ficoll isolation. MSCs were concentrated from bone marrow aspirate using the new device and the Ficoll method. The isolation capabilities of the device and the growth characteristics, secretome production, and differentiation capacity of the derived cells were determined. The new MSC isolation device concentrated the bone marrow in 90 seconds and resulted in a mononuclear cell yield 10-fold higher and with a twofold increase in cell retention compared with Ficoll. The cells isolated using the device were shown to exhibit similar morphology and functional activity as assessed by growth curves and secretome production compared to the Ficoll-isolated cells. The surface marker and trilineage differentiation profile of the device-isolated cells was consistent with the known profile of MSCs. The faster time to isolation and greater cell yield of the integrated centrifuge-based technology may make this an improved approach for MSC isolation from bone marrow aspirates. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Potency testing of mesenchymal stromal cell growth expanded in human platelet lysate from different human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzina, R; Iudicone, P; Fioravanti, D; Bonanno, G; Totta, P; Zizzari, I G; Pierelli, L

    2016-08-25

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been largely investigated, in the past decade, as potential therapeutic strategies for various acute and chronic pathological conditions. MSCs isolated from different sources, such as bone marrow (BM), umbilical cord tissue (UCT) and adipose tissue (AT), share many biological features, although they may show some differences on cumulative yield, proliferative ability and differentiation potential. The standardization of MSCs growth and their functional amplification is a mandatory objective of cell therapies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cumulative yield and the ex vivo amplification potential of MSCs obtained from various sources and different subjects, using defined culture conditions with a standardized platelet lysate (PL) as growth stimulus. MSCs isolated from BM, UCT and AT and expanded in human PL were compared in terms of cumulative yield and growth potential per gram of starting tissue. MSCs morphology, phenotype, differentiation potential, and immunomodulatory properties were also investigated to evaluate their biological characteristics. The use of standardized PL-based culture conditions resulted in a very low variability of MSC growth. Our data showed that AT has the greater capacity to generate MSC per gram of initial tissue, compared to BM and UCT. However, UCT-MSCs replicated faster than AT-MSCs and BM-MSCs, revealing a greater proliferation capacity of this source irrespective of its lower MSC yield. All MSCs exhibited the typical MSC phenotype and the ability to differentiate into all mesodermal lineages, while BM-MSCs showed the most prominent immunosuppressive effect in vitro. The adoption of standardized culture conditions may help researchers and clinicians to reveal particular characteristics and inter-individual variability of MSCs sourced from different tissues. These data will be beneficial to set the standards for tissue collection and MSCs clinical-scale expansion both for cell banking

  12. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: What Is the Mechanism in Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Dunavin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available After more than a decade of preclinical and clinical development, therapeutic infusion of mesenchymal stromal cells is now a leading investigational strategy for the treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. While their clinical use continues to expand, it is still unknown which of their immunomodulatory properties contributes most to their therapeutic activity. Herein we describe the proposed mechanisms, focusing on the inhibitory activity of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs at immunologic checkpoints. A deeper understanding of the mechanism of action will allow us to design more effective treatment strategies.

  13. Endometrial stromal cell attachment and matrix homeostasis in abdominal wall endometriomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Hiroko; Mogami, Haruta; Bou Nemer, Laurice; Word, Larry; Rogers, David; Miller, Rodney; Word, R Ann

    2018-02-01

    How does progesterone alter matrix remodeling in abdominal wall endometriomas compared with normal endometrium? Progesterone may prevent attachment of endometrial cells to the abdominal wall, but does not ameliorate abnormal stromal cell responses of abdominal wall endometriomas. Menstruation is a tightly orchestrated physiologic event in which steroid hormones and inflammatory cells cooperatively initiate shedding of the endometrium. Abdominal wall endometriomas represent a unique form of endometriosis in which endometrial cells inoculate fascia or dermis at the time of obstetrical or gynecologic surgery. Invasion of endometrium into ectopic sites requires matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) for tissue remodeling but endometrium is not shed externally. Observational study in 14 cases and 19 controls. Tissues and stromal cells isolated from 14 abdominal wall endometriomas were compared with 19 normal cycling endometrium using immunohistochemistry, quantitative PCR, gelatin zymography and cell attachment assays. P values cell preps to provide scientific rigor to the conclusions. The results indicate that MMP2 and MMP9 are not increased by TGFβ1 in endometrioma stromal cells. Although progesterone prevents attachment of endometrioma cells to matrix components of the abdominal wall, it does not ameliorate these abnormal stromal cell responses to TGFβ1. N/A. Endometriomas were collected from women identified pre-operatively. Not all endometriomas were collected. Stromal cells from normal endometrium were from different patients, not women undergoing endometrioma resection. This work provides insight into the mechanisms by which progesterone may prevent abdominal wall endometriomas but, once established, are refractory to progesterone treatment. Tissue acquisition was supported by NIH P01HD087150. Authors have no competing interests. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All

  14. The effects of canine bone marrow stromal cells on neuritogenesis from dorsal root ganglion neurons in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamishina, Hiroaki; Cheeseman, Jennifer A; Clemmons, Roger M

    2009-10-01

    The present in vitro study was designed to evaluate whether canine bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) promote neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Bone marrow aspirates were collected from iliac crests of three young adult dogs. DRG neurons were cultured on BMSCs, fibroblasts, or laminin substrates. DRG neurons were also cultured in BMSC- or fibroblast-conditioned media. DRG neurons grown on BMSCs extended longer neurites and developed a much more elaborate conformation of branching neurites compared to those on fibroblasts or laminin. Quantitative analysis revealed that these effects were associated with the emergence of increased numbers of primary and branching neurites. The effect appears to be dependent upon cell-cell interactions rather than by elaboration of diffusible molecules. With more extensive investigations into the basic biology of canine BMSCs, their ability for promoting neurite outgrowth may be translated into a novel therapeutic strategy for dogs with a variety of neurological disorders.

  15. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Interleukin-6 Promotes Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Acquisition of Epithelial Stem-Like Cell Properties in Ameloblastoma Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunmiao; Zhang, Qunzhou; Shanti, Rabie M; Shi, Shihong; Chang, Ting-Han; Carrasco, Lee; Alawi, Faizan; Le, Anh D

    2017-09-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a biological process associated with cancer stem-like or cancer-initiating cell formation, contributes to the invasiveness, metastasis, drug resistance, and recurrence of the malignant tumors; it remains to be determined whether similar processes contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of ameloblastoma (AM), a benign but locally invasive odontogenic neoplasm. Here, we demonstrated that EMT- and stem cell-related genes were expressed in the epithelial islands of the most common histologic variant subtype, the follicular AM. Our results revealed elevated interleukin (IL)-6 signals that were differentially expressed in the stromal compartment of the follicular AM. To explore the stromal effect on tumor pathogenesis, we isolated and characterized both mesenchymal stromal cells (AM-MSCs) and epithelial cells (AM-EpiCs) from follicular AM and demonstrated that, in in vitro culture, AM-MSCs secreted a significantly higher level of IL-6 as compared to the counterpart AM-EpiCs. Furthermore, both in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that exogenous and AM-MSC-derived IL-6 induced the expression of EMT- and stem cell-related genes in AM-EpiCs, whereas such effects were significantly abrogated either by a specific inhibitor of STAT3 or ERK1/2, or by knockdown of Slug gene expression. These findings suggest that AM-MSC-derived IL-6 promotes tumor-stem like cell formation by inducing EMT process in AM-EpiCs through STAT3 and ERK1/2-mediated signaling pathways, implying a role in the etiology and progression of the benign but locally invasive neoplasm. Stem Cells 2017;35:2083-2094. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  16. Role of Corneal Stromal Cells on Epithelial Cell Function during Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavani S. Kowtharapu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Following injury, corneal stromal keratocytes transform into repair-phenotype of activated stromal fibroblasts (SFs and participate in wound repair. Simultaneously, ongoing bi-directional communications between corneal stromal-epithelial cells also play a vital role in mediating the process of wound healing. Factors produced by stromal cells are known to induce proliferation, differentiation, and motility of corneal epithelial cells, which are also subsequently the main processes that occur during wound healing. In this context, the present study aims to investigate the effect of SFs conditioned medium (SFCM on corneal epithelial cell function along with substance P (SP. Antibody microarrays were employed to profile differentially expressed cell surface markers and cytokines in the presence of SFCM and SP. Antibody microarray data revealed enhanced expression of the ITGB1 in corneal epithelial cells following stimulation with SP whereas SFCM induced abundant expression of IL-8, ITGB1, PD1L1, PECA1, IL-15, BDNF, ICAM1, CD8A, CD44 and NTF4. All these proteins have either direct or indirect roles in epithelial cell growth, movement and adhesion related signaling cascades during tissue regeneration. We also observed activation of MAPK signaling pathway along with increased expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK, paxillin, vimentin, β-catenin and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP phosphorylation. Additionally, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT regulating transcription factors Slug and ZEB1 expression were enhanced in the presence of SFCM. SP enriched the expression of integrin subunits α4, α5, αV, β1 and β3 whereas SFCM increased α4, α5, αV, β1 and β5 integrin subunits. We also observed increased expression of Serpin E1 following SP and SFCM treatment. Wound healing scratch assay revealed enhanced migration of epithelial cells following the addition of SFCM. Taken together, we conclude that SFCM-mediated sustained

  17. Bone Marrow Regeneration Promoted by Biophysically Sorted Osteoprogenitors From Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Zhiyong; Lee, Wong Cheng; Guan, Guofeng; Nyan, Lin Myint; Lim, Chwee Teck; Han, Jongyoon

    2015-01-01

    Human tissue repair deficiencies can be supplemented through strategies to isolate, expand in vitro, and reimplant regenerative cells that supplant damaged cells or stimulate endogenous repair mechanisms. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), a subset of which is described as mesenchymal stem cells, are leading candidates for cell-mediated bone repair and wound healing, with hundreds of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. An outstanding key challenge for successful clinical translation of MSCs is the capacity to produce large quantities of cells in vitro with uniform and relevant therapeutic properties. By leveraging biophysical traits of MSC subpopulations and label-free microfluidic cell sorting, we hypothesized and experimentally verified that MSCs of large diameter within expanded MSC cultures were osteoprogenitors that exhibited significantly greater efficacy over other MSC subpopulations in bone marrow repair. Systemic administration of osteoprogenitor MSCs significantly improved survival rates (>80%) as compared with other MSC subpopulations (0%) for preclinical murine bone marrow injury models. Osteoprogenitor MSCs also exerted potent therapeutic effects as “cell factories” that secreted high levels of regenerative factors such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor A, bone morphogenetic protein 2, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 1, and angiopoietin-1; this resulted in increased cell proliferation, vessel formation, and reduced apoptosis in bone marrow. This MSC subpopulation mediated rescue of damaged marrow tissue via restoration of the hematopoiesis-supporting stroma, as well as subsequent hematopoiesis. Together, the capabilities described herein for label-freeisolation of regenerative osteoprogenitor MSCs can markedly improve the efficacy of MSC-based therapies. PMID:25411477

  18. A rare ovarian tumor, leydig stromal cell tumor, presenting with virilization: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Aminimoghaddam

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available  Abstract Leydig stromal cell tumor is a rare ovarian tumor that belongs to the group of sex-cord stromal tumors. They produce testosterone leading to hyperandrogenism. We present a 41yr old woman with symptoms of virilization and a mass of right adenex via ultra Sonography, and a rise of total and free serum testosterone. An ovarian source of androgen was suspected and a surgery performed. A diagnosis of leydig-stromal cell tumor was confirmed. Our report is a reminder that although idiopathic hirsutism and other benign androgen excess disorder like Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOs are common, ovarian mass should be considered in differential diagnosis. 

  19. Inhibition of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C prevents bone marrow stromal cell senescence in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunhui; Wang, Nan; Huang, Jie; Xin, Jie; Peng, Fen; Ren, Yinshi; Zhang, Shangli; Miao, Junying

    2009-10-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can proliferate in vitro and can be transplanted for treating many kinds of diseases. However, BMSCs become senescent with long-term culture, which inhibits their application. To understand the mechanism underlying the senescence, we investigated the activity of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) and levels of integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS with BMSC senescence. The activity of PC-PLC and levels of integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS increased greatly during cell senescence. Selective inhibition of increased PC-PLC activity with D609 significantly decreased the number of senescence-associated beta galactosidase positive cells in BMSCs. Furthermore, D609 restored proliferation of BMSCs and their differentiation into adipocytes. Moreover, D609 suppressed the elevated levels of integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS. The data suggest that PC-PLC is involved in senescence of BMSCs, and its function is associated with integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Decidualized Human Endometrial Stromal Cells Mediate Hemostasis, Angiogenesis, and Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Charles J.; Krikun, Graciela; Hickey, Martha; Huang, S. Joseph; Schatz, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    Factor VII binds trans-membrane tissue factor to initiate hemostasis by forming thrombin. Tissue factor expression is enhanced in decidualized human endometrial stromal cells during the luteal phase. Long-term progestin only contraceptives elicit: 1) abnormal uterine bleeding from fragile vessels at focal bleeding sites, 2) paradoxically high tissue factor expression at bleeding sites; 3) reduced endometrial blood flow promoting local hypoxia and enhancing reactive oxygen species levels; and 4) aberrant angiogenesis reflecting increased stromal cell-expressed vascular endothelial growth factor, decreased Angiopoietin-1 and increased endothelial cell-expressed Angiopoietin-2. Aberrantly high local vascular permeability enhances circulating factor VII to decidualized stromal cell-expressed tissue factor to generate excess thrombin. Hypoxia-thrombin interactions augment expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-8 by stromal cells. Thrombin, vascular endothelial growth factor and interlerukin-8 synergis-tically augment angiogenesis in a milieu of reactive oxygen species-induced endothelial cell activation. The resulting enhanced vessel fragility promotes abnormal uterine bleeding. PMID:19208784

  1. The Stimulatory Effect of Notochordal-Cell Conditioned Medium in a Nucleus Pulposus Explant Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Stefan; Doeselaar, Marina van; Meij, Björn; Tryfonidou, M; Ito, Keita

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Notochordal cell-conditioned medium (NCCM) has previously shown to have a stimulatory effect on nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in alginate and pellet cultures. These culture methods provide a different environment than the nucleus pulposus (NP)

  2. The Stimulatory Effect of Notochordal Cell-Conditioned Medium in a Nucleus Pulposus Explant Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Stefan A H; van Doeselaar, Marina; Meij, Björn P; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Ito, K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Notochordal cell-conditioned medium (NCCM) has previously shown to have a stimulatory effect on nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in alginate and pellet cultures. These culture methods provide a different environment than the nucleus pulposus (NP)

  3. Manufacturing of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cells on Microcarriers in a Dynamic System for Clinical Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Petry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The great properties of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs make these cells an important tool in regenerative medicine. Because of the limitations of hMSCs derived from the bone marrow during isolation and expansion, hMSCs derived from the umbilical cord stroma are a great alternative to overcome these issues. For a large expansion of these cells, we performed a process transfer from static culture to a dynamic system. For this reason, a microcarrier selection out of five microcarrier types was made to achieve a suitable growth surface for the cells. The growth characteristics and metabolite consumption and production were used to compare the cells growth in 12-well plate and spinner flask. The goal to determine relevant process parameters to transfer the expansion process into a stirred tank bioreactor was achieved.

  4. CD146/MCAM defines functionality of human bone marrow stromal stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid; Ditzel, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of surface markers for prospective isolation of functionally homogenous populations of human skeletal (stromal, mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) is highly relevant for cell therapy protocols. Thus, we examined the possible use of CD146 to subtype a heterogeneous hMSC...... population. METHODS: Using flow cytometry and cell sorting, we isolated two distinct hMSC-CD146(+) and hMSC-CD146(-) cell populations from the telomerized human bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (hMSC-TERT). Cells were examined for differences in their size, shape and texture by using high...... and adipocytes on the basis of gene expression and protein production of lineage-specific markers. In vivo, hMSC-CD146(+) and hMSC-CD146(-) cells formed bone and bone marrow organ when implanted subcutaneously in immune-deficient mice. Bone was enriched in hMSC-CD146(-) cells (12.6 % versus 8.1 %) and bone...

  5. Fibrocytes: A Novel Stromal Cells to Regulate Resistance to Anti-Angiogenic Therapy and Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hisatsugu; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2017-12-29

    An adequate blood supply is essential for cancer cells to survive and grow; thus, the concept of inhibiting tumor angiogenesis has been applied to cancer therapy, and several drugs are already in clinical use. It has been shown that treatment with those anti-angiogenic drugs improved the response rate and prolonged the survival of patients with various types of cancer; however, it is also true that the effect was mostly limited. Currently, the disappointing clinical results are explained by the existence of intrinsic or acquired resistance to the therapy mediated by both tumor cells and stromal cells. This article reviews the mechanisms of resistance mediated by stromal cells such as endothelial cells, pericytes, fibroblasts and myeloid cells, with an emphasis on fibrocytes, which were recently identified as the cell type responsible for regulating acquired resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy. In addition, the other emerging role of fibrocytes as mediator-producing cells in tumor progression is discussed.

  6. The establishment of a bank of stored clinical bone marrow stromal cell products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabatino Marianna

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs are being used to treat a variety of conditions. For many applications a supply of cryopreserved products that can be used for acute therapy is needed. The establishment of a bank of BMSC products from healthy third party donors is described. Methods The recruitment of healthy subjects willing to donate marrow for BMSC production and the Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP used for assessing potential donors, collecting marrow, culturing BMSCs and BMSC cryopreservation are described. Results Seventeen subjects were enrolled in our marrow collection protocol for BMSC production. Six of the 17 subjects were found to be ineligible during the donor screening process and one became ill and their donation was cancelled. Approximately 12 ml of marrow was aspirated from one posterior iliac crest of 10 donors; one donor donated twice. The BMSCs were initially cultured in T-75 flasks and then expanded for three passages in multilayer cell factories. The final BMSC product was packaged into units of 100 × 106 viable cells, cryopreserved and stored in a vapor phase liquid nitrogen tank under continuous monitoring. BMSC products meeting all lot release criteria were obtained from 8 of the 11 marrow collections. The rate of growth of the primary cultures was similar for all products except those generated from the two oldest donors. One lot did not meet the criteria for final release; its CD34 antigen expression was greater than the cut off set at 5%. The mean number of BMSC units obtained from each donor was 17 and ranged from 3 to 40. Conclusions The production of large numbers of BMSCs from bone marrow aspirates of healthy donors is feasible, but is limited by the high number of donors that did not meet eligibility criteria and products that did not meet lot release criteria.

  7. Platelet-derived stromal cell-derived factor-1 is required for the transformation of circulating monocytes into multipotential cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Seta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously described a primitive cell population derived from human circulating CD14(+ monocytes, named monocyte-derived multipotential cells (MOMCs, which are capable of differentiating into mesenchymal and endothelial lineages. To generate MOMCs in vitro, monocytes are required to bind to fibronectin and be exposed to soluble factor(s derived from circulating CD14(- cells. The present study was conducted to identify factors that induce MOMC differentiation. METHODS: We cultured CD14(+ monocytes on fibronectin in the presence or absence of platelets, CD14(- peripheral blood mononuclear cells, platelet-conditioned medium, or candidate MOMC differentiation factors. The transformation of monocytes into MOMCs was assessed by the presence of spindle-shaped adherent cells, CD34 expression, and the potential to differentiate in vitro into mesenchymal and endothelial lineages. RESULTS: The presence of platelets or platelet-conditioned medium was required to generate MOMCs from monocytes. A screening of candidate platelet-derived soluble factors identified stromal cell-derived factor (SDF-1 as a requirement for generating MOMCs. Blocking an interaction between SDF-1 and its receptor CXCR4 inhibited MOMC generation, further confirming SDF-1's critical role in this process. Finally, circulating MOMC precursors were found to reside in the CD14(+CXCR4(high cell population. CONCLUSION: The interaction of SDF-1 with CXCR4 is essential for the transformation of circulating monocytes into MOMCs.

  8. [The influence of low partial oxygen pressure on the biolodical process of mesenchymal stromal cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezovskyĭ, V Ia; Plotnikova, L M; Vesel'skyĭ, S P; Litovka, I H

    2014-01-01

    The influence of low partial oxygen pressure (Po2) on the amino acid composition in culture medium of human mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) lines 4BL has been studied. At 23 mm Hg (3% oxygen), a significant decrease (by 31%) in the concentration of proline and hydroxyproline was registered. Under these conditions, the concentration of serine and aspartic acid decreased by 45% compared to the control. Maximum consumption of free amino acids from the culture medium required for the synthesis of collagen (proline and hydroxyproline by 42%, serine and aspartic acid by 62%) was observed at a gas-phase Po2 of 38 mm Hg (5% O2). At Po2 76 mm Hg (10% O2), a lack of amino acids proline and hydroxyproline was only 21%, while that of glutamine and alanine amounted 12% compared to the control. This intensity ratio of consumption of amino acids may indicate that the maximum of MSC vital functions occurs at Po2 38 mm Hg.

  9. Artificial Niches for Stromal Stem Cells as a Potential Instrument for the Design of the Surface of Biomimetic Osteogenic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlusov, I. A.; Khlusova, M. Yu.; Pichugin, V. F.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Legostaeva, E. V.

    2014-02-01

    A relationship between the topography of rough calcium phosphate surfaces having osteogenic niche-reliefs and the electrostatic potential of these surfaces as a possible instrument to control stromal stem cells has been investigated. The in vitro culture of human lung prenatal stromal cells on nanostructured/ultrafine-grained VT1.0 titanium alloy plates with bilateral rough calcium phosphate (CaP) microarc coating was used. It was established that the amplitude of the electret CaP surface potential linearly increased with increasing area of valleys (sockets), and the negative charge is formed on the socket surface. The area of alkaline phosphatase staining (the marker of osteoblast maturation and differentiation) of adherent CD34- CD44+ cells increases linearly with increasing area of artificial microterritory (socket) of the CaP surface occupied with each cell. The negative electret potential in valleys (sockets) of microarc CaP coatings can be the physical mechanism mediating the influence of the surface topography on osteogenic maturation and differentiation of cells in vitro. This mechanism can be called "niche-potential" and can be used as an instrument for biomimetic modification of smooth CaP surfaces to strengthen their integration with the bone tissue.

  10. Tumor and Stromal-Based Contributions to Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwell, Steven M.; Weed, Scott A., E-mail: scweed@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Program in Cancer Cell Biology, Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2015-02-27

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is typically diagnosed at advanced stages with evident loco-regional and/or distal metastases. The prevalence of metastatic lesions directly correlates with poor patient outcome, resulting in high patient mortality rates following metastatic development. The progression to metastatic disease requires changes not only in the carcinoma cells, but also in the surrounding stromal cells and tumor microenvironment. Within the microenvironment, acellular contributions from the surrounding extracellular matrix, along with contributions from various infiltrating immune cells, tumor associated fibroblasts, and endothelial cells facilitate the spread of tumor cells from the primary site to the rest of the body. Thus far, most attempts to limit metastatic spread through therapeutic intervention have failed to show patient benefit in clinic trails. The goal of this review is highlight the complexity of invasion-promoting interactions in the HNSCC tumor microenvironment, focusing on contributions from tumor and stromal cells in order to assist future therapeutic development and patient treatment.

  11. Reciprocal upregulation of Notch signaling molecules in hematopoietic progenitor and mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Y

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs play pivotal supportive roles in hematopoiesis, how they interact with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs is not well understood. We investigated the interaction between HSCs and surrogate MSCs (C3H10T1/2 stromal cells, focusing on the molecular events induced by cell contact of these bipartite populations. C3H10T1/2 is a mesenchymal stromal cell line that can be induced to differentiate into preadipocytes (A54 and myoblasts (M1601. The stromal cell derivatives were cocultured with murine HSCs (Lineage-Sca1+, and gene expression profiles in stromal cells and HSCs were compared before and after the coculture. HSCs gave rise to cobblestone areas only on A54 cells, with ninefold more progenitors than on M1601 or undifferentiated C3H10T1/2 cells. Microarray-based screening and a quantitative reverse transcriptase directed-polymerase chain reaction showed that the levels of Notch ligands (Jagged1 and Delta-like 3 were increased in A54 cells upon interaction with HSCs. On the other hand, the expression of Notch1 and Hes1 was upregulated in the HSCs cocultured with A54 cells. A transwell assay revealed that the reciprocal upregulation was dependent on cell-to-cell contact. The result suggested that in the hematopoietic niche, HSCs help MSCs to produce Notch ligands, and in turn, MSCs help HSCs to express Notch receptor. Such a reciprocal upregulation would reinforce the downstream signaling to determine the fate of hematopoietic cell lineage. Clarification of the initiating events on cell contact should lead to the identification of specific molecular targets to facilitate HSC engraftment in transplantation therapy.

  12. Genistein promotes DNA demethylation of the steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) promoter in endometrial stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsukura, Hiroshi; Aisaki, Ken-ichi; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Matsushima, Yuko; Kanno, Jun; Muramatsu, Masaaki; Sudo, Katsuko; Sato, Noriko

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Genistein (GEN) is a phytoestrogen found in soy products. → GEN demethylated/unsilenced the steroidogenic factor 1 gene in endometrial tissue. → GEN thus altered mRNA expression in uteri of ovariectomized (OVX) mice. → A high-resolution melting assay was used to screen for epigenetic change. → We isolated an endometrial cell clone that was epigenetically modulated by GEN. -- Abstract: It has recently been demonstrated that genistein (GEN), a phytoestrogen in soy products, is an epigenetic modulator in various types of cells; but its effect on endometrium has not yet been determined. We investigated the effects of GEN on mouse uterine cells, in vivo and in vitro. Oral administration of GEN for 1 week induced mild proliferation of the endometrium in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, which was accompanied by the induction of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) gene expression. GEN administration induced demethylation of multiple CpG sites in the SF-1 promoter; these sites are extensively methylated and thus silenced in normal endometrium. The GEN-mediated promoter demethylation occurred predominantly on the luminal side, as opposed to myometrium side, indicating that the epigenetic change was mainly shown in regenerated cells. Primary cultures of endometrial stromal cell colonies were screened for GEN-mediated alterations of DNA methylation by a high-resolution melting (HRM) method. One out of 20 colony-forming cell clones showed GEN-induced demethylation of SF-1. This clone exhibited a high proliferation capacity with continuous colony formation activity through multiple serial clonings. We propose that only a portion of endometrial cells are capable of receiving epigenetic modulation by GEN.

  13. Genistein promotes DNA demethylation of the steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) promoter in endometrial stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsukura, Hiroshi, E-mail: hmatsukura.epi@mri.tmd.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Epidemiology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Aisaki, Ken-ichi; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Matsushima, Yuko; Kanno, Jun [Division of Cellular and Molecular Toxicology, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Muramatsu, Masaaki [Department of Molecular Epidemiology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Sudo, Katsuko [Department of Molecular Epidemiology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Animal Research Center, Tokyo Medical University, 6-1-1 Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8402 (Japan); Sato, Noriko, E-mail: nsato.epi@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Epidemiology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan)

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Genistein (GEN) is a phytoestrogen found in soy products. {yields} GEN demethylated/unsilenced the steroidogenic factor 1 gene in endometrial tissue. {yields} GEN thus altered mRNA expression in uteri of ovariectomized (OVX) mice. {yields} A high-resolution melting assay was used to screen for epigenetic change. {yields} We isolated an endometrial cell clone that was epigenetically modulated by GEN. -- Abstract: It has recently been demonstrated that genistein (GEN), a phytoestrogen in soy products, is an epigenetic modulator in various types of cells; but its effect on endometrium has not yet been determined. We investigated the effects of GEN on mouse uterine cells, in vivo and in vitro. Oral administration of GEN for 1 week induced mild proliferation of the endometrium in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, which was accompanied by the induction of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) gene expression. GEN administration induced demethylation of multiple CpG sites in the SF-1 promoter; these sites are extensively methylated and thus silenced in normal endometrium. The GEN-mediated promoter demethylation occurred predominantly on the luminal side, as opposed to myometrium side, indicating that the epigenetic change was mainly shown in regenerated cells. Primary cultures of endometrial stromal cell colonies were screened for GEN-mediated alterations of DNA methylation by a high-resolution melting (HRM) method. One out of 20 colony-forming cell clones showed GEN-induced demethylation of SF-1. This clone exhibited a high proliferation capacity with continuous colony formation activity through multiple serial clonings. We propose that only a portion of endometrial cells are capable of receiving epigenetic modulation by GEN.

  14. Cell Culture Made Easy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Frank J.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps to generate cell samples for observation and experimentation. The procedures (which use ordinary laboratory equipment) will establish a short-term primary culture of normal mammalian cells. Information on culture vessels and cell division and a list of questions to generate student interest and involvement in the topics are…

  15. Virally and physically transgenized equine adipose-derived stromal cells as a cargo for paracrine secreted factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavirani Sandro

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells have been shown to have multiple lineage differentiation properties and to be suitable for tissues regeneration in many degenerative processes. Their use has been proposed for the therapy of joint diseases and tendon injuries in the horse. In the present report the genetic manipulation of Equine Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells has been investigated. Results Equine Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells were successfully virally transduced as well as transiently and stably transfected with appropriate parameters, without detrimental effect on their differentiation properties. Moreover, green fluorescent protein alone, fused to neo gene, or co-expressed as bi-cistronic reporter constructs, driven by viral and house-keeping gene promoters, were tested. The better expressed cassette was employed to stably transfect Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells for cell therapy purposes. Stably transfected Equine Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells with a heterologous secreted viral antigen were able to immunize horses upon injection into the lateral wall of the neck. Conclusion This study provides the methods to successfully transgenize Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells both by lentiviral vector and by transfection using optimized constructs with suitable promoters and reporter genes. In conclusion these findings provide a working platform for the delivery of potentially therapeutic proteins to the site of cells injection via transgenized Equine Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells.

  16. Improvement of Heart Failure by Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Transplantation in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi Tousi, Seyed Mohammad Taghi; Faghihi, Mahdieh; Nobakht, Maliheh; Molazem, Mohammad; Kalantari, Elham; Darbandi Azar, Amir; Aboutaleb, Nahid

    2016-07-06

    Background: Recently, stem cells have been considered for the treatment of heart diseases, but no marked improvement has been recorded. This is the first study to examine the functional and histological effects of the transplantation of human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs) in rats with heart failure (HF). Methods: This study was conducted in the years 2014 and 2015. 35 male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into 5 equal experimental groups (7 rats each) as 1- Control 2- Heart Failure (HF) 3- Sham 4- Culture media 5- Stem Cell Transplantation (SCT). Heart failure was induced using 170 mg/kg/d of isoproterenol subcutaneously injection in 4 consecutive days. The failure confirmed by the rat cardiac echocardiography on day 28. In SCT group, 3×10 6 cells in 150 µl of culture media were transplanted to the myocardium. At the end, echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters together with histological evaluation were done. Results: Echocardiography results showed that cardiac ejection fraction in HF group increased from 58/73 ± 9% to 81/25 ± 6/05% in SCT group (p value < 0.001). Fraction shortening in HF group was increased from 27/53 ± 8/58% into 45/55 ± 6/91% in SCT group (p value < 0.001). Furthermore, hAMSCs therapy significantly improved mean diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, left ventricular systolic pressure, rate pressure product, and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure compared to those in the HF group, with the values reaching the normal levels in the control group. A marked reduction in fibrosis tissue was also found in the SCT group (p value < 0.001) compared with the animals in the HF group. Conclusion: The transplantation of hAMSCs in rats with heart failure not only decreased the level of fibrosis but also conferred significant improvement in heart performance in terms of echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters.

  17. Human Platelet Lysate versus Fetal Calf Serum: These Supplements Do Not Select for Different Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Rebollo, Eduardo; Mentrup, Birgit; Ebert, Regina; Franzen, Julia; Abagnale, Giulio; Sieben, Torsten; Ostrowska, Alina; Hoffmann, Per; Roux, Pierre-François; Rath, Björn; Goodhardt, Michele; Lemaitre, Jean-Marc; Bischof, Oliver; Jakob, Franz; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2017-07-11

    Culture medium of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is usually supplemented with either human platelet lysate (HPL) or fetal calf serum (FCS). Many studies have demonstrated that proliferation and cellular morphology are affected by these supplements - it is therefore important to determine if they favor outgrowth of different subpopulations and thereby impact on the heterogeneous composition of MSCs. We have isolated and expanded human bone marrow-derived MSCs in parallel with HPL or FCS and demonstrated that HPL significantly increases proliferation and leads to dramatic differences in cellular morphology. Remarkably, global DNA-methylation profiles did not reveal any significant differences. Even at the transcriptomic level, there were only moderate changes in pairwise comparison. Furthermore, the effects on proliferation, cytoskeletal organization, and focal adhesions were reversible by interchanging to opposite culture conditions. These results indicate that cultivation of MSCs with HPL or FCS has no systematic bias for specific cell types.

  18. Direct intramyocardial mesenchymal stromal cell injections in patients with severe refractory angina - one year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Friis, Tina; Mathiasen, Anders B

    2013-01-01

    Aims: In patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and refractory angina we performed direct intra-myocardial injections of autologous mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and followed the safety and efficacy of the treatment for 12 months. Methods and Results: A total of 31 patients...... with stable CAD, moderate to severe angina, normal left ventricular ejection fraction and no further revascularization options, were included. Bone marrow MSCs were isolated and culture expanded for 6 - 8 weeks and then stimulated with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for one week.The 12 months...... follow-up demonstrated, that it was safe to culture expand MSCs and use the cells for clinical treatment. The patients maximal metabolic equivalent (MET) during exercise increased from 4.23 MET at baseline to 4.72 MET at 12 months follow-up (p...

  19. Transforming growth factor-β synthesized by stromal cells and cancer cells participates in bone resorption induced by oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Ryosuke; Kayamori, Kou; Oue, Erika; Sakamoto, Kei; Harada, Kiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) plays a significant role in the regulation of the tumor microenvironment. To explore the role of TGF-β in oral cancer-induced bone destruction, we investigated the immunohistochemical localization of TGF-β and phosphorylated Smad2 (p-Smad2) in 12 surgical specimens of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). These studies revealed TGF-β and p-Smad2 expression in cancer cells in all tested cases. Several fibroblasts located between cancer nests and resorbing bone expressed TGF-β in 10 out of 12 cases and p-Smad2 in 11 out of 12 cases. Some osteoclasts also exhibited p ∼ Smad2 expression. The OSCC cell line, HSC3, and the bone marrow-derived fibroblastic cell line, ST2, synthesized substantial levels of TGF-β. Culture media derived from HSC3 cells could stimulate Tgf-β1 mRNA expression in ST2 cells. Recombinant TGF-β1 could stimulate osteoclast formation induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) in RAW264 cells. TGF-β1 could upregulate the expression of p-Smad2 in RAW264 cells, and this action was suppressed by the addition of a neutralizing antibody against TGF-β or by SB431542. Transplantation of HSC3 cells onto the calvarial region of athymic mice caused bone destruction, associated with the expression of TGF-β and p-Smad2 in both cancer cells and stromal cells. The bone destruction was substantially inhibited by the administration of SB431542. The present study demonstrated that TGF-β synthesized by both cancer cells and stromal cells participates in the OSCC-induced bone destruction. - Highlights: • Cancer cell, fibroblastic cells, and osteoclasts at bone resorbing area by oral cancer exhibited TGF-β and p-Smad2. • TGF-β1 stimulated osteoclastogenesis induced by RAKL in RAW264 cell. • Xenograft model of oral cancer-induced bone resorption was substantially inhibited by SB431542. • TGF-β synthesized by both cancer cells and stromal cells participates in the OSCC

  20. Transforming growth factor-β synthesized by stromal cells and cancer cells participates in bone resorption induced by oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Ryosuke [Department of Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Kayamori, Kou [Department of Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Oue, Erika [Department of Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Sakamoto, Kei [Department of Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Harada, Kiyoshi [Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Yamaguchi, Akira, E-mail: akira.mpa@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Oral Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-03-20

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) plays a significant role in the regulation of the tumor microenvironment. To explore the role of TGF-β in oral cancer-induced bone destruction, we investigated the immunohistochemical localization of TGF-β and phosphorylated Smad2 (p-Smad2) in 12 surgical specimens of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). These studies revealed TGF-β and p-Smad2 expression in cancer cells in all tested cases. Several fibroblasts located between cancer nests and resorbing bone expressed TGF-β in 10 out of 12 cases and p-Smad2 in 11 out of 12 cases. Some osteoclasts also exhibited p ∼ Smad2 expression. The OSCC cell line, HSC3, and the bone marrow-derived fibroblastic cell line, ST2, synthesized substantial levels of TGF-β. Culture media derived from HSC3 cells could stimulate Tgf-β1 mRNA expression in ST2 cells. Recombinant TGF-β1 could stimulate osteoclast formation induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) in RAW264 cells. TGF-β1 could upregulate the expression of p-Smad2 in RAW264 cells, and this action was suppressed by the addition of a neutralizing antibody against TGF-β or by SB431542. Transplantation of HSC3 cells onto the calvarial region of athymic mice caused bone destruction, associated with the expression of TGF-β and p-Smad2 in both cancer cells and stromal cells. The bone destruction was substantially inhibited by the administration of SB431542. The present study demonstrated that TGF-β synthesized by both cancer cells and stromal cells participates in the OSCC-induced bone destruction. - Highlights: • Cancer cell, fibroblastic cells, and osteoclasts at bone resorbing area by oral cancer exhibited TGF-β and p-Smad2. • TGF-β1 stimulated osteoclastogenesis induced by RAKL in RAW264 cell. • Xenograft model of oral cancer-induced bone resorption was substantially inhibited by SB431542. • TGF-β synthesized by both cancer cells and stromal cells participates in the OSCC

  1. Reconstruction of hematopoietic inductive microenvironment after transplantation of VCAM-1-modified human umbilical cord blood stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Liu

    Full Text Available The hematopoietic inductive microenvironment (HIM is where hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells grow and develop. Hematopoietic stromal cells were the key components of the HIM. In our previous study, we had successfully cultured and isolated human cord blood-derived stromal cells (HUCBSCs and demonstrated that they could secret hemopoietic growth factors such as GM-CSF, TPO, and SCF. However, it is still controversial whether HUCBSCs can be used for reconstruction of HIM. In this study, we first established a co-culture system of HUCBSCs and cord blood CD34(+ cells and then determined that using HUCBSCs as the adherent layer had significantly more newly formed colonies of each hematopoietic lineage than the control group, indicating that HUCBSCs had the ability to promote the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells/progenitor cells. Furthermore, the number of colonies was significantly higher in vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1-modified HUCBSCs, suggesting that the ability of HUCBSCs in promoting the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells/progenitor cells was further enhanced after having been modified with VCAM-1. Next, HUCBSCs were infused into a radiation-damaged animal model, in which the recovery of hematopoiesis was observed. The results demonstrate that the transplanted HUCBSCs were "homed in" to bone marrow and played roles in promoting the recovery of irradiation-induced hematopoietic damage and repairing HIM. Compared with the control group, the HUCBSC group had significantly superior effectiveness in terms of the recovery time for hemogram and myelogram, CFU-F, CFU-GM, BFU-E, and CFU-Meg. Such differences were even more significant in VCAM-1-modified HUCBSCs group. We suggest that HUCBSCs are able to restore the functions of HIM and promote the recovery of radiation-induced hematopoietic damage. VCAM-1 plays an important role in supporting the repair of HIM damage.

  2. Low-frequency vibration treatment of bone marrow stromal cells induces bone repair in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shengwei; Zhao, Wenzhi; Zhang, Lu; Mi, Lidong; Du, Guangyu; Sun, Chuanxiu; Sun, Xuegang

    2017-01-01

    To study the effect of low-frequency vibration on bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and potential bone repair in vivo . Forty New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into five groups with eight rabbits in each group. For each group, bone defects were generated in the left humerus of four rabbits, and in the right humerus of the other four rabbits. To test differentiation, bones were isolated and demineralized, supplemented with bone marrow stromal cells, and implanted into humerus bone defects. Varying frequencies of vibration (0, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 Hz) were applied to each group for 30 min each day for four weeks. When the bone defects integrated, they were then removed for histological examination. mRNA transcript levels of runt-related transcription factor 2, osteoprotegerin, receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligan, and pre-collagen type 1 α were measured. Humeri implanted with bone marrow stromal cells displayed elevated callus levels and wider, more prevalent, and denser trabeculae following treatment at 25 and 50 Hz. The mRNA levels of runt-related transcription factor 2, osteoprotegerin, receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand, and pre-collagen type 1 α were also markedly higher following 25 and 50 Hz treatment. Low frequency (25-50 Hz) vibration in vivo can promote bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and repair bone injury.

  3. Low-frequency vibration treatment of bone marrow stromal cells induces bone repair in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengwei He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:To study the effect of low-frequency vibration on bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and potential bone repair in vivo. Materials and Methods:Forty New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into five groups with eight rabbits in each group. For each group, bone defects were generated in the left humerus of four rabbits, and in the right humerus of the other four rabbits. To test differentiation, bones were isolated and demineralized, supplemented with bone marrow stromal cells, and implanted into humerus bone defects. Varying frequencies of vibration (0, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 Hz were applied to each group for 30 min each day for four weeks. When the bone defects integrated, they were then removed for histological examination. mRNA transcript levels of runt-related transcription factor 2, osteoprotegerin, receptor activator of nuclear factor k-B ligan, and pre-collagen type 1 a were measured. Results:Humeri implanted with bone marrow stromal cells displayed elevated callus levels and wider, more prevalent, and denser trabeculae following treatment at 25 and 50 Hz. The mRNA levels of runt-related transcription factor 2, osteoprotegerin, receptor activator of nuclear factor k-B ligand, and pre-collagen type 1 a were also markedly higher following 25 and 50 Hz treatment. Conclusion:Low frequency (25–50 Hz vibration in vivo can promote bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and repair bone injury.

  4. Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the treatment of postoperative temporal bone defect: an animal model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Školoudík, L.; Chrobok, V.; Kalfert, D.; Kočí, Zuzana; Syková, Eva; Chumak, Tetyana; Popelář, Jiří; Syka, Josef; Laco, J.; Dědková, J.; Dayanithi, Govindan; Filip, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 7 (2016), s. 1405-1414 ISSN 0963-6897 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : Human bone marrow * Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) * Middle ear surgery * Temporal bone Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines Impact factor: 3.006, year: 2016

  5. Multilineage differentiation of porcine bone marrow stromal cells associated with specific gene expression pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Lijin; Zou, Xuenong; Chen, Li

    2007-01-01

    There are increasing reports regarding differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) from human and various species of animals including pigs. The phenotype and function of BMSC along a mesenchymal lineage differentiation are well characterized by specific transcription factors and marker g...

  6. Cancer cells enter dormancy after cannibalizing mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosh, Thomas J; Ullah, Mujib; Zeitouni, Suzanne; Beaver, Joshua; Prockop, Darwin J

    2016-10-18

    Patients with breast cancer often develop malignant regrowth of residual drug-resistant dormant tumor cells years after primary treatment, a process defined as cancer relapse. Deciphering the causal basis of tumor dormancy therefore has obvious therapeutic significance. Because cancer cell behavior is strongly influenced by stromal cells, particularly the mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) that are actively recruited into tumor-associated stroma, we assessed the impact of MSCs on breast cancer cell (BCC) dormancy. Using 3D cocultures to mimic the cellular interactions of an emerging tumor niche, we observed that MSCs sequentially surrounded the BCCs, promoted formation of cancer spheroids, and then were internalized/degraded through a process resembling the well-documented yet ill-defined clinical phenomenon of cancer cell cannibalism. This suspected feeding behavior was less appreciable in the presence of a rho kinase inhibitor and in 2D monolayer cocultures. Notably, cannibalism of MSCs enhanced survival of BCCs deprived of nutrients but suppressed their tumorigenicity, together suggesting the cancer cells entered dormancy. Transcriptome profiles revealed that the resulting BCCs acquired a unique molecular signature enriched in prosurvival factors and tumor suppressors, as well as inflammatory mediators that demarcate the secretome of senescent cells, also referred to as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Overall, our results provide intriguing evidence that cancer cells under duress enter dormancy after cannibalizing MSCs. Importantly, our practical 3D coculture model could provide a valuable tool to understand the antitumor activity of MSCs and cell cannibalism further, and therefore open new therapeutic avenues for the prevention of cancer recurrence.

  7. Mesenchymal stromal cells improve human islet function through released products and extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzouni, Ahmed A; Vargas-Seymour, Andreia; Rackham, Chloe L; Dhadda, Paramjeet; Huang, Guo-Cai; Choudhary, Pratik; Nardi, Nance; King, Aileen J F; Jones, Peter M

    2017-12-01

    The aims of the present study were (i) to determine whether the reported beneficial effects of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) on mouse islet function extend to clinically relevant human tissues (islets and MSCs), enabling translation into improved protocols for clinical human islet transplantation; and (ii) to identify possible mechanisms through which human MSCs influence human islet function. Human islets were co-cultured with human adipose tissue-derived MSCs (hASCs) or pre-treated with its products - extracellular matrix (ECM) and annexin A1 (ANXA1). Mouse islets were pre-treated with mouse MSC-derived ECM. Islet insulin secretory function was assessed in vitro by radioimmunoassay. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to screen human adipMSCs for potential ligands of human islet G-protein-coupled receptors. We show that co-culture with hASCs improves human islet secretory function in vitro , as measured by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, confirming previous reports using rodent tissues. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these beneficial effects on islet function can be partly attributed to the MSC-derived products ECM and ANXA1. Our results suggest that hASCs have the potential to improve the quality of human islets isolated for transplantation therapy of Type 1 diabetes. Furthermore, it may be possible to achieve improvements in human islet quality in a cell-free culture system by using the MSC-derived products ANXA1 and ECM. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  8. Alginate micro-encapsulation of mesenchymal stromal cells enhances modulation of the neuro-inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Elizabeth C; Schloss, Rene S; Yarmush, Martin L; Shreiber, David I

    2015-10-01

    Modulation of inflammation after brain trauma is a key therapeutic goal aimed at limiting the consequences of the subsequent injury cascade. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated to dynamically regulate the inflammatory environment in several tissue systems, including the central nervous system. There has been limited success, however, with the use of direct implantation of cells in the brain caused by low viability and engraftment at the injury site. To circumvent this, we encapsulated MSCs in alginate microspheres and evaluated the ability of these encapsulated MSCs to attenuate inflammation in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC). OHSC were administered lipopolysaccharide to induce inflammation and immediately co-cultured with encapsulated or monolayer human MSCs. After 24 h, culture media was assayed for the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) produced by OHSC, as well as MSC-produced trophic mediators. Encapsulated MSCs reduced TNF-α more effectively than did monolayer MSCs. Additionally, there was a strong correlation between increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and reduction of TNF-α. In contrast to monolayer MSCs, inflammatory signals were not required to stimulate PGE2 production by encapsulated MSCs. Further encapsulation-stimulated changes were revealed in a multiplex panel analyzing 27 MSC-produced cytokines and growth factors, from which additional mediators with strong correlations to TNF-α levels were identified. These results suggest that alginate encapsulation of MSCs may not only provide an improved delivery vehicle for transplantation but may also enhance MSC therapeutic benefit for treating neuro-inflammation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. DNA Methyltransferases Modulate Hepatogenic Lineage Plasticity of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Wei Lee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The irreversibility of developmental processes in mammalian cells has been challenged by rising evidence that de-differentiation of hepatocytes occurs in adult liver. However, whether reversibility exists in mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC-derived hepatocytes (dHeps remains elusive. In this study, we find that hepatogenic differentiation (HD of MSCs is a reversible process and is modulated by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs. DNMTs are regulated by transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1, which in turn controls hepatogenic differentiation and de-differentiation. In addition, a stepwise reduction in TGFβ1 concentrations in culture media increases DNMT1 and decreases DNMT3 in primary hepatocytes (Heps and confers Heps with multi-differentiation potentials similarly to MSCs. Hepatic lineage reversibility of MSCs and lineage conversion of Heps are regulated by DNMTs in response to TGFβ1. This previously unrecognized TGFβ1-DNMTs-MSC-HD axis may further increase the understanding the normal and pathological processes in the liver, as well as functions of MSCs after transplantation to treat liver diseases.

  10. Exosomes from human colorectal cancer induce a tumor-like behavior in colonic mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugini, Luana; Valtieri, Mauro; Federici, Cristina; Cecchetti, Serena; Meschini, Stefania; Condello, Maria; Signore, Michele; Fais, Stefano

    2016-08-02

    Cancer cells, including colorectal cancer ones (CRC), release high amounts of nanovesicles (exosomes), delivering biochemical messages for paracrine or systemic crosstalk. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to play contradicting roles in tumor progression. CRC exosomes induce in cMSCs: i) atypical morphology, higher proliferation, migration and invasion; ii) formation of spheroids; iii) an acidic extracellular environment associated with iv) a plasma membrane redistribution of vacuolar H+-ATPase and increased expression of CEA. Colon cancer derived MSCs, which were isolated from tumor masses, produce umbilicated spheroids, a future frequently observed in the inner core of rapidly growing tumors and recapitulate the changes observed in normal colonic MSCs exposed to CRC exosomes. Tissue specific colonic (c)MSCs were exposed to primary or metastatic CRC exosomes and analysed by light and electron microscopy, proliferation in 2D and 3D cultures, migration and invasion assays, Western blot and confocal microscopy for vacuolar H+-ATPase expression. CRC exosomes are able to induce morphological and functional changes in colonic MSCs, which may favour tumor growth and its malignant progression. Our results suggest that exosomes are actively involved in cancer progression and that inhibiting tumor exosome release may represent a way to interfere with cancer.

  11. Tensile loading modulates bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and the development of engineered fibrocartilage constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, John T; Vanderploeg, Eric J; Mouw, Janna K; Wilson, Christopher G; Levenston, Marc E

    2010-06-01

    Mesenchymal progenitors such as bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are an attractive cell source for fibrocartilage tissue engineering, but the types or combinations of signals required to promote fibrochondrocyte-specific differentiation remain unclear. The present study investigated the influences of cyclic tensile loading on the chondrogenesis of BMSCs and the development of engineered fibrocartilage. Cyclic tensile displacements (10%, 1 Hz) were applied to BMSC-seeded fibrin constructs for short (24 h) or extended (1-2 weeks) periods using a custom loading system. At early stages of chondrogenesis, 24 h of cyclic tension stimulated both protein and proteoglycan synthesis, but at later stages, tension increased protein synthesis only. One week of intermittent cyclic tension significantly increased the total sulfated glycosaminoglycan and collagen contents in the constructs, but these differences were lost after 2 weeks of loading. Constraining the gels during the extended culture periods prevented contraction of the fibrin matrix, induced collagen fiber alignment, and increased sulfated glycosaminoglycan release to the media. Cyclic tension specifically stimulated collagen I mRNA expression and protein synthesis, but had no effect on collagen II, aggrecan, or osteocalcin mRNA levels. Overall, these studies suggest that the combination of chondrogenic stimuli and tensile loading promotes fibrochondrocyte-like differentiation of BMSCs and has the potential to direct fibrocartilage development in vitro.

  12. Temporal Profiling and Pulsed SILAC Labeling Identify Novel Secreted Proteins during ex vivo Osteoblast Differentiation of Human Stromal Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars P; Chen, Li; Nielsen, Maria Overbeck

    2012-01-01

    , is not fully established. To address these questions, we quantified the temporal dynamics of the human stromal (mesenchymal, skeletal) stem cell (hMSC) secretome during ex vivo OB differentiation using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). In addition, we employed pulsed SILAC...... the identification of novel factors produced by hMSC with potential role in OB differentiation. Our study demonstrates that the secretome of osteoblastic cells is more complex than previously reported and supports the emerging evidence that osteoblastic cells secrete proteins with endocrine functions and regulate...... regulators of OB differentiation. Furthermore, we studied the biological effects of one of these proteins, the hormone stanniocalcin 2 (STC2) and demonstrated its autocrine effects in enhancing osteoblastic differentiation of hMSC. In conclusion, combining complete and pulsed SILAC labeling facilitated...

  13. Inflammatory responses of stromal fibroblasts to inflammatory epithelial cells are involved in the pathogenesis of bovine mastitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenyao; Li, Xuezhong; Xu, Tong; Ma, Mengru [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Zhang, Yong, E-mail: zhangyong1956@nwsuaf.edu.cn [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Gao, Ming-Qing, E-mail: gaomingqing@nwsuaf.edu.cn [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi (China)

    2016-11-15

    Hypernomic secretion of epithelial cytokines has several effects on stromal cells. The contributions of inflammatory epithelial cells to stromal fibroblasts in bovine mammary glands with mastitis remain poorly understood. Here, we established an inflammatory epithelial cell model of bovine mastitis with gram-negative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and gram-positive lipoteichoic acid (LTA) bacterial cell wall components. We characterized immune responses of mammary stromal fibroblasts induced by inflammatory epithelial cells. Our results showed that inflammatory epithelial cells affected stromal fibroblast characteristics by increasing inflammatory mediator expression, elevating extracellular matrix protein deposition, decreasing proliferation capacity, and enhancing migration ability. The changes in stromal fibroblast proliferation and migration abilities were mediated by signal molecules, such as WNT signal pathway components. LPS- and LTA-induced inflammatory epithelial cells triggered different immune responses in stromal fibroblasts. Thus, in mastitis, bovine mammary gland stromal fibroblasts were affected by inflammatory epithelial cells and displayed inflammation-specific changes, suggesting that fibroblasts play crucial roles in bovine mastitis. - Highlights: • Inflammatory BMEs affect the properties of BMFs during mastitis. • BMEs inhibited the proliferation and promoted the migration of BMFs. • BMEs enhanced secretion of inflammatory mediators and deposition of ECM in BMFs. • Changes of the properties of BMFs were mediated by specific signal molecules.

  14. Inflammatory responses of stromal fibroblasts to inflammatory epithelial cells are involved in the pathogenesis of bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyao; Li, Xuezhong; Xu, Tong; Ma, Mengru; Zhang, Yong; Gao, Ming-Qing

    2016-11-15

    Hypernomic secretion of epithelial cytokines has several effects on stromal cells. The contributions of inflammatory epithelial cells to stromal fibroblasts in bovine mammary glands with mastitis remain poorly understood. Here, we established an inflammatory epithelial cell model of bovine mastitis with gram-negative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and gram-positive lipoteichoic acid (LTA) bacterial cell wall components. We characterized immune responses of mammary stromal fibroblasts induced by inflammatory epithelial cells. Our results showed that inflammatory epithelial cells affected stromal fibroblast characteristics by increasing inflammatory mediator expression, elevating extracellular matrix protein deposition, decreasing proliferation capacity, and enhancing migration ability. The changes in stromal fibroblast proliferation and migration abilities were mediated by signal molecules, such as WNT signal pathway components. LPS- and LTA-induced inflammatory epithelial cells triggered different immune responses in stromal fibroblasts. Thus, in mastitis, bovine mammary gland stromal fibroblasts were affected by inflammatory epithelial cells and displayed inflammation-specific changes, suggesting that fibroblasts play crucial roles in bovine mastitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Inflammatory responses of stromal fibroblasts to inflammatory epithelial cells are involved in the pathogenesis of bovine mastitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenyao; Li, Xuezhong; Xu, Tong; Ma, Mengru; Zhang, Yong; Gao, Ming-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Hypernomic secretion of epithelial cytokines has several effects on stromal cells. The contributions of inflammatory epithelial cells to stromal fibroblasts in bovine mammary glands with mastitis remain poorly understood. Here, we established an inflammatory epithelial cell model of bovine mastitis with gram-negative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and gram-positive lipoteichoic acid (LTA) bacterial cell wall components. We characterized immune responses of mammary stromal fibroblasts induced by inflammatory epithelial cells. Our results showed that inflammatory epithelial cells affected stromal fibroblast characteristics by increasing inflammatory mediator expression, elevating extracellular matrix protein deposition, decreasing proliferation capacity, and enhancing migration ability. The changes in stromal fibroblast proliferation and migration abilities were mediated by signal molecules, such as WNT signal pathway components. LPS- and LTA-induced inflammatory epithelial cells triggered different immune responses in stromal fibroblasts. Thus, in mastitis, bovine mammary gland stromal fibroblasts were affected by inflammatory epithelial cells and displayed inflammation-specific changes, suggesting that fibroblasts play crucial roles in bovine mastitis. - Highlights: • Inflammatory BMEs affect the properties of BMFs during mastitis. • BMEs inhibited the proliferation and promoted the migration of BMFs. • BMEs enhanced secretion of inflammatory mediators and deposition of ECM in BMFs. • Changes of the properties of BMFs were mediated by specific signal molecules.

  16. Mesenchymal stromal cells for cardiovascular repair: current status and future challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Kastrup, Jens

    2009-01-01

    of treatments in patients with heart failure, the 1-year mortality is still approximately 20% after the diagnosis has been established. Treatment with stem cells with the potential to regenerate the damaged myocardium is a relatively new approach. Mesenchymal stromal cells are a promising source of stem cells...... studies are promising, but there are still many unanswered questions. In this review, we explore present preclinical and clinical knowledge regarding the use of stem cells in cardiovascular regenerative medicine, with special focus on mesenchymal stromal cells. We take a closer look at sources of stem...... for regenerative therapy. Clinical studies on stem cell therapy for cardiac regeneration have shown significant improvements in ventricular pump function, ventricular remodeling, myocardial perfusion, exercise potential and clinical symptoms compared with conventionally treated control groups. The results of most...

  17. Modified Titanium Surface-Mediated Effects on Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Chaudhari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of titanium implants is used to enhance osseointegration. The study objective was to evaluate five modified titanium surfaces in terms of cytocompatibility and pro-osteogenic/pro-angiogenic properties for human mesenchymal stromal cells: amorphous microporous silica (AMS, bone morphogenetic protein-2 immobilized on AMS (AMS + BMP, bio-active glass (BAG and two titanium coatings with different porosity (T1; T2. Four surfaces served as controls: uncoated Ti (Ti, Ti functionalized with BMP-2 (Ti + BMP, Ti surface with a thickened titanium oxide layer (TiO2 and a tissue culture polystyrene surface (TCPS. The proliferation of eGFP-fLuc (enhanced green fluorescence protein-firefly luciferase transfected cells was tracked non-invasively by fluorescence microscopy and bio-luminescence imaging. The implant surface-mediated effects on cell differentiation potential was tracked by determination of osteogenic and angiogenic parameters [alkaline phosphatase (ALP; osteocalcin (OC; osteoprotegerin (OPG; vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A]. Unrestrained cell proliferation was observed on (unfunctionalized Ti and AMS surfaces, whereas BAG and porous titanium coatings T1 and T2 did not support cell proliferation. An important pro-osteogenic and pro-angiogenic potential of the AMS + BMP surface was observed. In contrast, coating the Ti surface with BMP did not affect the osteogenic differentiation of the progenitor cells. A significantly slower BMP-2 release from AMS compared to Ti supports these findings. In the unfunctionalized state, Ti was found to be superior to AMS in terms of OPG and VEGF-A production. AMS is suggested to be a promising implant coating material for bioactive agents delivery.

  18. Dental pulp-derived stromal cells exhibit a higher osteogenic potency than bone marrow-derived stromal cells in vitro and in a porcine critical-size bone defect model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs was compared with that of dental pulp-derived stromal cells (DPSCs in vitro and in a pig calvaria critical-size bone defect model. Methods: BMSCs and DPSCs were extracted from the tibia bone marrow and the molar teeth of each pig, respectively. BMSCs and DPSCs were cultured in monolayer and on a three-dimensional (3D polycaprolactone (PCL – hyaluronic acid – tricalcium phosphate (HT-PCL scaffold. Population doubling (PD, alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, and calcium deposition were measured in monolayer. In the 3D culture ALP activity, DNA content, and calcium deposition were evaluated. Six non-penetrating critical-size defects were made in each calvarium of 14 pigs. Three paired sub-studies were conducted: (1 empty defects vs. HT-PCL scaffolds; (2 PCL scaffolds vs. HT-PCL scaffolds; and (3 autologous BMSCs on HT-PCL scaffolds vs. autologous DPSCs on HT-PCL scaffolds. The observation time was five weeks. Bone volume fractions (BV/TV were assessed with micro-computed tomography (μCT and histomorphometry. Results and discussion: The results from the in vitro study revealed a higher ALP activity and calcium deposition of the DPSC cultures compared with BMSC cultures. Significantly more bone was present in the HT-PCL group than in both the pure PCL scaffold group and the empty defect group in vivo. DPSCs generated more bone than BMSCs when seeded on HT-PCL. In conclusion, DPSCs exhibited a higher osteogenic potential compared with BMSCs both in vitro and in vivo, making it a potential cell source for future bone tissue engineering.

  19. In Vivo Functional Selection Identifies Cardiotrophin-1 as a Cardiac Engraftment Factor for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotti, Francesca; Ruozi, Giulia; Falcione, Antonella; Doimo, Sara; Dal Ferro, Matteo; Lesizza, Pierluigi; Zentilin, Lorena; Banks, Lawrence; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2017-10-17

    Transplantation of cells into the infarcted heart has significant potential to improve myocardial recovery; however, low efficacy of cell engraftment still limits therapeutic benefit. Here, we describe a method for the unbiased, in vivo selection of cytokines that improve mesenchymal stromal cell engraftment into the heart both in normal conditions and after myocardial infarction. An arrayed library of 80 secreted factors, including most of the currently known interleukins and chemokines, were individually cloned into adeno-associated viral vectors. Pools from this library were then used for the batch transduction of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells ex vivo, followed by intramyocardial cell administration in normal and infarcted mice. Three weeks after injection, vector genomes were recovered from the few persisting cells and identified by sequencing DNA barcodes uniquely labeling each of the tested cytokines. The most effective molecule identified by this competitive engraftment screening was cardiotrophin-1, a member of the interleukin-6 family. Intracardiac injection of mesenchymal stromal cells transiently preconditioned with cardiotrophin-1 preserved cardiac function and reduced infarct size, parallel to the persistence of the transplanted cells in the healing hearts for at least 2 months after injection. Engraftment of cardiotrophin-1-treated mesenchymal stromal cells was consequent to signal transducer and activator of transcription 3-mediated activation of the focal adhesion kinase and its associated focal adhesion complex and the consequent acquisition of adhesive properties by the cells. These results support the feasibility of selecting molecules in vivo for their functional properties with adeno-associated viral vector libraries and identify cardiotrophin-1 as a powerful cytokine promoting cell engraftment and thus improving cell therapy of the infarcted myocardium. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Evaluation of Human Adipose Tissue Stromal Heterogeneity in Metabolic Disease Using Single Cell RNA-Seq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0251 TITLE: “Evaluation of Human Adipose Tissue Stromal Heterogeneity in Metabolic Disease Using Single Cell RNA...Heterogeneity in Metabolic Disease Using Single- Cell RNA-Seq 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Linus Tzu-Yen...ABSTRACT We have developed a robust protocol to generate single cell transcriptional profiles from subcutaneous adipose tissue samples of both human

  1. Activin receptor-like kinase 5 inhibition reverses impairment of endothelial cell viability by endogenous islet mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkin, Claire E; King, Aileen J; Dhadda, Paramjeet; Chagastelles, Pedro; Nardi, Nance; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P; Jones, Peter M

    2013-03-01

    Following islet transplantation, islet graft revascularization is compromised due to loss of endothelial cells (ECs) during islet culture. TGF-β signaling pathways are essential for vascular homeostasis but their importance for islet EC function is unclear. We have identified a population of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) within islets and investigated how modulation of TGF-β signaling by these cells influences islet EC viability. Cultured islets exhibited reduced expression of EC markers (VEGFR2, VE-cadherin and CD31), which was associated with diminished but sustained expression of endoglin a marker of both ECs and MSCs. Double fluorescent labeling of islets in situ with the EC marker CD31 disclosed a population of CD31-negative cells which were positive for endoglin. In vitro coculture of microvascular ECs with endoglin-positive, CD31-negative islet MSCs reduced VEGFR2 protein expression, disrupted EC angiogenic behavior, and increased EC detachment. Medium conditioned by islet MSCs significantly decreased EC viability and increased EC caspase 3/7 activity. EC:MSC cocultures showed enhanced Smad2 phosphorylation consistent with altered ALK5 signaling. Pharmacological inhibition of ALK5 activity with SB431542 (SB) improved EC survival upon contact with MSCs, and SB-treated cultured islets retained EC marker expression and sensitivity to exogenous VEGF164 . Thus, endoglin-expressing islet MSCs influence EC ALK5 signaling in vitro, which decreases EC viability, and changes in ALK5 activity in whole cultured islets contribute to islet EC loss. Modifying TGF-β signaling may enable maintenance of islet ECs during islet isolation and thus improve islet graft revascularization post-transplantation. Copyright © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  2. Influence of vascular endothelial growth factor stimulation and serum deprivation on gene activation patterns of human adipose tissue-derived stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tratwal, Josefine; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Juhl, Morten

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stimulation of mesenchymal stromal cells and adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASCs) with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been used in multiple animal studies and clinical trials for regenerative purposes. VEGF stimulation is believed to promote angiogenesis and VEGF...... stimulation is usually performed under serum deprivation. Potential regenerative molecular mechanisms are numerous and the role of contributing factors is uncertain. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of in vitro serum deprivation and VEGF stimulation on gene expression patterns...... of ASCs. METHODS: Gene expressions of ASCs cultured in complete medium, ASCs cultured in serum-deprived medium and ASCs stimulated with VEGF in serum-deprived medium were compared. ASC characteristics according to criteria set by the International Society of Cellular Therapy were confirmed by flow...

  3. Human platelet lysate stimulates high-passage and senescent human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell growth and rejuvenation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Sarah; Baraniak, Priya R; Copland, Ian B; Nerem, Robert M; McDevitt, Todd C

    2013-12-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are clinically useful because of their immunomodulatory and regenerative properties, but MSC therapies are limited by the loss of self-renewal and cell plasticity associated with ex vivo expansion culture and, on transplantation, increased immunogenicity from xenogen exposure during culture. Recently, pooled human platelet lysate (hPL) has been used as a culture supplement to promote MSC growth; however, the effects of hPL on MSCs after fetal bovine serum (FBS) exposure remain unknown. MSCs were cultured in medium containing FBS or hPL for up to 16 passages, and cell size, doubling time and immunophenotype were determined. MSC senescence was assessed by means of a fluorometric assay for endogenous β-galactosidase expression. MSCs cultured with FBS for different numbers of passages were switched to hPL conditions to evaluate the ability of hPL to "rescue" the proliferative capacity of MSCs. hPL culture resulted in more rapid cell proliferation at earlier passages (passage 5 or earlier) than remove FBS; by day 4, hPL (5%) yielded an MSC doubling time of 1.28 days compared with 1.52 days in 16% FBS. MSCs cultured first in FBS and switched to hPL proliferated more and demonstrated less β-galactosidase production and smaller cell sizes than remove MSCs continuously propagated in FBS. hPL enables rapid expansion of MSCs without adversely affecting immunophenotype. hPL culture of aged and senescent MSCs demonstrated cellular rejuvenation, reflected by decreased doubling time and smaller cell size. These results suggest that expansion of MSCs in hPL after FBS exposure can enhance cell phenotype and proliferative capacity. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cryopreserved Off-the-Shelf Allogeneic Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells for Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease and Heart Failure-A Safety Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Juhl, Morten

    2017-01-01

    and ischemic heart failure (IHF). Batches of CSCC_ASC were isolated from three healthy donors by liposuction from abdominal adipose tissue. Adipose mesenchymal stromal cells were culture expanded in bioreactors without the use of animal constituents, cryopreserved, and stored in vials in nitrogen dry......The present first-in-human clinical trial evaluated the safety and feasibility of a newly developed and cryopreserved Cardiology Stem Cell Centre adipose-derived stromal cell (CSCC_ASC) product from healthy donors for intramyocardial injection in ten patients with ischemic heart disease......-storage containers until use. Direct injection of CSCC_ASC into the myocardium did not cause any complications or serious adverse events related to either treatment or cell administration in a 6-month follow-up period. Four out of ten heart failure patients developed donor-specific de novo human leukocyte antigen...

  5. Cryopreserved Off-the-Shelf Allogeneic Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells for Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease and Heart Failure-A Safety Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Juhl, Morten

    2017-01-01

    The present first-in-human clinical trial evaluated the safety and feasibility of a newly developed and cryopreserved Cardiology Stem Cell Centre adipose-derived stromal cell (CSCC_ASC) product from healthy donors for intramyocardial injection in ten patients with ischemic heart disease...... and ischemic heart failure (IHF). Batches of CSCC_ASC were isolated from three healthy donors by liposuction from abdominal adipose tissue. Adipose mesenchymal stromal cells were culture expanded in bioreactors without the use of animal constituents, cryopreserved, and stored in vials in nitrogen dry...... developed cryopreserved product CSCC_ASC from healthy donors was a safe and feasible treatment. We observed a tendency toward efficacy in patients with IHF. These findings have to be confirmed in larger placebo controlled clinical trials. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1963-1971....

  6. Flow velocity-driven differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells in silk fibroin scaffolds: A combined experimental and computational approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanda Rita Vetsch

    Full Text Available Mechanical loading plays a major role in bone remodeling and fracture healing. Mimicking the concept of mechanical loading of bone has been widely studied in bone tissue engineering by perfusion cultures. Nevertheless, there is still debate regarding the in-vitro mechanical stimulation regime. This study aims at investigating the effect of two different flow rates (vlow = 0.001m/s and vhigh = 0.061m/s on the growth of mineralized tissue produced by human mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on 3-D silk fibroin scaffolds. The flow rates applied were chosen to mimic the mechanical environment during early fracture healing or during bone remodeling, respectively. Scaffolds cultured under static conditions served as a control. Time-lapsed micro-computed tomography showed that mineralized extracellular matrix formation was completely inhibited at vlow compared to vhigh and the static group. Biochemical assays and histology confirmed these results and showed enhanced osteogenic differentiation at vhigh whereas the amount of DNA was increased at vlow. The biological response at vlow might correspond to the early stage of fracture healing, where cell proliferation and matrix production is prominent. Visual mapping of shear stresses, simulated by computational fluid dynamics, to 3-D micro-computed tomography data revealed that shear stresses up to 0.39mPa induced a higher DNA amount and shear stresses between 0.55mPa and 24mPa induced osteogenic differentiation. This study demonstrates the feasibility to drive cell behavior of human mesenchymal stromal cells by the flow velocity applied in agreement with mechanical loading mimicking early fracture healing (vlow or bone remodeling (vhigh. These results can be used in the future to tightly control the behavior of human mesenchymal stromal cells towards proliferation or differentiation. Additionally, the combination of experiment and simulation presented is a strong tool to link biological responses to

  7. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Sphincter Regeneration: Role of Laminin Isoforms upon Myogenic Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Tanja; Hart, Melanie; Patarroyo, Manuel; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Klein, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are well known for their tri-lineage potential and ability to differentiate in vitro into osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic lineages. By selecting appropriate conditions MSCs can also be differentiated in vitro into the myogenic lineage and are therefore a promising option for cell-based regeneration of muscle tissue such as an aged or damaged sphincter muscle. For the differentiation into the myogenic lineage there is still a need to evaluate the effects of extracellular matrix proteins such as laminins (LM) which are crucial for different stem cell types and for normal muscle function. The laminin family consists of 16 functionally different isoforms with LM-211 being the most abundant isoform of adult muscle tissues. In the sphincter tissue a strong expression of the isoforms LM-211/221, LM-411/421 and LM-511/521 can be detected in the different cell layers. Bone marrow-derived MSCs in culture, however, mainly express the isoforms LM-411 and LM-511, but not LM-211. Even after myogenic differentiation, LM-211 can hardly be detected. All laminin isoforms tested (LM-211, LM-411, LM-511 and LM-521) showed a significant inhibition of the proliferation of undifferentiated MSCs but, with the exception of LM-521, they had no influence on the proliferation of MSCs cultivated in myogenic medium. The strongest cellular adhesion of MSCs was to LM-511 and LM-521, whereas LM-211 was only a weakly-adhesive substrate for MSCs. Myogenic differentiation of MSCs even reduced the interaction with LM-211, but it did not affect the interaction with LM-511 and LM-521. Since during normal myogenesis the latter two isoforms are the major laminins surrounding developing myogenic progenitors, α5 chain-containing laminins are recommended for further improvements of myogenic differentiation protocols of MSCs into smooth muscle cells. PMID:26406476

  8. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Sphincter Regeneration: Role of Laminin Isoforms upon Myogenic Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Seeger

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are well known for their tri-lineage potential and ability to differentiate in vitro into osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic lineages. By selecting appropriate conditions MSCs can also be differentiated in vitro into the myogenic lineage and are therefore a promising option for cell-based regeneration of muscle tissue such as an aged or damaged sphincter muscle. For the differentiation into the myogenic lineage there is still a need to evaluate the effects of extracellular matrix proteins such as laminins (LM which are crucial for different stem cell types and for normal muscle function. The laminin family consists of 16 functionally different isoforms with LM-211 being the most abundant isoform of adult muscle tissues. In the sphincter tissue a strong expression of the isoforms LM-211/221, LM-411/421 and LM-511/521 can be detected in the different cell layers. Bone marrow-derived MSCs in culture, however, mainly express the isoforms LM-411 and LM-511, but not LM-211. Even after myogenic differentiation, LM-211 can hardly be detected. All laminin isoforms tested (LM-211, LM-411, LM-511 and LM-521 showed a significant inhibition of the proliferation of undifferentiated MSCs but, with the exception of LM-521, they had no influence on the proliferation of MSCs cultivated in myogenic medium. The strongest cellular adhesion of MSCs was to LM-511 and LM-521, whereas LM-211 was only a weakly-adhesive substrate for MSCs. Myogenic differentiation of MSCs even reduced the interaction with LM-211, but it did not affect the interaction with LM-511 and LM-521. Since during normal myogenesis the latter two isoforms are the major laminins surrounding developing myogenic progenitors, α5 chain-containing laminins are recommended for further improvements of myogenic differentiation protocols of MSCs into smooth muscle cells.

  9. Adipose stromal cells contain phenotypically distinct adipogenic progenitors derived from neural crest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Sowa

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs contain phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous subpopulations of cells, but their developmental origin and their relative differentiation potential remain elusive. In the present study, we aimed at investigating how and to what extent the neural crest contributes to ASCs using Cre-loxP-mediated fate mapping. ASCs harvested from subcutaneous fat depots of either adult P0-Cre/or Wnt1-Cre/Floxed-reporter mice contained a few neural crest-derived ASCs (NCDASCs. This subpopulation of cells was successfully expanded in vitro under standard culture conditions and their growth rate was comparable to non-neural crest derivatives. Although NCDASCs were positive for several mesenchymal stem cell markers as non-neural crest derivatives, they exhibited a unique bipolar or multipolar morphology with higher expression of markers for both neural crest progenitors (p75NTR, Nestin, and Sox2 and preadipocytes (CD24, CD34, S100, Pref-1, GATA2, and C/EBP-delta. NCDASCs were able to differentiate into adipocytes with high efficiency but their osteogenic and chondrogenic potential was markedly attenuated, indicating their commitment to adipogenesis. In vivo, a very small proportion of adipocytes were originated from the neural crest. In addition, p75NTR-positive neural crest-derived cells were identified along the vessels within the subcutaneous adipose tissue, but they were negative for mural and endothelial markers. These results demonstrate that ASCs contain neural crest-derived adipocyte-restricted progenitors whose phenotype is distinct from that of non-neural crest derivatives.

  10. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induced by inflammatory priming elicits mesenchymal stromal cell-like immune-modulatory properties in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, M; Zanotto, M; Malpeli, G; Bassi, G; Perbellini, O; Chilosi, M; Bifari, F; Krampera, M

    2015-03-17

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has a central role in cancer progression and metastatic dissemination and may be induced by local inflammation. We asked whether the inflammation-induced acquisition of mesenchymal phenotype by neoplastic epithelial cells is associated with the onset of mesenchymal stromal cell-like immune-regulatory properties that may enhance tumour immune escape. Cell lines of lung adenocarcinoma (A549), breast cancer (MCF7) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) were co-cultured with T, B and NK cells before and after EMT induction by either the supernatant of mixed-lymphocyte reactions or inflammatory cytokines. EMT occurrence following inflammatory priming elicited multiple immune-regulatory effects in cancer cells resulting in NK and T-cell apoptosis, inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation and stimulation of regulatory T and B cells. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, but not Fas ligand pathway, was involved at least in part in these effects, as shown by the use of specific inhibitors. EMT induced by inflammatory stimuli confers to cancer cells some mesenchymal stromal cell-like immune-modulatory properties, which could be a cue for cancer progression and metastatic dissemination by favouring immune escape.

  11. Evaluation of Tissue Homogenization to Support the Generation of GMP-Compliant Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from the Umbilical Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J. Emnett

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that the umbilical cord (UC is an excellent source of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. However, current protocols for extracting and culturing UC-MSCs do not meet current good manufacturing practice (cGMP standards, in part due to the use of xenogeneic reagents. To support the development of a cGMP-compliant method, we have examined an enzyme-free isolation method utilizing tissue homogenization (t-H followed by culture in human platelet lysate (PL supplemented media. The yield and viability of cells after t-H were comparable to those obtained after collagenase digestion (Col-D. Importantly, kinetic analysis of cultured cells showed logarithmic growth over 10 tested passages, although the rate of cell division was lower for t-H as compared to Col-D. This slower growth of t-H-derived cells was also reflected in their longer population doubling time. Interestingly, there was no difference in the expression of mesenchymal markers and trilineage differentiation potential of cells generated using either method. Finally, t-H-derived cells had greater clonogenic potential compared to Col-D/FBS but not Col-D/PL and were able to maintain CFU-F capacity through P7. This bench scale study demonstrates the possibility of generating therapeutic doses of good quality UC-MSCs within a reasonable length of time using t-H and PL.

  12. Response of Primary Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Dermal Keratinocytes to Thermal Printer Materials In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Eva; Over, Patrick; Gridelli, Bruno; Gerlach, Jörg C

    Advancement in thermal three-dimensional printing techniques has greatly increased the possible applications of various materials in medical applications and tissue engineering. Yet, potential toxic effects on primary human cells have been rarely investigated. Therefore, we compared four materials commonly used in thermal printing for bioengineering, namely thermally printed acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, MED610, polycarbonate, and polylactic acid, and investigated their effects on primary human adult skin epidermal keratinocytes and bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in vitro. We investigated indirect effects on both cell types caused by potential liberation of soluble substances from the materials, and also analyzed BM-MSCs in direct contact with the materials. We found that even in culture without direct contact with the materials, the culture with MED610 (and to a lesser extent acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) significantly affected keratinocytes, reducing cell numbers and proliferation marker Ki67 expression, and increasing glucose consumption, lactate secretion, and expression of differentiation-associated genes. BM-MSCs had decreased metabolic activity, and exhibited increased cell death in direct culture on the materials. MED610 and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene induced the strongest expression of genes associated to differentiation and estrogen receptor activation. In conclusion, we found strong cell-type-specific effects of the materials, suggesting that materials for applications in regenerative medicine should be carefully selected not only based on their mechanical properties but also based on their cell-type-specific biological effects.

  13. Decidualization and syndecan-1 knock down sensitize endometrial stromal cells to apoptosis induced by embryonic stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Jean Boeddeker

    Full Text Available Human embryo invasion and implantation into the inner wall of the maternal uterus, the endometrium, is the pivotal process for a successful pregnancy. Whereas disruption of the endometrial epithelial layer was already correlated with the programmed cell death, the role of apoptosis of the subjacent endometrial stromal cells during implantation is indistinct. The aim was to clarify whether apoptosis plays a role in the stromal invasion and to characterize if the apoptotic susceptibility of endometrial stromal cells to embryonic stimuli is influenced by decidualization and Syndecan-1. Therefore, the immortalized human endometrial stromal cell line St-T1 was used to first generate a new cell line with a stable Syndecan-1 knock down (KdS1, and second to further decidualize the cells with progesterone. As a replacement for the ethically inapplicable embryo all cells were treated with the embryonic factors and secretion products interleukin-1β, interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, transforming growth factor-β1 and anti-Fas antibody to mimic the embryo contact. Detection of apoptosis was verified via Caspase ELISAs, PARP cleavage and Annexin V staining. Apoptosis-related proteins were investigated via antibody arrays and underlying signaling pathways were analyzed by Western blot. Non-decidualized endometrial stromal cells showed a resistance towards apoptosis which was rescinded by decidualization and Syndecan-1 knock down independent of decidualization. This was correlated with an altered expression of several pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and connected to a higher activation of pro-survival Akt in non-differentiated St-T1 as an upstream mediator of apoptotis-related proteins. This study provides insight into the largely elusive process of implantation, proposing an important role for stromal cell apoptosis to successfully establish a pregnancy. The impact of Syndecan-1 in attenuating the apoptotic signal is particularly interesting in the

  14. Wound-healing potential of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells in vitro--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Hi-Jin; Namgoong, Sik; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2015-11-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells have great potential for wound healing. However, it is difficult to clinically utilize cultured stem cells. Recently, human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hUCB-MSCs) have been commercialized for cartilage repair as a first cell therapy product that uses allogeneic stem cells. Should hUCB-MSCs have a superior effect on wound healing as compared with fibroblasts, which are the main cell source in current cell therapy products for wound healing, they may possibly replace fibroblasts. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the wound-healing activity of hUCB-MSCs with that of fibroblasts. This study was particularly designed to compare the effect of hUCB-MSCs on diabetic wound healing with those of allogeneic and autologous fibroblasts. Healthy (n = 5) and diabetic (n = 5) fibroblasts were used as the representatives of allogeneic and autologous fibroblasts for diabetic patients in the control group. Human UCB-MSCs (n = 5) were used in the experimental group. Cell proliferation, collagen synthesis and growth factor (basic fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor-β) production were compared among the three cell groups. Human UCB-MSCs produced significantly higher amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor when compared with both fibroblast groups. Human UCB-MSCs were superior to diabetic fibroblasts but not to healthy fibroblasts in collagen synthesis. There were no significant differences in cell proliferation and transforming growth factor-β production. Human UCB-MSCs may have greater capacity for diabetic wound healing than allogeneic or autologous fibroblasts, especially in angiogenesis. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of bone marrow stromal cell transferred bacterial {beta}-galactosidase gene by PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumakawa, Toshiro [Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Blood Transfusion and Hematology; Hibino, Hitoshi; Tani, Kenzaburo; Asano, Shigetaka; Futatugawa, Shouji; Sera, Kouichiro

    1997-12-31

    PIXE, Particle Induced X-ray Emission, is a powerful, multi-elemental analysis method which has many distinguishing features and has been used in varies research fields. Recently the method of applying baby cyclotrons for nuclear medicine to PIXE has been developed. This enables us to study biomedical phenomena from the physical point of view. Mouse bone marrow stromal cells were transferred bacterial {beta}-galactosidase gene (LacZ gene) by murine retroviral vectors. Analysis of the bone marrow stromal cells with the LacZ gene by PIXE revealed remarkable changes of intracellular trace elements compared with the normal control cells. These results indicate that gene transfer by retroviral vectors may bring about a dynamic change of intracellular circumstances of the target cell. (author)

  16. Stromal cell contributions to the homeostasis and functionality of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Scott N; Germain, Ronald N

    2009-09-01

    A defining characteristic of the immune system is the constant movement of many of its constituent cells through the secondary lymphoid tissues, mainly the spleen and lymph nodes, where crucial interactions that underlie homeostatic regulation, peripheral tolerance and the effective development of adaptive immune responses take place. What has only recently been recognized is the role that non-haematopoietic stromal elements have in many aspects of immune cell migration, activation and survival. In this Review, we summarize our current understanding of lymphoid compartment stromal cells, examine their possible heterogeneity, discuss how these cells contribute to immune homeostasis and the efficient initiation of adaptive immune responses, and highlight how targeting of these elements by some pathogens can influence the host immune response.

  17. Ultrasound-assisted liposuction provides a source for functional adipose-derived stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duscher, Dominik; Maan, Zeshaan N; Luan, Anna; Aitzetmüller, Matthias M; Brett, Elizabeth A; Atashroo, David; Whittam, Alexander J; Hu, Michael S; Walmsley, Graham G; Houschyar, Khosrow S; Schilling, Arndt F; Machens, Hans-Guenther; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Longaker, Michael T; Wan, Derrick C

    2017-12-01

    Regenerative medicine employs human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) for their multi-lineage plasticity and their pro-regenerative cytokine secretome. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ASCs) are concentrated in fat tissue, and the ease of harvest via liposuction makes them a particularly interesting cell source. However, there are various liposuction methods, and few have been assessed regarding their impact on ASC functionality. Here we study the impact of the two most popular ultrasound-assisted liposuction (UAL) devices currently in clinical use, VASER (Solta Medical) and Lysonix 3000 (Mentor) on ASCs. After lipoaspirate harvest and processing, we sorted for ASCs using fluorescent-assisted cell sorting based on an established surface marker profile (CD34 + CD31 - CD45 - ). ASC yield, viability, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation capacity and in vivo regenerative performance were assessed. Both UAL samples demonstrated equivalent ASC yield and viability. VASER UAL ASCs showed higher osteogenic and adipogenic marker expression, but a comparable differentiation capacity was observed. Soft tissue healing and neovascularization were significantly enhanced via both UAL-derived ASCs in vivo, and there was no significant difference between the cell therapy groups. Taken together, our data suggest that UAL allows safe and efficient harvesting of the mesenchymal stromal cellular fraction of adipose tissue and that cells harvested via this approach are suitable for cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells on cytokine production by peripheral blood naive, memory, and effector T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjeira, Paula; Pedrosa, Monia; Pedreiro, Susana; Gomes, Joana; Martinho, Antonio; Antunes, Brigida; Ribeiro, Tania; Santos, Francisco; Trindade, Helder; Paiva, Artur

    2015-01-05

    The different distribution of T cells among activation/differentiation stages in immune disorders may condition the outcome of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapies. Indeed, the effect of MSCs in the different functional compartments of T cells is not completely elucidated. We investigated the effect of human bone marrow MSCs on naturally occurring peripheral blood functional compartments of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells: naive, central memory, effector memory, and effector compartments. For that, mononuclear cells (MNCs) stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) plus ionomycin were cultured in the absence/presence of MSCs. The percentage of cells expressing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interferon gamma (IFNγ), and interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-17, IL-9, and IL-6 and the amount of cytokine produced were assessed by flow cytometry. mRNA levels of IL-4, IL-10, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4) in purified CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and phenotypic and mRNA expression changes induced by PMA + ionomycin stimulation in MSCs, were also evaluated. MSCs induced the reduction of the percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells producing TNF-α, IFNγ, and IL-2 in all functional compartments, except for naive IFNγ(+)CD4(+) T cells. This inhibitory effect differentially affected CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells as well as the T-cell functional compartments; remarkably, different cytokines showed distinct patterns of inhibition regarding both the percentage of producing cells and the amount of cytokine produced. Likewise, the percentages of IL-17(+), IL-17(+)TNF-α(+), and IL-9(+) within CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and of IL-6(+)CD4(+) T cells were decreased in MNC-MSC co-cultures. MSCs decreased IL-10 and increased IL-4 mRNA expression in stimulated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, whereas TGF-β was reduced in CD8(+) and augmented in CD4(+) T cells, with no changes for CTLA4. Finally, PMA

  19. Defining the role of mesenchymal stromal cells on the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases in skeletal muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sassoli, Chiara; Nosi, Daniele; Tani, Alessia; Chellini, Flaminia; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Quercioli, Franco; Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra; Formigli, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) transplantation improves healing of injured and diseased skeletal muscle, although the mechanisms of benefit are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated whether MSCs and/or their trophic factors were able to regulate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity in different cells of the muscle tissue. MSCs in co-culture with C2C12 cells or their conditioned medium (MSC-CM) up-regulated MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and function in the myoblastic cells; these effects were concomitant with the down-regulation of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and -2 and with increased cell motility. In the single muscle fiber experiments, MSC-CM administration increased MMP-2/9 expression in Pax-7 + satellite cells and stimulated their mobilization, differentiation and fusion. The anti-fibrotic properties of MSC-CM involved also the regulation of MMPs by skeletal fibroblasts and the inhibition of their differentiation into myofibroblasts. The treatment with SB-3CT, a potent MMP inhibitor, prevented in these cells, the decrease of α-smooth actin and type-I collagen expression induced by MSC-CM, suggesting that MSC-CM could attenuate the fibrogenic response through mechanisms mediated by MMPs. Our results indicate that growth factors and cytokines released by these cells may modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle repair/regeneration. - Highlights: • MSC-CM contains paracrine factors that up-regulate MMP expression and function in different skeletal muscle cells. • MSC-CM promotes myoblast and satellite cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. • MSC-CM negatively interferes with fibroblast-myoblast transition in primary skeletal fibroblasts. • Paracrine factors from MSCs modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle regeneration

  20. Defining the role of mesenchymal stromal cells on the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases in skeletal muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassoli, Chiara; Nosi, Daniele; Tani, Alessia; Chellini, Flaminia [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy); Mazzanti, Benedetta [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Haematology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy); Quercioli, Franco [CNR-National Institute of Optics (INO), Largo Enrico Fermi 6, 50125 Arcetri-Florence (Italy); Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy); Formigli, Lucia, E-mail: formigli@unifi.it [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies indicate that mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) transplantation improves healing of injured and diseased skeletal muscle, although the mechanisms of benefit are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated whether MSCs and/or their trophic factors were able to regulate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity in different cells of the muscle tissue. MSCs in co-culture with C2C12 cells or their conditioned medium (MSC-CM) up-regulated MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and function in the myoblastic cells; these effects were concomitant with the down-regulation of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and -2 and with increased cell motility. In the single muscle fiber experiments, MSC-CM administration increased MMP-2/9 expression in Pax-7{sup +} satellite cells and stimulated their mobilization, differentiation and fusion. The anti-fibrotic properties of MSC-CM involved also the regulation of MMPs by skeletal fibroblasts and the inhibition of their differentiation into myofibroblasts. The treatment with SB-3CT, a potent MMP inhibitor, prevented in these cells, the decrease of α-smooth actin and type-I collagen expression induced by MSC-CM, suggesting that MSC-CM could attenuate the fibrogenic response through mechanisms mediated by MMPs. Our results indicate that growth factors and cytokines released by these cells may modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle repair/regeneration. - Highlights: • MSC-CM contains paracrine factors that up-regulate MMP expression and function in different skeletal muscle cells. • MSC-CM promotes myoblast and satellite cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. • MSC-CM negatively interferes with fibroblast-myoblast transition in primary skeletal fibroblasts. • Paracrine factors from MSCs modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle regeneration.

  1. Stromal Adipocyte Enhancer-binding Protein (AEBP1) Promotes Mammary Epithelial Cell Hyperplasia via Proinflammatory and Hedgehog Signaling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Ryan W.; Bogachev, Oleg; Bharadwaj, Alamelu G.; McCluskey, Greg D.; Majdalawieh, Amin F.; Zhang, Lei; Ro, Hyo-Sung

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of mammary stromal-epithelial communication leads to aberrant mammary gland development and induces mammary tumorigenesis. Macrophages have been implicated in carcinogenesis primarily by creating an inflammatory microenvironment, which promotes growth of the adjacent epithelial cells. Adipocyte enhancer-binding protein 1 (AEBP1), a novel proinflammatory mediator, promotes macrophage inflammatory responsiveness by inducing NF-κB activity, which has been implicated in tumor cell growth and survival by aberrant sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression. Here, we show that stromal macrophage AEBP1 overexpression results in precocious alveologenesis in the virgin AEBP1 transgenic (AEBP1TG) mice, and the onset of ductal hyperplasia was accelerated in AEBP1TG mice fed a high fat diet, which induces endogenous AEBP1 expression. Transplantation of AEBP1TG bone marrow cells into non-transgenic (AEBP1NT) mice resulted in alveolar hyperplasia with up-regulation of NF-κB activity and TNFα expression as displayed in the AEBP1TG mammary macrophages and epithelium. Shh expression was induced in AEBP1TG macrophages and RAW264.7 macrophages overexpressing AEBP1. The Shh target genes Gli1 and Bmi1 expression was induced in the AEBP1TG mammary epithelium and HC11 mammary epithelial cells co-cultured with AEBP1TG peritoneal macrophages. The conditioned AEBP1TG macrophage culture media promoted NF-κB activity and survival signal, Akt activation, in HC11 cells, whereas such effects were abolished by TNFα neutralizing antibody treatment. Furthermore, HC11 cells displayed enhanced proliferation in response to AEBP1TG macrophages and their conditioned media. Our findings highlight the role of AEBP1 in the signaling pathways regulating the cross-talk between mammary epithelium and stroma that could predispose the mammary tissue to tumorigenesis. PMID:22995915

  2. Stromal adipocyte enhancer-binding protein (AEBP1) promotes mammary epithelial cell hyperplasia via proinflammatory and hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Ryan W; Bogachev, Oleg; Bharadwaj, Alamelu G; McCluskey, Greg D; Majdalawieh, Amin F; Zhang, Lei; Ro, Hyo-Sung

    2012-11-09

    Disruption of mammary stromal-epithelial communication leads to aberrant mammary gland development and induces mammary tumorigenesis. Macrophages have been implicated in carcinogenesis primarily by creating an inflammatory microenvironment, which promotes growth of the adjacent epithelial cells. Adipocyte enhancer-binding protein 1 (AEBP1), a novel proinflammatory mediator, promotes macrophage inflammatory responsiveness by inducing NF-κB activity, which has been implicated in tumor cell growth and survival by aberrant sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression. Here, we show that stromal macrophage AEBP1 overexpression results in precocious alveologenesis in the virgin AEBP1 transgenic (AEBP1(TG)) mice, and the onset of ductal hyperplasia was accelerated in AEBP1(TG) mice fed a high fat diet, which induces endogenous AEBP1 expression. Transplantation of AEBP1(TG) bone marrow cells into non-transgenic (AEBP1(NT)) mice resulted in alveolar hyperplasia with up-regulation of NF-κB activity and TNFα expression as displayed in the AEBP1(TG) mammary macrophages and epithelium. Shh expression was induced in AEBP1(TG) macrophages and RAW264.7 macrophages overexpressing AEBP1. The Shh target genes Gli1 and Bmi1 expression was induced in the AEBP1(TG) mammary epithelium and HC11 mammary epithelial cells co-cultured with AEBP1(TG) peritoneal macrophages. The conditioned AEBP1(TG) macrophage culture media promoted NF-κB activity and survival signal, Akt activation, in HC11 cells, whereas such effects were abolished by TNFα neutralizing antibody treatment. Furthermore, HC11 cells displayed enhanced proliferation in response to AEBP1(TG) macrophages and their conditioned media. Our findings highlight the role of AEBP1 in the signaling pathways regulating the cross-talk between mammary epithelium and stroma that could predispose the mammary tissue to tumorigenesis.

  3. Human platelet lysate supplementation of mesenchymal stromal cell delivery: issues of xenogenicity and species variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ashley B; Butts, Emily B; Copland, Ian B; Stevens, Hazel Y; Guldberg, Robert E

    2017-10-01

    Immunogenicity of fetal bovine serum (FBS) poses a problem for its use in the propagation of autologous mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) for cell therapy. Human platelet lysate (hPL), an enriched growth factor solution containing mitogenic and angiogenic cues, has potential utility in replacing FBS for human MSC (hMSC) delivery strategies. Despite its potentiation of hMSC number in vitro, little is known concerning its capacity to supplement implanted hMSC-seeded constructs and promote tissue regeneration in vivo. In this study, we tested the effects of incorporating hPL in cell-seeded constructs implanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised rats, investigated in vitro interactions between hPL and rat MSCs (rMSCs) and determined interspecies variability in the PL product [hPL vs rat PL (rPL)] and its effect on cultured MSCs (hPL/hMSCs vs rPL/rMSCs). The overarching aim was to determine the utility of hPL to foster MSC survival in preclinical rodent models. Exposure to hPL-supplemented media resulted in rMSC death, by a process attributable to heat-labile proteins, but not membrane attack complex formation. In the in vitro syngeneic model, the rodent product proved fundamentally distinct from the human product, with rPL having substantially lower growth factor content than hPL. Moreover, contrary to the positive effects of hPL on hMSC expansion, rPL did not reduce rMSC doubling time for the serum concentrations examined. When tested in vivo, hPL did not improve cell survival within hydrogel constructs through 2 weeks postimplantation. In summary, this study highlights the many facets of xenogenicity and interspecies variability that must be considered in the preclinical evaluation of hPL. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Human platelet lysate in mesenchymal stromal cell expansion according to a GMP grade protocol: a cell factory experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becherucci, Valentina; Piccini, Luisa; Casamassima, Serena; Bisin, Silvia; Gori, Valentina; Gentile, Francesca; Ceccantini, Riccardo; De Rienzo, Elena; Bindi, Barbara; Pavan, Paola; Cunial, Vanessa; Allegro, Elisa; Ermini, Stefano; Brugnolo, Francesca; Astori, Giuseppe; Bambi, Franco

    2018-05-02

    The use of platelet lysate (PL) for the ex-vivo expansion of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) was initially proposed by Doucet et al. in 2005, as an alternative to animal serum. Moreover, regulatory authorities discourage the use of fetal bovine serum (FBS) or other animal derivatives, to avoid risk of zoonoses and xenogeneic immune reactions. Even if many studies investigated PL composition, there still are some open issues related to its use in ex-vivo MSC expansion, especially according to good manufacturing practice (GMP) grade protocols. As an authorized cell factory, we report our experience using standardized PL produced by Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Meyer Transfusion Service for MSC expansion according to a GMP grade clinical protocol. As suggested by other authors, we performed an in-vitro test on MSCs versus MSCs cultured with FBS that still represents the best way to test PL batches. We compared 12 MSC batches cultured with DMEM 5% PL with similar batches cultured with DMEM 10% FBS, focusing on the MSC proliferation rate, MSC surface marker expression, MSC immunomodulatory and differentiation potential, and finally MSC relative telomere length. Results confirmed the literature data as PL increases cell proliferation without affecting the MSC immunophenotype, immunomodulatory potential, differentiation potential and relative telomere length. PL can be considered a safe alternative to FBS for ex-vivo expansion of MSC according to a GMP grade protocol. Our experience confirms the literature data: a large number of MSCs for clinical applications can be obtained by expansion with PL, without affecting the MSC main features. Our experience underlines the benefits of a close collaboration between the PL producers (transfusion service) and the end users (cell factory) in a synergy of skills and experiences that can lead to standardized PL production.

  5. Human mesenchymal stromal cell-secreted lactate induces M2-macrophage differentiation by metabolic reprogramming

    OpenAIRE

    Selleri, Silvia; Bifsha, Panojot; Civini, Sara; Pacelli, Consiglia; Dieng, Mame Massar; Lemieux, William; Jin, Ping; Bazin, Ren?e; Patey, Natacha; Marincola, Francesco M.; Moldovan, Florina; Zaouter, Charlotte; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Benabdhalla, Basma; Louis, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to dampen immune response and promote tissue repair, but the underlying mechanisms are still under investigation. Herein, we demonstrate that umbilical cord-derived MSC (UC-MSC) alter the phenotype and function of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) through lactate-mediated metabolic reprogramming. UC-MSC can secrete large quantities of lactate and, when present during monocyte-to-DC differentiation, induce instead the acquisition of M2-...

  6. Derivation of Insulin Producing Cells From Human Endometrial Stromal Stem Cells and Use in the Treatment of Murine Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Santamaria, Xavier; Massasa, Efi E; Feng, Yuzhe; Wolff, Erin; Taylor, Hugh S

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic islet cell transplantation is an effective approach to treat type 1 diabetes, however the shortage of cadaveric donors and limitations due to rejection require alternative solutions. Multipotent cells derived from the uterine endometrium have the ability to differentiate into mesodermal and ectodermal cellular lineages, suggesting the existence of mesenchymal stem cells in this tissue. We differentiated human endometrial stromal stem cells (ESSC) into insulin secreting cells using ...

  7. Genetically-modified pig mesenchymal stromal cells: xenoantigenicity and effect on human T-cell xenoresponses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Ezzelarab, Corin; Wilhite, Tyler; Kumar, Goutham; Hara, Hidetaka; Ayares, David; Cooper, David K C

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are being investigated as immunomodulatory therapy in the field of transplantation, particularly islet transplantation. While MSC can regenerate across species barriers, the immunoregulatory influence of genetically modified pig MSC (pMSC) on the human and non-human primate T-cell responses has not been studied. Mesenchymal stromal cells from wild-type (WT), α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene knockout (GTKO) and GTKO pigs transgenic for the human complement-regulatory protein CD46 (GTKO/CD46) were isolated and tested for differentiation. Antibody binding and T-cell responses to WT and GTKO pMSC in comparison with GTKO pig aortic endothelial cells (pAEC) were investigated. The expression of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class II (SLA II) was tested. Costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 mRNA levels were measured. Human T-cell proliferation and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to GTKO and GTKO/CD46 pMSC in comparison with human MSC (hMSC) were evaluated. α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene knockout and GTKO/CD46 pMSC isolation and differentiation were achieved in vitro. Binding of human antibodies and T-cell responses were lower to GTKO than those to WT pMSC. Human and baboon (naïve and sensitized) antibody binding were significantly lower to GTKO pMSC than to GTKO pAEC. Before activation, human CD4(+) T-cell response to GTKO pMSC was significantly weaker than that to GTKO pAEC, even after pIFN-γ activation. More than 99% of GTKO/CD46 pMSC expressed hCD46. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and CD4(+) T-cell responses to GTKO and GTKO/CD46 pMSC were comparable with those to hMSC, and all were significantly lower than to GTKO pAEC. GTKO/CD46 pMSC downregulated human T-cell proliferation as efficiently as hMSC. The level of proinflammatory cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and sCD40L correlated with the downregulation of T-cell proliferation by all types of MSC. Genetically modified pMSC is significantly less

  8. Endometrial Stromal Cells and Immune Cell Populations Within Lymph Nodes in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Endometriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazleabas, A. T.; Braundmeier, A. G.; Markham, R.; Fraser, I. S.; Berbic, M.

    2011-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that immunological responses may be altered in endometriosis. The baboon (Papio anubis) is generally considered the best model of endometriosis pathogenesis. The objective of the current study was to investigate for the first time immunological changes within uterine and peritoneal draining lymph nodes in a nonhuman primate baboon model of endometriosis. Paraffin-embedded femoral lymph nodes were obtained from 22 normally cycling female baboons (induced endometriosis n = 11; control n = 11). Immunohistochemical staining was performed with antibodies for endometrial stromal cells, T cells, immature and mature dendritic cells, and B cells. Lymph nodes were evaluated using an automated cellular imaging system. Endometrial stromal cells were significantly increased in lymph nodes from animals with induced endometriosis, compared to control animals (P = .033). In animals with induced endometriosis, some lymph node immune cell populations including T cells, dendritic cells and B cells were increased, suggesting an efficient early response or peritoneal drainage. PMID:21617251

  9. In vitro evaluation of alginate encapsulated adipose-tissue stromal cells for use as injectable bone graft substitute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbah, S.A.; Lu, W.W.; Chan, D.; Cheung, K.M.C.; Liu, W.G.; Zhao, F.; Li, Z.Y.; Leong, J.C.Y.; Luk, K.D.K.

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the survival and osteogenic behavior of murine-derived adipose-tissue stromal cells (ATSCs) encapsulated in alginate microcapsules thereby instigating further studies in this cell delivery strategy for in vivo osteogenesis. Cell viability was quantified using a tetrazolium-based assay and osteogenic differentiation was evaluated by both alkaline-phosphatase (ALP) histochemistry and osteocalcin mRNA analysis. Following microencapsulation, cell numbers increased from 3.9 x 10 3 on day 1 to 7.8 x 10 3 on day 7 and maintained excellent viability in the course of 21-day culture. ALP was 6.9, 5.5, and 3.2 times higher than monolayer cultures on days 7, 14, and 21, respectively. In addition, osteocalcin mRNA was detectable in encapsulated cultures earlier (day 14) than monolayer cultures. We conclude that alginate microcapsules can act as three-dimensional matrix for ATSC proliferation and has potential for use as injectable, biodegradable scaffold in bone tissue engineering

  10. Influence of chitosan-chitin nanofiber composites on cytoskeleton structure and the proliferation of rat bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiroshka, Victoria V; Petrova, Valentina A; Chernyakov, Daniil D; Bozhkova, Yulia O; Kiroshka, Katerina V; Baklagina, Yulia G; Romanov, Dmitry P; Kremnev, Roman V; Skorik, Yury A

    2017-01-01

    Chitosan scaffolds have gained much attention in various tissue engineering applications, but the effect of their microstructure on cell-material spatial interactions remains unclear. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of chitosan-based matrices doping with chitin nano-whiskers (CNW) on adhesion, spreading, cytoskeleton structure, and proliferation of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). The behavior of BMSCs during culture on chitosan-CNW films was determined by the molecular mass, hydrophobicity, porosity, crosslinking degree, protonation degree and molecular structure of the composite chitosan-CNW films. The shape, spreading area, cytoskeleton structure, and proliferation of BMSCs on chitosan matrices with a crystalline structure and high porosity were similar to that observed for BMSCs cultured on polystyrene tissue culture plates. The amorphous polymer structure and high swelling led to a decrease in the spreading area and cell proliferation. Thus, we can control the behavior of cells in culture (adhesion, spreading, and proliferation) by changing the physico-chemical properties of the chitosan-CNW films.

  11. CD117 expression in fibroblasts-like stromal cells indicates unfavorable clinical outcomes in ovarian carcinoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixia Huang

    Full Text Available The stem cell factor (SCF receptor CD117 (c-kit, is widely used for identification of hematopoietic stem cells and cancer stem cells. Moreover, CD117 expression in carcinoma cells indicates a poor prognosis in a variety of cancers. However the potential expression in tumor microenvironment and the biological and clinical impact are currently not reported. The expression of CD117 was immunohistochemically evaluated in a serial of 242 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC cases. Thirty-eight out of 242 cases were CD117 positive in fibroblast-like stromal cells and 22 cases were positive in EOC cells. Four cases were both positive in fibroblast-like stromal cells and EOC cells for CD117. CD117 expression in fibroblast-like stromal cells in ovarian carcinoma was closely linked to advanced FIGO stage, poor differentiation grade and histological subtype (p<0.05, and it was significantly associated with poor overall survival (OS and progression free survival (PFS (Kaplan-Meier analysis; p<0.05, log-rank test. CD117 expression in ovarian carcinoma cells was not associated with these clinicopathological variables. The CD117 positive fibroblast-like stromal cells were all positive for mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC marker CD73 but negative for fibroblast markers fibroblast activation protein (FAP and α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, indicating that the CD117+/CD73+ fibroblast-like stromal cells are a subtype of mesenchymal stem cells in tumor stroma, although further characterization of these cells are needed. It is concluded herewith that the presence of CD117+/CD73+ fibroblast-like stromal cells in ovarian carcinoma is an unfavorable clinical outcome indication.

  12. Pharmaceutical induction of ApoE secretion by multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney Mandolin J

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apolipoprotein E (ApoE is a molecular scavenger in the blood and brain. Aberrant function of the molecule causes formation of protein and lipid deposits or "plaques" that characterize Alzheimer's disease (AD and atherosclerosis. There are three human isoforms of ApoE designated ε2, ε3, and ε4. Each isoform differentially affects the structure and function of the protein and thus the development of disease. Homozygosity for ApoE ε4 is associated with atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease whereas ApoE ε2 and ε3 tend to be protective. Furthermore, the ε2 form may cause forms of hyperlipoproteinemia. Therefore, introduction of ApoE ε3 may be beneficial to patients that are susceptible to or suffering from these diseases. Mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are adult progenitor cells found in numerous tissues. They are easily expanded in culture and engraft into host tissues when administered appropriately. Furthermore, MSCs are immunosuppressive and have been reported to engraft as allogeneic transplants. In our previous study, mouse MSCs (mMSCs were implanted into the brains of ApoE null mice, resulting in production of small amounts of ApoE in the brain and attenuation of cognitive deficits. Therefore human MSCs (hMSCs are a promising vector for the administration of ApoE ε3 in humans. Results Unlike mMSCs, hMSCs were found not to express ApoE in culture; therefore a molecular screen was performed for compounds that induce expression. PPARγ agonists, neural stem cell conditioned medium, osteo-inductive media, dexamethasone, and adipo-inductive media (AIM were tested. Of the conditions tested, only AIM or dexamethasone induced sustained secretion of ApoE in MSCs and the duration of secretion was only limited by the length of time MSCs could be sustained in culture. Upon withdrawal of the inductive stimuli, the ApoE secretion persisted for a further 14 days. Conclusion The data

  13. Functional Imaging of Proteolysis: Stromal and Inflammatory Cells Increase Tumor Proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Sameni

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The underlying basement membrane is degraded during progression of breast and colon carcinoma. Thus, we imaged degradation of a quenched fluorescent derivative of basement membrane type IV collagen (DQ-collagen IV by living human breast and colon tumor spheroids. Proteolysis of DQ-collagen IV by HCT 116 and HKh-2 human colon tumor spheroids was both intracellular and pericellular. In contrast, proteolysis of DQ-collagen IV by BT20 human breast tumor spheroids was pericellular. As stromal elements can contribute to proteolytic activities associated with tumors, we also examined degradation of DQ-collagen IV by human monocytes/macrophages and colon and breast fibroblasts. Fibroblasts themselves exhibited a modest amount of pericellular degradation. Degradation was increased 4–17-fold in cocultures of fibroblasts and tumor cells as compared to either cell type alone. Inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases, plasmin, and the cysteine protease, cathepsin B, all reduced degradation in the cocultures. Monocytes did not degrade DQ-collagen IV; however, macrophages degraded DQ-collagen IV intracellularly. In coculture of tumor cells, fibroblasts, and macrophages, degradation of DQ-collagen IV was further increased. Imaging of living tumor and stromal cells has, thus, allowed us to establish that tumor proteolysis occurs pericellularly and intracellularly and that tumor, stromal, and inflammatory cells all contribute to degradative processes.

  14. Interleukin-1β modulates endochondral ossification by human adult bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mumme

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory cytokines present in the milieu of the fracture site are important modulators of bone healing. Here we investigated the effects of interleukin-1β (IL-1β on the main events of endochondral bone formation by human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSC, namely cell proliferation, differentiation and maturation/remodelling of the resulting hypertrophic cartilage. Low doses of IL-1β (50 pg/mL enhanced colony-forming units-fibroblastic (CFU-f and -osteoblastic (CFU-o number (up to 1.5-fold and size (1.2-fold in the absence of further supplements and glycosaminoglycan accumulation (1.4-fold upon BM-MSC chondrogenic induction. In osteogenically cultured BM-MSC, IL-1β enhanced calcium deposition (62.2-fold and BMP-2 mRNA expression by differential activation of NF-κB and ERK signalling. IL-1β-treatment of BM-MSC generated cartilage resulted in higher production of MMP-13 (14.0-fold in vitro, mirrored by an increased accumulation of the cryptic cleaved fragment of aggrecan, and more efficient cartilage remodelling/resorption after 5 weeks in vivo (i.e., more TRAP positive cells and bone marrow, less cartilaginous areas, resulting in the formation of mature bone and bone marrow after 12 weeks. In conclusion, IL-1β finely modulates early and late events of the endochondral bone formation by BM-MSC. Controlling the inflammatory environment could enhance the success of therapeutic approaches for the treatment of fractures by resident MSC and as well as improve the engineering of implantable tissues.

  15. Osteogenic potential of bone marrow stromal cells on smooth, roughened, and tricalcium phosphate-modified titanium alloy surfaces.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Colombo, John S

    2012-09-01

    This study investigated the influence of smooth, roughened, and tricalcium phosphate (TCP)-coated roughened titanium-aluminum-vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) surfaces on the osteogenic potential of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs).

  16. Morphological evaluation during in vitro chondrogenesis of dental pulp stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choo-Ryung Chung

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim was to confirm the stem cell-like properties of the dental pulp stromal cells and to evaluate the morphologic changes during in vitro chondrogenesis. Materials and Methods Stromal cells were outgrown from the dental pulp tissue of the premolars. Surface markers were investigated and cell proliferation rate was compared to other mesenchymal stem cells. Multipotency of the pulp cells was confirmed by inducing osteogenesis, adipogenesis and chondrogenesis. The morphologic changes in the chondrogenic pellet during the 21 day of induction were evaluated under light microscope and transmission electron microscope. TUNEL assay was used to evaluate apoptosis within the chondrogenic pellets. Results Pulp cells were CD90, 105 positive and CD31, 34 negative. They showed similar proliferation rate to other stem cells. Pulp cells differentiated to osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic tissues. During chondrogenesis, 3-dimensional pellet was created with multi-layers, hypertrophic chondrocyte-like cells and cartilage-like extracellular matrix. However, cell morphology became irregular and apoptotic cells were increased after 7 day of chondrogenic induction. Conclusions Pulp cells indicated mesenchymal stem cell-like characteristics. During the in vitro chondrogenesis, cellular activity was superior during the earlier phase (within 7 day of differentiation.

  17. Mammalian Cell Culture Simplified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A tissue culture experiment that does not require elaborate equipment and that can be used to teach sterile technique, the principles of animal cell line maintenance, and the concept of cell growth curves is described. The differences between cancerous and normal cells can be highlighted. The procedure is included. (KR)

  18. In Vitro Large Scale Production of Human Mature Red Blood Cells from Hematopoietic Stem Cells by Coculturing with Human Fetal Liver Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiafei Xi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro models of human erythropoiesis are useful in studying the mechanisms of erythroid differentiation in normal and pathological conditions. Here we describe an erythroid liquid culture system starting from cord blood derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. HSCs were cultured for more than 50 days in erythroid differentiation conditions and resulted in a more than 109-fold expansion within 50 days under optimal conditions. Homogeneous erythroid cells were characterized by cell morphology, flow cytometry, and hematopoietic colony assays. Furthermore, terminal erythroid maturation was improved by cosculturing with human fetal liver stromal cells. Cocultured erythroid cells underwent multiple maturation events, including decrease in size, increase in glycophorin A expression, and nuclear condensation. This process resulted in extrusion of the pycnotic nuclei in up to 80% of the cells. Importantly, they possessed the capacity to express the adult definitive β-globin chain upon further maturation. We also show that the oxygen equilibrium curves of the cord blood-differentiated red blood cells (RBCs are comparable to normal RBCs. The large number and purity of erythroid cells and RBCs produced from cord blood make this method useful for fundamental research in erythroid development, and they also provide a basis for future production of available RBCs for transfusion.

  19. Melanoma Cells Can Adopt the Phenotype of Stromal Fibroblasts and Macrophages by Spontaneous Cell Fusion in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemény, Lajos V; Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Jakab, Ádám; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B

    2016-06-02

    After the removal of primary cutaneous melanoma some patients develop local recurrences, even after having histologically tumor-free re-excision. A potential explanation behind this phenomenon is that tumor cells switch their phenotype, making their recognition via standard histopathological assessments extremely difficult. Tumor-stromal cell fusion has been proposed as a potential mechanism for tumor cells to acquire mesenchymal traits; therefore, we hypothesized that melanoma cells could acquire fibroblast- and macrophage-like phenotypes via cell fusion. We show that melanoma cells spontaneously fuse with human dermal fibroblasts and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. The hybrid cells' nuclei contain chromosomes from both parental cells and are indistinguishable from the parental fibroblasts or macrophages based on their morphology and immunophenotype, as they could lose the melanoma specific MART1 marker, but express the fibroblast marker smooth muscle actin or the macrophage marker CD68. Our results suggest that, by spontaneous cell fusion in vitro, tumor cells can adopt the morphology and immunophenotype of stromal cells while still carrying oncogenic, tumor-derived genetic information. Therefore, melanoma-stromal cell fusion might play a role in missing tumor cells by routine histopathological assessments.

  20. OP9-Lhx2 stromal cells facilitate derivation of hematopoietic progenitors both in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Generating engraftable hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs is an ideal approach for obtaining induced HSCs for cell therapy. However, the path from PSCs to robustly induced HSCs (iHSCs in vitro remains elusive. We hypothesize that the modification of hematopoietic niche cells by transcription factors facilitates the derivation of induced HSCs from PSCs. The Lhx2 transcription factor is expressed in fetal liver stromal cells but not in fetal blood cells. Knocking out Lhx2 leads to a fetal hematopoietic defect in a cell non-autonomous role. In this study, we demonstrate that the ectopic expression of Lhx2 in OP9 cells (OP9-Lhx2 accelerates the hematopoietic differentiation of PSCs. OP9-Lhx2 significantly increased the yields of hematopoietic progenitor cells via co-culture with PSCs in vitro. Interestingly, the co-injection of OP9-Lhx2 and PSCs into immune deficient mice also increased the proportion of hematopoietic progenitors via the formation of teratomas. The transplantation of phenotypic HSCs from OP9-Lhx2 teratomas but not from the OP9 control supported a transient repopulating capability. The upregulation of Apln gene by Lhx2 is correlated to the hematopoietic commitment property of OP9-Lhx2. Furthermore, the enforced expression of Apln in OP9 cells significantly increased the hematopoietic differentiation of PSCs. These results indicate that OP9-Lhx2 is a good cell line for regeneration of hematopoietic progenitors both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Mesenchymal stromal cells reverse hypoxia-mediated suppression of α-smooth muscle actin expression in human dermal fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulknor, Renea A.; Olekson, Melissa A.; Nativ, Nir I.; Ghodbane, Mehdi; Gray, Andrea J.; Berthiaume, François

    2015-01-01

    During wound healing, fibroblasts deposit extracellular matrix that guides angiogenesis and supports the migration and proliferation of cells that eventually form the scar. They also promote wound closure via differentiation into α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-expressing myofibroblasts, which cause wound contraction. Low oxygen tension typical of chronic nonhealing wounds inhibits fibroblast collagen production and differentiation. It has been suggested that hypoxic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) secrete factors that promote wound healing in animal models; however, it is unclear whether these factors are equally effective on the target cells in a hypoxic wound environment. Here we investigated the impact of MSC-derived soluble factors on the function of fibroblasts cultured in hypoxic fibroblast-populated collagen lattices (FPCLs). Hypoxia alone significantly decreased FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression. MSC-conditioned medium restored hypoxic FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression to levels similar to normoxic FPCLs. (SB431542), an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β 1 (TGF-β 1 )-mediated signaling, blocked most of the MSC effect on FPCL contraction, while exogenous TGF-β 1 at levels similar to that secreted by MSCs reproduced the MSC effect. These results suggest that TGF-β 1 is a major paracrine signal secreted by MSCs that can restore fibroblast functions relevant to the wound healing process and that are impaired in hypoxia. - Highlights: • Fibroblasts were cultured in collagen lattices (FPCLs) as model contracting wounds. • Hypoxia decreased FPCL contraction and fibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression. • Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) restored function of hypoxic fibroblasts. • MSCs regulate fibroblast function mainly via secreted transforming growth factor-β 1

  2. Mesenchymal stromal cells reverse hypoxia-mediated suppression of α-smooth muscle actin expression in human dermal fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulknor, Renea A.; Olekson, Melissa A.; Nativ, Nir I.; Ghodbane, Mehdi; Gray, Andrea J.; Berthiaume, François, E-mail: fberthia@rci.rutgers.edu

    2015-02-27

    During wound healing, fibroblasts deposit extracellular matrix that guides angiogenesis and supports the migration and proliferation of cells that eventually form the scar. They also promote wound closure via differentiation into α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-expressing myofibroblasts, which cause wound contraction. Low oxygen tension typical of chronic nonhealing wounds inhibits fibroblast collagen production and differentiation. It has been suggested that hypoxic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) secrete factors that promote wound healing in animal models; however, it is unclear whether these factors are equally effective on the target cells in a hypoxic wound environment. Here we investigated the impact of MSC-derived soluble factors on the function of fibroblasts cultured in hypoxic fibroblast-populated collagen lattices (FPCLs). Hypoxia alone significantly decreased FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression. MSC-conditioned medium restored hypoxic FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression to levels similar to normoxic FPCLs. (SB431542), an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β{sub 1} (TGF-β{sub 1})-mediated signaling, blocked most of the MSC effect on FPCL contraction, while exogenous TGF-β{sub 1} at levels similar to that secreted by MSCs reproduced the MSC effect. These results suggest that TGF-β{sub 1} is a major paracrine signal secreted by MSCs that can restore fibroblast functions relevant to the wound healing process and that are impaired in hypoxia. - Highlights: • Fibroblasts were cultured in collagen lattices (FPCLs) as model contracting wounds. • Hypoxia decreased FPCL contraction and fibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression. • Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) restored function of hypoxic fibroblasts. • MSCs regulate fibroblast function mainly via secreted transforming growth factor-β{sub 1}.

  3. Bacterial cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    ### Materials 1. Glass culture tubes with metal caps and labels - Growth medium, from media room or customized - Glass pipette tubes - Parafilm ### Equipment 1. Vortexer - Fireboy or Bunsen burner - Motorized pipette - Micropipettes and sterile tips ### Procedure For a typical liquid culture, use 5 ml of appropriate medium. The amount in each tube does not have to be exact if you are just trying to culture <