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Sample records for stroke type weekend

  1. Feasibility of a Nurse-Led Weekend Group Exercise Program for People after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Scrivener

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Additional physical activity including repetitive task practice can improve outcomes after stroke. The additional practice can be facilitated by therapists and family members or could also be delivered by nursing staff. Objective. To investigate the feasibility of a nurse-led weekend exercise program after stroke. Participants. Individuals after stroke, who participated in a weekend exercise program during their hospital admission. Methods. A retrospective audit of the number of referrals to and amount of exercise repetitions achieved in a nurse-led weekend exercise program was undertaken. The weekend exercise program occurs on each Saturday and Sunday for one hour. The repetitions of exercise completed during each class were documented by staff. An audit was conducted to ascertain the amount and type of exercise completed within the class. Results. During the study period 284 people were referred to the exercise program. The mean number of exercise repetitions completed per participant in each class was 180.7 (SD 205.4. The number of exercise repetitions completed by participants was highly variable ranging from 0 to 1190 per class. Conclusion. The amount of average exercise repetitions completed in the Weekend Warrior program was large but with significant variability. A nurse-led exercise class is a feasible method of delivering exercise opportunities to individuals in hospital after stroke.

  2. Differences in circadian phase and weekday/weekend sleep patterns in a sample of middle-aged morning types and evening types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, Sarah-Jane; Gander, Philippa H

    2016-01-01

    Factors contributing to sleep timing and sleep restriction in daily life include chronotype and less flexibility in times available for sleep on scheduled days versus free days. There is some evidence that these two factors interact, with morning types and evening types reporting similar sleep need, but evening types being more likely to accumulate a sleep debt during the week and to have greater sleep extension on weekend nights. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the independent contributions of circadian phase and weekend-to-weekday variability to sleep timing in daily life. The study included 14 morning types and 14 evening types recruited from a community-based sample of New Zealand adults (mean age 41.1 ± 4.7 years). On days 1-15, the participants followed their usual routines in their own homes and daily sleep start, midpoint and end times were determined by actigraphy and sleep diaries. Days 16-17 involved a 17 h modified constant routine protocol in the laboratory (17:00 to 10:00, morning types. Similarly on weekend days, evening types had later sleep start times (mean = 00:14 versus 23:07, p = .0032) and end times (mean = 08:56 versus 07:04, p morning types. Evening types also had later DLMO (22:06 versus 20:46, p = .0002) than morning types (mean difference = 80.4 min, SE = 18.6 min). The ANCOVA models found that later sleep start times were associated with later DLMO (p = .0172) and weekend-to-weekday sleep timing variability (p morning types and evening types, the estimated contributions of the DLMO to the mean observed differences in sleep timing were on weekdays, 39% for sleep start times and 49% for sleep end times; and on weekends, 41% for sleep start times and 34% of sleep end times. We conclude that differences in sleep timing between morning types and evening types were much greater than would be predicted on the basis of the independent contribution of the difference in DLMO on both weekdays and weekend days. The timing of sleep in

  3. Curvilinear associations of sleep patterns during weekdays and weekends with glycemic control in type 2 diabetes: the Hong Kong Diabetes Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Alice P S; Choi, Kai Chow; Zhang, Jihui; Luk, Andrea; Lam, Siu Ping; Chan, Michael H M; Ma, Ronald C W; Chan, Juliana C N; Wing, Yun Kwok

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to explore the associations of sleep patterns during weekdays and weekends with glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. We examined the association between indices of glycemic control [glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG)] and sleep parameters (sleep duration, bedtime, and differences of sleep duration during weekdays and weekends) from adults with type 2 diabetes recruited in a prospective cohort enrolling from hospital medical clinics. Restricted cubic spline regression was used to examine the relationships between the glycemic indices and sleep parameters. Excluding shift workers, a total of 3508 patients enrolled between July 2010 and July 2014 were included in this analysis. Mean age was 53.9 [standard deviation (SD) 8.7] years, and mean disease duration of diabetes was 8.3 (SD 7.1) years. Fifty-nine percentage were men. Mean sleep duration during weekdays and difference of sleep durations between weekdays and weekends were 7.7 (SD 1.3) hours and 0.6 (SD 1.2) hours, respectively. Mean HbA 1c and FPG were 7.6 (1.5) % and 7.6 (2.5) mmol/L, respectively. Using restricted cubic spline regressions with successive adjustments of potential confounders, sleep duration difference between weekdays and weekends remained significantly associated with both HbA 1c and FPG in a curvilinear manner. Sleep duration of about 1 h more during weekends when compared to weekdays was associated with beneficial effect in HbA 1c (-0.13 %, 95 % confidence interval -0.24 to -0.02). In type 2 diabetes, regular sleeping habit with modest sleep compensation during weekends has positive impact on glycemic control.

  4. Stroke Mortality, Clinical Presentation and Day of Arrival: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC Study

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    Emily C. O'Brien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent studies report that acute stroke patients who present to the hospital on weekends have higher rates of 28-day mortality than similar patients who arrive during the week. However, how this association is related to clinical presentation and stroke type has not been systematically investigated. Methods and Results. We examined the association between day of arrival and 28-day mortality in 929 validated stroke events in the ARIC cohort from 1987–2004. Weekend arrival was defined as any arrival time from midnight Friday until midnight Sunday. Mortality was defined as all-cause fatal events from the day of arrival through the 28th day of followup. The presence or absence of thirteen stroke signs and symptoms were obtained through medical record review for each event. Binomial logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (OR; 95% CI for the association between weekend arrival and 28-day mortality for all stroke events and for stroke subtypes. The overall risk of 28-day mortality was 9.6% for weekday strokes and 10.1% for weekend strokes. In models controlling for patient demographics, clinical risk factors, and event year, weekend arrival was not associated with 28-day mortality (0.87; 0.51, 1.50. When stratified by stroke type, weekend arrival was not associated with increased odds of mortality for ischemic (1.17, 0.62, 2.23 or hemorrhagic (0.37; 0.11, 1.26 stroke patients. Conclusions. Presence or absence of thirteen signs and symptoms was similar for weekday patients and weekend patients when stratified by stroke type. Weekend arrival was not associated with 28-day all-cause mortality or differences in symptom presentation for strokes in this cohort.

  5. Quality of life after stroke. Impact of stroke type and lesion location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, R. J.; Limburg, M.; van der Meulen, J. H.; Jacobs, H. M.; Aaronson, N. K.

    1995-01-01

    Little attention has been focused on the relationship between neurological lesions and quality of life (QL) in stroke research. The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of stroke types and lesion locations on QL. The study sample was composed of 441 stroke patients. Lesion locations and

  6. Impact of stroke type on survival and functional health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straten, A.; Reitsma, J. B.; Limburg, M.; van den Bos, G. A.; de Haan, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    In a cohort 760 consecutive stroke patients (23 hospitals in the Netherlands), we studied prognosis in relation to stroke type and focused on (a) short-term and long-term mortality, and (b) long-term functional health. Based on clinical and CT data, we distinguished infratentorial strokes from

  7. Incidence and types of sleep disorders in patients with stroke.

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    Pasic, Zejneba; Smajlovic, Dzevdet; Dostovic, Zikrija; Kojic, Biljana; Selmanovic, Senada

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disorders (SD) after stroke (stroke) are common occurrences, and most often in sleep apnea, insomnia and daytime sleepiness. GOALS. Research goals were to determine the types of SD and their frequency in patients with stroke in relation to the type of stroke and side of lesion. The study analyzed 200 patients with acute stroke hospitalized in the Clinic of Neurology, University Clinical Centre Tuzla in the period from 1st August 2007 to 1st June 2008. All patients have confirmed the existence of stroke by computerized tomography. SD was verified according to the General Curriculum of sleep, the Berlin questionnaire and Epvort scale. Stroke, by type, were divided into hemorrhagic and ischemic, and the localization of the stroke to right and left cerebral hemispheres. Of the total number of respondents, 78% had SD. Very serious level of SD had 42% of respondents, 20% moderate, and 16% of medium-severe degree. There was no statistically significant differences in the frequency of SD among patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke (76.8%: 82.5%, p = 0.58). In relation to the side of lesion there was more patient with SD and stroke in the right cerebral hemisphere, but there were no statistically significant differences (39.5%: 33%, p = 0.1). According Epvort scale sleep apnea and snoring was present in 86%, daytime sleepiness in 49.5% and narcolepsy 0.5%. Sleep disturbance as a neuropsychological disorder has a significant incidence in the acute phase of stroke. SD is slightly more common in hemorrhagic stroke and stroke in the right hemisphere. Sleep Apnea and snoring are the most common types of SD in patients with stroke.

  8. The Weekend Intervention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Harvey A.

    The Weekend Intervention Program (WIP) at the Wright State University School of Medicine is described in this report. Designed to address severe health and social problems while supporting the university's academic mission, the program began with the goal of addressing the health and social problems of alcohol abusers. WIP is a 72-hour intensive…

  9. A Mobitz type II atrioventricular block in multicentric ischemic stroke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cardiac and cerebrovascular illnesses are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Thromboembolisms, which are the result of cardiac arrhythmia, are important causes of ischemic stroke. In this study, we present a rare case of multicentric ischemic stroke induced by Mobitz type II atrioventricular block. The Pan African ...

  10. Demographic Characteristics of Strokes Types in Sanliurfa

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    Yusuf Ižnanc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Sanliurfa training and research hospital for diagnosis and treatment of patients with stroke admitted demographic features planned. We aimed to study demographic feature of stroke patient who admitted to Sanliurfa training and research hospital for diagnosis and treatment. Material and Method: 01/10/2011 and 01/9/2012, ischemic and hemorrhagic brain training and research hospital in Sanliurfa vascular disease diagnosis and treatment without any exclusion criteria, patient sequential 454 retrospectively.Results: 366%u2019si 88 were ischemic, hemorrhagic stroke. 54.6% by sex male,% 45.4 were women. Average age: 67.86 di.56.3% radiologically roaming the front circulation infarct brain infarct% found the rear 23.2. Hospital stay duration: 9.27 day.. Hemorrhagic stroke was longer this Sura in the group. Mortality rate 4.6% in all in packaging (21 patients, ischemic in boots in 1.9% (7 patients, hemorrhagic of boots were found at 15.9% (14 patients.Discussion: our study of Sanliurfa province stroke data in terms of the region together, although a portion of their valuable results. In the summer, the ischemic stroke incidence is higher.

  11. tDCS and Robotics on Upper Limb Stroke Rehabilitation: Effect Modification by Stroke Duration and Type of Stroke

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    Sofia Straudi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this exploratory pilot study is to test the effects of bilateral tDCS combined with upper extremity robot-assisted therapy (RAT on stroke survivors. Methods. We enrolled 23 subjects who were allocated to 2 groups: RAT + real tDCS and RAT + sham-tDCS. Each patient underwent 10 sessions (5 sessions/week over two weeks. Outcome measures were collected before and after treatment: (i Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity (FMA-UE, (ii Box and Block Test (BBT, and (iii Motor Activity Log (MAL. Results. Both groups reported a significant improvement in FMA-UE score after treatment (p<0.01. No significant between-groups differences were found in motor function. However, when the analysis was adjusted for stroke type and duration, a significant interaction effect (p<0.05 was detected, showing that stroke duration (acute versus chronic and type (cortical versus subcortical modify the effect of tDCS and robotics on motor function. Patients with chronic and subcortical stroke benefited more from the treatments than patients with acute and cortical stroke, who presented very small changes. Conclusion. The additional use of bilateral tDCS to RAT seems to have a significant beneficial effect depending on the duration and type of stroke. These results should be verified by additional confirmatory studies.

  12. ABO Blood Type and Stroke Risk: The REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study

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    Zakai, Neil A.; Judd, Suzanne E.; Alexander, Kristine; McClure, Leslie A.; Kissela, Brett M.; Howard, George; Cushman, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background ABO blood type is an inherited trait associated with coagulation factor levels and vascular outcomes. Objectives To assess the association of blood type with stroke and whether blood type contributes to racial disparities in stroke in the United States. Patients and Methods The REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study recruited 30,239 participants between 2003-07. Using a case-cohort design, blood type was genotyped in 646 participants with stroke and a 1,104 participant cohort random sample. Cox models adjusting for Framingham stroke risk factors assessed the association of blood type with stroke. Results Over 5.8 years of follow-up, blood types A or B versus type O were not associated with stroke. Blood type AB versus O was associated with an increased risk of stroke (adjusted HR 1.83; 95% CI 1.01, 3.30). The association of blood type AB versus O was greater in those without diabetes (adjusted HR 3.33; 95% CI 1.61, 6.88) than those with diabetes (adjusted HR 0.49; 95% CI 0.17, 1.44) (p-interaction = 0.02). Factor VIII levels accounted for 60% (95% CI 11%, 98%) of the association of AB blood type and stroke risk. Conclusion Blood type AB is associated with an increased risk of stroke that is not attenuated by conventional stroke risk factors and factor VIII levels were associated with 60% of the association. While blood type AB is rare in the U.S. population, it is a significant stroke risk factor and may play an important role in stroke risk in these individuals. PMID:24444093

  13. Stroke Treatments

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    ... Month Infographic Stroke Hero F.A.S.T. Quiz Stroke Treatment Stroke used to rank fourth in leading causes of ... type of treatment depends on the type of stroke. Ischemic stroke happens when a clot blocks a ...

  14. Social Network Types and Acute Stroke Preparedness Behavior

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    Bernadette Boden-Albala

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Presence of informal social networks has been associated with favorable health and behaviors, but whether different types of social networks impact on different health outcomes remains largely unknown. We examined the associations of different social network types (marital dyad, household, friendship, and informal community networks with acute stroke preparedness behavior. We hypothesized that marital dyad best matched the required tasks and is the most effective network type for this behavior. Methods: We collected in-person interview and medical record data for 1,077 adults diagnosed with stroke and transient ischemic attack. We used logistic regression analyses to examine the association of each social network with arrival at the emergency department (ED within 3 h of stroke symptoms. Results: Adjusting for age, race-ethnicity, education, gender, transportation type to ED and vascular diagnosis, being married or living with a partner was significantly associated with early arrival at the ED (odds ratio = 2.0, 95% confidence interval: 1.2–3.1, but no significant univariate or multivariate associations were observed for household, friendship, and community networks. Conclusions: The marital/partnership dyad is the most influential type of social network for stroke preparedness behavior.

  15. tDCS and Robotics on Upper Limb Stroke Rehabilitation: Effect Modification by Stroke Duration and Type of Stroke.

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    Straudi, Sofia; Fregni, Felipe; Martinuzzi, Carlotta; Pavarelli, Claudia; Salvioli, Stefano; Basaglia, Nino

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this exploratory pilot study is to test the effects of bilateral tDCS combined with upper extremity robot-assisted therapy (RAT) on stroke survivors. Methods. We enrolled 23 subjects who were allocated to 2 groups: RAT + real tDCS and RAT + sham-tDCS. Each patient underwent 10 sessions (5 sessions/week) over two weeks. Outcome measures were collected before and after treatment: (i) Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity (FMA-UE), (ii) Box and Block Test (BBT), and (iii) Motor Activity Log (MAL). Results. Both groups reported a significant improvement in FMA-UE score after treatment (p robotics on motor function. Patients with chronic and subcortical stroke benefited more from the treatments than patients with acute and cortical stroke, who presented very small changes. Conclusion. The additional use of bilateral tDCS to RAT seems to have a significant beneficial effect depending on the duration and type of stroke. These results should be verified by additional confirmatory studies.

  16. Weather types and strokes in the Augsburg region (Southern Germany)

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    Beck, Christoph; Ertl, Michael; Giemsa, Esther; Jacobeit, Jucundus; Naumann, Markus; Seubert, Stefanie

    2017-04-01

    Strokes are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide and the main reason for longterm care dependency in Germany. Concerning the economical impact on patients and healthcare systems it is of particular importance to prevent this disease as well as to improve the outcome of the affected persons. Beside the primary well-known risk factors like hypertension, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity and others, also weather seems to have pronounced influence on the occurrence and frequency of strokes. Previous studies most often focused on effects of singular meteorological variables like ambient air temperature, air pressure or humidity. An advanced approach is to link the entire suite of daily weather elements classified to air mass- or weather types to cerebrovascular morbidity or mortality. In a joint pilot study bringing together climatologists, environmental scientists and physicians from the University of Augsburg and the clinical centre Augsburg, we analysed relationships between singular meteorological parameters as well as combined weather effects (e.g. weather types) and strokes in the urban area of Augsburg and the surrounding rural region. A total of 17.501 stroke admissions to Neurological Clinic and Clinical Neurophysiology at Klinikum Augsburg between 2006 and 2015 are classified to either "ischaemic" (16.354) or "haemorrhagic" (1.147) subtype according to etiology (based on the International Classification of Diseases - 10th Revision). Spearman correlations between daily frequencies of ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes and singular atmospheric parameters (T, Tmin, Tmax, air pressure, humidity etc.) measured at the DWD (German weather service) meteorological station at Augsburg Muehlhausen are rather low. However, higher correlations are achieved when considering sub-samples of "homogenous weather conditions" derived from synoptic circulation classifications: e.g. within almost all of 10 types arising from a classification of

  17. Pathological Sub-Types, Risk Factors And Outcome Of Stroke At The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seventy five patients (93.8%) were discharged and four (5%) died in hospital. All patients who died had anterior circulation ischaemic stroke as per Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification. Conclusion: Ischaemic stroke is the most common pathological sub-type observed in this study.

  18. Patient and Process Factors Associated With Type of First Neuroimaging and Delayed Diagnosis in Childhood Arterial Ischemic Stroke.

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    Daverio, Marco; Bressan, Silvia; Gregori, Dario; Babl, Franz E; Mackay, Mark T

    2016-09-01

    In-hospital factors contribute more to delayed diagnosis of childhood arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) than prehospital factors. We aimed to explore process and patient factors associated with type of and timing to neuroimaging in childhood AIS in the emergency department (ED). This was a retrospective hospital registry-based study of children with AIS, presenting to an Australian tertiary pediatric ED between January 2003 and December 2012. Neuroimaging data and timelines of care were also collected from referring hospitals for transferred patients. Seventy-one AIS episodes and 19 transient ischemic attacks were recorded. The majority (56%) were initially seen at a referring hospital. Patients underwent computed tomography (CT) as first scan more frequently than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as first scan (61% vs. 32%) at both the referring and the tertiary hospitals. Time to first scan as CT was significantly shorter compared with MRI (median = 1.5 hours vs. 10.9 hours, p first presenting to a referring hospital and those directly accessing the tertiary center. Patient characteristics including age, past medical history, conscious state, focal symptoms, and signs on arrival were not associated with the type of first neuroimaging or time to diagnostic MRI. Patients presenting during weekends were less likely to receive an MRI as first scan (odds ratio [OR] = 0.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.1-0.8), while time to MRI was significantly longer for children presenting after hours (5 pm-8 am; median = 17.6 hours vs. 8.4 hours, p = 0.026). MRI overall and as first scan was associated with a higher use of sedation than CT (OR = 6.5, 95% CI = 1.3-32.9; and OR = 3.9, 95% CI = 1.3-11.8), particularly for children younger than 5 years of age (OR = 12.5, 95% CI = 3-52.4). Strategies to improve rapid diagnosis of pediatric stroke should include shared regional hospital networks protocols to optimize local imaging strategies and where possible rapid transfer to the

  19. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: WHITSUNTIDE WEEKEND

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Details of the arrangements to ensure the provision of a restaurant service during the Whitsuntide weekend are given below. On all the days indicated, hot meals will be served from 11h30 to 14h00 and 18h00 to 19h30. DATE RESTAURANT No. Opening times Saturday, June 7 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 and 3 closed Sunday, June 8 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 and 3 closed Monday, June 9 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 and 3 closed SATELLITE CAFETERIAS (Bldgs. 30, 40, 54) and the KIOSK will be closed on 7, 8 and 9 June.

  20. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adjust your treatment as needed. Rehabilitation After a stroke, you may need rehabilitation (rehab) to help you recover. Rehab may include working with speech, physical, and occupational therapists. Language, ... may have trouble communicating after a stroke. You may not be able to find the ...

  1. Risk of Stroke with Various Types of Menopausal Hormone Therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen; Nielsen, Lars Hougaard; Keiding, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Double-blind randomized studies on the effects of oral postmenopausal hormone therapies were stopped mainly because of increased risk of stroke. We aimed to assess the risk of all strokes and various subtypes associated with hormone therapy and explore the influence of reg...

  2. Long-Term Risk of Stroke in Patients With Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Following Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Thomas; Holzmann, Martin J; Sartipy, Ulrik

    2015-11-09

    We performed a nationwide population-based cohort study to investigate the long-term risk of stroke after coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. All patients who underwent primary coronary artery bypass grafting in Sweden from 2000 through 2011 were included from the SWEDEHEART register. We excluded patients with prior stroke, and patients who had a stroke or died within 30 days of surgery. The National Diabetes Register was used to identify patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Incident stroke (ischemic and hemorrhagic), and all-cause mortality was obtained by record linkage with the National Patient Register and the Cause of Death register. We used multivariable Cox regression to estimate the risk of stroke in relation to type of diabetes. A total of 53 820 patients (type 1 diabetes [n=714], type 2 diabetes [n=10 054], no diabetes [n=43 052]) were included. During a mean follow-up of 7.4 years (398 337 person-years), in total, 8.0% (n=4296) of the patients had a stroke: 7.3% (n=52) in patients with type 1 diabetes, 9.1% (n=915) in patients with type 2 diabetes, and 7.7% (n=3329) in patients with no diabetes. The multivariable adjusted hazard ratio (95% CI) for all stroke was 1.59 (1.20-2.11) in type 1 diabetes, and 1.32 (1.23-1.43) in type 2 diabetes. The long-term risk for stroke after coronary artery bypass grafting was increased in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, compared to patients with no diabetes. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  3. Unrealistic pessimism about risk of coronary heart disease and stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asimakopoulou, Koula G.; Skinner, T. Chas; Spimpolo, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Objective: We examined the accuracy of type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients' risk estimates of developing coronary heart disease (CHD)/having a stroke as a consequence of diabetes and their mood about these risks. Methods: Patients reported their perceived risks of developing CHD/having a stroke...... disease risk and mood was also seen where higher risk of actual and perceived CHD/stroke was related to worse mood. A positive relationship between mood and extent of perceptual error was further observed; the more inaccurate patients' perceptions of CHD/stroke risk were, the better their mood. Mood...... and rated their mood about these risks using a self-report measure. Using an objective risk calculator, they were then told their actual risk of CHD and stroke and their mood was re-assessed. Results: Patients' estimates of their risk of CHD/stroke were grossly inflated. A negative relationship between...

  4. Demographic Characteristics of Stroke Types in Adıyaman

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    Yaşar Altun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to investigate the etiologic, demographic, clinical features, and risk factors of patients who were hospitalized, followed up, and treated due to stroke in our hospital. Materials and Methods: In this study, the hospital records of patients diagnosed as having stroke or cerebrovascular disease (CVD between January 2013 and January 2015 in Adıyaman University Training and Research Hospital, where patients with stroke are frequently admitted or transferred, were retrospectively investigated. Results: In the past two years, 683 patients were followed-up or treated for stroke and CVD in our hospital. Stroke patients constituted 0.06% of all emergency admissions. Of these patients, 87.8% were diagnosed as having ischemic stroke and 8.6% were diagnosed as having hemorrhagic stroke. The sex distribution was almost equal (50.8% were males and 49.2% were females. Based on the results of brain scans performed during admission, radiologically, 498 (81.1% patients showed evidence of anterior system involvement and 116 (18.9% patients showed evidence of posterior system involvement. No focal areas were observed in computed tomography scans in 508 patients. However, diffusion magnetic resonance findings of these 508 patients were pathologic. Most of the patients with stroke were aged above 65 years (74.9%. The most common symptom during admission was unilateral muscle weakness (63.3%, and 58.6% of the patients were brought to the hospital by ambulance. Conclusion: As well as the results of our study being parallel to previous studies, our study also reflects the majority of stroke data in Adıyaman, Turkey, and provides significant results regarding our geographic region

  5. Auckland Stroke Outcomes Study. Part 1: Gender, stroke types, ethnicity, and functional outcomes 5 years poststroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigin, V L; Barker-Collo, S; Parag, V; Senior, H; Lawes, C M M; Ratnasabapathy, Y; Glen, E

    2010-11-02

    Studying long-term stroke outcomes including body functioning (neurologic and neuropsychological impairments) and activity limitations and participation is essential for long-term evidence-based rehabilitation and service planning, resource allocation, and improving health outcomes in stroke. However, reliable data to address these issues is lacking. This study (February 2007-December 2008) sourced its participants from the population-based incidence study conducted in Auckland in 2002-2003. Participants completed structured self-administered questionnaires, and a face-to-face interview including a battery of neuropsychological tests. Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze associations between and within functional outcomes and their potential predictors. Of 418 5-year stroke survivors, two-thirds had good functional outcome in terms of neurologic impairment and disability (defined as modified Rankin Score <3), 22.5% had cognitive impairment indicative of dementia, 20% had experienced a recurrent stroke, almost 15% were institutionalized, and 29.6% had symptoms suggesting depression. Highly significant correlations were found between and within various measurements of body functioning (especially neuropsychological impairments), activity, and participation. Age, dependency, and depression were independently associated with most outcomes analyzed. The strong associations between neuropsychological impairment and other functional outcomes and across various measurements of body functioning, activity, and participation justify utilizing a multidisciplinary approach to studying and managing long-term stroke outcomes. Observed gender and ethnic differences in some important stroke outcomes warrant further investigations.

  6. Stroke Risk among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Zhejiang: A Population-Based Prospective Study in China

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    Lihua Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to explore the incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM based on the long-term surveillance data in Zhejiang, China, during 2007 to 2013. Materials and Methods. During January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2013, a total of 327,268 T2DM and 307,984 stroke patients were registered on Diabetes and Stroke Surveillance System, respectively. Stroke subtypes were classified according to standard definitions of subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, and ischemic stroke. The incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes was calculated by standardized incidence ratio (SIRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs compared with general population. Results. The incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes among patients with T2DM was significantly higher than in general population. Stroke risk was found significantly increased with an SIR of 3.87 (95% CI 3.76–3.99 and 3.38 (95% CI 3.27–3.48 in females and males, respectively. The excess risk of stroke was mainly attributable to the significantly higher risk of cerebral infarctions with the risk for T2DM being four times that for general population. Conclusions. The relationship between stroke and T2DM was strong, especially in female. The incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes among patients with T2DM was up to 3-fold higher than in general population in Zhejiang province, especially the subtype of cerebral infarctions.

  7. Debunking Two Myths of the Weekend Effect

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    Foong Soon Cheong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper finds the weekend effect to be a remarkably robust anomaly and refutes the widespread belief that the weekend effect is due to data-mining or a consequence of some unusual/rare events. Out-of-sample analysis finds both the mean and median return on Monday is lower than that on Friday in nearly all years. It also reconciles and explains how some prior studies reached such an erroneous conclusion.

  8. Incremental Adaptive Fuzzy Control for Sensorless Stroke Control of A Halbach-type Linear Oscillatory Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Meizhen; Wang, Liqiang

    2018-01-01

    The halbach-type linear oscillatory motor (HT-LOM) is multi-variable, highly coupled, nonlinear and uncertain, and difficult to get a satisfied result by conventional PID control. An incremental adaptive fuzzy controller (IAFC) for stroke tracking was presented, which combined the merits of PID control, the fuzzy inference mechanism and the adaptive algorithm. The integral-operation is added to the conventional fuzzy control algorithm. The fuzzy scale factor can be online tuned according to the load force and stroke command. The simulation results indicate that the proposed control scheme can achieve satisfied stroke tracking performance and is robust with respect to parameter variations and external disturbance.

  9. Cell Treatment for Stroke in Type Two Diabetic Rats Improves Vascular Permeability Measured by MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangliang Ding

    Full Text Available Treatment of stroke with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC significantly enhances brain remodeling and improves neurological function in non-diabetic stroke rats. Diabetes is a major risk factor for stroke and induces neurovascular changes which may impact stroke therapy. Thus, it is necessary to test our hypothesis that the treatment of stroke with BMSC has therapeutic efficacy in the most common form of diabetes, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. T2DM was induced in adult male Wistar rats by administration of a high fat diet in combination with a single intraperitoneal injection (35mg/kg of streptozotocin. These rats were then subjected to 2h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo. T2DM rats received BMSC (5x106, n = 8 or an equal volume of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS (n = 8 via tail-vein injection at 3 days after MCAo. MRI was performed one day and then weekly for 5 weeks post MCAo for all rats. Compared with vehicle treated control T2DM rats, BMSC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats significantly (p<0.05 decreased blood-brain barrier disruption starting at 1 week post stroke measured using contrast enhanced T1-weighted imaging with gadopentetate, and reduced cerebral hemorrhagic spots starting at 3 weeks post stroke measured using susceptibility weighted imaging, although BMSC treatment did not reduce the ischemic lesion volumes as demarcated by T2 maps. These MRI measurements were consistent with histological data. Thus, BMSC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats initiated at 3 days after stroke significantly reduced ischemic vascular damage, although BMSC treatment did not change infarction volume in T2DM rats, measured by MRI.

  10. Small-animal PET imaging of the type 1 and type 2 cannabinoid receptors in a photothrombotic stroke model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandeputte, Caroline; Casteels, Cindy; Koole, Michel; Gerits, Anneleen [KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); Struys, Tom [Hasselt University, Laboratory of Histology, Biomedical Research Institute, Hasselt (Belgium); KU Leuven, Biomedical NMR Unit, Leuven (Belgium); Veghel, Daisy van; Evens, Nele; Bormans, Guy [KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Laboratory of Radiopharmacy, Leuven (Belgium); Dresselaers, Tom; Himmelreich, Uwe [KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Biomedical NMR Unit, Leuven (Belgium); Lambrichts, Ivo [Hasselt University, Laboratory of Histology, Biomedical Research Institute, Hasselt (Belgium); Laere, Koen van [KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); UZ Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium)

    2012-11-15

    Recent ex vivo and pharmacological evidence suggests involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology of stroke, but conflicting roles for type 1 and 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}) have been suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2} receptor binding over time in vivo in a rat photothrombotic stroke model using PET. CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2} microPET imaging was performed at regular time-points up to 2 weeks after stroke using [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 and [{sup 11}C]NE40. Stroke size was measured using MRI at 9.4 T. Ex vivo validation was performed via immunostaining for CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}. Immunofluorescent double stainings were also performed with markers for astrocytes (GFAP) and macrophages/microglia (CD68). [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 PET showed a strong increase in CB{sub 1} binding 24 h and 72 h after stroke in the cortex surrounding the lesion, extending to the insular cortex 24 h after surgery. These alterations were consistently confirmed by CB{sub 1} immunohistochemical staining. [{sup 11}C]NE40 did not show any significant differences between stroke and sham-operated animals, although staining for CB{sub 2} revealed minor immunoreactivity at 1 and 2 weeks after stroke in this model. Both CB{sub 1} {sup +} and CB{sub 2} {sup +} cells showed minor immunoreactivity for CD68. Time-dependent and regionally strongly increased CB{sub 1}, but not CB{sub 2}, binding are early consequences of photothrombotic stroke. Pharmacological interventions should primarily aim at CB{sub 1} signalling as the role of CB{sub 2} seems minor in the acute and subacute phases of stroke. (orig.)

  11. Neurorestorative Therapy of Stroke in Type two Diabetes Rats Treated with Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tao; Venkat, Poornima; Chopp, Michael; Zacharek, Alex; Ning, Ruizhuo; Cui, Yisheng; Roberts, Cynthia; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Sanberg, Cyndy Davis; Chen, Jieli

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Diabetes mellitus is a high risk factor for ischemic stroke. Diabetic stroke patients suffer worse outcomes, poor long term recovery, risk of recurrent strokes and extensive vascular damage. We investigated the neurorestorative effects and the underlying mechanisms of stroke treatment with human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs) in Type two diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rats. Methods Adult male T2DM rats were subjected to 2 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Three days after MCAo, rats were treated via tail-vein injection with: 1) phosphate-buffered-saline (PBS); 2) HUCBCs (5×106); n=10/group. Results HUCBC stroke treatment initiated 3 days after MCAo in T2DM rats did not significantly decrease blood-brain-barrier (BBB) leakage (p=0.1) and lesion volume (p=0.078), but significantly improved long term functional outcome and decreased brain hemorrhage (ptreatment significantly promoted white matter (WM) remodeling as indicated by increased expression of Bielschowsky silver (axons marker), Luxol fast blue (myelin marker), SMI-31 (neurofilament) and Synaptophysin in the ischemic border zone (IBZ). HUCBC promoted vascular remodeling, and significantly increased arterial and vascular density. HUCBC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats significantly increased M2 macrophage polarization (increased M2 macrophage CD163, CD 206; decreased M1 macrophage ED1 and iNOS expression) in the ischemic brain compared to PBS-treated T2DM-MCAo controls (ptreatment initiated 3 days after stroke significantly increased WM and vascular remodeling in the ischemic brain as well as decreased neuroinflammatory factor expression in the ischemic brain in T2DM rats and promoted M2 macrophage polarization. HUCBC reduction of neuroinflammation and increased vascular and WM-axonal remodeling may contribute to the HUCBC induced beneficial effects in T2DM stroke rats. PMID:26243222

  12. Sulfonylureas Improve Outcome in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunte, Hagen; Schmidt, Sein; Eliasziw, Michael; del Zoppo, Gregory J.; Simard, J. Marc; Masuhr, Florian; Weih, Markus; Dirnagl, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose The sulfonylurea receptor 1-regulated NCCa-ATP channel is upregulated in rodent models of stroke with block of the channel by the sulfonylurea, glibenclamide (glyburide), significantly reducing mortality, cerebral edema, and infarct volume. We hypothesized that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus taking sulfonylurea agents both at the time of stroke and during hospitalization would have superior outcomes. Methods We reviewed medical records of patients with diabetes mellitus hospitalized within 24 hours of onset of acute ischemic stroke in the Neurology Clinic, Charité Hospital, Berlin, Germany, during 1994 to 2000. After exclusions, the cohort comprised 33 patients taking a sulfonylurea at admission through discharge (treatment group) and 28 patients not on a sulfonylurea (control group). The primary outcome was a decrease in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale of 4 points or more from admission to discharge or a discharge National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 0. The secondary outcome was a discharge modified Rankin Scale score ≤2. Results No significant differences, other than stroke subtype, were observed among baseline variables between control and treatment groups. The primary outcome was reached by 36.4% of patients in the treatment group and 7.1% in the control group (P=0.007). The secondary outcome was reached by 81.8% versus 57.1% (P=0.035). Subgroup analyses showed that improvements occurred only in patients with nonlacunar strokes and were independent of gender, previous transient ischemic attack, and blood glucose levels. Conclusion Sulfonylureas may be beneficial for patients with diabetes mellitus with acute ischemic stroke. Further investigation of similar cohorts and a prospective randomized trial are recommended to confirm the present observations. PMID:17673715

  13. Stroke Incidence by Major Pathological Type and Ischemic Subtypes in the Auckland Regional Community Stroke Studies: Changes Between 2002 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthi, Rita V; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Parag, Varsha; Parmar, Priyakumari; Witt, Emma; Jones, Amy; Mahon, Susan; Anderson, Craig S; Barber, P Alan; Feigin, Valery L

    2018-01-01

    Major pathological stroke types (ischemic stroke [IS], primary intracerebral hemorrhage [ICH], and subarachnoid hemorrhage) and IS subtypes, have differing risk factors, management, and prognosis. We report changes in major stroke types and IS subtypes incidence during 10 years using data from the ARCOS (Auckland Regional Community Stroke Study) III performed during 12 months in 2002 to 2003 and the fourth ARCOS study (ARCOS-IV) performed in 2011 to 2012. ARCOS-III and ARCOS-IV were population-based registers of all new strokes in the greater Auckland region (population aged >15 years, 1 119 192). Strokes were classified into major pathological types (IS, ICH, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and undetermined type). Crude annual age-, sex-, and ethnic-specific stroke incidence with 95% confidence intervals was calculated. ISs were subclassified using TOAST (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) criteria into 5 etiologic groups. Rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for differences in age-standardized rates between the 2 studies. In ARCOS-IV, there were 1329 (81%) ISs, 211 (13%) ICHs, 79 (5%) subarachnoid hemorrhages, and 24 (1%) undetermined type strokes. The proportional distribution of IS subtypes was 29% cardioembolism, 21% small-vessel occlusion, 15% large-artery atherosclerosis, 5% other determined etiology, and 31% undetermined type. Between 2002 and 2011, age-standardized incidence decreased for subarachnoid hemorrhage (rate ratios, 0.73; 95% confidence intervals, 0.54-0.99) and undetermined type (rate ratios, 0.14; 95% confidence intervals, 0.09-0.22). Rates were stable for IS and ICH. Among IS subtypes, large-artery atherosclerosis and small-vessel occlusion rates increased significantly. The frequency of all risk factors increased in IS. Ethnic differences were observed for both stroke subtype rates and their risk factor frequencies. A lack of change in IS and ICH incidence may reflect a trend toward increased incidence of younger

  14. [Androgenic deficit and its treatment in stroke male patients with diabetes mellitus type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgunov, L Iu; Denisova, I A; Rozhkova, T I; Stakhovskaia, L V; Skvortsova, V I

    2011-01-01

    We have studied 154 men (mean age 61,4+/-4,1 years) with the first hemispheric ischemic stroke. Clinical and laboratory studies have revealed the androgenic deficit in 66,3%, with its frequency higher in patients with diabetes mellitus type II (50 and 26,3%, respectively). Forty-two men with diabetes mellitus type II and acquired androgenic deficit received replacing treatment with testosterone undecanoate in dose 1000 mg intramuscular. The treatment was started one week after the development of stroke, the next injections were given after 6 weeks and then every 12 weeks during 2 years. The control group included 30 males who did not receive androgens. After 2 years from the beginning of treatment, there were the decrease in clinical severity of androgenic deficit, the increase of total and free testosterone levels, and muscle power in the main group compared to the controls. Body mass index, glicated hemoglobin, cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoproteins have decreased as well. Secondary stroke has developed in 3 (7,1%) patients of the main group and in 5 (16,6%) controls; 12 (28,6%) patients returned to work in the main group compared to 2 (6,6%) in the control group. The treatment with androgens has a positive effect on risk factors of secondary ischemic stroke. It is an effective method for improvement of social adaptation of men survived after the stroke.

  15. The Weekend Education Source Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Wilbur

    A guidebook to short residential programs, the book provides an account of the many types of centers, the wide range of subjects, accommodations/facilities, and the procedures for enrollment and obtaining degrees/credits. The book was written in response to a deluge of inquiries to a "Reader's Digest" article on the topic. The first half of the…

  16. Aspirin Versus Clopidogrel for Type 2 Diabetic Patients with First-Ever Noncardioembolic Acute Ischemic Stroke: Ten-Year Survival Data from the Athens Stroke Outcome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milionis, Haralampos; Ntaios, George; Papavasileiou, Vasileios; Spengos, Konstantinos; Manios, Efstathios; Elisaf, Moses; Vemmos, Konstantinos

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of stroke and poor outcome following a stroke event. We assessed the impact of discharge treatment with aspirin versus clopidogrel on the 10-year survival of patients with type 2 diabetes after a first-ever noncardioembolic acute ischemic stroke (AIS). This was a post hoc analysis of the Athens Stroke Outcome Project. Study outcomes included death, stroke recurrence, and a composite cardiovascular disease (CVD) end point (recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction, unstable angina, coronary revascularization, aortic aneurysm rupture, or sudden death). Kaplan-Meier survival curve and Cox regression analyses were performed. A total of 304 (93 women) diabetic patients receiving either aspirin (n = 197) or clopidogrel (n = 107) were studied. The 10-year survival was better in clopidogrel-treated patients than in aspirin-treated patients (19 deaths [17.7%] for clopidogrel versus 55 deaths [27.9%] for aspirin; log-rank test: 4.91, P = .027). Similarly, clopidogrel was associated with a favorable impact on recurrent stroke (12 events [11.2%] for clopidogrel versus 39 events [19.7%] for aspirin; log-rank test: 4.46, P = .035) and on the composite CVD end point (21 events [19.6%] for clopidogrel versus 54 events [27.4%] for aspirin; log-rank test: 4.17, P = .041). In the multivariable analysis, the beneficial effect of clopidogrel over aspirin on both primary and secondary end points was independent of age, gender, the presence of CVD or CVD risk factors, and stroke severity. Our findings indicate a favorable effect of clopidogrel at discharge compared with aspirin in preventing death, recurrent stroke, and CVD events in diabetic patients with a first-ever noncardioembolic AIS. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Recurrent stroke after transient ischaemic attack or minor ischaemic stroke: does the distinction between small and large vessel disease remain true to type? Dutch TIA Trial Study Group.

    OpenAIRE

    Kappelle, L J; van Latum, J C; van Swieten, J C; Algra, A; Koudstaal, P J; van Gijn, J

    1995-01-01

    The incidence and vascular type of recurrent ischaemic stroke was studied in patients with supratentorial transient ischaemic attacks or non-disabling ischaemic strokes, who were treated with aspirin (30 or 283 mg). Patients were divided into groups with small vessel disease (SVD) (n = 1216) or large vessel disease (LVD) (n = 1221) on the grounds of their clinical features and CT at baseline. Patients with evidence of both SVD and LVD (n = 180) were excluded from further analyses. During foll...

  18. A discussion of the several types of two-stroke-cycle engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venediger, Herbert J

    1935-01-01

    This report discusses different types of two-stroke engines as well as the three most important design factors: volume of scavenge and charge delivery, scavenging process (scavenging result), and result of charge. Some of the types of engines discussed include: single cylinder with crank-chamber scavenge pump and auxiliary suction piston linked to working connecting rod; and two cylinder engines with a rotary scavenge pump arrangement. Three and four cylinder engines are also discussed in various designs.

  19. Shift rostering using decomposition: assign weekend shifts first

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Egbert; Hans, Elias W.; Post, Gerhard F.; Veltman, Bart

    This paper introduces a shift rostering problem that surprisingly has not been studied in literature: the weekend shift rostering problem. It is motivated by our experience that employees’ shift preferences predominantly focus on the weekends, since many social activities happen during weekends. The

  20. A Prospective Profile of Visual Field Loss following Stroke: Prevalence, Type, Rehabilitation, and Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Fiona J.; Wright, David; Brand, Darren; Jackson, Carole; Harrison, Shirley; Maan, Tallat; Vogwell, Linda; Peel, Sarah; Akerman, Nicola; Shipman, Tracey; Sperring, Una; MacDiarmid, Sonia; Freeman, Cicely

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To profile site of stroke/cerebrovascular accident, type and extent of field loss, treatment options, and outcome. Methods. Prospective multicentre cohort trial. Standardised referral and investigation protocol of visual parameters. Results. 915 patients were recruited with a mean age of 69 years (SD 14). 479 patients (52%) had visual field loss. 51 patients (10%) had no visual symptoms. Almost half of symptomatic patients (n = 226) complained only of visual field loss: almost half (n = 226) also had reading difficulty, blurred vision, diplopia, and perceptual difficulties. 31% (n = 151) had visual field loss as their only visual impairment: 69% (n = 328) had low vision, eye movement deficits, or visual perceptual difficulties. Occipital and parietal lobe strokes most commonly caused visual field loss. Treatment options included visual search training, visual awareness, typoscopes, substitutive prisms, low vision aids, refraction, and occlusive patches. At followup 15 patients (7.5%) had full recovery, 78 (39%) had improvement, and 104 (52%) had no recovery. Two patients (1%) had further decline of visual field. Patients with visual field loss had lower quality of life scores than stroke patients without visual impairment. Conclusions. Stroke survivors with visual field loss require assessment to accurately define type and extent of loss, diagnose coexistent visual impairments, and offer targeted treatment. PMID:24089687

  1. A Prospective Profile of Visual Field Loss following Stroke: Prevalence, Type, Rehabilitation, and Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona J. Rowe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To profile site of stroke/cerebrovascular accident, type and extent of field loss, treatment options, and outcome. Methods. Prospective multicentre cohort trial. Standardised referral and investigation protocol of visual parameters. Results. 915 patients were recruited with a mean age of 69 years (SD 14. 479 patients (52% had visual field loss. 51 patients (10% had no visual symptoms. Almost half of symptomatic patients (n=226 complained only of visual field loss: almost half (n=226 also had reading difficulty, blurred vision, diplopia, and perceptual difficulties. 31% (n=151 had visual field loss as their only visual impairment: 69% (n=328 had low vision, eye movement deficits, or visual perceptual difficulties. Occipital and parietal lobe strokes most commonly caused visual field loss. Treatment options included visual search training, visual awareness, typoscopes, substitutive prisms, low vision aids, refraction, and occlusive patches. At followup 15 patients (7.5% had full recovery, 78 (39% had improvement, and 104 (52% had no recovery. Two patients (1% had further decline of visual field. Patients with visual field loss had lower quality of life scores than stroke patients without visual impairment. Conclusions. Stroke survivors with visual field loss require assessment to accurately define type and extent of loss, diagnose coexistent visual impairments, and offer targeted treatment.

  2. B-type natriuretic peptide as a marker for heart failure in patients with acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Matthew A; Puttgen, H Adrian; Prabhakaran, Vivek; Reich, Daniel; Stevens, Robert D

    2007-09-01

    To determine whether serum N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (N-BNP), a biomarker of myocardial wall stress, is specific to acute heart failure (HF) in patients hospitalized with stroke. Case-control study. Tertiary hospital, Neurosciences Critical Care Unit and Stroke Unit. Consecutive patients with acute ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who were evaluated for HF. None. Cases and controls were classified, respectively, as patients with or without HF, defined according to modified Framingham criteria. Seventy-two patients were evaluated, 39 with ischemic stroke, 22 with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and 11 with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Thirty-four patients (47%) met criteria for HF, and 47 patients (65%) had systolic or diastolic left ventricular (LV) dysfunction on echocardiogram. Serum N-BNP was measured a median of 48 h following the onset of stroke and was increased (> 900 pg/ml) in 56 patients (78%), with higher levels in non-survivors (11898 +/- 12741 vs 4073 +/-5691; p = 0.001). In a multiple regression model, N-BNP elevation was not independently associated with HF (OR 5.4, 95% CI 0.8-36.0, p = 0.084). At a cut-off of 900 pg/ml, the sensitivity of N-BNP for HF was 94%, specificity 37%, positive predictive value (PPV) 57%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 88%. For systolic or diastolic LV dysfunction, the sensitivity of N-BNP was 89%, specificity 44%, PPV 75%, and NPV 69%. These results demonstrate that N-BNP elevation is not specific to HF or LV dysfunction in patients with acute ischemic stroke, SAH, and ICH.

  3. NURR1 involvement in recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator treatment complications after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Zamorano, Cristina; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Jullienne, Amandine; Le Béhot, Audrey; Bardou, Isabelle; Parés, Mireia; Fernández-Cadenas, Israel; Giralt, Dolors; Carrera, Caty; Ribó, Marc; Vivien, Denis; Ali, Carine; Rosell, Anna; Montaner, Joan

    2015-02-01

    Despite the effectiveness of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (r-tPA) during the acute phase of ischemic stroke, the therapy remains limited by a narrow time window and the occurrence of occasional vascular side effects, particularly symptomatic hemorrhages. Our aim was to investigate the mechanisms underlying the endothelial damage resulting from r-tPA treatment in ischemic-like conditions. Microarray analyses were performed on cerebral endothelial cells submitted to r-tPA treatment during oxygen and glucose deprivation to identify novel biomarker candidates. Validation was then performed in vivo in a mouse model of thromboembolic stroke and culminated in an analysis in a clinical cohort of patients with ischemic stroke treated with thrombolysis. The transcription factor NURR1 (NR4A2) was identified as a downstream target induced by r-tPA during oxygen and glucose deprivation. Silencing NURR1 expression reversed the endothelial-toxicity induced by the combined stimuli, a protective effect attributable to reduced levels of proinflammatory mediators, such as nuclear factor-kappa-beta 2 (NF-κ-B2), interleukin 1 alpha (IL1α), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), SMAD family member 3 (SMAD3), colony stimulating factor 2 (granulocyte-macrophage; CSF2). The detrimental effect of delayed thrombolysis, in conditions in which NURR1 gene expression was enhanced, was confirmed in the preclinical stroke model. Finally, we determined that patients with stroke who had a symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation after r-tPA treatment exhibited higher baseline serum NURR1 levels than did patients with an asymptomatic or absence of cerebral bleedings. Our results suggest that NURR1 upregulation by r-tPA during ischemic stroke is associated with endothelial dysfunction and inflammation and the enhancement of hemorrhagic complications associated to thrombolysis. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Risk of stroke in people with type 2 diabetes in the UK: a study using the General Practice Research Database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulnier, H.E.; Seaman, H.E.; Raleigh, V.S.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Colhoun, H.M.; Lawrenson, R.A.; Vries, de C.S.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Risk estimates for stroke in patients with diabetes vary. We sought to obtain reliable risk estimates for stroke and the association with diabetes, comorbidity and lifestyle in a large cohort of type 2 diabetic patients in the UK. Materials and methods Using the General Practice

  5. Antidiabetic drugs for stroke prevention in patients with type-2 diabetes. The neurologist's point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Blanca

    2018-04-13

    To date, stroke prevention in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) has been based on the control of other risk factors and comorbidities, as clinical trials aimed at intensive glycemic control have failed to prove the existence of any sort of benefit in reducing macrovascular complications. However, thanks to the FDA's requirement to evaluate the vascular risk of antidiabetic drugs, there has been significant progress in the knowledge of their benefits on the risk of vascular death, acute myocardial infarction and non-fatal stroke in patients with type 2 DM and high vascular risk. This implies the need to incorporate these drugs into the overall vascular prevention strategy in patients with DM who have already suffered a stroke. This manuscript is a critical, non-systematic review on the oral antidiabetics that have demonstrated any sort of effect on stroke risk, interpreting the results of the main clinical trials from the neurologist's point of view. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Resting Energy Expenditure in Patients with Stroke during the Subacute Phases - Relationships with Stroke Types, Location, Severity of Paresis, and Activities of Daily Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Michiyuki; Liu, Meigen; Wada, Ayako; Otsuka, Tomoyoshi; Nishimura, Atsuko

    2015-01-01

    The energy demands in patients with stroke during the subacute phases are unclear. However, this information is essential for appropriate clinical and nutritional management. The aims of this study were to determine the resting energy expenditure (REE) during the subacute phases, examine its relationships with stroke types, location, severity of hemiparesis, and activities of daily living (ADL), and evaluate whether estimation of REE from the Harris-Benedict equation (HB) requires the addition of a 'stress factor' to capture possible additional REE imposed by stroke. We measured REE in 95 patients with subacute stroke (53.5 ± 16.6 days post-stroke) with indirect calorimetry, and compared it with predicted values of energy expenditure estimated from the HB (expressed as percentage). Patients were admitted for rehabilitation of their first ischemic or nonsurgical hemorrhagic stroke. The severity of hemiparesis was assessed with the motor items of the Stroke Impairment Assessment Set (SIAS). The ADL was assessed with the Functional Independence Measure (FIM). We compared REE and %HB of the two groups divided by hemiparesis severity and ADL limitation using the Student's t-test, and those of the five groups divided by stroke location. The correlations between REE and the motor items of the SIAS and the FIM score were assessed with the Spearman rank correlation test. A multiple regression analysis for REE was conducted. The average body weight (BW) was 57.1 ± 11.3 kg. The average body mass index (BMI) was 22.5 ± 4.0. The mean REE (%HB) was 1,271 ± 284 kcal/day (106.0 ± 17.3%). REE and %HB of the low ADL group was less than that of the high ADL group (p energy expenditure suggests that stroke patients are not hypermetabolic during the subacute phase. The 'stress factor' in stroke patients during the subacute phase was 1.0-1.1. This finding provides important information for improving nutritional management during the subacute phase in patients with stroke. © 2015 S

  7. Carotid intima media thickness in type 2 diabetes mellitus with ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Kota

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is associated with high cardiovascular risk. Carotid intima media thickness (CIMT is used commonly as a noninvasive test for the assessment of degree of atherosclerosis. The objective of this study was to find out the cut-off point for CIMT for ischemic stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and to correlate CIMT with various parameters like smoking, hypertension, lipid profile and duration of T2DM. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 subjects in the age group of 30-75 years (M:F = 57:23 were selected and divided into three groups, i.e. diabetes with ischemic stroke, diabetes and healthy subjects. All the participants were subjected to B-mode ultrasonography of both common carotid arteries to determine CIMT, along with history taking, physical examination and routine laboratory investigations including included fasting and 2-hour postprandial blood sugar, blood urea, serum creatinine, lipid profile, glycated hemoglobin, and microalbuminuria. Results: Patients with T2DM with or without ischemic stroke were found to have significantly higher prevalence of increased CIMT and a value greater than 0.8 mm was found to be associated with the occurrence of stroke. The mean carotid IMT of the group as a whole was 0.840 ± 0.2 mm. The mean carotid IMT was not significantly different between T2DM patients with or without ischemic stroke (1.06 ± 0.2 vs. 0.97 ± 0.26 mm, P = 0.08. However, the mean CIMT was significantly higher in diabetic subjects compared to healthy subjects (1.01 ± 0.28 mm vs. 0.73 ± 0.08, P = 0.006. Other parameters like higher age, smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, low HDL cholesterol, the glycemic parameters and the duration of diabetes were independently and significantly related to CIMT. Conclusion: A high CIMT is a surrogate and reliable marker of higher risk of ischemic stroke amongst type 2 diabetic patients. Our study demonstrates the utility of carotid IMT as a simple non

  8. Type of Preadmission Antidiabetic Treatment and Outcome among Patients with Ischemic Stroke: A Nationwide Follow-up Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsdal, Henriette Thisted; Mehnert, Frank; Rungby, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    computed mortality rates and rates of readmission recurrent ischemic stroke or myocardial infarction according to type of treatment and used the Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to compute hazard ratios (HRs). RESULTS: We identified 4817 stroke patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We found...... hospitalized with ischemic stroke between 2003 and 2006 and who were registered in the Danish National Indicator Project. We obtained data on diabetes and type of antidiabetic treatment, patient characteristics, in-hospital quality of care, and mortality and readmissions by linking medical databases. We......, it did not reach statistical significance for all treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS: Preadmission use of sulfonylureas appeared not to be associated with an overall improved clinical outcome among type 2 diabetic patients admitted with ischemic stroke....

  9. Comparison of urodynamics between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients; can we suggest the category of urinary dysfunction in patients with cerebrovascular accident according to type of stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyung-Sik; Heo, Sung Hyuk; Lee, Sun-Ju; Jeon, Seung Hyun; Yoo, Koo Han

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the urodynamic parameters in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients with bladder dysfunction. We retrospectively reviewed medical records such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and urodynamic study and identified 84 cases among 150 stroke patients underwent urodynamic test due to lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) from June 2003 to May 2008. Exclusion criteria are diabetes mellitus (DM) cystopathy, previous pelvic surgery, spinal cord injury, benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), and other neurologic etiology. Among analyzed variables of urodynamic study, total bladder capacity, postvoid residual urine volume and bladder compliance have a significant value between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke group (P = 0.004, P = 0.017, P = 0.007). Ischemic group have detrusor overactivity (DO) (70.7%), detrusor underactivity (DU) (29.3%), and hemorrhagic group have DO (34.6%), DU (65.4%). (P = 0.003). Evaluation of the stroke type may be helpful in the determination of the type of urinary dysfunction and in deciding the appropriate bladder management. The urodynamic study, however, is essential to manage LUTS in stroke patients. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Does a weekend effect in diurnal temperature range exist in the eastern and central Tibetan Plateau?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You Qinglong; Kang Shichang; Xu Yanwei; Huang Jie; Fluegel, Wolfgang-Albert; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Yan Yuping

    2009-01-01

    The 'weekend effect' method (defined here as the average for Saturday through Monday minus the average for Wednesday through Friday) has been used to identify fingerprints of anthropogenic emissions. Based on daily maximum and minimum temperature series from the China Meteorological Administration homogenized dataset, the weekend effect in diurnal temperature range (DTR) at 71 stations with elevations above 2000 m asl in the eastern and central Tibetan Plateau (TP) during 1961-2004 is examined, and principal component analysis (PCA) is performed to cluster series into four subregions with similar weekend effect variability. The DTR demonstrates a much stronger negative weekend effect in autumn and shows larger positive values in winter, which provides a strong evidence of anthropogenic activity in this region, especially in the central TP. Analysis by topographic type and degree of urbanization shows a clear weekly cycle which cannot be explained by a microclimate effect. We hypothesize that the interaction with anthropogenic aerosols from local emissions and transported by atmospheric circulation may account for the weekly cycle in the TP. More caution should be paid to the driving mechanism of the weekend effect in the most remote and clear regions in the world.

  11. H-Type Hypertension and C Reactive Protein in Recurrence of Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension with high homocysteine (HHcy (H-type hypertension and C reactive protein (CRP can increase the incidence of ischemic stroke. However, it is not clear whether recurrent ischemic stroke (RIS is related to H-type hypertension and CRP. The present study investigated the correlation of H-type hypertension and CRP level with RIS. Totally, 987 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke were recruited in a teaching hospital in Henan province, China during March 2014 to March 2015. The demographic and clinical characteristics and blood biochemical parameters of patients were analyzed. Elevated levels of CRP and homocysteine (Hcy were defined as >8.2 mg/L and 10 μmol/L, respectively. Among the 987 patients, 234 were RIS. Thirty-eight percent of RIS patients had elevated CRP level and 91.5% of RIS patients had HHcy. In multivariate analysis, adjusted odds ratio (OR of RIS in patients aged ≥60 years was 1.576 (95% CI: 1.125–2.207, in male patients 1.935 (95% CI: 1.385–2.704, in patients with diabetes 1.463 (95% CI: 1.037–2.064, CRP levels 1.013 (95% CI: 1.006–1.019, simple hypertension 3.370 (95% CI: 1.15–10.183, and H-type hypertension 2.990 (95% CI: 1.176–7.600. RIS was associated with older age, male, diabetes, H-type hypertension and CRP. Controlling H-type hypertension and CRP level may reduce the risk of RIS.

  12. Post-stroke angiotensin II type 2 receptor activation provides long-term neuroprotection in aged rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennion, Douglas M; Isenberg, Jacob D; Harmel, Allison T

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) by administration of Compound 21 (C21), a selective AT2R agonist, induces neuroprotection in models of ischemic stroke in young adult animals. The mechanisms of this neuroprotective action are varied, and may include direct and indirect....... These findings demonstrate that the neuroprotection previously characterized only during earlier time points using stroke models in young animals is sustained long-term in aged rats, implying even greater clinical relevance for the study of AT2R agonists for the acute treatment of ischemic stroke in human....... Intraperitoneal injections of C21 (0.03mg/kg) after ischemic stroke induced by transient monofilament middle cerebral artery occlusion resulted in protective effects that were sustained for up to at least 3-weeks post-stroke. These included improved neurological function across multiple assessments...

  13. Tailor-made rehabilitation approach using multiple types of hybrid assistive limb robots for acute stroke patients: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Morishita, Takashi; Ogata, Toshiyasu; Saita, Kazuya; Hyakutake, Koichi; Watanabe, Junko; Shiota, Etsuji; Inoue, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    This article investigated the feasibility of a tailor-made neurorehabilitation approach using multiple types of hybrid assistive limb (HAL) robots for acute stroke patients. We investigated the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent rehabilitation using the HAL robots. The Brunnstrom stage, Barthel index (BI), and functional independence measure (FIM) were evaluated at baseline and when patients were transferred to a rehabilitation facility. Scores were compared between the multiple-robot rehabilitation and single-robot rehabilitation groups. Nine hemiplegic acute stroke patients (five men and four women; mean age 59.4 ± 12.5 years; four hemorrhagic stroke and five ischemic stroke) underwent rehabilitation using multiple types of HAL robots for 19.4 ± 12.5 days, and 14 patients (six men and eight women; mean age 63.2 ± 13.9 years; nine hemorrhagic stroke and five ischemic stroke) underwent rehabilitation using a single type of HAL robot for 14.9 ± 8.9 days. The multiple-robot rehabilitation group showed significantly better outcomes in the Brunnstrom stage of the upper extremity, BI, and FIM scores. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first pilot study demonstrating the feasibility of rehabilitation using multiple exoskeleton robots. The tailor-made rehabilitation approach may be useful for the treatment of acute stroke.

  14. Allied health weekend service provision in Australian rehabilitation units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruana, Erin L; Kuys, Suzanne S; Brauer, Sandra G

    2018-03-23

    To determine current Australian allied health rehabilitation weekend service provision and to identify perceived barriers to and facilitators of weekend service provision. Senior physiotherapists from Australian rehabilitation units completed an online cross-sectional survey exploring current service provision, staffing, perceived outcomes, and barriers and facilitators to weekend service provision. A total of 179 (83%) eligible units responded, with 94 facilities (53%) providing weekend therapy. A Saturday service was the most common (97%) with the most frequent service providers being physiotherapists (90%). Rehabilitation weekend service was perceived to increase patient/family satisfaction (66%) and achieve faster goal attainment (55%). Common barriers were budgetary restraints (66%) and staffing availability (54%), with facilitators including organisational support (76%), staff availability (62%) and staff support (61%). Despite increasing evidence of effectiveness, only half of Australian rehabilitation facilities provide weekend services. Further efforts are required to translate evidence from clinical trials into feasible service delivery models. © 2018 AJA Inc.

  15. Understanding the "Weekend Effect" for Emergency General Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, Richard S; Go, Derek E; Dhar, Vikrom K; Kim, Young; Hanseman, Dennis J; Wima, Koffi; Shah, Shimul A

    2018-02-01

    Several studies have identified a "weekend effect" for surgical outcomes, but definitions vary and the cause is unclear. Our aim was to better characterize the weekend effect for emergency general surgery using mortality as a primary endpoint. Using data from the University HealthSystem Consortium from 2009 to 2013, we identified urgent/emergent hospital admissions for seven procedures representing 80% of the national burden of emergency general surgery. Patient characteristics and surgical outcomes were compared between cases that were performed on weekdays vs weekends. Hospitals varied widely in the proportion of procedures performed on the weekend. Of the procedures examined, four had higher mortality for weekend cases (laparotomy, lysis of adhesions, partial colectomy, and small bowel resection; p surgery (p surgery procedures that incur higher mortality when performed on weekends. This may be due to acute changes in patient status that require weekend surgery or indications for urgent procedures (ischemia, obstruction) compared to those without a weekend mortality difference (infection). Hospitals that perform weekend surgery must acknowledge and identify ways to manage this increased risk.

  16. A prospective study of stroke sub-type from within an incident ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and thirty-two incident stroke cases were identified in the rural Hai demographic surveillance site (DSS) and 69 in the urban Dar-es-Salaam DSS; 63 patients with stroke due to ischaemia or cerebral haemorrhage from Hai and 17 from Dar-es-Salaam had a CT scan within 15 days of the stroke. Stroke was ...

  17. Post-stroke angiotensin II type 2 receptor activation provides long-term neuroprotection in aged rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Bennion

    Full Text Available Activation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R by administration of Compound 21 (C21, a selective AT2R agonist, induces neuroprotection in models of ischemic stroke in young adult animals. The mechanisms of this neuroprotective action are varied, and may include direct and indirect effects of AT2R activation. Our objectives were to assess the long-term protective effects of post-stroke C21 treatments in a clinically-relevant model of stroke in aged rats and to characterize the cellular localization of AT2Rs in the mouse brain of transgenic reporter mice following stroke. Intraperitoneal injections of C21 (0.03mg/kg after ischemic stroke induced by transient monofilament middle cerebral artery occlusion resulted in protective effects that were sustained for up to at least 3-weeks post-stroke. These included improved neurological function across multiple assessments and a significant reduction in infarct volume as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. We also found AT2R expression to be on neurons, not astrocytes or microglia, in normal female and male mouse brains. Stroke did not induce altered cellular localization of AT2R when assessed at 7 and 14 days post-stroke. These findings demonstrate that the neuroprotection previously characterized only during earlier time points using stroke models in young animals is sustained long-term in aged rats, implying even greater clinical relevance for the study of AT2R agonists for the acute treatment of ischemic stroke in human disease. Further, it appears that this sustained neuroprotection is likely due to a mix of both direct and indirect effects stemming from selective activation of AT2Rs on neurons or other cells besides astrocytes and microglia.

  18. Post-stroke angiotensin II type 2 receptor activation provides long-term neuroprotection in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennion, Douglas M; Isenberg, Jacob D; Harmel, Allison T; DeMars, Kelly; Dang, Alex N; Jones, Chad H; Pignataro, Megan E; Graham, Justin T; Steckelings, U Muscha; Alexander, Jon C; Febo, Marcelo; Krause, Eric G; de Kloet, Annette D; Candelario-Jalil, Eduardo; Sumners, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) by administration of Compound 21 (C21), a selective AT2R agonist, induces neuroprotection in models of ischemic stroke in young adult animals. The mechanisms of this neuroprotective action are varied, and may include direct and indirect effects of AT2R activation. Our objectives were to assess the long-term protective effects of post-stroke C21 treatments in a clinically-relevant model of stroke in aged rats and to characterize the cellular localization of AT2Rs in the mouse brain of transgenic reporter mice following stroke. Intraperitoneal injections of C21 (0.03mg/kg) after ischemic stroke induced by transient monofilament middle cerebral artery occlusion resulted in protective effects that were sustained for up to at least 3-weeks post-stroke. These included improved neurological function across multiple assessments and a significant reduction in infarct volume as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. We also found AT2R expression to be on neurons, not astrocytes or microglia, in normal female and male mouse brains. Stroke did not induce altered cellular localization of AT2R when assessed at 7 and 14 days post-stroke. These findings demonstrate that the neuroprotection previously characterized only during earlier time points using stroke models in young animals is sustained long-term in aged rats, implying even greater clinical relevance for the study of AT2R agonists for the acute treatment of ischemic stroke in human disease. Further, it appears that this sustained neuroprotection is likely due to a mix of both direct and indirect effects stemming from selective activation of AT2Rs on neurons or other cells besides astrocytes and microglia.

  19. The independent effect of type 2 diabetes mellitus on ischemic heart disease, stroke, and death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, Thomas; Scharling, Henrik; Jensen, Jan Skov

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have reported that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) have increased mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular diseases, independent of other risk factors. However, most of these studies have been performed in selected patient groups. The purpose...... of the present study was prospectively to assess the impact of type 2 DM on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in an unselected population. METHODS: A total of 13,105 subjects from the Copenhagen City Heart Study were followed up prospectively for 20 years. Adjusted relative risks of first, incident......, admission for, or death from ischemic heart disease, acute myocardial infarction, or stroke, as well as total mortality in persons with type 2 DM compared with healthy controls, were estimated. RESULTS: The relative risk of first, incident, and admission for myocardial infarction was increased 1.5- to 4...

  20. John Tyler Community College Weekend College: The First Semester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Tyler Community Coll., Chester, VA. Office of Assessment, Research, and Planning.

    The Weekend College (WEC) at Virginia's John Tyler Community College (JTCC) is an 8-week program offering classes every other weekend as well as student-directed learning activities outside the classroom. The program was begun in spring 1995, offering 9 courses and enrolling 152 students. To judge the effectiveness of the WEC, data were collected…

  1. Immersion Weekends: The Next Best Thing to Being There.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Bettye J.; Wellman, Cheryl A.

    A French language immersion weekend housed in an off-campus college lodge and accommodating 12 college students has been successfully implemented by the State University College of New York at Fredonia. The goals of the weekend experiences have been: the development of listening and speaking skills; creation of a cultural atmosphere of the…

  2. Alcohol consumption and the risk of morbidity and mortality for different stroke types - a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roerecke Michael

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observational studies have suggested a complex relationship between alcohol consumption and stroke, dependent on sex, type of stroke and outcome (morbidity vs. mortality. We undertook a systematic review and a meta-analysis of studies assessing the association between levels of average alcohol consumption and relative risks of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes separately by sex and outcome. This meta-analysis is the first to explicitly separate morbidity and mortality of alcohol-attributable stroke and thus has implications for public health and prevention. Methods Using Medical Subject Headings (alcohol drinking, ethanol, cerebrovascular accident, cerebrovascular disorders, and intracranial embolism and thrombosis and the key word stroke, a literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CABS, WHOlist, SIGLE, ETOH, and Web of Science databases between 1980 to June 2009 was performed followed by manual searches of bibliographies of key retrieved articles. From twenty-six observational studies (cohort or case-control with ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes the relative risk or odds ratios or hazard ratios of stroke associated with alcohol consumption were reported; alcohol consumption was quantified; and life time abstention (manually estimated where data for current abstainers were given was used as the reference group. Two reviewers independently extracted the information on study design, participant characteristics, level of alcohol consumption, stroke outcome, control for potential confounding factors, risk estimates and key criteria of study quality using a standardized protocol. Results The dose-response relationship for hemorrhagic stroke had monotonically increasing risk for increasing consumption, whereas ischemic stroke showed a curvilinear relationship, with a protective effect of alcohol for low to moderate consumption, and increased risk for higher exposure. For more than 3 drinks on average/day, in general women had

  3. Stroke types, risk factors, quality of care and outcomes at a Referral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The prevalence of stroke is increasing in sub-Saharan Africa due to increases in size of aging population and stroke risk factors. ... Subjects: All patients >18 years admitted with a diagnosis of stroke as per the WHO definition and with a supporting brain imaging (CT scan/ MRI )were included in the study.

  4. Heart-type Fatty Acid-Binding Protein (H-FABP as a Biochemical Marker to Differentiate Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Halimah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an acute neurological syndrome that occurs due to a decrease in blood flow caused by blocked or rupture of blood vessels of the brain (cerebrovascular that causes damage to brain tissue. Based on the pathogenesis, there are two types of stroke, the ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, in which the handling of treatment in both types of stroke are very different, so the differential diagnosis is required to distinguish the two types of stroke. The purpose of this study is to determine whether Heart-type Fatty Acid-Binding Protein (H-FABP can be used as a parameter of biochemical marker to distinguish between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. H-FABP assay is performed using blood serum and analyzed by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA sandwich method, each using H-FABP test kit. Blood serum taken from 20 patients with ischemic strokes and 18 hemorrhagic stroke patients from one of a hospital in Jakarta. The results showed that the average H-FABP concentration in ischemic stroke‑patients is 9,07 ng/mL and hemorrhagic stroke‑patients is 18,54 ng/mL; statistically there are significant difference between H-FABP concentration in ischemic stroke‑patients and hemorrhagic stroke-patients (α=0.05. Thus Heart-type Fatty Acid-Binding Protein (H-FABP can be used as one of the parameters of biochemical markers to distinguish between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

  5. Components of Hospital Perioperative Infrastructure Can Overcome the Weekend Effect in Urgent General Surgery Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Anai N; Zapf, Matthew A C; Blackwell, Robert H; Markossian, Talar; Chang, Victor; Mi, Zhiyong; Gupta, Gopal N; Kuo, Paul C

    2015-10-01

    We hypothesized that perioperative hospital resources could overcome the "weekend effect" (WE) in patients undergoing emergent/urgent surgeries. The WE is the observation that surgeon-independent patient outcomes are worse on the weekend compared with weekdays. The WE is often explained by differences in staffing and resources resulting in variation in care between the week and weekend. Emergent/urgent surgeries were identified using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Database (Florida) from 2007 to 2011 and linked to the American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey Database to determine hospital level characteristics. Extended median length of stay (LOS) on the weekend compared with the weekdays (after controlling for hospital, year, and procedure type) was selected as a surrogate for WE. Included were 126,666 patients at 166 hospitals. A total of 17 hospitals overcame the WE during the study period. Logistic regression, controlling for patient characteristics, identified full adoption of electronic medical records (OR 4.74), home health program (OR 2.37), pain management program [odds ratio (OR) 1.48)], increased registered nurse-to-bed ratio (OR 1.44), and inpatient physical rehabilitation (OR 1.03) as resources that were predictors for overcoming the WE. The prevalence of these factors in hospitals exhibiting the WE for all 5 years of the study period were compared with those hospitals that overcame the WE (P general surgery procedures. Improved hospital perioperative infrastructure represents an important target for overcoming disparities in surgical care.

  6. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE : ASCENSION AND WHITSUNTIDE WEEKENDS

    CERN Document Server

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2002-01-01

    Details of the arrangements to ensure the provision of a restaurant service during the Ascension and Whitsuntide weekends are given below. On all the days indicated, hot meals will be served from 11h30 to 14h00 and 18h00 to 19h30.   RESTAURANT SATELLITE CAFETERIAS KIOSQUE No. Opening times Usual opening times ASCENSION Thursday 9 May 1 2 3 08h00 - 21h00 Friday 10 May 1 2 3   07h00 - 21h00 07h00 - 18h00 Bldg. 40 Bldg. 30, 54 Bldg. 864 08h00 - 17h00     Saturday 11 May 1 2 3 07h00 - 23h00     Sunday 12 May 1 2 3 07h00 - 23h00     WHITSUNTIDE Saturday 18 May 1 2 3 08h00 - 21h00     Sunday 19 May 1 2 3 08h00 - 21h00     Monday 20 May 1 2 3 08h00 - 21h00     Restaurant Supervisory Committee Tel. 77551

  7. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: ASCENSION AND WHITSUNTIDE WEEKENDS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Details of the arrangements to ensure the provision of a restaurant service during the Ascension and Whitsuntide weekends are given below. On all the days indicated, hot meals will be served from 11h30 to 14h00 and 18h00 to 19h30. DATERESTAURANT No.Opening times ASCENSION Thursday, May 29 1 2 08h00 - 21h00 3 Friday, May 30 1 2 07h00 - 21h00 3 07h00 - 18h00 Saturday, May 31 1 2 09h00 - 20h00 3 Sunday, June 1st 1 2 09h00 - 20h00 3 WHITSUNTIDE Saturday, June 7 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 3 Sunday, June 8 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 3 Monday, June 9 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 3 SATELLITE CAFETERIAS (Bldgs. 30, 40, 54) will open at the usual hours on Friday 30 May only. The KIOSK will open from 8:00 to 17:00 hrs on Friday 30 May.

  8. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: ASCENSION AND WHITSUNTIDE WEEKENDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2001-01-01

    Details of the arrangements to ensure the provision of a restaurant service during the Ascension and Whitsuntide weekends are given below. On all the days indicated, hot meals will be served from 11h30 to 14h00 and 18h00 to 19h30. RESTAURANT CAFETERIAS PERIPHERIQUES SATELLITE CAFETERIAS KIOSQUE No. Horaire Opening times Horaire : comme d'habitude Usual opening times   ASCENSION         Jeudi 24 mai 1       Thursday, May 24 2 08h00 - 21h00 3           Vendredi 25 mai 1   Bâts. /Bldgs 6 13 17 40Bâts. /Bldgs. 30 54 Bâts. /Bldgs 864 08h00 — 17h00 Friday, May 25 2 07h00 - 21h00   3 07h00 - 18h00           Samedi 26 mai 1 07h00 - 23h00     Saturday, May 26 2   3           Dimanche 27 mai 1 07h00 - 23h00     Sunday, May 27 2   3                   PENTECOTE WHITSUNTIDE         Samedi 2 juin 1 08h00 - 21h00     Saturday, June 2 2   3           Dimanche 3 juin 1 08h00 — 21h00     Sunday, Jun...

  9. The Effects of Stroke Type, Locus, and Extent on Long-Term Outcome of Gait Rehabilitation: The LEAPS Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Stephen E.; Dobkin, Bruce; Wu, Samuel S.; Pei, Qinglin; Duncan, Pamela W

    2015-01-01

    Background Paresis in stroke is largely due to damage to descending corticospinal and corticobulbar pathways. Recovery of paresis predominantly reflects the impact on the neural consequences of this white matter lesion by reactive neuroplasticity (mechanisms involved in spontaneous recovery) and experience-dependent neuroplasticity, driven by therapy and daily experience. However, both theoretical considerations and empirical data suggest that type of stroke (large vessel distribution/lacunar infarction, hemorrhage), locus and extent of infarction (basal ganglia, right hemisphere cerebral cortex), and the presence of leukoaraiosis or prior stroke might influence long-term recovery of walking ability. In this secondary analysis based on the 408 participants in the Locomotor Experience Applied Post-Stroke (LEAPS) study database, we seek to address these possibilities. Methods Lesion type, locus, and extent were characterized by the two neurologists in the LEAPS trial on the basis of clinical CT and MRI scans. A series of regression models was employed to test our hypotheses regarding the effects of lesion type, locus, extent, and laterality on 2–12 month change in gait speed, controlling for baseline gait speed, age, and Berg Balance Scale score. Results Gait speed change at 1-year was significantly reduced in participants with basal ganglia involvement and prior stroke. There was a trend toward reduction of gait speed change in participants with lacunar infarctions. The presence of right hemisphere cortical involvement had no significant impact on outcome. Conclusions Type, locus, and extent of lesion, and the loss of substrate for neuroplastic effect due to prior stroke may impact long-term outcome of rehabilitation of hemiparetic gait. PMID:26498434

  10. Impaired Leptomeningeal Collateral Flow Contributes to the Poor Outcome following Experimental Stroke in the Type 2 Diabetic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Yosuke; Nishijima, Yasuo; Lee, Chih Cheng; Yang, Shih Yen; Shi, Lei; An, Lin; Wang, Ruikang K.; Tominaga, Teiji

    2015-01-01

    Collateral status is an independent predictor of stroke outcome. However, the spatiotemporal manner in which collateral flow maintains cerebral perfusion during cerebral ischemia is poorly understood. Diabetes exacerbates ischemic brain damage, although the impact of diabetes on collateral dynamics remains to be established. Using Doppler optical coherent tomography, a robust recruitment of leptomeningeal collateral flow was detected immediately after middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion in C57BL/6 mice, and it continued to grow over the course of 1 week. In contrast, an impairment of collateral recruitment was evident in the Type 2 diabetic db/db mice, which coincided with a worse stroke outcome compared with their normoglycemic counterpart db/+, despite their equally well-collateralized leptomeningeal anastomoses. Similar to the wild-type mice, both db/+ and db/db mice underwent collateral growth 7 d after MCA stroke, although db/db mice still exhibited significantly reduced retrograde flow into the MCA territory chronically. Acutely induced hyperglycemia in the db/+ mice did not impair collateral flow after stroke, suggesting that the state of hyperglycemia alone was not sufficient to impact collateral flow. Human albumin was efficacious in improving collateral flow and outcome after stroke in the db/db mice, enabling perfusion to proximal MCA territory that was usually not reached by retrograde flow from anterior cerebral artery without treatment. Our results suggest that the impaired collateral status contributes to the exacerbated ischemic injury in mice with Type 2 diabetes, and modulation of collateral flow has beneficial effects on stroke outcome among these subjects. PMID:25740515

  11. Weekend Physiotherapy Practice in Community Hospitals in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Ottensmeyer, C. Andrea; Chattha, Sanmeet; Jayawardena, Shemayi; McBoyle, Kelly; Wrong, Christine; Ellerton, Cindy; Mathur, Sunita; Brooks, Dina

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze weekend physiotherapy services in acute-care community hospitals across Canada. Method: Questionnaires were mailed to acute-care community hospitals (institutions with >100 inpatient beds, excluding psychiatric, mental health, paediatric, rehabilitation, tertiary, and long-term care facilities) across Canada from January to April 2010. The questionnaire collected information on patient referral criteria, staffing, workload, and compensation for weekend physiotherapy servic...

  12. Clinical value of the major types of reactions of the body’s stress-regulating systems in ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Mikhailovich Dolgov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The time course of changes in the parameters reflecting the status of different components of the body’s regulatory systems was studied in 125patients with hemispheric ischemic stroke via comprehensive evaluation of the hypothalamo-pituitary axes and some endocrine glands. There were three types of reactions of the body’s stress-regulating systems: 1 normergic; 2 hyperergic; 3 disergic, which characterized adaptive and disadaptive reactions in stroke. The changes in the nitroxydergic mechanisms of vascular tone regulation, which constrain the possible involvement of the vascular wall endothelium in the body’s adaptive reactions, progress as the condition becomes severe.

  13. Risk of Nonfatal Stroke in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: A Retrospective Comparison Between Disease Management Programs and Standard Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiefarn, Stefan; Heumann, Christian; Rettelbach, Anja; Kostev, Karel

    2017-07-01

    The present retrospective study examines the influence of disease management programs on nonfatal stroke in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in Germany. The evaluation is based on retrospective patient data from the Disease Analyzer (IMS Health). The analysis included 169 414 T2DM patients aged 40 years and older with an initial prescription of antihyperglycemic therapy between January 2004 and December 2014. A total of 86 713 patients participated in a disease management program (DMP) for T2DM and 82 701 patients received standard care. The main outcome measure of this study was nonfatal stroke. Kaplan-Meier curves of DMP and SC patients were compared using log rank test. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to provide an adjusted estimate of the DMP effect. It is apparent from the baseline characteristics that the general health of patients receiving standard care was poorer than that of patients participating in a DMP. The baseline HbA1c value was 7.6% in the DMP group and 7.8% in the SC group. Furthermore, the SC group had a higher proportion of preexisting conditions, such as coronary heart disease (CHD), peripheral arterial occlusive disease (pAOD), and renal insufficiency. The proportion of patients who received insulin in first year therapy was higher in the SC group. Time to event analysis showed that DMP was associated with a delayed occurrence of stroke, because stroke occurred an average of 350 days later in DMP patients than in patients receiving SC (DMP: 1.216 days, RV: 866 days). The Cox model with covariable adjustment confirmed the significant association of DMPs with nonfatal stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (HR 0.71; 95% CI: 0.69-0.74). The present study indicates that DMPs are positively associated with stroke. The possible reasons for this must be verified in further studies.

  14. Urodynamics post stroke in patients with urinary incontinence: Is there correlation between bladder type and site of lesion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Anupam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Assessment of bladder by urodynamic study (UDS in patients with urinary incontinence following stroke, and correlation with site of lesion. Study Design and Setting: Retrospective cross-sectional study in the neurological rehabilitation unit of a tertiary care institute. Materials and Methods: Forty patients (22 males with arterial or venous, ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, with urinary incontinence in the acute phase following the event, underwent UDS. Seventeen patients had right hemiplegia, 18 had left hemiplegia, and five had posterior circulation stroke with brainstem/cerebellar features. Bladder type was correlated with age, side, and site of lesion. Results: The mean age was 46.80 ± 16.65 years (range: 18-80 years. Thirty-six patients had arterial stroke and four had cortical venous thrombosis. UDS was performed after a mean of 28.32 ± 10.27 days (range: 8-53 days after the stroke. All but one patient had neurogenic bladder dysfunction, with 36 patients (90% having overactive detrusor (OD and three having underactive/areflexic detrusor. Among the 36 patients with OD, 25 patients (62.5% had OD without detrusor-sphincter dyssynergy (DSD and 11 (27.5% had OD with DSD. Bladder management was advised based on the UDS findings. No significant correlation ( P > 0.05 was found between type of bladder and age or side and site of lesion. Conclusions: UDS is a useful tool to assess and manage the bladder following stroke with urinary incontinence. In this study, no significant correlation was found between UDS findings and site of lesion.

  15. Weekend physiotherapy practice in community hospitals in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottensmeyer, C Andrea; Chattha, Sanmeet; Jayawardena, Shemayi; McBoyle, Kelly; Wrong, Christine; Ellerton, Cindy; Mathur, Sunita; Brooks, Dina

    2012-01-01

    To analyze weekend physiotherapy services in acute-care community hospitals across Canada. Questionnaires were mailed to acute-care community hospitals (institutions with >100 inpatient beds, excluding psychiatric, mental health, paediatric, rehabilitation, tertiary, and long-term care facilities) across Canada from January to April 2010. The questionnaire collected information on patient referral criteria, staffing, workload, and compensation for weekend physiotherapy services and on the availability of other rehabilitation health professionals. Of 146 community hospitals deemed eligible, 104 (71%) responded. Weekend physiotherapy was offered at 69% of hospitals across Canada, but this rate varied: ≥75% in all regions except Quebec (30%). Hospitals with a high proportion of acute-care beds were more likely to offer weekend physiotherapy services (logistic regression, p=0.021). Services differed among Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays in terms of the numbers of both physiotherapists and physiotherapy assistants working (Kruskal-Wallis, pCanada. Method: Questionnaires were mailed to acute-care community hospitals (institutions with >100 inpatient beds, excluding psychiatric, mental health, paediatric, rehabilitation, tertiary, and long-term care facilities) across Canada from January to April 2010. The questionnaire collected information on patient referral criteria, staffing, workload, and compensation for weekend physiotherapy services and on the availability of other rehabilitation health professionals. Results: Of 146 community hospitals deemed eligible, 104 (71%) responded. Weekend physiotherapy was offered at 69% of hospitals across Canada, but this rate varied: ≥75% in all regions except Quebec (30%). Hospitals with a high proportion of acute-care beds were more likely to offer weekend physiotherapy services (logistic regression, p =0.021). Services differed among Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays in terms of the numbers of both physiotherapists and

  16. Decrease in weekend number of steps in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Vašíčková

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The activities with which young people spend the weekends do not support the prevalence of an active and healthy lifestyle enough. There are research evidence-based results that physical activity performed during weekend days is lower than physical activity in weekdays. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to find out to what extent young people achieve recommended levels of physical activity on weekends and to identify possible differences with regard to nationality or gender. METHODS: Research was realised between 2008 and 2011 at randomly selected schools in the Czech Republic and in Poland. The week long step count monitoring had 786 participants in the Czech Republic and 673 participants in Poland aged 15–16 years. The online system INDARES was used to answer questionnaires and gather data from pedometers. RESULTS: Results showed that young people on average record lower numbers of steps on weekends compared to schooldays (difference is 1356 step/day; F(1, 1458 = 147.61; p ≈ .000; ω2 = .232***. The most critical day of the week is Sunday. The simplified recommended amount of 11,000 steps/day is achieved by 65.93% of Czech boys and 64.73% of Czech girls (49.28% of Polish boys and 42.92% of Polish girls on schooldays, whereas only by 42.59% of Czech boys and 43.8% of Czech girls (40.1% of Polish boys and 39.27% of Polish girls on weekends. There were no significant differences between boys and girls in terms of average number of steps per day. CONCLUSION: Reducing the weekend would certainly not secure effective advancement of physical activity and healthy lifestyle among young people, yet a change of their values and creating a habit of spending weekends actively is imperative. Use of the internet mainly in boys and use of pedometers mainly in girls are some of the tools to stimulate physical activity and healthy lifestyle in youth.

  17. Weekend sleep intervention for workers with habitually short sleep periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Tomohide; Takahashi, Masaya; Sato, Tomoaki; Sasaki, Takeshi; Oka, Tatsuo; Iwasaki, Kenji

    2011-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether extended sleep time during the weekend improves alertness and performance during the subsequent week for workers who are habitually short on sleep time. Daytime employees in the manufacturing industry [38.3, standard deviation (SD) 8.1 years old, mean weekday sleep ≤6 hours] participated in a study that lasted 3 successive weeks. Participants were instructed to stay in bed for ≥8 hours between 22:00-09:00 hours on weekends during the first week as a sleep intervention condition and keep their habitual sleep-wake patterns as a habitual weekend sleep condition beginning the weekend of the second week through Thursday of the third week. Half the participants underwent the conditions in one order and the other half in the reverse. Sleep was monitored by an actigraph. A psychomotor vigilance task, subjective fatigue, and blood pressure were measured on Monday and Thursday during the afternoon each week. Sleep duration on weekends was approximately 2 hours longer per day during the intervention. However, sleep duration during weekdays following the intervention returned to shorter periods. Significantly shorter reaction times and a smaller number of lapses on the psychomotor vigilance task were found on Mondays after the intervention than after the habitual weekend sleep. The opposite results, however, were observed on Thursdays. Sleep extension on weekends may be effective in improving alertness and performance during the first days in subsequent weeks among workers with short sleep times. These benefits might be maintained if sufficient sleep duration continues.

  18. Possibilities оf use of testosterone undecanoate in treatment in stroke male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yu. Morgunov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have studied 154 men with the first hemispheric ischemic stroke. Clinical and laboratory studies have revealed the androgen deficiency in 66.3 %, with its frequency higher in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (50 % and 26.3 %, respectively. Forty-two men with diabetes mellitus type 2 and acquired androgenic deficit received replacing treatment with testosterone undecanoate. After 2 years from the beginning of treatment, there were the decrease in clinical severity of androgenic deficit, the increase of total and free testosterone levels, and muscle power in the main group compared to the controls. Body mass index, glycated hemoglobin, cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoproteins have decreased as well. Secondary stroke has developed in 3 (7.1 % patients of the main group and in 5 (16.6 % controls. The treatment with androgens has a positive effect on risk factors of secondary ischemic stroke. It is an effective method for improvement of social adaptation of men survived after the stroke..

  19. Role of the MMP9 gene in hemorrhagic transformations after tissue-type plasminogen activator treatment in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Cadenas, Israel; Del Río-Espínola, Alberto; Carrera, Caty; Domingues-Montanari, Sophie; Mendióroz, Maite; Delgado, Pilar; Rosell, Anna; Ribó, Marc; Giralt, Dolors; Quintana, Manolo; Castellanos, Mar; Obach, Victor; Martínez, Sergi; Freijo, Mari Mar; Jiménez-Conde, Jordi; Roquer, Jaume; Martí-Fábregas, Joan; Molina, Carlos A; Alvarez-Sabín, José; Montaner, Joan

    2012-05-01

    Despite the benefits of tissue-type plasminogen activator treatment, some stroke patients experience adverse hemorrhagic transformations (HT). Plasma protein levels of MMP9 have been associated with HT occurrence. We aimed to analyze the association of the MMP9 gene with HT occurrence. We analyzed the MMP9 gene in blood samples from 885 stroke patients treated with tissue-type plasminogen activator by tag-SNP, imputed SNP, direct sequencing, and RNA expression. We did not observe any significant association between MMP9 genetic variations or MMP9 expression and HT occurrence. Moreover, no association was found between MMP9 expression and MMP9 polymorphisms. Genetic variations in the MMP9 gene are not associated with HT occurrence in tissue-type plasminogen activator-treated patients.

  20. Summer weekend sun exposure and sunburn among a New Zealand urban population, 1994-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Geraldine Geri F H; Reeder, Anthony I; Gray, Andrew R; McGee, Rob

    2013-08-30

    To describe summer weekend sun exposure and sunburn experience, 1994-2006, among urban New Zealanders (15-69 years) by sex, age group, skin type and outdoor activity type. A series of five telephone surveys undertaken in the summers of 1994, 1997, 1999-2000, 2002-3 and 2005-6 provided a sample of 6,195 respondents with usable data from five major cities (Auckland, Hamilton, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin). Respondents were administered a Computer Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI) questionnaire which sought sociodemographic information, sun exposure, and sunburn experience during the most recent weekend. Overall, 69% of the sample had spent at least 15 minutes outdoors between 11am and 4pm. Weekend sunburn was reported by 21%, and was more common among males, young adults and those with highly sun-sensitive skin than females, older adults and those with less sensitive skin. The head/face/neck was the body area most frequently and severely sunburned. Sunburn was associated with greater time spent outdoors and occurred most frequently during water-based (29%) and passive recreational activities (25%) and paid work (23%). Sun protection strategies could usefully be targeted not only towards at-risk population groups, but also towards those activities and contexts most strongly associated with potentially harmful sun exposure.

  1. Giant phaeochromocytoma presenting with an acute stroke: reappraising phaeochromocytoma surveillance for the neurofibromatosis type 1 phakomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yingshan; Tan, Leon Yuan Rui; Ho, Yong Howe; Leow, Melvin Khee Shing

    2017-11-03

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a multisystem genetic disorder associated with reduced lifespan attributed largely to malignancy and vascular causes. One of the tumours associated with NF1 is phaeochromocytoma. The phaeochromocytoma has earned the moniker, a 'great mimicker', due to its varied means of presentation. We present a patient with NF1 who was diagnosed with a giant 20 cm phaeochromocytoma after suffering from an ischaemic stroke. Current guidelines do not advocate surveillance of phaeochromocytoma in asymptomatic patients with NF1, unlike other genetic syndromes associated with phaeochromocytoma. However, there is increasing evidence that this approach may not help in the early detection and treatment of this potentially life-threatening disease. Our patient remained hypertensive after surgery despite achieving biochemical cure. The suggested chronicity of the underlying tumour in our patient is a reminder to practising clinicians to rethink our strategy in identifying phaeochromocytoma in adults with NF1. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Chronotype influences activity circadian rhythm and sleep: differences in sleep quality between weekdays and weekend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Jacopo A; Roveda, Eliana; Montaruli, Angela; Galasso, Letizia; Weydahl, Andi; Caumo, Andrea; Carandente, Franca

    2015-04-01

    Several studies have shown the differences among chronotypes in the circadian rhythm of different physiological variables. Individuals show variation in their preference for the daily timing of activity; additionally, there is an association between chronotype and sleep duration/sleep complaints. Few studies have investigated sleep quality during the week days and weekends in relation to the circadian typology using self-assessment questionnaires or actigraphy. The purpose of this study was to use actigraphy to assess the relationship between the three chronotypes and the circadian rhythm of activity levels and to determine whether sleep parameters respond differently with respect to time (weekdays versus the weekend) in Morning-types (M-types), Neither-types (N-types) and Evening-types (E-types). The morningness-eveningness questionnaire (MEQ) was administered to 502 college students to determine their chronotypes. Fifty subjects (16 M-types, 15 N-types and 19 E-types) were recruited to undergo a 7-days monitoring period with an actigraph (Actiwacth® actometers, CNT, Cambridge, UK) to evaluate their sleep parameters and the circadian rhythm of their activity levels. To compare the amplitude and the acrophase among the three chronotypes, we used a one-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey-Kramer post-hoc test. To compare the Midline Estimating Statistic of Rhythm (MESOR) among the three chronotypes, we used a Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test followed by pairwise comparisons that were performed using Dunn's procedure with a Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. The analysis of each sleep parameter was conducted using the mixed ANOVA procedure. The results showed that the chronotype was influenced by sex (χ(2) with p = 0.011) and the photoperiod at birth (χ(2) with p sleep parameters: Sleep end, Assumed Sleep, Immobility Time and Sleep Efficiency. Sleep Efficiency showed the same patterns as did Assumed Sleep and Immobility Time: the Sleep

  3. Efektivitas Layanan Weekend Banking (Studi BMI KCP PIM .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifa Farhah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Effectiveness of Weekend Banking Services (Study at BMI KCP PIM. The aim of this research is to analyze the effectiveness of weekend banking services at Bank Muamalat Indonesia. The method that used in this research is linier regression and. The result shown that the value of adjusted R-squared was 0.313409. It means that customer’s preference (dependent variable was influenced by location, brand image, and, product and services in the amount of 31.34% and the others 68.66% was influenced by the others factor. From the paired sample t-test shown that the weekend banking services still not effective to increase the third party funds  DOI:10.15408/aiq.v6i1.1370

  4. Botulinum Toxin Type a Injection, Followed by Home-Based Functional Training for Upper Limb Hemiparesis after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, Toru; Kakuda, Wataru; Taguchi, Kensuke; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Sase, Yousuke; Abo, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been reported to be an effective treatment for limb spasticity after stroke. However, the reduction in the spasticity after BoNT-A injection alone does not ensure an improvement in the active motor function of the affected limb. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinical effects of a BoNT-A injection,…

  5. Bion's Agony in The Long Week-End.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Robert

    2017-08-01

    In The Long Week-End Wilfred Bion focuses on his emotional distress during the first twenty-one years of his life. Rarely employing psychoanalytic terminology, he attempts to explore his emotional experience directly, struggling to find a language that could capture the complexity of inner life. Central to The Long Week-End is his desire to communicate how easily he could feel unintelligent, inept, weak, ashamed, guilty, angry, frightened, and cowardly in various settings. This self-criticism at times undermines his theoretical stance in this work, as he emphasizes the importance of doubt and uncertainty when attempting to comprehend most dimensions of experience.

  6. [The peculiarities of the application of transcranial magnetic therapy and electrical stimulation for the treatment of the patients presenting with various types of stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikova, E A

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the results of the authors' research, including analysis of the clinical and instrumental data concerning 203 patients with, stroke are presented. It is shown that the clinical effectiveness of the transcranial methods incorporated in the combined rehabilitation programs depends on the type of stroke and localization of the lesions. Specifically, the patients presenting with ischemic stroke of hemispheric localization experienced a neurophysiologically confirmed significant clinical improvement that became apparent after the consistent application of transcranial magnetic therapy and micropolarization. In the patients with ischemic stroke of stem localization, the positive influence on psychomotor recovery was achieved with the application of transcranial magnetic therapy, but transcranial micropolarization did not have an appreciable effect on the recovery of such patients. The patients presenting with hemorrhagic stroke did not experience any significant improvement of psychomotor parameters from transcranial magnetic therapy and transcranial micropolarization. The likely mechanism underlying the recovery of psychomotor processes under effect of transcranial magnetic therapy in the patients with ischemic stroke is the normalization of the frequency of interaction between brain structures. In addition, in the patients with ischemic stroke of hemispheric localization and in the patients with hemorrhagic stroke electrical myostimulation has a marked impact on the psychomotor recovery only in case of functional treatment. In the patients suffering from ischemic stroke of stem localization non-functional electromyostimulation significantly improves motor functions and cognitive motor control.

  7. Effects of Mirror Therapy in Stroke Patients With Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervane Vural, Secil; Nakipoglu Yuzer, Guldal Funda; Sezgin Ozcan, Didem; Demir Ozbudak, Sibel; Ozgirgin, Nese

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the effects of mirror therapy on upper limb motor functions, spasticity, and pain intensity in patients with hemiplegia accompanied by complex regional pain syndrome type 1. Randomized controlled trial. Training and research hospital. Adult patients with first-time stroke and simultaneous complex regional pain syndrome type 1 of the upper extremity at the dystrophic stage (N=30). Both groups received a patient-specific conventional stroke rehabilitation program for 4 weeks, 5 d/wk, for 2 to 4 h/d. The mirror therapy group received an additional mirror therapy program for 30 min/d. We evaluated the scores of the Brunnstrom recovery stages of the arm and hand for motor recovery, wrist and hand subsections of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) and motor items of the FIM-motor for functional status, Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) for spasticity, and visual analog scale (VAS) for pain severity. After 4 weeks of rehabilitation, both groups had significant improvements in the FIM-motor and VAS scores compared with baseline scores. However, the scores improved more in the mirror therapy group than the control group (P<.001 and P=.03, respectively). Besides, the patients in the mirror therapy arm showed significant improvement in the Brunnstrom recovery stages and FMA scores (P<.05). No significant difference was found for MAS scores. In patients with stroke and simultaneous complex regional pain syndrome type 1, addition of mirror therapy to a conventional stroke rehabilitation program provides more improvement in motor functions of the upper limb and pain perception than conventional therapy without mirror therapy. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of botulinum toxin type A for spastic foot in post-stroke patients enrolled in a rehabilitation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Halley Carvalho Pimentel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A on spastic foot in stroke patients in a rehabilitation program. Method: Hemiparetic stroke patients (n=21 enrolled in a rehabilitation program were divided into two groups. The first group (n=11 received a total of 300UI BTX-A, and the second group (n=10 received 100 UI BTX-A. All patients were assessed at baseline and 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after injection for Modified Ashworth Score, time walking 10 meters, and the Functional Independence Measure (mFIM motor score. Results: The higher-dose group exhibited a significant improvement in spasticity, and both groups showed an improvement in time walking 10 meters and mFIM, with no significant differences between them. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that gains in gait velocity and functional independence were not correlated to BTX-A dose.

  9. Weekend-weekday lightning variability for an urban region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, M. L.; Stallins, J. A.; Ashley, W. S.

    2011-12-01

    We characterized differences in warm-season weekday and weekend aerosol conditions and cloud-to- ground (CG) flashes (1995-2008) for an 80,000 square kilometer region around Atlanta, Georgia. Under weekday aerosol concentrations, a greater augmentation of CG flash activity within a 100 km radius around Atlanta was found. On weekends these effects contracted toward the city. This minimized any weekly anthropogenic cycle over the more densely populated urban center even though this location had a higher flash density, a higher percentage of days with flashes, and stronger peak currents over the course of a week compared to the surrounding region. The sharper contrasts in weekday and weekend lightning regime developed outside the perimeter of the city over non urban land uses. Here lightning on weekend and weekdays differed more in its density, frequency, polarity, and peak current. Across the full extent of the study region, weekday peak currents were stronger and flash days more frequent, suggesting that weekly CG lightning signals have a regional component not tied to a single city source.

  10. Cholecystectomy During the Weekend Increases Patients' Length of Hospital Stay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2016-01-01

    30 days between week time and weekend time. A longer postoperative length of stay was observed for patients operated on Fridays and Saturdays even though surgical complication rates were alike between weekdays. Patients with acute cholecystitis had a longer length of stay on Saturdays. CONCLUSION: We...

  11. Risk of stroke and cardiovascular events after ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack in patients with type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome: secondary analysis of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callahan, Alfred; Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B

    2011-01-01

    To perform a secondary analysis of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial, which tested the effect of treatment with atorvastatin in reducing stroke in subjects with a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack, to explore the effects of treatment...

  12. Activated protein C analog protects from ischemic stroke and extends the therapeutic window of tissue-type plasminogen activator in aged female mice and hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaoming; Zhao, Zhen; Chow, Nienwen; Rajput, Padmesh S; Griffin, John H; Lyden, Patrick D; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2013-12-01

    3K3A-activated protein C (APC) protects young, healthy male rodents after ischemic stroke. 3K3A-APC is currently under development as a neuroprotectant for acute ischemic stroke in humans. Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable recommends that after initial studies in young, healthy male animals, further studies should be performed in females, aged animals, and animals with comorbid conditions. Here, we studied the effects of delayed 3KA-APC therapy alone and with tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) in aged female mice and spontaneously hypertensive rats. We used Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable recommendations for ensuring good scientific inquiry. Murine recombinant 3K3A-APC (0.2 mg/kg) alone or with recombinant tPA (10 mg/kg) was given intravenously 4 hours after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in aged female mice and rats and after embolic stroke in spontaneously hypertensive rat. 3K3A-APC was additionally administered within 3 to 7 days after stroke. The neuropathological analysis and neurological scores, foot-fault, forelimb asymmetry, and adhesive removal tests were performed within 7 and 28 days of stroke. In all models, tPA alone had no effects on the infarct volume or behavior. 3K3A-APC alone or with tPA reduced the infarct volume 7 days after the middle cerebral artery occlusion in aged female mice and embolic stroke in spontaneously hypertensive rat by 62% to 66% and 50% to 53%, respectively, significantly improved (Pmice, 3K3A-APC was protective within 4 weeks of stroke. 3K3A-APC protects from ischemic stroke and extends the therapeutic window of tPA in aged female mice and in spontaneously hypertensive rat with a comorbid condition.

  13. Cost-Effectiveness of Treating Upper Limb Spasticity Due to Stroke with Botulinum Toxin Type A: Results from the Botulinum Toxin for the Upper Limb after Stroke (BoTULS Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Steen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Stroke imposes significant burdens on health services and society, and as such there is a growing need to assess the cost-effectiveness of stroke treatment to ensure maximum benefit is derived from limited resources. This study compared the cost-effectiveness of treating post-stroke upper limb spasticity with botulinum toxin type A plus an upper limb therapy programme against the therapy programme alone. Data on resource use and health outcomes were prospectively collected for 333 patients with post-stroke upper limb spasticity taking part in a randomized trial and combined to estimate the incremental cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY gained of botulinum toxin type A plus therapy relative to therapy alone. The base case incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of botulinum toxin type A plus therapy was £93,500 per QALY gained. The probability of botulinum toxin type A plus therapy being cost-effective at the England and Wales cost-effectiveness threshold value of £20,000 per QALY was 0.36. The point estimates of the ICER remained above £20,000 per QALY for a range of sensitivity analyses, and the probability of botulinum toxin type A plus therapy being cost-effective at the threshold value did not exceed 0.39, regardless of the assumptions made.

  14. A weekend effect in the seismicity of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorin, A. Ya.

    2014-12-01

    The study of weekly cyclicity of any one process is one method to search for anthropogenic, in particular, technogenic effects. The present work is devoted to a detailed study of weekly and diurnal inhomogeneities of distribution for earthquakes in Japan. Statistically significant differences between the parameters of the studied distributions were revealed for Sundays (compared to other days of week) in the series of weak, nonrepresentative earthquakes. Samplings of stronger earthquakes did not show that effect. This suggests that a weekend effect in the series of weak earthquakes is an apparent one caused by the noise discrimination of seismic waves. However, noise discrimination cannot explain the nighttime decrease in earthquake number after its day growth on Sunday. With respect to this, different hypotheses explaining the appearance of a weekend effect in the studied earthquake catalog of Japan are considered.

  15. Restaurant opening times for the Ascension and Whitsun weekends

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    For the Ascension weekend (from Thursday, 17 May to Sunday, 20 May inclusive) and the Whitsun weekend (from Saturday, 26 May to Monday, 28 May inclusive), the restaurant opening times will be as follows: Restaurant No.1 will be open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., with hot meals being served from 11.30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 6.30 p.m. to 8 p.m. (except Friday 18 May, when the restaurant will be open as normal). Restaurant No.2 will be closed (except Friday 18 May, when the restaurant will be open as normal). Restaurant No.3 will be closed.

  16. Planning ahead: Improving escalation plans before the weekend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkali, Angeliki; Black, Duncan; Smee, Elizabeth; Deshraj, Anshul; Smallwood, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Handover is the system by which responsibility for patient care is transferred between healthcare professionals. A significant aspect of handover is the existence of an escalation plan for each patient in case of deterioration over the weekend. According to the Royal College of Physicians, all patients should have a clear escalation plan documented in the notes before a weekend, since parent medical teams (Consultant team in charge of care) are best placed to make these decisions. If left to on-call teams, at a time of deterioration over a weekend, they might not have all available information, the patient might be unable to be involved in the decisions, and the family might not be consulted. With this is mind, we decided to analyse the existing handover process in a medium sized district general hospital, with the aim of improving the process and the documentation of escalation plans. The results from our retrospective analysis of the system in place revealed a significant lack of documentation of escalation plans in the medical notes. Three sample wards were selected to analyse the current handover system and test proposed measures before hospital-wide implementation. After trialling of a physical handover meeting in addition to the existing intranet system and a proforma for the Friday ward round, the documentation of escalation plans in the patients' notes improved from 9.1% to 41.1%. Based on these results, as well as formal feedback from junior doctors and informal feedback from other staff, the physical handover meeting and Friday ward round proforma will be implemented throughout the Trust. Our interventions led to an improvement in the documentation of escalation plans in our hospital, thus saving precious time in the event of a patient's deterioration. This also ensures that families and patients are involved in the decision making process and kept informed, and reduces the burden for the weekend on-call teams.

  17. Diabetes self management training and psychological support weekends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smeesters, Hannah; Skinner, Chas; Martin, Jo

    2007-01-01

    A lack of knowledge in diabetes self management skills, such as insulin administration, glucose testing and diet, have been identified in a high percentage of adults with the condition ever since insulin treatment was first introduced (Watkins et al, 1967; Murata et al, 2003). Adult support...... weekends that offer diabetes information and emotional support in an informal workshop setting may help enable better self management for people with diabetes by addressing these issues....

  18. Gender Differences in Risks of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Their Association with Metabolic Syndrome in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Fang Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke are common complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. We aimed to explore the differences in the risks of CHD and stroke between Chinese women and men with T2DM and their association with metabolic syndrome (MS. This study included 1514 patients with T2DM. The Asian Guidelines of ATPIII (2005 were used for MS diagnosis, and the UKPDS risk engine was used to evaluate the 10-year CHD and stroke risks. Women had lower CHD risk (15.3% versus 26.3%, fatal CHD risk (11.8% versus 19.0%, stroke risk (8.4% versus 10.3%, and fatal stroke risk (1.4% versus 1.6% compared with men with T2DM (p<0.05–0.001. The CHD risk (28.4% versus 22.6%, p<0.001 was significantly higher in men with MS than in those without MS. The CHD (16.2% versus 11.0%, p<0.001 and stroke risks (8.9% versus 5.8%, p<0.001 were higher in women with MS than in those without MS. In conclusion, our findings indicated that Chinese women with T2DM are less susceptible to CHD and stroke than men. Further, MS increases the risk of both these events, highlighting the need for comprehensive metabolic control in T2DM.

  19. Benefits of Attending a Weekend Childhood Cancer Survivor Family Retreat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashore, Lisa; Bender, Joyce

    2017-09-01

    To explore the long-term benefits to families of childhood cancer survivors who attended a weekend childhood cancer survivor family retreat. Descriptive-qualitative study including families who had attended the weekend retreat at least once but not in the past 12 months, and who attend a large pediatric hematology and oncology cancer survivorship program in Texas. A semistructured interview guide was used during three audio-taped focus groups to explore the benefits of having attended a weekend retreat. Descriptive qualitative analysis was used to analyze the focus groups' transcripts. Seven families participated in the focus groups, and the themes identified were reconnecting (with others or family), putting life in perspective, and changing outlook on life. Retreats offer families of cancer survivors opportunities to reconnect with others and their own family members in a therapeutic environment. These reconnections in a therapeutic environment enriched the families' positive outlooks on life and changed their perspectives. Families of childhood cancer survivors report a lack of support following the completion of therapy. Retreats in a nonclinical therapeutic setting optimize family-perceived support, relationship building, and reconnecting survivor families. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  20. Multicenter Study of Adverse Events After Intravenous Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Gotico, Hannah; Lightfoot, Tiffany; Meighan, Melissa

    2017-02-01

    The approved treatment by the Food and Drug Administration for acute ischemic stroke is intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV tPA). After IV tPA administration, patients are monitored for adverse events using an American Heart Association/American Stroke Association guideline instituted in 1996. There is limited evidence describing the safest and most efficient method to monitor patients during the first 24 hours after tPA administration. Although the overall rates of adverse events have been reported, the time when patients may be at most risk for an event has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to identify the time of adverse event occurrences in the first 24 hours after IV tPA administration. This was a descriptive, retrospective chart review study of patients admitted to an integrated health system and treated with IV tPA for acute stroke between July 2010 and July 2012. Charts were reviewed for adverse events using the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Global Trigger Tool for Measuring Adverse Events. Possible chart indicators of adverse events or "triggers" included neurological decline, vital signs elevated above specified parameters, and emergent imaging. Adverse events included episodes of neurological decline, angioedema, allergic reactions, bleeding, and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The timing of each detected event was determined, and descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Fourteen adverse events (2.8%) were detected in a population of 498 patients. Reactions consisted of allergic reaction (n = 1), angioedema (n = 1), neurological decline without ICH (n = 1), gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 1), bleeding gums (n = 1), and high-risk ICH (n = 9). Thirteen of the 14 adverse events (92.9%) occurred within the first 12 hours after IV tPA administration. Close monitoring during the first 12 hours after IV tPA treatment may be essential. However, close monitoring after 12 hours may not contribute significantly to

  1. Ankle-brachial index and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity are risk factors for ischemic stroke in patients with Type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes is increasing. While brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (BaPWV and ankle-brachial index (ABI are known to be associated with ischemic cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, whether these measures predict the risk of ischemic cerebrovascular disease in diabetic patients remains unclear. 117 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled in this study. According to the results of head magnetic resonance imaging, the patients were divided into a diabetes-only group (n = 55 and a diabetes and ischemic stroke group (n = 62. We then performed ABI and BaPWV examinations for all patients. Compared with the diabetes-only group, we found decreased ABI and increased BaPWV in the diabetes and ischemic stroke group. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that BaPWV and ABI were risk factors for ischemic stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes. Our findings indicate that decreased ABI and increased BaPWV are objective indicators of increased risk of ischemic stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  2. The provision of weekend physiotherapy services in tertiary-care hospitals in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Lauren; Bunston, Rebecca; Colangelo, Sarah; Kim, Dorothy; Nargi, Jessica; Hill, Kylie; Brooks, Dina

    2010-01-01

    To describe the provision of weekend physiotherapy (PT) services in tertiary-care hospitals in Canada. A prospective cross-sectional survey was conducted across tertiary-care hospitals, defined as those with university affiliation and at least one intensive care unit (ICU). Data were collected via telephone-administered questionnaires addressing hospital demographics, weekend staffing, workload, and weekend referral criteria. A response rate of 84% (n=36) was obtained. Of facilities providing weekend PT services (97%), 35 (100%) provided care on Saturdays, 32 (91%) on Sundays, and 33 (94%) on statutory holidays. Weekend services were staffed using permanent full-time (n=35; 100%) or part-time (n=28; 80%) in-patient staff or outsourced staff (n=1; 3%). The number of physiotherapists available on the weekend was smaller than the number available during the week (p<0.001). Common weekend referral criteria included cardiorespiratory problems (n=35; 100%), postoperative assessment of patients at risk for deterioration (n=32; 91%), and patients scheduled for discharge pending PT assessment (n=30; 86%). Both the scope and the number of staff available to provide PT services were less on the weekend than during the week. Despite the use of common criteria for weekend referral, variability in this service exists. Knowledge pertaining to current weekend PT services provides opportunities for harmonization of service delivery.

  3. Standby Conservation Plan No. 1: emergency weekend gasoline sales restrictions. Economic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-02-01

    The Emergency Weekend Sales Restrictions Plan has been designed to conserve gasoline and diesel fuel normally used for social and recreational purposes. The plan would authorize the Secretary of Energy to impose restrictions on the retail sale of motor fuels during weekend hours, defined as Friday noon to Sunday midnight. Only certain types of commercial vehicles and emergency vehicles could purchase fuel during these hours. The implementation of the measure is examined relative to a baseline economy characterized by a 15% petroleum shortfall. It is estimated that the measure would save 246,000 barrels per day of motor fuels, principally gasoline. Because the saved fuel can be made available to other sectors of the economy that are less petroleum intensive, it is projected that GNP would rise by approximately $7 billion as a result of the measure. The impact of the measure would vary sharply from one sector of the economy to another, however, with some industries experiencing losses in revenue. The cost of imposing the measure is preliminarily estimated at $5.2 million for nine months.

  4. CERN Summer Student Webfest: a weekend for science and creativity | 29 - 31 July 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Are you passionate about science? Do you like communicating that passion to the general public? Then come along to the CERN Summer Student Webfest on the weekend of 29-31 July! It is a grassroots initiative, open to all, that aims to spark new ideas that could innovate the future of web-based education about CERN, the LHC, particle physics, humanitarian matters and health.   The CERN Summer Student Webfest is a weekend of online web-based creativity modelled on the gatherings (sometimes called hackfests or hackathons) that energize many open-source communities. Participants will work in teams and design neat applications that encourage the public to learn more about science. The projects can range from designing online games for kids to crafting citizen science projects and developing low-cost mobile-phone-based cosmic ray detectors. You do not have to be a software or hardware expert to contribute: many types of skill sets are needed to develop a fun project, from writing and designing ...

  5. Exposure to workplace smoking bans and continuity of daily smoking patterns on workdays and weekends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Michael S; Shiffman, Saul; Chandra, Siddharth

    2018-05-01

    Individuals may compensate for workplace smoking bans by smoking more before or after work, or escaping bans to smoke, but no studies have conducted a detailed, quantitative analysis of such compensatory behaviors using real-time data. 124 daily smokers documented smoking occasions over 3weeks using ecological momentary assessment (EMA), and provided information on real-world exposure to smoking restrictions and type of workplace smoking policy (full, partial, or no bans). Mixed modeling and generalized estimating equations assessed effects of time of day, weekday (vs weekend), and workplace policy on mean cigarettes per hour (CPH) and reports of changing location to smoke. Individuals were most likely to change locations to smoke during business hours, regardless of work policy, and frequency of EMA reports of restrictions at work was associated with increased likelihood of changing locations to smoke (OR=1.11, 95% CI 1.05-1.16; pbusiness hours across weekdays and weekends. Smokers largely compensate for exposure to workplace smoking bans by escaping restrictions during business hours. Better understanding the effects of smoking bans on smoking behavior may help to improve their effectiveness and yield insights into determinants of smoking in more restrictive environments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Relationship between Brain Lesion Location and Aphasia Type in Persian Speaking Patients with Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Rezai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It has been many years that brain lesion analysis of different aphasia Syndromes has led the foundation to investigate the language representation and organization in the brain. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between brain lesion location and Broca's aphasia and Wernecke's aphasia in Persian speakers with stroke. Materials & Methods: In a single system design study, from 120 patients with stroke attending Emam Khomeyni and Loghman hospitals, Rofeyde, Karaj neurology, and Tabassom speech clinics and according to the Farsi Aphasia Test (FAT, syntactic comprehension subscale of Bilingual Aphasia Test (BAT, Farsi Aphasia Naming Test, and Apraxia Assessment inventory, only 9 patients with Broca’s aphasia and 2 with Wernicke’s aphasia were qualified to participate in this study. Patients’ brain lesion sites were determined by MRI. Patients with Broca’s aphasia were 5 male and 4 female Wernecke’s aphasia patients were 2 male. Results: External capsule-insula, rolandic operculum, inferior frontal gyrus, (precentral gyrus and postcentarl gyrus, and the anterior part of temporal gyrus were damaged in Broca’s aphasia patients (64±12.51 years old and the lesions of external capsule-insula, posterior part of temporal gyrus, anterior part of temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule were observed in Wernicke’s aphasia patients (66±8.48 years old. Conclusion: In no patient with Broca’s aphasia or Wernicke’s aphasia brain lesion confined only to Broca’s area or Wernicke’s area respectively. However, due to the limited number of participants in the present study, the extrapolation of the findings to other subjects with Broca’s or Wernicke’s aphasia would certainly be difficult.

  7. ESRD After Heart Failure, Myocardial Infarction, or Stroke in Type 2 Diabetic Patients With CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charytan, David M; Solomon, Scott D; Ivanovich, Peter; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Cooper, Mark E; McGill, Janet B; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Parfrey, Patrick; Singh, Ajay K; Burdmann, Emmanuel A; Levey, Andrew S; de Zeeuw, Dick; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; McMurray, John J V; Claggett, Brian; Lewis, Eldrin F; Pfeffer, Marc A

    2017-10-01

    How cardiovascular (CV) events affect progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), particularly in the setting of type 2 diabetes, remains uncertain. Observational study. 4,022 patients with type 2 diabetes, anemia, and chronic kidney disease from the Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events With Aranesp Therapy (TREAT). Postrandomization CV events. ESRD (defined as initiation of dialysis for >30 days, kidney transplantation, or refusal or nonavailability of renal replacement therapy) and post-ESRD mortality within 30 days and during overall follow-up after an intercurrent CV event. Population limited to clinical trial participants with diabetes and anemia. 155 of 652 (23.8%) ESRD cases occurred after an intercurrent CV event; 110 (16.9%) cases followed heart failure, 28 (4.3%) followed myocardial infarction, 12 (1.84%) followed stroke, and 5 (0.77%) followed multiple CV events. ESRD rate was higher within 30 days in individuals with an intercurrent CV event compared with those without an intercurrent event (HR, 22.2; 95% CI, 17.0-29.0). Compared to no intercurrent CV events, relative risks for ESRD were higher after the occurrence of heart failure overall (HR, 3.4; 95% CI, 2.7-4.2) and at 30 days (HR, 20.1; 95% CI, 14.5-27.9) than after myocardial infarction or stroke (Pfailure, are strongly associated with risk for ESRD. These findings underscore the need for kidney-specific therapies in addition to treatment of CV risk factors to lower ESRD incidence in diabetes. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. CERN Webfest: A weekend for science on the web

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    Are you passionate about science? Do you like communicating that passion to the general public? Then come along to the CERN Summer Student Webfest on the weekend of 3-4 August! It is a grassroots initiative by the summer students, open to all staff and users, and aims to spark new ideas that could innovate the future of web-based education about CERN, the LHC and particle physics.   The CERN Summer Student Webfest is a weekend of online web-based creativity modelled on the gatherings (sometimes called hackfests or hackathons) that energize many open-source communities. You can work with like-minded students and CERN staff to design and build demos of the web apps you would like to see online. Prizes will be awarded to the best projects, with a Grand Prize winner receiving a trip to the Mozilla Festival in London! Participants in the CERN Summer Student Webfest will work in teams and design neat applications that encourage the public to learn more about science and, in particular, CE...

  9. A retrospective cohort study on the risk of stroke in relation to a priori health knowledge level among people with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yun-Ju; Hu, Hsiao-Yun; Lee, Ya-Ling; Ku, Po-Wen; Yen, Yung-Feng; Chu, Dachen

    2017-05-22

    Intervention of diabetes care education with regular laboratory check-up in outpatient visits showed long-term benefits to reduce the risk of macrovascular complications among people with type 2 diabetes. However, research on the level of a priori health knowledge to the prevention of diabetic complications in community settings has been scarce. We therefore aimed to investigate the association of health knowledge and stroke incidence in patients with type 2 diabetes in Taiwan. A nationally representative sample of general Taiwanese population was selected using a multistage systematic sampling process from Taiwan National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) in 2005. Subjects were interviewed by a standardized face-to-face questionnaire in the survey, obtaining information of demographics, socioeconomic status, family medical history, obesity, health behaviors, and 15-item health knowledge assessment. The NHIS dataset was linked to Taiwan National Health Insurance claims data to retrieve the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in NHIS participants at baseline and identify follow-up incidence of stroke from 2005 to 2013. Univariate and multivariate Cox regressions were used to estimate the effect of baseline health knowledge level to the risk of stroke incidence among this group of people with type 2 diabetes. A total of 597 diabetic patients with a mean age of 51.28 years old and nearly half of males were analyzed. During the 9-year follow-up period, 65 new stroke cases were identified among them. Kaplan-Meier curves comparing the three groups of low/moderate/high knowledge levels revealed a statistical significance (p-value of log-rank test Taiwan. Development and delivery of health education on stroke prevention to people with type 2 diabetes are warranted.

  10. A systematic investigation of navigation impairment in chronic stroke patients : Evidence for three distinct types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessen, Michiel H.G.; Visser-Meily, Johanna M a; Meilinger, Tobias; Postma, Albert; de Rooij, Nicolien K; van der Ham, Ineke J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective In a recent systematic review, Claessen and van der Ham (2017) have analyzed the types of navigation impairment in the single-case study literature. Three dissociable types related to landmarks, locations, and paths were identified. This recent model as well as previous models of

  11. A cool Web challenge on a hot weekend

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Summer Student Webfest took place last weekend and brought dozens of young web enthusiasts to the Main Auditorium. Fifteen projects were presented in the Friday pitching session and after that the challenge was launched. And the winner is…   Five of the six members of the team behind the “Mother hunting” project during a brainstorming session. Image: Jiannan Zhang. … the “Mother hunting” game! An end-state particle explores CERN to try to reconstruct his (or her) family history of decay mothers and ancestors. Along the way, the particle meets famous physicists who teach it physics. A globe sphinx asks physics questions before the player can progress to various stages (read the game description on the dedicated page). Targeted at high school students, the game features very appealing 3D graphics, which accurately reproduce the layout of CERN. “Mother hunting” was one of the 15 projects presented at the...

  12. Comparison of crashes during public holidays and regular weekends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anowar, Sabreena; Yasmin, Shamsunnahar; Tay, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Traffic collisions and fatalities during the holiday festive periods are apparently on the rise in Alberta, Canada, despite the enhanced enforcement and publicity campaigns conducted during these periods. Using data from 2004 to 2008, this research identifies the factors that delineate between crashes that occur during public holidays and those occurring during normal weekends. We find that fatal and injury crashes are over-represented during holidays. Amongst the three risky behaviors targeted in the holiday blitzes (driver intoxication, unsafe speeding and restraint use), non-use of restraint is more prevalent whereas driver intoxication and unsafe speeding are less prevalent during holidays. The mixed results obtained suggest that it may be time to consider a more balanced approach to the enhanced enforcement and publicity campaigns. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Celebrating Benedict Kiely 2007 Benedict Kiely Weekend Keynote Address

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pierce

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Benedict Kiely (1919-2007 has an annual weekend devoted to his memory as one ofIreland’s leading writers in the modern period. The sixth such event was held in the newly-built Strule Arts Centre in Omagh in September 2007. Kiely lived most of his life in Dublin, pursuing a career as a journalist and a writer, but his roots were in County Tyrone. Educated by the Christian Brothers in Omagh, he embarked on a Jesuit novitiate in the Irish Midlands but this was cut short by a spinal injury, which meant a year of confinement on the broad of his back. Subsequently, he went on to read English and History at University College Dublin. His journalistic career took him first to the Irish Independent and then to the Irish Press, where he was literary editor. In the 1960s he took up visiting professorships at several North American colleges in Oregon and Tennessee. On his return he became well-known on Irish radio for talks and discussion programmes, and he was a regular contributor to Sunday Miscellany. A sharp observer of the Northern scene, he was particularly disturbed by the upsurge in violence in the recent Troubles, airing his grievances in imaginative works such as Proxopera (1977 andNothing Happens in Carmincross (1985. He died in Dublin on 9 February 2007 after a short illness, and after Requiem mass in Donnybrook he was laid to rest in the Dublin Road Cemetery in Omagh. The following is the text of the opening address I was invited to give at the sixth annual weekend. I spoke about Kiely’s sense of connection running through his writings.

  14. A higher body temperature is associated with haemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute stroke untreated with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rtPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leira, Rogelio; Sobrino, Tomás; Blanco, Miguel; Campos, Francisco; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; Castellanos, Mar; Moldes, Octavio; Millán, Mónica; Dávalos, Antoni; Castillo, José

    2012-02-01

    Higher body temperature is a prognostic factor of poor outcome in acute stroke. Our aim was to study the relationship between body temperature, HT (haemorrhagic transformation) and biomarkers of BBB (blood-brain barrier) damage in patients with acute ischaemic stroke untreated with rtPA (recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator). We studied 229 patients with ischaemic stroke <12 h from symptom onset. Body temperature was determined at admission and every 6 h during the first 3 days. HT was evaluated according to ECASS II (second European Co-operative Acute Stroke Study) criteria in a multimodal MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) at 72 h. We found that 55 patients (34.1%) showed HT. HT was associated with cardioembolic stroke (64.2% against 23.0%; P<0.0001), higher body temperature during the first 24 h (36.9°C compared with 36.5°C; P<0.0001), more severe stroke [NIHSS (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale) score, 14 (9-20) against 10 (7-15); P=0.002], and greater DWI (diffusion-weighted imaging) lesion volume at admission (23.2 cc compared with 13.2 cc; P<0.0001). Plasma MMP-9 (matrix metalloproteinase 9) (187.3 ng/ml compared with 44.2 ng/ml; P<0.0001) and cFn (cellular fibronectin) levels (16.3 μg/ml compared with 7.1 μg/ml; P=0.001) were higher in patients with HT. Body temperature within the first 24 h was independently associated with HT {OR (odds ratio), 7.3 [95% CI (confidence interval), 2.4-22.6]; P<0.0001} after adjustment for cardioembolic stroke subtype, baseline NIHSS score and DWI lesion volume. This effect remained unchanged after controlling for MMP-9 and cFn. In conclusion, high body temperature within the first 24 h after ischaemic stroke is a risk factor for HT in patients untreated with rtPA. This effect is independent of some biological signatures of BBB damage.

  15. Preventing stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hemorrhagic Stroke Ischemic Stroke Stroke Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ... any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should ...

  16. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stroke can cause lasting brain damage. People who survive a stroke need to relearn skills they lost because of ... them relearn those skills. The effects of a stroke depend on which area of the brain was ...

  17. 29 CFR 778.205 - Premiums for weekend and holiday work-example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Premiums for weekend and holiday work-example. 778.205....205 Premiums for weekend and holiday work—example. The application of section 7(e)(6) may be illustrated by the following example: Suppose an agreement of employment calls for the payment of $7.50 an...

  18. Drinking Plans and Drinking Outcomes: Examining Young Adults' Weekend Drinking Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trim, Ryan S.; Clapp, John D.; Reed, Mark B.; Shillington, Audrey; Thombs, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    This study examined relationships among drinking intentions, environments, and outcomes in a random sample of 566 undergraduate college students. Telephone interviews were conducted with respondents before and after a single weekend assessing drinking intentions for the coming weekend related to subsequent drinking behaviors. Latent class analyses…

  19. Short-term mortality in hip fracture patients admitted during weekends and holidays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, N B; Kehlet, H

    2006-01-01

    Acute surgical admission during weekends, with reduced staffing levels, has been associated with increased risk of mortality, but the effect of longer vacation/holiday periods has not been studied. We therefore examined early postoperative mortality in hip fracture patients admitted during weekends...

  20. Where are the Sunday babies? II. Declining weekend birth rates in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerchl, Alexander; Reinhard, Sarah C.

    2008-02-01

    Birth dates from almost 3 million babies born between 1969 and 2005 in Switzerland were analyzed for the weekday of birth. As in other countries but with unprecedented amplitude, a very marked non-random distribution was discovered with decreasing numbers of births on weekends, reaching -17.9% in 2005. While most of this weekend births avoidance rate is due to fewer births on Sundays (up to -21.7%), the downward trend is primarily a consequence of decreasing births on Saturdays (up to -14.5%). For 2005, these percentages mean that 3,728 fewer babies are born during weekends than could be expected from equal distribution. Most interestingly and surprisingly, weekend birth-avoiding rates are significantly correlated with birth numbers ( r = 0.86), i.e. the lower the birth number per year, the lower the number of weekend births. The increasing avoidance of births during weekends is discussed as being a consequence of increasing numbers of caesarean sections and elective labor induction, which in Switzerland reach 29.2 and 20.5%, respectively, in 2004. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that both primary and secondary caesarean sections are significantly correlated with weekend birth avoidance rates. It is therefore likely that financial aspects of hospitals are a factor determining the avoidance of weekend births by increasing the numbers of caesarean sections.

  1. The influence of the day of the week of hospital admission on the prognosis of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Juliana B; Goulart, Alessandra Carvalho; Alencar, Airlane P; Lotufo, Paulo A; Bensenor, Isabela M

    2013-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the weekday and weekend distribution of stroke case hospital admissions and their respective prognosis based on a sample from the Estudo de Mortalidade e Morbidade do Acidente Vascular Cerebral (EMMA), a cohort of stroke patients admitted to a community hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. We ascertained all consecutive cases of first-time strokes between April 2006 and December 2008 and performed a subsequent one-year follow-up. No association was found between frequency of hospital admissions due to ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes and the specific day of the week on which the admission occurred. However, ten-day and twelve-month case-fatality was higher in hemorrhagic stroke patients admitted at the weekend. We also found that intracerebral hemorrhage patients admitted on weekends had a worse survival rate (50%) compared with those admitted during weekdays (25.6%, P log-rank = 0.03). We found a multivariate hazard ratio of 2.49 (95%CI: 1.10-5.81, P trend = 0.03) for risk of death at the weekend compared to weekdays for intracerebral hemorrhage cases. No difference in survival was observed with respect to the overall sample of stroke or ischemic stroke patients.

  2. Molecular and Genetic Analyses of Collagen Type IV Mutant Mouse Models of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage Identify Mechanisms for Stroke Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanne, Marion; Jorgensen, Jeff; Gould, Douglas B

    2015-05-05

    Collagen type IV alpha1 (COL4A1) and alpha2 (COL4A2) form heterotrimers critical for vascular basement membrane stability and function. Patients with COL4A1 or COL4A2 mutations suffer from diverse cerebrovascular diseases, including cerebral microbleeds, porencephaly, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, the pathogenic mechanisms remain unknown, and there is a lack of effective treatment. Using Col4a1 and Col4a2 mutant mouse models, we investigated the genetic complexity and cellular mechanisms underlying the disease. We found that Col4a1 mutations cause abnormal vascular development, which triggers small-vessel disease, recurrent hemorrhagic strokes, and age-related macroangiopathy. We showed that allelic heterogeneity, genetic context, and environmental factors such as intense exercise or anticoagulant medication modulated disease severity and contributed to phenotypic heterogeneity. We found that intracellular accumulation of mutant collagen in vascular endothelial cells and pericytes was a key triggering factor of ICH. Finally, we showed that treatment of mutant mice with a US Food and Drug Administration-approved chemical chaperone resulted in a decreased collagen intracellular accumulation and a significant reduction in ICH severity. Our data are the first to show therapeutic prevention in vivo of ICH resulting from Col4a1 mutation and imply that a mechanism-based therapy promoting protein folding might also prevent ICH in patients with COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and anemia treated with Darbepoetin Alfa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skali, Hicham; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Parfrey, Patrick S

    2011-01-01

    More strokes were observed in the Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events With Aranesp Therapy (TREAT) among patients assigned to darbepoetin alfa. We sought to identify baseline characteristics and postrandomization factors that might explain this association....

  4. Paediatric stroke

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-02

    Apr 2, 2011 ... Ischemic Stroke Registry yielded an incidence of 3.3 cases per 100 000 children per year, of ... Neonatal stroke. The newborn period confers the highest risk period for childhood ischaemic stroke. Focal patterns of ischaemic brain injury to the perinatal brain are .... family history of young stroke/ thrombosis.

  5. The benefits of group music at the 1996 music weekend for women with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobia, D M; Shamos, E F; Harper, D M; Walch, S E; Currie, J L

    1999-01-01

    Music therapy has been proven to benefit cancer patients physically and emotionally. The Music Weekend for Women with Cancer was developed as a novel opportunity for participants to experience the healing powers of music amidst others who had a shared understanding of their illness. Fourteen female mixed cancer patients, three spouses, and one daughter attended the weekend from Friday evening through Sunday afternoon. Workshops and events centered on the use of music as a vehicle for expression of emotions, reflection, relaxation, communication, and enjoyment. Questionnaires were collected before the weekend to describe our population as well as three months after the weekend to assess any changes in their utilization of music and mood state. Although insufficiency of post-weekend data limited the potential for assessing the effects of the weekend on the participants' utilization of music and mood state, the extremely positive evaluations supported the role music can play in helping patients and families explore their reactions to cancer. Events such as this answer the call in the literature for more opportunities to use music and the arts in cancer education. The authors hope this weekend will serve as a prototype for future events that aim to offer the benefits of music.

  6. Weight rhythms: weight increases during weekends and decreases during weekdays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsama, Anna-Leena; Mattila, Elina; Ermes, Miikka; van Gils, Mark; Wansink, Brian; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2014-01-01

    The week's cycle influences sleep, exercise, and eating habits. An accurate description of weekly weight rhythms has not been reported yet - especially across people who lose weight versus those who maintain or gain weight. The daily weight in 80 adults (BMI 20.0-33.5 kg/m(2); age, 25-62 years) was recorded and analysed to determine if a group-level weekly weight fluctuation exists. This was a retrospective study of 4,657 measurements during 15-330 monitoring days. Semi-parametric regression was used to model the rhythm. A pattern of daily weight changes was found (p pattern was strongest for those who lost or maintained weight and weakest for those who slowly gained weight. Weight variations between weekends and weekdays should be considered as normal instead of signs of weight gain. Those who compensate the most are most likely to either lose or maintain weight over time. Long-term habits may make more of a difference than short-term splurges. People prone to weight gain could be counselled about the importance of weekday compensation. © 2014 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  7. Weight Rhythms: Weight Increases during Weekends and Decreases during Weekdays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Leena Orsama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The week's cycle influences sleep, exercise, and eating habits. An accurate description of weekly weight rhythms has not been reported yet - especially across people who lose weight versus those who maintain or gain weight. Methods: The daily weight in 80 adults (BMI 20.0-33.5 kg/m2; age, 25-62 years was recorded and analysed to determine if a group-level weekly weight fluctuation exists. This was a retrospective study of 4,657 measurements during 15-330 monitoring days. Semi-parametric regression was used to model the rhythm. Results: A pattern of daily weight changes was found (p Conclusion: Weight variations between weekends and weekdays should be considered as normal instead of signs of weight gain. Those who compensate the most are most likely to either lose or maintain weight over time. Long-term habits may make more of a difference than short-term splurges. People prone to weight gain could be counselled about the importance of weekday compensation.

  8. Bi-fuel System - Gasoline/LPG in A Used 4-Stroke Motorcycle - Fuel Injection Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthisripok, Tongchit; Phusakol, Nachaphat; Sawetkittirut, Nuttapol

    2017-10-01

    Bi-fuel-Gasoline/LPG system has been effectively and efficiently used in gasoline vehicles with less pollutants emission. The motorcycle tested was a used Honda AirBlade i110 - fuel injection type. A 3-litre LPG storage tank, an electronic fuel control unit, a 1-mm LPG injector and a regulator were securely installed. The converted motorcycle can be started with either gasoline or LPG. The safety relief valve was set below 48 kPa and over 110 kPa. The motorcycle was tuned at the relative rich air-fuel ratio (λ) of 0.85-0.90 to attain the best power output. From dynamometer tests over the speed range of 65-100 km/h, the average power output when fuelling LPG was 5.16 hp; dropped 3.9% from the use of gasoline91. The average LPG consumption rate from the city road test at the average speed of 60 km/h was 40.1 km/l, about 17.7% more. This corresponded to lower LPG’s energy density of about 16.2%. In emission, the CO and HC concentrations were 44.4% and 26.5% lower. Once a standard gas equipment set with ECU and LPG injector were securely installed and the engine was properly tuned up to suit LPG’s characteristics, the converted bi-fuel motorcycle offers efficiently, safely and economically performance with environmental friendly emission.

  9. The Italian real-life post-stroke spasticity survey: unmet needs in the management of spasticity with botulinum toxin type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picelli, A; Baricich, A; Cisari, C; Paolucci, Stefano; Smania, Nicola; Sandrini, Giorgio

    The present national survey seeking to identify unmet needs in the management of spasticity with botulinum toxin type A focused on the use of OnabotulinumoxinA, since this is the brand with the widest range of licensed indications in Italy. Physicians from twenty-four Italian neurorehabilitation units compiled a questionnaire about "real-life" post-stroke spasticity management. OnabotulinumtoxinA was reported to be used in the following average doses: upper limb 316.7 ± 79.1 units; lower limb 327.8 ± 152.3; upper and lower limb 543.7 ± 123.7 units. Of the physicians surveyed, 37.5% felt that increasing the frequency of OnabotulinumtoxinA injection would improve its efficacy; 70.8% use electrical stimulation/electromyography guidance (one fourth of injections with no instrumental guidance). Instrumental evaluation was used by 41.7% of the physicians. The participants expressed the view that early identification of post-stroke spasticity would be facilitated by the availability of a post-stroke checklist, and that this should be used by physiotherapists (91.7%), physiatrists (58.3%), family doctors (50%), stroke unit physicians (25%), patients and caregivers (79.2%). According to our findings, the management of poststroke spasticity has several unmet needs that, were they addressed, might improve these patients' clinical outcomes and quality of life. These needs concern patient follow-up, where a clearly defined pathway is lacking; furthermore, there is a need to use maximum doses per treatment and to ensure early intervention on post-stroke spasticity.

  10. Japanese Adaptation of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale-39 (SAQOL-39): Comparative Study among Different Types of Aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Akane; Kamiya, Kentaro; Tatsumi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Makihiko; Horiguchi, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a Japanese version of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale-39 (SAQOL-39), designated as SAQOL-39-J, and used psychometric methods to examine its acceptability and reliability. The acceptability and reliability of SAQOL-39-J, which was developed from the English version using a standard translation and back-translation method, were examined in 54 aphasia patients using standard psychometric methods. The acceptability and reliability of SAQOL-39-J were then compared among patients with different types of aphasia. SAQOL-39-J showed good acceptability, internal consistency (Cronbach's α score = .90), and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = .97). Broca's aphasia patients showed the lowest total scores and communication scores on SAQOL-39-J. The Japanese version of SAQOL-39, SAQOL-39-J, provides acceptable and reliable data in Japanese stroke patients with aphasia. Among different types of aphasia, Broca's aphasia patients had the lowest total and communication SAQOL-39-J scores. Further studies are needed to assess the effectiveness of health care interventions on health-related quality of life in this population. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Combination Low Dose Tissue Type-Plasminogen Activator plus Annexin A2 for Improving Thrombolytic Stroke Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghua eJiang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Risk of hemorrhagic transformation, incomplete reperfusion, neurotoxicity and a short treatment time window comprise major challenges for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA thrombolytic stroke therapy. Improving tPA therapy has become one of the highest priorities in the stroke field. This mini review article focuses on our recent efforts aimed at evaluating a novel combination approach of low-dose tPA plus recombinant annexin A2 (rA2, a tPA and plasminogen co-receptor, that might enhance tPA thrombolytic efficacy, while reducing its associated complications related to intracerebral hemorrhagic (ICH transformation. Results of our experimental studies using a focal embolic stroke model in rats support the feasibility of the combination approach and suggest the potential for successful clinical translation.

  12. Dietary patterns on weekdays and weekend days in 4–14-year-old Danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothausen, Berit Worm; Matthiessen, Jeppe; Andersen, L. F.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about dietary patterns on weekdays and weekend days in children, and the aim of the present study was to investigate 4–14-year-old children's dietary patterns specifically on weekdays (Monday–Thursday) and weekend days (Saturday–Sunday). Dietary data were derived from the Danish...... National Survey of Dietary Habits and Physical Activity 2003–8, where a total of 784 children aged 4–14 years completed a 7 d pre-coded food record. Principal component analysis was used to identify dietary patterns in the age groups 4–6, 7–10 and 11–14 years. Consistently, two dietary patterns, labelled...... ‘processed’ and ‘health conscious’, emerged on both weekdays and weekend days. Factor scores from corresponding dietary patterns were significantly correlated between weekdays and weekend days with the exception of the ‘health conscious’ pattern in the 7–10-year-olds. Within each age group, children...

  13. Differences in Danish children's diet quality on weekdays v. weekend days

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothausen, Berit Worm; Matthiessen, Jeppe; Hoppe, Camilla

    2012-01-01

    appeared as a mix of the diets on weekdays and weekend days. Conclusions Significant differences and distinct characteristic patterns were found in children's diet quality during weekdays, Fridays and weekend days. The present study suggests that in prevention of childhood overweight and obesity, more......Objective To compare differences in children's diet quality on weekdays (Monday–Thursday), Fridays and weekend days. Design A representative cross-sectional study in which participants completed a 7 d pre-coded food record. Mean intakes of energy, macronutrients and selected food items (g/10 MJ......) as well as energy density were compared between weekdays, Fridays and weekend days for each gender in three age groups (4–6, 7–10 and 11–14 years) using Tobit analysis to account for zero intakes. Setting The Danish National Survey of Dietary Habits and Physical Activity 2003–2008. Subjects Children (n...

  14. Causal Associations of Adiposity and Body Fat Distribution With Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke Subtypes, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Mendelian Randomization Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Caroline E; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Palmer, Tom M; White, Jon; Prieto-Merino, David; Zabaneh, Delilah; Engmann, Jorgen E L; Shah, Tina; Wong, Andrew; Warren, Helen R; McLachlan, Stela; Trompet, Stella; Moldovan, Max; Morris, Richard W; Sofat, Reecha; Kumari, Meena; Hyppönen, Elina; Jefferis, Barbara J; Gaunt, Tom R; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Zhou, Ang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Ryan, Andy; Mutsert, Renée de; Noordam, Raymond; Caulfield, Mark J; Jukema, J Wouter; Worrall, Bradford B; Munroe, Patricia B; Menon, Usha; Power, Chris; Kuh, Diana; Lawlor, Debbie A; Humphries, Steve E; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Sattar, Naveed; Kivimaki, Mika; Price, Jacqueline F; Davey Smith, George; Dudbridge, Frank; Hingorani, Aroon D; Holmes, Michael V; Casas, Juan P

    2017-06-13

    The implications of different adiposity measures on cardiovascular disease etiology remain unclear. In this article, we quantify and contrast causal associations of central adiposity (waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index [WHRadjBMI]) and general adiposity (body mass index [BMI]) with cardiometabolic disease. Ninety-seven independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms for BMI and 49 single-nucleotide polymorphisms for WHRadjBMI were used to conduct Mendelian randomization analyses in 14 prospective studies supplemented with coronary heart disease (CHD) data from CARDIoGRAMplusC4D (Coronary Artery Disease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis [CARDIoGRAM] plus The Coronary Artery Disease [C4D] Genetics; combined total 66 842 cases), stroke from METASTROKE (12 389 ischemic stroke cases), type 2 diabetes mellitus from DIAGRAM (Diabetes Genetics Replication and Meta-analysis; 34 840 cases), and lipids from GLGC (Global Lipids Genetic Consortium; 213 500 participants) consortia. Primary outcomes were CHD, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and major stroke subtypes; secondary analyses included 18 cardiometabolic traits. Each one standard deviation (SD) higher WHRadjBMI (1 SD≈0.08 U) associated with a 48% excess risk of CHD (odds ratio [OR] for CHD, 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28-1.71), similar to findings for BMI (1 SD≈4.6 kg/m 2 ; OR for CHD, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.22-1.52). Only WHRadjBMI increased risk of ischemic stroke (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.03-1.70). For type 2 diabetes mellitus, both measures had large effects: OR, 1.82 (95% CI, 1.38-2.42) and OR, 1.98 (95% CI, 1.41-2.78) per 1 SD higher WHRadjBMI and BMI, respectively. Both WHRadjBMI and BMI were associated with higher left ventricular hypertrophy, glycemic traits, interleukin 6, and circulating lipids. WHRadjBMI was also associated with higher carotid intima-media thickness (39%; 95% CI, 9%-77% per 1 SD). Both general and central adiposity have causal effects on CHD and type 2 diabetes mellitus

  15. Frontal lobe ischemic stroke presenting with peripheral type facial palsy: A crucial diagnostic challenge in emergency practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Onder

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Here, we illustrate a 69-year old female admitting with weakness on left side of the face who firstly considered peripheral facial palsy in the forefront. However, detailed neurological examination and cranial MRI findings finally yielded the proper diagnosis of right hemisphere ischemic stroke. Via this remarkable presentation, we point out the clinical challenges in evaluation processes of patients with facial palsy in emergency practice and emphasize the importance of detailed examination for the proper diagnosis as well as initiation of appropriate treatment agents without delay. Keywords: Facial paralysis, Stroke, Emergency department, Facial innervation, Pathophysiology

  16. Is mortality after hip fracture associated with surgical delay or admission during weekends and public holidays?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Cecilie Laubjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Riis, Troels

    2012-01-01

    Hip fractures are associated with high mortality, but the cause of this is still not entirely clear. We investigated the effect of surgical delay, weekends, holidays, and time of day admission on mortality in hip fracture patients.......Hip fractures are associated with high mortality, but the cause of this is still not entirely clear. We investigated the effect of surgical delay, weekends, holidays, and time of day admission on mortality in hip fracture patients....

  17. Modeling weekday to weekend changes in emissions and ozone in the Los Angeles basin for 1997 and 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarwood, Greg; Grant, John; Koo, Bonyoung; Dunker, Alan M.

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we used numerical models to investigate weekday to weekend ozone differences in the Los Angeles (LA) basin in 1997 and 2010. We developed relatively complete descriptions of weekday to weekend emission changes for nitrogen oxides (NOx) with 80% of the weekday NOx emissions receiving a weekend adjustment in 1997 and 67% in 2010. Weekend NOx decreases of 34% on Saturday and 45% on Sunday relative to weekdays for 1997 are predicted to become slightly greater by 2010 and are dominated by NOx decreases for on-road vehicles (especially heavy-duty diesel vehicles) and off-road construction equipment. Weekend anthropogenic reactive organic gas (ROG) decreases for 1997 (12% on Saturday and 16% on Sunday) are smaller than for NOx and become even smaller in 2010. However, there is less certainty in the weekend ROG emission changes because only 47% of the weekday ROG emissions received a weekend adjustment in 1997 and only 21% in 2010. The ozone modeling used multiple representations of the meteorology and chemistry in order to identify results that are consistent across these inputs. Weekend ozone increased in central portions of the basin in response to weekend NOx and ROG decreases for both 1997 and 2010, with both the SAPRC99 and CB4 chemical mechanisms, and with all meteorological data sets. Weekend ozone decreased in other portions of the basin in all models. Comparing 2010 to 1997, weekend ozone increases are smaller and confined to smaller portions of the LA basin near the Pacific coast, whereas weekend ozone decreases are larger and more widespread in 2010. For 2010, all models show lower 8-h ozone on Sunday than weekdays in the Riverside/San Bernardino area. First-order sensitivity analysis (via the decoupled direct method) shows that the weekday/weekend ozone changes are mainly due to the NOx emission changes. Also, the weekday/weekend ozone changes for 2010 are sensitive to the choice of initial and boundary concentrations.

  18. A Comparison of Success Rates of Embryo Transfer on Weekdays and Weekends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Solmaz Hasdemir

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study is to examine the effect of the embryo transfer (ET day on clinical pregnancy success rates in in vitro fertilization-ET (IVF-ET cycles. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, we divided patients with infertility who underwent IVF-ET with fresh embryos into two groups depending on whether the ET was performed on weekdays or weekends. The main outcome measure was to compare the clinical pregnancy rates of patients with similar demographic and clinical characteristics who underwent ET on weekdays or weekends. Results: A total of 188 patients underwent IVF-ET on weekdays (n=156 or weekends (n=32. Both groups had similar demographic and cycle characteristics. The overall pregnancy rate was 42.8%. Among the study groups, the weekday group had a 40.2% ET success rate and the weekend group had a 54.8% success rate (P=0.517. Although no statistically significant difference existed between the two groups, we observed an absolute 14.6% increase in pregnancy rate for ETs performed during weekends compared to those performed on weekdays, with a 35% statistical power. Conclusion: ETs performed during weekends were more successful than ETs performed during weekdays with an absolute 14.6% increase in clinical pregnancy rate. This finding should be confirmed by conducting further studies with larger groups of patients.

  19. Weekday and weekend sedentary time and physical activity in differentially active children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairclough, Stuart J; Boddy, Lynne M; Mackintosh, Kelly A; Valencia-Peris, Alexandra; Ramirez-Rico, Elena

    2015-07-01

    To investigate whether weekday-weekend differences in sedentary time and specific intensities of physical activity exist among children categorised by physical activity levels. Cross-sectional observational study. Seven-day accelerometer data were obtained from 810 English children (n=420 girls) aged 10-11 years. Daily average minday(-1) spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity were calculated for each child. Sex-specific moderate to vigorous physical activity quartile cut-off values categorised boys and girls separately into four graded groups representing the least (Q1) through to the most active (Q4) children. Sex- and activity quartile-specific multilevel linear regression analyses analysed differences in sedentary time, light physical activity, moderate physical activity, vigorous physical activity, and moderate to vigorous physical activity between weekdays and weekends. On weekdays Q2 boys spent longer in light physical activity (psedentary time or physical activity for Q4 boys. On weekdays Q2 and Q3 girls accumulated more sedentary time (psedentary time and physical activity varied little between weekdays and weekends. The most active children maintained their sedentary time and physical activity levels at weekends, while among less active peers weekend sedentary time and physical activity at all intensities was lower. Low active children may benefit most from weekend intervention strategies. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Ischemic Stroke: Decreased Insulin Sensitivity and Decreases in Antioxidant Enzyme Activity Are Related to Different Stroke Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Jotic

    2013-01-01

    C (1.14±0.58, 1.00±0.26 versus 3.14±0.62 min−1/mU/l × 104, P<0.001 and in nondiabetics in D and E versus F (3.38±0.77, 3.03±0.72 versus 6.03±1.69 min−1/mU/l × 104, P<0.001. Also, GSH-Px and GR activities were lower in A and B versus C (GSH-Px: 21.96±3.56,  22.51±1.23 versus 25.12±1.67; GR: 44.37±3.58,  43.50±2.39 versus 48.58±3.67 U/gHb; P<0.001 and in D and E versus F (GSH-Px: 24.75±3.02,  25.57±1.92 versus 28.56±3.91; GR: 48.27±6.81,  49.17±6.24 versus 53.67±3.96 U/gHb; P<0.001. Decreases in Si and GR were significantly related to both ATI and LI in T2D. Our results showed that decreased IS and impaired antioxidant enzymes activity influence ischemic stroke subtypes in T2D. The influence of insulin resistance might be exerted on the level of glutathione-dependent antioxidant enzymes.

  1. Epidemiology of stroke patients in Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unhcc

    2013-09-20

    Sep 20, 2013 ... stroke are not well identified in Ethiopia. Methods: A retrospective chart review of all stroke patients who presented from December 2010 to December ... In developed nations, ischemic stroke accounts for 85. % of the stroke types (1,5-6), but in ..... Emphasis on Stroke in the Young. EthiopJHealth. Dev. 2002 ...

  2. Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Giving Fundraise Planned Giving Corporate Giving Cause Marketing Join your team, your way! The Stroke Challenge ... Your Technology Guide High Blood Pressure and Stroke Importance of Physical Activity See More Multimedia Las minorías ...

  3. Stroke - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100218.htm Stroke - series—Part 1 To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Ischemic Stroke A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  4. Polar Science Weekend: A University / Science Center Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, H. L.; Moritz, R. E.; Lettvin, E.; Schatz, D.; Russell, L.

    2008-12-01

    Polar Science Weekend (PSW) is a four-day event featuring hands-on activities, live demonstrations, and a variety of exhibits about the polar regions and current polar research, presented by scientists from the University of Washington's Polar Science Center, and held at Seattle's Pacific Science Center. PSW was conceived and organized jointly by the Polar Science Center and Pacific Science Center, which is Washington State's most well-attended museum. The first PSW in March 2006 drew over 5000 visitors, and subsequent PSWs in 2007 and 2008 have both surpassed that figure. The success of this university / science center partnership has made PSW an annual event, and has served as a model for Pacific Science Center's Portal to the Public program, in which partnerships with other scientific institutions have been built. Researchers at the Polar Science Center (PSC) study the physical processes controlling high-latitude oceans, atmosphere, sea ice, and ice sheets, and are involved in numerous IPY projects. PSC scientists also engage in many outreach efforts such as classroom visits and public lectures, but PSW stands out as the highlight of the year. The partnership with Pacific Science Center brings access to facilities, publicity, and a large audience that would not otherwise be readily available to PSC. Pacific Science Center, constructed for the 1962 World's Fair in Seattle, serves more than one million visitors per year. Pacific Science Center's mission is to inspire a lifelong interest in science, math and technology by engaging diverse communities through interactive and innovative exhibits and programs. PSW helps to advance this mission by bringing students, teachers, and families face-to-face with scientists who work in some of the most remote and challenging places on earth, to learn first-hand about polar research in a fun and informal setting. This is made possible only by the partnership with PSC. In this talk we will present descriptions and photos of PSW

  5. Effects of gait rehabilitation with a footpad-type locomotion interface in patients with chronic post-stroke hemiparesis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Naoki; Saitou, Hideyuki; Takao, Toshifumi; Iizuka, Noboru; Okuno, Junko; Yano, Hiroaki; Tamaoka, Akira; Yanagi, Hisako

    2012-08-01

    We developed a footpad-type locomotion interface called the GaitMaster. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effects of gait rehabilitation using the GaitMaster in chronic stroke patients. Randomized cross-over design. An outpatient department. Twelve patients with chronic post-stroke hemiparesis. In group A, patients underwent an 'intervention phase' followed by a 'non-intervention phase', whereas in group B, patients underwent the non-intervention phase first, followed by the intervention phase. In the four- or six-week intervention phase, participants underwent twelve 20-minute sessions of gait rehabilitation using the GaitMaster4. We measured gait speed and timed up-and-go test. No differences between the two groups were observed in the baseline clinical data. For the combined groups A and B, the maximum gait and timed up-and-go test speeds improved significantly only in the intervention phase (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.003, respectively). The percentages of improvement from baseline at the end of GaitMaster training were 16.6% for the maximum gait speed and 8.3% for the timed up-and-go test. The effect size for GaitMaster4 training was 0.58 on the maximum gait speed and 0.43 on the timed up-and-go test. This pilot study showed that gait rehabilitation using the GaitMaster4 was a feasible training method for chronic stroke patients. Calculation of the sample size indicated that a sample size of 38 participants would be adequate to test a null hypothesis of nil benefit additional to routine rehabilitation for chronic stroke patients in a future randomized controlled trial.

  6. Selection of Patients and Anesthetic Types for Endovascular Treatment in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fubing Ouyang

    Full Text Available and Purpose Recent randomized controlled trials have demonstrated consistent effectiveness of endovascular treatment (EVT for acute ischemic stroke, leading to update on stroke management guidelines. We conducted this meta-analysis to assess the efficacy and safety of EVT overall and in subgroups stratified by age, baseline stroke severity, brain imaging feature, and anesthetic type.Published randomized controlled trials comparing EVT and standard medical care alone were evaluated. The measured outcomes were 90-day functional independence (modified Rankin Scale ≤2, all-cause mortality, and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage.Nine trials enrolling 2476 patients were included (1338 EVT, 1138 standard medical care alone. For patients with large vessel occlusions confirmed by noninvasive vessel imaging, EVT yielded improved functional outcome (pooled odds ratio [OR], 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.64-2.50, lower mortality (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58-0.97, and similar symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage rate (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.72-1.76 compared with standard medical care. A higher proportion of functional independence was seen in patients with terminus intracranial artery occlusion (±M1 (OR, 3.16; 95% CI, 1.64-6.06, baseline Alberta Stroke Program Early CT score of 8-10 (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.25-3.57 and age ≤70 years (OR, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.73-5.24. EVT performed under conscious sedation had better functional outcomes (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.47-2.96 without increased risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage or short-term mortality compared with general anesthesia.Vessel-imaging proven large vessel occlusion, a favorable scan, and younger age are useful predictors to identify anterior circulation stroke patients who may benefit from EVT. Conscious sedation is feasible and safe in EVT based on available data. However, firm conclusion on the choice of anesthetic types should be drawn from more appropriate randomized controlled trials.

  7. Long-term Reduction in Coronary Artery Disease and Stroke with 7,8 Years of Intensified, Multifactorial Intervention in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Microalbuminuria in the Steno-2 Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oellgaard, Jens; Gæde, Peter; Rossing, Peter

    2016-01-01

    as non-fatal acute myocardial infarction or cardiac revascularization) and cerebrovascular disease (defined as non-fatal ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke) and the secondary end-point was a composite of CAD, stroke and death from cardiovascular disease. Results: Hazard rates of CAD, stroke and the composite...... primary events was significantly decreased in the intensive-therapy group (p = 0.049 for CAD and p = 0.003 for stroke). Conclusions: At 21.2 years of follow up of 7.8 years of intensified, multifactorial, target driven treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus with microalbuminuria, we demonstrate significant......) and cerebrovascular disease. Methods: The original intervention (mean treatment duration 7.8 years) involved 160 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and microalbuminuria that were randomly assigned to either conventional therapy or intensified, multifactorial treatment including both behavioral and pharmacological...

  8. Cryptogenic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saadatnia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryptogenic stroke is defined as brain infarction that is not attributable to a source of definite embolism, large artery atherosclerosis, or small artery disease despite a thorough vascular, cardiac, and serologic evaluation. Despite many advances in our understanding of ischemic stroke, cryptogenic strokes remain a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The pathophysiology of cryptogenic stroke is likely various. Probable mechanisms include cardiac embolism secondary to occult paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, aortic atheromatous disease or other cardiac sources, paradoxical embolism from atrial septal abnormalities such as patent foramen ovale, hypercoagulable states, and preclinical or subclinical cerebrovascular disease.  Cryptogenic stroke is one-fourth among cerebral infarction, but most of them could be ascribed to embolic stroke. A significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging and improvement in our ability to detect paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with cryptogenic stroke has strengthened the idea that these strokes are embolic in nature. a significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging.embolic stroke of undetermined sources(ESUS was planned for unifying embolic stroke of undetermined source.  The etiologies underlying ESUS included minor-risk potential cardioembolic sources, covert paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, cancer-associated coagulopathy and embolism, arteriogenic emboli, and paroxysmal embolism. Extensive evaluation including transesophageal echocardiography and cardiac monitoring for long time could identify the etiology of these patients. Therefore cryptogenic stroke is a diagnosis of exclusion. Compared with other stroke subtypes, cryptogenic stroke tends to have a better prognosis and lower long-term risk of recurrence.

  9. Association of weekend continuity of care with hospital length of stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecker, Saul; Shine, Daniel; Park, Naeun; Goldfeld, Keith; Scott Braithwaite, R; Radford, Martha J; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of physician continuity of care with length of stay, likelihood of weekend discharge, in-hospital mortality and 30-day readmission. A cohort study of hospitalized medical patients. The primary exposure was the weekend usual provider continuity (UPC) over the initial weekend of care. This metric was adapted from an outpatient continuity of care index. Regression models were developed to determine the association between UPC and outcomes. An academic medical center. Length of stay which was calculated as the number of days from the first Saturday of the hospitalization to the day of discharge. Of the 3391 patients included in this study, the prevalence of low, moderate and high UPC for the initial weekend of hospitalization was 58.7, 22.3 and 19.1%, respectively. When compared with low continuity of care, both moderate and high continuity of care were associated with reduced length of stay, with adjusted rate ratios of 0.92 (95% CI 0.86-1.00) and 0.64 (95% CI 0.53-0.76), respectively. High continuity of care was associated with likelihood of weekend discharge (adjusted odds ratio 2.84, 95% CI 2.11-3.83) but was not significantly associated with mortality (adjusted odds ratio 0.72, 95% CI 0.29-1.80) or readmission (adjusted odds ratio 0.88, 95% CI 0.68-1.14) when compared with low continuity of care. Increased weekend continuity of care is associated with reduced length of stay. Improvement in weekend cross-coverage and patient handoffs may be useful to improve clinical outcomes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  10. Morphological and biochemical effects of weekend alcohol consumption in rats: Role of concentration and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-González, José A; Sernas-Morales, María de Lourdes; Morales-González, Ángel; González-López, Laura Ligía; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo Osiris; Vargas-Mendoza, Nancy; Fregoso-Aguilar, Tomás Alejandro; Anguiano-Robledo, Liliana; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo; Álvarez-González, Isela; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán

    2018-02-27

    To examine the association between weekend alcohol consumption and the biochemical and histological alterations at two different concentrations of alcohol in both genders in rats. Wistar rats weighing 170-200 g were divided into groups as follows: (1) Control groups; and (2) weekend alcohol-consumption group: 2 d/weekly per 12 wk, at two different concentrations: (1) Group of males or females with a consumption of a solution of alcohol at 40%; and (2) group of males or females with a consumption of a solution of alcohol at 5%. At the end of the experiment, serum and liver samples were obtained. The following enzymes and metabolites were determined in serum: Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT), Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST), Lactate Dehydrogenase, and Gamma-Glutamyltransferase, and glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, bilirubin, and albumin. Liver samples from each group were employed to analyze morphological abnormalities by light microscopy. In all of the weekend alcohol-consumption groups, AST activity presented a significant, 10-fold rise. Regarding ALT activity, the groups with weekend alcohol consumption presented a significant increase that was six times greater. Bilirubin levels increased significantly in both groups of females. We observed a significant increase in the parameters of fatty change and inflammation due to weekend alcohol consumption. Only the group of females that consumed alcohol at 40% presented slight hepatocellular disorganization. The results obtained herein provide solid evidence that weekend alcohol consumption gives rise to liver damage, demonstrated by biochemical and histological alterations, first manifested acutely, and prolonged weekend alcohol consumption can cause greater, irreversible damage.

  11. Context matters! sources of variability in weekend physical activity among families: a repeated measures study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Noonan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family involvement is an essential component of effective physical activity (PA interventions in children. However, little is known about the PA levels and characteristics of PA among families. This study used a repeated measures design and multiple data sources to explore the variability and characteristics of weekend PA among families. Methods Families (including a ‘target’ child aged 9–11 years, their primary caregiver(s and siblings aged 6–8 years were recruited through primary schools in Liverpool, UK. Participants completed a paper-based PA diary and wore an ActiGraph GT9X accelerometer on their left wrist for up to 16 weekend days. ActiGraph.csv files were analysed using the R-package GGIR version 1.1–4. Mean minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA for each weekend of measurement were calculated using linear mixed models, and variance components were estimated for participant (inter-individual, weekend of measurement, and residual error (intra-individual. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC were calculated from the proportion of total variance accounted for by inter-individual sources, and used as a measure of reliability. Diary responses were summed to produce frequency counts. To offer contextual insight into weekend PA among family units, demographic, accelerometer, and diary data were combined to form two case studies representative of low and high active families. Results Twenty-five participants from 7 families participated, including 7 ‘target’ children (mean age 9.3 ± 1.1 years, 4 boys, 6 siblings (mean age 7.2 ± 0.7 years; 4 boys and 12 adults (7 mothers and 5 fathers. There was a high degree of variability in target children’s (ICC = 0.55, siblings (ICC = 0.38, and mothers’ MVPA (ICC = 0.58, but not in fathers’ MVPA (ICC = 0.83. Children’s weekend PA was mostly unstructured in nature and undertaken with friends, whereas a greater proportion of parents’ weekend

  12. The Association of Physical Activity during Weekdays and Weekend with Body Composition in Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Drenowatz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity (PA is a key contributor in long-term weight management but there remains limited research on the association between weekly PA patterns and weight change. The purpose of the present study was to examine the prospective association between weekly PA patterns and weight change in generally healthy young adults. Anthropometric measurements, including dual X-ray absorptiometry, were obtained every 3 months over a period of one year in 338 adults (53% male. At each measurement time, participants wore a multisensor device for a minimum of 10 days to determine total daily energy expenditure and time spent sleeping, sedentary, in light PA (LPA, in moderate PA (MPA, and in vigorous PA (VPA. PA did not differ between weekdays and the weekend at baseline. Twenty-four-hour sleep time, however, was significantly longer during weekends compared to weekdays, which was associated with less time spent sedentary. Weight loss was associated with a significant increase in LPA at the expense of sedentary time during the weekend but not during weekdays. Regression analyses further revealed an inverse association between change in VPA during the weekend and body composition at 12-month follow-up. Taken together, these results suggest that weekend PA plays an important role in long-term weight management.

  13. The 'weekend effect' in acute medicine: a protocol for a team-based ethnography of weekend care for medical patients in acute hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Carolyn; Sutton, Elizabeth; Angell, Emma; Aldridge, Cassie P; Boyal, Amunpreet; Bion, Julian

    2017-04-05

    It is now well-recognised that patients admitted to hospital on weekends are at higher risk of death than those admitted during weekdays. However, the causes of this 'weekend effect' are poorly understood. Some contend that there is a deficit of medical staff on weekends resulting in poorer quality care, whereas others find that patients admitted to hospital on weekends are sicker and therefore at higher risk of adverse outcomes. Clarifying the causal pathway is clearly important in order to identify effective solutions. In this article we describe an ethnographic approach to evaluating the organisation and delivery of medical care on weekends compared with weekdays, with a specific focus on the role of medical staff as part of National Health Service England's plan to implement 7-day services. We will conduct an ethnographic study of 20 acute hospitals in England between April 2016 and March 2018 as part of the High-intensity Specialist-Led Acute Care project (www.hislac.org). Data will be collected through observations and shadowing, and interviews with staff, in 10 hospitals with higher intensity specialist (consultant) staffing on weekends and 10 with lower intensity specialist staffing. Interviews will be conducted with up to 20 patients sampled from two high-intensity and two low-intensity sites. We will coordinate, compare and contrast observations across our team of ethnographers. Analysis will be both in-depth and cross-cutting, exploring specific features within individual sites and making comparisons between them. We outline how data collection and analysis will be facilitated and organised. The project has received ethics approval from the South West Wales Research Ethics Committee: Reference 13/WA/0372. Informed consent will be obtained for all interview participants. The findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications in high-quality journals and at national and international conferences. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  14. Elevated mortality amongst weekend hospital admissions is not associated with adoption of seven-day clinical standards

    OpenAIRE

    Meacock, Rachel; Sutton, Matt

    2017-01-01

    IntroductionPatients admitted to hospital in an emergency at weekends have been found to experience higher mortality rates than those admitted during the week. The NHS in England has introduced four priority clinical standards for emergency hospital care with the objective of reducing the deaths associated with this ‘weekend effect’. This study aimed to determine whether adoption of these clinical standards is associated with the extent to which weekend mortality is elevated. MethodsWe utilis...

  15. Stroke Pattern in Enugu. A Study of CT images in South East Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-contrast cranial computed tomography (CT) scan reliably distinguishes between ischemic stroke (IS) and hemorrhagic strokes (HS) and will provide a reliable characterization of stroke types in the developing countries. Aims: To examine stroke types based on CT Imaging studies and the differences in stroke types ...

  16. Strokes in young adults: epidemiology and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smajlović D

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dževdet Smajlović Department of Neurology, University Clinical Centre Tuzla, School of Medicine, University of Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina Abstract: Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%–15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more

  17. Outcome Determinants of Stroke in a Brazilian Primary Stroke Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo W. Kuster

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stroke mortality in Brazil is one of the highest among Western countries. Nonetheless, stroke outcome determinants are still poorly known in this country. In this study we evaluate outcome determinants of stroke in a primary stroke center in São Paulo, Brazil. Methods. We evaluated demographic, clinical, and outcome data of patients with ischemic stroke (IS, transient ischemic attack (TIA, and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH admitted at “Hospital Paulistano,” São Paulo, Brazil. In-hospital mortality and functional outcome determinants were assessed. Univariate and binary logistic regression analysis were performed. Results. Three hundred forty-one patients were included in the study, 52.2% being male with 66.8±15.7 years. The stroke type distribution was IS: 59.2%, TIA: 29.6%, and ICH: 11.1%. ICH was associated with greater severity and poorer functional outcome. The determinants of poorer functional outcome were higher NIHSS, lower Glasgow score, and lower oxygen saturation level. The most important mortality determinant was the presence of visual symptoms. Conclusions. The stroke mortality and stroke outcome determinants found in the present study do not remarkably differ from studies carried out in developed countries. Stroke prognosis studies are crucial to better understand the high burden of stroke in Brazil.

  18. Differences in airborne particle and gaseous concentrations in urban air between weekdays and weekends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawska, L.; Jayaratne, E. R.; Mengersen, K.; Jamriska, M.; Thomas, S.

    Airborne particle number concentrations and size distributions as well as CO and NO x concentrations monitored at a site within the central business district of Brisbane, Australia were correlated with the traffic flow rate on a nearby freeway with the aim of investigating differences between weekday and weekend pollutant characteristics. Observations over a 5-year monitoring period showed that the mean number particle concentration on weekdays was (8.8±0.1)×10 3 cm -3 and on weekends (5.9±0.2)×10 3 cm -3—a difference of 47%. The corresponding mean particle number median diameters during weekdays and weekends were 44.2±0.3 and 50.2±0.2 nm, respectively. The differences in mean particle number concentration and size between weekdays and weekends were found to be statistically significant at confidence levels of over 99%. During a 1-year period of observation, the mean traffic flow rate on the freeway was 14.2×10 4 and 9.6×10 4 vehicles per weekday and weekend day, respectively—a difference of 48%. The mean diurnal variations of the particle number and the gaseous concentrations closely followed the traffic flow rate on both weekdays and weekends (correlation coefficient of 0.86 for particles). The overall conclusion, as to the effect of traffic on concentration levels of pollutant concentration in the vicinity of a major road (about 100 m) carrying traffic of the order of 10 5 vehicles per day, is that about a 50% increase in traffic flow rate results in similar increases of CO and NO x concentrations and a higher increase of about 70% in particle number concentration.

  19. Increased length of stay and costs associated with weekend admissions for failure to thrive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Rachel T; Bennett, William E; Finnell, S Maria E; Downs, Stephen M; Carroll, Aaron E

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate whether admission day of the week affects the length of stay (LOS) and health care costs for failure to thrive (FTT) admissions. Administrative data were obtained for all children aged <2 years (N = 23 332) with a primary admission diagnosis of FTT from 2003-2011 from 42 freestanding US hospitals. Demographic characteristics, day of admission, LOS, costs per stay, number of discharge diagnoses, primary discharge diagnoses, primary procedure code, number of radiologic and laboratory units billed during admission were obtained for each admission. Linear regression and zero-truncated Poisson regression were used for analysis. Weekend admission was significantly correlated with increased LOS and increased average cost (P < .002). This finding was also true for children with both admission and discharge diagnoses of FTT (P < .001). The number of procedures for children admitted on the weekend was not significantly different compared with children admitted on the weekdays (incident rate ratio [IRR]:1.04 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.99-1.09]). However, weekend admissions did have more radiologic studies (IRR: 1.13 [95% CI: 1.10-1.16]) and laboratory tests (IRR: 1.39 [95% CI: 1.38-1.40]) performed. If one-half of weekend admissions in 2010 with both admission and discharge diagnoses of FTT were converted to Monday admissions, total savings in health care dollars for 2010 would be $534, 145. Scheduled FTT admissions on weekends increased LOS and health care costs compared with weekday admissions of similar levels of complexity. Reduction in planned weekend admissions for FTT could significantly reduce health care costs.

  20. A crossover pilot study evaluating the functional outcomes of two different types of robotic movement training in chronic stroke survivors using the arm exoskeleton BONES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milot, Marie-Hélène; Spencer, Steven J; Chan, Vicky; Allington, James P; Klein, Julius; Chou, Cathy; Bobrow, James E; Cramer, Steven C; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2013-12-19

    To date, the limited degrees of freedom (DOF) of most robotic training devices hinders them from providing functional training following stroke. We developed a 6-DOF exoskeleton ("BONES") that allows movement of the upper limb to assist in rehabilitation. The objectives of this pilot study were to evaluate the impact of training with BONES on function of the affected upper limb, and to assess whether multijoint functional robotic training would translate into greater gains in arm function than single joint robotic training also conducted with BONES. Twenty subjects with mild to moderate chronic stroke participated in this crossover study. Each subject experienced multijoint functional training and single joint training three sessions per week, for four weeks, with the order of presentation randomized. The primary outcome measure was the change in Box and Block Test (BBT). The secondary outcome measures were the changes in Fugl-Meyer Arm Motor Scale (FMA), Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT), Motor Activity Log (MAL), and quantitative measures of strength and speed of reaching. These measures were assessed at baseline, after each training period, and at a 3-month follow-up evaluation session. Training with the robotic exoskeleton resulted in significant improvements in the BBT, FMA, WMFT, MAL, shoulder and elbow strength, and reaching speed (p robotic training programs. However, for the BBT, WMFT and MAL, inequality of carryover effects were noted; subsequent analysis on the change in score between the baseline and first period of training again revealed no difference in the gains obtained between the types of training. Training with the 6 DOF arm exoskeleton improved motor function after chronic stroke, challenging the idea that robotic therapy is only useful for impairment reduction. The pilot results presented here also suggest that multijoint functional robotic training is not decisively superior to single joint robotic training. This challenges the idea that

  1. Create your own website using WordPress in a weekend

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Alannah

    2013-01-01

    Having a website built can be a complicated and expensive undertaking. For large businesses this is a necessary expense, but for the ever-increasing number of independents and small businesses, this can easily be handled by the intrepid amateur. In Create Your Own Website Using WordPress in a Weekend, author Alannah Moore draws on her extensive experience to show how, in just a weekend, almost anyone can create a website in WordPress that looks professional and is entirely tailored to their needs and preferences. Through carefully structured step-by-step tutorials, the book takes the

  2. Differences between weekday and weekend levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in Thai adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konharn, Kurusart; Santos, Maria Paula; Ribeiro, José Carlos

    2015-03-01

    Attempts to reduce the decline in physical activity (PA) in adolescence have been the focus of many public health interventions. This study aimed to (1) determine differences in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) levels between weekdays and weekends and (2) identify adolescents meeting current PA guidelines (PAG). To meet these objectives, 186 Thai adolescents aged 13 to 18 years were asked to wear an ActiGraph accelerometer for 7 consecutive days. The results showed that MVPA levels were significantly higher in boys than girls on both weekdays (P youth. This study highlights the need to take weekend-weekday differences into account when developing PA interventions for adolescents. © 2012 APJPH.

  3. Weekend effect in upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ching Shih

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the weekend effect on the mortality of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding(UGIB. Methods The review protocol has been registered in the PROSPERO International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (registration number: CRD42017073313 and was written according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA statement. We conducted a search of the PUBMED, COCHRANE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases from inception to August 2017. All observational studies comparing mortality between UGIB patients with weekend versus weekday admissions were included. Articles that were published only in abstract form or not published in a peer-reviewed journal were excluded. The quality of articles was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. We pooled results from the articles using random-effect models. Heterogeneity was evaluated by the chi-square-based Q-test and I2test. To address heterogeneity, we performed sensitivity and subgroup analyses. Potential publication bias was assessed via funnel plot. Results Eighteen observational cohort studies involving 1,232,083 study patients were included. Weekend admission was associated with significantly higher 30-day or in-hospital mortality in all studies (OR = 1.12, 95% CI [1.07–1.17], P < 0.00001. Increased in-hospital mortality was also associated with weekend admission (OR = 1.12, 95% CI [1.08–1.17], P < 0.00001. No significant difference in in-hospital mortality was observed between patients admitted with variceal bleeding during the weekend or on weekdays (OR = 0.99, 95% CI [0.91–1.08], P = 0.82; however, weekend admission was associated with a 15% increase in in-hospital mortality for patients with non-variceal bleeding (OR = 1.15, 95% CI [1.09–1.21], P < 0.00001. The time to endoscopy for weekday admission was significantly less than that obtained for weekend admission (MD = −2.50, 95% CI [−4

  4. Post-stroke urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Z; Birns, J; Bhalla, A

    2013-11-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of the current evidence on post-stroke urinary incontinence. An electronic database search was performed to identify relevant studies and review articles related to Urinary Incontinence (UI) in the stroke population between the years 1966 and 2012. Urinary incontinence following stroke is a common problem affecting more than one-third of acute stroke patients and persisting in up to a quarter at 1 year. It is well established that this condition is a strong marker of stroke severity and is associated with poorer functional outcomes and increased institutionalisation and mortality rates compared with those who remain continent. Despite evidence linking better outcomes to those patients who regain continence, the results of national audits have demonstrated that the management of UI following stroke is suboptimal, with less than two-thirds of stroke units having a documented plan to promote continence. Current evidence supports a thorough assessment to categorise the type and severity of post-stroke urinary incontinence. An individually tailored, structured management strategy to promote continence should be employed. This has been associated with better stroke outcomes and should be the aim of all stroke health professionals. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Recovering after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroke rehabilitation; Cerebrovascular accident - rehabilitation; Recovery from stroke; Stroke - recovery; CVA - recovery ... LIVE AFTER A STROKE Most people will need stroke rehabilitation (rehab) to help them recover after they leave ...

  6. Autopsy approach to stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Seth

    2011-02-01

    Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality but the brain and other relevant tissues are often examined only cursorily when stroke patients come to autopsy. The pathological findings and clinical implications vary according to the type of stroke and its location and cause. Large ischaemic strokes are usually associated with atherosclerosis of extracranial or major intracranial arteries but can be caused by dissection. Most small cerebral infarcts are caused by arteriosclerosis or, in the elderly, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). However, vasculitides and coagulopathies can cause a range of different patterns of ischaemic (and, occasionally, haemorrhagic) stroke. Global brain ischaemia, caused by severe hypotension or raised intracranial pressure, produces damage that is accentuated in certain regions and neuronal populations and may be confused with hypoglycaemic injury. The main cause of subarachnoid haemorrhage is a ruptured berry aneurysm but CAA, arteriovenous malformations and infective aneurysms are occasionally responsible. These can also cause parenchymal brain haemorrhage, although this most often complicates hypertensive small vessel disease. Sometimes the haemorrhage arises from a neoplasm. Performing an adequate autopsy in stroke requires proper preparation, awareness of the likely pathological processes, familiarity with intracranial vascular anatomy, careful gross examination and dissection, and appropriate use of histology. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  7. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... unique for each person. Although a majority of functional abilities may be restored soon after a stroke, recovery is an ongoing process. Effects of a Stroke Weakness (hemiparesis) or paralysis (hemiplegia) on one side of the body that may affect the whole ...

  8. Pediatric Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of 3 and 10. In those with SCD, ischemic strokes most often occur in children under the age of 15 and adults over the age of 30, while hemorrhagic strokes most often occur in young adults between the ages of 20 and 30. ...

  9. Chronic inflammatory disorders and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, and stroke: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dregan, Alex; Charlton, Judith; Chowienczyk, Phil; Gulliford, Martin C

    2014-09-02

    This study sought to evaluate whether risks of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease are elevated across a range of organ-specific and multisystem chronic inflammatory disorders. A matched cohort study was implemented in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink including participants with severe psoriasis (5648), mild psoriasis (85 232), bullous skin diseases (4284), ulcerative colitis (12 203), Crohn's disease (7628), inflammatory arthritis (27 358), systemic autoimmune disorders (7472), and systemic vasculitis (6283) and in 373 851 matched controls. The main outcome measures were new diagnoses of type 2 diabetes mellitus, stroke, or coronary heart disease. The outcomes were evaluated for each condition in a multiple outcomes model, with adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Estimates for different inflammatory conditions were pooled in a random-effects meta-analysis. There were 4695 new diagnoses of type 2 diabetes mellitus, 3266 of coronary heart disease, and 1715 of stroke. The hazard ratio for pooled multiple failure estimate was 1.20 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-1.26). The highest relative hazards were observed in systemic autoimmune disorders (1.32; 95% CI, 1.16-1.50) and systemic vasculitis (1.29; 95% CI, 1.16-1.44). Hazards were increased in organ-specific disorders, including severe psoriasis (1.29; 95% CI, 1.12-1.47) and ulcerative colitis (1.26; 95% CI, 1.14-1.40). Participants in the highest tertile of C-reactive protein had greater risk of multiple outcomes (1.52; 95% CI, 1.37-1.68). The risk of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes mellitus is increased across a range of organ-specific and multisystem chronic inflammatory disorders with evidence that risk is associated with severity of inflammation. Clinical management of patients with chronic inflammatory disorders should seek to reduce cardiovascular risk. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Stroke injury, cognitive impairment and vascular dementia☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaria, Raj N.; Akinyemi, Rufus; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The global burden of ischaemic strokes is almost 4-fold greater than haemorrhagic strokes. Current evidence suggests that 25–30% of ischaemic stroke survivors develop immediate or delayed vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) or vascular dementia (VaD). Dementia after stroke injury may encompass all types of cognitive disorders. States of cognitive dysfunction before the index stroke are described under the umbrella of pre-stroke dementia, which may entail vascular changes as well as insidious neurodegenerative processes. Risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia after stroke are multifactorial including older age, family history, genetic variants, low educational status, vascular comorbidities, prior transient ischaemic attack or recurrent stroke and depressive illness. Neuroimaging determinants of dementia after stroke comprise silent brain infarcts, white matter changes, lacunar infarcts and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Until recently, the neuropathology of dementia after stroke was poorly defined. Most of post-stroke dementia is consistent with VaD involving multiple substrates. Microinfarction, microvascular changes related to blood–brain barrier damage, focal neuronal atrophy and low burden of co-existing neurodegenerative pathology appear key substrates of dementia after stroke injury. The elucidation of mechanisms of dementia after stroke injury will enable establishment of effective strategy for symptomatic relief and prevention. Controlling vascular disease risk factors is essential to reduce the burden of cognitive dysfunction after stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26806700

  11. Adhesive taping vs. daily manual muscle stretching and splinting after botulinum toxin type A injection for wrist and fingers spastic overactivity in stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamato, Andrea; Micello, Maria Francesca; Panza, Francesco; Fortunato, Francesca; Picelli, Alessandro; Smania, Nicola; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Fiore, Pietro; Ranieri, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of two procedures increasing the botulinum toxin type A effect for wrist and finger flexor spasticity after stroke. A single-blind randomized trial. Seventy patients with upper limb post-stroke spasticity. Adults with wrist and finger flexor muscles spasticity after stroke were submitted to botulinum toxin type A therapy. After the treatment, the subjects injected were randomly divided into two groups and submitted to adhesive taping (Group A) or daily muscle manual stretching, passive articular mobilization of wrist and fingers, and palmar splint (Group B) for 10 days. We measured spasticity with Modified Ashworth Scale, related disability with Disability Assessment Scale, and fingers position at rest. The measurements were done at baseline, after two weeks, and after one month from the treatment session. After two weeks, subjects in Group A reported a significantly greater decrease in spasticity scores (Modified Ashworth Scale fingers: mean (standard deviation) 1.3±0.6 vs. 2.1±0.6; Modified Ashworth Scale wrist: 1.7 ±0.6 vs. 2.3 ±0.8), and after one month in spasticity and disability scores (Modified Ashworth Scale fingers: mean (standard deviation) 1.9 ±0.7 vs. 2.5 ±0.6; Modified Ashworth Scale wrist: 2.0 ±0.7 vs. 2.6 ±0.6; Disability Assessment Scale: 1.6 ±0.7 vs. 2.1 ±0.7) compared with Group B subjects. Subjects in Group A reported also a significantly improved fingers position at rest compared with Group B subjects after two weeks (2.8 ±0.9 vs. 2.1 ±0.7) and one month (2.3 ±0.7 vs. 1.5 ±0.6). Adhesive taping of wrist and finger flexor muscles appeared to enhance the effect of botulinum toxin type A therapy more than daily manual muscle stretching combined with passive articular mobilization and palmar splint. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Low-Income Mothers' Nighttime and Weekend Work: Daily Associations with Child Behavior, Mother-Child Interactions, and Mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassman-Pines, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated low-income mothers' daily nighttime and weekend work and family outcomes. Sixty-one mothers of preschool-aged children reported daily on work hours, mood, mother-child interaction, and child behavior for two weeks (N = 724 person-days). Although nighttime and weekend work are both nonstandard schedules, results showed…

  13. Mortality after discharge from the intensive care unit during the early weekend period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, N.; Schierbeck, J.; Pedersen, L.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As a result of a shortage of intensive care capacity, patients may be discharged prematurely early during weekends which may lead to an increased mortality and risk of readmission to intensive care units (ICU). We examined whether discharge from the ICU during the first part...

  14. Relationship between weekend catch-up sleep and poor performance on attention tasks in Korean adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seog Ju; Lee, Yu Jin; Cho, Seong-Jin; Cho, In-Hee; Lim, Weonjeong; Lim, Wonshin

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the relationship between insufficient sleep and poor attention in Korean adolescents, adjusting for potential confounding factors of depressed mood and habitual snoring. School-based cross-sectional study. Eight high schools in 3 cities in the Republic of Korea. A sample of 2638 urban high school students (42.2% male and 57.8% female; mean [SD] age, 17.3 [0.6] years [age range, 14-19 years]) completed questionnaires and computerized attention tasks during the school term. Weekend catch-up sleep. Self-reported sleep schedules and habits, including sleep duration, bedtime, wake-up time, depressed mood, and habitual snoring. Also measured were numbers of omission and commission errors on computerized attention tasks. The mean (SD) sleep duration on weekdays was 5 hours 42 minutes (1 hour 0 minutes) per day and on weekends was 8 hours 24 minutes (1 hour 36 minutes) per day. The mean (SD) weekend catch-up sleep was 2 hours 42 minutes (1 hour 42 minutes) per day. After adjusting for age, sex, depressed mood (Beck Depression Inventory score, ≥10), habitual snoring, and weekday sleep duration, increased weekend catch-up sleep was significantly associated with more omission and commission errors on sustained attention tasks (P sleep as an indicator of insufficient weekday sleep is associated with poor performance on objective attention tasks. Assessment of catch-up sleep and sleep duration may be useful for physicians to evaluate sleep insufficiency and its adverse effects on attention in adolescents.

  15. Teaching Medical Students about Substance Abuse in a Weekend Intervention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Harvey; Rudisill, John R.

    1983-01-01

    A weekend program places medical students under supervision in close, intense contact with drug and alcohol abusers and strongly reinforces basic sciences and clinical instruction. Student reaction has been very positive. The program requires no new resources and is cost-effective. (Author/MSE)

  16. Drinking with mixed-gender groups is associated with heavy weekend drinking among young adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thrul, J.; Labhart, F.; Kuntsche, E.N.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: To investigate how gender composition of the drinking group affects young adults’ alcohol consumption on weekend evenings over and above the effect of drinking-group size. Design: Using the internet-based cellphone-optimized assessment technique (ICAT), participants completed online

  17. Participatory Learning in Residential Weekends: Benefit or Barrier to Learning for the International Student?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Fiona; Forster, Gillian; Powell, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    The context for this research is a residential learning weekend which is embedded into all postgraduate programmes at Newcastle Business School via a management development module entitled "Developing Self". The objective of this study was to identify and explore how participatory learning in multicultural groups enables international…

  18. Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-11

    Stroke; Acute Stroke; Acute Brain Injury; Ischemic Stroke; Hemorrhagic Stroke; Transient Ischemic Attack; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Cerebral Ischemia; Cerebral Infarction; Cerebral Stroke; Venous Sinus Thrombosis, Cranial

  19. Stroke Care 2: Stroke rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langhorne, P.; Bernhardt, J.; Kwakkel, G.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially

  20. Clinical Characteristics of Stroke Occurring while Bathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamasu, Joji; Nakatsukasa, Masashi; Oshima, Takeo; Tomiyasu, Kazuhiro; Mayanagi, Keita; Imai, Akira

    2017-07-01

    Stroke can occur during any human activity. Although cardiac arrests or drowning accidents while bathing have been studied extensively, there are few studies focusing on stroke occurring while bathing. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the clinical characteristics of stroke occurring while bathing and the association between stroke and drowning accidents. Clinical data prospectively acquired between January 2011 and December 2015 on 1939 patients with stroke (1224 cerebral infarctions [CIs], 505 intracerebral hemorrhages [ICHs], and 210 subarachnoid hemorrhages [SAHs]) were reviewed to identify patients who sustained a stroke while bathing. The ratio of bathing-related strokes to strokes occurring during other activities was evaluated. Moreover, the demographics of these 2 groups were compared in each stroke type. Among the 1939 patients, 78 (CI, 32; ICH, 28; and SAH, 18) sustained a stroke while bathing. The ratio of bathing to other activities in the SAH group was the highest (8.6%), followed by the ICH group (5.5%), whereas that in the CI group was the lowest (2.6%). Regardless of stroke type, only a minority of patients were found to have collapsed inside the bathtub. The higher ratio of bathing in hemorrhagic strokes may indicate that there is a small risk of hemorrhagic stroke while bathing in vulnerable subjects. This retrospective study did not establish a causal relationship between bathing and stroke nor identify risk factors, which means that future prospective studies are warranted. The finding that the great majority of bathing-related stroke patients were found to have collapsed outside the bathtub suggests that the involvement of stroke in drowning accidents in the bathtub may be small. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. When Mothers' Work Matters for Youths' Daily Time Use: Implications of Evening and Weekend Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soomi; Davis, Kelly D; McHale, Susan M; Kelly, Erin L; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Crouter, Ann C

    2017-08-01

    Drawing upon the work-home resources model, this study examined the implications of mothers' evening and weekend shifts for youths' time with mother, alone, and hanging out with peers unsupervised, with attention to both the amount and day-to-day consistency of time use. Data came from 173 mothers who worked in the long-term care industry and their youths who provided daily diaries. Multilevel modeling revealed that youths whose mothers worked more evening shifts on average spent less time with their mothers compared to youths whose mothers worked fewer evening shifts. Youths whose mothers worked more weekend shifts, however, spent more time with their mothers and exhibited less consistency in their time in all three activity domains compared to youths whose mothers worked fewer weekend shifts. Girls, not boys, spent less time alone on days when mothers worked weekend shifts than on days with standard shifts. Older but not younger adolescents spent more time hanging out with friends on evening and weekend shift days, and their unsupervised peer time was less consistent across days when mothers worked more evening shifts. These effects adjusted for sociodemographic and day characteristics, including school day, number of children in the household, mothers' marital status and work hours, and time with fathers. Our results illuminate the importance of the timing and day of mothers' work for youths' daily activities. Future interventions should consider how to increase mothers' resources to deal with constraints on parenting due to their work during nonstandard hours, with attention to child gender and age.

  2. Stroke in sickle cell anemia: New concepts in diagnosis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke is a devastating and potentially fatal complication of sickle cell disease. The highest incidence of cerebrovascular disease is in the first 10 years and especially between 2 to 5 years. Two types of stroke occur in these patients – infarctive and hemorrhagic strokes. While infarctive strokes occur frequently in children, ...

  3. Effect of Treatment Delay, Stroke Type, and Thrombolysis on the Effect of Glyceryl Trinitrate, a Nitric Oxide Donor, on Outcome after Acute Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Individual Patient from Randomised Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M. Bath

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nitric oxide (NO donors are a candidate treatment for acute stroke and two trials have suggested that they might improve outcome if administered within 4–6 hours of stroke onset. We assessed the safety and efficacy of NO donors using individual patient data (IPD from completed trials. Methods. Randomised controlled trials of NO donors in patients with acute or subacute stroke were identified and IPD sought from the trialists. The effect of NO donor versus control on functional outcome was assessed using the modified Rankin scale (mRS and death, by time to randomisation. Secondary outcomes included measures of disability, mood, and quality of life. Results. Five trials (4,197 participants were identified, all involving glyceryl trinitrate (GTN. Compared with control, GTN lowered blood pressure by 7.4/3.3 mmHg. At day 90, GTN did not alter any clinical measures. However, in 312 patients randomised within 6 hours of stroke onset, GTN was associated with beneficial shifts in the mRS (odds ratio (OR 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.34–0.78 and reduced death (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.14–0.78. Conclusions. NO donors do not alter outcome in patients with recent stroke. However, when administered within 6 hours, NO donors might improve outcomes in both ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke.

  4. Pediatric stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, M.

    2008-01-01

    Stroke in childhood has gained increasingly more attention and is accepted as an important disease in childhood. The reasons for this severe event and the consequences for the rest of the life are totally different than for adults. This is also true for the diagnosis and therapy. This paper gives a comprehensive overview on the characteristics of pediatric stroke to assist radiologists in making a rapid and safe diagnosis in order to identify the underlying disease. (orig.) [de

  5. A Retrospective Evaluation of Critical Care Blood Culture Yield - Do Support Services Contribute to the "Weekend Effect"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Ben; Nagaraja, Shankara; Collins, Andrea; Pennington, Shaun H; Blakey, John D

    2015-01-01

    The "weekend effect" describes an increase in adverse outcomes for patients admitted at the weekend. Critical care units have moved to higher intensity working patterns to address this with some improved outcomes. However, support services have persisted with traditional working patterns. Blood cultures are an essential diagnostic tool for patients with sepsis but yield is dependent on sampling technique and processing. We therefore used blood culture yield as a surrogate for the quality of support service provision. We hypothesized that blood culture yields would be lower over the weekend as a consequence of reduced support services. We performed a retrospective observational study examining 1575 blood culture samples in a university hospital critical care unit over a one-year period. Patients with positive cultures had, on average, higher APACHE II scores (p = 0.015), longer durations of stay (p = 0.03), required more renal replacement therapy (pculture yield decreased with repeated sampling with an increased proportion of contaminants. Blood cultures were 26.7% less likely to be positive if taken at the weekend (p = 0.0402). This effect size is the equivalent to the impact of sampling before and after antibiotic administration. Our study demonstrates that blood culture yield is lower at the weekend. This is likely caused by delays or errors in incubation and processing, reflecting the reduced provision of support services at the weekend. Reorganization of services to address the "weekend effect" should acknowledge the interdependent nature of healthcare service delivery.

  6. Combined therapeutic application of botulinum toxin type A, low-frequency rTMS, and intensive occupational therapy for post-stroke spastic upper limb hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuda, W; Abo, M; Momosaki, R; Yokoi, A; Fukuda, A; Ito, H; Tominaga, A; Umemori, T; Kameda, Y

    2012-03-01

    For spastic upper limb hemiparesis after stroke, we developed triple-element protocol of botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) injection, low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (LF-rTMS), and intensive occupational therapy (OT). Aim. To investigate the safety and feasibility of the protocol. Design. A preliminary study. Setting. At a university hospital. Population. Fourteen post-stroke patients with spastic upper limb hemiparesis (mean age: 54.9±9.2 years, time after onset: 87.1±48.2 months, ±SD). In all patients, BoNTA was injected into spastic muscles of the affected upper limb (maximum total dose: 240 units). Four weeks later, they were hospitalized to receive 22 sessions of 20-min LF-rTMS and 120-min intensive OT daily over 15 days. Motor function of the affected upper limb was evaluated mainly using Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT), motor activity log (MAL), and the severity of spasticity was measured with modified Ashworth scale (MAS) at BoNTA injection, discharge and four weeks post-discharge. All patients completed the protocol without any adverse effects. The FMA score and MAL scores, but not WMFT performance time, improved significantly at discharge. The MAS score of all examined muscles decreased significantly between BoNTA and discharge. The beneficial effect of the protocol on motor function and spasticity was almost maintained until four weeks after discharge. The protocol is safe and feasible, although further larger studies are needed to confirm its efficacy. The protocol is a potentially useful neurorehabilitative approach for this patient population.

  7. Driving After a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Association.org Professionals for Stroke Association.org Shop for Stroke Association.org Support for Stroke Association. ... a wheelchair accessible or modified van, truck or car can provide the assurance you need to feel ...

  8. Make a 2D RPG in a weekend with RPG maker VX Ace

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Darrin

    2015-01-01

    Make a 2D RPG in a Weekend shows you how to create your very own dungeon crawler game in RPG Maker VX Ace in a single weekend. The entire process, from start to finish, is covered within this book. You will see a variety of dungeon maps and events, all broken down for your convenience. One of the hardest parts of game development is actually finishing a game, but it is also one of the most important steps on the way to becoming a game developer. If you have yet to finish a game, this book will give you the confidence and resources you need to finally be able to create your very own RPG. Once

  9. The Efficacy and Safety of 3 Types of Interventions for Stroke Prevention in Patients With Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Diseases: A Network Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qian; Chang, Shumei; Lu, Songtao; Zhang, Yajing; Chang, Yajun

    2017-07-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the relative efficacy and safety of different types of interventions for stroke prevention in patients with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. This network meta-analysis (NMA) was conducted with a random effects model of Bayesian framework using Stata version 12.0. Odds ratios (ORs) and their credible intervals (CrIs) were applied for the efficacy and safety evaluation of various medical interventions, including aspirin, dipyridamole, ticlopidine, warfarin, and apixaban. In addition, the ranking of probability of every clinical outcome was estimated by comparing the surface under the cumulative ranking curve. Compared with dabigatran, both edoxaban and aspirin + warfarin exhibited a higher rate of all-cause stroke (OR, 2.84 [95% CrI, 1.17-6.97]; OR, 3.42 [95% CrI, 1.20-9.84]). With respect to intracranial hemorrhage, aspirin + clopidogrel yielded worse outcomes than 7 treatments, including placebo, apixaban, aspirin, aspirin + dipyridamole, cilostazol, clopidogrel, and dabigatran (OR, 2.21 [95% CrI, 1.45-3.40]; OR, 2.11 [95% CrI, 1.05-4.17]; OR, 1.53 [95% CrI, 1.11-2.15]; OR, 1.78 [95% CrI, 1.01-3.03]; OR, 4.17 [95% CrI, 1.37-14.28]; OR, 1.85 [95% CrI, 1.22-2.86]; and OR, 2.56 [95% CrI, 1.37-4.76]). In terms of ischemic stroke, dabigatran provided better efficacy than placebo, aspirin, and aspirin + dipyridamole (OR, 0.36 [95% CrI, 0.18-0.72]; OR, 0.43 [95% CrI, 0.21-0.84]; and OR, 0.41 [95% CrI, 0.17-0.94]). As for mortality, dabigatran resulted in a lower mortality compared with aspirin, aspirin + clopidogrel, edoxaban, and warfarin (OR, 0.48 [95% CrI, 0.23-0.97]; OR, 0.40 [95% CrI, 0.17-0.92]; OR, 0.27 [95% CrI, 0.10-0.72]; and OR, 0.52 [95% CrI, 0.28-0.92]). There are still some limitations to our NMA research. For instance, the lack of direct evidence for some therapies resulted in inconsistencies, particularly for warfarin compared with placebo and clopidogrel under different end points. Moreover, the included

  10. Identity, capital and community language schooling: teenagers at a weekend Chinese school in Melbourne, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Cunzhen

    2017-01-01

    Community languages schools (also known as ethnic or heritage languages schools) in Australia have not received much attention from sociologists and educational researchers, even though these schools are important and supplementary to mainstream schooling. This research explores the identity practices of a group of teenage Chinese-Australian students attending Huawen School (pseudonym), a weekend community language school in Victoria, Australia. The conceptual framework of this study draws on...

  11. Screen-based behaviour in Czech adolescents is more prevalent at weekends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenek Hamrik

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the main reasons for recent scientific interest in screen-based behaviour (SB is the relationship between SB and risk of being overweight or obese. The primary mechanism for overweight and obesity is an imbalance of energy intake versus energy expenditure and one reason for the interest in SB is its association with reduced energy expenditure relative to other activities. Objective: The aim of this study is to provide a basic overview of the level and structure of SB in Czech adolescents on the basis of age and gender while taking into account the differences between weekday and weekend screen based activities. Methods: Data from the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC study conducted in May-June 2010 in the Czech Republic were used. The sample consisted of 4365 Czech pupils (48.5% boys; age 11, n = 1406; age 13, n = 1446; age 15, n = 1513. Binomial logistic regression and Chi-square test of independence were used to provide basic comparison on the basis of gender and age groups. Results: The prevalence of SB rise with growing age with the most visible increase in prevalence is between ages 11 and age 13. SB is significantly more prevalent among adolescent boys compared with adolescent girls. Czech adolescents are more likely to not meet the recommendation of 2 hours for watching TV at weekends compared to weekdays. Playing computer games is more common among boys contrary to chatting online, which is more common among girls. The overall patterns of playing computer games and chatting online during weekends were similar to those at weekdays but increased. Conclusions: Most children in the Czech Republic do not meet the limit for total SB time of 4 or fewer hours while the prevalence of SB rises with growing age and at weekends. Interventions and strategies aiming at reducing SB in children focusing on the family and school environment in the Czech Republic are required.

  12. Evaluation of differences in ultraviolet exposure during weekend and weekday activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parisi, A.V.; Mainstone, J.S.; Meldrum, L.R.; Wong, J.C.F.; Kimlin, M.G.; Aitken, J.

    2000-01-01

    The weekday UV exposures to anatomical sites were evaluated for outdoor workers, home workers, adolescents, indoor workers, school staff and students in south-east Queensland, Australia. Additionally, the UV exposures at weekends of school staff, school students, indoor workers and outdoor workers were evaluated. The weekday exposures per day ranged from 1.0 to 11.0 SED for winter to summer respectively. During spring, the ratios of the personal exposures divided by the ambient exposures at the weekend to the personal exposures divided by the ambient exposures on the weekdays to the neck, hand and left arm were at least 3.4, 2.0 and 0.67 for the indoor workers, school staff and students and outdoor workers respectively. The same ratios for the erythemal UV exposures over the year, estimated from the exposures on four days in each of the four seasons, were at least 2.3 for the school staff and at least 1.3 for the 13 to 19 year old school students. These results reinforce the importance of targeting prevention programmes to both weekend and weekday exposures. (author)

  13. Compensation for Adolescents' School Mental Load by Physical Activity on Weekend Days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudláček, Michal; Frömel, Karel; Jakubec, Lukáš; Groffik, Dorota

    2016-03-09

    Increasing mental load and inadequate stress management significantly affect the efficiency, success and safety of the educational/working process in adolescents. The objective of this study is to determine the extent that adolescents compensate for their school mental load by physical activity (PA) on weekend days and, thus, to contribute to the objective measurement of mental load in natural working conditions. A cross-sectional study was conducted between September 2013 and April 2014. A set of different methods was employed-self-administered questionnaire (IPAQ-long questionnaire), objective measurements-pedometers, and accelerometers (ActiTrainers). They was distributed to 548 students from 17 high schools. Participants' mental load was assessed based on the difference between PA intensity and/or physical inactivity and heart rate range. The participants with the highest mental load during school lessons do not compensate for this load by PA on weekend days. Adolescents need to be encouraged to be aware of their subjective mental load and to intentionally compensate for this load by PA on weekend days. It is necessary to support the process of adopting habits by sufficient physical literacy of students, as well as teachers, and by changes in the school program.

  14. Compensation for Adolescents’ School Mental Load by Physical Activity on Weekend Days

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Kudláček

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Increasing mental load and inadequate stress management significantly affect the efficiency, success and safety of the educational/working process in adolescents. The objective of this study is to determine the extent that adolescents compensate for their school mental load by physical activity (PA on weekend days and, thus, to contribute to the objective measurement of mental load in natural working conditions. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted between September 2013 and April 2014. A set of different methods was employed—self-administered questionnaire (IPAQ-long questionnaire, objective measurements—pedometers, and accelerometers (ActiTrainers. They was distributed to 548 students from 17 high schools. Participants’ mental load was assessed based on the difference between PA intensity and/or physical inactivity and heart rate range. Results: The participants with the highest mental load during school lessons do not compensate for this load by PA on weekend days. Conclusions: Adolescents need to be encouraged to be aware of their subjective mental load and to intentionally compensate for this load by PA on weekend days. It is necessary to support the process of adopting habits by sufficient physical literacy of students, as well as teachers, and by changes in the school program.

  15. The impact of increased weekend physiotherapy service provision in critical care: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Catharine; Hudson, Megan; Heck, Carol

    2015-01-01

    At the hospital studied, weekend physiotherapy (WEPT) is routinely provided and in 2013 WEPT was increased from one (PRE) to three (POST) physiotherapists (PTs) to cover intensive care and ward patients. (1) To evaluate the impact of increased WEPT on patient volumes, treatments provided and conditions treated in critical care and wards; and (2) to understand the PTs' perspectives on the new coverage model. A mixed methods design was utilized. The quantitative component consisted of retrospective document reviews of all weekend patients treated January 1-May 5 (PRE) and May 11-December 31 (POST). The qualitative component used a questionnaire to collect staff feedback. PRE-POST comparisons were conducted using χ(2) or Mann-Whitney U tests. Significant (p = 0.00) increases POST were seen in number of patients treated, number of mobility treatments provided and number of post-surgical patients seen in both clinical areas. The majority of survey respondents reported feeling adequately trained, but had concerns regarding the impact of increased WEPT on work-life balance. PTs perceived enhanced service was beneficial for continuity of weekday care and improved patient function. Future studies need to focus on measuring the effect of increased weekend provision on outcomes, preventing complications and length of stay.

  16. Weekend schoolyard accessibility, physical activity, and obesity: the Trial of Activity in Adolescent Girls (TAAG) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Molly M; Cohen, Deborah A; Evenson, Kelly R; Elder, John; Catellier, Diane; Ashwood, J Scott; Overton, Adrian

    2007-05-01

    To assess the accessibility and suitability of schools as recreational sites and to determine whether they are associated with young adolescent girls' weekend metabolic equivalent-weighted moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and body mass index (BMI). We drew a half-mile (0.805 km) radius around the residences of participants in the Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (n=1556) in Maryland, South Carolina, Minnesota, Louisiana, California, and Arizona. We visited all schools and parks within the defined distance and documented their amenities and accessibility on Saturdays in Spring 2003. Staff gathered data on each girls' height and weight and used accelerometers to record weekend metabolic equivalent-weighted moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Schools represented 44% of potential neighborhood sites for physical activity. However, a third of schools were inaccessible on the Saturday we visited. Neighborhoods with locked schools were primarily non-white, older, more densely populated, and of lower socioeconomic status. Though there was no relationship between school accessibility on Saturdays and weekend metabolic equivalent-weighted moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, the number of locked schools was associated with significantly higher body mass index. The lack of relationship between metabolic equivalent-weighted moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and school accessibility may imply that young adolescent girls do not identify schools as recreational resources. However, due to the association between body mass index and locked schools, efforts to stem the obesity epidemic should include making schools more accessible.

  17. Detecting short-term responses to weekend recreation activity: desert bighorn sheep avoidance of hiking trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longshore, Kathleen M.; Lowrey, Chris; Thompson, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    To study potential effects of recreation activity on habitat use of desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni), we placed Global Positioning System collars on 10 female bighorn sheep within the Wonderland of Rocks–Queen Mountain region of Joshua Tree National Park (JOTR), California, USA, from 2002 to 2004. Recreation use was highest from March to April and during weekends throughout the year. Daily use of recreation trails was highest during midday. By comparing habitat use (slope, ruggedness, distance to water, and distance to recreation trails) of female bighorn sheep on weekdays versus weekends, we were able to detect short-term shifts in behavior in response to recreation. In a logistic regression of bighorn sheep locations versus random locations for March and April, female locations at midday (1200 hours) were significantly more distant from recreation trails on weekends compared with weekdays. Our results indicate that within this region of JOTR, moderate to high levels of human recreation activity may temporarily exclude bighorn females from their preferred habitat. However, the relative proximity of females to recreation trails during the weekdays before and after such habitat shifts indicates that these anthropogenic impacts were short-lived. Our results have implications for management of wildlife on public lands where the co-existence of wildlife and recreational use is a major goal.

  18. Hospital-based stroke care in Ireland: results from one regional register.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fan, C W

    2000-01-01

    Most patients with acute stroke are admitted to hospital. If stroke services in this country are to be improved, we need accurate and reliable information about the types of stroke patients being admitted, their present management and outcome.

  19. Increased Occurrence of Tracheal Intubation-Associated Events During Nights and Weekends in the PICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, Kyle J; Giuliano, John S; Napolitano, Natalie; Turner, David A; Nuthall, Gabrielle; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Nishisaki, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Adverse tracheal intubation-associated events are common in PICUs. Prior studies suggest provider and practice factors are important contributors to tracheal intubation-associated events. Little is known about how the incidence of tracheal intubation-associated events is affected by the time of day, day of the week, or presence of in-hospital attending-level intensivists. We hypothesize that tracheal intubations occurring during nights and weekends are associated with a higher frequency of tracheal intubation-associated events. Retrospective observational cohort study. Twenty international PICUs. Critically ill children requiring tracheal intubation. None. We analyzed 5,096 tracheal intubation courses from July 2010 to March 2014 from the prospective multicenter National Emergency Airway Registry for Children. Frequency of a priori-defined tracheal intubation-associated events was the primary outcome. Occurrence of any tracheal intubation-associated events and severe tracheal intubation-associated events were more common during nights (19:00 to 06:59) and weekends compared with weekdays (19% vs 16%, p = 0.01; 7% vs 6%, p = 0.05, respectively). This difference was significant in emergent intubations after adjusting for site-level clustering and patient factors: for any tracheal intubation-associated events: adjusted odds ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.02-1.41; p = 0.03; but not significant in nonemergent intubations: adjusted odds ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.63-1.40; p = 0.75. For emergent intubations, PICUs with home-call attending coverage had a significantly higher frequency of tracheal intubation-associated events during nights and weekends (adjusted odds ratio, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.01-1.66; p = 0.04), and this difference was attenuated in PICUs with in-hospital attending coverage (adjusted odds ratio, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.91-1.39; p = 0.28). Higher occurrence of tracheal intubation-associated events was observed during nights and weekends. This difference was primarily attributed to

  20. Care and Outcomes of Patients With Cancer Admitted to the Hospital on Weekends and Holidays: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe-Shaw, Lauren; Abushomar, Hani; Chen, Xi-Kuan; Gapanenko, Katerina; Taylor, Chelsea; Krzyzanowska, Monika K; Bell, Chaim M

    2016-07-01

    Patients admitted to the hospital on weekends experience worse outcomes than those admitted on weekdays. Patients with cancer may be especially vulnerable to the effects of weekend care. Our objective was to compare the care and outcomes of patients with cancer admitted urgently to the hospital on weekends and holidays versus those of patients with cancer admitted at other times. This was a retrospective study of all adult patients with cancer having an urgent hospitalization in Canada from 2010 to 2013. Patients admitted to hospital on weekends/holidays were compared with those admitted on weekdays. The primary outcome was 7-day in-hospital mortality. We also compared performance of procedures in the first 2 days of hospital admission and admission to critical care after the first 24 hours. 290,471 hospital admissions were included. Patients admitted to hospital on weekends/holidays had an increased risk of 7-day in-hospital mortality (4.8% vs 4.3%; adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.13; 95% CI, 1.08-1.17), corresponding to 137 excess deaths per year compared with the weekday group. This risk persisted after restricting the analysis to patients arriving by ambulance (7.1% vs 6.4%; adjusted OR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.04-1.18). Among those who had procedures in the first 4 days of admission, fewer weekend/holiday-admitted patients had them performed in the first 2 days, for 8 of 9 common procedure groups. There was no difference in critical care admission risk after the first 24 hours. Patients with cancer admitted to the hospital on weekends/holidays experience higher mortality relative to patients admitted on weekdays. This may result from different care processes for weekend/holiday patients, including delayed procedures. Future research is needed to identify key outcome-driving procedures, and ensure timely access to these on all days of the week. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  1. Heat Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Sofie Søndergaard; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren; Bestle, Morten Heiberg

    2017-01-01

    and mortality. This case report describes two Danish patients diagnosed with heat stroke syndrome during a heat wave in the summer of 2014. Both patients were morbidly obese and had several predisposing illnesses. However since heat stroke is a rare condition in areas with temperate climate, they were...... not diagnosed until several days after admittance; hence treatment with cooling was delayed. Both patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, where they were treated with an external cooling device and received treatment for complications. Both cases ended fatally. As global warming continues, more heat...

  2. Hemorrhagic and Ischemic Strokes Compared Stroke Severity, Mortality, and Risk Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, T. S.; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2009-01-01

    higher mortality risk (HR, 1.564; 95% CI, 1.441-1.696). The increased risk was, however, time-dependent; initially, risk was 4-fold, after 1 week it was 2.5-fold, and after 3 weeks it was 1.5-fold. After 3 months stroke type did not correlate to mortality. Conclusion-Strokes are generally more severe......Background and Purpose-Stroke patients with hemorrhagic (HS) and ischemic strokes were compared with regard to stroke severity, mortality, and cardiovascular risk factors. Methods-A registry started in 2001, with the aim of registering all hospitalized stroke patients in Denmark, now holds...... information for 39 484 patients. The patients underwent an evaluation including stroke severity (Scandinavian Stroke Scale), CT, and cardiovascular risk factors. They were followed-up from admission until death or censoring in 2007. Independent predictors of death were identified by means of a survival model...

  3. The role of nitric oxide in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou-qing Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is considered to be an acute cerebrovascular disease, including ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke. The high incidence and poor prognosis of stroke suggest that it is a highly disabling and highly lethal disease which can pose a serious threat to human health. Nitric oxide (NO, a common gas in nature, which is often thought as a toxic gas, because of its intimate relationship with the pathological processes of many diseases, especially in the regulation of blood flow and cell inflammation. However, recent years have witnessed an increased interest that NO plays a significant and positive role in stroke as an essential gas signal molecule. In view of the fact that the neuroprotective effect of NO is closely related to its concentration, cell type and time, only in the appropriate circumstances can NO play a protective effect. The purpose of this review is to summarize the roles of NO in ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke.

  4. An Analysis of the Relationship between Land Use and Weekend Travel: Focusing on the Internal Capture of Trips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hyoung Tommy Gim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Weekend travel has not been duly considered in academics and practice regarding its relationship with land use. A lack of consideration is notable in terms of how land use internalizes weekend travel. Thus, by separating the internal and external travel of the traffic analysis zone, this study analyzes the land use effect on weekend travel in comparison with that on weekday travel. Two structural equation models, each of which is specified for weekday and weekend travel, construct the same sample and their results become comparable. At the travel variable level, the models find consistent results: Stronger effects are made on internal travel than on external travel and particularly, on trip frequency than on travel time. This implies that compact land use causes a stronger addition of internal trips and a less strong reduction of external trips, that is, changes in destinations rather than in total travel time. At the factor level, unlike the weekday model in which the sociodemographic factor exerts a stronger effect, the weekend model presents that land use more strongly affects travel patterns. This magnitude difference is explained by the different flexibility of compulsory weekday travel and discretionary weekend travel in relation to the choice of trip destination and frequency.

  5. Study protocol for two randomized controlled trials examining the effectiveness and safety of current weekend allied health services and a new stakeholder-driven model for acute medical/surgical patients versus no weekend allied health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Terry P; O'Brien, Lisa; Mitchell, Deb; Bowles, Kelly-Ann; Haas, Romi; Markham, Donna; Plumb, Samantha; Chiu, Timothy; May, Kerry; Philip, Kathleen; Lescai, David; McDermott, Fiona; Sarkies, Mitchell; Ghaly, Marcelle; Shaw, Leonie; Juj, Genevieve; Skinner, Elizabeth H

    2015-04-02

    Disinvestment from inefficient or ineffective health services is a growing priority for health care systems. Provision of allied health services over the weekend is now commonplace despite a relative paucity of evidence supporting their provision. The relatively high cost of providing this service combined with the paucity of evidence supporting its provision makes this a potential candidate for disinvestment so that resources consumed can be used in other areas. This study aims to determine the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of the current model of weekend allied health service and a new stakeholder-driven model of weekend allied health service delivery on acute medical and surgical wards compared to having no weekend allied health service. Two stepped wedge, cluster randomised trials of weekend allied health services will be conducted in six acute medical/surgical wards across two public metropolitan hospitals in Melbourne (Australia). Wards have been chosen to participate by management teams at each hospital. The allied health services to be investigated will include physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, dietetics, social work and allied health assistants. At baseline, all wards will be receiving weekend allied health services. Study 1 intervention will be the sequential disinvestment (roll-in) of the current weekend allied health service model from each participating ward in monthly intervals and study 2 will be the roll-out of a new stakeholder-driven model of weekend allied health service delivery. The order in which weekend allied health services will be rolled in and out amongst participating wards will be determined randomly. This trial will be conducted in each of the two participating hospitals at a different time interval. Primary outcomes will be length of stay, rate of unplanned hospital readmission within 28 days and rate of adverse events. Secondary outcomes will be number of complaints and compliments, staff absenteeism

  6. Blood Biomarkers for the Early Diagnosis of Stroke: The Stroke-Chip Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Alejandro; López-Cancio, Elena; Pich, Sara; Penalba, Anna; Giralt, Dolors; García-Berrocoso, Teresa; Ferrer-Costa, Carles; Gasull, Teresa; Hernández-Pérez, María; Millan, Mónica; Rubiera, Marta; Cardona, Pedro; Cano, Luis; Quesada, Helena; Terceño, Mikel; Silva, Yolanda; Castellanos, Mar; Garces, Moisés; Reverté, Silvia; Ustrell, Xavier; Marés, Rafael; Baiges, Joan Josep; Serena, Joaquín; Rubio, Francisco; Salas, Eduardo; Dávalos, Antoni; Montaner, Joan

    2017-09-01

    Stroke diagnosis could be challenging in the acute phase. We aimed to develop a blood-based diagnostic tool to differentiate between real strokes and stroke mimics and between ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in the hyperacute phase. The Stroke-Chip was a prospective, observational, multicenter study, conducted at 6 Stroke Centers in Catalonia. Consecutive patients with suspected stroke were enrolled within the first 6 hours after symptom onset, and blood samples were drawn immediately after admission. A 21-biomarker panel selected among previous results and from the literature was measured by immunoassays. Outcomes were differentiation between real strokes and stroke mimics and between ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Predictive models were developed by combining biomarkers and clinical variables in logistic regression models. Accuracy was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic curves. From August 2012 to December 2013, 1308 patients were included (71.9% ischemic, 14.8% stroke mimics, and 13.3% hemorrhagic). For stroke versus stroke mimics comparison, no biomarker resulted included in the logistic regression model, but it was only integrated by clinical variables, with a predictive accuracy of 80.8%. For ischemic versus hemorrhagic strokes comparison, NT-proBNP (N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide) >4.9 (odds ratio, 2.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.55-3.71; P 4.7 (odds ratio, 2.02; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-3.45; P =0.010), together with age, sex, blood pressure, stroke severity, atrial fibrillation, and hypertension, were included in the model. Predictive accuracy was 80.6%. The studied biomarkers were not sufficient for an accurate differential diagnosis of stroke in the hyperacute setting. Additional discovery of new biomarkers and improvement on laboratory techniques seem necessary for achieving a molecular diagnosis of stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Evaluating the functional outcomes of ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin type A injections using the Euro-musculus approach for upper limb spasticity treatment in post-stroke patients; an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukavci, Raikan; Akturk, Semra; Ersoy, Yüksel

    2018-02-07

    Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin type A injection is an effective treatment for spasticity. Euro-musculus spasticity approach is a new method for administering injections to the correct point of the correct muscle. The clinical outcomes of this practical approach is not yet available in the literature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects on spasticity and the functional outcomes of ultrasound guided botulinum toxin type A injections via the Euro-musculus spasticity approach to treat upper limb spasticity in post-stroke patients. An observational study. Inpatient post-stroke patients. Twenty five post-stroke patients with post-stroke upper limb spasticity were recruited. The ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin type A injections were administered into the spastic target muscles using the Euro-musculus spasticity approach, and all of the patients were enrolled in rehabilitation programmes after the injections. This research included the innervation zone and injection site figures and ultrasound images of each muscle in the upper limb. The degree of spasticity was assessed via the Modified Ashworth Scale and the upper limb motor function via the Fugl Meyer Upper Extremity Scale at the baseline and 4 and 12 weeks after the botulinum toxin type A injection. Significant decreases in the Modified Ashworth Scale scores of the upper limb flexor muscle tone measured 4 and 12 weeks after the botulinum toxin type A injection were found when compared to the baseline scores (pFugl Meyer Upper Extremity subgroup scores, the sitting position, wrist and total scores at 4 and 12 weeks were significantly improved (pFugl Meyer Upper Extremity hand scores were significantly improved 12 weeks after the injection (p<0.025). Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin type A injection via the Euro- musculus spasticity approach is a practical and effective method for administering injections to the correct point of the correct muscle. Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin type A

  8. [Plan for stroke healthcare delivery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Sabín, J; Alonso de Leciñana, M; Gállego, J; Gil-Peralta, A; Casado, I; Castillo, J; Díez Tejedor, E; Gil, A; Jiménez, C; Lago, A; Martínez-Vila, E; Ortega, A; Rebollo, M; Rubio, F

    2006-12-01

    All stroke patients should receive the same degree of specialized healthcare attention according to the stage of their disease, independently of where they live, their age, gender or ethnicity. To create an organized healthcare system able to offer the needed care for each patient, optimizing the use of the existing resource. A committee of 14 neurologists specialized in neurovascular diseases representing different regions of Spain evaluated the available scientific evidence according to the published literature. During the acute phase, all stroke patients must be evaluated in hospitals that offer access to specialized physicians (neurologists) and the indicated diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Hospitals that deliver care to acute stroke patients must be prepared to attend these patients and need to arrange a predefined transferring circuit coordinated with the extrahospitalary emergency service. Since resources are limited, they should be structured into different care levels according to the target population. Thus, three types of hospitals will be defined for stroke care: reference stroke hospital, hospital with stroke unit, hospital with stroke team.

  9. Longitudinal changes in objectively measured physical activity differ for weekdays and weekends among Chinese children in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stephen Heung-Sang; Huang, Wendy Yajun; He, Gang

    2015-12-29

    Cross-sectional investigation showed that Chinese children in Hong Kong were more physically active on weekends than weekdays, which is contrary to previous findings. However, little is known as to whether these time-segment-specific differences persist with age. This study aimed to compare the 2-year changes in accelerometer-assessed physical activity (PA) and sedentary time (ST) between weekdays and weekends among Chinese children in Hong Kong. Children aged 6-8 years were recruited from primary schools in Hong Kong. Time spent in ST (children who provided 3-day valid data (including 1 weekend day) for at least two time points (n = 412). Magnitude of changes between weekdays and weekends was compared using age × time-segment interactions. At each assessment wave, the percentage of time spent in MVPA (% MVPA) and LPA (% LPA) was consistently high, whereas the percentage of time spent in ST (% ST) was lower on weekends than weekdays. A decrease in % MVPA was found for both weekdays (mean annual change: boys, -0.7, 95% CI = -0.9 to -0.1; girls, -0.8, 95% CI = -1.0 to -0.6) and weekends (boys, -1.2, 95% CI = -1.5 to -0.9; girls, -1.4, 95% CI = -1.6 to -1.1). An increase was found in % ST for both weekdays (boys, 1.3, 95% CI = 0.7 to 1.9; girls, 2.4, 95% CI = 1.9 to 3.3) and weekends (boys, 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1 to 2.5; girls, 2.6, 95% CI = 1.9 to 3.3). Mean annual change in MVPA time (min) was greater on weekends than weekdays (difference: boys, 3.0, 95% CI = 0.3 to 5.7; girls, 3.5, 95% CI = 1.1 to 5.8). Age-related decline in MVPA was more marked on weekends than weekdays. Interventions to hinder age-related changes in PA and ST should target both time segments, but weekends warrant particular attention for interventions targeting PA maintenance due to the greater declines.

  10. Weekly variation in health-care quality by day and time of admission: a nationwide, registry-based, prospective cohort study of acute stroke care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Benjamin D; Cloud, Geoffrey C; James, Martin A; Hemingway, Harry; Paley, Lizz; Stewart, Kevin; Tyrrell, Pippa J; Wolfe, Charles D A; Rudd, Anthony G

    2016-07-09

    Studies in many health systems have shown evidence of poorer quality health care for patients admitted on weekends or overnight than for those admitted during the week (the so-called weekend effect). We postulated that variation in quality was dependent on not only day, but also time, of admission, and aimed to describe the pattern and magnitude of variation in the quality of acute stroke care across the entire week. We did this nationwide, registry-based, prospective cohort study using data from the Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme. We included all adult patients (aged >16 years) admitted to hospital with acute stroke (ischaemic or primary intracerebral haemorrhage) in England and Wales between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014. Our outcome measure was 30 day post-admission survival. We estimated adjusted odds ratios for 13 indicators of acute stroke-care quality by fitting multilevel multivariable regression models across 42 4-h time periods per week. The study cohort comprised 74,307 patients with acute stroke admitted to 199 hospitals. Care quality varied across the entire week, not only between weekends and weekdays, with different quality measures showing different patterns and magnitudes of temporal variation. We identified four patterns of variation: a diurnal pattern (thrombolysis, brain scan within 12 h, brain scan within 1 h, dysphagia screening), a day of the week pattern (stroke physician assessment, nurse assessment, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and assessment of communication and swallowing by a speech and language therapist), an off-hours pattern (door-to-needle time for thrombolysis), and a flow pattern whereby quality changed sequentially across days (stroke-unit admission within 4 h). The largest magnitude of variation was for door-to-needle time within 60 min (range in quality 35-66% [16/46-232/350]; coefficient of variation 18·2). There was no difference in 30 day survival between weekends and weekdays (adjusted odds ratio 1

  11. [The structure of the nourishment of preschoolers during the weekend (short report)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapeshkina, N V

    2014-01-01

    To study the feeding of 190 children aged 3-7 years attending 4 preschool educational institutions in the city Mezhdurechensk, Kemerovo region, at home on weekends questionnaires were conducted by the parents. Studies have shown that multiple meals in 57% of children was 5 times a day, 43% of children--4 times a day, including snacks; 97% of children have at breakfast main dish, drinks and sandwiches and only 3% of children have breakfast that did not meet standards for structure and was insufficient and inadequate to cover subsistence expenses of energy, because consisted of a sandwich and a drink. Only 7% of preschooler's lunch met recommendations on its structure and included the first, main dish, salad and drink, lunch of 93% of children included only one hot dish (first course, or the second). Dinner in volume, compared with the recommended standards, was redundant on average 57% of preschoolers since consisted of sandwiches, salad, meat dish and side, drink. Children's snacking during the day included the following suite of products: sandwiches (with sausage, cheese, butter), tea with sweets (candies, chocolate), fermented milk drink, fruits. When examining the frequency of meals during the day on weekends, there is a tendency to use the same dishes (what children ate for lunch, they eat at dinner on the same day, and then for breakfast on Sunday). The study of the structure of meals in pre-school children at home during the days of the week (evening meal) found that in most cases (67.8%) their dinner was irrational, the structure was identical to the structure of the adults of the family (fried dishes: fried pies, fried potatoes, sodas). Irrationally organized meals for children at the weekend showed inadequate knowledge of parents on the healthy diet for their child at home.

  12. Prinsip Umum Penatalaksanaan Cedera Olahraga Heat Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Ade Tobing, Saharun Iso

    2016-01-01

    Exercises that are conducted in an extreme heat environment can cause heat injury. Heatinjury is associated with disturbance to temperature regulation and cardiovascular systems. Heatstroke is the most severe type of heat injury. Heat stroke is associated with high morbidity andmortality numbers, particularly if therapy treatment is delayed. In general, heat stroke is caused bytwo things, namely increase in heat production and decrease in heat loss.Heat stroke signs include: (1) rectal temper...

  13. Stroke awareness in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Thomas; Krarup, Lars-Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This is the first study to examine the awareness of major stroke symptoms and stroke risk factors among the general population in Denmark. Early recognition of stroke warning signs and means of reducing stroke occurrence could improve the treatment and prevention of stroke....

  14. Weekend versus weekday hospital deaths: analysis of in-patient data in a Nigerian tertiary healthcare center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, B O; Eke, N O; Obi-Nwosu, A; Osakwe, O J; Eke, C O; Obi, N P

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at comparing weekday deaths to weekend deaths of in-patients of a tertiary hospital in Nigeria. This is a 10-year retrospective survey conducted at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital in which the death records of the hospital were accessed from the various wards and health records department to extract relevant data pertaining to the time of hospital death. Tests of statistical significance were done using Chi-square test at 95% confidence intervals. A total of 3934 deaths were recorded during the period of study. The ages ranged from a few hours to 94 years with a mean age of 38.5 years. The male to female ratio was 1.2:1. An average of 547 weekend deaths and 568 weekday deaths were recorded, giving a ratio of 0.96:1. A ratio of weekend to weekday death rate of 0.99:1 and 0.93:1 for the males and females, respectively was noted. The labor ward, followed by the intensive care unit (ICU) had the highest weekend to weekday death ratio of 1.72:1 ( P = 0.0461) and 1.41:1 ( P = 0.1440), respectively. Weekend deaths were less in the other wards, with the gynaecological ward having the least ratio of 0.63:1 ( P = 0.7360). The rate of hospital deaths was generally found not to vary significantly over the weekends and weekdays in the hospital except for the labor ward which had significantly higher weekend to weekday death rates of 1.72:1. There is therefore need for confidential enquiry into the causes of hospital deaths, especially in the labor ward, in order to identify and prevent avoidable deaths.

  15. Stroke in Southern Europe: A systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo V. Vasiliadis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is a leading cause of death and acquired disability worldwide. In Europe, strokes account for almost 1.1 million death per year. In particular, countries in Southern Europe constitute populations with a different lifestyle and dietary habits from those in Northern Europe and that may influence stroke incidence, type and risk factors.Aim: The objective of this study was to review and summarise the trends of the incidence of stroke in Southern Europe, as well as,to mention stroke subtypes and recognise the risk factors for stroke.Methods: A systematic review in PubMed was conducted.Results: Therefore, twenty-three articles, representing seven countries, related to incidence, type and risk factors of stroke in this specific geographical area of Europe were identified. The annual stroke incidence varied from approximately 1.41 to 3.73 per 1000 population per year. Currently, in all the countries studied, ischemic stroke was the commonest stroke type in all series. Hypertension remains the main risk factor for both ischemic andhemorrhagic strokes, followed by diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia and other factors.Conclusions: A wide range of stroke incidence may be due to the different lifestyle and behavioural factors among countries. Further research that uses the best possible methods to study the incidence, type and risk factors of stroke are urgently needed in Balkan Peninsula.

  16. Embolic stroke of undetermined source: a retrospective analysis from an Italian Stroke Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Masina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The new clinical construct of embolic stroke of undetermined source (ESUS suggests that many cryptogenic strokes are related to minor-risk covert embolic cardiac sources or to embolus from non-occlusive plaques in the aortic arch or in the cerebral arteries. The authors analyzed the prevalence of ESUS in a real-life condition in Italy and compared the recurrence rates in cryptogenic strokes, cardioembolic strokes, and ESUS. The authors retrospectively reassessed according to ESUS criteria 391 consecutive admissions in a stroke unit where extensive diagnostic search was routinely performed. Recurrences in each stroke type within a 3-year follow-up period (mean time: 25.44 months - standard deviation: 9.42 were also compared. The prevalence of ESUS in the aforementioned cohort was 10.5%. All ESUS patients received antiplatelet agents. Warfarin was prescribed in 56.9% of cardioembolic strokes. The recurrence rate in ESUS patients was 4.4% per year, slightly higher than in cardioembolic strokes (3.5% and significantly higher than in cryptogenic non-ESUS (1.2% (P<0.0001. This is the first description of a cohort of ESUS patients in an Italian stroke unit. Patients with ESUS have a significantly higher risk of recurrence than in those with non-ESUS cryptogenic strokes, and slightly higher than in those with cardioembolic strokes. Results support the hypothesis of a more extensive diagnostic evaluation in cryptogenic strokes and the feasibility of such approach.

  17. Genetic View To Stroke Occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Yoosefee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the third leading cause of death. The role of genetics in the etiology and development of this disease is undeniable. As a result of inadequate previous research, more and more studies in the field of genetics are necessary to identify pathways involved in the pathogenesis of stroke, which in turn, may lead to new therapeutic approaches. However, due to the multifactorial nature of stroke and the few studies conducted in this field, genetic diversity is able to predict only a small fraction of the risk of disease. On the other hand, studies have shown genetically different architecture for different types of stroke, and finally pharmacogenomics as an important part of personalized medicine approach, is influenced by genetic studies, all of which confirm the need of addressing the topic by researchers.

  18. Stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhorne, Peter; Bernhardt, Julie; Kwakkel, Gert

    2011-05-14

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially beneficial treatment options for motor recovery of the arm include constraint-induced movement therapy and robotics. Promising interventions that could be beneficial to improve aspects of gait include fitness training, high-intensity therapy, and repetitive-task training. Repetitive-task training might also improve transfer functions. Occupational therapy can improve activities of daily living; however, information about the clinical effect of various strategies of cognitive rehabilitation and strategies for aphasia and dysarthria is scarce. Several large trials of rehabilitation practice and of novel therapies (eg, stem-cell therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, virtual reality, robotic therapies, and drug augmentation) are underway to inform future practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multiple Strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obododimma Oha

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This poem playfully addresses the slippery nature of linguistic signification, employing humour and sarcasm in presenting a wide range of human experience. It ironical twists -- and "strokes" (read ambiguously as both a giving a punishment and erotic pleasuring -- move from the naming of location through international discourse of capital to the crumbling relationships between nation states. It reading of the signs of language is tied to the unease and fracture in cultural and political experience.

  20. [Difference on sleeping between school-days and weekends in elementary school children, data from 8 provinces in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wenhui; Zhai, Yi; Li, Weirong; Shen, Chong; Shi, Xiaoming

    2015-06-01

    To understand the differences on sleeping-time between school-days and weekends among elementary school children. This cross-sectional study was conducted from September to November, 2010. A stratified random cluster sampling strategy was used to select the participants, under diverse geographical and economic levels in eight provinces, municipalities or autonomous regions, in mainland China. A total number of 20 603 elementary school children aged from 6-12 years old were chosen as research subjects to record their time of sleeping during school-days or weekends. Among the 6-12 year old, their time of sleeping was longer on weekends than that on school-days, while the average sleeping time during the weekends was longer in boys than in girls (t = 3.35, P sleeping on weekends, in girls. Proportions of serious lack of sleep, lack of sleep or with sufficient sleep during the weekends were 13.63% (2 809/20 603), 27.27% (5 618/20 603) and 59.10% (12 176/20 603). The proportion of sufficient sleep (over 50%) was significantly higher on weekends than that on school-days (less than 30%), however, nearly one third of the first grade primary school children were sleep insufficiently even on weekends. Nearly 10.00% of the children under seriously or moderately lack of sleep on school-days were still in a serious lack of sleep state on weekends. The three groups who were categorized as serious lack of sleep (less than 9 h), lack of sleep (9-10 h) or having sufficient (over 10 h) sleep on school-days accounted for 29.75%, 64.48%, 86.44%, respectively, when compared with the national regulation set as 10 h daily sleep for the children in China. The proportions of those whose time of sleep on weekends was less than school-days in the three groups as the same, moderate (within 1 h), with 1 h caught-up or over, were 9.41%, 22.77%, 43.32%, 24.50%, respectively. The percentage of pupils who caught up sleep appropriately (within 1 h) on weekends among those who were serious lack of

  1. Preventing Stroke Deaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... die within minutes. Strokes happen more in some populations and geographic areas. Stroke death declines have stalled in 3 out of every 4 states. Blacks have the highest stroke death rates among all ...

  2. Two Kinds of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section Two Kinds of Stroke Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... are often a warning sign for future strokes. Stroke Can Affect Anyone Award-winning actress Julie Harris ...

  3. Healthy Living after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Healthy Living After Stroke Nutrition Good nutrition is one way to reduce ... the hospital. Thank goodness, she did. Subscribe to Stroke Connection Get quarterly digital issues plus our monthly ...

  4. Understanding Life After Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Hjelmblink, Finn

    2008-01-01

    Stroke is an acute, neurological dysfunction of vascular origin with sudden occurrence and it influences physical, cognitive and psychological functions. Initial treatment aims at eliminating or reducing the brain damage. Soon, however, the influence of the stroke on the entire life of stroke survivors has to be considered. This thesis explores the meaning of life after stroke to 19 elderly stroke survivors during the first year post stroke. Survivors were interviewed twice and the interviews...

  5. Sex Differences in Stroke Survival: 10-Year Follow-up of the Copenhagen Stroke Study Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Nonboe; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2005-01-01

    the Scandinavian Stroke Scale (0-58); computed tomography determined stroke type. A risk factor profile was obtained for all including ischemic heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, previous stroke, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Date of death was obtained within a 10-year follow...... factors showed no difference between sexes for ischemic heart disease, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and previous stroke. Men more often were smokers and alcohol consumers. Unadjusted survival in men and women did not differ: 70.3% versus 66.7% (1-year), 40.0% versus 38.9% (5-year......BACKGROUND: Although diverging, most studies show that sex has no significant influence on stroke survival. METHODS: In a Copenhagen, Denmark, community all patients with stroke during March 1992 to November 1993 were registered on hospital admission. Stroke severity was measured using...

  6. Sex differences in stroke survival: 10-year follow-up of the Copenhagen stroke study cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Nonboe; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2005-01-01

    the Scandinavian Stroke Scale (0-58); computed tomography determined stroke type. A risk factor profile was obtained for all including ischemic heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, previous stroke, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Date of death was obtained within a 10-year follow...... factors showed no difference between sexes for ischemic heart disease, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and previous stroke. Men more often were smokers and alcohol consumers. Unadjusted survival in men and women did not differ: 70.3% versus 66.7% (1-year), 40.0% versus 38.9% (5-year......BACKGROUND: Although diverging, most studies show that sex has no significant influence on stroke survival. METHODS: In a Copenhagen, Denmark, community all patients with stroke during March 1992 to November 1993 were registered on hospital admission. Stroke severity was measured using...

  7. White matter changes in stroke patients. Relationship with stroke subtype and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leys, D; Englund, E; Del Ser, T

    1999-01-01

    or white matter lesions or leukoencephalopathy or leukoaraiosis' and 'stroke or cerebral infarct or cerebral hemorrhage or cerebrovascular disease or transient ischemic attack (TIA)'. WMC, as defined radiologically, are present in up to 44% of patients with stroke or TIA and in 50% of patients...... of death or dependency, recurrent stroke of any type, cerebral bleeding under anticoagulation, myocardial infarction, and poststroke dementia. WMC in stroke patients are often associated with small-vessel disease and lead to a higher risk of death, and poor cardiac and neurological outcome. However......White matter changes (WMC), detected by imaging techniques, are frequent in stroke patients. The aim of the study was to determine how WMC relate to stroke subtypes and to stroke outcome. We made a systematic Medline search for articles appearing with two of the following key words: either 'WMC...

  8. Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Simple Techniques Can Help Memory after a Stroke Self-Esteem after Stroke Cognitive Challenges After Stroke Depression Trumps ... spasticity), fatigue and more. Let's Talk About Stroke Fact Sheets Our stroke fact sheets cover treatments, recovery, ...

  9. Study design and methods of the BoTULS trial: a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the clinical effect and cost effectiveness of treating upper limb spasticity due to stroke with botulinum toxin type A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Laura

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following a stroke, 55–75% of patients experience upper limb problems in the longer term. Upper limb spasticity may cause pain, deformity and reduced function, affecting mood and independence. Botulinum toxin is used increasingly to treat focal spasticity, but its impact on upper limb function after stroke is unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A plus an upper limb therapy programme in the treatment of post stroke upper limb spasticity. Methods Trial design : A multi-centre open label parallel group randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation. Participants : Adults with upper limb spasticity at the shoulder, elbow, wrist or hand and reduced upper limb function due to stroke more than 1 month previously. Interventions : Botulinum toxin type A plus upper limb therapy (intervention group or upper limb therapy alone (control group. Outcomes : Outcome assessments are undertaken at 1, 3 and 12 months. The primary outcome is upper limb function one month after study entry measured by the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT. Secondary outcomes include: spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale; grip strength; dexterity (Nine Hole Peg Test; disability (Barthel Activities of Daily Living Index; quality of life (Stroke Impact Scale, Euroqol EQ-5D and attainment of patient-selected goals (Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Health and social services resource use, adverse events, use of other antispasticity treatments and patient views on the treatment will be compared. Participants are clinically reassessed at 3, 6 and 9 months to determine the need for repeat botulinum toxin type A and/or therapy. Randomisation : A web based central independent randomisation service. Blinding : Outcome assessments are undertaken by an assessor who is blinded to the randomisation group. Sample size : 332 participants provide 80% power to detect a 15% difference in treatment

  10. Protein consumptions in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Maghsoudi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Stroke is one of the most common causes of disabilities and death all over the world. The mortality rate of stroke is predicted to be doubled by 2030 in the Middle East countries. Nutrition is an effective strategy in prevention and management of stroke. This study assessed the relationship between various protein types and stroke risk. Materials and Methods: This hospital-based case-control study was performed in a University hospital. The data regarding consumption of usual food intake of 69 cases (46 men and 23 women and 60 controls (30 men and 30 women was collected with a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ. The mean consumption of red and white meat and vegetable and processed proteins consumption were compared between two groups. Results: The percent of total of daily protein intake were lower in patients with stroke in both sexes (25.92% vs 30.55% in men and 30.7% vs 31.14% in women. Conclusion: Lower protein consumption may be observed in patients with stroke patients in both sex.

  11. Prevention Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an important cause for neurological morbidity and mortality. Prevention of ischemic stroke involves identification and prevention of risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy. Risk factors have been classified as modifiable and non-modifiable; control of modifiable factors should prevent stroke occurrence. Stroke prevention has been described at three levels: primary, secondary and tertiary. Prolonged hypertension increases an individual′s risk for developing fatal or nonfatal stroke by three times and its control has been shown to prevent stroke. Diabetes mellitus is an important cause for microangiopathy and predisposes to stroke. Statin trials have shown significant reduction in stroke in those who were treated with statins. Stroke risk can be reduced by avoiding tobacco use, control of obesity and avoiding sedentary life style. Anti platelet medications are effective for secondary prevention of stroke. Educating society regarding modifiable risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy form the cornerstone for the prevention of stroke.

  12. The association between sedentary behaviors during weekdays and weekend with change in body composition in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenowatz, Clemens; DeMello, Madison M; Shook, Robin P; Hand, Gregory A; Burgess, Stephanie; Blair, Steven N

    2016-01-01

    High sedentary time has been considered an important chronic disease risk factor but there is only limited information on the association of specific sedentary behaviors on weekdays and weekend-days with body composition. The present study examines the prospective association of total sedentary time and specific sedentary behaviors during weekdays and the weekend with body composition in young adults. A total of 332 adults (50% male; 27.7 ± 3.7 years) were followed over a period of 1 year. Time spent sedentary, excluding sleep (SED), and in physical activity (PA) during weekdays and weekend-days was objectively assessed every 3 months with a multi-sensor device over a period of at least 8 days. In addition, participants reported sitting time, TV time and non-work related time spent at the computer separately for weekdays and the weekend. Fat mass and fat free mass were assessed via dual x-ray absorptiometry and used to calculate percent body fat (%BF). Energy intake was estimated based on TDEE and change in body composition. Cross-sectional analyses showed a significant correlation between SED and body composition (0.18 ≤ r ≤ 0.34). Associations between body weight and specific sedentary behaviors were less pronounced and significant during weekdays only ( r ≤ 0.16). Nevertheless, decrease in SED during weekends, rather than during weekdays, was significantly associated with subsequent decrease in %BF ( β = 0.06, p body composition. The stronger prospective association between sedentary behavior during weekends with subsequent body composition emphasizes the importance of leisure time behavior in weight management.

  13. Estimating the right allocation of resources on weekends and public holidays in Green Zone using hybrid methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Nazhatul Sahima Mohd; Liong, Choong-Yeun; Ismail, Wan Rosmanira; Noh, Abu Yazid Md; Noor, Nur Amalina Mohd

    2018-04-01

    Long patient waiting time and congestion is a major problem faced by Green Zone in Emergency Department at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (EDHUSM) especially during weekends and public holidays. Even though the Green Zone is servicing only the non-critical patients, patient waiting time, causing the department fails to achieve its Key Performance Indicator (KPI). The long waiting time is due to the insufficient resources provided during the weekends and public holidays versus the large number of patients. Currently, only two doctors supported by two nurses are scheduled for every shift during weekends and public holidays. The numbers of patients are higher during weekends and public holidays as compared to weekdays, but the scheduled number of doctors and nurses are the same as weekdays. Therefore, this study presents a hybrid method to estimate the right number of doctors and nurses for improving the services of the Green Zone during weekends and public holidays. Fifty scenarios based on current and proposed schedules of doctors and nurses are simulated and analysed using the hybrid method of Discrete Event Simulation (DES) and Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). Banker, Charnes and Cooper (BCC) input-oriented model and Super-Efficiency models of DEA were used to analyse the efficiency of the scenarios. The results show that the best schedule is a combination of four doctors supported by four nurses in every shift during weekends and public holidays for the Green Zone. The findings show that such schedule will not only help the department to achieve its KPI but also enable a more optimal utilization of the resources.

  14. Stroke while driving: Frequency and association with automobile accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamasu, Joji; Nakatsukasa, Masashi; Tomiyasu, Kazuhiro; Mayanagi, Keita; Nishimoto, Masaaki; Oshima, Takeo; Yoshii, Masami; Miyatake, Satoru; Imai, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular events while driving have occasionally been reported. In contrast, there have been few studies on stroke while driving. Aim The objectives of this study were to (1) report the frequency of stroke while driving and (2) evaluate its association with automobile accidents. Methods Clinical data prospectively acquired between January 2011 and December 2016 on 2145 stroke patients (1301 with ischemic stroke, 585 with intracerebral hemorrhage, and 259 with subarachnoid hemorrhage) were reviewed to identify patients who sustained a stroke while driving. The ratio of driving to performing other activities was evaluated for each stroke type. Furthermore, the drivers' response to stroke was reviewed to understand how automobile accidents occurred. Results Among the 2145 patients, 85 (63 ischemic stroke, 20 intracerebral hemorrhage, and 2 subarachnoid hemorrhage) sustained a stroke while driving. The ratio of driving to performing other activities was significantly higher in ischemic stroke (4.8%) than in intracerebral hemorrhage (3.4%) or subarachnoid hemorrhage (0.8%). A majority of drivers either continued driving or pulled over to the roadside after suffering a stroke. However, 14 (16%) patients were involved in automobile accidents. In most patients, an altered mental status due to severe stroke was the presumed cause of the accident. Conclusion Stroke occurred while driving in 4.0% of all strokes and accidents occurred in 16% of these instances.

  15. Effect of GLP-1R Knockout on stroke outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Voinea, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability in adults in westernized societies and it has an important impact on health and economy. Comorbid health conditions such as hypertension, inactive lifestyle, smoking, obesity and diabetes considerably increase the risk of stroke. Moreover, studies have shown an increased probability of stroke occurrence and recurrence in the type 2 diabetes (T2D). Stroke leads to neurological deficits like motor impairments, disabilities and poor quality of life. The ...

  16. Fibroblast Growth Factor Type 1 (FGF1)-Overexpressed Adipose-Derived Mesenchaymal Stem Cells (AD-MSCFGF1) Induce Neuroprotection and Functional Recovery in a Rat Stroke Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazavi, Hamed; Hoseini, Seyed Javad; Ebrahimzadeh-Bideskan, Alireza; Mashkani, Baratali; Mehri, Soghra; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Sadri, Kayvan; Mahdipour, Elahe; Ghasemi, Faezeh; Forouzanfar, Fatemeh; Hoseini, Azar; Pasdar, Ali Reza; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid

    2017-10-01

    Stroke, as the second most common cause of death, imposes a great financial burden on both the individual and society. Mesenchymal stem cells from rodents have demonstrated efficacy in experimental animal models of stroke due to enhanced neurological recovery. Since FGF1 (fibroblast growth factor 1) displays neuroprotective properties, for the first time, we investigated the effect of acute intravenous administration of FGF1 gene transfected adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (AD-MSC FGF1 ) on transient experimental ischemic stroke in rats. Stroke induction was made by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). 2 × 10 6  AD-MSC FGF1 was administrated intravenously 30 min after carotid reperfusion. The ability of technetium 99m -hexamethyl propylene amine oxime ( 99m Tc-HMPAO)-labeled AD-MSC FGF1 to enter into ischemic brain was evaluated 2 h post injection. 24 h post operation, the neurological recovery (rotarod and Roger's tests), the infarct volume (2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride, TTC assay), apoptosis rate (TUNEL assay), and the expression of FGF1 protein (western blotting) in the ischemic hemisphere were assessed. The 99m Tc-HMPAO-labeled AD-MSC FGF1 could enter into the ischemic brain. Ischemic hemisphere activity was significantly higher than that observed in the contralateral hemisphere (p = 0.002). The administration of AD-MSC FGF1 resulted in significant improvement of neurological function tests and increased density of FGF1 protein in the peri-infarct area, while the infarct volume and the apoptotic index were significantly decreased, in comparison to the other treated groups. In conclusion, acute intravenous administration of AD-MSC FGF1 can be a novel and promising candidate approach for the treatment of ischemic stroke.

  17. Survival after stroke. Risk factors and determinants in the Copenhagen Stroke Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2010-01-01

    -based surveys is emphasized. For factors such as sex, and most cardiovascular risk factors further studies are necessary to clarify the relation to survival because studies disagree. Conclusions from studies of the relation between survival and alcohol intake are still debatable, mostly because of diverging...... definitions of the intensity of exposure. Smoking is uniformly associated with a poorer survival after stroke. Stroke unit treatment improves both short- and longterm survival regardless of stroke type, severity, age, and cardiovascular risk factor profile....

  18. Four-Stroke and Two-Stroke Marine Engines Comparison and Application

    OpenAIRE

    Eng. Waleed Alturki

    2017-01-01

    Marine engines have evolved a lot through time. From the earliest instances of rowing equipment to the advanced machinery, propulsion engines have become a critical part in the efficiency of marine vessels. These engines can be classified and selected using various characteristics and types, such as its operating cycle. Engines can come in either the four-stroke or the two-stroke version. Four-stroke engines are primarily used in cars, buses, and trucks due to their lower noise production and...

  19. Leukocytosis in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Nakayama, H

    1999-01-01

    Leukocytosis is a common finding in the acute phase of stroke. A detrimental effect of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has been suggested, and trials aiming at reducing the leukocyte response in acute stroke are currently being conducted. However, the influence of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has...

  20. Stroke: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Stroke: First aid Stroke: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A stroke occurs when there's bleeding into your brain or when blood flow to your ... cells start dying. Seek immediate medical assistance. A stroke is a true emergency. The sooner treatment is ...

  1. Interventions on central computing services during the weekend of 21 and 22 August

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    As part of the planned upgrade of the computer centre infrastructure to meet the LHC computing needs, approximately 150 servers, hosting in particular the NICE home directories, Mail services and Web services, will need to be physically relocated to another part of the computing hall during the weekend of the 21 and 22 August. On Saturday 21 August, starting from 8:30a.m. interruptions of typically 60 minutes will take place on the following central computing services: NICE and the whole Windows infrastructure, Mail services, file services (including home directories and DFS workspaces), Web services, VPN access, Windows Terminal Services. During any interruption, incoming mail from outside CERN will be queued and delivered as soon as the service is operational again. All Services should be available again on Saturday 21 at 17:30 but a few additional interruptions will be possible after that time and on Sunday 22 August. IT Department

  2. Adapting the Home After a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... after a Stroke Adapting the Home after a Stroke Caregiver Introduction What is Aphasia? Stroke Recovery Guides ...

  3. Incidence of constipation in stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianxiang; Yuan, Mengguo; Liu, Yunfang; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Jingqing; Guo, Weifeng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There is growing awareness of a link between the gut and cardiovascular disease. Constipation is common among individuals who have had a stroke, and it negatively affects social functioning and quality of life. However, no systematic study on the incidence of constipation in stroke patients has been reported. We selected studies included in Medline, Embase, Cochrane database, and Web of Science. Studies were included if they reported the incidence in stroke patients. Two authors selected the studies, extracted the data independently, and assessed these. Subgroup analyses were conducted according to the stroke subtype and stage of stroke. After detailed evaluations, 8 studies (n  =  1385 participants) were found that contained data that were suitable for meta-analytic synthesis. A forest plot showed that the incidence of constipation was 48% (95% confidence interval [CI]  =  33%–63%). In the analysis of the type of stroke subgroup, the incidence of constipation in patients who had had a hemorrhagic stroke (66% [95% CI  =  40–91%]) was higher than that in patients who had experienced an ischemic stroke (51% [95% CI  =  27%–75%]). The incidence in the acute stage (45% [95% CI  =  36%–54%]) was lower than that in the rehabilitation stage (48% [95% CI  =  23%–73%]). Constipation after a stroke event occurs frequently. This finding may raise awareness about bowel complications to allow correct evaluation and proper management. PMID:28640117

  4. Using Stroke Removal to Investigate Chinese Character Identification during Reading: Evidence from Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guoli; Bai, Xuejun; Zang, Chuanli; Bian, Qian; Cui, Lei; Qi, Wei; Rayner, Keith; Liversedge, Simon P.

    2012-01-01

    We explored the effect of stroke removal from Chinese characters on eye movements during reading to examine the role of stroke encoding in character identification. Experimental sentences were comprised of characters with different proportions of strokes removed (15, 30, and 50%), and different types of strokes removed (beginning, ending, and…

  5. 76 FR 47441 - Safety Zone; Apache Pier Labor Day Weekend Fireworks Display, Atlantic Ocean, Myrtle Beach, SC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... Display, Atlantic Ocean, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY... vicinity of Apache Pier in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina during a Labor Day weekend fireworks display on... fireworks display is scheduled to take place in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. The fireworks will be launched...

  6. MACH MIT: Deutsches Wochenende am Karlsfluss (MACH MIT: a German Week-End on the Charles River).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reizes, Sonia; Kramsch, Claire J.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a joint high school/college pilot program planned by Massachusetts foreign language teachers and hosted by M.I.T. The success of the program dubbed "MACH MIT Total Immersion German Weekend" is attributed to the concept of active involvement, which was implemented through games, seminars, shows, cooking and other activities.…

  7. A field-based community assessment of intoxication levels across college football weekends: does it matter who's playing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Adam E; Howell, Steve; Bopp, Trevor; Stellefson, Michael; Chaney, Elizabeth; Piazza-Gardner, Anna; Payne-Purvis, Caroline

    2014-12-01

    While alcohol consumption has been consistently linked to college football games in the United States, this literature lacks (a) field-based event-level analyses; (b) assessments of the context of drinking, such as days leading to an event, that occurs in conjunction with a contest; (c) investigations of non-student drinking; and (d) objective assessments of opponent rating. Therefore, the present study: (1) examines the extent to which breath alcohol concentrations (BrAC) among restaurant and bar district patrons differ for low- and high-profile games and (2) explores the relationship between an objective rating of a team's opponent and BrAC levels. Data were collected throughout the fall 2011 football season via six anonymous field studies in a bar district within a southeastern college community. During low-profile game weekends, respondents recorded significantly lower BrAC levels than those during high-profile game weekends. Additionally, there was a positive correlation between opponent rating and BrAC levels, such that mean BrAC readings were highest prior to the game featuring the highest rated opponent. Overall, participants exhibited significantly higher BrACs when a higher-rated opponent was playing that weekend. When resources (money, manpower) are limited, community-based prevention and enforcement efforts should occur during the weekends surrounding higher-profile games.

  8. Predicting Success for Nontraditional Students in an Afternoon and Evening/Weekend Associate Degree in Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Hernani Luison, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Mount St. Mary's College has offered a nontraditional Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) Program since 1992. The program has an afternoon and evening/weekend format. There has been one previous research study published in 2005 that described the student population that Mount St. Mary's College serves. This present study will examine the…

  9. When yesterday's consumption strikes back: Deviation from usual consumption inversely predicts amounts consumed the next weekend evening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labhart, F.; Kuntsche, E.N.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and Aims. Young adults' weekend alcohol consumption is characterised by heavy episodic drinking (HED) with low alcohol use in between. This study investigates whether consuming a lower or higher number of drinks than usual on a given evening predicts consumption the following evening.

  10. SWAT (Student Weekend Arborist Team): A Model for Land Grant Institutions and Cooperative Extension Systems to Conduct Street Tree Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowett, F.D.; Bassuk, N.L.

    2012-01-01

    SWAT (Student Weekend Arborist Team) is a program affiliated with Cornell University and Extension founded to conduct street tree inventories in New York State communities with 10,000 residents or fewer, a group of communities underserved in community forestry planning. Between 2002 and 2010, SWAT conducted 40 inventories, and data from these…

  11. The association between sedentary behaviors during weekdays and weekend with change in body composition in young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin P. Shook

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available High sedentary time has been considered an important chronic disease risk factor but there is only limited information on the association of specific sedentary behaviors on weekdays and weekend-days with body composition. The present study examines the prospective association of total sedentary time and specific sedentary behaviors during weekdays and the weekend with body composition in young adults. Methods: A total of 332 adults (50% male; 27.7 ± 3.7 years were followed over a period of 1 year. Time spent sedentary, excluding sleep (SED, and in physical activity (PA during weekdays and weekend-days was objectively assessed every 3 months with a multi-sensor device over a period of at least 8 days. In addition, participants reported sitting time, TV time and non-work related time spent at the computer separately for weekdays and the weekend. Fat mass and fat free mass were assessed via dual x-ray absorptiometry and used to calculate percent body fat (%BF. Energy intake was estimated based on TDEE and change in body composition. Results: Cross-sectional analyses showed a significant correlation between SED and body composition (0.18 ≤ r ≤ 0.34. Associations between body weight and specific sedentary behaviors were less pronounced and significant during weekdays only (r ≤ 0.16. Nevertheless, decrease in SED during weekends, rather than during weekdays, was significantly associated with subsequent decrease in %BF (β = 0.06, p <0.01. After adjusting for PA and energy intake, results for SED were no longer significant. Only the association between change in sitting time during weekends and subsequent %BF was independent from change in PA or energy intake (β%BF = 0.04, p = 0.01, while there was no significant association between TV or computer time and subsequent body composition. Conclusions: The stronger prospective association between sedentary behavior during weekends with subsequent body composition emphasizes the importance of leisure

  12. Weekday-weekend patterns of physical activity and screen time in parents and their pre-schoolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Sigmundová

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study focuses on the comparison of weekday/weekend parent-child behavioural patterns (step count (SC and screen time (ST and answers the question of whether achieving the recommendations for daily SC (10,000 in parents also helps their preschool children achieve the recommended daily SC (11,500. Methods The participants (278 parents aged 30–45 and their 194 children aged 4–7 were randomly recruited from 10 Czech public kindergartens. The participants recorded SC (pedometer Yamax Digiwalker SW-200 and ST duration (proxy-report for seven consecutive days (≥8 h/day during September–October 2014 and April–May 2015. Differences between weekdays/weekends SC or ST were tested using a paired t-test. The odds of achieving the recommended daily SC for children were estimated using general logistic regression separately for weekdays and weekends. Results Only the mothers were found to have a significantly lower SC at weekends than on weekdays. All of the participants showed significantly more ST at weekends than on weekdays (daughters: 78.6 vs. 45.7 min/day, p < 0.001; sons: 78.8 vs. 55.8 min/day; mothers: 93.0 vs. 68.3 min/day; and fathers: 116.6 vs. 87.5 min/day. Daughters and sons were significantly more likely to achieve daily SC recommendation if a the SC on weekdays during the daily routine in kindergarten exceeded the median of kindergarten SC or b at weekends if their mother (OR: 9.67, 95 % CI: 3.57–26.23 exceeded 10,000 steps a day. Conclusions Especially at weekends, preschoolers have higher odds of meeting the recommended 11,500 steps per day when their mother reaches 10,000 steps per day and this is independent of the amount of parents’ ST. Moreover, physical activity in kindergarten helps preschool children meet the 11,500 recommended steps per day on weekdays. Therefore, interventions to promote physical activity in preschoolers should focus on kindergartens and encourage involvement of their

  13. Role of prediabetes in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Milija D Mijajlović,1,* Vuk M Aleksić,2,* Nadežda M Šternić,1 Mihailo M Mirković,3 Natan M Bornstein4,5 1Neurology Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, School of Medicine University of Belgrade, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Clinical Hospital Center Zemun, Belgrade, 3Department of Neurology, General Hospital Valjevo, Valjevo, Serbia; 4Department of Neurology, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 5Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and probably the greatest cause of adult disability worldwide. Diabetes mellitus (DM is a state of accelerated aging of blood vessels. Patients with diabetes have increased risk of stroke. Hyperglycemia represents a risk factor for poor outcome following stroke, and probably is just a marker of poor outcome rather than a cause. Lowering of blood glucose levels has not been shown to improve prognosis. Also, prevention of stroke risk among patients with DM is not improved with therapy for reduction of glucose levels. On the other hand, prediabetes, a metabolic state between normal glucose metabolism and diabetes, is a risk factor for the development of DM type 2 and subsequently for stroke. Several methods are known to identify prediabetes patients, including fasting plasma glucose levels, 2-hour post load glucose levels, and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. In this text, we tried to summarize known data about diagnosis, epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, and prevention of prediabetes in relation to DM and stroke. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, insulin, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, risk factors, stroke

  14. Stroke: Working toward a Prioritized World Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachinski, Vladimir; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Gorelick, Philip B.; Hacke, Werner; Cramer, Steven C.; Kaste, Markku; Fisher, Marc; Brainin, Michael; Buchan, Alastair M.; Lo, Eng H.; Skolnick, Brett E.; Furie, Karen L.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Kivipelto, Miia; Morris, John; Rothwell, Peter M.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Smith, Jr., Sidney C.; Wang, Yulun; Bryer, Alan; Ford, Gary A.; Iadecola, Costantino; Martins, Sheila C.O.; Saver, Jeff; Skvortsova, Veronika; Bayley, Mark; Bednar, Martin M.; Duncan, Pamela; Enney, Lori; Finklestein, Seth; Jones, Theresa A.; Kalra, Lalit; Kleim, Jeff; Nitkin, Ralph; Teasell, Robert; Weiller, Cornelius; Desai, Bhupat; Goldberg, Mark P.; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Saarelma, Osmo; Schwamm, Lee H.; Shinohara, Yukito; Trivedi, Bhargava; Wahlgren, Nils; Wong, Lawrence K.; Hakim, Antoine; Norrving, Bo; Prudhomme, Stephen; Bornstein, Natan M.; Davis, Stephen M.; Goldstein, Larry B.; Leys, Didier; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose The aim of the Synergium was to devise and prioritize new ways of accelerating progress in reducing the risks, effects, and consequences of stroke. Methods Preliminary work was performed by 7 working groups of stroke leaders followed by a synergium (a forum for working synergistically together) with approximately 100 additional participants. The resulting draft document had further input from contributors outside the synergium. Results Recommendations of the Synergium are: Basic Science, Drug Development and Technology: There is a need to develop: (1) New systems of working together to break down the prevalent ‘silo’ mentality; (2) New models of vertically integrated basic, clinical, and epidemiological disciplines; and (3) Efficient methods of identifying other relevant areas of science. Stroke Prevention: (1) Establish a global chronic disease prevention initiative with stroke as a major focus. (2) Recognize not only abrupt clinical stroke, but subtle subclinical stroke, the commonest type of cerebrovascular disease, leading to impairments of executive function. (3) Develop, implement and evaluate a population approach for stroke prevention. (4) Develop public health communication strategies using traditional and novel (e.g., social media/marketing) techniques. Acute Stroke Management: Continue the establishment of stroke centers, stroke units, regional systems of emergency stroke care and telestroke networks. Brain Recovery and Rehabilitation: (1) Translate best neuroscience, including animal and human studies, into poststroke recovery research and clinical care. (2) Standardize poststroke rehabilitation based on best evidence. (3) Develop consensus on, then implementation of, standardized clinical and surrogate assessments. (4) Carry out rigorous clinical research to advance stroke recovery. Into the 21st Century: Web, Technology and Communications: (1) Work toward global unrestricted access to stroke-related information. (2) Build

  15. Stroke: working toward a prioritized world agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachinski, Vladimir; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Gorelick, Philip B; Hacke, Werner; Cramer, Steven C; Kaste, Markku; Fisher, Marc; Brainin, Michael; Buchan, Alastair M; Lo, Eng H; Skolnick, Brett E; Furie, Karen L; Hankey, Graeme J; Kivipelto, Miia; Morris, John; Rothwell, Peter M; Sacco, Ralph L; Smith, Sidney C; Wang, Yulun; Bryer, Alan; Ford, Gary A; Iadecola, Costantino; Martins, Sheila C O; Saver, Jeff; Skvortsova, Veronika; Bayley, Mark; Bednar, Martin M; Duncan, Pamela; Enney, Lori; Finklestein, Seth; Jones, Theresa A; Kalra, Lalit; Kleim, Jeff; Nitkin, Ralph; Teasell, Robert; Weiller, Cornelius; Desai, Bhupat; Goldberg, Mark P; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Saarelma, Osmo; Schwamm, Lee H; Shinohara, Yukito; Trivedi, Bhargava; Wahlgren, Nils; Wong, Lawrence K; Hakim, Antoine; Norrving, Bo; Prudhomme, Stephen; Bornstein, Natan M; Davis, Stephen M; Goldstein, Larry B; Leys, Didier; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2010-08-01

    The aim of the Synergium was to devise and prioritize new ways of accelerating progress in reducing the risks, effects, and consequences of stroke. Preliminary work was performed by seven working groups of stroke leaders followed by a synergium (a forum for working synergistically together) with approximately 100 additional participants. The resulting draft document had further input from contributors outside the synergium. Recommendations of the Synergium are: Basic Science, Drug Development and Technology: There is a need to develop: (1) New systems of working together to break down the prevalent 'silo' mentality; (2) New models of vertically integrated basic, clinical, and epidemiological disciplines; and (3) Efficient methods of identifying other relevant areas of science. Stroke Prevention: (1) Establish a global chronic disease prevention initiative with stroke as a major focus. (2) Recognize not only abrupt clinical stroke, but subtle subclinical stroke, the commonest type of cerebrovascular disease, leading to impairments of executive function. (3) Develop, implement and evaluate a population approach for stroke prevention. (4) Develop public health communication strategies using traditional and novel (eg, social media/marketing) techniques. Acute Stroke Management: Continue the establishment of stroke centers, stroke units, regional systems of emergency stroke care and telestroke networks. Brain Recovery and Rehabilitation: (1) Translate best neuroscience, including animal and human studies, into poststroke recovery research and clinical care. (2) Standardize poststroke rehabilitation based on best evidence. (3) Develop consensus on, then implementation of, standardized clinical and surrogate assessments. (4) Carry out rigorous clinical research to advance stroke recovery. Into the 21st Century: Web, Technology and Communications: (1) Work toward global unrestricted access to stroke-related information. (2) Build centralized electronic archives and

  16. The weekend effect within and downwind of Sacramento ─ Part 1: Observations of ozone, nitrogen oxides, and VOC reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Goldstein

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Day-of-week patterns in human activities can be used to examine the ways in which differences in primary emissions result in changes in the rates of photochemical reactions, and the production of secondary pollutants. Data from twelve California Air Resources Board monitoring sites in Sacramento, CA, and the downwind Mountain Counties air basin are analyzed to reveal day of week patterns in ozone and its precursors in the summers of 1998–2002. Measurements of non-methane hydrocarbons are available for the summers of 2001–2003 at three of these sites and NOx at six of these sites for the full time period. This routine monitoring data is complemented by data sets of ozone and nitrogen oxide concentrations obtained in the summers of 2001 and 2003 at three sites in the region and comprehensive measurements of VOC reactivity at two sites in 2001. Daytime concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NOx≡NO+NO2 are approximately 35% lower on weekends at all the sites, whereas the VOC reactivity changes by less than 10%. All six sites in the Sacramento Valley have higher 8-h maximum average ozone on the weekend and are more likely to exceed the national standard of 85 ppb on the weekend. In contrast, all the sites in the Mountain Counties are less likely to exceed the federal ozone standard on the weekend. Analysis of the day-of-week trends in odd oxygen show that the weekend effect of ozone within Sacramento is strongly influenced by NO sources close to the monitoring sites. This suggests that ozone measurements from monitoring sites close to highways, including two rural locations, may not be representative of the regional abundance, and lead to underestimates of long term exposure for humans and ecosystems.

  17. Protocol for the health economic evaluation of increasing the weekend specialist to patient ratio in hospitals in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Samuel I; Chen, Yen-Fu; Bion, Julian F; Aldridge, Cassie P; Girling, Alan; Lilford, Richard J

    2018-01-01

    Introduction This protocol concerns the evaluation of increased specialist staffing at weekends in hospitals in England. Seven-day health services are a key policy for the UK government and other health systems trying to improve use of infrastructure and resources. A particular motivation for the 7-day policy has been the observed increase in the risk of death associated with weekend admission, which has been attributed to fewer hospital specialists being available at weekends. However, the causes of the weekend effect have not been adequately characterised; many of the excess deaths associated with the ‘weekend effect’ may not be preventable, and the presumed benefits of improved specialist cover might be offset by the cost of implementation. Methods/design The Bayesian-founded method we propose will consist of four major steps. First, the development of a qualitative causal model. Specialist presence can affect multiple, interacting causal processes. One or more models will be developed from the results of an expert elicitation workshop and probabilities elicited for each model and relevant model parameters. Second, systematic review of the literature. The model from the first step will provide search limits for a review to identify relevant studies. Third, a statistical model for the effects of specialist presence on care quality and patient outcomes. Fourth, valuation of outcomes. The expected net benefits of different levels of specialist intensity will then be evaluated with respect to the posterior distributions of the parameters. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the Review Subcommittee of the South West Wales REC on 11 November 2013. Informed consent was not required for accessing anonymised patient case records from which patient identifiers had been removed. The findings of this study will be published in peer-reviewed journals; the outputs from this research will also form part of the project report to the HS&DR Programme Board

  18. Airplane stroke syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humaidan, Hani; Yassi, Nawaf; Weir, Louise; Davis, Stephen M; Meretoja, Atte

    2016-07-01

    Only 37 cases of stroke during or soon after long-haul flights have been published to our knowledge. In this retrospective observational study, we searched the Royal Melbourne Hospital prospective stroke database and all discharge summaries from 1 September 2003 to 30 September 2014 for flight-related strokes, defined as patients presenting with stroke within 14days of air travel. We hypothesised that a patent foramen ovale (PFO) is an important, but not the only mechanism, of flight-related stroke. We describe the patient, stroke, and flight characteristics. Over the study period, 131 million passengers arrived at Melbourne airport. Our centre admitted 5727 stroke patients, of whom 42 (0.73%) had flight-related strokes. Flight-related stroke patients were younger (median age 65 versus 73, p<0.001), had similar stroke severity, and received intravenous thrombolysis more often than non-flight-related stroke patients. Seven patients had flight-related intracerebral haemorrhage. The aetiology of the ischaemic strokes was cardioembolic in 14/35 (40%), including seven patients with confirmed PFO, one with atrial septal defect, four with atrial fibrillation, one with endocarditis, and one with aortic arch atheroma. Paradoxical embolism was confirmed in six patients. Stroke related to air travel is a rare occurrence, less than one in a million. Although 20% of patients had a PFO, distribution of stroke aetiologies was diverse and was not limited to PFO and paradoxical embolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-Term Risk of Dementia among Survivors of Ischemic or Hemorrhagic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corraini, Priscila; Henderson, Victor; Ording, Anne Gulbech

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Stroke is a risk factor for dementia, but the risk of dementia after different stroke types is poorly understood. We examined the long-term risk of dementia among survivors of any first-time stroke and of first-time ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid...... 303 survivors of unspecified stroke types. Patients were aged ≥18 years and survived for at least 3 months after diagnosis. We formed a comparison cohort from the general population (1 075 588 patients without stroke, matched to stroke patients by age and sex). We computed absolute risks and hazard...... ratios of dementia up to 30 years after stroke. RESULTS: The 30-year absolute risk of dementia among stroke survivors was 11.5% (95% confidence interval, 11.2%-11.7%). Compared with the general population, the hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for dementia among stroke survivors was 1.80 (1...

  20. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes ... the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Cholesterol Salt Video: Know Your ...

  1. Epidemiology and in-hospital outcome of stroke in South Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deresse, Birrie; Shaweno, Debebe

    2015-08-15

    Although the burden of stroke in Sub-Saharan Africa, including Ethiopia, is increasing, there are few available data on stroke in Ethiopia. To describe the magnitude of risk factors, sub-types and in-hospital outcome of stroke at Hawassa University Referral Hospital, Ethiopia. A prospective hospital-based study was conducted with all adult patients admitted to Hawassa University Referral Hospital with stroke diagnosis between May 2013 and April 2014. Computerized tomography scan was performed in all patients to confirm the type of stroke. Stroke severity at admission was assessed by the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. Stroke outcome at discharge was measured using the modified Rankin stroke scale. A total of 163 stroke patients were recruited during the study period, of which 82 (50.3%) patients had ischemic stroke while 81 (49.7%) had hemorrhagic stroke. Stroke risk factors included hypertension (50.9%), cardiac diseases (16.6%), diabetes mellitus (7.4%), alcohol (10.4%), cigarette smoking (4.9%) and tuberculous meningitis (3.1%). In-hospital stroke mortality was 14.7%. The main predictors of in-hospital stroke mortality were stroke severity at admission, hemorrhagic stroke, decreased level of consciousness and seizure. The proportion of hemorrhagic stroke is higher than in Western countries. Hypertension is the most common risk factor for stroke. More than half of the patients were discharged with severe disability. We recommend establishing stroke units in resource limited countries like Ethiopia in order to reduce stroke mortality and post stroke disability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Development, expansion, and use of a stroke clinical trials resource for novel exploratory analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Myzoon; Bath, Philip; Brady, Marian; Davis, Stephen; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Donnan, Geoffrey; Fisher, Marc; Hacke, Werner; Hanley, Daniel F; Luby, Marie; Tsivgoulis, G; Wahlgren, Nils; Warach, Steven; Lees, Kennedy R

    2012-02-01

    Analysis of reliable registry data can direct future research to influence clinical care. Data from the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive have been used to test hypotheses and inform trial design. We sought to expand Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive into a broader stroke resource with new opportunities for research and international collaboration. Using procedures initially developed for an acute stroke trial archive, we invited trialists to lodge data on rehabilitation, secondary prevention, intracerebral haemorrhage, imaging, and observational stroke studies. We have extended Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive into six subsections: Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Acute (n = 28 190 patients' data), Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Rehab (n = 10 194), Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-intracerebral haemorrhage (n = 1829), Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Prevention, Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Imaging (n = 1300), and Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Plus (n = 6573). Enrollment continues, with commitments for the contribution of six further trials to Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Prevention, 13 trials to Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Rehab, and one registry to Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Plus. Data on age, type of stroke, medical history, outcomes by modified Rankin scale and Barthel Index (BI), mortality, and adverse events are available for analyses. The Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive network encourages the development of young investigators and provides opportunities for international peer review and collaboration. Application of the original Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive concepts beyond acute stroke trials can extend the value of clinical research at low cost, without threatening commercial or intellectual property interests. This delivers valuable research output to inform

  3. Impact of sleep duration and weekend oversleep on body weight and blood pressure in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan SF

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Weekend oversleep or catchup sleep is a frequent occurrence in children, but there are relatively little data concerning its impact on weight and blood pressure. The aim of this study was to assess the association between sleep duration and oversleep, and weight and blood pressure in adolescents. Methods: Sleep duration, weight and blood pressure of 327 children (51.4% boys, mean age 13.3 + 1.7 years who had polysomnograms performed during both exam cycles of the Tucson Children’s Assessment of Sleep Apnea study (TuCASA were analyzed. Sleep duration on school nights and non-school nights was used to compute a weighted average of child and parent reported overall sleep duration respectively. Oversleep was defined as the difference between self and parent reported weekend sleep and weekday sleep separately. Simple correlations between overall sleep duration, sleep on school and non-school nights and oversleep, and blood pressure, standardized body mass index (BMI, snoring, respiratory disturbance index (RDI and age were calculated. Significant bivariate associations then were used to develop multivariate partial correlation models. Results: Unadjusted negative correlations with BMI were noted for parent reported total sleep duration at the 1st exam cycle, parent and child reported total sleep and school night sleep duration, and parent reported non-school night sleep duration at the 2nd exam cycle. Additionally, for BMI, positive correlations were observed for log RDI at both exam cycles and snoring at the 2nd exam cycle. For blood pressure, there were positive associations with age, parent reported oversleep, caffeine consumption and snoring. Additionally, for blood pressure, negative relationships were observed with parent reported total sleep duration at the 1st exam cycle, and parent and child reported total sleep and school night sleep durations at the 2nd exam cycle. Partial correlations found that BMI was negatively

  4. Impact of Sleep Duration and Weekend Oversleep on Body Weight and Blood Pressure in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Stuart F; Combs, Daniel; Parthasarathy, Sairam

    2018-01-01

    Weekend oversleep or catchup sleep is a frequent occurrence in children, but there are relatively little data concerning its impact on weight and blood pressure. The aim of this study was to assess the association between sleep duration and oversleep, and weight and blood pressure in adolescents. Sleep duration, weight and blood pressure of 327 children (51.4% boys, mean age 13.3 ± 1.7 years) who had polysomnograms performed during both exam cycles of the Tucson Children's Assessment of Sleep Apnea study (TuCASA) were analyzed. Sleep duration on school nights and non-school nights was used to compute a weighted average of child and parent reported overall sleep duration respectively. Oversleep was defined as the difference between self and parent reported weekend sleep and weekday sleep separately. Simple correlations between overall sleep duration, sleep on school and non-school nights and oversleep, and blood pressure, standardized body mass index (BMI), snoring, respiratory disturbance index (RDI) and age were calculated. Significant bivariate associations then were used to develop multivariate partial correlation models. Unadjusted negative correlations with BMI were noted for parent reported total sleep duration at the 1 st exam cycle, parent and child reported total sleep and school night sleep duration, and parent reported non-school night sleep duration at the 2 nd exam cycle. Additionally, for BMI, positive correlations were observed for log RDI at both exam cycles and snoring at the 2 nd exam cycle. For blood pressure, there were positive associations with age, parent reported oversleep, caffeine consumption and snoring. Additionally, for blood pressure, negative relationships were observed with parent reported total sleep duration at the 1 st exam cycle, and parent and child reported total sleep and school night sleep durations at the 2 nd exam cycle. Partial correlations found that BMI was negatively correlated with parent reported total sleep duration

  5. Management of stroke: a clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kameshwar; Kumar, Amit

    2009-06-01

    Stroke is defined as repidly developing symptoms or signs of loss of cerebral function with no apparent cause other than vascular origin. The issues to be addressed when making diagnosis of stroke are : (1) is it a stroke? (2) What pathological type of stroke? (3) Where is the lesion? (4) What caused it? Differential diagnosis of stroke is chronic subdural haematoma, brain tumour, hypoglycaemic, metabolic encephalopathies, postictal neurological deficit and functional. CT or MRI is important investigation while dealing with a stroke patient. In treating acute stroke one has to go through the objectives eg, optimising the patient's chance of survival, minimising the risk and degree of disability and preventing recurrence. One has to think of genera care required in management of stroke. Control of blood pressure and blood sugar is important. Specific treatment includes aspirin, t-PA, low molecular weight heparin, calcium antagonists though some reservation persists over efficacy. Psychological support, cognitive impairment, motor and sensory impairment are to be addressed. Functional rehabilitation interventions, log-term management and secondary prevention are to be cared for.

  6. Stroke Management: An Emerging Role of Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepaneeta Sarmah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Stroke incidences and associated mortality are expected to rise to 23 million and 7.8 million, respectively, by 2030. Further, the aging population, imbalanced lifestyles, and environmental factors continue to shift the rate of stroke incidence, particularly in developing countries. There is an urgent need to develop new therapeutic approaches for treating stroke. Nanotechnology is a growing field, offering an encouraging future prospect for medical research in the management of strokes. The world market for nanotechnology derived products is expected to rise manyfold in the coming decades. Different types of nanomaterials such as perfluorocarbon nanoparticles, iron oxide nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles, quantum dots, nanospheres, etc. have been developed for the diagnosis as well as therapy of strokes. Today, nanotechnology has also been integrated with stem cell therapy for treating stroke. However several obstacles remain to be overcome when using such nanomaterials for treating stroke and other neurological diseases.

  7. Daily Variation in the Occurrence of Different Subtypes of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Ripamonti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Three thousand two hundred and ninety-eight patients admitted to our Stroke Unit with hemorrhagic, large artery atherosclerosis, cardioembolic, small-vessel occlusion, and undetermined etiology-cryptogenic strokes were included in the study. The circadian variability in onset in each stroke subgroup and the associations with various risk factors were analyzed. In each subgroup, a significant minority of patients suffered from stroke during sleep. In the ischemic group, hypercholesterolemia, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, and previous myocardial infarction facilitated the onset during waking. During waking, stroke onset was significantly higher in the morning compared to the afternoon both in the hemorrhagic and in the ischemic type. In hemorrhagic stroke, a previous stroke was associated with a lower early morning occurrence. In large artery atherosclerosis stroke, males were at higher risk of early morning occurrence (p<0.01. In small-vessel occlusion stroke, hypertension is significantly more present in the morning compared to the afternoon onset (p<0.005. Circadian patterns of stroke onset were observed both in hemorrhagic and in ischemic stroke, irrespective of the ischemic subgroup. In all groups, stroke was more likely to occur during waking than during sleep and, in the diurnal period, during morning than during afternoon. Moreover, sex and some clinical factors influence the diurnal pattern.

  8. Stroke and methamphetamine use in young adults: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin, Julia M; Darke, Shane; Farrell, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Methamphetamine use and stroke are significant public health problems. Strokes among people aged below 45 years are much less common than in older age groups but have significant mortality and morbidity. Methamphetamine is a putative cause of strokes among younger people. A review of methamphetamine-related strokes was conducted. Bibliographic databases were searched until February 2017 for articles related to methamphetamine and stroke. Both haemorrhagic and ischaemic strokes were considered. Of 370 articles screened, 77 were selected for inclusion. There were 81 haemorrhagic and 17 ischaemic strokes reported in case reports and series. Both types were approximately twice as common in males. Route of administration associated with haemorrhagic stroke was typically oral or injecting, but for ischaemic stroke inhalation was most common. Haemorrhagic stroke was associated with vascular abnormalities in a third of cases. One quarter of individuals completely recovered, and a third died following haemorrhagic stroke. One-fifth completely recovered, and one-fifth died following ischaemic stroke. There is a preponderance of haemorrhagic strokes associated with methamphetamine use in young people, and methamphetamine-related stroke is associated with poor clinical outcomes. Mechanisms of methamphetamine-associated stroke include hypertension, vasculitis, direct vascular toxicity and vasospasm. In a period of rising worldwide methamphetamine use, the incidence of methamphetamine-related stroke will increase, with a consequent increase in the burden of disease contributed by such events. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Differences in Spatial Physical Activity Patterns between Weekdays and Weekends in Primary School Children: A Cross-Sectional Study Using Accelerometry and Global Positioning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahel Bürgi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Targeting the weekend to promote physical activity (PA in children seems to be promising given that they tend to be less physically active and, particularly, as the age-related decline in PA is more marked during weekends. Considering the ambiguity of why children are not able to maintain their PA level on weekends, the aim of the present study was to objectively investigate differences in children’s spatial PA patterns between week and weekend days using the combination of Global Positioning System (GPS and accelerometry. Seventy-four second graders (aged 7–9 years and 98 sixth graders (aged 11–14 years wore an accelerometer and GPS sensor for seven consecutive days to determine where children spend time and engage in PA. Time-matched accelerometer and GPS data was mapped with a geographic information system and multilevel analyses accounting for the hierarchical structure of the data were conducted. Differences between weekdays and weekends regarding the total time spent and the absolute and relative level of PA in various settings were found in both age groups. The findings support previous research pointing to the importance of targeting weekend PA, especially when children grow older. Future interventions should encourage children to use outdoor spaces more frequently on weekends, rather than stay at home, and to commute actively to destinations other than school.

  10. Test Your Stroke Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 9-1-1. Which of the following are risk factors for stroke? High blood pressure Heart disease Smoking High cholesterol Diabetes Show Answer All of these are risk factors for stroke. If you smoke - quit. If you have high ...

  11. Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More The Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia Click a letter below to get a brief ... of cardiovascular terms from our Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia and get links to in-depth information. A ...

  12. Stroke Connection Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Submit A Story Edit Module Show Tags Stroke Rehabilitation Two-Part Series Making the Best Decisions at ... first part of a two-part series on stroke rehab, we offer guidance for the decision-making process ...

  13. Stroke (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your friend. Being around friends can help with healing. Preventing Strokes Some strokes can be prevented in ... Why Does Hair Turn Gray? What Are Wrinkles? Alzheimer Disease Your Brain & Nervous System Why Exercise Is ...

  14. Stroke Trials Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions Sponsors ... a clinical trial near you Welcome to the Stroke Trials Registry Our registry of clinical trials in ...

  15. Driving for fun? Comparing the effect of fuel prices on weekday and weekend fuel consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frondel, Manuel; Vance, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Focusing on individual motorists in car-owning households in Germany, this paper investigates the determinants of automobile travel, with the specific aim of quantifying the effects of fuel prices and person-level attributes on travel conducted over a five-day week and weekend. Our analysis is predicated on the notion that car use is an individual decision, albeit one that is dependent on intra-household allocation processes, thereby building on a growing body of literature that has identified the importance of socioeconomic factors such as employment status, gender, and the presence of children in determining both access to and use of the car. To capture this two-stage decision process, we employ the two-part model, which consists of probit and OLS estimators, and derive elasticity estimates that incorporate both the discrete and continuous choices pertaining to car use. With fuel price elasticity estimates ranging between - 0.45 and - 0.50, our results suggest raising prices via fuel taxes to be a promising energy conservation and climate protection measure. (author)

  16. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE : First two week-ends in September, 2001

    CERN Multimedia

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee, tel. 77551

    2001-01-01

    Saturday / Sunday, September 1st / 2nd Restaurant no 1 (COOP - building 501, Meyrin site) will be closed exceptionally during the week-end of 1 and 2 September 2001. In order to ensure the continuity of a restaurant service, restaurant no 2 (DSR - building 504, Meyrin site) will be open on both the Saturday and Sunday between 8h00 and 21h00, hot meals being served from 11h30 to 14h00, then from 18h00 to 19h30. 'Jeûne Genevois' On Thursday 6 September 2001, all restaurants, cafétérias and kiosques will be closed except for restaurant no. 1 and its cafétéria (COOP - building 50 - Meyrin) which will provide a limited service from 8h00 to 21h00. Hot meals will be served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. For technical reasons, restaurant no. 2 and its cafétéria (DSR - building 504 - Meyrin) as well as the cafétérias in buildings 30 and 54 will remain closed on Friday 7 September. They will resume their norm...

  17. A description of weekend physiotherapy services in three tertiary hospitals in the greater Toronto area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kylie; Brooks, Dina

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to describe the cardiorespiratory physiotherapy weekend service (PWS) at three tertiary hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) and (2) to compare measures of staff burden among the clinical service areas in one of the hospitals that had a programme-based management structure. Two focus-group meetings were held with physiotherapists from hospitals within the GTA. Thereafter, variables characterizing the PWS were collected over 8 months, using a standardized data-collection form. A total of 632 data-collection forms were received. Response rates exceeded 75% at each hospital. Workload variables, including the number of patient visits, new referrals per hour, and the proportion of staff completing unpaid overtime, differed between the hospitals (pholidays (p>0.13). Workload measures varied between clinical service areas at the hospital that provided PWS using a programme-based approach. These findings highlight the important shortcomings of a programme-based management approach to providing PWS and may constitute a catalyst for change.

  18. A review of post-stroke urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuong, Nicole E; Klausner, Adam P; Hampton, Lance J

    2016-06-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents, or strokes, are a common cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Urinary incontinence is a prevalent morbidity experienced by post-stroke patients that is associated with long term disability and institutionalization effects on these patients. An extensive literature review was conducted using multiple academic search engines using the keywords: 'stroke,' 'CVA,' 'urinary incontinence,' 'urodynamics,' 'pharmacologic treatments,' and 'conservative treatments.' Articles were reviewed and summarized to explain incidence, assessment, and treatments of urinary incontinence in post-stroke individuals. Twenty-eight percent to seventy-nine percent of stroke survivors experience urinary incontinence with detrusor overactivity being the most common type of incontinence assessed by urodynamic studies. There continues to be insufficient data studying the effects and benefits of non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments in post-stroke patients. Similarly, urinary incontinence remains an indicator of increased morbidity, disability, and institutionalization rates in the post-stroke patient. Stroke is a debilitating disease which causes urinary incontinence in many patients. As a result, patients have increased rates of hospitalization and disability compared to post-stroke patients without urinary incontinence. The history and physical exam are key in diagnosing the type of urinary incontinence with urodynamic studies being an adjunctive study. Non-pharmacologic treatment, such as behavioral therapy, and pharmacologic agents including antimuscarinics and beta adrenergic medications, are not well studied in the post-stroke patient. Urinary incontinence in stroke patients needs to be further studied to help decrease morbidity and mortality rates within this population.

  19. Participation in leisure activities after stroke: A survey of community-residing stroke survivors in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent-Onabajo, Grace; Blasu, Cephas

    2016-01-01

    Leisure provides pleasure and relaxation, and has health benefits even after a stressful and life-changing event such as a stroke. This study examined leisure participation among a sample of community-residing stroke survivors in Nigeria. Fifty-five stroke survivors undergoing rehabilitation were consecutively recruited from two government hospitals in Northern Nigeria. Data on pre- and post-stroke participation, and socio-demographic (age, sex, marital, employment, and educational status) and clinical (level of disability, post-stroke duration, stroke type and side of hemiplegia/hemiparesis) attributes of the stroke survivors were obtained. Leisure participation was assessed in four domains of recreational, social, cognitive, and productive/creative activities. Associations between leisure participation and the socio-demographic and clinical variables were examined using bivariate analysis. Mean (SD) age of the stroke survivors was 53.55 (14.39) years. Prevalence of leisure participation was 89.1%. Participation in specific leisure domains however varied thus: social (83.6%), cognitive (60%), recreational (41.8%), productive/creative activities (30.9%). Significant associations were observed between participation in cognitive, productive/creative, and recreational leisure activities, and specific socio-demographic and clinical attributes. Leisure participation was high in a general sense but marginal in recreational and productive/creative activities. The observed socio-demographic and clinical associations with post-stroke leisure participation may assist in providing effective leisure rehabilitation strategies.

  20. Renal Function Predicts Outcomes in Patients with Ischaemic Stroke and Haemorrhagic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snarska, Katarzyna; Kapica-Topczewska, Katarzyna; Bachórzewska-Gajewska, Hanna; Małyszko, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated renal function and the impact of renal function on in-hospital outcomes in patients with ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. We collected data from 766 patients with stroke; 637 (83.2 %) with ischaemic and 129 with haemorrhagic one. The mean serum creatinine on admission in patients with both types of stroke, who died, was significantly higher than in those who survived. Multivariate analysis showed that independent predictors of mortality in patients with ischaemic stroke were: ischemic heart disease or prior myocardial infarction, diabetes, admission glucose and eGFR on admission. Also, multivariate analysis showed that independent predictors of mortality in patients with haemorrhagic stroke were: age and admission glucose. Patients with haemorrhagic stroke, in particular with acute kidney injury during hospitalisation had significantly worse outcomes than patients with ischaemic stroke. Assessment of kidney function is prerequisite to employ the necessary measures to decrease the risk of in-hospital mortality among patients with acute stroke. Appropriate approach to patients with renal dysfunction (adequate hydration, avoidance of nephrotoxic drugs, drug dose adjustment etc) should be considered as preventive and therapeutic strategies in the management of acute stroke. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. The Impact of Pre-Stroke Depressive Symptoms, Fatalism, and Social Support on Disability after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrief, Anjail Z; Sánchez, Brisa N; Lisabeth, Lynda D; Skolarus, Lesli E; Zahuranec, Darin B; Baek, Jonggyu; Garcia, Nelda; Case, Erin; Morgenstern, Lewis B

    2017-11-01

    Psychological and social factors have been linked to stroke mortality; however, their impact on stroke disability is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of pre-stroke fatalism, depressive symptoms, and social support on 90-day neurologic, functional, and cognitive outcomes. Ischemic strokes (2008-2011) were identified from the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi Project. Validated scales were used to assess fatalism, depressive symptoms, and social support during baseline interviews. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, activities of daily living/instrumental activities of daily living (ADL/IADL) scale, and Modified Mini-Mental State Exam (3MSE) were used to assess 90-day outcomes. The associations between the pre-stroke variables and 90-day outcomes were estimated from regression models adjusting for demographics, risk factors, tissue-type plasminogen activator treatment, and comorbidities. Among 364 stroke survivors, higher pre-stroke fatalism was associated with worse functional (.17 point higher ADL/IADL per interquartile range [IQR] higher fatalism; 95% confidence interval [CI]: .05, .30) and cognitive (2.81 point lower 3MSE per IQR higher fatalism; 95% CI: .95, 4.67) outcomes. Higher pre-stroke depressive symptoms were associated with worse functional (.16 point higher ADL/IADL per IQR higher Patient Health Questionnaire-9; 95% CI: .04, .28) and cognitive (2.28 point lower 3MSE per IQR higher Patient Health Questionnaire-9; 95% CI: .46, 4.10) outcomes. Participants in the middle tertile of social support had better cognitive outcomes (3.75 points higher 3MSE; 95% CI: .93, 6.56) compared with the highest tertile. The associations between pre-stroke fatalism, depressive symptoms, and social support and 90-day outcomes suggest that psychosocial factors play an important role in stroke recovery. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Genetics of ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, A; Dichgans, M

    2013-02-01

    Stroke is one of the most widespread causes of mortality und disability worldwide. Around 80 % of strokes are ischemic and different forms of intracranial bleeding account for the remaining cases. Monogenic stroke disorders are rare but the diagnosis may lead to specific therapeutic consequences for the affected patients who are predominantly young. In common sporadic stroke, genetic factors play a role in the form of susceptibility genes. Their discovery may give rise to new therapeutic options in the future.

  3. Hemorrhagic Stroke in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan M.D., Lori C.; Hillis M.D., Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately half of stroke in childhood. Unlike arterial ischemic stroke, there are no consensus guidelines to assist in the evaluation and treatment of these children. We review the literature on the evaluation, treatment, etiology and neurologic outcome of hemorrhagic stroke in children. Important differences between pediatric and adult hemorrhage are highlighted, as treatment guidelines for adults may not be applicable in all cases. Needed future research ...

  4. Feasibility of progesterone treatment for ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Claire L; Bath, Philip M

    2016-03-01

    Two multi-centre phase III clinical trials examining the protective potential of progesterone following traumatic brain injury have recently failed to demonstrate any improvement in outcome. Thus, it is timely to consider how this impacts on the translational potential of progesterone treatment for ischaemic stroke. A wealth of experimental evidence supports the neuroprotective properties of progesterone, and associated metabolites, following various types of central nervous system injury. In particular, for ischaemic stroke, studies have also begun to reveal possible mechanisms of such neuroprotection. However, the results in traumatic brain injury now question whether further clinical development of progesterone for ischaemic stroke is relevant. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Weekend catch-up sleep is independently associated with suicide attempts and self-injury in Korean adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seung-Gul; Lee, Yu Jin; Kim, Seog Ju; Lim, Weonjeong; Lee, Heon-Jeong; Park, Young-Min; Cho, In Hee; Cho, Seong-Jin; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2014-02-01

    The current study aims to determine the associations of insufficient sleep with suicide attempts and self-injury in a large, school-based Korean adolescent sample. A sample of 4553 middle- and high-school students (grades 7-10) was recruited in this study. Finally, 4145 students completed self-report questionnaires including items on sleep duration (weekday/weekend), self-injury, suicide attempts during the past year, the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire (SIQ), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). A multiple linear regression model showed that higher SIQ scores were associated with longer weekend catch-up sleep duration (p=0.009), higher BDI score (psleep duration (p=0.011), higher BDI score (psleep duration--which is an indicator of insufficient weekday sleep--might be associated with suicide attempts and self-injury in Korean adolescents. © 2014.

  6. Thrombin Generation in Acute Ischaemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim O. Balogun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Stroke remains a global leading cause of death and disability. Traditional description of plasma biology in the aftermath of acute ischaemic stroke favours development of hypercoagulability, resulting from complex interplay between plasma and endothelial factors. However, no single assay measures the overall global coagulation process. We postulate that thrombin generation would assist in identifying coagulation abnormalities after acute stroke. Aim. To investigate the coagulation abnormalities after acute ischaemic stroke using thrombin generation. Methods. We evaluated thrombin generation, measured with calibrated automated thrombography in stroke of different aetiological types (n=170 within 48 hours of symptoms onset (baseline and in the second week (time 2 and in normal healthy volunteers (n=71. Results. Two-point thrombin generation assays showed prolonged lag time and time to peak at baseline (3.3 (2.9, 4.0 versus 3.6 (3.2, 4.7; p=0.005 and (3.3 (2.9, 4.0 versus 3.6 (3.2, 4.7; p=0.002, respectively, and at time 2 (3.5 (2.9, 4.2 versus 4.0 (3.1, 4.9; p=0.004 and (5.9 (5.3, 6.6 versus 6.8 (5.8, 7.7 p=0.05, respectively, in cardioembolic stroke (n=39, when compared to noncardioembolic stroke (n=117. The result was reproduced in multiple comparisons between acute ischaemic stroke subgroups and normal healthy volunteers. Endogenous thrombin potential and peak thrombin did not indicate hypercoagulability after acute ischaemic stroke, and thrombolytic therapy did not affect thrombin generation assays. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that thrombin generation in platelet poor plasma is not useful in defining hypercoagulability in acute ischaemic stroke. This is similar to observed trend in coronary artery disease and contrary to other hypercoagulable states.

  7. Daily variations in ambulance calls for selected causes in Arkhangelsk, Russia: potential role of excessive alcohol consumption on weekends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei N. Drachev

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess daily variations in ambulance calls for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs, mental and behavioral disorders, and external causes in Arkhangelsk, Northwest Russia, in 2000–2008. Study design. A population-based study. Methods. Data about all ambulance calls during the years 2000–2008 were obtained from the Arkhangelsk ambulance station. Information about patient's gender, age, doctor's diagnosis according to International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, and the date of call were recorded. Pearson's Chi-squared tests were used for comparing proportions of ambulance calls across the week for CVDs (I00-99, mental and behavioral disorders (F00-F99, and external causes (S00-T98, V01-Y98. The ratio of incidence of ambulance calls on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday versus the rest of week was also calculated. Results. There is a significant daily variation (p < 0.001 in calls for CVDs in men and women aged 18–59 and women aged 60 years and older, with increased numbers of calls on weekends and Mondays varying between 2 and 3% excess calls. For mental and behavioral disorders, a similar pattern was found in the age group of 18–59 year-olds. Ratios for the number of calls during weekends and Mondays vs. the rest of the week were 1.05 (95% CI: 1.02–1.08 among women and 1.02 (95% CI: 1.00–1.05 among men. For external causes, a significant variation and an increase in ambulance calls during Saturdays, Sundays, and Mondays from 4 to 17% excess calls was observed for both age and gender groups. Conclusions. The observed daily variations in ambulance calls with an increased number of calls on weekends and Mondays for CVDs, mental and behavioral disorders, and external causes may be associated with excessive alcohol consumption on the weekends. Further research using data on individual levels of alcohol consumption are warranted.

  8. Weekday and weekend moderate to vigorous physical activity of young musicians in the context of public health recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocka, Agnieszka; Mynarski, Władysław; Grabara, Małgorzata; Powerska-Didkowska, Aneta; Borek, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity is very important for the proper mental and physical development of children and youths, especially for the development of the locomotor system. The students of music schools are a unique group of children and youths, because of specific loads on the organs of locomotion, associated with the playing of musical instruments. They can therefore be exposed to a variety of health problems, particularly in the case of insufficient physical activity. The aim of the presented study was to assess the level of physical activity of music schools' students on weekdays and weekends against the parameters of physical efforts beneficial to health. The study involved 225 musicians from the Katowice School of Music, Complex of I and II degrees, aged 10-18 years (138 girls and 87 boys). The level of physical activity was assessed on the basis of moderate to vigorous rates (MVPA). Both on weekdays as well as at the weekends, boys presented a higher level of physical activity of at least moderate intensity (MVPA), which also resulted in a greater total weekly pro-health physical activity. Both boys and girls dedicated significantly more time to beneficial pro-health efforts physical health at weekends (p<0.01). The percentage of young musicians who meet accepted (in this study) standards for the optimal amount of physical activity in both groups was dramatically low (3.6% of girls and 11.5% of boys). Both boys and girls from the music schools often undertake moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) at the weekends. The boys more often than the girls made pro-health physical efforts of moderate and high intensity.

  9. Magnetic inductive phase shift: a new method to differentiate hemorrhagic stroke from ischemic stroke on rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qingguang; Jin, Gui; Ma, Ke; Qin, Mingxin; Zhuang, Wei; Sun, Jian

    2017-05-30

    The major therapy for ischemic stroke is thrombolytic treatment, but severe consequences occur when this method is used to treat hemorrhagic stroke. Currently, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are used to differentiate between two types of stroke, but these two methods are ineffective for pre-hospital care. We developed a new brain diagnostic device for rabbits based on electromagnetic induction to non-invasively differentiate two types of stroke. The device includes two coils and a phase difference measurement system that detects the magnetic inductive phase shift (MIPS) value to reflect the tissue's condition. The hemorrhage model was established through the injection of autologous blood into the internal capsule of a rabbit's brain. Ischemia was induced in the brain of a rabbit by bilateral carotid artery occlusion. Two types of animal models were measured with our device. The MIPS value gradually decreased with increasing injected blood and increased with ischemia time. The MIPS changes induced by the two types of strokes were exact opposites, and the absolute values of MIPS variation in the hemorrhagic and the ischemic groups were significantly larger than those of the normal control group (P stroke from hemorrhagic stroke on rabbit brain in a non-invasive, continuous, and bulk monitoring manner by using a simple and inexpensive apparatus.

  10. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide for risk assessment in patients with atrial fibrillation: insights from the ARISTOTLE Trial (Apixaban for the Prevention of Stroke in Subjects With Atrial Fibrillation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazi, Ziad; Wallentin, Lars; Siegbahn, Agneta; Andersson, Ulrika; Christersson, Christina; Ezekowitz, Justin; Gersh, Bernard J; Hanna, Michael; Hohnloser, Stefan; Horowitz, John; Huber, Kurt; Hylek, Elaine M; Lopes, Renato D; McMurray, John J V; Granger, Christopher B

    2013-06-04

    This study sought to assess the prognostic value of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) enrolled in the ARISTOTLE (Apixaban for the Prevention of Stroke in Subjects With Atrial Fibrillation) trial, and the treatment effect of apixaban according to NT-proBNP levels. Natriuretic peptides are associated with mortality and cardiovascular events in several cardiac diseases. In the ARISTOTLE trial, 18,201 patients with AF were randomized to apixaban or warfarin. Plasma samples at randomization were available from 14,892 patients. The association between NT-proBNP concentrations and clinical outcomes was evaluated using Cox proportional hazard models, after adjusting for established cardiovascular risk factors. Quartiles of NT-proBNP were: Q1, ≤363 ng/l; Q2, 364 to 713 ng/l; Q3, 714 to 1,250 ng/l; and Q4, >1,250 ng/l. During 1.9 years, the annual rates of stroke or systemic embolism ranged from 0.74% in the bottom NT-proBNP quartile to 2.21% in the top quartile, an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.35 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.62 to 3.40; p ARISTOTLE]; NCT00412984). Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Weekday AOD smaller than weekend AOD in eastern China on the basis of the MODIS AOD product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jingjing; Xia, Xiangao; Zhang, Xiaoling; Che, Huizheng; Li, Xiaojing

    2018-05-01

    A weekly cycle of surface particulate matter (PM) characterized by smaller values during weekends and larger values during weekdays was reported in eastern China. Whether column-integrated aerosol optical depth (AOD) showed similar weekly cycling as that of PM was debated. The weekly variation of AOD in eastern China was further studied by using the latest MODIS aerosol product (collection 6) with a fine spatial resolution (0.1°) from 2002 to 2015. We used three statistical methods to determine whether the weekly cycle of AOD was significant. AOD during weekdays (Wednesday to Friday) was lower than that during weekends. The maximum and minimum AOD was generally observed on Monday and Wednesday, respectively. This weekly pattern of AOD was in good agreement with previous results based on satellite aerosol products with a coarse spatial resolution, but it was in contrast to that of PM. Further analysis of the AOD weekly variability in 19 provincial cities suggested that AOD during weekdays was smaller than that during weekends in urban regions. Potential causes for the different weekly cycle of PM and AOD in eastern China were discussed.

  12. Full Random Coefficients Multilevel Modeling of the Relationship between Land Use and Trip Time on Weekdays and Weekends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hyoung Tommy Gim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Interests in weekend trips are increasing, but few have studied how they are affected by land use. In this study, we analyze the relationship between compact land use characteristics and trip time in Seoul, Korea by comparing two research models, each of which uses the weekday and weekend data of the same travelers. To secure sufficient numbers of subjects and groups, full random coefficients multilevel models define the trip as level one and the neighborhood as level two, and find that level-two land use characteristics account for less variation in trip time than level-one individual characteristics. At level one, weekday trip time is found to be reduced by the choice of the automobile as a travel mode, but not by its ownership per se. In addition, it becomes reduced if made by high income travelers and extended to travel to quality jobs. Among four land use characteristics at level two, population density, road connectivity, and subway availability are shown to be significant in the weekday model. Only subway availability has a positive relationship with trip time and this finding is consistent with the level-one result that the choice of automobile alternatives increases trip time. The other land use characteristic, land use balance, turns out to be a single significant land use variable in the weekend model, implying that it is concerned mainly with non-work, non-mandatory travel.

  13. Trends in screen time on week and weekend days in a representative sample of Southern Brazil students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Adair S; Silva, Kelly S; Barbosa Filho, Valter C; Bezerra, Jorge; de Oliveira, Elusa S A; Nahas, Markus V

    2014-12-01

    Economic and technological improvements can help increase screen time use among adolescents, but evidence in developing countries is scarce. The aim of this study was to examine changes in TV watching and computer/video game use patterns on week and weekend days after a decade (2001 and 2011), among students in Santa Catarina, southern Brazil. A comparative analysis of two cross-sectional surveys that included 5 028 and 6 529 students in 2001 and 2011, respectively, aged 15-19 years. The screen time use indicators were self-reported. 95% Confidence intervals were used to compare the prevalence rates. All analyses were separated by gender. After a decade, there was a significant increase in computer/video game use. Inversely, a significant reduction in TV watching was observed, with a similar magnitude to the change in computer/video game use. The worst trends were identified on weekend days. The decrease in TV watching after a decade appears to be compensated by the increase in computer/video game use, both in boys and girls. Interventions are needed to reduce the negative impact of technological improvements in the lifestyles of young people, especially on weekend days. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Clinicoanatomical correlation in stroke related aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Bohra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: With advances in neuroimaging, traditional views regarding the clinicoanatomic correlation in stroke patients with aphasia are being challenged and it has been observed that lesions at a given cortical or subcortical site may manifest with different aphasia profiles. Aims: To study as to whether there is a strict clinicoanatomical correlation between the type of aphasia and lesion site in patients with first ever stroke. Settings and Design: Observational study, based in a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: Stroke patient′s ≥18 years of age were screened and those with first ever stroke and aphasia were subjected to a detailed stroke workup and language assessment using the Hindi version of Western Aphasia Battery (WAB. Statistical analysis was done with χ2 test with Yates correction and Kruskal-Wallis test. The level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: Overall aphasia was detected in 27.9% of the 260 screened cases with stroke. Amongst 60 cases with first ever stroke and aphasia, the aphasia type was: Global (33.33%, Broca′s (28.3%, transcortical motor (13.33%, transcortical sensory (10%, Wernicke′s (8.33%, anomic (5%, and conduction (1.67% aphasia. A definite correlation between the lesion site and the type of aphasia as per the traditional classification was observed in 35% cases only. Conclusions: No absolute correlation exists between the lesion site and the type of clinical aphasia syndrome in majority of the patients with cortical and subcortical stroke.

  15. Bidirectional Power Stroke by Ncd Kinesin

    OpenAIRE

    Butterfield, Anthony E.; Stewart, Russell J.; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Skliar, Mikhail

    2010-01-01

    Optical trapping experiments reveal details of molecular motor dynamics. In noisy data, temporal structure within the power stroke of motors can be analyzed by ensemble averaging, but this obscures infrequent subcategories of events. We have here developed an analysis method that uses Kalman filtering of measurements, model-based estimation of the power strokes produced by the motor head, and automatic event classification to discriminate between different types of motor events. This method w...

  16. [Etiologic mechanism and prevention of perioperative stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kentaro; Ujifuku, Kenta; Hiu, Takeshi; Kitagawa, Naoki; Suyama, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Izumi

    2008-05-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques and improvements in perioperative care, the incidence of perioperative strokes has not decreased, reflecting the aging of the population and the increased number of patients with complication. We investigated the cases who were consulted due to perioperative stroke. From April, 2004 to March, 2007, a total of 102 patients were referred for neurological evaluation because of perioperative stroke. Types of planned or performed surgery, risk factors, types of stroke and timing of the events were analyzed. Sixty-seven cases were consulted preoperatively for history or risk factors of stroke. Forty-seven cases had ischemic risk factors and cerebral vascular recanalization was carried out in four patients who experienced severe cerebral hypoperfusion. The other patients with ischemic risk factors were treated to avoid dehydration or hypotension perioperatively. Nine cases with hemorrhagic risk factors, such as cerebral aneurysm, were treated to avoid significant hypertension during surgery. The types of planned surgery were cardiovascular surgery in 29 cases, abdominal surgery in 13, cervical surgery in 7, and thoracic surgery in 6. Except for one case, who suffered cerebral embolism due to cardiac surgery, those who were consulted preoperatively did not experience stroke. Neurological events had occurred in 35 patients and they were consulted postoperatively. The surgical procedures were cardiovascular surgery in 19 patients, thoracic surgery in 6, abdominal surgery in 6. The types of stroke were cerebral infarction in 20 cases, hypoxic brain in 8, and transient ischemic attack in 5. The cause of the cerebral infarction was considered as cerebral embolism in 19 cases. Those who were consulted preoperatively were treated to prevent intraoperative stroke and did not suffer neurological complication. Most stoke in patients undergoing surgery were not related to hypoperfusion but due to embolism.

  17. Stroke: Temporal Trends and Association with Atmospheric Variables and Air Pollutants in Northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santurtún, Ana; Ruiz, Patricia Bolivar; López-Delgado, Laura; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Riancho, Javier; Zarrabeitia, María T

    2017-07-01

    Stroke, the second cause of death and the most frequent cause of severe disability among adults in developed countries, is related to a large variety of risk factors. This paper assesses the temporal patterns in stroke episodes in a city in Northern Spain during a 12-year period and analyzes the possible effects that atmospheric pollutants and meteorological variables may have on stroke on a daily scale. Our results show that there is an increase in stroke admissions (r = 0.818, p = 0.001) especially in patients over 85 years old. On a weekly scale, the number of hospital admissions due to stroke remains stable from Monday to Friday, whereas it abruptly decreases during the weekends, reaching its minimum values on Sunday (p atmospheric circulation shows a higher frequency of the former in Santander with enhanced negative air pressure anomalies over western Spain; the fact that under these conditions the region studied registers very low values of relative humidity is in line with the aforementioned inverse correlation, which has not been described elsewhere in the literature. This study could be a first step for implementing stroke alert protocols depending on air pollution levels and circulation patterns forecasts.

  18. Sex Disparities in Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlendorff, Christian; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2015-01-01

    between 2003 and 2012 (N=79 617), and the Danish Register of Causes of Death. Information was available on age, sex, marital status, stroke severity, stroke subtype, socioeconomic status, and cardiovascular risk profile. We studied only deaths due to the index stroke, with the assumption that death.......5%) or 1 month (6.9%), respectively. After the age of 60 years, women had more severe strokes than men. Up to ages in the mid-60s, no difference in the risk of death from stroke was seen between the 2 sexes. For people aged >65 years, however, the risk gradually became greater in men than in women...

  19. Clinical Epidemiology Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a huge public health problem because of its high morbidity and disability. The epidemiology of stroke is of relevance to construct practical paradigms to tackle this major health issue in the community. Recent data have shown that about 72-86% of strokes are ischemic, 9-18% are due to hemorrhage (intracerebral of subarachnoid and the rest are undefined. The risk factors for stroke are multiple and combined. At present, stroke is no more considered as unavoidable and untreatable. It is an emergency and specialized units and teams improve outcome and lower costs. Death related to stroke is declining in many countries and in both sexes. This decrease in multifactorial. The detection and more effective treatment of hypertension may play an important factor, as well as the improved medical care and improvement in diagnostic procedures. While stroke incidence appears stable and stroke mortality is slowly declining, the absolute magnitude of stroke is likely to grow over the next 30 years. as the population ages, the absolute number of stroke victims and demands on healthcare and other support systems is likely to increase substantially in the future. Keeping this in perspective, this chapter shall focus on the epidemiology of stroke in the world and in Indian, in particular.

  20. Registration of acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, Cathrine; Mehnert, Frank; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The validity of the registration of patients in stroke-specific registries has seldom been investigated, nor compared with administrative hospital discharge registries. The objective of this study was to examine the validity of the registration of patients in a stroke-specific registry...... (The Danish Stroke Registry [DSR]) and a hospital discharge registry (The Danish National Patient Registry [DNRP]). METHODS: Assuming that all patients with stroke were registered in either the DSR, DNRP or both, we first identified a sample of 75 patients registered with stroke in 2009; 25 patients...... in the DSR, 25 patients in the DNRP, and 25 patients registered in both data sources. Using the medical record as a gold standard, we then estimated the sensitivity and positive predictive value of a stroke diagnosis in the DSR and the DNRP. Secondly, we reviewed 160 medical records for all potential stroke...

  1. Sleep and Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M V Padma Srivastav

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian variations in conjunction with sleep-related heart rhythm changes and sleepdisordered breathing (SDB are contributing risk factors for stroke. Strong scientificevidence now exists indicating that SDB contributes to systemic hypertension, aprominent risk factor for stroke, and compelling circumstantial evidence is presentsuggesting that SDB raises the risk for development of stroke through other circulatorymechanisms as well. Preliminary evidence indicates that post-stroke patients have ahigher prevalence of SDB, which is likely to compromise their rehabilitation outcomes.Since SDB is modifiable with the application of CPAP and other treatment modalities,there is practical value in investigating patients at risk of stroke or post stroke forpresence of SDB. Successful application of CPAP or BiPAP therapy may improve theoutcome in both instances.Key words : Sleep, Stroke, SDB, CPAP

  2. Ethnic disparities in incidence of stroke subtypes: Auckland Regional Community Stroke Study, 2002-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigin, Valery; Carter, Kristie; Hackett, Maree; Barber, P Alan; McNaughton, Harry; Dyall, Lorna; Chen, Mei-hua; Anderson, Craig

    2006-02-01

    Limited population-based data exist on differences in the incidence of major pathological stroke types and ischaemic stroke subtypes across ethnic groups. We aimed to provide such data within the large multi-ethnic population of Auckland, New Zealand. All first-ever cases of stroke (n=1423) in a population-based register in 940 000 residents (aged 15 years) in Auckland, New Zealand, for a 12-month period in 2002-2003, were classified into ischaemic stroke, primary intracerebral haemorrhage (PICH), subarachnoid haemorrhage, and undetermined stroke, according to standard definitions and results of neuroimaging/necropsy (in over 90% of cases). Ischaemic stroke was further classified into five subtypes. Ethnicity was self-identified and grouped as New Zealand (NZ)/European, Maori/Pacific, and Asian/other. Incidence rates were standardised to the WHO world population by the direct method, and differences in rates between ethnic groups expressed as rate ratios (RRs), with NZ/European as the reference group. In NZ/European people, ischaemic stroke comprised 73%, PICH 11%, and subarachnoid haemorrhage 6%, but PICH was higher in Maori/Pacific people (17%) and in Asian/other people (22%). Compared with NZ/European people, age-adjusted RRs for PICH were 2.7 (95% CI 1.8-4.0) and 2.3 (95% CI 1.4-3.7) among Maori/Pacific and Asian/other people, respectively. The corresponding RR for ischaemic stroke was greater for Maori/Pacific people (1.7 [95% CI 1.4-2.0]), particularly embolic stroke, and for Asian/other people (1.3 [95% CI 1.0-1.7]). The onset of stroke in Maori/Pacific and Asian/other people began at significantly younger ages (62 years and 64 years, respectively) than in NZ/Europeans (75 years; p<0.0001). There were ethnic differences in the risk factor profiles (such as age, sex, hypertension, cardiac disease, diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia, smoking status, overweight) for the stroke types and subtypes. Compared to NZ/Europeans, Maori/Pacific and Asian/other people are

  3. Cost-effectiveness analysis of weekday and weeknight or weekend shifts for assessment of appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, Andrea S.; Babyn, Paul; Chait, Peter [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Amernic, Heidi; Coyte, Peter C. [University of Toronto, Department of Health Policy and Management Evaluation, Toronto (Canada); Dick, Paul [Hospital for Sick Children, Paediatric Emergency Medicine, Population Health Sciences, Toronto, ON (Canada); Langer, Jacob [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of General Surgery, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ungar, Wendy J. [University of Toronto, Population Health Sciences, Toronto (Canada); Hospital for Sick Children, Paediatric Emergency Medicine, Population Health Sciences, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2005-12-01

    Assessment of appendicitis during a weeknight or weekend shift (after-hours period, AHP) might be more costly and less effective than its assessment on a weekday shift (standard hours period, SHP) because of increased costs (staff premium fees) and perforation risk (longer delays and less experience of fellows). Objectives: The objectives were to compare the costs and effectiveness of assessing children with suspected appendicitis who required a laparotomy and had US or CT after-hours with those of assessing children during standard hours, and to evaluate the importance of diagnostic imaging (DI) within the overall costs. We retrospectively microcosted resource use within six areas of a tertiary hospital (emergency [ED], diagnostic imaging (DI), surgery, wards, transport, and pathology) in a tertiary hospital. About 41 children (1.8-17 years) in the AHP and 35 (2.9-16 years) in the SHP were evaluated. Work shift effectiveness was measured with a histological score that assessed the severity of appendicitis (non-perforated appendicitis: scores 1-3; perforated appendicitis: score 4). The SHP was less costly and more effective regardless of whether the calculation included US or CT costs only. For a salary-based fee schedule, US$733 were saved per case of perforated appendicitis averted in the SHP. For a fee-for-service payment schedule, $847 were saved. Within the overall budget, the highest costs were those incurred on the ward for both shifts. The average cost per patient in DI ranged from 2 to 5% of the total costs in both shifts. Most perforation cases were found in the AHP (31.7%, AHP vs. 17.1%, SHP), which resulted in higher ward costs for patients in the AHP. (orig.)

  4. Cost-effectiveness analysis of weekday and weeknight or weekend shifts for assessment of appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doria, Andrea S.; Babyn, Paul; Chait, Peter; Amernic, Heidi; Coyte, Peter C.; Dick, Paul; Langer, Jacob; Ungar, Wendy J.

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of appendicitis during a weeknight or weekend shift (after-hours period, AHP) might be more costly and less effective than its assessment on a weekday shift (standard hours period, SHP) because of increased costs (staff premium fees) and perforation risk (longer delays and less experience of fellows). Objectives: The objectives were to compare the costs and effectiveness of assessing children with suspected appendicitis who required a laparotomy and had US or CT after-hours with those of assessing children during standard hours, and to evaluate the importance of diagnostic imaging (DI) within the overall costs. We retrospectively microcosted resource use within six areas of a tertiary hospital (emergency [ED], diagnostic imaging (DI), surgery, wards, transport, and pathology) in a tertiary hospital. About 41 children (1.8-17 years) in the AHP and 35 (2.9-16 years) in the SHP were evaluated. Work shift effectiveness was measured with a histological score that assessed the severity of appendicitis (non-perforated appendicitis: scores 1-3; perforated appendicitis: score 4). The SHP was less costly and more effective regardless of whether the calculation included US or CT costs only. For a salary-based fee schedule, US$733 were saved per case of perforated appendicitis averted in the SHP. For a fee-for-service payment schedule, $847 were saved. Within the overall budget, the highest costs were those incurred on the ward for both shifts. The average cost per patient in DI ranged from 2 to 5% of the total costs in both shifts. Most perforation cases were found in the AHP (31.7%, AHP vs. 17.1%, SHP), which resulted in higher ward costs for patients in the AHP. (orig.)

  5. [Improving the continuous care process in primary care during weekends and holidays: redesigning and FMEA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañada Dorado, A; Cárdenas Valladolid, J; Espejo Matorrales, F; García Ferradal, I; Sastre Páez, S; Vicente Martín, I

    2010-01-01

    To describe a project carried out in order to improve the process of Continuous Health Care (CHC) on Saturdays and bank holidays in Primary Care, area number 4, Madrid. The aim of this project was to guarantee a safe and error-free service to patients receiving home health care on weekends. The urgent need for improving CHC process was identified by the Risk Management Functional Unit (RMFU) of the area. In addition, some complaints had been received from the nurses involved in the process as well as from their patients. A SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis performed in 2009 highlighted a number of problems with the process. As a result, a project for improvement was drawn up, to be implemented in the following stages: 1. Redesigning and improving the existing process. 2. Application of failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) to the new process. 3. Follow up, managing and leading the project. 4. Nurse training. 5. Implementing the process in the whole area. 6. CHC nurse satisfaction surveys. After carrying out this project, the efficiency and level of automation improved considerably. Since implementation of the process enhancement measures, no complaints have been received from patients and surveys show that CHC nurse satisfaction has improved. By using FMEA, errors were given priority and enhancement steps were taken in order to: Inform professionals, back-up personnel and patients about the process. Improve the specialist follow-up report. Provide training in ulcer patient care. The process enhancement, and especially its automation, has resulted in a significant step forward toward achieving greater patient safety. FMEA was a useful tool, which helped in taking some important actions. Finally, CHC nurse satisfaction has clearly improved. Copyright © 2009 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of work stress on work-related rumination, restful sleep, and nocturnal heart rate variability experienced on workdays and weekends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahle-Hinz, Tim; Bamberg, Eva; Dettmers, Jan; Friedrich, Niklas; Keller, Monika

    2014-04-01

    The present study reports the lagged effects of work stress on work-related rumination, restful sleep, and nocturnal heart rate variability experienced during both workdays and weekends. Fifty employees participated in a diary study. Multilevel and regression analyses revealed a significant relationship between work stress measured at the end of a workday, work-related rumination measured during the evening, and restful sleep measured the following morning. Work stress, measured as the mean of 2 consecutive workdays, was substantially but not significantly related to restful sleep on weekends. Work stress was unrelated to nocturnal heart rate variability. Work-related rumination was related to restful sleep on weekends but not on workdays. Additionally, work-related rumination on weekends was positively related to nocturnal heart rate variability during the night between Saturday and Sunday. No mediation effects of work stress on restful sleep or nocturnal heart rate variability via work-related rumination were confirmed.

  7. Physical Activity in Hospitalised Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya West

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to examine the amount and type of physical activity engaged in by people hospitalised after stroke. Method. We systematically reviewed the literature for observational studies describing the physical activity of stroke patients. Results. Behavioural mapping, video recording and therapist report are used to monitor activity levels in hospitalised stroke patients in the 24 included studies. Most of the patient day is spent inactive (median 48.1%, IQR 39.6%–69.3%, alone (median 53.7%, IQR 44.2%–60.6% and in their bedroom (median 56.5%, IQR 45.2%–72.5%. Approximately one hour per day is spent in physiotherapy (median 63.2 minutes, IQR 36.0–79.5 and occupational therapy (median 57.0 minutes, IQR 25.1–58.5. Even in formal therapy sessions limited time is spent in moderate to high level physical activity. Low levels of physical activity appear more common in patients within 14 days post-stroke and those admitted to conventional care. Conclusions. Physical activity levels are low in hospitalised stroke patients. Improving the description and classification of post stroke physical activity would enhance our ability to pool data across observational studies. The importance of increasing activity levels and the effectiveness of interventions to increase physical activity after stroke need to be tested further.

  8. Association of Osteopontin, Neopterin, and Myeloperoxidase With Stroke Risk in Patients With Prior Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attacks: Results of an Analysis of 13 Biomarkers From the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Peter; Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B; Sillesen, Henrik; Bao, Weihang; Preston, Gregory M; Welch, K Michael A

    2017-12-01

    Established risk factors do not fully identify patients at risk for recurrent stroke. The SPARCL trial (Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels) evaluated the effect of atorvastatin on stroke risk in patients with a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known coronary heart disease. This analysis explored the relationships between 13 plasma biomarkers assessed at trial enrollment and the occurrence of outcome strokes. We conducted a case-cohort study of 2176 participants; 562 had outcome strokes and 1614 were selected randomly from those without outcome strokes. Time to stroke was evaluated by Cox proportional hazards models. There was no association between time to stroke and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A 2 , monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, resistin, matrix metalloproteinase-9, N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, or soluble CD40 ligand. In adjusted analyses, osteopontin (hazard ratio per SD change, 1.362; P strokes. After adjustment for the Stroke Prognostic Instrument-II and treatment, osteopontin, neopterin, and myeloperoxidase remained independently associated with outcome strokes. The addition of these 3 biomarkers to Stroke Prognostic Instrument-II increased the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve by 0.023 ( P =0.015) and yielded a continuous net reclassification improvement (29.1%; P stroke and improved risk classification when added to a clinical risk algorithm. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique Identifier: NCT00147602. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Comparison of self-reported week-day and weekend-day sitting time and weekly time-use: results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Uffelen, Jannique G Z; Watson, Melanie J; Dobson, Annette J; Brown, Wendy J

    2011-09-01

    The study of sedentary behavior is a relatively new area in population health research, and little is known about patterns of sitting time on week-days and weekend-days. To compare self-reported week-day and weekend-day sitting time with reported weekly time spent in other activities. Data were from 8,717 women born between 1973 and 1978 ('younger'), and 10,490 women born between 1946 and 1951 ('mid-age') who completed surveys for the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health in 2003 and 2001, respectively. They were asked about time spent sitting on week-days and weekend-days. The women were also asked to report time spent in employment, active leisure, passive leisure, home duties, and studying. Mean week-day and weekend-day sitting times were compared with time-use using analysis of variance. Younger women sat more than mid-aged women, and sitting time was higher on week-days than on weekend-days in both cohorts. There were marked positive associations between week-day and weekend-day sitting times and time spent in passive leisure in both cohorts, and with time spent studying on week-days for the younger women. Week-day sitting time was markedly higher in women who reported >35 h in employment, compared with those who worked day sitting time was higher than weekend-day sitting time, the patterns of the relationships between week-day and weekend-day sitting and time-use were largely similar, except for time spent in employment.

  10. Management Of Post Stroke Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of seizures in relation to stroke is 8.9%, with a frequency of 10.6 and 8.6% in haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke, respectively. In subarachnoid haemorrhage the incidence is 8.5%. Due to the fact that infarcts are significantly more frequent than haemorrhages, seizures are mainly related to occlusive vascular disease of the brain. The general view is to consider stroke-related seizures as harmless complications in the course of a prolonged vascular disease involving the heart and brain. Seizures can be classified as those of early and those of late onset in a paradigm comparable to post-traumatic epilepsy, with an arbitrary dividing point of two weeks after the event. Most early-onset seizures occur during the first day after the stroke. Late-onset seizures occur three times more often than early-onset ones. A first late-onset epileptic event is most likely to take place between six months and two years after the stroke. However, up to 28% of patients develop their first seizure several years later. Simple partial seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, account for about 50% of total seizures, while complex partial spells, with or without secondary generalisation, and primary generalised tonic–clonic insults account for approximately 25% each. Status epilepticus occurs in 12% of stroke patients, but the recurrence rate after an initial status epilepticus is not higher than after a single seizure. Inhibitory seizures, mimicking transient ischaemic attacks, are observed in 7.1% of cases. The only clinical predictor of late-onset seizures is the initial presentation of partial anterior circulation syndrome due to a territorial infarct. Patients with total anterior circulation syndrome have less chance of developing epileptic spells, not only due to their shorter life expectancy but also due to the fact that the large infarcts are sharply demarcated in these patients. The optimal timing and type of antiepileptic drug

  11. Clinical characteristics of stroke occurring in the toilet: Are older adults more vulnerable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamasu, Joji; Tomiyasu, Kazuhiro; Miyatake, Satoru; Mayanagi, Keita; Yoshii, Masami; Nakatsukasa, Masashi

    2018-02-01

    While autonomic imbalance during defecation/micturition can cause hemodynamic instability, stroke occurring in the toilet has rarely been investigated. The objective of the present study was to clarify the frequency and clinical characteristics of toilet-related stroke. Clinical data prospectively acquired between January 2011 and December 2015 on 1939 patients with acute stroke (1224 cerebral infarctions [CI], 505 intracerebral hemorrhages [ICH] and 210 subarachnoid hemorrhages [SAH]) were reviewed to identify patients with a toilet-related stroke. For each stroke type, the ratios of stroke occurring during defecation/micturition to those occurring during other activities were calculated. Subsequently, how patients with toilet-related stroke were brought to medical attention was investigated. Whether older patients (aged >65 years) had an elevated ratio of toilet-related stroke was investigated in each stroke type. A total of 108 patients (41 CI, 37 ICH and 30 subarachnoid hemorrhages) sustained a stroke in the toilet. The ratio of toilet-related stroke was highest in subarachnoid hemorrhages (14.3%), followed by ICH (7.3%). Circadian differences existed among the three stroke types: toilet-related CI were more likely to occur in the night-time than ICH. Patients with toilet-related CI were significantly more likely to sustain cardioembolic stroke. In all three stroke types, toilet-related stroke in CI, but not in hemorrhagic strokes. The toilet is a closed space where stroke occurs disproportionately frequently. Effort to reduce the incidence of toilet-related strokes is warranted, as early patient detection is not always feasible. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 250-255. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  12. Strokes are possible complications of cannabinoids use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Valérie; Jouanjus, Emilie

    2017-05-01

    It is critically important to identify all factors that may play a role in the recent increase of the incidence of stroke among the young population. Considering the worldwide use of cannabinoids (cannabis and synthetic cannabinoids), the recent legalization of their consumption in some countries, and their supposed involvement in cardiovascular events, we evaluated their role in the occurrence of neurovascular complications among the young. Ninety-eight patients were described in the literature as having a cannabinoids-related stroke (85 after cannabis use and 13 after synthetic cannabinoids). The distribution by type of stroke was as follows: 4 patients with an undetermined type of stroke, 85 with an ischemic stroke and/or a transient ischemic attack, and 9 with a hemorrhagic stroke. The mean age of patients was 32.3±11.8years (range 15-63), and the majority of them were male with a sex ratio of 3.7:1. Cannabis was often smoked with tobacco in 66% of cases. Most of the patients with cannabinoids-related strokes were chronic cannabis users in 81% of cases, and for 18% of them, there was a recent increase of the amount of cannabis consumption during the days before the occurrence of stroke. Even if the prognosis of stroke was globally favorable in 46% of cases, with no or few sequelae, 5 patients died after the neurovascular event. One striking element reported in the majority of the reports was a temporal relationship between cannabinoids use, whether natural or synthetic, and the occurrence of stroke. However, a temporal correlation does not mean causation, and other factors may be involved. Cannabis may be considered as a risk factor of stroke until research shows evidence of an underlying mechanism that, alone or in association with others, contributes to the development of stroke. As of today, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction triggered by cannabinoids use may be a convincing mechanism of stroke in 27% of cases. Indeed, despite the widespread use of

  13. Changes in behaviour and faecal glucocorticoid levels in response to increased human activities during weekends in the pin-tailed sandgrouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Fabián; Benítez-López, Ana; Tarjuelo, Rocío; Barja, Isabel; Viñuela, Javier; García, Jesús T; Morales, Manuel B; Mougeot, Francois

    2016-12-01

    Human recreational activities are becoming increasingly widespread and frequent, a fact that may potentially exacerbate their effects on wildlife. These human-related disturbances on animals may induce behavioural and physiological changes that can ultimately affect their fitness, showing a similar anti-predator response that against natural predator or other threats. Here, we combine the use of behavioural and physiological approaches to assess the potential effect of winter human activities on a threatened farmland bird in Europe, the pin-tailed sandgrouse (Pterocles alchata). We compared before, during and after weekend variations in human activity rates, pin-tailed sandgrouse behaviour (flocking and flying behaviour, interspecific association in mixed flocks and habitat use) and faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations. Human disturbances, in particular those associated with hunting activities, peaked during weekends. Sandgrouse showed significant behavioural changes (increased sandgrouse-only flock sizes, increased proportion of birds flying and changes in habitat use) during weekends and higher faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations after the weekends compared with during or before weekends. Therefore, physiological stress levels could be modulated by behavioural adjustments such as increased flock sizes and changes in habitat use that may allow sandgrouse to cope with increased human disturbance rates during weekends. Nevertheless, temporal and spatial organization of hunting days among groups of estates might be good strategies to buffer these potential adverse effects on wintering pin-tailed sandgrouse and other steppe species of conservation concern, while preserving a socio-economically important activity such as hunting.

  14. Friday Night Is Pizza Night: A Comparison of Children’s Dietary Intake and Maternal Perceptions and Feeding Goals on Weekdays and Weekends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra A. Hoffmann

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Childhood obesity is a serious issue in the U.S. While obesity is the result of a multitude of factors, a great deal of research has focused on children’s dietary intake. While children’s eating patterns vary throughout the week, not much else is known about weekday-weekend differences. Therefore, the current study examined differences in the frequency and portion size of school-age children’s consumption of common foods and beverages, as well as mothers’ perceptions of those items and their child feeding goals, on weekdays and weekends. A total of 192 mothers of children aged 7 to 11 were recruited through Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. Results showed a consistent pattern of more frequent consumption and larger portions of unhealthy foods and beverages on weekends. This aligned with mothers’ perceptions of those foods and beverages as weekend items, as well as their feeding goals of health and price being less important on weekends. It is quite possible that weekends are viewed as having less structure and facilitate schedules that allow children to consume more meals away from home. These findings shed light on additional risk factors in children’s eating patterns and highlight the serious implications that day of the week can have on childhood obesity.

  15. Neuroserpin polymorphisms and stroke risk in a biracial population: the stroke prevention in young women study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stern Barney J

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroserpin, primarily localized to CNS neurons, inhibits the adverse effects of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA on the neurovascular unit and has neuroprotective effects in animal models of ischemic stroke. We sought to evaluate the association of neuroserpin polymorphisms with risk for ischemic stroke among young women. Methods A population-based case-control study of stroke among women aged 15–49 identified 224 cases of first ischemic stroke (47.3% African-American and 211 age-matched control subjects (43.1% African-American. Neuroserpin single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs chosen through HapMap were genotyped in the study population and assessed for association with stroke. Results Of the five SNPs analyzed, the A allele (frequency; Caucasian = 0.56, African-American = 0.42 of SNP rs6797312 located in intron 1 was associated with stroke in an age-adjusted dominant model (AA and AT vs. TT among Caucasians (OR = 2.05, p = 0.023 but not African-Americans (OR = 0.71, p = 0.387. Models adjusting for other risk factors strengthened the association. Race-specific haplotype analyses, inclusive of SNP rs6797312, again demonstrated significant associations with stroke among Caucasians only. Conclusion This study provides the first evidence that neuroserpin is associated with early-onset ischemic stroke among Caucasian women.

  16. Stroke in Commercial Flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Velasco, Rodrigo; Masjuan, Jaime; DeFelipe, Alicia; Corral, Iñigo; Estévez-Fraga, Carlos; Crespo, Leticia; Alonso-Cánovas, Araceli

    2016-04-01

    Stroke on board aircraft has been reported in retrospective case series, mainly focusing on economy class stroke syndrome. Data on the actual incidence, pathogenesis, and prognosis of stroke in commercial flights are lacking. A prospective registry was designed to include all consecutive patients referred from an international airport (40 million passengers a year) to our hospital with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack and onset of symptoms during a flight or immediately after landing. Forty-four patients (32 ischemic strokes and 12 transient ischemic attacks) were included over a 76-month period (January 2008 to April 2014). The estimated incidence of stroke was 1 stroke in 35 000 flights. Pathogeneses of stroke or transient ischemic attack were atherothrombotic in 16 (36%), economy class stroke syndrome in 8 (18%), cardioembolic in 7 (16%), arterial dissection in 4 (9%), lacunar stroke in 4 (9%), and undetermined in 5 (12%) patients. Carotid stenosis >70% was found in 12 (27%) of the patients. Overall prognosis was good, and thrombolysis was applied in 44% of the cases. The most common reason for not treating patients who had experienced stroke onset midflight was the delay in reaching the hospital. Only 1 patient with symptom onset during the flight prompted a flight diversion. We found a low incidence of stroke in the setting of air travel. Economy class stroke syndrome and arterial dissection were well represented in our sample. However, the main pathogenesis was atherothrombosis with a high proportion of patients with high carotid stenosis. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Stroke And Substance Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Chitsaz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: stroke in recreational substance users can be an indirect complication, like endocarditis and cardio embolism in parenteral drug users. With some drug like cocaine, stroke appear to be the result of a direct effect. In young subjects without other risk factors provide persuasive evidence for causality . OPIATES: Heroine is the most abused opiate drug, which is administered by injection, by snorting or by smoking. Stroke affects heroin users by diverse mechanisms,. Injectors are at risk of infections endocarditis, which carries risk for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Cerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage usually occurs after rupture of a septic (mycotic aneurysm. Heroine users can are also at risk for hemorrhagic stroke secondary to liver failure with deranged clotting and to heroin nephropathy with uremia or malignant hypertension. In some heroin users the drug it self is directly causal due to vasculitis, hypersensitivity and immunologic changes. Embolization of foreign material to brain due to mixed of heroine with quinine can cause cerebral embolism. AMPHETAMINE AND other psychostimulants: In abuser of amphetamine hemorrhagic stroke can occur, oral, intravenous, nasal, and inhalational routes of administration have been reported. Most were chronic user, but in several patients, stroke followed a first exposure. Some of amphetamine induced intracranial hemorrhages are secondary to acute hypertension, some to cerebral vacuities, and some to a combination of two. Decongestants and diet pills: Phenylpropanolamine (PPA, an amphetamine – like drug, in decongestants and diet pills, induce acute hypertension, sever headache, psychiatric symptoms, seizures and hemorrhagic stroke. Ephedrine and pseudo ephedrine are present in decongestants and bronchodilators and induce headache, tachyarrhythmia, hypertensive emergency, and hemorrhagic and occlusive stroke. Ecstasy, 3,4 Methylenedioxymethamphetamin (MDMA with amphetamine like can

  18. Lacunar strokes: a single institutional experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Objective: Lacunar ischemic strokes comprise approximately 25% of all ischemic strokes. We compared the risk factors and clinical pattern of this type of stroke between males and females. Methods: This observational study involved 50 consecutive patients with their first-ever lacunar stroke and was conducted at the department of neurology of Sulaimaniya general teaching hospital, Iraq from December 1, 2010 to March 1, 2013. Patients’ risk factors, clinical presentation, and strokes’ patterns were noted and a comparison was made between males and females. Results: Males (64% outnumbered females (36% with a male to female ration of 1.7. The mean age of males was 63 years while it was 61 years in females. Although hypertension was more common in females than in males, diabetes and smoking were more common in the latter group; however, there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 genders in terms of hypertension (P-value <0.3 and diabetes (P-value < 0.07 while smoking was strongly associated with male gender (P-value<0.0001. Pure motor hemiparesis, ataxic hemiparesis, pure sensory stroke, and dysarthria-clumsy hand syndrome were more common in males; only senori-motor stroke revealed a statistically significant difference in favor males (P-value<0.0001; 95% CI -1.7 to 19.2. There was no statistically significant difference in terms of which side of the brain was infarcted between males and females (P-value<0.4. Conclusion: Males around the age of 63 years were the main target for these lacunar strokes. Cigarette smoking and sensorimotor strokes were significantly associated with male gender. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 659-666

  19. Sequential strokes in a hyperacute stroke unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesalingam, Jeban; Buddha, Sandeep; Carlton-Jones, Anoma L; Nicholas, Richard

    2014-08-01

    Vasculitis is a rare, but treatable condition that can present to hyperacute stroke units. Thrombolysis does not treat the underlying pathology, and a rapidly evolving clinical picture drives clinical decision often before all the investigation results are available.

  20. Blood Pressure Control: Stroke and Stroke Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Christoph Diener

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor for primary and secondary stroke prevention.All antihypertensive drugs are effective in primary prevention: the risk reduction for stroke is 30—42%. However, not all classes of drugs have the same effects: there is some indication that angiotensin receptor blockers may be superior to other classes of antihypertensive drugs in stroke prevention.Seventy-five percent of patients who present to hospital with acute stroke have elevated blood pressure within the first 24—48 hours. Extremes of systolic blood pressure (SBP increase the risk of death or dependency. The aim of treatment should be to achieve and maintain the SBP in the range 140—160 mmHg. However, fast and drastic blood pressure lowering can have adverse consequences.The PROGRESS trial of secondary prevention with perindopril + indapamide versus placebo + placebo showed a decrease in numbers of stroke recurrences in patients given both active antihypertensive agents, more impressive for cerebral haemorrhage.There were also indications that active treatment might decrease the development of post-stroke dementia.

  1. Personality as significant predictor of post-stroke anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solgajová, Andrea; Sollár, Tomáš; Vörösová, Gabriela; Zrubcová, Dana

    2017-08-01

    Anxiety in stroke patients is very frequent. It negatively influences the whole recovery process. The study objective is to study personality traits, age, gender, and type of stroke as predictors of anxiety in stroke patients. Research presents a prospective cross-sectional descriptive study. The sample consisted of 74 hospitalized stroke patients. The data collection methods were the HADS for anxiety measurement and the Mini IPIP for evaluation of five personality factors. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to study the relationship between anxiety and personality variables, gender, age, and type of stroke. We found three statistically significant predictors of anxiety in stroke patients. Neuroticism and low Agreeableness explain 50% of the variability of anxiety. Another statistically significant predictor was age; higher-level anxiety relates to lower age. Other personality traits (Extraversion, Openness to experience, and Conscientiousness), gender, and type of stroke do not appear as significant predictors of post-stroke anxiety. Anxiety in stroke patients is predicted mostly by the personality traits and young age of patients. Knowing these predictors can result in early detection and management of emotional consequences of disease, and thus influence the whole recovery process.

  2. New York City International Polar Weekend at the American Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfirman, S.; Turrin, M.; Macphee, R.

    2008-12-01

    The American Museum of Natural History, in partnership with Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the Earth Institute of Columbia University and Barnard College, is featuring the International Polar Year through a New York City International Polar Weekend (NYC-IPW) in 2007, 2008 and 2009. The event showcases current polar research, polar environmental changes, history and culture during two days of family programs and activities, performances, and lectures. The goal of the NYC-IPW is to engage diverse audiences and enhance the public understanding of polar science, in particular IPY research, through close interactions with polar experts. Activities for the public include many disciplines, ranging from the physical sciences and cultural anthropology to music and art, and are presented in many forms, from lectures, panels and films to posters and play. Highlights of the NYC-IPW include: 1) A polar fair for youth and adults, showcasing scientists, artists, and educators who have worked at one or both poles and including many interactive exhibits featuring such topics as life in New York at the end of the last Ice Age, how Arctic sea ice is changing, and life on and under the ice. 2) Performances and presentations oriented towards children and families, including Inuit Throat Singers, Central Park Zoo Theater Group, and a northern lights show. 3) Lectures showcasing current IPY research and addressing such issues as the possible effects of climate change on the poles and the rest of the world, as well as polar poetry, art and film. 4) A partnership with New York City Urban Advantage program for Middle School students in the city to meet with scientists, teachers and students who had participated in polar research and travel. 5) Norwegian Consulate sponsorship of science presenters and Sami performers. The March 2007 event involved 85 presenters and volunteers from 22 institutions, and attracted ca. 3,500 visitors. Approximately 5,000 visitors attended the February 2008

  3. Knowledge of Stroke Risk Factors among Stroke Survivors in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Vincent-Onabajo; Taritei Moses

    2016-01-01

    Background. Knowledge of stroke risk factors is expected to reduce the incidence of stroke?whether first-ever or recurrent. This study examined knowledge of stroke risk factors and its determinants among stroke survivors. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of consenting stroke survivors at two physiotherapy facilities in Nigeria was carried out. Sociodemographic and clinical data were obtained and knowledge of stroke risk factors (defined as the ability to mention at least one correct risk fac...

  4. European Stroke Science Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattle, Heinrich P.; Brainin, Michael; Chamorro, Angel; Diener, Hans Christoph; Hacke, Werner; Leys, Didier; Norrving, Bo; Ward, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The European Stroke Organisation (ESO) held its first European Stroke Science Workshop in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany (15-17 December 2011). Stroke experts based in Europe were invited to present and discuss their current research. The scope of the workshop was to review the most recent findings of selected topics in stroke, to exchange ideas, to stimulate new research and to enhance collaboration between European stroke research groups. Seven scientific sessions were held, each starting with a keynote lecture to review the state of the art of the given topic, followed by 4 or 5 short presentations by experts. They were asked to limit their presentations to 10 slides containing only recent information. The meeting was organized by the executive committee of the ESO (Heinrich Mattle, chairman, Michael Brainin, Angel Chamorro, Werner Hacke, Didier Leys) and supported by the European Stroke Conference (Michael Hennerici). In this article we summarize the main contents of this successful workshop. PMID:22836350

  5. Acute stroke imaging research roadmap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Koehrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Warach, Steven

    The recent "Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment" meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  6. Post-stroke depression: Prevalence and relationship with disability in chronic stroke survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Abhishek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate (1 the prevalence of operationally defined depressive disorder (ICD-10 in chronic stroke subjects and (2 the relationship of post-stroke depression (PSD with disability. Design: Cross-sectional, descriptive study. Setting: Neurological rehabilitation unit of a tertiary care university research center. Materials and Methods: Participants were those with first episode of supratentorial stroke of more than 3 months′ duration with impaired balance and gait who had been referred for rehabilitation. Data were collected on demographic data, stroke data (side and type of lesion and post-stroke duration, cognition (mini mental state examination, depressive ideation (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale - HRDS, impairment (Scandinavian Stroke Scale, balance (Berg Balance Scale, ambulatory status (Functional Ambulation Category, walking ability (speed, and independence in activities of daily living (Barthel Index. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 13.0. We carried out the chi-square test for ordinal variables and the independent t test for continuous variables. Results: Fifty-one patients (M:F: 41:10 of mean age 46.06 ± 11.19 years and mean post-stroke duration of 467.33 ± 436.39 days were included in the study. Eighteen of the 51 participants (35.29% met the criteria for depression. Demographic variables like male gender, being married, living in a nuclear family, urban background, and higher HRDS score were significantly correlated with PSD (P < 0.05. Depression was related to functional disability after stroke but to a statistically insignificant level (P > 0.05 and was unrelated to lesion-related parameters. Conclusion: Depression occurs in one-third of chronic stroke survivors and is prevalent in subjects referred for rehabilitation. PSD is related primarily to demographic variables and only to a lesser extent to functional disability following stroke.

  7. Body Mass Index and Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2013-01-01

    Although obesity is associated with excess mortality and morbidity, mortality is lower in obese than in normal weight stroke patients (the obesity paradox). Studies now indicate that obesity is not associated with increased risk of recurrent stroke in the years after first stroke. We studied the ...... the association between body mass index (BMI) and stroke patient's risk of having a history of previous stroke (recurrent stroke)....

  8. Spontaneous ischaemic stroke in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, Hanne Birgit; Skerritt, G. C.; Gideon, P.

    2013-01-01

    Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms.......Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms....

  9. The impact of right ventricular stroke work on B-type natriuretic peptide levels in patients with mitral stenosis undergoing percutaneous mitral valvuloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, William A M; Lodi-Junqueira, Lucas; Neto, Cirilo P Fonseca; Tan, Timothy C; Nascimento, Bruno R; Mehrotra, Praveen; Barbosa, Marcia M; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P; Nunes, Maria Carmo P

    2013-10-01

    We aimed to explore the relationship between brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and right ventricular (RV) function in patients with mitral stenosis (MS), and to investigate the hemodynamic parameters that predict reduction of BNP levels after percutaneous mitral valvuloplasty (PMV). Few studies have evaluated BNP in the context of MS, specifically the impact of the RV stroke work (RVSW) on serum BNP levels has not been defined. Thirty patients with symptomatic rheumatic MS in sinus rhythm who were referred for a PMV were enrolled. Right and left heart pressures were obtained before and after valvuloplasty. RVSW index (RVSWI) was calculated by cardiac catheterization. Basal BNP levels were elevated in MS patients and correlated with several hemodynamic parameters including pulmonary pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance index, cardiac index (CI), and RVSWI. In multivariate analysis, CI and RVSWI were independent predictors of raised basal BNP levels. PMV resulted in a significant decrease in the RVSWI with a concurrent increase in CI (2.4 ± 0.43 to 2.9 ± 0.8 L/min/m(2), P = 0.010). Overall, plasma BNP levels significantly decreased from 124 (63/234) to 73 (48/148) pg/ml postvalvuloplasty. Multivariate analysis revealed that the reduction of left atrial (LA) pressure post-PMV was an independent predictor of change in BNP levels. Elevated baseline BNP level in MS patients was independently associated with CI and RVSWI. Plasma BNP levels were reduced after successful PMV, which was associated with the reduction of the LA pressure. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Customers’ travel practices of weekend routes (a case study for the travel agency «Voyage» in Gatchina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandrova A. A.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available the article reflects the results of an empirical research conducted in the travel agency «Voyage» in Gatchina in order to reveal the preferences of its customers about weekend routes to Saint Petersburg for the spring of 2016 and their willingness to pay for the service of the travel agency via online payment services. The authors describe the most perspective areas for routes in St. Petersburg in the spring of 2016 and specific examples. The research contains recommendations concerning implementation of online payment services of the travel agency.

  11. The image of a brain stroke in a computed tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just, E.G.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of 100 findings from patients who suffered brain strokes and by the use of 1500 ensured stroke images it was tested whether or not the stroke-predilection typologie outlined by Zuelch is based on a coincidental summation of individual cases. The radio-computed tomography with the possibility of evaluation of non-lethal cases proved itself as a suited method for confirmation or repudiation of this stroke theory. By means of the consistently achieved association of the frontal, respectively horizontal sectional image for the typology it could be proven and - with the exception of a few rather seldom types - also demonstrated that the basic and predilection types of brain stroke repeated themselves in their pattern. In individual cases a specification of lower types could also be undertaken. (orig./TRV) [de

  12. Manual and oral apraxia in acute stroke, frequency and influence on functional outcome: The Copenhagen Stroke Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, P M; Jørgensen, H S; Kammersgaard, L P; Nakayama, H; Raaschou, H O; Olsen, T S

    2001-09-01

    To determine the frequency of manual and oral apraxia in acute stroke and to examine the influence of these symptoms on functional outcome. Seven hundred seventy six unselected, acute stroke patients who were admitted within seven days of stroke onset with unimpaired consciousness were included. If possible, the patients were assessed for manual and oral apraxia on acute admission. Neurologic stroke severity including aphasia was assessed with the Scandinavian Stroke Scale, and activities of daily living function was assessed with the Barthel Index. All patients completed their rehabilitation in the same large stroke unit. Six hundred eighteen patients could cooperate with the apraxia assessments. Manual apraxia was found in 7% of subjects (10% in left and 4% in right hemispheric stroke; chi2 = 9.0; P = 0.003). Oral apraxia was found in 6% (9% in left and 4% in right hemispheric stroke; chi2 = 5.4; P = 0.02). Both manual and oral apraxia were related to increasing stroke severity, and manual, but not oral, apraxia was associated with increasing age. There was no gender difference in frequency of apraxia. Patients with either type of apraxia had temporal lobe involvement more often than patients without. When analyzed with multiple linear and logistic regression analyses, neither manual nor oral apraxia had any independent influence on functional outcome. Apraxia is significantly less frequent in unselected patients with acute stroke than has previously been assumed and has no independent negative influence on functional outcome.

  13. Prognosis and outcome of acute stroke in the University College ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-02

    Mar 2, 2011 ... the first 7 days and 19% at 1 month for first-ever stroke, falling drastically to about 9% per annum ... (c) Brain computerized tomographic (CT) scan and/or postmortem examinations results. Stroke sub-types were confirmed by brain CT scan in 55 patients; by postmortem examinations in 4 patients who died ...

  14. Efficacy of a clinical stroke score in monitoring complications in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficacy of a clinical stroke score in monitoring complications in acute ischaemic stroke patients could be used as an independent prognostic factor. ... Onset and types of complications were documented within the duration of the study period, using a questionnaire and laboratory investigations. Results: Fifty-nine [67.8%] ...

  15. Post-stroke language disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinanović, Osman; Mrkonjić, Zamir; Zukić, Sanela; Vidović, Mirjana; Imamović, Kata

    2011-03-01

    Post-stroke language disorders are frequent and include aphasia, alexia, agraphia and acalculia. There are different definitions of aphasias, but the most widely accepted neurologic and/or neuropsychological definition is that aphasia is a loss or impairment of verbal communication, which occurs as a consequence of brain dysfunction. It manifests as impairment of almost all verbal abilities, e.g., abnormal verbal expression, difficulties in understanding spoken or written language, repetition, naming, reading and writing. During the history, many classifications of aphasia syndromes were established. For practical use, classification of aphasias according to fluency, comprehension and abilities of naming it seems to be most suitable (nonfluent aphasias: Broca's, transcortical motor, global and mixed transcortical aphasia; fluent aphasias: anomic, conduction, Wernicke's, transcortical sensory, subcortical aphasia). Aphasia is a common consequence of left hemispheric lesion and most common neuropsychological consequence of stroke, with a prevalence of one-third of all stroke patients in acute phase, although there are reports on even higher figures. Many speech impairments have a tendency of spontaneous recovery. Spontaneous recovery is most remarkable in the first three months after stroke onset. Recovery of aphasias caused by ischemic stroke occurs earlier and it is most intensive in the first two weeks. In aphasias caused by hemorrhagic stroke, spontaneous recovery is slower and occurs from the fourth to the eighth week after stroke. The course and outcome of aphasia depend greatly on the type of aphasia. Regardless of the fact that a significant number of aphasias spontaneously improve, it is necessary to start treatment as soon as possible. The writing and reading disorders in stroke patients (alexias and agraphias) are more frequent than verified on routine examination, not only in less developed but also in large neurologic departments. Alexia is an acquired

  16. Post-stroke depression: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espárrago Llorca, G; Castilla-Guerra, L; Fernández Moreno, M C; Ruiz Doblado, S; Jiménez Hernández, M D

    2015-01-01

    Post-stroke depression (PSD) is the most common mood disorder following a stroke, and also the main factor limiting recovery and rehabilitation in stroke patients. In addition, it may increase mortality by up to ten times. PSD occurs in 1 in 3 stroke patients and more than half of all cases are neither diagnosed nor treated. Several mechanisms, including biological, behavioral, and social factors, are involved in its pathogenesis. Symptoms usually occur within the first three months after stroke (early onset PSD), and less frequently at a later time (late onset PSD). Symptoms resemble those of other types of depression, although there are some differences: PSD patients experience more sleep disturbances, vegetative symptoms, and social withdrawal. For PSD diagnosis, we recommended vigilance and use of specific diagnostic tools such as the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 (PHQ-2). The treatments of choice are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). However, there are still many unanswered questions in the treatment of PSD, such as the best time to start treatment or the effects of antidepressants on cognition and motor function, among others. Neurologists play a pivotal role in the care and management of patients recovering from stroke. They must be familiar with methods for early detection and treatment of PSD, as this can facilitate a patient's functional recovery and social reintegration, and improve quality of life for patients and their families. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Validation Study of the Siriraj Stroke Score in North-east Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The management and prognosis of stroke depends on the correct assessment of its pathological sub-type. It is therefore pertinent to have a simple and quick means of evaluating patients with stroke. The Siriraj stroke score (SSS) was developed in Thailand based on clinical parameters and have a good ...

  18. An interdisciplinary visual team in an acute and sub-acute stroke unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Guldberg, Anne-Mette; Friis, Claus Radmer

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the work of an interdisciplinary visual team in a stroke unit providing early identification and assessment of patients with visual symptoms, and secondly to investigate frequency, type of visual deficits after stroke and self-evaluated impact on everyday life after stroke...

  19. Immune interventions in stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ying; Liu, Qiang; Anrather, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory and immune responses in the brain can shape the clinical presentation and outcome of stroke. Approaches for effective management of acute stroke are sparse and many measures for brain protection fail, but our ability to modulate the immune system and modify the disease progression of multiple sclerosis is increasing. As a result, immune interventions are currently being explored as therapeutic interventions in acute stroke. In this Review, we compare the immunological features of acute stroke with those of multiple sclerosis, identify unique immunological features of stroke, and consider the evidence for immune interventions. In acute stroke, microglia activation and cell death products trigger an inflammatory cascade that damages vessels and the parenchyma within minutes to hours of the ischaemia or haemorrhage. Immune interventions that restrict brain inflammation, vascular permeability and tissue oedema must be administered rapidly to reduce acute immune-mediated destruction and to avoid subsequent immunosuppression. Preliminary results suggest that the use of drugs that modify disease in multiple sclerosis might accomplish these goals in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. Further elucidation of the immune mechanisms involved in stroke is likely to lead to successful immune interventions. PMID:26303850

  20. Relational Processing Following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Glenda; Halford, Graeme S.; Shum, David; Maujean, Annick; Chappell, Mark; Birney, Damian

    2013-01-01

    The research examined relational processing following stroke. Stroke patients (14 with frontal, 30 with non-frontal lesions) and 41 matched controls completed four relational processing tasks: sentence comprehension, Latin square matrix completion, modified Dimensional Change Card Sorting, and n-back. Each task included items at two or three…

  1. National Stroke Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Event Join a Stroke Challenge Team Comeback Trail Tell Your Story Community Presentations Faces of Stroke Volunteer With Us ... in a video presentation. Watch Video ... to feel the right side of her body. Kathryn’s friends performed the FAST exam and soon ...

  2. Diagnostic neuroimaging in stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarenwattananon, A.; Khandji, A.; Brust, J.C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Since the development of cerebral angiography 60 years ago, there has been a proliferation of increasingly sophisticated, expensive, and, fortunately, safe imaging techniques for patients with cerebrovascular disease. In addition, occlusive and hemorrhagic stroke are now recognized as having a wide variety of possible causes. This chapter addresses the different imaging options available for particular kinds of stroke

  3. The Optimal Golf Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchinger, Mikael; Durigen, Susan; Dahl, Johan Rambech

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a preliminary investigation into aspects of the game of golf. A series of models is proposed for the golf stroke, the momentum transfer between club and ball and the flight of the ball.Numerical and asymptotic solutions are presented reproducing many of the features observed...... in the golf stroke of a professional golfer....

  4. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  5. Delay in presentation after acute ischemic stroke: the Careggi Hospital Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleonora, Innocenti; Patrizia, Nencini; Ilaria, Romani; Alessandra, Del Bene; Francesco, Arba; Benedetta, Piccardi; Giovanni, Pracucci

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator is the approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke within 4.5 h from symptoms onset. Evidence suggests the earlier treatment was given, the greater the chance of a favorable outcome. We investigated if the delay in hospital presentation has been modified in the past 8 years. Acute ischemic strokes admitted to the Emergency Department of the Careggi Hospital, Florence from March 2004 to December 2012 were prospectively collected in the Careggi Hospital Stroke Registry. Proportion of patients presenting ≤ 2 h, 2-3.5, 3.5-6, and >6 h from symptom onset or with awakening stroke were compared. From March 2004 to December 2012, 3,856 patients with acute ischemic stroke arrived to the Careggi Emergency Department. During the period, 28.3 % of patients arrived ≤ 2 h from symptoms onset and 9.8 % between 2 and 3.5 h. The proportion of time-eligible patients is steady in the first years with a slight increase in 2011 and 2012. Early presentation is significantly associated with younger age, intracerebral hemorrhage, and stroke severity. In this study, about one-third of acute ischemic strokes arrived at the Emergency Department within the therapeutic time-window for intravenous thrombolysis. There is only a slight increase in early presentation through the period, mainly in the last 2 years. Additional efforts are required to impact deeply on the rates of time-eligible patients.

  6. The Danish Stroke Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Ingeman, Annette; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Stroke Registry is to monitor and improve the quality of care among all patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) treated at Danish hospitals. STUDY POPULATION: All patients with acute stroke (from 2003) or TIA (from 2013) treated...... at Danish hospitals. Reporting is mandatory by law for all hospital departments treating these patients. The registry included >130,000 events by the end of 2014, including 10,822 strokes and 4,227 TIAs registered in 2014. MAIN VARIABLES: The registry holds prospectively collected data on key processes...... of care, mainly covering the early phase after stroke, including data on time of delivery of the processes and the eligibility of the individual patients for each process. The data are used for assessing 18 process indicators reflecting recommendations in the national clinical guidelines for patients...

  7. Ovsiankina's Great Relief: How Supplemental Work during the Weekend May Contribute to Recovery in the Face of Unfinished Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigelt, Oliver; Syrek, Christine J

    2017-12-20

    Unfinished tasks have been identified as a significant job stressor that impairs employee recovery after work. Classic experimental research by Ovsiankina has shown that people tend to resume yet unfinished tasks to satisfy their need for closure. We apply this notion to current working life and examine supplemental work after hours as a means to achieve peace of mind. We investigate how progress towards goal accomplishment through supplemental work may facilitate recovery in terms of psychological detachment, relaxation, autonomy, and mastery experiences. We conducted a week-level diary study among 83 employees over a period of 14 consecutive weeks, which yielded 575 observations in total and 214 matched observations of unfinished tasks, supplemental work during the weekend, progress, and recovery experiences. Unfinished tasks were assessed on Friday. Supplemental work and recovery experiences were assessed on Monday. Multilevel modeling analyses provide evidence that unfinished tasks at the end of the work week are associated with lower levels of detachment at the intraindividual level, tend to relate to lower relaxation, but are unrelated to autonomy and mastery. Progress towards finishing tasks during the weekend alleviates the detrimental effects of unfinished tasks on both kinds of recovery experiences. Supplemental work is negatively linked to detachment, but largely unrelated to the other recovery experiences.

  8. Dual-earner couples' weekend recovery support, state of recovery, and work engagement: Work-linked relationship as a moderator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, YoungAh; Haun, Verena C

    2017-10-01

    Despite growing recovery research, little is known about couple-dyadic processes of recovery from work. Given that dual-earner couples experience most of their recovery opportunities during nonwork times when they are together, partners in a couple relationship may substantially affect recovery and work engagement. In this study, we propose a couple-dyadic model in which weekend partner recovery support (reported by the recipient partner) is positively related to the recipient partner's state of recovery after the weekend which, in turn, increases the recipient's work engagement the following week (actor-actor mediation effect). We also test the effect of one's state of recovery on the partner's subsequent work engagement (partner effect). Additionally, work-linked relationship status is tested as a moderator of the partner effect. Actor-partner interdependence mediation modeling is used to analyze the data from 167 dual-earner couples who answered surveys on 4 measurement occasions. The results support the indirect effect of partner recovery support on work engagement through the postweekend state of recovery. Multigroup analysis results reveal that the partner effect of state of recovery on work engagement is significant for work-linked couples only and is absent for non-work-linked couples. Theoretical and practical implications, limitations, and future research directions are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Stroke mimic diagnoses presenting to a hyperacute stroke unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Ang; Cloud, Geoffrey C; Pereira, Anthony C; Moynihan, Barry J

    2016-10-01

    Stroke services have been centralised in several countries in recent years. Diagnosing acute stroke is challenging and a high proportion of patients admitted to stroke units are diagnosed as a non-stroke condition (stroke mimics). This study aims to describe the stroke mimic patient group, including their impact on stroke services. We analysed routine clinical data from 2,305 consecutive admissions to a stroke unit at St George's Hospital, London. Mimic groupings were derived from 335 individual codes into 17 groupings. From 2,305 admissions, 555 stroke mimic diagnoses were identified (24.2%) and 72% of stroke mimics had at least one stroke risk factor. Common mimic diagnoses were headache, seizure and syncope. Medically unexplained symptoms and decompensation of underlying conditions were also common. Median length of stay was 1 day; a diagnosis of dementia (p=0.028) or needing MRI (p=0.006) was associated with a longer stay. Despite emergency department assessment by specialist clinicians and computed tomography brain, one in four suspected stroke patients admitted to hospital had a non-stroke diagnosis. Stroke mimics represent a heterogeneous patient group with significant impacts on stroke services. Co-location of stroke and acute neurology services may offer advantages where service reorganisation is being considered. © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  10. Post-stroke depression among stroke survivors attending two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The burden of stroke worldwide is increasing rapidly. There is paucity of data on post-stroke depression (PSD) among stroke survivors in Uganda, despite the high prevalence of PSD reported elsewhere. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, we assessed adult participants with confirmed first stroke with a ...

  11. Perception of stroke among patients with stroke | Ajayi | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The perception of patients to stroke is variable. The aim of this study was to determine the perception of stroke among stroke patients. The study was carried out between January 2004 - December 2004 on all the patients presenting with features of stroke at the Federal Medical Center Ido, Nigeria. Data were collected by ...

  12. Cerebrorenal interaction and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Beyond the original meaning of chronic kidney disease (CKD) as high-risk state for future dialysis, CKD is now known as an established risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Stroke is a major player of cardiovascular disease and has deep two-way relationships with CKD. CKD is an evident risk factor for stroke. Meta-analyses of cohort studies and trials indicate that proteinuria/albuminuria increases the risk of stroke by 71-92%, and reduced glomerular filtration rate increases the risk by 43%. In addition, CKD has a strong relationship with subclinical brain damage including white matter changes, microbleeds, cognitive impairment, and carotid atherosclerosis. CKD is prevalent in acute stroke patients; patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate stroke patients and 39% of total intracerebral hemorrhage patients in our institute. Acute and chronic management of stroke are influenced by CKD. Therapeutic effects of several antithrombotic and thrombolytic agents, including recently-developed novel oral anticoagulants, are affected by renal function. Moreover, reduced glomerular filtration rate is independently associated with increased 1- and 10-year mortalities in the end. Stroke also has deep relationships with end-stage kidney disease. Stroke occurs much more commonly in dialysis patients than general population or CKD patients without need for dialysis. The triggers of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in patients with end-stage kidney disease include special characteristics unique to dialysis, such as drastic hemodynamic change, dialysate and anticoagulants, and vascular calcification. As cohorts of dialysis patients become older, more hypertensive, and more diabetic than before, stroke become more prevalent and more serious events in dialysis clinics. Now, clinicians should have much interest in the association between CKD and cerebrovascular diseases, so-called the cerebro-renal interaction. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Third European Stroke Science Workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dichgans, Martin; Planas, Anna M.; Biessels, Geert Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165576367; van der Worp, Bart|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/189855010; Sudlow, Cathie; Norrving, B.; Lees, Kennedy; Mattle, Heinrich P.

    2016-01-01

    Lake Eibsee, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, November 19 to 21, 2015: The European Stroke Organization convened >120 stroke experts from 27 countries to discuss latest results and hot topics in clinical, translational, and basic stroke research. Since its inception in 2011, the European Stroke Science

  14. Dizziness in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zamergrad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential diagnosis of new-onset acute vestibular vertigo is chiefly made between vestibular neuronitis and stroke. Dizziness in stroke is usually accompanied by other focal neurological symptoms of brainstem and cerebellar involvement. However, stroke may appear as isolated vestibular vertigo in some cases. An analysis of history data and the results of neurovestibular examination and brain magnetic resonance imaging allows stroke to be diagnosed in patients with acute isolated dizziness. The treatment of patients with stroke-induced dizziness involves a wide range of medications for the reduction of the degree of dizziness and unsteadiness and for the secondary prevention of stroke. Vestibular rehabilitation is an important component of treatment. The paper describes an observation of a patient with poorly controlled hypertension, who developed new-onset acute systemic dizziness. Vestibular neuronitis might be presumed to be a peripheral cause of vestibular disorders, by taking into account the absence of additional obvious neurological symptoms (such as pareses, defective sensation, diplopia, etc. and the nature of nystagmus. However, intention tremor in fingernose and heel-knee tests on the left side, a negative Halmagyi test, and results of Romberg’s test could suggest that stroke was a cause ofdizziness.

  15. Dietary fibre intake and risk of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke in the UK Women's Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threapleton, D E; Burley, V J; Greenwood, D C; Cade, J E

    2015-04-01

    Stroke risk is modifiable through many risk factors, one being healthy dietary habits. Fibre intake was associated with a reduced stroke risk in recent meta-analyses; however, data were contributed by relatively few studies, and few examined different stroke types. A total of 27,373 disease-free women were followed up for 14.4 years. Diet was assessed with a 217-item food frequency questionnaire and stroke cases were identified using English Hospital Episode Statistics and mortality records. Survival analysis was applied to assess the risk of total, ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke in relation to fibre intake. A total of 135 haemorrhagic and 184 ischaemic stroke cases were identified in addition to 138 cases where the stroke type was unknown or not recorded. Greater intake of total fibre, higher fibre density and greater soluble fibre, insoluble fibre and fibre from cereals were associated with a significantly lower risk for total stroke. For total stroke, the hazard ratio per 6 g/day total fibre intake was 0.89 (95% confidence intervals: 0.81-0.99). Different findings were observed for haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke in healthy-weight or overweight women. Total fibre, insoluble fibre and cereal fibre were inversely associated with haemorrhagic stroke risk in overweight/obese participants, and in healthy-weight women greater cereal fibre was associated with a lower ischaemic stroke risk. In non-hypertensive women, higher fibre density was associated with lower ischaemic stroke risk. Greater total fibre and fibre from cereals are associated with a lower stroke risk, and associations were more consistent with ischaemic stroke. The different observations by stroke type, body mass index group or hypertensive status indicates potentially different mechanisms.

  16. Clinical neurogenetics: stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Natalia S

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of cerebrovascular disease holds promise of novel stroke prevention strategies and therapeutics that are both safe and effective. Apart from a few single-gene disorders associated with cerebral ischemia or intracerebral hemorrhage, stroke is a complex genetic phenotype that requires careful ascertainment and robust association testing for discovery and validation analyses. The recently uncovered shared genetic contribution between clinically manifest stroke syndromes and closely related intermediate cerebrovascular phenotypes offers effective and efficient approaches to complex trait analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cost of stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Iversen, Helle K; Ibsen, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    . The attributable cost of direct net health care costs after the stroke (general practitioner services, hospital services, and medication) and indirect costs (loss of labor market income) were €10,720, €8,205 and €7,377 for patients, and €989, €1,544 and €1.645 for their partners, over and above that of controls......BACKGROUND: To estimate the direct and indirect costs of stroke in patients and their partners. DESCRIPTION: Direct and indirect costs were calculated using records from the Danish National Patient Registry from 93,047 ischemic, 26,012 hemorrhagic and 128,824 unspecified stroke patients...

  18. Determinan Penyakit Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woro Riyadina

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Penyakit stroke merupakan penyebab kematian dan kecacatan kronik yang paling tinggi pada kelompok umur diatas usia 45 tahun terbanyak di Indonesia. Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengidentifikasi determinan utama yang berhubungan dengan penyakit stroke pada masyarakat di kelurahan Kebon Kalapa Bogor. Analisis lanjut terhadap 1.912 responden subset baseline data penelitian “Studi Kohort Faktor Risiko Penyakit Tidak Menular” Data dikumpulkan dengan metode wawancara pada penduduk tetap di kelurahan Kebon Kalapa, Kecamatan Bogor Tengah, Bogor tahun 2012. Diagnosis stroke berdasarkan anamnesis dan pemeriksaan dokter spesialis syaraf. Variabel independen meliputi karakteristik sosiodemografi, status kesehatan dan perilaku berisiko. Data dianalisis dengan uji regresi logistik ganda. Penyakit stroke ditemukan pada 49 (2,6% orang. Determinan utama stroke meliputi hipertensi (OR = 4,20; IK 95% = 2,20 – 8,03, penyakit jantung koroner (OR = 2,74; IK 95% = 1,51 – 4,99, diabetes melitus (OR = 2,89; IK 95% = 1,47 – 5,64, dan status ekonomi miskin (OR = 1,83 ; IK 95% = 1,03 – 3,33. Pencegahan penyakit stroke dilakukan dengan peningkatan edukasi (kampanye/penyuluhan melalui pengendalian faktor risiko utama yaitu hipertensi dan pencegahan terjadinya penyakit degeneratif lain yaitu penyakit jantung koroner dan diabetes melitus. Stroke disease is the leading cause of death and chronic disabi lity in most over the age of 45 years in Indonesia. The aim of study was to identify the major determinants of stroke disease in Kebon Kalapa community in Bogor. A deep analyze was conducted in 1.912 respondents based on the subset of baseline data “Risk Factors Cohort Study of Non Communicable Diseases.” Data was collected by interviews on Kebon Kalapa community, Bogor in 2012. Stroke diagnosis was determined by anamnesis and neu-rological examination with specialist. Independent variables were sociodemographic characteristics, health status and risk behavior

  19. The Migraine?Stroke Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Mi Ji; Lee, Chungbin; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2016-01-01

    Migraine and stroke are common neurovascular disorders which share underlying physiological processes. Increased risks of ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and subclinical ischemic lesions have been consistently found in migraineurs. Three possible associations are suggested. One is that underlying pathophysiology of migraine can lead to ischemic stroke. Second, common comorbidities between migraine and stroke can be present. Lastly, some syndromes can manifest with both migraine-like head...

  20. Mediterranean Diet in patients with acute ischemic stroke: Relationships between Mediterranean Diet score, diagnostic subtype, and stroke severity index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Casuccio, Alessandra; Buttà, Carmelo; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Della Corte, Vittoriano; Arnao, Valentina; Clemente, Giuseppe; Maida, Carlo; Simonetta, Irene; Miceli, Giuseppe; Lucifora, Benedetto; Cirrincione, Anna; Di Bona, Danilo; Corpora, Francesca; Maugeri, Rosario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet appears to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease, as well as the risk of death due to cardiovascular disease. No study has addressed the association between diagnostic subtype of stroke and its severity and adherence to a Mediterranean Diet in subjects with acute ischemic stroke. To evaluate the association between Mediterranean Diet adherence, TOAST subtype, and stroke severity by means of a retrospective study. The type of acute ischemic stroke was classified according to the TOAST criteria. All patients admitted to our ward with acute ischemic stroke completed a 137-item validated food-frequency questionnaire adapted to the Sicilian population. A scale indicating the degree of adherence to the traditional Mediterranean Diet was used (Me-Di score: range 0-9). 198 subjects with acute ischemic stroke and 100 control subjects without stroke. Stroke subjects had a lower mean Mediterranean Diet score compared to 100 controls without stroke. We observed a significant positive correlation between Me-Di score and SSS score, whereas we observed a negative relationship between Me-Di score and NIHSS and Rankin scores. Subjects with atherosclerotic (LAAS) stroke subtype had a lower mean Me-Di score compared to subjects with other subtypes. Multinomial logistic regression analysis in a simple model showed a negative relationship between MeDi score and LAAS subtype vs. lacunar subtype (and LAAS vs. cardio-embolic subtype). Patients with lower adherence to a Mediterranean Diet are more likely to have an atherosclerotic (LAAS) stroke, a worse clinical presentation of ischemic stroke at admission and a higher Rankin score at discharge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Explicit memory and implicit memory in occipital lobe stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Liang; Wang, JiHua; Feng, Lei; Wang, MeiHong; Li, Xiu; Hu, JiaYun; Wang, Kai

    2015-03-01

    Occipital stroke patients mainly showed cortical blindness and unilateral vision loss; memory is generally reserved. Recent reports from neuroimaging show the occipital lobe may be involved in the processing of implicit memory (IM), especially the perception type of IM processing. In this study, we explored the explicit memory (EM) and IM damage in occipital lobe stroke patients. A total of 25 occipital strokes and 29 years of age, educational level equivalent healthy controls (HCs), evaluated by using immediate recall, delayed recall, recognition for EM tasks, picture identification, and category exemplar generation for IM tasks. There was no significant difference between occipital stroke patients and HCs in EM tasks and category exemplar generation task. In the picture identification task, occipital lobe stroke group score was poorer than HC group, the results were statistically significant, but in the pictures identify rate, occipital stroke patients and normal control group had no significant difference. The occipital stroke patients may have IM damage, primarily damage the perception type of IM priming effects, which was unrelated with their cortical blindness. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Botulinum toxin type A for refractory post-stroke shoulder pain Toxina botulínica do tipo A no tratamento do ombro doloroso após AVC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glícia Pedreira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A has been used to treat several neurological conditions such as sialorrhea, hyperhydrosis, dystonia, hemifacial spasm, spasticity and pain. Although spasticity has been successfully treated with BTX-A, few are the authors studying the use of BTX-A to treat shoulder pain secondary to stroke. In order to study if BTX-A is effective to treat post-stroke shoulder pain, we followed up during 4 months 16 patients with sustained shoulder pain. Patients received BTX-A according to previous discussion with the rehabilitation group to determine the muscles and dose to be injected and were evaluated by the join range of motion and analogic pain scale. There was decrease of pain during shoulder motion, mainly during the movements of extension and rotation. We conclude that BTX-A is a safe and efficacious therapy.A toxina botulínica do tipo A (TB-A tem sido utilizada com sucesso para o tratamento de várias enfermidades neurológicas, tais como sialorréia, hiperidrose, distonia, espasmo hemifacial, espasticidade e dor. Embora espasticidade seja tratada com sucesso após o advento da TB-A, poucos são os autores que utilizaram a TB-A no tratamento da dor no ombro espástico secundária a acidente vascular cerebral (AVC. Com o objetivo de estudar a eficácia da TB-A no tratamento da dor no ombro secundária a AVC, foram acompanhados 16 pacientes com esta enfermidade associada à dor refratária no ombro espástico. Os pacientes receberam TB-A de acordo com dose e pontos de injeção definidos previamente pelo grupo de reabilitação e foram avaliados pelos ângulos de abertura da articulação do ombro e escala de avaliação analógica de dor. Houve melhora da dor à movimentação da articulação do ombro, principalmente nos movimentos de rotação e extensão. Concluímos que a TB-A é uma terapêutica segura e eficaz para o tratamento do ombro doloroso secundário a AVC.

  3. Bilateral Medial Medullary Stroke: A Challenge in Early Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir M. Torabi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral medial medullary stroke is a very rare type of stroke, with catastrophic consequences. Early diagnosis is crucial. Here, I present a young patient with acute vertigo, progressive generalized weakness, dysarthria, and respiratory failure, who initially was misdiagnosed with acute vestibular syndrome. Initial brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI that was done in the acute phase was read as normal. Other possibilities were excluded by lumbar puncture and MRI of cervical spine. MR of C-spine showed lesion at medial medulla; therefore a second MRI of brain was requested, showed characteristic “heart appearance” shape at diffusion weighted (DWI, and confirmed bilateral medial medullary stroke. Retrospectively, a vague-defined hyperintense linear DWI signal at midline was noted in the first brain MRI. Because of the symmetric and midline pattern of this abnormal signal and similarity to an artifact, some radiologists or neurologists may miss this type of stroke. Radiologists and neurologists must recognize clinical and MRI findings of this rare type of stroke, which early treatment could make a difference in patient outcome. The abnormal DWI signal in early stages of this type of stroke may not be a typical “heart appearance” shape, and other variants such as small dot or linear DWI signal at midline must be recognized as early signs of stroke. Also, MRI of cervical spine may be helpful if there is attention to brainstem as well.

  4. Stroke in Indigenous Africans, African Americans, and European Americans: Interplay of Racial and Geographic Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Mayowa; Sarfo, Fred; Howard, Virginia J; Irvin, Marguerite R; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Akinyemi, Rufus; Bennett, Aleena; Armstrong, Kevin; Tiwari, Hemant K; Akpalu, Albert; Wahab, Kolawole W; Owolabi, Lukman; Fawale, Bimbo; Komolafe, Morenikeji; Obiako, Reginald; Adebayo, Philip; Manly, Jennifer M; Ogbole, Godwin; Melikam, Ezinne; Laryea, Ruth; Saulson, Raelle; Jenkins, Carolyn; Arnett, Donna K; Lackland, Daniel T; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Howard, George

    2017-05-01

    The relative contributions of racial and geographic factors to higher risk of stroke in people of African ancestry have not been unraveled. We compared stroke type and contributions of vascular risk factors among indigenous Africans (IA), African Americans (AA), and European Americans (EA). SIREN (Stroke Investigative Research and Educational Network) is a large multinational case-control study in West Africa-the ancestral home of 71% AA-whereas REGARDS (Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke) is a cohort study including AA and EA in the United States. Using harmonized assessments and standard definitions, we compared data on stroke type and established risk factors for stroke in acute stroke cases aged ≥55 years in both studies. There were 811 IA, 452 AA, and 665 EA stroke subjects, with mean age of 68.0±9.3, 73.0±8.3, and 76.0±8.3 years, respectively ( P stroke was more frequent among IA (27%) compared with AA (8%) and EA (5.4%; P strokes were more prevalent in IA (47.1%), followed by AA (35.1%) and then EA (21.0%; P risk factors such as sedentary lifestyle may contribute to the higher proportion of ischemic stroke in AA compared with IA, whereas racial factors may contribute to the higher proportion of hypertension and diabetes mellitus among stroke subjects of African ancestry. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Stroke - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain cells can die, causing lasting damage. Risk factors are things that increase your chance of getting ... disease or condition. This article discusses the risk factors for stroke and things you can do to ...

  6. Post-Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... negotiate the provision of reasonable accommodations in the workplace. When can a stroke patient begin rehabilitation? Rehabilitation ... at home gives people the advantage of practicing skills and developing compensatory strategies in the context of ...

  7. A Stroke of Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaisdell, Bob

    2011-01-01

    The author reflects on foreign-language learning by his EFL students as well as his own foreign-language learning. He concludes by musing on the possible and fantastical devastation on language-ability wrought by strokes.

  8. Epilepsy after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, T S; Høgenhaven, H; Thage, O

    1987-01-01

    Development of epilepsy was studied prospectively in a group of 77 consecutive stroke patients. Included were stroke patients less than 75 years old admitted within the first 3 days after the stroke. Excluded were patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, vertebrobasilar stroke, and patients...... with other severe diseases. Cerebral angiography, CT, and EEG were performed in all patients. The patients were followed clinically for 2 to 4 years. Seven patients (9%) developed epilepsy. Of 23 patients with lesions involving the cortex, 6 (26%) developed epilepsy. Of 54 patients in whom the cortex...... was not involved, only 1 (2%) developed epilepsy. Patients with persisting paresis and cortical involvement seem to be at particularly high risk of developing epilepsy, as 50% of such patients (6 of 12) developed the disease....

  9. The "Know Stroke" Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section The "Know Stroke" Campaign Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... Javascript on. NINDS is conducting a public awareness campaign across the United States to educate people about ...

  10. Validation of Siriraj Stroke Score in southeast Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chukwuonye II

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Innocent Ijezie Chukwuonye,1 Kenneth Arinze Ohagwu,2 Enoch Ogbonnaya Uche,3,4 Abali Chuku,5 Rowland Ihezuo Nwanke,2 Christopher Chukwuemeka Ohagwu,6 Ignatius U Ezeani,7 Collins Ogbonna Nwabuko,8 Martin Anazodo Nnoli,9 Efosa Oviasu,4,10 Okechukwu Samuel Ogah4,11 1Division of Nephrology, 2Division of Neurology, Department of Internal Medicine, Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Nigeria; 3Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria; 4Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Nigeria; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Nigeria; 6Department of Radiography, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria; 7Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Nigeria; 8Department of Hematology, Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Nigeria; 9Department of Anatomical Pathology, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria; 10Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria; 11Division of Cardiology, University College Hospital Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria Abstract: The aim of the study is to validate the use of Siriraj Stroke Score (SSS in the diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic and acute ischemic stroke in southeast Nigeria. This was a prospective study on validity of SSS in the diagnosis of stroke types in southeast Nigeria. Subjects diagnosed with stroke for whom brain computerized tomography (CT scan was performed on admission were recruited during the study period. SSS was calculated for each subject, and the SSS diagnosis was compared with brain CT scan-based diagnosis. A total of 2,307 patients were admitted in the hospital medical wards during the study period, of whom 360 (15.6% were stroke patients and of these, 113 (31.4% adult subjects met the inclusion criteria. The mean age of the subjects was 66.5±2.6 years. The mean interval between ictus and presentation was 2

  11. Is there a weekend bias in clutch-initiation dates from citizen science? Implications for studies of avian breeding phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Caren B

    2014-09-01

    Accurate phenology data, such as the timing of migration and reproduction, is important for understanding how climate change influences birds. Given contradictory findings among localized studies regarding mismatches in timing of reproduction and peak food supply, broader-scale information is needed to understand how whole species respond to environmental change. Citizen science-participation of the public in genuine research-increases the geographic scale of research. Recent studies, however, showed weekend bias in reported first-arrival dates for migratory songbirds in databases created by citizen-science projects. I investigated whether weekend bias existed for clutch-initiation dates for common species in US citizen-science projects. Participants visited nests on Saturdays more frequently than other days. When participants visited nests during the laying stage, biased timing of visits did not translate into bias in estimated clutch-initiation dates, based on back-dating with the assumption of one egg laid per day. Participants, however, only visited nests during the laying stage for 25% of attempts of cup-nesting species and 58% of attempts in nest boxes. In some years, in lieu of visit data, participants provided their own estimates of clutch-initiation dates and were asked "did you visit the nest during the laying period?" Those participants who answered the question provided estimates of clutch-initiation dates with no day-of-week bias, irrespective of their answer. Those who did not answer the question were more likely to estimate clutch initiation on a Saturday. Data from citizen-science projects are useful in phenological studies when temporal biases can be checked and corrected through protocols and/or analytical methods.

  12. Weekend warrior physical activity pattern and common mental disorder: a population wide study of 108,011 British adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Mark; Biddle, Stuart J H; Stamatakis, Emmanuel

    2017-07-14

    The dose-response association between physical activity (PA) and mental health is poorly described. We explored cross-sectional associations between physical activity and common mental disorder (psychological distress) in 'weekend warriors' who do all their exercise in one or two sessions per week. Adult participants (n = 108,011, age = 47 ± 17 yrs., 46.5% men) were recruited from general population household-based surveys (Health Survey for England and Scottish Health Survey) from 1994 to 2004. Data were pooled and analyzed using logistic regression models. Moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was self-reported and psychological distress was measured using the 12 item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Psychological distress (GHQ-12 > 3) was prevalent in 14.5% of the sample. In healthy participants an inverse association between PA and psychological distress was optimal at the PA guideline (150 mins/wk. MVPA or 75 min/wk. Vigorous PA) regardless of whether it was accumulated in one or two bouts per week "Weekend warrior" (odd ratio = 0.68, 95% CI, 0.63, 0.73) or as more frequent daily bouts (odd ratio = 0.68, 95% CI, 0.64, 0.72) in comparison to the inactive reference group. In participants with chronic health conditions an inverse association between PA and psychological distress was also evident at lower doses (one or two sessions of PA a week below PA guideline) (OR = 0.72, 95% CI, 0.68, 0.77). Undertaking vigorous intensity PA as part of the PA guideline conferred additional benefit in women (odds ratio = 0.87, 95% CI, 0.75, 1.00), but not men. Mental health benefits may be accrued through different PA patterns, thus individual approaches to prescribing exercise should be promoted.

  13. Relationship between functional disability and costs one and two years post stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Lekander

    Full Text Available Stroke affects mortality, functional ability, quality of life and incurs costs. The primary objective of this study was to estimate the costs of stroke care in Sweden by level of disability and stroke type (ischemic (IS or hemorrhagic stroke (ICH.Resource use during first and second year following a stroke was estimated based on a research database containing linked data from several registries. Costs were estimated for the acute and post-acute management of stroke, including direct (health care consumption and municipal services and indirect (productivity losses costs. Resources and costs were estimated per stroke type and functional disability categorised by Modified Rankin Scale (mRS.The results indicated that the average costs per patient following a stroke were 350,000SEK/€37,000-480,000SEK/€50,000, dependent on stroke type and whether it was the first or second year post stroke. Large variations were identified between different subgroups of functional disability and stroke type, ranging from annual costs of 100,000SEK/€10,000-1,100,000SEK/€120,000 per patient, with higher costs for patients with ICH compared to IS and increasing costs with more severe functional disability.Functional outcome is a major determinant on costs of stroke care. The stroke type associated with worse outcome (ICH was also consistently associated to higher costs. Measures to improve function are not only important to individual patients and their family but may also decrease the societal burden of stroke.

  14. Telestroke in stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Jacques; Joubert, Lynette B; de Bustos, Elizabeth Medeiros; Ware, Dallas; Jackson, David; Harrison, Terrence; Cadilhac, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Stroke is a high-frequency disorder placing a significant burden on the health care systems, being the foremost cause of complex chronic disability in adults. Devising systems that can enhance the prevention of stroke recurrence is an important priority and challenge in both the developed and the developing world. The potential for recurrent stroke can be substantially reduced by effective management of vascular risk factors. Telestroke is a tool with potential application to improve risk management of stroke survivors. Lack of acknowledgment of existing practices as well as lack of awareness of potential financial barriers to diffusion of telestroke can lead to limited implementation. Telestroke offers service providers the opportunity to access large numbers of stroke survivors targeting secondary prevention. The ideal 'telestroke model' provides service support, education for the patient and caregiver, as well as integration of specialist and primary care services. Effective use of technological advances, with adequate recognition of the importance of human interaction in the long-term management of a largely elderly population of stroke survivors is challenging but possible. Telestroke should be systems- and not technology-driven. Barriers in the implementation of telestroke have been identified as insufficient planning of IT infrastructure, lack of long-term vision for sustainability, a lack of contextual perspective as well as poor communication across domains. Future telestroke models should provide effective action in an integrated model of care recognizing and involving all existing players and practices. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Post-stroke dyskinesias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakawah MO

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Obadah Nakawah, Eugene C Lai Stanely H. Appel Department of Neurology, Houston Methodist Neurological Institute, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Strokes, whether ischemic or hemorrhagic, are among the most common causes of secondary movement disorders in elderly patients. Stroke-related (vascular movement disorders, however, are uncommon complications of this relatively common disease. The spectrum of post-stroke movement disorders is broad and includes both hypo- and hyperkinetic syndromes. Post-stroke dyskinesias are involuntary hyperkinetic movements arising from cerebrovascular insults and often present with mixed phenotypes of hyperkinesia which can sometimes be difficult to classify. Nevertheless, identification of the most relevant motor phenotype, whenever possible, allows for a more specific phenomenological categorization of the dyskinesia and thus helps guide its treatment. Fortunately, post-stroke dyskinesias are usually self-limiting and resolve within 6 to 12 months of onset, but a short-term pharmacotherapy might sometimes be required for symptom control. Functional neurosurgical interventions targeting the motor thalamus or globus pallidus interna might be considered for patients with severe, disabling, and persistent dyskinesias (arbitrarily defined as duration longer than 12 months. Keywords: vascular dyskinesia, stroke, movement disorders

  16. Communication activity in stroke patients with aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaux, Jean-Michel; Lagadec, Tiphaine; de Sèze, Mathieu Panchoa; Zongo, Drissa; Asselineau, Julien; Douce, Emmanuelle; Trias, Joel; Delair, Marie-France; Darrigrand, Bénédicte

    2013-04-01

    To study communication disability in stroke patients with aphasia. Prospective, multicentric cohort study of patients with aphasia, consecutively included after a first stroke, and examined 1 year later at home. Assessment included a stroke severity scale, the Barthel Index, the boston diagnostic aphasia examination, a communication questionnaire, and the aphasia depression rating scale. A total of 164 patients were included. Among the 100 survivors assessed at follow-up, 24% had severe aphasia, 12% moderate aphasia and 64% mild aphasia according to the Boston diagnostic aphasia examination severity score. Patients mainly reported difficulties in conversation with strangers and/or on abstract topics, using a phone, reading and writing administrative documents, dealing with money and outdoor communication activities. Communication was strongly related to aphasia severity. Age, gender, education level, residence status and type of stroke had no influence on communication activity. On multivariate analysis, severity of stroke and severity of aphasia on inclusion were found to account for 58% of variance and were independent predictors of the communication questionnaire score at follow-up. Documenting the most impaired communication skills may help to set priority goals for speech and language therapy in aphasia.

  17. Nursing care for stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulek, Zeliha; Poulsen, Ingrid; Gillis, Katrin

    2018-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To conduct a survey of the clinical nursing practice in European countries in accordance with the European Stroke Strategies (ESS) 2006, and to examine to what extent the ESS have been implemented in stroke care nursing in Europe. BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death...... comprising 61 questions based on the ESS and scientific evidence in nursing practice was distributed to representatives of the European Association of Neuroscience Nurses, who sent the questionnaire to nurses active in stroke care. The questionnaire covered the following areas of stroke care: Organization...... of stroke services, Management of acute stroke and prevention including basic care and nursing, and Secondary prevention. RESULTS: Ninety-two nurses in stroke care in 11 European countries participated in the survey. Within the first 48 hours after stroke onset, 95% monitor patients regularly, 94% start...

  18. Improving public education about stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Mark J

    2012-09-01

    Stroke is a common and serious disease. Most studies have shown that basic public knowledge about what a stroke is, symptoms of a stroke, and the proper reaction to a stroke is quite deficient. The fact that a stroke affects cognitive, communicative, and motor functions may partially explain the poor reaction to acute stroke symptoms. Several educational studies, using diverse formats and messaging paradigms, have been shown to positively affect public knowledge of stroke symptoms. Such efforts have often used mass media public education campaigns with an emphasis on recognizing symptoms of an acute stroke. Some have been able to demonstrate an increase in the chance of patients (or by-standers) calling 911 and seeking emergency care. However, many programs were of brief duration, and their long-term benefits are uncertain. Continual educational efforts will be needed to improve stroke knowledge and increase the percentage of patients who seek emergency care. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  19. Relearning the Basics: Rehabilitation after a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation Relearning the Basics: Rehabilitation After a Stroke Past ... to help them recover successfully. What is post-stroke rehabilitation? Rehab helps stroke survivors relearn skills lost to ...

  20. Heritage Language Education without Inheriting Hegemonic Ideologies: Shifting Perspectives on "Korea" in a Weekend Japanese-Language School in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerr, Neriko Musha; Lee, Kiri

    2016-01-01

    Learning a heritage language can be celebrated to enhance marginalized groups' self-esteem, but a heritage can also encompass ideologies prevalent in the groups' original homeland. Based on ethnographic fieldwork (2007-2011) at a weekend Japanese-language school in the United States, this article investigates how ideologies on race politics…

  1. The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak: Why young people drink more than intended on weekend nights: An event-level study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labhart, F.; Anderson, K.G.; Kuntsche, E.N.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Heavy alcohol use is common among young adults on weekend nights and is assumed to be intentional. However, little is known about the extent to which heavy consumption is planned prior to the onset of drinking and what factors contribute to drinking more than intended. This study

  2. The importance of parental beliefs and support for pedometer-measured physical activity on school days and weekend days among Canadian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Ploeg, Kerry A; Kuhle, Stefan; Maximova, Katerina; McGavock, Jonathan; Wu, Biao; Veugelers, Paul J

    2013-12-05

    Parental influences are essential to the behaviours and physical activity of their children. Our study aimed to determine if parental beliefs and support are associated with children's pedometer measured physical activity levels on school days and weekend days. In the spring of 2009 and 2011, we analyzed cross-sectional data from 1,355 grade five students and parents in 30 schools in Alberta, Canada. Parents reported how much they care about exercising, how much they encourage their child to be physically active, and how frequently they engage in physical activities with their child. Physical activity was assessed from step counts obtained from time-stamped pedometers collected over nine consecutive days. Increased parental encouragement was positively associated with boys' and girls' physical activity on school days (Boys: beta = 1373, 95% CI: 606, 2139; Girls: beta = 632, 95% CI: 108, 1155) and girls' physical activity on weekend days (beta = 997, 95% CI: 130, 1864). Increased parental care was positively associated with boys' physical activity on weekend days (beta = 1381, 95% CI: 85, 2676). Increased parental support and engagement was associated with an additional 632-1381 steps/day for children in this study. Parental care, encouragement and engagement are associated with physical activity levels of children 10-11 years of age. Policy makers and researchers should consider the importance of targeting parents when designing strategies to promote physical activity in children. This is particularly relevant to weekends and holidays when children's activity levels are low.

  3. Pattern of hospitalized-stroke patients in ASEAN countries an ASNA stroke epidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jusuf Misbach

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available To better understanding the demographic characteristics, admission time, clinical pattern, risk factors, stroke type, length of stay, and discharge outcome of hospitalized acute stroke patients in ASEAN member countries, ASEAN   Neurological Association (ASNA formed a Standing Commiltee for Stroke in 1996 and this is the first ASNA Stroke Epidemiological Study using the same stroke protocol. This prospective hospital based study was conducted in seven ASEAN countries (Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam by participating neurologists from October 1996 to March 1997. Of the 3723 consecutive hospitalized stroke patients (2030 males and 1660 females from 44 participating hospitals in this study ie Brunei (n=53, Indonesia (n=2065, Malaysia (n=300,Philippines (n=545,Singapore (n=232, Thailand (n=244 and Vietnam (n=284, the mean age was 59.0 ± 13,8 years 16% of patients were younger than 45 years and 37% of patients were older than 65 years. There were no significant differences in age at onset among stroke subjects except in Vietnam (younger and Singapore (older. The sex distribution showed a slight higher prevalence of women in Singapore and in the age group > 64 years. The mean adrnission time was 41.5 ± 87.0 hours, 19% of patients were admitted within 3 hours, 29% within 6 hours and 66% more than 6 hours (delayed admission especially in Malaysia and Singapore (80% and 77% respectively. Motor disability was the most prevalent clinical feature in all countries and carotid bruit was the rarest (1%. Hypertension was the most common risk factor (68% in all countries, followed by TIA (35%, smoking, diabetes mellitus, ischnemic heart disease and hypercholesterolemia. CT scan was performed on 76% of subjects. The diagnostic classification was non lacunar anterior circulation (32%, lacunar infarction (14%, hemorrhagic stroke (26%, SAH (4%. Mean length of stay was 11.4 ± 11.8 days. Most of the patients

  4. Mini-Stroke vs. Regular Stroke: What's the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How is a ministroke different from a regular stroke? Answers from Jerry W. Swanson, M.D. When ... brain, spinal cord or retina, which may cause stroke-like symptoms but does not damage brain cells ...

  5. STROKE IN YOUNG ADULTS: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF 68 CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Harirchian

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous etiologies are responsible for cases of stroke in young adults. This study reviews the causes of two types of stroke (ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhage in young adults aged 15 to 40years, admitted to our center (a tertiary care center from 1997 to 2002. The purpose of this study is to determine the relative frequency of causes of stroke in young adults and compare this with published data in the literature. Using the codes 46.0 to 46.8 of the International Classification of Diseases- 10th Edition (ICD-10, cases were identified from the records of the stroke patients admitted in Imam Khomeini Hospital and the data were collected from their files using a comprehensive questionnaire. Forty-two cases of ischemic stroke (62% and 26 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage (38% were identified. The leading cause of ischemic stroke was cardioembolism (38.1%, followed by atherosclerosis in 5 cases (11.9%. Among cardiac causes infarction was attributable to consequences of rheumatic heart disease in 8 cases. In 3 cases a cessation or decrease in dose of warfarin was followed directly by an ischemic stroke. The most leading cause of intracerebral hemorrhage was hypertension (30.8%. Other causes were anticoagulant therapy, intratumoral hemorrhage, aplastic anemia, leukemia, arteriovenous malformations, and chronic active hepatitis. In conclusion, cardioembolism and hypertension were the most leading causes of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in young adults admitted in our hospital.

  6. Hearing Characteristics of Stroke Patients: Prevalence and Characteristics of Hearing Impairment and Auditory Processing Disorders in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohi, Nehzat; Vickers, Deborah A; Lakshmanan, Rahul; Chandrashekar, Hoskote; Werring, David J; Warren, Jason D; Bamiou, Doris-Eva

    2017-06-01

    Stroke survivors may suffer from a range of hearing impairments that may restrict their participation in postacute rehabilitation programs. Hearing impairment may have a significant impact on listening, linguistic skills, and overall communication of the affected stroke patient. However, no studies sought to systematically characterize auditory function of stroke patients in detail, to establish the different types of hearing impairments in this cohort of patients. Such information would be clinically useful in understanding and addressing the hearing needs of stroke survivors. The present study aimed to characterize and classify the hearing impairments, using a detailed audiological assessment test battery, in order to determine the level of clinical need and inform appropriate rehabilitation for this patient population. A case-control study. Forty-two recruited stroke patients who were discharged from a stroke unit and 40 control participants matched for age. All participants underwent pure-tone audiometry and immittance measurements including acoustic reflex threshold, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions, auditory-evoked brainstem response, and a central auditory processing assessment battery, performed in a single session. Hearing impairments were classified as peripheral hearing loss (cochlear and neural type), central auditory processing disorder (CAPD), and as a combination of CAPD and peripheral hearing loss. Overall mean hearing thresholds were not significantly different between the control and stroke groups. The most common type of hearing impairment in stroke patients was the combination type, "peripheral and CAPD," in the 61- to 80-yr-old subgroup (in 55%), and auditory processing deficits in 18- to 60-yr-olds (in 40%), which were both significantly higher than in controls. This is the first study to examine hearing function in detail in stroke patients. Given the importance of hearing for the efficiency of communication, it is essential to identify

  7. Risk Factors and Stroke Characteristic in Patients with Postoperative Strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi; Cao, Wenjie; Cheng, Xin; Fang, Kun; Zhang, Xiaolong; Gu, Yuxiang; Leng, Bing; Dong, Qiang

    2017-07-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial thrombectomy are now the standard therapies for patients with acute ischemic stroke. In-house strokes have often been overlooked even at stroke centers and there is no consensus on how they should be managed. Perioperative stroke happens rather frequently but treatment protocol is lacking, In China, the issue of in-house strokes has not been explored. The aim of this study is to explore the current management of in-house stroke and identify the common risk factors associated with perioperative strokes. Altogether, 51,841 patients were admitted to a tertiary hospital in Shanghai and the records of those who had a neurological consult for stroke were reviewed. Their demographics, clinical characteristics, in-hospital complications and operations, and management plans were prospectively studied. Routine laboratory test results and risk factors of these patients were analyzed by multiple logistic regression model. From January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2015, over 1800 patients had neurological consultations. Among these patients, 37 had an in-house stroke and 20 had more severe stroke during the postoperative period. Compared to in-house stroke patients without a procedure or operation, leukocytosis and elevated fasting glucose levels were more common in perioperative strokes. In multiple logistic regression model, perioperative strokes were more likely related to large vessel occlusion. Patients with perioperative strokes had different risk factors and severity from other in-house strokes. For these patients, obtaining a neurological consultation prior to surgery may be appropriate in order to evaluate the risk of perioperative stroke. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Stroke risk perception among participants of a stroke awareness campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Kraywinkel, Klaus; Heidrich, Jan; Heuschmann, Peter U; Wagner, Markus; Berger, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Subjective risk factor perception is an important component of the motivation to change unhealthy life styles. While prior studies assessed cardiovascular risk factor knowledge, little is known about determinants of the individual perception of stroke risk. Methods Survey by mailed questionnaire among 1483 participants of a prior public stroke campaign in Germany. Participants had been informed about their individual stroke risk based on the Framingham stroke risk score. S...

  9. Child-Mediated Stroke Communication: findings from Hip Hop Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Olajide; DeSorbo, Alexandra; Noble, James; Gerin, William

    2012-01-01

    Low thrombolysis rates for acute ischemic stroke are linked to delays in seeking immediate treatment due to low public stroke awareness. We aimed to assess whether "Child-Mediated Stroke Communication" could improve stroke literacy of parents of children enrolled in a school-based stroke literacy program called Hip Hop Stroke. Parents of children aged 9 to 12 years from 2 public schools in Harlem, New York City, were recruited to participate in stroke literacy questionnaires before and after their child's participation in Hip Hop Stroke, a novel Child-Mediated Stroke Communication intervention delivered in school auditoriums. Parental recall of stroke information communicated through their child was assessed 1-week after the intervention. Fifth and sixth grade students (n=182) were enrolled into Hip Hop Stroke. One hundred two parents were approached in person to participate; 75 opted to participate and 71 completed both the pretest and post-test (74% response rate and 95% retention rate). Parental stroke literacy improved after the program; before the program, 3 parents of 75 (3.9%) were able to identify the 5 cardinal stroke symptoms, distracting symptom (chest pains), and had an urgent action plan (calling 911) compared with 21 of 71 parents (29.6%) postintervention (P<0.001). The FAST mnemonic was known by 2 (2.7%) of participants before the program versus 29 (41%) after program completion (P<0.001). Knowledge of stroke signs and symptoms remains low among residents of this high-risk population. The use of Child-Mediated Stroke Communication suggests that school children aged 9 to 12 years may be effective conduits of critical stroke knowledge to their parents.

  10. World Stroke Organization Global Stroke Services Guidelines and Action Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay, Patrice; Furie, Karen L.; Davis, Stephen M.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Norrving, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Every two seconds, someone across the globe suffers a symptomatic stroke. 'Silent' cerebrovascular disease insidiously contributes to worldwide disability by causing cognitive impairment in the elderly. The risk of cerebrovascular disease is disproportionately higher in low to middle income countries where there may be barriers to stroke care. The last two decades have seen a major transformation in the stroke field with the emergence of evidence-based approaches to stroke prevention,...

  11. Primary prevention of stroke by a healthy lifestyle in a high-risk group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Susanna C; Åkesson, Agneta; Wolk, Alicja

    2015-06-02

    To examine the impact of a healthy lifestyle on stroke risk in men at higher risk of stroke because of other cardiovascular diseases or conditions. Our study population comprised 11,450 men in the Cohort of Swedish Men who had a history of hypertension, high cholesterol levels, diabetes, heart failure, or atrial fibrillation. Participants had completed a questionnaire about diet and lifestyle and were free from stroke and ischemic heart disease at baseline (January 1, 1998). We defined a healthy lifestyle as a low-risk diet (≥5 servings/d of fruits and vegetables and 0 to ≤30 g/d). Ascertainment of stroke cases was accomplished through linkage with the National Inpatient Register and the Swedish Cause of Death Register. During a mean follow-up of 9.8 years, we ascertained 1,062 incident stroke cases. The risk of total stroke and stroke types decreased with increasing number of healthy lifestyle factors. The multivariable relative risk of total stroke for men who achieved all 5 healthy lifestyle factors compared with men who achieved 0 or 1 factor was 0.28 (95% confidence interval 0.14-0.55). The corresponding relative risks (95% confidence interval) were 0.31 (0.15-0.66) for ischemic stroke and 0.32 (0.04-2.51) for hemorrhagic stroke. A healthy lifestyle is associated with a substantially reduced risk of stroke in men at higher risk of stroke. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  12. Meta-Analysis of Perioperative Stroke and Mortality in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Aditya; Thiagarajan, Karthy; Van Ham, Raymond; Gleason, Thomas G; Mulukutla, Suresh; Schindler, John T; Jeevanantham, Vinodh; Thirumala, Parthasarathy D

    2016-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a rapidly evolving safe method with decreasing incidence of perioperative stroke. There is a void in literature concerning the impact of stroke after TAVI in predicting 30-day stroke-related mortality. The primary aim of this meta-analysis was to determine whether perioperative stroke increases risk of stroke-related mortality after TAVI. Online databases, using relevant keywords, and additional related records were searched to retrieve articles involving TAVI and stroke after TAVI. Data were extracted from the finalized studies and analyzed to generate a summary odds ratio (OR) of stroke-related mortality after TAVI. The stroke rate and stroke-related mortality rate in the total patient population were 3.07% (893 of 29,043) and 12.27% (252 of 2,053), respectively. The all-cause mortality rate was 7.07% (2,053 of 29,043). Summary OR of stroke-related mortality after TAVI was estimated to be 6.45 (95% confidence interval 3.90 to 10.66, p York Heart Association class III/IV status, previous stroke, valve type, and implantation route. All failed to exhibit any significant associations with the OR. In conclusion, perioperative strokes after TAVI are associated with >6 times greater risk of 30-day stroke-related mortality. Transapical TAVI is not associated with increased stroke-related mortality in patients who suffer from perioperative stroke. Preventative measures need to be taken to alleviate the elevated rates of stroke after TAVI and subsequent direct mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Child-Mediated Stroke Communication: Findings from Hip Hop Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Olajide; DeSorbo, Alexandra; Noble, James; Gerin, William

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Low thrombolysis rates for acute ischemic stroke is linked to delays in seeking immediate treatment due to low public stroke awareness. We aimed to assess whether “Child-Mediated Stroke Communication” (CMSC) could improve stroke literacy parents of children enrolled in a school-based stroke literacy program called Hip Hop Stroke (HHS). Methods Parents of children aged 9 to 12 years from two public schools in Harlem, NYC, were recruited to participate in stroke literacy questionnaires before and after their child’s participation in HHS, a novel CMSC intervention delivered in school auditoriums. Parental recall of stroke information communicated through their child was assessed 1-week following the intervention. Results Fifth and Sixth grade students (n =182) were enrolled into HHS. 102 parents were approached in person to participate; 75 opted to participate and 71 completed both pretest and post-test (74% response rate and 95% retention rate). Parental stroke literacy improved after the program: before the program, 3 parents of 75 (3.9%) were able to identify the five cardinal stroke symptoms, distracting symptom (chest pains), and had an urgent action plan (calling 911), compared to 21 of 71 parents (29.6%) post-intervention (pstroke signs and symptoms remains low among residents of this high-risk population. The use of Child-Mediated Stroke Communication suggests that schoolchildren aged 9-12 may be effective conduits of critical stroke knowledge to their Parents. PMID:22033995

  14. From stroke unit care to stroke care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, J; Sulter, G.

    1999-01-01

    In some stroke units continuous monitoring of blood pressure, electrocardiogram, body temperature, and oxygen saturation has become an integral part of the management of acute stroke. In addition, regular measurements of blood glucose are performed. Stroke units equipped with such monitoring

  15. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  16. The obesity paradox in stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2015-01-01

    . Data include age, gender, civil status, stroke severity, computed tomography, and cardiovascular risk factors. Patients were followed up to 9·8 years (median 2·6 years). We used Cox regression models to compare risk of death and readmission for recurrent stroke in the four body mass index groups......BACKGROUND: Although associated with excess mortality and morbidity, obesity is associated with lower mortality after stroke. The association between obesity and risk of recurrent stroke is unclear. AIMS: The study aims to investigate the association in stroke patients between body mass index...... and risk of death and readmission for recurrent stroke. METHODS: An administrative Danish quality-control registry designed to collect a predefined dataset on all hospitalized stroke patients in Denmark 2000–2010 includes 45 615 acute first-ever stroke patients with information on body mass index in 29 326...

  17. Preventable Pediatric Stroke via Vaccination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A. Press

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the Vascular Effects of Infection in Pediatric Stroke (VIPS group studied the risk of arterial ischemic stroke (AIS associated with minor infection and routine childhood vaccinations.

  18. Matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors in different acute stroke subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukasovic, Ines; Tesija-Kuna, Andrea; Topic, Elizabeta; Supanc, Visnja; Demarin, Vida; Petrovcic, Marija

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine serum levels of selected matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their natural inhibitors (TIMPs) in the acute phase of different stroke types subdivided according to the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP) classification and the possibility of discriminating stroke types according to their levels. The study included 126 patients with acute stroke within the first 24 h of symptom onset, and 124 healthy volunteers. The stroke group had lower MMP-2 concentrations and MMP-2/TIMP-2 ratios (pnegative correlation of MMP-2 levels with MMP-9 and MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was recorded in all stroke subtypes except for TACI. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed similar discriminating power for MMP-9 levels and Barthel index in the differential diagnosis of TACI. High MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio (odds ratio 3.263) was associated with TACI. Our results demonstrate that the MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio may provide information to help in assessing stroke patients in the future as a baseline biomarker of infarct extent.

  19. Classification of stroke disease using convolutional neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbun, J. T.; Seniman; Andayani, U.

    2018-03-01

    Stroke is a condition that occurs when the blood supply stop flowing to the brain because of a blockage or a broken blood vessel. A symptoms that happen when experiencing stroke, some of them is a dropped consciousness, disrupted vision and paralyzed body. The general examination is being done to get a picture of the brain part that have stroke using Computerized Tomography (CT) Scan. The image produced from CT will be manually checked and need a proper lighting by doctor to get a type of stroke. That is why it needs a method to classify stroke from CT image automatically. A method proposed in this research is Convolutional Neural Network. CT image of the brain is used as the input for image processing. The stage before classification are image processing (Grayscaling, Scaling, Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization, then the image being classified with Convolutional Neural Network. The result then showed that the method significantly conducted was able to be used as a tool to classify stroke disease in order to distinguish the type of stroke from CT image.

  20. ACUTE STROKE: FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME PREDICTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Sujatha; Ramalingam; Vinodkumar; Vasumathi; Valarmathi; Anu

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ischemic strokes account for >80% of total stroke events. Biochemical modalities like serum uric acid, ESR, CRP, Serum Fibrinogen will be a low cost and useful way to predict functional outcome after ischemic stroke. The Barthel ADL index it is an ordinal scale helping us to measure performances in ADL-activities in daily living. The present study aims to study the Biochemical parameters Uric Acid, CRP, ESR and Fibrinogen in Ischemic Stroke patients and to assess fu...

  1. SAR: Stroke Authorship Recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Sara

    2015-10-15

    Are simple strokes unique to the artist or designer who renders them? If so, can this idea be used to identify authorship or to classify artistic drawings? Also, could training methods be devised to develop particular styles? To answer these questions, we propose the Stroke Authorship Recognition (SAR) approach, a novel method that distinguishes the authorship of 2D digitized drawings. SAR converts a drawing into a histogram of stroke attributes that is discriminative of authorship. We provide extensive classification experiments on a large variety of data sets, which validate SAR\\'s ability to distinguish unique authorship of artists and designers. We also demonstrate the usefulness of SAR in several applications including the detection of fraudulent sketches, the training and monitoring of artists in learning a particular new style and the first quantitative way to measure the quality of automatic sketch synthesis tools. © 2015 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Personal accounts of stroke experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wachters-Kaufmann, CSM

    2000-01-01

    As there appeared to be a need for personal accounts of stroke experiences, a book called "Speaking about Stroke" was written for stroke patients and their caregivers. For the past two years, a questionnaire was sent to the people who had ordered the book, to gain an insight into the characteristics

  3. Questions and Answers about Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stroke. High blood pressure increases your risk of stroke four to six times. Heart disease, especially a condition ... leading cause of serious, long-term adult disability. Four million Americans are living with the effects of stroke. The length of time to recover from a ...

  4. Stroke and Episodic Memory Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chun; Alexander, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Memory impairments are common after stroke, and the anatomical basis for impairments may be quite variable. To determine the range of stroke-related memory impairment, we identified all case reports and group studies through the Medline database and the Science Citation Index. There is no hypothesis about memory that is unique to stroke, but there…

  5. Stroke prevention: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    2012-03-01

    Stroke is a personal, familial, and social disaster. It is the third cause of death worldwide, the first cause of acquired disability, the second cause of dementia, and its cost is astronomic. The burden of stroke is likely to increase given the aging of the population and the growing incidence of many vascular risk factors. Prevention of stroke includes--as for all other diseases--a "mass approach" aiming at decreasing the risk at the society level and an individual approach, aiming at reducing the risk in a given subject. The mass approach is primarily based on the identification and treatment of vascular risk factors and, if possible, in the implementation of protective factors. These measures are the basis of primary prevention but most of them have now been shown to be also effective in secondary prevention. The individual approach combines a vascular risk factor modification and various treatments addressing the specific subtypes of stroke, such as antiplatelet drugs for the prevention of cerebral infarction in large and small artery diseases of the brain, carotid endarterectomy or stenting for tight carotid artery stenosis, and oral anticoagulants for the prevention of cardiac emboli. There is a growing awareness of the huge evidence-to-practice gap that exists in stroke prevention largely due to socio-economic factors. Recent approaches include low cost intervention packages to reduce blood pressure and cheap "polypills" combining in a single tablet aspirin and several drugs to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. Polypill intake should however not lead to abandon the healthy life-style measures which remain the mainstay of stroke prevention.

  6. Association of weekend admission with hospital length of stay, time to chemotherapy, and risk for respiratory failure in pediatric patients with newly diagnosed leukemia at freestanding US children's hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Elizabeth K; Reilly, Anne F; Fisher, Brian T; Fitzgerald, Julie; Li, Yimei; Seif, Alix E; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Bagatell, Rochelle; Aplenc, Richard

    2014-10-01

    In adult patients with leukemia, weekend admission is associated with increased inpatient mortality. It is unknown whether weekend diagnostic admissions in pediatric patients with leukemia demonstrate similar adverse outcomes. To estimate adverse clinical outcomes associated with weekend admission in the first hospitalization of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed leukemia. This retrospective cohort study from 1999 to 2011 featured index hospital admissions identified from the Pediatric Health Information System database. Participants were children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoid leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia. Weekend (Saturday and Sunday) or weekday index admission. Inpatient mortality, length of inpatient stay, time to chemotherapy, and organ-system failure in index admission. A total of 10 720 patients with acute lymphoid leukemia and 1323 patients with acute myeloid leukemia were identified; 2009 patients (16.7%) were admitted on the weekend. While the total daily number of patients receiving intensive care unit-level care was constant regardless of the day of admission, these patients represented a larger percentage of total admissions on weekends. In adjusted analyses, patients admitted on the weekend did not have an increased rate of mortality during the first admission (odds ratio, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.8-1.6). Patients whose initial admission for leukemia occurred during a weekend had a significantly increased length of stay (1.4-day increase; 95% CI, 0.7-2.1), time to initiation of chemotherapy (0.36-day increase; 95% CI, 0.3-0.5), and risk for respiratory failure (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.7) after adjusting for demographics, severity of illness, and hospital-level factors. While pediatric patients with newly diagnosed leukemia admitted on weekends do not have higher mortality rates, they have a prolonged length of stay, increased time to chemotherapy, and higher risk for respiratory failure. Patients who are severely ill at presentation

  7. Dietary fibre intake and risk of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke in the UK Women’s Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Threapleton, DE; Burley, VJ; Greenwood, DC; Cade, JE

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke risk is modifiable through many risk factors, one being healthy dietary habits. Fibre intake was associated with a reduced stroke risk in recent meta-analyses; however, data were contributed by relatively few studies, and few examined different stroke types. METHODS: A total of 27 373 disease-free women were followed up for 14.4 years. Diet was assessed with a 217-item food frequency questionnaire and stroke cases were identified using English Hospital Episode Statistics an...

  8. Prospective of ischemic stroke biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szewczak Krzysztof

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Methods currently used in brain vascular disorder diagnostics are neither fast enough nor clear-out; thus, there exists a necessity of finding new types of testing which could enlarge and complete the actual panel of diagnostics or be an alternative to current methods. The discovery of sensitive and specific biomarkers of ischemic brain stroke will improve the effects of treatment and will help to assess the progress or complications of the disease. The relevant diagnosis of ischemic stroke (IS within the first 4.5 hours after the initial symptoms allows for the initiation of treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activators which limits the magnitude of negative changes in the brain and which enhance the final effectiveness of therapy. The potential biomarkers which are under investigation are substances involved in the processes of coagulation and fibrinolysis, and are of molecules released from damaged vascular endothelial cells and from nerves and cardiac tissue. The analyzed substances are typical of oxidative stress, apoptosis, excitotoxicity and damage of the blood brain barrier.

  9. Vitamin D deficiency and stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D comprises a group of fat-soluble pro-hormones, obtained from sun exposure, food, and supplements, and it must undergo two hydroxylation reactions to be activated in the body. Several studies have shown the role of vitamin D in mineral metabolism regulation, especially calcium, phosphorus, and bone metabolism. Some factors such as inadequate vitamin intake and liver or kidney disorders can lead to vitamin D deficiency. Furthermore, vitamin D malnutrition may also be linked to susceptibility to chronic diseases such as heart failure, peripheral artery disease, high blood pressure, cognitive impairment including foggy brain and memory loss, and autoimmune diseases including diabetes type I. Recent research has revealed that low levels of vitamin D increase the risk of cardiovascular-related morbidity (Sato et al., 2004 and mortality (Pilz et al., 2008. Also, hypertension contributes to a reduction in bone mineral density and increase in the incidence of stroke and death. This article reviews the function and physiology of vitamin D and examines the effects of vitamin D deficiency on susceptibility to stroke, as a cardiovascular event, and its morbidity and subsequent mortality.

  10. Stroke rehabilitation and patients with multimorbidity: a scoping review protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L.A. Nelson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke care presents unique challenges for clinicians, as most strokes occur in the context of other medical diagnoses. An assessment of capacity for implementing “best practice” stroke care found clinicians reporting a strong need for training specific to patient/system complexity and multimorbidity. With mounting patient complexity, there is pressure to implement new models of healthcare delivery for both quality and financial sustainability. Policy makers and administrators are turning to clinical practice guidelines to support decision-making and resource allocation. Stroke rehabilitation programs across Canada are being transformed to better align with the Canadian Stroke Strategy’s Stroke Best Practice Recommendations. The recommendations provide a framework to facilitate the adoption of evidence-based best practices in stroke across the continuum of care. However, given the increasing and emerging complexity of patients with stroke in terms of multimorbidity, the evidence supporting clinical practice guidelines may not align with the current patient population. To evaluate this, electronic databases and gray literature will be searched, including published or unpublished studies of quantitative, qualitative or mixed-methods research designs. Team members will screen the literature and abstract the data. Results will present a numerical account of the amount, type, and distribution of the studies included and a thematic analysis and concept map of the results. This review represents the first attempt to map the available literature on stroke rehabilitation and multimorbidity, and identify gaps in the existing research. The results will be relevant for knowledge users concerned with stroke rehabilitation by expanding the understanding of the current evidence.

  11. Acute Predictors of Social Integration Following Mild Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Frances M; Harris, Darren W; Olver, John H; Davis, Stephen M; Disler, Peter B

    2018-04-01

    Despite an acknowledged need to accurately predict stroke outcome, there is little empirical evidence regarding acute predictors of participation restriction post stroke. The current study examines prediction of social integration following mild stroke, using combinations of acute poststroke factors. In a prospective, longitudinal study, a cohort of 60 stroke survivors was followed up at 6 months post stroke. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were employed to evaluate the value of acute poststroke variables in predicting social integration at 6 months post stroke. A combination of age, number of comorbidities, stroke severity, social support factors, and general self-efficacy in the acute poststroke period accounted for 42% of the variance in 6-month social integration. The largest amount of variance (20%) was explained by inclusion of social support factors, including number and types of support. Post hoc analysis was conducted to establish whether marital status was the mediating variable through which early poststroke social support factors exerted influence upon subsequent social integration. The new combination of acute variables accounted for 48% of the variance in 6-month social integration. Results suggested that subjects with partners perceived higher levels of functional social support and lower levels of participation restriction. Stroke survivors with partners may receive greater amounts of companionship and encouragement from their partners, which enhances self-esteem and confidence. Such individuals are possibly more able to participate in and maintain relationships, thus improving social integration. Social support factors, mediated via marital status, are the strongest predictors of subsequent social integration following mild stroke. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Blood microRNAs in Low or No Risk Ischemic Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Rong Tan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is a multi-factorial disease where some patients present themselves with little or no risk factors. Blood microRNA expression profiles are becoming useful in the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases. We therefore investigated the blood microRNA profiles in young stroke patients who presented with minimal or absence of risk factors for stroke such as type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Blood microRNA profiles from these patients varied with stroke subtypes as well as different functional outcomes (based on modified Rankin Score. These microRNAs have been shown to target genes that are involved in stroke pathogenesis. The findings from our study suggest that molecular mechanisms in stroke pathogenesis involving low or no risk ischemic stroke patients could differ substantially from those with pre-existing risk factors.

  13. Ischemic Stroke and Cancer: Stroke Severely Impacts Cancer Patients, While Cancer Increases the Number of Strokes

    OpenAIRE

    Bang, Oh Young; Seok, Jin Myoung; Kim, Seon Gyeong; Hong, Ji Man; Kim, Hahn Young; Lee, Jun; Chung, Pil-Wook; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Chung, Chin-Sang; Lee, Kwang Ho

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer and ischemic stroke are two of the most common causes of death among the elderly, and associations between them have been reported. However, the main pathomechanisms of stroke in cancer patients are not well known, and can only be established based on accurate knowledge of the characteristics of cancer-related strokes. We review herein recent studies concerning the clinical, laboratory, and radiological features of patients with cancer-related stroke. Main Contents This revi...

  14. Intravenous Thrombolysis in Unknown-Onset Stroke: Results From the Safe Implementation of Treatment in Stroke-International Stroke Thrombolysis Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorado, Laura; Ahmed, Niaz; Thomalla, Götz; Lozano, Manuel; Malojcic, Branko; Wani, Mushtaq; Millán, Mònica; Tomek, Ales; Dávalos, Antoni

    2017-03-01

    Stroke patients with unknown onset (UKO) are excluded from thrombolytic therapy. We aim to study the safety and efficacy of intravenous alteplase in ischemic stroke patients with UKO of symptoms compared with those treated within 4.5 hours in a large cohort. Data were analyzed from 47 237 patients with acute ischemic stroke receiving intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator in hospitals participating in the Safe Implementation of Treatment in Stroke-International Stroke Thrombolysis Registry between 2010 and 2014. Two groups were defined: (1) patients with UKO (n=502) and (2) patients treated within 4.5 hours of stroke onset (n=44 875). Outcome measures were symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage per Safe Implementation of Treatment in Stroke on the 22 to 36 hours post-treatment neuroimaging and mortality and functional outcome assessed by the modified Rankin Scale at 3 months. Patients in UKO group were significantly older, had more severe stroke at baseline, and longer door-to-needle times than patients in the ≤4.5 hours group. Logistic regression showed similar risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (adjusted odds ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.44-2.67) and no significant differences in functional independency (modified Rankin Scale score of 0-2; adjusted odds ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.56-1.10), but higher mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-2.41) in the UKO group compared with the ≤4.5 hours group. Patients treated within 4.5 hours showed reduced disability over the entire range of modified Rankin Scale compared with the UKO group (common adjusted odds ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.65). Our data suggest no excess risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage but increased mortality and reduced favorable outcome in patients with UKO stroke compared with patients treated within the approved time window. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Impact of disinvestment from weekend allied health services across acute medical and surgical wards: 2 stepped-wedge cluster randomised controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry P Haines

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Disinvestment (removal, reduction, or reallocation of routinely provided health services can be difficult when there is little published evidence examining whether the services are effective or not. Evidence is required to understand if removing these services produces outcomes that are inferior to keeping such services in place. However, organisational imperatives, such as budget cuts, may force healthcare providers to disinvest from these services before the required evidence becomes available. There are presently no experimental studies examining the effectiveness of allied health services (e.g., physical therapy, occupational therapy, and social work provided on weekends across acute medical and surgical hospital wards, despite these services being routinely provided internationally. The aim of this study was to understand the impact of removing weekend allied health services from acute medical and surgical wards using a disinvestment-specific non-inferiority research design.We conducted 2 stepped-wedge cluster randomised controlled trials between 1 February 2014 and 30 April 2015 among patients on 12 acute medical or surgical hospital wards spread across 2 hospitals. The hospitals involved were 2 metropolitan teaching hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. Data from n = 14,834 patients were collected for inclusion in Trial 1, and n = 12,674 in Trial 2. Trial 1 was a disinvestment-specific non-inferiority stepped-wedge trial where the 'current' weekend allied health service was incrementally removed from participating wards each calendar month, in a random order, while Trial 2 used a conventional non-inferiority stepped-wedge design, where a 'newly developed' service was incrementally reinstated on the same wards as in Trial 1. Primary outcome measures were patient length of stay (proportion staying longer than expected and mean length of stay, the proportion of patients experiencing any adverse event, and the proportion with an unplanned

  16. Family History in Young Patients With Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Vincent; Grittner, Ulrike; Dichgans, Martin; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Kessler, Christof; Kolodny, Edwin; Kropp, Peter; Martus, Peter; Norrving, Bo; Ringelstein, Erich Bernd; Rothwell, Peter M; Schmidt, Reinhold; Tanislav, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Rolfs, Arndt

    2015-07-01

    Family history of stroke is an established risk factor for stroke. We evaluated whether family history of stroke predisposed to certain stroke subtypes and whether it differed by sex in young patients with stroke. We used data from the Stroke in Fabry Patients study, a large prospective, hospital-based, screening study for Fabry disease in young patients (aged stroke in whom cardiovascular risk factors and family history of stroke were obtained and detailed stroke subtyping was performed. A family history of stroke was present in 1578 of 4232 transient ischemic attack and ischemic stroke patients (37.3%). Female patients more often had a history of stroke in the maternal lineage (P=0.027) than in the paternal lineage. There was no association with stroke subtype according to Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment nor with the presence of white matter disease on brain imaging. Patients with dissection less frequently reported a family history of stroke (30.4% versus 36.3%; P=0.018). Patients with a parental history of stroke more commonly had siblings with stroke (3.6% versus 2.6%; P=0.047). Although present in about a third of patients, a family history of stroke is not specifically related to stroke pathogenic subtypes in patients with young stroke. Young women with stroke more often report stroke in the maternal lineage. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00414583. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Two-epoch cross-sectional case record review protocol comparing quality of care of hospital emergency admissions at weekends versus weekdays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bion, Julian; Aldridge, Cassie P; Girling, Alan; Rudge, Gavin; Beet, Chris; Evans, Tim; Temple, R Mark; Roseveare, Chris; Clancy, Mike; Boyal, Amunpreet; Tarrant, Carolyn; Sutton, Elizabeth; Sun, Jianxia; Rees, Peter; Mannion, Russell; Chen, Yen-Fu; Watson, Samuel Ian; Lilford, Richard

    2017-12-22

    The mortality associated with weekend admission to hospital (the 'weekend effect') has for many years been attributed to deficiencies in quality of hospital care, often assumed to be due to suboptimal senior medical staffing at weekends. This protocol describes a case note review to determine whether there are differences in care quality for emergency admissions (EAs) to hospital at weekends compared with weekdays, and whether the difference has reduced over time as health policies have changed to promote 7-day services. Cross-sectional two-epoch case record review of 20 acute hospital Trusts in England. Anonymised case records of 4000 EAs to hospital, 2000 at weekends and 2000 on weekdays, covering two epochs (financial years 2012-2013 and 2016-2017). Admissions will be randomly selected across the whole of each epoch from Trust electronic patient records. Following training, structured implicit case reviews will be conducted by consultants or senior registrars (senior residents) in acute medical specialities (60 case records per reviewer), and limited to the first 7 days following hospital admission. The co-primary outcomes are the weekend:weekday admission ratio of errors per case record, and a global assessment of care quality on a Likert scale. Error rates will be analysed using mixed effects logistic regression models, and care quality using ordinal regression methods. Secondary outcomes include error typology, error-related adverse events and any correlation between error rates and staffing. The data will also be used to inform a parallel health economics analysis. The project has received ethics approval from the South West Wales Research Ethics Committee (REC): reference 13/WA/0372. Informed consent is not required for accessing anonymised patient case records from which patient identifiers had been removed. The findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications in high-quality journals and through local High-intensity Specialist-Led Acute

  18. Risk-adjusted hospital mortality rates for stroke: evidence from the Australian Stroke Clinical Registry (AuSCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadilhac, Dominique A; Kilkenny, Monique F; Levi, Christopher R; Lannin, Natasha A; Thrift, Amanda G; Kim, Joosup; Grabsch, Brenda; Churilov, Leonid; Dewey, Helen M; Hill, Kelvin; Faux, Steven G; Grimley, Rohan; Castley, Helen; Hand, Peter J; Wong, Andrew; Herkes, Geoffrey K; Gill, Melissa; Crompton, Douglas; Middleton, Sandy; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Anderson, Craig S

    2017-05-01

    Hospital data used to assess regional variability in disease management and outcomes, including mortality, lack information on disease severity. We describe variance between hospitals in 30-day risk-adjusted mortality rates (RAMRs) for stroke, comparing models that include or exclude stroke severity as a covariate. Cohort design linking Australian Stroke Clinical Registry data with national death registrations. Multivariable models using recommended statistical methods for calculating 30-day RAMRs for hospitals, adjusted for demographic factors, ability to walk on admission, stroke type, and stroke recurrence. Australian hospitals providing at least 200 episodes of acute stroke care, 2009-2014. Hospital RAMRs estimated by different models. Changes in hospital rank order and funnel plots were used to explore variation in hospital-specific 30-day RAMRs; that is, RAMRs more than three standard deviations from the mean. In the 28 hospitals reporting at least 200 episodes of care, there were 16 218 episodes (15 951 patients; median age, 77 years; women, 46%; ischaemic strokes, 79%). RAMRs from models not including stroke severity as a variable ranged between 8% and 20%; RAMRs from models with the best fit, which included ability to walk and stroke recurrence as variables, ranged between 9% and 21%. The rank order of hospitals changed according to the covariates included in the models, particularly for those hospitals with the highest RAMRs. Funnel plots identified significant deviation from the mean overall RAMR for two hospitals, including one with borderline excess mortality. Hospital stroke mortality rates and hospital performance ranking may vary widely according to the covariates included in the statistical analysis.

  19. Trends in in-hospital mortality among patients with stroke in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The incidence and burden of stroke in China is increasing rapidly. However, little is known about trends in mortality during stroke hospitalization. The objectives of this study were to assess trends of in-hospital mortality among patients with stroke and explore influence factors of in-hospital death after stroke in China. METHODS: 109 grade III class A hospitals were sampled by multistage stratified cluster sampling. All patients admitted to hospitals between 2007 and 2010 with a discharge diagnosis of stroke were included. Trends in in-hospital mortality among patients with stroke were assessed. Influence factors of in-hospital death after stroke were explored using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: Overall stroke hospitalizations increased from 79,894 in 2007 to 85,475 in 2010, and in-hospital mortality of stroke decreased from 3.16% to 2.30% (P<0.0001. The percentage of severe patients increased while odds of mortality (2010 versus 2007 decreased regardless of stroke type: subarachnoid hemorrhage (OR 0.792, 95% CI = 0.636 to 0.987, intracerebral hemorrhage (OR 0.647, 95% CI = 0.591 to 0.708, and ischemic stroke (OR 0.588, 95% CI = 0.532 to 0.649. In multivariable analyses, older age, male, basic health insurance, multiple comorbidities and severity of disease were linked to higher odds of in-hospital mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The mortality of stroke hospitalizations decreased likely reflecting advancements in stroke care and prevention. Decreasing of mortality with increasing of severe stroke patients indicated that we should pay more attention to rehabilitation and life quality of stroke patients. Specific individual and hospital-level characteristics may be targets for facilitating further declines.

  20. Morphological risk factors of stroke during thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelis, Drosos; Bischoff, Moritz S; Jobst, Bertram; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Hinz, Ulf; Geisbüsch, Philipp; Böckler, Dittmar

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to identify independent factors correlating to an increased risk of perioperative stroke during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). A prospective maintained TEVAR database, medical records, and imaging studies of 300 patients (205 men; median age of all, 66 years, range 21-89), who underwent TEVAR between March 1997 and February 2011, were reviewed. Preoperative CT data sets were reviewed by two experienced radiologists with focus on the atheroma burden in the aortic arch (grade I, normal, to grade V, ulcerated or pedunculated atheroma). Aortic arch geometry (arch types I-III) was documented. Further parameters included in the univariate analysis were age, gender, urgency of repair, duration of procedure, adenosine-induced cardiac arrest or rapid pacing, proximal landing zone, left subclavian artery (LSA) coverage, and number of stent grafts. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the independent correlations of potential risk factors. Atherosclerotic aneurysm was the most common pathology (44%). One hundred and fifty-four of our patients (51%) were treated under urgent or emergent conditions. Seventeen percent of all patients had significant arch atheroma (grade IV or V), and 43% had a steep type III aortic arch. The perioperative stroke was 4% (12 patients; median age, 73 years, range 31-78). Two strokes were lethal (0.7%). All strokes were classified as embolic based on imaging characteristics. In eight patients, strokes were located in the left cerebral hemisphere (seven of them in the anterior and one in the posterior circulation). Four stroke patients (one in the left posterior circulation) underwent LSA coverage without revascularization. Three stroke patients had severe arch atheroma grade V. Five patients suffering stroke were recognized to have a type III aortic arch. Strokes were equally distributed between zones 0-2 vs. 3-4 (n = 6 each, 5 vs. 3.3%). The highest incidence was found in zone 1 (11

  1. Leisure Activities, the Social Weekend, and Alcohol Use: Evidence From a Daily Study of First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Andrea K.; Ram, Nilam; Maggs, Jennifer L.; Caldwell, Linda L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to document within-person and between-persons associations between the duration of day-to-day activities (volunteering, spiritual activities, media use, socializing, entertainment/campus events and clubs, athletics, classes, working for pay) and alcohol use (quantity and heavy drinking) and to examine whether these associations differed by gender and the time of week. Method: First-semester college students (N=717 persons; 51.6% female) provided up to 14 consecutive days of data (N= 9,431 days) via daily web-based surveys. Multilevel analyses tested whether alcohol use was associated with activity duration, gender, and time of week. Results: Between-persons associations indicated that alcohol use was higher among individuals who spent more time involved in athletics and socializing and lower among students who spent more time in spiritual and volunteer activities. Within-person associations indicated that students consumed more alcohol and were more likely to drink heavily on weekends, on days they spent more time than usual socializing, and on days they spent less time than usual in spiritual activities and using media. Conclusions: Select activities and days were linked with less alcohol use at both the between- and within-person levels, suggesting that attention should be paid to both selection effects and social context to understand the mechanisms linking activity duration and student drinking. PMID:22333332

  2. Intensive weekend group treatment for panic disorder and its impact on co-occurring PTSD: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Ellen J; Barrera, Terri L; Hiatt, Emily L; Chaison, Angelic D; Dunn, Nancy Jo; Petersen, Nancy J; Stanley, Melinda A

    2015-06-01

    This pilot study examines the feasibility, acceptability, and potential effectiveness of delivering an intensive weekend group treatment for panic disorder (PD) to Veterans returning from deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan with co-occurring posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The treatment program lasted 6h each day and was delivered by two experienced therapists. Patients received core components of panic treatment, including psychoeducation, cognitive restructuring, and interoceptive exposure. The interoceptive exposure exercises directly targeted anxiety sensitivity, a psychological construct also implicated in the maintenance of PTSD. Eighty-nine percent of patients who expressed interest in the treatment attended a baseline evaluation, and 63% of those who were study eligible initiated treatment. Treatment retention was high, with all 10 patients who initiated treatment completing the program. Veterans reported finding the treatment and delivery format highly acceptable and reported high levels of satisfaction. Panic symptoms improved significantly following the treatment and were maintained at a 7-month follow-up, with 71.4% of the sample reporting being panic free. Co-occurring PTSD symptoms also improved along with symptoms of anxiety and depression. Preliminary findings suggest that brief and intensive group treatments for PD/PTSD are a promising method of delivering cognitive behavioral therapy that may rapidly improve symptoms. This innovative treatment delivery format also may be a cost-effective way of increasing treatment engagement through increased access to quality care. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Leisure activities, the social weekend, and alcohol use: evidence from a daily study of first-year college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Andrea K; Ram, Nilam; Maggs, Jennifer L; Caldwell, Linda L

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to document within-person and between-persons associations between the duration of day-to-day activities (volunteering, spiritual activities, media use, socializing, entertainment/campus events and clubs, athletics, classes, working for pay) and alcohol use (quantity and heavy drinking) and to examine whether these associations differed by gender and the time of week. First-semester college students (N = 717 persons; 51.6% female) provided up to 14 consecutive days of data (N = 9,431 days) via daily web-based surveys. Multilevel analyses tested whether alcohol use was associated with activity duration, gender, and time of week. Between-persons associations indicated that alcohol use was higher among individuals who spent more time involved in athletics and socializing and lower among students who spent more time in spiritual and volunteer activities. Within-person associations indicated that students consumed more alcohol and were more likely to drink heavily on weekends, on days they spent more time than usual socializing, and on days they spent less time than usual in spiritual activities and using media. Select activities and days were linked with less alcohol use at both the between- and within-person levels, suggesting that attention should be paid to both selection effects and social context to understand the mechanisms linking activity duration and student drinking.

  4. Ageism in stroke rehabilitation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, Eva Joan; Geoghegan, Sheena Elizabeth; O'Neill, Desmond

    2014-05-01

    stroke is predominantly a disease of older people. While age bias has been demonstrated in studies of pharmacological therapeutic interventions in stroke, the extent of discrimination by age in stroke rehabilitation studies is unknown. The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature to assess the extent of ageism in stroke rehabilitation studies. all randomised control trials (RCT) on stroke rehabilitation entered in the Cochrane database which reported mean age were included. Patient gender and exclusion criteria were also recorded. of 241 RCT's identified, 182 were eligible for inclusion. The mean age of all patients was 64.3, almost a decade younger than those seen by stroke physicians in daily practice in global terms, and 11-12 years younger than encountered in hospital practice in the British Isles. Almost half (46%) of trials excluded patients with cognitive impairment, almost one-quarter (23%) patients with dysphasia and one-eighth (13%) excluded patients with multiple strokes. we have identified a clear difference in the mean age of those included in stroke rehabilitation studies compared with the international mean age of stroke. In addition, a quarter of trials excluded dysphasic patients which may indicate omission of more severe strokes. This means that the evidence base for stroke rehabilitation is deficient in terms of matching the characteristics of patients encountered in clinical practice, and a more representative sample of older people and those with significant disability must be included in future trials.

  5. Stroke? Localized, otogenic meningitis!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingolfsdottir, Harpa Maria; Thomasen, Per Caye

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a patient admitted with aphasia, treated for a stroke. Subsequently, it was revealed that the symptoms were caused by complicated otitis media with localized meningitis. This case draws attention to the possible intracranial spread of infection when neurological symptoms occur...

  6. Ischemic strokes and migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousser, M.G.; Baron, J.C.; Chiras, J.

    1985-01-01

    Lasting neurological deficits, though most infrequent, do occur in migrainous subjects and are well documented by clinical angiographic computed tomographic (CT scan) and even pathological studies. However the mechanism of cerebral ischemia in migraine remains widely unknown and the precise role of migraine in the pathogenesis of ischemic strokes is still debated. (orig./MG)

  7. Stroke while jogging.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, W. F.; Roussak, J.

    1980-01-01

    Jogging is a form of physical exercise that has stimulated the imagination of the public as shown by recent appearance of its own journal (Jogging Magazine, Editor J. Bryant). We wish to report the unusual complication of an acute stroke sustained during jogging.

  8. Stroke while jogging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, W. F.; Roussak, J.

    1980-01-01

    Jogging is a form of physical exercise that has stimulated the imagination of the public as shown by recent appearance of its own journal (Jogging Magazine, Editor J. Bryant). We wish to report the unusual complication of an acute stroke sustained during jogging. Images p229-a Fig. 1 PMID:7448490

  9. Sex differences in stroke.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haast, R.A.M.; Gustafson, D.R.; Kiliaan, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in stroke are observed across epidemiologic studies, pathophysiology, treatments, and outcomes. These sex differences have profound implications for effective prevention and treatment and are the focus of this review. Epidemiologic studies reveal a clear age-by-sex interaction in

  10. Citation Classics in Stroke: The Top-100 Cited Articles on Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yerim; Yoon, Dae Young; Kim, Jee-Eun; Park, Kang Min; Lee, Ju-Hun; Song, Hong-Ki; Bae, Jong Seok

    2017-01-01

    Stroke is a disastrous disease and a major health burden worldwide, especially in Korea. Hemorrhagic stroke (HS) accounts for approximately 20% of all the types of strokes. It is important to be able to evaluate stroke diagnoses and evolving treatments. We aimed to identify the top-100 cited articles and assess a paradigm shift that occurred in the field of HS. We searched all articles that had been cited more than 100 times using the Web of Science citation search tool during January 2016. Among a total of 2,651 articles, we identified the top-100 cited articles on HS. The number of citations for the articles analyzed in this study ranged from 1,746 to 211, and the number of annual citations ranged from 125.6 to 5.5. Most of the articles that were published in Stroke (35%) and Journal of Neurosurgery (22%), originated in the United States (n = 56), were original articles (64%), and dealt with the natural history or etiology (n = 37) and vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 8). We analyzed the top-100 cited articles in the field of HS based on citation rates. The results provide a unique perspective on historical and academic developments in this field. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Formation and function of acute stroke-ready hospitals within a stroke system of care recommendations from the brain attack coalition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Mark J; Wechsler, Lawrence R; Jensen, Mary E Lee; Latchaw, Richard E; Crocco, Todd J; George, Mary G; Baranski, James; Bass, Robert R; Ruff, Robert L; Huang, Judy; Mancini, Barbara; Gregory, Tammy; Gress, Daryl; Emr, Marian; Warren, Margo; Walker, Michael D

    2013-12-01

    Many patients with an acute stroke live in areas without ready access to a Primary or Comprehensive Stroke Center. The formation of care facilities that meet the needs of these patients might improve their care and outcomes and guide them and emergency responders to such centers within a stroke system of care. The Brain Attack Coalition conducted an electronic search of the English medical literature from January 2000 to December 2012 to identify care elements and processes shown to be beneficial for acute stroke care. We used evidence grading and consensus paradigms to synthesize recommendations for Acute Stroke-Ready Hospitals (ASRHs). Several key elements for an ASRH were identified, including acute stroke teams, written care protocols, involvement of emergency medical services and emergency department, and rapid laboratory and neuroimaging testing. Unique aspects include the use of telemedicine, hospital transfer protocols, and drip and ship therapies. Emergent therapies include the use of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator and the reversal of coagulopathies. Although many of the care elements are similar to those of a Primary Stroke Center, compliance rates of ≥67% are suggested in recognition of the staffing, logistical, and financial challenges faced by rural facilities. ASRHs will form the foundation for acute stroke care in many settings. Recommended elements of an ASRH build on those proven to improve care and outcomes at Primary Stroke Centers. The ASRH will be a key component for patient care within an evolving stroke system of care.

  12. Thrombolysis in Postoperative Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Nicolas; Hubert, Nikolai Dominik; Backhaus, Roland; Haberl, Roman Ludwig; Hubert, Gordian Jan

    2017-11-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) is beneficial in reducing disability in selected patients with acute ischemic stroke. There are numerous contraindications to IVT. One is recent surgery. The aim of this study was to analyze the safety of IVT in patients with postoperative stroke. Data of consecutive IVT patients from the Telemedical Project for Integrative Stroke Care thrombolysis registry (February 2003 to October 2014; n=4848) were retrospectively searched for keywords indicating preceding surgery. Patients were included if surgery was performed within the last 90 days before stroke. The primary outcome was defined as surgical site hemorrhage. Subgroups with major/minor surgery and recent/nonrecent surgery (within 10 days before IVT) were analyzed separately. One hundred thirty-four patients underwent surgical intervention before IVT. Surgery had been performed recently (days 1-10) in 49 (37%) and nonrecently (days 11-90) in 85 patients (63%). In 86 patients (64%), surgery was classified as major, and in 48 (36%) as minor. Nine patients (7%) developed surgical site hemorrhage after IVT, of whom 4 (3%) were serious, but none was fatal. One fatal bleeding occurred remotely from surgical area. Rate of surgical site hemorrhage was significantly higher in recent than in nonrecent surgery (14.3% versus 2.4%, respectively, odds ratio adjusted 10.73; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-61.27). Difference between patients with major and minor surgeries was less distinct (8.1% and 4.2%, respectively; odds ratio adjusted 4.03; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-25.04). Overall in-hospital mortality was 8.2%. Intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 9.7% and was asymptomatic in all cases. IVT may be administered safely in postoperative patients as off-label use after appropriate risk-benefit assessment. However, bleeding risk in surgical area should be taken into account particularly in patients who have undergone surgery shortly before stroke onset. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Imaging of Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, Ryan; Garg, Ankur

    2016-10-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke comprises approximately 15% to 20% of all strokes. This article provides readers with an understanding of the indications and significance of various neuroimaging techniques available for patients presenting with hemorrhagic strokes of distinct causes. The most common initial neuroimaging study is a noncontrast head CT, which allows for the identification of hemorrhage. Once an intracranial hemorrhage has been identified, the pattern of blood and the patient's medical history, neurologic examination, and laboratory studies lead the practitioner to pursue further neuroimaging studies to guide the medical, surgical, and interventional management. Given that hemorrhagic stroke constitutes a heterogeneous collection of diagnoses, the subsequent neuroimaging pathway necessary to better evaluate and care for these patients is variable based on the etiology.With an increasing incidence and prevalence of atrial fibrillation associated with the aging population and the introduction of three new direct factor Xa inhibitors and one direct thrombin inhibitor to complement vitamin K antagonists, oral anticoagulant use continues to increase. Patients on oral anticoagulants have a sevenfold to tenfold increased risk for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Furthermore, patients who have an ICH associated with oral anticoagulant use have a higher mortality rate than those with primary ICH. Despite the reduced incidence of hypertension-related ICH over the past decade, it is expected that the incidence of ICH will continue to increase. Neuroimaging studies are integral to the identification of hemorrhagic stroke, determination of the underlying etiology, prevention of hematoma expansion, treatment of acute complications, and treatment of the underlying etiology, if indicated. Neuroimaging is essential for prognostication and thus directly impacts patient care.

  14. Rehabilitating the Stroke Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Grimmond

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this project was to complete an analysis of monograph and audiovisual items held in the Central Coast Health Service (CCHS Libraries and containing information relevant to the treatment of acute stroke. Acute stroke is treated by multidisciplinary teams of clinicians based at two hospitals within the CCHS. The adequacy of the library collection was measured by subject coverage and age. Methods The methodology used consisted of three main steps: a literature review; design, administration, and analysis of a questionnaire to members of the CCHS Acute Stroke Team; and an analysis of the libraries’ collections. The research project utilised project management methodology and an evidence based librarianship framework. Results The questionnaire revealed that electronic resources were by far the most frequently used by participants, followed in order by print journals, books, interlibrary loan articles, and audiovisual items. Collection analysis demonstrated that the monograph and audiovisual collections were adequate in both scope and currency to support the information needs of Acute Stroke Team members, with the exception of resources to support patient education. Conclusion The researchers developed recommendations for future collection development in the area of acute stroke resources. Conducting this project within the evidence based librarianship framework helped to develop library staff members’ confidence in their ability to make future collection development decisions, informed by the target group’s information needs and preferences. The collection analysis methodology was designed to be replicated, and new specialist groups within the client base of the library will be targeted to repeat the collection analysis process.

  15. Stroke treatment outcomes in hospitals with and without Stroke Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masjuan, J; Gállego Culleré, J; Ignacio García, E; Mira Solves, J J; Ollero Ortiz, A; Vidal de Francisco, D; López-Mesonero, L; Bestué, M; Albertí, O; Acebrón, F; Navarro Soler, I M

    2017-10-23

    Organisational capacity in terms of resources and care circuits to shorten response times in new stroke cases is key to obtaining positive outcomes. This study compares therapeutic approaches and treatment outcomes between traditional care centres (with stroke teams and no stroke unit) and centres with stroke units. We conducted a prospective, quasi-experimental study (without randomisation of the units analysed) to draw comparisons between 2 centres with stroke units and 4 centres providing traditional care through the neurology department, analysing a selection of agreed indicators for monitoring quality of stroke care. A total of 225 patients participated in the study. In addition, self-administered questionnaires were used to collect patients' evaluations of the service and healthcare received. Centres with stroke units showed shorter response times after symptom onset, both in the time taken to arrive at the centre and in the time elapsed from patient's arrival at the hospital to diagnostic imaging. Hospitals with stroke units had greater capacity to respond through the application of intravenous thrombolysis than centres delivering traditional neurological care. Centres with stroke units showed a better fit to the reference standards for stroke response time, as calculated in the Quick study, than centres providing traditional care through the neurology department. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Secular trends in ischemic stroke subtypes and stroke risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogiatzi, Chrysi; Hackam, Daniel G; McLeod, A Ian; Spence, J David

    2014-11-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of a stroke improves patient outcomes, and knowledge of the cause of the initial event is crucial to identification of the appropriate therapy to maximally reduce risk of recurrence. Assumptions based on historical frequency of ischemic subtypes may need revision if stroke subtypes are changing as a result of recent changes in therapy, such as increased use of statins. We analyzed secular trends in stroke risk factors and ischemic stroke subtypes among patients with transient ischemic attack or minor or moderate stroke referred to an urgent transient ischemic attack clinic from 2002 to 2012. There was a significant decline in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and blood pressure, associated with a significant decline in large artery stroke and small vessel stroke. The proportion of cardioembolic stroke increased from 26% in 2002 to 56% in 2012 (Prisk factors was observed, with a significant decline in stroke/transient ischemic attack caused by large artery atherosclerosis and small vessel disease. As a result, cardioembolic stroke/transient ischemic attack has increased significantly. Our findings suggest that more intensive investigation for cardiac sources of embolism and greater use of anticoagulation may be warranted. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Basic and clinical research advances in ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-yuan MA

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the most common cerebrovascular disease worldwide, which seriously affects life quality of survivals and results in huge economic burden of families and society. In terms of clinical treatment for ischemic stroke, apart from thrombolytic therapy with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA, the occurrence and successful application of endovascular thrombectomy in patients of ischemic stroke is a major breakthrough. Meanwhile, many novel clinical drugs for ischemic stroke therapy have entered into clinical trials. Most of basic and clinical researches have showed promising results in ischemic stroke therapy. This review mainly summarizes the progress of research during the period of Twelfth Five-Year Plan for National Economic and Social Development on treatment of ischemic stroke, including omics technologies, gene therapy, microRNA (miRNA interference and stem cell therapy. Stem cell therapy has shown great potential since many clinical trials have been completed or are ongoing. The development and mutual transformation of basic and clinical research will provide valuable and comprehensive information for the precise treatment of ischemic stroke.

  18. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Intrathecal Transplantation in Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy is being widely explored in the management of stroke and has demonstrated great potential. It has been shown to assist in the remodeling of the central nervous system by inducing neurorestorative effect through the process of angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and reduction of glial scar formation. In this study, the effect of intrathecal administration of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs is analyzed on the recovery process of patients with chronic stroke. 24 patients diagnosed with chronic stroke were administered cell therapy, followed by multidisciplinary neurorehabilitation. They were assessed on functional independence measure (FIM objectively, along with assessment of standing and walking balance, ambulation, and hand functions. Out of 24 patients, 12 improved in ambulation, 10 in hand functions, 6 in standing balance, and 9 in walking balance. Further factor analysis was done. Patients of the younger groups showed higher percentage of improvement in all the areas. Patients who underwent cell therapy within 2 years after the stroke showed better changes. Ischemic type of stroke had better recovery than the hemorrhagic stroke. This study demonstrates the potential of autologous BMMNCs intrathecal transplantation in improving the prognosis of functional recovery in chronic stage of stroke. Further clinical trials are recommended. This trial is registered with NCT02065778.

  19. Astrocytes, therapeutic targets for neuroprotection and neurorestoration in ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongwu; Chopp, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type within the central nervous system. They play essential roles in maintaining normal brain function, as they are a critical structural and functional part of the tripartite synapses and the neurovascular unit, and communicate with neurons, oligodendrocytes and endothelial cells. After an ischemic stroke, astrocytes perform multiple functions both detrimental and beneficial, for neuronal survival during the acute phase. Aspects of the astrocytic inflammatory response to stroke may aggravate the ischemic lesion, but astrocytes also provide benefit for neuroprotection, by limiting lesion extension via anti-excitotoxicity effects and releasing neurotrophins. Similarly, during the late recovery phase after stroke, the glial scar may obstruct axonal regeneration and subsequently reduce the functional outcome; however, astrocytes also contribute to angiogenesis, neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, and axonal remodeling, and thereby promote neurological recovery. Thus, the pivotal involvement of astrocytes in normal brain function and responses to an ischemic lesion designates them as excellent therapeutic targets to improve functional outcome following stroke. In this review, we will focus on functions of astrocytes and astrocyte-mediated events during stroke and recovery. We will provide an overview of approaches on how to reduce the detrimental effects and amplify the beneficial effects of astrocytes on neuroprotection and on neurorestoration post stroke, which may lead to novel and clinically relevant therapies for stroke. PMID:26455456

  20. Correlation study on cystatin C and ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Rong-bo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the relationship between serum cystatin C (Cys C and patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods The clinical and laboratory data of 115 patients with acute ischemic stroke and 110 controls were recorded and analyzed. Results The serum Cys C levels of patients in ischemic stroke group [(1.15 ± 0.34 mg/L] were higher than that of the control group [(0.99 ± 0.25 mg/L]. The difference between two groups was significant after correction of age and cardiovascular risk factors (t = ? 3.889, P = 0.000. It was found that age, Cys C, homocysteine (Hcy, type 2 diabetes mellitus [hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, fructosamine (FRU], smoking, alcohol consumption, hypertension and intima-media thickness (IMT were risk factors for ischemic stroke on univariate Logistic regression analysis. The difference of serum Cys C level between the patients and controls was significant (P = 0.000, but through covariance analysis, after adjusted other risk factors, it was not significant (P = 0.875. Conclusion The serum Cys C levels of patients in ischemic stroke group is higher than the control group. It can be used as an indicator in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. The elevation of serum Cys C is a risk factor for ischemic stroke, but not an independent risk factor.

  1. Understanding Stroke - Know Stroke • Know the Signs • Act in Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Understanding Stroke Know Stroke • Know the Signs • Act in Time Past Issues / ... Julie Harris, and motivational speaker David Layton. Preventing Stroke "Until I had my stroke, I didn't ...

  2. Early Dysphagia Screening by Trained Nurses Reduces Pneumonia Rate in Stroke Patients: A Clinical Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palli, Christoph; Fandler, Simon; Doppelhofer, Kathrin; Niederkorn, Kurt; Enzinger, Christian; Vetta, Christian; Trampusch, Esther; Schmidt, Reinhold; Fazekas, Franz; Gattringer, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Dysphagia is a common stroke symptom and leads to serious complications such as aspiration and pneumonia. Early dysphagia screening can reduce these complications. In many hospitals, dysphagia screening is performed by speech-language therapists who are often not available on weekends/holidays, which results in delayed dysphagia assessment. We trained the nurses of our neurological department to perform formal dysphagia screening in every acute stroke patient by using the Gugging Swallowing Screen. The impact of a 24/7 dysphagia screening (intervention) over swallowing assessment by speech-language therapists during regular working hours only was compared in two 5-month periods with time to dysphagia screening, pneumonia rate, and length of hospitalization as outcome variables. Overall, 384 patients (mean age, 72.3±13.7 years; median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 3) were included in the study. Both groups (pre-intervention, n=198 versus post-intervention, n=186) were comparable regarding age, sex, and stroke severity. Time to dysphagia screening was significantly reduced in the intervention group (median, 7 hours; range, 1-69 hours) compared with the control group (median, 20 hours; range, 1-183; P =0.001). Patients in the intervention group had a lower rate of pneumonia (3.8% versus 11.6%; P =0.004) and also a reduced length of hospital stay (median, 8 days; range, 2-40 versus median, 9 days; range, 1-61 days; P =0.033). 24/7 dysphagia screening can be effectively performed by nurses and leads to reduced pneumonia rates. Therefore, empowering nurses to do a formal bedside screening for swallowing dysfunction in stroke patients timely after admission is warranted whenever speech-language therapists are not available. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Weekend ethanol consumption and high-sucrose diet: resveratrol effects on energy expenditure, substrate oxidation, lipid profile, oxidative stress and hepatic energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Katiucha Karolina Honório Ribeiro; Souza, Gisele Aparecida; Seiva, Fábio Rodrigues Ferreira; Ebaid, Geovana Xavier; Novelli, Ethel Lourenzi Barbosa

    2011-01-01

    The present study analyzed the association between weekend ethanol and high-sucrose diet on oxygen consumption, lipid profile, oxidative stress and hepatic energy metabolism. Because resveratrol (RS, 3,5,4'-trans-trihydroxystilbene) has been implicated as a modulator of alcohol-independent cardiovascular protection attributed to red wine, we also determined whether RS could change the damage done by this lifestyle. Male Wistar 24 rats receiving standard chow were divided into four groups (n = 6/group): (C) water throughout the experimental period; (E) 30% ethanol 3 days/week, water 4 days/week; (ES) a mixture of 30% ethanol and 30% sucrose 3 days/week, drinking 30% sucrose 4 days/week; (ESR) 30% ethanol and 30% sucrose containing 6 mg/l RS 3 days/week, drinking 30% sucrose 4 days/week. After 70 days the body weight was highest in ESR rats. E rats had higher energy expenditure (resting metabolic rate), oxygen consumption (VO(2)), fat oxidation, serum triacylglycerol (TG) and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) than C. ES rats normalized calorimetric parameters and enhanced carbohydrate oxidation. ESR ameliorated calorimetric parameters, reduced TG, VLDL and lipid hydroperoxide/total antioxidant substances, as well enhanced high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and HDL/TG ratio. Hepatic hydroxyacyl coenzyme-A dehydrogenase (OHADH)/citrate synthase ratio was lower in E and ES rats than in C. OHADH was highest in ESR rats. The present study brought new insights on weekend alcohol consumption, demonstrating for the first time, that this pattern of ethanol exposure induced dyslipidemic profile, calorimetric and hepatic metabolic changes which resemble that of the alcoholism. No synergistic effects were found with weekend ethanol and high-sucrose intake. RS was advantageous in weekend drinking and high-sucrose intake condition ameliorating hepatic metabolism and improving risk factors for cardiovascular damage.

  4. Mortality Associated with Night and Weekend Admissions to ICU with On-Site Intensivist Coverage: Results of a Nine-Year Cohort Study (2006-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunot, Vincent; Landreau, Liliane; Corne, Philippe; Platon, Laura; Besnard, Noémie; Buzançais, Aurèle; Daubin, Delphine; Serre, Jean Emmanuel; Molinari, Nicolas; Klouche, Kada

    2016-01-01

    The association between mortality and time of admission to ICU has been extensively studied but remains controversial. We revaluate the impact of time of admission on ICU mortality by retrospectively investigating a recent (2006-2014) and large ICU cohort with on-site intensivist coverage. All adults (≥ 18 years) admitted to a tertiary care medical ICU were included in the study. Patients' characteristics, medical management, and mortality were prospectively collected. Patients were classified according to their admission time: week working days on- and off-hours, and weekends. ICU mortality was the primary outcome and adjusted Hazard-ratios (HR) of death were analysed by multivariate Cox model. 2,428 patients were included: age 62±18 years; male: 1,515 (62%); and median SAPSII score: 38 (27-52). Overall ICU mortality rate was 13.7%. Admissions to ICU occurred during open-hours in 680 cases (28%), during night-time working days in 1,099 cases (45%) and during weekends in 649 cases (27%). Baseline characteristics of patients were similar between groups except that patients admitted during the second part of night (00:00 to 07:59) have a significantly higher SAPS II score than others. ICU mortality was comparable between patients admitted during different time periods but was significantly higher for those admitted during the second part of the night. Multivariate analysis showed however that admission during weeknights and weekends was not associated with an increased ICU mortality as compared with open-hours admissions. Time of admission, especially weeknight and weekend (off-hour admissions), did not influence the prognosis of ICU patients. The higher illness severity of patients admitted during the second part of the night (00:00-07:59) may explain the observed increased mortality.

  5. The weekday-weekend difference and the estimation of the non-vehicle contributions to the urban increment of airborne particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alan M.; Yin, Jianxin; Harrison, Roy M.

    Analysis of three separate urban data sets has identified significant weekend reductions of PM 10, PM 2.5 and PM 2.5-10 mass concentrations compared to weekday values. Significant weekday-weekend differences were also found for elemental carbon in the fine size fraction, and calcium in the coarse size fraction. There was no significant weekday-weekend difference in the case of sea salt or compounds of nitrate or sulphate. Given the paucity of day of the week-specific activity data for sources other than road traffic, it has been assumed that non-traffic sources of particles are uniform throughout the week, allowing estimation of the traffic contribution to PM concentrations. While this approach may neglect a weekday-weekend difference in particulate matter from construction sources, the effect of such sources is believed to be small. Two methods (by calculation and regression) of deriving the non-vehicle contribution to the urban increment above the regional background were compared. Both resulted in values of 2.1-2.7 μg m -3 (with an estimated error of around 2 μg m -3) for the non-vehicle urban increment in PM 10 measured by TEOM (gravimetric equivalent) at some urban background sites in London. The annual average traffic contribution to the urban increment is estimated as 1.6-4.4 μg m -3 for background sites in London, except Bloomsbury where the estimated traffic contribution is higher and that for non-traffic sources is lower. Use of the same method at the rural Harwell site leads to an estimate of 1.8 μg m -3 for the traffic contribution.

  6. The importance of parental beliefs and support for pedometer-measured physical activity on school days and weekend days among Canadian children

    OpenAIRE

    Vander Ploeg, Kerry A; Kuhle, Stefan; Maximova, Katerina; McGavock, Jonathan; Wu, Biao; Veugelers, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Background Parental influences are essential to the behaviours and physical activity of their children. Our study aimed to determine if parental beliefs and support are associated with children’s pedometer measured physical activity levels on school days and weekend days. Methods In the spring of 2009 and 2011, we analyzed cross-sectional data from 1,355 grade five students and parents in 30 schools in Alberta, Canada. Parents reported how much they care about exercising, how much they encour...

  7. The importance of parental beliefs and support for pedometer-measured physical activity on school days and weekend days among Canadian children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Parental influences are essential to the behaviours and physical activity of their children. Our study aimed to determine if parental beliefs and support are associated with children’s pedometer measured physical activity levels on school days and weekend days. Methods In the spring of 2009 and 2011, we analyzed cross-sectional data from 1,355 grade five students and parents in 30 schools in Alberta, Canada. Parents reported how much they care about exercising, how much they encourage their child to be physically active, and how frequently they engage in physical activities with their child. Physical activity was assessed from step counts obtained from time-stamped pedometers collected over nine consecutive days. Results Increased parental encouragement was positively associated with boys’ and girls’ physical activity on school days (Boys: beta = 1373, 95% CI: 606, 2139; Girls: beta = 632, 95% CI: 108, 1155) and girls’ physical activity on weekend days (beta = 997, 95% CI: 130, 1864). Increased parental care was positively associated with boys’ physical activity on weekend days (beta = 1381, 95% CI: 85, 2676). Increased parental support and engagement was associated with an additional 632–1381 steps/day for children in this study. Conclusions Parental care, encouragement and engagement are associated with physical activity levels of children 10–11 years of age. Policy makers and researchers should consider the importance of targeting parents when designing strategies to promote physical activity in children. This is particularly relevant to weekends and holidays when children’s activity levels are low. PMID:24308428

  8. Introduction of a Microsoft Excel-based unified electronic weekend handover document in Acute and General Medicine in a DGH: aims, outcomes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostelec, Pablo; Emanuele Garbelli, Pietro; Emanuele Garbelli, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    On-call weekends in medicine can be a busy and stressful time for junior doctors, as they are responsible for a larger pool of patients, most of whom they would have never met. Clinical handover to the weekend team is extremely important and any communication errors may have a profound impact on patient care, potentially even resulting in avoidable harm or death. Several senior clinical bodies have issued guidelines on best practice in written and verbal handover. These include: standardisation, use of pro forma documents prompting doctors to document vital information (such as ceiling of care/resuscitation status) and prioritisation according to clinical urgency. These guidelines were not consistently followed in our hospital site at the onset of 2014 and junior doctors were becoming increasingly dissatisfied with the handover processes. An initial audit of handover documents used across the medical division on two separate weekends in January 2014, revealed high variability in compliance with documentation of key information. For example, ceiling of care was documented for only 14-42% of patients and resuscitation status in 26-72% of patients respectively. Additionally, each ward used their own self-designed pro forma and patients were not prioritised by clinical urgency. Within six months from the introduction of a standardised, hospital-wide weekend handover pro forma across the medical division and following initial improvements to its layout, ceiling of therapy and resuscitation status were documented in approximately 80% of patients (with some minor variability). Moreover, 100% of patients in acute medicine and 75% of those in general medicine were prioritised by clinical urgency and all wards used the same handover pro forma.

  9. Challenging comparison of stroke scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke scales can be classified as clinicometric scales and functional impairment, handicap scales. All studies describing stroke scales were reviewed by internet searching engines with the final search performed on January 1, 2013. The following string of keywords was entered into search engines; stroke, scale, score and disability. Despite advantages of modified National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and Scandinavian stroke scale comparing to the NIHSS, including their simplification and less inter-rater variability; most of the stroke neurologists around the world continue using the NIHSS. The modified Rankin scale (mRS and Barthel index (BI are widely used functional impairment and disability scales. Distinction between grades of mRS is poorly defined. The Asian stroke disability scale is a simplified functional impairment, handicap scale which is as valid as mRS and BI. At the present time, the NIHSS, mRS and BI are routine stroke scales because physicians have used to work with these scales for more than two decades, although it could not be an acceptable reason. On the other side, results of previous stroke trials, which are the basis of stroke management guidelines are driven using these scales.

  10. Parent-Child Associations in Pedometer-Determined Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour on Weekdays and Weekends in Random Samples of Families in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Sigmundová

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates whether more physically active parents bring up more physically active children and whether parents’ level of physical activity helps children achieve step count recommendations on weekdays and weekends. The participants (388 parents aged 35–45 and their 485 children aged 9–12 were randomly recruited from 21 Czech government-funded primary schools. The participants recorded pedometer step counts for seven days (≥10 h a day during April–May and September–October of 2013. Logistic regression (Enter method was used to examine the achievement of the international recommendations of 11,000 steps/day for girls and 13,000 steps/day for boys. The children of fathers and mothers who met the weekend recommendation of 10,000 steps were 5.48 (95% confidence interval: 1.65; 18.19; p < 0.01 and 3.60 times, respectively (95% confidence interval: 1.21; 10.74; p < 0.05 more likely to achieve the international weekend recommendation than the children of less active parents. The children of mothers who reached the weekday pedometer-based step count recommendation were 4.94 times (95% confidence interval: 1.45; 16.82; p < 0.05 more likely to fulfil the step count recommendation on weekdays than the children of less active mothers.

  11. SECONDARY PREVENTION OF STROKE IN PATIENTS WITH NON-VALVULAR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION: THE CLINICIANS’ VIEWPOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Drozdova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is one of the main risk factor of ischemic stroke. Current problems of the management of patients with stroke due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation and secondary stroke prevention in these patients are considered. Data of own author’s observation for patients of this type during 6 months after discharge from the hospital are presented. The problems which patients faced with are analyzed. Comparative assessment of warfarin and dabigatran therapies is given.

  12. Computed tomography scan in the evaluation of patients with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PK Chhetri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular accident is a frequent cause of death and disability in most parts of the globe. The incidence of cerebrovascular diseases increases with age and the number of strokes is projected to increase as the elderly population grows. This study was undertaken to determine the type of stroke and also to relate the risks factors associated with stroke. Hundred consecutive patients presenting with stroke in the emergency department / neurology clinic were subjected to computed tomography scan of the brain. Sixty – four patients had ischemic infarct and 36 had intracranial hemorrhage which included 2 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and 1 with underlying cavernous angioma. Ischemic stroke was thus commoner than hemorrhagic stroke. Previous infarct or lacunes were noted in 25 % of the patients presenting with stroke. Risk factors were present in most (77 % of the patients presenting with stroke. Among the various risk factors, the single most common was smoking seen in 38 cases, followed by hypertension in 28 cases, obesity in 8 cases and diabetes in 3 cases. Twenty- one patients had multiple combinations of the above risk factors. Among the multiple risk factors, combination of alcohol and smoking was the commonest seen in 11 cases, followed by hypertension and obesity in 8 cases and alcohol with obesity in 2 cases. Change in lifestyle and eating habits may thus help reduce the incidence of stroke. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal,2012,Vol-8,No-2, 24-31 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v8i2.6834

  13. Structural MRI markers of brain aging early after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werden, Emilio; Cumming, Toby; Li, Qi; Bird, Laura; Veldsman, Michele; Pardoe, Heath R; Jackson, Graeme; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Brodtmann, Amy

    2017-07-11

    To examine associations between ischemic stroke, vascular risk factors, and MRI markers of brain aging. Eighty-one patients (mean age 67.5 ± 13.1 years, 31 left-sided, 61 men) with confirmed first-ever (n = 66) or recurrent (n = 15) ischemic stroke underwent 3T MRI scanning within 6 weeks of symptom onset (mean 26 ± 9 days). Age-matched controls (n = 40) completed identical testing. Multivariate regression analyses examined associations between group membership and MRI markers of brain aging (cortical thickness, total brain volume, white matter hyperintensity [WMH] volume, hippocampal volume), normalized against intracranial volume, and the effects of vascular risk factors on these relationships. First-ever stroke was associated with smaller hippocampal volume ( p = 0.025) and greater WMH volume ( p = 0.004) relative to controls. Recurrent stroke was in turn associated with smaller hippocampal volume relative to both first-ever stroke ( p = 0.017) and controls ( p = 0.001). These associations remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, education, and, in stroke patients, infarct volume. Total brain volume was not significantly smaller in first-ever stroke patients than in controls ( p = 0.056), but the association became significant after further adjustment for atrial fibrillation ( p = 0.036). Cortical thickness and brain volumes did not differ as a function of stroke type, infarct volume, or etiology. Brain structure is likely to be compromised before ischemic stroke by vascular risk factors. Smaller hippocampal and total brain volumes and increased WMH load represent proxies for underlying vascular brain injury. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Which risk factors are more associated with ischemic stroke than intracerebral hemorrhage in patients with atrial fibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Emer R; Kapral, Moira K; Fang, Jiming; Eikelboom, John W; ó Conghaile, Aengus; Canavan, Michelle; O'Donnell, Martin J

    2012-08-01

    The decision to prescribe oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation is based on an assessment of the competing risks of ischemic stroke and major bleeding, of which intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the most important type. We sought to determine the comparative importance of risk factors for ischemic stroke and ICH in patients with acute stroke and atrial fibrillation with particular emphasis on risk factors common to both stroke types. Consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke or ICH and atrial fibrillation included in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network constituted the cohort. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between baseline risk factors and presentation with ICH versus ischemic stroke. Risk factors included: (1) those previously reported to be risk factors for both ischemic stroke and major bleeding (particularly ICH) ("shared" risk factors, including age, alcohol, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, prior stroke/transient ischemic attack and preadmission dementia); and (2) other risk factors associated with either stroke subtype alone. A total of 3197 patients presented with atrial fibrillation and acute stroke, of which 12.2% presented with ICH. Of the "shared" risk factors, age (OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.06-1.34 per decade) and prior stroke/transient ischemic attack (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.12-1.87) were more associated with ischemic stroke than ICH, whereas a history of hypertension (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.68-1.17), diabetes mellitus (OR 1.23; 95% CI, 0.92-1.64), renal impairment (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.95-1.71), and alcohol intake were not more strongly associated with either stroke subtype. Of the risk factors known to be associated with both ischemic stroke and ICH in patients with atrial fibrillation, we found that none had a stronger association with ICH. Older age was more strongly associated with ischemic stroke than ICH.

  15. Guidelines for acute ischemic stroke treatment: part II: stroke treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Cristina Ouriques Martins

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The second part of these Guidelines covers the topics of antiplatelet, anticoagulant, and statin therapy in acute ischemic stroke, reperfusion therapy, and classification of Stroke Centers. Information on the classes and levels of evidence used in this guideline is provided in Part I. A translated version of the Guidelines is available from the Brazilian Stroke Society website (www.sbdcv.com.br.

  16. For whom the desert bell tolls: heat stroke or stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Bolatkale

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Heat stroke is the most complicated and dangerous amongst heat injuries that can lead to irreversible injury and even death with itself or with creating predisposibility to different diseases. The following case report depicts a patient who presented primarily with impairment of consciousness after walking 45 km in the summer heat to cross the Syria-Turkey border and later syncope. This case report aims to highlight the possibility of higher co-incidence with heat stroke and stroke.

  17. British Association of Stroke Physicians: benchmarking survey of stroke services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Helen; Dennis, Martin; Cohen, David; Rudd, Anthony

    2003-03-01

    the National Service Framework for Older People requires every general hospital which cares for stroke patients to introduce a specialist stroke service by 2004. to describe the organisation and staffing of specialist hospital-based stroke services in the UK. a national postal survey of consultant members of the British Association of Stroke Physicians (BASP) seeking details of the provision of neurovascular clinics, acute stroke units (ASUs), stroke rehabilitation units (SRUs), and the organisation and staffing of these services. the response rate was 91/126 (72%). Fifty-four neurovascular clinics, 40 ASUs and 68 SRUs were identified. Neurovascular clinics used a number of strategies to maintain rapid access and 30 (56%) were run by a single consultant. Only 50% ASUs usually admitted patients within 24 h of stroke. As the number of beds available on ASUs and SRUs did not reflect the total number of stroke in-patients, 21 (53%) ASUs and 45 (79%) SRUs had admission criteria. Training opportunities were limited: 37% ASUs and 82% SRUs had no specialist registrar. The therapy sessions (1 session=half a day) available per bed per week on a SRU were: physiotherapy 0.8; occupational therapy 0.6; speech and language therapy 0.25. significant development is needed to achieve the NSF target for hospital-based stroke services as few Trusts currently have all components in place and even when available not all stroke patients have access to specialist care. Stroke specialists will be required to run these services but training opportunities are currently limited. Stroke unit therapy staffing levels were lower than was available in randomised controlled trials.

  18. Anemia and stroke: Where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiafa, G; Savopoulos, C; Kanellos, I; Mylonas, K S; Tsikalakis, G; Tegos, T; Kakaletsis, N; Hatzitolios, A I

    2017-06-01

    Anemia seems to have a clear relationship with cerebrovascular events (CVEs), as there is a direct connection between central nervous system, blood supply, and tissue oxygen delivery. Anemia is considered a hyperkinetic state which disturbs endothelial adhesion molecule genes that may lead to thrombus formation. Furthermore, blood flow augmentation and turbulence may result in the migration of this thrombus, thus producing artery-to-artery embolism. It is for this reason that anemia is characterized as "the fifth cardiovascular risk factor." Anemia is consistently present in patients with acute stroke, ranging from 15% to 29%, while the mortality rate was significantly higher in patients suffering from anemia at the time of admission. Different types of anemia (sickle cell disease, beta thalassemia, iron deficiency anemia [IDA]) have been associated with increased cardiovascular and CVE risk. The relation between hemoglobin level and stroke would require further investigation. Unfortunately, treatment of anemia in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease still lacks clear targets and specific therapy has not developed. However, packed red blood cell transfusion is generally reserved for therapy in patients with CVEs. What is more, treatment of IDA prevents thrombosis and the occurrence of stroke; although iron levels should be checked, chronic administration favors thrombosis. Regarding erythropoietin (EPO), as there is lack of studies in anemic stroke patients, it would be desirable to utilize both neuroprotective and hematopoietic properties of EPO in anemic stroke patients. This review aims to clarify the poorly investigated and defined issues concerning the relation of anemia and CVEs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The Female Stroke Survival Advantage: Relation to Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Dehlendorff, Christian; Andersen, Klaus Kaae

    2009-01-01

    Background: Age-related hormonal factors are thought to be related to the gender gap in longevity. Testing the hypothesis that survival is best in young premenopausal women we studied the effect of age on 1-week mortality in stroke patients. Methods: A registry was started in 2001 with the aim...... logistic regression. Results: The probability of death within 1 week adjusted for stroke severity, stroke type and risk factors was highly age-dependent in both men and women. Up to the age of 50 years, the 1-week female/male mortality rates paralleled being slightly (15%) but insignificantly better...... in women. While mortality increased almost linearly in women over the entire age range, it increased steeply in men from the age of 50 and at the age of 80 years survival was 80% better in women. Conclusion: The female stroke survival advantage applies to all ages. It increases with age due to a steeply...

  20. Vision In Stroke cohort: Profile overview of visual impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Fiona J

    2017-11-01

    To profile the full range of visual disorders from a large prospective observation study of stroke survivors referred by stroke multidisciplinary teams to orthoptic services with suspected visual problems. Multicenter prospective study undertaken in 20 acute Trust hospitals. Standardized screening/referral forms and investigation forms documented data on referral signs and symptoms plus type and extent of visual impairment. Of 1,345 patients referred with suspected visual impairment, 915 were recruited (59% men; mean age at stroke onset 69 years [SD 14]). Initial visual assessment was at median 22 days post stroke onset. Eight percent had normal visual assessment. Of 92% with confirmed visual impairment, 24% had reduced central visual acuity visual field loss was present in 52%, most commonly homonymous hemianopia. Fifteen percent had visual inattention and 4.6% had other visual perceptual disorders. Overall 84% were visually symptomatic with visual field loss the most common complaint followed by blurred vision, reading difficulty, and diplopia. Treatment options were provided to all with confirmed visual impairment. Targeted advice was most commonly provided along with refraction, prisms, and occlusion. There are a wide range of visual disorders that occur following stroke and, frequently, with visual symptoms. There are equally a wide variety of treatment options available for these individuals. All stroke survivors require screening for visual impairment and warrant referral for specialist assessment and targeted treatment specific to the type of visual impairment.

  1. When yesterday's consumption strikes back: deviation from usual consumption inversely predicts amounts consumed the next weekend evening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labhart, Florian; Kuntsche, Emmanuel

    2014-07-01

    Young adults' weekend alcohol consumption is characterised by heavy episodic drinking (HED) with low alcohol use in between. This study investigates whether consuming a lower or higher number of drinks than usual on a given evening predicts consumption the following evening. In French-speaking Switzerland, 115 young adults (57% female, mean age = 23.2) answered questionnaires on their cellphones six times every Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening over five consecutive weeks. Multilevel models with group-mean centering were used to analyse 462 evening pairs. Although the sample average number of drinks consumed tended to increase from Thursday [Mmen (SD) = 3.6 (5.0); Mwomen (SD) = 2.9(4.2)] to Saturday [Mmen (SD) = 7.4( 7.1); Mwomen (SD) = 5.2(5.6)], substantial day-to-day variations were observed within individuals. Variations from the usual consumption (i.e. higher or lower number of drinks than usual) on the first day had a significant inverse impact on amounts consumed the following day (unstandardised regression coefficient (B) = -0.27, P < 0.01). This effect was more marked for evening pairs including HED (B = -0.44, P < 0.001). Men and heavy drinkers were less subject to day-to-day variations than women and usually moderate drinkers. The inverse relationship might result from adverse consequences experienced after HED or an intentional reduction in alcohol consumption in anticipation of a heavy drinking session the next day. Event-specific prevention is needed for women and usually light or moderate drinkers as their more distinct consumption peaks put them at greater risk, particularly of accidents and injuries. © 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  2. Zeigarnik's sleepless nights: How unfinished tasks at the end of the week impair employee sleep on the weekend through rumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrek, Christine J; Weigelt, Oliver; Peifer, Corinna; Antoni, Conny H

    2017-04-01

    It is almost common sense that work stress leads to sleep impairment, but the question of how work-related stressors impair employee sleep remains open. This study focuses on the role of rumination as the underlying mechanism for sleep impairment. Specifically, the authors contribute to recent research differentiating affective rumination from problem-solving pondering and examine the impact of both forms of rumination on the stressor-sleep relationship. Following theories of rumination and the Zeigarnik effect, they focus on unfinished tasks as a key onset for rumination. Unfinished tasks have received much research attention in the memory context but have been neglected as a stressor that can impact recovery. Drawing on theory, differential indirect links between unfinished tasks and sleep through affective rumination versus problem-solving pondering are examined. Further, the number of unfinished tasks extending over a 3-month period may impair employee sleep more than unfinished tasks within the acute phase. In this study, intraindividual links in a diary study supplemented by depicting between-person effects of unfinished tasks over a period of 3 months are examined. The authors matched 357 Friday and Monday observations over a 12-week interval for 59 employees. The results of the multilevel analysis suggest that the within-person relationship between unfinished tasks and sleep is mediated by affective rumination. Although problem-solving pondering was negatively related to sleep impairment, the indirect effect was not significant. Finally, beyond the acute effect, the authors found higher levels of unfinished tasks over 3 months are related to increased sleep impairment on the weekend. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Hemichorea after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadullah Saglam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The deterioration of the balance between direct and indirect ways in the basal ganglia causes chorea. The lesions of contralateral basal ganglia, thalamus or the connection of them all together are responsible for this. Chorea can be observed during the course of metabolic and vascular diseases, neurodegenerative or hereditary diseases. Hyperkinetic movement disorders after acute ischemic stroke are reported as rare; however, hemichorea is the most frequent developing disorder of hyperkinetic movement as a result of cerebrovascular disease. In this case report, we presented two case who applied us with choreiform movements in his left half of the body after acute thalamic stroke. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(0.100: 29-32

  4. [Smoking and stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yoichiro

    2011-05-01

    Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for the brain infarction (lacunar and atherothrombotic brain infarction) and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Not only active smoking but also passive smoking and smokeless tobacco products pose a risk. The risk after smoking cessation for 5-10 years is equal to that faced by a non-smoker. Many patients continue smoking even after an attack of stroke; therefore, support measures to enforce nonsmoking are required in this high-risk population. We offer nonsmoking support using the 5A approach, and assess the nonsmoking stage (precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance). We also administer medical therapy for smoking cessation when the patients find it difficult to quit smoking on their own accord. Nicotine dependency needs a follow-up like that required for other risk factors in the primary and secondary prevention of the stroke because smoking is a chronic disease that tends to recur.

  5. Detrusor Hyperreflexia in Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    AYBEK, Zafer

    2014-01-01

    In this study detrusor hyperreflexia was investigated by urodynamic study during the acute phase of stroke in patients who became incontinent after a cerebrovascular accident. Urodynamic studies reveal physiopathological findings of incontinence while the acute period of cerebrovascular accident do not cover neurogenic bladder features. In our study it was observed that most of the patients (60%) had normal bladder functions and detrusor hyperreflexia was a rare rindings. This res...

  6. Stroke Management: Nursing Roles

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Esmaeili

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The subacute and long-term assessment and management of patients who have suffered a stroke includes physical therapy and testing to determine the precise etiology of the event so as to prevent recurrence. The acute management differs. Immediate goals include minimizing brain injury, treating medical complications, and moving toward uncovering the pathophysiologic basis of the patient's symptoms. Methods: This is a review paper that report up to date finding with review some...

  7. Early rehabilitation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Julie; Godecke, Erin; Johnson, Liam; Langhorne, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Early rehabilitation is recommended in many guidelines, with limited evidence to guide practice. Brain neurobiology suggests that early training, at the right dose, will aid recovery. In this review, we highlight recent trials of early mobilization, aphasia, dysphagia and upper limb treatment in which intervention is commenced within 7 days of stroke and discuss future research directions. Trials in this early time window are few. Although the seminal AVERT trial suggests that a cautious approach is necessary immediately (stroke, early mobility training and mobilization appear well tolerated, with few reasons to delay initiating some rehabilitation within the first week. The results of large clinical trials of early aphasia therapy are on the horizon, and examples of targeted upper limb treatments with better patient selection are emerging. Early rehabilitation trials are complex, particularly those that intervene across acute and rehabilitation care settings, but these trials are important if we are to optimize recovery potential in the critical window for repair. Concerted efforts to standardize 'early' recruitment, appropriately stratify participants and implement longer term follow-up is needed. Trial standards are improving. New recommendations from a recent Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation Roundtable will help drive new research.

  8. [Predictors of epilepsy in children after ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lvova, O A; Shalkevich, L V; Dron, A N; Lukaschuk, M Y; Orlova, E A; Gusev, V V; Suleymanova, E V; Sulimov, A V; Kudlatch, A I

    To determine clinical/instrumental predictors of symptomatic epilepsy after ischemic stroke in children. One hundred and thirty-six patients, aged 0-15 years, with the diagnosis of ischemic stroke (ICD-10 I63.0-I63.9) were examined. The duration of the study was 18 months - 12 years. Patients were stratified into post-stroke (n=22) and control (n=114) groups, the latter included patients without epilepsy regardless of the presence of convulsive seizures in the acute stage of stroke. Predictors were determined based on EEG and characteristics of convulsive syndrome in the acute stage of stroke. The following prognostic criteria were found: generalized type of seizures, focal type of seizures with secondary generalization, epileptiform (peak and/or peak-wave) activity, focal character of epileptiform activity, generalized type of seizures in the combination with slow wave background activity on EEG, generalized type of seizures in the combination with slow wave activity and disorganized activity on EEG.

  9. Blood glucose in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2009-01-01

    Blood glucose is often elevated in acute stroke, and higher admission glucose levels are associated with larger lesions, greater mortality and poorer functional outcome. In patients treated with thrombolysis, hyperglycemia is associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation...... to the risk of inducing potentially harmful hypoglycemia has been raised. Still, basic and observational research is overwhelmingly in support of a causal relationship between blood glucose and stroke outcome and further research on glucose-lowering therapy in acute stroke is highly warranted....

  10. Acute Stroke Imaging Research Roadmap

    OpenAIRE

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.

    2008-01-01

    The recent “Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment” meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), industry representatives, and members of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to discuss the role of advanced n...

  11. Problematising risk in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Mary Y; Kessler, Dorothy; Ceci, Christine; Laliberté-Rudman, Debbie; McGrath, Colleen; Sikora, Lindsey; Gardner, Paula

    2016-11-01

    Following stroke, re-engagement in personally valued activities requires some experience of risk. Risk, therefore, must be seen as having positive as well as negative aspects in rehabilitation. Our aim was to identify the dominant understanding of risk in stroke rehabilitation and the assumptions underpinning these understandings, determine how these understandings affect research and practise, and if necessary, propose alternate ways to conceptualise risk in research and practise. Alvesson and Sandberg's method of problematisation was used. We began with a historical overview of stroke rehabilitation, and proceeded through five steps undertaken in an iterative fashion: literature search and selection; data extraction; syntheses across texts; identification of assumptions informing the literature and; generation of alternatives. Discussion of risk in stroke rehabilitation is largely implicit. However, two prominent conceptualisations of risk underpin both knowledge development and clinical practise: the risk to the individual stroke survivor of remaining dependent in activities of daily living and the risk that the health care system will be overwhelmed by the costs of providing stroke rehabilitation. Conceptualisation of risk in stroke rehabilitation, while implicit, drives both research and practise in ways that reinforce a focus on impairment and a generic, decontextualised approach to rehabilitation. Implications for rehabilitation Much of stroke rehabilitation practise and research seems to centre implicitly on two risks: risk to the patient of remaining dependent in ADL and risk to the health care system of bankruptcy due to the provision of stroke rehabilitation. The implicit focus on ADL dependence limits the ability of clinicians and researchers to address other goals supportive of a good life following stroke. The implicit focus on financial risk to the health care system may limit access to rehabilitation for people who have experienced either milder or

  12. Guide to Choosing Stroke Rehabilitation Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Stroke Association’s Guide to Choosing Stroke Rehabilitation Services Rehabilitation, often referred to as rehab, is an important part of stroke recovery. Through rehab, you:  Re-learn basic skills such ...

  13. What You Need to Know about Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain. The other kind of stroke, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks ... are very common among African Americans. The best treatment for stroke is prevention. You can reduce your ...

  14. Epidermoid Causing Ischemic Stroke in the Brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghvendra Ramdasi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial tumors may rarely cause stroke. We report an epidermoid cyst causing stroke in a pediatric patient. We have also reviewed the literature and pathogenesis of stroke caused by intracranial tumors.

  15. What Are the Warning Signs of Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cardiovascular Conditions What Are the Warning Signs of Stroke? Brain tissue affected by blockage Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in ... over 55 years old have more chance of stroke, and the risk gets greater as you get ...

  16. Stroke-related stigma among West Africans: Patterns and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Nichols, Michelle; Qanungo, Suparna; Teklehaimanot, Abeba; Singh, Arti; Mensah, Nathaniel; Saulson, Raelle; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Ezinne, Uvere; Owolabi, Mayowa; Jenkins, Carolyn; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2017-04-15

    Disability-adjusted life-years lost after stroke in Low & Middle-Income Countries (LMICs) is almost seven times those lost in High-income countries. Although individuals living with chronic neurological and mental disorders are prone to stigma, there is a striking paucity of literature on stroke-related stigma particularly from LMICs. To assess the prevalence, severity, determinants and psycho-social consequences of stigma among LMIC stroke survivors. Between November 2015 and February 2016, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of 200 consecutive stroke survivors attending a neurology clinic in a tertiary medical center in Ghana. The validated 8-Item Stigma Scale for Chronic Illness (SSCI-8) questionnaire was administered to study participants to assess internalized and enacted domains of stigma at the personal dimension with further adaptation to capture family and community stigma experienced by stroke participants. Responses on the SSCI-8 were scored from 1 to 5 for each item, where 1=never, 2=rarely, 3=sometimes, 4=often and 5=always with a score range of 8-40. Demographic and clinical data on stroke type and severity as well as depression and Health-Related Quality of Life indicators were also collected. Predictors of stroke-related stigma were assessed using Linear Models (GLM) via Proc GENMOD in SAS 9.4. 105 (52.5%) subjects recruited were males and the mean±SD age of stroke survivors in this survey was 62.0±14.4years. Mean SSCI-8 score was highest for personal stigma (13.7±5.7), which was significantly higher than family stigma (11.9±4.6; p=0.0005) and social/community stigma (11.4±4.4; pstigma. A graded increase in scores on the Geriatric Depression Scale and Centre for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale was observed across the three categories. Living in an urban setting was associated with higher SSCI-8 scores. Moreover, stroke subjects with more severe post-stroke residual symptom deficits reported a significantly higher frequency of stigma

  17. Burden of stroke in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Keat Wei; Gan, Siew Hua

    2013-08-01

    In Cambodia, stroke is not ranked among the top 10 leading causes of death, but infectious disease are among the top three leading causes of death. This finding could be attributed to a lack of awareness among Cambodians of the signs and symptoms of stroke or to poor reporting, incomplete data, lack of neurologists and neurosurgeons, or low accessibility to the hospitals. The only study of stroke in Cambodia is the Prevalence of Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factors in Cambodia survey, which identified several stroke-related risk factors in the population. Tobacco chewing or smoking is the main risk factor for stroke in Cambodia. Traditional therapies, such as oyt pleung (moxibustion) and jup (cupping), are widely practiced for stroke rehabilitation. In Cambodia, there are few neurologists and few important equipment, such as magnetic resonance imaging machines and computed tomography scanners. The Cambodian government should cooperate with the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund to attract foreign expertise and technologies to treat stroke patients. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  18. Infections and Ischemic Stroke Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Grabska, Katarzyna; Gromadzka, Grażyna; Członkowska, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Background. Infections increase the risk of ischemic stroke (IS) and may worsen IS prognosis. Adverse effects of in-hospital infections on stroke outcome were also reported. We aimed to study the prevalence of pre- and poststroke infections and their impact on IS outcome. Methods. We analysed clinical data of 2066 IS patients to assess the effect of pre-stroke and post-stroke infections on IS severity, as well as short-term (up to 30 days) and long-term (90 days) outcome. The independent i...

  19. Stroke scale score and early prediction of outcome after stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, R.; Zuberi, F.Z.; Afsar, S.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the baseline National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score as a predictor of functional outcome after ischemic stroke. Subjects and Methods: The study included 50 patients who presented to Civil Hospital, Karachi, during the study period with acute stroke and were evaluated with CT scan of brain. Only those patients were enrolled in the study that had acute ischemic stroke. The enrolled subjects were then evaluated for the neurological impairment using National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The subjects were followed-up and their functional outcome was assessed using Barthel index (BI) on the 7th day of their admission. Results: Of the fifty patients enrolled in the study, 31 (62%) were males and 19 (38%) were females, with age ranging from 45 years to 95 years and a mean age of 59.9 years. Neurological impairment at presentation was assessed by NIHSS. The score ranged between 2 and 28. The functional outcome was evaluated on the 7th day using Barthel index (BI), which ranged from 0 to 80. NIHSS score was found to be a good predictor of functional outcome in patients with ischemic stroke (p<0.001). Other factors like gender, hypertension and heart disease did not affect the functional recovery in such patients. Various factors were found to be significant for early prediction of stroke recovery. The NIHSS score was the strongest predictor of outcome after ischemic stroke. Age at the time of the event was also found to be an important predictor for stroke recovery. Conclusion: The NIHSS score is a good predictor of patient's recovery after stroke. Assessing the patient's neurological impairment at first presentation of ischemic stroke can guide the physician regarding the prognosis and management plan. (author)

  20. Identification of stroke mimics among clinically diagnosed acute strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuntiyatorn, Lojana; Saksornchai, Pichaya; Tunlayadechanont, Supoch

    2013-09-01

    Stroke is a clinically syndrome of a sudden onset of neurological deficit in a vascular cause. Stroke mimics is the non-vascular disorders with stroke-like clinical symptoms. It is important to distinguish true stroke from mimics since treatment plan may differ To determine the incidence of the stroke mimics and identify their etiologies. All non-contrast head CT of the patients with clinically diagnosed stroke who immediately received imaging upon arrival at the emergency department of the university hospital were retrospectively reviewed in 12-month period between January 1 and December 31, 2008. Medical records, laboratory results, MRI, and 6-month clinical follow-up records were reviewed for final diagnosis. Seven hundred four patients were included in this study, including 363 (51.5%) men and 341 (48.5%) women with range in age from 24 to 108 years. Amongst those, 417 (59.2%) were ischemic stroke, 80 (11.40%) were hemorrhagic stroke, 186 (26.4%) were stroke-mimics, and 21 (3%) were inconclusive. The etiologies among stroke-mimics were metabolic/intoxication (35, 18.8%), sepsis (28, 15.0%), seizure (21, 11.3%), syncope (20, 10.8%), subdural hemorrhage (14, 7.5%), vertigo (11, 6.0%), brain tumor (10, 5.30%), central nervous system infection (5, 2.7%), others (26, 14.0%), and unspecified (16, 8.6%). Incidence rates and etiologies of the stroke mimics were similar to the western reports. However the frequency of each mimic was not.

  1. Acupuncture for dysphagia in acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yue; Wang, Liping; He, Jinghua; Wu, Taixiang

    2008-07-16

    Dysphagia after acute stroke is associated with poor prognosis, particularly if prolonged. Acupuncture has been widely used for this complication in China. However, its therapeutic effect is unclear. To determine the therapeutic effect of acupuncture for dysphagia after acute stroke compared with placebo, sham or no acupuncture intervention. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched September 2007), the Chinese Stroke Trials Register and the Trials Register of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field (last searched January 2007) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2007). In January 2007 we searched the following databases from the first available date; MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, CISCOM, BIOSIS Previews, ProQuest Digital Dissertations, Science Citation Index, ISI Proceedings, ACUBRIEFS, ACP Journal Club, Books@Ovid and Journals@Ovid, Chinese Biological Medicine Database, Chinese scientific periodical database of VIP INFORMATION, China periodical in China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Evidence-Based Medicine Database, Science China, Chinese Social Science Citation Index, and the Chinese Science and Technology Document Databases. We also searched databases of ongoing trials, conference proceedings, and grey literature, handsearched three Chinese journals and contacted authors and researchers. We included all truly randomised controlled trials that evaluated the effect of acupuncture, irrespective of type, in patients with dysphagia within 30 day after the onset of ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke. All types of acupuncture interventions were eligible. The control intervention could be placebo acupuncture, sham acupuncture, or no acupuncture. The primary outcome was recovery of normal feeding. The secondary outcomes were case fatality, deterioration, late disability, length of hospital stay, quality of life, feeding tube removal, aspiration pneumonia and nutritional

  2. Intrinsic factors influencing help-seeking behaviour in an acute stroke situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zock, Elles; Kerkhoff, Henk; Kleyweg, Ruud Peter; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-09-01

    The proportion of stroke patients eligible for intravenous or intra-arterial treatment is still limited because many patients do not seek medical help immediately after stroke onset. The aim of our study was to explore which intrinsic factors and considerations influence help-seeking behaviour of relatively healthy participants, confronted with stroke situations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 non-stroke participants aged 50 years or older. We presented 5 clinical stroke situations as if experienced by the participants themselves. Recognition and interpretation of symptoms were evaluated and various factors influencing help-seeking behaviour were explored in-depth. We used the thematic synthesis method for data analysis. Five themes influencing help-seeking behaviour in a stroke situation were identified: influence of knowledge, views about seriousness, ideas about illness and health, attitudes towards others and beliefs about the emergency medical system. A correct recognition of stroke symptoms or a correct interpretation of the stroke situations did not automatically result in seeking medical help. Interestingly, similar factors could lead to different types of actions between participants. Many intrinsic, as well as social and environmental factors are of influence on help-seeking behaviour in an acute stroke situation. All these factors seem to play a complex role in help-seeking behaviour with considerable inter-individual variations. Accomplishing more patients eligible for acute stroke treatment, future research should focus on better understanding of all factors at various levels grounded in a theory of help-seeking behaviour.

  3. Regular group exercise is associated with improved mood but not quality of life following stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle N. McDonnell

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. People with stroke living in the community have an increased prevalence of depression and lower quality of life than healthy older adults. This cross-sectional observational study investigated whether participation in regular exercise was associated with improved mood and quality of life.Methods. We recruited three groups of community dwelling participants: 13 healthy older adults, 17 adults post-stroke who regularly participated in group exercise at a community fitness facility and 10 adults post-stroke who did not regularly exercise. We measured mood using the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS and quality of life using the Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL scale.Results. Levels of stress and depression were significantly greater in the people with stroke who did not undertake regular exercise (p = 0.004 and p = 0.004 respectively, although this group had more recent strokes (p < 0.001. Both stroke groups had lower quality of life scores (p = 0.04 than the healthy adults.Conclusions. This small, community-based study confirms that people following stroke report poorer quality of life than stroke-free individuals. However, those who exercise regularly have significantly lower stress and depression compared to stroke survivors who do not. Future research should focus on the precise type and amount of exercise capable of improving mood following stroke.

  4. Stroke in Saudi children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jarallah, Ahmed A.; Kentab, Anal Y.; Al-Nasser, Mohammad N.; Bahakim, Hassan M.; Kurban, Khadija M.; Zahraa, Jihad N.; Nasir, Ali A.; Abdel-Gader, Abdel-Galil M.; Alorainy, Ibrahim A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.; Kabiraj, Mohammad M.; Khoja, Waleed A.

    2006-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology and clinical features of stroke in a prospective and retrospective cohort of Saudi children and ascertain the causes, pathogenesis, and risk factors. The Retrospective Study Group (RSG) included children with stroke who were evaluated at the Division of Pediatric Neurology, or admitted to King Khalid University Hospital, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the period July 1992 to February 2001. The Prospective Study Group (PSG) included those seen between February 2001 and March 2003. During the combined study periods of 10 years and 7 months, 117 children (61 males and 56 females, aged one month-12 years) were evaluated; the majority (89%) of these were Saudis. The calculated annual hospital frequency rate of stroke was 27.1/100,000 of the pediatric (1month-12 years) population The mean age at onset of the initial stroke in the 104 Saudi children was 27.1 months (SD=39.3 months) median and median was 6 months. Ischemic strokes accounted for the majority of cases (76%). Large-vessel infarcts (LVI, 51.9%) were more common than small-vessel lacunar lesions (SVLL, 19.2%). Five patients (4.8%) had combined LVI and SVLL. Intracranial hemorrhage was less common (18.2%), whereas sinovenous thrombosis was diagnosed in 6 (5.8%) patients. A major risk factor was identified in 94 of 104 (89.4%) Saudi children. Significantly more hematologic disorders and coagulopathies were identified in the PSG compared to the RSG (p=0.001), reflecting a better yield following introduction of more comprehensive hematologic and cogulation laboratory tests during the prospective study period. Hematologic disorders were the most common risk factor (46.2%); presumed perinatal ischemic cerebral injury was risk factor in 23 children (22.1) and infectious and inflammatory disorders of the circulatory system in 18 (17.3%). Congenital and genetic cerebrovascular anomalies were the underlying cause in 7 patients (6.7%) and

  5. Changes in the management of acute ischemic stroke after publication of Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke (2004). A multicenter cooperative study in Toyama prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, Shutaro; Toyoda, Shigeo; Tanaka, Kortaro

    2009-01-01

    It is unclear whether the management of stroke has been improved since the Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke (2004) was published. The aim of the present study was to clarify changes in the management for acute ischemic stroke after publication of the Japanese Guidelines. We investigated the management of patients with acute ischemic stroke in nine hospitals belonging to the committee of Toyama Acute Ischemic Stroke Study, before and after publication of the Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke (2004). Two-hundred and ninety-three acute ischemic stroke patients were registered in 2003 and 237 in 2006, respectively. The percentage of lacunar stroke was 39%, 37%, atherothrombotic infarction; 28%, 30%, cardioembolic stroke (CE); 21%, 22%, and others; 12%, 11%, respectively. The ratio of CE patients who were admitted within 3 hours of onset was significantly increased from 34% in 2003 to 57% in 2006. Although 74 patients (31%) with any clinical type were admitted within 3 hours of onset, thrombolytic therapy with tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) was administered to only 5 patients (2.1%) in 2006. Diffusion weighted images became available in all hospitals, and were more frequently used for diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke in 92% of patients in 2006 as compared to 59% in 2003. Ischemic lesions were more frequently detected before the start of treatment in 52% of patients in 2006 as compared to 43% in 2003. After the Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke (2004) was published, the treatment of acute ischemic stroke patients appeared to follow this guideline in many patients. Thrombolytic therapy with rt-PA, however, was performed in very few patients. (author)

  6. Accuracy of Electronic Health Record Data for Identifying Stroke Cases in Large-Scale Epidemiological Studies: A Systematic Review from the UK Biobank Stroke Outcomes Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfield, Rebecca; Grant, Ian; Sudlow, Cathie L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Long-term follow-up of population-based prospective studies is often achieved through linkages to coded regional or national health care data. Our knowledge of the accuracy of such data is incomplete. To inform methods for identifying stroke cases in UK Biobank (a prospective study of 503,000 UK adults recruited in middle-age), we systematically evaluated the accuracy of these data for stroke and its main pathological types (ischaemic stroke, intracerebral haemorrhage, subarachnoid haemorrhage), determining the optimum codes for case identification. Methods We sought studies published from 1990-November 2013, which compared coded data from death certificates, hospital admissions or primary care with a reference standard for stroke or its pathological types. We extracted information on a range of study characteristics and assessed study quality with the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Studies tool (QUADAS-2). To assess accuracy, we extracted data on positive predictive values (PPV) and—where available—on sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive values (NPV). Results 37 of 39 eligible studies assessed accuracy of International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-coded hospital or death certificate data. They varied widely in their settings, methods, reporting, quality, and in the choice and accuracy of codes. Although PPVs for stroke and its pathological types ranged from 6–97%, appropriately selected, stroke-specific codes (rather than broad cerebrovascular codes) consistently produced PPVs >70%, and in several studies >90%. The few studies with data on sensitivity, specificity and NPV showed higher sensitivity of hospital versus death certificate data for stroke, with specificity and NPV consistently >96%. Few studies assessed either primary care data or combinations of data sources. Conclusions Particular stroke-specific codes can yield high PPVs (>90%) for stroke/stroke types. Inclusion of primary care data and combining data sources should

  7. Accuracy of Electronic Health Record Data for Identifying Stroke Cases in Large-Scale Epidemiological Studies: A Systematic Review from the UK Biobank Stroke Outcomes Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Woodfield

    Full Text Available Long-term follow-up of population-based prospective studies is often achieved through linkages to coded regional or national health care data. Our knowledge of the accuracy of such data is incomplete. To inform methods for identifying stroke cases in UK Biobank (a prospective study of 503,000 UK adults recruited in middle-age, we systematically evaluated the accuracy of these data for stroke and its main pathological types (ischaemic stroke, intracerebral haemorrhage, subarachnoid haemorrhage, determining the optimum codes for case identification.We sought studies published from 1990-November 2013, which compared coded data from death certificates, hospital admissions or primary care with a reference standard for stroke or its pathological types. We extracted information on a range of study characteristics and assessed study quality with the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Studies tool (QUADAS-2. To assess accuracy, we extracted data on positive predictive values (PPV and-where available-on sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive values (NPV.37 of 39 eligible studies assessed accuracy of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-coded hospital or death certificate data. They varied widely in their settings, methods, reporting, quality, and in the choice and accuracy of codes. Although PPVs for stroke and its pathological types ranged from 6-97%, appropriately selected, stroke-specific codes (rather than broad cerebrovascular codes consistently produced PPVs >70%, and in several studies >90%. The few studies with data on sensitivity, specificity and NPV showed higher sensitivity of hospital versus death certificate data for stroke, with specificity and NPV consistently >96%. Few studies assessed either primary care data or combinations of data sources.Particular stroke-specific codes can yield high PPVs (>90% for stroke/stroke types. Inclusion of primary care data and combining data sources should improve accuracy in large

  8. Association of ischaemic stroke subtype with long-term cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntaios, G; Papavasileiou, V; Makaritsis, K; Milionis, H; Michel, P; Vemmos, K

    2014-08-01

    There is no strong evidence that all ischaemic stroke types are associated with high cardiovascular risk. Our aim was to investigate whether all ischaemic stroke types are associated with high cardiovascular risk. All consecutive patients with ischaemic stroke registered in the Athens Stroke Registry between 1 January 1993 and 31 December 2010 were categorized according to the TOAST classification and were followed up for up to 10 years. Outcomes assessed were cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke recurrence, and a composite cardiovascular outcome consisting of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, acute heart failure, sudden cardiac death, stroke recurrence and aortic aneurysm rupture. The Kaplan-Meier product limit method was used to estimate the probability of each end-point in each patient group. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the independent covariates of each end-point. Two thousand seven hundred and thirty patients were followed up for 48.1 ± 41.9 months. The cumulative probabilities of 10-year cardiovascular mortality in patients with cardioembolic stroke [46.6%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 40.6-52.8], lacunar stroke (22.1%, 95% CI 16.2-28.0) or undetermined stroke (35.2%, 95% CI 27.8-42.6) were either similar to or higher than those of patients with large-artery atherosclerotic stroke (LAA) (28.7%, 95% CI 22.4-35.0). Compared with LAA, all other TOAST types had a higher probability of 10-year stroke recurrence. In Cox proportional hazards analysis, compared with patients with LAA, patients with any other stroke type were associated with similar or higher risk for the outcomes of overall mortality, cardiovascular mortality, stroke recurrence and composite cardiovascular outcome. Large-artery atherosclerotic stroke and cardioembolic stroke are associated with the highest risk for future cardiovascular events, with the latter carrying at least as high a risk as LAA stroke. © 2014 The Author

  9. Ischemic Stroke: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clots) (American Stroke Association) Let's Talk about Ischemic Stroke (American Heart Association) Also in Spanish Prevention and Risk Factors Carotid Endarterectomy (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) ...

  10. Predicting outcome after stroke: the role of basic activities of daily living predicting outcome after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gialanella, B; Santoro, R; Ferlucci, C

    2013-10-01

    Very few studies have investigated the influence of single activities of daily living (ADL) at admission as possible predictors of functional outcome after rehabilitation. The aim of the current study was to investigate admission functional status and performance of basic ADLs as assessed by Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scale as possible predictors of motor and functional outcome after stroke during inpatient rehabilitation. This is a prospective and observational study. Inpatients of our Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Two hundred sixty consecutive patients with primary diagnosis of stroke were enrolled and 241 patients were used in the final analyses. Two backward stepwise regression analyses were applied to predict outcome. The first backward stepwise regression had age, gender, stroke type, stroke-lesion size, aphasia, neglect, onset to admission interval, Cumulative Illness Rating Scale, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), Fugl-Meyer Scale, Trunk Control Test, and FIM (total, motor and cognitive scores) as independent variables. The second analyses included the above variables plus FIM items as an independent variable. The dependent variables were the discharge scores and effectiveness in total and motor-FIM, and discharge destination. The first multivariate analysis showed that admission Fugl-Meyer, neglect, total, motor and cognitive FIM scores were the most important predictors of FIM outcomes, while admission NIHSS score was the only predictor of discharge destination. Conversely, when admission single FIM items were included in the statistical model, admission Fugl-Meyer, neglect, grooming, dressing upper body, and social interaction scores were the most important predictors of FIM outcomes, while admission memory and bowel control scores were the only predictors of discharge destination. Our study indicates that performances of basic ADLs are important stroke outcome predictors and among which social

  11. Stroke subtypes and factors associated with ischemic stroke in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke subtypes assessed four OCSP (Oxfordshire Communi-. African Health Sciences Vol 15 Issue 1, March 2015. 68. 69 ty Stroke Project Classification) subtypes classification. 13 was used with lacunar circulation infarct (LACI) and total anterior (TACI), partial anterior (PACI), posterior. (POCI) circulation infarcts as non ...

  12. 'This stroke was sent…': Stroke-related illness concepts and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Though there is evidence that stroke incidence is increasing even in low and middle income countries, there is no study of stroke-related illness concepts and HSB in Nigerians. Data from 960 educated Nigerians were analysed. Eight hundred and fifty four respondents (431 aged 20-40 years and 423 aged 41 years or ...

  13. Thromboxane biosynthesis in stroke and post-stroke dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. van Kooten (Fop)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractWith 25 to 30 thousand new patients per year and an incidence of 170/100.000, stroke is a major health problem in the Netherlands, as it is in other western countries. It accounts for almost I 0% of the annual death in the Netherlands. Approximately 80% of stroke is of ischemic

  14. Thromboxane biosynthesis in stroke and post-stroke dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. van Kooten (Fop)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractWith 25 to 30 thousand new patients per year and an incidence of 170/100.000, stroke is a major health problem in the Netherlands, as it is in other western countries. It accounts for almost I 0% of the annual death in the Netherlands. Approximately 80% of stroke is of ischemic origin,

  15. Improving Stroke Management through Specialized Stroke Units in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... rehabilitation of the stroke patient. The establishment of stroke units has been found to improve the survival of patients and significantly reduce disability by rendering holistic care. Early intervention to rapidly restore and maintain blood supply to the ischemic area in the brain, minimize brain damage and hence impairment ...

  16. The progress of research into interleukin gene polymorphism associated with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen CHEN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a common disease, stroke seriously impairs human health. Interleukin (IL is an important type of inflammatory mediators, which is involved in the pathogenesis of stroke. With the study of genomics, we discovered that some gene loci of IL were associated with stroke, such as IL-1α-889 C/T, IL-1RN rs380092 and IL-10-1082 G/G. Meanwhile, some gene loci of IL might become independent risk factors of stroke, such as IL-4 C582T and IL4-589C>T. Therefore, the IL gene polymorphism had become a research focus in pathogenesis of stroke. Our paper describes the relationship between IL subtype and its gene polymorphism with stroke. We look forward to provide a useful information for further research.

  17. Optimised Selection of Stroke Biomarker Based on Svm and Information Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of molecular biology and gene-engineering technology, gene diagnosis has been an emerging approach for modern life sciences. Biological marker, recognized as the hot topic in the molecular and gene fields, has important values in early diagnosis, malignant tumor stage, treatment and therapeutic efficacy evaluation. So far, the researcher has not found any effective way to predict and distinguish different type of stroke. In this paper, we aim to optimize stroke biomarker and figure out effective stroke detection index based on SVM (support vector machine and information theory. Through mutual information analysis and principal component analysis to complete the selection of biomarkers and then we use SVM to verify our model. According to the testing data of patients provided by Xuanwu Hospital, we explore the significant markers of the stroke through data analysis. Our model can predict stroke well. Then discuss the effects of each biomarker on the incidence of stroke.

  18. Diagnosis in stroke - an uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aichner, F.T.

    2003-01-01

    In practical day-to-day terms, most patients have one of the common causes of stroke: ischemic stroke caused by the complications of atherothrombosis, intracranial small vessel disease, embolism from the heart, primary intracerebral hemorrhage caused by hypertension, or subarachnoid hemorrhage as a result of a ruptured saccular aneurysm. There are three issues to be considered in assessing the reliability of the clinical diagnosis of stroke: the diagnosis of stroke itself: is it a stroke or not; whether the stroke is caused by an infarct or a hemorrhage and particular in ischemic stroke the site and size of the lesion (anterior vs. posterior circulation, lacunar vs. cortical, etc.). No clinical scoring method can differentiate with absolute reliability ischemic stroke from primary intracerebral hemorrhage. To do this brain computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is required. For vascular diagnosis ultrasound and magnetic resonance angiography are ideal and complementary non-invasive techniques. Both have no risks and are reasonably sensitive. Catheterangiography is only reserved for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage with a view to surgical or endovascular treatment or in exceptional cases to establish a more firm prognosis. The diagnosis of ischemic stroke caused by embolism from the heart can only be considered at all if there is an identifiable cardioembolic source which is the case in about 30 % of ischemic stroke, a higher proportion in recent studies using transoesophageal echocardiography. It is not clear that transoesophageal echocardiography provides much more information for clinical decision-making than transthoracic echocardiography, although it certainly provides more anatomical information in selected patients. This article summarizes the diagnostic armamentarium which is used for the diagnosis of stroke and gives an overview of clinically reliable and relevant measures. Refs. 23 (author)

  19. Prospective assessment of patients with stroke in Tikur Anbessa Specialised Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayalew Zewdie

    2018-03-01

    Discussion: Our study identified hypertension to be the most common risk factor for stroke. The predominant aetiology type in this cohort is haemorrhagic stroke. Lastly, the median arrival time to an emergency centre was 24 h after symptom onset.

  20. functional motor recovery in stroke survivors-determinants in a sub

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-01

    Apr 1, 2014 ... giving a drop-out rate of one in four (1:4) and all enrollees were only admitted and discharged patients in the stroke unit. Stroke type was categorised as cerebral infarct and intracerebral haemorrhage. Operationally functional motor recovery was defined by at least a two point reduction in modified.